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Sample records for soap-free emulsion copolymerization

  1. Monodispersepoly[BMA-co-(COPS-I)] Particles by Soap-Free Emulsion Copolymerization and Its Optical Properties as Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Chang; Choo, Hun Seung

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization of benzyl methacrylate (BMA) with sodium 1-allyloxy-2-hydroxypropane sulfonate (COPS-I) and the resulting optical properties, a series of experiments was carried out at various reaction conditions such as the changes of BMA concentration, COPS-I concentration, BMA concentration under a fixed COPS-I amount, initiator and divinyl benzene (DVB) concentration. All the latices showed highly monodispersed spherical particles in the size range of 144~435 nm and the respective shiny structural colors from their colloidal photonic crystals. It is found that the changes in such polymerization factors greatly affect the number of particles and particle diameter, polymerization rate, molecular weight, zeta-potential, and refractive indices. The increase of number of particles led to the increased rate of polymerization and zeta-potential of the latices, on the other hand, to the decreased molecular weight. Refractive indices and the reflectivity increased with COPS-I concentration, on the other hand, and decreased with DVB concentration. Especially, refractive indices of the resulting poly[BMA-co-(COPS-I)] colloidal photonic crystals showed much higher values of 1.65~2.21 than that of polystyrene, due to the formation of core-shell shaped morphology. Monodisperse and high refractive index of poly[BMA-co-(COPS-I)] particles prepared in this work could be used for the study in photonic crystals and electrophoretic display.

  2. Superparamagnetic polymer emulsion particles from a soap-free seeded emulsion polymerization and their application for lipase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanjun; Chen, Xia; Li, Yanfeng; Liu, Xiao; Lei, Lin; Zhang, Yakui; Qian, Jiayu

    2014-01-01

    Using emulsion copolymer of styrene (St), glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) as seed latexes, the superparamagnetic polymer emulsion particles were prepared by seeded emulsion copolymerization of butyl methacrylate (BMA), vinyl acetate (VAc) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of the seed latexes and superparamagnetic Fe3O4/SiOx nanoparticles (or Fe3O4-APTS nanoparticles) through a two-step process, without addition of any emulsifier. The magnetic emulsion particles named P(St-GMA-HEMA)/P(BMA-VAc) were characterized by transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results showed that the magnetic emulsion particles held a structure with a thinner shell (around 100 nm) and a bigger cavity (around 200 nm), and possessed a certain level of magnetic response. The resulting magnetic emulsion particles were employed in the immobilization of lipase by two strategies to immobilized lipase onto the resulting magnetic composites directly (S-1) or using glutaraldehyde as a coupling agent (S-2), thus, experimental data showed that the thermal stability and reusability of immobilized lipase based on S-2 were higher than that of S-1.

  3. Preparation of poly(BMA-co-MMA) particles by soap-free emulsion polymerization and its optical properties as photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Chang; Choo, Hun-Seung

    2014-11-01

    Narrowly dispersed poly(BMA-co-MMA) and PBMA latices with particle diameters ranging within 216-435 nm were synthesized successfully by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization with KPS and AIBA. The average particle diameter and particle size distribution, average molecular weight and its distribution, glass transition temperature, reflectance spectra in visible wavelength, and refractive indices for the respective poly(BMA-co-MMA) latices and their photonic crystals were systematically investigated in terms of BMA/MMA ratio, BMA content, polymerization temperature, and DVB effect. The rate of polymerization increased with increasing MMA concentration in BMA/MMA ratio. The particle diameter increased with BMA concentration in BMA/MMA ratio. The molecular weight increased with BMA concentration in BMA/MMA ratio and monomer concentration. The drying of the latices offered self-assembled shiny colloidal crystal films showing the characteristic structural colors in visible wavelength. All the poly(BMA-co-MMA) latices prepared in the study were fallen within the range of photonic grade microspheres. The reflectance measurement on the colloidal photonic crystals having different particle diameters clearly exhibited narrow stopbands. The reflection maxima (λ(max)) measured in this study were well close to the λ(max) calculated, derived from the Bragg's equation. The refractive indices of poly(BMA-co-MMA) photonic crystals were found to be almost same as the theoretical values and increased proportionally from 1.50 to 1.57 with BMA content in BMA/MMA ratios. It was, thus, found that the optical reflectance properties of the poly(BMA-co-MMA) colloidal photonic crystals can be controlled easily by adjusting the reaction conditions and BMA/MMA ratio in soap-free emulsion copolymerization of BMA and MMA.

  4. Preparation of micrometer-sized polymer particles with control of initiator dissociation during soap-free emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Tatsuro; Konno, Hiroyuki; Gu, Shunchao; Konno, Mikio

    2006-12-19

    A previously proposed method of soap-free emulsion polymerization employing an amphoteric initiator, 2,2'-azobis [N-(2-carboxyethyl)-2-methylpropionamidine] tetrahydrate (VA-057), was extended to synthesize micrometer-sized polystyrene particles with low polydispersity in an acidic region of pH from 3.3 to 4.6. A buffer system of CH3COOH/CH3COONa was used for the adjustment of pH, which was aimed at effective promotion of particle coagulation in early stage of the polymerization. In these experiments, CH3COOH concentration was varied from 20 to 360 mM at a CH3COONa concentration of 10 mM. Polymer particles with an average size of 1.8 microm and low polydispersity were obtained at the CH3COOH concentration of 40 mM for the concentrations of 1.1 M styrene monomer and 10 mM initiator. To more precisely control dispersion stability of particles, experiments in which pH was stepwisely changed during the polymerization were also carried out. This polymerization method could enhance the average size of particles to 2.2 microm while retaining the monodispersity of particles. Furthermore, combination of pH stepwise change and monomer addition during the polymerization could produce particles with an average size of 3.0 microm and low polydispersity.

  5. Nonspherical nanoparticles with controlled morphologies via seeded surface-initiated single electron transfer radical polymerization in soap-free emulsion.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jinfeng; Wang, Lixia; Zhu, Lei; Pan, Mingwang; Wang, Wenjie; Liu, Ying; Liu, Gang

    2015-04-14

    This work reports a facile novel approach to prepare asymmetric poly(vinylidene fluoride)/polystyrene (PVDF/PS) composite latex particles with controllable morphologies using one-step soap-free seeded emulsion polymerization, i.e., surface-initiated single electron transfer radical polymerization (SET-RP) of styrene (St) at the surface of PVDF seed particles. It was observed that the morphology was influenced mainly by the St/PVDF feed ratio, the polymerization temperature, and the length of the catalyst Cu(0) wire (Φ 1.00 mm). When the feed ratio was St/PVDF = 5.0 g/1.0 g, snowman-like Janus particles were exclusively obtained. Raspberry-like and popcorn-like composite particles were observed at a higher reaction temperature or a shorter length of the catalyst wire. The reaction kinetics plots demonstrated some unique features. The formation of nonspherical composite nanoparticles can be ascribed to the surface nucleation of PS bulges following the SET-RP.

  6. Intriguing Morphology Evolution from Noncrosslinked Poly(tert-butyl acrylate) Seeds with Polar Functional Groups in Soap-Free Emulsion Polymerization of Styrene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Pan, Mingwang; Song, Shaofeng; Zhu, Lei; Yuan, Jinfeng; Liu, Gang

    2016-08-09

    Herein, we demonstrate a facile approach to prepare anisotropic poly(tert-butyl acrylate)/polystyrene (PtBA/PS) composite particles with controllable morphologies by soap-free seeded emulsion polymerization (SSEP). In the first step, noncrosslinked PtBA seeds with self-stabilizing polar functional groups (e.g., ester groups and radicals) are synthesized by soap-free emulsion polymerization. During the subsequent SSEP of styrene (St), PS bulges are nucleated on the PtBA seeds due to the microphase separation confined in the latex particles. The morphology evolution of PtBA/PS composite particles is tailored by varying the monomer/seed feed ratio, polymerization time, and polymerization temperature. Many intriguing morphologies, including hamburger-like, litchi-like, mushroom-like, strawberry-like, bowl-like, and snowman-like, have been acquired for PtBA/PS composite particles. The polar groups on the PtBA seed surface greatly influence the formation and further merging of PS/St bulges during the polymerization. A possible formation mechanism is proposed on the basis of experimental results. These complex composite particles are promising for applications in superhydrophobic coatings.

  7. Soap-free emulsion polymerization of poly (methyl methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate): effects of anionic comonomers and methanol on the different characteristics of the latexes.

    PubMed

    Adelnia, Hossein; Pourmahdian, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Soap-free emulsion polymerization (SFEP) of methyl methacrylate, butyl acrylate was conducted in water/methanol media with sodium salts of four different acidic comonomers, namely styrene sulfonic acid (NaSS), 2-acrylamide-2-methyl-1-propane sulfonic acid (NaAmps), acrylic acid (NaAA), and itaconic acid (Na2ita). It was found that the introduction of methanol as co-solvent (35 wt%) to the medium greatly decreases the amount of water-soluble polyelectrolyte in the cases NaAA and Na2ita while it does not make difference for NaSS and NaAmps. Having employed the concept of conductance dependency to the ion mobility, the onset concentration in which soluble chains were formed was detected. The addition of sulfonic-based comonomers (NaSS and NaAmps), first decreased particle size and then led to predomination of solution polymerization over SFEP. On the contrary, the incorporation of carboxylic-based comonomers (NaAA and Na2ita) led to increase in particle size. Moreover, the particle size results were in good qualitative agreement with the classical Smith-Ewart theory.

  8. RETRACTED: Size-controlled spherical polymer nanoparticles: synthesis with tandem acoustic emulsification followed by soap-free emulsion polymerization and one-step fabrication of colloidal crystal films of various colors.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yuki; Nakabayashi, Koji; Kojima, Maya; Atobe, Mahito

    2014-11-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). This article was retracted at the request of the Editor. The above paper is essentially a duplicate of an original Article in “Size-Controlled Synthesis of Polymer Nanoparticles with Tandem Acoustic Emulsification Followed by Soap-Free Emulsion Polymerization” ACS Macro Lett., 2013, 2 (6), pp 482–484, 10.1021/mz4001817. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High solids content, soap-free, film-forming latexes stabilized by laponite clay platelets.

    PubMed

    Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie; Guimarães, Thiago Rodrigues; Pereira, Ana Maria Cenacchi; Alves, Gizelda Maria; Moreira, José Carlos; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Dos Santos, Amilton Martins

    2010-11-01

    High solids content film-forming poly[styrene-co-(n-butyl acrylate)] [poly(Sty-co-BuA)] latexes armored with Laponite clay platelets have been synthesized by soap-free emulsion copolymerization of styrene and n-butyl acrylate. The polymerizations were performed in batch in the presence of Laponite and a methyl ether acrylate-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) macromonomer in order to promote polymer/clay association. The overall polymerization kinetics showed a pronounced effect of clay on nucleation and stabilization of the latex particles. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy observation confirmed the armored morphology and indicated that the majority of Laponite platelets were located at the particle surface. The resulting nanostructured films displayed enhanced mechanical properties. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Synthesis of pH and temperature sensitive, core-shell nano/microgels, by one pot, soap-free emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Medina, A; Cornejo-Bravo, J M; Licea-Claveríe, A

    2012-03-01

    The synthesis and properties of thermal/pH-sensitive core-shell copolymer nano/microgels were investigated. The crosslinked core consisted of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) while the shell was stabilized by poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) and 2-methacryloyloxybenzoic acid (2MBA) using a "one pot" soapless emulsion polymerization method. Monodisperse particles were produced with average hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 40 to 880 nm, as determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) in water at 25°C, depending on the synthetic recipe used. The influence of PEGMA and 2MBA content on size and temperature transition at different pH values was studied. Zeta potential measurements and acid-base titration studies demonstrated almost complete incorporation of acid comonomer (2MBA) into the nano/microgels. Two different crosslinkers, a stable and an acid labile, were compared. The crosslinker used has a major influence on the size and charge density of the nano/microgels produced. Microscopic studies confirmed the core-shell morphology of the nano/microgels.

  11. Preparation of hybrid thiol-acrylate emulsion-templated porous polymers by interfacial copolymerization of high internal phase emulsions.

    PubMed

    Langford, Caitlin R; Johnson, David W; Cameron, Neil R

    2015-05-01

    Emulsion-templated highly porous polymers (polyHIPEs), containing distinct regions differing in composition, morphology, and/or properties, are prepared by the simultaneous polymerization of two high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) contained within the same mould. The HIPEs are placed together in the mould and subjected to thiol-acrylate photopolymerization. The resulting polyHIPE material is found to contain two distinct semicircular regions, reflecting the composition of each HIPE. The original interface between the two emulsions becomes a copolymerized band between 100 and 300 μm wide, which is found to be mechanically robust. The separate polyHIPE layers are distinguished from one another by their differing average void diameter, chemical composition, and extent of contraction upon drying. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Modification of flax fibres by radiation induced emulsion graft copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moawia, Rihab Musaad; Nasef, Mohamed Mahmoud; Mohamed, Nor Hasimah; Ripin, Adnan

    2016-05-01

    Flax fibres were modified by radiation induced graft copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) by pre-irradiation method in an emulsion medium. The effect of reaction parameters on the degree of grafting (DOG) such as concentration of bleaching agent, absorbed dose, monomer concentration, temperature and reaction time were investigated. The DOG was found to be dependent on the investigated parameters. The incorporation of poly(GMA) grafts in the bleached flax fibres was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The structural and mechanical changes were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and mechanical tester, respectively. The results revealed that reacting bleached flax fibres irradiated with 20 kGy with 5% GMA emulsion containing 0.5% polyoxyethylene-sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) surfactant at 40 °C for 1 h led to a maximum DOG of 148%. The grafted fibres showed sufficient mechanical strength and hydrophobicity which make them promising precursors for development of adsorbents after appropriate chemical treatments.

  13. Two-dimensional Raman correlation spectroscopy study of an emulsion copolymerization reaction process.

    PubMed

    Noda, Isao; Allen, William M; Lindberg, Seth E

    2009-02-01

    The emulsion copolymerization of styrene and 1,3-butadiene using an oligomeric nonionic surfactant as an emulsifier to make a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) copolymer latex was monitored by real-time in situ Raman spectroscopy. Time-resolved Raman spectra collected during the early stage of the polymerization reaction were subjected to a series of data analysis techniques, including two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy, multivariate self-modeling curve resolution (SMCR), and kernel analysis, to elucidate the fine details of the complex reaction process. Generalized 2D correlation analysis of time-resolved Raman spectra readily identified the characteristic Raman scattering bands for the monomers and copolymer. Cross-peaks appearing in 2D Raman correlation spectra showed that the decrease in the spectral intensity of Raman bands assignable to 1,3-butadiene occurs before the band intensity changes for styrene or SBR copolymer. The positions of asynchronous cross-peaks were used to identify a spectral region with the most distinct pattern of intensity variations, which in turn could be used as the starting point for the alternating least squares iteration of the SMCR analysis. SMCR analysis of the time-resolved Raman spectra generated a set of estimated pure component spectra and concentration profiles of styrene, 1,3-butadiene, and SBR copolymer without requiring independently measured calibration data. The estimated concentration profiles of monomers and copolymer indicated that the reaction of 1,3-butadiene started before the consumption of styrene and production of SBR copolymer. Kernel analysis of the estimated concentration profiles provided a succinct measure of the similarity and dissimilarity of the concentration changes of monomers and copolymer.

  14. Effects of agitation in emulsion polymerization of n-butyl methacrylate and its copolymerization with N-methylol acrylamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Sitaraman

    Effects of agitation in emulsion polymerization were investigated using a 2 dm3 stirred reactor and Rushton turbine agitators and a semi-batch mode of reaction. High-solids recipes giving monodisperse polymer particles with core-shell morphology were developed for monomer-starved, semi-batch emulsion copolymerization of n-butyl methacrylate (BMA) and N-methylol acrylamide (NMA). A larger agitator, or a higher agitation speed, resulted in higher particle concentration, more viscous latex, less water-soluble polymer, and higher mass of coagulum. Better incorporation of NMA in the polymer particles was because of greater particle-water interfacial area and more efficient macromixing in the reactor. A mechanism where the surface of the polymer particles is the most favorable site for copolymerization, is proposed for the incorporation of NMA. Nucleation of a greater number of particles at higher agitation intensity was a general observation for recipes with surfactant concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (cmc). Effects of agitation on the kinetics of emulsion polymerization of BMA were studied using reaction calorimetry. At a reaction temperature of 70°C, the molecular weight was higher at higher agitation speed, while at 50°C, the converse was true. The order of dependence of the mass of coagulum on the agitation speed depended on the surfactant coverage of the polymer particles: the variation was almost two-fold (1.2 to 2.3). The coagulum mass was related to surfactant coverage using results from the DLVO theory. The volume-surface average diameter of the monomer droplets in the emulsion scaled to the 1.6 power of agitation speed, and the droplet size distribution was log-normal. Thermal crosslinking of the copolymer particles and films was investigated, and the effect of carbon tetrabromide on the gel content of the copolymer films was studied experimentally and theoretically. The increase in the gel content as a function of time during thermal

  15. Immobilization of aminoglycosidic aminocyclitols antibiotic onto soap-free poly(MMA-EA-AA) latex particles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kai; Kan, Chengyou; Du, Yi; Liu, Deshan; Yeung, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Monodispersed soap-free poly(MMA-EA-AA) latex particles with surface carboxyl groups were synthesized by emulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA), ethyl acrylate (EA) and acrylic acid (AA) in aqueous medium, and streptomycin sulfate (SMS) was immobilized onto these particles using three different methods. A model experiment was designed to test the feasibility of the reaction between the carboxyl groups of polymer and the amino groups of the medicine. The covalent coupling between the latex particles and the medicine was confirmed by XPS. Results showed that the medicine molecules were located on the particle surface after immobilization, and the coupling efficiency of SMS in pre-adsorption method was higher than that in direct method. The highest coupling efficiency of this medicine was achieved using the spacer-arm method. It was demonstrated that the immobilized medicine had similar antimicrobial activity as the free form using Escherichia coli as an evaluating organism.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of self-crosslinking fluorinated polyacrylate soap-free latices with core-shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; An, Qiufeng; Hao, Lifen; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Min

    2013-03-01

    Novel self-crosslinking fluorinated polyacrylate soap-free latices (FMBN) with core-shell structure were synthesized by semicontinuous seeded emulsion polymerization method from dodecafluoroheptyl methacrylate (DFMA), methyl methacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA), and N-methylolamide (NMA) in the presence of a polymerizable emulsifier-ammonium allyloxtmethylate nonylphenol ethoxylates sulfate (DNS-86). Effects of the DNS-86 and DFMA amounts on stability and properties of the FMBN emulsions were studied. Besides, the latices and their film were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectrum, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), laser particle size analyzer, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), contact angle goniometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. FT-IR spectra and 1H NMR spectrum showed that DFMA successfully participated in soap-free emulsion polymerization and monomers formed the fluorinated acrylate copolymer. The resulted latex particles had the core-shell structure. The films formed from the FMBN latices thus had two Tg. Their thermal stability and Tg of the shell phase increased gradually with augment of DFMA amount in polymer. XPS, AFM and hydrophobicity analyses indicated the fluoroalkyl groups had the tendency to enrich at the film-air interface. This enrichment of fluorine at the film-air interface was more evident after the annealing process. Water contact angles of the FMBN film before and after the annealing process could attain 115.5° and 117.5°, individually.

  17. pH-sensitive wax emulsion copolymerization with acrylamide hydrogel using gamma irradiation for dye removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobashy, Mohamed Mohamady; Elhady, Mohamed., A.

    2017-05-01

    Emulsion polymerization is an efficient method for the production of new wax-hydrogel matrices of cetyl alcohol: stearic acid wax and acrylamide hydrogel using triethylamine (TEA) as an emulsifier. A cross-linking reaction occurred when a mixture of wax-hydrogel solution was irradiated with gamma rays at a dose of 20 kGy. The gelation percentage of the matrices (CtOH-StA/PAAm) was 86%, which indicates that a sufficiently high conversion occurred in these new wax-hydrogel matrices. The ability of PAAm and CtOH-StA/PAAm as an adsorbent for dye removal was investigated. The removal of three reactive dyes, namely Remazol Red (RR), Amido Black (AB), and Toluidine Blue (TB), from aqueous solutions depends on the pH of the dye solution. Removal efficiency was investigated by UV spectrophotometry, and the results showed the affinity of the wax hydrogel to adsorb TB was 98% after 320 min. Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance spectra confirmed the cross-linking process involved between the chains of wax and hydrogel; furthermore, scanning electron microscopy images showed that the wax and hydrogel were completely miscible to form a single matrix. Swelling measurements showed the high affinity of adsorbed dyes from aqueous solutions at different pH values to the wax-hydrogel network; the highest swelling values of 13.05 and 8.24 (g/g) were observed at pH 10 and 6, respectively

  18. The properties of covalently immobilized trypsin on soap-free P(MMA-EA-AA) latex particles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kai; Kan, Chengyou; Yeung, Anthony; Liu, Deshan

    2005-04-19

    The covalent immobilization of trypsin onto poly[(methyl methacrylate)-co-(ethyl acrylate)-co-(acrylic acid)] latex particles, produced by a soap-free emulsion polymerization technique, was carried out using the carbodiimide method. The catalytic properties and kinetic parameters, as well as the stability of the immobilized enzyme were compared to those of the free enzyme. Results showed that the optimum temperature and pH for the immobilized trypsin in the hydrolysis of casein were 55 degrees C and 8.5, both of which were higher than that of the free form. It was found that K(m) (Michaelis constant) was 45.7 mg . ml(-1) and V(max) (maximal reaction rate) was 793.0 microg . min(-1) for immobilized trypsin, compared to a K(m) of 30.0 mg . ml(-1) and a V(max) of 5 467.5 microg . min(-1) for free trypsin. The immobilized trypsin exhibited much better thermal and chemical stabilities than its free counterpart and maintained over 63% of its initial activity after reusing ten times.

  19. Facile Soap-Free Miniemulsion Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate via Reverse Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gaohua; Zhang, Lifen; Pan, Xiangqiang; Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2012-12-21

    A facile soap-free miniemulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) was successfully carried out via a reverse ATRP technique, using a water-soluble potassium persulfate (KPS) or 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (V-50) both as the initiator and the stabilizer, and using an oil-soluble N,N-n-butyldithiocarbamate copper (Cu(S2CN(C4H9)2)2) as the catalyst without adding any additional ligand. Polymerization results demonstrated the "living"/controlled characteristics of ATRP and the resultant latexes showed good colloidal stability with average particle size around 300-700 nm in diameter. The monomer droplet nucleation mechanism was proposed. NMR spectroscopy and chain-extension experiments under UV light irradiation confirmed the attachment and livingness of UV light sensitive -S-C(=S)-N(C4H9)2 group in the chain end.

  20. Chain Transfer of Vegetable Oil Macromonomers in Acrylic Solution Copolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Micah; Messman, Jamie M; Rawlins, James

    2011-01-01

    Use of vegetable oil macromonomers (VOMMs) as comonomers in emulsion polymerization enables good film coalescence without the addition of solvents that constitute volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOMMs are derived from renewable resources and offer the potential of post-application crosslinking via auto-oxidation. However, chain transfer reactions of VOMMs with initiator and/or polymer radicals during emulsion polymerization reduce the amount of allylic hydrogen atoms available for primary auto-oxidation during drying. Vegetable oils and derivatives were reacted in combination with butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate via solution polymerization. The copolymerization was monitored using in situ infrared spectroscopy to determine the extent of chain transfer. 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the loci of chain transfer and the molecular weight characteristics of the polymers were characterized by SEC. Solution polymerization was utilized to minimize temperature fluctuations and maintain polymer solubility during the initial characterization.

  1. Multiple emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yazan, Y; Seiller, M; Puisieux, F

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to update the information on multiple emulsions known to be promising delivery systems for both pharmaceuticals and cosmetic materials. The possibility of encapsulating active substances within liquid membranes may lead to interesting opportunities in both fields. Thus the formulation, manufacturing, stabilization, analysis and potential application of multiple emulsions seems to be worth surveying, putting a special emphasis on cosmetic applications.

  2. Steric stabilization of Pickering emulsions for the efficient synthesis of polymeric microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Salari, Joris W O; van Heck, Jeroen; Klumperman, Bert

    2010-09-21

    It is commonly known that Pickering emulsions are extremely stable against coalescence and are, therefore, potentially interesting for the synthesis of new materials, such as colloidosomes, microcapsules, composite particles, foams, and so on. However, for the efficient synthesis of such materials, one also has to consider the colloidal stability against aggregation, which is often neglected. In this study, it is demonstrated that steric stabilization is provided to Pickering emulsion droplets by the adsorption of poly(styrene-block-ethylene-co-propylene) (pS-b-EP) and that it is a requirement for the efficient synthesis of polymeric microcapsules. Monodisperse polystyrene particles of 648 nm are synthesized by soap-free emulsion polymerization. A model Pickering emulsion is then formed by the addition of sodium chloride at a critical concentration of 325 mM and mixing it with either heptane or decane. Subsequently, pS-b-EP is added to the Pickering emulsion to provide steric stabilization. Size exclusion chromatography is used to prove and quantify the adsorption of pS-b-EP onto the Pickering emulsion droplets. A maximum surface coverage of 1.3 mg/m(2) is obtained after 2 h, which is approximately one-third of the adsorption on a pure pS surface. We believe that the presence of polar sulfate groups on the particle, which initially stabilized the particle in water, reduces the adsorption of pS-b-EP. Microcapsules are formed by heating the Pickering emulsion above the glass-transition temperature of the particles. Significant aggregation is observed, if no pS-b-EP is used. The adsorption of pS-b-EP provides steric stabilization to the Pickering emulsion droplets, reduces aggregation significantly, and ultimately leads to the successful and efficient synthesis of pS microcapsules.

  3. Polylactide-based microspheres prepared using solid-state copolymerized chitosan and d,l-lactide.

    PubMed

    Demina, T S; Akopova, T A; Vladimirov, L V; Zelenetskii, A N; Markvicheva, E A; Grandfils, Ch

    2016-02-01

    Amphiphilic chitosan-g-poly(d,l-lactide) copolymers have been manufactured via solid-state mechanochemical copolymerization and tailored to design polyester-based microspheres for tissue engineering. A single-step solid-state reactive blending (SSRB) using low-temperature co-extrusion has been used to prepare these copolymers. These materials have been valorized to stabilize microspheres processed by an oil/water emulsion evaporation technique. Introduction of the copolymers either in water or in the oil phase of the emulsion allowed to replace a non-degradable emulsifier typically used for microparticle preparation. To enhance cell adhesion, these copolymers were also tailored to bring amino-saccharide positively charged segments to the microbead surface. Size distribution, surface morphology, and total microparticle yield have been studied and optimized as a function of the copolymer composition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Feasibility of the Simultaneous Determination of Monomer Concentrations and Particle Size in Emulsion Polymerization Using in Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An immersion Raman probe was used in emulsion copolymerization reactions to measure monomer concentrations and particle sizes. Quantitative determination of monomer concentrations is feasible in two-monomer copolymerizations, but only the overall conversion could be measured by Raman spectroscopy in a four-monomer copolymerization. The feasibility of measuring monomer conversion and particle size was established using partial least-squares (PLS) calibration models. A simplified theoretical framework for the measurement of particle sizes based on photon scattering is presented, based on the elastic-sphere-vibration and surface-tension models. PMID:26900256

  5. Tailored synthesis of amine N-halamine copolymerized polystyrene with capability of killing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qian; Bao, Sarina; Zhao, Yue; Zhao, Tianyi; Xiao, Linghan; Gao, Ge; Chokto, Harnoode; Dong, Alideertu

    2015-04-15

    Novel amine N-halamine copolymerized polystyrene (ANHCPS) nanostructures were controllably fabricated as potent antibiotics by using the surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization for killing pathogenic bacteria. The morphology and size of the ANHCPS were well tailored by tuning reaction conditions such as monomer molar ratio, temperature, and copolymerization time. Effect of chlorination aging time on the oxidative chlorine content in the ANHCPS was established, and the oxidative chlorine content was determined by the modified iodometric/thiosulfate technique. Antibacterial behavior of the ANHCPS on bacterial strain was evaluated using Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as model pathogenic bacteria via the plate counting technique, inhibition zone study, and time-kill assay. Antimicrobial results illustrated that the ANHCPS possessed superior antibacterial capability of killing pathogenic bacteria. The destruction induced by the ANHCPS on bacterial surface structure was proven by using SEM technique. The effect of the oxidative chlorine content and morphology/size on the antimicrobial capability was constructed as well. This study provides us a novel approach for controllably synthesizing amine N-halamine polymers, and making them the potent candidates for killing bacteria or even the control of microorganism contamination.

  6. Radiation induced graft copolymerization of methyl methacrylate onto chrome-tanned pig skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrucha, K.; Pȩkala, W.; Kroh, J.

    Graft copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) onto chrome-tanned pig skins was carried out by the irradiation with 60Co ?-rays. The grafted polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) chains were isolated by acid hydrolysis of the collagen backbone in order to characterize the graft copolymers. Proof of grafting was obtained through the detection of amino acid endgroups in the isolated grafts by reaction with ninhydrin. The grafting yield of MMA in aqueous emulsion was found to be higher than that for pure MMA and MMA in acetone. The degree of grafting increases with increasing monomer concentration in emulsion and reaches maximum at radiation dose ca 15 kGy. The yield of grafting is very high - ca 90% of monomer converts into copolymer and only 10% is converted into homopolymer. The present paper reports the physical properties of chrome-tanned pig skins after graft polymerization with MMA in emulsion. Modified leathers are more resistant against water absorption and abrasion in comparison with unmodified ones. They have more uniform structure over the whole surface, greater thickness and stiffness. The results reported seem to indicate that MMA may be used in the production of shoe upper and sole leathers. The mechanism of some of the processes occuring during radiation grafting of MMA in water emulsion on tanned leathers has been also suggested and discussed.

  7. Highly concentrated emulsions: 1. Average drop size determination by analysis of incoherent polarized steady light transport.

    PubMed

    Paruta-Tuarez, Emilio; Fersadou, Hala; Sadtler, Véronique; Marchal, Philippe; Choplin, Lionel; Baravian, Christophe; Castel, Christophe

    2010-06-01

    The analysis of incoherent polarized steady light transport is reported as a convenient technique for the drop size determination in highly concentrated oil-in-water emulsions. The studied system consists in heptane-in-water emulsions stabilized with a copolymeric surfactant (Synperonic PE®/L64). Hundred grams of parent emulsions, at two volume fractions of dispersed phase (φ=0.958 and 0.937) were prepared using a semi-batch process. Then, they were diluted with the aqueous phase to obtain volume fractions ranging from 0.886 to 0.958. The use of a copolymeric surfactant allows the dilution of the highly concentrated emulsions without any change in the particle size distribution as confirmed by laser diffraction measurements. We found that the polarization technique allows the determination of the film thickness between water drops rather than their sizes. Consequently, we propose a geometrical relationship to determine an average drop size from the film thickness. The sensitivity of this alternative technique to detect changes in average drop size was studied by changing some process and formulation parameters. Drop size determination in highly concentrated emulsions via this method is useful since the measurement protocol neither involves dilution nor induces structural changes in the emulsion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct Copolymerization of CO2 and Diols

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Masazumi; Ito, Kazuki; Honda, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Direct polymerization of CO2 and diols is promising as a simple and environmental-benign method in place of conventional processes using high-cost and/or hazardous reagents such as phosgene, carbon monoxide and epoxides, however, there are no reports on the direct method due to the inertness of CO2 and severe equilibrium limitation of the reaction. Herein, we firstly substantiate the direct copolymerization of CO2 and diols using CeO2 catalyst and 2-cyanopyridine promotor, providing the alternating cooligomers in high diol-based yield (up to 99%) and selectivity (up to >99%). This catalyst system is applicable to various diols including linear C4-C10 α,ω-diols to provide high yields of the corresponding cooligomers, which cannot be obtained by well-known methods such as copolymerization of CO2 and cyclic ethers and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates. This process provides us a facile synthesis method for versatile polycarbonates from various diols and CO2 owing to simplicity of diols modification. PMID:27075987

  9. Direct Copolymerization of CO2 and Diols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Masazumi; Ito, Kazuki; Honda, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    Direct polymerization of CO2 and diols is promising as a simple and environmental-benign method in place of conventional processes using high-cost and/or hazardous reagents such as phosgene, carbon monoxide and epoxides, however, there are no reports on the direct method due to the inertness of CO2 and severe equilibrium limitation of the reaction. Herein, we firstly substantiate the direct copolymerization of CO2 and diols using CeO2 catalyst and 2-cyanopyridine promotor, providing the alternating cooligomers in high diol-based yield (up to 99%) and selectivity (up to >99%). This catalyst system is applicable to various diols including linear C4-C10 α,ω-diols to provide high yields of the corresponding cooligomers, which cannot be obtained by well-known methods such as copolymerization of CO2 and cyclic ethers and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates. This process provides us a facile synthesis method for versatile polycarbonates from various diols and CO2 owing to simplicity of diols modification.

  10. Porating anion-responsive copolymeric gels.

    PubMed

    England, Dustin; Yan, Feng; Texter, John

    2013-09-24

    A polymerizable ionic liquid surfactant, 1-(11-acryloyloxyundecyl)-3-methylimidiazolium bromide (ILBr), was copolymerized with methyl methacrylate (MMA) in aqueous microemulsions at 30% (ILBr w/w) and various water to MMA ratios. The ternary phase diagram of the ILBr/MMA/water system was constructed at 25 and 60 °C. Homopolymers and copolymers of ILBr and MMA were produced by thermally initiated chain radical microemulsion polymerization at various compositions in bicontinuous and reverse microemulsion subdomains. Microemulsion polymerization reaction products varied from being gel-like to solid, and these materials were analyzed by thermal and scanning electron microscopy methods. Microemulsion polymerized materials were insoluble in all solvents tested, consistent with light cross-linking. Ion exchange between Br(-) and PF6(-) in these copolymeric materials resulted in the formation of open-cell porous structures in some of these materials, as was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several compositions illustrate the capture of prepolymerization nanoscale structure by thermally initiated polymerization, expanding the domain of compositions exhibiting this feat and yet to be demonstrated in any other system. Regular cylindrical pores in interpenetrating ILBr-co-MMA and PMMA networks are produced by anion exchange in the absence of templates. A percolating cluster/bicontinuous transition is "captured" by SEM after using anion exchange to visualize the mixed cluster/pore morphology. Some design principles for achieving this capture and for obtaining stimuli responsive solvogels are articulated, and the importance of producing solvogels in capturing the nanoscale is highlighted.

  11. High temperature structural, polymeric foams from high internal emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hoisington, M.A.; Duke, J.R.; Apen, P.G.

    1996-02-01

    In 1982, a high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) polymerization process to manufacture microcellular, polymeric foam systems was patented by Unilever. This patent discloses a polymerization process that occurs in a water-in-oil emulsion in which the water represents at least 76% of the emulsion by volume. The oil phase consists of vinyl monomers such as styrene and acrylates that are crosslinked by divinyl monomers during polymerization. After polymerization and drying to remove the water phase, the result is a crosslinked polymer foam with an open cell microstructure that is homogeneous throughout in terms of morphology, density, and mechanical properties. Since 1982, numerous patents have examined various HIPE polymerized foam processing techniques and applications that include absorbents for body fluids, cleaning materials, and ion exchange systems. All the published HIPE polymerized foams have concentrated on materials for low temperature applications. Copolymerization of styrene with maleic anhydride and N-substituted maleimides to produce heat resistant thermoplastics has been studied extensively. These investigations have shown that styrene will free radically copolymerize with N-substituted maleimides to create an alternating thermoplastic copolymer with a Tg of approximately 200{degrees}C. However, there are many difficulties in attempting the maleimide styrene copolymerization in a HIPE such as lower polymerization temperatures, maleimide solubility difficulties in both styrene and water, and difficulty obtaining a stable HIPE with a styrene/maleimide oil phase. This work describes the preparation of copolymer foams from N-ethylmaleimide and Bis(3-ethyl-5-methyl-4-maleimide-phenyl)methane with styrene based monomers and crosslinking agents.

  12. Detection of coalescing agents in water-borne latex emulsions using an environment sensitive fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Raja, Tanzeela Nazir; Brouwer, Albert M; Biemans, Koen; Nabuurs, Tijs; Tennebroek, Ronald

    2010-07-30

    In this paper we report the determination of partitioning of coalescing agents (organic co-solvents) in water-borne latex emulsions by means of a fluorescence method. An environment-sensitive fluorescent probe was copolymerized via emulsion polymerization. The presence of organic co-solvents inside the polymer particles is revealed by the photophysical properties of the probe. In particular, the position of the fluorescence emission maximum of co-polymerized can be used to measure the amount of coalescing agent present in the polymer particles. The spectral shifts are shown to be due to the softening of the matrix, rather than to solvation of the probe by the added co-solvent.

  13. Logarithmic Exchange Kinetics in Monodisperse Copolymeric Micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Daza, Fabián A.; Bonet Avalos, Josep; Mackie, Allan D.

    2017-06-01

    Experimental measurements of the relaxation kinetics of copolymeric surfactant exchange for micellar systems unexpectedly show a peculiar logarithmic decay. Several authors use polydispersity as an explanation for this behavior. However, in coarse-grained simulations that preserve microscopic details of the surfactants, we find evidence of the same logarithmic behavior. Since we use a strictly monodisperse distribution of chain lengths such a relaxation process cannot be attributed to polydispersity, but has to be caused by an inherent physical process characteristic of this type of system. This is supported by the fact that the decay is specifically logarithmic and not a power law with an exponent inherited from the particular polydispersity distribution of the sample. We suggest that the degeneracy of the energy states of the hydrophobic block in the core, which is broken on leaving the micelle, can qualitatively explain the broad distribution of energy barriers, which gives rise to the observed nonexponential relaxation.

  14. Kinetics and thermodynamics of living copolymerization processes.

    PubMed

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-11-13

    Theoretical advances are reported on the kinetics and thermodynamics of free and template-directed living copolymerizations. Until recently, the kinetic theory of these processes had only been established in the fully irreversible regime, in which the attachment rates are only considered. However, the entropy production is infinite in this regime and the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium cannot be investigated. For this purpose, the detachment rates should also be included. Inspite of this complication, the kinetics can be exactly solved in the regimes of steady growth and depolymerization. In this way, analytical expressions are obtained for the mean growth velocity, the statistical properties of the copolymer sequences, as well as the thermodynamic entropy production. The results apply to DNA replication, transcription and translation, allowing us to understand important aspects of molecular evolution.This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. Thermodynamics meets information in copolymerization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Copolymers are natural supports of information. This latter is contained in the sequence of monomeric units composing every copolymer. A well-known example is DNA in biology. At the molecular scale, the growth of a single copolymer is stochastic and proceeds by successive random attachments or detachments of monomers continuously supplied by the surrounding solution. The thermodynamics of copolymerization with or without a template shows that fundamental links exist between entropy production and the information content of the copolymer sequence. During depolymerization, this information is erased in a way compatible with Landauer's principle. These advances open new perspectives to understand information transmission during DNA replication and, more generally, information processing at the molecular scale in biology and polymer science.

  16. Kinetics and thermodynamics of living copolymerization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Theoretical advances are reported on the kinetics and thermodynamics of free and template-directed living copolymerizations. Until recently, the kinetic theory of these processes had only been established in the fully irreversible regime, in which the attachment rates are only considered. However, the entropy production is infinite in this regime and the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium cannot be investigated. For this purpose, the detachment rates should also be included. Inspite of this complication, the kinetics can be exactly solved in the regimes of steady growth and depolymerization. In this way, analytical expressions are obtained for the mean growth velocity, the statistical properties of the copolymer sequences, as well as the thermodynamic entropy production. The results apply to DNA replication, transcription and translation, allowing us to understand important aspects of molecular evolution. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  17. Copolymerization on Selective Substrates: Experimental Test and Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kozhunova, Elena Yu; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Zaremski, Mikhail Yu; Chertovich, Alexander V

    2017-04-11

    We explore the influence of a selective substrate on the composition and sequence statistics during the free radical copolymerization. In particular, we study the radical copolymerization of styrene and acrylic acid in bulk and in silica pores of different sizes. We show that the substrate affects both polymer composition and sequence statistics. We use dissipative particle dynamics simulations to study the polymerization process in detail, trying to pinpoint the parameters responsible for the observed differences in the polymer chain composition and sequences. The magnitude of the observed effect depends on the fraction of adsorbed monomer units, which cannot be described in the framework of the copolymerization theories based on the terminal unit model.

  18. UV-initiated template copolymerization of AM and MAPTAC: Microblock structure, copolymerization mechanism, and flocculation performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Zheng, Huaili; Gao, Baoyu; Sun, Yongjun; Liu, Bingzhi; Zhao, Chuanliang

    2017-01-01

    Flocculation as the core technology of sludge pretreatment can improve the dewatering performance of sludge that enables to reduce the cost of sludge transportation and the subsequent disposal costs. Therefore, synthesis of high-efficiency and economic flocculant is remarkably desired in this field. This study presents a cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM) flocculant with microblock structure synthesized through ultraviolet (UV)-initiated template copolymerization by using acrylamide (AM) and methacrylamido propyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (MAPTAC) as monomers, sodium polyacrylate (PAAS) as template, and 2,2'-azobis [2-(2-imidazolin-2-yl) propane] dihydrochloride (VA-044) as photoinitiator. The microblock structure of the CPAM was observed through nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR and (13)C NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. Furthermore, thermogravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry (TG/DSC) analysis was used to evaluate its thermal decomposition property. The copolymerization mechanism was investigated through the determination of the binding constant MK and study on polymerization kinetics. Results showed that the copolymerization was conducted in accordance with the I (ZIP) template polymerization mechanism, and revealed the coexistence of bimolecular termination free-radical reaction and mono-radical termination in the polymerization process. Results of sludge dewatering tests indicated the superior flocculation performance of microblock flocculant than random distributed CPAM. The residual turbidity, filter cake moisture content, and specific resistance to filtration reached 9.37 NTU, 68.01%, and 6.24 (10(12) m kg(-1)), respectively, at 40 mg L(-1) of template poly(AM-MAPTAC) and pH 6.0. Furthermore, all flocculant except commercial CPAM showed a wide scope of pH application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Latest nuclear emulsion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokujo, Hiroki; Kawahara, Hiroaki; Komatani, Ryosuke; Morishita, Misaki; Nakano, Toshiyuki; Otsuka, Naoto; Yoshimoto, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a extremely high-resolution 3D tracking detector. Since the discovery of the pion by C.F. Powell et al. in 1946, experiments with nuclear emulsions have contributed to the development of particle physics. (e.g. the OPERA collaboration reported the discovery of νμ * ντ oscillations in appearance mode in 2015) The technology of nuclear emulsion still keeps making progress. Since 2010, we have introduced a system of nuclear emulsion gel production to our laboratory in Nagoya University, and have started self-development of the new gel, instead of from the photographic film companies. Moreover, a faster automated emulsion scanning system is developed. Its scanning speed reaches 4000 cm2/h, and the load for analyzing becomes more and more lighter. In this presentation, we report the status of nuclear emulsion technologies for cosmic ray experiments.

  20. Oil emulsions of fluorosilicone fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, J. W.

    1985-08-27

    Emulsions of fluorosilicone fluids in mineral oil are disclosed. These emulsions are stabilized by a polydimethylsiloxane-polybutadiene copolymer or a polydimethylsiloxane-hydrogenated polybutadiene copplymer. The emulsions are an effective foam suppressant for organic liquids, especially crude petroleum.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of brush-like multigraft copolymers PnBA-g-PMMA by a combination of emulsion AGET ATRP and emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Wenwen; Li, Chunmei; Tan, Jiaojun; Yin, Dezhong; Zhang, Hepeng; Zhang, Baoliang; Yin, Changjie; Zhang, Qiuyu

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, poly(n-butyl acrylate)-g-poly(methyl methacrylate) multigraft copolymers were synthesized by macromonomer technique and miniemulsion copolymerization. The PMMA macromonomers were obtained by an activator generated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) in emulsion system and subsequent allylation. Then the copolymerization of different macromonomers with nBA was carried out in miniemulsion system, obtaining multigraft copolymers with high molecular weight. The latex particles and distribution of emulsion AGET ATRP and miniemulsion copolymerization were characterized using laser light scattering. The molecular weight and polydispersity indices of macromonomers and multigraft copolymers were analyzed by gel permeation chromatography, and the number-average molecular weight range is 187,600-554,800 g/mol for PnBA-g-PMMA copolymers. In addition, the structural characteristics of macromonomer and brush-like copolymers were determined by infrared spectra and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The thermal performance of brush-like copolymers were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. Atomic force microscopy results showed that the degree of microphase separation was varying with increasing PMMA content in PnBA-g-PMMA. The dynamic rheometer analysis revealed that multigraft copolymer with PMMA content of 31.4% exhibited good elastomeric properties to function as a TPE. These multigraft copolymers show a promising low cost and environmental friendly thermoplastic elastomer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Tuning the critical solution temperature of polymers by copolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Bernhard; Chudoba, Richard; Dzubiella, Joachim; Heyda, Jan

    2015-12-28

    We study statistical copolymerization effects on the upper critical solution temperature (CST) of generic homopolymers by means of coarse-grained Langevin dynamics computer simulations and mean-field theory. Our systematic investigation reveals that the CST can change monotonically or non-monotonically with copolymerization, as observed in experimental studies, depending on the degree of non-additivity of the monomer (A-B) cross-interactions. The simulation findings are confirmed and qualitatively explained by a combination of a two-component Flory-de Gennes model for polymer collapse and a simple thermodynamic expansion approach. Our findings provide some rationale behind the effects of copolymerization and may be helpful for tuning CST behavior of polymers in soft material design.

  3. Octadecyl maleamic acid salt as a microreactor for its copolymerization reaction with butyl acrylate in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Milton Gaspar, L J; Baskar, Geetha

    2006-03-14

    The hydrogelator, octadecyl maleamic acid salt (ODMAS), has been shown to perform as a microreactor in copolymerization reaction with butyl acrylate in aqueous medium thereby providing functionalized latex. The evidence for occurrence of controlled polymerization reaction inside the microreactor is drawn from the composition and the polydispersity index of the copolymers. The copolymers generated under microreactor conditions or in other words, from emulsion phase provided by the hydrogelator exhibit significant incorporation of ODMAS with narrow polydispersity index. For example, a copolymer with ODMAS as high as 0.62 m and polydispersity index at 1.39 could be achieved. On the contrary, the solution copolymerization reactions in THF resulted in low yield of polymers with molecular weight at 10(3) order and polydispersity index in range of 2.53-2.91. The particle size distribution of the latexes remains almost invariant at 74 +/- 4 nm, over the concentration range of 0.12-0.62m with standard deviation (sigma) of 0.12-0.22. The surface area/molecule of ODMAS on the latex particle has been estimated to be 0.21 nm(2)/molecule. The polymerized latexes exhibit zeta potential at 64 +/- 3 mV and surface tension in range of 42.8-47.9 mN m(-)(1) respectively. This is indicative of coverage of latex with ODMAS.

