Science.gov

Sample records for sns diagnostics summary

  1. Beam diagnostic suite for the SNS linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardekopf, R. A.; Kurennoy, S. S.; Power, J. F.; Shafer, R. E.; Stovall, J. E.

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is the next-generation pulsed neutron source to be built in the United States. The accelerator chosen to produce the 2 MW beam power on the neutron-producing target is an H- linear accelerator (linac) to 1 GeV, followed by a proton accumulator ring. The ring compresses the 1 ms long beam bunches from the linac to less than 1 μs. The linac is pulsed at 60 Hz with a 6% duty factor. Stringent control of the pulse structure and stability of the high-intensity H- beam is needed to minimize beam loss in the linac and to optimize injection into the accumulator ring. This requires a set of beam diagnostics that can operate at high peak currents (˜52 mA) with high sensitivity and minimum beam interception.

  2. STATUS OF VARIOUS SNS DIAGNOSTIC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Purcell, J David; Patton, Jeff; Pelaia II, Tom; Sundaram, Madhan; Pennisi, Terry R

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator systems are ramping up to deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron scattering research. Enhancements or additions have been made to several instrument systems to support the ramp up in intensity, improve reliability, and/or add functionality. The Beam Current Monitors now support increased rep rates, the Harp system now includes charge density calculations for the target, and a new system has been created to collect data for the beam accounting and present the data over the web and to the operator consoles. The majority of the SNS beam instruments are PC-based and their configuration files are now managed through the Oracle relational database. A new version for the wire scanner software was developed to add features to correlate the scan with beam loss, parking in the beam, and measuring the longitudinal beam current. This software is currently being tested. This paper also includes data from the selected instruments.

  3. SUMMARY ON TITANIUM NITRIDE COATING OF SNS RING VACUUM CHAMBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    TODD, R.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; WEISS, D.

    2005-05-16

    The inner surfaces of the 248 m Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring vacuum chambers are coated with {approx}100nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the chamber walls. There are approximately 135 chambers and kicker modules, some up to 5m in length and 36cm in diameter, coated with TiN. The coating is deposited by means of reactive DC magnetron sputtering -using a - cylindrical cathode with internal permanent magnets. This cathode configuration generates a deposition-rate sufficient to meet the required production schedule and produces stoichiometric films with good adhesion, low SEY and acceptable outgassing. Moreover, the cathode magnet configuration allows for simple changes in length and has been adapted to coat the wide variety of chambers and components contained within the arcs, injection, extraction, collimation and RF straight sections. Chamber types and quantities as well as the cathode configurations are presented herein. The unique coating requirements of the injection kicker ceramic chambers and the extraction kicker ferrite surface will be emphasized. A brief summary of the salient coating properties is given including the interdependence of SEY as a function of surface roughness and its effect on outgassing.

  4. Diagnostics summary: Working group T9

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph J. Pasquinelli; Marc C. Ross

    2002-12-09

    The diagnostics T9 group was charged with reviewing the diagnostic requirements of the proposed accelerators for the future. The list includes the e+e- colliders, Muon Neutrino source, NLC, Proton Driver, Tesla, and the VLHC. While the machines vary widely on diagnostic requirements, there are many similarities that were discovered. The following sections will attempt to point out the similarities and requirements for R and D for these future accelerators. To answer the Charge to the group they organized joint sessions with most of the machine groups and several of the technical groups. In addition, due to their overwhelming importance, they held a special session on position monitor systems. For each of the joint machine group sessions they generated a table of required diagnostic systems, selected the highest priority items using a ranking based on need and RD effort, and pondered a RD path leading from the present state of the technology to a system satisfying the requirement. They used the joint technical group sessions to collect up to date RD plans and to assess the applicability of new ideas in a broad range of topics. As required by their Charge, they have also tried to include promising new ideas.

  5. SNS Logbook

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaia II, Tom; Giannella, Mario; Horn, Bradley; Patton, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    An electronic logbook has been developed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) [1] at Oak Ridge National Lab. This logbook serves as a means of chronologically recording daily operations activities and experiences and communicating them to appropriate groups. The logbook is database driven and integrates into our existing database schema. The interface to the logbook is web based and works with most modern web browsers on the major platforms. Additionally, a Java package provides a simple mechanism to post entries from within our XAL [2] applications.

  6. Active beam position stabilization of pulsed lasers for long-distance ion profile diagnostics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

    PubMed

    Hardin, Robert A; Liu, Yun; Long, Cary; Aleksandrov, Alexander; Blokland, Willem

    2011-02-14

    A high peak-power Q-switched laser has been used to monitor the ion beam profiles in the superconducting linac at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The laser beam suffers from position drift due to movement, vibration, or thermal effects on the optical components in the 250-meter long laser beam transport line. We have designed, bench-tested, and implemented a beam position stabilization system by using an Ethernet CMOS camera, computer image processing and analysis, and a piezo-driven mirror platform. The system can respond at frequencies up to 30 Hz with a high position detection accuracy. With the beam stabilization system, we have achieved a laser beam pointing stability within a range of 2 μrad (horizontal) to 4 μrad (vertical), corresponding to beam drifts of only 0.5 mm × 1 mm at the furthest measurement station located 250 meters away from the light source.

  7. Active beam position stabilization of pulsed lasers for long-distance ion profile diagnostics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Robert A; Liu, Yun; Long, Cary D; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Blokland, Willem

    2011-01-01

    A high peak-power Q-switched laser has been used to monitor the ion beam profiles in the superconducting linac at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The laser beam suffers from position drift due to movement, vibration, or thermal effects on the optical components in the 250-meter long laser beam transport line. We have designed, bench-tested, and implemented a beam position stabilization system by using an Ethernet CMOS camera, computer image processing and analysis, and a piezo-driven mirror platform. The system can respond at frequencies up to 30 Hz with a high position detection accuracy. With the beam stabilization system, we have achieved a laser beam pointing stability within a range of 2 rad (horizontal) to 4 rad (vertical), corresponding to beam drifts of only 0.5 mm 1 mm at the furthest measurement station located 250 meters away from the light source.

  8. SNS BEAM COMMISSIONING TOOLS AND EXPERIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Galambos, John D

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) successfully met the primary construction project completion milestones in April 2006. An important ingredient of this successful commissioning was the development and use of software tools. With the increasing digitalization of beam diagnostics and increasing complexity of Integrated Control Systems of large accelerators, the need for high level software tools is critical for smooth commissioning. At SNS a special Java based infrastructure called XAL was prepared for beam commissioning. XAL provides a hierarchal view of the accelerator, is data base configured, and includes a physics model of the beam. This infrastructure and individual applications development along with a historical time line of the SNS commissioning will be discussed.

  9. Summary of beam quality diagnostics and control working group

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, John; Piot, Philippe; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    The working group on beam quality, diagnostics, and control at the 12th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held a series of meetings during the Workshop. The generation of bright charged-particle beams (in particular electron and positron beams), along with state-of-the-art beam diagnostics and synchronization were discussed.

  10. Summary I - accelerator ion sources, fundamentals and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Moehs, Douglas P.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 12-15, 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the first three oral sessions of the symposium.

  11. Summary I - Accelerator Ion sources, Fundamentals and Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Moehs, Douglas P.

    2007-08-10

    The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 12-15, 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the first three oral sessions of the symposium.

  12. SNS programming environment user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennille, Geoffrey M.; Howser, Lona M.; Humes, D. Creig; Cronin, Catherine K.; Bowen, John T.; Drozdowski, Joseph M.; Utley, Judith A.; Flynn, Theresa M.; Austin, Brenda A.

    1992-01-01

    The computing environment is briefly described for the Supercomputing Network Subsystem (SNS) of the Central Scientific Computing Complex of NASA Langley. The major SNS computers are a CRAY-2, a CRAY Y-MP, a CONVEX C-210, and a CONVEX C-220. The software is described that is common to all of these computers, including: the UNIX operating system, computer graphics, networking utilities, mass storage, and mathematical libraries. Also described is file management, validation, SNS configuration, documentation, and customer services.

  13. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hatfield; F. Casagrande; I. Campisi; P. Gurd; M. Howell; D. Stout; H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; and P. Knudsen

    2005-08-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  14. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, D.; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Gurd, P.; Howell, M.; Stout, D.; Strong, H.; Arenius, D.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2006-04-27

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  15. Commissioning Experience of SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2007-07-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H{sup -} front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. The linac was commissioned in five discrete runs, starting in 2002 and completed in 2005. The accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines were commissioned in two runs in January-February and April 2006. With the completed commissioning of the SNS accelerator, the facility has begun initial low-power operations. In the course of beam commissioning, most beam performance parameters and beam intensity goals have been achieved at low duty factor. A number of beam dynamics measurements have been performed, including emittance evolution, transverse coupling in the ring, beam instability thresholds, and beam distributions on the target. The commissioning results, achieved beam performance and initial operating experience of the SNS linac will be presented.

  16. SNS second target station moderator performance update

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, Franz X.

    2010-03-08

    In its first years of operations of its first target station, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is working towards a facility upgrade by a megawatt-class second target station operated at 20 Hz repetition rate, which is intended to complement the existing ORNL neutron sources, the first SNS target station and the HFIR reactor, with high-intensity cold neutron beams.The first round of optimization calculations converged on larger-volume cylindrical para-hydrogen moderators placed in wing configuration on top and bottom of a flat mercury target, pre-moderated by layers of ambient water and surrounded by beryllium reflector. The metric of these optimization calculations was time-averaged and energy-integrated neutron brightness below 5 meV with the requirement to be able to serve 20 ports with neutrons. A summary of these calculations will be given including lessons learned from the variety of simulated configurations and detailed neutron performance characteristics like spectral intensities, emission time distributions, local variations of moderator brightness at the viewed areas, and sensitivity of the optimization metric to optimized parameters for the most promising configuration.

  17. The stationarity paradigm revisited: Hypothesis testing using diagnostics, summary metrics, and DREAM(ABC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadegh, Mojtaba; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Xu, Chonggang; Volpi, Elena

    2015-11-01

    Many watershed models used within the hydrologic research community assume (by default) stationary conditions, that is, the key watershed properties that control water flow are considered to be time invariant. This assumption is rather convenient and pragmatic and opens up the wide arsenal of (multivariate) statistical and nonlinear optimization methods for inference of the (temporally fixed) model parameters. Several contributions to the hydrologic literature have brought into question the continued usefulness of this stationary paradigm for hydrologic modeling. This paper builds on the likelihood-free diagnostics approach of Vrugt and Sadegh and uses a diverse set of hydrologic summary metrics to test the stationary hypothesis and detect changes in the watersheds response to hydroclimatic forcing. Models with fixed parameter values cannot simulate adequately temporal variations in the summary statistics of the observed catchment data, and consequently, the DREAM(ABC) algorithm cannot find solutions that sufficiently honor the observed metrics. We demonstrate that the presented methodology is able to differentiate successfully between watersheds that are classified as stationary and those that have undergone significant changes in land use, urbanization, and/or hydroclimatic conditions, and thus are deemed nonstationary.

  18. SNS Ring and RTBT Beam Current Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokland, W.; Armstrong, G.; Deibele, C.; Pogge, J.; Gaidash, V.

    2006-11-01

    The SNS Diagnostics Group has implemented Beam Current Monitors (BCM) for the Ring and RTBT (Ring to Target Beam Transferline). In the Ring, the BCM must handle a thousand-fold increase of intensity during the accumulation, and in the RTBT, the BCM must communicate the integrated charge of the beam pulse in real-time for every shot to the target division for correlation with the produced neutrons. This paper describes the development of a four channel solution for the Ring BCM and the use of FPGA for the RTBT BCM to deliver the total charge to the target over a fiber optic network. Both system versions are based on the same commercial digitizer board.

  19. Summary of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) diagnostics, including JET (Joint European Torus) and JT-60

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Young, K.M.; Johnson, L.C.

    1990-05-01

    The diagnostic instrumentation on TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and the specific properties of each diagnostic, i.e., number of channels, time resolution, wavelength range, etc., are summarized in tables, grouped according to the plasma parameter measured. For comparison, the equivalent diagnostic capabilities of JET (Joint European Torus) and the Japanese large tokamak, JT-60, as of late 1987 are also listed in the tables. Extensive references are given to publications on each instrument.

  20. Patient radiation exposure in diagnostic radiology examinations: an overview. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, R.L.

    1983-08-01

    The report surveys the published data on entrance skin exposure received by patients during diagnostic radiology examinations. It provides a reference source to aid radiology facilities in determining whether the amount of exposure received by their patients is appropriate for the diagnostic procedures employed.

  1. Overview of SNS Cryomodule Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Drury; Edward Daly; Christiana Grenoble; William Hicks; Lawrence King; Tomasz Plawski; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Haipeng Wang; Mark Wiseman; G. Davis; Jean Delayen

    2005-05-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerating Facility (Jefferson Lab) has completed production of 24 Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cryomodules for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) superconducting linac. This includes one medium-{beta} (0.61) prototype, eleven medium-{beta} and twelve high-{beta} (0.81) production cryomodules. Nine medium-{beta} cryomodules as well as two high-{beta} cryomodules have undergone complete operational performance testing in the Cryomodule Test Facility at Jefferson Lab. The set of tests includes measurements of maximum gradient, unloaded Q (Q{sub 0}), microphonics, and response to Lorentz forces. The Q{sub ext}'s of the various couplers are measured and the behavior of the higher order mode couplers is examined. The mechanical and piezo tuners are also characterized. The results of these performance tests will be discussed in this paper.

  2. A COMPACTRIO-BASED BEAM LOSS MONITOR FOR THE SNS RF TEST CAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Armstrong, Gary A

    2009-01-01

    An RF Test Cave has been built at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be able to test RF cavities without interfering the SNS accelerator operations. In addition to using thick concrete wall to minimize radiation exposure, a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) must abort the operation within 100 usec when the integrated radiation within the cave exceeds a threshold. We choose the CompactRIO platform to implement the BLM based on its performance, cost-effectiveness, and rapid development. Each in/output module is connected through an FPGA to provide point-by-point processing. Every 10 usec the data is acquired analyzed and compared to the threshold. Data from the FPGA is transferred using DMA to the real-time controller, which communicates to a gateway PC to talk to the SNS control system. The system includes diagnostics to test the hardware and integrates the losses in real-time. In this paper we describe our design, implementation, and results

  3. INSTABILITY ISSUES AT THE SNS STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-06-28

    The impedance and beam instability issues of the SNS storage ring is reviewed, and the effort toward solutions at the BNL is reported. Some unsettled issues are raised, indicating the direction of planned works.

  4. ICTP-IAEA Workshop on Dense Magnetized Plasma and Plasma Diagnostics: an executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Mank, G.; Markowicz, A.; Miklaszewski, R.; Tuniz, C.; Crespo, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Workshop on Dense Magnetized Plasma and Plasma Diagnostics was held from 15 to 26 November 2010 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. It was attended by 60 participants, including 15 lecturers, 2 tutors and 37 trainees, representing 25 countries.

  5. LASER APPLICATIONS: H- BEAM PHOTO-DETACHMENT AND PUSH BUTTON DIAGNOSTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun

    2012-01-01

    The laser based nonintrusive H- beam diagnostics and laser assisted H- beam stripping technologies have been developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). This paper reviews the present status of the SNS laser based diagnostics and the recent R&D progress on the fiber transmission of laser pulses and power enhancement optical cavity which will be used in diagnostics and laser stripping.

  6. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Kimitaka

    2009-02-19

    In this presentation, lectures in the school are revisited and a brief summary is given. An emphasis is made to illustrate how the lectures are interconnected so as to constitute the unified basis of knowledge in realizing thermonuclear fusion in ITER.The first message here is the integration of the knowledge. All of conditions (which is imposed by individual characteristic dynamics) must be simultaneously fulfilled. Plasma conditions (density, pressure, current, shape, etc.) set parameter boundaries. Achievement of Q = 10 is expected to be realized near the ridge of boundary, so that exact knowledge of mutual relations between constraints is inevitable. The other message is that, the constraints of plasma, material and design must be subject to a special care. In this regard, the use of tritium in ITER introduces new issue in research. For instance, the containment of tritium in the device leads to a new demand for the system. This issue influences the choice of the wall material. The difference of the wall material (either light element or heavy metal), on the other hand, can have a large impact on confinement. These new features in integration will be explained.The other issue is the need of integration of knowledge to form a law of understanding. The mission of ITER must be realized as fast as possible, considering the fact the necessity for fusion energy will be more keen as time goes on. The operation of ITER has been predicted by extending the empirical scaling relations. More precise prediction and the resolution of possible problems in advance are required. For this urgency, our knowledge must be distilled as a scientific law in which elementary processes are validated.

  7. Beam diagnostics, collimation, injection/extraction, targetry, accidents and commissioning: Working group C&G summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Hasegawa, K.; Henderson, S.; Schmidt, R.; Tomizawa, M.; Wittenburg, K.; /DESY

    2006-11-01

    The performance of accelerators with high beam power or high stored beam energy is strongly dependent on the way the beam is handled, how beam parameters are measured and how the machine is commissioned. Two corresponding working groups have been organized for the Workshop: group C ''Beam diagnostics, collimation, injection/extraction and targetry'' and group G ''Commissioning strategies and procedures''. It has been realized that the issues to be discussed in these groups are interlaced with the participants involved and interested in the above topics, with an extremely important subject of beam-induced accidents as additional topic. Therefore, we have decided to combine the group sessions as well as this summary report. Status, performance and outstanding issues of each the topic are described in the sections below, with additional observations and proposals by the joint group at the end.

  8. The SNS External Antenna H- Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Stockli, Martin P; Murray Jr, S N; Crisp, Danny W; Carmichael, Justin R; Goulding, Richard Howell; Han, Baoxi; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility, currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. In order to insure that we will meet our operational commitments as well as provide for future facility upgrades with high reliability, we have developed an RF-driven, H- ion source based on a ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber [1]. This source is expected to be utilized by the SNS for neutron production starting in 2009. This report details the design of the production source which features an AlN plasma chamber, 2-layer external antenna, cooled-multicusp magnet array, Cs2CrO4 cesium system and a Molybdenum plasma ignition gun. Performance of the production source both on the SNS accelerator and SNS test stand is reported. The source has also been designed to accommodate an elemental Cs system with an external reservoir which has demonstrated unanalyzed beam currents up to ~100mA (60Hz, 1ms) on the SNS ion source test stand.

  9. Summary of Glaucoma Diagnostic Testing Accuracy: An Evidence-Based Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Saad; Khan, Zainab; Si, Francie; Mao, Alex; Pan, Irene; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Hutnik, Cindy; Moher, David; Tingey, David; Trope, Graham E.; Damji, Karim F.; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Goeree, Ron; Hodge, William

    2016-01-01

    Background New glaucoma diagnostic technologies are penetrating clinical care and are changing rapidly. Having a systematic review of these technologies will help clinicians and decision makers and help identify gaps that need to be addressed. This systematic review studied five glaucoma technologies compared to the gold standard of white on white perimetry for glaucoma detection. Methods OVID® interface: MEDLINE® (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations), EMBASE®, BIOSIS Previews®, CINAHL®, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library were searched. A gray literature search was also performed. A technical expert panel, information specialists, systematic review method experts and biostatisticians were used. A PRISMA flow diagram was created and a random effect meta-analysis was performed. Results A total of 2,474 articles were screened. The greatest accuracy was found with frequency doubling technology (FDT) (diagnostic odds ratio (DOR): 57.7) followed by blue on yellow perimetry (DOR: 46.7), optical coherence tomography (OCT) (DOR: 41.8), GDx (DOR: 32.4) and Heidelberg retina tomography (HRT) (DOR: 17.8). Of greatest concern is that tests for heterogeneity were all above 50%, indicating that cutoffs used in these newer technologies were all very varied and not uniform across studies. Conclusions Glaucoma content experts need to establish uniform cutoffs for these newer technologies, so that studies that compare these technologies can be interpreted more uniformly. Nevertheless, synthesized data at this time demonstrate that amongst the newest technologies, OCT has the highest glaucoma diagnostic accuracy followed by GDx and then HRT. PMID:27540437

  10. Practice Bulletin No. 162 Summary: Prenatal Diagnostic Testing for Genetic Disorders.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal genetic diagnostic testing is intended to determine, with as much certainty as possible, whether a specific genetic disorder or condition is present in the fetus. In contrast, prenatal genetic screening is designed to assess whether a patient is at increased risk of having a fetus affected by a genetic disorder. Originally, prenatal genetic testing focused primarily on Down syndrome (trisomy 21), but now it is able to detect a broad range of genetic disorders. Although it is necessary to perform amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) to definitively diagnose most genetic disorders, in some circumstances, fetal imaging with ultrasonography, echocardiography, or magnetic resonance imaging may be diagnostic of a particular structural fetal abnormality that is suggestive of an underlying genetic condition.The objective of prenatal genetic testing is to detect health problems that could affect the woman, fetus, or newborn and provide the patient and her obstetrician-gynecologist or other obstetric care provider with enough information to allow a fully informed decision about pregnancy management. Prenatal genetic testing cannot identify all abnormalities or problems in a fetus, and any testing should be focused on the individual patient's risks, reproductive goals, and preferences. It is important that patients understand the benefits and limitations of all prenatal screening and diagnostic testing, including the conditions for which tests are available and the conditions that will not be detected by testing. It also is important that patients realize that there is a broad range of clinical presentations, or phenotypes, for many genetic disorders and that results of genetic testing cannot predict all outcomes. Prenatal genetic testing has many benefits, including reassuring patients when results are normal, identifying disorders for which prenatal treatment may provide benefit, optimizing neonatal outcomes by ensuring the appropriate location for

  11. H- ion source developments at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Stockli, Martin P; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Han, Baoxi; Kang, Yoon W; Goulding, Richard Howell; Crisp, Danny W; Sparks, Dennis O; Luciano, Nicholas P; Carmichael, Justin R; Carr, Jr, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will require substantially higher average and pulse H- beam currents than can be produced from conventional ion sources such as the base line SNS source. H- currents of 40-50 mA (SNS operations) and 70-100 mA (power upgrade project) with an rms emittance of 0.20-0.35 Pi mm mrad and a ~7% duty factor will be needed. We are therefore investigating several advanced ion source concepts based on RF excitation. First, the performance characteristics of an external antenna source based on an Al2O3 plasma chamber combined with an external multicusp magnetic configuration, an elemental Cs system, and plasma gun will be discussed. Second, the first plasma measurements of a helicon-driven H- ion source will also be presented.

  12. SNS EXTRACTION KICKER POWER SUPPLY PROTOTYPE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    MI,J.L.; SANDBERG,J.; SANDERS,R.; SOUKAS,A.; ZHANG,W.

    2000-06-27

    The SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) accumulator ring Extraction System consists of a Fast kicker and a Lambertson Septum magnet. The proposed design will use 14 kicker magnets powered by an Extraction Kicker Power Supply System. They will eject the high power beam from the SNS accumulator ring into RTBT (Ring to Target Beam Tunnel) through a Lambertson Septum magnet. This paper describes some test results of the SNS Extraction Kicker power supply prototype. The high repetition rate of 60 pulse per second operation is the challenging part of the design. In the prototype testing, a 3 kA damp current of 700ns pulse-width, 200 nS rise time and 60 Hz repetition rate at 32 kV PFN operation voltage has been demonstrated. An Extraction kicker power supply system design diagram is depicted.

  13. Summary of the British Thoracic Society guidelines for advanced diagnostic and therapeutic flexible bronchoscopy in adults.

    PubMed

    Du Rand, I A; Barber, P V; Goldring, J; Lewis, R A; Mandal, S; Munavvar, M; Rintoul, R C; Shah, P L; Singh, S; Slade, M G; Woolley, A

    2011-11-01

    This new guideline covers the rapidly advancing field of interventional bronchoscopy using flexible bronchoscopy. It includes the use of more complex diagnostic procedures such as endobronchial ultrasound, interventions for the relief of central airway obstruction due to malignancy and the recent development of endobronchial therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. The guideline aims to help all those who undertake flexible bronchoscopy to understand more about this important area. It also aims to inform respiratory physicians and other specialists dealing with lung cancer of the procedures possible in the management and palliation of central airway obstruction. The guideline covers transbronchial needle aspiration and endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, electrocautery/diathermy, argon plasma coagulation and thermal laser, cryotherapy, cryoextraction, photodynamic therapy, brachytherapy, tracheobronchial stenting, electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy, endobronchial valves for emphysema and bronchial thermoplasty for asthma.

  14. CLEARING OF ELECTRON CLOUD IN SNS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,L.LEE,Y.Y.RAPRIA,D.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    In this paper we describe a mechanism using the clearing electrodes to remove the electron cloud in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring, where strong multipacting could happen at median clearing fields. A similar phenomenon was reported in an experimental study at Los Alamos laboratory's Proton Synchrotron Ring (PSR). We also investigated the effectiveness of the solenoid's clearing mechanism in the SNS, which differs from the short bunch case, such as in B-factories. The titanium nitride (TiN) coating of the chamber walls was applied to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY).

  15. Radiofrequency generation using a SNS microbridge

    SciTech Connect

    Luiz, A.M.; Niolsky, R. )

    1991-03-01

    The authors show the feasibility of a sinusoidal oscillator using a SNS microbridge linked with a series RLC tank circuit, supplied by a constant DC current and operated at the negative differential resistance range of its I-V characteristic curve. The frequency of this sinusoidal generator is equal to the resonant frequency of the tank RLC circuit. This new type of generator can be operated for a wide range of frequencies, from audio-frequencies up to the limit of microwaves. This paper suggests other possible electronic applications based on the appropriate use of the negative resistance region of the I-V characteristic curve of the SNS microbridge.

  16. Establishing an Ongoing Binational U.S.-Mexico Border Climate Diagnostic Summary: Developing a Prototype and Navigating the Institutional Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfin, G.; Varady, R.; Morehouse, B.; Wilder, M.; Crawford, B.

    2007-05-01

    In its eighth report to the President and Congress of the United States, the Good Neighbor Environmental Board (an independent federal advisory committee, that advises the President and Congress on environmental practices and infrastructure needs along the U.S. border with Mexico) noted that management of water resources issues along the U.S. border with Mexico would be aided by data and information sharing. They encouraged agencies and institutions to make data accessible, and to exchange data and information, even on a limited or ad hoc basis, in order to build trust and the capacity for managers and staff on both sides of the border to collaborate and work together to solve problems of mutual interest. Although climate is merely one factor affecting decision makers, it can often be the "straw that breaks the camel's back." Along the arid and semiarid U.S. border with Mexico, population growth, industrialization, increasing water consumption, and other factors have exacerbated societal vulnerability to naturally occurring persistent climate phenomena, such as drought. In 2006, scientists from institutions in the U.S. and Mexico agreed to collaborate to address decision makers' pressing needs for climate information, by developing a climate diagnostic and outlook product in a format usable and easily accessible by managers and policy makers. The Border Climate Summary (Resumen del Climate de la Frontera), modeled after monthly climate newsletters produced in the U.S., provides a tangible and simple information tool to strengthen the basic capacity for climate information to be usefully incorporated into decision processes. The Summary provides forecasts and value-added information on temperature, precipitation, and drought within the region. However, in order for the Summary to be effective at reaching its intended audiences, collaborators must break through barriers posed by regulatory and institutional control. They must also identify key insertion points for

  17. SNS Emittance Scanner, Increasing Sensitivity and Performance through Noise Mitigation ,Design, Implementation and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogge, J.

    2006-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator systems will deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron scattering research. The SNS MEBT Emittance Harp consists of 16 X and 16 Y wires, located in close proximity to the RFQ, Source, and MEBT Choppers. Beam Studies for source and LINAC commissioning required an overall increase in sensitivity for halo monitoring and measurement, and at the same time several severe noise sources had to be effectively removed from the harp signals. This paper is an overview of the design approach and techniques used in increasing gain and sensitivity while maintaining a large signal to noise ratio for the emittance scanner device. A brief discussion of the identification of the noise sources, the mechanism for transmission and pick up, how the signals were improved and a summary of results.

  18. SNS Emittance Scanner, Increasing Sensitivity and Performance through Noise Mitigation ,Design, Implementation and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pogge, J.

    2006-11-20

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator systems will deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron scattering research. The SNS MEBT Emittance Harp consists of 16 X and 16 Y wires, located in close proximity to the RFQ, Source, and MEBT Choppers. Beam Studies for source and LINAC commissioning required an overall increase in sensitivity for halo monitoring and measurement, and at the same time several severe noise sources had to be effectively removed from the harp signals. This paper is an overview of the design approach and techniques used in increasing gain and sensitivity while maintaining a large signal to noise ratio for the emittance scanner device. A brief discussion of the identification of the noise sources, the mechanism for transmission and pick up, how the signals were improved and a summary of results.

  19. nEDM at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Steven

    2014-07-30

    This PowerPoint presentation covered the following topics: Overview; participants in the collaboration; the experimental method and Free Precession Method descriptions; and then experimental design elements, ending with a summary. A new nEDM experiment is under development with a goal sensitivity 90% CL σd < (3-5) x 10-28 e-cm in 300 live-days; Free precession method: SQUIDS to read out the 3He precession frequency, Scintillation signal for the n relative precession frequency; Dressed spin method: Strong RF field to match n and 3He effective magnetic moments; Modulation/feedback of dressing parameter based on scintillation signal; and, Ongoing development/demonstration of many aspects of the apparatus (a subset was shown here).

  20. BEAM TRANSVERSE ISSUES AT THE SNS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Allen, Christopher K; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Galambos, John D; Wang, Jian-Guang

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac system is designed to deliver 1 GeV pulsed H- beams up to 1.56 MW. As beam power was increased from 10 kW to 680 kW in less than three years, beam loss in the accelerator systems C particularly in the superconducting linac (SCL), became more critical. In the previous studies, beam loss in the SCL was mainly attributed to longitudinal problems. However, our most recent simulations have focused on the transverse issues. These include multipole components from magnet imperfections and from dipole corrector windings of the SNS linac quadrupoles. The effects of these multipoles coupled with other transverse errors and a new possible cause of beam loss will be discussed.

  1. PROGRESS IN DESIGN OF THE SNS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    R. HARDEKOPF

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a six-laboratory collaboration to build an intense pulsed neutron facility at Oak Ridge, TN. The linac design has evolved from the conceptual design presented in 1997 to achieve higher initial performance and to incorporate desirable upgrade features. The linac will initially produce 2-MW beam power using a combination of radio-frequency quadruple (RFQ) linac, drift-tube linac (DTL), coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and superconducting-cavity linac (SCL). Designs of each of these elements support the high peak intensity and high quality beam required for injection into the SNS accumulator ring. This paper will trace the evolution of the linac design, the cost and performance factors that drove architecture decisions, and the progress made in the R&D program.

  2. SNS EXTRACTION FAST KICKER SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,W.; SANDBERG,J.; LAMBIASE,R.; LEE,Y.Y.; LOCKEY,R.; MI,J.; NEHRING,T.; PAI,C.; TSOUPAS,N.; TUOZZOLO,J.; WARBURTON,D.; WEI,J.; RUST,K.; CUTLER,R.

    2003-06-15

    The SNS Extraction Fast Kicker System is a very high power, high repetition rate pulsed power system. It was design and developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This system will consist of fourteen identical high voltage, high current modulators, and their auxiliary control and charging systems. The modulators will drive fourteen extraction magnet sections located inside of the SNS accumulator ring. The required kicker field rise time is 200 ns, a pulse flattop of 700 ns, a pulse repetition rate of 60 pulse-per-second. A 2500 Ampere per modulator output is required to reach the extraction kicker magnetic field strength. This design features a Blumlein Pulse-Forming-Network based topology, a low beam impedance termination, a fast current switching thyratron, and low inductance capacitor banks. It has a maximum charging voltage of 50kV, an open circuit output of 100kV, and a designed maximum pulsed current output of 4kA per modulator. The overall system output will be multiple GVA with 60 Pulse-per-second repetition rate. A prototype modulator has been successfully built and tested well above the SNS requirement. The modulator system production is in progress.

  3. 2-K pump down studies at SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, M.; Casagrande, F.; DeGraff, B.; Ganni, V.; Kim, S.-H.; Knudsen, P.; Martinez, M.; Morris, B.; Neustadt, T.; Norton, R.; Scanlon, C.; Strong, H.; Vandygriff, D.; Wilson, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linear accelerator (LINAC) consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities cooled to 2.1 K by a cryogenic refrigeration system. The 2-K cold box consists of four stages of cold compressors with liquid nitrogen cooled variable speed motors. Transitioning from 4.5-K operation to 2.1-K operation in the cryomodules involves pumping the cryomodules down from approximately 1 bar to 0.040 bar. This effort is conducted through the use of several sequences developed as a collaborative effort between Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) and SNS personnel during the original commissioning of the SNS cryogenic system. Over the last ten years, multiple lessons have been learned about VFD behavior, thermal stability, procedural development and refining the sequences. From 2012 to 2014, there were multiple pump down iterations that were not successful. Studies have been conducted to determine the cause of these unsuccessful iterations. The results of these studies including components replaced and aspects that have not yet been solved are presented in this paper. Future plans to refine the sequence and determine the cause of unsuccessful pump downs will also be presented.

  4. Results of the SNS front end commissioning at Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ratti, A.; Ayers, J.J.; Doolittle, L.; Greer, J.B.; Keller, R.; Lewis, S.; Lionberger, C.; Monroy, M.; Pruyn, J.; Staples, J.W.; Syversrude, D.; Thomae, R.; Virostek, S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Shea, T.; SNS Accelerator Physics Group; SNS Beam Diagnostics Collaboration

    2002-08-16

    The Front-End Systems (FES) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project comprise an rf-driven H{sup -} ion source, an electrostatic 2-lens LEBT, a 2.5 MeV RFQ, followed by a 14-quadrupole, 4-rebuncher MEBT including traveling-wave fast choppers. The nominal 2.5 MeV H{sup -} beam has a current of 38 mA at a repetition rate of 60 Hz and 1 ms pulse length, for a macro duty-factor of 6%, and is chopped at a rate of approximately 1 MHz with a mini duty-factor of 68%. The normalized rms beam emittance at the MEBT exit, matching the first tank of a 402.5 MHz Alvarez linac, is measured to be approximately 0.3 {pi} mm mrad. Diagnostic elements include wire scanners, BPMs, fast current monitors, a slit-harp emittance device and RFQ field monitoring probes. The results of the beam commissioning and the operation of the RFQ and diagnostic instrumentation are reported. The entire FES was shut down at LBNL at the end of May 2002 and will be recommissioned at ORNL prior to installation of the drift-tube linac.

  5. Modulator considerations for the SNS RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-12-31

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an intense neutron source for neutron scattering experiments. The project is in the research stage, with construction funding beginning next year. The SNS is comprised of an ion source, a 1,000 MeV, H{sup {minus}} linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, a neutron producing target, and experimental area to utilize the scattering of the neutrons. The linear accelerator is RF driven, and the peak beam current is 27 mA and the beam duty factor is 5.84%. The peak RF power required is 104 MW, and the H{sup {minus}} beam pulse length is 0.97 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The RF pulses must be about 0.1 ms longer than the beam pulses, due to the Q of the accelerating cavities, and the time required to establish control of the cavity fields. The modulators for the klystrons in this accelerator are discussed in this paper. The SNS is designed to be expandable, so the beam power can be doubled or even quadrupled in the future. One of the double-power options is to double the beam pulse length and duty factor. The authors are specifying the klystrons to operate in this twice-duty-factor mode, and the modulator also should be expandable to 2 ms pulses at 60 Hz. Due to the long pulse length and low RF frequency of 805 MHz, the klystron power is specified at 2.5 MW peak, and the RF system will have 56 klystrons at 805 MHz, and three 1.25 MW peak power klystrons at 402.5 MHz for the low energy portion of the accelerator. The low frequency modulators are conventional floating-deck modulation anode control systems.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SNS EXTERNAL ANTENNA H- ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Carmichael, Justin R; Crisp, Danny W; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. To meet present and future beam current and reliability requirements we are developing an RF-driven, H- ion source based on a ceramic aluminium nitride (AlN) plasma chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. This report recounts the design of the prototype source, describes the Cs collar variations tested, enumerates recent modifications made to the source to prepare a production version, and summarizes the results of runs on the SNS test stand and Front End (FE) of the SNS accelerator. Up to ~100 mA unanalyzed beam currents (60Hz, 1ms) have been measured on the SNS ion source test stand, and up to 42mA have been successfully accelerated by the RFQ on the SNS front-end at lower RF power.

  7. A facile inexpensive route for SnS thin film solar cells with SnS2 buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedi, Sreedevi; Minna Reddy, Vasudeva Reddy; Pejjai, Babu; Jeon, Chan-Wook; Park, Chinho; K. T., Ramakrishna Reddy

    2016-05-01

    Environment-friendly SnS based thin film solar cells with SnS2 as buffer layer were successfully fabricated from a facile inexpensive route, chemical bath deposition (CBD). Layer studies revealed that as-grown SnS and SnS2 films were polycrystalline; (1 1 1)/(0 0 1) peaks as the preferred orientation; 1.3 eV/2.8 eV as optical band gaps; and showed homogeneous microstructure with densely packed grains respectively. Ionization energy and electron affinity values were found by applying photoemission yield spectroscopy (PYS) to the CBD deposited SnS and SnS2 films for the first time. These values obtained as 5.3 eV and 4.0 eV for SnS films; 6.9 eV and 4.1 eV for SnS2 films. The band alignment of SnS/SnS2 junction showed TYPE-II heterostructure. The estimated conduction and valance band offsets were 0.1 eV and 1.6 eV respectively. The current density-voltage (J-V) measurements of the cell showed open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.12 V, short circuit current density (Jsc) of 10.87 mA cm-2, fill factor (FF) of 39% and conversion efficiency of 0.51%.

  8. SNS Laser Stripping for H- Injection

    SciTech Connect

    V.V. Danilov, Y. Liu, K.B. Beard, V.G. Dudnikov, R.P. Johnson, Michelle D. Shinn

    2009-05-01

    The ORNL spallation neutron source (SNS) user facility requires a reliable, intense beams of protons. The technique of H- charge exchange injection into a storage ring or synchrotron has the potential to provide the needed beam currents, but it will be limited by intrinsic limitations of carbon and diamond stripping foils. A laser in combination with magnetic stripping has been used to demonstrate a new technique for high intensity proton injection, but several problems need to be solved before a practical system can be realized. Technology developed for use in Free Electron Lasers is being used to address the remaining challenges to practical implementation of laser controlled H- charge exchange injection for the SNS. These technical challenges include (1) operation in vacuum, (2) the control of the UV laser beam to synchronize with the H- beam and to shape the proton beam, (3) the control and stabilization of the Fabry-Perot resonator, and (4) protection of the mirrors from radiation.

  9. EXPERIENCE WITH THE SNS SC LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Allen, Christopher K; Campisi, Isidoro E; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Galambos, John D; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Jeon, Dong-O; Kim, Sang-Ho; Pelaia II, Tom; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2008-01-01

    The SNS superconducting linac (SCL) is designed to deliver 1 GeV, up to 1.56-MW pulsed H- beams for neutron production. Commissioning of the accelerator systems was completed in June 2006, and the maximum beam energy achieved was approximately 952 MeV. In 2007, the SCL was successfully tuned for 1.01-GeV beam during a test operation. In the linac tune-up, phase scan signature matching, drifting beam measurement, and linac radio frequency cavity phase scaling were applied. In this paper, we will introduce the experiences with the SCL, including the tune-up, beam loss, and beam activation, and briefly discuss beam parameter measurements

  10. SNS Target Systems initial operating experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManamy, T.; Forester, J.

    2009-02-01

    The SNS mercury target started operation with low beam power when commissioned on April 28, 2006. The beam power has been following a planned ramp up since then and has reached 340 kW as of February 2008. The target systems supporting neutron production include the target and mercury loop, the cryogenic and ambient moderator systems, reflector and vessel systems, bulk shielding and shutters systems, utility systems, remote handling systems and the associated instrumentation and controls. Availability for these systems has improved with time and reached 100% for the first 2000 hour neutron production run in fiscal year 2008. An overview of the operating experience and the planning to support continued power increases to 1.4 MW for these systems will be given in this paper.

  11. Comparison Analysis among Large Amount of SNS Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Fujio; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Suwa, Hirohiko; Okada, Isamu; Izumi, Kiyoshi; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro

    In recent years, application of Social Networking Services (SNS) and Blogs are growing as new communication tools on the Internet. Several large-scale SNS sites are prospering; meanwhile, many sites with relatively small scale are offering services. Such small-scale SNSs realize small-group isolated type of communication while neither mixi nor MySpace can do that. However, the studies on SNS are almost about particular large-scale SNSs and cannot analyze whether their results apply for general features or for special characteristics on the SNSs. From the point of view of comparison analysis on SNS, comparison with just several types of those cannot reach a statistically significant level. We analyze many SNS sites with the aim of classifying them by using some approaches. Our paper classifies 50,000 sites for small-scale SNSs and gives their features from the points of network structure, patterns of communication, and growth rate of SNS. The result of analysis for network structure shows that many SNS sites have small-world attribute with short path lengths and high coefficients of their cluster. Distribution of degrees of the SNS sites is close to power law. This result indicates the small-scale SNS sites raise the percentage of users with many friends than mixi. According to the analysis of their coefficients of assortativity, those SNS sites have negative values of assortativity, and that means users with high degree tend to connect users with small degree. Next, we analyze the patterns of user communication. A friend network of SNS is explicit while users' communication behaviors are defined as an implicit network. What kind of relationships do these networks have? To address this question, we obtain some characteristics of users' communication structure and activation patterns of users on the SNS sites. By using new indexes, friend aggregation rate and friend coverage rate, we show that SNS sites with high value of friend coverage rate activate diary postings

  12. Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Bratica, Robyn; Dempsey, Jack R.; Karle, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of recent crisis management publications. The first article summarized provides a review of research documenting that even when children are not physically proximal to a national disaster (9/11), they may still have negative reactions. The second article summarized is an examination of the PTSD diagnostic criterion…

  13. Hadronic Weak Interaction Studies at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia

    2016-03-01

    Neutrons have been a useful probe in many fields of science, as well as an important physical system for study in themselves. Modern neutron sources provide extraordinary opportunities to study a wide variety of physics topics. Among them is a detailed study of the weak interaction. An overview of studies of the hadronic weak (quark-quark) as well as semi-leptonic (quark-lepton) interactions at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is presented. These measurements, done in few-nucleon systems, are finally letting us gain knowledge of the hadronic weak interaction without the contributions from nuclear effects. Forthcoming results from the NPDGamma experiment will, due to the simplicity of the neutron, provide an unambiguous measurement of the long range pion-nucleon weak coupling (often referred to as hπ), which will finally test the theoretical predictions. Results from NPDGamma and future results from the n +3 He experiment will need to be complemented by additional measurements to completely describe the hadronic weak interaction.

  14. Ion Source Development at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Desai, Nandishkumar J; Han, Baoxi; Kenik, Edward A; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Potter, Kerry G; Lang, Bonnie R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates near 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly-persistent ~38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ~90%. The ~1 ms-long, 60 Hz, ~50 mA H- beam pulses are extracted from a Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp, RF-driven, internal-antenna ion source. An electrostatic LEBT (Low Energy Beam Transport) focuses the 65 kV beam into the RFQ accelerator. The ion source and LEBT have normally a combined availability of ~99%. Although much progress has been made over the last years to achieve this level of availability further improvements are desirable. Failures of the internal antenna and occasionally impaired electron dump insulators require several source replacements per year. An attempt to overcome the antenna issues with an AlN external antenna source early in 2009 had to be terminated due to availability issues. This report provides a comprehensive review of the design, experimental history, status, and description of recently updated components and future plans for this ion source. The mechanical design for improved electron dump vacuum feedthroughs is also presented, which is compatible with the baseline and both external antenna ion sources.

  15. Ion Source Development at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F.; Han, B. X.; Kenik, E. A.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Potter, K. G.; Lang, B. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Desai, N. J.

    2011-09-26

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates near 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly-persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. The {approx}1 ms-long, 60 Hz, {approx}50 mA H{sup -} beam pulses are extracted from a Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp, RF-driven, internal-antenna ion source. An electrostatic LEBT (Low Energy Beam Transport) focuses the 65 kV beam into the RFQ accelerator. The ion source and LEBT have normally a combined availability of {approx}99%. Although much progress has been made over the last years to achieve this level of availability further improvements are desirable. Failures of the internal antenna and occasionally impaired electron dump insulators require several source replacements per year. An attempt to overcome the antenna issues with an AlN external antenna source early in 2009 had to be terminated due to availability issues. This report provides a comprehensive review of the design, experimental history, status, and description of recently updated components and future plans for this ion source. The mechanical design for improved electron dump vacuum feedthroughs is also presented, which is compatible with the baseline and both external antenna ion sources.

  16. HIGH LEVEL RF FOR THE SNS RING.

    SciTech Connect

    ZALTSMAN,A.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,J.; BRODOWSKI,J.; METH,M.; SPITZ,R.; SEVERINO,F.

    2002-06-03

    A high level RF system (HLRF) consisting of power amplifiers (PA's) and ferrite loaded cavities is being designed and built by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project. It is a fixed frequency, two harmonic system whose main function is to maintain a gap for the kicker rise time. Three cavities running at the fundamental harmonic (h=l) will provide 40 kV and one cavity at the second harmonic (h=2) will provide 20 kV. Each cavity has two gaps with a design voltage of 10 kV per gap and will be driven by a power amplifier (PA) directly adjacent to it. The PA uses a 600kW tetrode to provide the necessary drive current. The anode of the tetrode is magnetically coupled to the downstream cell of the cavity. Drive to the PA will be provided by a wide band, solid state amplifier located remotely. A dynamic tuning scheme will be implemented to help compensate for the effect of beam loading.

  17. Diversity of expression of the sensory neuron-specific TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium ion channels SNS and SNS2.

    PubMed

    Amaya, F; Decosterd, I; Samad, T A; Plumpton, C; Tate, S; Mannion, R J; Costigan, M; Woolf, C J

    2000-04-01

    The differential distribution of two tetrodotoxin resistant (TTXr) voltage-gated sodium channels SNS (PN3) and SNS2 (NaN) in rat primary sensory neurons has been investigated. Both channels are sensory neuron specific with SNS2 restricted entirely to those small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells with unmyelinated axons (C-fibers). SNS, in contrast, is expressed both in small C-fiber DRG cells and in 10% of cells with myelinated axons (A-fibers). All SNS expressing A-fiber cells are Trk-A positive and many express the vanilloid-like receptor VRL1. About half of C-fiber DRG neurons express either SNS or SNS2, and in most, the channels are colocalized. SNS and SNS2 are found both in NGF-responsive and GDNF-responsive C-fibers and many of these cells also express the capsaicin receptor VR1. A very small proportion of small DRG cells express either only SNS or only SNS2. At least four different classes of A- and C-fiber DRG neurons exist, therefore, with respect to expression of these sodium channels. PMID:10845770

  18. A Helicon Ion Source for the SNS Power Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.; Goulding, R. H.; Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Kang, Y.

    2006-10-01

    The SNS Power Upgrade will require an ion source capable of producing negative hydrogen ion (H--) beams of 70-95 mA, depending on source emittance, with a duty factor of 7.4%. Presently no sources in operation at existing accelerator facilities can simultaneously meet these requirements of beam current, emittance, duty factor with a reasonable lifetime. The possibility of meeting these requirements by combining a helicon hydrogen plasma generator previously developed in the Fusion Energy Division (FED) at ORNL with the existing SNS-LBNL H-- ion source will be discussed. Both these systems have been highly optimized and reflect the current state-of-the-art in high-density hydrogen plasma production and high-brightness H-- generation. The helicon plasma generator has demonstrated the capability of producing hydrogen plasma densities up to an order of magnitude greater than in the current SNS-LBNL source.

  19. H{sup -} ion source developments at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Han, B.; Kang, Y.; Goulding, R. H.; Crisp, D. W.; Sparks, D. O.; Luciano, N. P.; Carmichael, J. R.; Carr, J.

    2008-02-15

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will require substantially higher average and pulse H{sup -} beam currents than can be produced from conventional ion sources such as the base line SNS source. H{sup -} currents of 40-50 mA (SNS operations) and 70-100 mA (power upgrade project) with a rms emittance of 0.20-0.35{pi} mm mrad and a {approx}7% duty factor will be needed. We are therefore investigating several advanced ion source concepts based on rf plasma excitation. First, the performance characteristics of an external antenna source based on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} plasma chamber combined with an external multicusp magnetic configuration, an elemental Cs system, and plasma gun will be discussed. Second, the first plasma measurements of a helicon-driven H{sup -} ion source will also be presented.

  20. AN OVERVIEW OF THE SNS ACCELERATOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH, H.; LUDWIG, H.; MAHLER, G.; PAI, C.; PEARSON, C.; RANK, J.; TUOZZOLO, J.; WEI, J.

    2006-06-23

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS*) is an accelerator-based neutron source currently nearing completion at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed in 2006, the SNS will provide a 1 GeV, 1.44 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. SNS is a collaborative effort between six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories and offered a unique opportunity for the mechanical engineers to work with their peers from across the country. This paper presents an overview of the overall success of the collaboration concentrating on the accelerator ring mechanical engineering along with some discussion regarding the relative merits of such a collaborative approach. Also presented are a status of the mechanical engineering installation and a review of the associated installation costs.

  1. Effect of indium and antimony doping in SnS single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chaki, Sunil H. Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M.P.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Single crystals growth of pure SnS, indium doped SnS and antimony doped SnS by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique. • Doping of In and Sb occurred in SnS single crystals by cation replacement. • The replacement mechanism ascertained by EDAX, XRD and substantiated by Raman spectra analysis. • Dopants concentration affects the optical energy bandgap. • Doping influences electrical transport properties. - Abstract: Single crystals of pure SnS, indium (In) doped SnS and antimony (Sb) doped SnS were grown by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique. Two doping concentrations of 5% and 15% each were employed for both In and Sb dopants. Thus in total five samples were studied viz., pure SnS (S1), 5% In doped SnS (S2), 15% In doped SnS (S3), 5% Sb doped SnS (S4) and 15% Sb doped SnS (S5). The grown single crystal samples were characterized by evaluating their surface microstructure, stoichiometric composition, crystal structure, Raman spectroscopy, optical and electrical transport properties using appropriate techniques. The d.c. electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power variations with temperature showed semiconducting and p-type nature of the as-grown single crystal samples. The room temperature Hall Effect measurements further substantiated the semiconducting and p-type nature of the as-grown single crystal samples. The obtained results are deliberated in detail.

  2. In Vitro Study of SnS2, BiOCl and SnS2-Incorporated BiOCl Inorganic Nanoparticles Used as Doxorubicin Carrier.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiangming; Mo, Yunfei; Liu, Jianghui; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Yuanming

    2016-06-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have been widely used in biomedical field. In this paper, we try to study the use of three types of inorganic nanoparticles (i.e., SnS2, BiOCl and SnS2-incorporated BiOCl (SnS2/BiOCl)) as doxorubicin (DOX) carriers. Firstly, SnS2, BiOCl and SnS2/BiOCl were synthesised, then were characterized by TEM, nanoparticles size and zeta potential. Next the drug release and cell viability test were carried out. The cell viability test indicated that the drug carriers can effectively kill HeLa cells while maintaining low cytotoxicity against normal cells-fibroblasts. The results show the potential of SnS2/BiOCl nanoparticles for antitumor applications.

  3. In Vitro Study of SnS2, BiOCl and SnS2-Incorporated BiOCl Inorganic Nanoparticles Used as Doxorubicin Carrier.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiangming; Mo, Yunfei; Liu, Jianghui; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Yuanming

    2016-06-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have been widely used in biomedical field. In this paper, we try to study the use of three types of inorganic nanoparticles (i.e., SnS2, BiOCl and SnS2-incorporated BiOCl (SnS2/BiOCl)) as doxorubicin (DOX) carriers. Firstly, SnS2, BiOCl and SnS2/BiOCl were synthesised, then were characterized by TEM, nanoparticles size and zeta potential. Next the drug release and cell viability test were carried out. The cell viability test indicated that the drug carriers can effectively kill HeLa cells while maintaining low cytotoxicity against normal cells-fibroblasts. The results show the potential of SnS2/BiOCl nanoparticles for antitumor applications. PMID:27427625

  4. COMPUTATIONAL BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES FOR IMPROVING THE RING INJECTION AND EXTRACTION SYSTEMS IN SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Plum, Michael A; Wang, Jian-Guang

    2008-01-01

    The ring injection and extraction systems must function as designed in order for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to achieve its specified performance. In commissioning and early operations we have encountered problems that have been traced to these systems. We experienced high beam losses in and around the injection dump, the rectification of which has necessitated ongoing study and development by a multidisciplinary team. Results already include a number of enhancements of existing features and the addition of new elements and diagnostics. The problem in the extraction region stems from tilted beam distributions observed in the ring-to-target beam transport line (RTBT) and on the target, thus complicating the control of the beam-on-target distribution. This indicates the inadvertent introduction of x-y beam coupling somewhere upstream of the RTBT. The present paper describes computational studies, using the ORBIT Code, addressed at the detailed understanding and solution of these problems.

  5. STATUS OF NEW 2.5 MEV TEST FACILITY AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Champion, Mark; Crofford, Mark T; Kang, Yoon W; Menshov, Alexander A; Roseberry, Jr., R Tom; Stockli, Martin P; Webster, Anthony W; Welton, Robert F; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2014-01-01

    A new 2.5MeV beam test facility is being built at SNS. It consists of a 65 keV H- ion source, a 2.5MeV RFQ, a beam line with various beam diagnostics and a 6 kW beam dump. The facility is capable of producing one-ms-long pulses at 60Hz repetition rate with up to 50mA peak current. The commissioning with reduced average beam power is planned for fall 2014 to verify operation of all systems. The full power operation is scheduled to begin in 2015. The status of the facility will be presented as well as a discussion of the future R&D program.