  4. Catalysts for CO2/epoxide ring-opening copolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Trott, G.; Saini, P. K.; Williams, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes and reviews recent progress in the development of catalysts for the ring-opening copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides. The copolymerization is an interesting method to add value to carbon dioxide, including from waste sources, and to reduce pollution associated with commodity polymer manufacture. The selection of the catalyst is of critical importance to control the composition, properties and applications of the resultant polymers. This review highlights and exemplifies some key recent findings and hypotheses, in particular using examples drawn from our own research. PMID:26755758

  5. Magnetoresistive Emulsion Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  6. Copolymerization of carbon dioxide and butadiene via a lactone intermediate.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Ito, Shingo; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2014-04-01

    Although carbon dioxide has attracted broad interest as a renewable carbon feedstock, its use as a monomer in copolymerization with olefins has long been an elusive endeavour. A major obstacle for this process is that the propagation step involving carbon dioxide is endothermic; typically, attempted reactions between carbon dioxide and an olefin preferentially yield olefin homopolymerization. Here we report a strategy to circumvent the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers for copolymerizations of carbon dioxide and olefins by using a metastable lactone intermediate, 3-ethylidene-6-vinyltetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-one, which is formed by the palladium-catalysed condensation of carbon dioxide and 1,3-butadiene. Subsequent free-radical polymerization of the lactone intermediate afforded polymers of high molecular weight with a carbon dioxide content of 33 mol% (29 wt%). Furthermore, the protocol was applied successfully to a one-pot copolymerization of carbon dioxide and 1,3-butadiene, and one-pot terpolymerizations of carbon dioxide, butadiene and another 1,3-diene. This copolymerization technique provides access to a new class of polymeric materials made from carbon dioxide.

  7. Copolymerization of carbon dioxide and butadiene via a lactone intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Ryo; Ito, Shingo; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2014-04-01

    Although carbon dioxide has attracted broad interest as a renewable carbon feedstock, its use as a monomer in copolymerization with olefins has long been an elusive endeavour. A major obstacle for this process is that the propagation step involving carbon dioxide is endothermic; typically, attempted reactions between carbon dioxide and an olefin preferentially yield olefin homopolymerization. Here we report a strategy to circumvent the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers for copolymerizations of carbon dioxide and olefins by using a metastable lactone intermediate, 3-ethylidene-6-vinyltetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-one, which is formed by the palladium-catalysed condensation of carbon dioxide and 1,3-butadiene. Subsequent free-radical polymerization of the lactone intermediate afforded polymers of high molecular weight with a carbon dioxide content of 33 mol% (29 wt%). Furthermore, the protocol was applied successfully to a one-pot copolymerization of carbon dioxide and 1,3-butadiene, and one-pot terpolymerizations of carbon dioxide, butadiene and another 1,3-diene. This copolymerization technique provides access to a new class of polymeric materials made from carbon dioxide.

  8. A methyl methacrylate-HEMA-CL(n) copolymerization investigation: from kinetics to bioapplications.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Rooney, Thomas R; Lupi, Monica; Ubezio, Paolo; Hutchinson, Robin A; Moscatelli, Davide

    2013-10-01

    The radical copolymerization kinetics of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and poly-ϵ-caprolactone macromonomer functionalized with a vinyl end group (HEMA-CL(n)) is studied using a pulsed-laser technique. The reactivity ratios for this system are near unity, while a linear relationship between k(p,cop), the copolymer-averaged propagation rate coefficient, and the composition of macromonomer in the feed (0-80 wt% range) is determined. At 50 wt% macromonomer in the feed, a 1.67 ± 0.02 and 1.64 ± 0.06 increase in k(p,cop)/k(p,MMA) is determined for HEMA-CL3 and HEMA-CL2, respectively. These macromonomers are adopted to synthesize nanoparticles (NPs) in the range of 100-150 nm through batch emulsion free radical polymerization (BEP) to produce partially degradable drug delivery carriers. The produced NPs are tested in 4T1 cell line and show excellent characteristics as carriers: they do not affect cell proliferation, and a relevant number of NPs, thousands per cell, are internalized.

  9. Fundamental Study of Emulsions Stabilized by Soft and Rigid Particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Zifu; Harbottle, David; Pensini, Erica; Ngai, To; Richtering, Walter; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-06-16

    Two distinct uniform hybrid particles, with similar hydrodynamic diameters and comparable zeta potentials, were prepared by copolymerizing N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and styrene. These particles differed in their styrene to NIPAM (S/N) mass ratios of 1 and 8 and are referred to as S/N 1 and S/N 8, respectively. Particle S/N 1 exhibited a typical behavior of soft particles; that is, the particles shrank in bulk aqueous solutions when the temperature was increased. As a result, S/N 1 particles were interfacially active. In contrast, particle S/N 8 appeared to be rigid in response to temperature changes. In this case, the particles showed a negligible interfacial activity. Interfacial shear rheology tests revealed the increased rigidity of the particle-stabilized film formed at the heptane-water interface by S/N 1 than S/N 8 particles. As a result, S/N 1 particles were shown to be better emulsion stabilizers and emulsify a larger amount of heptane, as compared with S/N 8 particles. The current investigation confirmed a better performance of emulsion stabilization by soft particles (S/N 1) than by rigid particles (S/N 8), reinforcing the importance of controlling softness or deformability of particles for the purpose of stabilizing emulsions.

  10. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  11. Copolymerization of Metal Nanoparticles: A Route to Colloidal Plasmonic Copolymers**

    PubMed Central

    Lukach, Ariella; Sugikawa, Kota; Chung, Siyon; Vickery, Jemma; Therien-Aubin, Heloise; Yang, Bai; Rubinstein, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The resemblance between colloidal and molecular polymerization reactions has been recognized as a powerful tool for the fundamental studies of polymerization reactions, as well as a platform for the development of new nanoscale systems with desired properties. Future applications of colloidal polymers will require nanoparticle (NP) ensembles with a high degree of complexity that can be realized by hetero-assembly of NPs with different dimensions, shapes and compositions. In the present work, we have developed a method to apply strategies from molecular copolymerization to the co-assembly of gold nanorods with different dimensions into random and block copolymer structures (plasmonic copolymers). The approach was extended to the co-assembly of random copolymers of gold and palladium nanorods. A kinetic model validated and further expanded the kinetic theories developed for molecular copolymerization reactions. PMID:24520012

  12. Polar-Nonpolar Radical Copolymerization under Li+ Catalysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-21

    description of our copolymerization results. The polyisobutylene (b- PIB ) that is produced by homopolymerization of IB in an inert solvent such as 1,2...the linear polyisobutylene (l- PIB ) produced under the usual cationic initiation. The difference is clear in spectral (NMR) and physical (DSC, TGA...HPLC) properties. A detailed 2D-NMR examination of b- PIB obtained from ordinary IB and several isotopically labeled versions of IB revealed that its

  13. Recent advances in photoinduced donor/acceptor copolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, S.; Viswanathan, K.; Hoyle, C. E.; Clark, S. C.; Miller, C.; Morel, F.; Decker, C.

    1999-05-01

    Photoinitiated free radical polymerization of donor (D)/acceptor (A) type monomers has gained considerable interest due to the possibility to efficiently photopolymerize non-acrylate based systems. Furthermore, this photoinduced alternating copolymerization can be accomplished without the presence of a conventional free radical generating photoinitiator. In the past, we have shown that the structural influences in the direct photolysis of N-Alkyl and N-Arylmaleimides as well as their corresponding ground state charge transfer complexes (CTC) with suitable donors have carefully been investigated. For certain combinations of A and D type monomers, a direct photolysis of the ground state complex or the excitation of the acceptor, followed by the formation of an exciplex, has been shown to initiate the copolymerization. Herein, we show that the main route of initiation is based on inter or intra molecular H-abstraction from an excited state maleimide, whereby no exciplex formation takes place. H-abstraction will predominantly take place in systems where easily abstractable hydrogens are present. Our laser flash photolysis investigation, ESR [1] (A. Hiroshi, I. Takasi, T. Nosi, Macromol. Chem. 190 (1989) 2821) and phosphorescence emissions [2,3] (K.S. Chen, T. Foster, J.K.S. Wan, J. Phys. Chem. 84 (1980) 2473; C.J. Seliskar, S.P. McGlynn, J. Chem. Phys. 55 (1971) 4337) studies show that triplet excited states of N-alkyl substituted maleimides (RMI), which are well known strong precursors for direct H-abstractions from aliphatic ethers and secondary alcohols, are formed upon excitation. Rates of copolymerization and degrees of conversion for copolymerization of maleimide/vinyl ether pairs in air and nitrogen have been measured as a function of hydrogen abstractability of the excited triplet state MI as well as the influence of concentration and hydrogen donating effect of the hydrogen donor.

  14. Ethylene Copolymerization with 1-Octene Using a 2-Methylbenz

    PubMed

    Xu; Ruckenstein

    1998-07-28

    A new effective constrained geometry catalyst precursor for the ethylene/1-octene copolymerization, namely 2-methylbenz[e]indenylamido complex [eta5:eta1-(2-MeBenzInd)SiMe2NtBu]TiCl2 (4), was synthesized. Activated with methylaluminoxane (MAO), the complex 4 showed (a) an improved copolymerization activity and stability, (b) an enhanced comonomer incorporation in the copolymer, and (c) most importantly, an increased copolymer molecular weight, when compared with the previously employed catalysts. The polymerization conditions were found to have a significant effect on the catalyst activity, 1-octene incorporation, molecular weight, and even copolymer microstructure. For the copolymerization parameters, the values rE approximately 2.20 for ethylene and rO approximately 0.55 for 1-octene with rE.rO approximately 1.21 were obtained, reflecting a pronounced tendency for the random distribution of the comonomers in the copolymer chain. The 13C NMR analysis revealed that the E-O copolymer generated by the MAO-activated complex 4 has a regioirregular arrangement of the 1-octene repeat units as a result of some tail-to-tail incorporation of the 1-octene comonomer.

  15. Pickering emulsion templated interfacial atom transfer radical polymerization for microencapsulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Hitchcock, Adam P; Stöver, Harald D H

    2010-12-07

    This Article describes a new microencapsulation method based on a Pickering emulsion templated interfacial atom transfer radical polymerization (PETI-ATRP). Cationic LUDOX CL nanoparticles were coated electrostatically with an anionic polymeric ATRP initiator, poly(sodium styrene sulfonate-co-2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)ethyl methacrylate) (PSB), prepared by radical copolymerization of sodium styrene sulfonate and 2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)ethyl methacrylate (BIEM). The resulting PSB-modified CL particles were surface active and could be used to stabilize oil-in-water Pickering emulsions. ATRP of water-soluble cross-linking monomers, confined to the oil-water interface by the surface-bound PSB, then led to nanoparticle/polymer composite shells. This method allowed encapsulation of core solvents (xylene, hexadecane, perfluoroheptane) with different solubility parameters. The microcapsule (MC) wall chemistry could accommodate different monomers, demonstrating the versatility of this method. Double-walled MCs were formed by sequentially carrying out PETI-ATRP and in situ polymerization of encapsulated monomers. The double-walled structure was verified by both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM).

  16. FINE GRAIN NUCLEAR EMULSION

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, A.J.

    1962-04-24

    A method of preparing nuclear track emulsions having mean grain sizes less than 0.1 microns is described. The method comprises adding silver nitrate to potassium bromide at a rate at which there is always a constant, critical excess of silver ions. For minimum size grains, the silver ion concentration is maintained at the critical level of about pAg 2.0 to 5.0 during prectpitation, pAg being defined as the negative logarithm of the silver ion concentration. It is preferred to eliminate the excess silver at the conclusion of the precipitation steps. The emulsion is processed by methods in all other respects generally similar to the methods of the prior art. (AEC)

  17. Holographic DESA emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duenkel, Lothar; Eichler, Juergen; Schneeweiss, Claudia; Ackermann, Gerhard

    2005-04-01

    The DESA material is an ultra-fine grained silver bromide emulsion referring to the name of its four inventors (D)uenkel, (E)ichler, (S)chneeweiss, (A)ckermann of the University of Applied Sciences in Berlin, Germany. The thickness of the dried layer is between 5 and 7.5 μm, and the mean grain size is by about 15 nm, as determined by TEM. During manufacturing, emulsion precipitation and coating are separated strictly from spectral and chemical sensitization. Thus, a high performance could be obtained. Resolution is estimated higher than 8000 lp/mm. Sensitivity amounts to 80 up to 120 μJoules/cm2 for maximum diffraction efficiency by recording Denisyuk white-light reflection holograms at 632,8 nm (HeNe laser). The paper provides an insight into fundamentals of the ultra-fine grained silver halide technology together with new challenges for further developments under theoretical and practical aspects.

  18. Chain Copolymerization Reactions: An Algorithm to Predict the Reaction Evolution with Conversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallardo, Alberto; Aguilar, Maria Rosa; Abraham, Gustavo A.; Roman, Julio San

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to study and understand the behavior of chain copolymerization reactions. When a binary copolymerization reaction follows the terminal model, Conversion is able to predict the evolution of different parameters, such as instantaneous and cumulative copolymer molar fractions, or molar fractions of any sequence with the…

  19. Chain Copolymerization Reactions: An Algorithm to Predict the Reaction Evolution with Conversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallardo, Alberto; Aguilar, Maria Rosa; Abraham, Gustavo A.; Roman, Julio San

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to study and understand the behavior of chain copolymerization reactions. When a binary copolymerization reaction follows the terminal model, Conversion is able to predict the evolution of different parameters, such as instantaneous and cumulative copolymer molar fractions, or molar fractions of any sequence with the…

  20. Metabolism of environmental chemicals by plants - copolymerization into lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Sandermann, H. Jr.; Scheel, D.; Trenck, T.v.d.

    1983-01-01

    Plants have frequently been found to incorporate xenobiotics into ill-defined ''insoluble'' metabolite fractions. Evidence for the lignin nature of such fractions and for the formation of ''insoluble'' metabolite fractions in sterile plant cell cultures is summarized. In several cases, total ''insoluble'' plant metabolite fractions of pesticides were found to be excreted undigested by rats and sheep. Conclusive evidence for covalent incorporation of chemicals into lignin has only recently been obtained. In the case of herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and of the fungicide pentachlorophenol, the derived pesticide/lignin copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography in dimethylformamide, spectral methods, and chemical degradation. In independent studies, artificial lignin was prepared from coniferyl alcohol with the aid of peroxidase/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Benzo(..cap alpha..)pyrene quinones and chlorinated anilines could be copolymerized, and the resulting copolymer species were characterized with regard to size distribution and spectral properties. Detailed /sup 1/H- and /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopic studies showed that a major mechanism of copolymerization of the anilines consisted of a nucleophilic addition to the benzylic ..cap alpha..-carbon of lignol quinone-methide intermediates. In addition, covalent linkages involving the aromatic rings were also formed. 61 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Cyclodextrin stabilised emulsions and cyclodextrinosomes.

    PubMed

    Mathapa, Baghali G; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2013-11-07

    We report the preparation of o/w emulsions stabilised by microcrystals of cyclodextrin-oil inclusion complexes. The inclusion complexes are formed by threading cyclodextrins from the aqueous phase on n-tetradecane or silicone oil molecules from the emulsion drop surface which grow further into microrods and microplatelets depending on the type of cyclodextrin (CD) used. These microcrystals remain attached on the surface of the emulsion drops and form densely packed layers which resemble Pickering emulsions. The novelty of this emulsion stabilisation mechanism is that molecularly dissolved cyclodextrin from the continuous aqueous phase is assembled into colloid particles directly onto the emulsion drop surface, i.e. molecular adsorption leads to effective Pickering stabilisation. The β-CD stabilised tetradecane-in-water emulsions were so stable that we used this system as a template for preparation of cyclodextrinosomes. These structures were produced solely through formation of cyclodextrin-oil inclusion complexes and their assembly into a crystalline phase on the drop surface retained its stability after the removal of the core oil. The structures of CD-stabilised tetradecane-in-water emulsions were characterised using optical microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, cross-polarised light microscopy and WETSEM while the cyclodextrinosomes were characterised by SEM. We also report the preparation of CD-stabilised emulsions with a range of other oils, including tricaprylin, silicone oil, isopropyl myristate and sunflower oil. We studied the effect of the salt concentration in the aqueous phase, the type of CD and the oil volume fraction on the type of emulsion formed. The CD-stabilised emulsions can be applied in a range of surfactant-free formulations with possible applications in cosmetics, home and personal care. Cyclodextrinosomes could find applications in pharmaceutical formulations as microencapsulation and drug delivery vehicles.

  2. Rubberized asphalt emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, E.

    1986-09-02

    A method is described of making a rubberized asphalt composition which comprises the steps of: (a) combining asphalt with a hydrocarbon oil having a flash point of 300/sup 0/F. or more to provide a homogenous asphalt-oil mixture or solution, (b) then combining the asphalt-oil mixture with a particulate rubber at a temperature sufficient to provide a homogenous asphalt-rubber-oil gel, and (c) emulsifying the asphalt-rubber-oil gel by passing the gel, water, and an emulsifying agent through a colloid mill to provide an emulsion.

  3. Formation of Janus TiO2 nanoparticles by a pickering emulsion approach applying phosphonate coupling agents.

    PubMed

    Bachinger, Angelika; Ivanovici, Sorin; Kickelbick, Guido

    2011-10-01

    Anisotropic surface modification of TiO2 nanoparticles was achieved applying a Pickering emulsion approach. TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by sol-gel routes which allowed an excellent control over their size and morphology. The obtained colloids were further used as stabilizers in the formation of oil-in-water Pickering emulsion. For reasons of comparison, also commercially available titanium dioxide nanoparticles (Evonik AEROXIDE TiO2 P25) were used in the functionalization experiments. An organophosphorus coupling agent present in the oil phase coordinated to the surface of the anatase nanoparticles. In such a way an anisotropic surface modification of the particles was achieved which increased the stability of the Pickering emulsion. Spectroscopic studies revealed the presence of organophosphorus coupling agents which exhibited a covalent bonding to the surface of the particles. Thermogravimetric analyses confirmed a lower surface coverage of the particles modified in emulsion compared to those modified in suspension. Reactions of organophosphorus coupling agents containing an additional methacrylate group applying an organic monomer (methyl methacrylate) as the oil phase of the Pickering emulsion resulted in hybrid TiO2@polymer spheres. Spectroscopic characterization of the resulting particles revealed that the phosphonates were coordinated to the TiO2 surface and at the same time copolymerized with the MMA within the oil droplet. Morphological investigations of the isolated final product showed that the material was composed of polymer spheres with the stabilizing TiO2 nanoparticles on their surface.

  4. Programmed emulsions for sodium reduction in emulsion based foods.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Natalie; Hewson, Louise; Fisk, Ian; Wolf, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    In this research a microstructure approach to reduce sodium levels in emulsion based foods is presented. If successful, this strategy will enable reduction of sodium without affecting consumer satisfaction with regard to salty taste. The microstructure approach comprised of entrapment of sodium in the internal aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water emulsions. These were designed to destabilise during oral processing when in contact with the salivary enzyme amylase in combination with the mechanical manipulation of the emulsion between the tongue and palate. Oral destabilisation was achieved through breakdown of the emulsion that was stabilised with a commercially modified octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-starch. Microstructure breakdown and salt release was evaluated utilising in vitro, in vivo and sensory methods. For control emulsions, stabilised with orally inert proteins, no loss of structure and no release of sodium from the internal aqueous phase was found. The OSA-starch microstructure breakdown took the initial form of oil droplet coalescence. It is hypothesised that during this coalescence process sodium from the internalised aqueous phase is partially released and is therefore available for perception. Indeed, programmed emulsions showed an enhancement in saltiness perception; a 23.7% reduction in sodium could be achieved without compromise in salty taste (p < 0.05; 120 consumers). This study shows a promising new approach for sodium reduction in liquid and semi-liquid emulsion based foods.

  5. Kinetics and thermodynamics of first-order Markov chain copolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, P.; Andrieux, D.

    2014-07-01

    We report a theoretical study of stochastic processes modeling the growth of first-order Markov copolymers, as well as the reversed reaction of depolymerization. These processes are ruled by kinetic equations describing both the attachment and detachment of monomers. Exact solutions are obtained for these kinetic equations in the steady regimes of multicomponent copolymerization and depolymerization. Thermodynamic equilibrium is identified as the state at which the growth velocity is vanishing on average and where detailed balance is satisfied. Away from equilibrium, the analytical expression of the thermodynamic entropy production is deduced in terms of the Shannon disorder per monomer in the copolymer sequence. The Mayo-Lewis equation is recovered in the fully irreversible growth regime. The theory also applies to Bernoullian chains in the case where the attachment and detachment rates only depend on the reacting monomer.

  6. Direct Synthesis of Imidazolium-Functional Polyethylene by Insertion Copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zhongbao; Leicht, Hannes; Mecking, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Cationic imidazolium-functionalized polyethylene is accessible by insertion copolymerization of ethylene and allyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (AIm-BF4 ) with phosphinesulfonato palladium(II) catalyst precursors. Imidazolium-substituted repeat units are incorporated into the main chain and the initiating saturated chain end of the linear polymers, rather than the terminating unsaturated chain end. The counterion of the allyl imidazolium monomer is decisive, with the chloride analogue (AIm-Cl) no polymerization is observed. Stoichiometric studies reveal the formation of an inactive chloride complex from the catalyst precursor. An effect of moderate densities (0.5 mol%) of ionic groups on the copolymers' physical properties is exemplified by an enhanced wetting by water.

  7. Invertase immobilization onto radiation-induced graft copolymerized polyethylene pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar; Vitolo, Michele; de Oliveira, Rômulo Cesar; Higa, Olga Zazuco

    1996-06-01

    The graft copolymer poly(ethylene-g-acrylic acid) (LDPE-g-AA) was prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) pellets, and characterized by infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The presence of the grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was established. Invertase was immobilized onto the graft polymer and the thermodynamic parameters of the soluble and immobilized enzyme were determined. The Michaelis constant, Km, and the maximum reaction velocity, Vmax, were determined for the free and the immobilized invertase. The Michaelis constant, Km was larger for the immobilized invertase than for the free enzyme, whereas Vmax was smaller for the immobilized invertase. The thermal stability of the immobilized invertase was higher than that of the free enzyme.

  8. Kinetic theory and thermodynamics of template-directed copolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Template-directed copolymerization is the fundamental process for the replication, transcription, and translation of genetic information. The copy of the template sequence is grown by the attachment of monomers with a molecular machine. The long-time kinetics of such processes is exactly solvable in terms of iterated function systems. This method determines the effects of sequence heterogeneity and replication errors on the growth of the copy and the statistical properties of its sequence. In particular, a transition can occur between linear and sublinear growth in time of the copy. In the linear regime, the local growth velocity along the template may have a fractal distribution. Furthermore, the growth can be driven around equilibrium by the entropic effect of replication errors in an adverse free-energy landscape.

  9. Free-radical copolymerization of fullerenes with styrene

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, T.; Webber, S.E.

    1995-05-08

    Various methods to chemically modify the fullerenes have been reported in the last few years since the production of large-scale amounts of fullerene soot that contains primarily C{sub 60}, a lesser amount of C{sub 70}, and traces of higher fullerenes. Fortunately, these components can be separated from each other by standard chromatographic methods, permitting convenient experimentation on relatively pure components. The authors have found that C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} copolymerize with styrene in a standard free-radical polymerization, either in the bulk or codissolved in an aromatic solvent. The resulting polymers are soluble in common solvents that dissolve polystyrene and possess a dark brown color. The absorption spectrum of the copolymer is strongly modified from that of the parent fullerene, and the fluorescence is blue-shifted and much stronger. The present paper describes a very simple method for direct incorporation of C{sub 60} or C{sub 70} into polystyrene by direct free-radical copolymerization under routine conditions. While a great deal remains to be done to characterize fullerenes as comonomers in free-radical polymerization, this method is so direct and simple that it may be of interest to a wide range of researchers working in the area of fullerene chemistry. The authors note a report by Gong et al. in which a polymerization of styrene and {alpha}-methylstyrene was carried out in the presence of C{sub 60} using benzoyl peroxide as an initiator. These authors explicitly state that the C{sub 60} retains its normal absorption spectrum and is dispersed within the resulting solid polymer matrix. No other characterization is presented to demonstrate if chemical attachment of the C{sub 60} to the polymer occurred.

  10. Synthesis evaluation and adsorption studies of anionic copolymeric surfactants based on fatty acrylate ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dougdoug, W. I. A.; El-Mossalamy, E. H.

    2006-12-01

    A series of anionic copolymeric surfactants based on n-dodecylacrylate ester (M 1) as hydrophobe, and oxypropylated acrylate ester (MA 4,6) as hydrophiles, were prepared by copolymerization of n-dodecylacrylate (M 1) and oxypropylated acrylate ester (MA 4,6) with molar ratio's (0.3:0.7, 0.4:0.6 and 0.5:0.5, respectively) in presence of benzoyl peroxide as initiator followed by sulfation and neutralization to afforded [(PAS 4), and (PAS 6)] a-c, as anionic copolymeric surfactant in suitable yield. These derivatives were purified and characterized by IR and 1H NMR spectral studies. Surface activity, and biodegradability were evaluated. Adsorption of some copolymeric surfactant on salary sand was investigated to assess possibility of treating waste water streams for removal of Pb 2+ and Hg 2+ toxic minerals. The effect of several factors governing the adsorption such as initial concentration, temperature, pH, have been studied.

  11. Electromagnetic Scale Models Using Emulsions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    microwave range; the solutions have a nearly constant permittivity and a conductivity that is adjustable by varying the salt concentration. Mixtures of...emulsion. At this point, complete demulsification has occurred. The emulsion can then be reformed only by subjecting it to the process (homogenization...130-137, June 1986. [17] A. Stogryn, "Equations for calculating the dielectric constant of saline water," IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory and Tech

  12. Thermocapillary Motion in an Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukhnachov, Vladislav V.; Voinov, Oleg V.

    1996-01-01

    The phenomenological model for the motion of an emulsion or a gas-liquid mixture exposed to thermocapillary forces and micro-acceleration is formulated. The analytical and numerical investigation of one-dimensional flows for these media is fulfilled, the structure of discontinuous motion is studied. The stability conditions of a space-uniform state and of the interface between an emulsion and a pure liquid are obtained.

  13. P-chiral phosphine-sulfonate/palladium-catalyzed asymmetric copolymerization of vinyl acetate with carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akifumi; Kageyama, Takeharu; Goto, Hiroki; Carrow, Brad P; Ito, Shingo; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2012-08-01

    Utilization of palladium catalysts bearing a P-chiral phosphine-sulfonate ligand enabled asymmetric copolymerization of vinyl acetate with carbon monoxide. The obtained γ-polyketones have head-to-tail and isotactic polymer structures. The origin of the regio- and stereoregularities was elucidated by stoichiometric reactions of acylpalladium complexes with vinyl acetate. The present report for the first time demonstrates successful asymmetric coordination-insertion (co)polymerization of vinyl acetate.

  14. Highly CO2/N2-switchable zwitterionic surfactant for pickering emulsions at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingwei; Lu, Weiqiang; Wang, Wen-Jun; Li, Bo-Geng; Zhu, Shiping

    2014-09-02

    Cross-linked polymer particles were prepared via surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) and sodium methacrylate (SMA) using N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) (MBA) as a cross-linker. Generated particles are zwitterionic, possessing unique isoelectric points in the pH range of 7.5-8.0, which is readily tunable through CO2/N2 bubbling. The particles were found to be highly responsive to CO2/N2 switching, dissolving in water with CO2 bubbling and precipitating with N2 bubbling at room temperature. Pickering emulsions of n-dodecane were prepared using these particles as the sole emulsifier. These emulsions can be rapidly demulsified with CO2 bubbling, resulting in complete oil/water phase separations. Nitrogen bubbling efficiently re-emulsifies the oil with the aid of homogenization. The rapid emulsification/demulsification using CO2/N2 bubbling at room temperature provides these cross-linked zwitterionic particles with distinct advantages as functional Pickering surfactants.

  15. Aluminium coordination complexes in copolymerization reactions of carbon dioxide and epoxides.

    PubMed

    Ikpo, Nduka; Flogeras, Jenna C; Kerton, Francesca M

    2013-07-07

    Al complexes are widely used in a range of polymerization reactions (ROP of cyclic esters and cationic polymerization of alkenes). Since the discovery in 1978 that an Al porphyrin complex could copolymerize propylene oxide with carbon dioxide, Al coordination compounds have been studied extensively as catalysts for epoxide-carbon dioxide copolymerizations. The most widely studied catalysts are Al porphyrin and Al salen derivatives. This is partially due to their ability to act as mechanistic models for more reactive, paramagnetic Cr catalysts. However, this in depth mechanistic understanding could be employed to design more active Al catalysts themselves, which would be beneficial given the wide availability of this metal. Polymerization data (% CO3 linkages, M(n), M(w)/M(n) and TON) for these complexes are presented and mechanisms discussed. In most cases, especially those employing square-based pyramidal Al complexes, co-catalysts are required to obtain high levels of carbon dioxide incorporation. However, in some cases, the use of co-catalysts inhibits the copolymerization reaction. Lewis acidic Al phenolate complexes have been used as activators in CHO-carbon dioxide copolymerizations to increase TOF and this has recently led to the development of asymmetric copolymerization reactions. Given the ready availability of Al, the robustness of many complexes (e.g. use in immortal polymerizations) and opportunity to prepare block copolymers and other designer materials, Al complexes for copolymerization of carbon dioxide are surely worth a second look.

  16. Innovative Applications Of Food Related Emulsions.

    PubMed

    S, Kiokias; T, Varzakas

    2016-02-06

    Research on oxidative stability of multiple emulsions is very scarce. Given that this is a relevant topic that must be ascertained before the successful application of multiple emulsions in foods (especially when a combination of highly unsaturated oils is used as a lipid phase), this review mainly focus on various aspects of the multiple emulsions. Fat replacement in meat products using emulsions is critically discussed along with innovative applications of natural antioxidants in food based emulsions and multiple emulsions based on bioactive compounds/encapsulation as well as confectionery products.

  17. Effects of stereochemistry and copolymerization on the LCST of PNIPAm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Tiago E.; Mukherji, Debashish; Kremer, Kurt; Netz, Paulo A.

    2017-01-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) is a smart polymer that presents a lower critical transition temperature (LCST) of 305 K. Interestingly, this transition point falls within the range of the human body temperature, making PNIPAm a highly suitable candidate for bio-medical applications. However, it is sometimes desirable to have a rather flexible tuning of the LCST of these polymers to further increase their range of applications. In this work, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study the LCST of PNIPAm-based (co-)polymers. We study different molecular architectures where the polymer sequences are tuned either by modifying its stereochemistry or by the co-polymerization of PNIPAm with acrylamide (Am) units. Our analysis connects global polymer conformations with the microscopic intermolecular interactions. These findings suggest that the collapse of a PNIPAm chain upon heating is dependent on the hydration structure around the monomers, which is strongly dependent on the tacticity and the presence of more hydrophilic acrylamide monomers. Our results are found to be in good agreement with the existing experimental data.

  18. Effects of stereochemistry and copolymerization on the LCST of PNIPAm.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Tiago E; Mukherji, Debashish; Kremer, Kurt; Netz, Paulo A

    2017-01-21

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) is a smart polymer that presents a lower critical transition temperature (LCST) of 305 K. Interestingly, this transition point falls within the range of the human body temperature, making PNIPAm a highly suitable candidate for bio-medical applications. However, it is sometimes desirable to have a rather flexible tuning of the LCST of these polymers to further increase their range of applications. In this work, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study the LCST of PNIPAm-based (co-)polymers. We study different molecular architectures where the polymer sequences are tuned either by modifying its stereochemistry or by the co-polymerization of PNIPAm with acrylamide (Am) units. Our analysis connects global polymer conformations with the microscopic intermolecular interactions. These findings suggest that the collapse of a PNIPAm chain upon heating is dependent on the hydration structure around the monomers, which is strongly dependent on the tacticity and the presence of more hydrophilic acrylamide monomers. Our results are found to be in good agreement with the existing experimental data.

  19. Temperature-responsive copolymeric hydrogel systems synthetized by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Barriguete, Jesús Eduardo; Bucio, Emilio

    2017-06-01

    Eight different systems of hydrogel copolymers with diverse temperature responsiveness were prepared to elaborate membranes for their biomedical application. The hydrogels were synthesized using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PNVCL), which have a low critical solution temperature (LCST) close to that of the human body temperature. The networks were synthesized using gamma radiation at a dose rate of 11.2 kGy h-1, and dose of 50 kGy. The LCST of each system was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The effect of using hydrophilic monomers of acrylic acid (AAc), methacrylic acid (MAAc), dimethyl acrylamide (DMAAm), and hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) for the copolymerization on the critical point was evaluated. Five viable systems were obtained, with the best hydrogel being that of poly(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm), which an LCST at 39.8 °C. All the samples were characterized by FTIR-ATR, DSC, TGA, X-Ray Diffraction, and SEM. The proportion of monomers during the formation of the copolymers was decisive in the displacement of the LCST.

  20. Optimizing organoclay stabilized Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yannan; Threlfall, Mhairi; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2011-04-15

    Oil-in-water emulsions were prepared using montmorillonite clay platelets, pre-treated with quaternary amine surfactants. In previous work, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) has been used. In this study, two more hydrophilic quaternary amine surfactants, Berol R648 and Ethoquad C/12, were used and formed Pickering emulsions, which were more stable than the emulsions prepared using CTAB coated clay. The droplets were also more mono-disperse. The most hydrophilic surfactant Berol R648 stabilizes the emulsions best. Salt also plays an important role in forming a stable emulsion. The droplet size decreases with surfactant concentration and relatively mono-disperse droplets can be obtained at moderate surfactant concentrations. The time evolution of the droplet size indicates a good stability to coalescence in the presence of Berol R648. Using polarizing microscopy, the clay platelets were found to be lying flat at the water oil interface. However, a significant fraction (about 90%) of clay stayed in the water phase and the clay particles at the water-oil interface formed stacks, each consisting of four clay platelets on average.

  1. Anisotropic nanoparticles with controllable morphologies from non-cross-linked seeded emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qun; Pan, Mingwang; Yuan, Jinfeng; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Xiaomei; Yu, Haifeng

    2013-09-01

    A simple and elegant approach to fabricate anisotropic P(VC-co-AAEM)/PS nanoparticles with controllable morphologies via emulsifier-free seeded emulsion polymerization is presented. Non-cross-linked P(VC-co-AAEM) seeds with hydrophilic surface are first synthesized through copolymerization of vinyl chloride (VC) and acetoacetoxyethyl methacrylate (AAEM), which are used to prepare P(VC-co-AAEM)/PS NPs with multiple bulges by SEP of styrene. Electron microscopy observation indicates that the content of AAEM in seeds is crucial to control the phase separation and morphology of the composite NPs. Moreover, the thermodynamic immiscibility between PVC and PS is the driving force for the formation of PS bulges onto the P(VC-co-AAEM) seeds. The resultant anisotropic NPs with non-cross-linked feature may promisingly serve as compatibilizers for further polymer processing. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Dynamics of Polydisperse Coarsening Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirenda, Nic; Hicock, Harry; Feitosa, Klebert; Crocker, John

    2014-03-01

    Soft glassy materials display complex fluid behavior characterized by a yield stress and distinctive elastic and viscous moduli. The complexity emerges from the disordered structure and interactions between the athermal particles. Here we study the dynamics of an optically clear and neutrally buoyantly emulsion whose droplets coarsen driven by Laplace pressure induced diffusion. The emulsion displays an anomalous loss modulus typical of coarsening foam systems. We use confocal microscopy to image the droplets, measure their size and centroid location, and track their evolution in time. The relaxation process of the coarsening emulsion is found to be marked by a continuous, slow structural evolution interspersed by sudden droplet swaps. We characterize the time scales of each process and the statistics of droplet rearrangements. We acknowledge support from Research Corporation and NSF-DMR-1229383.

  3. Poly(monothiocarbonate)s from the Alternating and Regioselective Copolymerization of Carbonyl Sulfide with Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Zhang, Xing-Hong; Darensbourg, Donald J

    2016-10-18

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an air pollutant that causes acid rain, ozonosphere damage, and carbon dioxide (CO2) generation. It is a heterocumulene and structural analogue of CO2. Relevant to organic synthesis, it is a source of C═O or C═S groups and thus an ideal one-carbon (C1) building block for synthesizing sulfur-containing polymers through the similar route of CO2 copolymerization. In contrast, traditional synthesis of sulfur-containing polymers often involves the condensation of thiols with phosgene and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic thiocarbonates that are generally derived from thiols and phosgene; thus, COS/epoxide copolymerization is a "greener" route to supplement or supplant current processes for the production of sulfur-containing polymers. This Accounts highlights our efforts on the discovery of the selective formation of poly(monothiocarbonate)s from COS with epoxides via heterogeneous zinc-cobalt double metal cyanide complex (Zn-Co(III) DMCC) and homogeneous (salen)CrX complexes. The catalytic activity and selectivity of Zn-Co(III) DMCC for COS/epoxide copolymerization are similar to those for CO2/epoxide copolymerization. (salen)CrX complexes accompanied by onium salts exhibited high activity and selectivity for COS/epoxide copolymerization under mild conditions, affording copolymers with >99% monothiocarbonate units and high tail-to-head content up to 99%. By way of contrast, these catalysts often show moderate or low activity for CO2/epoxide copolymerization. Of note, a specialty of COS/epoxide copolymerization is the occurrence of an oxygen-sulfur exchange reaction (O/S ER), which may produce carbonate and dithiocarbonate units. O/S ER, which are induced by the metal-OH bond regenerated by chain transfer reactions, can be kinetically inhibited by changing the reaction conditions. We provide a thorough mechanistic understanding of the electronic/steric effect of the catalysts on the regioselectivity of COS copolymerization. The

  4. Reactivity ratios, and mechanistic insight for anionic ring-opening copolymerization of epoxides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bongjae F.; Wolffs, Martin; Delaney, Kris T.; Sprafke, Johannes K.; Leibfarth, Frank A.; Hawker, Craig J.; Lynd, Nathaniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity ratios were evaluated for anionic ring-opening copolymerizations of ethylene oxide (EO) with either allyl glycidyl ether (AGE) or ethylene glycol vinyl glycidyl ether (EGVGE) using a benzyl alkoxide initiator. The chemical shift for the benzylic protons of the initiator, as measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy, were observed to be sensitive to the sequence of the first two monomers added to the initiator during polymer growth. Using a simple kinetic model for initiation and the first propagation step, reactivity ratios for the copolymerization of AGE and EGVGE with EO could be determined by analysis of the 1H NMR spectroscopy for the resulting copolymer. For the copolymerization between EO and AGE, the reactivity ratios were determined to be rAGE = 1.31 ± 0.26 and rEO = 0.54 ± 0.03, while for EO and EGVGE, the reactivity ratios were rEGVGE = 3.50 ± 0.90 and rEO = 0.32 ± 0.10. These ratios were consistent with the compositional drift observed in the copolymerization between EO and EGVGE, with EGVGE being consumed early in the copolymerization. These experimental results, combined with density functional calculations, allowed a mechanism for oxyanionic ring-opening polymerization that begins with coordination of the Lewis-basic epoxide to the cation to be proposed. The calculated transition-state energies agree qualitatively with the observed relative rates for polymerization. PMID:23226879

  5. Emulsion Droplet Combustion in Microgravity: Water/Heptane Emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avedisian, C. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews a series of experiments to further examine parametric effects on sooting processes of droplet flames in microgravity. The particular focus is on a fuel droplet emulsified with water, specifically emulsions of n-heptane as the fuel-phase and water as the dispersed phase. Water was selected as the additive because of its anticipated effect on soot formation, and the heptane fuel phase was chosen to theoretically reduce the likelihood of microexplosions because its boiling point is nearly the same as that of water: 100 C for water and 98 C for heptane. The water content was varied while the initial droplet diameter was kept within a small range. The experiments were carried out in microgravity to reduce the effects of buoyancy and to promote spherical symmetry in the burning process. Spherically symmetric droplet burning is a convenient starting point for analysis, but experimental data are difficult to obtain for this situation as evidenced by the fact that no quantitative data have been reported on unsupported emulsion droplet combustion in a convection-free environment. The present study improves upon past work carried out on emulsion droplet combustion in microgravity which employed emulsion droplets suspended from a fiber. The fiber can be instrusive to the emulsion droplet burning process as it can promote coalescence of the dispersed water phase and heterogeneous nucleation on the fiber. Prior work has shown that the presence of water in liquid hydrocarbons can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the combustion process. Water is known to reduce soot formation and radiation heat transfer to combustor walls Gollahalli (1979) reduce flame temperatures and thereby NOx emissions, and encourage secondary droplet atomization or microexplosion. Water also tends to retard ignition and and promote early extinction. The former effect restricted the range of water volume fractions as discussed below.

  6. Emulsion Droplet Combustion in Microgravity: Water/Heptane Emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avedisian, C. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews a series of experiments to further examine parametric effects on sooting processes of droplet flames in microgravity. The particular focus is on a fuel droplet emulsified with water, specifically emulsions of n-heptane as the fuel-phase and water as the dispersed phase. Water was selected as the additive because of its anticipated effect on soot formation, and the heptane fuel phase was chosen to theoretically reduce the likelihood of microexplosions because its boiling point is nearly the same as that of water: 100 C for water and 98 C for heptane. The water content was varied while the initial droplet diameter was kept within a small range. The experiments were carried out in microgravity to reduce the effects of buoyancy and to promote spherical symmetry in the burning process. Spherically symmetric droplet burning is a convenient starting point for analysis, but experimental data are difficult to obtain for this situation as evidenced by the fact that no quantitative data have been reported on unsupported emulsion droplet combustion in a convection-free environment. The present study improves upon past work carried out on emulsion droplet combustion in microgravity which employed emulsion droplets suspended from a fiber. The fiber can be instrusive to the emulsion droplet burning process as it can promote coalescence of the dispersed water phase and heterogeneous nucleation on the fiber. Prior work has shown that the presence of water in liquid hydrocarbons can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the combustion process. Water is known to reduce soot formation and radiation heat transfer to combustor walls Gollahalli (1979) reduce flame temperatures and thereby NOx emissions, and encourage secondary droplet atomization or microexplosion. Water also tends to retard ignition and and promote early extinction. The former effect restricted the range of water volume fractions as discussed below.

  7. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  8. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of ‘minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions. PMID:26797564

  9. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of `minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions.

  10. Mechanistic Insights into the Carbon Dioxide/Cyclohexene Oxide Copolymerization Reaction: Is One Metal Center Enough?

    PubMed

    González-Fabra, Joan; Castro-Gómez, Fernando; Kleij, Arjan W; Bo, Carles

    2017-03-22

    A detailed study on the mechanism for the alternating copolymerization of cyclohexene oxide (CHO) and CO2 mediated by an [Al{amino-tri(phenolate)}]/NBu4 I binary catalyst system was performed by using DFT-based methods. Four potential mechanisms (one monometallic and three bimetallic) were considered for the first propagation cycle of the CHO/CO2 copolymerization. The obtained Gibbs free energies provided a rationale for the relative high activity of a non-covalent dimeric structure formed in situ and thus for the feasibility of a bimetallic mechanism to obtain polycarbonates quantitatively. Gibbs free energies also indicated that the alternating copolymerization was favored over the cyclic carbonate formation.

  11. The emulsion chamber technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Photographic emulsion has the unique property of recording tracks of ionizing particles with a spatial precision of 1 micron, while also being capable of deployment over detector areas of square meters or 10's of square meters. Detectors are passive, their cost to fly in Space is a fraction of that of instruments of similar collecting. A major problem in their continued use has been the labor intensiveness of data retrieval by traditional microscope methods. Two factors changing the acceptability of emulsion technology in space are the astronomical costs of flying large electronic instruments such as ionization calorimeters in Space, and the power and low cost of computers, a small revolution in the laboratory microscope data-taking. Our group at UAH made measurements of the high energy composition and spectra of cosmic rays. The Marshall group has also specialized in space radiation dosimetry. Ionization calorimeters, using alternating layers of lead and photographic emulsion, to measure particle energies up to 10(exp 15) eV were developed. Ten balloon flights were performed with them. No such calorimeters have ever flown in orbit. In the ECT program, a small emulsion chamber was developed and will be flown on the Shuttle mission OAST-2 to resolve the principal technological questions concerning space exposures. These include assessments of: (1) pre-flight and orbital exposure to background radiation, including both self-shielding and secondary particle generation; the practical limit to exposure time in space can then be determined; (2) dynamics of stack to optimize design for launch and weightlessness; and (3) thermal and vacuum constraints on emulsion performance. All these effects are cumulative and affect our ability to perform scientific measurements but cannot be adequately predicted by available methods.

  12. Novel palladium(II)-catalyzed copolymerization of carbon monoxide with olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.; Lai, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    The catalyst, (Pd(CH/sub 3/CN)/sub 4/)(BF/sub 4/)/sub 2/.n-triphenylphosphine n = (1-3), demonstrated the capacity to mediate the copolymerization of CO with ethylene and other alkenes under very mild conditions. The reaction of ethylene (350 psi), dissolved in acetonitrile, and CO(350 psi) was performed at 25/sup 0/C for 1 d. The copolymerizations of CO(800 psi) with norbornadiene and norbornylene were performed at 60/sup 0/C. The structures of the copolymers were studied by NMR. 9 references, 1 figure.

  13. Mechanical properties of products of thermocatalytic and radiolytic styrene - acrylonitrile copolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Gadalla, A.M.; Derini, M.A.E.

    1983-12-01

    The mechanical properties of styrene (S)-acrylonitrile (AN) mixtures, ranging from 20 to 80 wt % S, polymerized by thermocatalytic and radiolytic techniques were studied. Maximum compressive and tensile strength was obtained for the mixture containing 60 wt % styrene. The hardness increased with styrene concentration up to 40 wt % and then remained nearly constant. Radiolytic copolymerization gave stronger copolymers than thermal copolymerization since irradiation enhances crosslinking. For the same composition, as the dose increases, the strength increases to a maximum and then decreases due to competing rates of crosslinking and degradation. 5 figures.

  14. Analysis of emulsion stability in acrylic dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions either micro or nano permit transport or solubilization of hydrophobic substances within a water-based phase. Different methods have been introduced at laboratory and industrial scales: mechanical stirring, high-pressure homogenization, or ultrasonics. In digital imaging, toners may be formed by aggregating a colorant with a latex polymer formed by batch or semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. Latex emulsions are prepared by making a monomer emulsion with monomer like Beta-carboxy ethyl acrylate (β-CEA) and stirring at high speed with an anionic surfactant like branched sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonates , aqueous solution until an emulsion is formed. Initiator for emulsion polymerization is 2-2'- azobis isobutyramide dehydrate with chain transfer agent are used to make the latex. If the latex emulsion is unstable, the resulting latexes produce a toner with larger particle size, broader particle size distribution with relatively higher latex sedimentation, and broader molecular weight distribution. Oswald ripening and coalescence cause droplet size to increase and can result in destabilization of emulsions. Shear thinning and elasticity of emulsions are applied to determine emulsion stability.

  15. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  16. New hybrid latexes from a soybean oil-based waterborne polyurethane and acrylics via emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongshang; Larock, Richard C

    2007-10-01

    A series of new waterborne polyurethane (PU)/acrylic hybrid latexes have been successfully synthesized by the emulsion polymerization of acrylic monomers (butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate) in the presence of a soybean oil-based waterborne PU dispersion using potassium persulfate as an initiator. The waterborne PU dispersion has been synthesized by a polyaddition reaction of toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and a soybean oil-based polyol (SOL). The resulting hybrid latexes, containing 15-60 wt % SOL as a renewable resource, are very stable and exhibit uniform particle sizes of 125 +/- 20 nm as determined by transmittance electronic microscopy. The structure, thermal, and mechanical properties of the resulting hybrid latex films have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis, extraction, and mechanical testing. Grafting copolymerization of the acrylic monomers onto the PU network occurs during the emulsion polymerization, leading to a significant increase in the thermal and mechanical properties of the resulting hybrid latexes. This work provides a new way of utilizing renewable resources to prepare environmentally friendly hybrid latexes with high performance for coating applications.

  17. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition123

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10–15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  18. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE.

  19. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification.

  20. Recent Studies of Pickering Emulsions: Particles Make the Difference.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Ma, Guang-Hui

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, emulsions stabilized by micro- or nanoparticles (known as Pickering emulsions) have attracted much attention. Micro- or nanoparticles, as the main components of the emulsion, play a key role in the preparation and application of Pickering emulsions. The existence of particles at the interface between the oil and aqueous phases affects not only the preparation, but also the properties of Pickering emulsions, affording superior stability, low toxicity, and stimuli-responsiveness compared to classical emulsions stabilized by surfactants. These advantages of Pickering emulsions make them attractive, especially in biomedicine. In this review, the effects of the characteristics of micro- and nanoparticles on the preparation and properties of Pickering emulsions are introduced. In particular, the preparation methods of Pickering emulsions, especially uniform-sized emulsions, are listed. Uniform Pickering emulsions are convenient for both mechanistic research and applications. Furthermore, some biomedical applications of Pickering emulsions are discussed and the problems hindering their clinical application are identified.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Graft Copolymers Poly(isoprene-g-styrene) of High Molecular Weight by a Combination of Anionic Polymerization and Emulsion Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Weiyu; Li, Hui; Lu, Xinyi; Chen, Jihua; Kang, Nam-goo; Zhang, Qiuyu; Mays, Jimmy

    2015-01-14

    In this study, high molecular weight “comb-shaped” graft copolymers, poly(isoprene-g-styrene), with polyisoprene as the backbone and polystyrene as side chains, were synthesized via free radical emulsion polymerization by copolymerization of isoprene with a polystyrene macromonomer synthesized using anionic polymerization. A small amount of toluene was used in order to successfully disperse the macromonomer. Both a redox and thermal initiation system were used in the emulsion polymerization, and the latex particle size and distribution were investigated by dynamic light scattering. The structural characteristics of the macromonomer and comb graft copolymers were investigated through use of size exclusion chromatography, spectroscopy, microscopy, thermal analysis, and rheology. While the macromonomer was successfully copolymerized to obtain the desired multigraft copolymers, small amounts of unreacted macromonomer remained in the products, reflecting its reduced reactivity due to steric effects. Nevertheless, the multigraft copolymers obtained were very high in molecular weight (5–12 × 105 g/mol) and up to 10 branches per chain, on average, could be incorporated. A material incorporating 29 wt% polystyrene exhibits a disordered microphase separated morphology and elastomeric properties. As a result, these materials show promise as new, highly tunable, and potentially low cost thermoplastic elastomers.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Graft Copolymers Poly(isoprene-g-styrene) of High Molecular Weight by a Combination of Anionic Polymerization and Emulsion Polymerization

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Weiyu; Li, Hui; ...

    2015-01-14

    In this study, high molecular weight “comb-shaped” graft copolymers, poly(isoprene-g-styrene), with polyisoprene as the backbone and polystyrene as side chains, were synthesized via free radical emulsion polymerization by copolymerization of isoprene with a polystyrene macromonomer synthesized using anionic polymerization. A small amount of toluene was used in order to successfully disperse the macromonomer. Both a redox and thermal initiation system were used in the emulsion polymerization, and the latex particle size and distribution were investigated by dynamic light scattering. The structural characteristics of the macromonomer and comb graft copolymers were investigated through use of size exclusion chromatography, spectroscopy, microscopy, thermalmore » analysis, and rheology. While the macromonomer was successfully copolymerized to obtain the desired multigraft copolymers, small amounts of unreacted macromonomer remained in the products, reflecting its reduced reactivity due to steric effects. Nevertheless, the multigraft copolymers obtained were very high in molecular weight (5–12 × 105 g/mol) and up to 10 branches per chain, on average, could be incorporated. A material incorporating 29 wt% polystyrene exhibits a disordered microphase separated morphology and elastomeric properties. As a result, these materials show promise as new, highly tunable, and potentially low cost thermoplastic elastomers.« less

  3. Spreading of Emulsions on Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2012-11-01

    The wettability of emulsions is an important factor with explicit influence in an extensive variety of industrial applications ranging from the petroleum to food industries. Surprisingly, there is no comprehensive study of emulsion spreading to date; this is due to the complexity of the structure of the emulsions and non-homogeneity of the dispersed phase bubbles in size as well as distribution through the emulsion. The spreading of water/silicone oil emulsions on glass substrates was investigated. The emulsions were prepared with varying volume fractions of water dispersed in silicone oil, with addition of small amounts of surfactant to stabilize the emulsion structure. The time dependent variation of dynamic contact angle, base diameter, and the spreading rate of the droplets of an emulsion are different from a pure substance. The effect of water/silicone oil weight percentage as well as the droplet size and dispersed phase bubble size were also investigated. The weight percentage of water/silicone oil emulsion and droplet size did not have significant influence on the spreading dynamics; however the dispersed phase drop size affected the spreading dynamics substantially.

  4. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-06-01

    Emulsions-liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid-are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number-the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability.

  5. Poly(vinyl alcohol) stabilization of acrylic emulsion polymers using the miniemulsion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Noma

    Miniemulsion approach was employed to obtain stable acrylic latexes of n-butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate (50/50 wt%) stabilized with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and to enhance the grafting reaction between PVA and acrylic monomers at the water/droplet interface. The stability of miniemulsions were studied in terms of the type and concentration of' the stabilizer, and the PVA partitioning were determined as a function of the PVA concentration. Using the comparison of PVA partitioning at droplet surface and grafted PVA as a function of concentration, it was suggested that the water/monomer interface is the main grafting site in the miniemulsion polymerization. Seeded emulsion and miniemulsion copolymerizations initiated with water-soluble (hydrogen peroxide, HPO), partially water-soluble (t-butyl peroxide, TBHP), and oil-soluble (t-butyl peroxyoctoate, TBPO) initiators were carried out to further investigate the oil/water interface as the grafting site for PVA. The interaction between the capillary wall in the CHDF (capillary hydrodynamic fractionation) chromatographic particle sizer and the water-soluble polymers adsorbed on the particle surface was studied using different types of water-soluble polymers and eluants. Different grafting architectures depending on the initiation site were suggested based on the CHDF results. The amounts of grafted PVA produced in miniemulsion polymers initiated with TBHP and TBPO were substantially less than those in the corresponding seeded emulsion polymerizations. The effect on the internal viscosity at the interface was proposed to explain the difference in grafting in terms of polymerization methods. Aqueous phase and interface grafting were studied using the measurement of the degree of hydrolysis (DH) of the serum PVA and adsorbed PVA after miniemulsion polymerizations. Based on the results, it was found that aqueous phase and interface grafting occurred in the HPO system; however, interface grafting dominated the TBHP

  6. Preparation of CO₂/N₂-triggered reversibly coagulatable and redispersible polyacrylate latexes by emulsion polymerization using a polymeric surfactant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Yu, Guoqiang; Wang, Wen-Jun; Li, Bo-Geng; Zhu, Shiping

    2012-05-29

    We report here a novel approach for making reversibly coagulatable and redispersible polyacrylate latexes by emulsion (co)polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using a polymeric surfactant, poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)(10) -block-poly(methyl methacrylate)(14) . The surfactant was protonated with HCl prior to use. The resulted PMMA latexes were readily coagulated with trace amount of caustic soda. The coagulated latex particles, after washing with deionized water, could be redispersed into fresh water to form stable latexes again by CO(2) bubbling with ultrasonication. The recovered latexes could then be coagulated by N(2) bubbling with gentle heating. These coagulation and redispersion processes were repeatable by the CO(2) /N(2) bubbling.

  7. Copolymerized and bonded silica nanoparticles as labels and pseudostationary phase in bioanalytical applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Henary, Maged M.; Abdelwahab, Walid; Chapman, Gala

    2017-02-01

    Silica nanoparticles have been increasingly used in developing bioanalytical, biomedical and in many other applications. Silica nanoparticles can easily be synthesized and with the advent of wide availability of modified TEOS reactive analogues only the researcher imagination is the limit of preparing silica nanoparticles that contain different molecules that are either copolymerized inside of the silica nanoparticle or chemically attached (bonded) to the silica nanoparticle surface. Relatively non-porous silica nanoparticles can contain copolymerized dyes for the creation of bright fluorescence labels while the surface of these silica nanoparticles can be bonded with reactive moieties that are suitable for covalently labeling the molecule of interest. Also the surface bonded moieties can serve other purposes, e.g., molecular recognition either on a non-fluorescent or fluorescent silica nanoparticle. As far as the fluorescent nanoparticles development concerns near-infrared (NIR) absorbing carbocyanine dyes have been increasingly used as they can be useful for developing bioanalytical, biomedical methods and in many other applications. Carbocyanines are preferred as they are relatively easy to synthesize and can be designed to achieve particular spectroscopic properties. For example either copolymerized or surface bound dyes can contain appropriate functional moieties absorption and fluorescence properties change when it is complexed to metal ions, to detect pH changes, bind to biological molecules, etc. Fluorescence intensity of carbocyanines significantly increases by enclosing several dye molecules in a single silica nanoparticle due to shielding however self quenching may become a problem at high dye concentrations in confined spaces. Large Stokes' shift dyes can significantly decrease this problem. This can be achieved by substituting meso position halogens in the NIR fluorescent carbocyanines with a linker containing amino moiety which can also serve as

  8. Metallic nanoshells on porphyrin-stabilized emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Haorong; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Medforth, Craig J

    2013-10-29

    Metal nanostructures formed by photocatalytic interfacial synthesis using a porphyrin-stabilized emulsion template and the method for making the nanostructures. Catalyst-seeded emulsion droplets are employed as templates for hollow-nanoshell growth. The hollow metal nanospheres may be formed with or without inclusions of other materials.

  9. Flows of Wet Foamsand Concentrated Emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemer, Martin B.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project was is to advance a microstructural understanding of foam and emulsion flows. The dynamics of individual surfactant-covered drops and well as the collective behavior of dilute and concentrated was explored using numerical simulations. The long-range goal of this work is the formulation of reliable microphysically-based statistical models of emulsion flows.

  10. Kinetics of crosslinking in emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Ghielmi, A.; Fiorentino, S.; Morbidelli, M.

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical model for evaluating the chain length distribution of nonlinear polymers produced in emulsions is presented. The heterogeneous emulsion polymerization process is described. The aim of the analysis is the distribution of active polymer chains and pairs of chains with a given growth time in latex particles in state.

  11. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  12. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties.

  13. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties.

  14. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    The goal of this research project is to utilize emulsion droplets as chemical reactors for execution of complex polymerization chemistries to develop unique and functional particle materials. Emulsions are dispersions of immiscible fluids where one fluid usually exists in the form of drops. Not surprisingly, if a liquid-to-solid chemical reaction proceeds to completion within these drops, the resultant solid particles will possess the shape and relative size distribution of the drops. The two immiscible liquid phases required for emulsion polymerization provide unique and complex chemical and physical environments suitable for the engineering of novel materials. The development of novel non-ionic fluorosurfactants allows fluorocarbon oils to be used as the continuous phase in a water-free emulsion. Such emulsions enable the encapsulation of almost any hydrocarbon compound in droplets that may be used as separate compartments for water-sensitive syntheses. Here, we exemplify the promise of this approach by suspension polymerization of polyurethanes (PU), in which the liquid precursor is emulsified into droplets that are then converted 1:1 into polymer particles. The stability of the droplets against coalescence upon removal of the continuous phase by evaporation confirms the formation of solid PU particles. These results prove that the water-free environment of fluorocarbon based emulsions enables high conversion. We produce monodisperse, cross-linked, and fluorescently labeled PU-latexes with controllable mesh size through microfluidic emulsification in a simple one-step process. A novel method for the fabrication of monodisperse mesoporous silica particles is presented. It is based on the formation of well-defined equally sized emulsion droplets using a microfluidic approach. The droplets contain the silica precursor/surfactant solution and are suspended in hexadecane as the continuous oil phase. The solvent is then expelled from the droplets, leading to

  15. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16–240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration. PMID:25844544

  16. Destabilization of emulsions by natural minerals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Songhu; Tong, Man; Wu, Gaoming

    2011-09-15

    This study developed a novel method to destabilize emulsions and recycle oils, particularly for emulsified wastewater treatment. Natural minerals were used as demulsifying agents, two kinds of emulsions collected from medical and steel industry were treated. The addition of natural minerals, including artificial zeolite, natural zeolite, diatomite, bentonite and natural soil, could effectively destabilize both emulsions at pH 1 and 60 °C. Over 90% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be removed after treatment. Medical emulsion can be even destabilized by artificial zeolite at ambient temperature. The mechanism for emulsion destabilization by minerals was suggested as the decreased electrostatic repulsion at low pH, the enhanced gathering of oil microdroplets at elevated temperature, and the further decreased surface potential by the addition of minerals. Both flocculation and coalescence were enhanced by the addition of minerals at low pH and elevated temperature.

  17. Aging mechanism in model Pickering emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouilloux, Sarah; Malloggi, Florent; Daillant, Jean; Thill, Antoine

    We study the stability of a model Pickering emulsion system. A special counter-flow microfluidics set-up was used to prepare monodisperse Pickering emulsions, with oil droplets in water. The wettability of the monodisperse silica nanoparticles (NPs) could be tuned by surface grafting and the surface coverage of the droplets was controlled using the microfluidics setup. A surface coverage as low as 23$\\%$ is enough to stabilize the emulsions and we evidence a new regime of Pickering emulsion stability where the surface coverage of emulsion droplets of constant size increases in time, in coexistence with a large amount of dispersed phase. Our results demonstrate that the previously observed limited coalescence regime where surface coverage tends to control the average size of the final droplets must be put in a broader perspective.

  18. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K.

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  19. Sequential elution of multiply and singly phosphorylated peptides with polar-copolymerized mixed-mode RP18/SCX material.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuling; Guo, Zhimou; Sheng, Qianying; Xue, Xingya; Liang, Xinmiao

    2012-06-21

    Novel polar-copolymerized mixed-mode RP18/SCX material was developed for feasible phosphopeptide enrichment, in which multiply and singly phosphorylated peptides could be sequentially eluted and separated with high selectivity.

  20. Microgel formation in the free radical crosslinking copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and ethylene glycol dimethcrylate (EGDMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Xiudong Sung; Yuen-Yuen Chiu; Lee, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    The formation of heterogeneous structure through intramolecular reaction is an important feature in the free radical crosslinking copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA). Such structure formation affects not only the curing behavior but also the rheological changes of the resin. In this work, the effect of co-monomer composition on the reaction kinetics, rheological changes and microgel formation of MMA-EGDMA copolymerization was studied. A percolation model was adopted to simulate such monovinyl-divinyl reactions.

  1. Antimicrobial cotton containing N-halamine and quaternary ammonium groups by grafting copolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Liu, Yin; Ren, Xuehong; Huang, T. S.

    2014-03-01

    The monomer (3-acrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride (APTMAC) was used to treat cotton fibers by grafting copolymerization. The grafted cotton fabrics were characterized by SEM image and FTIR spectra. The treated samples with quaternary ammonium groups could decrease 96.08% of Staphylococcus aureus and 48.74% of Escherichia coli O157:H7 within 30 min. After chlorination with dilute sodium hypochlorite, the treated cotton fabrics containing both N-halamine and quaternary ammonium groups effectively inactivated 100% (log reduction 5.82) of S. aureus and 100% (log reduction 6.26) of E. coli O157:H7 within 5 min of contact time. The grafting process of cotton fabric has small effect on the thermal stability and tensile strength, which favors the practical application. Compared to the traditional pad-dry-cure method to produce antibacterial materials, the radical grafting copolymerization method occurred in water without any organic solvents involved in the whole treatment.

  2. Fabrication of microarray of gel-immobilized compounds on a chip by copolymerization.

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliskov, A. V.; Timofeev, E. N.; Surzhikov, S. A.; Drobyshev, A. L.; Shick, V. V.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology

    1999-09-01

    The manufacturing of microchips containing oligonucleotides and proteins immobilized within gel pads, ranging in size from 10 x 10 to 100 x 100 {mu}m, is described. The microchips are produced by photo- or persulfate-induced copolymerization of unsaturated derivatives of biomolecules with acrylamide-bisacrylamide mixture. Oligonucleotides containing 5'-allyl or 5'-butenediol units were synthesized using standard phosphoramidite chemistry. Acryloyl residues were attached to a protein by a twostep procedure. Photopolymerization was induced by illumination of the monomer solution containing initiator with UV light through the mask. The mask was applied directly over the monomer solution or projected through a microscope. Alternatively, copolymerization was carried out in drops of aqueous solution of monomers containing ammonium persulfate. Drops with different allyl-oligonucleotides were distributed on a glass slide, and the polymerization was induced by diffusion of N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) from a hexane solution that covered the aqueous drops.

  3. Zirconium oxocluster/polymer hybrid nanoparticles prepared by photoactivated miniemulsion copolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Cesare; Flouda, Paraskevi; Antonello, Alice; Rosenauer, Christine; Pérez-Pla, Francisco F.; Landfester, Katharina; Gross, Silvia; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    The photoactivated free radical miniemulsion copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and the zirconium oxocluster Zr4O2(methacrylate)12 is used as an effective and fast preparation method for polymer/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles. The oxoclusters, covalently anchored to the polymer network, act as metal-organic cross-linkers, thus improving the thermomechanical properties of the resulting hybrid nanoparticles. Benzoin carbonyl organic compounds were used as photoinitiators. The obtained materials are compared in terms of cross-linking, effectiveness of cluster incorporation, and size distribution with the analogous nanoparticles produced by using conventional thermally induced free radical miniemulsion copolymerization. The kinetics of the polymerization process in the absence and in the presence of the oxocluster is also investigated.

  4. Equilibrium polymerization of acenaphthylene and its copolymerizations with electron-accepting vinyl monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatsuki, Shouji; Kubo, Masataka; Iwayama, Hiroaki

    1993-12-20

    Radical polymerization kinetics of acenaphthylene in toluene using 2,2{prime}-azobis (isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) as an initiator was investigated revealing an equilibrium polymerization. The values of monomer concentration at equilibrium were determined to be between 1.3 and 3.3 mol/L for a temperature range of 50--70 C. The thermodynamics parameters were determined and showed an enthalpy change of {delta}H = {minus}43 kJ/mol and an entropy change of {delta}S ={minus}98J/K {center_dot} mol. Furthermore, copolymerization of acenaphthylene with electron-accepting vinyl monomers such as methyl methacrylate (MMA) and acrylonitrile (AN) were carried out and showed a change from random to alternating copolymerization as the acenaphthylene concentration decreased. This change in mechanism is rationally explained in terms of the equilibrium polymerization of acenaphthylene.

  5. Copolymerization of glycidyl ethers with CO/sub 2/ on a homogeneous catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kudashev, R.K.; Glukhov, E.A.; Kuramshina, E.A.; Monakov, Y.B.; Gailyunas, I.A.; Rafikov, S.R.

    1987-08-01

    The authors have investigated the relative reactivity of glycidyl ethers in copolymerization with CO/sub 2/ in the presence of the catalytic system Al(i-C/sub 4/H/sub 9/)/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O-epichlorohydrin. Solid CO/sub 2/ was introduced into the chilled autoclave, which contained toluene (the solvent), the epoxy compound, and epichlorohydrin. A relative reactivity series for glycidyl ethers in copolymerization with CO/sub 2/ in the presence of the system Al(i-C/sub 4/H/sub 9/)/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O-EPC has been established, which is connected with a dual type of the active centers present in the system. The viscous flow properties of the copolymers depend on the content of the CO/sub 2/-groups.

  6. Zirconium oxocluster/polymer hybrid nanoparticles prepared by photoactivated miniemulsion copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Cesare; Flouda, Paraskevi; Antonello, Alice; Rosenauer, Christine; Pérez-Pla, Francisco F; Landfester, Katharina; Gross, Silvia; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael

    2017-09-08

    The photoactivated free radical miniemulsion copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and the zirconium oxocluster Zr4O2(methacrylate)12 is used as an effective and fast preparation method for polymer/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles. The oxoclusters, covalently anchored to the polymer network, act as metal-organic cross-linkers, thus improving the thermomechanical properties of the resulting hybrid nanoparticles. Benzoin carbonyl organic compounds were used as photoinitiators. The obtained materials are compared in terms of cross-linking, effectiveness of cluster incorporation, and size distribution with the analogous nanoparticles produced by using conventional thermally induced free radical miniemulsion copolymerization. The kinetics of the polymerization process in the absence and in the presence of the oxocluster is also investigated.

  7. Zwitterionic monomer graft copolymerization onto polyurethane surface through a PEG spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingjing; Xu, Weilin

    2010-04-01

    A new zwitterionic surface was obtained by a novel three-step grafting procedure. The zwitterionic monomer was introduced by cerium-induced graft copolymerization in the presence of N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAA) as cross-linking agent. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the MBAA could stimulate zwitterionic monomer grafting onto the membrane surface. Surface properties were also determined by atomic force microscope (AFM) and water contact angle. The hemocompatibility of the modified PU membranes was evaluated by the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) and prothrombin time (PT). The TT and APTT of PU were significantly prolonged by the zwitterion of sulfobetaine monomer grafting copolymerization. The new polyurethane membrane could have a great potential in biomedical applications.

  8. Theoretical models of nonlinear effects in two-component cooperative supramolecular copolymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Markvoort, Albert J.; ten Eikelder, Huub M.M.; Hilbers, Peter A.J.; de Greef, Tom F.A.; Meijer, E.W.

    2011-01-01

    The understanding of multi-component mixtures of self-assembling molecules under thermodynamic equilibrium can only be advanced by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. In such systems, small differences in association energy between the various components can be significantly amplified at the supramolecular level via intricate nonlinear effects. Here we report a theoretical investigation of two-component, self-assembling systems in order to rationalize chiral amplification in cooperative supramolecular copolymerizations. Unlike previous models based on theories developed for covalent polymers, the models presented here take into account the equilibrium between the monomer pool and supramolecular polymers, and the cooperative growth of the latter. Using two distinct methodologies, that is, solving mass-balance equations and stochastic simulation, we show that monomer exchange accounts for numerous unexplained observations in chiral amplification in supramolecular copolymerization. In analogy with asymmetric catalysis, amplification of chirality in supramolecular polymers results in an asymmetric depletion of the enantiomerically related monomer pool. PMID:22027589

  9. EPR investigation on radiation-induced graft copolymerization of styrene onto polyethylene: Energy transfer effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salih, M. A.; Buttafava, A.; Ravasio, U.; Mariani, M.; Faucitano, A.

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, energy transfer phenomena concerning the in-source graft copolymerization of styrene onto LDPE were investigated through the EPR analysis of the radical intermediates. The model solution experiments have shown a substantial deviation of the experimental G (radicals) values with respect to the additivity law, which reflect the negative effect of the styrene monomer concentration on the initiation rate of the graft copolymerization. The EPR measurements performed on polyethylene- co-styrene graft copolymers of various composition following low-temperature vacuum gamma irradiation have confirmed the decrease of the total radical yields with increasing the styrene concentration. The effect was partly attributed to the heterogeneity of the graft copolymer matrix and to the lack of molecular mobility in the solid state at low temperature, which prevents the attainment of the favourable geometrical configurations in intermolecular energy and charge transfer events.

  10. A facile approach toward multifunctional polyethersulfone membranes via in situ cross-linked copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chuangchao; Ji, Haifeng; Qin, Hui; Nie, Shengqiang; Zhao, Weifeng; Zhao, Changsheng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, multifunctional polyethersulfone (PES) membranes are prepared via in situ cross-linked copolymerization coupled with a liquid-liquid phase separation technique. Acrylic acid (AA) and N-vinylpyrrolidone (VP) are copolymerized in PES solution, and the solution is then directly used to prepare PES membranes. The infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy testing, scanning electron microscopy, and water contact angle measurements confirm the successful modification of pristine PES membrane. Protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, plasma recalcification time, and activated partial thromboplastin time assays convince that the modified PES membranes have a better biocompatibility than pristine PES membrane. In addition, the modified membranes showed good protein antifouling property and significant adsorption property of cationic dye. The loading of Ag nanoparticles into the modified membranes endows the composite membranes with antibacterial activity.

  11. Copolymerization of ethylene with polar monomer by α - diimine nickel complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yiqin; Zhang, Danfeng

    2017-09-01

    Copolymerization of ethylene and ethyl acrylate was carried out by α-diimine nickel catalyst [ArN=CH-CH=NAr]NiBr2 (Ar = 2,6-C6H3(CH3)2) in the presence of methylaluminoxane (MAO). The effects of experimental conditions in which mole ratio of Al/Ni, concentration of polar monomer, polymerization temperature, ethylene pressure and polymerization time varied on ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymerization were investigated. The structures of the obtained copolymers were characterized by high-temperature NMR and FT-IR. It was found that Al/Ni mole ratio was 1000, the concentration of ethyl acrylate was 10 mmol/L, the polymerization temperature was 30 °C, the ethylene pressure was 10 atm, the polymerization time was 4 h, the molecular weight of the polymer and the incorporation of ethyl acrylate in the copolymer reached the good result.

  12. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  13. [On bitumen emulsions in water].

    PubMed

    Rivas, Hercilio; Gutierrez, Xiomara; Silva, Felix; Chirinos, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    The most important factors, controlling the process of emulsification of highly viscous hydrocarbons in water, which are responsible for keeping the stability and other properties of these systems, are discused in this article. The effect of non-ionic surfactants, such as nonil phenol ethoxilated compounds on the interfacial behavior of bitumen/water systems is analyzed. The effect of the natural surfactants in presence or in absence of electrolytes is also analyzed. The procedures followed in order to obtain the optimal conditions of formulation and formation of bitumen in water emulsions, are discussed and the effect of some parameters on the mean droplet diameter and distribution are also considered. It was found that keeping constant mixing speed and time of mixing, the mean droplet diameter decreases as the bitumen concentration increases. Emulsion stability, which can be monitored by following the changes in mean droplet diameters and viscosity as a function of the storage time, is deeply affected by the type and concentration of surfactant.

  14. Tailored Living Block Copolymerization: Multiblock Poly(cyclohexene carbonate)s with Sequence Control

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeung Gon; Cowman, Christina D.; LaPointe, Anne M.; Wiesner, Ulrich; Coates, Geoffrey W.

    2011-03-08

    In this Communication, the living block copolymerization of functionalized cyclohexene oxides and CO{sub 2} is described, yielding multiblock poly(cyclohexene carbonate)s [p(CHC)s] with a diverse range of functionality on the side chains and good control of block sequence and length. Unlike prior systems that contain stable vinyl backbones, the carbonate backbones of polymers reported herein are degradable, allowing possible applications where removable templates are required.

  15. Recovery of bitumen from bituminous oil-in-water emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Seitzer, W.H.

    1984-06-26

    Bitumen recovery from a tar sands emulsion or other bituminous oil-in-water emulsion is increased by milling the emulsion for a time sufficient to cause a bitumen-rich liquid fraction to rise to the surface, and separating such fraction. Addition of water to the starting emulsion or during milling further enhances the recovery of bitumen.

  16. The research about microscopic structure of emulsion membrane in O/W emulsion by NMR and its influence to emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yiqiao; Chen, Jisheng; Zhang, Shu; Fan, Kaiyan; Chen, Gang; Zhuang, Zerong; Zeng, Mingying; Chen, De; Lu, Longgui; Yang, Linlin; Yang, Fan

    2016-03-16

    This paper discussed the influence of microstructure of emulsion membrane on O/W emulsion stability. O/W emulsions were emulsified with equal dosage of egg yolk lecithin and increasing dosage of co-emulsifier (oleic acid or HS15). The average particle size and centrifugal stability constant of emulsion, as well as interfacial tension between oil and water phase were determined. The microstructure of emulsion membrane had been studied by (1)H/(13)C NMR, meanwhile the emulsion droplets were visually presented with TEM and IFM. With increasing dosage of co-emulsifier, emulsions showed two stable states, under which the signal intensity of characteristic group (orient to lipophilic core) of egg yolk lecithin disappeared in NMR of emulsions, but that (orient to aqueous phase) of co-emulsifiers only had some reduction at the second stable state. At the two stable states, the emulsion membranes were neater in TEM and emulsion droplets were rounder in IFM. Furthermore, the average particle size of emulsions at the second stable state was bigger than that at the first stable state. Egg yolk lecithin and co-emulsifier respectively arranged into monolayer and bilayer emulsion membrane at the two stable states. The microstructure of emulsion membrane was related to the stability of emulsion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nickel(0)-catalyzed cycloaddition copolymerization involving two diynes and carbon dioxide to poly(2-pyrone)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuda, Tetsuo; Ooi, Osamu; Maruta, Ken-ichi )

    1993-08-01

    A copolymerizability order of five diynes, i.e., 3,11-tetradecadiyne (A), 2,6-octadiyne (B), 1,4-di(2-hexynyl)benzene (C), 1,3-di(2-hexynyl)benzene (D), and 1,7-cyclotridecadiyne (E), in the nickel(0)-catalyzed 1:1 cycloaddition copolymerization of the diyne with CO[sub 2] to the poly(2-pyrone) was determined by the nickel(0)-catalyzed copolymerization involving two diynes and CO[sub 2]. The copolymerizability order obtained by analyzing the copolymer composition using [sup 1]H NMR spectroscopy was A [gt] E [gt] B [gt] C [gt] D. This order was explained in terms of the steric hindrance exerted by the substituent on the terminal C[triple bond]C bond of the cooligomer or the copolymer to its cycloaddition along with mobility of its terminal C[triple bond]C bond moiety for the cycloaddition. An order of cycloaddition reactivity of the diyne, which is related to formation of the cooligomer, was determined by measuring the unreacted diyne in the copolymerization involving five diynes and CO[sub 2] using gas chromatography. The result was E [gt] B [gt] C [gt] D [gt] A. Thus high copolymerizability of diyne A is noteworthy.

  18. Emulsion package and method of mixing the emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, R.G.; Brenneman, S.; Clancy, J.J.

    1984-08-28

    A coal tar emulsion driveway sealer is packaged in a sealed bag. The volume of sealer is less than half the capacity of the bag and the bag is substantially completely evacuated but for the sealer. The separated sealer is mixed by compressing the sides of the bag to induce turbulent flow of the paste and liquid for hydraulic mixing thereof. The sealer may be dispensed at a controlled rate without spattering by cutting a corner from the bag to provide a pour spout. The bag with the sealer may be contained in a carton. The bag membrane comprises an aluminum layer vapor deposited on polyester. Those two layers are sandwiched between layers of EVA copolymer.

  19. Using emulsion inversion in industrial processes.

    PubMed

    Salager, Jean-Louis; Forgiarini, Ana; Márquez, Laura; Peña, Alejandro; Pizzino, Aldo; Rodriguez, María P; Rondón-González, Marianna

    2004-05-20

    Emulsion inversion is a complex phenomenon, often perceived as an instability that is essentially uncontrollable, although many industrial processes make use of it. A research effort that started 2 decades ago has provided the two-dimensional and three-dimensional description, the categorization and the theoretical interpretation of the different kinds of emulsion inversion. A clear-cut phenomenological approach is currently available for understanding its characteristics, the factors that influence it and control it, the importance of fine-tuning the emulsification protocol, and the crucial occurrence of organized structures such as liquid crystals or multiple emulsions. The current know-how is used to analyze some industrial processes involving emulsion inversion, e.g. the attainment of a fine nutrient or cosmetic emulsion by temperature or formulation-induced transitional inversion, the preparation of a silicone oil emulsion by catastrophic phase inversion, the manufacture of a viscous polymer latex by combined inversion and the spontaneous but enigmatic inversion of emulsions used in metal working operations such as lathing or lamination.

  20. High acyl gellan as an emulsion stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Joice Aline Pires; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-03-30

    High acyl gellan (0.01-0.2% w/w) was used as stabilizer in oil in water emulsions containing 30% (w/w) of sunflower oil and prepared under different process conditions. Stable emulsions to phase separation could be obtained using high acyl gellan (HA) content above 0.05% (w/w), while low acyl gellan (LA) prepared at the same conditions could not stabilize emulsions. Emulsions properties depended on the process used to mix the oil and gellan dispersion since high pressure homogenization favored stabilization while very high energy density applied by ultrasound led to systems destabilization. Emulsions prepared using high pressure homogenization showed zeta potential values ranging from -50 up to -59 mV, suggesting that electrostatic repulsion could be contributing to the systems stability. Rheological properties of continuous phase were also responsible for emulsions stabilization, since HA gellan dispersions showed high viscosity and gel-like behavior. The high viscosity of the continuous phase could be associated to the presence of high acyl gellan microgels/aggregates. Disentanglement of these aggregates performed by ultrasound strongly decreased the viscosity and consequently affected the emulsions behavior, reducing the stability to phase separation.

  1. Ethylcellulose: a new type of emulsion stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Eva; Kreuter, Jörg; Daniels, Rolf

    2003-07-01

    Cellulose ethers, in particular hypromellose, represent an interesting alternative when emulsions have to be stabilized avoiding conventional low molecular weight surfactants. So far this option has been only described for the formulation of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions. Since surfactant-free water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions seem to be also attractive as drug carriers, ethyl cellulose, an oil-soluble cellulose derivative, was studied for its ability to stabilize w/o emulsions. Measurements of the interfacial tension confirmed that ethylcellulose was positively adsorbed at the water/oil interface with diverse lipids. Appearance of model emulsions was dependent on the processing temperature. At low temperatures (15 degrees C) cream-like o/w emulsions were obtained. Processing at 30 degrees C yielded fluid w/o-lotions. Investigation of the microstructure showed that the surface of the emulsion droplets was covered with particles which formed a mechanical barrier. These colloidal particles were shown to be a precipitate of ethylcellulose which forms when the polymer which was dissolved in the lipid phase comes into contact with water. Thus, ethylcellulose was demonstrated to represent a new type of particulate polymeric emulsifier.

  2. Latest Developments in Nuclear Emulsion Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. These trajectories are recorded as tracks consist of a lot of silver grains. The size of silver grain is about 1 μm, so that nuclear emulsion has submicron three-dimensional spatial resolution, which gives us a few mrad three-dimensional angular resolution. The important technical progress was speed-up of the read-out technique of nuclear emulsions built with optical microscope system. We succeeded in developing a high-speed three-dimensional read-out system named Super Ultra Track Selector (S-UTS) with the operating read-out speed of approximately 50 cm2/h. Nowadays we are developing the nuclear emulsion gel independently in Nagoya University by introducing emulsion gel production machine. Moreover, we are developing nuclear emulsion production technologies (gel production, poring and mass production). In this paper, development of nuclear emulsion technologies for the OPERA experiment, applications by the technologies and current development are described.

  3. Method for demulsification of bitumen emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, D.R.; Entire, E.E.; Gipson, R.M.

    1984-07-03

    A process for recovering bitumen from oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions is disclosed wherein water soluble demulsifiers are used. These demulsifiers are polymers of specific quaternary ammonium monomers or co-polymers of these quaternary ammonium monomers wth other types of monomers wherein the greater portion of the co-polymer is comprised of the quaternary ammonium monomers. To resolve the bitumonous petroleum emulsions, the process is carried out between 25/sup 0/ and 160/sup 0/ C. wherein the demulsifier of the invention is contacted with the bituminous emulsion.

  4. Pump safety tests regarding emulsion explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Perlid, H.

    1996-12-31

    In the handling of emulsion explosives pumping is a key operation. A number of serious accidents has shown that pumping can be a risky operation and should be carefully considered and investigated. This is the background behind a series of pump tests carried out by Nitro Nobel. This paper refers to pump safety tests with an eccentric screw pump (progressive cavity) and emulsion explosives. A selection of emulsions unsensitized as well as sensitized were tested. The tests were performed in a circulation system against dead head and as dry pumping.

  5. Decompressing Emulsion Droplets Favors Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremond, Nicolas; Thiam, Abdou R.; Bibette, Jérôme

    2008-01-01

    The destabilization process of an emulsion under flow is investigated in a microfluidic device. The experimental approach enables us to generate a periodic train of droplet pairs, and thus to isolate and analyze the basic step of the destabilization, namely, the coalescence of two droplets which collide. We demonstrate a counterintuitive phenomenon: coalescence occurs during the separation phase and not during the impact. Separation induces the formation of two facing nipples in the contact area that hastens the connection of the interfaces prior to fusion. Moreover, droplet pairs initially stabilized by surfactants can be destabilized by forcing the separation. Finally, we note that the fusion mechanism is responsible for a cascade of coalescence events in a compact system of droplets where the separation is driven by surface tension.

  6. Dielectrophoresis of reverse phase emulsions.

    PubMed

    Flores-Rodriguez, N; Bryning, Z; Markx, G H

    2005-08-01

    Reverse miniemulsions, emulsions of droplets of size 200 nm-1 microm of a polar liquid dispersed in an apolar continuous liquid phase, exhibit strong electrokinetic responses in low-frequency electric fields. The electrokinetic behaviour of a reverse miniemulsion, previously developed for use as electronic paper, has been investigated under static and flow conditions, in uniform and non-uniform electric fields. Results reveal that when using frequencies lower than 10 Hz strong aggregation of the droplets occurs. In uniform electric fields, under static conditions, droplets reversibly aggregate into honeycomb-like or irregular aggregates. Under flow conditions, droplets aggregate into approximately equidistant streams. In non-uniform electric fields the droplets reversibly aggregate in high-field regions, and can be guided along regions of high field strength in a flow. The potential of the technique for the formation of structured materials is discussed.

  7. Use of olive oil-in-water gelled emulsions in model turkey breast emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdaroğlu, M.; Öztürk, B.

    2017-09-01

    Today, gelled emulsion systems offer a novel possibility in lipid modification of meat products. In this study, we aimed to investigate the quality characteristics of model turkey emulsions that were prepared with olive oil-in-water gelled emulsion (GE) as partial or total beef fat replacer. The results indicated that while most of the GE treatments showed equivalent emulsion characteristics in terms of emulsion stability, water-holding capacity and cook yield, utilization of 100% GE as the lipid source could increase total expressible fluid of the model turkey emulsion and thus negatively affect the quality. Utilization of GE was effective in total fat reduction, as the model turkey emulsions formulated with more than 50% GE had significantly lower fat content compared to full-beef fat control model emulsion. However, beef fat replacement with GE produced considerable changes in colour parameters. Finally, it was concluded that utilization of GE as a partial beef fat replacer has good potential to enhance stability and reduce total fat in turkey meat emulsion products.

  8. Development of Highly Active and Regioselective Catalysts for the Copolymerization of Epoxides with Cyclic Anhydrides: An Unanticipated Effect of Electronic Variation.

    PubMed

    DiCiccio, Angela M; Longo, Julie M; Rodríguez-Calero, Gabriel G; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2016-06-08

    Recent developments in polyester synthesis have established several systems based on zinc, chromium, cobalt, and aluminum catalysts for the ring-opening alternating copolymerization of epoxides with cyclic anhydrides. However, to date, regioselective processes for this copolymerization have remained relatively unexplored. Herein we report the development of a highly active, regioselective system for the copolymerization of a variety of terminal epoxides and cyclic anhydrides. Unexpectedly, electron withdrawing substituents on the salen framework resulted in a more redox stable Co(III) species and longer catalyst lifetime. Using enantiopure propylene oxide, we synthesized semicrystalline polyesters via the copolymerization of a range of epoxide/anhydride monomer pairs.

  9. Multi-body coalescence in Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Haitao; Jing, Benxin; Liu, Fang; Burns, Peter C; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-01-12

    Particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions have shown unusual behaviours such as the formation of non-spherical droplets and the sudden halt of coalescence between individual droplets. Here we report another unusual behaviour of Pickering emulsions-the simultaneous coalescence of multiple droplets in a single event. Using latex particles, silica particles and carbon nanotubes as model stabilizers, we show that multi-body coalescence can occur in both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. The number of droplets involved in the nth coalscence event equals four times the corresponding number of the tetrahedral sequence in close packing. Furthermore, coalescence is promoted by repulsive latex and silica particles but inhibited by attractive carbon nanotubes. The revelation of multi-body coalescence is expected to help better understand Pickering emulsions in natural systems and improve their designs in engineering applications.

  10. Aging properties of Kodak type 101 emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohne, B.; Feldman, U.; Neupert, W.

    1984-01-01

    Aging tests for several batches of Kodak type 101 emulsion show that storage conditions significantly influence how well the film will maintain its sensitometric properties, with sensitivity and density increasing to a maximum during this period. Any further aging may result in higher fog levels and sensitivity loss. It is noted that storage in an environment free of photographically active compounds allows film property optimization, and that film batches with different sensitivities age differently. Emulsions with maximum 1700-A sensitivity are 2.5 times faster than those at the low end of the sensitivity scale. These sensitive emulsions exhibit significantly accelerated changes in aging properties. Their use in space applications requires careful consideration of time and temperature profiles, encouraging the use of less sensitive emulsions when the controllability of these factors is limited.

  11. Autoxidation of unsaturated lipids in food emulsion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue-E; Wang, Wei-Dong; Chen, Hong-Wei; Li, Chao

    2011-05-01

    Unsaturated lipids having various physiological roles are of significance in biochemistry, nutrition, medicine, and food. However, the susceptibility of lipids to oxidation is a major cause of quality deterioration in food emulsions. The reaction mechanism and factors that influence oxidation are appreciably different for emulsified lipids and bulk lipids. This article gives a brief overview of the current knowledge on autoxidation of oil-in-water food emulsions, especially those that contain unsaturated lipids, which are important in the food industry. Autoxidation of unsaturated lipids in oil-in-water emulsion is discussed, and so also their oxidation mechanism, the major factors influencing oxidation, determination measures, research status, and the problems encountered in recent years. Some effective strategies for controlling lipid oxidation in food emulsion have been presented in this review.

  12. Aging properties of Kodak type 101 emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohne, B.; Feldman, U.; Neupert, W.

    1984-01-01

    Aging tests for several batches of Kodak type 101 emulsion show that storage conditions significantly influence how well the film will maintain its sensitometric properties, with sensitivity and density increasing to a maximum during this period. Any further aging may result in higher fog levels and sensitivity loss. It is noted that storage in an environment free of photographically active compounds allows film property optimization, and that film batches with different sensitivities age differently. Emulsions with maximum 1700-A sensitivity are 2.5 times faster than those at the low end of the sensitivity scale. These sensitive emulsions exhibit significantly accelerated changes in aging properties. Their use in space applications requires careful consideration of time and temperature profiles, encouraging the use of less sensitive emulsions when the controllability of these factors is limited.

  13. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials.

  14. Shear-stabilized emulsion flooding process

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, C.W.; Reed, R.L.

    1982-06-29

    Additional amounts of crude oil are recovered from a subterranean formation by flooding with a translucent emulsion comprising an upper- or middle-phase microemulsion as an external phase and a polymer-containing brine solution as an internal phase. The translucent emulsion tends to coalesce into its component phases under conditions of no shear, but is stabilized by low shears such as those imposed on fluids flowing through a subterranean formation.

  15. Hexagonal phase based gel-emulsion (O/H1 gel-emulsion): formation and rheology.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad Mydul; Aramaki, Kenji

    2008-11-04

    The formation, stability, and rheological behavior of a hexagonal phase based gel-emulsion (O/H1 gel-emulsion) have been studied in water/C12EO8/hydrocarbon oil systems. A partial phase behavior study indicates that the oil nature has no effect on the phase sequences in the ternary phase diagram of water/C12EO8/oil systems but the domain size of the phases or the oil solubilization capacity considerably changes with oil nature. Excess oil is in equilibrium with the hexagonal phase (H1) in the ternary phase diagram in the H1+O region. The O/H1 gel-emulsion was prepared (formation) and kept at 25 degrees C to check stability. It has been found that the formation and stability of the O/H1 gel-emulsion depends on the oil nature. After 2 min observation (formation), the results show that short chain linear hydrocarbon oils (heptane, octane) are more apt to form a O/H1 gel-emulsion compared to long chain linear hydrocarbon oils (tetradecane, hexadecane), though the stability is not good enough in either system, that is, oil separates within 24 h. Nevertheless, the formation and stability of the O/H1 gel-emulsion is appreciably increased in squalane and liquid paraffin. It is surmised that the high transition temperature of the H1+O phase and the presence of a bicontinuous cubic phase (V1) might hamper the formation of a gel-emulsion. It has been pointed out that the solubilization of oil in the H1 phase could be related to emulsion stability. On the other hand, the oil nature has little or no effect on the formation and stability of a cubic phase based gel-emulsion (O/I1 gel-emulsion). From rheological measurements, it has found that the rheogram of the O/H1 gel-emulsion indicates gel-type structure and shows shear thinning behavior similar to the case of the O/I1 gel-emulsion. Rheological data infer that the O/I1 gel-emulsion is more viscous than the O/H1 gel-emulsion at room temperature but the O/H1 gel-emulsion shows consistency at elevated temperature.

  16. Preparation of amphiphilic glycopolymers with flexible long side chain and their use as stabilizer for emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Alvárez-Paino, Marta; Juan-Rodríguez, Rafael; Cuervo-Rodríguez, Rocío; Muñoz-Bonilla, Alexandra; Fernández-García, Marta

    2014-03-01

    A glycomonomer was synthesized from poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA). The terminal hydroxyl moieties were activated with ester groups and subsequently the glucosamine was incorporated forming urethane linkages. The obtained glycomonomer was copolymerized with methyl acrylate by free radical polymerization varying the initial feed composition to produce different amphiphilic glycopolymers. The glycopolymers were then characterized and compared with the homologous glycopolymers based on 2-{[(D-glucosamin-2-N-yl)carbonyl]oxy}ethyl methacrylate. Both series of glycopolymers were used in emulsion polymerization of methyl acrylate as stabilizers without the addition of any cosurfactant. Although high conversions were not achieved with any of the employed surfactant, the glycopolymers provide good colloidal stability, spherical, monodisperse and small latex particles in comparison with the surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. The latex particles stabilized with the glycosurfactant based on PEGMA, containing a flexible spacer between the backbone and the glucosamine, lead to smooth films whereas the short side chain surfactant from 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), with higher glass transition temperature, restricts the coalescence of particles and, therefore, the film formation. Moreover, the surface bioactivity of these polymer coatings was examined by analyzing their specific interaction with the lectin, Concanavalin A, Canavalia ensiformis. The specific and successful binding to the Concanavalin A was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy for both series being more intense with increasing amount of glycounits in the glycopolymer stabilizers. Interestingly, the incorporation of a flexible spacer in the glycopolymer structures enhances the binding activity.