  6. First Results from the VULCAN Diffractometer at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xun-Li; Holden, T. M.; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; An, Ke; Skorpenske, Harley David; Rennich, George Q; Iverson, Erik B; Jones, Amy Black

    2010-01-01

    On Friday June 26, 2009, the neutron beam shutter for the VULCAN diffractometer at the SNS was opened for the first time. Initial measurements to characterize the instrument performance are reported. It is shown that the measurement results are by and large in agreement with design calculations. New research opportunities with VULCAN are discussed.

  7. DESIGN OF BEAM-EXTRACTION SEPTUM MAGNET FOR THE SNS.

    SciTech Connect

    TSOUPAS,N.; LEE,Y.Y.; RANK,J.; TUOZZOLO,J.

    2001-06-18

    The beam-extraction process from the SNS accumulator ring [1,2] requires a Lambertson septum magnet. In this paper we discuss the geometrical and magnetic field requirements of the magnet and present results obtained from two and three dimensional magnetic field calculations that shows the field quality in the regions of interest of the septum magnet.

  8. From CMS to SNS: Educational Networking for Urban Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Pearl

    2011-01-01

    A complex view of the socioeconomic digital divide in urban schools requires us to address not only the gaps in access to technology, but also inequities in access to human support, digital content, and "effective pedagogical" approaches to technology integration. This study explored the use of social networking site (SNS) as a platform to provide…

  9. Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Efremenko, Yuri; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss opportunities for a neutrino program at the Spallation Neutrons Source (SNS) being commissioning at ORNL. Possible investigations can include study of neutrino-nuclear cross sections in the energy rage important for supernova dynamics and neutrino nucleosynthesis, search for neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, and various tests of the standard model of electro-weak interactions.

  10. Overview of Privacy in Social Networking Sites (SNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powale, Pallavi I.; Bhutkar, Ganesh D.

    2013-07-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have become an integral part of communication and life style of people in today's world. Because of the wide range of services offered by SNSs mostly for free of cost, these sites are attracting the attention of all possible Internet users. Most importantly, users from all age groups have become members of SNSs. Since many of the users are not aware of the data thefts associated with information sharing, they freely share their personal information with SNSs. Therefore, SNSs may be used for investigating users' character and social habits by familiar or even unknown persons and agencies. Such commercial and social scenario, has led to number of privacy and security threats. Though, all major issues in SNSs need to be addressed, by SNS providers, privacy of SNS users is the most crucial. And therefore, in this paper, we have focused our discussion on "privacy in SNSs". We have discussed different ways of Personally Identifiable Information (PII) leakages from SNSs, information revelation to third-party domains without user consent and privacy related threats associated with such information sharing. We expect that this comprehensive overview on privacy in SNSs will definitely help in raising user awareness about sharing data and managing their privacy with SNSs. It will also help SNS providers to rethink about their privacy policies.

  11. Synthesis and Raman analysis of SnS nanoparticles synthesized by PVP assisted polyol method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baby, Benjamin Hudson; Mohan, D. Bharathi

    2015-06-01

    SnS film was prepared by a simple drop casting method after synthesizing SnS nanoparticles by using PVP assisted polyol method. Confocal Raman study was carried out for the as deposited and annealed (150, 300 and 400 °C) films at two different excitation wavelengths 514 and 785 nm. At the excitation wavelength of 514 nm, the Raman modes showed for a mixed phase of SnS and SnS2 up to 150 °C and then only a pure SnS phase was observed up to 400 °C due to the dissociation of SnS2 in to SnS by releasing S. The increase in intensity of Raman (Ag and B3g) as well as IR (B3u) active modes of SnS are observed with increasing annealing temperature at excitation wavelength 785 nm due to the increased crystallinity and inactiveness of SnS2 modes. X-ray diffraction confirming the formation of a single phase of SnS while the greater homogeneity in both size and shape of SnS nanoparticles were confirmed through surface morphology from SEM.

  12. Interceptive Beam Diagnostics - Signal Creation and Materials Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael

    2004-11-10

    The focus of this tutorial will be on interceptive beam diagnostics such as wire scanners, screens, and harps. We will start with an overview of the various ways beams interact with materials to create signals useful for beam diagnostics systems. We will then discuss the errors in a harp or wire scanner profile measurement caused by errors in wire position, number of samples, and signal errors. Finally we will apply our results to two design examples-the SNS wire scanner system and the SNS target harp.

  13. MODEL BENCHMARK WITH EXPERIMENT AT THE SNS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Liu, Yun; Plum, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The history of attempts to perform a transverse match-ing in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) superconduct-ing linac (SCL) is discussed. The SCL has 9 laser wire (LW) stations to perform non-destructive measurements of the transverse beam profiles. Any matching starts with the measurement of the initial Twiss parameters, which in the SNS case was done by using the first four LW stations at the beginning of the superconducting linac. For years the consistency between data from all LW stations could not be achieved. This problem was resolved only after significant improvements in accuracy of the phase scans of the SCL cavities, more precise analysis of all available scan data, better optics planning, and the initial longitudi-nal Twiss parameter measurements. The presented paper discusses in detail these developed procedures.

  14. SnS2 Thin Film Deposition by Spray Pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahia Jaber, Abdallah; Noaiman Alamri, Saleh; Salah Aida, Mohammed

    2012-06-01

    Tin disulfide (SnS2) thin films have been synthesized using a simplified spray pyrolysis technique using a perfume atomizer. The films were deposited using two different solutions prepared by the dilution of SnCl2 and thiourea in distilled water and in methanol. The obtained films have a microcrystalline structure. The film deposited using methanol as the solvent is nearly stochiometric SnS2 with a spinel phase having a (001) preferential orientation. The film prepared with an aqueous solution is Sn-rich. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images reveal that the film deposited with the aqueous solution is rough and is formed with large wires. However, the film deposited with methanol is dense and smooth. Conductivity measurements indicate that the aqueous solution leads to an n-type semiconductor, while methanol leads to a p-type semiconductor.

  15. Fabrication and tuning of the SNS CCL hot model

    SciTech Connect

    Bultman, N. K.; Billen, J. H.; Chen, Z.; Richards, D. R.; Young, L. M.; Hopkins, S. M.

    2003-01-01

    A full-scale powered model of the SNS CCL was completed in August 2001. The manufacturing processes and tuning procedures used in the CCL Hot Model formed the basis of the main manufacturing contract for the SNS CCL system later placed in private industry. In this paper we summarize the design basis for the CCL and the manufacturing and process steps required to fabricate and of the various tooling and lifting and handling fixtures utilized in the process at the various machining, brazing, welding, and tuning steps. The tooling utilized in the fabrication and tuning process is discussed in detail. The ultimate successful testing of the CCL hot model has key to development of a manufacturing plan for the CCL system.

  16. SNS BLM SYSTEM EVOLUTION: DETECTORS, ELECTRONICS AND SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, Alexander P; Pogge, James R; Dickson, Richard W

    2009-01-01

    SNS is a high intensity hadron beam facility; so the Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) system is a crucial part of Machine Protection System and an important tool for beam tuning. The paper presents the current status of installed detectors and experimental data obtained during SNS operations. We compare several different types of BLMs and show advantages and disadvantages of each type. The electronic parts obsolescence became a real issue since the original electronics was designed about 10 years ago. The first test of our next generation BLM system is expected to be done by summer 2009. The new system will contribute to significant noise reduction and will follow a modular concept of Smart Device to achieve a higher degree of reliability and maintainability.

  17. Method Producing an SNS Superconducting Junction with Weak Link Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a high temperature superconductor Josephson element and an improved SNS weak link barrier element is provided. A YBaCuO superconducting electrode film is deposited on a substrate at a temperature of approximately 800 C. A weak link barrier layer of a nonsuperconducting film of N-YBaCuO is deposited over the electrode at a temperature range of 520 C. to 540 C. at a lower deposition rate. Subsequently a superconducting counter-electrode film layer of YBaCuO is deposited over the weak link barrier layer at approximately 800 C. The weak link barrier layer has a thickness of approximately 50 A and the SNS element can be constructed to provide an edge geometry junction.

  18. Shot noise in diffusive SNS and SIN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, Francois; Hoffmann, Christian; Quirion, David; Sanquer, Marc

    2003-05-01

    We studied shot noise in metallic SNS and doped silicon-based SIN junctions. In SNS structures, the shot noise is very much enhanced due to incoherent multiple Andreev reflections (IMAR) which are truncated, at low voltages, by inelastic electron-electron interaction. These experimental results show good agreement with recent semiclassical theory. In SIN junctions, the zero-voltage conductance is increased by disorder-induced coherent MAR (reflectionless tunneling) and we found that the shot noise is double ( SI=4 eI) below the Thouless energy and equals the full shot noise ( SI=2 eI) above. We also present conductance measurements which show the same zero bias anomaly but in a double-barrier metallic SININ junction.

  19. EPICS V4 Evaluation for SNS Neutron Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kasemir, Kay; Pearson, Matthew R; Guyotte, Greg S

    2015-01-01

    Version 4 of the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) toolkit allows defining application-specific structured data types (pvData) and offers a network protocol for their efficient exchange (pvAccess). We evaluated V4 for the transport of neutron events from the detectors of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to data acquisition and experiment monitoring systems. This includes the comparison of possible data structures, performance tests, and experience using V4 in production on a beam line.

  20. SNS LINAC Wire Scanner System : Signal Levels and Accuracy.

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. A.; Christensen, W.; Myer, R. E.; Rose, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The linac wire scanner system for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, TN, USA, calls for 5 units in the medium energy beam transport (MEBT), 5 in the drift tube linac (DTL), and 10 in the coupled cavity linac (CCL). In this paper we present expected signal levels and an analysis of the error in the beam size measurement as functions of wire position and electrical signal errors.

  1. Halo and space charge issues in the SNS Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Abell, D.T.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Lee, Y.Y.; Malitsky, N.; Wei, J.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    2000-06-30

    The latest designs for high-intensity proton rings require minimizing beam-induced radioactivation of the vacuum chamber. Although the tune depression in the ring is much smaller than in high-intensity linacs, space-charge contributions to halo formation and, hence, beam loss may be significant. This paper reviews our current understanding of halo formation issues for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of electrodeposited SnS films

    SciTech Connect

    Jim, W. Y. Sun, Y. C. Djurišić, A. B.; Chan, W. K.

    2013-12-04

    Here we systematically investigated the effect of solution concentration and growth temperature on the properties of SnS thin films. The properties of deposited films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We found that sample quality is strongly affected by deposition conditions and that the sample composition exhibits strong temperature dependence. Detailed discussion of material properties dependence on the growth conditions is given.

  3. WATER PURITY DEVELOPMENT FOR THE COUPLED CAVITY LINAC (CCL) AND DRIFT TUBE LINAC (DTL) STRUCTURES OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    D. KATONAK; J. BERNARDIN; S. HOPKINS

    2001-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a facility being designed for scientific and industrial research and development. SNS will generate and use neutrons as a diagnostic tool for medical purposes, material science, etc. The neutrons will be produced by bombarding a heavy metal target with a high-energy beam of protons, generated and accelerated with a linear particle accelerator, or linac. The low energy end of the linac consists of two room temperature copper structures, the drift tube linac (DTL), and the coupled cavity linac (CCL). Both of these accelerating structures use large amounts of electrical energy to accelerate the proton beam. Approximately 60-80% of the electrical energy is dissipated in the copper structure and must be removed. This is done using specifically designed water cooling passages within the linac's copper structure. Cooling water is supplied to these cooling passages by specially designed resonance control and water cooling systems. One of the primary components in the DTL and CCL water cooling systems, is a water purification system that is responsible for minimizing erosion, corrosion, scaling, biological growth, and hardware activation. The water purification system consists of filters, ion exchange resins, carbon beds, an oxygen scavenger, a UV source, and diagnostic instrumentation. This paper reviews related issues associated with water purification and describes the mechanical design of the SNS Linac water purification system.

  4. HIGH INTENSITY EFFECTS IN THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2008-01-01

    Currently operating at 0.5 MW beam power on target, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is already the world's most powerful pulsed neutron source. However, we are only one third of the way to full power. As we ramp toward full power, the control of the beam and beam loss in the ring will be critical. In addition to practical considerations, such as choice of operating point, painting scheme, RF bunching, and beam scattering, it may be necessary to understand and mitigate collective effects due to space charge, impedances, and electron clouds. At each stage of the power ramp-up, we use all available resources to understand and to minimize beam losses. From the standpoint of beam dynamics, the losses observed so far under normal operating conditions have not involved collective phenomena. We are now entering the intensity regime in which this may change. In dedicated high intensity beam studies, we have already observed resistive wall, extraction kicker impedance-driven, and electron cloud activities. The analysis and simulation of this data are important ongoing activities at SNS. This paper discusses the status of this work, as well as other considerations necessary to the successful full power operation of SNS.

  5. The First ASME Code Stamped Cryomodule at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, M P; Crofford, M T; Douglas, D L; Kim, S -H; Steward, S T; Strong, W H; Afanador, R; Hannah, B S; Saunders, J; Mammosser, J D

    2012-07-01

    The first spare cryomodule for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been designed, fabricated, and tested by SNS personnel. The approach to design for this cryomodule was to hold critical design features identical to the original design such as bayonet positions, coupler positions, cold mass assembly, and overall footprint. However, this is the first SNS cryomodule that meets the pressure requirements put forth in the 10 CFR 851: Worker Safety and Health Program. The most significant difference is that Section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code was applied to the vacuum vessel of this cryomodule. Applying the pressure code to the helium vessels within the cryomodule was considered. However, it was determined to be schedule prohibitive because it required a code case for materials that are not currently covered by the code. Good engineering practice was applied to the internal components to verify the quality and integrity of the entire cryomodule. The design of the cryomodule, fabrication effort, and cryogenic test results will be reported in this paper.

  6. DATA ACQUISITION FOR SNS BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    YENG,Y.GASSNER,D.HOFF,L.WITKOVER,R.

    2003-10-13

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor system uses VME based electronics to measure the radiation produced by lost beam. Beam loss signals from cylindrical argon-filled ion chambers and neutron detectors will be conditioned in analog front-end (AFE) circuitry. These signals will be digitized and further processed in a dedicated VME crate. Fast beam inhibit and low-level, long-term loss warnings will be generated to provide machine protection. The fast loss data will have a bandwidth of 35kHz. While the low level, long-term loss data will have much higher sensitivity. This is further complicated by the 3 decade range of intensity as the Ring accumulates beam. Therefore a bandwidth of 100kHz and dynamic range larger than 21 bits data acquisition system will be required for this purpose. Based on the evaluation of several commercial ADC modules in preliminary design phase, a 24 bits Sigma-Delta data acquisition VME bus card was chosen as the SNS BLM digitizer. An associated vxworks driver and EPICS device support module also have been developed at BNL. Simulating test results showed this system is fully qualified for both fast loss and low-level, long-term loss application. The first prototype including data acquisition hardware setup and EPICS software (running database and OPI clients) will be used in SNS Drift Tube Linac (DTL) system commissioning.

  7. Numerical modeling of the SNS H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2015-04-01

    Ion source rf antennas that produce H- ions can fail when plasma heating causes ablation of the insulating coating due to small structural defects such as cracks. Reducing antenna failures that reduce the operating capabilities of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator is one of the top priorities of the SNS H- Source Program at ORNL. Numerical modeling of ion sources can provide techniques for optimizing design in order to reduce antenna failures. There are a number of difficulties in developing accurate models of rf inductive plasmas. First, a large range of spatial and temporal scales must be resolved in order to accurately capture the physics of plasma motion, including the Debye length, rf frequencies on the order of tens of MHz, simulation time scales of many hundreds of rf periods, large device sizes on tens of cm, and ion motions that are thousands of times slower than electrons. This results in large simulation domains with many computational cells for solving plasma and electromagnetic equations, short time steps, and long-duration simulations. In order to reduce the computational requirements, one can develop implicit models for both fields and particle motions (e.g. divergence-preserving ADI methods), various electrostatic models, or magnetohydrodynamic models. We have performed simulations using all three of these methods and have found that fluid models have the greatest potential for giving accurate solutions while still being fast enough to perform long timescale simulations in a reasonable amount of time. We have implemented a number of fluid models with electromagnetics using the simulation tool USim and applied them to modeling the SNS H- ion source. We found that a reduced, single-fluid MHD model with an imposed magnetic field due to the rf antenna current and the confining multi-cusp field generated increased bulk plasma velocities of > 200 m/s in the region of the antenna where ablation is often observed in the SNS source. We report

  8. INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Shishlo, Andrei P; Plum, Michael A; Lebedev, Valerie; Laface, Emanuele; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

  9. PLANS FOR A NEUTRON EDM EXPERIMENT AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    ITO, TAKEYASU

    2007-01-31

    The electric dipole moment of the neutron, leptons, and atoms provide a unique window to Physics Beyond the Standard Model. They are currently developing a new neutron EDM experiment (the nEDM Experiment). This experiment, which will be run at the 8.9 {angstrom} Neutron Line at the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FNPB) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will search for the neutron EDM with a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than the present limit. In this paper, the motivation for the experiment, the experimental method, and the present status of the experiment are discussed.

  10. Status of the SNS Ring Power Ramp UP

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Allen, Christopher K; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Galambos, John D; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Jeon, Dong-O; Pelaia II, Tom; Shishlo, Andrei P; Zhang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Beam was first circulated in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring in January 2006. Since that time we have been working to raise the beam power to the design value of 1.4 MW. In general the power ramp up has been proceeding very well, but several issues have been uncovered. Examples include poor transmission of the waste beams in the injection dump beam line, and cross-plane coupling in the ring to target beam transport line. In this paper we will discuss these issues and present an overall status of the ring and the transport beam lines.

  11. Results of the Cryogenic Testing of the SNS Prototype Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    I.E. Campisi; G. Ciovati; E. Daly; K. Davis; J.R. Delayen; M. Drury; P. Kneisel; J. Mammosser; T. Powers; J. Preble; C.E. Reece; M. Stirbet; H. Wang; K. Wilson; S. Smee

    2002-08-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed a prototype of the medium beta SNS cryomodule. Tests were recently performed on the module, which includes three 805 MHz cavities of beta=0.61, with coaxial power couplers and frequency tuners (mechanical and piezoelectric). The cavities exceeded accelerating gradients of 16 MV/m (design value 10.5 MV/m) with Q{sub 0}'s of about 10{sup 10} at the design field. One of the power couplers has been tested up to peak powers of over 700 kW. Results of the tests are reported in this paper.

  12. PERFORMANCE OF AND UPGRADES TO THE SNS COLLIMATOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A; Abdou, Ashraf A; Jacobs, Lorelei L; Janney, Jim G; Geoghegan, Patrick J; McTeer, Stephen Mark; Popova, Irina; Ferguson, Phillip D; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2009-01-01

    As the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam power is increased, the collimator systems are becoming correspondingly more important. The High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) transverse collimators are now routinely used during neutron production. We are in the process of redesigning the HEBT momentum collimation system due to problems with gas production from radiolysis. The Ring collimators are designed for two-stage operation but to date they are mainly used in one-stage mode. In this paper we will discuss the status, the operational performance, and upgrades to the collimation systems.

  13. Status of the Cryogenic System Commissioning at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    F. Casagrande; I.E. Campisi; P.A. Gurd; D.R. Hatfield; M.P. Howell; D. Stout; W.H. Strong; D. Arenius; J.C. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; P.K. Knudsen

    2005-05-16

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 Watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning strategy and status will be presented.

  14. UNCERTAIN SYSTEM MODELING OF SNS RF CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    S. KWON; A. REGAN; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    This paper addresses the modeling problem of the linear accelerator RF system for SNS. The cascade of the klystron and the cavity is modeled as a nominal system. In the real world, high voltage power supply ripple, Lorentz Force Detuning, microphonics, cavity RF parameter perturbations, distortions in RF components, and loop time delay imperfection exist inevitably, which must be analyzed. The analysis is based on the accurate modeling of the disturbances and uncertainties. In this paper, a modern control theory is applied for modeling the disturbances, uncertainties, and for analyzing the closed loop system robust performance.

  15. Annealing effect for SnS thin films prepared by high-vacuum evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Revathi, Naidu Bereznev, Sergei; Loorits, Mihkel; Raudoja, Jaan; Lehner, Julia; Gurevits, Jelena; Traksmaa, Rainer; Mikli, Valdek; Mellikov, Enn; Volobujeva, Olga

    2014-11-01

    Thin films of SnS are deposited onto molybdenum-coated soda lime glass substrates using the high-vacuum evaporation technique at a substrate temperature of 300 °C. The as-deposited SnS layers are then annealed in three different media: (1) H{sub 2}S, (2) argon, and (3) vacuum, for different periods and temperatures to study the changes in the microstructural properties of the layers and to prepare single-phase SnS photoabsorber films. It is found that annealing the layers in H{sub 2}S at 400 °C changes the stoichiometry of the as-deposited SnS films and leads to the formation of a dominant SnS{sub 2} phase. Annealing in an argon atmosphere for 1 h, however, causes no deviations in the composition of the SnS films, though the surface morphology of the annealed SnS layers changes significantly as a result of a 2 h annealing process. The crystalline structure, surface morphology, and photosensitivity of the as-deposited SnS films improves significantly as the result of annealing in vacuum, and the vacuum-annealed films are found to exhibit promising properties for fabricating complete solar cells based on these single-phase SnS photoabsorber layers.

  16. Synthesis and Raman analysis of SnS nanoparticles synthesized by PVP assisted polyol method

    SciTech Connect

    Baby, Benjamin Hudson; Mohan, D. Bharathi

    2015-06-24

    SnS film was prepared by a simple drop casting method after synthesizing SnS nanoparticles by using PVP assisted polyol method. Confocal Raman study was carried out for the as deposited and annealed (150, 300 and 400 °C) films at two different excitation wavelengths 514 and 785 nm. At the excitation wavelength of 514 nm, the Raman modes showed for a mixed phase of SnS and SnS{sub 2} up to 150 °C and then only a pure SnS phase was observed up to 400 °C due to the dissociation of SnS{sub 2} in to SnS by releasing S. The increase in intensity of Raman (A{sub g} and B{sub 3g}) as well as IR (B{sub 3u}) active modes of SnS are observed with increasing annealing temperature at excitation wavelength 785 nm due to the increased crystallinity and inactiveness of SnS{sub 2} modes. X-ray diffraction confirming the formation of a single phase of SnS while the greater homogeneity in both size and shape of SnS nanoparticles were confirmed through surface morphology from SEM.

  17. RADIATION-RESISTANT FIBER OPTIC STRAIN SENSORS FOR SNS TARGET INSTRUMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Bryan, Jeff; Riemer, Bernie; Sangrey, Robert L; Wendel, Mark W; Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of stresses and strains in the mercury tar-get vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is important to understand the structural dynamics of the target. This work reports the development of radiation-resistant fiber optic strain sensors for the SNS target in-strumentation.

  18. Perceptions of Teachers and Students towards Educational Application of SNS and Its Educational Effects in Middle School Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, June; Lee, Yunoug; Kim, Mi Hwa

    2015-01-01

    SNS use by youth is a growing trend. However, there is a lack of studies on how the application of SNS can contribute to learning and public education for youth. As SNS was not originally developed for educational purposes, there is a possibility that it can be used for meaningful educational activity or that its application can lead to the…

  19. Radiation transport analyses in support of the SNS Target Station Neutron Beam Line Shutters Title I Design

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.M.; Pevey, R.E.; Lillie, R.A.; Johnson, J.O.

    2000-12-01

    A detailed radiation transport analysis of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) shutters is important for the construction of the SNS because of its impact on conventional facility design, normal operation of the facility, and maintenance operations. Thus far the analysis of the SNS shutter travel gaps has been completed. This analysis was performed using coupled Monte Carlo and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations.

  20. Spallation Neutron Source SNS Diamond Stripper Foil Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Robert W; Plum, Michael A; Wilson, Leslie L; Feigerle, Charles S.; Borden, Michael J.; Irie, Y.; Sugai, I; Takagi, A

    2007-01-01

    Diamond stripping foils are under development for the SNS. Freestanding, flat 300 to 500 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} foils as large as 17 x 25 mm{sup 2} have been prepared. These nano-textured polycrystalline foils are grown by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition in a corrugated format to maintain their flatness. They are mechanically supported on a single edge by a residual portion of their silicon growth substrate; fine foil supporting wires are not required for diamond foils. Six foils were mounted on the SNS foil changer in early 2006 and have performed well in commissioning experiments at reduced operating power. A diamond foil was used during a recent experiment where 15 {micro}C of protons, approximately 64% of the design value, were stored in the ring. A few diamond foils have been tested at LANSCE/PSR, where one foil was in service for a period of five months (820 C of integrated injected charge) before it was replaced. Diamond foils have also been tested in Japan at KEK (640 keV H{sup -}) where their lifetimes slightly surpassed those of evaporated carbon foils, but fell short of those for Sugai's new hybrid boron carbon (HBC) foils.

  1. Next Generation H{sup -} Ion Sources for the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Murray, S. N.; Crisp, D.; Carmichael, J.; Goulding, R. H.; Han, B.; Pennisi, T.; Santana, M.; Tarvainen, O.

    2009-03-12

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is the leading accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility, currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. In order to insure meeting operational requirements as well as providing for future facility beam power upgrades, a multifaceted H- ion source development program is ongoing. This work discusses several aspects of this program, specifically the design and first beam measurements of an RF-driven, external antenna H- ion source based on an A1N ceramic plasma chamber, elemental and chromate Cs-systems, and plasma ignition gun. Unanalyzed beam currents of up to {approx}100 mA(60 Hz, 1 ms) have been observed and sustained currents >60 mA(60 Hz, 1 ms) have been demonstrated on the test stand. Accelerated beam currents of {approx}40 mA have also been demonstrated into the SNS front end. Data are also presented describing the first H- beam extraction experiments from a helicon plasma generator based on the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) engine design.

  2. Next Generation H- Ion Sources for the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Carmichael, Justin R; Carr, Jr, Jerry; Crisp, Danny W; Goulding, Richard Howell; Han, Baoxi; Pennisi, Terry R; Murray Jr, S N; Stockli, Martin P; Tarvainen, Olli A; Santana, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is the leading accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility, currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. In order to insure meeting operational requirements as well as providing for future facility beam power upgrades, a multifaceted H{sup -} ion source development program is ongoing. This work discusses several aspects of this program, specifically the design and first beam measurements of an RF-driven, external antenna H{sup -} ion source based on an AlN ceramic plasma chamber, elemental and chromate Cs-systems, and plasma ignition gun. Unanalyzed beam currents of up to {approx}100 mA (60Hz, 1ms) have been observed and sustained currents >60 mA (60Hz, 1ms) have been demonstrated on the test stand. Accelerated beam currents of {approx}40 mA have also been demonstrated into the SNS front end. Data are also presented describing the first H{sup -} beam extraction experiments from a helicon plasma generator based on the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) engine design.

  3. SNS Sample Activation Calculator Flux Recommendations and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    McClanahan, Tucker C.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Iverson, Erik B.; Lu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses the Sample Activation Calculator (SAC) to calculate the activation of a sample after the sample has been exposed to the neutron beam in one of the SNS beamlines. The SAC webpage takes user inputs (choice of beamline, the mass, composition and area of the sample, irradiation time, decay time, etc.) and calculates the activation for the sample. In recent years, the SAC has been incorporated into the user proposal and sample handling process, and instrument teams and users have noticed discrepancies in the predicted activation of their samples. The Neutronics Analysis Team validated SAC by performing measurements on select beamlines and confirmed the discrepancies seen by the instrument teams and users. The conclusions were that the discrepancies were a result of a combination of faulty neutron flux spectra for the instruments, improper inputs supplied by SAC (1.12), and a mishandling of cross section data in the Sample Activation Program for Easy Use (SAPEU) (1.1.2). This report focuses on the conclusion that the SAPEU (1.1.2) beamline neutron flux spectra have errors and are a significant contributor to the activation discrepancies. The results of the analysis of the SAPEU (1.1.2) flux spectra for all beamlines will be discussed in detail. The recommendations for the implementation of improved neutron flux spectra in SAPEU (1.1.3) are also discussed.

  4. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.W. Kang; D.E. Anderson; I.E. Campisi; M. Champion; M.T. Crofford; R.E. Fuja; P.A. Gurd; S. Hasan; K.-U. Kasemir; M.P. McCarthy; D. Stout; J.Y. Tang; A.V. Vassioutchenko; M. Wezensky; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; T. Powers; M. Stirbet

    2005-05-16

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavities have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducting and superconducting accelerating cavities and components.

  5. Developing a Research Agenda to Optimize Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: An Executive Summary of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization" was held on May 12, 2015, with the goal of developing a high-priority research agenda on which to base future research. The specific aims of the conference were to (1) understand the current state of evidence regarding emergency department (ED) diagnostic imaging use and identify key opportunities, limitations, and gaps in knowledge; (2) develop a consensus-driven research agenda emphasizing priorities and opportunities for research in ED diagnostic imaging; and (3) explore specific funding mechanisms available to facilitate research in ED diagnostic imaging. Over a 2-year period, the executive committee and other experts in the field convened regularly to identify specific areas in need of future research. Six content areas within emergency diagnostic imaging were identified before the conference and served as the breakout groups on which consensus was achieved: clinical decision rules; use of administrative data; patient-centered outcomes research; training, education, and competency; knowledge translation and barriers to imaging optimization; and comparative effectiveness research in alternatives to traditional computed tomography use. The executive committee invited key stakeholders to assist with the planning and to participate in the consensus conference to generate a multidisciplinary agenda. There were a total of 164 individuals involved in the conference and spanned various specialties, including general emergency medicine, pediatric emergency medicine, radiology, surgery, medical physics, and the decision sciences.

  6. Diagnostic Development on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    A.L. Roquemore; D. Johnson; R. Kaita; et al

    1999-12-16

    Diagnostics are described which are currently installed or under active development for the newly commissioned NSTX device. The low aspect ratio (R/a less than or equal to 1.3) and low toroidal field (0.1-0.3T) used in this device dictate adaptations in many standard diagnostic techniques. Technical summaries of each diagnostic are given, and adaptations, where significant, are highlighted.

  7. Developing a Research Agenda to Optimize Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: An Executive Summary of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization," was held on May 12, 2015, with the goal of developing a high-priority research agenda on which to base future research. The specific aims of the conference were to: 1) understand the current state of evidence regarding emergency department (ED) diagnostic imaging utilization and identify key opportunities, limitations, and gaps in knowledge; 2) develop a consensus-driven research agenda emphasizing priorities and opportunities for research in ED diagnostic imaging; and 3) explore specific funding mechanisms available to facilitate research in ED diagnostic imaging. Over a 2-year period, the executive committee and other experts in the field convened regularly to identify specific areas in need of future research. Six content areas within emergency diagnostic imaging were identified prior to the conference and served as the breakout groups on which consensus was achieved: clinical decision rules; use of administrative data; patient-centered outcomes research; training, education, and competency; knowledge translation and barriers to imaging optimization; and comparative effectiveness research in alternatives to traditional computed tomography use. The executive committee invited key stakeholders to assist with planning and to participate in the consensus conference to generate a multidisciplinary agenda. There were 164 individuals involved in the conference spanning various specialties, including emergency medicine (EM), radiology, surgery, medical physics, and the decision sciences. This issue of AEM is dedicated to the proceedings of the 16th annual AEM consensus conference as well as original research related to emergency diagnostic imaging.

  8. Design and Analysis of Vacuum Pumping Systems for SNS DTL and CCL Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S; Tung, L; Kishiyama, K; Nederbragt, W; Bernardin,; Bustos, G; Gillis, R; Meyer, Sr, R

    2001-06-14

    The mechanical design of the vacuum pumping systems for SNS DTL (Drift Tube Linac) and CCL (Cavity Coupled Linac) linac systems is summarized. Both vacuum systems were modeled to select the optimal pump configuration. The pressure history in up to 182 sub-volumes was analyzed in detail. Included in the model are time-dependent outgassing rates and pressure-dependent pump speeds for a variety of gas species. With this information, we solved for the pressure history during roughing and with turbo and ion pumps. The number and size of each pump were optimized to achieve the desired pressure with minimal costs. In the optimized design, directly mounted ion pumps were provided for six DTL tanks. For four CCL modules (each in length of 12-15 m), ion pumps with manifolds were selected. With all metallic surface outgassing, seal leakage and expected gas loads from all diagnostic devices taken into account, the designed systems can provide operating drift-tube pressure below 1.8 x 10{sup -7} Torr and CCL beamline pressures below 9.2 x 10{sup -8} Torr even under abnormal conditions. Details of the design and the modeling results are presented.

  9. Visible-light-driven photocatalytic and chemical sensing properties of SnS2 nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Umar, Ahmad; Akhtar, M S; Dar, G N; Abaker, M; Al-Hajry, A; Baskoutas, S

    2013-09-30

    This work demonstrated the successful and facile large-scale synthesis and characterizations of SnS2 nanoflakes. The detailed morphological studies revealed that the synthesized products were nanoflakes and were grown in large quantity. The XRD pattern and detailed compositional studies confirmed that the synthesized SnS2 nanoflakes were well-crystalline and possessing hexagonal SnS2 phase. The synthesized SnS2 nanoflakes were used as efficient photocatalysts for photocatalytic degradation and effective electron mediators for the fabrication of chemical sensor. The photocatalytic properties of SnS2 nanoflakes towards the photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B dye under visible light irradiation showed reasonably good degradation of ~61%. Moreover, the as-synthesized SnS2 nanoflakes were used as efficient electron mediators for the fabrication of nitroaniline chemical sensor by simple I-V technique. Very high-sensitivity of ~ 505.82±0.02 mAcm(-2).(mole/L)(-1) and experimental detection limit of ~15×10(-6) (mole/L) in a short response time of ~10.0 s with LDR in the range of 15.6×10(-6)-0.5×10(-3) mole L(-1) were observed for the fabricated nitroaniline chemical sensor. The observed results indicated that the SnS2 nanoflakes can efficiently be used as visible-light-driven photocatalysts and the fabrication of ultra-high sensitive chemical sensors.

  10. Design and Prototyping of an Ionization Profile Monitor for the SNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bartkoski, Dirk A; Deibele, Craig E; Polsky, Yarom

    2014-12-01

    An ionization profile monitor (IPM) has been designed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. Utilizing ionized electrons produced by beam-gas ionization, the SNS IPM uses a 120 kV bias potential to overcome beam space charge and accelerate electrons towards a movable particle detector. A 300 G magnetic field is used to confine the transverse electron motion, resulting in profile errors at the estimated 7% level. With a system bandwidth of 17.5 MHz. The SNS IPM is capable of measuring turn-by-turn beam profiles for a fully accumulated beam. This paper presents a description of the system and design.

  11. SEQUOIA: A Newly Operating Chopper Spectrometer at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Sherline, Todd E; Clancy, James P; Ross, Kathyrn; Ruff, Jacob; Gaulin, Bruce D.; Nagler, Stephen E

    2010-01-01

    A fine resolution chopper spectrometer (SEQUOIA) recently received first neutrons at the SNS. The commissioning phase of the instrument is underway. SEQUOIA is designed to utilize neutrons of an incident energy (Ei) between 10-2000 meV. A monochromatic beam is provided on a sample, 20 m from the decoupled ambient temperature H2O moderator, by filtering the white beam with a Fermi chopper located 18 m from the source. After interacting with the sample, neutrons are detected by an array of 3He linear position sensitive tubes located on a vertical cylinder with a radius of 5.5 m. This contribution presents current results from the commissioning experiments and compares SEQUOIA s actual and predicted performance. These commissioning experiments include characterization of the beam by monitors, determination of the chopper phase offsets, and runs with V and C4H2I2S. The predicted performance is provided by analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. VULCAN-The engineering diffractometer at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xun-Li; Holden, T. M.; Rennich, George Q; Stoica, A. D.; Liaw, Peter K; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R

    2006-01-01

    The VULCAN diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is designed to tackle a broad range of problems in materials science and engineering, including spatial mapping of the residual stress distribution in components, deformation behavior under static and cyclic loadings, and the kinetics of the phase transformation. The optics design features a focusing neutron guide, wide-angular detector coverage for diffraction, and an area detector for small angle scattering. By employing an interchangeable neutron guide-collimator system, the instrument can be optimally configured for individual experiments with desired resolution. The performance of the instrument was estimated using Monte Carlo simulation. A suite of specialized sample environments is also under construction as an integrated part of the instrument.

  13. H- AND PROTON BEAM LOSS COMPARISON AT SNS SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Galambos, John D; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of beam loss in the superconducting part (SCL) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac for H- and protons is presented. During the experiment the nominal beam of negative hydrogen ions in the SCL was replaced by a proton beam created by insertion of a thin stripping carbon foil placed in the low energy section of the linac. The observed significant reduction in the beam loss for protons is explained by a domination of the intra beam stripping mechanism of the beam loss for H-. The details of the experiment are discussed, and a preliminary estimation of the cross section of the reaction H- + H- -> H- + H0 + e is presented. Earlier, a short description of these studies was presented in [1].

  14. SNS Ring Operational Experience and Power Ramp Up Status

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    The SNS Ring has now been operating for about 3.5 years, and our march continues to increase the beam power to the full design value of 1.4 MW. The Ring is a loss-limited machine, and in general the radioactivation levels are good, but there are some unanticipated hot spots that we are working to improve. High intensity collective effects such as space-charge and beam instability have had minimal impact on beam operations to date. The cross plane coupling issue in the ring to target beam transport line has been solved. We will also discuss the status of equipment upgrades in the high-energy beam transport beam line, the injection-dump beam transport line, the ring, and the ring-to-target beam transport line.

  15. STATUS OF BEAM IMAGING DEVELOPMENTS FOR THE SNS TARGET

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Thomas J; McManamy, Thomas J; Maxey, L Curt; Shkvarunets, A; Feldman, D; Fiorito, R

    2009-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) continues a ramp up in proton beam power toward the design goal of 1.4 MW on target. At Megawatt levels, US and Japanese studies have shown that cavitation in the Mercury target could lead to dramatically shortened target lifetime. Therefore, it will be critical to measure and control the proton beam distribution on the target, in a region of extremely high radiation and limited accessibility. Several sources of photons have been considered for imaging the beam on or near the target. These include a freestanding temporary screen, a scintillating coating, Helium gas scintillation, optical transition radiation, and a beam- heated wire mesh. This paper will outline the selection process that led to the current emphasis on coating development. In this harsh environment, the optics design presented significant challenges. The optical system has been constructed and characterized in preparation for installation. Optical test results will be described along with predictions of overall system performance.

  16. THE SNS VACUUM CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE FOR THE SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Derrick C

    2009-01-01

    The superconducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has 23 cryomodules whose vacuum system is monitored and controlled by custom built hardware. The original control hardware was provided by Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and contained a variety of custom boards utilizing integrated circuits to perform logic. The need for control logic changes, a desire to increase maintainability, and a desire to increase flexibility to adapt for the future has led to a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based upgrade. This paper provides an overview of the commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware being used in the superconducting vacuum control system. Details of the design and challenges to convert a control system during small windows of maintenance periods without disrupting beam operation will be covered in this paper.

  17. THE SNS RESONANCE CONTROL COOLING SYSTEM CONTROL VALVE UPGRADE PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Derrick C; Schubert, James Phillip; Tang, Johnny Y

    2008-01-01

    The normal-conducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) uses 10 separate Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS) water skids to control the resonance of 6 Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and 4 Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) accelerating structures. The RCCS water skids use 2 control valves; one to regulate the chilled water flow and the other to bypass water to a chilled water heat exchanger. These valves have hydraulic actuators that provide position and feedback to the control system. Frequency oscillations occur using these hydraulic actuators due to their coarse movement and control of the valves. New pneumatic actuator and control positioners have been installed on the DTL3 RCCS water skid to give finer control and regulation of DTL3 cavity temperature. This paper shows a comparison of resonance control performance for the two valve configurations.

  18. HIGH RESOLUTION EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT SNS FRONT END

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac accelerates an H- beam from 2.5MeV up to 1GeV. Recently the emittance scanner in the MEBT (2.5 MeV) was upgraded. In addition to the slit - harp measurement, we now can use a slit installed on the same actuator as the harp. In combination with a faraday cup located downstream in DTL part of the linac, it represents a classical slit-slit emittance measurement device. While a slit slit scan takes much longer, it is immune to harp related problems such as wire cross talk, and thus looks promising for accurate halo measurements. Time resolution of the new device seems to be sufficient to estimate the amount of beam in the chopper gap (the scanner is downstream of the chopper), and probably to measure its emittance. This paper describes the initial measurements with the new device and some model validation data.

  19. REDUCING BEAM COUPLING IMPEDANCES IN SNS RING EXTRACTION KICKERS.

    SciTech Connect

    KURENNOY,S.S.; DAVINO,D.; LEE,Y.Y.

    2001-06-18

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Accumulator ring extraction kickers [1] consists of 14 modules of windowframe ferrite pulsing magnets with the rise time of about 200 ns. Their contribution to the beam coupling impedances is a serious concern. The kicker impedances, as well as its deflecting magnetic field versus time, are studied using detailed 3-D MAFIA modeling. Various design options, external circuit resistances, and a range of ferrite permeabilities are explored. A kicker module with wide conductor windings around the ferrite behind the kicker current sheet suggests a significant reduction of the kicker transverse and longitudinal coupling impedances. This design provides a good extraction field performance, as demonstrated by electromagnetic simulations. Results of measurements for a small model are also presented.

  20. The RF power system for the SNS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-12-31

    The initial goal of the SNS project is to produce a 1 MW average beam of protons with short pulse lengths onto a neutron-producing target. The objective of the SNS RF system is to generate 117 MW peak of pulsed 805 MHz microwave power with an accelerated beam pulse length of 1.04 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The power system must be upgradeable in peak power to deliver 2 MW average power to the neutron target. The RF system also requires about 3 MW peak of RF power at 402.5 MHz, but that system is not discussed here. The design challenge is to produce an RF system at minimum cost, that is very reliable and economical to operate. The combination of long pulses and high repetition rates make conventional solutions, such as the pulse transformer and transmission line method, very expensive. The klystron, with a modulating anode, and 1.5 MW of peak output power is the baseline RF amplifier, an 56 are required in the baseline design. The authors discuss four power system configurations that are the candidates for the design. The baseline design is a floating-deck modulating anode system. A second power system being investigated is the fast-pulsed power supply, that can be turned on and off with a rise time of under 0.1 ms. This could eliminate the need for a modulator, and drastically reduce the energy storage requirements. A third idea is to use a pulse transformer with a series IGBT switch and a bouncer circuit on the primary side, as was done for the TESLA modulator. A fourth method is to use a series IGBT switch at high voltage, and not use a pulse transformer. The authors discuss the advantages and problems of these four types of power systems, but they emphasize the first two.

  1. Hexagonal Cu2SnS3 with metallic character: Another category of conducting sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Changzheng; Hu, Zhenpeng; Wang, Chengle; Sheng, Hua; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2007-10-01

    A hexagonal Cu2SnS3 with uniform and well-dispersed nanoparticle morphology has been synthesized, representing an example of hexagonal system in the Cu -Sn-E (S, Se) ternary chalcogenides. Both theoretical calculation and experimental results give the unique metallic character of Cu2SnS3, which is significantly different from the traditional opinion that I-IV-VI ternary chalcogenides were regarded previously as small or middle band-gap semiconductors. Also, M(I)2SnS3 (M =Ag, Au, Rb, and Cs) serial compounds are another potential family of conducting sulfides. The conducting Cu2SnS3 product with the interlayer space and tunnels in the crystal structures could be fascinatingly introduced to the lithium battery application.

  2. Electrical and optical properties of SnS2/WSe2 van der Waals Heterojunction FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, Ahmad; Nourbakhsh, Amirhasan; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomas

    Two dimensional crystals based on atomically thin films of transition metal dichalcogenides offer an exciting platform for various optoelectronic applications. Their unique crystal properties make them particularly attractive for van der Waals heterostructures which open up an additional degree of freedom to tailor the material properties into new physics and device applications. In this work, we explore, for the first time, the optoelectronic properties of van der Waals SnS2/WSe2 heterojunction. WSe2 is an ambipolar semiconductor while SnS2 is an n-type wide bandgap semiconductor. We use the pickup and dry transfer methods to fabricate SnS2/WSe2 heterojunction transistors (hetero-FETs). We observe negative differential transconductance in the SnS2/WSe2 hetero-FET. Also, the heterostructure couples strongly to incident light and shows high photovoltaic responsivity which can find applications in nano-devices such as photo-detectors and solar cells.

  3. Bifacial solar cell with SnS absorber by vapor transport deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wangperawong, Artit; Hsu, Po-Chun; Yee, Yesheng; Herron, Steven M.; Clemens, Bruce M.; Cui, Yi; Bent, Stacey F.

    2014-10-27

    The SnS absorber layer in solar cell devices was produced by vapor transport deposition (VTD), which is a low-cost manufacturing method for solar modules. The performance of solar cells consisting of Si/Mo/SnS/ZnO/indium tin oxide (ITO) was limited by the SnS layer's surface texture and field-dependent carrier collection. For improved performance, a fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate was used in place of the Mo to smooth the topography of the VTD SnS and to make bifacial solar cells, which are potentially useful for multijunction applications. A bifacial SnS solar cell consisting of glass/FTO/SnS/CdS/ZnO/ITO demonstrated front- and back-side power conversion efficiencies of 1.2% and 0.2%, respectively.

  4. Regulation of expression of the sensory neuron-specific sodium channel SNS in inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Okuse, K; Chaplan, S R; McMahon, S B; Luo, Z D; Calcutt, N A; Scott, B P; Akopian, A N; Wood, J N

    1997-01-01

    Increased voltage-gated sodium channel activity may contribute to the hyperexcitability of sensory neurons in inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. We examined the levels of the transcript encoding the tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel SNS in dorsal root ganglion neurons in a range of inflammatory and neuropathic pain models in the rat. Local Freund's adjuvant or systemic nerve growth factor-induced inflammation did not substantially alter the total levels of SNS mRNA. When NGF-treated adult rat DRG neurons in vitro were compared with NGF-depleted control neurons, SNS total mRNA levels and the levels of membrane-associated immunoreactive SNS showed a small increase (17 and 25%, respectively), while CGRP levels increased fourfold. SNS expression is thus little dependent on NGF even though SNS transcript levels dropped by more than 60% 7-14 days after axotomy. In the streptozotocin diabetic rat SNS levels fell 25%, while in several manipulations of the L5/6 tight nerve ligation rat neuropathic pain model, SNS levels fell 40-80% in rat strains that are either susceptible or relatively resistant to the development of allodynia. Increased expression of SNS mRNA is thus unlikely to underlie sensory neuron hyperexcitability associated with inflammation, while lowered SNS transcript levels are associated with peripheral nerve damage. PMID:9532581

  5. Performance of the H- Ion Source Supporting 1-MW Beam Operations at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Hardek, Thomas W; Kang, Yoon W; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F; Stockli, Martin P

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reached 1-MW of beam power in September 2009, and now routinely operates near 1-MW for the production of neutrons. This paper reviews the performance, operational issues, implemented and planned mitigations of the SNS H- ion source to support such high power-level beams with high availability. Some results from R&D activities are also briefly described.

  6. Performance of the H{sup -} Ion Source Supporting 1-MW Beam Operations at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Hardek, T.; Kang, Y.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.

    2011-09-26

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reached 1-MW of beam power in September 2009, and now routinely operates near 1-MW for the production of neutrons. This paper reviews the performance, operational issues, implemented and planned mitigations of the SNS H{sup -} ion source to support such high power-level beams with high availability. Some results from R and D activities are also briefly described.

  7. Funding Research in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: Summary of a Panel Discussion at the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Cherney, Alan R; Marin, Jennifer R; Brown, Jeremy; Anise, Ayodola; Krosnick, Steven; Henriksen, Kerm; Lewis, Roger J; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    As part of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization," a panel of representatives from the National Institute of Health's Office of Emergency Care Research, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute was assembled to discuss future opportunities for funding research in this particular area of interest. Representatives from these agencies and organizations discussed their missions and priorities and how they distribute funding. They also addressed questions on mechanisms for new and established researchers to secure future funding. PMID:26567519

  8. Funding Research in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: Summary of a Panel Discussion at the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Cherney, Alan R; Marin, Jennifer R; Brown, Jeremy; Anise, Ayodola; Krosnick, Steven; Henriksen, Kerm; Lewis, Roger J; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    As part of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization," a panel of representatives from the National Institute of Health's Office of Emergency Care Research, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute was assembled to discuss future opportunities for funding research in this particular area of interest. Representatives from these agencies and organizations discussed their missions and priorities and how they distribute funding. They also addressed questions on mechanisms for new and established researchers to secure future funding.

  9. NGF has opposing effects on Na+ channel III and SNS gene expression in spinal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Black, J A; Langworthy, K; Hinson, A W; Dib-Hajj, S D; Waxman, S G

    1997-07-01

    Following sciatic nerve transection, the expression of sodium channel III (alpha-III) transcripts increases and SNS (alpha-SNS) transcripts decreases in small (< 25 microns diameter) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which may reflect an interruption of retrograde transport of peripherally derived factor(s) involved in the regulation of these channels. To test the hypothesis that the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), which is abundant in peripheral targets, participates in the modulation of the expression of these sodium channel transcripts, we examined the hybridization signal of alpha-SNS and alpha-III mRNAs in small DRG neurons from adult rats that had been dissociated and maintained for 7 days in the absence or presence of exogenous NGF. Neurons maintained in control (no added NGF) cultures showed changes in alpha-III and alpha-SNS hybridization signal similar to those induced by axotomy, with increased alpha-III mRNA levels and decreased alpha-SNS mRNA levels, compared with those observed in small DRG neurons at 1 day in vitro. The addition of exogenous NGF to DRG cultures attenuated these alterations in transcript levels, decreasing alpha-III mRNA and increasing alpha-SNS mRNA expression. These results suggest that NGF participates in the regulation of membrane excitability in small DRG neurons by pathways that include opposing effects on different sodium channel genes. PMID:9243635

  10. Structural and transport studies on nanostructured SnS synthesized by solvothermal process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pratima; Paul, Gouri S.

    2009-03-01

    Nanostructured SnS has a lot of interest due to its potential application in optoelectronic devices such as solar absorber, near-infrared detector and as a holographic recording medium. SnS usually exhibits p-type conduction and reported to have a direct band gap of about 1.32-1.5 eV and an indirect band gap of 1-1.3 eV dependent of the condition of preparation. In this work we report structural and transport studies on nanostructured SnS synthesized by solvothermal process for different reaction time (RT). Structural and morphological analyses are carried out by XRD, SEM and TEM. It is observed that structure of the as-prepared SnS powder samples vary with RT. SAED patterns reveal that as synthesized SnS are single crystals. Transport measurements done on thin films prepared by Doctor's blade techniques show that films are thermally stable and uniform through out the surface. The conductivity of the SnS thin films is measured in coplanar geometry in the temperature range (303--463) K. The films show thermally activated conduction and the curves are identical for both heating and cooling cycle.

  11. Structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of Ce-doped SnS2 nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiruthigaa, G.; Manoharan, C.; Bououdina, M.; Ramalingam, S.; Raju, C.

    2015-06-01

    Novel Ce-doped SnS2 nanoflakes were synthesised by solid state reaction at low temperature and solvent-free. Structural, morphological and optical properties were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR, FT-Raman, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL) and UV-Vis spectra. XRD analysis confirms the formation of pure single hexagonal SnS2 phase with a preferred orientation along (011) direction and that the lattice volume varies depending on Ce doping level. Both Raman and FTIR analyses confirm the formation of single SnS2 phase. The estimated value of the optical bandgap energy (Eg), as obtained from UV-Vis analysis, varies with Ce doping concentration, associated with size effect, Ce3+ ions occupying Sn4+ sites as well the creation of vacancies within the crystal lattice. SEM and TEM observations reveal the formation of nanoflakes. It was found that Ce-doped SnS2 nanoflakes exhibit higher photocatalytic activity for degradation of reactive red 120 dye than that of un-doped SnS2. Due to their low toxicity, Ce-doped SnS2 nanoflakes showed great potential as photocatalysts.

  12. [The role of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in pain sensation studied on sns-knockout mice].

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Yamamoto, M; Maruyama, H

    2001-09-01

    Nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons express sensory neuron-specific tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel(SNS). The role of SNS in nociception has been studied by constructing sns-knockout mice. The sns-knockout mice expressed only TTX-sensitive sodium currents on step depolarizations from normal resting potentials, demonstrating that the slow TTX-resistant currents are mediated by the sns gene. The mutant mice were viable, fertile and apparently normal, although lowered thresholds of electrical activation of C-fibers and increased current densities of TTX-sensitive sodium channels demonstrated compensatory up-regulation of TTX-sensitive currents in DRG neurons. Behavioral studies demonstrated a pronounced analgesia to noxious mechanical stimuli, small deficits in noxious thermoreception and delayed development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. These data show that SNS is involved in pain sensation. PMID:11554037

  13. Effects of Na and secondary phases on physical properties of SnS thin film after sulfurization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Yu; Kodani, Yuto; Chantana, Jakapan; Minemoto, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    2.48%-efficient SnS thin film solar cell is obtained under thermal evaporation method by optimizing growth temperature. The method to fabricate SnS films is limited by growth temperature, which should not be over 200 °C to prevent re-evaporation of SnS. To further enhance SnS grains, SnS films were annealed in H2S gas from 200 to 500 °C, namely sulfurization process. SnS grain size was increased with sulfurization temperature of above 400 °C however, secondary phase grains on film’s surface were observed owing to the accumulated Na, diffused from soda-lime glass substrate into the film, thus deteriorating film’s quality, implied by Urbach energy.