  17. Pickering emulsions stabilized by charged nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ridel, Laure; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Gilon-Delepine, Nicole; Dugas, Pierre-Yves; Chevalier, Yves

    2016-09-28

    The stabilization of o/w Pickering emulsions in cases of weak adsorption of solid particles at the surface of oil droplets is addressed. Though the adsorption is usually very strong and irreversible when partial wetting conditions are fulfilled, electrostatic repulsions between charged solid particles act against the adsorption. The regime of weak adsorption was reached using charged silica nanoparticles at high pH and low ionic strength. O/w Pickering emulsions of the diisopropyl adipate oil were stabilized by colloidal nanoparticles of Ludox® AS40 consisting of non-aggregated particles of bare silica (hydrophilic). The combination of stability assessment, droplet size and electrokinetic potential measurements at various pH values, adsorption isotherms and cryo-SEM observations of the adsorbed layers disclosed the specificities of the stabilization of Pickering emulsions by adsorption of solid nanoparticles against strong electrostatic repulsions. Not only the long-term stability of emulsions was poor under strong electrostatic repulsions at high pH, but emulsification failed since full dispersion of oil could not be achieved. Emulsion stability was ensured by decreasing electrostatic repulsions by lowering the pH from 9 to 3. Stable emulsions were stabilized by a monolayer of silica particles at 54% coverage of the oil droplet surface at low silica content and an adsorption regime as multilayers was reached at higher concentrations of silica although there was no aggregation of silica in the bulk aqueous phase.

  18. Conditions for equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela J; de Folter, Julius W J; Luigjes, Bob; Castillo, Sonja I R; Sacanna, Stefano; Philipse, Albert P; Kegel, Willem K

    2010-08-19

    Particular types of solid-stabilized emulsions can be thermodynamically stable as evidenced by their spontaneous formation and monodisperse droplet size, which only depends on system parameters. Here, we investigate the generality of these equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions with respect to the basic constituents: aqueous phase with ions, oil, and stabilizing particles. From systematic variations of these constituents, we identify general conditions for the spontaneous formation of monodisperse solid-stabilized emulsions droplets. We conclude that emulsion stability is achieved by a combination of solid particles as well as amphiphilic ions adsorbed at the droplet surface, and low interfacial tensions of the bare oil-water interface of order 10 mN/m or below. Furthermore, preferential wetting of the colloidal particles by the oil phase is necessary for thermodynamic stability. We demonstrate the sufficiency of these basic requirements by extending the observed thermodynamic stability to emulsions of different compositions. Our findings point to a new class of colloid-stabilized meso-emulsions with a potentially high impact on industrial emulsification processes due to the associated large energy savings.

  19. Method for treating tar sands emulsion and apparatus therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Bialek, R.F.

    1986-04-15

    A method is described for resolving a hot bitumen emulsion comprised primarily of bitumen, water and chemical diluents. The method consists of: providing separate but communicated emulsion mixing, and emulsion settling chamber, passing the hot bitumen emulsion through a first elongated mixing passage in the mixing chamber wherein a rapidly flowing stream of recycled emulsion is combined with a minor portion of unrecycled bitumen emulsion, to form a combined bitumen emulsion stream, thereafter passing the combined bitumen emulsion stream into an elongated discontinuous mixing passage comprised of vertically arranged and interconnected mixing passages within the emulsion mixer, where in the combined bitumen emulsion stream passes at a slower rate than in the first elongated mixing passage, passing the combined bitumen emulsion stream into an overflow passage communicated with the second elongated mixing passage, introducing a part of the combined emulsion stream from the overflow passage into the emulsion settling chamber, recycling the remainder of the combined emulsion stream from the overflow passage into the first elongated mixing passage, and removing separated flows of bitumen and water from the settling chamber.

  20. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory. ...

  1. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory. ...

  2. Synthesis of cationic flocculant by radiation-induced copolymerization of methyl chloride salt of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate with acrylamide in aqueous solution. II. Copolymerization at higher monomer concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigaki, I.; Fukuzaki, H.; Okada, T.; Okada, T.; Okamoto, J.; Machi, S.

    1981-05-01

    The radiation-induced copolymerization of methyl chloride salt of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate with acrylamide was studied to prepare a polymer flocculant that can be handled as a solid. The product obtained in the presence of 5 to 20% water was a solid and could be ground to a powder without drying. In order to obtain a water-soluble polymer at a higher concentration, the effect of various additives on the copolymerization was investigated and found that alcohols bearing a hydrogen atom attached to the tertiary carbon atom effectively inhibit intermolecular crosslinking to give water-soluble polymer. It is suggested that the formation of water-insoluble polymer is predominantly attributable to the crosslinking of polymer chains rather than to the imidation of amide groups. Copolymerization in the presence of isopropyl alcohol as inhibitor of the crosslinking was also studied and compared with that reported previously, which was carried out at a lower monomer concentration without additives.

  3. Palm oil anionic surfactants based emulsion breaker (Case study of emulsions breaker at Semanggi Field production wells)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhpidah; Hambali, E.; Suryani, A.; Kartika, I. A.

    2017-05-01

    The presence of emulsion in oil production process is undesirable. The emulsion will increase the production costs, transportation and costs related to emulsion separation process between water and oil. The development of palm oil-based surfactant as an emulsion breaker needs to be conducted given the availability of abundant raw materials in Indonesia and as an alternative to petroleum-based surfactant. The purpose of this study is to produce palm oil-based emulsion breaker, assessing the effect of additive application to the emulsion breaker and analyze the performance of the emulsion breaker. This research was conducted by formulating palm oil anionic surfactant in water formation with the addition of co-surfactant additive and co-solvent. Palm oil anionic surfactant-based emulsion breaker with 0.5% concentration in water can reduce 50% of emulsions with the interfacial tension (IFT) of 2.33x10-2 dyne/cm. The addition of co-solvent (toluene: xylene) is able to remove the emulsion formed with a lower IFT namely 10-3 dyne / cm. The resulting emulsion breaker is capable to remove the emulsion between water and oil. The performance test of emulsion breaker show that the emulsion is able to maintain its performance at reservoir temperature with no indicate of plugging and the value generated incremental oil recovery values is 13%.

  4. Control of Grafting Density and Distribution in Graft Polymers by Living Ring-Opening Metathesis Copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Pin; Chang, Alice B; Chen, Hsiang-Yun; Liberman-Martin, Allegra L; Bates, Christopher M; Voegtle, Matthew J; Bauer, Christina A; Grubbs, Robert H

    2017-03-15

    Control over polymer sequence and architecture is crucial to both understanding structure-property relationships and designing functional materials. In pursuit of these goals, we developed a new synthetic approach that enables facile manipulation of the density and distribution of grafts in polymers via living ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Discrete endo,exo-norbornenyl dialkylesters (dimethyl DME, diethyl DEE, di-n-butyl DBE) were strategically designed to copolymerize with a norbornene-functionalized polystyrene (PS), polylactide (PLA), or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) macromonomer mediated by the third-generation metathesis catalyst (G3). The small-molecule diesters act as diluents that increase the average distance between grafted side chains, generating polymers with variable grafting density. The grafting density (number of side chains/number of norbornene backbone repeats) could be straightforwardly controlled by the macromonomer/diluent feed ratio. To gain insight into the copolymer sequence and architecture, self-propagation and cross-propagation rate constants were determined according to a terminal copolymerization model. These kinetic analyses suggest that copolymerizing a macromonomer/diluent pair with evenly matched self-propagation rate constants favors randomly distributed side chains. As the disparity between macromonomer and diluent homopolymerization rates increases, the reactivity ratios depart from unity, leading to an increase in gradient tendency. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our method, an array of monodisperse polymers (PLA(x)-ran-DME(1-x))n bearing variable grafting densities (x = 1.0, 0.75, 0.5, 0.25) and total backbone degrees of polymerization (n = 167, 133, 100, 67, 33) were synthesized. The approach disclosed in this work therefore constitutes a powerful strategy for the synthesis of polymers spanning the linear-to-bottlebrush regimes with controlled grafting density and side chain distribution, molecular

  5. Perfectly alternating copolymerization of CO2 and epichlorohydrin using cobalt(III)-based catalyst systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guang-Peng; Wei, Sheng-Hsuan; Ren, Wei-Min; Lu, Xiao-Bing; Xu, Tie-Qi; Darensbourg, Donald J

    2011-09-28

    Selective transformations of carbon dioxide and epoxides into biodegradable polycarbonates by the alternating copolymerization of the two monomers represent some of the most well-studied and innovative technologies for potential large-scale utilization of carbon dioxide in chemical synthesis. For the most part, previous studies of these processes have focused on the use of aliphatic terminal epoxides or cyclohexene oxide derivatives, with only rare reports concerning the synthesis of CO(2) copolymers from epoxides containing electron-withdrawing groups such as styrene oxide. Herein we report the production of the CO(2) copolymer with more than 99% carbonate linkages from the coupling of CO(2) with epichlorohydrin, employing binary and bifunctional (salen)cobalt(III)-based catalyst systems. Comparative kinetic studies were performed via in situ infrared measurements as a function of temperature to assess the activation barriers for the production of cyclic carbonate versus copolymer involving two electronically different epoxides: epichlorohydrin and propylene oxide. The relative small activation energy difference between copolymer versus cyclic carbonate formation for the epichlorohydrin/CO(2) process (45.4 kJ/mol) accounts in part for the selective synthesis of copolymer to be more difficult in comparison with the propylene oxide/CO(2) case (53.5 kJ/mol). Direct observation of the propagating polymer-chain species from the binary (salen)CoX/MTBD (X = 2,4-dinitrophenoxide and MTBD = 7-methyl-1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene) catalyst system by means of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry confirmed the perfectly alternating nature of the copolymerization process. This observation in combination with control experiments suggests possible intermediates involving MTBD in the CO(2)/epichlorohydrin copolymerization process.

  6. Y-shaped Folic Acid-Conjugated PEG-PCL Copolymeric Micelles for Delivery of Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Feng, Runliang; Zhu, Wenxia; Chu, Wei; Teng, Fangfang; Meng, Ning; Deng, Peizong; Song, Zhimei

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin is a natural hydrophobic product showing anticancer activity. Many studies show its potential use in the field of cancer treatment due to its safety and efficiency. However, its application is limited due to its low water-solubility and poor selective delivery to cancer. A Y-shaped folic acid-modified poly (ethylene glycol)-b-poly (ε-caprolactone)2 copolymer was prepared to improve curcumin solubility and realize its selective delivery to cancer. The copolymer was synthesized through selective acylation reaction of folic acid with α- monoamino poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone)2. Curcumin was encapsulated into the copolymeric micelles with 93.71% of encapsulation efficiency and 11.94 % of loading capacity. The results from confocal microscopy and cellular uptake tests showed that folic acid-modified copolymeric micelles could improve cellular uptake of curcumin in Hela and HepG2 cells compared with folic acid-unmodified micelles. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that folic acid-modified micelles improved anticancer activity against Hela and HepG2 cells in comparison to folic acidunmodified micelles. Meanwhile, both drug-loaded micelles demonstrated higher activity against Hela cell lines than HepG2. The research results suggested that the folic acid-modified Y-shaped copolymeric micelles should be used to enhance hydrophobic anticancer drugs' solubility and their specific delivery to folic acid receptors-overexpressed cancer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Relative rates for plasma homo- and copolymerizations of olefins in a homologous series of fluorinated ethylenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the rate of plasma polymerization, or deposition rate, of a given monomer depends on various plasma process parameters, e.g., monomer flow rate, pressure, power, frequency (DC, rf or microwave), location of the substrate in the reactor, reactor geometry or configuration, and temperature. In contrast, little work has been done to relate deposition rates to monomer structures for a homologous series of monomers where the rates are obtained under identical plasma process parameters. For the particular series of fluorinated ethylenes (C2HxF4-x; x = 0-4), deposition rates were reported for ethylene (ET), vinyl fluoride, vinylidene fluoride and tetrafluoroethylene (TFE), but for plasma polymerizations carried out under different discharge conditions, e.g., pressure, current density, and electrode temperature. Apparently, relative deposition rates were reported for only two members of that series (ET, x = 4, and TFE, x = 0) for which the plasma polymerizations were conducted under identical conditions. We now present relative deposition rates for both homopolymerizations and copolymerizations of the entire series of fluorinated ethylenes (x = 0-4). Our interest in such rates stems from prior work on the plasma copolymerization of ET and TFE in which it was found that the deposition rates for the plasma copolymers, when plotted versus mol % TFE in the ET/TFE feed stock, followed a concave-downward curve situated above the straight line joining the deposition rates for the plasma homopolymers. This type of plot (observed also for an argon-ET/TFE plasma copolymerization) indicated a positive interaction between ET and TFE such that each monomer apparently "sensitized" the plasma copolymerization of the other. Since the shape of that plot is not altered if mol % TFE is replaced by F/C, the fluorine-to-carbon ratio, this paper aims (1) to show how the relative deposition rates for plasma copolymers drawn from all pairs of monomers in the C2HxF4-x series

  8. Near-infrared luminescent copolymerized hybrid materials built from tin nanoclusters and PMMA.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weiqiang; Feng, Jing; Song, Shuyan; Lei, Yongqian; Zhou, Liang; Zheng, Guoli; Dang, Song; Wang, Song; Zhang, Hongjie

    2010-10-01

    Novel near-infrared (NIR) luminescent copolymerized hybrid materials were prepared by covalently grafting and physically doping Ln complexes (Ln = Er, Sm, Yb, and Nd) into a copolymer matrix built from nanobuilding blocks. The structures of the obtained hybrid materials were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In the photoluminescence studies, the hybrid materials showed characteristic NIR luminescence of corresponding Ln(3+) ions through intramolecular energy transfer from ligands to Ln(3+) ions. Transparent films of these materials can be easily prepared through spin-coating on indium tin oxide (ITO) glasses taking advantage of the matrix nature.

  9. Mechanistic aspects of the alternating copolymerization of carbon monoxide with olefins catalyzed by cationic palladium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Batistini, A.; Consiglio, G.

    1992-05-01

    The copolymerization of propylene with carbon monoxide using a catalytic system based on palladium acetate, modified with the atropisomeric chiral ligand (S)-(6,6{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl-2,2{prime}-diyl)bis(dicyclohexylphosphine), gives poly[spiro-2,5-(3-methyltetrahydrofuran)]. This material is transformed into the isomeric poly(1-oxo-2-methyltrimethylene) by dissolution in hexafluoro-2-propanol and precipitation with methanol. A mechanism based on a carbene intermediate is proposed in order to account for the formation of the polyketone material in the spiroketal form. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Relative rates for plasma homo- and copolymerizations of olefins in a homologous series of fluorinated ethylenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the rate of plasma polymerization, or deposition rate, of a given monomer depends on various plasma process parameters, e.g., monomer flow rate, pressure, power, frequency (DC, rf or microwave), location of the substrate in the reactor, reactor geometry or configuration, and temperature. In contrast, little work has been done to relate deposition rates to monomer structures for a homologous series of monomers where the rates are obtained under identical plasma process parameters. For the particular series of fluorinated ethylenes (C2HxF4-x; x = 0-4), deposition rates were reported for ethylene (ET), vinyl fluoride, vinylidene fluoride and tetrafluoroethylene (TFE), but for plasma polymerizations carried out under different discharge conditions, e.g., pressure, current density, and electrode temperature. Apparently, relative deposition rates were reported for only two members of that series (ET, x = 4, and TFE, x = 0) for which the plasma polymerizations were conducted under identical conditions. We now present relative deposition rates for both homopolymerizations and copolymerizations of the entire series of fluorinated ethylenes (x = 0-4). Our interest in such rates stems from prior work on the plasma copolymerization of ET and TFE in which it was found that the deposition rates for the plasma copolymers, when plotted versus mol % TFE in the ET/TFE feed stock, followed a concave-downward curve situated above the straight line joining the deposition rates for the plasma homopolymers. This type of plot (observed also for an argon-ET/TFE plasma copolymerization) indicated a positive interaction between ET and TFE such that each monomer apparently "sensitized" the plasma copolymerization of the other. Since the shape of that plot is not altered if mol % TFE is replaced by F/C, the fluorine-to-carbon ratio, this paper aims (1) to show how the relative deposition rates for plasma copolymers drawn from all pairs of monomers in the C2HxF4-x series

  11. Graft copolymerization onto polybutadiene: Cross-linking and thermal degradation of vinyl polymers and copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dayue (David)

    This work consists of three parts. In Part I, the graft copolymerization of methyl methacrylate, methyl acrylate, methacylic acid and acrylic acid onto polybutadiene and its copolymers by benzoyl peroxide, BPO, or 2, 2'azobis(2-methylpropionitrile), AIBN, initiation were explored. The results show that these monomers can be grafted onto butadiene region of butadiene-containing polymers. The extent of both graft copolymerization and homopolymerization are dependent on the time and temperature of the reaction and the concentration of all of the reactants. One must specify the monomer, initiator and solvent for the efficient graft copolymerization. The methyl methacrylate adds directly to the radical sites which are formed on the backbone by the interaction of the polymer and the primary radical form the initiator, while for the other three monomers, the graft copolymerization occurs by addition of macro-radical to the double bonds. In Part II, the cross-linking of polybutadiene, butadiene-styrene copolymers, and polystyrene by irradiation, thermal and chemical processes, and Friedel-Crafts chemistry and the effect of cross-linking on the thermal stability were investigated. The proof of cross-linking of the polymer comes from the insolubility of the product after the cross-linking reaction and is characterized by gel content and swelling ratio. The results show that the thermal stability of the polymer can be improved by cross-linking. In Part III, the thermal degradation of three vinyl polymers, poly(vinylsulfonic acid) and its sodium salt and poly(vinylphosphonic acid) were studied by combination technique: TGA/FTIR. The results show that TGA/FTIR combined with analysis of residues provides an excellent opportunity to understand the degradation pathway of the compounds. The observation of foaming indicates that the char which is formed contains carbon as well as the inorganic salts which have been observed. The carbon is in a partially graphitized form. The salts

  12. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Park, Jinhee

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat. PMID:26761836

  13. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Park, Jinhee; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat.

  14. The atomization of water-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Broniarz-Press, L.; Ochowiak, M.; Rozanski, J.; Woziwodzki, S.

    2009-09-15

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies on atomization of the emulsions flowing through twin-fluid atomizers obtained by the use of the digital microphotography method. The main elements of the test installation were: nozzle, reservoir, pump and measurement units of liquid flow. The photographs were taken by a digital camera with automatic flash at exposure time of 1/8000 s and subsequently analyzed using Image Pro-Plus. The oils used were mineral oils 20-90, 20-70, 20-50 and 20-30. The studies were performed at flow rates of liquid phase changed from 0.0014 to 0.011 (dm{sup 3}/s) and gas phase changed from 0.28 to 1.4 (dm{sup 3}/s), respectively. The analysis of photos shows that the droplets being formed during the liquid atomization have very different sizes. The smallest droplets have diameters of the order of 10 {mu}m. The experimental results showed that the changes in physical properties of a liquid phase lead to the significant changes in the spray characteristics. The analysis of the photos of water and emulsions atomization process showed that the droplet sizes are dependent on gas and liquid flow rates, construction of nozzle and properties of liquid. The differences between characteristics of atomization for water and emulsions have been observed. Analysis of photos on forming the droplets in air-water and air-emulsions systems showed that droplets are bigger in air-emulsion system (at the same value of gas to liquid mass ratio). The values of Sauter mean diameter (SMD) increased with increase of volume fraction of oil in emulsion. The droplet size increased with emulsion viscosity. (author)

  15. Copper mediated controlled radical copolymerization of styrene and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate and determination of their reactivity ratios.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koiry, Bishnu; Singha, Nikhil

    2014-10-01

    Copolymerization is an important synthetic tool to prepare polymers with desirable combination of properties which are difficult to achieve from the different homopolymers concerned. This investigation reports the copolymerization of 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) and styrene using copper bromide (CuBr) as catalyst in combination with N,N,N’,N”,N”- pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDETA) as ligand and 1-phenylethyl bromide (PEBr) as initiator. Linear kinetic plot and linear increase in molecular weights versus conversion indicate that copolymerization reactions were controlled. The copolymer composition was calculated using 1H NMR studies. The reactivity ratio of styrene and EHA (r1 and r2) were determined using the Finemann-Ross (FR), inverted Finemann-Ross (FR) and Kelen-Tudos (KT) methods. Thermal properties of the copolymers were also studied by using TGA and DSC analysis.

  16. Synthesis of polymer latex particles decorated with organically-modified laponite clay platelets via emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Norma Negrete; Persoz, Stéphanie; Putaux, Jean-Luc; David, Laurent; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie

    2006-02-01

    We report a new route to colloidal nanocomposites consisting of polymer latex particles covered with Laponite clay nanoplatelets. These composite particles are prepared by seeded emulsion (co)polymerization of styrene and butyl acrylate from Laponite clay suspensions previously functionalized by ion exchange using either a free radical initiator: 2,2-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) hydrochloride (AIBA) or a cationic vinyl monomer: 2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (MADQUAT). The successful intercalation of the cationic reactive molecules was confirmed by elemental analysis, FTIR, 13C solid-state NMR and WAXD. The organically-modified clays were dispersed into water with the help of tetrasodium pyrophosphate and an anionic surfactant. stable latexes, produced under different experimental conditions, were successfully obtained from the clay suspensions. Cryo-TEM images of the resulting latexes showed spherical composite particles with diameters in the 50-250 nm range with clay sheets located on their surface. This paper reports on the effect of the processing conditions on the particle morphology and latex stability, and describes the mechanism of formation of the nanocomposite particles.

  17. Copolymerization of Epichlorohydrin and CO2 Using Zinc Glutarate: An Additional Application of ZnGA in Polycarbonate Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sudakar, Padmanaban; Sivanesan, Dharmalingam; Yoon, Sungho

    2016-05-01

    The use of zinc glutarate (ZnGA) as a heterogeneous catalyst for the copolymerization of epichlorohydrin, an epoxide with an electron-withdrawing substituent, and CO2 is reported. This catalyst shows the highest selectivity (98%) for polycarbonate over the cyclic carbonate in epichlorohydrin/CO2 copolymerization under mild conditions. The (epichlorohydrin-co-CO2 ) polymer exhibits a high glass transition temperature (Tg ), 44 °C, which is the maximum Tg value obtained for the (epichlorohydrin-co-CO2 ) polymer to date.

  18. In Situ Generation of Co(III) -Salen Complexes for Copolymerization of Propylene Oxide and CO2.

    PubMed

    Hatazawa, Masahiro; Nakabayashi, Koji; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2016-09-12

    A simple admixture of Co(II) -salcy complexes with [Cp2 Fe(III) ]PF6 resulted in reproduction of the results with isolated Co(III) -salcy complexes in the copolymerization of epoxide and carbon dioxide. By using this in situ-generated active species with bis(triphenylphosphoranilydene)ammonium 2,4-dinitrophenolate, a para-methoxy-substituted Co-salcy complex was proven to be more active than the parent tert-butyl-substituted system. In contrast, the Co(II) -salcy complex substituted with the more strongly electron-donating NMe2 group did not show any activity for this copolymerization.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of membranes obtained by graft copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and acrylic acid onto chitosan.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, K S C R; Coelho, J F J; Ferreira, P; Pinto, I; Lorenzetti, S G; Ferreira, E I; Higa, O Z; Gil, M H

    2006-03-09

    Chitosan based membranes to be applied on wound healing as topical drug delivery systems were developed by graft copolymerization of acrylic acid (AA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) onto chitosan using cerium ammonium nitrate as chemical initiator. Evidence for graft copolymerization of the vinyl monomers onto chitosan was obtained by FTIR and DMTA. Swelling degree, cytotoxicity, thrombogenicity and haemolytic activity of these membranes were evaluated. Chitosan-graft-AA-graft-HEMA showed to be the best matrix for drug delivery systems than chitosan-graft-AA because it retains good swelling properties, but the content in HEMA has improved cytocompatibility, hemocompatibility and thrombogenic character.

  20. Discrete metal-based catalysts for the copolymerization of CO2 and epoxides: discovery, reactivity, optimization, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Coates, Geoffrey W; Moore, David R

    2004-12-10

    Most synthetic polymers are made from petroleum feedstocks. Given the non-renewable nature of these materials, there is increasing interest in developing routes to polymeric materials from renewable resources. In addition, there is a growing demand for biodegradable polymeric materials. Polycarbonates made from CO(2) and epoxides have the potential to meet these goals. Since the discovery of catalysts for the copolymerization of CO(2) and epoxides in the late 1960's by Inoue, a significant amount of research has been directed toward the development of catalysts of improved activity and selectivity. Reviewed here are well-defined catalysts for epoxide-CO(2) copolymerization and related reactions.

  1. WIMP tracking with cryogenic nuclear emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Naka, T.; Furuya, S.; Asada, T.; Katsuragawa, T.; Yoshimoto, M.; Umemoto, A.; Machii, S.; Ichiki, H.; Sato, O.; Hoshino, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Directional dark matter search experiments enable us to reveal the presence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles. A promising detector for a directional measurement is a fine-grained nuclear emulsion consisting of fine crystals of silver bromide with 20 nm or 40 nm size. A critical task for the success of the experiment is to remove background tracks of electrons coming from stopping beta rays of 14C decays in the nuclear emulsion. An electron rejection power of at least 10-10 is needed in order to start a 10 kg experiment. We present a novel cryogenic approach to reject the electron background that makes use of the phonon effect in nuclear emulsion. For the proof of principle, we have been investigating the sensitivity of fine-grained nuclear emulsions as a function of temperature by exposing to gamma rays and ion beams with an ion implant system in the range of 77-300 K. Results of gamma ray exposure indicate that the electron rejection power is estimated to be better than 3 ×10-9 at 77 K. Results of ion exposure imply that fine-grained nuclear emulsion is sensitive to ions which are light and heavy and ion tracks' angle can be measured.

  2. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    DOEpatents

    Ruhe, Thomas C.; Rao, Pilaka P.

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  3. Tuneable Rheological Properties of Fluorinated Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon Orellana, Laura Andreina; Riechers, Birte; Caen, Ouriel; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    Pickering emulsions are an appealing approach to stabilize liquid-liquid dispersions without surfactants. Recently, amphiphilic silica nanoparticles have been proposed as an alternative to surfactants for droplet microfluidics applications, where aqueous drops are stabilized in fluorinated oils. This system, proved to be effective in preventing the leakage of resorufin, a model dye that was known to leak in surfactant-stabilized drops. The overall capabilities of droplet-based microfluidics technology is highly dependent on the dynamic properties of droplets, interfaces and emulsions. Therefore, fluorinated pickering emulsions dynamic properties need to be characterized, understood and controlled to be used as a substitute of already broadly studied emulsions for droplet microfluidics applications. In this study, fluorinated pickering emulsions have been found to behave as a Herschel Bulkley fluid, representing a challenge for common microfluidic operations as re-injection and sorting of droplets. We found that this behavior is controlled by the interaction between the interfacial properties of the particle-laden interface and the bulk properties of the two phases

  4. Stimuli-responsive Pickering emulsions: recent advances and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juntao; Quinlan, Patrick James; Tam, Kam Chiu

    2015-05-14

    Pickering emulsions possess many advantages over traditional surfactant stabilized emulsions. For example, Pickering emulsions impart better stability against coalescence and, in many cases, are biologically compatible and environmentally friendly. These characteristics open the door for their use in a variety of industries spanning petroleum, food, biomedicine, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Depending on the application, rapid, but controlled stabilization and destabilization of an emulsion may be necessary. As a result, Pickering emulsions with stimuli-responsive properties have, in recent years, received a considerable amounts of attention. This paper provides a concise and comprehensive review of Pickering emulsion systems that possess the ability to respond to an array of external triggers, including pH, temperature, CO2 concentration, light intensity, ionic strength, and magnetic field. Potential applications for which stimuli-responsive Pickering emulsion systems would be of particular value, such as emulsion polymerization, enhanced oil recovery, catalyst recovery, and cosmetics, are discussed.

  5. Copolymerization of Glycolide and ɛ-Caprolactone Using 12-Aminolauric Acid Modified Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, HAV; Reyes, LQ

    2017-09-01

    Poly(glycolide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (PGLYCL) nanocomposites were prepared by copolymerization glycolide (GLY) and ɛ-caprolactone (ɛ-CL) in the presence of varying loadings 12-aminolauric acid (12-ALA)-modified montmorillonite. Copolymerization was successfully achieved based on the increase in polymer molecular weight after the reaction determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The amount of the poly(glycolide) block and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) block units in the copolymer, identified by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy, suggested that the increase in organo-clay loading cause a reduction GLYL: ɛ-CLL ratio. The arrangement of the monomers in the polymer products was elucidated to have an ABA triblock structure, where PCL block is the central block and the PGLY is found at both end of the copolymer. The presence of intercalated and exfoliated silicates in the nanocomposites were observed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The biocompatibility of the nanocomposites with NCTC 292 mouse normal fibroblast was high relative to untreated cell cultures using tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-dye reduction assay.

  6. Relative Rates for Plasma Homo- and Copolymerizations of Olefins in a Homologous Series of Fluorinated Ethylenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The relative rates of plasma (co)polymerizations of ethylene, vinyl fluoride, vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene and tetrafluoroethylene (VF(sub x); x = 0-4, respectively) were determined in an rf, capacitively coupled, tubular reactor with external electrodes using identical plasma parameters. The averages of deposition rates obtained by both microgravimetry and ellipsometry were plotted versus the F/C ratios of the monomers or monomer blends. The deposition rates for VF(sub x)(x = 1-3) and 20 monomer blends were all located above a straight line joining the rates for VF(sub 0) and VF(sub 4), following a concave-downward plot of deposition rate versus F/C ratio similar to that reported previously for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 4) blends. The deposition rates for VF(sub m)/VF(sub n) blends (m = 3 or 4; n = 0-2) were all greater than expected for non-interacting monomers; those for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 2) and VF(sub 1)/VF(sub 2) blends were all lower than expected; while those for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 1) and VF(sub 3)/VF(sub 4) blends fen on a straightline plot versus F/C ratio, indicative of apparent non-interaction between monomers. The mechanisms for plasma (co)polymerizations of VF(sub x) monomers responsible for the wide range of relative deposition rates remain to be elucidated.

  7. Relative Rates for Plasma Homo- and Copolymerizations of Olefins in a Homologous Series of Fluorinated Ethylenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The relative rates of plasma (co)polymerizations of ethylene, vinyl fluoride, vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene and tetrafluoroethylene (VF(sub x); x = 0-4, respectively) were determined in an rf, capacitively coupled, tubular reactor with external electrodes using identical plasma parameters. The averages of deposition rates obtained by both microgravimetry and ellipsometry were plotted versus the F/C ratios of the monomers or monomer blends. The deposition rates for VF(sub x)(x = 1-3) and 20 monomer blends were all located above a straight line joining the rates for VF(sub 0) and VF(sub 4), following a concave-downward plot of deposition rate versus F/C ratio similar to that reported previously for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 4) blends. The deposition rates for VF(sub m)/VF(sub n) blends (m = 3 or 4; n = 0-2) were all greater than expected for non-interacting monomers; those for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 2) and VF(sub 1)/VF(sub 2) blends were all lower than expected; while those for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 1) and VF(sub 3)/VF(sub 4) blends fen on a straightline plot versus F/C ratio, indicative of apparent non-interaction between monomers. The mechanisms for plasma (co)polymerizations of VF(sub x) monomers responsible for the wide range of relative deposition rates remain to be elucidated.

  8. Synthesis of Vol. I. Improvers by copolymerization of decyl methacrylate with styrene

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, A.I.; Levshina, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    This article demonstrates how copolymerization can be used to improve the quality of polyalkyl methacrylates. Benzoyl peroxide was used as an initiator for copolymerization performed in toluene solution. The influences of the concentrations of initiator and monomer mixture in toluene, the temperature, the length of the reaction period, and the quantity of styrene were investigated. The results indicate that as the reaction temperature was raised from 70/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/C, the molecular weight of the copolymer decreased from 20,000 to 12,000 and the yield remained unchanged. An increase in the content of styrene from 10% to 40% led to an increase in the molecular weight of the copolymer from 10,000 to 17,000. When the volume ratio of toluene to monomer mixture was increased, the molecular weight of the copolymer decreased while the yield remained constant. It is determined that by varying the quantities of stryene and toluene, the molecular weight of the copolymer can be regulated without changing the temperature or the initiator concentration.

  9. Extraction of palm tree cellulose and its functionalization via graft copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Al-Hoqbani, Abdulmajeed A; Abdel-Halim, E S; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2014-09-01

    The work in this paper was planned with the aim of extracting the cellulosic component of palm tree waste and functionalizing this cellulose through graft copolymerization with acrylic acid. The cellulose extraction included hot alkali treatment with aqueous sodium hydroxide to remove the non-cellulosic binding materials. The alkali treatment was followed by an oxidative bleaching using peracid/hydrogen peroxide mixture with the aim of removing the rest of non-cellulosic materials to improve the fiber hydrophilicity and accessibility towards further grafting reaction. Optimum conditions for cellulose extraction are boiling in 5% (W/V) NaOH in a material to liquor ratio of 1:20 for 1 h then bleaching with 60 ml/l bleaching mixture at initial pH value of 6.5 for 30 min. The pH of the bleaching medium is turned to the alkaline range 11 and bleaching continues for extra 30 min. Graft copolymerization reaction was initiated by potassium bromate/thiourea dioxide redox system. Optimum conditions for grafting are 30 mmol of potassium bromate, 30 mmol of thiourea dioxide and 150 g of acrylic acid (each per 100 g of cellulose). The polymerization reaction was carried out for 120 min at 50°C using a material to liquor ratio of 1:20.

  10. Relating emulsion stability to interfacial properties for pharmaceutical emulsions stabilized by Pluronic F68 surfactant.

    PubMed

    Powell, Kristin Conrad; Damitz, Robert; Chauhan, Anuj

    2017-04-15

    We explore mechanisms of emulsion stability for several systems using Pluronic F68 and a range of oils commonly used in pharmaceutics and cosmetics. We report measurements of dynamic emulsion drop size, zeta potential, and creaming time, as well as dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial viscoelasticity. Experiments show that with 1wt% Pluronic F68, soybean oil emulsions were the most stable with no creaming over six months, followed by isopropyl myristate, octanoic acid, and then ethyl butyrate. The eventual destabilization occurred due to the rising of large drops which formed through Ostwald ripening and coalescence. While Ostwald ripening is important, it is not the dominant destabilization mechanism for the time scale of interest in pharmaceutical emulsions. The more significant destabilization mechanism, coalescence, is reduced through surfactant adsorption, which decreases surface tension, increases surface elasticity, and adds a stearic hindrance to collisions. Though the measured values of elasticity obtained using a standard oscillatory pendant drop method did not correlate to emulsion stability, this is because the frequencies for the measurements were orders of magnitude below those relevant to coalescence in emulsions. However, we show that the high frequency elasticity obtained by fitting the surface tension data to a Langmuir isotherm has very good correlation with the emulsion stability, indicating that the elasticity of the interface plays a key role in stabilizing these pharmaceutical formulations. Further, this study highlights how these important high frequency elasticity values can be easily estimated from surface isotherms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mathematical modeling of ultrafiltration of emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Epshtein, S.I.

    1992-07-10

    The goal of this work is development of a mathematical model of the microfiltration process for oil emulsions. First of all to proceed to development of the basic equations describing the process of microfiltration, the authors study several rules obtained as a result of studies carried out in a cold rolling mill on an experimental setup of known construction, which included four F-1 BTU-0.5/2 ultrafilters connected in series, a pump, a 3 m{sup 3} settling tank, and a 1 m{sup 3} tank for the washing solution. An emulsion based on self-emulsifying oil T, which is used for preparing working emulsions for a four-stand cold rolling sheet mill, was purified. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Clinical applications of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy.

    PubMed

    Muller, Sam H; Diaz, James H; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-12-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE; Intralipid) therapy, a standard treatment in local anesthetic toxicity, has demonstrated therapeutic efficacies for a number of different drug class-mediated toxicities. Some of these varied drug groups include antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiarrhythmics, and calcium channel blockers. To meet the objective of describing the growing number of indications for Intralipid therapy and any diverse effects and/or failures of Intralipid therapy in reversing multiple drug toxicities, we queried several Internet search engines with the key words "intravenous lipid emulsion therapy," "Intralipid," "lipid emulsion," and "local anesthetic systemic toxicity," resulting in the identification of 31 case reports for descriptive analysis. These case reports included 49 separate drug overdose cases involving ten separate drug classes which were successfully reversed with Intralipid. The education of clinicians regarding the beneficial and varied roles of Intralipid therapy in different clinical settings is warranted, particularly in terms of the potential for Intralipid therapy to reverse the toxicities of non-local anesthetic drugs.

  13. Multi-body coalescence in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Haitao; Jing, Benxin; Liu, Fang; Burns, Peter C.; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-01-01

    Particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions have shown unusual behaviours such as the formation of non-spherical droplets and the sudden halt of coalescence between individual droplets. Here we report another unusual behaviour of Pickering emulsions—the simultaneous coalescence of multiple droplets in a single event. Using latex particles, silica particles and carbon nanotubes as model stabilizers, we show that multi-body coalescence can occur in both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. The number of droplets involved in the nth coalscence event equals four times the corresponding number of the tetrahedral sequence in close packing. Furthermore, coalescence is promoted by repulsive latex and silica particles but inhibited by attractive carbon nanotubes. The revelation of multi-body coalescence is expected to help better understand Pickering emulsions in natural systems and improve their designs in engineering applications.

  14. Forces acting in quasi 2d emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Carlos; Lowensohn, Janna; Weeks, Eric

    We study the forces in a quasi two dimensional emulsion system. Our samples are oil-in-water emulsions confined between two close-spaced parallel plates, so that the oil droplets are deformed into pancake shapes. By means of microscopy, we measure the droplet positions and their deformation, which we can relate to the contact forces due to surface tension. We improve over prior work in our lab, achieving a better force resolution. We use this result to measure and calibrate the viscous forces acting in our system, which fully determine all the forces on the droplets. Our results can be applied to study static configurations of emulsion, as well as faster flows.

  15. Stabilization of Oil-Water Emulsions by Hydrophobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dorobantu, Loredana S.; Yeung, Anthony K. C.; Foght, Julia M.; Gray, Murray R.

    2004-01-01

    Formation of oil-water emulsions during bacterial growth on hydrocarbons is often attributed to biosurfactants. Here we report the ability of certain intact bacterial cells to stabilize oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions without changing the interfacial tension, by inhibition of droplet coalescence as observed in emulsion stabilization by solid particles like silica. PMID:15466587

  16. NARCOSIS AND EMULSION REVERSAL BY INERT GASES

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Dewey F.; Fenn, Wallace O.

    1957-01-01

    Investigations of the effect of high pressures of Na (100 to 130 atmospheres) and of Ar (60 to 80 atmospheres) showed that these gases are effective in reversing the phases of an oil in water emulsion. Nitrous oxide did not cause reversal at pressures as high as 53 atmospheres nor did helium as high as 107 atmospheres. We found CO2 most effective in reversing the emulsions and attributed this to its chemical properties. It is suggested that these observations may help to explain the narcotic effects of inert gases. PMID:13416527

  17. Treatment of cocaine overdose with lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Jakkala-Saibaba, R; Morgan, P G; Morton, G L

    2011-12-01

    We describe the management and recovery of a 28-year-old man following a history of overdose by nasal inhalation of cocaine. The patient was presented in a comatose state suffering from seizures and marked cardiovascularly instability. Intravenous lipid emulsion was administered following initial resuscitation and tracheal intubation, as a means of treating persistent cardiac arrhythmias and profound hypotension. Following lipid emulsion therapy, the patient's life-threatening cardiovascular parameters rapidly improved and he recovered well without any side effects, thus being discharged within 2 days. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. Electrodynamic treatment of reversed-type emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Skachkov, A.E.; Lavrov, I.S.; Timonov, S.M.

    1985-11-01

    The authors have produced an inhomogeneous electric field in processing reversed emulsions by using the oscillations of conducting spheres in an electric field; this is known as the electrical pendulum effect. The apparatus for the electrodynamic treatment of reversed-type emulsion is shown and the physical characteristics (density, kinematic viscosity, dielectric constant) are shown for the hydrocarbons used: hexane, octane, hexadecane and diesel fuel. It is shown that there is a minimum in the dependence of the residual water content after electrodynamic treatment on the external field strength; the minimum shifts to larger external field strength as the viscosity increases.

  19. Stimuli-Sensitive Composite Microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Haruma

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgels were prepared by precipitation polymerization and PNIPAM shell / hard core particles were obtained by soap-free emulsion copolymerization or seeded polymerization. Hairy particles were prepared by “grafting-to” modification or “grafting-from” living radical polymerization. They exhibited not only volume phase transition but also changes in some physical properties in a certain temperature range. Composite thermosensitive microgels including magnetite, Au, or titania were obtained by in situ formation of metal or metal oxide in polymeric particles. The functions of metal or metal oxide were tuned by reversible volume phase transition of the microgel as a function of temperature. Enzyme-carrying thermosensitive microgels exhibited unique temperature-dependence of enzyme activity.

  20. RAFT copolymerization of itaconic anhydride and 2-methoxyethyl acrylate: a multifunctional scaffold for preparation of "clickable" gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Kasama, Takeshi; Jankova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2013-05-25

    RAFT copolymerization of 2-methoxyethyl acrylate and itaconic anhydride - a monomer derived from renewable resources - is carried out in a controlled fashion. The copolymer allows preparation of gold nanoparticles with abundant surficial carboxyl and alkyne functional groups that are dendronized via Cu(I)-mediated "click" reaction.

  1. Efficient catalyst removal and recycling in copolymerization of epoxides with carbon dioxide via simple liquid-liquid phase separation.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Koji; Fujie, Ryuhei; Shintani, Ryo; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2013-10-18

    A simple and efficient catalyst removal system has been developed in the cobalt-salen-catalyzed copolymerization of propylene oxide with carbon dioxide. The present system requires no prior modification of the catalyst, and the removal is achieved by simple addition of myristic acid, followed by organic liquid-liquid phase separation.

  2. Alternating copolymerization of dihydrocoumarin and epoxides catalyzed by chromium salen complexes: a new route to functional polyesters.

    PubMed

    Van Zee, Nathan J; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2014-06-18

    We report the alternating ring-opening copolymerization of dihydrocoumarin with epoxides catalyzed by chromium(III) salen complexes. This process provides access to a range of perfectly alternating polyesters with high molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions. Atactic poly(cyclohexene dihydrocoumarate) and poly(cyclopentene dihydrocoumarate) were found to be semi-crystalline by differential scanning calorimetry.

  3. Liquid marbles as a micro-reactor for efficient radical alternating copolymerization of diene monomer and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Sato, E; Yuri, M; Fujii, S; Nishiyama, T; Nakamura, Y; Horibe, H

    2015-12-18

    Liquid marbles have been shown to be a novel micro-reactor to synthesize polyperoxides by the radical alternating copolymerization of the 1,3-diene monomer with oxygen in a good yield. Oxygen gas is effectively absorbed as a comonomer by the large and permeable gas-liquid interface of the liquid marbles.

  4. Polymerization of olefins through heterogeneous catalysis: 14--The influence of temperature in the solution copolymerization of ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Jaber, I.A.; Ray, W.H. . Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1993-10-10

    The influence of temperature variation on the kinetics and the polymer properties in the homo- and copolymerization of ethylene in a solution reactor is discussed. The polymerization is conducted in a semibatch mode at 320 Psig total reactor pressure for 10 min polymerization time. Temperature variations in the range 145-200 C in both homo- and copolymerization of ethylene with 1-octene shows that the highest catalyst yield was obtained at temperature of 165--175 C. At the optimal temperature, a high initial maximum in the rate of ethylene consumption is attained in a few seconds followed by a relatively slow decay when compared with polymerization conducted a higher temperatures. Polymerization at temperatures [>=] 185 C resulted in a lower peak in the consumption rate of ethylene accompanied by a rapid decay with time. In the case of ethylene/1-octene copolymerization, a rather low comonomer incorporation level is obtained at the conditions employed; the 1-octene incorporated was only 0.2--0.7 mol%. Higher M[sub w] values, of about 350,000 at 145 C, are obtained in homopolymerization in comparison to M[sub w] values obtained in copolymerization, of about 195,000 at the same temperature. Over the temperature range of 145--200 C, both M[sub w] and M[sub n] values vary by about 40%.

  5. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-31

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  6. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-01

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  7. Emulsions stabilised by whey protein microgel particles: towards food-grade Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Rouvet, Martine; Gehin-Delval, Cécile; Schmitt, Christophe; Binks, Bernard P

    2014-09-28

    We have investigated a new class of food-grade particles, whey protein microgels, as stabilisers of triglyceride-water emulsions. The sub-micron particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at all pH with and without salt. All emulsions creamed but exhibited exceptional resistance to coalescence. Clear correlations exist between the properties of the microgels in aqueous dispersion and the resulting emulsion characteristics. For conditions in which the particles were uncharged, fluid emulsions with relatively large drops were stabilised, whereas emulsions stabilized by charged particles contained smaller flocculated drops. A combination of optical microscopy of the drops and spectrophotometry of the resolved aqueous phase allowed us to estimate the interfacial adsorption densities of the particles using the phenomenon of limited coalescence. We deduce two classes of particle arrangement. Complete adsorption of the particles was obtained when they were neutral or when their charges were screened by salt resulting in at least one particle monolayer at the interface. By contrast, only around 50% of the particles adsorbed when they were charged with emulsion drops being covered by less than half a monolayer. These findings were supported by direct visualization of drop interfaces using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Uncharged particles were highly aggregated and formed a continuous 2-D network at the interface. Otherwise particles organized as individual aggregates separated by particle-free regions. In this case, we suggest that some particles spread at the interface leading to the formation of a continuous protein membrane. Charged particles displayed the ability to bridge opposing interfaces of neighbouring drops to form dense particle disks protecting drops against coalescence; this is the main reason for the flocculation and stability of emulsions containing sparsely covered drops.

  8. Phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Xu, Zhiguang; Cai, Zengxiao; Guo, Qipeng

    2015-06-28

    Herein, we report the phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) induced by salt concentration and pH changes. The ionomers are sulfonated polystyrenes (SPSs) with different sulfonation degrees. The emulsion types were determined by conductivity measurements, confocal microscopy and optical microscopy, and the formation of HIPE organogels was verified by the tube-inversion method and rheological measurements. SPSs with high sulfonation degrees (water-soluble) and low sulfonation degrees (water-insoluble) can stabilize oil-in-water emulsions; these emulsions were transformed into water-in-oil HIPEs by varying salt concentrations and/or changing the pH. SPS, with a sulfonation degree of 11.6%, is the most efficient, and as low as 0.2 (w/v)% of the organic phase is enough to stabilize the HIPEs. Phase inversion of the oil-in-water emulsions occurred to form water-in-oil HIPEs by increasing the salt concentration in the aqueous phase. Two phase inversion points from oil-in-water emulsions to water-in-oil HIPEs were observed at pH 1 and 13. Moreover, synergetic effects between the salt concentration and pH changes occurred upon the inversion of the emulsion type. The organic phase can be a variety of organic solvents, including toluene, xylene, chloroform, dichloroethane, dichloromethane and anisole, as well as monomers such as styrene, butyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. Poly(HIPEs) were successfully prepared by the polymerization of monomers as the continuous phase in the ionomer-stabilized HIPEs.

  9. Particle-Stabilized Powdered Water-in-Oil Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2016-04-05

    The preparation of powdered water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions by gentle aeration of w/o emulsions stabilized by hydrophobic fumed silica particles in the presence of oleophobic fluorinated clay particles is reported for an alkane and a triglyceride oil. The resultant powders consist of water drops dispersed in oil globules themselves dispersed in air (w/o/a). They contain ∼80 wt % of the precursor w/o emulsion and were stable to phase separation for over 1 year but release oil and water when sheared on a substrate. Above a certain ratio of w/o emulsion:fluorinated clay particles, the powdered emulsions partially invert to an emulsion paste, composed of air bubbles and water droplets dispersed in oil. The tap density and angle of repose of the powdered emulsions were measured and compared with those of the corresponding powdered oils making up the continuous phase of the precursor emulsions. The contact angles of water droplets under oil on glass slides spin coated with silica particles and oil drops and w/o emulsion droplets in air on compressed disks of fluorinated clay particles are consistent with the stabilization of w/o emulsions and powdered emulsions, respectively.