  14. 78 FR 32612 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility... previously published Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment...

  15. SNS Collimating System Design — Performance and Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, N.; Ludewig, H.; Raparia, D.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Brodowski, J.; Murdoch, G.

    2003-12-01

    The collimating system in the accumulator ring and transfer lines of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project is responsible for stopping 0.1% of the 2 MW beam of 1.0 GeV protons that are in the beam halo. The collimating structures are a combination of movable beam scrapers and stationary absorbers. Specifically, pairs of charge-exchange foils or scrapers moving in-and-out of the beam in the vertical and horizontal directions help guide the halo protons into respective absorbers which consist of an intricate design of a double wall beam tube, a water-cooled particle bed and radial shielding. Off-momentum protons, with the help of respective charge exchange foils and a dipole magnet, are directed to a momentum dump consisting of a cooled particle bed downstream of a double-walled window separating it from the vacuum space. Addressed in this paper is the thermo-mechanical response and survivability of key components of the collimating system (such as the collimating beam tube in the absorbers, the beam windows and the primary element of the bean scraper structure) in the event of intercept of the full beam under accident conditions. While the potential for the full beam to be intercepted by these components is remote, still special attention will be paid in assessing the amount of full beam (or number of pulses) they can tolerate.

  16. Rotating Target Development for SNS Second Target Station

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, Thomas J; Rennich, Mark J; Crawford, Roy K; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Janney, Jim G

    2010-01-01

    A rotating target for the second target station (STS) at SNS has been identified as an option along with a mercury target. Evaluation of the rotating target alternative for STS has started at 1.5 MW which is considered an upper bound for the power. Previous preconceptual design work for a 3 MW rotating target is being modified for the lower power level. Transient thermal analysis for a total loss of active water cooling has been done for a simplified 2D model of the target and shielding monolith which shows that peak temperatures are well below the level at which tungsten vaporization by steam could exceed site boundary dose limits. Design analysis and integration configuration studies have been done for the target-moderator-reflector assembly which maximizes the number of neutron beam lines and provides for replacement of the target and moderators. Target building hot cell arrangement for this option will be described. An option for operation in rough vacuum without a proton beam window using Ferro fluid seals on a vertical shaft is being developed. A full scale prototypic drive module based on the 3 MW preconceptual design has been fabricated and successfully tested with a shaft and mock up target supplied by the ESS-Bilbao team. Overall planning leading to decision between mercury and the rotating target in 2011 will be discussed

  17. METALLIZATION OF SNS RING INJECTION KICKER CERAMIC CHAMBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; TODD,R.J.

    2002-06-03

    Ceramic chambers will be used in the pulsed kicker magnets for the injection of H{sup -} into the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring, to avoid shielding of a fast-changing external magnetic field by metallic chamber walls and to reduce eddy current heating. The inner surfaces of the ceramic chambers will be coated with a conductive layer, possibly titanium (Ti) or copper (Cu) with a titanium nitride (TiN) overlayer, to reduce the beam coupling impedance, provide passage for beam image current and to reduce the secondary electron yields. This paper describes the development of sputtering method for the 0.83m long 16cm inner diameter (ID) ceramic chambers. Coatings of Ti, Cu and TiN with thickness up to 10 {micro}m were produced by means of DC magnetron sputtering. The difficulty of coating insulators was overcome with the introduction of an anode screen. Films with good adhesion, uniform longitudinal thickness, and conductivity were produced.

  18. Advanced Gate Drive for the SNS High Voltage Converter Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.A.; Anderson, D.E.; /Oak Ridge

    2009-05-07

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is developing a next generation H-bridge switch plate [1], a critical component of the SNS High Voltage Converter Modulator [2]. As part of that effort, a new IGBT gate driver has been developed. The drivers are an integral part of the switch plate, which are essential to ensuring fault-tolerant, high-performance operation of the modulator. The redesigned driver improves upon the existing gate drive in several ways. The new gate driver has improved fault detection and suppression capabilities; suppression of shoot-through and over-voltage conditions, monitoring of dI/dt and Vce(sat) for fast over-current detection and suppression, and redundant power isolation are some of the added features. In addition, triggering insertion delay is reduced by a factor of four compared to the existing driver. This paper details the design and performance of the new IGBT gate driver. A simplified schematic and description of the construction are included. The operation of the fast over-current detection circuits, active IGBT over-voltage protection circuit, shoot-through prevention circuitry, and control power isolation breakdown detection circuit are discussed.

  19. DOUBLE-WALL COLLIMATOR DESIGN OF THE SNS PROJECT.

    SciTech Connect

    SIMOS,N.; LUDEWIG,H.; CATALAN-LASHERAS,N.; CRIVELLO,S.

    2001-06-18

    The collimator absorber array of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project is responsible for stopping the 1.0 GeV protons that are in the halo of the beam. It is estimated that 0.1% of the 2 MW beam will be intercepted by the adopted collimating scheme implemented at various sections of the beam transport and accumulation. This paper summarizes the conceptual design of the collimator absorber as well as the supporting detailed analysis that were performed and guided the design process. Key requirement in the design process is the need for the collimator beam tube to minimize beam impedance while closely following its beta function. Due to lack of available experimental data, the long-term behavior of irradiated materials in an environment where they interface with coolant flow becomes an issue. Uncertainties in the long-term behavior prompted a special double-wall design that will enable not only beam halo interception but also the efficient transfer of deposited energy both under normal and off-normal conditions to the coolant flow. The thermo-mechanical response of the double wall beam tube and of a particle bed surrounding it are discussed in detail in the paper.

  20. Beam Position-Phase Monitors for SNS Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    Electromagnetic modeling with MAFIA of the combined beam position-phase monitors (BPPMs) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac has been performed. Time-domain 3-D simulations are used to compute the signal amplitudes and phases on the BPPM electrodes for a given processing frequency, 402.5 MHz or 805 MHz, as functions of the beam transverse position. Working with a summed signal from all the BPPM electrodes provides a good way to measure accurately the beam phase. While for an off-axis beam the signal phases on the individual electrodes can differ from those for a centered beam by a few degrees, the phase of the summed signal is found to be independent of the beam transverse position inside the device. Based on the analysis results, an optimal BPPM design with 4 one-end-shorted 60-degree electrodes has been chosen. It provides a good linearity and sufficient signal power for both position and phase measurements, while satisfying the linac geometrical constrains and mechanical requirements.

  1. A LARGE APERTURE NARROW QUADROUPOLE FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    TSOUPAS,N.; BRODOWSKI,J.; MENG,W.; WEI,J.; LEE,Y.Y.; TUOZZOLO,J.

    2002-06-03

    The accumulator ring of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is designed to accept high-intensity H{sup -} beam of 1 GeV kinetic energy from the injecting LINAC, and to accumulate, in a time interval of 1 msec, 2 x 10{sup 14} protons in a single bunch of 700 nsec. In order to optimize the effective straight-section spaces for beam-injection, extraction and collimation, we have minimized the width of the large aperture quadrupoles which are located in the same straight sections of the accumulator ring with the injection and extraction systems. By minimizing the width of the quadrupoles to {+-}40.4 cm, the beam-injection and extraction angles are lowered to 8.75{sup o} and 16.8{sup o} respectively. Further optimization of the narrow quadrupole, minimizes the strength of the dodecapole multipole component of the quadrupole, thus reducing the width of the 12pole structure resonance and allowing a larger tune space for stability of the circulating beam. In this paper we present results derived from magnetic field calculations of 2D and 3D modeling, and discuss the method of optimizing the size of the quadrupole and minimizing its dodecapole multipole component.

  2. RF Beam Position Monitor for the SNS Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Kurt; Cameron, Peter; Dawson, Craig; Degen, Chris; Kesselman, Martin; Mead, Joseph

    2004-11-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source Ring accumulates 1060 pulses of 38-mA peak current 1-GeV H-minus particles from the Linac through the HEBT line, then delivers this accumulated beam in a single pulse to a mercury target via the RTBT line. The dynamic range over the course of the accumulation cycle is 60 dB. As a result of particle energy distribution the 402.5-MHz RF bunching frequency quickly de-coheres during the first few turns. In order to measure first-turn position a dual-mode BPM has been designed to process 402.5-MHz signal energy during the first few turns then switch to a Baseband mode to process de-cohered energy in the low MHz region. The design has been implemented as a dual mother/daughter board PCI architecture. Both Baseband and RF calibration are included on the RF BPM board. A prototype system has been installed in the SNS Linac.

  3. Bilayer SnS2: Tunable stacking sequence by charging and loading pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacaksiz, C.; Cahangirov, S.; Rubio, A.; Senger, R. T.; Peeters, F. M.; Sahin, H.

    2016-03-01

    Employing density functional theory-based methods, we investigate monolayer and bilayer structures of hexagonal SnS2, which is a recently synthesized monolayer metal dichalcogenide. Comparison of the 1 H and 1 T phases of monolayer SnS2 confirms the ground state to be the 1 T phase. In its bilayer structure we examine different stacking configurations of the two layers. It is found that the interlayer coupling in bilayer SnS2 is weaker than that of typical transition-metal dichalcogenides so that alternative stacking orders have similar structural parameters and they are separated with low energy barriers. A possible signature of the stacking order in the SnS2 bilayer has been sought in the calculated absorbance and reflectivity spectra. We also study the effects of the external electric field, charging, and loading pressure on the characteristic properties of bilayer SnS2. It is found that (i) the electric field increases the coupling between the layers at its preferred stacking order, so the barrier height increases, (ii) the bang gap value can be tuned by the external E field and under sufficient E field, the bilayer SnS2 can become a semimetal, (iii) the most favorable stacking order can be switched by charging, and (iv) a loading pressure exceeding 3 GPa changes the stacking order. The E-field tunable band gap and easily tunable stacking sequence of SnS2 layers make this 2D crystal structure a good candidate for field effect transistor and nanoscale lubricant applications.

  4. Analysis of SnS2 hyperdoped with V proposed as efficient absorber material.

    PubMed

    Seminovski, Yohanna; Palacios, Pablo; Wahnón, Perla

    2014-10-01

    Intermediate-band materials can improve the photovoltaic efficiency of solar cells through the absorption of two subband-gap photons that allow extra electron-hole pair formations. Previous theoretical and experimental findings support the proposal that the layered SnS2 compound, with a band-gap of around 2 eV, is a candidate for an intermediate-band material when it is doped with a specific transition-metal. In this work we characterize vanadium doped SnS2 using density functional theory at the dilution level experimentally found and including a dispersion correction combined with the site-occupancy-disorder method. In order to analyze the electronic characteristics that depend on geometry, two SnS2 polytypes partially substituted with vanadium in symmetry-adapted non-equivalent configurations were studied. In addition the magnetic configurations of vanadium in a SnS2 2H-polytype and its comparison with a 4H-polytype were also characterized. We demonstrate that a narrow intermediate-band is formed, when these dopant atoms are located in different layers. Our theoretical predictions confirm the recent experimental findings in which a paramagnetic intermediate-band material in a SnS2 2H-polytype with 10% vanadium concentration is obtained. PMID:25204457

  5. The SNS/HFIR Web Portal System for SANS

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Stuart I; Miller, Stephen D; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Reuter, Michael A; Peterson, Peter F; Kohl, James Arthur; Trater, James R; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Lynch, Vickie E

    2010-01-01

    In a busy world, continuing with the status-quo, to do things the way we are already familiar, often seems to be the most efficient way to conduct our work. We look for the value-add to decide if investing in a new method is worth the effort. How shall we evaluate if we have reached this tipping point for change? For contemporary researchers, understanding the properties of the data is a good starting point. The new generation of neutron scattering instruments being built are higher resolution and produce one or more orders of magnitude larger data than the previous generation of instruments. For instance, we have grown out of being able to perform some important tasks with our laptops the data are too big and the computations would simply take too long. These large datasets can be problematic as facility users now begin to grapple with many of the same issues faced by more established computing communities. These issues include data access, management, and movement, data format standards, distributed computing, and collaboration among others. The Neutron Science Portal has been architected, designed, and implemented to provide users with an easy-to-use interface for managing and processing data, while also keeping an eye on meeting modern cybersecurity requirements imposed on institutions. The cost of entry for users has been lowered by utilizing a web interface providing access to backend portal resources. Users can browse or search for data which they are allowed to see, data reduction applications can be run without having to load the software, sample activation calculations can be performed for SNS and HFIR beamlines, McStas simulations can be run on TeraGrid and ORNL computers, and advanced analysis applications such as those being produced by the DANSE project can be run. Behind the scenes is a live cataloging system which automatically catalogs and archives experiment data via the data management system, and provides proposal team members access to their

  6. Diagnostic Testing Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, David L.

    This paper presents an explanation of the program design of the three separate Pascal-language programs which comprise UCLA's Diagnostic Testing Package "DX." The three parts of the DX test package are three closely interrelated programs--Editest, Runtest, and Summary. Editest serves the following functions: (1) the creation of a suitable…

  7. Beam Loss due to Foil Scattering in the SNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the contribution of scattering from the primary stripper foil to losses in the SNS ring, we have carried out calculations using the ORBIT Code aimed at evaluating these losses. These calculations indicate that the probability of beam loss within one turn following a foil hit is ~1.8 10-8 , where is the foil thickness in g/cm2, assuming a carbon foil. Thus, for a typical SNS stripper foil of thickness = 390 g/cm2, the probability of loss within one turn of a foil hit is ~7.0 10-6. This note describes the calculations used to arrive at this result, presents the distribution of these losses around the SNS ring, and compares the calculated results with observed ring losses for a well-tuned production beam.

  8. Structural stability and electronic properties of low-index surfaces of SnS

    SciTech Connect

    Tritsaris, Georgios A.; Malone, Brad D.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-05-07

    Thin film photovoltaic cells are increasingly important for cost-effective solar energy harvesting. Layered SnS is a promising absorber material due to its high optical absorption in the visible and good doping characteristics. We use first-principles calculations based on density functional theory to study structures of low-index surfaces of SnS using stoichiometric and oxygen-containing structural models, in order to elucidate their possible effect on the efficiency of the photovoltaic device. We find that the surface energy is minimized for the surface with orientation parallel to the layer stacking direction. Compared to stoichiometric surfaces, the oxygen-containing surfaces exhibit fewer electronic states near the band gap. This reduction of near-gap surface states by oxygen should reduce recombination losses at grain boundaries and interfaces of the SnS absorber, and should be beneficial to the efficiency of the solar cell.

  9. Catalytically solid-phase self-organization of nanoporous SnS with optical depolarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Wu, Chung-Lun; Lin, Chun-Jung; Tsai, Ling-Hsuan; Chang, Jung-Hung; Chen, Mu Ku; Shih, Min-Hsiung; Lee, Chao-Kuei; Wu, Chih-I.; Tsai, Din Ping; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2016-02-01

    The catalytic solid-phase synthesis of self-organized nanoporous tin sulfide (SnS) with enhanced absorption, manipulative transmittance and depolarization features is demonstrated. Using an ultralow radio-frequency (RF) sputtering power, the variation of the orientation angle between the anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane and the axis of the sputtered ion beam detunes the catalytically synthesized SnS from nanorod to nanoporous morphology, along the sidewall of the AAO membrane. The ultraslow catalytic sputtering synthesis on the AAO at the RF plasma power of 20 W and the orientation angle of 0° regulates the porosity and integrality of nanoporous SnS, with average pore diameter of 80-150 nm. When transferring from planar to nanoporous structure, the phase composition changes from SnS to SnS2-Sn2S3, and the optical bandgap shrinks from 1.43 to 1.16 eV, due to the preferred crystalline orientation, which also contributes to an ultralow reflectance of <1% at 200-500 nm when both the transmittance and the surface scattering remain at their maxima. The absorption coefficient is enhanced by nearly one order of magnitude with its minimum of >5 × 104 cm-1 at the wavelength between 200 and 700 nm, due to the red-shifting of the absorption spectrum to at least 100 nm. The catalytically self-organized nanoporous SnS causes strong haze and beam divergence of 20°-30° by depolarized nonlinear scattering at the surface, which favors the solar energy conversion with reduced surface reflection and enhanced photon scattering under preserved transmittance.

  10. Mining Archived HYSPEC User Data to Analyze the Prompt Pulse at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Michael B.; Iverson, Erik B.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Winn, Barry L.

    2015-10-01

    The Hybrid-Spectrometer (HYSPEC) is one of 17 instruments currently operated at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL). The secondary spectrometer of this instrument is located inside an out-building off the north side of the SNS instrument hall. HYSPEC has experienced a larger background feature than similar inelastic instruments since its commissioning in 2011. This background feature is caused by a phenomenon known as the “prompt pulse” which is an essential part of neutron production in a pulsed spallation source but comes with unfortunate side effects.

  11. Carbon dots decorated vertical SnS2 nanosheets for efficient photocatalytic oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhongzhou; Wang, Fengmei; Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Liu, Kaili; Huang, Yun; Liu, Quanlin; Jiang, Chao; He, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Metal sulfides are highly desirable materials for photocatalytic water splitting because of their appropriate energy bands. However, the poor stability under light illumination in water hinders their wide applications. Here, two-dimensional SnS2 nanosheets, along with carbon dots of the size around 10 nm, are uniformly grown on fluorine doped tin oxide glasses with a layer of nickel nanoparticles. Significantly, strong light absorption and enhanced photocurrent density are achieved after integration of SnS2 nanosheets with carbon dots. Notably, the rate of oxygen evolution reached up to 1.1 mmol g-1 h-1 under simulated sunlight irradiation featuring a good stability.

  12. alpha-SNS produces the slow TTX-resistant sodium current in large cutaneous afferent DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Renganathan, M; Cummins, T R; Hormuzdiar, W N; Waxman, S G

    2000-08-01

    In this study, we used sensory neuron specific (SNS) sodium channel gene knockout (-/-) mice to ask whether SNS sodium channel produces the slow Na(+) current ("slow") in large (>40 microm diam) cutaneous afferent dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. SNS wild-type (+/+) mice were used as controls. Retrograde Fluoro-Gold labeling permitted the definitive identification of cutaneous afferent neurons. Prepulse inactivation was used to separate the fast and slow Na(+) currents. Fifty-two percent of the large cutaneous afferent neurons isolated from SNS (+/+) mice expressed only fast-inactivating Na(+) currents ("fast"), and 48% expressed both fast and slow Na(+) currents. The fast and slow current densities were 0.90 +/- 0.12 and 0.39 +/- 0.16 nA/pF, respectively. Fast Na(+) currents were blocked completely by 300 nM tetrodotoxin (TTX), while slow Na(+) currents were resistant to 300 nM TTX, confirming that the slow Na(+) currents observed in large cutaneous DRG neurons are TTX-resistant (TTX-R). Slow Na(+) currents could not be detected in large cutaneous afferent neurons from SNS (-/-) mice; these cells expressed only fast Na(+) current, and it was blocked by 300 nM TTX. The fast Na(+) current density in SNS (-/-) neurons was 1.47 +/- 0. 14 nA/pF, approximately 60% higher than the current density observed in SNS (+/+) mice (P < 0.02). A low-voltage-activated TTX-R Na(+) current ("persistent") observed in small C-type neurons is not present in large cutaneous afferent neurons from either SNS (+/+) or SNS (-/-) mice. These results show that the slow TTX-R Na(+) current in large cutaneous afferent DRG is produced by the SNS sodium channel. PMID:10938298

  13. Research on SNS and Education: The State of the Art and Its Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodríguez-Hoyos, Carlos; Haya Salmón, Ignacio; Fernández-Díaz, Elia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents, for further discussion, a review of the scientific literature produced internationally on the use of Social Network Sites (SNS) in different levels of education and settings. A total of 62 articles published in international scientific journals with peer review have been analysed. The main objective of this paper is to discuss…

  14. THE CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF THE SNS EXTERNAL ANTENNA H- ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Carmichael, Justin R; Desai, Nandishkumar J; Fuja, Raymond E; Goulding, Richard Howell; Han, Baoxi; Kang, Yoon W; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Potter, Kerry G; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility, currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. In order to insure that the SNS will meet operational commitments as well as provide for future facility upgrades with high reliability, we are developing an RF-driven, H- ion source based on a water-cooled, ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber. To date, early versions of this source has delivered up to 42 mA to the SNS Front End (FE) and unanalyzed beam currents up to ~ 100mA (60Hz, 1ms) to the ion source test stand. This source was operated on the SNS accelerator from February to April 2009 and produced ~35mA (beam current required by the ramp up plan) with availability of ~97%. During this run several ion source failures identified reliability issues which must be addressed before the source re-enters routine operation: plasma ignition, antenna lifetime, magnet cooling and cooling jacket integrity. This report discusses these issues, details proposed engineering solutions and notes progress to date.

  15. Uniform hierarchical SnS microspheres: Solvothermal synthesis and lithium ion storage performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhen Wang, Qin; Wang, Xiaoqing; Fan, Fan; Wang, Chenyan; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Uniform hierarchical SnS microspheres via solvothermal reaction. • The formation process was investigated in detail. • The obtained hierarchical SnS microspheres exhibit superior capacity (1650 mAh g{sup −1}) when used as lithium battery for the hierarchical microsphere structure. - Abstract: Hierarchical SnS microspheres have been successfully synthesized by a mild solvothermal process using poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as surfactant in this work. The morphology and composition of the microspheres were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The influence of reaction parameters, such as sulfur sources, reaction temperature and the concentration of PVP, on the final morphology of the products are investigated. On the basis of time-dependent experiments, the growth mechanism has also been proposed. The specific surface area of the 3D hierarchitectured SnS microspheres were investigated by using nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. Lithium ion storage performances of the synthesized materials as anodes for Lithium-ion battery were investigated in detail and it exhibits excellent electrochemical properties.

  16. Cross Space: The Exploration of SNS-Based Writing Activities in a Multimodal Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kwang-Soon; Kim, Bong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the positive learning effect of formulating English sentences via Social Network Service (SNS; "Kakao-Talk") on less proficient L2 university students' (LPSs') writing, when the application is utilized as a tool to link in and out-of class activities in a multimodal-learning environment. Its objective is also to…

  17. Electronic Structure and Defect Physics of Tin Sulfides: SnS, Sn2S3 , and Sn S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yu; Burton, Lee A.; Walsh, Aron; Oba, Fumiyasu

    2016-07-01

    The tin sulfides SnS, Sn2S3 , and Sn S2 are investigated for a wide variety of applications such as photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, two-dimensional electronic devices, Li ion battery electrodes, and photocatalysts. For these applications, native point defects play important roles, but only those of SnS have been investigated theoretically in the literature. In this study, we consider the band structures, band-edge positions, and thermodynamical stability of the tin sulfides using a density functional that accounts for van der Waals corrections and the G W0 approximation. We revisit the point-defect properties, namely, electronic and atomic structures and energetics of defects, in SnS and newly examine those in Sn S2 and Sn2S3 with a comparison to those in SnS. We find that Sn S2 shows contrasting defect properties to SnS: Undoped SnS shows p -type behavior, whereas Sn S2 shows n type, which are mainly attributed to the tin vacancies and tin interstitials, respectively. We also find that the defect features in Sn2S3 can be described as a combination of those in SnS and Sn S2 , intrinsically Sn2S3 showing n -type behavior. However, the conversion to p type can be attained by doping with a large monovalent cation, namely, potassium. The ambipolar dopability, coupled with the earth abundance of its constituents, indicates great potential for electronic applications, including photovoltaics.

  18. Nanostructured SnS with inherent anisotropic optical properties for high photoactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Malkeshkumar; Chavda, Arvind; Mukhopadhyay, Indrajit; Kim, Joondong; Ray, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    In view of the worldwide energy challenge in the 21st century, the technology of semiconductor-based photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting has received considerable attention as an alternative approach for solar energy harvesting and storage. Two-dimensional (2D) structures such as nanosheets have the potential to tap the solar energy by unlocking the functional properties at the nanoscale. Tin(ii) sulfide is a fascinating solar energy material due to its anisotropic material properties. In this manuscript, we report on exploiting the 2D structure modulated optical properties of nanocrystalline SnS thin film synthesized by chemical spray pyrolysis using ambient transport in the harvesting of solar energy. We obtained the nanostructured SnS with well-preserved dimensions and morphologies with one step processing. The work demonstrates that the intrinsically ordered SnS nanostructure on FTO coated glass can tap the incident radiation in an efficient manner. The structure-property relationship to explain the photo-response in nanocrystalline-SnS is verified experimentally and theoretically. The novel design scheme for antireflection coating along with the anisotropic properties of SnS is conceived for realizing a PEC cell. The developed PEC cell consists of a SnS photoanode which shows considerably high photocurrent density of 7 mA cm-2 with aqueous media under AM 1.5G, 100 mW cm-2 exposure with notably stable operation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that a non-ideal capacitive behavior as well as drift assisted transport across the solid-state interface is responsible for such a high photo-current density in the nanocrystalline-SnS photoanode.In view of the worldwide energy challenge in the 21st century, the technology of semiconductor-based photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting has received considerable attention as an alternative approach for solar energy harvesting and storage. Two-dimensional (2D) structures such as nanosheets have the

  19. Electrothermal thruster diagnostics. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zafran, S.; Jackson, B.

    1983-01-01

    A flight-qualified electrothermal thruster demonstrated its adaptability to a variety of propellants. Originally qualified for operation with hydrazine propellant, it was operated with nitrogen, hydrogen, and ammonia propellants, demonstrating 73, 61, and 52 percent overall efficiency with these propellants, respectively, when tested over a wide range of operating conditions. By introducing a preheater to admit hot, rather than cold, propellant inlet gases to the thruster's augmentation heat exchanger, delivered specific impulse closer to theoretical performance limits should be achieved.

  20. Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three articles relevant to school crisis response: (1) "Factors Contributing to Posttraumatic Growth," summarized by Steve DeBlois; (2) "Psychological Debriefing in Cross-Cultural Contexts" (Stacey Rice); and (3) "Brain Abnormalities in PTSD" (Sunny Windingstad). The first summary reports the findings of a…

  1. Making Record-efficiency SnS Solar Cells by Thermal Evaporation and Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Rafael; Steinmann, Vera; Yang, Chuanxi; Hartman, Katy; Chakraborty, Rupak; Poindexter, Jeremy R; Castillo, Mariela Lizet; Gordon, Roy; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-05-22

    Tin sulfide (SnS) is a candidate absorber material for Earth-abundant, non-toxic solar cells. SnS offers easy phase control and rapid growth by congruent thermal evaporation, and it absorbs visible light strongly. However, for a long time the record power conversion efficiency of SnS solar cells remained below 2%. Recently we demonstrated new certified record efficiencies of 4.36% using SnS deposited by atomic layer deposition, and 3.88% using thermal evaporation. Here the fabrication procedure for these record solar cells is described, and the statistical distribution of the fabrication process is reported. The standard deviation of efficiency measured on a single substrate is typically over 0.5%. All steps including substrate selection and cleaning, Mo sputtering for the rear contact (cathode), SnS deposition, annealing, surface passivation, Zn(O,S) buffer layer selection and deposition, transparent conductor (anode) deposition, and metallization are described. On each substrate we fabricate 11 individual devices, each with active area 0.25 cm(2). Further, a system for high throughput measurements of current-voltage curves under simulated solar light, and external quantum efficiency measurement with variable light bias is described. With this system we are able to measure full data sets on all 11 devices in an automated manner and in minimal time. These results illustrate the value of studying large sample sets, rather than focusing narrowly on the highest performing devices. Large data sets help us to distinguish and remedy individual loss mechanisms affecting our devices.

  2. Making Record-efficiency SnS Solar Cells by Thermal Evaporation and Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Rafael; Steinmann, Vera; Yang, Chuanxi; Hartman, Katy; Chakraborty, Rupak; Poindexter, Jeremy R; Castillo, Mariela Lizet; Gordon, Roy; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-01-01

    Tin sulfide (SnS) is a candidate absorber material for Earth-abundant, non-toxic solar cells. SnS offers easy phase control and rapid growth by congruent thermal evaporation, and it absorbs visible light strongly. However, for a long time the record power conversion efficiency of SnS solar cells remained below 2%. Recently we demonstrated new certified record efficiencies of 4.36% using SnS deposited by atomic layer deposition, and 3.88% using thermal evaporation. Here the fabrication procedure for these record solar cells is described, and the statistical distribution of the fabrication process is reported. The standard deviation of efficiency measured on a single substrate is typically over 0.5%. All steps including substrate selection and cleaning, Mo sputtering for the rear contact (cathode), SnS deposition, annealing, surface passivation, Zn(O,S) buffer layer selection and deposition, transparent conductor (anode) deposition, and metallization are described. On each substrate we fabricate 11 individual devices, each with active area 0.25 cm(2). Further, a system for high throughput measurements of current-voltage curves under simulated solar light, and external quantum efficiency measurement with variable light bias is described. With this system we are able to measure full data sets on all 11 devices in an automated manner and in minimal time. These results illustrate the value of studying large sample sets, rather than focusing narrowly on the highest performing devices. Large data sets help us to distinguish and remedy individual loss mechanisms affecting our devices. PMID:26067454

  3. Nanostructured SnS with inherent anisotropic optical properties for high photoactivity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Malkeshkumar; Chavda, Arvind; Mukhopadhyay, Indrajit; Kim, Joondong; Ray, Abhijit

    2016-01-28

    In view of the worldwide energy challenge in the 21(st) century, the technology of semiconductor-based photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting has received considerable attention as an alternative approach for solar energy harvesting and storage. Two-dimensional (2D) structures such as nanosheets have the potential to tap the solar energy by unlocking the functional properties at the nanoscale. Tin(ii) sulfide is a fascinating solar energy material due to its anisotropic material properties. In this manuscript, we report on exploiting the 2D structure modulated optical properties of nanocrystalline SnS thin film synthesized by chemical spray pyrolysis using ambient transport in the harvesting of solar energy. We obtained the nanostructured SnS with well-preserved dimensions and morphologies with one step processing. The work demonstrates that the intrinsically ordered SnS nanostructure on FTO coated glass can tap the incident radiation in an efficient manner. The structure-property relationship to explain the photo-response in nanocrystalline-SnS is verified experimentally and theoretically. The novel design scheme for antireflection coating along with the anisotropic properties of SnS is conceived for realizing a PEC cell. The developed PEC cell consists of a SnS photoanode which shows considerably high photocurrent density of 7 mA cm(-2) with aqueous media under AM 1.5G, 100 mW cm(-2) exposure with notably stable operation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that a non-ideal capacitive behavior as well as drift assisted transport across the solid-state interface is responsible for such a high photo-current density in the nanocrystalline-SnS photoanode. PMID:26745636

  4. Combinatorial development of Cu2SnS3 as an earth abundant photovoltaic absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Lauryn L.

    The development of high efficiency, earth abundant photovoltaic absorbers is critical if photovoltaics are to be implemented on the TW scale. Although traditional thin films absorbers such as Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and CdTe have achieved over 20% device efficiencies, the ultimately scalability of these devices may be limited by elemental scarcity and toxicity issues. To date, the most successful earth abundant thin film absorber is Cu2ZnSn(S,Se) 4, which has achieved 12.6% efficiency as of 2014. However, chemical complexity and disorder issues with this material have made the path to higher efficiency CZTSSe devices unclear. As a result, many researchers are now exploring alternative earth abundant absorber materials. In this thesis, we apply our "rapid development" methodology to the exploration of alternative photovoltaic absorbers. The rapid development (RD) methodology, consisting of exploration, research, and development stages, uses complementary theory and experiment to assess candidate materials and down-select in each stage. The overall result is that, in the time span of ~2-3 years, we are able to rapidly go from tens of possible absorber materials to 1-2 working PV device prototypes. Here, we demonstrate the RD approach as applied to the Cu-Sn-S system. We begin our investigation of the Cu-Sn-S system by evaluating the thermodynamic stability, electrical transport, electronic structure, and optical and defect properties of candidate materials using complementary theory and experiment. We find that Cu2SnS3 is the most promising absorber candidate because of its strong optical absorption, tunable doping, and wide stability range. Our other candidate compounds suffer from serious flaws that preclude them from being successful photovoltaic absorbers, including too high experimental conductivity (Cu4SnS4), or poor hole transport and low absorption coefficient (Cu4Sn7S16). Next, we investigate the doping and defect physics of Cu2SnS 3. We identify the origins of the

  5. Combinatorial development of Cu2SnS3 as an earth abundant photovoltaic absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Lauryn L.

    The development of high efficiency, earth abundant photovoltaic absorbers is critical if photovoltaics are to be implemented on the TW scale. Although traditional thin films absorbers such as Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and CdTe have achieved over 20% device efficiencies, the ultimately scalability of these devices may be limited by elemental scarcity and toxicity issues. To date, the most successful earth abundant thin film absorber is Cu2ZnSn(S,Se) 4, which has achieved 12.6% efficiency as of 2014. However, chemical complexity and disorder issues with this material have made the path to higher efficiency CZTSSe devices unclear. As a result, many researchers are now exploring alternative earth abundant absorber materials. In this thesis, we apply our "rapid development" methodology to the exploration of alternative photovoltaic absorbers. The rapid development (RD) methodology, consisting of exploration, research, and development stages, uses complementary theory and experiment to assess candidate materials and down-select in each stage. The overall result is that, in the time span of ~2-3 years, we are able to rapidly go from tens of possible absorber materials to 1-2 working PV device prototypes. Here, we demonstrate the RD approach as applied to the Cu-Sn-S system. We begin our investigation of the Cu-Sn-S system by evaluating the thermodynamic stability, electrical transport, electronic structure, and optical and defect properties of candidate materials using complementary theory and experiment. We find that Cu2SnS3 is the most promising absorber candidate because of its strong optical absorption, tunable doping, and wide stability range. Our other candidate compounds suffer from serious flaws that preclude them from being successful photovoltaic absorbers, including too high experimental conductivity (Cu4SnS4), or poor hole transport and low absorption coefficient (Cu4Sn7S16). Next, we investigate the doping and defect physics of Cu2SnS 3. We identify the origins of the

  6. Simultaneous tunability of the electronic and phononic gaps in SnS2 under normal compressive strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Babu; Manjanath, Aaditya; Singh, Abhishek K.

    2016-03-01

    Controlled variation of the electronic properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials by applying strain has emerged as a promising way to design materials for customized applications. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that while the electronic structure and indirect band gap of SnS2 do not change significantly with the number of layers, they can be reversibly tuned by applying biaxial tensile (BT), biaxial compressive (BC), and normal compressive (NC) strains. Mono to multilayered SnS2 exhibit a reversible semiconductor to metal (S-M) transition with applied strain. For bilayer (2L) SnS2, the S-M transition occurs at the strain values of 17%, -26%, and -24% under BT, BC, and NC strains, respectively. Due to weaker interlayer coupling, the critical strain value required to achieve the S-M transition in SnS2 under NC strain is much higher than for MoS2. From a stability viewpoint, SnS2 becomes unstable at very low strain values on applying BC (-6.5%) and BT strains (4.9%), while it is stable even up to the transition point (-24%) in the case of NC strain. In addition to the reversible tuning of the electronic properties of SnS2, we also show tunability in the phononic band gap of SnS2, which increases with applied NC strain. This gap increases three times faster than for MoS2. This simultaneous tunability of SnS2 at the electronic and phononic levels with strain, makes it a potential candidate in field effect transistors (FETs) and sensors as well as frequency filter applications.

  7. Fast Monte Carlo simulation of a dispersive sample on the SEQUOIA spectrometer at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Granroth, Garrett E; Chen, Meili; Kohl, James Arthur; Hagen, Mark E; Cobb, John W

    2007-01-01

    Simulation of an inelastic scattering experiment, with a sample and a large pixilated detector, usually requires days of time because of finite processor speeds. We report simulations on an SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) instrument, SEQUOIA, that reduce the time to less than 2 hours by using parallelization and the resources of the TeraGrid. SEQUOIA is a fine resolution (∆E/Ei ~ 1%) chopper spectrometer under construction at the SNS. It utilizes incident energies from Ei = 20 meV to 2 eV and will have ~ 144,000 detector pixels covering 1.6 Sr of solid angle. The full spectrometer, including a 1-D dispersive sample, has been simulated using the Monte Carlo package McStas. This paper summarizes the method of parallelization for and results from these simulations. In addition, limitations of and proposed improvements to current analysis software will be discussed.

  8. N-type conduction in SnS by anion substitution with Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Hiroshi; Iguchi, Yuki; Sugiyama, Taiki; Kamiya, Toshio; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Relatively nontoxic, earth-abundant Cl was incorporated into n-type SnS as a dopant. The existence of impurity phases was carefully identified in Sn(S1‑ x ‑ y Cl x )-dense ceramics. The highest electron mobility (8.3 cm2 V‑1 s‑1) in n-type conduction was achieved in samples with x ≥ 0.005. Cl concentration is critical for conduction-type conversion, whereas carrier density and electron mobility are determined by sulfur-site deficiency. Carrier transport is explained by grain boundary potential barrier scattering in undoped p-type samples and by ionized impurity scattering in Cl-doped n-type samples.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Support of the SNS Liquid Mercury Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.

    1999-11-14

    Experimental and computational thermal-hydraulic research is underway to support the liquid mercury target design for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility. The SNS target will be subjected to internal nuclear heat generation that results from pulsed proton beam collisions with the mercury nuclei. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots and diminished heat removal from the target structure. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are being used as a part of this research. Recent improvements to the 3D target model include the addition of the flow adapter which joins the inlet/outlet coolant pipes to the target body and an updated heat load distribution at the new baseline proton beam power level of 2 MW. Two thermal-hydraulic experiments are planned to validate the CFD model.

  10. Edge effects in the magnetic interference pattern of a ballistic SNS junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Hendrik; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.; Glazman, Leonid I.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the Josephson critical current Ic(Φ ) of a wide superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) junction as a function of the magnetic flux Φ threading it. Electronic trajectories reflected from the side edges alter the function Ic(Φ ) as compared to the conventional Fraunhofer-type dependence. At weak magnetic fields, B ≲Φ0/d2 , the edge effect lifts zeros in Ic(Φ ) and gradually shifts the minima of that function toward half-integer multiples of the flux quantum. At B >Φ0/d2 , the edge effect leads to an accelerated decay of the critical current Ic(Φ ) with increasing Φ . At larger fields, eventually, the system is expected to cross into a regime of "classical" mesoscopic fluctuations that is specific for wide ballistic SNS junctions with rough edges.

  11. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE SNS RING VACUUM INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH,H.C.; SMART,L.A.; TANG,J.Y.

    2001-06-18

    BNL is undertaking the design, construction and commissioning of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring and the beam transport lines [l]. Ultrahigh vacuum of 10{sup {minus}9} Torr is required in the accumulator ring to minimize beam-gas ionization, a contributing factor to the e-p instability observed in a few high-intensity proton storage rings. All vacuum instrumentation must be capable of local and remote operation to achieve a reliable vacuum system, especially in this extremely high intensity accelerator. The design and development of the SNS ring vacuum instrumentation and control through the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) distributed real-time software tools are presented.

  12. Background Neutron Studies for Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering Measurements at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane; Coherent Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The COHERENT collaboration has proposed to measure coherent, elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CE νNS) cross sections on several nuclear targets using neutrinos produced at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The largest background of concern arises from beam-induced, fast neutrons that can mimic a nuclear recoil signal event in the detector. Multiple technologies of neutron detection have been employed at prospective experiment sites at the SNS. Analysis of these data have produced a consistent picture of the backgrounds expected for a CE νNS measurement. These background studies show that at suitable locations, the fast neutrons of concern arrive mainly in the prompt 1.3 μs window and the neutrons in the delayed window are primarily of lower energies that are relatively easier to shield.

  13. RAMPING UP THE SNS BEAM CURRENT WITH THE LBNL BASELINE H- SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Newland, Denny J; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Over the last two years the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has ramped up the repetition rate, pulse length, and the beam current to reach 540 kW, which has challenged many subsystems including the H- source designed and built by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This paper discusses the major modifications of the H- source implemented to consistently and routinely output the beam current required by the SNS beam power ramp up plan. At this time, 32 mA LINAC beam current are routinely produced, which meets the requirement for 690 kW planned for end of 2008. In June 2008, a 14-day production run used 37 mA, which is close to the 38 mA required for 1.44 MW. A medium energy beam transport (MEBT) beam current of 46 mA was demonstrated on September 2, 2008.

  14. CONSTRUCTION AND POWER TEST OF THE EXTRACTION KICKER MAGNET FOR SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    PAI, C.; HAHN, H.; HSEUH, H.; LEE, Y.; MENG, W.; MI,J.; SANDBERG, J.; TODD, R.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Two extraction kicker magnet assemblies that contain seven individual pulsed magnet modules each will kick the proton beam vertically out of the SNS accumulator ring into the aperture of the extraction Lambertson septum magnet. The proton beam then travels to the 1.4 MW SNS target assembly. The 14 kicker magnets and major components of the kicker assembly have been fabricated in BNL. The inner surfaces of the kicker magnets were coated with TiN to reduce the secondary electron yield. All 14 PFN power supplies have been built, tested and delivered to OWL. Before final installation, a partial assembly of the kicker system with three kicker magnets was assembled to test the functions of each critical component in the system. In this paper we report the progress of the construction of the kicker components, the TIN coating of the magnets, the installation procedure of the magnets and the full power test of the kicker with the PFN power supply.

  15. Design, construction, and initial operation of the SNS MEBT chopper system

    SciTech Connect

    Hardekopf, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    The chopper system for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) provides a gap in the beans for clean extraction from the accumulator ring. It consists of a pre-chopper in the low-energy bean transport (LEBT) and a faster chopper in the medium-energy beam transport (MEBT). We report here on the final design, fabrication, installation, and first beans tests of the MEBT chopper. The traveling-wave deflector is a meander-line design that matches the propagation of the deflecting pulse with the velocity of the beam at 2.5 MeV, after the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) acceleration stage. The pulses uses a series of fast-risetime MOSFET transistors to generate the deflecting pulses of +- 2.5 kV with rise and fall times of 10 ns. We describe the design and fabrication of the meander line and pulsers and report on the first operation during initial beam tests at SNS.

  16. (abstract) All Epitaxial Edge-geometry SNS Devices with Doped PBCO and YBCO Normal Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barner, J. B.; Hunt, B. D.; Foote, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    We will present our results on tapered-edge-geometry SNS weak link fabricated from c-axis oriented base-, counterelectrode and normal layers using a variety of processing conditions. To date, we have employed a variety of different normal materials (Co-doped YBCO, Y-doped PBCO, Ca-doped PBCO). We have been examining the junction fabrication process in detail and we will present our methods. In particular, we have been examining both epitaxial and non-epitaxial milling mask overlayers and we will present a comparison of both methods. These devices behave similar to the expectations of the resisively shunted junction model and conventional SNS proximity effect models but with some differences which will be discussed. We will present the detailed systematics of our junctions including device parameters versus temperature, rf and dc magnetic response for the various processing conditions.

  17. (abstract) Epitaxial High-T(sub c) SNS Weak Links on Silicon-on-Sapphire Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, B. D.; Barner, J. B.; Foote, M. C.; Vasquez, R. P.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Phillips, T. G.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    1994-01-01

    High-T(sub c) SNS weak links are expected to prove useful as high frequency sources and detectors. Recent studies with low-T(sub c) Josephson mixers using shunted tunnel junctions at 100 GHz show good initial performance, and modeling suggests that these results should extrapolate to higher frequencies if larger I(sub c)R(sub n) products can be achieved. Progress on this work will be reported.

  18. Emittance studies of the SNS external-antenna H- ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R; Murray Jr, S N; Santana, Manuel; Long, Cary D

    2010-01-01

    A new Allison-type emittance scanner has been built to characterize the ion sources and low energy beam transport systems at SNS. In this work, the emittance characteristics of the H- beam produced with the external-antenna RF-driven ion source and transported through the 2-lens electrostatic LEBT are studied. The beam emittance dependence on beam intensity, extraction parameters, and the evolution of the emittance and twiss parameters over beam pulse duration are presented.

  19. STUDY OF LONGITUDINAL INJECTION/STACKING IN THE SNS ACUMMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE-WANG,J.

    1999-03-29

    Various longitudinal distributions, resulting from the specific injection and stacking methods, are considered to minimize longitudinal and transverse instabilities and particle losses in SNS accumulator ring. The longitudinal phase space paintings by linac energy ramping, increased linac energy spread and the use of a random phase RF debunching cavity are reported. Bunch lengthening and beam in gap rate as functions of injection energy spread, RF voltage and injection energy error is summarized. Finally, the energy error tolerance is concluded.

  20. SNS target tests at the LANSCE-WNR in 2001 Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemer, B. W.; Haines, J. R.; Hunn, J. D.; Lousteau, D. C.; McManamy, T. J.; Tsai, C. C.

    2003-05-01

    Testing of mercury filled targets in an 800 MeV proton beam was conducted at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center-Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE-WNR) facility on two occasions in 2001. The objective for the first test campaign was to investigate if target vessel cavitation damage could occur under transient pressure conditions much like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) target. Such an investigation was inspired after mechanical tests conducted by a Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI/KEK) team revealed cavitation pitting in a mercury container having comparable pressure wave intensity. The first WNR test confirmed cavitation damage with 200 proton pulses on each of two test targets. As a result, concerns arose that the lifetime of the SNS target could be seriously limited. A second test campaign was then prepared and conducted to investigate if alternate target materials or geometries could reduce or eliminate the damage. Tested materials included Stellite, Nitronic-60 as well as 316LN stainless steel (the baseline SNS target material) that was cold worked and surface hardened. Theories that the original test target geometry caused the damage were checked with tests using thick beam windows and a target with a non-axisymmetric shape. This paper describes the test program and covers target preparation, irradiation conditions, post-test decontamination and an overview of the examinations performed. J.D. Hunn covers the detailed description of the metallurgical examinations in another paper here at IWSMT-5.

  1. BEAM STOP DESIGN METHODOLOGY AND DESCRIPTION OF A NEW SNS BEAM STOP

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom; Plum, Michael A; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Jacobs, Lorelei L; Lu, Wei; McTeer, Stephen Mark

    2010-01-01

    The design of accelerator components such as magnets, accelerator cavities and beam instruments tends to be a fairly standardized and collective effort within the particle accelerator community with well established performance, reliability and, in some cases, even budgetary criteria. Beam stop design, by contrast, has been comparatively subjective historically with much more general goals. This lack of rigor has lead to a variety of facility implementations with limited standardization and minimal consensus on approach to development within the particle accelerator community. At the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), for example, there are four high power beam stops in use, three of which have significantly different design solutions. This paper describes the design of a new off-momentum beam stop for the SNS. The technical description of the system will be complemented by a discussion of design methodology. This paper presented an overview of the new SNS HEBT off-momentum beam stop and outlined a methodology for beam stop system design. The new beam stop consists of aluminium and steel blocks cooled by a closed-loop forced-air system and is expected to be commissioned this summer. The design methodology outlined in the paper represents a basic description of the process, data, analyses and critical decisions involved in the development of a beam stop system.

  2. RF Conditioning and Testing of Fundamental Power Couplers for SNS Superconducting Cavity Production

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stirbet; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; C. Grenoble; J. Henry; G. Myneni; T. Powers; K. Wilson; M. Wiseman; I.E. Campisi; Y.W. Kang; D. Stout

    2005-05-16

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) makes use of 33 medium beta (0.61) and 48 high beta (0.81) superconducting cavities. Each cavity is equipped with a fundamental power coupler, which should withstand the full klystron power of 550 kW in full reflection for the duration of an RF pulse of 1.3 msec at 60 Hz repetition rate. Before assembly to a superconducting cavity, the vacuum components of the coupler are submitted to acceptance procedures consisting of preliminary quality assessments, cleaning and clean room assembly, vacuum leak checks and baking under vacuum, followed by conditioning and RF high power testing. Similar acceptance procedures (except clean room assembly and baking) were applied for the airside components of the coupler. All 81 fundamental power couplers for SNS superconducting cavity production have been RF power tested at JLAB Newport News and, beginning in April 2004 at SNS Oak Ridge. This paper gives details of coupler processing and RF high power-assessed performances.

  3. Synthesis of earth-abundant Cu2SnS3 powder using solid state reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Devendra; Chaudhuri, Tapas K.; Shripathi, T.; Deshpande, U.

    2014-03-01

    Cu2SnS3 (CTS) powder has been synthesized at 200 °C by solid state reaction of pastes consisting of Cu and Sn salts and different sulphur compounds in air. The compositions of the products is elucidated from XRD and only thiourea is found to yield CTS without any unwanted CuSx or SnSy. Rietveld analysis of Cu2SnS3 is carried out to determine the structure parameters. XPS shows that Cu and Sn are in oxidation states +1 and +4, respectively. Morphology of powder as revealed by SEM shows the powder to be polycrystalline with porous structure. The band gap of CTS powder is found to be 1.1 eV from diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Cu2SnS3 pellets are p-type with electrical conductivity of 10-2 S/cm. The thermal degradation and metal-ligand coordination in CTS precursor are studied with TGA/DSC and FT-IR, respectively, and a probable mechanism of formation of CTS has been suggested.

  4. SRF Accelerator Technology Transfer Experience from the Achievement of the SNS Cryomodule Production Run

    SciTech Connect

    John Hogan; Ed Daly; Michael Drury; John Fischer; Tommy Hiatt; Peter Kneisel; John Mammosser; Joseph Preble; Timothy Whitlatch; Katherine Wilson; Mark Wiseman

    2005-05-01

    This paper will discuss the technology transfer aspect of superconducting RF expertise, as it pertains to cryomodule production, beginning with the original design requirements through testing and concluding with product delivery to the end user. The success of future industrialization, of accelerator systems, is dependent upon a focused effort on accelerator technology transfer. Over the past twenty years the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has worked with industry to successfully design, manufacture, test and commission more superconducting RF cryomodules than any other entity in the world. The most recent accomplishment of Jefferson Lab has been the successful production of twenty-four cryomodules designed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Jefferson Lab was chosen, by the United States Department of Energy, to provide the superconducting portion of the SNS linac due to its reputation as a primary resource for SRF expertise. The successful partnering with, and development of, industrial resources to support the fabrication of the superconducting RF cryomodules for SNS by Jefferson Lab will be the focus of this paper.

  5. Simultaneous tunablility of electronic and phononic gap in SnS2 under normal compressive strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Babu; Manjanath, Aaditya; Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Ever since the discovery of graphene, 2D materials have emerged as an attractive field of research. Here, using density functional theory based calculations, we show tunability in the electronic structure of mono to multilayered SnS2 under biaxial tensile (BT), biaxial compressive (BC), and normal compressive (NC) strains. We obtain a reversible semiconductor to metal (S-M) transition in mono to multilayered SnS2 without changing the nature of the band gap (i.e. indirect). For the stability analysis with applied strain, we use bilayer (2L-)SnS2 as our prototype system. Surprisingly, under a high NC strain, 2L-SnS2 does not exhibit unstable modes. The phonon spectra of 2L-SnS2 shows a gap in the optical region, which, most interestingly, increases with applied NC strain. Such a simultaneous tunability of the electronic as well as phononic properties of SnS2 under applied strain can be exploited in many applications such as pressure sensors, micromechanical resonators, frequency filters, and in many other multi-physics devices. Materials Research Centre , Indian Institute of Science , Bangalore, India.

  6. Numerical modeling of the SNS H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2015-04-08

    Ion source rf antennas that produce H- ions can fail when plasma heating causes ablation of the insulating coating due to small structural defects such as cracks. Reducing antenna failures that reduce the operating capabilities of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator is one of the top priorities of the SNS H- Source Program at ORNL. Numerical modeling of ion sources can provide techniques for optimizing design in order to reduce antenna failures. There are a number of difficulties in developing accurate models of rf inductive plasmas. First, a large range of spatial and temporal scales must be resolved in order to accurately capture the physics of plasma motion, including the Debye length, rf frequencies on the order of tens of MHz, simulation time scales of many hundreds of rf periods, large device sizes on tens of cm, and ion motions that are thousands of times slower than electrons. This results in large simulation domains with many computational cells for solving plasma and electromagnetic equations, short time steps, and long-duration simulations. In order to reduce the computational requirements, one can develop implicit models for both fields and particle motions (e.g. divergence-preserving ADI methods), various electrostatic models, or magnetohydrodynamic models. We have performed simulations using all three of these methods and have found that fluid models have the greatest potential for giving accurate solutions while still being fast enough to perform long timescale simulations in a reasonable amount of time. We have implemented a number of fluid models with electromagnetics using the simulation tool USim and applied them to modeling the SNS H- ion source. We found that a reduced, single-fluid MHD model with an imposed magnetic field due to the rf antenna current and the confining multi-cusp field generated increased bulk plasma velocities of > 200 m/s in the region of the antenna where ablation is often observed in the SNS source. We report

  7. Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of two recent crisis management publications: (1) "Social Validity of the CISM Model for School Crisis Intervention," summarized by Jack R. Dempsey; and (2) "School Violence: Associations With Control, Security/Enforcement, Educational/Therapeutic Approaches, and Demographic Factors," summarized by Ashlee Barton.…

  8. Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This column features summaries of research articles from 3 recent crisis management publications. The first, "School Shootings and Counselor Leadership: Four Lessons from the Field" summarized by Kristi Fenning, was conducted as the result of the increased demand for trained crisis personnel on school campuses. Survey participants were leaders…

  9. Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three recent crisis management publications: (1) "School Violence: Associations With Control, Security/Enforcement, Educational/Therapeutic Approaches, and Demographic Factors," reviewed by Ashlee Barton; (2) "The Relationship Between Cognitive Coping Styles and PTSD in Survivors of Traffic Accidents," summarized…

  10. Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of four recent crisis management publications: (1) "Crisis Intervention for Children/Caregivers Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence," summarized by Donna DeVaughn Kreskey; (2) "Predictors of Trauma Reactions Following the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks," summarized by Kelly O'Connor; (3) "Cognitive Coping Styles and PTSD…

  11. Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This column features summaries of five research articles relevant to school crisis response. The first, "High School Teachers' Experiences With Suicidal Students," summarized by Robyn Bratica, offers the results of a study examining high school teachers' experiences with suicidal students and suggests that contact with suicidal students is very…

  12. Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three recent crisis management publications: (1) "The Impact of School Violence on School Personnel," summarized by Kimberly de Deaux; (2) "Children Exposed to War/Terrorism," summarized by Jennifer DeFago; and (3) "Suicide Survivors Seeking Mental Health Services," summarized by Kimberly de Deaux. The first…

  13. Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    In this column, members of the NASP Crisis Management in the Schools Interest Group provide summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first study investigated the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among rescue workers. The second article explored the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention, which is…

  14. Development of Companion Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Mankoff, David A; Edmonds, Christine E; Farwell, Michael D; Pryma, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    The goal of individualized and targeted treatment and precision medicine requires the assessment of potential therapeutic targets to direct treatment selection. The biomarkers used to direct precision medicine, often termed companion diagnostics, for highly targeted drugs have thus far been almost entirely based on in vitro assay of biopsy material. Molecular imaging companion diagnostics offer a number of features complementary to those from in vitro assay, including the ability to measure the heterogeneity of each patient's cancer across the entire disease burden and to measure early changes in response to treatment. We discuss the use of molecular imaging methods as companion diagnostics for cancer therapy with the goal of predicting response to targeted therapy and measuring early (pharmacodynamic) response as an indication of whether the treatment has "hit" the target. We also discuss considerations for probe development for molecular imaging companion diagnostics, including both small-molecule probes and larger molecules such as labeled antibodies and related constructs. We then describe two examples where both predictive and pharmacodynamic molecular imaging markers have been tested in humans: endocrine therapy for breast cancer and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-targeted therapy. The review closes with a summary of the items needed to move molecular imaging companion diagnostics from early studies into multicenter trials and into the clinic.

  15. Development of Companion Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Mankoff, David A; Edmonds, Christine E; Farwell, Michael D; Pryma, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    The goal of individualized and targeted treatment and precision medicine requires the assessment of potential therapeutic targets to direct treatment selection. The biomarkers used to direct precision medicine, often termed companion diagnostics, for highly targeted drugs have thus far been almost entirely based on in vitro assay of biopsy material. Molecular imaging companion diagnostics offer a number of features complementary to those from in vitro assay, including the ability to measure the heterogeneity of each patient's cancer across the entire disease burden and to measure early changes in response to treatment. We discuss the use of molecular imaging methods as companion diagnostics for cancer therapy with the goal of predicting response to targeted therapy and measuring early (pharmacodynamic) response as an indication of whether the treatment has "hit" the target. We also discuss considerations for probe development for molecular imaging companion diagnostics, including both small-molecule probes and larger molecules such as labeled antibodies and related constructs. We then describe two examples where both predictive and pharmacodynamic molecular imaging markers have been tested in humans: endocrine therapy for breast cancer and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-targeted therapy. The review closes with a summary of the items needed to move molecular imaging companion diagnostics from early studies into multicenter trials and into the clinic. PMID:26687857

  16. Development of Companion Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Mankoff, David A.; Edmonds, Christine E.; Farwell, Michael D.; Pryma, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of individualized and targeted treatment and precision medicine requires the assessment of potential therapeutic targets to direct treatment selection. The biomarkers used to direct precision medicine, often termed companion diagnostics, for highly targeted drugs have thus far been almost entirely based on in vitro assay of biopsy material. Molecular imaging companion diagnostics offer a number of features complementary to those from in vitro assay, including the ability to measure the heterogeneity of each patient’s cancer across the entire disease burden and to measure early changes in response to treatment. We discuss the use of molecular imaging methods as companion diagnostics for cancer therapy with the goal of predicting response to targeted therapy and measuring early (pharmacodynamic) response as an indication of whether the treatment has “hit” the target. We also discuss considerations for probe development for molecular imaging companion diagnostics, including both small-molecule probes and larger molecules such as labeled antibodies and related constructs. We then describe two examples where both predictive and pharmacodynamic molecular imaging markers have been tested in humans: endocrine therapy for breast cancer and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2–targeted therapy. The review closes with a summary of the items needed to move molecular imaging companion diagnostics from early studies into multicenter trials and into the clinic. PMID:26687857

  17. Experimental Plasma Research project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Diagnostics; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report.

  18. Electric field modulation of the band gap, dielectric constant and polarizability in SnS atomically thin layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Longfei; Zou, Bingsuo; Shi, Li-Jie

    2016-06-01

    The band structure and dielectric properties of multilayer SnS films have been investigated by density-functional theory total-energy calculations. It shows that electric field can tune the band gap of SnS multilayer and induce a phase transition from semiconductor to semi-metal. The critical electric field of phase transition for SnS bilayer is 0.09 V/Å, which is lower than MoS2(0.3 V/Å), MoSe2(0.25 V/Å), MoTe2(0.2 V/Å), WS2(0.27 V/Å) and WSe2(0.20 V/Å). Combining the electric structure with dielectric properties, we explain the reason why multilayer SnS films are more sensitive to the electric field. The sensitive response character to electric field makes SnS multilayer as a potential material for the nano-electronic and nano-optical devices.

  19. High on/off ratio photosensitive field effect transistors based on few layer SnS2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianzhe; Xia, Congxin; Li, Honglai; Pan, Anlian

    2016-08-26

    2D layered SnS2 nanosheets have attracted increasing research interest due to their highly anisotropic structural, electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. Here, through mechanical exfoliation, few-layer SnS2 was obtained from as-synthesized many-layered bulk SnS2. Micro-characterization and Raman study demonstrate the hexagonal symmetry structure of the nanosheets so fabricated. The energy band structures of both SnS2 bulk and monolayer were investigated comparatively. A highly photosensitive field effect transistor based on the obtained few-layer SnS2 nanosheets was fabricated, which shows a high I photo/I dark ratio of 10(3), and keeps the responsivity and external quantum efficiency (EQE) at a realistic level of 8.5 A W(-1) and 1.2 × 10(3)% respectively. This 2D structured high on/off ratio photosensitive field effect device may find promising potential applications in functional electronic/optoelectronic devices or systems. PMID:27421108

  20. Effect of ethylene glycol on the growth of hexagonal SnS 2 nanoplates and their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunqing; Chen, Yiqing; Liu, Lizhu

    2011-08-01

    Hexagonal SnS 2 particles were synthesized via a solvothermal method using a mixture of ethylene glycol (EG) and distilled water as solvent. Hexagonal SnS 2 nanoplates of more regular morphology were obtained when the volumetric ratio of EG to distilled water (EG:H 2O) decreased from 4:1 to 1:4. The effect of EG on the growth of hexagonal SnS 2 nanoplates was investigated and a growth restraint mechanism in [0 0 1] was proposed. A large band gap of 3.52 eV of the hexagonal SnS 2 nanoplates may facilitate electron injection from photo-excited dye molecules in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A photoluminescence (PL) peak at 761 nm under excitation at 507 nm was also observed in the hexagonal SnS 2 nanoplates. The 761 nm emission, which is within the absorption band of the Ru-based dye, is expected to make sufficient utilization of solar energy in DSSCs.

  1. High on/off ratio photosensitive field effect transistors based on few layer SnS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianzhe; Xia, Congxin; Li, Honglai; Pan, Anlian

    2016-08-01

    2D layered SnS2 nanosheets have attracted increasing research interest due to their highly anisotropic structural, electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. Here, through mechanical exfoliation, few-layer SnS2 was obtained from as-synthesized many-layered bulk SnS2. Micro-characterization and Raman study demonstrate the hexagonal symmetry structure of the nanosheets so fabricated. The energy band structures of both SnS2 bulk and monolayer were investigated comparatively. A highly photosensitive field effect transistor based on the obtained few-layer SnS2 nanosheets was fabricated, which shows a high I photo/I dark ratio of 103, and keeps the responsivity and external quantum efficiency (EQE) at a realistic level of 8.5 A W‑1 and 1.2 × 103% respectively. This 2D structured high on/off ratio photosensitive field effect device may find promising potential applications in functional electronic/optoelectronic devices or systems.

  2. SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FOR TIN COATING ON THE STAINLESS STEEL OF SNS ACCUMULATOR RING VACUUM CHAMBER.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,P.HSEUH,H.C.TODD,R.J.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    BNL is responsible for the design and construction of the US Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. Titanium Nitride (TiN) coating on the stainless steel vacuum chamber of the SNS accumulator ring is needed to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) and the undesirable resonant multiplication of electrons. The total SEY of TiN coated stainless steel material has been measured after coating samples were exposed to air and after electron and ion bombardment. We report here about TiN coating system setup at BNL and SEY measurements results at CERN, SLAC and KEK. We also present some simulation results of SNS accumulator ring electron-cloud effects using different SEY values.

  3. Search for the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment at the SNS at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarkar, Ameya

    2010-02-10

    The possible existence of a non-zero electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron is of fundamental interest for our understanding of the nature of electro-weak and strong interactions. The experimental search for this moment has the potential to reveal new sources of T and CP violation and to challenge calculations that propose extensions to the Standard Model. A new experiment being developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to lower the current EDM limit of the neutron by a factor of 50 to 100 over the present upper limit of 2.9x10{sup -26} e cm.

  4. Nanodiamond Foils for H- Stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and Related Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vispute, R D; Ermer, Henry K; Sinsky, Phillip; Seiser, Andrew; Shaw, Robert W; Wilson, Leslie L; Harris, Gary; Piazza, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a single nanodiamond foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the entire operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control over film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development

  5. Ramping Up the SNS Beam Power with the LBNL Baseline H- source

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Newland, Denny J; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    LBNL designed and built the Frontend for the Spallation Neutron Source, including its H- source and Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT). This paper discusses the performance of the H- source and LEBT during the commissioning of the accelerator, as well as their performance while ramping up the SNS beam power to 540 kW. Detailed discussions of major shortcomings and their mitigations are presented to illustrate the effort needed to take even a well-designed R&D ion source into operation. With these modifications, at 4% duty factor the LBNL H- source meets the essential requirements that were set at the beginning of the project.

  6. Effect of thickness on electrical properties of SILAR deposited SnS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaltun, Yunus; Astam, Aykut; Cerhan, Asena; ćayir, Tuba

    2016-03-01

    Tin sulfide (SnS) thin films of different thickness were prepared on glass substrates by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method at room temperature using tin (II) chloride and sodium sulfide aqueous solutions. The thicknesses of the films were determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements and found to be 47.2, 65.8, 111.0, and 128.7nm for 20, 25, 30 and 35 deposition cycles respectively. The electrical properties of the films were investigated using d.c. two-point probe method at room temperature and the results showed that the resistivity was found to decrease with increasing film thickness.

  7. A Fusing Switch for Fault Suppression in the SNS High Voltage Converter Modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Mark A.; Burkhart, Craig; Nguyen, Minh N.; Anderson, David E.; /Oak Ridge

    2009-08-03

    The High Voltage Converter Modulators (HVCMs) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have operated in excess of a combined 250,000 hours. Performance and reliability improvements to the HVCM are ongoing to increase modulator availability as accelerator system demands increase. There is a relatively large amount of energy storage in the HVCMs, {approx}180 kJ. This energy has the potential to dump into unsuppressed faults, cause damage, and increase the time to repair. The 'fusing switch' concept involves isolation of this stored energy from the location of the most common faults. This paper introduces this concept and its application to the HVCMs.

  8. Electromagnetic Modeling of a Fast Traveling-Wave Beam Chopper for the SNS Project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    1998-04-01

    High current and severe restrictions on beam losses, below 1 nA/m, in the designed linac for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) require clean and fast --- with the rise time from 2% to 98% less than 2.5 ns --- beam chopping in its front end, at the beam energy 2.5 MeV. The development of new traveling-wave deflecting current structures, based on meander lines, is discussed. Three-dimensional time-domain computer simulations are used to study transient effects in the chopper and to optimize its design.

  9. SnS thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition, dip coating and SILAR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaki, Sunil H.; Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2016-05-01

    The SnS thin films were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD), dip coating and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) techniques. In them, the CBD thin films were deposited at two temperatures: ambient and 70 °C. The energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the thin films. The electrical transport properties studies on the as-deposited thin films were done by measuring the I-V characteristics, DC electrical resistivity variation with temperature and the room temperature Hall effect. The obtained results are deliberated in this paper.

  10. Taking Stress Response out of the Box: Stability, Discontinuity, and Temperament Effects on HPA and SNS across Social Stressors in Mother-Infant Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Ablow, Jennifer C.; Measelle, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated continuity and stability of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) response measures in mother-infant dyads across 2 different types of social stress sessions. Synchrony of response trajectories across systems (SNS-HPA coordination) and partners (mother-infant attunement) was addressed, as…

  11. A novel method of synthesis of small band gap SnS nanorods and its efficient photocatalytic dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Das, Dipika; Dutta, Raj Kumar

    2015-11-01

    A facile one pot method has been developed for synthesis of stable (ξ=-37.5 mV), orthorhombic structured SnS nanorods capped with mercaptoacetic acid by precipitation method. The SnS nanorods were measured to be about 45 nm long with a diameter of 20 nm, as studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The band gap of the MAA capped SnS nanorods was 1.81 eV, measured by diffused reflectance spectroscopy and was larger than the bulk SnS. The relative positions of highest valence band and lowest conduction band were determined from theoretical band structure calculation as 1.58 eV and -0.23 eV, respectively. The UV-Visible-NIR fluorescence emission spectrum of the SnS nanorods revealed intense emission peak at 1000 nm (1.239 eV) and weaker peaks at 935 nm, 1080 nm, 1160 nm which is likely to be due to Sn(2+) vacancies. The as-synthesized SnS nanorods exhibited more than 95% sunlight induced photocatalytic degradation of trypan blue in 4 h, following first order kinetics with high rate of degradation (k) (0.0124 min(-1)). The observed dye degradation is attributable to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), confirmed from terephthalic acid assay. The ROS generation has been explained on the basis of interaction between photoexcited electrons from conduction band with molecular oxygen adhered to the surface of nanorods owing to favourable redox potentials of O2/O2(-) (-0.20 eV) in normal hydrogen electrode (NHE) scale.

  12. A novel method of synthesis of small band gap SnS nanorods and its efficient photocatalytic dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Das, Dipika; Dutta, Raj Kumar

    2015-11-01

    A facile one pot method has been developed for synthesis of stable (ξ=-37.5 mV), orthorhombic structured SnS nanorods capped with mercaptoacetic acid by precipitation method. The SnS nanorods were measured to be about 45 nm long with a diameter of 20 nm, as studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The band gap of the MAA capped SnS nanorods was 1.81 eV, measured by diffused reflectance spectroscopy and was larger than the bulk SnS. The relative positions of highest valence band and lowest conduction band were determined from theoretical band structure calculation as 1.58 eV and -0.23 eV, respectively. The UV-Visible-NIR fluorescence emission spectrum of the SnS nanorods revealed intense emission peak at 1000 nm (1.239 eV) and weaker peaks at 935 nm, 1080 nm, 1160 nm which is likely to be due to Sn(2+) vacancies. The as-synthesized SnS nanorods exhibited more than 95% sunlight induced photocatalytic degradation of trypan blue in 4 h, following first order kinetics with high rate of degradation (k) (0.0124 min(-1)). The observed dye degradation is attributable to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), confirmed from terephthalic acid assay. The ROS generation has been explained on the basis of interaction between photoexcited electrons from conduction band with molecular oxygen adhered to the surface of nanorods owing to favourable redox potentials of O2/O2(-) (-0.20 eV) in normal hydrogen electrode (NHE) scale. PMID:26196717

  13. Highly sensitive and fast phototransistor based on large size CVD-grown SnS2 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yun; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Kai; Wang, Zhen-Xing; Wang, Qi-Sheng; Wang, Feng-Mei; Wang, Feng; Zhan, Xue-Ying; Li, Shu-Shen; Luo, Jun-Wei; He, Jun

    2015-08-01

    A facile and fruitful CVD method is reported for the first time, to synthesize high-quality hexagonal SnS2 nanosheets on carbon cloth via in situ sulfurization of SnO2. Moreover, highly sensitive phototransistors based on SnS2 with an on/off ratio surpassing 106 under ambient conditions and a rising time as short as 22 ms under vacuum are fabricated, which are superior than most phototransistors based on LMDs. Electrical transport measurements at varied temperatures together with theoretical calculations verify that sulfur vacancies generated by the growth process would induce a defect level near the bottom of the conduction band, which significantly affects the performance of the SnS2 device. These findings may open up a new pathway for the synthesis of LMDs, shed light on the effects of defects on devices and expand the building blocks for high performance optoelectronic devices.A facile and fruitful CVD method is reported for the first time, to synthesize high-quality hexagonal SnS2 nanosheets on carbon cloth via in situ sulfurization of SnO2. Moreover, highly sensitive phototransistors based on SnS2 with an on/off ratio surpassing 106 under ambient conditions and a rising time as short as 22 ms under vacuum are fabricated, which are superior than most phototransistors based on LMDs. Electrical transport measurements at varied temperatures together with theoretical calculations verify that sulfur vacancies generated by the growth process would induce a defect level near the bottom of the conduction band, which significantly affects the performance of the SnS2 device. These findings may open up a new pathway for the synthesis of LMDs, shed light on the effects of defects on devices and expand the building blocks for high performance optoelectronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04174k

  14. Profile summary.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    All drugs appearing in the Adis Profile Summary table have been selected based on information contained in R&D Insight trade mark, a proprietary product of Adis International. The information in the profiles is gathered from the world's medical and scientific literature, at international conferences and symposia, and directly from the developing companies themselves. The emphasis of Drugs in R&D is on the clinical potential of new drugs, and selection of agents for inclusion is based on products in late-phase clinical development that have recently had a significant change in status.

  15. Wet chemical synthesis and self-assembly of SnS2 nanoparticles on TiO2 for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukigase, Hiroki; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Berger, Marie-Hélène; Sagawa, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Susumu

    2011-04-01

    SnS2 nanoparticles were synthesized through a simple wet chemical process at room temperature. The SnS2 nanoparticles were approximately spherical in shape and had diameter about 3-4 nm. SnS2-sensitized TiO2 electrodes were fabricated by the immersion of chemically modified TiO2 to well-dispersed SnS2 solution for 72 h (i.e., self-assembly method.) SnS2-sensitized TiO2 electrodes were applied in quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). Under AM1.5 irradiation with 100 mW/cm2 light intensity (at 1 sun), the short-circuit current density (J(sc)), the open-circuit voltage (V(oc)), the fill factor (FF), and the energy conversion efficiency (eta) were 0.47 mA/cm2, 0.29 V, 0.58 and 0.081%, respectively.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of thin crystals of layered semiconductor SnS2 for fast photodetection application.

    PubMed

    Su, Guoxiong; Hadjiev, Viktor G; Loya, Phillip E; Zhang, Jing; Lei, Sidong; Maharjan, Surendra; Dong, Pei; M Ajayan, Pulickel; Lou, Jun; Peng, Haibing

    2015-01-14

    Layered two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors, such as MoS(2) and SnS(2), have been receiving intensive attention due to their technological importance for the next-generation electronic/photonic applications. We report a novel approach to the controlled synthesis of thin crystal arrays of SnS(2) at predefined locations on chip by chemical vapor deposition with seed engineering and have demonstrated their application as fast photodetectors with photocurrent response time ∼ 5 μs. This opens a pathway for the large-scale production of layered 2D semiconductor devices, important for applications in integrated nanoelectronic/photonic systems.

  17. Producing Persistent, High-Current, High-Duty-Factor H- Beams for Routine 1 MW Operation of SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Hardek, Thomas W; Kang, Yoon W; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    Since 2009, SNS has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of ~50 mA H- ions from the ion source with a ~5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of ~3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to ~170 C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H- beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 C.

  18. Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayon, Juan A.

    1992-08-01

    The Astrotech 21 Optical Systems Technology Workshop was held in Pasadena, California on March 6-8, 1991. The purpose of the workshop was to examine the state of Optical Systems Technology at the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA), and in industry and academia, in view of the potential Astrophysics mission set currently being considered for the late 1990's through the first quarter of the 21st century. The principal result of the workshop is this publication, which contains an assessment of the current state of the technology, and specific technology advances in six critical areas of optics, all necessary for the mission set. The workshop was divided into six panels, each of about a dozen experts in specific fields, representing NASA, industry, and academia. In addition, each panel contained expertise that spanned the spectrum from x-ray to submillimeter wavelengths. This executive summary contains the principal recommendations of each panel. The six technology panels and their chairs were: (1) Wavefront Sensing, Control, and Pointing, Thomas Pitts, Itek Optical Systems, A Division of Litton; (2) Fabrication, Roger Angel, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona; (3) Materials and Structures, Theodore Saito, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; (4) Optical Testing, James Wyant, WYKO Corporation; (5) Optical Systems Integrated Modeling, Robert R. Shannon, Optical Sciences Center, University of Arizona; and (6) Advanced Optical Instruments Technology, Michael Shao, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. This Executive Summary contains the principal recommendations of each panel.

  19. Computational Benchmark Calculations Relevant to the Neutronic Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Yugo, J.J.

    1999-11-14

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide an intense source of low-energy neutrons for experimental use. The low-energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of a high-energy (1.0 GeV) proton beam on a mercury (Hg) target and slowed down in liquid hydrogen or light water moderators. Computer codes and computational techniques are being benchmarked against relevant experimental data to validate and verify the tools being used to predict the performance of the SNS. The LAHET Code System (LCS), which includes LAHET, HTAPE ad HMCNP (a modified version of MCNP version 3b), have been applied to the analysis of experiments that were conducted in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the AGS experiments, foils of various materials were placed around a mercury-filled stainless steel cylinder, which was bombarded with protons at 1.6 GeV. Neutrons created in the mercury target, activated the foils. Activities of the relevant isotopes were accurately measured and compared with calculated predictions. Measurements at BNL were provided in part by collaborating scientists from JAERI as part of the AGS Spallation Target Experiment (ASTE) collaboration. To date, calculations have shown good agreement with measurements.

  20. Comprehensive optical studies on SnS layers synthesized by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedi, Sreedevi; Minnam Reddy, Vasudeva Reddy; Park, Chinho; Chan-Wook, Jeon; Ramakrishna Reddy, K. T.

    2015-04-01

    A simple non-vacuum and cost effective wet chemical technique, chemical bath deposition was used to prepare tin sulphide (SnS) layers on glass substrates. The layers were formed by varying bath temperature in the range, 40-80 °C, keeping other deposition parameters as constant. An exhaustive investigation on their optical properties with bath temperature was made using the transmittance and reflectance measurements. The absorption coefficient was evaluated from the optical transmittance data utilizing Lambert's principle and is >104 cm-1 for all the as-prepared layers. The energy band gap of the layers was determined from the differential reflectance spectra that varied from 1.41 eV to 1.30 eV. Consequently, refractive index and extinction coefficient were obtained from Pankov relations and dispersion constants were calculated using Wemple-Didomenico method. In addition, other optical parameters such as the optical conductivity, dielectric constants, dissipation factor, high frequency dielectric constant and relaxation time were also calculated. Finally electrical parameters such as resistivity, carrier mobility and carrier density of as-prepared layers were estimated using optical data. A detailed analysis of the dependence of all above mentioned parameters on bath temperature is reported and discussed for a clean understanding of electronic characteristics of SnS layers.

  1. Programming PLCS under EPICS at the SNS Project : Further Experiences in Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    P. A. Gurd; W. H. Strong; J. D. Creel

    2003-10-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source being built in Tennessee by a partnership of six national laboratories. The control system components for the SNS were produced by personnel at the collaborating laboratories, by vendors of the equipment, and by commercial contractors. A number of different approaches were used to provide the programming for both the programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and the input-output controllers (IOCs) which were all based on the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). For conventional facilities, both the PLCs and the IOCs were programmed under a commercial contract. The PLCs for the high power radio frequency system (HPRF) were programmed by the vendors of the equipment, while the IOCs were programmed by the collaborating laboratory. Finally, while the IOCs for the cryogenic systems were programmed at Oak Ridge, three different approaches were used to produce the PLC programming: some were programmed at Oak Ridge, some at TJNAF, and some at vendor sites. This paper discusses the status of the PLCs in the control system and the integration challenges encountered in the various approaches.

  2. RF Distribution System for High Power Test of the SNS Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Kang, Yoon W; Broyles, Michael R; Crofford, Mark T; Geng, Xiaosong; Kim, Sang-Ho; Phibbs, Curtis L; Strong, William Herb; Peglow, Robert C; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V

    2012-01-01

    A four-way waveguide RF power distribution system for testing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) multi-cavity cryomodule to investigate the collective behavior has been developed. A single klystron operating at 805MHz for 1.3 msec at 60Hz powers the 4-way waveguide splitter to deliver up to 400 kW to individual cavities. Each cavity is fed through a combination of waveguide splitters and vector modulators (VM) to provide independent magnitude and phase controls. The waveguide vector modulator consists of two quadrature hybrids and two motorized waveguide phase shifters. The phase shifters and the assembled waveguide vector modulators were individually tested and characterized for low power and high RF power in the SNS RF test facility. Precise calibrations of magnitude and phase were performed to generate the look up tables (LUTs) to provide operational references during the cryomodule test. An I-Q demodulator module was developed and utilized to measure relative phases in pulsed high RF power operation. PLC units were developed for mechanical control of the phase shifters. Initial low/high power measurements were made using LabVIEW. An operation algorithm has been implemented into EPICS control for the cryomodule test stand.

  3. Wavelength-Shifting-Fiber Scintillation Detectors for Thermal Neutron Imaging at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Lowell; Diawara, Yacouba; Ellis, E Darren; Funk, Loren L; Hannan, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2012-01-01

    We have developed wavelength-Shifting-fiber Scintillator Detector (SSD) with 0.3 m2 area per module. Each module has 154 x 7 pixels and a 5 mm x 50 mm pixel size. Our goal is to design a large area neutron detector offering higher detection efficiency and higher count-rate capability for Time-Of-Flight (TOF) neutron diffraction in Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A ZnS/6LiF scintillator combined with a novel fiber encoding scheme was used to record the neutron events. A channel read-out-card (CROC) based digital-signal processing electronics and position-determination algorithm was applied for neutron imaging. Neutron-gamma discrimination was carried out using pulse-shape discrimination (PSD). A sandwich flat-scintillator detector can have detection efficiency close to He-3 tubes (about 10 atm). A single layer flat-scintillator detector has count rate capability of 6,500 cps/cm2, which is acceptable for powder diffractometers at SNS.

  4. SNS 2.1K Cold Box Turn-down Studies

    SciTech Connect

    F. Casagrande; P.A. Gurd; D.R. Hatfield; M.P. Howell; W.H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; V. Ganni; P. Knudsen

    2006-06-26

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is nearing completion. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The 2.1K cold box consists of four stages of centrifugal compressors with LN2-cooled variable speed electric motors and magnetic bearings. The cryogenic system successfully supported the Linac beam commissioning at both 4.2K and 2.1K and has been fully operational since June 2005. This paper describes the control principles utilized and the experimental results obtained for the SNS cold compressors turn-down capability to about 30% of the design flow, and possible limitation of the frequency dependent power factor of the cold compressor electric motors, which was measured for the first time during commissioning. These results helped to support the operation of the Linac over a very broad and stable cold compressor operating flow range (refrigeration capacity) and pressure. This in turn helped to optimize the cryogenic system operating parameters, minimizing the utilities and improving the system reliability and availability.

  5. Amines free environmentally friendly rapid synthesis of Cu2SnS3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhande, A. C.; Pawar, S. A.; Jo, Eunjin; He, Mingrui; Shelke, A.; Lokhande, C. D.; Kim, Jin Hyeok

    2016-08-01

    Cubic and tetragonal structured Cu2SnS3 (CTS) nanoparticles are rapidly synthesized within a short reaction time of 5 min using low cost amine free octadecene (ODE) solvent by hot injection technique. The effects of precursor concentration, sulfur source and reaction time on the CTS nanoparticle synthesis are studied. The crystal structure, size, phase purity, atomic composition, oxidation state and optical properties of these nanoparticles are studied in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-visible spectroscopy techniques. Spherical shaped particles in the size range of 25-30 nm are obtained with atomic composition in close agreement with the stoichiometry of Cu2SnS3. The reaction mechanism of CTS nanoparticle formation is proposed. The synthesized cubic and tetragonal structured CTS nanoparticles exhibit optimal band gaps of 1.23 eV and 1.45 eV, respectively, suitable for use in photovoltaic applications.

  6. SNS RING INJECTION STRIPPED ELECTRON COLLECTION: DESIGN ANALYSIS AND TECHNICAL ISSUES.

    SciTech Connect

    LEE, Y.; MAHLER, G.; MENG, W.; RAPARIA, D.; WANG, L.; WEI, J.

    2005-05-16

    This paper describes the simulation studies on the motions of stripped electrons generated in the injection section of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring and the effective collection mechanism. Such studies are important for high intensity machines, in order to reduce beam loss and protect other components in the vicinity. The magnetic field is applied to guide electrons to a collector, which is located at the bottom of the beam vacuum chamber. Part of the study results with and without considering the interactions between electrons and materials are presented and discussed. The final engineering design of the electron collector (catcher). The electron multi-pacting induced by beam loss and residual gas ionization along the ring has been studied in detail [l]. In the SNS accumulator ring straight section, electrons are stripped from the injected H{sup -} beam through a carbon foil. These protons must make 1100 turns to be compressed from 1 ms Linac pulse into a 700 ns bunch with 2E14 protons. The stripped electrons will have the same initial velocity but twice the intensity (current) of the H{sup -} beam. In this paper, we report the studies on electrons, and the optimum design of the collector.

  7. 78 FR 1166 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. See 77 FR 6916 (February 9, 2012). The NPRM and... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment...

  8. Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyonmin; Deirmengian, Carl A.; Hickok, Noreen J.; Morrison, Tiffany N.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic infections are complex conditions that require immediate diagnosis and accurate identification of the causative organisms to facilitate appropriate management. Conventional methodologies for diagnosis of these infections sometimes lack accuracy or sufficient rapidity. Current molecular diagnostics are an emerging area of bench-to-bedside research in orthopaedic infections. Examples of promising molecular diagnostics include measurement of a specific biomarker in the synovial fluid, polymerase chain reaction–based detection of bacterial genes, and metabolomic determination of responses to orthopaedic infection. PMID:25808967

  9. High-T(sub c) Edge-geometry SNS Weak Links on Silicon-on-sapphire Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, B.; Foote, M.; Pike, W.; Barner, J.; Vasquez, R.

    1994-01-01

    High-quality superconductor/normal-metal/superconductor(SNS) edge-geometry weak links have been produced on silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) substrates using a new SrTiO(sub 3)/'seed layer'/cubic-zirconia (YS2) buffer system.

  10. A look ahead: Status of the SNS external antenna ion source and the new RFQ test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F. Aleksandrov, A.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, M.; Kang, Y.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Dudnikov, V. G.

    2015-04-08

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now operates with ∼1 MW of beam power to target with the near-term goal of delivering 1.4 MW. Plans are being considered to incorporate a second target station into the facility which will require ∼2.8 MW of beam power. Presently, H{sup −} beam pulses (∼1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by an RF-driven, Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp ion source which injects beam into an RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) accelerator that, in turn, feeds the SNS Linac. Currently the source/RFQ system delivers ∼35 mA of pulsed current to the linac which is mostly sufficient for 1.4 MW operations while ∼50 mA are needed for the second target station upgrade. This paper provides a look forward for the SNS by providing (i) the present and future SNS source/RFQ beam requirements and our plans to achieve these, (ii) a description and status of the external antenna ion source being developed for the replacement of the current internal antenna ion source, and (iii) a description and status of the newly constructed RFQ test facility.

  11. Photo-enhanced salt-water splitting using orthorhombic Ag8SnS6 photoelectrodes in photoelectrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kong-Wei; Tsai, Wei-Tseng; Wu, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-06-01

    Orthorhombic Ag8SnS6 photoelectrodes are prepared on various substrates via reactive sulfurization using the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering of silver-tin metal precursors. Evaluations of the photoelectrochemical performances of Ag8SnS6 photoelectrodes with various levels of silver content are carried out in various aqueous solutions. X-ray diffraction patterns and Hall measurements of samples after a three-stage sulfurization process show that all samples are the pure orthorhombic Ag8SnS6 phase with n-type conductivity. The energy band gaps, carrier concentrations, and mobilities of samples on glass substrates are 1.31-1.33 eV, 7.07 × 1011-8.52 × 1012 cm-3, and 74.9-368 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively, depending on the [Ag]/[Ag+Sn] molar ratio in samples. The highest photoelectrochemical performances of orthorhombic Ag8SnS6 photoelectrodes in aqueous 0.35 M Na2S + 0.25 M K2SO3 and 0.5 M NaCl solutions are respectively 2.09 and 2.5 mA cm-2 at an applied voltages of 0.9 and 1.23 V vs. a reversible hydrogen electrode under light irradiation with a light intensity of 100 mW cm-2 from a 300-W Xe lamp.

  12. A look ahead: Status of the SNS external antenna ion source and the new RFQ test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Aleksandrov, A.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, M.; Kang, Y.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2015-04-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now operates with ˜1 MW of beam power to target with the near-term goal of delivering 1.4 MW. Plans are being considered to incorporate a second target station into the facility which will require ˜2.8 MW of beam power. Presently, H- beam pulses (˜1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by an RF-driven, Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp ion source which injects beam into an RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) accelerator that, in turn, feeds the SNS Linac. Currently the source/RFQ system delivers ˜35 mA of pulsed current to the linac which is mostly sufficient for 1.4 MW operations while ˜50 mA are needed for the second target station upgrade. This paper provides a look forward for the SNS by providing (i) the present and future SNS source/RFQ beam requirements and our plans to achieve these, (ii) a description and status of the external antenna ion source being developed for the replacement of the current internal antenna ion source, and (iii) a description and status of the newly constructed RFQ test facility.

  13. Fungal Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Thomas R.; Wickes, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of fungal infection is critical to effective treatment. There are many impediments to diagnosis such as a diminishing number of clinical mycologists, cost, time to result, and requirements for sensitivity and specificity. In addition, fungal diagnostics must meet the contrasting needs presented by the increasing diversity of fungi found in association with the use of immunosuppressive agents in countries with high levels of medical care and the need for diagnostics in resource-limited countries where large numbers of opportunistic infections occur in patients with AIDS. Traditional approaches to diagnosis include direct microscopic examination of clinical samples, histopathology, culture, and serology. Emerging technologies include molecular diagnostics and antigen detection in clinical samples. Innovative new technologies that use molecular and immunoassay platforms have the potential to meet the needs of both resource-rich and resource-limited clinical environments. PMID:24692193

  14. In vivo NGF deprivation reduces SNS expression and TTX-R sodium currents in IB4-negative DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Fjell, J; Cummins, T R; Fried, K; Black, J A; Waxman, S G

    1999-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that changes in sodium channel expression and localization may be involved in some pathological pain syndromes. SNS, a tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channel, is preferentially expressed in small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, many of which are nociceptive. TTX-R sodium currents and SNS mRNA expression have been shown to be modulated by nerve growth factor (NGF) in vitro and in vivo. To determine whether SNS expression and TTX-R currents in DRG neurons are affected by reduced levels of systemic NGF, we immunized adult rats with NGF, which causes thermal hypoalgesia in rats with high antibody titers to NGF. DRG neurons cultured from rats with high antibody titers to NGF, which do not bind the isolectin IB4 (IB4(-)) but do express TrkA, were studied with whole cell patch-clamp and in situ hybridization. Mean TTX-R sodium current density was decreased from 504 +/- 77 pA/pF to 307 +/- 61 pA/pF in control versus NGF-deprived neurons, respectively. In comparison, the mean TTX-sensitive sodium current density was not significantly different between control and NGF-deprived neurons. Quantification of SNS mRNA hybridization signal showed a significant decrease in the signal in NGF-deprived neurons compared with the control neurons. The data suggest that NGF has a major role in the maintenance of steady-state levels of TTX-R sodium currents and SNS mRNA in IB4(-) DRG neurons in adult rats in vivo. PMID:10036280

  15. The implementation of the graphics of program EAGLE: A numerical grid generation code on NASA Langley SNS computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Johnny L.

    1989-01-01

    Program EAGLE (Eglin Arbitrary Geometry Implicit Euler) Numerical Grid Generation System is a composite (multi-block) algebraic or elliptic grid generation system designed to discretize the domain in and/or around any arbitrarily shaped three dimensional regions. This system combines a boundary conforming surface generation scheme and includes plotting routines designed to take full advantage of the DISSPLA Graphics Package (Version 9.0). Program EAGLE is written to compile and execute efficiently on any Cray machine with or without solid state disk (SSD) devices. Also, the code uses namelist inputs which are supported by all Cray machines using the FORTRAN compiler CFT77. The namelist inputs makes it easier for the user to understand the inputs and operation of Program EAGLE. EAGLE's numerical grid generator is constructed in the following form: main program, EGG (executive routine); subroutine SURFAC (surface generation routine); subroutine GRID (grid generation routine); and subroutine GRDPLOT (grid plotting routines). The EAGLE code was modified to use on the NASA-LaRC SNS computer (Cray 2S) system. During the modification a conversion program was developed for the output data of EAGLE's subroutine GRID to permit the data to be graphically displayed by IRIS workstations, using Plot3D. The code of program EAGLE was modified to make operational subroutine GRDPLOT (using DI-3000 Graphics Software Packages) on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. How to implement graphically, the output data of subroutine GRID was determined on any NASA-LaRC graphics terminal that has access to the SNS Computer System DI-300 Graphics Software Packages. A Quick Reference User Guide was developed for the use of program EAGLE on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. One or more application program(s) was illustrated using program EAGLE on the NASA LaRC SNS Computer System, with emphasis on graphics illustrations.

  16. Impedance spectroscopy of Cu2SnS3 material for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaleh, L.; Chehouani, H.; Belaqziz, M.; Djessas, K.; Gauffier, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    The complex impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range 100-1 MHz and temperature range 300-475 K is used to study the electrical properties of the bulk ternary semiconductor compound Cu2SnS3. The dynamic electrical conductivity study shows that correlated barrier hopping model may be appropriate to describe the transport mechanism in our material. The dependences of dielectric parameters by fitting data with Cole-Cole equations on temperature have been discussed in detail. Relaxation time was found to decrease with increasing temperature and to obey the Arrhenius relationship. The values of calculated resistances for bulk were found to be smaller compared with that of grain boundary contributions.

  17. Geomaterials related to photovoltaics: a nanostructured Fe-bearing kuramite, Cu3SnS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, Francesco; Bencistà, Ilaria; D'Acapito, Francesco; Frizzera, Silvia; Caneschi, Andrea; Innocenti, Massimo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Montegrossi, Giordano; Oberhauser, Werner; Romanelli, Maurizio; Dittrich, Herbert; Pardi, Luca A.; Tippelt, Gerold; Amthauer, Georg

    2016-09-01

    The successful synthesis of nanoparticles of Fe-bearing kuramite, (Cu,Fe)3SnS4, is reported in this study. Nanocrystalline powders were obtained through a mild, environmentally friendly and scalable solvothermal approach, in a single run. The sample was the object of a multidisciplinary investigation, including X-ray diffraction and absorption, scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis, electron paramagnetic resonance, diffuse reflectance and Mössbauer spectroscopy as well as SQUID magnetometry. The nanoparticles consist of pure Fe-bearing kuramite, exhibiting tetragonal structure. The valence state of the metal cations was assessed to be Cu+, Sn4+ and Fe3+. The material presents a band gap value of 1.6 eV, which is fully compatible with solar cell applications. The uptake of Fe by nanokuramite opens a compositional field where the physical properties can be tuned. We thus foster the application of Fe-bearing nanokuramite for photovoltaics and energy storage purposes.

  18. Liquid nitrogen historical and current usage of the central helium liquefier at SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraff, B.; Howell, M.; Kim, S.; Neustadt, T.

    2015-12-01

    The main cryogenic system for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is comprised of a 4-K cold box, a 2-K cold box, six warm compressors, and ancillary support equipment. This system has been cold and operating with little disruption since 2005. Design and operation of liquid nitrogen (LN2) supplied from a single 20,000-gallon supply Dewar will be discussed. LN2 used to precool the 4-K cold box heat exchanger started to increase around 2011. LN2 Consumption during 2012 and 2013 was almost double the nominal usage rate. Studies of this data, plant parameter changes to respond to this information, and current interpretations are detailed in this paper. The usage rate of LN2 returned to normal in late 2013 and remained there until recent additional changes. Future study plans to understand potential causes of this including contamination migration within the 4-K cold box will also be addressed.

  19. Geomaterials related to photovoltaics: a nanostructured Fe-bearing kuramite, Cu3SnS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, Francesco; Bencistà, Ilaria; D'Acapito, Francesco; Frizzera, Silvia; Caneschi, Andrea; Innocenti, Massimo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Montegrossi, Giordano; Oberhauser, Werner; Romanelli, Maurizio; Dittrich, Herbert; Pardi, Luca A.; Tippelt, Gerold; Amthauer, Georg

    2016-05-01

    The successful synthesis of nanoparticles of Fe-bearing kuramite, (Cu,Fe)3SnS4, is reported in this study. Nanocrystalline powders were obtained through a mild, environmentally friendly and scalable solvothermal approach, in a single run. The sample was the object of a multidisciplinary investigation, including X-ray diffraction and absorption, scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis, electron paramagnetic resonance, diffuse reflectance and Mössbauer spectroscopy as well as SQUID magnetometry. The nanoparticles consist of pure Fe-bearing kuramite, exhibiting tetragonal structure. The valence state of the metal cations was assessed to be Cu+, Sn4+ and Fe3+. The material presents a band gap value of 1.6 eV, which is fully compatible with solar cell applications. The uptake of Fe by nanokuramite opens a compositional field where the physical properties can be tuned. We thus foster the application of Fe-bearing nanokuramite for photovoltaics and energy storage purposes.

  20. Towards Understanding the Cesium Cycle of the Persistent H{sup -} Beams at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2011-09-26

    This paper describes the accomplishments of the SNS H{sup -} ion source, which delivers routinely {approx}50 mA at a 5.4% duty factor with {approx}99% availability, enabling 1 MW beams for neutron production with {approx}90% availability. It discusses the need for increasing reliability and beam current. But mostly it focuses on its unexpected feature: H{sup -} beams that are apparently persistent for up to 5 weeks without adding Cs after an initial dose of less than {approx}5 mg. Thermal emission and sputtering are qualitatively evaluated, and appear consistent with a negligible Cs sputter rate after the initial dose disappears from the Cs plasma. It concludes with a list of future experiments that can shed more light on this apparently unique Cs cycle.

  1. Recent Performance of the SNS H-Source for 1-MW Neutron Production

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the SNS ion source and LEBT as they continue to deliver ~50 mA H- beams at a 5.3% duty factor required for neutron production with a ~1MW proton beam since the fall of 2009. The source continues to deliver persistent H- beams for up to 6 weeks without adding Cs after an initial dose of ~4 mg, except when there are excessive plasma impurities. In one case the H- beam decayed due to an air leak, which is shown to be consistent with sputtering of the Cs layer, and which allows to bracket the plasma potential. In another case, the performance of two sources degraded progressively, which appears to be consistent with a progressive deterioration of the Cs covered Mo converter. These two and other recently discovered issues are discussed in detail.

  2. Ramping Up the SNS Beam Power with the LBNL Baseline H{sup -} Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Newland, D.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2009-03-12

    LBNL designed and built the Frontend for the Spallation Neutron Source, including its H{sup -} source and Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT). This paper discusses the performance of the H{sup -} source and LEBT during the commissioning of the accelerator, as well as their performance while ramping up the SNS beam power to 540 kW. Detailed discussions of major shortcomings and their mitigations are presented to illustrate the effort needed to take even a well-designed R and D ion source into operation. With these modifications, at 4% duty factor the LBNL H{sup -} source meets the essential requirements that were set at the beginning of the project.

  3. Towards Understanding the Cesium Cycle of the Persistent H- Beams at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the accomplishments of the SNS H- ion source, which delivers routinely ~50 mA at a 5.4% duty factor with ~99% availability, enabling 1 MW beams for neutron production with ~90 % availability. It discusses the need for increasing reliability and beam current. But mostly it focuses on its unexpected feature: H- beams that are apparently persistent for up to 5 weeks without adding Cs after an initial dose of less than ~5 mg. Thermal emission and sputtering are qualitatively evaluated, and appear consistent with a negligible Cs sputter rate after the initial dose disappears from the Cs plasma. It concludes with a list of future experiments that can shed more light on this apparently unique Cs cycle.

  4. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF THE BEAM LOSS MONITORING SYSTEM FOR THE SNS.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.; GASSNER,D.

    2002-05-06

    The SNS to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide a high average intensity 1 GeV beam to produce spallation neutrons. Loss of a even small percentage of this intense beam would result in high radiation. The Beam Loss Monitor (ELM) system must detect such small, long term losses yet be capable of measuring infrequent short high losses. The large dynamic range presents special problems for the system design. Ion chambers will be used as the detectors. A detector originally designed for the FNAL Tevatron, was considered but concerns about ion collection times and low collection efficiency at high loss rates favor a new design. The requirements and design concepts of the proposed approach will be presented. Discussion of the design and testing of the ion chambers and the analog j-Point end electronics will be presented. The overall system design will be described.

  5. Recent Performance of and Plasma Outage Studies with the SNS H- Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    SNS ramps to higher power levels that can be sustained with high availability. The goal is 1.4 MW despite a compromised RFQ, which requires higher RF power than design levels to approach the nominal beam transmission. Unfortunately at higher power the RFQ often loses its thermal stability, a problem apparently enhanced by beam losses and high influxes of hydrogen. Delivering as much H- beam as possible with the least amount of hydrogen led to plasma outages. The root cause is the dense 1-ms long ~55-kW 2-MHz plasma pulses reflecting ~90% of the continuous ~300W, 13-MHz power, which was mitigated with a 4-ms filter for the reflected power signal and an outage resistant, slightly-detuned 13-MHz match. Lowering the H2 also increased the H- beam current to ~55 mA, and increased the transmission by ~7%.

  6. Interior Vector Magnetic Field Monitoring via External Measurements for the SNS Neutron EDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Brown, Michael; Carr, Robert; Filippone, Bradley; Osthelder, Charles; Plaster, Bradley; Slutsky, Simon; Swank, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of a magnetic field monitoring system designed to reconstruct the vector magnetic field components (and, hence, all nine of the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior measurement fiducial volume solely from external measurements is under development for the SNS neutron EDM experiment. A first-generation room-temperature prototype array has already been tested. A second-generation prototype array consisting of 12 cryogenic-compatible fluxgate magnetometer probes will be deployed within the cold region of the experiment's 1 / 3 -scale cryogenic magnet testing apparatus. We will report progress towards the development of this second-generation prototype. This work was supported in part by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics under Award No. DE-FG02-08ER41557.

  7. Next Generation IGBT Switch Plate Development for the SNS High Voltage Converter Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Mark A.; Burkhart, Craig; Nguyen, Minh N.; Anderson, David E.; /Oak Ridge

    2008-09-18

    The RF source High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM) systems installed on the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have operated well in excess of 200,000 hours, during which time numerous failures have occurred. An improved Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch plate is under development to help mitigate these failures. The new design incorporates two significant improvements. The IGBTs are upgraded to 4500 V, 1200 A, press-pack devices, which increase the voltage margin, facilitate better cooling, and eliminate explosive disassembly of the package in the event of device failure. The upgrade to an advanced IGBT gate drive circuit decreases switching losses and improves fault-condition response. The upgrade design and development status will be presented.

  8. Processability of poly 2,5-di-(-2-thienyl)pyrrole, poly(SNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Toribio F.; Villanueva, Sara; Brillas, Enrique; Carrasco, Jose

    1999-05-01

    A polyconjugated and electroactive material was electrogenerated as a film by flow of anodic currents through solutions containing the monomer 2,5-di-(-2-thienyl)pyrrole, SNS, an electrolyte (LiClO4) and the solvent, acentonitrile. The weight of the electropolymerized material increases linearly with the consumed charge: the electrogeneration is a faradaic process. The oxidized material is insoluble in some electrolytes but it solves by electrochemical reduction following again this electrodissolution a faradaic process. Electropolymerization and electrodissolution are not reverse processes. The polymerization involves the generation of new covalent bonds in order to create a new material, the polymer, from the monomer. The flow of an anodic current through a solution formed by electrodissolution of different films deposits again an electroactive material. This electrodeposition is the opposite process, related to the electrodissolution, meanwhile, the productivity of the electropolymerization process is 1/4 that of those processes. Electrodissolution and electrodeposition mimic similar ways of processability using inorganic metals.

  9. Phase-tunable Majorana bound states in a topological N-SNS junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Esben Bork; Danon, Jeroen; Flensberg, Karsten

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically study the differential conductance of a one-dimensional normal-superconductor-normal-superconductor (N-SNS) junction with a phase bias applied between the two superconductors. We consider specifically a junction formed by a spin-orbit coupled semiconducting nanowire with regions of the nanowire having superconducting pairing induced by a bulk s -wave superconductor. When the nanowire is tuned into a topologically nontrivial phase by a Zeeman field, it hosts zero-energy Majorana modes at its ends as well as at the interface between the two superconductors. The phase-dependent splitting of the Majorana modes gives rise to features in the differential conductance that offer a clear distinction between the topologically trivial and nontrivial phases. We calculate the transport properties of the junction numerically and also present a simple analytical model that captures the main properties of the predicted tunneling spectroscopy.

  10. Self-consistent solution for proximity effect and Josephson current in ballistic graphene SNS Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Black-Schaffer, Annica M.

    2010-04-06

    We use a tight-binding Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) formalism to self-consistently calculate the proximity effect, Josephson current, and local density of states in ballistic graphene SNS Josephson junctions. Both short and long junctions, with respect to the superconducting coherence length, are considered, as well as different doping levels of the graphene. We show that self-consistency does not notably change the current-phase relationship derived earlier for short junctions using the non-selfconsistent Dirac-BdG formalism but predict a significantly increased critical current with a stronger junction length dependence. In addition, we show that in junctions with no Fermi level mismatch between the N and S regions superconductivity persists even in the longest junctions we can investigate, indicating a diverging Ginzburg-Landau superconducting coherence length in the normal region.

  11. SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC UPGRADE PLAN FOR THE SECOND TARGET STATION PROJECT AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Doleans, Marc; Galambos, John D; Howell, Matthew P; Mammosser, John

    2015-01-01

    The beam power of the Linac for the Second Target Station (STS) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be doubled to 2.8 MW. For the energy upgrade, seven additional cryomodules will be installed in the reserved space at the end of the linac tunnel to produce linac output energy of 1.3 GeV. The cryomodules for STS will have the same physical length but will incorporate some design changes based on the lessons learned from operational experience over the last 10 years and from the high beta spare cryomodule developed in house. The average macro-pulse beam current for the STS will be 38 mA which is about a 40 % increase from the present beam current for 1.4 MW operation. Plans for the new cryomodules and for the existing cryomodules to support higher beam current for the STS are presented in this paper.

  12. Ballistic and diffusive regimes in current-phase relations of graphene SNS heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratz, Philip; Amet, Francois; Watson, Christopher; Moler, Kathryn; Ke, Chung; Borzenets, Ivan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Deacon, Russell; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Bomze, Yuriy; Tarucha, Seigo; Finkelstein, Gleb

    Current-phase relations (CPRs) are an indirect measurement of the energy distribution of phase-coherent modes in Josephson junctions through the spectral supercurrent near equilibrium, probing low-energy excitations not accessible by transport. We report on planned experimental measurements of the CPRs of gated, high-mobility (105 cm2/Vs) single-layer graphene SNS heterojunctions in ring geometries with superconducting MoRe alloy contacts, inductively read out with a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The graphene layers are encapsulated on both sides with hexagonal-BN (h-BN). We will address the CPR dependence on experimentally tunable parameters (temperature, carrier density, and channel length), and possible crossovers between the ballistic and diffusive regimes.

  13. THE METHODS OF PRODUCING AND ANALYZING POLARIZED NEUTRON BEAMS FOR HYSPEC AT THE SNS.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO, S.M.; PASSELL, L.; ZALIZNYAK, A.; GHOSH, V.J.; LEONHARDT, W.L.; HAGEN, M.E.

    2005-04-25

    The Hybrid Spectrometer (HYSPEC), under construction at the SNS on beam line 14B, is the only inelastic scattering instrument designed to enable polarization of the incident and the scattered neutron beams. A Heusler monochromator will replace the graphite crystal for producing polarized neutrons. In the scattered beam it is planned to use a collimator--multi-channel supermirror bender array to analyze the polarization of the scattered beam over the final energy range from 5-20 meV. Other methods of polarization analysis under consideration such as transmission filters using He{sup 3}, Sm, and polarized protons are considered. Their performance is estimated and a comparison of the various methods of polarization is made.