  10. Pickering w/o emulsions: drug release and topical delivery.

    PubMed

    Frelichowska, Justyna; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Valour, Jean-Pierre; Mouaziz, Hanna; Pelletier, Jocelyne; Chevalier, Yves

    2009-02-23

    The skin absorption from Pickering emulsions as a new dosage form was investigated for the first time. Pickering emulsions are stabilized by adsorbed solid particles instead of emulsifier molecules. They are promising dosage forms that significantly differ from classical emulsions within several features. The skin permeation of a hydrophilic model penetrant (caffeine) was investigated from a w/o Pickering emulsion and compared to a w/o classical emulsion stabilized with an emulsifier. Both emulsions had the same composition and physicochemical properties in order to focus on the effect of the interfacial layer on the drug release and skin absorption processes. The highest permeation rates were obtained from the Pickering emulsion with a pseudo-steady state flux of 25 microg cm(-2)h(-1), threefold higher than from a classical emulsion (9.7 microg cm(-2)h(-1)). After 24h exposure, caffeine was mostly in the receptor fluid and in the dermis; cumulated amounts of caffeine were higher for the Pickering emulsion. Several physicochemical phenomena were investigated for clearing up the mechanisms of enhanced permeation from the Pickering emulsion. Among them, higher adhesion of Pickering emulsion droplets to skin surface was disclosed. The transport of caffeine adsorbed on silica particles was also considered relevant since skin stripping showed that aggregates of silica particles entered deeply the stratum corneum.

  11. How does oil type determine emulsion characteristics in concentrated Na-caseinate emulsions?

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Lin; McGrath, Kathryn M

    2013-08-01

    Macroscopic properties and ensemble average diffusion of concentrated (dispersed phase 50-60 wt%) Na-caseinate-stabilised emulsions for three different oils (soybean oil, palm olein and tetradecane) were explored. On a volume fraction basis, pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE)-NMR data show that droplet dynamics for all three systems are similar within a region of the emulsion morphology diagram. The exact limits of the emulsion space depend however on which oil is considered. The reduced solubility of tetradecane in water, and Na-caseinate in tetradecane, result in the stabilisation of flocs during formulation. Floc formation is not observed when soybean oil or palm olein is used under identical emulsion formulation conditions. Linear rheology experiments provide indirect evidence that the local structure and the properties of the thin film interfacial domain of tetradecane emulsions vary from those of soybean oil and palm olein emulsions. Collectively these data indicate that protein/oil interactions within a system dominate over specific oil droplet structure and size distribution, which are similar in the three systems.

  12. Topical delivery of acetyl hexapeptide-8 from different emulsions: influence of emulsion composition and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hoppel, Magdalena; Reznicek, Gottfried; Kählig, Hanspeter; Kotisch, Harald; Resch, Günter P; Valenta, Claudia

    2015-02-20

    Acetyl hexapeptide-8 (AH-8) is a well-known component of anti-aging products and was recently explored as a promising topical treatment of blepharospasm. Although AH-8 appears in a variety of cosmetic products, its skin penetration is sparsely studied and controversially discussed. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the vehicle type on the AH-8 delivery to the skin. Besides skin permeation experiments with Franz type diffusion cells, the spatial distribution of AH-8 in the stratum corneum after a real in-use application was investigated by in vitro tape stripping on porcine ear skin. By applying LC-MS/MS for quantification of AH-8, we demonstrated that a multiple water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsion can significantly increase penetration of AH-8 into porcine skin compared to simple O/W and W/O emulsions. The internal structure of the developed multiple emulsion was confirmed by electron microscopic investigations and NMR self diffusion studies. In general, a clear superiority of water-rich W/O/W and O/W emulsions over an oil-rich W/O emulsion in terms of dermal delivery of AH-8 was found. This enhanced delivery of AH-8 could be explained by an increased absorption of the water-rich emulsions into the skin, confirmed by combined ATR-FTIR and tape stripping experiments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Crystals and crystallization in oil-in-water emulsions: implications for emulsion-based delivery systems.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian

    2012-06-15

    Many bioactive components intended for oral ingestion (pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals) are hydrophobic molecules with low water-solubilities and high melting points, which poses considerable challenges to the formulation of oral delivery systems. Oil-in-water emulsions are often suitable vehicles for the encapsulation and delivery of this type of bioactive component. The bioactive component is usually dissolved in a carrier lipid phase by either dilution and/or heating prior to homogenization, and then the carrier lipid and water phases are homogenized to form an emulsion consisting of small oil droplets dispersed in water. The successful development of this kind of emulsion-based delivery system depends on a good understanding of the influence of crystals on the formation, stability, and properties of emulsions. This review article addresses the physicochemical phenomena associated with the encapsulation, retention, crystallization, release, and absorption of hydrophobic bioactive components within emulsions. This knowledge will be useful for the rational formulation of effective emulsion-based delivery systems for oral delivery of crystalline hydrophobic bioactive components in the food, health care, and pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Probing Interfacial Emulsion Stability Controls using Electrorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuyu; Brandvik, Amy; Alvarado, Vladimir

    2010-11-01

    The stability of water-in-oil emulsions is controlled by interfacial mechanisms that include oil film rheology of approaching drops and the strength of drop interfaces. Film drainage is mainly a function of the continuous phase rheology. Temperature is used to regulate the viscosity of the continuous phase and hence determine its effect on emulsion stability through film drainage, in contrast with interfacial strength. In this study, one crude oil is used to formulate water-in-oil emulsions. Oil-water interfacial tension is measured to gauge other interfacial changes with temperature. The critical field value, used as proxy of emulsion stability, approaches a plateau value for each crude oil- aqueous solution pair, at sufficiently high temperature (50 ^oC), which is interpreted to reflect the intrinsic drop-coating film resistance to coalescence. Interfacial tension does vary significantly with either aqueous phase composition or temperature. From comparison with previous results, we speculate that drop coating film is composed of a fraction of asphaltic compunds.

  15. Ordered macroporous materials by emulsion templating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, A.; Pine, D. J.

    1997-10-01

    Ordered macroporous materials with pore diameters comparable to optical wavelengths are predicted to have unique and highly useful optical properties such as photonic bandgaps and optical stop-bands. Tight control over the pore size distribution might also lead to improved macroporous materials (those with pores greater than approximately 50nm) for application as catalytic surfaces and supports, adsorbents, chromatographic materials, filters, light-weight structural materials, and thermal, acoustic and electrical insulators. Although methods exist for producing ordered porous materials with pore diameters less than 10nm (refs 10, 11), there is no general method for producing such materials with uniform pore sizes at larger length scales. Here we report a new method for producing highly monodisperse macroporous materials with pore sizes ranging from 50nm to several micrometres. Starting with an emulsion of equally sized droplets (produced through a repeated fractionation procedure), we form macroporous materials of titania, silica and zirconia by using the emulsion droplets as templates around which material is deposited through a sol-gel process. Subsequent drying and heat treatment yields solid materials with spherical pores left behind by the emulsion droplets. These pores are highly ordered, reflecting the self-assembly of the original monodisperse emulsion droplets into a nearly crystalline array. We show that the pore size can be accurately controlled, and that the technique should be applicable to a wide variety of metal oxides and even organic polymer gels.

  16. Histidine residues in the peptide D-Lys(6)-GnRH: potential for copolymerization in polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Alexandra P; Kleffmann, Torsten; Rades, Thomas; McDowell, Arlene

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ethylcyanoacrylate) (PECA) nanoparticles containing the bioactive d-Lys(6)-GnRH were manufactured by an in situ interfacial polymerization process using a w/o-microemulsion template containing the peptide in the dispersed aqueous pseudophase of the microemulsion. Polymeric nanoparticles were characterized using PCS, RP-HPLC (bulk level) and MALDI TOF mass spectrometry (molecular level). The peptide d-Lys(6)-GnRH was reactive with the alkylcyanoacrylate monomer, resulting in some of the peptide copolymerizing with the monomer. MALDI TOF/TOF (tandem) analysis revealed that the histidine residue in position 2 of d-Lys(6)-GnRH interacts covalently in the polymerization process. A reaction mechanism for this nucleophilic interference is suggested. The copolymerization reaction appeared to occur within seconds after the addition of the monomer to the microemulsion. The surface charge of resulting nanoparticles was less negative (-3 mV) compared with the zeta potential of empty nanoparticles (-27.5 mV). The copolymerization yielded high entrapment rates of 95 +/- 4% of peptide, but showed limited release ( approximately 11%) of free peptide over 5 days. A separate experiment demonstrated that the addition of d-Lys(6)-GnRH to preformed empty PECA nanoparticles (ex situ) also yielded fractions of copolymerized peptide suggesting a certain proportion of polymer remains available for copolymerization possibly through an unzipping depolymerization/repolymerization process. Therefore, the reactivity of histidine residues in bioactives needs to be considered whenever using the bioactive in situ or ex situ with polymeric PECA nanoparticles.

  17. Improved detection of amylase activity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with copolymerized starch.

    PubMed

    Martínez, T F; Alarcón, F J; Díaz-López, M; Moyano, F J

    2000-08-01

    An improved method, based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) for detection of amylase activity is described. This method will allow better characterization of certain amylases than that obtained by the Davis technique. The main features of the technique are: (i) identification of amylase bands and molecular mass determination are possible in the same gel; (ii) the hydrolysis of copolymerized substrate during electrophoretic separation is prevented using very low temperatures instead of inactivating agents such as chelating agents; and (iii) the technique is applicable to reveal amylase activity in a wide range of biological samples. The method is not useful for enzymes sensitive to SDS and for high molecular mass amylases.

  18. Block Copolymerization of Lactide and an Epoxide Facilitated by a Redox Switchable Iron-Based Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Biernesser, Ashley B; Delle Chiaie, Kayla R; Curley, Julia B; Byers, Jeffery A

    2016-04-18

    A cationic iron(III) complex was active for the polymerization of various epoxides, whereas the analogous neutral iron(II) complex was inactive. Cyclohexene oxide polymerization could be "switched off" upon in situ reduction of the iron(III) catalyst and "switched on" upon in situ oxidation, which is orthogonal to what was observed previously for lactide polymerization. Conducting copolymerization reactions in the presence of both monomers resulted in block copolymers whose identity can be controlled by the oxidation state of the catalyst: selective lactide polymerization was observed in the iron(II) oxidation state and selective epoxide polymerization was observed in the iron(III) oxidation state. Evidence for the formation of block copolymers was obtained from solubility differences, GPC, and DOSY-NMR studies.

  19. Radiation-induced graft copolymerization of binary monomer mixture containing acrylonitrile onto polyethylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong-Ho; Nho, Young Chang

    2000-04-01

    Graft copolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN)/acrylic acid (AA), acrylonitrile (AN)/methacrylic acid (MA), and acrylonitrile (AN)/glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto pre-irradiated polyethylene (PE) films were studied. The effect of reaction conditions such as solvents, additives, and monomer composition on the grafting yields was investigated. The extent of grafting was found to increase with increasing sulfuric acid concentration when sulfuric acid as an additive was added to the grafting solution. In AN/AA mixture, the proportion of acrylonitrile in the copolymer increased with an increasing AN component in feed monomers. On the other hand, in AN/MA mixture, acrylonitrile component in copolymer was very slight in spite of the increase AN component in feed monomers. In the AN/GMA mixture, the proportion of acrylonitrile in the copolymer increased with increasing acrylonitrile component in AN/GMA feed monomer.

  20. Surface Modification of PET Fabric by Graft Copolymerization with Acrylic Acid and Its Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Abdolahifard, M.; Bahrami, S. Hajir; Malek, R. M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Graft copolymerization of acrylic acid (AA) onto Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabrics with the aid of benzoyl peroxide was carried out. The effect of polymerization parameters on the graft yield was studied. Percent grafting was enhanced significantly by increasing benzoyl peroxide (BP) concentrations up to 3.84 g/lit and then decreased upon further increase in initiator concentration. Preswelling of PET leads to changes in its sorption-diffusion properties and favors an increase in the degree of grafting. The antibiotics treated grafted fabrics showed antibacterial properties towards gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. FTIR and SEM were used to characterize AA-grafted polyester fabrics. PMID:24052819

  1. Constrained Geometry Organotitanium Catalysts Supported on Nanosized Silica for Ethylene (co)Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuo-Tseng; Wu, Ling-Huey

    2017-05-05

    Supported olefin polymerization catalysts can prevent reactor-fouling problems and produce uniform polymer particles. Constrained geometry complexes (CGCs) have less sterically hindered active sites than bis-cyclopentadienyl metallocene catalysts. In the literature, micrometer-sized silica particles were used for supporting CGC catalysts, which might have strong mass transfer limitations. This study aims to improve the activity of supported CGC catalysts by using nanometer-sized silica. Ti[(C₅Me₄)SiMe₂(N(t)Bu)]Cl₂, a "constrained-geometry" titanium catalyst, was supported on MAO-treated silicas (nano-sized and micro-sized) by an impregnation method. Ethylene homo-polymerization and co-polymerization with 1-octene were carried out in a temperature range of 80-120 °C using toluene as the solvent. Catalysts prepared and polymers produced were characterized. For both catalysts and for both reactions, the maximum activities occurred at 100 °C, which is significantly higher than that (60 °C) reported before for supported bis-cyclopentadienyl metallocene catalysts containing zirconium, and is lower than that (≥140 °C) used for unsupported Ti[(C₅Me₄)SiMe₂(N(t)Bu)]Me₂ catalyst. Activities of nano-sized catalyst were 2.6 and 1.6 times those of micro-sized catalyst for homopolymerization and copolymerization, respectively. The former produced polymers with higher crystallinity and melting point than the latter. In addition, copolymer produced with nanosized catalyst contained more 1-octene than that produced with microsized catalyst.

  2. Immune modulation by parenteral lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A; Calder, Philip C

    2007-05-01

    Total parenteral nutrition is the final option for nutritional support of patients with severe intestinal failure. Lipid emulsions constitute the main source of fuel calories and fatty acids (FAs) in parenteral nutrition formulations. However, adverse effects on patient outcomes have been attributed to the use of lipids, mostly in relation to impaired immune defenses and altered inflammatory responses. Over the years, this issue has remained in the limelight, also because technical advances have provided no safeguard against the most daunting problems, ie, infectious complications. Nevertheless, numerous investigations have failed to produce a clear picture of the immunologic characteristics of the most commonly used soybean oil-derived lipid emulsions, although their high content of n-6 polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) has been considered a drawback because of their proinflammatory potential. This concern initiated the development of emulsions in which part of the n-6 FA component is replaced by less bioactive FAs, such as coconut oil (rich in medium-chain saturated FAs) or olive oil (rich in the n-9 monounsaturated FA oleic acid). Another approach has been to use fish oil (rich in n-3 PUFA), the FAs of which have biological activities different from those of n-6 PUFAs. Recent studies on the modulation of host defenses and inflammation by fish-oil emulsions have yielded consistent data, which indicate that these emulsions may provide a tool to beneficially alter the course of immune-mediated conditions. Although most of these lipids have not yet become available on the US market, this review synthesizes available information on immunologic characteristics of the different lipids that currently can be applied via parenteral nutrition support.

  3. Showing Emulsion Properties with Common Dairy Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Diaz, Carlos; Gonzalez-Romero, Elisa

    1996-09-01

    Foods are mixtures of different chemical compounds, and the quality we sense (taste, texture, color, etc.) are all manifestations of its chemical properties. Some of them can be visualized with the aid of simple, safe and inexpensive experiments using dairy products that can be found in any kitchen and using almost exclusively kitchen utensils. In this paper we propose some of them related with food emulsions. Food emulsions cover an extremely wide area of daily-life applications such as milk, sauces, dressings and beverages. Experimentation with some culinary recipes to prepare them and the analyisis of the observed results is close to ideal subject for the introduction of chemical principles, allowing to discuss about the nature and composition of foods, the effects of additives, etc. At the same time it allows to get insights into the scientific reasons that underlie on the recipes (something that it is not usually found in most cookbooks). For example, when making an emulsion like mayonnaise, why the egg yolks and water are the first materials in the bowl , and the oil is added to them rather than in the other way around? How you can "rescue" separate emulsions (mayonnaise)? Which parameters affect emulsion stability? Since safety, in its broad sense, is the first requisite for any food, concerns about food exist throughout the world and the more we are aware of our everyday life, the more likely we will be to deal productively with the consequences. On the other hand, understanding what foods are and how cooking works destroys no delightful mystery of the art of cuisine, instead the mystery expands.

  4. Synthetic Polymers at Interfaces: Monodisperse Emulsions Multiple Emulsions and Liquid Marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guanqing

    The adsorption of polymeric materials at interfaces is an energetically favorable process which is investigated in much diversified fields, such as emulsions, bubbles, foams, liquid marbles. Pickering emulsion, which is emulsion stabilized by solid particles has been investigated for over one century and preparation of Pickering emulsion with narrow size distribution is crucial for both the theoretical study of the stabilization mechanism and practical application, such as templated fabrication of colloidosomes. The precise control over the size and functionality of polymer latices allows the preparation of monodisperse Pickering emulsions with desired sizes through SPG membrane emulsification at rather rapid rate compared to microfludic production. Double or multiple emulsions have long been investigated but its rapid destabilization has always been a major obstacle in applying them into practical applications. The modern living polymerization techniques allow us to prepare polymers with designed structure of block copolymers which makes it possible to prepare ultra-stable multiple emulsions. The precise tuning of the ratio of hydrophobic part over the hydrophilic can unveil the stabilization mechanism. Liquid marble is a new type of materials of which liquid droplets are coated by dry particles. The coating of an outer layer of dry particles renders the liquid droplets non-sticky at solid surface which is useful in transportation of small amount of liquid without leakage at extreme low friction force. The property of liquid marbles relies largely on the stabilizers and the drying condition of polymeric latices is shown to have great influence on the property of liquid marbles. Firstly, an introduction to the interfacial and colloidal science with special attention to topics on emulsions, multiple emulsion and liquid marbles is given in Chapter 1. The unique features of an interface and a discussion on the definition of colloids are introduced prior to the

  5. One-step process for transforming a water-in-oil emulsion into an oil-in-water emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.R.S.

    1986-12-09

    A process is described for the production of an oil-in-water emulsion for pipeline transmission which comprises: (a) producing a hydrocarbon crude including a water-in-oil emulsion; (b) adding to the hydrocarbon crude when the crude is at a temperature of from about 100/sup 0/ to about 200/sup 0/F, an emulsifier system capable of forming and sustaining an oil-in-water emulsion at the temperature and at ambient pipeline transmission temperatures. The amount of emulsifier system added is sufficient to form and sustain an oil-in-water emulsion having a selected water content of from about 15 percent to about 35 percent by weight water and a viscosity sufficiently low for pipeline transmission; (c) agitating the hydrocarbon crude including a water-in-oil emulsion and the added emulsifier system, to form an oil-in-water emulsion; and (d) separating any excess water from the formed oil-in-water emulsion.

  6. Double emulsion solvent evaporation techniques used for drug encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Zafar, Nadiah; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2015-12-30

    Double emulsions are complex systems, also called "emulsions of emulsions", in which the droplets of the dispersed phase contain one or more types of smaller dispersed droplets themselves. Double emulsions have the potential for encapsulation of both hydrophobic as well as hydrophilic drugs, cosmetics, foods and other high value products. Techniques based on double emulsions are commonly used for the encapsulation of hydrophilic molecules, which suffer from low encapsulation efficiency because of rapid drug partitioning into the external aqueous phase when using single emulsions. The main issue when using double emulsions is their production in a well-controlled manner, with homogeneous droplet size by optimizing different process variables. In this review special attention has been paid to the application of double emulsion techniques for the encapsulation of various hydrophilic and hydrophobic anticancer drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotic drugs, proteins and amino acids and their applications in theranostics. Moreover, the optimized ratio of the different phases and other process parameters of double emulsions are discussed. Finally, the results published regarding various types of solvents, stabilizers and polymers used for the encapsulation of several active substances via double emulsion processes are reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapid dissolution of propofol emulsions under sink conditions.

    PubMed

    Damitz, Robert; Chauhan, Anuj

    2015-03-15

    Pain accompanying intravenous injections of propofol is a major problem in anesthesia. Pain is ascribed to the interaction of propofol with the local vasculature and could be impacted by rapid dissolution of the emulsion formulation to release the drug. In this paper, we measure the dissolution of propofol emulsions including the commercial formulation Diprivan(®). We image the turbidity of blood protein sink solutions after emulsions are injected. The images are digitized, and the drug release times are estimated from the pixel intensity data for a range of starting emulsion droplet size. Drug release times are compared to a mechanistic model. After injection, pixel intensity or turbidity decreases due to reductions in emulsion droplet size. Drug release times can still be measured even if the emulsion does not completely dissolve such as with Diprivan(®). Both pure propofol emulsions and Diprivan(®) release drug very rapidly (under five seconds). Reducing emulsion droplet size significantly increases the drug release rate. Drug release times observed are slightly longer than the model prediction likely due to imperfect mixing. Drug release from emulsions occurs very rapidly after injection. This could be a contributing factor to pain on injection of propofol emulsions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Characterization of fluorocarbon-in-water emulsions with added triglyceride.

    PubMed

    Weers, Jeffry G; Arlauskas, Rebecca A; Tarara, Thomas E; Pelura, Timothy J

    2004-08-31

    Fluorocarbon-in-water emulsions are being explored clinically as synthetic oxygen carriers in general surgery. Stabilizing fluorocarbon emulsions against coarsening is critical in maintaining the biocompatibility of the formulation following intravenous administration. It has been purported that the addition of a small percentage of long-chain triglyceride results in stabilization of fluorocarbon emulsions via formation of a three-phase emulsion. In a three-phase emulsion, the triglyceride forms a layer around the dispersed fluorocarbon, thereby improving the adhesion of the phospholipid surfactant to the dispersed phase. In the present study, we examined the effect of triglyceride addition on the physicochemical characteristics of the resulting complex dispersion. In particular, we examined the particle composition and stability of the dispersed particles using a method which first fractionates (classifies) the different particles prior to sizing (i.e., sedimentation field-flow fractionation). It was determined that the addition of a long-chain triglyceride (soybean oil) results in oil demixing and two distinct populations of emulsion droplets. The presence of the two types of emulsion droplets is not observed via light scattering techniques, since the triglyceride droplets dominate the scattering due to a large difference in the refractive index between the particles and the medium as compared to fluorocarbon droplets. The growth of the fractionated fluorocarbon emulsion droplets was followed over time, and it was found that there was no difference in growth rates with and without added triglyceride. In contrast, addition of medium-chain-triglyceride (MCT) oils results in a single population of emulsion droplets (i.e., a three-phase emulsion). These emulsions are not stable to droplet coalescence, however, as significant penetration of MCT into the phospholipid lipid interfacial layer results in a negative increment in the monolayer spontaneous curvature, thereby

  9. A comparative study of the physicochemical properties of a virgin coconut oil emulsion and commercial food supplement emulsions.

    PubMed

    Khor, Yih Phing; Koh, Soo Peng; Long, Kamariah; Long, Shariah; Ahmad, Sharifah Zarah Syed; Tan, Chin Ping

    2014-07-01

    Food manufacturers are interested in developing emulsion-based products into nutritional foods by using beneficial oils, such as fish oil and virgin coconut oil (VCO). In this study, the physicochemical properties of a VCO oil-in-water emulsion was investigated and compared to other commercial oil-in-water emulsion products (C1, C2, C3, and C4). C3 exhibited the smallest droplet size of 3.25 µm. The pH for the emulsion samples ranged from 2.52 to 4.38 and thus were categorised as acidic. In a texture analysis, C2 was described as the most firm, very adhesive and cohesive, as well as having high compressibility properties. From a rheological viewpoint, all the emulsion samples exhibited non-Newtonian behaviour, which manifested as a shear-thinning property. The G'G'' crossover illustrated by the VCO emulsion in the amplitude sweep graph but not the other commercial samples illustrated that the VCO emulsion had a better mouthfeel. In this context, the VCO emulsion yielded the highest zeta potential (64.86 mV), which was attributed to its strong repulsive forces, leading to a good dispersion system. C2 comprised the highest percentage of fat among all emulsion samples, followed by the VCO emulsion, with 18.44% and 6.59%, respectively.

  10. Emulsion characteristics, chemical and textural properties of meat systems produced with double emulsions as beef fat replacers.

    PubMed

    Serdaroğlu, Meltem; Öztürk, Burcu; Urgu, Müge

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, double emulsions are stated to have a promising potential in low-fat food production, however, there are very few studies on their possible applications in meat matrices. We aimed to investigate the quality of beef emulsion systems in which beef fat was totally replaced by double emulsions (W1/O/W2) prepared with olive oil and sodium caseinate (SC) by two-step emulsification procedure. Incorporation of W1/O/W2 emulsion resulted in reduced lipid, increased protein content, and modified fatty acid composition. W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments had lower jelly and fat separation, higher water-holding capacity and higher emulsion stability than control samples with beef fat. Increased concentrations of W1/O/W2 emulsions resulted in significant changes in texture parameters. TBA values were lower in W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments than control treatment after 60days of storage. In conclusion, our study confirms that double emulsions had promising impacts on modifying fatty acid composition and developing both technologically and oxidatively stable beef emulsion systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DEP actuation of emulsion jets and dispensing of sub-nanoliter emulsion droplets.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ravi; Kaler, Karan V I S

    2009-10-07

    Liquid Dielectrophoresis (L-DEP) has been successfully leveraged at microscopic scales and shown to provide a controllable means of on-chip precision dispensing and manipulation of sub-nanoliter single emulsion droplets. In this paper, we report on the dynamics of a DEP actuated emulsion jet prior to break-up and compare its characteristic behavior based on the lumped parameter model of Jones et al. (R. Ahmed and T. B. Jones, J. Micromech. Microeng., 2007, 17, 1052). Furthermore, features and aspects of these emulsion jets, their break-up and formation of sub-nanoliter emulsion droplets is studied in further detail. Applications of the proposed scheme in dispensing encapsulated sub-nanoliter droplets is envisioned in various fields including microTAS, on-chip handling and storage of cells and other biological samples for longer duration in controlled environments as well as solving the more general encapsulation issues in surface microfluidic devices. Scalability of the proposed scheme is shown by producing controlled sample-oil single emulsion droplets (aqueous samples in oil) in the range of 50-400 picoliters.

  12. Crocin loaded nano-emulsions: Factors affecting emulsion properties in spontaneous emulsification.

    PubMed

    Mehrnia, Mohammad-Amin; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Makhmal-Zadeh, Behzad S; Maghsoudlou, Yahya

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous emulsification may be used for encapsulating bioactive compounds in food and pharmaceutical industry. It has several advantages over high energy and other low energy methods including, protecting sensitive compounds against severe conditions of high energy method and its ability to minimize surfactant, removal of cosurfactant and thermal stability compared with other low energy methods. In this study, we examined possibility of encapsulating highly soluble crocin in W/O micro-emulsions using spontaneous method which further could be used for making double emulsions. Nonionic surfactants of Span 80 and polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) were used for making micro-emulsions that showed the high potential of PGPR for spontaneous method. Surfactant to water ratio (SWR%) was evaluated to find the highest amount of aqueous phase which can be dispersed in organic phase. Droplet size decreased by increasing SWR toward the SWR=100% which had the smallest droplet size and then increased at higher levels of surfactant. By increasing SWR, shear viscosity increased which showed the high effect of PGPR on rheological properties. This study shows in addition to W/O micro-emulsions, spontaneous method could be used for preparing stable O/W micro-emulsions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasonication-assisted preparation and characterization of emulsions and emulsion gels for topical drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay K; Behera, Baikuntha; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal

    2015-03-01

    The current study describes the use of ultrasonication for the preparation of biphasic emulsions and emulsion gels for topical drug delivery. Sorbitan monostearate (SMS) was used as the surfactant for stabilizing the interface of sesame oil (apolar phase) and water (polar phase). Emulsions were formed at lower concentrations of SMS, whereas emulsion gels were formed at higher concentrations of SMS. The formulations were characterized by fluorescent microscopy, X-ray diffraction, viscosity, stress relaxation, spreadability, and differential scanning calorimetry studies. Fluorescence microscopy suggested formation of oil-in-water type of formulations. There was an increase in the viscosity, bulk resistance, and firmness of the formulations as the proportions of SMS was increased. The emulsion gels were viscoelastic in nature. Thermal studies suggested higher thermodynamic stability at higher proportions of either SMS or water. Metronidazole, a model antimicrobial drug, was incorporated within the formulations. The release of the drug from the formulations was found to be diffusion mediated. The drug-loaded formulations showed sufficient antimicrobial efficiency to be used as carriers for topical antimicrobial drug delivery. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Polar, non-coordinating ionic liquids as solvents for the alternating copolymerization of styrene and CO catalyzed by cationic palladium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Klingshirn, Marc A; Broker, Grant A; Holbrey, John D; Shaughnessy, Kevin H; Rogers, Robin D

    2002-07-07

    The palladium-catalyzed copolymerization of styrene and CO in an ionic liquid solvent, 1-hexylpyridinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, gave improved yields and increased molecular weights compared to polymerizations run in methanol.

  15. Entropically Driven Colloidal Assembly in Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Hui; Lai, Liang-Jie; Chen, Hui

    2007-03-01

    Using the techniques developed by Manoharan [1], we encapsulate small numbers of colloidal microspheres and polymers in oil-in-water emulsion droplets, remove the oil and generate colloidal clusters covered with polymers. We observe two types of arrangement in the clusters. The first kind is the same as the type reported in [1] of which the clusters are formed without polymer. The second kind is the same as the structure reported in [2] of which the clusters are formed by binary colloidal microspheres. The polymers we put in the emulsions induce depletion interactions between colloidal particles. We will show that two types of structures are from the interplay between the depletion interactions and surface tension. [1] Manoharan, Elsesser, Pine, Science 301, 483(2003). [2] Cho et al. JACS 127, 15968 (2005).

  16. Acrylic emulsion binder for tape casting

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.; Ibbitson, S.A.; Donato, A.T.

    1996-06-01

    A crosslinkable acrylic emulsion binder has been demonstrated to significantly increase tensile strength of green tapes. A low Tg acrylic emulsion binder is blended with the crosslinkable binder to retain flexibility and elasticity of green tapes. The tensile strength of green tapes can be increased from 1.19 MPa to 2.34 MPa by incorporating a crosslinkable binder into the formulation while the tapes remain flexible and elastic with {approximately}15% strain at break. Upon stretching, the green tapes do not yield before breaking. Increasing the drying temperature appears to slightly increase the tensile strength of the green tapes, and has a marginal effect on the strain at break of the tapes. This binder system does not liberate formaldehyde as a result of crosslinking.

  17. Rational use of intravenous fat emulsions.

    PubMed

    Pelham, L D

    1981-02-01

    The composition, effect on blood components, relative value compared with intravenous dextrose, clinical applications as a caloric and fatty acid source, adverse reactions, limitations, and administration of intravenous fat emulsions are reviewed. Fat emulsions provide essential fatty acids and calories and are primarily used to supplement of parenteral nutrition regimens. Their use as a major source of calories remains limited because of cost. However, the trend toward aligning intravenous nutrition to that of the normal diet and the increased demand for peripherally administered parenteral nutrition have increased demand for use. The advantages and disadvantages presented may be used by clinicians to assist in establishing the role of intravenous fat therapy in nutritional support services.

  18. Evaluation on oxidative stability of walnut beverage emulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Liu, Fuguo; Xue, Yanhui; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-07-15

    Walnut beverage emulsions were prepared with walnut kernels, mixed nonionic emulsifiers and xanthan gum. The effects of food antioxidants on the physical stability and lipid oxidation of walnut beverage emulsions were investigated. The results showed that tea polyphenols could not only increase the droplet size of the emulsions, but also enhance physical stability during the thermal storage at 62 ± 1 °C. However, water-dispersed oil-soluble vitamin E and enzymatically modified isoquercitrin obviously decreased the physical stability of the emulsion system during the thermal storage. BHT and natural antioxidant extract had scarcely influenced on the physical stability of walnut beverage emulsions. Tea polyphenols and BHT could significantly retard lipid oxidation in walnut beverage emulsions against thermal and UV light exposure during the storage. Vitamin E exhibited the prooxidant effect during the thermal storage and the antioxidant attribute during UV light exposure. Other food antioxidants had no significant effect on retarding lipid oxidation during thermal or light storage.

  19. Imaging techniques applied to characterize bitumen and bituminous emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Ramón-Torregrosa, P; Páez-Dueñas, A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this article is to present some important advances in the imaging techniques currently used in the characterization of bitumen and bituminous emulsions. Bitumen exhibits some properties, such as a black colour and a reflecting surface at rest, which permit the use of optical techniques to study the macroscopic behaviour of asphalt mixes in the cold mix technology based on emulsion use. Imaging techniques allow monitoring in situ the bitumen thermal sensitivity as well as the complex phenomenon of emulsion breaking. Evaporation-driven breaking was evaluated from the shape of evaporating emulsion drops deposited onto non-porous and hydrophobic substrates. To describe the breaking kinetics, top-view images of a drying emulsion drop placed on an aggregate sheet were acquired and processed properly. We can conclude that computer-aided image analysis in road pavement engineering can elucidate the mechanism of breaking and curing of bituminous emulsion.

  20. Large area emulsion chamber experiments for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Emulsion-chamber experiments employing nuclear-track emulsions, etchable plastic detectors, metal plates, and X-ray films continue to demonstrate high productivity and potential in the study of cosmic-ray primaries and their interactions. Emulsions, with unsurpassed track-recording capability, provide an appropriate medium for the study of nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy, which will likely produce observations of a phase change in nuclear matter. The many advantages of emulsion chambers (excellent multitrack recording capability, large geometry factor, low apparatus cost, simplicity of design and construction) are complemented by the major advantages of the Space Shuttle as an experiment carrier. A Shuttle experiment which could make a significant advance in both cosmic-ray primary and nucleus-nucleus interaction studies is described. Such an experiment would serve as a guide for use of emulsions during the Space Station era. Some practical factors that must be considered in planning a Shuttle exposure of emulsion chambers are discussed.

  1. Refractive index matching and clear emulsions.

    PubMed

    Sun, James Ziming; Erickson, Michael C E; Parr, James W

    2005-01-01

    Refractive index (RI) matching is a unique way of making clear emulsions to meet market trends. However, RI matching has not been sufficiently investigated in terms of physical principles and methodologies. Snell's law (n2 sin r2= n1 sin r1) is applicable to cosmetic emulsions. When oil phase and water phase have equal RI (n2 = n1) values, light will not bend as it strikes obliquely at the emulsion interface. Instead, light is transmitted through the emulsion without refraction, which produces clarity. Theoretical RI values in solution can be calculated with summation of the product of the weight percentage and refractive index of each ingredient (RI(mix) = [W1 x n1 + W2 x n2 + W3 x n3 + + Wn x nn]Wtau). Oil-phase RI values are normally at 1.4 or higher. Glycols are used to adjust the water phase RI, since they typically have larger RI values than water. Noticeable deviations from calculated RI values are seen in experimentally prepared solutions. Three basic deviation types are observed: negative, positive, and slightly negative or positive, which can occur in glycol aqueous solutions at different concentrations. The deviations are attributed to changes in molecular interaction between molecules in solution, which can lead to changes in specific gravity. Negative RI deviation corresponds to a decrease in specific gravity, and positive RI deviation corresponds to an increase in specific gravity. RI values will deviate from calculated values since an increase or decrease in specific gravity leads to a change in optical density.

  2. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  3. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  4. Tunable mechano-responsive organogels by ring-opening copolymerizations of N-carboxyanhydrides.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jingwei; Zou, Jiong; He, Xun; Zhang, Fuwu; Zhang, Shiyi; Raymond, Jeffery E; Wooley, Karen L

    2014-01-01

    The simple copolymerization of N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomers is utilized to generate copolypeptides having a combination of α-helix and β-sheet sub-structures that, when grown from a solvophilic synthetic polymer block segment, are capable of driving mechano-responsive supramolecular sol-to-gel-to-sol and sol-to-gel-to-gel transitions reversibly, which allow also for injection-based processing and self-healing behaviors. A new type of polypeptide-based organogelator, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(γ-benzyl-l-glutamate-co-glycine) (mPEG-b-P(BLG-co-Gly)), is facilely synthesized by statistical ring-opening copolymerizations (ROPs) of γ-benzyl-l-glutamate (BLG) and glycine (Gly) NCAs initiated by mPEG-amine. These systems exhibit tunable secondary structures and result in sonication stimulus responsiveness of the organogels with the polypeptide segment variation, controlled by varying the ratio of BLG NCA to Gly NCA during the copolymerizations. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) studies indicate the α-helical component decreases while the β-sheet content increases systematically with a higher mole fraction of Gly in the polypeptide segment. The supramolecular assembly of β-sheet nanofibrils, having a tunable width over the range of 10.4 - 14.5 nm with varied BLG to Gly ratio, are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The further self-assembly of these nanostructures into 3-D gel networks within N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) occurs at low critical gelation concentrations (CGC) (lowest ca. 0.6 wt %). Increased BLG to Gly ratios lead to an increase of the α-helical component in the secondary structures of the polypeptide segments, resulting in wider and more flexible nanofibrils. The presence of α-helical component in the polymers enhances the stability of the organogels against sonication, and instantaneous gel-to-gel transitions are observed as in situ reconstruction of networks

  5. Pickering emulsions in foods - opportunities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Linke, Christina; Drusch, Stephan

    2017-04-17

    In order to critically discuss the potential of Pickering-type emulsions in food applications this review provides the theoretical background of the stabilizing mechanisms, the resulting requirements for particles to stabilize these systems and the limitations resulting from these fundamental considerations. Food grade particle systems investigated in the past are presented. It becomes obvious that with a proper choice of a particle, oil-in-water as well as water-in-oil emulsions can be achieved. For highly viscous products, products with a high internal phase volume and foams Pickering particles offer alternatives to commonly used surfactants. Pickering emulsions might be able to offer new approaches for fat reduction as well as encapsulation and sustained release of active ingredients. Nevertheless, a major part of successful systems have been achieved with silica or modified particles, which is not in line with the consumer demand for clean label, natural systems or not even food grade. However, the intriguing possibilities motivate and justify future research on the identification of new suitable ingredients, improvement of existing formulations and identification of new fields of application.

  6. [Multiple emulsions; bioactive compounds and functional foods].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The continued appearance of scientific evidence about the role of diet and/or its components in health and wellness, has favored the emergence of functional foods which currently constitute one of the chief factors driving the development of new products. The application of multiple emulsions opens new possibilities in the design and development of functional foods. Multiple emulsions can be used as an intermediate product (food ingredient) into technological strategies normally used in the optimization of the presence of bioactive compounds in healthy and functional foods. This paper presents a summary of the types, characteristics and formation of multiple emulsions, possible location of bioactive compounds and their potential application in the design and preparation of healthy and functional foods. Such applications are manifested particularly relevant in relation to quantitative and qualitative aspects of lipid material (reduced fat/calories and optimization of fatty acid profile), encapsulation of bioactive compounds mainly hydrophilic and sodium reduction. This strategy offers interesting possibilities regarding masking flavours and improving sensory characteristics of foods. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. Lipid Emulsion for Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanowicz, Sarah; Patil, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    The accidental overdose of local anesthetics may prove fatal. The commonly used amide local anesthetics have varying adverse effects on the myocardium, and beyond a certain dose all are capable of causing death. Local anesthetics are the most frequently used drugs amongst anesthetists and although uncommon, local anaesthetic systemic toxicity accounts for a high proportion of mortality, with local anaesthetic-induced cardiac arrest particularly resistant to standard resuscitation methods. Over the last decade, there has been convincing evidence of intravenous lipid emulsions as a rescue in local anesthetic-cardiotoxicity, and anesthetic organisations, over the globe have developed guidelines on the use of this drug. Despite this, awareness amongst practitioners appears to be lacking. All who use local anesthetics in their practice should have an appreciation of patients at high risk of toxicity, early symptoms and signs of toxicity, preventative measures when using local anesthetics, and the initial management of systemic toxicity with intravenous lipid emulsion. In this paper we intend to discuss the pharmacology and pathophysiology of local anesthetics and toxicity, and the rationale for lipid emulsion therapy. PMID:21969824

  8. Swelling and thermodynamic studies of temperature responsive 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate/itaconic acid copolymeric hydrogels prepared via gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, Simonida L. J.; Mićić, Maja M.; Filipović, Jovanka M.; Suljovrujić, Edin H.

    2007-08-01

    The copolymeric hydrogels based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and itaconic acid (IA) were synthesized by gamma radiation induced radical polymerization. Swelling and thermodynamic properties of PHEMA and copolymeric P(HEMA/IA) hydrogels with different IA contents (2, 3.5 and 5 mol%) were studied in a wide pH and temperature range. Initial studies of so-prepared hydrogels show interesting pH and temperature sensitivity in swelling and drug release behavior. Special attention was devoted to temperature investigations around physiological temperature (37 °C), where small changes in temperature significantly influence swelling and drug release of these hydrogels. Due to maximum swelling of hydrogels around 40 °C, the P(HEMA/IA) hydrogel containing 5 mol% of IA without and with drug-antibiotic (gentamicin) were investigated at pH 7.40 and in the temperature range 25-42 °C, in order to evaluate their potential for medical applications.

  9. Synthesis, cyclopolymerization and cyclo-copolymerization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine and its hydrochloride salt.

    PubMed

    Bouhadir, Kamal H; Abramian, Lara; Ezzeddine, Alaa; Usher, Karyn; Vladimirov, Nikolay

    2012-11-08

    We report herein the synthesis and characterization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl) adenine. We evaluated two different synthetic routes starting with adenine where the optimal route was achieved through coupling of 9-(2-chloroethyl)adenine with diallylamine. The cyclopolymerization and cyclo-copolymerization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine hydrochloride salt resulted in low molecular weight oligomers in low yields. In contrast, 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine failed to cyclopolymerize, however, it formed a copolymer with SO₂ in relatively good yields. The molecular weights of the cyclopolymers were around 1,700-6,000 g/mol, as estimated by SEC. The cyclo-copolymer was stable up to 226 °C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a free-radical cyclo-copolymerization of a neutral alkyldiallylamine derivative with SO₂. These polymers represent a novel class of carbocyclic polynucleotides.

  10. Lentil and chickpea protein-stabilized emulsions: optimization of emulsion formulation.

    PubMed

    Can Karaca, Asli; Nickerson, Michael T; Low, Nicholas H

    2011-12-28

    Chickpea and lentil protein-stabilized emulsions were optimized with regard to pH (3.0-8.0), protein concentration (1.1-4.1% w/w), and oil content (20-40%) for their ability to form and stabilize oil-in-water emulsions using response surface methodology. Specifically, creaming stability, droplet size, and droplet charge were assessed. Optimum conditions for minimal creaming (no serum separation after 24 h), small droplet size (<2 μm), and high net droplet charge (absolute value of ZP > 40 mV) were identified as 4.1% protein, 40% oil, and pH 3.0 or 8.0, regardless of the plant protein used for emulsion preparation.

  11. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-12-28

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences.

  12. Synthesis of copolymerized porous organic frameworks with high gas storage capabilities at both high and low pressures.

    PubMed

    Pei, Cuiying; Ben, Teng; Li, Yanqiang; Qiu, Shilun

    2014-06-11

    A series of copolymerized porous organic frameworks (C-POFs) were synthesized with monomers of tetrakis(4-bromophenyl)methane and tris(4-bromophenyl)amine in different ratios by a Yamamoto-type Ullmann cross-coupling reaction. These C-POFs exhibit high physicochemical stability, large surface areas and excellent H2, CH4 and CO2 adsorption properties both at low and high pressures.

  13. Ring-opening copolymerization of maleic anhydride with epoxides: a chain-growth approach to unsaturated polyesters.

    PubMed

    DiCiccio, Angela M; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2011-07-20

    We report the ring-opening copolymerization of maleic anhydride with a variety of epoxides catalyzed by a chromium(III) salen complex. Quantitative isomerization of the cis-maleate form of all polymers affords the trans-fumarate analogues. Addition of chain transfer reagents yields low M(n), narrow PDI polymer samples. This method provides access to a range of new unsaturated polyesters with versatile functionality, as well as the first synthesis of high molecular weight poly(propylene fumarate).

  14. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences. PMID:26723608

  15. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-12-01

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences.

  16. Interaction between a perfluorocarbon emulsion and radiographic contrast media.

    PubMed

    Franke, Ralf-Peter; Reuter, Peter; Röhlke, Wolfgang; Matschke, Klaus; Keller, Steffi; Klosterhalfen, Bernd; Mittermayer, Christian; Mrowietz, Christoph; Jung, Friedrich

    2004-03-01

    This study evaluated specially designed perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions as blood substitutes in case of induced ischemia of the left heart ventricle in healthy farm pigs. Two hundred ml of perfluorocarbon emulsion were infused while 200 ml of blood were simultaneously drawn. Radiographic contrast media were given to aid placement of balloon catheters in the left coronary artery. Histopathological analysis showed that right heart failure caused the deaths of both pigs. Particles (up to>3 micro) of foreign body materials obstructed capillaries of all organs analyzed (heart, lung, liver, kidneys and spleen). Laboratory investigation showed severe interference between the PFC emulsion and radiographic contrast media, resulting in the deterioration of the PFC emulsion. The strongest interference occurred when PFC emulsion and Accupaque interacted; particle size started at an initial 311 nm and went up to >3 micro within seconds. Great care must be taken when PFC emulsions are used in combination with x-ray contrast media. None of the described radiographic contrast media should be used within 48 hours prior to the use of this PFC emulsion. Also, the use of these contrast media should be avoided for a certain period of time after using PFC emulsion. The mechanisms of elimination of PFC emulsions from the circulation are not completely understood and has yet to be evaluated.

  17. Studies with a safflower oil emulsion in total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K. H.; Deitel, M.

    1981-01-01

    The prevention of essential fatty acid deficiency and the provision of adequate amounts of energy are two major concerns in total parenteral nutrition. Since earlier preparations of fat emulsion used to supplement the usual regimen of hypertonic glucose and amino acids have widely varying clinical acceptability, a new product, a safflower oil emulsion available in two concentrations (Liposyn), was evaluated. In four clinical trials the emulsion was used as a supplement to total parenteral nutrition. In five surgical patients 500 ml of the 10% emulsion infused every third day prevented or corrected essential fatty acid deficiency; however, in some cases in infusion every other day may be necessary. In 40 patients in severe catabolic states the emulsion provided 30% to 50% of the energy required daily: 10 patients received the 10% emulsion for 14 to 42 days, 9 patients received each emulsion in turn for 7 days, and 21 patient received the 20% emulsion for 14 to 28 days. All the patients survived and tolerated the lipid well; no adverse clinical effects were attributable to the lipid infusions. Transient mild, apparently clinically insignificant abnormalities in the results of one or more liver function tests and eosinophilia were observed in some patients. Thus, the safflower oil emulsion, at both concentrations, was safe and effective as a source of 30% to 50% of the energy required daily by seriously ill patients. PMID:6799182

  18. Development of Nuclear Emulsion for Fast Neutron Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machii, Shogo; Kuwabara, Kenichi; Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. Energy resolution of nuclear emulsion is 21% (12%) FWHM against neutron energy of 2.8 MeV (4.9 MeV). Nuclear emulsion has high gamma ray rejection power. For now, at least 2×104 gamma rays/cm2, no increase of as a background for neutron measurement when scan using automatic nuclear emulsion read out system HTS. This value suggests that it is applicable even under high gamma ray environment, such as nuclear fusion reactor.