  14. Electromagnetic modeling of beam position and phase monitors for SNS linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2000-11-01

    Electromagnetic modeling of the beam position monitors (BPMs) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac has been performed with MAFIA. The signal amplitudes and phases on the BPM electrodes are computed as functions of the beam transverse position using time-domain 3-D simulations with an ultra-relativistic beam. An analytical model is then applied to extrapolate the results to lower beam velocities. It is shown that while the signal phases on the individual electrodes for an off-axis beam can differ from those for a centered beam by a few degrees, the phase of the summed signal from all electrodes is insensitive to the beam transverse position inside the device. Based on the analysis results, an optimal BPM design with 4 one-end-shorted 60-degree electrodes has been chosen. It provides a very good linearity and sufficient signal power for both position and phase measurements, while satisfying the linac geometrical constrains and mechanical requirements.

  15. Diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Morris, Peter; Perkins, Alan

    2012-04-21

    Physical techniques have always had a key role in medicine, and the second half of the 20th century in particular saw a revolution in medical diagnostic techniques with the development of key imaging instruments: x-ray imaging and emission tomography (nuclear imaging and PET), MRI, and ultrasound. These techniques use the full width of the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma rays to radio waves, and sound. In most cases, the development of a medical imaging device was opportunistic; many scientists in physics laboratories were experimenting with simple x-ray images within the first year of the discovery of such rays, the development of the cyclotron and later nuclear reactors created the opportunity for nuclear medicine, and one of the co-inventors of MRI was initially attempting to develop an alternative to x-ray diffraction for the analysis of crystal structures. What all these techniques have in common is the brilliant insight of a few pioneering physical scientists and engineers who had the tenacity to develop their inventions, followed by a series of technical innovations that enabled the full diagnostic potential of these instruments to be realised. In this report, we focus on the key part played by these scientists and engineers and the new imaging instruments and diagnostic procedures that they developed. By bringing the key developments and applications together we hope to show the true legacy of physics and engineering in diagnostic medicine. PMID:22516558

  16. Diagnostic Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    Diagnostic imaging lets doctors look inside your body for clues about a medical condition. A variety of machines and techniques can create pictures of the structures and activities inside your body. The type of imaging your doctor uses depends on your symptoms and ...

  17. SIMULATION AND MOCKUP OF SNS JET-FLOW TARGET WITH WALL JET FOR CAVITATION DAMAGE MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Felde, David K

    2014-01-01

    Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory induce cavitation damage on the stainless steel target container. The cavitation damage is thought to limit the lifetime of the target for power levels at and above 1 MW. Severe through-wall cavitation damage on an internal wall near the beam entrance window has been observed in spent-targets. Surprisingly though, there is very little damage on the walls that bound an annular mercury channel that wraps around the front and outside of the target. The mercury flow through this channel is characterized by smooth, attached streamlines. One theory to explain this lack of damage is that the uni-directional flow biases the direction of the collapsing cavitation bubble, reducing the impact pressure and subsequent damage. The theory has been reinforced by in-beam separate effects data. For this reason, a second-generation SNS mercury target has been designed with an internal wall jet configuration intended to protect the concave wall where damage has been observed. The wall jet mimics the annular flow channel streamlines, but since the jet is bounded on only one side, the momentum is gradually diffused by the bulk flow interactions as it progresses around the cicular path of the target nose. Numerical simulations of the flow through this jet-flow target have been completed, and a water loop has been assembled with a transparent test target in order to visualize and measure the flow field. This paper presents the wall jet simulation results, as well as early experimental data from the test loop.

  18. Order-of-Magnitude Estimate of Fast Neutron Recoil Rates in Proposed Neutrino Detector at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Erik B.

    2006-02-01

    Yuri Efremenko (UT-K) and Kate Scholberg (Duke) indicated, during discussions on 12 January 2006 with the SNS Neutronics Team, interest in a new type of neutrino detector to be placed within the proposed neutrino bunker at SNS, near beam-line 18, against the RTBT. The successful operation of this detector and its associated experiments would require fast-neutron recoil rates of approximately one event per day of operation or less. To this end, the author has attempted the following order-of-magnitude estimate of this recoil rate in order to judge whether or not a full calculation effort is needed or justified. For the purposes of this estimate, the author considers a one-dimensional slab geometry, in which fast and high-energy neutrons making up the general background in the target building are incident upon one side of an irbon slab. This iron slab represents the neutrino bunker walls. If we assume that a significant fraction of the dose rate throughout the target building is due to fast or high-energy neutrons, we can estimate the flux of such neutrons based upon existing shielding calculations performed for radiation protection purposes. In general, the dose rates within the target building are controlled to be less than 0.25 mrem per hour. A variety of calculations have indicated that these dose rates have significant fast and high-energy neutron components. Thus they can estimate the fast neutron flux incident on the neutrino bunker, and thereby the fast neutron flux inside that bunker. Finally, they can estimate the neutron recoil rate within a nominal detector volume. Such an estimate is outlined in Table 1.

  19. Interior Vector Magnetic Field Monitoring for the SNS Neutron EDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Plaster, Brad

    2014-09-01

    A concept has been developed which provides for a real-time determination of the spatial dependence of the vector components of the magnetic field (and, hence, the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior fiducial volume of the SNS neutron EDM experiment solely from exterior measurements at fixed discrete locations. This technique will be especially important during the operation of the experiment, when direct measurements of the field gradients present within the fiducial volume will not be physically possible. Our method, which is based on the solution to the Laplace Equation, is completely general and does not require the field to possess any type of symmetry. We describe the concept and our systematic approach for optimizing the locations of these exterior measurements. We also present results from prototyping studies of a field monitoring system deployed within a half-scale prototype of the experiment's magnetic field environment. A concept has been developed which provides for a real-time determination of the spatial dependence of the vector components of the magnetic field (and, hence, the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior fiducial volume of the SNS neutron EDM experiment solely from exterior measurements at fixed discrete locations. This technique will be especially important during the operation of the experiment, when direct measurements of the field gradients present within the fiducial volume will not be physically possible. Our method, which is based on the solution to the Laplace Equation, is completely general and does not require the field to possess any type of symmetry. We describe the concept and our systematic approach for optimizing the locations of these exterior measurements. We also present results from prototyping studies of a field monitoring system deployed within a half-scale prototype of the experiment's magnetic field environment. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of

  20. Effects and Correction of Closed Orbit Magnet Errors in the SNS Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bunch, S.C.; Holmes, J.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the effect and correction of three types of orbit errors in SNS: quadrupole displacement errors, dipole displacement errors, and dipole field errors. Using the ORBIT beam dynamics code, we focus on orbit deflection of a standard pencil beam and on beam losses in a high intensity injection simulation. We study the correction of these orbit errors using the proposed system of 88 (44 horizontal and 44 vertical) ring beam position monitors (BPMs) and 52 (24 horizontal and 28 vertical) dipole corrector magnets. Correction is carried out numerically by adjusting the kick strengths of the dipole corrector magnets to minimize the sum of the squares of the BPM signals for the pencil beam. In addition to using the exact BPM signals as input to the correction algorithm, we also consider the effect of random BPM signal errors. For all three types of error and for perturbations of individual magnets, the correction algorithm always chooses the three-bump method to localize the orbit displacement to the region between the magnet and its adjacent correctors. The values of the BPM signals resulting from specified settings of the dipole corrector kick strengths can be used to set up the orbit response matrix, which can then be applied to the correction in the limit that the signals from the separate errors add linearly. When high intensity calculations are carried out to study beam losses, it is seen that the SNS orbit correction system, even with BPM uncertainties, is sufficient to correct losses to less than 10-4 in nearly all cases, even those for which uncorrected losses constitute a large portion of the beam.

  1. Project summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    California Polytechnic State University's design project for the 1990-91 school year was the design of a close air support aircraft. There were eight design groups that participated and were given requests for proposals. These proposals contained mission specifications, particular performance and payload requirements, as well as the main design drivers. The mission specifications called for a single pilot weighing 225 lb with equipment. The design mission profile consisted of the following: (1) warm-up, taxi, take off, and accelerate to cruise speed; (2) dash at sea level at 500 knots to a point 250 nmi from take off; (3) combat phase, requiring two combat passes at 450 knots that each consist of a 360 deg turn and an energy increase of 4000 ft. - at each pass, half of air-to-surface ordnance is released; (4) dash at sea level at 500 knots 250 nmi back to base; and (5) land with 20 min of reserve fuel. The request for proposal also specified the following performance requirements with 50 percent internal fuel and standard stores: (1) the aircraft must be able to accelerate from Mach 0.3 to 0.5 at sea level in less than 20 sec; (2) required turn rates are 4.5 sustained g at 450 knots at sea level; (3) the aircraft must have a reattack time of 25 sec or less (reattack time was defined as the time between the first and second weapon drops); (4) the aircraft is allowed a maximum take off and landing ground roll of 2000 ft. The payload requirements were 20 Mk 82 general-purpose free-fall bombs and racks; 1 GAU-8A 30-mm cannon with 1350 rounds; and 2 AIM-9L Sidewinder missiles and racks. The main design drivers expressed in the request for proposal were that the aircraft should be survivable and maintainable. It must be able to operate in remote areas with little or no maintenance. Simplicity was considered the most important factor in achieving the former goal. In addition, the aircraft must be low cost both in acquisition and operation. The summaries of the aircraft

  2. Optimal sampling ratios in comparative diagnostic trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ting; Tang, Liansheng Larry; Rosenberger, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A subjective sampling ratio between the case and the control groups is not always an efficient choice to maximize the power or to minimize the total required sample size in comparative diagnostic trials.We derive explicit expressions for an optimal sampling ratio based on a common variance structure shared by several existing summary statistics of the receiver operating characteristic curve. We propose a two-stage procedure to estimate adaptively the optimal ratio without pilot data. We investigate the properties of the proposed method through theoretical proofs, extensive simulation studies and a real example in cancer diagnostic studies. PMID:24948841

  3. Impedance group summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Dooling, J.; Dyachkov, M.; Fedotov, A.; Gluckstern, R.; Hahn, H.; Huang, H.; Kurennoy, S.; Linnecar, T.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Stupakov, G.; Toyama, T.; Wang, J. G.; Weng, W. T.; Zhang, S. Y.; Zotter, B.

    1999-12-01

    The impedance working group was charged to reply to the following 8 questions relevant to the design of high-intensity proton machines such as the SNS or the FNAL driver. These questions were first discussed one by one in the whole group, then each ne of them assigned to one member to summarize. On the lst morning these contributions were publicly read, re-discussed and re-written where required—hence they are not the opinion of a particular person, but rather the averaged opinion of all members of the working group. (AIP)

  4. Utilization of Monte Carlo Calculations in Radiation Transport Analyses to Support the Design of the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    2000-10-23

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has given the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project approval to begin Title I design of the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and construction is scheduled to commence in FY01 . The SNS initially will consist of an accelerator system capable of delivering an {approximately}0.5 microsecond pulse of 1 GeV protons, at a 60 Hz frequency, with 1 MW of beam power, into a single target station. The SNS will eventually be upgraded to a 2 MW facility with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). The radiation transport analysis, which includes the neutronic, shielding, activation, and safety analyses, is critical to the design of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed SNS, and the Monte Carlo method is the cornerstone of the radiation transport analyses.

  5. Thin films of tin(II) sulphide (SnS) by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) using tin(II) dithiocarbamates as single-source precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevin, Punarja; Lewis, David J.; Raftery, James; Azad Malik, M.; O'Brien, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The synthesis of the asymmetric dithiocarbamates of tin(II) with the formula [Sn(S2CNRR')2] (where R=Et, R'=n-Bu (1); R=Me, R'=n-Bu (2); R=R'=Et (3)) and their use for the deposition of SnS thin films by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) is described. The effects of temperature and the concentration of the precursors on deposition were investigated. The stoichiometry of SnS was best at higher concentrations of precursors (250 mM) and at 450 °C. The direct electronic band gap of the SnS produced by this method was estimated from optical absorbance measurements as 1.2 eV. The composition of films was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) spectroscopy.

  6. A Cross-Cultural Examination of SNS Usage Intensity and Managing Interpersonal Relationships Online: The Role of Culture and the Autonomous-Related Self-Construal

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Li; Kim, Jung-Ae; Golden, Karen Jennifer; Kim, Jae-Hwi; Park, Miriam Sang-Ah

    2016-01-01

    Perception of the autonomy and relatedness of the self may be influenced by one's experiences and social expectations within a particular cultural setting. The present research examined the role of culture and the Autonomous-Related self-construal in predicting for different aspects of Social Networking Sites (SNS) usage in three Asian countries, especially focusing on those aspects serving interpersonal goals. Participants in this cross-cultural study included 305 university students from Malaysia (n = 105), South Korea (n = 113), and China (n = 87). The study explored specific social and interpersonal behaviors on SNS, such as browsing the contacts' profiles, checking for updates, and improving contact with SNS contacts, as well as the intensity of SNS use, hypothesizing that those with high intensity of use in the Asian context may be doing so to achieve the social goal of maintaining contact and keeping updated with friends. Two scales measuring activities on other users' profiles and contact with friends' profiles were developed and validated. As predicted, some cross-cultural differences were found. Koreans were more likely to use SNS to increase contact but tended to spend less time browsing contacts' profiles than the Malaysians and Chinese. The intensity of SNS use differed between the countries as well, where Malaysians reported higher intensity than Koreans and Chinese. Consistent with study predictions, Koreans were found with the highest Autonomous-Related self-construal scores. The Autonomous-Related self-construal predicted SNS intensity. The findings suggest that cultural contexts, along with the way the self is construed in different cultures, may encourage different types of SNS usage. The authors discuss study implications and suggest future research directions. PMID:27148100

  7. A Cross-Cultural Examination of SNS Usage Intensity and Managing Interpersonal Relationships Online: The Role of Culture and the Autonomous-Related Self-Construal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Li; Kim, Jung-Ae; Golden, Karen Jennifer; Kim, Jae-Hwi; Park, Miriam Sang-Ah

    2016-01-01

    Perception of the autonomy and relatedness of the self may be influenced by one's experiences and social expectations within a particular cultural setting. The present research examined the role of culture and the Autonomous-Related self-construal in predicting for different aspects of Social Networking Sites (SNS) usage in three Asian countries, especially focusing on those aspects serving interpersonal goals. Participants in this cross-cultural study included 305 university students from Malaysia (n = 105), South Korea (n = 113), and China (n = 87). The study explored specific social and interpersonal behaviors on SNS, such as browsing the contacts' profiles, checking for updates, and improving contact with SNS contacts, as well as the intensity of SNS use, hypothesizing that those with high intensity of use in the Asian context may be doing so to achieve the social goal of maintaining contact and keeping updated with friends. Two scales measuring activities on other users' profiles and contact with friends' profiles were developed and validated. As predicted, some cross-cultural differences were found. Koreans were more likely to use SNS to increase contact but tended to spend less time browsing contacts' profiles than the Malaysians and Chinese. The intensity of SNS use differed between the countries as well, where Malaysians reported higher intensity than Koreans and Chinese. Consistent with study predictions, Koreans were found with the highest Autonomous-Related self-construal scores. The Autonomous-Related self-construal predicted SNS intensity. The findings suggest that cultural contexts, along with the way the self is construed in different cultures, may encourage different types of SNS usage. The authors discuss study implications and suggest future research directions.

  8. Tuning band gap of monolayer and bilayer SnS2 by strain effect and external electric field: A first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Abeera; Shin, Young-Han

    Recently many efforts have been paid to two-dimensional layered metal dichalcogenides (LMDs). Among them MoS2 has become a prototype LMD, and recent studies show surprising and rich new physics emerging in other van der Waals materials such as layered SnS2 [1-4]. SnS2 is a semiconducting earth-abundant material and Sn is a group IV element replacing the transition metal in MoS2. SnS2 shows new possibilities in various potential applications. However, the knowledge on basic properties of layered SnS2 is still not well understood. In this study, we consider two types of structures; 1T with P 3 m 1 (164) space group and 1H with P63 / mmc (194) space group. Our first principles calculations show that the 1T structure for SnS2 is more stable than the 1H structure whereas latter is more stable for MoS2. Moreover,in contrast to MoS2,SnS2 shows an indirect band gap both for 1T and 1H structures while 1T MoS2 is metallic and 1H has a direct band gap. We also study strain effect in the range of 0-10% on the band structure for monolayer and bilayer SnS2 (both for 1T and 1H structures).We find significant change in their band gaps. We also investigate the bilayer SnS2 with and without out-of-plane stress. This research was supported by Brain Korea 21 Plus Program and Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and future Planning (NRF-2014M3A7B4049367, NRF-2014R1A2A1A1105089).

  9. A Cross-Cultural Examination of SNS Usage Intensity and Managing Interpersonal Relationships Online: The Role of Culture and the Autonomous-Related Self-Construal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Li; Kim, Jung-Ae; Golden, Karen Jennifer; Kim, Jae-Hwi; Park, Miriam Sang-Ah

    2016-01-01

    Perception of the autonomy and relatedness of the self may be influenced by one's experiences and social expectations within a particular cultural setting. The present research examined the role of culture and the Autonomous-Related self-construal in predicting for different aspects of Social Networking Sites (SNS) usage in three Asian countries, especially focusing on those aspects serving interpersonal goals. Participants in this cross-cultural study included 305 university students from Malaysia (n = 105), South Korea (n = 113), and China (n = 87). The study explored specific social and interpersonal behaviors on SNS, such as browsing the contacts' profiles, checking for updates, and improving contact with SNS contacts, as well as the intensity of SNS use, hypothesizing that those with high intensity of use in the Asian context may be doing so to achieve the social goal of maintaining contact and keeping updated with friends. Two scales measuring activities on other users' profiles and contact with friends' profiles were developed and validated. As predicted, some cross-cultural differences were found. Koreans were more likely to use SNS to increase contact but tended to spend less time browsing contacts' profiles than the Malaysians and Chinese. The intensity of SNS use differed between the countries as well, where Malaysians reported higher intensity than Koreans and Chinese. Consistent with study predictions, Koreans were found with the highest Autonomous-Related self-construal scores. The Autonomous-Related self-construal predicted SNS intensity. The findings suggest that cultural contexts, along with the way the self is construed in different cultures, may encourage different types of SNS usage. The authors discuss study implications and suggest future research directions. PMID:27148100

  10. Diagnostic and forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Galey, F D

    1995-12-01

    In most competent veterinary diagnostic laboratories, analytical findings are interpreted by the veterinary toxicologist to determine the significance of the finding in view of historic, clinical, and pathologic findings. A veterinary toxicologist also will provide consultation about possible toxic rule-outs for a case, treatment of affected animals, and prevention of additional cases. Once all of the information is available, a complete summary of the findings can be provided to the client. When the procedures outlined are followed, including a systematic approach to collecting all the evidence (historic, clinical, pathologic, and analytic), proper sampling techniques, and good communication between the clinician and the client and laboratory, the usefulness of the toxicology investigation will be maximized.

  11. Deterministic Two-Dimensional Polymorphism Growth of Hexagonal n-Type SnS₂ and Orthorhombic p-Type SnS Crystals.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Heo, Hoseok; Sung, Ji Ho; Kim, Kyungwook; Hwang, Hyein; Jo, Moon-Ho

    2015-06-10

    van der Waals layered materials have large crystal anisotropy and crystallize spontaneously into two-dimensional (2D) morphologies. Two-dimensional materials with hexagonal lattices are emerging 2D confined electronic systems at the limit of one or three atom thickness. Often these 2D lattices also form orthorhombic symmetries, but these materials have not been extensively investigated, mainly due to thermodynamic instability during crystal growth. Here, we show controlled polymorphic growth of 2D tin-sulfide crystals of either hexagonal SnS2 or orthorhombic SnS. Addition of H2 during the growth reaction enables selective determination of either n-type SnS2 or p-type SnS 2D crystal of dissimilar energy band gap of 2.77 eV (SnS2) or 1.26 eV (SnS) as a final product. Based on this synthetic 2D polymorphism of p-n crystals, we also demonstrate p-n heterojunctions for rectifiers and photovoltaic cells, and complementary inverters.

  12. HVCM Topology Enhancements to Support a Power Upgrade Required by a Second Target Station (STS) at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Solley, Dennis J; Anderson, David E; Patel, Gunjan P; Peplov, Vladimir V; Saethre, Robert B; Wezensky, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the topology used in the HVCMs at SNS to process power for both the cold and warm linac sections of the klystron gallery in support of extended operations at the megawatt level. In anticipation of a second target station and higher anticipated power levels, an enhancement to the present topology is being investigated. SPICE circuit simulations and preliminary experimental data will be presented.

  13. Formation of porous SnS nanoplate networks from solution and their application in hybrid solar cells.

    PubMed

    Rath, T; Gury, L; Sánchez-Molina, I; Martínez, L; Haque, S A

    2015-06-25

    Herein, we present a facile solution-based route towards nanostructured, hybrid absorber layers based on tin mono-sulfide (SnS), an emerging, non-toxic absorber material for low-cost and large-scale PV applications. Charge photogeneration properties in the hybrid system are studied using transient absorption spectroscopy and fabricated solar cells show efficient photocurrent generation over a broad spectral range.

  14. SnS Thin Film Prepared by Pyrolytic Synthesis as an Efficient Counter Electrode in Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoyan; Shi, Chengwu; Zhang, Yanru; Liu, Feng; Fang, Xiaqin; Zhu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The SnS thin films were successfully prepared by pyrolysis procedure for the counter electrodes in quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) using the methanol solution containing stannous chloride dihydrate (0.40 mol x L(-1)) and thiourea (0.40 mol x L(-1)) as precursor solution at 300 degrees C in the air atmosphere. The electrochemical catalytic activity of the SnS thin films prepared by pyrolytic synthesis for the redox couple of S(2-)/S(2-) was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The result revealed that the charge transfer resistance of the as-prepared SnS thin film with the dipping-heating cycles of 5 was 106.4 Ω and the corresponded QDSCs gave a short circuit photocurrent density of 8.69 mA x cm(-2), open circuit voltage of 0.42 V, and fill factor of 0.43, yielding the photoelectric conversion efficiency of 1.57%, under the illumination of simulated AM 1.5 sunlight (100 mWx cm(-2)).

  15. High-Resolution Tracking Asymmetric Lithium Insertion and Extraction and Local Structure Ordering in SnS2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yu-Yang; Huang, Yuan; Liao, Lei; Sutter, Peter; Liu, Kaihui; Yu, Dapeng; Wang, En-Ge

    2016-09-14

    In the rechargeable lithium ion batteries, the rate capability and energy efficiency are largely governed by the lithium ion transport dynamics and phase transition pathways in electrodes. Real-time and atomic-scale tracking of fully reversible lithium insertion and extraction processes in electrodes, which would ultimately lead to mechanistic understanding of how the electrodes function and why they fail, is highly desirable but very challenging. Here, we track lithium insertion and extraction in the van der Waals interactions dominated SnS2 by in situ high-resolution TEM method. We find that the lithium insertion occurs via a fast two-phase reaction to form expanded and defective LiSnS2, while the lithium extraction initially involves heterogeneous nucleation of intermediate superstructure Li0.5SnS2 domains with a 1-4 nm size. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the Li0.5SnS2 is kinetically favored and structurally stable. The asymmetric reaction pathways may supply enlightening insights into the mechanistic understanding of the underlying electrochemistry in the layered electrode materials and also suggest possible alternatives to the accepted explanation of the origins of voltage hysteresis in the intercalation electrode materials. PMID:27504584

  16. n-type conversion of SnS by isovalent ion substitution: Geometrical doping as a new doping route

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Fan-Yong; Xiao, Zewen; Toda, Yoshitake; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Tin monosulfide (SnS) is a naturally p-type semiconductor with a layered crystal structure, but no reliable n-type SnS has been obtained by conventional aliovalent ion substitution. In this work, carrier polarity conversion to n-type was achieved by isovalent ion substitution for polycrystalline SnS thin films on glass substrates. Substituting Pb2+ for Sn2+ converted the majority carrier from hole to electron, and the free electron density ranged from 1012 to 1015 cm−3 with the largest electron mobility of 7.0 cm2/(Vs). The n-type conduction was confirmed further by the position of the Fermi level (EF) based on photoemission spectroscopy and electrical characteristics of pn heterojunctions. Density functional theory calculations reveal that the Pb substitution invokes a geometrical size effect that enlarges the interlayer distance and subsequently reduces the formation energies of Sn and Pb interstitials, which results in the electron doping. PMID:26020855

  17. SnS films for photovoltaic applications: Physical investigations on sprayed Sn xS y films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, N. Koteeswara; Reddy, K. T. Ramakrishna

    2005-11-01

    Thin films of tin sulphide (SnxSy) have been deposited on antimony-doped tin oxide-coated glass substrates using spray pyrolysis. The depositions were made using 0.1 M equimolar solutions of tin chloride and thiourea at different substrate temperatures varied in the range 100-450 °C. The physical properties of the films were studied using EDAX, XRD, SEM, AFM, van der Pauw method and spectrophotometry. The obtained results were discussed in the view of testing the suitability of SnS films as an absorber for the fabrication of photovoltaic devices. The films formed for temperatures of 300-375 °C were nearly stoichiometric (Sn/S=1.03), single phase (SnS) and showed a strong (1 1 1) preferred orientation with an average grain size of 0.37 μm. These single-phase films exhibited p-type conductivity with an average electrical resistivity of 30 Ω cm and a net carrier concentration of 2×1015 cm-3. These layers had a direct energy band gap of ∼1.32 eV with an absorption coefficient of ∼105 cm-2 above the fundamental absorption edge. The films deposited at temperatures <300 °C and >375 °C deviated from stoichiometry and additional phases were found to be present.

  18. Fabrication of Cu2SnS3 solar cells by screen-printing and high-pressure sintering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takeshi; Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Cu-poor Cu2-xSnS3 (CTS) powders with x = 0.0-0.3 prepared by mixing the elemental powders and post-heating at 600 °C in N2 gas were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy. The area of the solid solution region in the Cu-poor side of CTS was quite small in the Cu2S-SnS2 pseudo-binary system. We deposited CTS films by a screen printing and high-pressure sintering (PHS) process and post-annealing at 575 °C for 10 min under a 1% H2S/N2 gas atmosphere. The solar cells were fabricated with a device structure of Ag/indium tin oxide (ITO)/i-ZnO/CdS/Cu2SnS3 (CTS)/Mo/soda-lime glass. The CTS solar cell with x = 0.1 showed maximum efficiency of 1.03%. Then, we prepared Cu1.9SnS3 powders by mixing the elemental powders and post-heating at various temperatures. The CTS solar cell with Cu1.9SnS3 powder prepared by post-heating at 300 °C showed an efficiency of 1.38% with Voc of 182 mV, Jsc of 21.7 mA/cm2, and FF of 0.350.

  19. SnS Thin Film Prepared by Pyrolytic Synthesis as an Efficient Counter Electrode in Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoyan; Shi, Chengwu; Zhang, Yanru; Liu, Feng; Fang, Xiaqin; Zhu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The SnS thin films were successfully prepared by pyrolysis procedure for the counter electrodes in quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) using the methanol solution containing stannous chloride dihydrate (0.40 mol x L(-1)) and thiourea (0.40 mol x L(-1)) as precursor solution at 300 degrees C in the air atmosphere. The electrochemical catalytic activity of the SnS thin films prepared by pyrolytic synthesis for the redox couple of S(2-)/S(2-) was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The result revealed that the charge transfer resistance of the as-prepared SnS thin film with the dipping-heating cycles of 5 was 106.4 Ω and the corresponded QDSCs gave a short circuit photocurrent density of 8.69 mA x cm(-2), open circuit voltage of 0.42 V, and fill factor of 0.43, yielding the photoelectric conversion efficiency of 1.57%, under the illumination of simulated AM 1.5 sunlight (100 mWx cm(-2)). PMID:26716249

  20. Evaluation of SNS Beamline Shielding Configurations using MCNPX Accelerated by ADVANTG

    SciTech Connect

    Risner, Joel M; Johnson, Seth R.; Remec, Igor; Bekar, Kursat B.

    2015-01-01

    Shielding analyses for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory pose significant computational challenges, including highly anisotropic high-energy sources, a combination of deep penetration shielding and an unshielded beamline, and a desire to obtain well-converged nearly global solutions for mapping of predicted radiation fields. The majority of these analyses have been performed using MCNPX with manually generated variance reduction parameters (source biasing and cell-based splitting and Russian roulette) that were largely based on the analyst's insight into the problem specifics. Development of the variance reduction parameters required extensive analyst time, and was often tailored to specific portions of the model phase space. We previously applied a developmental version of the ADVANTG code to an SNS beamline study to perform a hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo analysis and showed that we could obtain nearly global Monte Carlo solutions with essentially uniform relative errors for mesh tallies that cover extensive portions of the model with typical voxel spacing of a few centimeters. The use of weight window maps and consistent biased sources produced using the FW-CADIS methodology in ADVANTG allowed us to obtain these solutions using substantially less computer time than the previous cell-based splitting approach. While those results were promising, the process of using the developmental version of ADVANTG was somewhat laborious, requiring user-developed Python scripts to drive much of the analysis sequence. In addition, limitations imposed by the size of weight-window files in MCNPX necessitated the use of relatively coarse spatial and energy discretization for the deterministic Denovo calculations that we used to generate the variance reduction parameters. We recently applied the production version of ADVANTG to this beamline analysis, which substantially streamlined the analysis process. We also tested importance function

  1. Diagnostic Classification Models: Thoughts and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper by Drs. Rupp and Templin provides a much needed step toward the general application of diagnostic classification modeling (DCMs). The authors have provided a summary of many of the concepts that one must consider to properly apply a DCM (which ranges from model selection and estimation, to assessing the appropriateness of the model using…

  2. 'Medusa head ataxia': the expanding spectrum of Purkinje cell antibodies in autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. Part 3: Anti-Yo/CDR2, anti-Nb/AP3B2, PCA-2, anti-Tr/DNER, other antibodies, diagnostic pitfalls, summary and outlook.

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B

    2015-09-17

    Serological testing for anti-neural autoantibodies is important in patients presenting with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, since these autoantibodies may indicate cancer, determine treatment and predict prognosis. While some of them target nuclear antigens present in all or most CNS neurons (e.g. anti-Hu, anti-Ri), others more specifically target antigens present in the cytoplasm or plasma membrane of Purkinje cells (PC). In this series of articles, we provide a detailed review of the clinical and paraclinical features, oncological, therapeutic and prognostic implications, pathogenetic relevance, and differential laboratory diagnosis of the 12 most common PC autoantibodies (often referred to as 'Medusa head antibodies' due to their characteristic somatodendritic binding pattern when tested by immunohistochemistry). To assist immunologists and neurologists in diagnosing these disorders, typical high-resolution immunohistochemical images of all 12 reactivities are presented, diagnostic pitfalls discussed and all currently available assays reviewed. Of note, most of these antibodies target antigens involved in the mGluR1/calcium pathway essential for PC function and survival. Many of the antigens also play a role in spinocerebellar ataxia. Part 1 focuses on anti-metabotropic glutamate receptor 1-, anti-Homer protein homolog 3-, anti-Sj/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor- and anti-carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII-associated autoimmune cerebellar ataxia (ACA); part 2 covers anti-protein kinase C gamma-, anti-glutamate receptor delta-2-, anti-Ca/RhoGTPase-activating protein 26- and anti-voltage-gated calcium channel-associated ACA; and part 3 reviews the current knowledge on anti-Tr/delta notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor-, anti-Nb/AP3B2-, anti-Yo/cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2- and Purkinje cell antibody 2-associated ACA, discusses differential diagnostic aspects and provides a summary and outlook.

  3. Effect of Microwaves on the Current-Phase-Relation of diffusive SNS Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchsle, M.; Bentner, J.; Tranitz, P.; Wegscheider, W.; Strunk, C.

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the current-phase-relation (CPR) of long diffusive superconductor - normal metal - superconductor (SNS) Josephson junctions under microwave irradiation. The samples consist of narrow Ag bridges with a length between 300 and 500 nm inserted into a Nb loop by shadow evaporation on top of a mesoscopic Hall cross. Our Hall-sensors are based on high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs- heterostructures. They directly detect the magnetic response of the loop to an external magnetic field, from which the full CPR can be reconstructed. The measurements are done in the high-temperature regime ETh

  4. Recent Performance and Ignition Tests of the pulsed SNS H- Source for 1-MW Neutron Production

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray, Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    After acquiring several reliable spare targets, SNS ramped the beam power from 850 kW to 1.4 MW, which required an increase in H- beam pulse length from 0.88 to 1.0 ms at 60 Hz. This increase initially produced slow 2-MHz power ramp-ups and, after several weeks of uninterrupted operation, it produced plasma outages every time the pulse length was raised above ~0.95 ms. Similar outages were previously observed towards the end of long service cycles, which were believed to indicate that the breakdown voltage of the high purity hydrogen started to exceed the induced electric fields. In 2011 the RF was reconfigured to start with 10 cycles of 1.96 MHz, which yielded the shortest H- beam rise times and apparently eliminated those plasma outages. The new, pulse-length dependent outages were eliminated by increasing the initial frequency to 1.985 MHz. However, careful frequency studies are unable to justify this frequency. In addition, the paper discusses the issues and solutions for the electron-dump voltage, which starts to sag and become unstable after several weeks of high current operation.

  5. Josephson critical current of long SNS junctions in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Hendrik; Fal'Ko, Vladimir I.; Glazman, Leonid I.

    We evaluate the Josephson critical current of a long and wide two-dimensional superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) junction, taking into account the effect of electron reflection off the side edges of the junction. Considering clean junctions, we find that the effect of edges alters the usual Fraunhofer-like dependence of the Josephson critical current Ic on the magnetic flux Φ. At relatively weak fields, B <~Φ0 /W2 , the edge effect lifts zeros of the Ic (Φ) dependence and gradually shifts the maxima of that function by Φ0 / 2 . (Here W is the width of the junction and Φ0 the magnetic flux quantum.) At higher fields, B >~Φ0 /W2 , the edge effect leads to an accelerated decay of the critical current Ic (Φ) with increasing Φ. Our results are robust with respect to the roughness of realistic boundaries. Finally, we discuss the role of mesoscopic fluctuations of Ic (Φ) originating from the scattering off the edges, and compare our findings to recent experiments.

  6. THERMO-MECHANICAL RESPONSE OF THE HALO INTERCEPTS INTERACTING WITH THE SNS PROTON BEAM.

    SciTech Connect

    SIMOS,N.; LUDEWIG,H.; CATALAN-LASHERAS,N.; BRODOWSKI,J.; WEI,J.

    2001-06-18

    Integral part of the primary collimator of the SNS accumulator ring is a halo intercept assembly in the form of movable scraper blades that allow interception of the halo protons in four planes. In order to achieve large coulomb scattering of the halo protons and energy losses of less than 1%, platinum was chosen as the material of choice while its thickness was optimized to satisfy the energy loss requirements. This paper outlines the adopted design of the scraper assembly and presents the thermal response of the system that intercepts the beam halo as well as the subsequent thermal stress analysis and the issues associated with the performance of the scraper. Specifically, the current design incorporates a highly conducting material (copper) in the blade structure interfacing with the platinum scraper and is responsible for conducting the deposited energy away from the beam interception region. The mechanical performance and durability of such system, especially of the special bonding between the dissimilar materials, is the primary focus of this effort.

  7. Recent performance and ignition tests of the pulsed SNS H- source for 1-MW neutron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2015-04-01

    After acquiring several reliable spare targets, SNS ramped the beam power from 850 kW to 1.4 MW, which required an increase in H- beam pulse length from 0.88 to 1.0 ms at 60 Hz. This increase initially produced slow 2-MHz power ramp-ups and, after several weeks of uninterrupted operation, it produced plasma outages every time the pulse length was raised above ˜0.95 ms. Similar outages were previously observed towards the end of long service cycles, which were believed to indicate that the breakdown voltage of the high purity hydrogen started to exceed the induced electric fields. In 2011 the RF was reconfigured to start with 10 cycles of 1.96 MHz, which yielded the shortest H- beam rise times and apparently eliminated those plasma outages. The new, pulse-length dependent outages were eliminated by increasing the initial frequency to 1.985 MHz. However, careful frequency studies are unable to justify this frequency. In addition, the paper discusses the issues and solutions for the electron-dump voltage, which starts to sag and become unstable after several weeks of high current operation. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor this article has been updated to include References 3-13, which were present in the author's original submission but were lost during manuscript processing in the Proceedings Editor's office. The updated article was published on 5 May 2015.

  8. Recent Performance of the SNS H- ion source and low-energy beam transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Ewald, Kerry D; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Tang, Johnny Y; Welton, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Recent measurements of the H beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to 45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H beam exiting the RFQ dropped from 40 mA to 34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  9. Control System for the SNS H- Source Test Stand Allison Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Cary D; Stockli, Martin P; Gorlov, Timofey V; Han, Baoxi; Pennisi, Terry R; Murray Jr, S N

    2010-01-01

    SNS is currently in progress of a multi-year plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H- ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source test stand to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplying the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial PC to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LabVIEW, and consists of two parts, a data acquisition program to control the hardware, and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis.

  10. METALLIZATION OF CERAMIC VACUUM CHAMBERS FOR SNS RING INJECTION KICKER MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; TODD,R.J.

    2002-04-22

    Ceramic chambers will be used in the pulsed kicker magnets for the injection of H{sup -} into the US Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. There are two reasons for using ceramic chambers in kickers: (1) to avoid shielding of a fast-changing external magnetic field by metallic chamber walls; and (2) to reduce heating due to eddy currents. The inner surfaces of the ceramic chambers will be coated with a conductive layer, possibly titanium (Ti) or copper with a titanium nitride (TiN) overlayer, to reduce the beam coupling impedance and provide passage for beam image current. This paper describes the development of sputtering method for the 0.83m long 16cm inner diameter ceramic chambers. Coatings of Ti, Cu and TiN with thicknesses up to 10 {micro}m were produced by means of DC magnetron sputtering. The difficulty of coating insulators was overcome with the introduction of an anode screen. Films with good adhesion, uniform longitudinal thickness, and conductivity were produced.

  11. A NEW DIFFERENTIAL AND ERRANT BEAM CURRENT MONITOR FOR THE SNS* ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Peters, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    A new Differential and errant Beam Current Monitor (DBCM) is being implemented for both the Spallation Neutron Source's Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) and the Super Conducting Linac (SCL) accelerator sections. These new current monitors will abort the beam when the difference between two toroidal pickups exceeds a threshold. The MEBT DBCM will protect the MEBT chopper target, while the SCL DBCM will abort beam to minimize fast beam losses in the SCL cavities. The new DBCM will also record instances of errant beam, such as beam dropouts, to assist in further optimization of the SNS Accelerator. A software Errant Beam Monitor was implemented on the regular BCM hardware to study errant beam pulses. The new system will take over this functionality and will also be able to abort beam on pulse-to-pulse variations. Because the system is based on the FlexRIO hardware and programmed in LabVIEW FPGA, it will be able to abort beam in about 5 us. This paper describes the development, implementation, and initial test results of the DBCM, as well as errant beam examples.

  12. Non-monotonic effect of growth temperature on carrier collection in SnS solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Steinmann, V.; Mangan, N. M.; Brandt, R. E.; Poindexter, J. R.; Jaramillo, R.; Mailoa, J. P.; Hartman, K.; Polizzotti, A.; Buonassisi, T.; Yang, C.; Gordon, R. G.

    2015-05-18

    We quantify the effects of growth temperature on material and device properties of thermally evaporated SnS thin-films and test structures. Grain size, Hall mobility, and majority-carrier concentration monotonically increase with growth temperature. However, the charge collection as measured by the long-wavelength contribution to short-circuit current exhibits a non-monotonic behavior: the collection decreases with increased growth temperature from 150 °C to 240 °C and then recovers at 285 °C. Fits to the experimental internal quantum efficiency using an opto-electronic model indicate that the non-monotonic behavior of charge-carrier collection can be explained by a transition from drift- to diffusion-assisted components of carrier collection. The results show a promising increase in the extracted minority-carrier diffusion length at the highest growth temperature of 285 °C. These findings illustrate how coupled mechanisms can affect early stage device development, highlighting the critical role of direct materials property measurements and simulation.

  13. Gamma Dose Calculations in the Target Service Cell of the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.; Johnson, J.O.; Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.

    1999-11-14

    Calculations of the gamma dose rates inside and outside of the Target Service Cell (TSC) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) are complicated by the large size of the structure, large volume of air (internal void), optical thickness of the enclosing walls, and multiplicity of radiation sources. Furthermore, a reasonably detailed distribution of the dose rate over the volume of the TSC, and on the outside of its walls is necessary in order to optimize electronic instrument locations, and plan access control. For all these reasons a deterministic transport method was preferred over Monte Carlo, The three- dimensional neutral particle transport code TORT was employed for this purpose with support from other peripheral codes in the Discrete Ordinates of Oak Ridge System (DOORS). The computational model for the TSC is described and the features of TORT and its companion codes that enable such a difficult calculation are discussed. Most prominent is the presence of severe ray effects in the air cavity of the TSC that persists in the transport through the concrete walls and is pronounced throughout the problem volume. Initial attempts at eliminating ray effects from the computed results using the newly developed three-dimensional uncollided flux and first collided source code GRTUNCL3D are described.

  14. Installation and Initial Operation of an On-line Target Imaging System for SNS

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, Thomas J; Banke, Glenn; Blokland, Willem; Brunson, Aly; Dayton, Michael J; Goetz, Kathleen C; Janney, Jim G; Lance, Michael J; Maxey, L Curt; Montgomery, Fred C; Rosenblad, Peter M; Sampath, Sanjay; Simpson, Marc Livingstone; Shea, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    After several years of operation, the SNS now enters an era of megawatt class operation. At this intensity level, the target will be operating closer to its engineering limits and the beam profile on target must be carefully controlled. During commissioning and early operations, a temporary imaging system was used to measure the proton density on target. This system was not designed to survive the increasing power levels and it had to be removed in the second half of 2006. Since then, no direct measurement of beam properties at the target has been available. A collaboration was forged to remedy this situation, and has resulted in a new imaging system consisting of three major components: a thermal-sprayed luminescent coating deposited on the target nose, a radiation-tolerant optical system installed upstream of the target, and an image acquisition system integrated with the accelerator controls network. The design, installation, and integration of these components will be described. Initial beam measurements and image analysis results will be presented. Lessons learned during this initial operating experience have been documented and will guide the collaboration s future plans.

  15. Neural network based approach for tuning of SNS feedback and feedforward controllers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S. I.; Prokop, M. S.; Regan, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    The primary controllers in the SNS low level RF system are proportional-integral (PI) feedback controllers. To obtain the best performance of the linac control systems, approximately 91 individual PI controller gains should be optimally tuned. Tuning is time consuming and requires automation. In this paper, a neural network is used for the controller gain tuning. A neural network can approximate any continuous mapping through learning. In a sense, the cavity loop PI controller is a continuous mapping of the tracking error and its one-sample-delay inputs to the controller output. Also, monotonic cavity output with respect to its input makes knowing the detailed parameters of the cavity unnecessary. Hence the PI controller is a prime candidate for approximation through a neural network. Using mean square error minimization to train the neural network along with a continuous mapping of appropriate weights, optimally tuned PI controller gains can be determined. The same neural network approximation property is also applied to enhance the adaptive feedforward controller performance. This is done by adjusting the feedforward controller gains, forgetting factor, and learning ratio. Lastly, the automation of the tuning procedure data measurement, neural network training, tuning and loading the controller gain to the DSP is addressed.

  16. Integrated modeling/analyses of thermal-shock effects in SNS targets

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Haines, J.

    1996-06-01

    In a spallation neutron source (SNS), extremely rapid energy pulses are introduced in target materials such as mercury, lead, tungsten, uranium, etc. Shock phenomena in such systems may possibly lead to structural material damage beyond the design basis. As expected, the progression of shock waves and interaction with surrounding materials for liquid targets can be quite different from that in solid targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe ORNL`s modeling framework for `integrated` assessment of thermal-shock issues in liquid and solid target designs. This modeling framework is being developed based upon expertise developed from past reactor safety studies, especially those related to the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Unlike previous separate-effects modeling approaches employed (for evaluating target behavior when subjected to thermal shocks), the present approach treats the overall problem in a coupled manner using state-of-the-art equations of state for materials of interest (viz., mercury, tungsten and uranium). That is, the modeling framework simultaneously accounts for localized (and distributed) compression pressure pulse generation due to transient heat deposition, the transport of this shock wave outwards, interaction with surrounding boundaries, feedback to mercury from structures, multi-dimensional reflection patterns & stress induced (possible) breakup or fracture.

  17. Glutatione modified ultrathin SnS2 nanosheets with highly photocatalytic activity for wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Renjie; Zhou, Tengfei; Hu, Juncheng; Li, Jinlin

    2014-04-01

    L-Glutatione (GSH) modified ultrathin SnS2 nanosheets were successfully synthesized via a one-pot, facile and rapid solvothermal approach. During the process, the GSH not only served as the sulfur sources, the structure-directing agent, but also as the surface modified ligands. The as-synthesized samples mainly consist of ultrathin nanosheets with the thickness of about 10 nm. Inspiringly, even under the visible light (λ > 420 nm) irradiation, the as-synthesized products exhibited highly photocatalytic activities for both the degradation of methyl orange (MO) and the reductive conversion of Cr (VI) in aqueous solution. The superior performance was presented by completely removed the methyl orange and aqueous Cr(VI) in 20 min and 60 min, respectively. It was much higher than the pure samples, which suggested that these obtained photocatalysts have the potential for wastewater treatment in a green way. The high-efficiency of photocatalytic properties could attribute to the ultrathin size of the photocatalysts and the chelation between GSH and Sn (IV), which have the advantages of electron-hole pairs separation. Moreover, modified organic compounds with common electron donors would also enhance the spectral response even to the near infrared region through ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) mechanism.

  18. A PROCEDURE TO SET PHASE AND AMPLITUDE OF THE RF IN THE SNS LINAC'S SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    L.M. YOUNG

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes a procedure to set the phase and amplitude of the RF fields in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac's superconducting cavities. The linac uses superconducting cavities to accelerate the H{sup -} ion beam from the normal conducting linac at 185 MeV to a final energy of {approx}1 GeV. There are two types of cavities in the linac, 33 cavities with a geometric beta of 0.61 and 48 cavities with a geometric beta of 0.81. The correct phase setting of any single superconducting cavity depends on the RF phase and amplitude of all the preceding superconducting cavities. For the beam to be properly accelerated it must arrive at each cavity with a relative phase ({phi}{sub s}), called the synchronous phase, of about -20 degrees. That is, it must arrive early with respect to the phase at which it would gain the maximum energy by 20 degrees. This timing provides the longitudinal focusing. Beam particles arriving slightly later gain more energy and move faster relative to the synchronous beam particle. The problem is to set the phase and amplitude of each cavity in the linac so that the synchronous particle arrives at each cavity with the correct phase. The amplitude of each superconducting cavity will be adjusted as high as possible constrained only by the available RF power and the breakdown field of the cavity.

  19. Cu2SnS3 nanostructures for inorganic–organic hybrid infrared photodetector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Sandra; Krupanidhi, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    Cu2SnS3 (CTS) nanostructures were synthesized using the solvothermal method and used in a CTS-polymer inorganic–organic hybrid device to study the enhancement in the infrared (IR) photoresponse. The structural and optical properties of the CTS nanostructures were measured. The IR photoresponse was measured for both the P3HT-PCBM polymer blend and various concentrations of CTS in P3HT-PCBM. The responsivity, sensitivity, external quantum efficiency and specific detectivity were found to be 19.4 mA W‑1, 1.4, 3.01% and 7.97 × 108 Jones respectively for the P3HT:PCBM = 1:1 sample and 211.5 mA W‑1, 3.6, 32.8% and 8.7 × 109 Jones respectively for CTS:P3HT:PCBM = 12:1:1 sample at 1 V bias and 477.7 mW cm‑2 IR illumination intensity. The photoresponse was also measured under 1550 nm laser illumination of 1100 mW cm‑2 intensity. The time dependent photoresponse showed good cyclic stability over time for different ON–OFF cycles. CTS nanostructures prove to be beneficial in enhancing the photoresponse of the IR photodetector device.

  20. The Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer NOMAD at the Spallation Neutron Source SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Carruth, John William; Hoffmann, Ron; Chipley, Kenneth King; Neuefeind, Joerg C

    2012-01-01

    The Nanoscale Ordered Materials Diffractometer (NOMAD) is neutron time-of-flight diffractometer designed to determine pair dist ribution functions of a wide range of materials ranging from short range ordered liquids to long range ordered crystals. Due to a large neutron flux provided by the Spallation Neutron Source SNS and a large detector coverage neutron count-rates exceed comparable instruments by one to two orders of magnitude. This is achieved while maintaining a relatively high momentum transfer resolution of a $\\delta Q/Q \\sim 0.8\\%$ FWHM (typical), and an achievable $\\delta Q/Q$ of 0.24\\% FWHM (best). The real space resolution is related to the maximum momentum transfer; A maximum momentum transfer of 50\\AA$^{-1}$ can be achieved routinely and the maximum momentum transfer given by the detector configuration and the incident neutron spectrum is 125 \\AA$^{-1}$. High stability of the source and the detector allow small contrast isotope experiments to be performed. A detailed description of the instrument is given and the results of experiments with standard samples are discussed.

  1. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H- ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2014-01-01

    An RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H- ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ~1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a mean for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  2. Fabrication and sulfurization of Cu2SnS3 thin films with tuning the concentration of Cu-Sn-S precursor ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi-Jie; Shei, Shih-Chang; Chang, Shih-Chang; Chang, Shoou-Jinn

    2016-12-01

    In this study, Cu-Sn-S nanoinks were synthesized by combining chelating polyetheramine to Cu, Sn, S powders of various concentrations. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that nanoinks synthesized at low concentrations are composed almost entirely of binary phases SnS and Cu2S. Synthesizing nanoinks at higher concentrations decreased the quantity of binary phase and led to the appearance of ternary phase Cu4SnS4. Following sulfurization, single phase Cu2SnS3 (CTS) thin film was obtained from nanoinks of low concentration; however, impurities, such as Cu2S were detected in the thin film obtained from nanoinks of high concentration. This can be attributed to the fact that lower concentrations reduce the reactivity of all the elements. As a result, the SnS phase reacted more readily and more rapidly, resulting in the early formation of a stoichiometric CTS thin film during sulfurization. Under these reaction conditions, Cu2S and SnS transform into CTS and thereby prevent the formation of unwanted phases of Cu2S and Cu4SnS4. Raman spectra revealed that second phase Cu2S phase remained in the high-concentration samples, due to an increase in reactivity due to the participation of a greater proportion of the copper in the reaction. The surface microstructure of low-concentration samples display closely packed Cu2SnS3 grains with a flat morphology and an atomic composition ratio of Cu:Sn:S = 34.69:15.90:49.41, which is close to stoichiometric. Hall measurement revealed that low-concentration sample has superior electrical properties; i.e., a hole concentration of 5.23 × 1017 cm-3, mobility of 14.2 cm2/V-s, and optical band-gap energy of 1.346 eV, which are suitable for thin-film solar cells.

  3. Rotorcraft Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haste, Deepak; Azam, Mohammad; Ghoshal, Sudipto; Monte, James

    2012-01-01

    Health management (HM) in any engineering systems requires adequate understanding about the system s functioning; a sufficient amount of monitored data; the capability to extract, analyze, and collate information; and the capability to combine understanding and information for HM-related estimation and decision-making. Rotorcraft systems are, in general, highly complex. Obtaining adequate understanding about functioning of such systems is quite difficult, because of the proprietary (restricted access) nature of their designs and dynamic models. Development of an EIM (exact inverse map) solution for rotorcraft requires a process that can overcome the abovementioned difficulties and maximally utilize monitored information for HM facilitation via employing advanced analytic techniques. The goal was to develop a versatile HM solution for rotorcraft for facilitation of the Condition Based Maintenance Plus (CBM+) capabilities. The effort was geared towards developing analytic and reasoning techniques, and proving the ability to embed the required capabilities on a rotorcraft platform, paving the way for implementing the solution on an aircraft-level system for consolidation and reporting. The solution for rotorcraft can he used offboard or embedded directly onto a rotorcraft system. The envisioned solution utilizes available monitored and archived data for real-time fault detection and identification, failure precursor identification, and offline fault detection and diagnostics, health condition forecasting, optimal guided troubleshooting, and maintenance decision support. A variant of the onboard version is a self-contained hardware and software (HW+SW) package that can be embedded on rotorcraft systems. The HM solution comprises components that gather/ingest data and information, perform information/feature extraction, analyze information in conjunction with the dependency/diagnostic model of the target system, facilitate optimal guided troubleshooting, and offer

  4. High-quality SnO2@SnS2 core-shell heterojunctions: Designed construction, mechanism and photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Yang, Junyou; Qu, Qiuliang; Zhu, Pinwen; Li, Weixin

    2015-01-01

    High-quality SnO2@SnS2 core-shell heterojunctions have been constructed through sulfurization of SnO2 nanoflowers self-sacrificial templates with H2S gas at relatively low temperature in this paper. The unreacted SnO2 core and the in-situ synthesized SnS2 shell are in good crystallinity with a low lattice mismatch interface. The formation mechanism of the core-shell heterostructures have been examined by experiments and theoretic computation from the perspectives of both adsorption and diffusion. When used as photoanode in all-solid-state semiconductor-sensitized solar cells, the SnO2@SnS2 core-shell heterojunctions based hybrid solar cell shows a promising conversion efficiency of 1.45% under 1 sun illumination, which is over 5 times than that of SnS2 quantum dot sensitized SnO2 electrode made by the common chemistry bath deposition method. The enhanced photovoltaic performance is contributed to the unique structure of SnO2@SnS2 core-shell heterojunctions which provide highly covered sensitizers and favored interface for suppressing the charge recombination from SnO2 to electrolyte. This strategy and understanding can be extended to other nanostructure core-shell architecture and fields.