  19. Fat emulsion composition alters intake and the effects of baclofen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Wilt, D C; Wojnicki, F H E; Babbs, R K; Coupland, J N; Corwin, R L C

    2011-12-01

    Thickened oil-in-water emulsions are useful model foods in rat studies due to their high acceptance and similarity to foods consumed by humans. Previous work from this laboratory used oil-in-water emulsions thickened with a biopolymer blend containing starch. Intake and effects of baclofen, a GABA-B agonist that decreases fat intake and drug self-administration, were reported, but the contribution of starch was not assessed. In the present study, intake and effects of baclofen were assessed in rats using emulsions prepared with two fat types (32% vegetable shortening, 32% corn oil) and thickened with three biopolymer blends. One biopolymer blend contained starch and the other two did not. Daily 1-h intake of the vegetable shortening emulsion containing starch was significantly greater than the other emulsions. When starch was added to the emulsions originally containing no starch, intake significantly increased. Baclofen generally reduced intake of all emulsions regardless of starch content and stimulated intake of chow. However, effects were more often significant for vegetable shortening emulsions. This report: (1) demonstrates that products used to prepare thickened oil-in-water emulsions have significant effects on rat ingestive behavior, and (2) confirms the ability of baclofen to reduce consumption of fatty foods, while simultaneously stimulating intake of chow. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. FAT EMULSION COMPOSITION ALTERS INTAKE AND THE EFFECTS OF BACLOFEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Wilt, DC; Wojnicki, FHE; Babbs, RK; Coupland, JN; Corwin, RLC

    2011-01-01

    Thickened oil-in-water emulsions are useful model foods in rat studies due to their high acceptance and similarity to foods consumed by humans. Previous work from this laboratory used oil-in-water emulsions thickened with a biopolymer blend containing starch. Intake and effects of baclofen, a GABA-B agonist that decreases fat intake and drug self-administration, were reported, but the contribution of starch was not assessed. In the present study, intake and effects of baclofen were assessed in rats using emulsions prepared with two fat types (32% vegetable shortening, 32% corn oil) and thickened with three biopolymer blends. One biopolymer blend contained starch and the other two did not. Daily 1-h intake of the vegetable shortening emulsion containing starch was significantly greater than the other emulsions. When starch was added to the emulsions originally containing no starch, intake significantly increased. Baclofen generally reduced intake of all emulsions regardless of starch content and stimulated intake of chow. However, effects were more often significant for vegetable shortening emulsions. This report: 1) demonstrates that products used to prepare thickened oil-in-water emulsions have significant effects on rat ingestive behavior, and 2) confirms the ability of baclofen to reduce consumption of fatty foods, while simultaneously stimulating intake of chow. PMID:21855586

  1. Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Elmore, M.R.; Nelson, D.A.; Voss, C.F.; Koehmstedt, P.L.

    1981-09-01

    Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables.

  2. Swelling and drug release behavior of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate/itaconic acid) copolymeric hydrogels obtained by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, S. Lj.; Mićić, M. M.; Filipović, J. M.; Suljovrujić, E. H.

    2007-05-01

    The new copolymeric hydrogels based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and itaconic acid (IA) were prepared by gamma irradiation, in order to examine the potential use of these hydrogels in controlled drug release systems. The influence of IA content in the gel on the swelling characteristics and the releasing behavior of hydrogels, and the effect of different drugs, theophylline (TPH) and fenethylline hydrochloride (FE), on the releasing behavior of P(HEMA/IA) matrix were investigated in vitro. The diffusion exponents for swelling and drug release indicate that the mechanisms of buffer uptake and drug release are governed by Fickian diffusion. The swelling kinetics and, therefore, the release rate depends on the matrix swelling degree. The drug release was faster for copolymeric hydrogels with a higher content of itaconic acid. Furthermore, the drug release for TPH as model drug was faster due to a smaller molecular size and a weaker interaction of the TPH molecules with(in) the P(HEMA/IA) copolymeric networks.

  3. Nanospace-confinement copolymerization strategy for encapsulating polymeric sulfur into porous carbon for lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bing; Chang, Zhi; Xu, Guiyin; Nie, Ping; Wang, Jie; Pan, Jin; Dou, Hui; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2015-06-03

    Given their high theoretical energy density, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have recently attracted ever-increasing research interest. However, the dissolution of polysulfides and uncontrolled deposition of insoluble discharge product significantly hinder the cycling stability. Herein, a nanospace-confinement copolymerization strategy for encapsulating polymeric sulfur into porous carbon matrix is presented. The morphologies and sulfur contents of carbon/polymeric sulfur (C/PS) composites could be readily tailored by controlling the copolymerization time. Confining polymeric sulfur in the porous carbon with abundant interparticle pores facilitates rapid electronic/ionic transport and mitigates dissolution of polysulfides intermediates. More importantly, the organic sulfur units dispersed in the insoluble/insulating Li2S2/Li2S phase could prevent its irreversible deposition. Such nanostructure with tailored chemistry property permits the C/PS electrodes to exhibit enhanced cycling stability and high rate capability. The nanospace-confinement copolymerization strategy features general and facial advantages, which may provide new opportunities for the future development of advanced sulfur cathodes.

  4. Interaction between erythrocytes and free phospholipids as an emulsifying agent in fat emulsions or drug carrier emulsions for intravenous injections.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Fumiyoshi; Nagasaka, Yoshihide

    2004-08-15

    Hemolysis caused by the interaction between rabbit erythrocytes and oil-in-water emulsions (e.g., fat emulsions or drug carrier emulsions for intravenous injections) prepared with various oil concentrations was investigated. In emulsions prepared with oil concentrations in the range of 2.5-12.5%, the percentage of both hemolysis and free purified egg yolk lecithins (PEL) in the water phase of the emulsions decreased with the increased oil concentration and became constant above 12.5% oil concentration. The change in free PEL percentage in the water phase of the emulsions prepared with various oil concentrations showed the same relationship as that of the percentage hemolysis caused by the interaction between rabbit erythrocytes and emulsions prepared with various oil concentrations. No hemolysis caused by an interaction between rabbit erythrocytes and vesicles prepared with PEL at a concentration of 0.012% was observed. However, hemolysis levels of 64.2% and 91.1% were observed at PEL concentrations of 0.12% and 1.2%, respectively. These results led to the conclusion that hemolysis caused by the interaction between erythrocytes and emulsions was due to PEL vesicles in the water phase of the emulsions.

  5. Film Formation from Nanosized Copolymeric Latex Particles: A Photon Transmission Study.

    PubMed

    Arda; Özer; Pişkin; Pekcan

    2001-01-15

    The photon transmission technique was used to monitor the evolution of transparency during film formation from nanosized copolymeric latex particles. The latex films were prepared from poly(methyl methacrylate-co-butyl methacrylate) (P(MMA-co-BMA)) particles which were produced by microemulsion polymerization. These films were annealed at elevated temperatures in various time intervals above the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of P(MMA-co-BMA). It is observed that the transmitted photon intensity (I(tr)) from these films increased as the annealing temperature increased. There are three different film formation stages. These stages are explained by the void closure, healing, and interdiffusion processes, respectively. The activation energies for viscous flow (DeltaH approximately 16 kcal/mol), minor chains (DeltaE(H) approximately 27 kcal/mol), and backbone motion (Delta E(b) approximately 132 kcal/mol) were obtained using various models. Void closure (tau(v), T(v)) and healing points (tau(H), T(H)) were determined. Using the time-temperature pairs, void closure and healing activation energies were measured and found to be 21 and 30 kcal/mol, respectively. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. Template-Directed Copolymerization, Random Walks along Disordered Tracks, and Fractals.

    PubMed

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-12-02

    In biology, template-directed copolymerization is the fundamental mechanism responsible for the synthesis of DNA, RNA, and proteins. More than 50 years have passed since the discovery of DNA structure and its role in coding genetic information. Yet, the kinetics and thermodynamics of information processing in DNA replication, transcription, and translation remain poorly understood. Challenging issues are the facts that DNA or RNA sequences constitute disordered media for the motion of polymerases or ribosomes while errors occur in copying the template. Here, it is shown that these issues can be addressed and sequence heterogeneity effects can be quantitatively understood within a framework revealing universal aspects of information processing at the molecular scale. In steady growth regimes, the local velocities of polymerases or ribosomes along the template are distributed as the continuous or fractal invariant set of a so-called iterated function system, which determines the copying error probabilities. The growth may become sublinear in time with a scaling exponent that can also be deduced from the iterated function system.

  7. Fluorinated polymides for interlayer dielectric applications: Tailoring of properties via copolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Auman, B.C.; McKerrow, A.J.; Ho, P.S.

    1996-10-01

    Over the past several years DuPont has been exploring new, rod-like fluorinated polyimides for interlayer dielectric (ILD) applications. It has been shown that copolymerization is a versatile method for tailoring properties of these rigid polyimides. Initial product offerings from DuPont showed an excellent balance of properties for ILD applications. These materials, however, due to their highly rod-like structure and very low in-plane coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), actually yielded negative thermal stresses on silicon at the 1 {mu}m thicknesses typical of interlayer dielectrics. More flexible materials with higher CTE typically yield positive stress values which can be undesirably quite high. The dielectric constant of these highly rod-like fluorinated polyimides was also somewhat anisotropic, again due to the rod-like nature and resulting high in-plane orientation of these polyimides. Since a thermal stress on silicon near zero and a more isotropic dielectric constant are likely the most desirable states for an ILD, the highly rod-like polyimide was further optimized by incorporation of a more flexible fluorinated comonomer, 6FDA, at various levels to increase CTE and balance dielectric constant. The various properties of this series of fluorinated polyimides were investigated. The results have shown that it is indeed possible to obtain near zero stress on silicon while attaining more isotropic dielectric constant via structure optimization.

  8. Arabidopsis peroxidase-catalyzed copolymerization of coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols: kinetics of an endwise process.

    PubMed

    Demont-Caulet, Nathalie; Lapierre, Catherine; Jouanin, Lise; Baumberger, Stéphanie; Méchin, Valérie

    2010-10-01

    In order to determine the mechanism of the earlier copolymerization steps of two main lignin precursors, sinapyl (S) alcohol and coniferyl (G) alcohol, microscale in vitro oxidations were carried out with a PRX34 Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase in the presence of H(2)O(2). This plant peroxidase was found to have an in vitro polymerization activity similar to the commonly used horseradish peroxidase. The selected polymerization conditions lead to a bulk polymerization mechanism when G alcohol was the only phenolic substrate available. In the same conditions, the presence of S alcohol at a 50/50 S/G molar ratio turned this bulk mechanism into an endwise one. A kinetics monitoring (size-exclusion chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the different species formed during the first 24h oxidation of the S/G mixture allowed sequencing the bondings responsible for oligomerization. Whereas G homodimers and GS heterodimers exhibit low reactivity, the SS pinoresinol structure act as a nucleating site of the polymerization through an endwise process. This study is particularly relevant to understand the impact of S units on lignin structure in plants and to identify the key step at which this structure is programmed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dinuclear Zinc Salen Catalysts for the Ring Opening Copolymerization of Epoxides and Carbon Dioxide or Anhydrides.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Arnaud; Garden, Jennifer A; White, Andrew J P; Williams, Charlotte K

    2015-12-21

    A series of four dizinc complexes coordinated by salen or salan ligands, derived from ortho-vanillin and bearing (±)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (L1) or 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (L2) backbones, is reported. The complexes are characterized using a combination of X-ray crystallography, multinuclear NMR, DOSY, and MALDI-TOF spectroscopies, and elemental analysis. The stability of the dinuclear complexes depends on the ligand structure, with the most stable complexes having imine substituents. The complexes are tested as catalysts for the ring-opening copolymerization (ROCOP) of CO2/cyclohexene oxide (CHO) and phthalic anhydride (PA)/CHO. All complexes are active, and the structure/activity relationships reveal that the complex having both L2 and imine substituents displays the highest activity. In the ROCOP of CO2/CHO its activity is equivalent to other metal salen catalysts (TOF = 44 h(-1) at a catalyst loading of 0.1 mol %, 30 bar of CO2, and 80 °C), while for the ROCOP of PA/CHO, its activity is slightly higher than other metal salen catalysts (TOF = 198 h(-1) at a catalyst loading of 1 mol % and 100 °C). Poly(ester-block-carbonate) polymers are also afforded using the most active catalyst by the one-pot terpolymerization of PA/CHO/CO2.

  10. Preparation of hydrophilic and antifouling polysulfone ultrafiltration membrane derived from phenolphthalin by copolymerization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixiao; Mi, Zhiming; Chen, Chunhai; Zhou, Hongwei; Zhao, Xiaogang; Wang, Daming

    2017-04-01

    In this task, carboxylated polysulfone (PSF-COOH) was achieved by introducing the monomer of phenolphthalin (PPL) containing carboxyl to the molecule backbone of polysulfone (PSF). And a series of PSF-COOH copolymers with different carboxylation degree was synthesized by adjusting the molar (%) of bisphenol A (BPA) and PPL in direct copolymerization method and was prepared as PSF-COOH ultrafiltration membranes via phase separation method. The effect of PPL molar (%) in copolymers on the morphology, hydrophilicity, permeation flux, antifouling and mechanical properties of membranes was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), water contact angle, ultrafiltration experiments and universal testing machine, respectively. The results showed that with the increased carboxyl content in membranes, the hydrophilicity, permeation fluxes and antifouling properties of membranes gradually increased. When the molar (%) of PPL to BPA was 100:0, the membrane exhibited the highest pure water flux (329.6 L/m2 h) and the maximum flux recovery rate (92.5%). When the content of carboxyl in the membrane was 80% or more, after three cycles of BSA solution (1 g/L) filtration, the flux recovery rate was basically constant or showed a slightly increase. Thus, it can achieve the goal of long term usage without compromising flux.

  11. MinCD cell division proteins form alternating co-polymeric cytomotive filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Debnath; Trambaiolo, Daniel; Amos, Linda A.; Löwe, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Summary During bacterial cell division, filaments of the tubulin-like protein FtsZ assemble at midcell to form the cytokinetic Z-ring. Its positioning is regulated by the oscillation of MinCDE proteins. MinC is activated by MinD through an unknown mechanism and prevents Z-ring assembly anywhere but midcell. Here, using X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy and in vivo analyses we show that MinD activates MinC by forming a new class of alternating copolymeric filaments that show similarity to eukaryotic septin filaments A non-polymerising mutation in MinD causes aberrant cell division in E. coli. MinCD copolymers bind to membrane, interact with FtsZ, and are disassembled by MinE. Imaging a functional msfGFP-MinC fusion protein in MinE deleted cells reveals filamentous structures. EM imaging of our reconstitution of the MinCD-FtsZ interaction on liposome surfaces reveals a plausible mechanism for regulation of FtsZ ring assembly by MinCD copolymers. PMID:25500731

  12. Controlled graft copolymerization of lactic acid onto starch in a supercritical carbon dioxide medium.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Kouroush; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Rzayev, Zakir M O; Piskin, Erhan

    2014-12-19

    This work presents a new approach for the synthesis of a starch-g-poly L-lactic acid (St-g-PLA) copolymer via the graft copolymerization of LA onto starch using stannous 2-ethyl hexanoate (Sn(Oct)2) as a catalyst in a supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) medium. The effects of several process parameters, including the pressure, temperature, scCO2 flow rate and reaction time, on the polymerization yield and grafting degree were studied. Amorphous graft St-g-PLA copolymers with increased thermal stability and processability were produced with a high efficiency. The maximum grafting degree (i.e., 52% PLA) was achieved with the following reaction conditions: 6h, 100°C, 200 bar and a 1:3 (w/w) ratio of St/LA. It was concluded that these low cost biobased graft biopolymers are potential candidates for several environment-friendly applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In vivo non-invasive optical imaging of temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Jian; Qian, Zhiyu; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xinyang; Hu, Yuzhu; Gu, Yueqing

    2008-05-01

    Assessment of hyperthermia in pathological tissue is a promising strategy for earlier diagnosis of malignant tumors. In this study, temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPA-co-AA) was successfully synthesized by the precipitation polymerization method. The diameters of nanohydrogels were controlled to be less than 100 nm. Also the lower critical solution temperature (LCST, 40 °C) was manipulated above physiological temperature after integration of near-infrared (NIR) organic dye (heptamethine cyanine dye, HMCD) within its interior cores. NIR laser light (765 nm), together with sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) cameras, were designed to construct an NIR imaging system. The dynamic behaviors of PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites in denuded mice with or without local hyperthermia treatment were real-time monitored by an NIR imager. The results showed that the PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites accumulated in the leg treated with local heating and diffused much slower than that in the other leg without heating. The results demonstrated that the temperature-responsive PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites combining with an NIR imaging system could be an effective temperature mapping technique, which provides a promising prospect for earlier tumor diagnosis and thermally related therapeutic assessment.

  14. Chemically induced graft copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate onto polyurethane surface for improving blood compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chunli; Wang, Miao; Cai, Xianmei; Huang, Xiaobo; Li, Li; Zhu, Haomiao; Shen, Jian; Yuan, Jiang

    2011-11-01

    To improve hydrophilicity and blood compatibility properties of polyurethane (PU) film, we chemically induced graft copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) onto the surface of polyurethane film using benzoyl peroxide as an initiator. The effects of grafting temperature, grafting time, monomer and initiator concentrations on the grafting yields were studied. The maximum grafting yield value was obtained 0.0275 g/cm2 for HEMA. Characterization of the films was carried out by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), water contact angle measurements. ATR-FTIR data showed that HEMA was successfully grafted onto the PU films surface. Water contact angle measurement demonstrated the grafted films possessed a relatively hydrophilic surface. The blood compatibility of the grafted films was preliminarily evaluated by a platelet-rich plasma adhesion test and hemolysis test. The results of platelet adhesion experiment showed that polyurethane grafted polymerization with monomer of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate had good blood compatibility featured by the low platelet adhesion. Hemolysis rate of the PU-g-PHEMA films was dramatically decreased than the ungrafted PU films. This kind of new biomaterials grafted with HEMA monomers might have a potential usage for biomedical applications.

  15. Template-Directed Copolymerization, Random Walks along Disordered Tracks, and Fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    In biology, template-directed copolymerization is the fundamental mechanism responsible for the synthesis of DNA, RNA, and proteins. More than 50 years have passed since the discovery of DNA structure and its role in coding genetic information. Yet, the kinetics and thermodynamics of information processing in DNA replication, transcription, and translation remain poorly understood. Challenging issues are the facts that DNA or RNA sequences constitute disordered media for the motion of polymerases or ribosomes while errors occur in copying the template. Here, it is shown that these issues can be addressed and sequence heterogeneity effects can be quantitatively understood within a framework revealing universal aspects of information processing at the molecular scale. In steady growth regimes, the local velocities of polymerases or ribosomes along the template are distributed as the continuous or fractal invariant set of a so-called iterated function system, which determines the copying error probabilities. The growth may become sublinear in time with a scaling exponent that can also be deduced from the iterated function system.

  16. Studies on graft copolymerization of gellan gum with N,N-dimethylacrylamide by the redox system.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vijay Shankar; Verma, Shiv Kumar; Yadav, Mithilesh; Behari, Kunj

    2014-09-01

    The present paper reports the graft copolymerization of N,N-dimethylacrylamide onto gellan gumby free radical polymerization using potassium peroxymonosulphate/sarbose redox system in an inert atmosphere. The reaction conditions for maximum grafting have been optimized by varying the reaction variables, including the concentration of N,N-dimethylacrylamide(4.0×10(-2)-20×10(-2) mol dm(-3)), potassium peroxymonosulphate (0.6×10(-2)-1.4×10(-2)mol dm(-3)), sarbose (0.4×10(-3)-3.6×10(-3) mol dm(-3)), sulphuric acid (2.0×10(-3)-10×10(-3) mol dm(-3)), gellan gum (0.6-1.4 g dm(-3)) along with time duration (60-180 min) and temperature (25-45°C).Water-swelling capacity, metal ion sorption and flocculation studies of synthesized graft copolymer have been performed with respect to the parent polymer. The graft copolymer has been characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Crude oil emulsions containing a compatible fluorochemical surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Karydas, A.; Rodgers, J.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a crude oil in water emulsion, which is stable to both breakdown and phase inversion up to at least about 50{degrees} C., the emulsion containing an effective, compatible, emulsion stabilizing amount of a fluorochemical surfactant of the formula (R{sub {ital f}}){sub {ital n}}A{sub {ital m}}Q wherein R{sub {ital f}} is an inert, stable, oleophobic and hydrophobic fluoroaliphatic group having up to about 20 carbon atoms; n is an integer from 1 to 3; A is a direct bond or an organic linking group and is covalently bonded to both R{sub {ital f}} and Q; Q is an anionic, nonionic or amphoteric group; and m is an integer from 1 to 3; wherein the amount of weight of the fluorochemical surfactant present in the emulsion being between about 0.001 and 1% by weight of the emulsion, in the presence of absence of up to about 2% by weight of a crude oil emulsion promoting hydrocarbon surfactant, with the proviso that at least about 0.005% by weight total fluorochemical and hydrocarbon surfactant is present, based upon the weight of emulsion, and wherein the emulsion contains bout 15 to about 90 percent by weight water, based upon the weight of emulsion, such that the viscosity of the emulsion is less than about 50% of the viscosity of the crude oil, and wherein the emulsion spontaneously breaks down into an aqueous and crude oil phase at a temperature between about 55{degrees} and 75{degrees} C.

  18. Na-caseinate/oil/water systems: emulsion morphology diagrams.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Lin; McGrath, Kathryn M

    2012-09-01

    The concentrated (dispersed phase 50-70 wt%) composition space of Na-caseinate, a family of milk proteins, stabilised emulsions was investigated for three different oils: soybean oil, palm olein and tetradecane with pH 6.8 phosphate buffer continuous phase. The variation of emulsion stability and microstructure were explored using static light scattering, diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance, cryo-scanning electron microscopy, rheology and the time varying macroscopic phase separation of the emulsions. For soybean oil and palm olein a rich diversity of emulsion microstructures and stabilities are realised. Five emulsion domains, each having a different microstructure and macroscopic stability have been identified within the composition space probed. For the lowest concentrations of emulsifier bridging flocculation is evident and emulsions are of low stability. Increasing Na-caseinate concentration leads to an increased stability and the existence of distinct individual oil droplets, visualised using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Further increases in Na-caseinate concentration reduce emulsion stability due to depletion flocculation. Na-caseinate self-assembly is then initiated. At sufficiently high Na-caseinate and/or oil concentrations the continuous phase of the emulsion is a three-dimensional protein network and emulsion stability is again enhanced. At the limits of the emulsion composition space a gel-like paste is formed. The diversity of emulsion microstructure is reduced when tetradecane is the discrete phase. Na-caseinate self-assembly is limited and there is no evidence for formation of a protein network. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water. The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles

  20. Tuning Amphiphilicity of Particles for Controllable Pickering Emulsion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Yapei

    2016-01-01

    Pickering emulsions with the use of particles as emulsifiers have been extensively used in scientific research and industrial production due to their edge in biocompatibility and stability compared with traditional emulsions. The control over Pickering emulsion stability and type plays a significant role in these applications. Among the present methods to build controllable Pickering emulsions, tuning the amphiphilicity of particles is comparatively effective and has attracted enormous attention. In this review, we highlight some recent advances in tuning the amphiphilicity of particles for controlling the stability and type of Pickering emulsions. The amphiphilicity of three types of particles including rigid particles, soft particles, and Janus particles are tailored by means of different mechanisms and discussed here in detail. The stabilization-destabilization interconversion and phase inversion of Pickering emulsions have been successfully achieved by changing the surface properties of these particles. This article provides a comprehensive review of controllable Pickering emulsions, which is expected to stimulate inspiration for designing and preparing novel Pickering emulsions, and ultimately directing the preparation of functional materials. PMID:28774029

  1. Linear oil displacement by the emulsion entrapment process. [Dissertation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Lack of mobility control is one of the major impediments to successful enhanced oil recovery, especially for high viscosity oils. This work presents experimental and theoretical results for linear secondary oil displacements using dilute, stable suspensions of oil drops. The major hypothesis is that emulsions provide mobility control through entrapment or local permeability reduction, not through viscosity ratio improvement. In order to describe the displacement process, previous emulsion filtration theory is extended to longer cores and to two-phase flow. Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is satisfactory for continuous secondary oil displacement with various drop-size emulsions in unconsolidated sand packs of permeabilities ranging from 0.7 ..mu..m/sup 2/ to 3.3 ..mu..m/sup 2/. Linear emulsion floods are shown to be most effective when the mean drop-size to pore-size ratio is in the region between straining and interception at the emulsion shock. Floods are more effective when the emulsion concentration is high which minimizes retention lag. Additionally, a parallel flooding apparatus is utilized to determine qualitatively the macroscopic benefits of emulsion mobility control. Direct analogies are established between augmented oil recovery with dilute emulsions and with entrapping polymers.

  2. Nanoscale and Microscale Iron Emulsions for Treating DNAPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Cherie L.

    2002-01-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using emulsified nanoscale and microscale iron particles to enhance dehalogenation of (Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid) DNAPL free-phase. The emulsified system consisted of a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable oil-in-water emulsion with nanoscale or microscale iron particles contained within the emulsion droplets. It was demonstrated that DNAPLs, such as trichloroethene (TCE), diffuse through the oil membrane of the emulsion particle whereupon they reach an aqueous interior and the surface of an iron particle where dehalogenation takes place. The hydrocarbon reaction by-products of the dehalogenation reaction, primarily ethene (no chlorinated products detected), diffuse out of the emulsion droplet. This study also demonstrated that an iron-emulsion system could be delivered in-situ to the DNAPL pool in a soil matrix by using a simulated push well technique. Iron emulsions degraded pure TCE at a rate comparable to the degradation of dissolved phase TCE by iron particles, while pure iron had a very low degradation rate for free-phase TCE. The iron-emulsion systems can be injected into a sand matrix where they become immobilized and are not moved by flowing water. It has been documented that surfactant micelles possess the ability to pull pooled TCE into emulsion droplets where degradation of TCE takes place.

  3. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Gelger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water, The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles.

  4. Mannans as stabilizers of oil-in-water beverage emulsions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant polysaccharides and gums such as gum arabic (GA) are commonly used as stabilizers of oil-in-water emulsions. O-acetyl-galactoglucomannan (GGM), a by-product from mechanical pulping of spruce wood, is able to stabilize colloidal wood resin emulsions (Hannuksela and Holmbom, 2004), but its use a...

  5. Synthesis of metallic nanoshells on porphyrin-stabilized emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Haorong; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2011-12-13

    Metal nanostructures formed by photocatalytic interfacial synthesis using a porphyrin-stabilized emulsion template and the method for making the nanostructures. Catalyst-seeded emulsion droplets are employed as templates for hollow-nanoshell growth. The hollow metal nanospheres may be formed with or without inclusions of other materials.

  6. Stability of cosmetic emulsion containing different amount of hemp oil.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M; Ziomek, M; Żbikowska, A

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the optimal conditions, that is the content of hemp oil and time of homogenization to obtain stable dispersion systems. For this purpose, six emulsions were prepared, their stability was examined empirically and the most correctly formulated emulsion composition was determined using a computer simulation. Variable parameters (oil content and homogenization time) were indicated by the optimization software based on Kleeman's method. Physical properties of the synthesized emulsions were studied by numerous techniques involving particle size analysis, optical microscopy, Turbiscan test and viscosity of emulsions. The emulsion containing 50 g of oil and being homogenized for 6 min had the highest stability. Empirically determined parameters proved to be consistent with the results obtained using the computer software. The computer simulation showed that the most stable emulsion should contain from 30 to 50 g of oil and should be homogenized for 2.5-6 min. The computer software based on Kleeman's method proved to be useful for quick optimization of the composition and production parameters of stable emulsion systems. Moreover, obtaining an emulsion system with proper stability justifies further research extended with sensory analysis, which will allow the application of such systems (containing hemp oil, beneficial for skin) in the cosmetic industry. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  7. Rheological properties of heavy oils and heavy oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M.R.

    1996-06-01

    In this study, the author investigated the effects of a number of process variables such as shear rate, measurement temperature, pressure, the influence of pretreatment, and the role of various amounts of added water on the rheology of the resulting heavy oil or the emulsion. Rheological properties of heavy oils and the corresponding emulsions are important from transportation and processing standpoints.

  8. Maximizing the stability of pyrolysis oil/diesel fuel emulsions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several emulsions consisting of biomass pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) in diesel fuel were produced and analyzed for stability over time. An ultrasonic probe was used to generate microscopic droplets of bio-oil suspended in diesel fuel, and this emulsion was stabilized using surfactant chemicals. The most...

  9. Emulsion design to improve the delivery of functional lipophilic components.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian

    2010-01-01

    The food industry has used emulsion science and technology for many years to create a diverse range of food products, such as milk, cream, soft drinks, nutritional beverages, dressings, mayonnaise, sauces, dips, deserts, ice cream, margarine, and butter. The majority of these food products are conventional oil-in-water (O/W) or water-in-oil (W/O) type emulsions. Recently, there has been increasing interest within the food industry in either improving or extending the functional performance of foods using novel structured emulsions. This article reviews recent developments in the creation of structured emulsions that could be used by the food and other industries, including nanoemulsions, multiple emulsions, multilayer emulsions, solid lipid particles, and filled hydrogel particles. These structured emulsions can be produced from food-grade [generally recognized as safe (GRAS)] ingredients (e.g., lipids, proteins, polysaccharides, surfactants, and minerals), using simple processing operations (e.g., mixing, homogenizing, and thermal processing). The structure, production, performance, and potential applications of each type of structured emulsion system are discussed.

  10. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water. The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles

  11. Formulation of indomethacin emulsion using biopolymer of Prunus avium.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shivangi; Dabral, Prashant; Rana, Vinod; Upadhaya, Kumud; Bhardwaj

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the investigation was to formulate Indomethacin Emulsion using Bio-polymer as Emulsifier. Different batches of emulsions were prepared by varying concentration of biopolymer prunus avium. Based evaluation of the prepared polymers, a conclusion can be drawn that in the Prunus avium bio-material can serve as a promising film forming agent for formulating various drug.

  12. Glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles by emulsion polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Abeylath, Sampath C.; Turos, Edward

    2007-01-01

    A selection of glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles has been prepared by radical-initiated emulsion polymerization in aqueous media. Using ethyl acrylate as a co-monomer, carbohydrate acrylates were incorporated into the poly(ethyl acrylate) framework to give stable emulsions of glyconanoparticles with an average particle size of around 40 nm. Using this technique a variety of glyconanoparticles were prepared from 3-O-acryloyl-1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-α-D-glucofuranose, 1-O-acryloyl-2,3:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-α-D-mannofuranose, 6-O-acryloyl-1,2:3,4-di-O-isopropylidene-α-D-galactopyranose, 2-N-acryloyl-1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine, 5-O-acryloyl-2,3-isopropylidene-1-methoxy-β-D-ribofuranose and 4-N-acetyl-5’-O-acryloyl-2’,3’-O-isopropylidene cytidine. Scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and proton NMR analysis of the emulsions indicated essentially 100% incorporation of the carbohydrate acrylate monomer into the polymer with the exception of O-benzyl- and O-benzoyl-protected carbohydrate acrylates, which gave incomplete incorporation. Formation of larger glyconanoparticles of ~80nm with (unprotected) 3-O-acryloyl-D-glucose and 5-O-acryloyl-1-methoxy-β-D-ribofuranose revealed the influence of free hydroxyl groups in the monomer on the particle size during polymerization, a feature which is also apparently dependent on the amount of carbohydrate in the matrix. This methodology allows for a new, simple route to the synthesis of polymeric glyconanoparticles with potential applications in targeted drug delivery and materials development. PMID:18677404

  13. Perfluorochemical emulsions decrease Kupffer cell phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bottalico, L.A.; Betensky, H.T.; Min, Y.B.; Weinstock, S.B. )

    1991-07-01

    One drawback to using perfluorochemical emulsions as blood substitutes is that perfluorochemical particles are cleared from the blood by the reticuloendothelial system, primarily liver and spleen. The authors measured the impact of two perfluorochemical emulsions on clearance of colloidal carbon (less than 1 microns) and 51Cr-sheep red blood cells (about 8 microns) by the reticuloendothelial system in vivo and in the isolated perfused liver. Male rats were injected with 2 ml/100 gm body wt of Fluosol-DA or Oxypherol-ET for 4 consecutive days. Carbon (1 ml/100 gm body wt) or sheep red blood cells (0.05 ml of 5% vol/vol/100 gm body wt) were then injected intravenously (in vivo) or added to perfusate. Samples were taken at several time points for 1 hr. In the isolated perfused liver, carbon clearance was depressed by 25% 1 day after treatment. Rates returned to control levels by 12 days in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but remained depressed by 67% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats. Sheep red blood cell (8 microns) clearance was two to five times slower than carbon clearance and depressed by 40% in livers from Fluosol-DA rats 1 day and 12 days after treatment. Added serum did not improve phagocytosis. In vivo carbon clearance remained normal in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but decreased by 74% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats 1 day after treatment, returning to normal by 12 days. Clearance rates were similar in control rats in vivo and in the perfused liver. They conclude that the isolated perfused liver is a good model to measure liver clearance function. Although low doses of perfluorochemical emulsions may depress Kupffer cell phagocytosis, general reticuloendothelial system function is not significantly compromised.

  14. Detoxifying emulsion for overdosed aspirin intoxication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Stambouli, Moncef; Pareau, Dominique

    2013-01-30

    Aspirin overdose could lead to intoxication, with the clinical manifestations of vomit, pulmonary edema and severe dyspnea. Stomach washing, emetics and activated charcoal are the common treatments with a limited efficiency for the intoxication. In this study, an active emulsion for aspirin intoxication was prepared with the detoxifying efficiency of 100% in less than 15 min, with the conditions of dodecane used as the oil phase, 8% Abil EM90 as the surfactant and 0.1 mol/L sodium hydroxide as the inner aqueous phase in a volume ratio of 2 between internal aqueous phase and the oil phase.

  15. Review of Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous fat emulsion (IVFE) is an important source of calories and essential fatty acids for patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN). Administered as an individual infusion or combined with PN, the fats provided by IVFE are vital for cellular structural function and metabolism. The affinity of some medications to lipids has led to the use of IVFE as a treatment for any lipophilic drug overdose. This article will explain the available formulations of IVFE, administration, and maintenance issues, as well as the risks and benefits for various applications. PMID:27828934

  16. Factors influencing meat emulsion properties and product texture: A review.

    PubMed

    Santhi, D; Kalaikannan, A; Sureshkumar, S

    2017-07-03

    Emulsion-based meat products play an important role in modern meat industry. Though meat batters have been prepared traditionally since long back in the history, the scientific principles and the knowhow are significantly important in the case of commercial products. In India, the market for emulsion meat products is gaining importance in the recent years and the native producers are in critical need for the scientific basis of production of emulsion meat products with better yield, good sensory qualities and nutrition. Hence, this review will throw light on some of the important factors which influence the properties of meat emulsion such as stability, structure, etc. and the product texture and yield as the revealed by past researches which will be useful to the meat processors in their practical application in preparing meat emulsion products.

  17. Structure- and oil type-based efficacy of emulsion adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Theo; Hofmans, Marij P M; Theelen, Marc J G; Manders, Frans; Schijns, Virgil E J C

    2006-06-29

    Oil-based emulsions are well-known immunopotentiators for inactivated, "killed" vaccines. We addressed the relationship between emulsion structure and levels of in vivo antibody formation to inactivated New Castle Disease virus (NDV) and Infectious Bronchitis virus (IBV) as antigens in 3-week-old chickens. The use of a polymeric emulsifier allowed for direct comparison of three types of emulsions, water-in-oil (W/O), oil-in-water (O/W) and W/O-in-water (W/O/W), while maintaining an identical content of components for each vehicle. They were prepared with either non-metabolizable, mineral oil or metabolizable, Miglyol 840. In addition, we assessed the inherent release capacity of each emulsion variant in vitro. Remarkably, we noted that W/O-type emulsions induced the best immune responses, while they released no antigen during 3 weeks. In general, mineral oil vaccines showed superior efficacy compared to Miglyol 840-based vaccines.

  18. Pickering emulsions for food applications: background, trends, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Berton-Carabin, Claire C; Schroën, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Particle-stabilized emulsions, also referred to as Pickering emulsions, have garnered exponentially increasing interest in recent years. This has also led to the first food applications, although the number of related publications is still rather low. The involved stabilization mechanisms are fundamentally different as compared to conventional emulsifiers, which can be an asset in terms of emulsion stability. Even though most of the research on Pickering emulsions has been conducted on model systems, with inorganic solid particles, recent progress has been made on the utilization of food-grade or food-compatible organic particles for this purpose. This review reports the latest advances in that respect, including technical challenges, and discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of using Pickering emulsions for food applications, as an alternative to conventional emulsifier-based systems.

  19. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, was used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improve the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study were: (1) Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems. (2) Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system. (3) Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit. (4) Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system. and (5) Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts (not completed due to lack of funds)

  20. Development of an Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Ultrasound Drug Delivery Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Sebastian, Ian E.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2010-03-01

    Many therapeutic applications of ultrasound (US) include the use of pefluorocarbon (PFC) microbubbles or emulsions. These colloidal systems can be activated in the presence of US, which in the case of emulsions, results in the production of bubbles—a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). ADV can be used as a drug delivery mechanism, thereby yielding the localized release of toxic agents such a chemotherapeutics. In this work, emulsions that contain PFC and chlorambucil, a chemotherapy drug, are formulated using albumin or lipid shells. For albumin droplets, the oil phase—which contained CHL—clearly enveloped the PFC phase. The albumin emulsion also displayed better retention of CHL in the absence of US, which was evaluated by incubating Chinese hamster ovary cells with the various formulations. Thus, the developed emulsions are suitable for further testing in ADV-induced release of CHL.

  1. Domain and droplet sizes in emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frijters, Stefan; Günther, Florian; Harting, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Particle-stabilized emulsions are commonly used in various industrial applications. These emulsions can present in different forms, such as Pickering emulsions or bijels, which can be distinguished by their different topologies and rheology. We numerically investigate the effect of the volume fraction and the uniform wettability of the stabilizing spherical particles in mixtures of two fluids. For this, we use the well-established three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method, extended to allow for the added colloidal particles with non-neutral wetting properties. We obtain data on the domain sizes in the emulsions by using both structure functions and the Hoshen-Kopelman (HK) algorithm, and we demonstrate that both methods have their own (dis)advantages. We confirm an inverse dependence between the concentration of particles and the average radius of the stabilized droplets. Furthermore, we demonstrate the effect of particles detaching from interfaces on the emulsion properties and domain-size measurements.

  2. Enzymatically Crosslinked Emulsion Gels Using Star-Polymer Stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; An, Zesheng

    2016-10-01

    A novel type of emulsion gel based on star-polymer-stabilized emulsions is highlighted, which contains discrete hydrophobic oil and hydrophilic aqueous solution domains. Well-defined phenol-functionalized core-crosslinked star polymers are synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT)-mediated dispersion polymerization and are used as stabilizers for oil-in-water emulsions. Horseradish-peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of the phenol moieties in the presence of H2 O2 enables rapid formation of crosslinked emulsion gels under mild conditions. The crosslinked emulsion gels exhibit enhanced mechanical strength, as well as widely tunable composition. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. An exclusively based parenteral fish-oil emulsion reverses cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Triana Junco, Miryam; García Vázquez, Natalia; Zozaya, Carlos; Ybarra Zabala, Marta; Abrams, Steven; García de Lorenzo, Abelardo; Sáenz de Pipaón Marcos, Miguel

    2014-10-25

    Prolonged parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to liver damage. Recent interest has focused on the lipid component of PN. A lipid emulsion based on w-3 fatty acids decrease conjugated bilirubin. A mixed lipid emulsion derived from soybean, coconut, olive, and fish oils reverses jaundice. Here we report the reversal of cholestasis and the improvement of enteral feeding tolerance in 1 infant with intestinal failure-associated liver disease. Treatment involved the substitution of a mixed lipid emulsion with one containing primarily omega-3 fatty acids during 37 days. Growth and biochemical tests of liver function improved significantly. This suggests that fat emulsions made from fish oils may be more effective means of treating this condition compared with an intravenous lipid emulsion containing soybean oil, medium -chain triglycerides, olive oil, and fish oil.

  4. Polyacrylates with High Biomass Contents for Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives Prepared via Mini-emulsion Polymerization

    Treesearch

    Gang Pu; Matthew R. Dubay; Jiguang Zhang; Steven J. Severtson; Carl J. Houtman

    2012-01-01

    n-Butyl acrylate and other acrylic monomers were copolymerized with an acrylated macromonomer to produce polymers for pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) applications. Macromonomers were generated through the ring-opening copolymerization of L-lactide and ε-caprolactone with 2-hydroxyethyl...

  5. Development of new-type nuclear emulsion for a balloon-borne emulsion gamma-ray telescope experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, K.; Aoki, S.; Kamada, K.; Kosaka, T.; Mizutani, F.; Shibayama, E.; Takahashi, S.; Tateishi, Y.; Tawa, S.; Yamada, K.; Kawahara, H.; Otsuka, N.; Rokujo, H.

    2015-12-01

    This study reports a new-type of nuclear emulsion that improves the track-finding efficiency of charged particle detection. The emulsion is applied to the GRAINE project, a balloon-borne experiment that observes cosmic γ-rays through an emulsion γ-ray telescope. The new emulsion film dramatically improves the detection efficiency for γ-rays. The nuclear emulsion gel and films for the second GRAINE balloon-borne experiment (GRAINE-2015) were fully self-produced by ourselves. New handling methods for the novel emulsion film have also been developed. Over time, the stored films gradually become desensitized to minimum ionizing particles, but the original sensitivity can be restored by a resetting process. Moreover, the fading of latent images can be arrested by a drying process. To sensitize the new-type films and avoid their fading, emulsion preprocessing was applied immediately prior to GRAINE-2015. A balloon flight with the emulsion γ-ray telescope was successfully completed in Australia on 12th May 2015. By scanning with automated optical microscopes and analyzing the penetrated tracks, we confirmed the high track-finding efficiency (97%) of the mounted films. The analysis of γ-ray event detection, aims at detecting Vela pulsar, is in progress.

  6. Development of multiple W/O/W emulsions as dermal carrier system for oligonucleotides: effect of additives on emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Schmidts, T; Dobler, D; Schlupp, P; Nissing, C; Garn, H; Runkel, F

    2010-10-15

    Multiple water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions are of major interest as potential skin delivery systems for water-soluble drugs like oligonucleotides due to their distinct encapsulation properties. However, multiple emulsions are highly sensitive in terms of variations of the individual components. The presence of osmotic active ingredients in the inner water phase is crucial for the generation of stable multiple emulsions. In order to stabilize the emulsions the influence of NaCl, MgSO(4), glucose and glycine and two cellulose derivatives was investigated. Briefly, multiple W/O/W emulsions using Span 80 as a lipophilic emulsifier and different hydrophilic emulsifiers (PEG-40/50 stearate, steareth-20 and polysorbate 80) were prepared. Stability of the emulsions was analyzed over a period of time using rheological measurements, droplet size observations and conductivity analysis. In this study we show that additives strongly influence the properties stability of multiple emulsions. By increasing the concentration of the osmotic active ingredients, smaller multiple droplets are formed and the viscosity is significantly increased. The thickening agents resulted in a slightly improved stability. The most promising emulsions were chosen and further evaluated for their suitability and compatibility to incorporate a DNAzyme oligonucleotide as active pharmaceutical ingredient. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Solid phase graft copolymerization of acrylic monomers onto thermoplastics and their use as blend compatibilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Srinivas

    This research work is an extension of some of the earlier work done on the development of solid phase grafting technique to graft various monomers onto polymers as well as postulation of the usefulness of the graft copolymers thus synthesized. Polystyrene grafted with acrylic acid, previously developed in bench scale, was synthesized in pilot-plant scale batches. Process parameter studies on the grafting of acrylic acid onto polypropylene and developmental studies on the grafting of maleic anhydride onto polystyrene were also done. Polymers grafted with polar molecules such as maleic anhydride and acrylic acid have been used to compatibilize immiscible blends of polar and non-polar polymers. On the same note, the applicability of the solid phase graft copolymers as blend compatibilizers were investigated and their performance was compared to commercially available compatibilizers. Solid phase graft copolymerization process is a technique to synthesize graft copolymers. Some of its salient features are use of minimal solvent to conduct the reaction and easy equipment modification. It is a low pressure and low temperature process. This technique provides a viable alternative to the environmentally hazardous, and time consuming conventional process currently in use. Hence, development of this technique could be beneficial not only to the plastics industry, but also to mankind. Also, this technique provides a low-cost and extremely easy method to develop graft copolymers such as acrylic acid functionalized polymers that are rapidly gaining popularity as blend compatibilizers and polymer reinforcing agents. A study that proves the potential of these solid phase graft copolymers as good blend compatibilizers for industrially important immiscible polymers will develop interest in the industries about this grafting process. The free radical solid phase graft copolymerization process was carried in a modified Brabender-type mixer fitted with specially designed blades to

  8. Clickable degradable aliphatic polyesters via copolymerization with alkyne epoxy esters: synthesis and postfunctionalization with organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Teske, Nele S; Voigt, Julia; Shastri, V Prasad

    2014-07-23

    Degradable aliphatic polyesters are the cornerstones of nanoparticle (NP)-based therapeutics. In this paradigm, covalent modification of the NP with cell-targeting motifs and dyes can aid in guiding the NP to its destination and gaining visual confirmation. Therefore, strategies to impart chemistries along the polymer backbone that are amenable to easy modification, such as 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of an azide to an alkyne (the "click reaction"), could be significant. Here we present a simple and efficient way to introduce alkyne groups at high density in aliphatic polyesters without compromising their crystallinity via the copolymerization of cyclic lactones with propargyl 3-methylpentenoate oxide (PMPO). Copolymers of lactic acid and ε-caprolactone with PMPO were synthesized with up to 9 mol % alkyne content, and accessibility of the alkyne groups to the click reaction was demonstrated using several dyes commonly employed in fluorescence microscopy and imaging (Cy3, ATTO-740, and coumarin 343). In order to establish the suitability of these copolymers as nanocarriers, copolymers were formulated into NPs, and cytocompatibility, cellular uptake, and visualization studies undertaken in HeLa cells. Dye-modified NPs exhibited no quenching, remained stable in solution for at least 10 days, showed no cytotoxicity, and were readily taken up by HeLa cells. Furthermore, in addition to enabling the incorporation of multiple fluorophores within the same NP through blending of individual dye-modified copolymers, dye-modified polyesters offer advantages over physical entrapment of dye, including improved signal to noise ratio and localization of the fluorescence signal within cells, and possess the necessary prerequisites for drug delivery and imaging.