  5. The SNS/HFIR Web Portal System How Can it Help Me?

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Stephen D; Geist, Al; Herwig, Kenneth W; Peterson, Peter F; Reuter, Michael A; Ren, Shelly; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Campbell, Stuart I; Kohl, James Arthur; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Cobb, John W; Lynch, Vickie E; Chen, Meili; Trater, James R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract. In a busy world, continuing with the status-quo, to do things the way we are already familiar, often seems to be the most efficient way to conduct our work. We look for the value-add to decide if investing in a new method is worth the effort. How shall we evaluate if we have reached this tipping point for change? For contemporary researchers, understanding the properties of the data is a good starting point. The new generation of neutron scattering instruments being built are higher resolution and produce one or more orders of magnitude larger data than the previous generation of instruments. For instance, we have grown out of being able to perform some important tasks with our laptops the data are too big and the computations would simply take too long. These large datasets can be problematic as facility users now begin to grapple with many of the same issues faced by more established computing communities. These issues include data access, management, and movement, data format standards, distributed computing, and collaboration among others. The Neutron Science Portal has been architected, designed, and implemented to provide users with an easy-to-use interface for managing and processing data, while also keeping an eye on meeting modern cybersecurity requirements imposed on institutions. The cost of entry for users has been lowered by utilizing a web interface providing access to backend portal resources. Users can browse or search for data which they are allowed to see, data reduction applications can be run without having to load the software, sample activation calculations can be performed for SNS and HFIR beamlines, McStas simulations can be run on TeraGrid and ORNL computers, and advanced analysis applications such as those being produced by the DANSE project can be run. Behind the scenes is a live cataloging system which automatically catalogs and archives experiment data via the data management system, and provides proposal team members access

  6. 1400, +/- 900V PEAK PULSE SWITCH MODE POWER SUPPLIES FOR SNS INJECTION KICKERS.

    SciTech Connect

    LAMBIASE,R.ENG,W.SANDBERG,J.DEWAN,S.HOLMES,R.RUST,K.ZENG,J.

    2004-03-10

    This paper describes simulation and experimental results for a 1400A, {+-} 900V peak rated, switch mode power supply for SNS Injection Kicker Magnets. For each magnet (13 m{Omega}, 160{micro}H), the power supply must supply controlled pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate. The pulse current must rise from zero to maximum in less than 1 millisec in a controlled manner, flat top for up to 2 millisec, and should fall in a controlled manner to less than 4A within 500{micro}s. The low current performance during fall time is the biggest challenge in this power supply. The simulation results show that to meet the controlled fall of the current and the current ripple requirements, voltage loop bandwidth of at least 10 kHz and switching frequency of at least 100 kHz are required. To achieve high power high frequency switching with IGBT switches, a series connected topology with three phase shifted (O{sup o}, 60{sup o} & 120{sup o}) converters each with 40 kHz switching frequency (IGBT at 20kHz), has been achieved. In this paper, the circuit topology, relevant system specifications and experimental results that meet the requirements of the power supply are described in detail. A unique six pulse SCR rectifier circuit with capacitor storage has been implemented to achieve minimum pulse width to meet required performance during current fall time below 50A due to the very narrow pulse width and non-linearity from IGBT turn-on/off times.

  7. Quasiparticle and Optical Properties of Mono- and Bi-layer SnS2: A First-Principles GW and GW +BSE Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng; Qiu, Diana; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Unlike most semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, SnS2, another layered metal dichalcogenide, is calculated within density functional theory to be an indirect bandgap semiconductor in both its bulk and monolayer forms. Experimental characterization of mono- and bi-layer SnS2 has been performed, but the details of its quasiparticle and excitonic properties remain unclear. Thus, we employ ab initio GW and GW +BSE calculations to study the quasiparticle band structure and optical absorption spectrum, respectively, of mono- and bi-layer SnS2 with spin-orbit coupling included throughout the calculations. We further investigate the character of excitonic states contributing to the optical spectrum. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility.

  8. Ternary Cu2SnS3 cabbage-like nanostructures: large-scale synthesis and their application in Li-ion batteries with superior reversible capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Baihua; Li, Hongxing; Zhang, Ming; Mei, Lin; Chen, Libao; Wang, Yanguo; Li, Qiuhong; Wang, Taihong

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, novel ternary Cu2SnS3 cabbage-like nanostructures are synthesized on a large scale via a facile solvothermal route. The individual Cu2SnS3 cabbage-like hierarchitecture is constructed from 2D nanosheets with thickness of about 15.6 nm. The Cu2SnS3 electrodes exhibit an initial reversible capacity of 842 mAh g-1 and still reach 621 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles. Such an admirable performance could be related to their 3D porous structural features as well as the high electrical conductivity induced by Cu. The electrochemical properties of the 3D hierarchical nanostructures imply its potential application in high energy density Li-ion batteries.

  9. Behavioral diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J S; Pyles, D A

    1989-01-01

    The contemporary behavior analyst, to operate ethically and effectively, must be aware of many more factors affecting behavior than simple consequences. Although the literature demonstrating the effectiveness of active behavior management is impressive, a compelling argument can be made that a great number of behavior problem seen in individuals with developmental disabilities may be attributable to factors other than consequences. Our experience has been more often than not that physiological, organic, medication, or situational variables are the actual culprits in maladaptive behavior. Individuals with severe or profound retardation may respond to aversive features of their environment by displaying noncompliance, tantrums, aggression, or self-injurious behavior. These antecedents can affect their behavior just as powerfully as can the consequences of their behavior. Behavior analysts must become sensitive to these potential factors and be prepared to employ behavioral diagnostic strategies in the search for the causes of maladaptive behavior. Finally, they must be prepared to design rather unconventional passive behavior management treatment programs involving the manipulation of the antecedent environment. In the case of Carrie, from the example at the beginning of this paper, the analysis yielded the hypothesis that her face scratching was a reaction to sinus blockage caused by seasonal allergies. Her treatment involved daily dosages of antihistamines administered by our nurses and subsequent elimination of the scratching. Tom was found to be suffering from "wheelchair fatigue." When he was allowed to recline on other surfaces (e.g., bean bag chair, mat, bolster) on a regular basis, he did not attempt any form of self-injury. Melissa was found to have a severe case of Pre Menstrual Syndrome as well as seizure disorder, and was treated with the appropriate medications. Her headbanging was reduced to a few minor incidents per month. Walter's tantrums on closer

  10. Glial-derived neurotrophic factor upregulates expression of functional SNS and NaN sodium channels and their currents in axotomized dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Cummins, T R; Black, J A; Dib-Hajj, S D; Waxman, S G

    2000-12-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons produce multiple sodium currents, including several different TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) currents and TTX-resistant (TTX-R) currents, which are produced by distinct sodium channels. We previously demonstrated that, after sciatic nerve transection, the levels of SNS and NaN sodium channel alpha-subunit transcripts and protein in small (18-30 micrometer diameter) DRG neurons are reduced, as are the amplitudes and densities of the slowly inactivating and persistent TTX-R currents produced by these two channels. In this study, we asked whether glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which has been shown to prevent some axotomy-induced changes such as the loss of somatostatin expression in DRG neurons, can ameliorate the axotomy-induced downregulation of SNS and NaN TTX-R sodium channels. We show here that exposure to GDNF can significantly increase both slowly inactivating and persistent TTX-R sodium currents, which are paralleled by increases in SNS and NaN mRNA and protein levels, in axotomized DRG neurons in vitro. We also show that intrathecally administered GDNF increases the amplitudes of the slowly inactivating and persistent TTX-R currents, and SNS and NaN protein levels, in peripherally axotomized DRG neurons in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that GDNF upregulates the persistent TTX-R current in SNS-null mice, thus demonstrating that the upregulated persistent sodium current is not produced by SNS. Because TTX-R sodium channels have been shown to be important in nociception, the effects of GDNF on axotomized DRG neurons may have important implications for the regulation of nociceptive signaling by these cells. PMID:11102483

  11. SnS2- Compared to SnO2-Stabilized S/C Composites toward High-Performance Lithium Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaona; Lu, Yue; Hou, Zhiguo; Zhang, Wanqun; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai; Liang, Jianwen; Qian, Yitai

    2016-08-01

    The common sulfur/carbon (S/C) composite cathodes in lithium sulfur batteries suffer gradual capacity fading over long-term cycling incurred by the poor physical confinement of sulfur in a nonpolar carbon host. In this work, these issues are significantly relieved by introducing polar SnO2 or SnS2 species into the S/C composite. SnO2- or SnS2-stabilized sulfur in porous carbon composites (SnO2/S/C and SnS2/S/C) have been obtained through a baked-in-salt or sealed-in-vessel approach at 245 °C, starting from metallic tin (mp 231.89 °C), excess sulfur, and porous carbon. Both of the in situ-formed SnO2 and SnS2 in the two composites could ensure chemical interaction with lithium polysulfide (LiPS) intermediates proven by theoretical calculation. Compared to SnO2/S/C, the SnS2/S/C sample affords a more appropriate binding effect and shows lower charge transfer resistance, which is important for the efficient redox reaction of the adsorbed LiPS intermediates during cycling. When used as cathodes for Li-S batteries, the SnS2/S/C composite with sulfur loading of 78 wt % exhibits superior electrochemical performance. It delivers reversible capacities of 780 mAh g(-1) after 300 cycles at 0.5 C. When further coupled with a Ge/C anode, the full cell also shows good cycling stability and efficiency. PMID:27419855

  12. SnS2- Compared to SnO2-Stabilized S/C Composites toward High-Performance Lithium Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaona; Lu, Yue; Hou, Zhiguo; Zhang, Wanqun; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai; Liang, Jianwen; Qian, Yitai

    2016-08-01

    The common sulfur/carbon (S/C) composite cathodes in lithium sulfur batteries suffer gradual capacity fading over long-term cycling incurred by the poor physical confinement of sulfur in a nonpolar carbon host. In this work, these issues are significantly relieved by introducing polar SnO2 or SnS2 species into the S/C composite. SnO2- or SnS2-stabilized sulfur in porous carbon composites (SnO2/S/C and SnS2/S/C) have been obtained through a baked-in-salt or sealed-in-vessel approach at 245 °C, starting from metallic tin (mp 231.89 °C), excess sulfur, and porous carbon. Both of the in situ-formed SnO2 and SnS2 in the two composites could ensure chemical interaction with lithium polysulfide (LiPS) intermediates proven by theoretical calculation. Compared to SnO2/S/C, the SnS2/S/C sample affords a more appropriate binding effect and shows lower charge transfer resistance, which is important for the efficient redox reaction of the adsorbed LiPS intermediates during cycling. When used as cathodes for Li-S batteries, the SnS2/S/C composite with sulfur loading of 78 wt % exhibits superior electrochemical performance. It delivers reversible capacities of 780 mAh g(-1) after 300 cycles at 0.5 C. When further coupled with a Ge/C anode, the full cell also shows good cycling stability and efficiency.

  13. Solution-processable glass LiI-Li4SnS4 superionic conductors for all-solid-state Li-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kern Ho Park; Oh, Dae Yang; Choi, Young Eun; Nam, Young Jin; Han, Lili; Kim, Ju -Young; Xin, Huolin; Lin, Feng; Oh, Seung M.; Jung, Yoon Seok

    2015-12-22

    The new, highly conductive (4.1 × 10–4 S cm–1 at 30 °C), highly deformable, and dry-air-stable glass 0.4LiI-0.6Li4SnS4 is prepared using a homogeneous methanol solution. Furthermore, the solution process enables the wetting of any exposed surface of the active materials with highly conductive solidified electrolytes (0.4LiI-0.6Li4SnS4), resulting in considerable improvements in electrochemical performances of these electrodes over conventional mixture electrodes.

  14. The role of Mott-Schottky heterojunctions in Ag-Ag8SnS6 as counter electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    He, Qingquan; Huang, Shoushuang; Wang, Cheng; Qiao, Qiquan; Liang, Na; Xu, Miao; Chen, Wenlong; Zai, Jiantao; Qian, Xuefeng

    2015-03-01

    Well-defined uniform pyramidal Ag-Ag8SnS6 heterodimers are prepared via a one-pot method. A plausible formation mechanism for the unique structures based on a seed-growth process and an etching effect due to oleylamine is proposed. The formed metal-semiconductor Mott-Schottky heterojunction promotes electron transfer from semiconducting Ag8 SnS6 to metallic Ag, which catalyzes the reduction of I3 (-) to I(-). When used as counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells, the heterodimers show comparable performance to platinum.

  15. Solution-Processable Glass LiI-Li4 SnS4 Superionic Conductors for All-Solid-State Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Kern Ho; Oh, Dae Yang; Choi, Young Eun; Nam, Young Jin; Han, Lili; Kim, Ju-Young; Xin, Huolin; Lin, Feng; Oh, Seung M; Jung, Yoon Seok

    2016-03-01

    A new, highly conductive (4.1 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 30 °C), highly deformable, and dry-air-stable glass 0.4LiI-0.6Li4 SnS4 is prepared using a homogeneous methanol solution. The solution process enables the wetting of any exposed surface of the active materials with highly conductive solidified electrolytes (0.4LiI-0.6Li4 SnS4), resulting in considerable improvements in the electrochemical performance of these electrodes over conventional mixture electrodes. PMID:26690558

  16. The SNS/HFIR Web Portal System - How Can it Help Me?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen D.; Geist, Al; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Peterson, Peter F.; Reuter, Michael A.; Ren, Shelly; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Campbell, Stuart I.; Kohl, James A.; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S.; Cobb, John W.; Lynch, Vickie E.; Chen, Meili; Trater, James R.; Smith, Bradford C.; (William Swain, Tom; Huang, Jian; Mikkelson, Ruth; Mikkelson, Dennis; een, Mar K. L. Gr

    2010-11-01

    In a busy world, continuing with the status-quo, to do things the way we are already familiar, often seems to be the most efficient way to conduct our work. We look for the value-add to decide if investing in a new method is worth the effort. How shall we evaluate if we have reached this tipping point for change? For contemporary researchers, understanding the properties of the data is a good starting point. The new generation of neutron scattering instruments being built are higher resolution and produce one or more orders of magnitude larger data than the previous generation of instruments. For instance, we have grown out of being able to perform some important tasks with our laptops - the data are too big and the computations would simply take too long. These large datasets can be problematic as facility users now begin to grapple with many of the same issues faced by more established computing communities. These issues include data access, management, and movement, data format standards, distributed computing, and collaboration among others. The Neutron Science Portal has been architected, designed, and implemented to provide users with an easy-to-use interface for managing and processing data, while also keeping an eye on meeting modern cybersecurity requirements imposed on institutions. The cost of entry for users has been lowered by utilizing a web interface providing access to backend portal resources. Users can browse or search for data which they are allowed to see, data reduction applications can be run without having to load the software, sample activation calculations can be performed for SNS and HFIR beamlines, McStas simulations can be run on TeraGrid and ORNL computers, and advanced analysis applications such as those being produced by the DANSE project can be run. Behind the scenes is a "live cataloging" system which automatically catalogs and archives experiment data via the data management system, and provides proposal team members access to

  17. V-doped SnS2: a new intermediate band material for a better use of the solar spectrum.

    PubMed

    Wahnón, Perla; Conesa, José C; Palacios, Pablo; Lucena, Raquel; Aguilera, Irene; Seminovski, Yohanna; Fresno, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    Intermediate band materials can boost photovoltaic efficiency through an increase in photocurrent without photovoltage degradation thanks to the use of two sub-bandgap photons to achieve a full electronic transition from the valence band to the conduction band of a semiconductor structure. After having reported in previous works several transition metal-substituted semiconductors as able to achieve the electronic structure needed for this scheme, we propose at present carrying out this substitution in sulfides that have bandgaps of around 2.0 eV and containing octahedrally coordinated cations such as In or Sn. Specifically, the electronic structure of layered SnS(2) with Sn partially substituted by vanadium is examined here with first principles quantum methods and seen to give favourable characteristics in this respect. The synthesis of this material in nanocrystalline powder form is then undertaken and achieved using solvothermal chemical methods. The insertion of vanadium in SnS(2) is found to produce an absorption spectrum in the UV-Vis-NIR range that displays a new sub-bandgap feature in agreement with the quantum calculations. A photocatalytic reaction-based test verifies that this sub-bandgap absorption produces highly mobile electrons and holes in the material that may be used for the solar energy conversion, giving experimental support to the quantum calculations predictions. PMID:21996706

  18. Self-assembled lamellar MoS2, SnS2 and SiO2 semiconducting polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Kirmayer, Saar; Aharon, Eyal; Dovgolevsky, Ekaterina; Kalina, Michael; Frey, Gitti L

    2007-06-15

    Lamellar nanocomposites based on semiconducting polymers incorporated into layered inorganic matrices are prepared by the co-assembly of organic and inorganic precursors. Semiconducting polymer-incorporated silica is prepared by introducing the semiconducting polymers into a tetrahydrofuran (THF)/water homogeneous sol solution containing silica precursor species and a surface-active agent. Semiconducting polymer-incorporated MoS(2) and SnS(2) are prepared by Li intercalation into the inorganic compound, exfoliation and restack in the presence of the semiconducting polymer. All lamellar nanocomposite films are organized in domains aligned parallel to the substrate surface plane. The incorporated polymers maintain their semiconducting properties, as evident from their optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra. The optoelectronic properties of the nanocomposites depend on the properties of both the inorganic host and the incorporated guest polymer as demonstrated by integrating the nanocomposite films into light-emitting diodes. Devices based on polymer-incorporated silica and polymer-incorporated MoS(2) show no diode behaviour and no light emission due to the insulating and metallic properties of the silica and MoS(2) hosts. In contrast, diode performance and electroluminescence are obtained from devices based on semiconducting polymer-incorporated semiconducting SnS(2), demonstrating that judicious selection of the composite components in combination with the optimization of material synthesis conditions allows new hierarchical structures to be tailored for electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  19. Structure, Surface Morphology, and Optical and Electronic Properties of Annealed SnS Thin Films Obtained by CBD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reghima, Meriem; Akkari, Anis; Guasch, Cathy; Turki-Kamoun, Najoua

    2014-09-01

    SnS thin films were initially coated onto Pyrex substrates by the chemical bath deposition (CBD) method and annealed at various temperatures ranging from 200°C to 600°C for 30 min in nitrogen gas. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that a structural transition from face-centered cubic to orthorhombic occurs when the annealing temperature is over 500°C. The surface morphology of all thin layers was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The elemental composition of Sn and S, as measured by energy dispersive spectroscopy, is near the stoichiometric ratio. Optical properties studied by means of transmission and reflection measurements show an increase in the absorption coefficient with increasing annealing temperatures. The band gap energy is close to 1.5 eV, which corresponds to the optimum for photovoltaic applications. Last, the thermally stimulated current measurements show that the electrically active traps located in the band gap disappear after annealing at 500°C. These results suggest that, once again, annealing as a post-deposition treatment may be useful for improving the physical properties of the SnS layers included in photovoltaic applications. Moreover, the thermo-stimulated current method may be of practical relevance to explore the electronic properties of more conventional industrial methods, such as sputtering and chemical vapor deposition.

  20. V-doped SnS2: a new intermediate band material for a better use of the solar spectrum.

    PubMed

    Wahnón, Perla; Conesa, José C; Palacios, Pablo; Lucena, Raquel; Aguilera, Irene; Seminovski, Yohanna; Fresno, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    Intermediate band materials can boost photovoltaic efficiency through an increase in photocurrent without photovoltage degradation thanks to the use of two sub-bandgap photons to achieve a full electronic transition from the valence band to the conduction band of a semiconductor structure. After having reported in previous works several transition metal-substituted semiconductors as able to achieve the electronic structure needed for this scheme, we propose at present carrying out this substitution in sulfides that have bandgaps of around 2.0 eV and containing octahedrally coordinated cations such as In or Sn. Specifically, the electronic structure of layered SnS(2) with Sn partially substituted by vanadium is examined here with first principles quantum methods and seen to give favourable characteristics in this respect. The synthesis of this material in nanocrystalline powder form is then undertaken and achieved using solvothermal chemical methods. The insertion of vanadium in SnS(2) is found to produce an absorption spectrum in the UV-Vis-NIR range that displays a new sub-bandgap feature in agreement with the quantum calculations. A photocatalytic reaction-based test verifies that this sub-bandgap absorption produces highly mobile electrons and holes in the material that may be used for the solar energy conversion, giving experimental support to the quantum calculations predictions.

  1. Microwave-assisted rapid synthesis of tetragonal Cu2SnS3 nanoparticles for solar photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Devendra; Chaudhuri, Tapas K.; Shripathi, T.; Deshpande, U.; Sathe, V. G.

    2014-05-01

    A simple and rapid process for the synthesis of Cu2SnS3 (CTS) nanoparticles by microwave heating of metal-organic precursor solution is described. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirm the formation of tetragonal CTS. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates the presence of Cu, Sn, S in +1, +4, -2 oxidation states, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy divulges the formation of crystalline tetragonal CTS nanoparticles with sizes ranging 2-25 nm. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the 300-2,400 nm wavelength range suggests a band gap of 1.1 eV. Pellets of CTS nanoparticles show p-type conduction and the carrier transport in temperature range of 250-425 K is thermally activated with activation energy of 0.16 eV. Thin film solar cell (TFSC) with architecture: graphite/Cu2SnS3/ZnO/ITO/SLG is fabricated by drop-casting dispersion of CTS nanoparticles which delivered a power conversion efficiency of 0.135 % with open circuit voltage, short circuit current and fill factor of 220 mV, 1.54 mA cm-2, 0.40, respectively.

  2. Summary report for CF6 jet engine diagnostics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasching, W. A.; Stricklin, R.

    1982-01-01

    Cockpit cruise recordings and test cell data in conjunction with hardware inspection results from airline overhaul shops were analyzed to define the extent and magnitude of performance deterioration of the General Electric CF6 high bypass turbofan engines. The magnitude of Short Term deterioration from the Long Term was isolated and the individual damage mechanisms that were the cause for the majority of the performance deterioration were identified. A potential for reduction in compressor clearance and a potential for improvement in turbine roundness, which corresponds to cruise SFC reductions of 0.38 and 0.36 percent, respectively, were identified.

  3. Diagnostics for Respondent-driven Sampling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a widely used method for sampling from hard-to-reach human populations, especially populations at higher risk for HIV. Data are collected through peer-referral over social networks. RDS has proven practical for data collection in many difficult settings and is widely used. Inference from RDS data requires many strong assumptions because the sampling design is partially beyond the control of the researcher and partially unobserved. We introduce diagnostic tools for most of these assumptions and apply them in 12 high risk populations. These diagnostics empower researchers to better understand their data and encourage future statistical research on RDS. PMID:27226702

  4. NFSMI Research Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettles, Mary Frances

    2014-01-01

    The NFSMI Research Summary is a continuing series of summaries reporting recently completed research and research-based resources funded by the National Food Service Management Institute. The following research studies are summarized in this article: (1) Succession Planning for Management Level Staff in School Nutrition Programs; (2)…

  5. NASA Information Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mar, May 1987, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This document consists of 11 "NASA Information Summaries" grouped together: (1) "Our Planets at a Glance" (PMS-010); (2) "Space Shuttle Mission Summary: 1985-1986" (PMS-005); (3) "Astronaut Selection and Training" (PMS-019); (4) "Space Station" (PMS-008); (5) "Materials Processing in Space" (PMS-026); (6) "Countdown!: NASA Launch Vehicles and…

  6. Interface Bonds Determined Gas-Sensing of SnO2-SnS2 Hybrids to Ammonia at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Xu, Keng; Li, Neng; Zeng, Dawen; Tian, Shouqin; Zhang, Shasha; Hu, Die; Xie, Changsheng

    2015-06-01

    Unique gas-sensing properties of semiconducting hybrids that are mainly related to the heterogeneous interfaces have been considerably reported. However, the effect of heterogeneous interfaces on the gas-sensing properties is still unclear, which hinders the development of semiconducting hybrids in gas-sensing applications. In this work, SnO2-SnS2 hybrids were synthesized by the oxidation of SnS2 at 300 °C with different times and exhibited high response to NH3 at room temperature. With the increasing oxidation time, the relative concentration of interfacial Sn bonds, O-Sn-S, among the total Sn species of the SnO2-SnS2 hybrids increased first and then decreased. Interestingly, it can be found that the response of SnO2-SnS2 hybrids to NH3 at room temperature exhibited a strong dependence on the interfacial bonds. With more chemical bonds at the interface, the lower interface state density and the higher charge density of SnO2 led to more chemisorbed oxygen, resulting in a high response to NH3. Our results revealed the real roles of the heterogeneous interface in gas-sensing properties of hybrids and the importance of the interfacial bonds, which offers guidance for the material design to develop hybrid-based sensors.

  7. A facile phosphine-free colloidal synthesis of Cu2SnS3 and Cu2ZnSnS4 nanorods with a controllable aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Jun; Liu, Pai; Ryan, Kevin M

    2015-09-18

    Cu2SnS3 (CTS) nanorods were synthesized with a controllable aspect ratio via a facile phosphine-free colloidal synthesis. This synthesis can be readily extended to obtain Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanorods with tunable Zn content. PMID:26235602

  8. Report on Partial Findings of an Ongoing Research: Social Networking Sites (SNS) as a Platform to Support Teaching and Learning in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bt. Ubaidullah, Nor Hasbiah; Samsuddin, Khairulanuar; Bt. Fabil, Norsikin; Bt. Mahadi, Norhayati

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the partial findings of a survey that was carried out in the analysis phase of an ongoing research for the development of a prototype of a Social Networking Site (SNS) to support teaching and learning in secondary schools. For the initial phase of the study, a quantitative research method was used based on a survey involving 383…

  9. Enhanced photocatalytic performance in Bi2WO6/SnS heterostructures: Facile synthesis, influencing factors and mechanism of the photocatalytic process.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rongfeng; Su, Huaifen; Sun, Yuanwei; Zhang, Xianxi; Li, Lei; Liu, Caihua; Zeng, Suyuan; Sun, Dezhi

    2016-03-15

    Highly-efficient photocatalyst based on Bi2WO6/SnS heterostructure was prepared via a surface functionalization method using 3-mercaptopropionic (MPA) as the surface functionalizing agent. Compared to bare Bi2WO6 and SnS nanoparticles, the as-formed Bi2WO6/SnS heterostructure exhibits enhanced photocatalytic activity for the degradation of Rhodamine B (Rh B). Photoluminescence and photocurrent measurements demonstrate that the enhanced photocatalytic activity during the photocatalytic process is closely related to the enhanced electron-hole separation efficiency. The photocatalytic activity of the as-formed Bi2WO6/SnS heterostructure can be perfectly remained even after being used for five times, showing excellent durability during the photocatalytic process. The influence of pH and inorganic ions are systematically investigated. And the optimum pH for the photocatalytic process is determined to be 6. The addition of chloride ion will exert negative effect on the photodegradation process of Rh B. The mechanism of photodegradation process was investigated by exploring the quenching effects of different scavengers and the results suggest that the reactive holes play the major role in the photodegradation process of Rh B.

  10. Sensory neuron-specific sodium channel SNS is abnormally expressed in the brains of mice with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and humans with multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Joel A.; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman; Baker, David; Newcombe, Jia; Cuzner, M. Louise; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2000-10-01

    Clinical abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (MS) have classically been considered to be caused by demyelination and/or axonal degeneration; the possibility of molecular changes in neurons, such as the deployment of abnormal repertoires of ion channels that would alter neuronal electrogenic properties, has not been considered. Sensory Neuron-Specific sodium channel SNS displays a depolarized voltage dependence, slower activation and inactivation kinetics, and more rapid recovery from inactivation than classical "fast" sodium channels. SNS is selectively expressed in spinal sensory and trigeminal ganglion neurons within the peripheral nervous system and is not expressed within the normal brain. Here we show that sodium channel SNS mRNA and protein, which are not present within the cerebellum of control mice, are expressed within cerebellar Purkinje cells in a mouse model of MS, chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. We also demonstrate SNS mRNA and protein expression within Purkinje cells from tissue obtained postmortem from patients with MS, but not in control subjects with no neurological disease. These results demonstrate a change in sodium channel expression in neurons within the brain in an animal model of MS and in humans with MS and suggest that abnormal patterns of neuronal ion channel expression may contribute to clinical abnormalities such as ataxia in these disorders.

  11. Ternary SnS2–xSex Alloys Nanosheets and Nanosheet Assemblies with Tunable Chemical Compositions and Band Gaps for Photodetector Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Xu, Cheng-Yan; Li, Yang; Zhou, Fei; Chen, Xiao-Shuang; Hu, Ping-An; Zhen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ternary metal dichalcogenides alloys exhibit compositionally tunable optical properties and electronic structure, and therefore, band gap engineering by controllable doping would provide a powerful approach to promote their physical and chemical properties. Herein we obtained ternary SnS2−xSex alloys with tunable chemical compositions and optical properties via a simple one-step solvothermal process. Raman scattering and UV-vis-NIR absorption spectra reveal the composition-related optical features, and the band gaps can be discretely modulated from 2.23 to 1.29 eV with the increase of Se content. The variation tendency of band gap was also confirmed by first-principles calculations. The change of composition results in the difference of crystal structure as well as morphology for SnS2−xSex solid solution, namely, nanosheets assemblies or nanosheet. The photoelectrochemical measurements indicate that the performance of ternary SnS2−xSex alloys depends on their band structures and morphology characteristics. Furthermore, SnS2−xSex photodetectors present high photoresponsivity with a maximum of 35 mA W−1 and good light stability in a wide range of spectral response from ultraviolet to visible light, which renders them promising candidates for a variety of optoelectronic applications. PMID:26616539

  12. Cu2SnS3 thin-film solar cells fabricated by sulfurization from NaF/Cu/Sn stacked precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Mitsuki; Fujimoto, Junya; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Izaki, Masanobu

    2015-04-01

    Cu2SnS3 thin films were prepared by crystallization in a sulfur/tin mixing atmosphere from stacked NaF/Cu/Sn precursors deposited by the sequential evaporation of Sn, Cu elements, and NaF. The NaF mole ratio was changed at \\text{Cu}:\\text{Sn}:\\text{NaF} = 1:0.6:x (x = 0 to 0.12). From X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra, the Cu2SnS3 thin films were considered to have a monoclinic structure. The grain size of the Cu2SnS3 thin films decreased with increasing NaF/Cu mole ratio. The band-gap energies of the Cu2SnS3 thin films determined from quantum efficiency spectra were 0.93 and 1.02 eV. The solar cell with x = 0.075 demonstrated the best performance, namely, Voc = 283 mV, Isc = 37.3 mA/cm2, FF = 0.439, and η = 4.63%.

  13. National NIF Diagnostic Program Fiscal Year 2002 Second Quarter Report

    SciTech Connect

    MacGowan, B

    2002-04-01

    Since October 2001 the development of the facility diagnostics for NIF has been funded by the NIF Director through the National NIF Diagnostic Program (NNDP). The current emphasis of the NNDP is on diagnostics for the early NIF quad scheduled to be available for experiment commissioning in FY03. During the past six months the NNDP has set in place processes for funding diagnostics, developing requirements for diagnostics, design reviews and monthly status reporting. Those processes are described in an interim management plan for diagnostics (''National NIF Diagnostic Program Interim Plan'', NIF-0081315, April 2002) and a draft Program Execution Plan (''Program Execution Plan for the National NlF Diagnostic Program'', NIF-0072083, October 2001) and documents cited therein. Work has been funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bechtel Nevada at Los Alamos and Santa Barbara. There are no major technical risks with the early diagnostics. The main concerns relate to integration of the diagnostics into the facility, all such issues are being worked. This report is organized to show the schedule and budget status and a summary of Change Control Board actions for the past six months. The following sections then provide short descriptions of the status of each diagnostic. Where design reviews or requirements documents are cited, the documents are available on the Diagnostics file server or on request.

  14. Comparative guide to emerging diagnostic tools for large commercial HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Hannah; Piette, Mary Ann

    2001-05-01

    This guide compares emerging diagnostic software tools that aid detection and diagnosis of operational problems for large HVAC systems. We have evaluated six tools for use with energy management control system (EMCS) or other monitoring data. The diagnostic tools summarize relevant performance metrics, display plots for manual analysis, and perform automated diagnostic procedures. Our comparative analysis presents nine summary tables with supporting explanatory text and includes sample diagnostic screens for each tool.

  15. Rescue of alpha-SNS sodium channel expression in small dorsal root ganglion neurons after axotomy by nerve growth factor in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dib-Hajj, S D; Black, J A; Cummins, T R; Kenney, A M; Kocsis, J D; Waxman, S G

    1998-05-01

    Small (18-25 microm diam) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are known to express high levels of tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium current and the mRNA for the alpha-SNS sodium channel, which encodes a TTX-R channel when expressed in oocytes. These neurons also preferentially express the high affinity receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF), TrkA. Levels of TTX-R sodium current and of alpha-SNS mRNA are reduced in these cells after axotomy. To determine whether NGF participates in the regulation of TTX-R current and alpha-SNS mRNA in small DRG neurons in vivo, we axotomized small lumbar DRG neurons by sciatic nerve transection and administered NGF or Ringer solution to the proximal nerve stump using osmotic pumps. Ten to 12 days after pump implant, whole cell patch-clamp recording demonstrated that TTX-R current density was decreased in Ringer-treated axotomized neurons (154 +/- 45 pA/pF; mean +/- SE) compared with nonaxotomized control neurons (865 +/- 123 pA/pF) and was restored partially toward control levels in NGF-treated axotomized neurons (465 +/- 78 pA/pF). The V1/2 for steady-state activation and inactivation of TTX-R currents were similar in control, Ringer- and NGF-treated axotomized neurons. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed an upregulation of alpha-SNS mRNA levels in NGF-treated compared with Ringer-treated axotomized DRG. In situ hybridization showed that alpha-SNS mRNA levels were decreased significantly in small Ringer-treated axotomized DRG neurons in vivo and also in small DRG neurons that were dissociated and maintained in vitro, so as to correspond to the patch-clamp conditions. NGF-treated axotomized neurons had a significant increase in alpha-SNS mRNA expression, compared with Ringer-treated axotomized cells. These results show that the administration of exogenous NGF in vivo, to the proximal nerve stump of the transected sciatic nerve, results in an upregulation of TTX-R sodium current and of alpha-SNS mRNA levels in

  16. Programmed Cell Death in the Leaves of the Arabidopsis Spontaneous Necrotic Spots (sns-D) Mutant Correlates with Increased Expression of the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor eIF4B2

    PubMed Central

    Gaussand, Gwénaël M. D. J.-M.; Jia, Qi; van der Graaff, Eric; Lamers, Gerda E. M.; Fransz, Paul F.; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; de Pater, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    From a pool of transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants harboring an activator T-DNA construct, one mutant was identified that developed spontaneous necrotic spots (sns-D) on the rosette leaves under aseptic conditions. The sns-D mutation is dominant and homozygous plants are embryo lethal. The mutant produced smaller rosettes with a different number of stomata than the wild-type. DNA fragmentation in the nuclei of cells in the necrotic spots and a significant increase of caspase-3 and caspase-6 like activities in sns-D leaf extracts indicated that the sns-D mutation caused programmed cell death (PCD). The integration of the activator T-DNA caused an increase of the expression level of At1g13020, which encodes the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4B2. The expression level of eIF4B2 was positively correlated with the severity of sns-D mutant phenotype. Overexpression of the eIF4B2 cDNA mimicked phenotypic traits of the sns-D mutant indicating that the sns-D mutant phenotype is indeed caused by activation tagging of eIF4B2. Thus, incorrect regulation of translation initiation may result in PCD. PMID:22639576

  17. Biofuels: Project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The US DOE, through the Biofuels Systems Division (BSD) is addressing the issues surrounding US vulnerability to petroleum supply. The BSD goal is to develop technologies that are competitive with fossil fuels, in both cost and environmental performance, by the end of the decade. This document contains summaries of ongoing research sponsored by the DOE BSD. A summary sheet is presented for each project funded or in existence during FY 1993. Each summary sheet contains and account of project funding, objectives, accomplishments and current status, and significant publications.

  18. Microstructure and composition of a SNS Josephson junction using CaRuO{sub 3} as the metallic barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, S.; Merkle, K.L.; Char, K.

    1994-10-01

    Superconductor - normal - superconductor (SNS) edge junctions consisting of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}/CaRuO{sub 3}/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} were fabricated on (001) LaA1O{sub 3} substrates. These devices display an excess interface resistance which is not well understood but is related to the SN interface and interlayer structure. High-resolution and conventional transmission electron microscopy were employed to investigate the SN interface to determine the structure and possible interface defects. Energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis were performed on the CaRuO{sub 3} film and near interface regions to quantify the extent of interdiffusion between the CiRuO{sub 3} and YBCO films. Changes in either the interface structure or the normal layer chemistry are expected to greatly influence the junction properties.

  19. Analysis of electrical conduction mechanism in the high temperature range of the nanostructured photoabsorber Cu2SnS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahlali, S.; Essaleh, L.; Belaqziz, M.; Chehouani, H.; Djessas, K.; Viallet, B.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamic electrical conduction in the bulk ternary semiconductor compound Cu2SnS3 is studied for the first time in the high temperature range from 300 °C to 440 °C in the frequency range 1 kHz-1 MHz. New activation energy for conduction mechanism is obtained and its frequency dependence is analyzed. The Cole-Cole representation is almost half circular indicating a single contribution to total electrical conduction through the material. The activation energy for the mean relaxation process, obtained separately from the analysis of imaginary part Z″ of complex impedance Z* and from the equivalent electric circuit, is estimated to be (942 ± 74) meV . The correlated barrier hopping model is considered to analyze the experimental data. The results are compared with those obtained previously in low temperature range.

  20. Three-dimensional particle trajectories and waste beam losses in injection dump beam line of SNS accumulator ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Plum, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    The SNS ring injection dump beam line has been suffering high beam losses since its commissioning. In order to understand the mechanisms of the beam losses, we have performed 3D simulation studies of the beam line. The 3D models consist of three injection chicane dipoles and one injection dump septum magnet. 3D particle trajectories in the models are computed. We then extend particle optics calculations to the injection dump. Our studies have clearly shown some design and operation problems, that cause beam losses in the injection dump beam line. These include incorrect chicane dipole settings, incorrect position of a chicane dipole, too small aperture of injection dump septum, and inadequate focusing downstream. This paper reports our findings and the remedies to the injection beam loss problems.

  1. Air-Stable, High-Conduction Solid Electrolytes of Arsenic-Substituted Li4SnS4

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Gayatri; Lin, Zhan; Li, Juchuan; Liu, Zengcai; Dudney, Nancy J; Liang, Chengdu

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-ion-conducting solid electrolytes show promise for enabling high-energy secondary battery chemistries and solving safety issues associated with conventional lithium batteries. Achieving the combination of high ionic conductivity and outstanding chemical stability in solid electrolytes is a grand challenge for the synthesis of solid electrolytes. Herein we report the design of aliovalent substitution of Li4SnS4 to achieve high conduction and excellent air stability based on the hard and soft acids and bases theory. The composition of Li3.833Sn0.833As 0.166S4 has a high ionic conductivity of 1.39 mS/cm 1 at 25 C. Considering the high Li+ transference number, this phase conducts Li+ as well as carbonate-based liquid electrolytes. This research also addresses the compatibility of the sulfide-based solid electrolytes through chemical passivation.

  2. SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION OF THE LINAC RF SYSTEM USING A WAVELET METHOD AND ITS APPLICATIONS IN THE SNS LLRF CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Y. WANG; S. KWON; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    For a pulsed LINAC such as the SNS, an adaptive feed-forward algorithm plays an important role in reducing the repetitive disturbance caused by the pulsed operation conditions. In most modern feed-forward control algorithms, accurate real time system identification is required to make the algorithm more effective. In this paper, an efficient wavelet method is applied to the system identification in which the Haar function is used as the base wavelet. The advantage of this method is that the Fourier transform of the Haar function in the time domain is a sine function in the frequency domain. Thus we can directly obtain the system transfer function in the frequency domain from the coefficients of the time domain system response.

  3. An investigation of the SNS Josephson junction as a three-terminal device. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, H.; Prans, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    A particular phenomenon of the SNS Josephson junction was investigated; i.e., control by a current entering the normal region and leaving through one of the superconducting regions. The effect of the control current on the junction was found to be dependent upon the ration of the resistances of the two halves of the N layer. A low frequency, lumped, nonlinear model was proposed to describe the electrical characteristics of the device, and a method was developed to plot the dynamic junction resistance as a function of junction current. The effective thermal noise temperature of the sample was determined. Small signal linearized analysis of the device suggests its use as an impedance transformer, although geometric limitations must be overcome. Linear approximation indicates that it is reciprocal and no power gain is possible. It is felt that, with suitable metallurgical and geometrical improvements, the device has promise to become a superconducting transistor.

  4. Eco-friendly p-type Cu2SnS3 thermoelectric material: crystal structure and transport properties

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yawei; Li, Chao; Huang, Rong; Tian, Ruoming; Ye, Yang; Pan, Lin; Koumoto, Kunihito; Zhang, Ruizhi; Wan, Chunlei; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    As a new eco-friendly thermoelectric material, copper tin sulfide (Cu2SnS3) ceramics were experimentally studied by Zn-doping. Excellent electrical transport properties were obtained by virtue of 3-dimensionally conductive network for holes, which are less affected by the coexistence of cubic and tetragonal phases that formed upon Zn subsitition for Sn; a highest power factors ~0.84 mW m−1 K−2 at 723 K was achieved in the 20% doped sample. Moreover, an ultralow lattice thermal conductivity close to theoretical minimum was observed in these samples, which could be related to the disordering of atoms in the coexisting cubic and tetragonal phases and the interfaces. Thanks to the phonon-glass-electron-crystal features, a maximum ZT ~ 0.58 was obtained at 723 K, which stands among the tops for sulfide thermoelectrics at the same temperature. PMID:27666524

  5. Site environmental report summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment.

  6. Trends in Laboratory Diagnostic Methods in Periodontology.

    PubMed

    Bolerázska, Beáta; Mareková, Mária; Markovská, Neda

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a summary of current knowledge on the laboratory diagnosis of periodontitis. It focuses on the theoretical foundations and is supplemented with new knowledge. It subsequently describes specifically the laboratory diagnosis methods of periodontitis: the protein expression of inflammation, oral microbiology and molecular diagnostics. Periodontitis is a serious disease worldwide and its confirmed association with systemic diseases means its severity is increasing. Its laboratory diagnosis has the potential to rise to the level of clinical and diagnostic imaging. The transfer of diagnostic methods from laboratory to clinical use is increasingly used in the prevention and monitoring of the exacerbation and treatment of periodontal disease, as well as of its impact on systemic disease. PMID:27131349

  7. Diagnostics for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Donne, A. J. H.; Hellermann, M. G. von; Barnsley, R.

    2008-10-22

    After an introduction into the specific challenges in the field of diagnostics for ITER (specifically high level of nuclear radiation, long pulses, high fluxes of particles to plasma facing components, need for reliability and robustness), an overview will be given of the spectroscopic diagnostics foreseen for ITER. The paper will describe both active neutral-beam based diagnostics as well as passive spectroscopic diagnostics operating in the visible, ultra-violet and x-ray spectral regions.

  8. [Molecular diagnostics of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ryska, A; Dziadziuszko, R; Olszewski, W; Berzinec, P; Öz, B; Gottfried, M; Cufer, T; Samarzija, M; Plank, L; Ostoros, Gy; Tímár, J

    2015-09-01

    Development of the target therapies of lung cancer was a rapid process which fundamentally changed the pathological diagnosis as well. Furthermore, molecular pathology became essential part of the routine diagnostics of lung cancer. These changes generated several practical problems and in underdeveloped countries or in those with reimbursement problems have been combined with further challenges. The central and eastern region of Europe are characterized by similar problems in this respect which promoted the foundation of NSCLC Working Group to provide up to date protocols or guidelines. This present paper is a summary of the molecular pathology and target therapy guidelines written with the notion that it has to be upgraded continuously according to the development of the field.

  9. Biofuels program summary. Volume 2: Research summaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    The Federal government has supported research on biomass technology and energy from municipal waste since 1975. Separate research programs were conducted until 1985 when the two were merged into biofuels and municipal waste technology to take advantage of their many similarities in conversion requirements and research needs. The purpose of the biofuels program is to provide focus, direction, coordination, and funding for the development of technologies that produce tailored energy crops and convert these crops and wastes to fuels. The FY 1989 program includes research on the production (growth) of biomass and its conversion to fuels. Research on biomass production involves the development and use of genetically improved trees and grasses specifically for their energy conversion characteristics (terrestrial energy crops). The Biofuels Program Summary is prepared each year and consists of a two-volume reference set describing the technological advances, current projects, and future research and development (R and D) directions of the program. This volume (Volume 2-Research Summaries) is a compilation of detailed descriptions of the R and D projects performed by the national laboratories and their subcontractors from industry, universities, and nonprofit research institutions.

  10. Role of pH of precursor solution in taming the material properties of spray pyrolysed SnS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajeesh, T. H.; Jinesh, K. B.; Kartha, C. Sudha; Vijayakumar, K. P.

    2012-07-01

    Samples were deposited using chemical spray pyrolysis technique by varying the pH of the starting precursor solution from 0.8 to 3.2. These samples were analyzed using X- ray diffraction, optical absorption spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and electrical measurements in order to investigate the role of pH of the precursor solution on structural, morphological, electrical and optical properties of the SnS films. From the study we could optimize the pH of precursor solution required for the deposition of device quality SnS thin films. Resistivity of the films was brought down by three orders (to 6 × 10-2 Ω cm) along with enhancement in grain size as well as photosensitivity by optimizing the pH of the precursor solution alone. Band gap of the films could also be tailored by controlling the pH of the precursor solution.

  11. In situ capping for size control of monochalcogenides (ZnS, CdS, and SnS) nanocrystals produced by anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Kidder, Michelle; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji -Won

    2015-07-24

    Metal monochalcogenide quantum dot nanocrystals of ZnS, CdS and SnS were prepared by anaerobic, metal-reducing bacteria using in situ capping by oleic acid or oleylamine. Furthermore, the capping agent preferentially adsorbs on the surface of the nanocrystal, suppressing the growth process in the early stages, thus leading to production of nanocrystals with a diameter of less than 5 nm.

  12. Atomistic description of thiostannate-capped CdSe nanocrystals: retention of four-coordinate SnS4 motif and preservation of Cd-rich stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Protesescu, Loredana; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Borovinskaya, Olga; Rossini, Aaron J; Emsley, Lyndon; Copéret, Christophe; Günther, Detlef; Sargent, Edward H; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2015-02-11

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are widely studied as building blocks for novel solid-state materials. Inorganic surface functionalization, used to displace native organic capping ligands from NC surfaces, has been a major enabler of electronic solid-state devices based on colloidal NCs. At the same time, very little is known about the atomistic details of the organic-to-inorganic ligand exchange and binding motifs at the NC surface, severely limiting further progress in designing all-inorganic NCs and NC solids. Taking thiostannates (K4SnS4, K4Sn2S6, K6Sn2S7) as typical examples of chalcogenidometallate ligands and oleate-capped CdSe NCs as a model NC system, in this study we address these questions through the combined application of solution (1)H NMR spectroscopy, solution and solid-state (119)Sn NMR spectroscopy, far-infrared and X-ray absorption spectroscopies, elemental analysis, and by DFT modeling. We show that through the X-type oleate-to-thiostannate ligand exchange, CdSe NCs retain their Cd-rich stoichiometry, with a stoichiometric CdSe core and surface Cd adatoms serving as binding sites for terminal S atoms of the thiostannates ligands, leading to all-inorganic (CdSe)core[Cdm(Sn2S7)yK(6y-2m)]shell (taking Sn2S7(6-) ligand as an example). Thiostannates SnS4(4-) and Sn2S7(6-) retain (distorted) tetrahedral SnS4 geometry upon binding to NC surface. At the same time, experiments and simulations point to lower stability of Sn2S6(4-) (and SnS3(2-)) in most solvents and its lower adaptability to the NC surface caused by rigid Sn2S2 rings.

  13. Atomistic Description of Thiostannate-Capped CdSe Nanocrystals: Retention of Four-Coordinate SnS4 Motif and Preservation of Cd-Rich Stoichiometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are widely studied as building blocks for novel solid-state materials. Inorganic surface functionalization, used to displace native organic capping ligands from NC surfaces, has been a major enabler of electronic solid-state devices based on colloidal NCs. At the same time, very little is known about the atomistic details of the organic-to-inorganic ligand exchange and binding motifs at the NC surface, severely limiting further progress in designing all-inorganic NCs and NC solids. Taking thiostannates (K4SnS4, K4Sn2S6, K6Sn2S7) as typical examples of chalcogenidometallate ligands and oleate-capped CdSe NCs as a model NC system, in this study we address these questions through the combined application of solution 1H NMR spectroscopy, solution and solid-state 119Sn NMR spectroscopy, far-infrared and X-ray absorption spectroscopies, elemental analysis, and by DFT modeling. We show that through the X-type oleate-to-thiostannate ligand exchange, CdSe NCs retain their Cd-rich stoichiometry, with a stoichiometric CdSe core and surface Cd adatoms serving as binding sites for terminal S atoms of the thiostannates ligands, leading to all-inorganic (CdSe)core[Cdm(Sn2S7)yK(6y-2m)]shell (taking Sn2S76– ligand as an example). Thiostannates SnS44– and Sn2S76– retain (distorted) tetrahedral SnS4 geometry upon binding to NC surface. At the same time, experiments and simulations point to lower stability of Sn2S64– (and SnS32–) in most solvents and its lower adaptability to the NC surface caused by rigid Sn2S2 rings. PMID:25597625

  14. Project Summary and Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, Charles

    1999-01-01

    A top level summary of activities conducted throughout the course of the EDOMP in response to initial concerns at the outset of the program is provided. Significant findings from the investigations are summarized, together with resulting countermeasures that were implemented and flight rules that were developed in response to these findings. Subsequent paragraphs provide more information; details will be found in the referenced sections.

  15. Space station executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An executive summary of the modular space station study is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) design characteristics, (2) experiment program, (3) operations, (4) program description, and (5) research implications. The modular space station is considered a candidate payload for the low cost shuttle transportation system.

  16. Crisis Management Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Zhe, Elizabeth; Torem, Chris; Comeaux, Natashia; Dempsey, Allison

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a summary of recent crisis management publications. The first research report summarized, "Predictors of PTSD," was a study of predictor variables for responses to the World Trade Center attack. The second paper, "Effective Mental Health Response to Catastrophic Events," looked at effective responses following Hurricane…

  17. Healthcare. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This executive summary highlights several findings about healthcare. These are: (1) Healthcare is 18 percent of the U.S. economy, twice as high as in other countries; (2) There are two labor markets in healthcare: high-skill, high-wage professional and technical jobs and low-skill, low-wage support jobs; (3) Demand for postsecondary education in…

  18. Remarkable Retellings, Super Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Retelling and summarizing are great ways to get children involved in what they're reading--and thinking about what they understand in texts. Summarizing is a more complex task than retelling. Creating a formal summary usually involves reducing a text by about a third, writing a topic statement, eliminating redundant and unimportant details, and…

  19. Crisis Management: Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Dorman, Sally; Anderson, Luke; McNair, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first report, "A Framework for International Crisis Intervention" (Sally Dorman), is a review of how existing crisis intervention models (including the NASP PREPaRE model) have been adapted for international use. The second article, "Responding…

  20. DIAGNOSTIC METHODS IN AYURVEDA

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, V. J.

    1982-01-01

    This is an analytical study of the Diagnostic methods Prescribes in Ayurveda. As in the case of disease and treatments the concept of diagnosis also is unique in Ayurveda. It goes to the Nidana of Doshicimbalance by studying the physical, physiological, psychic and behavoural aspects of the patient. The paper gives an insight into the various diagnostic methods enunciated in Sastras which turns out to be a fore-runner of any of modern diagnostic methods. PMID:22556480

  1. Plasma diagnostics for FED

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.D.

    1981-01-01

    An overview of the plasma diagnostic instruments recommended for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is described. First the role and need for plasma diagnostics is discussed. This is followed by an identification of particles and radiation eminating from the plasma. Next some design considerations are presented for the overall set of diagnostic instruments. Finally, instruments used for control and for plasma performance measurements are included in separate lists.

  2. TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.; Persons, R.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller (DVC) provides in conjunction with the Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA), control and monitoring for the pumps, valves and gauges associated with each individual diagnostic vacuum system. There will be approximately 50 systems on TFTR. Two standard versions of the controller (A and B) wil be provided in order to meet the requirements of two diagnostic manifold arrangements. All pump and valve sequencing, as well as protection features, will be implemented by the controller.

  3. Atomic and electronic structure transformations in SnS2 at high pressures: a joint single crystal X-ray diffraction and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Filsø, M Ø; Eikeland, E; Zhang, J; Madsen, S R; Iversen, B B

    2016-03-01

    The layered semiconductor SnS2 spurs much interest for both intercalation and optoelectronic applications. Despite the wealth of research in the field of metal dichalcogenides, the structure-property relationship of this compound remains unclear. Here we present a thorough study combining single-crystal X-ray diffraction and DFT calculations on SnS2 in the pressure range 0 < p < 20 GPa. The anisotropic compression of the unit cell is clearly linked to the van der Waals interactions between the S-Sn-S sandwich layers, as the compression mainly affects the interlayer distance. This compression behavior is coincidal with the compression of other well-known layered compounds (graphite and boron nitride) but differs significantly from the compression of other MS2 compounds, making it clear that SnS2 presents a unique and interesting case in the field of metal dichalcogenides. The compression leads to a significant increase in S···S interlayer interaction which in turn results in a change in the electronic structure, documented through DFT band structure calculations. The calculated narrowing of the band gap is supported by a significant, reversible color change of the single crystal. At 20 GPa, the size of the band gap has decreased from 2.15 to 0.88 eV, and band gap closure is predicted to occur at 33 GPa.