  9. Quantitative determination of insulin entrapment efficiency in triblock copolymeric nanoparticles by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiongliang; Fu, Yao; Hu, Haiyan; Duan, Yourong; Zhang, Zhirong

    2006-04-11

    A rapid and effective isocratic chromatographic procedure was described in this paper for the determination of insulin entrapment efficiency (EE) in triblock copolymeric nanoparticles using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with an ultraviolet/visible detector at low flow rate. The method has been developed on a Shimadzu Shim-pack VP-ODS column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm, Chiyoda-Ku, Tokyo, Japan) using a mixture of 0.2 M sodium sulfate anhydrous solution adjusted to pH 2.3 with phosphoric acid and acetonitrile (73:27, v/v) as mobile phase at the flow rate of 0.8 ml min(-1) and a 214 nm detection. The method was validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, precision, accuracy, solution stability, limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ). The calibration curve was linear in the concentration range of 2.0-500.0 microg ml(-1), and the limits of detection and quantitation were 8 and 20 ng, respectively. The mean recovery of insulin from spiked samples, in a concentration range of 8-100 microg ml(-1), was 98.96% (R.S.D.= 2.51%, n = 9). The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were less than 2.24%. The proposed method has the advantages of simple pretreatment, rapid isolation, high specificity and precision, which can be used for direct analysis of insulin in commercially available raw materials, formulations of nanoparticles, and drug release as well as stability studies.

  10. Manganese(III) Schiff base complexes: chemistry relevant to the copolymerization of epoxides and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Frantz, Eric B

    2007-07-23

    Schiff base complexes of the form (acacen)Mn(III)X (acacen = N,N'-bis(acetylacetone)-1,2-ethylenediimine), where X = OAc, Cl, or N(3), have been evaluated for their ability to couple CO(2) and cyclohexene oxide in the presence of a variety of cocatalysts to provide cyclic or polycarbonates. These complexes proved to be ineffective at catalyzing this process; however, valuable information related to the coordination chemistry of these manganese Schiff bases was elucidated. Of importance, mechanistic findings as revealed by comprehensive studies involving structurally related (salen)CrX and (salen)CoX complexes strongly support the requirement of six-coordinate metal species for the effective copolymerization of CO(2) and epoxides. In the case of these Mn(III) complexes, it was determined that in chloroform or toluene solution a five-coordinate species was greatly favored over a six-coordinate species even in the presence of 20 equiv or more of various Lewis bases. Significantly epoxide monomers such as propylene oxide and cyclohexene oxide displayed no tendency to bind to these (acacen)MnX derivatives, even when used as solvents. Only in the case of excessive quantities of heterocyclic amines such as pyridine, DMAP, and DBU was spectral evidence of a six-coordinate Mn derivative observed in solution. X-ray crystal structures are provided for many of the complexes involved in this study, including the one-dimensional polymeric structures of [(acacen)MnOAc x 2H(2)O](n), [(acacen)MnN(3)](n) (mu(1,3)-N(3)), and a rare mixed bridging species [(acacen)MnN(3)](n) (mu(1,3)-N(3)/mu(1,1)-N(3)). In addition, a structure was obtained in which the unit cell contains both a (acacen)MnN(3)(DMAP) and a (acacen)MnN(3) species.

  11. Novel rubbers from cationic copolymerization of soybean oils and dicyclopentadiene. 1. Synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Andjelkovic, Dejan D; Larock, Richard C

    2006-03-01

    Novel thermosetting copolymers, ranging from tough and ductile to very soft rubbers, have been prepared by the cationic copolymerization of regular (SOY) and 100% conjugated soybean oils (C(100)SOY) with dicyclopentadiene (DCP) catalyzed by Norway fish oil (NFO)-modified and SOY- and C(100)SOY-diluted boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BFE). The gelation time of the reactions varies from 4 to 991 min at 110 degrees C. The yields of the bulk copolymers are essentially quantitative, while the yields of the cross-linked copolymers remaining after Soxhlet extraction with methylene chloride range from 69% to 88%, depending on the monomer stoichiometry and the catalyst used. (1)H NMR spectroscopy and Soxhlet extraction data indicate that these copolymers consist of a cross-linked soybean oil-DCP network plasticized by certain amounts of methylene chloride-soluble linear or less cross-linked soybean oil-DCP copolymers, unreacted oil, and some low molecular weight hydrolyzed oil. The molecular weights of these soluble fractions are in the range from 400 to 10,000 g/mol based on polystyrene standards. The bulk copolymers have glass transition temperatures ranging from -22.6 to 56.6 degrees C, while their tan delta peak values range from 0.7 to 1.2. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicates that these soybean oil-DCP copolymers are thermally stable below 200 degrees C, with 10% and 50% weight loss temperatures ranging from 280 to 372 degrees C and 470-554 degrees C, respectively. These properties suggest that these biobased thermosets may prove useful alternatives to current petroleum-based plastics and find widespread utility.

  12. [Dietary fat emulsions of lowered caloric content].

    PubMed

    Brents, M Ia; Fursova, S A; Vorob'eva, V M; Baeva, V S

    1983-01-01

    The products such as mayonnaise for infant's and dietetic nutrition were supplemented with the most full-value and readily assimilable proteins of milk and plant origin, whereas inhibitors and components (yolk-yellow, soybean oil, etc) not very suitable for dietetic nutrition were excluded. The know how and composition of dietetic pastes with a fatness of 10-50% were those of sauces for cold dishes and desserts with a fatness of 1-10%. These products represent a stable, readily assimilable vegetative oil emulsion. They are manufactured according to a simplified (comparatively to the conventional) flow-sheet that involves two parallel processes: preparation of a vegetative oil emulsion by means of homogenization at a high pressure and preparation of a concentration aqueous suspension of excipients. Apart from the increased biological value and high quality of fatty products, the know how under consideration enables the butter and fatty industry to produce mayonnaises with a fat content under 35% and to make the best use of reiterative raw material of the milk industry.

  13. Random close packing of polydisperse jammed emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujic, Jasna

    2010-03-01

    Packing problems are everywhere, ranging from oil extraction through porous rocks to grain storage in silos and the compaction of pharmaceutical powders into tablets. At a given density, particulate systems pack into a mechanically stable and amorphous jammed state. Theoretical frameworks have proposed a connection between this jammed state and the glass transition, a thermodynamics of jamming, as well as geometric modeling of random packings. Nevertheless, a simple underlying mechanism for the random assembly of athermal particles, analogous to crystalline ordering, remains unknown. Here we use 3D measurements of polydisperse packings of emulsion droplets to build a simple statistical model in which the complexity of the global packing is distilled into a local stochastic process. From the perspective of a single particle the packing problem is reduced to the random formation of nearest neighbors, followed by a choice of contacts among them. The two key parameters in the model, the available space around a particle and the ratio of contacts to neighbors, are directly obtained from experiments. Remarkably, we demonstrate that this ``granocentric'' view captures the properties of the polydisperse emulsion packing, ranging from the microscopic distributions of nearest neighbors and contacts to local density fluctuations and all the way to the global packing density. Further applications to monodisperse and bidisperse systems quantitatively agree with previously measured trends in global density. This model therefore reveals a general principle of organization for random packing and lays the foundations for a theory of jammed matter.

  14. ESR studies of semicontinuous emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, W.; Westmoreland, D.G.

    1993-12-31

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is used in the detection and quantification of propagating radicals during a semicontinuous emulsion polymerization. The propagating radical concentration is crucial for the determination of kinetic parameters of the emulsion polymerization process. A flow reactor was built which involves a closed-loop flow system that circulates latex from the polymerization reactor through the ESR cavity for free-radical measurements and back to the reactor. With the continuous measurement of the radical concentrations during a polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA), {bar n} (average number of radicals per particle) and k{sub p} (propagating rate constant), are measured throughout the entire polymerization. For the polymerization of the MMA system studied, the authors observed a gradual increased in n and decrease in k{sub p} during the run, suggesting a diffusionally controlled process and that the polymerization is not occurring homogeneously throughout the polymer particles. In the glassy pMMA matrix, radicals can be {open_quotes}trapped{close_quotes} within a minimum volume and remain unterminated.

  15. Evidence for Marginal Stability in Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jie; Jorjadze, Ivane; Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Wyart, Matthieu; Brujic, Jasna

    2016-11-01

    We report the first measurements of the effect of pressure on vibrational modes in emulsions, which serve as a model for soft frictionless spheres at zero temperature. As a function of the applied pressure, we find that the density of states D (ω ) exhibits a low-frequency cutoff ω*, which scales linearly with the number of extra contacts per particle δ z . Moreover, for ω <ω*, our results are consistent with D (ω )˜ω2/ω*2, a quadratic behavior whose prefactor is larger than what is expected from Debye theory. This surprising result agrees with recent theoretical findings [E. DeGiuli, A. Laversanne-Finot, G. A. Düring, E. Lerner, and M. Wyart, Soft Matter 10, 5628 (2014); S. Franz, G. Parisi, P. Urbani, and F. Zamponi, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 112, 14539 (2015)]. Finally, the degree of localization of the softest low frequency modes increases with compression, as shown by the participation ratio as well as their spatial configurations. Overall, our observations show that emulsions are marginally stable and display non-plane-wave modes up to vanishing frequencies.

  16. Detecting plastic events in emulsions simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lulli, Matteo; Matteo Lulli, Massimo Bernaschi, Mauro Sbragaglia Team

    2016-11-01

    Emulsions are complex systems which are formed by a number of non-coalescing droplets dispersed in a solvent leading to non-trivial effects in the overall flowing dynamics. Such systems possess a yield stress below which an elastic response to an external forcing occurs, while above the yield stress the system flows as a non-Newtonian fluid, i.e. the stress is not proportional to the shear. In the solid-like regime the network of the droplets interfaces stores the energy coming from the work exerted by an external forcing, which can be used to move the droplets in a non-reversible way, i.e. causing plastic events. The Kinetic-Elasto-Plastic (KEP) theory is an effective theory describing some features of the flowing regime relating the rate of plastic events to a scalar field called fluidity f =γ˙/σ , i.e. the inverse of an effective viscosity. Boundary conditions have a non-trivial role not captured by the KEP description. In this contribution we will compare numerical results against experiments concerning the Poiseuille flow of emulsions in microchannels with complex boundary geometries. Using an efficient computational tool we can show non-trivial results on plastic events for different realizations of the rough boundaries. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007- 2013)/ERC Grant Agreement no. [279004].

  17. A DFT Study on the Co-polymerization of CO2 and Ethylene: Feasibility Analysis for the Direct Synthesis of Polyethylene Esters.

    PubMed

    Moha, Verena; Cozzula, Daniela; Hölscher, Markus; Leitner, Walter; Müller, Thomas E

    2016-07-07

    The co-polymerization of CO2 with the non-polar monomer ethylene, though highly desirable, still presents a challenge whereas the palladium-catalyzed CO/C2 H4 co-polymerization is well understood. Building on this analogy, the goal of this study was to elucidate the feasibility of developing suitable catalysts for co-polymerizing CO2 with ethylene to polyethylene esters. Computational methods based on density functional theory were hereby employed. In the search for new catalyst lead structures, a closed catalytic cycle was identified for the palladium-catalyzed CO2 /C2 H4 co-polymerization reaction. The computational study on palladium complexes with a substituted anionic 2-[bis(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-phosphine]-benzene-2-hydroxo ligand revealed key aspects that need to be considered when designing ligand sets for potential catalysts for the non-alternating co-polymerization of CO2 and ethylene. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Reactivity ratios and sequence structures of the copolymers prepared using photo-induced copolymerization of MMA with MTMP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Yongtao; Cui, Yanyan; Dong, Zhixian

    2012-05-01

    4-Methacryloyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine (MTMP) was applied as reactive hindered amine piperidine. Photo-induced copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA, M(1)) with MTMP (M(2)) was carried out in benzene solution at ambient temperature. The reactivity ratios for these monomers were measured by running a series of reactions at various feed ratios of initial monomers, and the monomer incorporation into copolymer was determined using (1)H NMR. Reactivity ratios of the MMA/MTMP system were measured to be r(1)= 0.37 and r(2)= 1.14 from extended Kelen-Tüdos method. The results show that monomer MTMP prefers homopolymerization to copolymerization in the system, whereas monomer MMA prefers copolymerization to homopolymerization. Sequence structures of the MMA/MTMP copolymers were characterized using (1)H NMR. The results show that the sequence structure for the main chain of the MMA/MTMP copolymers is mainly composed of a syndiotactic configuration, only with a little heterotactic configuration. Three kinds of the sequences of rr, rr', and lr' in the syndiotactic configuration are found. The sequence-length distribution in the MMA/MTMP copolymers is also obtained. For f(1)= 0.2, the monomer unit of MMA is mostly separated by MTMP units, and for f(1)= 0.6, the alternating tendency prevails and a large number of mono-sequences are formed; further up to f(1)= 0.8, the monomer unit of MTMP with the sequence of one unit is interspersed among the chain of MMA.

  19. Research of inverted emulsions properties on the base of new emulsifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Epikhin, A.; Novoseltsev, D.; Andropov, M.; Yanovsky, V.; Ulyanova, O.

    2014-08-01

    Emulsifiers on the base of tallol and ethanolamines derived acids have been researched in the paper. Electrical stability of emulsions drilling muds has been investigated. It is proved that synthesized emulsifiers according to emulsion stability can be divided into two groups. The first group is emulsifiers with high initial electrical stability but low emulsion stability under long-term storing, and the second group is emulsifiers with low electrical stability but with high emulsion stability. Emulsions flow characteristics have been researched. It is established that emulsifier on the base of ethanolamine provides better emulsion characteristics for drilling muds emulsions.

  20. Grafting onto wool. XX. Graft copolymerization of vinyl monomers by use of redox initiators. Comparison of monomer reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, B.N.; Singha, A.S.; Sharma, R.K.

    1982-04-01

    Methyl methacrylate (MMA) and ethylacrylate (EA) have been graft copolymerized onto Himachali wool in aqueous medium by using a ferrous ammonium sulfate-hydrogen peroxide (FAS-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) system as redox initiator. Percentage of grafting has been determined as functions of concentration of monomer, molar ratio of (FAS)/(H/sub 2/O/sub 2/), time, and temperature. Percentage of grafting is found to depend upon the molar ratio of (FAS)/(H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). An attempt has been made to compare the reactivities of the acceptor monomer (MMA and EA) with that of the donor monomer (VAc) toward grafting onto wool.

  1. Surface modification of copolymerized films from three-armed biodegradable macromers - An analytical platform for modified tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Müller, Benno M; Loth, Rudi; Hoffmeister, Peter-Georg; Zühl, Friederike; Kalbitzer, Liv; Hacker, Michael C; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela

    2017-03-15

    The concept of macromers allows for a broad adjustment of biomaterial properties by macromer chemistry or copolymerization. Copolymerization strategies can also be used to introduce reactive sites for subsequent surface modification. Control over surface features enables adjustment of cellular reactions with regard to site and object of implantation. We designed macromer-derived polymer films which function as non-implantable analytical substrates for the investigation of surface properties of equally composed scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. To this end, a toolbox of nine different biodegradable, three-armed macromers was thermally cross-copolymerized with poly(ethylene glycol)-methacrylate (PEG-MA) to films. Subsequent activation of PEG-hydroxyl groups with succinic anhydride and N-hydroxysuccinimid allowed for covalent surface modification. We quantified the capacity to immobilize analytes of low (amino-functionalized fluorescent dye, Fcad, and RGD-peptides) and high (alkaline phosphatase, ALP) molecular weight. Fcad grafting level was controlled by macromer chemistry, content and molecular weight of PEG-MA, but also the solvent used for film synthesis. Fcad molar amount per surface area was twentyfive times higher on high-swelling compared to low-swelling films, but differences became smaller when large ALP (appr. 2:1) were employed. Similarly, small differences were observed on RGD peptide functionalized films that were investigated by cell adhesion studies. Presentation of PEG-derivatives on surfaces was visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) which unraveled composition-dependent domain formation influencing fluorescent dye immobilization. Surface wetting characteristics were investigated via static water contact angle. We conclude that macromer ethoxylation and lactic acid content determined film swelling, PEG domain formation and eventually efficiency of surface decoration. Surfaces of implantable biomaterials are the site of interaction with a

  2. A sterically expanded "constrained geometry catalyst" for highly active olefin polymerization and copolymerization: an unyielding comonomer effect.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Levi J; Reibenspies, Joseph H; Miller, Stephen A

    2004-12-29

    The 14 A octamethyloctahydrodibenzofluorene moiety has been incorporated into a sterically expanded constrained geometry catalyst, Me2Si(eta1-C29H36)(eta1-N-tBu)ZrCl2.OEt2 (1). The solid-state structure suggests that the activated olefin polymerization catalyst is quite spatially accessible, rationalizing its extraordinary reactivity toward alpha-olefins. 1/MAO (MAO = methylaluminoxane) can be more reactive toward alpha-olefins than toward ethylene and exhibit activities that are linearly and continuously proportional to 4-methyl-1-pentene or 1-octene concentration in their copolymerizations with ethylene.

  3. Integrated microfluidic system with simultaneous emulsion generation and concentration.

    PubMed

    Koppula, Karuna S; Fan, Rong; Veerapalli, Kartik R; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-03-15

    Because the size, size distribution, and concentration of emulsions play an important role in most of the applications, controlled emulsion generation and effective concentration are of great interest in fundamental and applied studies. While microfluidics has been demonstrated to be able to produce emulsion drops with controlled size, size distribution, and hierarchical structures, progress of controlled generation of concentrated emulsions is limited. Here, we present an effective microfluidic emulsion generation system integrated with an orifice structure to separate aqueous droplets from the continuous oil phase, resulting in concentrated emulsion drops in situ. Both experimental and simulation results show that the efficiency of separation is determined by a balance between pressure drop and droplet accumulation near the orifice. By manipulating this balance via changing flow rates and microfluidic geometry, we can achieve monodisperse droplets on chip that have a concentration as high as 80,000 drops per microliter (volume fraction of 66%). The present approach thus provides insights to the design of microfluidic device that can be used to concentrate emulsions (drops and bubbles), colloidal particles (drug delivery polymer particles), and biological particles (cells and bacteria) when volume fractions as high as 66% are necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Stability of drug-carrier emulsions containing phosphatidylcholine mixtures.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Michele; Pattarino, Franco; Ignoni, Terenzio

    2002-03-01

    Lipid emulsion particles containing 10% of medium chain triglycerides were prepared using 2% w/w of a mixture 1:1 w/w of purified soya phosphatidylcholine and 2-hexanoyl phosphatidylcholine as emulsifier mixture, for use as drug carriers. The mean droplet sizes of emulsions, prepared using an Ultra Turrax or a high-pressure homogenizer, were about 288 and 158 nm, respectively, compared with 380 and 268 nm for emulsions containing lecithin, or 325 and 240 nm for those containing 6-phosphatidylcholine. The stability of the emulsions, determined by monitoring the decrease of a lipophilic marker at a specified level within the emulsion, and observing coalescence over time, was also greatly increased using the emulsifier mixture. The emulsion stability did not notably change in the presence of a model destabilizing drug, indomethacin. The use of a second hydrophilic surfactant to adjust the packing properties of the lecithin at the oil-water interface provided an increase in the stability of lipid emulsions, and this may be of importance in the formulation of drug delivery systems.

  5. Physical properties and stability of two emulsion formulations of propofol.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Davis, S S; Washington, C

    2001-03-14

    We have compared the physical properties of two commercial emulsion formulations of the intravenous anaesthetic propofol, (Diprivan, AstraZeneca, and Propofol Intravenous Emulsion, Gensia Sicor Pharmaceuticals) which appear to differ primarily in the additive content and formulation pH. Diprivan contains disodium edetate and has a pH of 7-8.5, while the Gensia product contains sodium metabisulphite and is formulated to a pH of 4.5-6.4. The average zeta potential of Diprivan at pH 8 was -50 mV while that of the Gensia product at pH 4-5 was -40 mV. This information suggests that the physical stability of Propofol Intravenous Emulsion should be lower than that of Diprivan. Three random batches of both products were subjected to a range of stability tests, including shaking, thermal cycling, and freeze-thaw cycling, and the emulsion droplet size distribution was then assessed by dynamic light scattering, light diffraction, and electrical and optical zone sensing. Both emulsions initially showed narrow submicrometre particle size distributions. An increased level of droplets larger than 5 microm could be detected in Propofol Intravenous Emulsion after as little as 4 h shaking (300 strokes/min at room temperature) and visible free oil could be detected after 8-12 h shaking. In contrast, Diprivan showed no increase in the large droplet count after shaking for times up to 16 h. A similar difference in the emulsions was found after one freeze-thaw cycle, with Propofol Intravenous Emulsion exhibiting extensive coalescence, while that of Diprivan was at the limits of detection. We conclude that these two products have different physical stability characteristics, and that this may in part be due to the reduced zeta potential in Propofol Intravenous Emulsion compared to that of Diprivan.

  6. Synergistic effect on corrosion resistance of Phynox substrates grafted with surface-initiated ATRP (co)polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA).

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, Bastien; Maheux, Simon; Devillers, Sébastien; Kanoufi, Frédéric; Combellas, Catherine; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2014-07-09

    Phynox is of high interest for biomedical applications due to its biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. However, some Phynox applications require specific surface properties. These can be imparted with suitable surface functionalizations of its oxide layer. The present work investigates the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-methacryloyoxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), and ATRP copolymerization of (HEMA-co-MPC) (block and statistic copolymerization with different molar ratios) on grafted Phynox substrates modified with 11-(2-bromoisobutyrate)-undecyl-1-phosphonic acid (BUPA) as initiator. It is found that ATRP (co)polymerization of these monomers is feasible and forms hydrophilic layers, while improving the corrosion resistance of the system.

  7. Transport and Retention of Emulsion Droplets in Sandy Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esahani, S. G.; Muller, K.; Chapra, S. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Emulsions are commonly used as amendments during remediation; yet, the processes controlling the distribution of droplets within the subsurface are not well understood. Given that inadequate spatial and/or temporal delivery of amendments often leads to ineffective treatment, there is a need to better understand emulsion transport. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the transport and retention of emulsion droplets in columns containing Ottawa sands. Breakthrough curves and deposition profiles from these experiments were interrogated using a mathematical model capable of describing attachment, detachment, and straining to begin to elucidate the physical processes controlling delivery. Emulsions were constructed by stabilizing soybean oil droplets within a continuous aqueous phase. Physical properties of the resulting oil-in-water emulsions were favorable for subsurface delivery (nominal properties: 1 g/mL density; 10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet d50). Emulsions were introduced to the columns for approximately two pore volumes and followed by an extended flush of background solution. Effluent droplet size distributions did not vary significantly over the course of the experiment and remained similar to those measured for the influent emulsion. Emulsion breakthrough curves exhibited tailing, and deposition profiles were found to be hyper-exponential and unaffected by extended periods of background flow. Depending on emulsion composition and flow characteristics, 10-30% of the injected emulsion was retained on the sand suggesting a non-negligible influence on accessible porosity over the course of the experiment. Experimental results were further interpreted using a droplet transport model that accounts for temporal and spatial variation in porosity due to the retention of the emulsion droplets. At present the model assumes a uniform size distribution of inelastic emulsion droplets which are transported by advection and dispersion, and exchanged with the solid

  8. Powdery Emulsion Explosive: A New Excellent Industrial Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Ouqi; Zhang, Kaiming; Yu, Zhengquan; Tang, Shujuan

    2012-07-01

    Powdery emulsion explosive (PEE), a new powdery industrial explosive with perfect properties, has been made using an emulsification-spray drying technique. PEE is composed of 91-92.5 wt% ammonium nitrate (AN), 4.5-6 wt% organic fuels, and 1.5-1.8 wt% water. Due to its microstructure as a water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion and low water content, it has excellent detonation performance, outstanding water resistance, reliable safety, and good application compared with other industrial explosives, such as ammonite, emulsion explosives, and ANFO.

  9. The development of a super-fine-grained nuclear emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Takashi; Naka, Tatsuhiro; Kuwabara, Ken-ichi; Yoshimoto, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    A nuclear emulsion with micronized crystals is required for the tracking detection of submicron ionizing particles, which are one of the targets of dark-matter detection and other techniques. We found that a new production method, called the PVA—gelatin mixing method (PGMM), could effectively control crystal size from 20 nm to 50 nm. We called the two types of emulsion produced with the new method the nano imaging tracker and the ultra-nano imaging tracker. Their composition and spatial resolution were measured, and the results indicate that these emulsions detect extremely short tracks.

  10. Rheology and microstructure of magmatic emulsions - Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Daniel J.; Spera, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The rheological properties of a dilute mixture of melt plus vapor bubbles, referred to as emulsion, are investigated theoretically and in rheometric experiments on dilute viscous germanium dioxide emulsions at temperatures between 1100 and 1175 C and at 100 kPa pressure in a rotating rod rheometer at shear rates between 0.05/s and 7/s. The results indicate that the emulsions may be described by a power-law constitutive relation when observations cover a sufficient range of shear rates to resolve nonlinear flow.

  11. Rheology and microstructure of magmatic emulsions - Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Daniel J.; Spera, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The rheological properties of a dilute mixture of melt plus vapor bubbles, referred to as emulsion, are investigated theoretically and in rheometric experiments on dilute viscous germanium dioxide emulsions at temperatures between 1100 and 1175 C and at 100 kPa pressure in a rotating rod rheometer at shear rates between 0.05/s and 7/s. The results indicate that the emulsions may be described by a power-law constitutive relation when observations cover a sufficient range of shear rates to resolve nonlinear flow.

  12. Superhydrophobic cellulose-based bionanocomposite films from Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Ilker S.; Steele, Adam; Martorana, Philip J.; Loth, Eric; Miller, Lance

    2009-04-01

    Inherently superhydrophobic and flexible cellulose-based bionanocomposites were fabricated from solid stabilized (Pickering) emulsions. Emulsions were formed by dispersing cyclosiloxanes in water stabilized by layered silicate particles and were subsequently modified by blending into a zinc oxide nanofluid. The polymer matrix was a blend of cellulose nitrate and fluoroacrylic polymer (Zonyl 8740) precompatibilized in solution. Coatings were spray cast onto aluminum substrates from polymer blends dispersed in modified Pickering emulsions. No postsurface treatment was required to induce superhydrophobicity. Effect of antiseptic additives on bionanocomposite superhydrophobicity is also discussed. Replacing cellulose nitrate with commercial liquid bandage solutions produced identical superhydrophobic coatings.

  13. Data on the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, Aldana L; Gliemmo, María F; Campos, Carmen A

    2016-12-01

    This article contains experimental data and images for the physical characterization of oil in water emulsions. Mentioned data are related to the research article "Effect of stabilizers, oil level and structure on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces bailii and on physical stability of model systems simulating acid sauces" (A.L. Zalazar, M.F. Gliemmo, C.A. Campos, 2016) [1]. Physical characterization of emulsions was performed through the evaluation of Span and Specific Surface Area (SSA) determined by light scattering using a Mastersizer. Furthermore, microscopy images were recorded by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The latter are presented to collaborate in the analysis of emulsion microstructure.

  14. o-Phenylene-bridged Cp/sulfonamido titanium complexes for ethylene/1-octene copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Joe, Dae June; Wu, Chun Ji; Bok, Taekki; Lee, Eun Jung; Lee, Choong Hoon; Han, Won-Sik; Kang, Sang Ook; Lee, Bun Yeoul

    2006-09-07

    The Suzuki-coupling reaction of 2-(dihydroxyboryl)-3,4-dimethyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one and 2-(dihydroxyboryl)-3-methyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one with 2-bromoaniline derivatives affords cyclopentenone compounds from which cyclopentadiene compounds, 4,6-R'(2)-2-(2,5-Me2C5H3)C6H2NH2 and 4,6-R'(2)-2-(2,3,5-Me3C5H2)C6H2NH2 are prepared. After sulfonation of the -NH2 group with p-TsCl, metallation is carried out by successive addition of Ti(NMe2)4 and Me2SiCl2 affording o-phenylene-bridged Cp/sulfonamido titanium dichloride complexes, [4,6-R'(2)-2-(2,5-Me2C5H2)C6H2NSO2C6H4CH3)]TiCl2 (R'=H, ; R'=Me, ; R'=F, ) and [4,6-R'(2)-2-(2,3,5-Me3C5H)C6H2NSO2C6H4CH3)]TiCl2 (R'=H, ; R'=Me, ; R'=F, ). The molecular structures of and [2-(2,5-Me2C5H2)C6H4NSO2C6H4CH3)]Ti(NMe2)2 are determined by X-ray crystallography. The Cp(centroid)-Ti-N angle in is smaller (100.90 degrees) than that observed for the CGC (constrained-geometry catalyst), [Me2Si(eta5-Me4Cp)(NtBu)]TiCl2 (107.6 degrees) indicating a more "constrained feature" in than in the CGC. Complex shows the highest activity among the newly prepared complexes in ethylene/1-octene copolymerization but it is slightly inferior to the CGC in terms of activity, comonomer-incorporation ability, and molecular weight of the obtained polymers.

  15. Biofilm Formation in Microscopic Double Emulsion Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Connie; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    In natural, medical, and industrial settings, there exist surface-associated communities of bacteria known as biofilms. These highly structured films are composed of bacterial cells embedded within self-produced extracellular matrix, usually composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids; this matrix serves to protect the bacterial community from antibiotics and environmental stressors. Here, we form biofilms encapsulated within monodisperse, microscopically-sized double emulsion droplets using microfluidics. The bacteria self-organize at the inner liquid-liquid droplet interfaces, multiply, and differentiate into extracellular matrix-producing cells, forming manifold three-dimensional shell-within-a-shell structures of biofilms, templated upon the inner core of spherical liquid droplets. By using microfluidics to encapsulate bacterial cells, we have the ability to view individual cells multiplying in microscopically-sized droplets, which allows for high-throughput analysis in studying the genetic program leading to biofilm development, or cell signaling that induces differentiation.

  16. NEWS: Nuclear Emulsions for WIMP Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marco, Natalia; NEWS Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    In the field of direct Dark Matter search a different and promising approach is the directionality: the observation of the incoming apparent direction of WIMPs would in fact provide a new and unambiguous signature. The NEWS project is a very innovative approach for a high sensitivity experiment aiming at the directional detection of WIMPs: the detector is based on a novel emulsion technology called NIT (Nano Imaging Trackers) acting both as target and tracking device. In this paper we illustrate the features of a NIT-based detector and the newly developed read-out systems allowing to reach a spatial resolution of the order of 10 nm. We present the background studies and the experimental design. Finally we report about the time schedule of the experiment and the expected sensitivity for DM searches.

  17. Electromagnetic Shower Reconstruction in Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. S.

    2006-04-01

    Atmospheric neutrino data from the MACRO, Soudan II and Super-Kamiokande experiments are consistent with the hypothesis of νμ → ντ oscillations. The OPERA experiment aims to prove definitively this hypothesis with the direct observation of ντ neutrinos in the νμ beam produced at CERN (CNGS). The apparatus, in construction at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory, is equipped with electronic detectors and a sensitive target. The target is highly segmented in units, bricks, composed of alternate nuclear emulsion plates and lead sheets. An algorithm to reconstruct electromagnetic showers in a brick was developed. The algorithm was optimized using experimental data from 1, 3 and 6 GeV electron exposures and cross-checked with detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, a neural network was used as electron/pion separator.

  18. Cationic acrylamide emulsion polymer brine thickeners

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, P.A.; Piccoline, M.A.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a thickened, solids free, aqueous drilling and servicing brine having a density of at least 14.4 ppg. comprising (a) an aqueous solution of at least one water-soluble salt of a multivalent metal, and (b) a cationic water-in-oil emulsion polymer of acrylamide or methacrylamide and a cationic monomer selected from the group consisting of a dialkylaminoalkyl acrylamide or methacrylamide, a trialkylaminoalkyl acrylamide or methacrylamide, a trialkylaminoalkyl acrylate or methacrylate, and a dialkyldialkyl ammonium halide. The acrylamide or methacrylamide to cationic monomer molar ratio of the polymer is about 70:30 to 95:5, the polymer having an I.V. in 1.0N KCl of about 1.0 to 7.0 dl/g and being present in a compatible and viscosifying amount; the thickened brine characterized by being substantially non-dilatent.

  19. Emulsion chamber observations and interpretation (HE 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, M.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results from Emulsion Chamber (EC) experiments at mountain altitudes or at higher levels using flying carriers are examined. The physical interest in this field is concentrated on the strong interaction at the very high energy region exceeding the accelerator energy, also on the primary cosmic ray intensity and its chemical composition. Those experiments which observed cosmic ray secondaries gave information on high energy interaction characteristics through the analyses of secondary spectra, gamma-hadron families and C-jets (direct observation of the particle production occuring at the carbon target). Problems of scaling violation in fragmentation region, interaction cross section, transverse momentum of produced secondaries, and some peculiar features of exotic events are discussed.

  20. Phytonadione Content in Branded Intravenous Fat Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Forchielli, Maria Luisa; Conti, Matteo; Motta, Roberto; Puggioli, Cristina; Bersani, Germana

    2017-03-01

    Intravenous fat emulsions (IVFE) with different fatty acid compositions contain vitamin E as a by-product of vegetable and animal oil during the refining processes. Likewise, other lipid-soluble vitamins may be present in IVFE. No data, however, exist about phytonadione (vitamin K1) concentration in IVFE information leaflets. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the phytonadione content in different IVFE. Analyses were carried out in triplicate on 6 branded IVFE as follows: 30% soybean oil (100%), 20% olive-soybean oil (80%-20%), 20% soybean-medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) coconut oil (50%-50%), 20% soybean-olive-MCT-fish oil (30%-25%-30%-15%), 20% soybean-MCT-fish oil (40%-50%-10%), and 10% pure fish oil (100%). Phytonadione was analyzed and quantified by a quali-quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method after its extraction from the IVFE by an isopropyl alcohol-hexane mixture, reverse phase-liquid chromatography, and specific multiple-reaction monitoring for phytonadione and vitamin d3 (as internal standard). This method was validated through specificity, linearity, and accuracy. Average vitamin K1 content was 500, 100, 90, 100, 95, and 70 µg/L in soybean oil, olive-soybean oil, soybean-MCT coconut oil, soybean-olive-MCT-fish oil, soybean-MCT-fish oil, and pure fish oil intravenous lipid emulsions (ILEs), respectively. The analytical LC-MS method was extremely effective in terms of specificity, linearity ( r = 0.99), and accuracy (coefficient of variation <5%). Phytonadione is present in IVFE, and its intake varies according to IVFE type and the volume administered. It can contribute to daily requirements and become clinically relevant when simultaneously infused with multivitamins during long-term parenteral nutrition. LC-MS seems adequate in assessing vitamin K1 intake in IVFE.

  1. Physical chemistry of highly concentrated emulsions.

    PubMed

    Foudazi, Reza; Qavi, Sahar; Masalova, Irina; Malkin, Alexander Ya

    2015-06-01

    This review explores the physics underlying the rheology of highly concentrated emulsions (HCEs) to determine the relationship between elasticity and HCE stability, and to consider whether it is possible to describe all physicochemical properties of HCEs on the basis of a unique physical approach. We define HCEs as emulsions with a volume fraction above the maximum closest packing fraction of monodisperse spheres, φm=0.74, even if droplets are not of polyhedron shape. The solid-like rheological behavior of HCEs is characterized by yield stress and elasticity, properties which depend on droplet polydispersity and which are affected by caging at volume fractions about the jamming concentration, φj. A bimodal size distribution in HCEs diminishes caging and facilitates droplet movement, resulting in HCEs with negligible yield stress and no plateau in storage modulus. Thermodynamic forces automatically move HCEs toward the lowest free energy state, but since interdroplet forces create local minimums - points beyond which free energy temporarily increases before it reaches the global minimum of the system - the free energy of HCEs will settle at a local minimum unless additional energy is added. Several attempts have been undertaken to predict the elasticity of HCEs. In many cases, the elastic modulus of HCEs is higher than the one predicted from classical models, which only take into account spatial repulsion (or simply interfacial energy). Improved models based on free energy calculation should be developed to consider the disjoining pressure and interfacial rheology in addition to spatial repulsion. The disjoining pressure and interfacial viscoelasticity, which result in the deviation of elasticity from the classical model, can be regarded as parameters for quantifying the stability of HCEs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Concerning the deactivation of cobalt(III)-based porphyrin and salen catalysts in epoxide/CO2 copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Salmeia, Khalifah A; Vagin, Sergei I; Rieger, Bernhard

    2015-03-09

    Functioning as active catalysts for propylene oxide (PO) and carbon dioxide copolymerization, cobalt(III)-based salen and porphyrin complexes have drawn great attention owing to their readily modifiable nature and promising catalytic behavior, such as high selectivity for the copolymer formation and good regioselectivity with respect to the polymer microstructure. Both cobalt(III)-salen and porphyrin catalysts have been found to undergo reduction reactions to their corresponding catalytically inactive cobalt(II) species in the presence of propylene oxide, as evidenced by UV/Vis and NMR spectroscopies and X-ray crystallography (for cobalt(II)-salen). Further investigations on a TPPCoCl (TPP = tetraphenylporphyrin) and NaOMe system reveal that such a catalyst reduction is attributed to the presence of alkoxide anions. Kinetic studies of the redox reaction of TPPCoCl with NaOMe suggests a pseudo-first order in cobalt(III)-porphyrin. The addition of a co-catalyst, namely bis(triphenylphosphine)iminium chloride (PPNCl), into the reaction system of cobalt(III)-salen/porphyrin and PO shows no direct stabilizing effect. However, the results of PO/CO2 copolymerization by cobalt(III)-salen/porphyrin with PPNCl suggest a suppressed catalyst reduction. This phenomenon is explained by a rapid transformation of the alkoxide into the carbonate chain end in the course of the polymer formation, greatly shortening the lifetime of the autoreducible PO-ring-opening intermediates, cobalt(III)-salen/porphyrin alkoxides.

  3. Mussel-inspired one-step copolymerization to engineer hierarchically structured surface with superhydrophobic properties for removing oil from water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shouying

    2014-10-08

    In the present study, a superhydrophobic polyurethane (PU) sponge with hierarchically structured surface, which exhibits excellent performance in absorbing oils/organic solvents, was fabricated for the first time through mussel-inspired one-step copolymerization approach. Specifically, dopamine (a small molecular bioadhesive) and n-dodecylthiol were copolymerized in an alkaline aqueous solution to generate polydopamine (PDA) nanoaggregates with n-dodecylthiol motifs on the surface of the PU sponge skeletons. Then, the superhydrophobic sponge that comprised a hierarchical structured surface similar to the chemical/topological structures of lotus leaf was fabricated. The topological structures, surface wettability, and mechanical property of the sponge were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, contact angle experiments, and compression test. Just as a result of the highly porous structure, superhydrophobic property and strong mechanical stability, this sponge exhibited desirable absorption capability of oils/organic solvents (weight gains ranging from 2494% to 8670%), suggesting a promising sorbents for the removal of oily pollutants from water. Furthermore, thanks to the nonutilization of the complicated processes or sophisticated equipment, the fabrication of the superhydrophobic sponge seemed to be quite easy to scale up. All these merits make the sponge a competitive candidate when compared to the conventional absorbents, for example, nonwoven polypropylene fabric.

  4. The effects of emulsifying agents on disposition of lipid-soluble drugs included in fat emulsion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Masumitsu, Yasushi; Okudaira, Kazuho; Hayashi, Masahiro

    2004-02-01

    The uses for drug delivery systems of two soybean oil fat emulsions prepared with an emulsifying agent, phosphatidyl choline (PC) or Pluronic F-127 (PLU), were examined comparatively in vivo and in vitro. In the presence of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in vitro, the mean particle size of the PLU emulsion changed less than that of the PC emulsion. The production of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) from the PLU emulsion in the presence of LPL was smaller than that from the PC emulsion. These in vitro results indicate that the PLU emulsion is more stable than the PC emulsion. Plasma NEFA concentration following intravenous administration of the emulsions decreased with time for the PC emulsion, but was kept lower and constant for the PLU emulsion, supporting the in vitro stability data. The order of plasma cyclosporine A (CsA) concentration following intravenous administration in the above two emulsions and the mixed solution of polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG) and dimethylamide (DMA) in rats was PLU emulsion>PC emulsion>PEG/DMA solution. The plasma concentration was maintained higher and tissue distribution lower for the PLU emulsion than for other formulations. The uptake of oil violet (OV) into the rat parenchymal cells from the PLU emulsion was approximately half that from the PC emulsion, but the uptake into the Kupffer cells was almost equal in both emulsions. In conclusion, these emulsifying agents can control plasma elimination and tissue distribution of lipophilic drugs included in the emulsion. The use of the emulsion formulation makes it possible to avoid side effects through the reduction of drug uptake into non-targeted tissues.

  5. Electrical surface characteristics of a technical T emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.A.; Tarovskii, A.A.; Men, S.K.

    1988-07-01

    Technical emulsions are removed from the waste water of industrial plants by flocculation and coagulation methods. These processes can be regulated by information on the structure of the electric double layers of the emulsions and the changes which occur when reagents are added. In this paper the structure of the electric double layer of a technical T emulsion was studied by the methods of potentiometric titration, conductometry, and microelectrophoresis. A considerably higher value of the surface charge in comparison to the electrokinetic value has been established over a broad range of concentrations of 1-1, 2-1/sub 2/, and 3-1/sub 3/ electrolytes. Reversal of the charge of the droplets of the emulsion in the presence of AlCl/sub 3/ has been discovered.

  6. Physicochemical analysis in the evaluation of reconstituted dry emulsion tablets.

    PubMed

    Niczinger, Noémi Anna; Kállai-Szabó, Barnabás; Lengyel, Miléna; Gordon, Péter; Klebovich, Imre; Antal, István

    2017-02-05

    The aim of this study was to characterize the formation of emulsions by droplet size analysis and turbidimetry during reconstitution from a solid dosage form, namely from dry emulsion systems, which carry an oil phase for poorly soluble active ingredients. For the dry emulsion systems tablets were prepared either from oil-in-water systems using a freeze-drying process or through direct compression containing the same oil and excipients. The ratios of oil to emulgents and oil to xanthan gum were equal in both methods. In the preparation methods applied, mannitol, erythritol and lactose were used as excipients and mannitol was found to be the most effective excipient based on droplet size reconstitution, turbidimetry and physical properties. Quality control involved testing the physical properties of tablets and characterizing the reconstituted emulsions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluorescent-magnetic Janus particles prepared via seed emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kaewsaneha, Chariya; Bitar, Ahmad; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Polpanich, Duangporn; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2014-06-15

    Anisotropic polymeric colloidal or Janus particles possessing simultaneous magnetic and fluorescent properties were successfully prepared via the swelling-diffusion or the in situ emulsion polymerization method. In the swelling-diffusion process, magnetic emulsions (an organic ferrofluid dispersed in aqueous medium) were synthesized and used for seeds of submicron magnetic Janus particles. After swelling the anisotropic particles obtained by 1-pyrene-carboxaldehyde fluorescent dye dissolved in tetrahydrofuran, well-defined fluorescent-magnetic Janus particles were produced. In the in situ emulsion polymerization, styrene monomer mixed with fluorescent dye monomers, i.e., 1-pyrenylmethyl methacrylate (PyMMA) or fluorescein dimethacrylate (FDMA), and an oil-soluble initiator (2,2'-azobis(2-isobutyronitrile)) were emulsified in the presence of magnetic seed emulsions. The confocal microscopic images showed the fluorescent-magnetic Janus particles with high fluorescent intensity when a fluorescent crosslinker monomer FDMA was employed.

  8. Image Charge Effects on the Formation of Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Singh, Virendra; Behrens, Sven Holger

    2012-10-18

    Vigorous mixing of an aqueous particle dispersion with oil usually produces a particle-stabilized emulsion (a "Pickering emulsion"), the longevity of which depends on the particles' wetting properties. A known exception occurs when particles fail to adsorb to the oil-water interface created during mixing because of a strong repulsion between charges on the particle surface and similar charges on the oil-water interface; in this case, no Pickering emulsion is formed. Here, we present experimental evidence that the rarely considered electrostatic image force can cause a much bigger hindrance to particle adsorption and prevent the formation of Pickering emulsions even when the particle interaction with the interface charge is attractive. A simple theoretical estimate confirms the observed magnitude of this effect and points at an important limitation of Pickering emulsification, a technology with widespread industrial applications and increasing popularity in materials research and development.

  9. Aging mechanisms of perfluorocarbon emulsions using image analysis.

    PubMed

    Freire, Mara G; Dias, Ana M A; Coelho, Maria A Z; Coutinho, João A P; Marrucho, Isabel M

    2005-06-01

    The aging mechanisms of perfluorocarbon emulsions were investigated using image analysis. Oil-in-water emulsions of two perfluorocarbons, n-perfluorohexane and perfluorodecalin, were prepared with three emulsifiers, Lecithin, Span 20, and Pluronic F-68. The effect of the temperature and the replacement of water by an aqueous phase consisting of a microbial culture medium were also studied. The emulsions were prepared by sonication and their stability was followed through analysis of the evolution of mean droplet size. The results indicate that the stability of perfluorocarbon in water emulsions depends on all the parameters investigated and that two aging mechanisms, coalescence and molecular diffusion, may take place. Analysis of the evolution of the mean droplet size during long time periods indicate that coalescence is more common than previously reported for these systems and seems to be favored by a temperature increase.

  10. Stability and demulsification of emulsions stabilized by asphaltenes or resins.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lixin; Lu, Shiwei; Cao, Guoying

    2004-03-15

    Experimental data are presented to show the influence of asphaltenes and resins on the stability and demulsification of emulsions. It was found that emulsion stability was related to the concentrations of the asphaltene and resin in the crude oil, and the state of dispersion of the asphaltenes and resins (molecular vs colloidal) was critical to the strength or rigidity of interfacial films and hence to the stability of the emulsions. Based on this research, a possible emulsion minimization approach in refineries, which can be implemented utilizing microwave radiation, is also suggested. Comparing with conventional heating, microwave radiation can enhance the demulsification rate by an order of magnitude. The demulsification efficiency reaches 100% in a very short time under microwave radiation.

  11. Dehydration of oil waste emulsions by means of flocculants

    SciTech Connect

    Gandurina, L.V.; Butseva, L.N.; Shtondina, V.S.

    1995-05-01

    Oil waste emulsions are formed in the course of pumping petroleum crudes and products and are collected from the surfaces of equipment in recirculating water systems and wastewater disposal facilities (oil separators, sand traps, oil traps, holding pits for accidental spills, settlers, ponds, sludge accumulators, and so on). Emulsions are also obtained in the course of cleaning equipment in crude oil desalting and dehydration units. Such emulsions are stable, structurized systems that are very resistant to dewatering by heating and settling in separator tanks. In order to break stabilized emulsions, i.e., in order to ensure complete coalescence of drops when they collide, it is not sufficient to increase the forces of mutual attraction of drops at the moment of collision; in addition, the protective shell must be either destroyed or weakened. Demulsifying agents, or surfactants, will displace the stabilizers. This report is concerned with demulsifier efficiency.

  12. Pickering emulsions stabilized by paraffin wax and Laponite clay particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Caifu; Liu, Qian; Mei, Zhen; Wang, Jun; Xu, Jian; Sun, Dejun

    2009-08-01

    Emulsions containing wax in dispersed droplets stabilized by disc-like Laponite clay particles are prepared. Properties of the emulsions prepared at different temperatures are examined using stability, microscopy and droplet-size analysis. At low temperature, the wax crystals in the oil droplets can protrude through the interface, leading to droplet coalescence. But at higher temperatures, the droplet size decreases with wax concentration. Considering the viscosity of the oil phase and the interfacial tension, we conclude that the wax is liquid-like during the high temperature emulsification process, but during cooling wax crystals appear around the oil/water interface and stabilize the droplets. The oil/water ratio has minimal effect on the emulsions between ratios of 3:7 and 7:3. The Laponite is believed to stabilize the emulsions by increasing the viscosity of the continuous phase and also by adsorbing at the oil/water interface, thus providing a physical barrier to coalescence.