  4. EXCESS RF POWER REQUIRED FOR RF CONTROL OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC, A PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY SUPERCONDUCTING PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    M. LYNCH; S. KWON; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    A high-intensity proton linac, such as that being planned for the SNS, requires accurate RF control of cavity fields for the entire pulse in order to avoid beam spill. The current design requirement for the SNS is RF field stability within {+-}0.5% and {+-}0.5{sup o} [1]. This RF control capability is achieved by the control electronics using the excess RF power to correct disturbances. To minimize the initial capital costs, the RF system is designed with 'just enough' RF power. All the usual disturbances exist, such as beam noise, klystron/HVPS noise, coupler imperfections, transport losses, turn-on and turn-off transients, etc. As a superconducting linac, there are added disturbances of large magnitude, including Lorentz detuning and microphonics. The effects of these disturbances and the power required to correct them are estimated, and the result shows that the highest power systems in the SNS have just enough margin, with little or no excess margin.

  5. An Analysis of Categorical Definitions, Diagnostic Methods, Diagnostic Criteria and Personnel Utilization in the Classification of Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newkirk, Diane; And Others

    The project report provides information relevant to the status, function, and effect of currently used definitions of handicapped children and the diagnostic methods used. An initial section serves as both an introduction to and summary of the process used during the project, and includes project conclusions. Section II contains analyses of…

  6. Summary of TMX results: executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.

    1981-02-26

    This report summarizes results from the successful experimental operation of the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) over the period October 1978 through September 1980. The experimental program, summarized by the DOE milestones given in Table 1, had three basic phases: (1) an 8-month checkout period, October 1978 through May 1979; (2) a 6-month initial period of operation, June through November 1979, during which the basic principles of the tandem configuration were demonstrated (i.e., plasma confinement was improved over that of a single-cell mirror); and (3) a 10-month period, December 1979 through September 1980, during which the initial TMX results were corroborated by additional diagnostic measurements and many detailed physics investigations were carried out. This report summarizes the early results, presents results of recent data analysis, and outlines areas of ongoing research.

  7. [Diagnostic Errors in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Buser, Claudia; Bankova, Andriyana

    2015-12-01

    The recognition of diagnostic errors in everyday practice can help improve patient safety. The most common diagnostic errors are the cognitive errors, followed by system-related errors and no fault errors. The cognitive errors often result from mental shortcuts, known as heuristics. The rate of cognitive errors can be reduced by a better understanding of heuristics and the use of checklists. The autopsy as a retrospective quality assessment of clinical diagnosis has a crucial role in learning from diagnostic errors. Diagnostic errors occur more often in primary care in comparison to hospital settings. On the other hand, the inpatient errors are more severe than the outpatient errors.

  8. [Diagnostic Errors in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Buser, Claudia; Bankova, Andriyana

    2015-12-01

    The recognition of diagnostic errors in everyday practice can help improve patient safety. The most common diagnostic errors are the cognitive errors, followed by system-related errors and no fault errors. The cognitive errors often result from mental shortcuts, known as heuristics. The rate of cognitive errors can be reduced by a better understanding of heuristics and the use of checklists. The autopsy as a retrospective quality assessment of clinical diagnosis has a crucial role in learning from diagnostic errors. Diagnostic errors occur more often in primary care in comparison to hospital settings. On the other hand, the inpatient errors are more severe than the outpatient errors. PMID:26649954

  9. Automotive Diagnostic Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbus State Community Coll., OH.

    This document contains materials developed for and about the automotive diagnostic technologies tech prep program of the South-Western City Schools in Ohio. Part 1 begins with a map of the program, which begins with an automotive/diagnostic technologies program in grades 11 and 12 that leads to entry-level employment or a 2-year automotive…

  10. Recent performance of the SNS H{sup −} ion source and low-energy beam transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P. Ewald, K. D.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Tang, J.; Welton, R.

    2014-02-15

    Recent measurements of the H{sup −} beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to ∼45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H{sup −} beam exiting the RFQ dropped from ∼40 mA to ∼34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  11. Atom-Thin SnS2-xSex with Adjustable Compositions by Direct Liquid Exfoliation from Single Crystals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhanhai; Liang, Hui; Wang, Xusheng; Ma, Xinlei; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Yanlian; Xie, Liming; Chen, Dong; Long, Yujia; Chen, Jitao; Chang, Yunjie; Yan, Chunhua; Zhang, Xinxiang; Zhang, Xueji; Ge, Binghui; Ren, Zhian; Xue, Mianqi; Chen, Genfu

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) chalcogenide materials are fundamentally and technologically fascinating for their suitable band gap energy and carrier type relevant to their adjustable composition, structure, and dimensionality. Here, we demonstrate the exfoliation of single-crystal SnS2-xSex (SSS) with S/Se vacancies into an atom-thin layer by simple sonication in ethanol without additive. The introduction of vacancies at the S/Se site, the conflicting atomic radius of sulfur in selenium layers, and easy incorporation with an ethanol molecule lead to high ion accessibility; therefore, atom-thin SSS flakes can be effectively prepared by exfoliating the single crystal via sonication. The in situ pyrolysis of such materials can further adjust their compositions, representing tunable activation energy, band gap, and also tunable response to analytes of such materials. As the most basic and crucial step of the 2D material field, the successful synthesis of an uncontaminated and atom-thin sample will further push ahead the large-scale applications of 2D materials, including, but not limited to, electronics, sensing, catalysis, and energy storage fields. PMID:26690902

  12. Fabrication of Cu2SnS3 thin-film solar cells with power conversion efficiency of over 4%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Ayaka; Toyonaga, Kotoba; Chino, Kotaro; Katagiri, Hironori; Araki, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    Cu2SnS3 (CTS) thin films were produced by the co-evaporation of Cu, Sn, and cracked sulfur, followed by annealing. The as-deposited films were then annealed at 570 °C for 5 min in the presence of 100 mg of sulfur lumps in a rapid thermal processing furnace filled with N2 gas at atmospheric pressure. Solar cells were then fabricated using the CTS films as absorber layers, and their efficiency was evaluated for different Cu/Sn compositional ratios. The largest grain size was found for films with a slightly Sn-rich composition. The highest performance was obtained for solar cells containing a CTS thin film with a Cu/Sn ratio of about 1.9. A cell with a Cu/Sn ratio of 1.87 exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 258 mV, a short-circuit current density of 35.6 mA/cm2, a fill factor of 0.467, and a power conversion efficiency of 4.29%.

  13. Giant piezoelectricity of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides: SnSe, SnS, GeSe, and GeS

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Ruixiang; Yang, Li; Li, Wenbin; Li, Ju

    2015-10-26

    We predict enormous, anisotropic piezoelectric effects in intrinsic monolayer group IV monochalcogenides (MX, M=Sn or Ge, X=Se or S), including SnSe, SnS, GeSe, and GeS. Using first-principle simulations based on the modern theory of polarization, we find that their piezoelectric coefficients are about one to two orders of magnitude larger than those of other 2D materials, such as MoS{sub 2} and GaSe, and bulk quartz and AlN which are widely used in industry. This enhancement is a result of the unique “puckered” C{sub 2v} symmetry and electronic structure of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides. Given the achieved experimental advances in the fabrication of monolayers, their flexible character, and ability to withstand enormous strain, these 2D structures with giant piezoelectric effects may be promising for a broad range of applications such as nano-sized sensors, piezotronics, and energy harvesting in portable electronic devices.

  14. Atom-Thin SnS2-xSex with Adjustable Compositions by Direct Liquid Exfoliation from Single Crystals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhanhai; Liang, Hui; Wang, Xusheng; Ma, Xinlei; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Yanlian; Xie, Liming; Chen, Dong; Long, Yujia; Chen, Jitao; Chang, Yunjie; Yan, Chunhua; Zhang, Xinxiang; Zhang, Xueji; Ge, Binghui; Ren, Zhian; Xue, Mianqi; Chen, Genfu

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) chalcogenide materials are fundamentally and technologically fascinating for their suitable band gap energy and carrier type relevant to their adjustable composition, structure, and dimensionality. Here, we demonstrate the exfoliation of single-crystal SnS2-xSex (SSS) with S/Se vacancies into an atom-thin layer by simple sonication in ethanol without additive. The introduction of vacancies at the S/Se site, the conflicting atomic radius of sulfur in selenium layers, and easy incorporation with an ethanol molecule lead to high ion accessibility; therefore, atom-thin SSS flakes can be effectively prepared by exfoliating the single crystal via sonication. The in situ pyrolysis of such materials can further adjust their compositions, representing tunable activation energy, band gap, and also tunable response to analytes of such materials. As the most basic and crucial step of the 2D material field, the successful synthesis of an uncontaminated and atom-thin sample will further push ahead the large-scale applications of 2D materials, including, but not limited to, electronics, sensing, catalysis, and energy storage fields.

  15. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H{sup −} ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X. Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2014-02-15

    A RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H{sup −} ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ∼1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a means for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN (aluminum nitrite) chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  16. The formation of IRIS diagnostics. III. Near-ultraviolet spectra and images

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, T. M. D.; Leenaarts, J.; De Pontieu, B.; Carlsson, M.; Uitenbroek, H. E-mail: jorritl@astro.uio.no E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2013-12-01

    The Mg II h and k lines are the prime chromospheric diagnostics of NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). In the previous papers of this series, we used a realistic three-dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamics model to calculate the h and k lines in detail and investigated how their spectral features relate to the underlying atmosphere. In this work, we employ the same approach to investigate how the h and k diagnostics fare when taking into account the finite resolution of IRIS and different noise levels. In addition, we investigate the diagnostic potential of several other photospheric lines and near-continuum regions present in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) window of IRIS and study the formation of the NUV slit-jaw images. We find that the instrumental resolution of IRIS has a small effect on the quality of the h and k diagnostics; the relations between the spectral features and atmospheric properties are mostly unchanged. The peak separation is the most affected diagnostic, but mainly due to limitations of the simulation. The effects of noise start to be noticeable at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 20, but we show that with noise filtering one can obtain reliable diagnostics at least down to a S/N of 5. The many photospheric lines present in the NUV window provide velocity information for at least eight distinct photospheric heights. Using line-free regions in the h and k far wings, we derive good estimates of photospheric temperature for at least three heights. Both of these diagnostics, in particular the latter, can be obtained even at S/Ns as low as 5.

  17. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostics Workshop was held July 25-26, 1995 at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the workshop was to foster timely exchange of information and expertise acquired by researchers and users of laser based Rayleigh scattering diagnostics for aerospace flow facilities and other applications. This Conference Publication includes the 12 technical presentations and transcriptions of the two panel discussions. The first panel was made up of 'users' of optical diagnostics, mainly in aerospace test facilities, and its purpose was to assess areas of potential applications of Rayleigh scattering diagnostics. The second panel was made up of active researchers in Rayleigh scattering diagnostics, and its purpose was to discuss the direction of future work.

  18. GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2012-05-14

    A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for each characterization technique used. This report contains the summary of the results.

  19. Blois V: Experimental summary

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.G.

    1993-09-01

    The author gives a summary talk of the best experimental data given at the Vth Blois Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering. He addresses the following eight areas in his talk: total and elastic cross sections; single diffractive excitation; electron-proton scattering; di-jets and rapidity gaps; areas of future study; spins and asymmetries; high-transverse momentum and masses at the Tevatron; and disoriented chiral condensates and cosmic radiation.

  20. Epidemiology of and Diagnostic Strategies for Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Dardé, Marie-Laure

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii was discovered a little over 100 years ago, but knowledge of its biological life cycle and its medical importance has grown in the last 40 years. This obligate intracellular parasite was identified early as a pathogen responsible for congenital infection, but its clinical expression and the importance of reactivations of infections in immunocompromised patients were recognized later, in the era of organ transplantation and HIV infection. Recent knowledge of host cell-parasite interactions and of parasite virulence has brought new insights into the comprehension of the pathophysiology of infection. In this review, we focus on epidemiological and diagnostic aspects, putting them in perspective with current knowledge of parasite genotypes. In particular, we provide critical information on diagnostic methods according to the patient's background and discuss the implementation of screening tools for congenital toxoplasmosis according to health policies. PMID:22491772

  1. ULSGEN (Uplink Summary Generator)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y.-F.; Schrock, M.; Reeve, T.; Nguyen, K.; Smith, B.

    2014-01-01

    Uplink is an important part of spacecraft operations. Ensuring the accuracy of uplink content is essential to mission success. Before commands are radiated to the spacecraft, the command and sequence must be reviewed and verified by various teams. In most cases, this process requires collecting the command data, reviewing the data during a command conference meeting, and providing physical signatures by designated members of various teams to signify approval of the data. If commands or sequences are disapproved for some reason, the whole process must be restarted. Recording data and decision history is important for traceability reasons. Given that many steps and people are involved in this process, an easily accessible software tool for managing the process is vital to reducing human error which could result in uplinking incorrect data to the spacecraft. An uplink summary generator called ULSGEN was developed to assist this uplink content approval process. ULSGEN generates a web-based summary of uplink file content and provides an online review process. Spacecraft operations personnel view this summary as a final check before actual radiation of the uplink data. .

  2. Diagnostic Value of Presepsin for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Hu, Zhi-De; Song, Jia; Shao, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several individual studies have reported the diagnostic accuracy of presepsin (sCD14-ST) for sepsis, but the results are inconsistent. The present systematic review and meta-analysis pooled data to better ascertain the value of circulatory presepsin as a biomarker for sepsis. Studies published in English before November 7, 2014 and assessing the diagnostic accuracy of presepsin for sepsis were retrieved from medical databases. The quality of eligible studies was assessed using a revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy (QUADAS-2). The overall diagnostic accuracy of presepsin for sepsis was pooled according to a bivariate model. Publication bias was assessed using Deek funnel plot asymmetry test. Eleven studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. The overall diagnostic sensitivity of presepsin for sepsis was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.77–0.88), and specificity was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.72–0.83). The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.84–0.90). The pretest probability of sepsis was 0.56 among all subjects. When presepsin was introduced as the diagnostic test for sepsis, the posttest probabilities were 0.81 for a positive result and 0.19 for a negative. The major design deficits of the included studies were lack of prespecified thresholds and patient selection bias. The publication bias was negative. Presepsin is an effective adjunct biomarker for the diagnosis of sepsis, but is insufficient to detect or rule out sepsis when used alone. PMID:26632748

  3. Cable Diagnostic Focused Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hartlein, R.A.; Hampton, R.N.

    2010-12-30

    This report summarizes an extensive effort made to understand how to effectively use the various diagnostic technologies to establish the condition of medium voltage underground cable circuits. These circuits make up an extensive portion of the electric delivery infrastructure in the United States. Much of this infrastructure is old and experiencing unacceptable failure rates. By deploying efficient diagnostic testing programs, electric utilities can replace or repair circuits that are about to fail, providing an optimal approach to improving electric system reliability. This is an intrinsically complex topic. Underground cable systems are not homogeneous. Cable circuits often contain multiple branches with different cable designs and a range of insulation materials. In addition, each insulation material ages differently as a function of time, temperature and operating environment. To complicate matters further, there are a wide variety of diagnostic technologies available for assessing the condition of cable circuits with a diversity of claims about the effectiveness of each approach. As a result, the benefits of deploying cable diagnostic testing programs have been difficult to establish, leading many utilities to avoid the their use altogether. This project was designed to help address these issues. The information provided is the result of a collaborative effort between Georgia Tech NEETRAC staff, Georgia Tech academic faculty, electric utility industry participants, as well as cable system diagnostic testing service providers and test equipment providers. Report topics include: •How cable systems age and fail, •The various technologies available for detecting potential failure sites, •The advantages and disadvantages of different diagnostic technologies, •Different approaches for utilities to employ cable system diagnostics. The primary deliverables of this project are this report, a Cable Diagnostic Handbook (a subset of this report) and an online

  4. Melioidosis Diagnostic Workshop, 20131

    PubMed Central

    AuCoin, David; Baccam, Prasith; Baggett, Henry C.; Baird, Rob; Bhengsri, Saithip; Blaney, David D.; Brett, Paul J.; Brooks, Timothy J.G.; Brown, Katherine A.; Chantratita, Narisara; Cheng, Allen C.; Dance, David A.B.; Decuypere, Saskia; Defenbaugh, Dawn; Gee, Jay E.; Houghton, Raymond; Jorakate, Possawat; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Merlin, Toby L.; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Norton, Robert; Peacock, Sharon J.; Rolim, Dionne B.; Simpson, Andrew J.; Steinmetz, Ivo; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Stokes, Martha M.; Sue, David; Tuanyok, Apichai; Whistler, Toni; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Walke, Henry T.

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is a severe disease that can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical manifestations and a lack of adequate diagnostic capabilities for suspected cases. There is broad interest in improving detection and diagnosis of this disease not only in melioidosis-endemic regions but also outside these regions because melioidosis may be underreported and poses a potential bioterrorism challenge for public health authorities. Therefore, a workshop of academic, government, and private sector personnel from around the world was convened to discuss the current state of melioidosis diagnostics, diagnostic needs, and future directions. PMID:25626057

  5. Plasma diagnostic reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.; Afeyan, B.B.; Garrison, J.C.; Kaiser, T.B.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Domier, C.W.; Chou, A.E.; Baang, S.

    1996-02-26

    Theoretical and experimental studies of plasma diagnostic reflectometry have been undertaken as a collaborative research project between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California Department of Applied Science Plasma Diagnostics Group under the auspices of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL. Theoretical analyses have explored the basic principles of reflectometry to understand its limitations, to address specific gaps in the understanding of reflectometry measurements in laboratory experiments, and to explore extensions of reflectometry such as ultra-short-pulse reflectometry. The theory has supported basic laboratory reflectometry experiments where reflectometry measurements can be corroborated by independent diagnostic measurements.

  6. Radioactive diagnostic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, A.; Aihara, M.; Matsuda, M.; Suzuki, A.; Tsuya, A.

    1984-02-07

    A radioactive diagnostic agent for renal cortex, adrenal cortex, myocardium, brain stem, spinal nerve, etc., which comprises as an essential component monoiodoacetic acid wherein the iodine atom is radioactive.

  7. Space Shuttle Missions Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Floyd V.; Legler, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    This document has been produced and updated over a 21-year period. It is intended to be a handy reference document, basically one page per flight, and care has been exercised to make it as error-free as possible. This document is basically "as flown" data and has been compiled from many sources including flight logs, flight rules, flight anomaly logs, mod flight descent summary, post flight analysis of mps propellants, FDRD, FRD, SODB, and the MER shuttle flight data and inflight anomaly list. Orbit distance traveled is taken from the PAO mission statistics.

  8. IAU Symposium 317 Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of the halo yields fundamental information on the formation and evolution of galaxies: this was quite exhaustively discussed at this very important symposium. I present a brief personal summary of the meeting, outlining those points that I found more exciting and suggestive. I also remarked a few areas that were possibly not enough expanded. I found this research field extremely interesting and I think there are great expectations for new developments in the next few years, thanks to the new large spectroscopic surveys and the ESA GAIA satellite.

  9. FY 1996 activity summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety provides nuclear safety policy, independent technical evaluation, and technical support. A summary of these activities is provided in this report. These include: (1) changing the mission of the former production facilities to storage and waste management; (2) stabilizing nuclear materials not recycled due to production cessation or interruptions; (3) reformulating the authorization basis for existing facilities to convert to a standards based approach for operations consistent with modern expectations; and (4) implementing a modern regulatory framework for nuclear facilities. Enforcement of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act is also reported.

  10. Manual of diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, G.; Baker, S.; Davis, L.

    1988-01-01

    This book is on ordering and understanding the results of radiologic studies. Main sections are (I) Diagnostic Radiology serves as a basic introduction; (II) Diagnostic Modalities dedicates a chapter to each imaging modality in a clinical context, with a brief technical description and patient preparation guidelines; and (III) Organ System Imaging contains a chapter on each major organ system, covering the abilities and limitations of each modality to image a specific organ system and the significance of anatomic, physiologic, and general pathologic information.

  11. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cudahy, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  12. Recent performance and ignition tests of the pulsed SNS H{sup −} source for 1-MW neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P. Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2015-04-08

    After acquiring several reliable spare targets, SNS ramped the beam power from 850 kW to 1.4 MW, which required an increase in H{sup −} beam pulse length from 0.88 to 1.0 ms at 60 Hz. This increase initially produced slow 2-MHz power ramp-ups and, after several weeks of uninterrupted operation, it produced plasma outages every time the pulse length was raised above ∼0.95 ms. Similar outages were previously observed towards the end of long service cycles, which were believed to indicate that the breakdown voltage of the high purity hydrogen started to exceed the induced electric fields. In 2011 the RF was reconfigured to start with 10 cycles of 1.96 MHz, which yielded the shortest H{sup −} beam rise times and apparently eliminated those plasma outages. The new, pulse-length dependent outages were eliminated by increasing the initial frequency to 1.985 MHz. However, careful frequency studies are unable to justify this frequency. In addition, the paper discusses the issues and solutions for the electron-dump voltage, which starts to sag and become unstable after several weeks of high current operation. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor this article has been updated to include References 3–13, which were present in the author’s original submission but were lost during manuscript processing in the Proceedings Editor's office. The updated article was published on 5 May 2015.

  13. Polyethylene glycol-assisted growth of Cu2SnS3 promising absorbers for thin film solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, S.; Çetinkaya, S.; Yaşar, S.; Bilican, İ.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the results of the polyethylene glycol- (PEG) assisted preparation and characterization of high-quality and well-crystallized Cu2SnS3 (CTS) thin films obtained using sol-gel spin-coating method and a subsequent annealing in a sulphur atmosphere. Structural, morphological, compositional, electrical and optical investigations were carried out. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples proved the polycrystalline nature and preferred crystallization of the films. No peak referring to other binary or ternary phases were detected in the patterns. The intensity of the preferred orientation and crystallite size of the films increased with increasing PEG content. This trend yielded an improvement in photo-transient currents of the PEG-assisted growth of CTS films. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the CTS films have continuous, dense and agglomeration-like morphology. Through energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies, it has been deduced that the samples consist of Cu, Sn and S of which atomic percentages were consistent with Cu/Sn and S/metal initial ratios. The agglomerated morphology of the samples has been attributed to increasing PEG content. A remarkable enhancement was observed in photo-transient currents of p-n junction of the produced films along with increasing PEG content. Through resistivity-temperature measurements, three impurity level electrical activation energy values for each film were found. Optical band gap values of the films were estimated via absorbance-wavelength behaviours and decreased with increasing PEG content. It has been revealed that PEG-assisted growth of CTS thin films is a promising way to improve its photovoltaic characteristics.

  14. Current development of saliva/oral fluid-based diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chih-Ko; Christodoulides, Nicolaos J; Floriano, Pierre N; Miller, Craig S; Ebersole, Jeffrey L; Weigum, Shannon E; McDevitt, John; Redding, Spencer W

    2010-07-01

    Saliva can be easily obtained in medical and non-medical settings, and contains numerous bio-molecules, including those typically found in serum for disease detection and monitoring. In the past two decades, the achievements of high-throughput approaches afforded by biotechnology and nanotechnology allow for disease-specific salivary biomarker discovery and establishment of rapid, multiplex, and miniaturized analytical assays. These developments have dramatically advanced saliva-based diagnostics. In this review, we discuss the current consensus on development of saliva/oral fluid-based diagnostics and provide a summary of recent research advancements of the Texas-Kentucky Saliva Diagnostics Consortium. In the foreseeable future, current research on saliva based diagnostic methods could revolutionize health care.

  15. Hemoptysis with diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Bimalendu

    2013-02-01

    Hemoptysis is a common symptom. Although initial diagnostic workup, including a chest radiograph, often gives a clue to the cause, it provides no diagnostic hints in 3.0-42.2% of episodes of hemoptysis. To describe those cases with no diagnostic hints at initial investigations, experts have used different terms, including unexplained hemoptysis, idiopathic hemoptysis, cryptogenic hemoptysis and hemoptysis with normal chest radiographs. As hemoptysis is a common symptom of bronchogenic carcinoma, there is a concern of having underlying malignancy. Physicians value high-resolution computed tomography and fiberoptic bronchoscopy as the next investigations to establish diagnosis. These investigations however are expensive and nonspecific results are common in those cases of hemoptysis where initial diagnostic workup gives no clues to the cause. As a result, controversies exist with regard to their use. In this article, the author has proposed diagnostic approaches to evaluate those cases of hemoptysis with no diagnostic hints at initial investigation, after extensive review of published articles related to the case scenario. PMID:23362818

  16. Neutron Diagnostics for NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Cris W.; Berggren, R.; Caldwell, S.; Chrien, R. C.; Cverna, F.; Faulkner, J.; Mack, J. M.; Morgan, G. L.; Murphy, T. J.; Oertel, J. A.; Tegtmeier, J.; Walton, R.; Wilke, M.; Wilson, D. C.; Young, C. S.

    1999-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be a pre-emminent facility for research on burning plasmas. Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing a focus area of coordinating fusion reaction product diagnostics on NIF and studying fusion burn. We will be developing ``core'' diagnostics for NIF including neutron time-of-flight and single-hit systems for ion temperature and neutron spectra, measurements of ``bang-time'' (time of fusion burn relative to start of laser pulse), and support for activation measurements for high-yield and radiochemical analysis. We are also developing advanced Phase 2 diagnostics including a gas Cerenkov burn history diagnostic and work on apertures and detectors for neutron imaging. This will include tests of these diagnostic systems on the OMEGA laser in the coming years. The measurement requirements and system descriptions of these NIF diagnostics will be described. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-36.

  17. [Diagnostics in osteology].

    PubMed

    Jakob, F; Genest, F; Seefried, L; Tsourdi, E; Lapa, C; Hofbauer, L C

    2016-07-01

    Clinical diagnostics in metabolic bone diseases cover a broad spectrum of conventional and state of the art methods ranging from the medical history and clinical examination to molecular imaging. Patient treatment is carried out in an interdisciplinary team due to the multiple interactions of bone with other organ systems. Diagnosis of osteoporosis is supported by high level national guidelines. A paradigm shift concerning the clinical relevance of bone mineral density measurement renders this now to be a strong risk factor rather than a diagnostic parameter, while strengthening the value of other clinical factors for risk assessment. The impact of parameters for muscle mass, structure and function is steadily increasing in all age groups. In order to identify underlying diseases that influence bone metabolism a panel of general laboratory diagnostic parameters is recommended. Markers for bone formation and resorption and specific parameters for the regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism should be evaluated by specialists because they require diligence in preanalytics and experience in interpretation. Genetic diagnosis is well established for rare bone diseases while diagnostic panels are not yet available for routine diagnostics in polygenetic diseases such as osteoporosis. Conventional radiology is still very important to identify, e. g. fractures, osteolytic and osteoblastic lesions and extraosseous calcifications; however tomography-based methods which combine, e. g. scintigraphy or positron emission technologies with anatomical imaging are of increasing significance. Clinical diagnostics in osteology require profound knowledge and are subject to a dynamic evolution. PMID:27307159

  18. Intern Summary Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Topics covered include: Probe Station Antenna Range; LERCIP 2004 Summary; L.E.R.C.I.P. Internship Summary; Hubble Space Telescope Bi-Stem Thermal Shield Analyses; GRABER - the Duct Tape of Space and JIMO Heat Conducting Foam; CDF and PDF Comparison Between Humacao, Puerto Rico and Florida; Development of the On-board Aircraft Network; Development of the Planar Inlet Design and Analysis Process (PINDAP); An Overview of My 2004 Summer Internship [Non-destructive Evaluation]; My Summer Experience as an Administrative Officer Assistant [in the Safety and Assurance Directorate Office]; Programming an Experiment Control System; Reducing the Cation Exchange Capacity of Lithium Clay to Form Better Dispersed; Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites; Feasibility of EB Welded Hastelloy X and Combination of Refractory Metals; My Work in the NASA Glenn History Office and Records Management Office; Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio; [The Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center]; Drinking Water Database; Design of an EXB Probe; and Texturing Carbon-carbon Composite Radiator Surfaces Utilizing Atomic Oxygen.

  19. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2010 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2009 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. National reserves information for most mineral commodities found in this report, including those for the United States, are derived from a variety of sources. The ideal source of such information would be comprehensive evaluations that apply the same criteria to deposits in different geographic areas and report the results by country. In the absence of such evaluations, national reserves estimates compiled by countries for selected mineral commodities are a primary source of national reserves information. Lacking national assessment information by governments, sources such as academic articles, company reports, presentations by company representatives, and trade journal articles, or a combination of these, serve as the basis for national reserves information reported in the mineral commodity sections of this publication. A national estimate may be assembled from the following: historically reported reserves information carried for years without alteration because no new information is available; historically reported reserves reduced by the amount of historical production; and company reported reserves. International minerals availability studies conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM), before 1996, and estimates of identified resources by an international collaborative effort (the

  20. Enhancement of photoelectrochemical activity of SnS thin-film photoelectrodes using TiO2, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 metal oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vequizo, Junie Jhon M.; Yokoyama, Masanori; Ichimura, Masaya; Yamakata, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfide (SnS) fine photoelectrodes fabricated by three-step pulsed electrodeposition were active for H2 evolution. The incident-photon-conversion-efficiency increases from 900 nm and offers a good fit with the absorption spectrum. The activity was enhanced by 3.4, 3.0, and 1.8 times compared to bare SnS by loading Nb2O5, TiO2, and Ta2O5, respectively. Nb2O5 was most efficient because its conduction band is low enough to facilitate effective electron transfer from SnS; it also has sufficiently high potential for H2 evolution. The overall activity is determined by the competitive interfacial electron transfer between SnS/metal-oxide and metal-oxide/water. Therefore, constructing appropriate heterojunctions is necessary for further improving photoelectrochemical systems.

  1. MJO Simulation Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Waliser, D; Sperber, K; Hendon, H; Kim, D; Maloney, E; Wheeler, M; Weickmann, K; Zhang, C; Donner, L; Gottschalck, J; Higgins, W; Kang, I; Legler, D; Moncrieff, M; Schubert, S; Stern, W; Vitart, F; Wang, B; Wang, W; Woolnough, S

    2008-06-02

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) interacts with, and influences, a wide range of weather and climate phenomena (e.g., monsoons, ENSO, tropical storms, mid-latitude weather), and represents an important, and as yet unexploited, source of predictability at the subseasonal time scale. Despite the important role of the MJO in our climate and weather systems, current global circulation models (GCMs) exhibit considerable shortcomings in representing this phenomenon. These shortcomings have been documented in a number of multi-model comparison studies over the last decade. However, diagnosis of model performance has been challenging, and model progress has been difficult to track, due to the lack of a coherent and standardized set of MJO diagnostics. One of the chief objectives of the US CLIVAR MJO Working Group is the development of observation-based diagnostics for objectively evaluating global model simulations of the MJO in a consistent framework. Motivation for this activity is reviewed, and the intent and justification for a set of diagnostics is provided, along with specification for their calculation, and illustrations of their application. The diagnostics range from relatively simple analyses of variance and correlation, to more sophisticated space-time spectral and empirical orthogonal function analyses. These diagnostic techniques are used to detect MJO signals, to construct composite life-cycles, to identify associations of MJO activity with the mean state, and to describe interannual variability of the MJO.

  2. The Viking project. [summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    The Viking project launched two unmanned spacecraft to Mars in 1975 for scientific exploration with special emphasis on the search for life. Each spacecraft consisted of an orbiter and a lander. The landing sites were finally selected after the spacecraft were in orbit. Thirteen investigations were performed: three mapping experiments from the orbiter, one atmospheric investigation during the lander entry phase, eight experiments on the surface of the planet, and one using the spacecraft radio and radar systems. The experiments on the surface dealt principally with biology, chemistry, geology, and meteorology. Seventy-eight scientists have participated in the 13 teams performing these experiments. This paper is a summary of the project and an introduction to the articles that follow.

  3. Neutrino physics: Summary talk

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    This paper is organized as follows: First, I describe the state of neutrino phenomenology. Emphasis is placed on sin/sup 2/ /theta//sub W/, its present status and future prospects. In addition, some signatures of ''new physics'' are described. Then, kaon physics at Fermilab is briefly discussed. I concentrate on the interesting rare decay K/sub L/ /yields/ /pi//sup 0/e/sup +/e/sup /minus// which may be a clean probe direct CP violation. Neutrino mass, mixing, and electromagnetic moments are surveyed. There, I describe the present state and future direction of accelerator based experiments. Finally, I conclude with an outlook on the future. Throughout this summary, I have drawn from and incorporated ideas discussed by other speakers at this workshop. However, I have tried to combine their ideas with my own perspective on neutrino physics and where it is headed. 49 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. DiagTest3Grp: An R Package for Analyzing Diagnostic Tests with Three Ordinal Groups

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jingqin; Xiong, Chengjie

    2012-01-01

    Medical researchers endeavor to identify potentially useful biomarkers to develop marker-based screening assays for disease diagnosis and prevention. Useful summary measures which properly evaluate the discriminative ability of diagnostic markers are critical for this purpose. Literature and existing software, for example, R packages nicely cover summary measures for diagnostic markers used for the binary case (e.g., healthy vs. diseased). An intermediate population at an early disease stage usually exists between the healthy and the fully diseased population in many disease processes. Supporting utilities for three-group diagnostic tests are highly desired and important for identifying patients at the early disease stage for timely treatments. However, application packages which provide summary measures for three ordinal groups are currently lacking. This paper focuses on two summary measures of diagnostic accuracy—volume under the receiver operating characteristic surface and the extended Youden index, with three diagnostic groups. We provide the R package DiagTest3Grp to estimate, under both parametric and nonparametric assumptions, the two summary measures and the associated variances, as well as the optimal cut-points for disease diagnosis. An omnibus test for multiple markers and a Wald test for two markers, on independent or paired samples, are incorporated to compare diagnostic accuracy across biomarkers. Sample size calculation under the normality assumption can be performed in the R package to design future diagnostic studies. A real world application evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of neuropsychological markers for Alzheimer’s disease is used to guide readers through step-by-step implementation of DiagTest3Grp to demonstrate its utility. PMID:23504300

  5. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics. PMID:23126904

  6. Beamlet laser diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, S.C.; Behrendt, W.C.; Smith, I.

    1996-06-01

    Beamlet is instrumented extensively to monitor the performance of the overall laser system and many of its subsystems. Beam diagnostics, installed in key locations, are used to fully characterize the beam during its propagation through the multipass cavity and the laser`s output section. This article describes the diagnostics stations located on Beamlet and discusses the design, calibration, and performance of the Beamlet calorimeters. The authors used Nova`s diagnostics packages to develop the Beamlet design to determine beam energy, spatial profile, temporal profile, and other beam parameters. Technologic improvements within the last several years in controls, charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras, and fast oscilloscopes have allowed the authors to obtain more accurate measurements on the Beamlet laser system. They briefly cover some of these techniques, including a description of their LabVIEW based data acquisition system.

  7. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  8. ORION laser target diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.; and others

    2012-10-15

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  9. Reversed field pinch diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a toroidal, axisymmetric magnetic confinement configuration characterized by a magnetic field configuration in which the toroidal magnetic field is of similar strength to the poloidal field, and is reversed at the edge compared to the center. The RFP routinely operates at high beta, and is a strong candidate for a compact fusion device. Relevant attributes of the configuration will be presented, together with an overview of present and planned experiments and their diagnostics. RFP diagnostics are in many ways similar to those of other magnetic confinement devices (such as tokamaks); these lectures will point out pertinent differences, and will present some diagnostics which provide special insights into unique attributes of the RFP.

  10. PDX diagnostic control system

    SciTech Connect

    Mika, R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a computer-base diagnostic control system operating on the PDX Tokamak. The prime function of the system is to control mechanical positioning devices associated with various diagnostics including Thomson Scattering, X-Ray Pulse Height Analyzer, Rotating Scanning Monochromator, Fast Ion Detection Experiment, Bolometers and Plasma Limiters. The diagnostic control system consists of a PDP-11/34 computer, a CAMAC system partitioned between the PDX control room and the PDX machine area, and special electronic control modules developed at PPL. The special modules include a digital closed loop motor controller and user interface control panel for control and status display. A standard control panel was developed for interfacing each system user with the PDP-11/34 computer, through specially developed CAMAC modules.

  11. INTRODUCTION Summary of Papers Summary of Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Serge; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2010-12-01

    consequence of the so-called sub-harmonic instability. Igonin et al study the perturbation growth at a free surface of condensed matter with deterministic initial perturbations under the effect of a shock wave, which induces the RM instability. Two- and three-dimensional initial perturbations at the surface are imposed, and pulsed radiography and a two-piston shock tube technique are applied for experimental diagnostics. The authors quantify the dependency of the linear growth-rate on shock strength and geometry of the perturbation, show that the growth of the perturbations strongly depends on material compression in the shock tube, and find that 3D perturbations grow faster than 2D perturbations in the nonlinear regime of RMI. Matsuoka uses analytical and numerical methods to investigate the RT and RM instabilities in the incompressible limit. The author considers the interfacial dynamics in planar geometry and accounts for the effect of surface tension. Under certain conditions in the parameter regime, a mode-mode interaction leads to a 'resonance' type of behavior in the interfacial dynamics, and this resonant motion is studied in detail. Nevmerzhitsky et al report new experimental results on turbulent mixing induced by the RT instability at the gas-liquid interface. The width of the mixing zone spans a substantial dynamic range, thus allowing for accurate quantification of the mixing growth-rate. The authors find that the prefactor in the gt2 scaling law varies with time and depends on the Reynolds number in the range Re~104-106. Some interesting features of the front dynamics are observed, including front pulsation and formation of secondary structures. High energy density physics. The theme of high energy density physics is of special interest to the TMB community. Huete Ruiz de Lira investigates the classical problem of turbulence generation by a shock wave interacting with a random density inhomogeneity field, and proposes an exact small-amplitude linear theory to

  12. [Sialendoscopy: diagnostic possibilities and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Boehm, A; Faure, F; Dietz, A

    2008-05-01

    With the improved availability of sialendoscopy (SE) during the last decade the therapeutical concept for sialoliths has remarkably changed. Due to the introduction of SE the diagnostic opportunities could be extended. Before introduction of SE, the diagnostic was focused only on the existence and size of sialoliths. Now, questions like consistence of sialoliths and their mobility in the duct system, stenoses with sialolithiasis-like symptoms as well as the evaluation of the remaining secretory capacity of the involved gland became relevant for the therapeutic decision. Furthermore there are an increasing number of therapeutic opportunities available. For some of these techniques long term experiences are missing so far. On the basis of the review of the current literature and a retrospective analysis of 256 own patients the different techniques and their indication are described. The combination of different therapeutical options of the SE and the still established extracorporal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) results in an important reduction of glandular resection in patients with sialolithiasis. Thus, the rate of glandular resection for the glandular submandibular can be decreased to 5 % and for the glandular parotis to 1 %. In summary, the most effective way is a stepwise approach based on the diagnostic tools of SE and including the laser-lithotripsy and ESWL in the treatment of sialolithiasis.

  13. Diagnostic dry bone histology in human paleopathology.

    PubMed

    de Boer, H H Hans; Van der Merwe, A E Lida

    2016-10-01

    Paleopathology is the study of trauma and disease as may be observed in ancient (human) remains. In contrast to its central role in current medical practice, microscopy plays a rather modest role in paleopathology. This is at least partially due to the differences between fresh and decomposed (i.e., skeletonized or "dry bone") tissue samples. This review discusses these differences and describes how they affect the histological analysis of paleopathological specimens. First, we provide a summary of some general challenges related to the histological analysis of palaeopathological specimens. Second, the reader is introduced in bone tissue histology and bone tissue dynamics. The remainder of the paper is dedicated to the diagnostic value of dry bone histology. Its value and limitations are illustrated by comparing several well-studied paleopathological cases with similar contemporary, clinical cases. This review illustrates that due to post-mortem loss of soft tissue, a limited number of disorders display pathognomonic features during histological analysis of skeletonized human remains. In the remainder of cases, histology may help to narrow down the differential diagnosis or is diagnostically unspecific. A comprehensive, multidisciplinary diagnostic approach therefore remains essential. Clin. Anat. 29:831-843, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Diagnostic models. 2. Fabrication].

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, M; Vincent, G; L'Official-Vincent, M

    1989-09-01

    After describing in Part I the preparation of diagnostic cast, the authors describe the Wax Up preparation. Most of the definition of centric relation agree that the position of the mandible is slightly behind its position in centric occlusion. The Hinge axis position is used for mounting the cast on articulator. The final restauration must reconstruct both position and the occlusion should be established in front the centric occlusion. After equilibration anterior guidance is studied and restaured if necessary. After creating the different curve of occlusion, the final Wax Up is settled. The use of the diagnostic cast so obtained will be presented in Part III.

  15. Diagnostic hematology of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Nicole I; Alleman, A Rick; Sayler, Katherine A

    2011-03-01

    The hematologic evaluation of reptiles is an indispensable diagnostic tool in exotic veterinary practice. The diversity of reptile species, their characteristic physiologic features, and effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors present unique challenges for accurate interpretation of the hemogram. Combining the clinical presentation with hematologic findings provides valuable information in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease and helps guide the clinician toward therapy and further diagnostic testing. This article outlines the normal and pathologic morphology of blood cells of reptile species. The specific comparative aspects of reptiles are emphasized, and structural and functional abnormalities in the reptilian hemogram are described.

  16. ALS Performance Summary - Update

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, A M; Brown, W D; Martz, Jr., H E

    2004-09-30

    High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments play an important role in corroborating the improved physics codes that underlie LLNL's Stockpile Stewardship mission. Conducting these experiments, whether on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or another national facility such as Omega, will require not only improvement in the diagnostics for measuring the experiment, but also detailed knowledge of the as-built target components and assemblies themselves. To assist in this effort, a defined set of well-known reference standards designed to represent a range of HEDP targets have been built and are being used to quantify the performance of different characterization techniques [Hibbard, et al. 2004]. Without the critical step of using reference standards for qualifying characterization tools there can be no verification of either commercial or internally-developed characterization techniques and thus an uncertainty in the input to the physics code models would exist.

  17. Determination of sulfur in crude oil using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry of the SnS molecule in a graphite furnace.

    PubMed

    Cadorim, Heloisa R; Pereira, Éderson R; Carasek, Eduardo; Welz, Bernhard; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2016-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of sulfur, as the tin mono-sulfide (SnS) molecule, in crude oil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS) has been developed. The molecular absorbance of the SnS has been measured using the wavelength at 271.624 nm and the crude oil samples were prepared as micro-emulsions due to their high viscosity. Several chemical modifiers (Ir, Pd, Ru, Zr) were tested and palladium was chosen, because it exhibited the best performance. The heating program was optimized by comparing the pyrolysis and vaporization curves obtained for an aqueous sulfur standard and a micro-emulsion of a crude oil certified reference material (CRM). The optimum pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were found to be 600 and 2000°C, respectively. The limit of detection and the characteristic mass using micro-emulsion analysis of crude oil samples were 5.8 and 13.3 ng S. Accuracy and precision of the method has been evaluated using two crude oil CRM (NIST 2721 and NIST 2722), showing good agreement with the informed or certified values.

  18. Peculiarities in electrical and optical properties of Cu2Zn1- x Mn x SnS4 films obtained by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orletskii, I. G.; Mar'yanchuk, P. D.; Solovan, M. N.; Maistruk, E. V.; Kozyarskii, D. P.

    2016-03-01

    Thin films of Cu2Zn1- x Mn x SnS4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) solid solutions have been obtained for the first time by the spray pyrolysis of aqueous salt solutions (copper, zinc, manganese, and tin chlorides and thiourea) at a temperature of T S = 563 K. The films possess specific electric conductivities within σ ≈ 35-422 Ω-1 cm-1 and optical bandgap width E g op that increases with the manganese content from 1.54 eV ( x = 0) to 2.25 eV ( x = 1). Electrical and optical properties of the obtained films have been studied and analyzed based on a model of polycrystalline materials with grain boundaries. The energy barriers Eb between grains have been determined. The dependence of the bandgap of Cu2Zn1- x Mn x SnS4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) solid solutions on the composition has been established using the results of measurements of the optical transmission and absorption coefficients.

  19. Economic Effects of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences (JINS) on the State of Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Univ of TN, Center for Business Research

    2002-12-18

    This report provides an analysis of the economic impacts arising from the construction and operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and Joint Institute of Neutron Science (JINS) facilities on the State of Tennessee. The study was conducted by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in cooperation with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Science Alliance at UTK. Estimates provided are based on data provided by ORNL and the Office of Research at UTK. The estimates contained in the report quantify the income, employment, and sales tax revenue which will be generated by the activities of the SNS and JINS by accounting for the (1) direct impacts, those arising directly from the expenditures for the construction and operation of the facilities; (2) indirect impacts, those arising from the visitors to the facilities and from facility expenditures in Tennessee; and (3) multiplier impacts, those arising from the ripple effects created as new income is spent and respent in the state economy.

  20. Azobenzene mesogens mediated preparation of SnS nanocrystals encapsulated with in-situ N-doped carbon and their enhanced electrochemical performance for lithium ion batteries application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Zhou, Yang; Duan, Junfei; Chen, Dongzhong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, azobenzene mesogen-containing tin thiolates have been synthesized, which possess ordered lamellar structures persistent to higher temperature and serve as liquid crystalline precursors. Based on the preorganized tin thiolate precursors, SnS nanocrystals encapsulated with in-situ N-doped carbon layer have been achieved through a simple solventless pyrolysis process with the azobenzene mesogenic thiolate precursor served as Sn, S, N, and C sources simultaneously. Thus prepared nanocomposite materials as anode of lithium ion batteries present a large specific capacity of 604.6 mAh·g‑1 at a current density of 100 mA·g‑1, keeping a high capacity retention up to 96% after 80 cycles, and display high rate capability due to the synergistic effect of well-dispersed SnS nanocrystals and N-doped carbon layer. Such encouraging results shed a light on the controlled preparation of advanced nanocomposites based on liquid crystalline metallomesogen precursors and may boost their novel intriguing applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21574062) and the Huaian High-Technology Research Institute of Nanjing University, China (Grant No. 2011Q1).

  1. Azobenzene mesogens mediated preparation of SnS nanocrystals encapsulated with in-situ N-doped carbon and their enhanced electrochemical performance for lithium ion batteries application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Zhou, Yang; Duan, Junfei; Chen, Dongzhong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, azobenzene mesogen-containing tin thiolates have been synthesized, which possess ordered lamellar structures persistent to higher temperature and serve as liquid crystalline precursors. Based on the preorganized tin thiolate precursors, SnS nanocrystals encapsulated with in-situ N-doped carbon layer have been achieved through a simple solventless pyrolysis process with the azobenzene mesogenic thiolate precursor served as Sn, S, N, and C sources simultaneously. Thus prepared nanocomposite materials as anode of lithium ion batteries present a large specific capacity of 604.6 mAh·g-1 at a current density of 100 mA·g-1, keeping a high capacity retention up to 96% after 80 cycles, and display high rate capability due to the synergistic effect of well-dispersed SnS nanocrystals and N-doped carbon layer. Such encouraging results shed a light on the controlled preparation of advanced nanocomposites based on liquid crystalline metallomesogen precursors and may boost their novel intriguing applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21574062) and the Huaian High-Technology Research Institute of Nanjing University, China (Grant No. 2011Q1).

  2. Diagnostic Lessons as Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Barbara J.

    Embedded in a sensitive instructional context rather than a stifling testing atmosphere, diagnostic lessons provide assessment that is reliable, practical, valid, and efficient. In this type of assessment, there are several determiners of instructional placement: (1) students' propensity to adapt strategies as a result of specified instruction,…

  3. Sexual Addiction: Diagnostic Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giugliano, John R.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years clinicians report a great deal of concern about definition, diagnostic assessment, and treatment modalities when dealing with what might be called out-of-control sexual behavior. Many terms have been used to describe the phenomenon of problematic sexual behavior. Many of these concepts overlap, some are no longer popular, and some…

  4. Equivalent Diagnostic Classification Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; Bechger, Timo

    2009-01-01

    Rupp and Templin (2008) do a good job at describing the ever expanding landscape of Diagnostic Classification Models (DCM). In many ways, their review article clearly points to some of the questions that need to be answered before DCMs can become part of the psychometric practitioners toolkit. Apart from the issues mentioned in this article that…

  5. Heterodyne laser diagnostic system

    DOEpatents

    Globig, Michael A.; Johnson, Michael A.; Wyeth, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    The heterodyne laser diagnostic system includes, in one embodiment, an average power pulsed laser optical spectrum analyzer for determining the average power of the pulsed laser. In another embodiment, the system includes a pulsed laser instantaneous optical frequency measurement for determining the instantaneous optical frequency of the pulsed laser.

  6. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960`s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore`s Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail.

  7. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  8. Mineral commodity summaries 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2014 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2013 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2014 are welcomed.

  9. Summary of Vulcan Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J.D.

    2000-03-23

    This is a summary of the results of my calculations compared to Elisabeth Wolfrum's data on the Vulcan imprint experiments. The material strength makes essentially no difference to the growth of perturbations seeded by the laser imprint. For the low-intensity case (30 J laser energy, beam intensity of 0.5 x 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}) the thin (2 microns) Al foil melts quickly from the front (driven) surface and decompresses quickly from the back surface, so there is actually only a fraction of the foil that is solid and compressed, and then for only a short time. And this solid fraction is not accelerating much during this short time. In particular, the shock (which is at about 250 kbar when it is about half way through the foil) travels entirely through the foil in about 0.25 ns. At 0.3 ns the ablation front is 0.6 {micro}m in from the original position of the front surface, the next 0.6 {micro}m is melted, so only the back 0.8 {micro}m is solid and compressed. This solid portion, though, is not moving much; the place where the imprinted perturbations are growing is back at the ablation front, where the perturbations are clearly growing fluid-like. By 0.5 ns the entire foil is melted and decompressing from both ends. Thus, the actual foil distortion looks little different with and without strength.

  10. Fertilizer summary data 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, J.T.; Hargett, N.L.

    1991-05-01

    Fertilizer Summary Data, published biennially by the National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC), combines fertilizer application and consumption statistics, crop acreage, and farm income/expense data by state and region for the period 1970 through 1990. This sixteenth edition contains statistics on commercial fertilizers sold for farm and nonfarm use, fertilizer distribution by class, and the leading fertilizer grades. Fertilizers are classified as single- or multiple-nutrient materials. Single-nutrient fertilizers, such as anhydrous ammonia (82-0-0), contain only one primary plant nutrient. Multiple-nutrient fertilizers contain two or more plant nutrients and include the ammonium phosphates and grades manufactured by dry or fluid mixing or chemical processing. In some cases, States report materials used in blending multiple-nutrient fertilizers as single-nutrient ingredients lather than the final manufactured product. Fertilizer consumption statistics for 1970 through 1980 are from US Department of Agriculture annual reports. Annual consumption data for 1985 through 1990 are based on the tabulation of individual state fertilizer tonnage reports submitted annually to TVA for inclusion in the National record of fertilizer consumption, Commercial Fertilizers. Crop statistics, fertilizer application rates, and farm income and expense data are supplied by the National Agricultural Statistics Service and the Economic Research Service, USDA.

  11. Mineral commodity summaries 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2013 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2012 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2013 are welcomed.

  12. Diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for ovarian cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Peng, Hongling; Zhao, Xia

    2015-04-01

    This meta-analysis is the first study aimed at assessing the overall diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for ovarian cancer. PubMed, Embase and Medline databases were systematically searched for relevant articles published up to June 2014. Data were pooled to yield summary sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio and receiver operating characteristic curves using Meta-Disc Version 1.4 software. Ten independent studies with 579 ovarian tumors were enrolled in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio statistics were 0.89 (0.83-0.94), 0.91 (0.88-0.93) and 91.70 (41.41-203.05), respectively, and the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.9619 (standard error: 0.0125), all indicating that contrast-enhanced ultrasound has high diagnostic accuracy in differentiation of malignant from benign ovarian tumors.

  13. SNS Injection Foil Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Ladd, Peter; Luck, Chris; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom; Shaw, Robert W; Macek, Robert James; Raparia, Deepak; Plum, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.4 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H0 excited states created during the H charge exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we will detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms, and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  14. SNS shielding analyses overview

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz; Iverson, Erik B; Lu, Wei; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on on-going shielding analyses for Spallation Neutron Source. Presently, the most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, save operation and adequate radiation background in the future. There is on-going work for the accelerator facility. This includes radiation-protection analyses for radiation monitors placement, designing shielding for additional facilities to test accelerator structures, redesigning some parts of the facility, and designing test facilities to the main accelerator structure for component testing. Neutronics analyses are required as well to support spent structure management, including waste characterisation analyses, choice of proper transport/storage package and shielding enhancement for the package if required.

  15. Strategic National Stockpile (SNS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of Procalcitonin in Bacterial Meningitis Versus Nonbacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting-Ting; Hu, Zhi-De; Qin, Bao-Dong; Ma, Ning; Tang, Qing-Qin; Wang, Li-Li; Zhou, Lin; Zhong, Ren-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have investigated the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in bacterial meningitis (BM), but the results were heterogeneous. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the diagnostic accuracy of PCT as a marker for BM detection. A systematic search of the EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed databases was performed to identify studies published before December 7, 2015 investigating the diagnostic accuracy of PCT for BM. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed using the revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy method. The overall diagnostic accuracy of PCT detection in CSF or blood was pooled using the bivariate model. Twenty-two studies involving 2058 subjects were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The overall specificities and sensitivities were 0.86 and 0.80 for CSF PCT, and 0.97 and 0.95 for blood PCT, respectively. Areas under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.90 and 0.98 for CSF PCT and blood PCT, respectively. The major limitation of this systematic review and meta-analysis was the small number of studies included and the heterogeneous diagnostic thresholds adopted by eligible studies. Our meta-analysis shows that PCT is a useful biomarker for BM diagnosis. PMID:26986140

  17. Cardiovascular modeling and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system is introduced. A model exhibits a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. Potentially, a model will be incorporated into a cardiovascular diagnostic system. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the variables of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion to optimize the utilization of biomedical sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  18. Blast wave energy diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Thomas E; Tierney, Heidi E; Idzorek, George C; Watt, Robert G; Peterson, Robert R; Peterson, Darrell L; Fryer, Christopher L; Lopez, Mike R; Jones, Michael C; Sinars, Daniel; Rochau, Gregory A; Bailey, James E

    2008-10-01

    The distance radiation waves that supersonically propagate in optically thick, diffusive media are energy sensitive. A blast wave can form in a material when the initially diffusive, supersonic radiation wave becomes transonic. Under specific conditions, the blast wave is visible with radiography as a density perturbation. [Peterson et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056901 (2006)] showed that the time-integrated drive energy can be measured using blast wave positions with uncertainties less than 10% at the Z Facility. In some cases, direct measurements of energy loss through diagnostic holes are not possible with bolometric and x-ray radiometric diagnostics. Thus, radiography of high compression blast waves can serve as a complementary technique that provides time-integrated energy loss through apertures. In this paper, we use blast waves to characterize the energy emerging through a 2.4 mm aperture and show experimental results in comparison to simulations. PMID:19044574

  19. Nanodevices in diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ye; Fine, Daniel H.; Tasciotti, Ennio; Bouamrani, Ali; Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The real-time, personalized and highly sensitive early-stage diagnosis of disease remains an important challenge in modern medicine. With the ability to interact with matter at the nanoscale, the development of nanotechnology architectures and materials could potentially extend subcellular and molecular detection beyond the limits of conventional diagnostic modalities. At the very least, nanotechnology should be able to dramatically accelerate biomarker discovery, as well as facilitate disease monitoring, especially of maladies presenting a high degree of molecular and compositional heterogeneity. This article gives an overview of several of the most promising nanodevices and nanomaterials along with their applications in clinical practice. Significant work to adapt nanoscale materials and devices to clinical applications involving large interdisciplinary collaborations is already underway with the potential for nanotechnology to become an important enabling diagnostic technology. PMID:20229595

  20. DIAGNOSTICS OF BNL ERL

    SciTech Connect

    POZDEYEV,E.; BEN-ZVI, I.; CAMERON, P.; GASSNER, D.; KAYRAN, D.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The ERL Prototype project is currently under development at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The ERL is expected to demonstrate energy recovery of high-intensity beams with a current of up to a few hundred milliamps, while preserving the emittance of bunches with a charge of a few nanocoulombs produced by a high-current SRF gun. To successfully accomplish this task the machine will include beam diagnostics that will be used for accurate characterization of the three dimensional beam phase space at the injection and recirculation energies, transverse and longitudinal beam matching, orbit alignment, beam current measurement, and machine protection. This paper outlines requirements on the ERL diagnostics and describes its setup and modes of operation.

  1. Summary of the IEA Workshop on Alpha Physics and Tritium Issues in Large Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Stratton, B.; Zweben, S.J.; Pitcher, C.S.

    1993-11-01

    A brief summary is presented of the talks given during this meeting, which was held at PPPL and sponsored by the IEA (International Energy Agency) as part of the Large Tokamak collaboration. These talks are summarized into four sessions: tritium issues in large tokamaks, alpha particle simulation experiments, alpha particle theory, and alpha particle diagnostics.

  2. Sonographic diagnostics in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Jens; Schwürzer-Voit, Markus; Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold; Voit, Christiane

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasonography non-invasively visualizes changes within the skin, skin appendages, subcutaneous tissue, subcutaneous (regional) lymph nodes and peripheral vessels. Thus it is an established diagnostic tool in dermatology. Compared to X-ray, MRI and PET, ultrasonography has some advantages; however, it is more dependent on the individual experience of the investigator. Therefore a structured education and continuous training are necessary. This review describes the physical and technical basics, the administrative requirements and the main indications in dermatology.

  3. PML diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Aksamit, Allen J.; Clifford, David B.; Davis, Larry; Koralnik, Igor J.; Sejvar, James J.; Bartt, Russell; Major, Eugene O.; Nath, Avindra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish criteria for the diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Methods: We reviewed available literature to identify various diagnostic criteria employed. Several search strategies employing the terms “progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy” with or without “JC virus” were performed with PubMed, SCOPUS, and EMBASE search engines. The articles were reviewed by a committee of individuals with expertise in the disorder in order to determine the most useful applicable criteria. Results: A consensus statement was developed employing clinical, imaging, pathologic, and virologic evidence in support of the diagnosis of PML. Two separate pathways, histopathologic and clinical, for PML diagnosis are proposed. Diagnostic classification includes certain, probable, possible, and not PML. Conclusion: Definitive diagnosis of PML requires neuropathologic demonstration of the typical histopathologic triad (demyelination, bizarre astrocytes, and enlarged oligodendroglial nuclei) coupled with the techniques to show the presence of JC virus. The presence of clinical and imaging manifestations consistent with the diagnosis and not better explained by other disorders coupled with the demonstration of JC virus by PCR in CSF is also considered diagnostic. Algorithms for establishing the diagnosis have been recommended. PMID:23568998

  4. Upgrading Diagnostic Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proxauf, B.; Kimeswenger, S.; Öttl, S.

    2014-04-01

    Diagnostic diagrams of forbidden lines have been a useful tool for observers in astrophysics for many decades now. They are used to obtain information on the basic physical properties of thin gaseous nebulae. Moreover they are also the initial tool to derive thermodynamic properties of the plasma from observations to get ionization correction factors and thus to obtain proper abundances of the nebulae. Some diagnostic diagrams are in wavelengths domains which were difficult to take either due to missing wavelength coverage or low resolution of older spectrographs. Thus they were hardly used in the past. An upgrade of this useful tool is necessary because most of the diagrams were calculated using only the species involved as a single atom gas, although several are affected by well-known fluorescence mechanisms as well. Additionally the atomic data have improved up to the present time. The new diagnostic diagrams are calculated by using large grids of parameter space in the photoionization code CLOUDY. For a given basic parameter the input radiation field is varied to find the solutions with cooling-heating-equilibrium. Empirical numerical functions are fitted to provide formulas usable in e.g. data reduction pipelines. The resulting diagrams differ significantly from those used up to now and will improve the thermodynamic calculations.

  5. Diagnostics for Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    McNerney, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Improving the availability of high quality diagnostic tests for infectious diseases is a global priority. Lack of access by people living in low income countries may deprive them of life saving treatment and reduces opportunities to prevent onward transmission and spread of the disease. Diagnostic laboratories are often poorly resourced in developing countries, and sparsely distributed. Improved access may be achieved by using tests that do not require laboratory support, including rapid tests for use at the point-of-care. Despite increased interest, few new in vitro diagnostic (IVD) products reach the majority populations in low income countries. Barriers to uptake include cost and lack of robustness, with reduced test performances due to environmental pressures such as high ambient temperatures or dust. In addition to environmental factors test developers must consider the local epidemiology. Confounding conditions such as immunosuppression or variations in antigen presentation or genotype can affect test performance. Barriers to product development include access to finance to establish manufacturing capacity and cover the costs of market entry for new devices. Costs and delays may be inflated by current regulatory preregistration processes to ensure product safety and quality, and more harmonized approaches are needed.

  6. ITER Diagnostic First Wal

    SciTech Connect

    G. Douglas Loesser, et. al.

    2012-09-21

    The ITER Diagnostic Division is responsible for designing and procuring the First Wall Blankets that are mounted on the vacuum vessel port plugs at both the upper and equatorial levels This paper will discuss the effects of the diagnostic aperture shape and configuration on the coolant circuit design. The DFW design is driven in large part by the need to conform the coolant arrangement to a wide variety of diagnostic apertures combined with the more severe heating conditions at the surface facing the plasma, the first wall. At the first wall, a radiant heat flux of 35W/cm2 combines with approximate peak volumetric heating rates of 8W/cm3 (equatorial ports) and 5W/cm3 (upper ports). Here at the FW, a fast thermal response is desirable and leads to a thin element between the heat flux and coolant. This requirement is opposed by the wish for a thicker FW element to accommodate surface erosion and other off-normal plasma events.

  7. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Dance, David R; McLean, Donald; Kramer, Hans-Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures. PMID:20655679

  8. [Acromegaly: reducing diagnostic delay].

    PubMed

    Giustina, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic delay of acromegaly is still very relevant (6-8 years on average) without substantial changes in last twenty years. Clinical impact of this diagnostic delay is significant: tumor growth (2/3 of the patients at diagnosis bear a pituitary macroadenoma), development of irreversible complications (arthropathy, sleep apnea) and in all increased mortality. Reasons for this delay are related to the disease itself (facial and acral changes are very slow and subtle) but also to medical unawareness. Simple tools based on a few sufficiently sensitive and specific signs and symptoms which can trigger the diagnostic suspect would be useful in clinical practice. Global evaluation during follow-up (tumor volume, signs and symptoms, complications, circulating levels of growth hormone and its peripheral mediator IGF-I) has become crucial for the therapeutic decision making. In this regard, tools like SAGIT are now under validation and are expected to improve management of acromegaly. In fact, in the last 30 years there has been a relevant growth of the medical options to treat acromegaly and in the near future there will be an expansion of the medical options. This will greatly help the needed personalization of treatment which necessarily should consider patient convenience and preference and control of complications such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:27571562

  9. Microsphere based saliva diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissin, David M.; DiCesare, Christopher; Hayman, Ryan B.; Blicharz, Timothy M.; Walt, David R.

    2005-11-01

    Saliva presents a minimally invasive alternative medium to blood for performing diagnostics1. Microsphere sensors for ions, small organic molecules, and proteins are currently being developed and optical microarrays containing thousands of these sensors will be used for simultaneous multi-analyte analysis. The fiber bundle platform in use is 1mm in diameter and contains approximately 50,000 individually addressable 3.1μm fibers, each with an etched well capable of housing a single 3.1μm microsphere sensor. Micron-sized bead-based chemistries are produced in house, followed by deposition onto a fiber-optic bundle platform, allowing for multiplexed analysis. The ultimate goal is to develop a universal diagnostic system using saliva as the diagnostic medium. This platform will permit multiplexed analysis of a sample by integrating microfluidics with the optical arrays loaded with sensors capable of detecting relevant biomarkers associated with a wide range of disease states. Disease states that are currently under investigation include end stage renal disease (ESRD) and Sjoegrens Syndrome (SS).

  10. Diagnostics for Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    McNerney, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Improving the availability of high quality diagnostic tests for infectious diseases is a global priority. Lack of access by people living in low income countries may deprive them of life saving treatment and reduces opportunities to prevent onward transmission and spread of the disease. Diagnostic laboratories are often poorly resourced in developing countries, and sparsely distributed. Improved access may be achieved by using tests that do not require laboratory support, including rapid tests for use at the point-of-care. Despite increased interest, few new in vitro diagnostic (IVD) products reach the majority populations in low income countries. Barriers to uptake include cost and lack of robustness, with reduced test performances due to environmental pressures such as high ambient temperatures or dust. In addition to environmental factors test developers must consider the local epidemiology. Confounding conditions such as immunosuppression or variations in antigen presentation or genotype can affect test performance. Barriers to product development include access to finance to establish manufacturing capacity and cover the costs of market entry for new devices. Costs and delays may be inflated by current regulatory preregistration processes to ensure product safety and quality, and more harmonized approaches are needed. PMID:26854149

  11. Astigmatism and diagnostic procedures.

    PubMed

    Visnjić, Mirna Belovari; Zrinsćak, Ognjen; Barisić, Freja; Iveković, Renata; Laus, Katia Novak; Mandić, Zdravko

    2012-06-01

    Astigmatism represents an inability of the cornea and lens to provide a sharp image onto the retina. Correcting astigmatic errors, whether congenital, contact lens induced or surgically induced, is now an integral part of modern cataract and refractive procedures. Development of modern technology has enabled accurate diagnosis and perfect opportunities for correction; however, while cataract and keratorefractive surgery have come a long way in the last decade, the treatment and diagnosis of astigmatism continue to challenge ophthalmologists. There are several diagnostic procedures and tools available today, some standard and some contemporary that include keratometry, corneal topography, apparatus using wavefront or Scheimpflug analysis like Orbscan, Pentacam, Wavescan, etc. With the introduction of several new diagnostic tools, measurements of astigmatism have become less of an issue, but in some cases it is still difficult to obtain consistent results. What remains still unanswered is the question of the best diagnostic tool on the market. Further research is needed to evaluate both tools as well as their clinical application for optimal use. PMID:23115957

  12. Microgravity Combustion Diagnostics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Gilbert J. (Editor); Greenberg, Paul S. (Editor); Piltch, Nancy D. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Through the Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) of the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) at NASA Headquarters, a program entitled, Advanced Technology Development (ATD) was promulgated with the objective of providing advanced technologies that will enable the development of future microgravity science and applications experimental flight hardware. Among the ATD projects one, Microgravity Combustion Diagnostics (MCD), has the objective of developing advanced diagnostic techniques and technologies to provide nonperturbing measurements of combustion characteristics and parameters that will enhance the scientific integrity and quality of microgravity combustion experiments. As part of the approach to this project, a workshop was held on July 28 and 29, 1987, at the NASA Lewis Research Center. A small group of laser combustion diagnosticians met with a group of microgravity combustion experimenters to discuss the science requirements, the state-of-the-art of laser diagnostic technology, and plan the direction for near-, intermediate-, and long-term programs. This publication describes the proceedings of that workshop.

  13. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  14. Summary of The History Manifesto.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Noortje

    2016-06-01

    This essay provides a brief, impartial summary of some main points of The History Manifesto, of the debate among historians that it has engendered, and of its connection to previous debates in and about the history of the sciences.

  15. Long term performance session summary

    SciTech Connect

    Hanauer, S.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents brief summaries of reports given on plutonium disposal. Topics include: performance of waste forms; glass leaching; ceramic leaching; safeguards and security issues; safeguards of vitrification; and proliferation risks of geologic disposal.

  16. Update on diagnostic classification in autism

    PubMed Central

    King, Bryan H.; Navot, Noa; Bernier, Raphael; Webb, Sara Jane

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review In the lead up to and following the recent publication of the DSM-5, the diagnostic construct of autism has received intense scrutiny. Recent findings This article briefly reviews the history of the diagnosis of autism, the changes that have occurred in the diagnosis over time, and the rationale for change. The most significant changes being introduced with the DSM-5 are highlighted, as well as some of the concerns that will be a focus of attention with respect to the potential impacts going forward. Summary The categorical divisions that characterized the pervasive developmental disorders are now collapsed into a single entity, autism spectrum disorder. The final DSM-5 criteria have yet to be formally compared prospectively against prior criteria, but early indications suggest that the boundaries around the pervasive developmental disorders have not been substantially altered. PMID:24441420

  17. Slant Borehole Demonstration Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER, M.G.

    2000-07-19

    This report provides a summary of the demonstration project for development of a slant borehole to retrieve soil samples from beneath the SX-108 single-shell tank. It provides a summary of the findings from the demonstration activities and recommendations for tool selection and methods to deploy into the SX Tank Farm. Daily work activities were recorded on Drilling and Sampling Daily Work Record Reports. The work described in this document was performed during March and April 2000.

  18. AdaNET executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digman, R. Michael

    1988-01-01

    The goal of AdaNET is to transfer existing and emerging software engineering technology from the Federal government to the private sector. The views and perspectives of the current project participants on long and short term goals for AdaNET; organizational structure; resources and returns; summary of identified AdaNET services; and the summary of the organizational model currently under discussion are presented.

  19. Nuclear Diagnostics of ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Ierche, R A; Moran, M J; Phillips, T W; Sangster, T C; Schmid, G J; Stoyer, M A; Disdier, L; Bourgade, J L; Rouyer, A; Fisher, R K; Gerggren, R R; Caldwen, S E; Faulkner, J R; Mack, J M; Oertel, J A; Young, C S; Glebov, V Y; Jaanimagi, P A; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M; Stockel, C; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2001-10-18

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF), a high temperature and high density plasma is produced by the spherical implosion of a small capsule. A spherical target capsule is irradiated uniformly by a laser beam (direct irradiation) or x-rays from a high Z enclosure (hohlraum) that is irradiated by laser or ion beams (indirect irradiation). Then high-pressure ablation of the surface causes the fuel to be accelerated inward. Thermonuclear fusion reactions begin in the center region of the capsule as it is heated to sufficient temperature (10 keV) by the converging shocks (hot spot formation). During the stagnation of the imploded shell, the fuel in the shell region is compressed to high density ({approx} 10{sup 3} times solid density in fuel region). When these conditions are established, energy released by the initial nuclear reactions in center ''hot-spot'' region can heat up the cold ''fuel'' region and cause ignition. They are developing advanced nuclear diagnostics for imploding plasmas of the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF is a 1.8MJ, 192-beam glass laser system that is under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. One objective of the NIF is to demonstrate ignition and gain in an inertial confinement fusion plasma. Extreme physical conditions characterize the imploded plasmas on the NIF. First, the thickness of the plasma, expressed by areal density (plasma density times radius), is large, up to {approx} 1 g/cm{sup 2}. Highly penetrating probes such as energetic neutrons, hard x-rays, or {gamma} rays are required to see deep inside the plasma. Second, the implosion time is quite short. The implosion process takes {approx} 20 ns and the duration of the fusion reaction is on the order of 100 picoseconds. To observe the time history of the nuclear reactions, time resolution better than 10 ps is required. Third, the size of the imploded plasma is quite small ({approx} 100 {micro}m). To see the shape of burning region

  20. CF 6 engine diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stricklin, R.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the activities which led to defining deterioration rates of the CF6 family of engines, a description of what was learned, and an identification of means of conserving fuel based upon the program findings are presented. The program to define the deterioration levels and modes for the CF6 family of engines involved four distinct phases: analysis of inbound engine test results, analysis of airline cruise data, analysis of airline test cell data resulting from testing of refurbished engines, and inspection of engine hardware.

  1. The Use of Integrated Electronic Data Capture and Analysis for Accelerator Construction and Commissioning: Pansophy from the SNS Towards the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    J. P. Ozelis; V. Bookwalter; B. Madre; C. E. Reece

    2005-05-01

    Jefferson Lab has extensively used a proprietary web-based system (Pansophy) that integrates commercial database, data analysis, document archiving and retrieval, and user interface software, as a coherent knowledge management product during the construction of the cryomodules for the SNS Superconducting Linac, providing elements of process and procedure control, data capture and review, and data mining and analysis. With near real-time and potentially global access to production data, process monitoring and performance analyses could be pursued in a timely manner, providing crucial feedback. The extensibility, portability, and accessibility of Pansophy via universally available software components provide the essential features needed in any information and project management system capable of meeting the needs of future accelerator construction efforts, requiring an unprecedented level of regional and international coordination and collaboration, to which Pansophy is well suited.

  2. ASSESSING THE USE OF A STANDARDIZED DENTAL DIAGNOSTIC TERMINOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Tokede, Oluwabunmi; White, Joel M.; Stark, Paul C.; Vaderhobli, Ram; Walji, Muhammad F.; Ramoni, Rachel B.; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta E.; Kimmes, Nicole S.; Tavares, Anamaria

    2012-01-01

    Although standardized terminologies, such as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), have been in use in medicine for over a century, in the dental profession, efforts to standardize dental diagnostic terms have not achieved widespread acceptance. To address this gap, a standardized dental diagnostic terminology - the ‘EZcodes’ terminology was developed in 2009. Fifteen dental practices and schools in the United States and Europe have implemented the ‘EZcodes’. In this paper we report on the utilization and valid entry of the EZcodes at three of the dental schools that have adopted this standardized dental diagnostic terminology. Electronic data on the use of procedure codes with diagnostic terms from the three schools over a one-year period between July 2010 and June 2011 were aggregated. The diagnostic term and procedure code pairs were adjudicated by three calibrated dentists. Analyses were conducted to gain insight into the utilization and valid entry of the EZcodes diagnostic terminology in the one-year period extending from 7/1/2010 through 6/30/2011. Error proportions in the entry of diagnostic term (and by diagnostic category) were also computed. Within the twelve-month period included in the analysis, a total of 29,965 diagnostic terms and 249,411 procedure codes were entered at the three institutions resulting in a utilization proportion of 12%. Caries and periodontics were the more frequently used categories. More than 1000 of the available 1321 diagnostic terms were never used at the three institutions. Overall, 60.5% of the EZcodes entries were found to be valid. In summary, our results demonstrate low utilization of EZ codes in an electronic dental record and raise the need for specific training of dental providers on the importance of using dental diagnostic terminology and specifically how to use the terms within the EHR. This will serve to increase the use/correct use of the EZcodes diagnostic terminology and ultimately create a

  3. The TTX-resistant sodium channel Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3): expression and correlation with membrane properties in rat nociceptive primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Djouhri, Laiche; Fang, Xin; Okuse, Kenji; Wood, John N; Berry, Carol M; Lawson, Sally N

    2003-08-01

    We have examined the distribution of the sensory neuron-specific Na+ channel Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3) in nociceptive and non-nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and whether its distribution is related to neuronal membrane properties. Nav1.8-like immunoreactivity (Nav1.8-LI) was examined with an affinity purified polyclonal antiserum (SNS11) in rat DRG neurons that were classified according to sensory receptive properties and by conduction velocity (CV) as C-, Adelta- or Aalpha/beta. A significantly higher proportion of nociceptive than low threshold mechanoreceptive (LTM) neurons showed Nav1.8-LI, and nociceptive neurons had significantly more intense immunoreactivity in their somata than LTM neurons. Results showed that 89, 93 and 60% of C-, Adelta- and Aalpha/beta-fibre nociceptive units respectively and 88% of C-unresponsive units were positive. C-unresponsive units had electrical membrane properties similar to C-nociceptors and were considered to be nociceptive-type neurons. Weak positive Nav1.8-LI was also present in some LTM units including a C LTM, all Adelta LTM units (D hair), about 10% of cutaneous LTM Aalpha/beta-units, but no muscle spindle afferent units. Nav1.8-LI intensity was negatively correlated with soma size (all neurons) and with dorsal root CVs in A- but not C-fibre neurons. Nav1.8-LI intensity was positively correlated with action potential (AP) duration (both rise and fall time) in A-fibre neurons and with AP rise time only in positive C-fibre neurons. It was also positively correlated with AP overshoot in positive neurons. Thus high levels of Nav1.8 protein may contribute to the longer AP durations (especially in A-fibre neurons) and larger AP overshoots that are typical of nociceptors. PMID:12794175

  4. The TTX-Resistant Sodium Channel Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3): Expression and Correlation with Membrane Properties in Rat Nociceptive Primary Afferent Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Djouhri, Laiche; Fang, Xin; Okuse, Kenji; Wood, John N; Berry, Carol M; Lawson, Sally N

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of the sensory neuron-specific Na+ channel Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3) in nociceptive and non-nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and whether its distribution is related to neuronal membrane properties. Nav1.8-like immunoreactivity (Nav1.8-LI) was examined with an affinity purified polyclonal antiserum (SNS11) in rat DRG neurons that were classified according to sensory receptive properties and by conduction velocity (CV) as C-, Aδ- or Aα/β. A significantly higher proportion of nociceptive than low threshold mechanoreceptive (LTM) neurons showed Nav1.8-LI, and nociceptive neurons had significantly more intense immunoreactivity in their somata than LTM neurons. Results showed that 89, 93 and 60 % of C-, Aδ- and Aα/β-fibre nociceptive units respectively and 88 % of C-unresponsive units were positive. C-unresponsive units had electrical membrane properties similar to C-nociceptors and were considered to be nociceptive-type neurons. Weak positive Nav1.8-LI was also present in some LTM units including a C LTM, all Aδ LTM units (D hair), about 10 % of cutaneous LTM Aα/β-units, but no muscle spindle afferent units. Nav1.8-LI intensity was negatively correlated with soma size (all neurons) and with dorsal root CVs in A- but not C-fibre neurons. Nav1.8-LI intensity was positively correlated with action potential (AP) duration (both rise and fall time) in A-fibre neurons and with AP rise time only in positive C-fibre neurons. It was also positively correlated with AP overshoot in positive neurons. Thus high levels of Nav1.8 protein may contribute to the longer AP durations (especially in A-fibre neurons) and larger AP overshoots that are typical of nociceptors. PMID:12794175

  5. Optimization of low cost, non toxic, earth abundant p-type Cu2SnS3 thin film for Photovoltaic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, J. J.; Patel, S.; Joshi, U. S.

    2016-09-01

    Cu2SnS3 (CTS) is one of promising candidate as an absorber material for thin film solar cell. Because of relatively higher prize of Indium and hazardous environmental impact of processing of Gallium, CTS is suitable alternative candidate to Cu2SnS3 (CIGS) based solar cell as its constituent elements such as copper, tin and sulphur are abundantly available in earth's crust. CTS is ternary semiconductor and its energy band gap is 1.5eV, which is perfectly matched with solar energy spectrum for maximum transfer of solar energy into electrical energy through photovoltaic action. The primary methods for the synthesis of CTS are Thermal evaporation, electrochemical, sputtering and wet chemical methods. Here in this paper we have optimized a low cost non-vacuum solution process method for the synthesis of CTS without any external sulfurization. The X-ray diffraction studies showed the formation of phase with the peaks corresponding to (112), (220) and (312) planes. Chemical Solution Deposition (CSD) for the synthesis of CTS is suitable for large area deposition and it includes several routes like solvothermal methods, direct liquid coating and nano ink based technique. The metal Chloride salts and thiourea is used as a source of sulphur to synthesize CTS solution and homogeneous thin films of CTS deposited on glass substrate using spin coating method. Use of abrasive solvent like hydrazine and hydrogen sulphide gas which are used to synthesize CTS thin film have detrimental effect on environment, we report eco friendly solvent based approach to synthesize CTS at low temperature 200 °C.

  6. Geothermal Energy Summary

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Renner

    2007-08-01

    Following is complete draft.Geothermal Summary for AAPG Explorer J. L. Renner, Idaho National Laboratory Geothermal energy is used to produce electricity in 24 countries. The United States has the largest capacity (2,544 MWe) followed by Philippines (1,931 MWe), Mexico (953 MWe), Indonesia (797 MWe), and Italy (791 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). When Chevron Corporation purchased Unocal Corporation they became the leading producer of geothermal energy worldwide with projects in Indonesia and the Philippines. The U. S. geothermal industry is booming thanks to increasing energy prices, renewable portfolio standards, and a production tax credit. California (2,244 MWe) is the leading producer, followed by Nevada (243 MWe), Utah (26 MWe) and Hawaii (30 MWe) and Alaska (0.4 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). Alaska joined the producing states with two 0.4 KWe power plants placed on line at Chena Hot Springs during 2006. The plant uses 30 liters per second of 75°C water from shallow wells. Power production is assisted by the availability of gravity fed, 7°C cooling water (http://www.yourownpower.com/) A 13 MWe binary power plant is expected to begin production in the fall of 2007 at Raft River in southeastern Idaho. Idaho also is a leader in direct use of geothermal energy with the state capital building and several other state and Boise City buildings as well as commercial and residential space heated using fluids from several, interconnected geothermal systems. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 modified leasing provisions and royalty rates for both geothermal electrical production and direct use. Pursuant to the legislation the Bureau of Land management and Minerals Management Service published final regulations for continued geothermal leasing, operations and royalty collection in the Federal Register (Vol. 72, No. 84 Wednesday May 2, 2007, BLM p. 24358-24446, MMS p. 24448-24469). Existing U. S. plants focus on high-grade geothermal systems located in the west. However, interest in non

  7. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  8. Engineering Annual Summary 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Dimolitsas, S.; Gerich, C.

    2000-04-11

    a 100 percent data capture rate. came to an end. Within an intense three-month period, Engineering effectively transitioned its 150 employees working on this project to other Laboratory projects. We leveraged our competence in microsystems and biosciences to establish a robust technical presence in the field of biological and chemical weapons defense. This year, we saw successful operational tests of several hand-held versions of our analytical instruments. Concurrently, we saw our efforts in information technologies and medical devices pay off significantly, when both these areas grew robustly. In the operations area, Engineering underwent an important change in its technology investment strategy. In 1998, we consolidated our nine technical thrust areas into five Engineering Technology Centers and restructured these centers to form the Engineering Science and Technology Program, reporting directly to my office. In 1999, we completed the selection of four of the five Directors to lead each of these areas and moved from startup to true enterprise. This 1999 Summary highlights these five Centers.

  9. Engineering Annual Summary 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Dimolitsas, S

    1999-05-01

    Unlike most research and development laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is responsible for delivering production-ready designs. Unlike most industry, LLNL is responsible for R and D that must significantly increase the nation's security. This rare combination of production engineering expertise and national R and D agenda identifies LLNL as one of the few organizations today that conducts cutting-edge engineering on grand-scale problems, while facing enormous technical risk and undergoing diligent scrutiny of its budget, schedule, and performance. On the grand scale, cutting-edge technologies are emerging from our recent ventures into ''Xtreme Engineering{trademark}.'' Basically, we must integrate and extend technologies concurrently and then push them to their extreme, such as building very large structures but aligning them with extreme precision. As we extend these technologies, we push the boundaries of engineering capabilities at both poles: microscale and ultrascale. Today, in the ultrascale realm, we are building NIF, the world's largest laser, which demands one of the world's most complex operating systems with 9000 motors integrated through over 500 computers to control 60,000 points for every laser shot. On the other pole, we have fabricated the world's smallest surgical tools and the smallest instruments for detecting biological and chemical agents used by antiterrorists. Later in this Annual Summary, we highlight some of our recent innovations in the area of Xtreme Engineering, including large-scale computer simulations of massive structures such as major bridges to prepare retrofitting designs to withstand earthquakes. Another feature is our conceptual breakthrough in developing the world's fastest airplane, HyperSoar, which can reach anywhere in the planet in two hours at speeds of 6700 mph. In the last few years, Engineering has significantly pushed the technology in structural mechanics and micro-instrumentation. For example

  10. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2006-07-01

    A summary is given of presentations and discussions in theLaser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2006 Advanced AcceleratorConcepts Workshop. Presentation highlights include: widespreadobservation of quasi-monoenergetic electrons; good agreement betweenmeasured and simulated beam properties; the first demonstration oflaser-plasma acceleration up to 1 GeV; single-shot visualization of laserwakefield structure; new methods for measuring<100 fs electronbunches; and new methods for "machining" laser-plasma acceleratorstructures. Discussion of future direction includes: developing a roadmapfor laser-plasma acceleration beyond 1 GeV; a debate over injection andguiding; benchmarking simulations with improved wake diagnostics;petawatt laser technology for future laser-plasmaaccelerators.

  11. Planetary Transmission Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G. (Technical Monitor); Samuel, Paul D.; Conroy, Joseph K.; Pines, Darryll J.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a methodology for detecting and diagnosing gear faults in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission. This diagnostic technique is based on the constrained adaptive lifting algorithm. The lifting scheme, developed by Wim Sweldens of Bell Labs, is a time domain, prediction-error realization of the wavelet transform that allows for greater flexibility in the construction of wavelet bases. Classic lifting analyzes a given signal using wavelets derived from a single fundamental basis function. A number of researchers have proposed techniques for adding adaptivity to the lifting scheme, allowing the transform to choose from a set of fundamental bases the basis that best fits the signal. This characteristic is desirable for gear diagnostics as it allows the technique to tailor itself to a specific transmission by selecting a set of wavelets that best represent vibration signals obtained while the gearbox is operating under healthy-state conditions. However, constraints on certain basis characteristics are necessary to enhance the detection of local wave-form changes caused by certain types of gear damage. The proposed methodology analyzes individual tooth-mesh waveforms from a healthy-state gearbox vibration signal that was generated using the vibration separation (synchronous signal-averaging) algorithm. Each waveform is separated into analysis domains using zeros of its slope and curvature. The bases selected in each analysis domain are chosen to minimize the prediction error, and constrained to have the same-sign local slope and curvature as the original signal. The resulting set of bases is used to analyze future-state vibration signals and the lifting prediction error is inspected. The constraints allow the transform to effectively adapt to global amplitude changes, yielding small prediction errors. However, local wave-form changes associated with certain types of gear damage are poorly adapted, causing a significant change in the

  12. FASTBUS Snoop Diagnostic Module

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, H.V.; Downing, R.

    1980-11-01

    Development of the FASTBUS Snoop Module, undertaken as part of the prototype program for the new interlaboratory data bus standard, is described. The Snoop Module resides on a FASTBUS crate segment and provides diagnostic monitoring and testing capability. Communication with a remote host computer is handled independent of FASTBUS through a serial link. The module consists of a high-speed ECL front-end to monitor and single-step FASTBUS cycles, a master-slave interface, and a control microprocessor with serial communication ports. Design details and performance specifications of the prototype module are reported. 9 figures, 1 table.

  13. [Frontal mass: diagnostic challenges].

    PubMed

    Rubino, Gina; Correia, Alexandre; Rodrigues, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga spp. are part of the oral flora of humans and animals, being responsible for skin and soft tissues infections and invasive infections. Microbiological identification can be difficult due to its slow growth. We present a case of infection caused by this bacteria in the form of an extracerebral intracranial abscess, presenting as a frontal mass that posed some diagnostic challenges. A surgical drainage was performed together with antibiotic therapy with favourable outcome. This microorganism was identified in the second week of treatment and then a careful history revealed a dog bite days prior to the initial symptoms. This could have been the site of entry to a posterior focalization. PMID:23069241

  14. Diagnostics for hybrid reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Orsitto, Francesco Paolo

    2012-06-19

    The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

  15. 49 CFR 194.113 - Information summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information summary. 194.113 Section 194.113... Response Plans § 194.113 Information summary. (a) The information summary for the core plan, required by... state(s). (b) The information summary for the response zone appendix, required in § 194.107,...

  16. 49 CFR 194.113 - Information summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Information summary. 194.113 Section 194.113... Response Plans § 194.113 Information summary. (a) The information summary for the core plan, required by... state(s). (b) The information summary for the response zone appendix, required in § 194.107,...

  17. Does Writing Summaries Improve Memory for Text?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spirgel, Arie S.; Delaney, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    In five experiments, we consistently found that items included in summaries were better remembered than items omitted from summaries. We did not, however, find evidence that summary writing was better than merely restudying the text. These patterns held with shorter and longer texts, when the text was present or absent during the summary writing,…

  18. 40 CFR 1502.12 - Summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Summary. 1502.12 Section 1502.12 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.12 Summary. Each environmental impact statement shall contain a summary which adequately and accurately summarizes the statement. The summary shall stress...

  19. Instrumentation and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Nakaishi, C.V.; Bedick, R.C.

    1990-12-01

    This Technology Status Report describes research and accomplishments for the Instrumentation and Diagnostics (I D) Projects within the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Program of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). Process understanding and control can be improved through the development of advanced instrumentation and diagnostics. The thrust of the I D Projects is to further develop existing measurement and control techniques for application to advanced coal-based technologies. Project highlights are: an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) instrument has been developed to analyze trace elements in gasification and combustion process streams. An in situ two-color Mie scattering technique with LSS can simultaneously measure the size, velocity, and elemental composition of coal particles during combustion. A high-temperature, fluorescence thermometry technique has accurately measured gas temperatures during field testing in combustion and gasification environments. Expert systems have been developed to improve the control of advanced coal-based processes. Capacitance flowmeters were developed to determine the mass flowrate, solid volume fraction, and particle velocities of coal slurries. 32 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Molecular diagnostics in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, V C C; Yew, W W; Yuen, K Y

    2005-11-01

    Molecular diagnostics in tuberculosis has enabled rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in clinical specimens, identification of mycobacterial species, detection of drug resistance, and typing for epidemiological investigation. In the laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis, the nucleic acid amplification (NAA) test is rapid and specific but not as sensitive as culture of mycobacteria. The primary determinant of successful NAA testing for tuberculosis depends on the shedding of mycobacterial DNA in secretions from caseating granulomas and its dissemination into sterile body fluids or tissue biopsies. In multibacillary diseases with a high mycobacterial load, a positive Ziehl-Neelsen smear with a positive NAA test is diagnostic of active tuberculosis, whereas a positive Ziehl-Neelsen smear with a negative NAA test in the absence of inhibitors would indicate nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. The role of the NAA test is more important in paucibacillary diseases with low mycobacterial loads. The presence of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors, however, especially in extrapulmonary specimens, may produce false-negative results. Although this problem can be overcome to some extent by extra extraction steps, the additional processing invariably leads to the loss of mycobacterial DNA. To circumvent this problem, a brief culture augmentation step is carried out before the NAA test is performed, which can enhance the mycobacterial load while concomitantly diluting inhibitors, thereby maintaining the sensitivity of the test without excessively increasing turnaround time.

  1. Radiation hardening of diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The world fusion program has advanced to the stage where it is appropriate to construct a number of devices for the purpose of burning DT fuel. In these next-generation experiments, the expected flux and fluence of 14 MeV neutrons and associated gamma rays will pose a significant challenge to the operation and diagnostics of the fusion device. Radiation effects include structural damage to materials such as vacuum windows and seals, modifications to electrical properties such as electrical conductivity and dielectric strength and impaired optical properties such as reduced transparency and luminescence of windows and fiber optics during irradiation. In preparation for construction and operation of these new facilities, the fusion diagnostics community needs to work with materials scientists to develop a better understanding of radiation effects, and to undertake a testing program aimed at developing workable solutions for this multi-faceted problem. A unique facility to help in this regard is the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility, a neutron source located at the beam stop of the world's most powerful accelerator, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The LAMPF proton beam generates 10{sup 16} neutrons per second because of spallation'' reactions when the protons collide with the copper nuclei in the beam stop.

  2. Diagnostic Technologies in Practice

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Malcolm; Kwag, Michael; Chown, Sarah A.; Doupe, Glenn; Trussler, Terry; Rekart, Michael; Gilbert, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing HIV-positive gay men through enhanced testing technologies that detect acute HIV infection (AHI) or recent HIV infection provides opportunities for individual and population health benefits. We recruited 25 men in British Columbia who received an acute (n = 13) or recent (n = 12) HIV diagnosis to engage in a longitudinal multiple-methods study over one year or longer. Our thematic analysis of baseline qualitative interviews revealed insights within men’s accounts of technologically mediated processes of HIV discovery and diagnosis. Our analysis illuminated the dialectic of new HIV technologies in practice by considering the relationship between advances in diagnostics (e.g., nucleic acid amplification tests) and the users of these medical technologies in clinical settings (e.g., clients and practitioners). Technological innovations and testing protocols have shifted experiences of learning of one’s HIV-positive status; these innovations have created new diagnostic categories that require successful interpretation and translation to be rendered meaningful, to alleviate uncertainty, and to support public health objectives. PMID:25201583

  3. NIO1 diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Zaniol, B. Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.; De Muri, M.; Mimo, A.

    2015-04-08

    The radio frequency ion source NIO1, jointly developed by Consorzio RFX and INFN-LNL, will generate a 60kV-135mA hydrogen negative ion beam, composed of 9 beamlets over an area of about 40 × 40 mm{sup 2}. This experiment will operate in continuous mode and in conditions similar to those foreseen for the larger ion sources of the Neutral Beam Injectors for ITER. The modular design of NIO1 is convenient to address the several still open important issues related to beam extraction, optics, and performance optimization. To this purpose a set of diagnostics is being implemented. Electric and water cooling plant related measurements will allow monitoring current, pressure, flow, and temperature. The plasma in the source will be characterized by emission spectroscopy, cavity ring-down and laser absorption spectroscopy. The accelerated beam will be analyzed with a fast emittance scanner, its intensity profile and divergence with beam emission spectroscopy and visible tomography. The power distribution of the beam on the calorimeter will be monitored by thermocouples and by an infrared camera. This contribution presents the implementation and initial operation of some of these diagnostics in the commissioning phase of the experiment, in particular the cooling water calorimetry and emission spectroscopy.

  4. Thioaptamer Diagnostic System (TDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Xianbin

    2015-01-01

    AM Biotechnologies, LLC, in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a diagnostic device that quickly detects sampled biomarkers. The TDS quickly quantifies clinically relevant biomarkers using only microliters of a single sample. The system combines ambient-stable, long shelf-life affinity assays with handheld, microfluidic gel electrophoresis affinity assay quantification technology. The TDS is easy to use, operates in microgravity, and permits simultaneous quantification of 32 biomarkers. In Phase I of the project, the partners demonstrated that a thioaptamer assay used in the microfluidic instrument could quantify a specific biomarker in serum in the low nanomolar range. The team also identified novel affinity agents to bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and demonstrated their ability to detect BAP with the microfluidic instrument. In Phase II, AM Biotech expanded the number of ambient affinity agents and demonstrated a TDS prototype. In the long term, the clinical version of the TDS will provide a robust, flight-tested diagnostic capability for space exploration missions.

  5. [Hemophagocytic syndrome: diagnostic problems].

    PubMed

    Czogała, Małgorzata; Czogała, Wojciech; Balwierz, Walentyna

    2006-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HS) is a rare but life-threatening disease caused by inappropriate activation of T-lymphocytes and histiocytes, hipercytokinemia and hemophagocytosis. The most common symptoms are fever, hepatosplenomegaly, unspecific neurological abnormalities, pancytopenia, coagulopathy, hiperferritinemia and lipid abnormalities. HS is classified into two forms: primary, inherited (Familial Hamophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis--FHL) and secondary (associated with infection, malignancy, autoimmune disease). In spite of the fact that diagnostic guidelines are available it often remains unrecognised. Prognosis of HS depends on the form of disease and in case of secondary HS on the underlying disease. Development of the treatment protocols (HLH-94, HLH-2004) which combine immunochemiotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has strongly improved prognosis in HS especially in the primary form. Three-year overall survival for children with HS is now over 50%. Early diagnosis and appropriate therapy is crucial for effectiveness of the treatment. Popularisation of the knowledge about the syndrome, diagnostic guidelines and treatment protocols can contribute to more frequent appropriate recognition of HS and to improvement of the treatment results. PMID:16892901

  6. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  7. Diagnostic tests for syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection caused by Treponema pallidum. A total of 13,106 cases of primary and secondary syphilis were reported in the United States in 2011 and the rate of infection has increased in subgroups, particularly men who have sex with men. The disease is mainly diagnosed through clinical findings and serologic testing. However, no single serologic test of syphilis is sufficient. Hence, the serologic diagnosis of syphilis requires the detection of 2 types of antibodies (nontreponemal antibodies and treponemal antibodies). The paradigm in syphilis testing has recently shifted in many centers to screen with a treponemal antibody test, reflexing to a nontreponemal test if the treponemal antibody test is positive. This reverse of the traditional algorithm may not be widely recognized among clinicians.

  8. Wind energy systems: program summary

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    The Federal Wind Energy Program (FWEP) was initiated to provide focus, direction and funds for the development of wind power. Each year a summary is prepared to provide the American public with an overview of government sponsored activities in the FWEP. This program summary describes each of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current wind energy projects initiated or renewed during FY 1979 (October 1, 1978 through September 30, 1979) and reflects their status as of April 30, 1980. The summary highlights on-going research, development and demonstration efforts and serves as a record of progress towards the program objectives. It also provides: the program's general management structure; review of last year's achievements; forecast of expected future trends; documentation of the projects conducted during FY 1979; and list of key wind energy publications.

  9. Summary of instabilities and damping group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koscielniak, Shane

    1999-12-01

    There are a number of new high intensity proton synchrotrons proposed: the SNS at Oakridge and ESS in Europe, as neutron sources; the JHF/NSP in Japan, a multi-disciplinary facility sponsored by KEK and JAERI; the New FNAL Booster; and the Proton Driver as first stage of a μ-μ collider. In addition there are operating machines such as ISIS at RAL, the Brookhaven AGS and its Booster, and the IPNS at Argonne with high intensity and beam power. Moreover, at the energy frontier the beam quality requirements of CERN LHC will pose new and challenging operation modes for its injector chain comprising Booster, PS, and SPS. All will encounter beam current limitations arising from beam instability; and the lower energy machines are also limited by space-charge collective effects. Though many anticipated problems are shared in common between these machines, the impetus for the theme of this workshop, "Instabilities of High Intensity Hadron Beams in Rings", comes from the SNS and Proton Driver which were the inspiration for the charge to the "Instabilities Working Group" to answer the following questions.

  10. Monotone Properties of a General Diagnostic Model. Research Report. ETS RR-07-25

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xueli

    2007-01-01

    Monotonicity properties of a general diagnostic model (GDM) are considered in this paper. Simple data summaries are identified to inform about the ordered categories of latent traits. The findings are very much in accordance with the statements made about the GPCM (Hemker, Sijtsma, Molenaar, & Junker, 1996, 1997). On the one hand, by fitting a…

  11. Impact and cost-effectiveness of current and future tuberculosis diagnostics: the contribution of modelling

    PubMed Central

    Houben, R.; Cohen, T.; Pai, M.; Cobelens, F.; Vassall, A.; Menzies, N. A.; Gomez, G. B.; Langley, I.; Squire, S. B.; White, R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The landscape of diagnostic testing for tuberculosis (TB) is changing rapidly, and stakeholders need urgent guidance on how to develop, deploy and optimize TB diagnostics in a way that maximizes impact and makes best use of available resources. When decisions must be made with only incomplete or preliminary data available, modelling is a useful tool for providing such guidance. Following a meeting of modelers and other key stakeholders organized by the TB Modelling and Analysis Consortium, we propose a conceptual framework for positioning models of TB diagnostics. We use that framework to describe modelling priorities in four key areas: Xpert® MTB/RIF scale-up, target product profiles for novel assays, drug susceptibility testing to support new drug regimens, and the improvement of future TB diagnostic models. If we are to maximize the impact and cost-effectiveness of TB diagnostics, these modelling priorities should figure prominently as targets for future research. PMID:25189546

  12. Diagnostics and Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, J.W.

    1993-03-01

    This report discusses activities of the Diagnostics and Microelectronics thrust area which conducts activities in semiconductor devices and semiconductor fabrication technology for programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our multidisciplinary engineering and scientific staff use modern computational tools and semi-conductor microfabrication equipment to develop high-performance devices. Our work concentrates on three broad technologies of semiconductor microdevices: (1) silicon on III-V semiconductor microeletronics, (2) lithium niobate-based and III-V semiconductor-based photonics, and (3) silicon-based micromaching for application to microstructures and microinstruments. In FY-92, we worked on projects in seven areas, described in this report: novel photonic detectors; a wideband phase modulator; an optoelectronic terahertz beam system; the fabrication of microelectrode electrochemical sensors; diamond heatsinks; advanced micromachining technologies; and electrophoresis using silicon microchannels.

  13. Diagnostic evaluation of rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Nance, Jessica R; Mammen, Andrew L

    2015-06-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is characterized by severe acute muscle injury resulting in muscle pain, weakness, and/or swelling with release of myofiber contents into the bloodstream. Symptoms develop over hours to days after an inciting factor and may be associated with dark pigmentation of the urine. Serum creatine kinase and urine myoglobin levels are markedly elevated. Clinical examination, history, laboratory studies, muscle biopsy, and genetic testing are useful tools for diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis, and they can help differentiate acquired from inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis. Acquired causes include substance abuse, medication or toxic exposures, electrolyte abnormalities, endocrine disturbances, and autoimmune myopathies. Inherited predisposition to rhabdomyolysis can occur with disorders of glycogen metabolism, fatty acid β-oxidation, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Less common inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis include structural myopathies, channelopathies, and sickle-cell disease. This review focuses on the differentiation of acquired and inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis and proposes a practical diagnostic algorithm. Muscle Nerve 51: 793-810, 2015. PMID:25678154

  14. Rig Diagnostic Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soileau, Kerry M.; Baicy, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Rig Diagnostic Tools is a suite of applications designed to allow an operator to monitor the status and health of complex networked systems using a unique interface between Java applications and UNIX scripts. The suite consists of Java applications, C scripts, Vx- Works applications, UNIX utilities, C programs, and configuration files. The UNIX scripts retrieve data from the system and write them to a certain set of files. The Java side monitors these files and presents the data in user-friendly formats for operators to use in making troubleshooting decisions. This design allows for rapid prototyping and expansion of higher-level displays without affecting the basic data-gathering applications. The suite is designed to be extensible, with the ability to add new system components in building block fashion without affecting existing system applications. This allows for monitoring of complex systems for which unplanned shutdown time comes at a prohibitive cost.

  15. Peritoneal tuberculosis: diagnostic options.

    PubMed Central

    Lal, N; Soto-Wright, V

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extrapulmonary tuberculosis has vague symptoms and few signs. It is essential to recognize and diagnose this curable disease prior to performing definitive surgery. Newer tests such as DNA or RNA amplification allow for early diagnosis but have limitations. CASE: We report a case of peritoneal tuberculosis in an immigrant woman. She had vague symptoms of low-grade fever, mild abdominal pain, obstipation, and bloating. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed to establish the diagnosis. Tuberculosis was confirmed by DNA extraction from the frozen section specimen with subsequent analysis using polymerase chain reaction. CONCLUSION: Peritoneal tuberculosis is a disease that often simulates malignancies. With the increasing prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus in developed countries, tuberculosis is also on the rise and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with an abdominal/pelvic mass and ascites. PMID:10524670

  16. Diagnostic Evaluation of Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Nance, Jessica R.; Mammen, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is characterized by severe acute muscle injury resulting in muscle pain, weakness, and/or swelling with release of myofiber contents into the bloodstream. Symptoms develop over hours to days following an inciting factor and may be associated with dark pigmentation of the urine. Serum creatine kinase and urine myoglobin levels are markedly elevated. The clinical examination, history, laboratory studies, muscle biopsy, and genetic testing are useful tools for diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis, and they can help differentiate acquired from inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis. Acquired causes include substance abuse, medication or toxic exposures, electrolyte abnormalities, endocrine disturbance, and autoimmune myopathies. Inherited predisposition to rhabdomyolysis can occur with disorders of glycogen metabolism, fatty acid beta-oxidation, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Less common inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis include structural myopathies, channelopathies, and sickle cell disease. This review focuses on the differentiation of acquired and inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis and proposes a practical diagnostic algorithm. PMID:25678154

  17. Balloon gondola diagnostics package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantor, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to define a new gondola structural specification and to quantify the balloon termination environment, NASA developed a balloon gondola diagnostics package (GDP). This addition to the balloon flight train is comprised of a large array of electronic sensors employed to define the forces and accelerations imposed on a gondola during the termination event. These sensors include the following: a load cell, a three-axis accelerometer, two three-axis rate gyros, two magnetometers, and a two axis inclinometer. A transceiver couple allows the data to be telemetered across any in-line rotator to the gondola-mounted memory system. The GDP is commanded 'ON' just prior to parachute deployment in order to record the entire event.

  18. Diagnostic and vaccine chapter.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, J H; Kokanov, S K; Verkhovsky, O A

    2010-10-01

    The first report in this chapter describes the development of a killed composite vaccine. This killed vaccine is non-infectious to humans, other animals, and the environment. The vaccine has low reactivity, is non-abortive, and does not induce pathomorphological alterations to the organs of vaccinated animals. The second report of this chapter describes the diagnostic value of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Brucella-specific antibodies and its ability to discriminate vaccinated cattle from infected cattle. The results indicated that the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is more sensitive than traditional tests for detecting antibodies to Brucella abortus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle. PMID:20850688

  19. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  20. Optical Diagnostics in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftimia, Nicusor

    2003-03-01

    Light has a unique potential for non-invasive tissue diagnosis. The relatively short wavelength of light allows imaging of tissue at the resolution of histopathology. While strong multiple scattering of light in tissue makes attainment of this resolution difficult for thick tissues, most pathology emanates from epithelial surfaces. Therefore, high-resolution diagnosis of many important diseases may be achieved by transmitting light to the surface of interest. The recent fiber-optic implementation of technologies that reject multiple scattering, such as confocal microscopy and optical low coherence interferometry, have brought us one step closer to realizing non-invasive imaging of architectural and cellular features of tissue. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can produce high-resolution cross-sectional images of biological structures. Clinical OCT studies conducted in the gastrointestinal tract and cardiovascular system have shown that OCT is capable of providing images of the architectural (> 20 µm) microanatomy of a variety of epithelial tissues, including the layered structure of squamous epithelium and arterial vessels. Fine Needle Aspiration- Low Coherence Interferometry (FNA-LCI) is another optical diagnostics technique, which is a suitable solution to increase the effectiveness of the FNA procedures. LCI is capable of measuring depth resolved (axial, z) tissue structure, birefringence, flow (Doppler shift), and spectra at a resolution of several microns. Since LCI systems are fiber-optic based, LCI probes may easily fit within the bore of a fine gauge needle, allowing diagnostic information to be obtained directly from the FNA biopsy site. Fiber optic spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a new confocal microscopy method, which eliminates the need for rapid beam scanning within the optical probe. This advance enables confocal microscopy to be performed through small diameter probes and will allow assessment of internal human tissues in vivo at