  13. Improving the detection efficiency in nuclear emulsion trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Bozza, C.; Buonaura, A.; Consiglio, L.; D`Ambrosio, N.; Lellis, G. De; De Serio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Fini, R. A.; Galati, G.; Giacomelli, G.; Grella, G.; Hosseini, B.; Kose, U.; Lauria, A.; Longhin, A.; Mandrioli, G.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Montesi, M. C.; Paoloni, A.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Rescigno, R.; Roda, M.; Rosa, G.; Schembri, A.; Shchedrina, T.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spinetti, M.; Stellacci, S. M.; Tenti, M.; Tioukov, V.

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear emulsion films are a tracking device with unique space resolution. Their use in nowadays large-scale experiments relies on the availability of automated microscope operating at very high speed. In this paper we describe the features and the latest improvements of the European Scanning System, a last-generation automated microscope for emulsion scanning. In particular, we present a new method for the recovery of tracking inefficiencies. Stacks of double coated emulsion films have been exposed to a 10 GeV/c pion beam. Efficiencies as high as 98% have been achieved for minimum ionising particle tracks perpendicular to the emulsion films and of 93% for tracks with tan(θ) ≃ 0.8.

  14. Emulsion Polymerization of Butyl Acrylate: Spin Trapping and EPR Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.; Westmoreland, D.

    1994-01-01

    The propagating radical in the emulsion polymerization reaction of butyl acrylate was detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy using two spin trapping agents, 2-methyl-2nitrosopropane and alpha -N-tert-butylnitrone.

  15. Biocompatible surfactants for water-in-fluorocarbon emulsions.

    PubMed

    Holtze, C; Rowat, A C; Agresti, J J; Hutchison, J B; Angilè, F E; Schmitz, C H J; Köster, S; Duan, H; Humphry, K J; Scanga, R A; Johnson, J S; Pisignano, D; Weitz, D A

    2008-10-01

    Drops of water-in-fluorocarbon emulsions have great potential for compartmentalizing both in vitro and in vivo biological systems; however, surfactants to stabilize such emulsions are scarce. Here we present a novel class of fluorosurfactants that we synthesize by coupling oligomeric perfluorinated polyethers (PFPE) with polyethyleneglycol (PEG). We demonstrate that these block copolymer surfactants stabilize water-in-fluorocarbon oil emulsions during all necessary steps of a drop-based experiment including drop formation, incubation, and reinjection into a second microfluidic device. Furthermore, we show that aqueous drops stabilized with these surfactants can be used for in vitro translation (IVT), as well as encapsulation and incubation of single cells. The compatability of this emulsion system with both biological systems and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices makes these surfactants ideal for a broad range of high-throughput, drop-based applications.

  16. Reduced Fat Food Emulsions: Physicochemical, Sensory, and Biological Aspects.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheryl; Smith, Gordon; Degner, Brian; McClements, David Julian

    2016-01-01

    Fat plays multiple important roles in imparting desirable sensory attributes to emulsion-based food products, such as sauces, dressings, soups, beverages, and desserts. However, there is concern that over consumption of fats leads to increased incidences of chronic diseases, such as obesity, coronary heart disease, and diabetes. Consequently, there is a need to develop reduced fat products with desirable sensory profiles that match those of their full-fat counterparts. The successful design of high quality reduced-fat products requires an understanding of the many roles that fat plays in determining the sensory attributes of food emulsions, and of appropriate strategies to replace some or all of these attributes. This paper reviews our current understanding of the influence of fat on the physicochemical and physiological attributes of food emulsions, and highlights some of the main approaches that can be used to create high quality emulsion-based food products with reduced fat contents.

  17. Emulsion Polymerization of Butyl Acrylate: Spin Trapping and EPR Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.; Westmoreland, D.

    1994-01-01

    The propagating radical in the emulsion polymerization reaction of butyl acrylate was detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy using two spin trapping agents, 2-methyl-2nitrosopropane and alpha -N-tert-butylnitrone.

  18. Tocopherol and tocotrienol homologs in parenteral lipid emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A; Pavlina, Thomas M; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral lipid emulsions, which are made of oils from plant and fish sources, contain different types of tocopherols and tocotrienols (vitamin E homologs). The amount and types of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions vary considerably and are not completely known. The objective of this analysis was to develop a quantitative method to determine levels of all vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions. An HPLC system was used to measure vitamin E homologs using a Pinnacle DB Silica normal phase column and an isocratic, n-hexane:1,4 dioxane (98:2) mobile phase. An optimized protocol was used to report vitamin E homolog concentrations in soybean oil-based (Intralipid®, Ivelip®, Lipofundin® N, Liposyn® III, and Liposyn® II), medium- and long-chain fatty acid-based (Lipofundin®, MCT and Structolipid®), olive oil-based (ClinOleic®), and fish oil-based (Omegaven®) and mixture of these oils-based (SMOFlipid®, Lipidem®) commercial parenteral lipid emulsions. Total content of all vitamin E homologs varied greatly between different emulsions, ranging from 57.9 to 383.9 µg/mL. Tocopherols (α, β, γ, δ) were the predominant vitamin E homologs for all emulsions, with tocotrienol content < 0.3%. In all of the soybean emulsions, except for Lipofundin® N, the predominant vitamin E homolog was γ-tocopherol, which ranged from 57–156 µg/mL. ClinOleic® predominantly contained α-tocopherol (32 µg/mL), whereas α-tocopherol content in Omegaven® was higher than most of the other lipid emulsions (230 µg/mL). Practical applications The information on the types and quantity of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions will be extremely useful to physicians and healthcare personnel in selecting appropriate lipid emulsions that are exclusively used in patients with inadequate gastrointestinal function, including hospitalized and critically ill patients. Some emulsions may require vitamin E supplementation in order to meet minimal human requirements

  19. Tunable Pickering emulsions with polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles (PGLNs).

    PubMed

    Silmore, Kevin S; Gupta, Chetali; Washburn, Newell R

    2016-03-15

    Lignin is an abundant biopolymer that has native interfacial functions but aggregates strongly in aqueous media. Polyacrylamide was grafted onto kraft lignin nanoparticles using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) chemistry to form polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles (PGLNs) that tune aggregation strength while retaining interfacial activities in forming Pickering emulsions. Polymer graft density on the particle surface, ionic strength, and initial water and cyclohexane volume fractions were varied and found to have profound effects on emulsion characteristics, including emulsion volume fraction, droplet size, and particle interfacial concentration that were attributed to changes in lignin aggregation and hydrophobic interactions. In particular, salt concentration was found to have a significant effect on aggregation, zeta potential, and interfacial tension, which was attributed to changes in solubility of both the kraft lignin and the polyacrylamide grafts. Dynamic light scattering, UV-vis spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and tensiometry were used to quantify emulsion properties and nanoparticle behavior. Under all conditions, the emulsions exhibited relatively fast creaming but were stable against coalescence and Ostwald ripening for a period of months. All emulsions were also oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions, as predicted by the Bancroft rule, and no catastrophic phase inversions were observed for any nanoparticle compositions. We conclude that lower grafting density of polyacrylamide on a lignin core resulted in high levels of interfacial activity, as characterized by higher concentration at the water-cyclohexane interface with a corresponding decrease in interfacial tension. These results indicate that the interfacial properties of polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles are primarily due to the native hydrophobic interactions of the lignin core. These results suggest that the forces that drive aggregation are also correlated with interfacial

  20. BslA-stabilized emulsion droplets with designed microstructure

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Emulsions are a central component of many modern formulations in food, pharmaceuticals, agrichemicals and personal care products. The droplets in these formulations are limited to being spherical as a consequence of the interfacial tension between the dispersed phase and continuous phase. The ability to control emulsion droplet morphology and stabilize non-spherical droplets would enable the modification of emulsion properties such as stability, substrate binding, delivery rate and rheology. One way of controlling droplet microstructure is to apply an elastic film around the droplet to prevent it from relaxing into a sphere. We have previously shown that BslA, an interfacial protein produced by the bacterial genus Bacillus, forms an elastic film when exposed to an oil- or air–water interface. Here, we highlight BslA's ability to stabilize anisotropic emulsion droplets. First, we show that BslA is capable of arresting dynamic emulsification processes leading to emulsions with variable morphologies depending on the conditions and emulsification technique applied. We then show that frozen emulsion droplets can be manipulated to induce partial coalescence. The structure of the partially coalesced droplets is retained after melting, but only when there is sufficient free BslA in the continuous phase. That the fidelity of replication can be tuned by adjusting the amount of free BslA in solution suggests that freezing BslA-stabilized droplets disrupts the BslA film. Finally, we use BslA's ability to preserve emulsion droplet structural integrity throughout the melting process to design emulsion droplets with a chosen shape and size. PMID:28630671

  1. Formation and stability of polychlorinated biphenyl Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Roy-Perreault, Andréanne; Kueper, Bernard H; Rawson, Jim

    2005-03-01

    An emulsion stabilized by colloidal suspensions of finely divided solids is known as a Pickering emulsion. The potential for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to form Pickering emulsions ex situ when in contact with powdered solids, such as clays and metal oxides, is investigated here. Bentonite, iron oxide and magnesium oxide dispersions proved to be robust Pickering emulsion stabilizers, whereas manganese oxide dispersions were not. Batch experiments revealed that emulsions can be formed using a moderately low energy input and can be stabilized with solid concentrations as low as 0.5 wt.%. For the base conditions (volumetric oil fraction (phi(oil))=30 vol.%; solid concentration (chi)=2 wt.%), the formed emulsions were indefinitely stable and the initial average droplet diameters varied from 80 to 258 mum, depending on the solid used in the colloidal dispersion. The average droplet size varied at early time, but for most conditions stabilized to a steady-state value 1 week after preparation. The effect of Ostwald ripening was limited. At greater than 0.5 wt.% concentration, the efficiency of the solid dispersion as a stabilizer was dependant on the volumetric oil fraction but not on the solid concentration. Generally, systems with volumetric oil fractions outside of the 20-70 vol.% range were unstable. The emulsions' droplet stability, average droplet size and size distribution were observed to vary as a function of the amount of energy provided to the system, the volumetric oil fraction, and the concentration of the solid in the aqueous dispersion. It is hypothesized that drilling through fractured rock in the immediate vicinity of dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) PCBs may provide both the energy and solid material necessary to form Pickering emulsions.

  2. Rheological properties of highly concentrated protein-stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Tatiana D; Leal-Calderon, Fernando

    2004-05-20

    We prepared concentrated quasi monodisperse hexadecane-in-water emulsions stabilized by various proteins and investigated their rheological properties. Some protein-stabilized emulsions possess remarkably high elasticity and at the same time they are considerably fragile--they exhibit coalescence at yield strain and practically do not flow. The elastic storage modulus G' and the loss modulus G" of the emulsions were determined for different oil volume fractions above the random close packing. Surprisingly, the dimensionless elastic moduli G'/(sigma/a), sigma being the interfacial tension, and a being the mean drop radius, obtained for emulsions stabilized by different proteins do not collapse on a single master curve. They are almost always substantially higher than the corresponding values obtained for equivalent Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-stabilized emulsions. The unusually high elasticity cannot be attributed to a specificity of the continuous phase, because the osmotic equation of state of our emulsions is found identical to the one obtained for samples stabilized by classical surfactants. In parallel, we mimicked the thin films that separate the droplets in the concentrated emulsion and found that the protein adsorption layers contain a substantial number of sticky surface aggregates. These severely obstruct local rearrangements of individual drops in respect to their neighbors which leads to coalescence at yield strain. Furthermore, we found that G'/(sigma/a) is correlated (for a given oil volume fraction) to the dilatational elastic modulus, of the protein layer adsorbed on the droplets. The intrinsic elasticity of the protein layers, together with the blocked local rearrangements are considered as the main factors determining the unusual bulk elasticity of the studied emulsions.

  3. Instant polysaccharide-based emulsions: impact of microstructure on lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Torcello-Gómez, Amelia; Foster, Timothy J

    2017-06-21

    The development of emulsion-based products through optimisation of ingredients, reduction in energy-input during manufacture, while fulfilling healthy attributes, are major objectives within the food industry. Instant emulsions can meet these features, but comprehensive studies are necessary to investigate the effect of the initial formulation on the final microstructure and, in turn, on the in vitro lipolysis, comprising the double aim of this work. The instant emulsion is formed within 1.5-3 min after pouring the aqueous phase into the oil phase which contains a mixture of emulsifier (Tween 20), swelling particles (Sephadex) and thickeners (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, HPMC, and guar gum, GG) under mild shearing (180 rpm). The creation of oil-in-water emulsions is monitored in situ by viscosity analysis, the final microstructure visualised by microscopy and the release of free fatty acids under simulated intestinal conditions quantified by titration. Increasing the concentration and molecular weight (Mw) of GG leads to smaller emulsion droplets due to increased bulk viscosity upon shearing. This droplet size reduction is magnified when increasing the Mw of HPMC or swelling capacity of viscosifying particles. In addition, in the absence of the emulsifier Tween 20, the sole use of high-Mw HPMC is effective in emulsification due to combined increased bulk viscosity and interfacial activity. Hence, optimisation of the ingredient choice and usage level is possible when designing microstructures. Finally, emulsions with larger droplet size (>20 μm) display a slower rate and lower extent of lipolysis, while finer emulsions (droplet size ≤20 μm) exhibit maximum rate and extent profiles. This correlates with the extent of emulsion destabilisation observed under intestinal conditions.

  4. Generation of colloidal granules and capsules from double emulsion drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kathryn S.

    Assemblies of colloidal particles are extensively used in ceramic processing, pharmaceuticals, inks and coatings. In this project, the aim was to develop a new technique to fabricate monodispersed colloidal assemblies. The use of microfluidic devices and emulsion processing allows for the fabrication of complex materials that can be used in a variety of applications. A microfluidic device is used to create monodispersed water/oil/water (w/o/w) double emulsions with interior droplets of colloidal silica suspension ranging in size from tens to hundreds of microns. By tailoring the osmotic pressure using glycerol as a solute in the continuous and inner phases of the emulsion, we can control the final volume size of the monodispersed silica colloidal crystals that form in the inner droplets of the double emulsion. Modifying the ionic strength in the colloidal dispersion can be used to affect the particle-particle interactions and crystal formation of the final colloidal particle. This w/o/w technique has been used with other systems of metal oxide colloids and cellulose nanocrystals. Encapsulation of the colloidal suspension in a polymer shell for the generation of ceramic-polymer core-shell particles has also been developed. These core-shell particles have spawned new research in the field of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. Systems and chemistries for creating cellulose hydrogels within the double emulsions have also been researched. Water in oil single emulsions and double emulsions have been used to create cellulose hydrogel spheres in the sub-100 micron diameter range. Oil/water/oil double emulsions allow us to create stable cellulose capsules. The addition of a second hydrogel polymer, such as acrylate or alginate, further strengthens the cellulose gel network and can also be processed into capsules and particles using the microfluidic device. This work could have promising applications in acoustic metamaterials, personal care products, pharmaceuticals

  5. Enhanced reductive dechlorination in columns treated with edible oil emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Cameron M.; Borden, Robert C.

    2006-09-01

    The effect of edible oil emulsion treatment on enhanced reductive dechlorination was evaluated in a 14 month laboratory column study. Experimental treatments included: (1) emulsified soybean oil and dilute HCl to inhibit biological activity; (2) emulsified oil only; (3) emulsified oil and anaerobic digester sludge; and (4) continuously feeding soluble substrate. A single application of emulsified oil was effective in generating strongly reducing, anaerobic conditions for over 14 months. PCE was rapidly reduced to cis-DCE in all three live columns. Bioaugmentation with a halorespiring enrichment culture resulted in complete dechlorination of PCE to ethene in the soluble substrate column (yeast extract and lactate). However, an additional treatment with a pulse of yeast extract and bioaugmentation culture was required to stimulate complete dechlorination in the emulsion treated columns. Once the dechlorinating population was established, the emulsion only column degraded PCE from 90-120 μM to below detection with concurrent ethene production in a 33 day contact time. The lower biodegradation rates in the emulsion treated columns compared to the soluble substrate column suggest that emulsified oil barriers may require a somewhat longer contact time for effective treatment. In the HCl inhibited column, partitioning of PCE to the retained oil substantially delayed PCE breakthrough. However, reduction of PCE to more soluble degradation products ( cis-DCE, VC and ethene) greatly reduced the impact of oil-water partitioning in live columns. There was only a small decline in the hydraulic conductivity ( K) of column #1 (low pH + emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.57) and column #2 (live + emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.73) indicating emulsion injection did not result in appreciable clogging of the clayey sand. However, K loss was greater in column #3 (sludge +emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.12) and column #4 (soluble substrate, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.03) indicating clogging due

  6. Preparation of Pickering Double Emulsions Using Block Copolymer Worms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rational formulation of Pickering double emulsions is described using a judicious combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic block copolymer worms as highly anisotropic emulsifiers. More specifically, RAFT dispersion polymerization was utilized to prepare poly(lauryl methacrylate)–poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 20% w/w solids in n-dodecane and poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)–poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate)–poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 13% w/w solids in water by polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions can be readily prepared with mean droplet diameters ranging from 30 to 80 μm using a two-stage approach. First, a w/o precursor emulsion comprising 25 μm aqueous droplets is prepared using the hydrophobic worms, followed by encapsulation within oil droplets stabilized by the hydrophilic worms. The double emulsion droplet diameter and number of encapsulated water droplets can be readily varied by adjusting the stirring rate employed during the second stage. For each stage, the droplet volume fraction is relatively high at 0.50. The double emulsion nature of the final formulation was confirmed by optical and fluorescence microscopy studies. Such double emulsions are highly stable to coalescence, with little or no change in droplet diameter being detected over storage at 20 °C for 10 weeks as judged by laser diffraction. Preliminary experiments indicate that the complementary o/w/o emulsions can also be prepared using the same pair of worms by changing the order of homogenization, although somewhat lower droplet volume fractions were required in this case. Finally, we demonstrate that triple and even quadruple emulsions can be formulated using these new highly anisotropic Pickering emulsifiers. PMID:25834923

  7. Computed tomography-guided screening of surfactant effect on blood circulation time of emulsions: application to the design of an emulsion formulation for paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hye; Hong, Soon-Seok; Kim, So Hee; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Lim, Joon Seok; Lim, Soo-Jeong

    2014-08-01

    In an effort to apply the imaging techniques currently used in disease diagnosis for monitoring the pharmacokinetics and biodisposition of particulate drug carriers, we sought to use computed tomography (CT) scanning methodology to investigate the impact of surfactant on the blood residence time of emulsions. We prepared the iodinated oil Lipiodol emulsions with different compositions of surfactants and investigated the impact of surfactant on the blood residence time of emulsions by CT scanning. The blood circulation time of emulsions was prolonged by including Tween 80 or DSPE-PEG (polyethylene glycol 2000) in emulsions. Tween 80 was less effective than DSPE-PEG in terms of prolongation effect, but the blood circulating time of emulsions was prolonged in a Tween 80 content-dependent manner. As a proof-of-concept demonstration of the usefulness of CT-guided screening in the process of formulating drugs that need to be loaded in emulsions, paclitaxel was loaded in emulsions prepared with 87 or 65% Tween 80-containing surfactant mixtures. A pharmacokinetics study showed that paclitaxel loaded in 87% Tween 80 emulsions circulated longer in the bloodstream compared to those in 65% Tween 80 emulsions, as predicted by CT imaging. CT-visible, Lipiodol emulsions enabled the simple evaluation of surfactant composition effects on the biodisposition of emulsions.

  8. Formulation, stability and degradation kinetics of intravenous cinnarizine lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuai; Chen, Hao; Cui, Yue; Tang, Xing

    2009-05-21

    Cinnarizine was loaded in the lipid emulsion to develop an intravenous formulation with good physical and chemical stability. High-pressure homogenization was used to prepare the lipid emulsion. The factors influencing the stability of cinnarizine lipid emulsion, such as different drug loading methods, pH, temperature, sterilization methods and sterilization time were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatograph. The degradation of cinnarizine in aqueous solution and lipid emulsion both followed apparent first-order kinetics. A possible degradation mechanism was postulated by the bell-shaped pH-rate profile of cinnarizine. Localization of the drug in the interfacial lecithin layer significantly improved the chemical stability of cinnarizine and its stabilizing mechanism was thoroughly discussed and proved. The activation energy of cinnarizine in lipid emulsion was calculated to be 51.27 kJ/mol which was similar to that in aqueous solution. This indicates that the stabilizing effect of the drug carrier on cinnarizine was not an alteration of the degradation reaction. In addition, shelf-life of cinnarizine in lipid emulsion was estimated to be 1471.6 days at 4 degrees C, which is much longer compared with 19.8 days in aqueous solution. The final products were stable enough to resist a 121 degrees C rotating steam sterilization for 15 min.

  9. Stability of Emulsions Containing Both Sodium Caseinate and Tween 20.

    PubMed

    Dickinson; Ritzoulis; Povey

    1999-04-15

    The creaming and rheology of oil-in-water emulsions (30 vol% n-tetradecane, pH 6.8) stabilized by a mixture of commercial sodium caseinate and the non-ionic emulsifier polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) has been investigated at 21 degrees C. The presence of sufficient Tween 20 to displace most of the protein from the emulsion droplet surface leads to greatly enhanced emulsion creaming (and strongly non-Newtonian rheology) which is indicative of depletion flocculation by nonadsorbed surface-active material (protein and emulsifier). In emulsions containing a constant amount of surface-active material, the replacement of a very small fraction of Tween 20 by caseinate in a stable pure Tween 20 emulsion leads to enhanced creaming for a small fraction of the droplets, and this fraction increases with increasing replacement of emulsifier by protein. This behavior is probably due to depletion flocculation, although an alternative bridging mechanism is also a possibility. The overall stability of these sets of emulsions can be represented in terms of a global stability diagram containing regions of bridging flocculation and coalescence (low content of surface-active material), stability (intermediate content), and depletion flocculation (high content). Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  10. Stabilization/solidification of munition destruction waste by asphalt emulsion.

    PubMed

    Cervinkova, Marketa; Vondruska, Milan; Bednarik, Vratislav; Pazdera, Antonin

    2007-04-02

    Destruction of discarded military munitions in an explosion chamber produces two fractions of hazardous solid waste. The first one is scrap waste that remains in the chamber after explosion; the second one is fine dust waste, which is trapped on filters of gas products that are exhausted from the chamber after explosion. The technique of stabilization/solidification of the scrap waste by asphalt emulsion is described in this paper. The technique consists of simple mixing of the waste with anionic asphalt emulsion, or two-step mixing of the waste with cationic asphalt emulsion. These techniques are easy to use and the stabilized scrap waste proves low leachability of contained heavy metals assessed by TCLP test. Hence, it is possible to landfill the scrap waste stabilized by asphalt emulsion. If the dust waste, which has large specific surface, is stabilized by asphalt emulsion, it is not fully encapsulated; the results of the leaching tests do not meet the regulatory levels. However, the dust waste solidified by asphalt emulsion can be deposited into an asphalted disposal site of the landfill. The asphalt walls of the disposal site represent an efficient secondary barrier against pollutant release.

  11. Pickering emulsions: challenges and opportunities in topical delivery.

    PubMed

    Marto, Joana; Ascenso, Andreia; Simoes, Sandra; Almeida, António J; Ribeiro, Helena M

    2016-08-01

    Topical drug delivery is a challenging area with many advantages such as avoidance of first passage effect, stabilization of blood concentrations and attainment of local therapeutic effect with fewer side effects. Despite all these advantages, topical drug delivery remains limited to few molecules, since skin acts as a barrier to the delivery of many therapeutic molecules. To overcome this obstacle, a favored strategy relies on selecting suitable vehicles for dermatologic therapy, such as emulsions, gels and, more recently, nanoparticulate systems. Particle-stabilized emulsions, also known as Pickering emulsions, have garnered interest in recent years. Although most of the investigation on Pickering emulsions has been based on model systems with inorganic or organic solid particles, recent advances have been made regarding the application of nanocarriers, protein-based particles or cyclodextrins for this purpose. This review reports the latest advances in Pickering emulsions technical challenges, and discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of using these formulations for topical pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications as an alternative to conventional surfactant-based systems. Pickering emulsions appear as a multifunctional dosage form with endless advantages. A great deal of progress is expected in this area, which might represent a renewed vision for the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry.

  12. Evaluation of emulsion stability by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akers, M J; Lach, J L

    1976-02-01

    A new method is described for evaluating the stability of emulsion bases and active components contained within such emulsions. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a technique that has the capability of detecting changes in particle size, surface properties, or drug quality of emulsions as a function of time without disturbance of the system. Such physical or chemical changes are monitored by changes in the visible and UV wavelength spectral characteristics of the emulsified systems. Four basic emulsion systems were prepared and analyzed for physical stability for 6 months by three techniques: visible coalescence, particle counting measurement, and DRS. Two drugs, aspirin and ascorbic acid, were then incorporated within stable emulsion bases, and the chemical stability of these drugs was monitored by DRS for 6 months. Results were compared with concomitant quantitative drug assay procedures. Good agreement was observed when data from DRS and analytical measurements were compared. The DRS technique may be used as a supportive method, offering simplicity and expedience, with other methods of evaluating emulsion stability and drug stability within emulsified systems.

  13. Chemical stability of teniposide in aqueous and parenteral lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Cui, Yue; Tang, Xing

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degradation kinetics of teniposide in lipid emulsion and aqueous solution. The chemical stability of teniposide in lipid emulsion and aqueous solution at various pH values and temperatures was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography. In addition, the viscosities of emulsion at different temperatures were investigated. The degradation of teniposide both in emulsion and in aqueous solution was shown to follow pseudo-first-order degradation kinetics. The t (1/2) values of teniposide lipid emulsion (TLE) and the aqueous solution were 80 and 2.6 days at 10 degrees C, respectively. Under the most stable pH range of 6.0-6.5, stability of teniposide in the emulsion increased more than 30-fold compared with that in aqueous solution. Furthermore, there was a difference between the shelf life of TLE actually measured (29 days) at 10 degrees C and the one deduced (15 days) from the degradation data of high temperatures by Arrhenius equation. It could be hypothesized that the difference was due to a slower diffusion of teniposide from oil phase to aqueous phase at the lower temperatures, which would be a speed-limited process in the degradation of TLE. The results of viscosity test confirmed the presumption.

  14. Fat overload syndrome after the rapid infusion of SMOFlipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Hojsak, Iva; Kolaček, Sanja

    2014-01-01

    Fat overload syndrome is a well-known complication of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy. It is characterized by headaches, fever, jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, respiratory distress, and spontaneous hemorrhage. Other symptoms include anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, low fibrinogen levels, and coagulopathy. Several reports in the literature describe fat overload syndrome caused by rapid infusion of lipid emulsions, all with soybean-based lipid emulsions. We report fat overload syndrome in a 2-year-old girl with short bowel syndrome on home parenteral nutrition. Fat overload syndrome occurred as a result of accidental, very rapid infusion of a 20% soy oil, medium-chain triglyceride, olive and fish oil-based lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid) that showed the same complications seen with an earlier lipid emulsion (Intralipid). The patient was successfully treated with supportive care combining fluid infusion, transfusion of platelets, and substitution of serum albumin (0.5 g/kg/d) and fresh-frozen plasma (10 mL/kg). In the next couple of days, she received extra platelets, erythrocyte transfusion, and filgrastim (Neupogen; 5 µg/kg/d) due to a very low leukocyte count. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of fat overload syndrome caused by SMOFlipid emulsion described in the literature.

  15. Analyzing Benzene and Cyclohexane Emulsion Droplet Collisions on Ultramicroelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Deng, Haiqiang; Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J

    2015-11-03

    We report the collisions of single emulsion oil droplets with extremely low dielectric constants (e.g., benzene, ε of 2.27, or cyclohexane, ε of 2.02) as studied via emulsion droplet reactor (EDR) on an ultramicroelectrode (UME). By applying appropriate potentials to the UME, we observed the electrochemical effects of single-collision signals from the bulk electrolysis of single emulsion droplets. Different hydrophobic redox species (ferrocene, decamethyl-ferrocene, or metalloporphyrin) were trapped in a mixed benzene (or cyclohexane) oil-in-water emulsion using an ionic liquid as the supporting electrolyte and emulsifier. The emulsions were prepared using ultrasonic processing. Spike-like responses were observed in each i-t response due to the complete electrolysis of all of the above-mentioned redox species within the droplet. On the basis of these single-particle collision results, the collision frequency, size distribution, i-t decay behavior of the emulsion droplets, and possible mechanisms are analyzed and discussed. This work demonstrated that bulk electrolysis can be achieved in a few seconds in these attoliter reactors, suggesting many applications, such as analysis and electrosynthesis in low dielectric constant solvents, which have a much broader potential window.

  16. Droplet-based microfluidics and the dynamics of emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baret, Jean-Christophe; Brosseau, Quentin; Semin, Benoit; Qu, Xiaopeng

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions are complex fluids already involved for a long time in a wide-range of industrial processes, such as, for example, food, cosmetics or materials synthesis [1]. More recently, applications of emulsions have been extended to new fields like biotechnology or biochemistry where the compartmentalization of compounds in emulsion droplets is used to parallelise (bio-) chemical reactions [2]. Interestingly, these applications pinpoint to fundamental questions dealing with surfactant dynamics, dynamic surface tension, hydrodynamic interactions and electrohydrodynamics. Droplet-based microfluidics is a very powerful tool to quantitatively study the dynamics of emulsions at the single droplet level or even at the single interface level: well-controlled emulsions are produced and manipulated using hydrodynamics, electrical forces, optical actuation and combination of these effects. We will describe here how droplet-based microfluidics is used to extract quantitative informations on the physical-chemistry of emulsions for a better understanding and control of the dynamics of these systems [3].[4pt] [1] J. Bibette et al. Rep. Prog. Phys., 62, 969-1033 (1999)[0pt] [2] A. Theberge et al., Angewandte Chemie Int. Ed. 49, 5846 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.-C. Baret et al., Langmuir, 25, 6088 (2009)

  17. Physical and antimicrobial properties of thyme oil emulsions stabilized by ovalbumin and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Niu, Fuge; Pan, Weichun; Su, Yujie; Yang, Yanjun

    2016-12-01

    Natural biopolymer stabilized oil-in-water emulsions were formulated using ovalbumin (OVA), gum arabic (GA) solutions and their complexes. The influence of interfacial structure of emulsion (OVA-GA bilayer and OVA/GA complexes emulsions) on the physical properties and antimicrobial activity of thyme oil (TO) emulsion against Escherichia coli (E. coli) was evaluated. The results revealed that the two types of emulsions with different oil phase compositions remained stable during a long storage period. The oil phase composition had an appreciable influence on the mean particle diameter and retention of the TO emulsions. The stable emulsion showed a higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and the TO emulsions showed an improved long-term antimicrobial activity compared to the pure thyme oil, especially complexes emulsion at pH 4.0. These results provided useful information for developing protection and delivery systems for essential oil using biopolymer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Agglutination of intravenously administered phosphatidylcholine-containing lipid emulsions with serum C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Tugirimana, Pierrot; Speeckaert, Marijn M; Fiers, Tom; De Buyzere, Marc L; Kint, Jos; Benoit, Dominique; Delanghe, Joris R

    2013-04-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is able to bind phospholipids in the presence of calcium. We wanted to investigate the reaction of CRP with various commercial fat emulsions and to explore the impact of CRP agglutination on serum CRP levels. Serum specimens were mixed with Intralipid 20% (soybean oil-based fat emulsion), Structolipid (structured oil-based fat emulsion), Omegaven (fish oil-based fat emulsion), or SMOFlipid (mixed soybean oil-, olive oil-, and fish oil-based emulsion) in Tris-calcium buffer (pH 7.5). After 30 minutes of incubation at 37°C, CRP-phospholipid complexes were turbidimetrically quantified and flow cytometric analysis was performed. Similarly, CRP complexes were monitored in vivo, following administration of fat emulsion. CRP was able to agglutinate phospholipid-containing lipid droplets present in the soybean oil-based fat emulsion and the structured oil-based fat emulsion. To a lesser extent, agglutination was observed for fish oil-containing fat emulsions, whereas no agglutination was noticed for the mixed soybean oil-, olive oil-, and fish oil-based emulsion. Results for propofol-containing emulsions were comparable. Agglutination correlated with phospholipid content of the emulsions. When in vivo agglutination occurred, plasma CRP values dropped due to consumption of CRP by phospholipid-induced agglutination. In this in vitro experiment, we demonstrated agglutination of CRP with phospholipids in various fat emulsions. Research studies are required in patients to determine which effects occur with various intravenous fat emulsions.

  19. Comment to "The pharmacopeial evolution of Intralipid injectable emulsion in plastic containers: from a coarse to a fine emulsion".

    PubMed

    Ellborg, Anders; Ferreira, Denise; Mohammadnejad, Javad; Wärnheim, Torbjörn

    2010-06-15

    The droplet size distribution of 50 batches of multi-chamber bags containing the parenteral nutrition emulsions Intralipid (Kabiven and Kabiven Peripheral) or Structolipid (StructoKabiven and StructoKabiven Peripheral), respectively, has been investigated. The results show that the non-compounded lipid emulsions analysed are in compliance with the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) chapter 729, Method II limit for the droplet size distribution, PFAT(5)<0.05%.

  20. Enhanced cellular uptake of nanoparticles by increasing the hydrophobicity of poly(lactic acid) through copolymerization with cell-membrane-lipid components.

    PubMed

    Samadi Moghaddam, Mariam; Heiny, Markus; Shastri, V Prasad

    2015-10-07

    The influence of hydrophobicity on the internalization of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) remains poorly investigated. The hydrophobicity of poly(L-lactide) was increased by copolymerization with cell-membrane-lipid components, and this significantly enhanced the uptake of NPs up to 60% in the human cervical cancer cell line in comparison to unmodified poly(L-lactide) NPs.

  1. Reactivity of vegetable oil macromonomers in thiol-ene, cationic, and emulsion polymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Micah Stephen

    Vegetable oils were, and continue, to be a mainstay in unsaturated polyester ("alkyd") technology. Our endeavor is to use vegetable oil-based polymers in environmentally-friendly coatings. The role of vegetable oil cis-unsaturation has not been fully explored in polymers. To that end, vegetable oil macromonomers (VOMMs) in three different systems were investigated to determine the involvement of cis-unsaturation in chain transfer, auto-oxidation, and copolymerization reactions. VOMMs were incorporated into UV curable thiol-ene coatings, UV cationic coatings, and acrylic solution copolymers and fundamental studies were conducted to determine how and to what extent cis-unsaturation contributes to film performance properties. In thiol-ene UV curable coatings, cis-unsaturation was involved in the initial curing reaction and to lesser degrees, in postcure crosslinking. Its behavior was determined to be dependent on the ene component. Thiol-ene photopolymerization yielded homogeneous networks but formulations containing VOMMs exhibited greater heterogeneity due to non-uniformity in the VOMM chemical structures, and the concurrent reactions occurring during thiol-ene photopolymerization and "dark cure". Partially epoxidized soybean oil was synthesized to contain varying levels of residual cis-unsaturation. Cationic photopolymerization of partially epoxidized soybean oil yielded lightly crosslinked films, but the influence of free radical decomposition byproducts has not been fully investigated. The low involvement of the cis-unsaturation in photopolymerization was attributed to its low reactivity and/or radical combination with antioxidants and molecular oxygen dissolved in the films. When used in emulsion polymerization, VOMMs lower the minimum filming temperature during coalescence and increase the Tg after application via auto-oxidation. Free radical polymerization of VOMMs is accompanied by chain transfer reactions between polymer radicals and VOMMs that reduces

  2. Use of microwave radiation in separating emulsions and dispersions of hydrocarbons and water

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, N.O.

    1986-04-15

    A method is described for enhancing the separation of hydrocarbon and water from an emulsion or dispersion thereof comprising the steps of subjecting the emulsion or dispersion to microwave radiation in the range of one millimeter to 30 centimeters and heating the microwave irradiated emulsion or dispersion to a separating temperature using conventional heating means. A method is also described for enhancing the separation of hydrocarbon and water from from dispersion or emulsion thereof in the presence of chemical deemulsifiers comprising the steps of contacting the dispersion or emulsion and chemical deemulsifiers with microwave energy before heating the emulsion or dispersion to a separating temperature using conventional heating means.

  3. Comparative biomechanical and radiological characterization of osseointegration of a biodegradable magnesium alloy pin and a copolymeric control for osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lindtner, Richard A; Castellani, Christoph; Tangl, Stefan; Zanoni, Gerald; Hausbrandt, Peter; Tschegg, Elmar K; Stanzl-Tschegg, Stefanie E; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2013-12-01

    Magnesium alloys offer great advantages as degradable implant material for pediatric fracture fixation and hold the potential to overcome certain critical shortcomings inherent to currently used degradable (co)polymers. Besides good biocompatibility and appropriate degradation kinetics, sufficient implant anchorage in host bone is critical to prevent implant failure. Bone-implant anchorage of biodegradable magnesium alloys, however, has not yet been related and compared to that of copolymers, their degradable counterparts currently in clinical use. The aim of this study, therefore, was to comparatively assess bone-implant interface strength and the amount of peri-implant bone of a biodegradable magnesium alloy pin (Mg-Y-Nd-HRE) and a self-reinforced copolymeric control (85/15 poly(l-lactic-co-glycolic acid)). To this purpose, push-out testing, microfocus computed tomography (μCT), histological and scanning electron microscopic examination was performed after 4, 12 and 24 weeks of transcortical implantation in 72 rats. Biomechanical testing revealed significantly higher ultimate shear strength for the magnesium alloy pins than for the copolymeric controls at all 3 timepoints (P≤0.001 for all comparisons). As evaluated by μCT, the amount of bone present near the interface and in a wider radius (up to 0.5mm) around it was higher in the magnesium alloy implants at 4 weeks, without significant differences at 12 and 24 weeks. Histological examination confirmed direct bone-to-implant contact for both implant types. In vivo degradation of implants did not induce any noticeable local or systemic inflammation. This data suggests that the investigated degradable magnesium alloy rod exhibits markedly superior bone-implant interface strength and a greater amount of peri-implant bone than a self-reinforced copolymeric control currently in use; thus it fulfills a crucial prerequisite for its successful clinical deployment as an alternative degradable orthopedic implant

  4. Increasing entrapment of peptides within poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles prepared from water-in-oil microemulsions by copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mingtao; Davies, Nigel M; Toth, Istvan

    2008-10-01

    Low molecular hydrophilic actives such as peptides are typically poorly encapsulated within poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles when prepared from micellar or microemulsion templates. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the entrapment of peptides within poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles could be increased by functionalizing the peptide so that it could copolymerize with the alkyl cyanoacrylate monomer. Peptide and acryloyl functionalized peptide representing the antigenic epitope of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein (LCMV(33-41)) were synthesized using solid-phase peptide synthesis. Poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles were prepared to encapsulate either peptide or functionalized peptide using both an aqueous micellar and a water-in-oil microemulsion polymerization template. Using the micellar template, nanoparticles could not be produced in the presence of acryloyl peptide. Rather an agglomerated mass formed on the stirrer. In contrast, nanoparticles could be prepared using both acryloyl and parent peptide using the water-in-oil microemulsion template. Encapsulation efficiency was more than twofold greater for functionalized peptide, being greater than 90%. Encapsulation efficiency of functionalized peptide was also observed to increase with increasing the amount of alkyl cyanoacrylate monomer used for polymerization. A biphasic release profile was observed for the nanoparticles entrapping the non-functionalized peptide with greater than 50% of peptide being released during the first 10 min and with around 90% being released at 6h. In contrast, less than 10% of the total amount of acryloyl LCMV(33-41) entrapped within the nanoparticles was detected in the release media following the initial 10 min, and no further release of peptide was observed up to the termination of the release study at 360 min. The difference in entrapment and release kinetics between the parent and functionalized peptide strongly supports the

  5. Enhancing biosensor properties of conducting polymers via copolymerization: Synthesis of EDOT-substituted bis(2-pyridylimino)isoindolato-palladium complex and electrochemical sensing of glucose by its copolymerized film.

    PubMed

    Tekbaşoğlu, Tuğçe Yazıcı; Soganci, Tugba; Ak, Metin; Koca, Atıf; Şener, M Kasım

    2017-01-15

    1,3-Bis(2-pyridylimino)isoindoline derivative bearing 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT-BPI) and its palladium complex (EDOT-PdBPI) were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, UV-Vis spectroscopies and via mass spectrometric analysis. Polymerization of EDOT-PdBPI and copolymerization with 4-amino-N-(2,5-di(thiophene-2-yl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)benzamide (HKCN) were carried out by an electrochemical method. In addition, P(EDOT-PdBPI-co-HKCN) modified graphite rod electrode was improved for amperometric glucose sensor based on glucose oxidase (GOx). In this novel biosensor matrix, amino groups in HKCN were used for the enzyme immobilization. On the other hand, EDOT-PdBPI used to mediate the bioelectrocatalytic reaction. Amperometric detection was carried out following oxygen consumption at -0.7V vs. the Ag reference electrode in phosphate buffer (50mM, pH 6.0). The novel biosensor showed a linear amperometric response for glucose within a concentration range of 0.25mM to 2.5mM (LOD: 0.176mM). Amperometric signals at 1mM of glucose were 17.9μA under anaerobic conditions. Amperometric response of the P(EDOT-PdBPI-co-HKCN)/GOx electrode decreased only by 13% within eight weeks. The P(EDOT-PdBPI-co-HKCN)/GOx electrode showed good selectivity in the presence of ethanol and phenol. This result shows that, modification of the proposed biosensor by copolymerization of amine functionalized monomer, which is indispensable to the enzyme immobilization, with palladium complex bearing monomer, which is mediate the bioelectrocatalytic reaction, have provided to give perfect response to different glucose concentrations.

  6. Development of novel zein-sodium caseinate nanoparticle (ZP)-stabilized emulsion films for improved water barrier properties via emulsion/solvent evaporation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Juan; Yin, Ye-Chong; Yin, Shou-Wei; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Shi, Wei-Jian; Tang, Chuan-He; Wang, Jin-Mei

    2013-11-20

    This work attempted to develop novel high barrier zein/SC nanoparticle (ZP)-stabilized emulsion films through microfluidic emulsification (ZPE films) or in combination with solvent (ethyl acetate) evaporation techniques (ZPE-EA films). Some physical properties, including tensile and optical properties, water vapor permeability (WVP), and surface hydrophobicity, as well as the microstructure of ZP-stabilized emulsion films were evaluated and compared with SC emulsion (SCE) films. The emulsion/solvent evaporation approach reduced lipid droplets of ZP-stabilized emulsions, and lipid droplets of ZP-stabilized emulsions were similar to or slightly lower than that of SC emulsions. However, ZP- and SC-stabilized emulsion films exhibited a completely different microstructure, nanoscalar lipid droplets were homogeneously distributed in the ZPE film matrix and interpenetrating protein-oil complex networks occurred within ZPE-EA films, whereas SCE films presented a heterogeneous microstructure. The different stabilization mechanisms against creaming or coalescence during film formation accounted for the preceding discrepancy of the microstructures between ZP-and SC-stabilized emulsion films. Interestingly, ZP-stabilized emulsion films exhibited a better water barrier efficiency, and the WVP values were only 40-50% of SCE films. A schematic representation for the formation of ZP-stabilized emulsion films was proposed to relate the physical performance of the films with their microstructure and to elucidate the possible forming mechanism of the films.

  7. Design and development of oral nanoparticulated insulin in multiple emulsion.

    PubMed

    Siddhartha, T Venkata; Senthil, V; Kishan, Ilindra Sai; Khatwal, Rizwan Basha; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V

    2014-01-01

    The present research aimed at developing an injection-free nanoparticulated formulation in multiple emulsion form, for oral delivery of insulin, which otherwise undergoes degradation in the gastric environment if administered orally. Insulin-polymeric nanoparticles were prepared using layer by layer (LbL) adsorption method and incorporated into an emulsion to form a nanoparticulated multiple emulsion. Using 0.6 M sodium chloride, the insulin nanoaggregates of 300-400 nm size were obtained about a yield of 94%. The characteristics of a representative nanoparticle were as follows: particle size - 391.9±0.41 nm, polydispersity index -0.425, zeta potential- +20.6 mv, encapsulation efficiency- 86.7±1.42% and percentage entrapment efficiency of the insulin-polymeric nanoparticles in the inner aqueous phase of emulsion was 84.6%. The FT-IR analysis confirms that there were no drug interactions with the polymers. Stability analysis carried out for 3 months at 8-40 °C, showed only minor changes at the end period. The release kinetics of the nanoparticulated multiple emulsion at pH 7.4 followed first order kinetics and obeyed the Fickian law. However, at pH 2.0 the release kinetics from nanoparticulated multiple emulsion followed zero order kinetics without obeying to the Fickian law. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the nanoparticulated multiple emulsion formulation has good release characteristics and imparted a tolerable protection for insulin at different pH conditions, which may be exploited for oral administration.

  8. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-02-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets (that is, droplets with faces of differing chemistries) and multiple emulsions, are of increasing importance in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules for food, in chemical separations, in cosmetics, and in dynamic optics. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets' physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have great utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with

  9. To Model Chemical Reactivity in Heterogeneous Emulsions, Think Homogeneous Microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence Stuart; Liu, Changyao; Losada-Barreiro, Sonia; Pastoriza-Gallego, Maria José; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Qing; Krishnan, Gunaseelan; Sánchez-Paz, Verónica; Zhang, Yongliang; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2015-08-25

    Two important and unsolved problems in the food industry and also fundamental questions in colloid chemistry are how to measure molecular distributions, especially antioxidants (AOs), and how to model chemical reactivity, including AO efficiency in opaque emulsions. The key to understanding reactivity in organized surfactant media is that reaction mechanisms are consistent with a discrete structures-separate continuous regions duality. Aggregate structures in emulsions are determined by highly cooperative but weak organizing forces that allow reactants to diffuse at rates approaching their diffusion-controlled limit. Reactant distributions for slow thermal bimolecular reactions are in dynamic equilibrium, and their distributions are proportional to their relative solubilities in the oil, interfacial, and aqueous regions. Our chemical kinetic method is grounded in thermodynamics and combines a pseudophase model with methods for monitoring the reactions of AOs with a hydrophobic arenediazonium ion probe in opaque emulsions. We introduce (a) the logic and basic assumptions of the pseudophase model used to define the distributions of AOs among the oil, interfacial, and aqueous regions in microemulsions and emulsions and (b) the dye derivatization and linear sweep voltammetry methods for monitoring the rates of reaction in opaque emulsions. Our results show that this approach provides a unique, versatile, and robust method for obtaining quantitative estimates of AO partition coefficients or partition constants and distributions and interfacial rate constants in emulsions. The examples provided illustrate the effects of various emulsion properties on AO distributions such as oil hydrophobicity, emulsifier structure and HLB, temperature, droplet size, surfactant charge, and acidity on reactant distributions. Finally, we show that the chemical kinetic method provides a natural explanation for the cut-off effect, a maximum followed by a sharp reduction in AO efficiency with

  10. Ostwald ripening of water-in-hydrocarbon emulsions.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jim; Burgess, Diane J

    2003-08-15

    The purposes of this study are to determine Ostwald ripening rates in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions and evaluate the potential application of the LSW theory to W/O emulsions. Water-in-oil emulsions were prepared by mixing water and hydrocarbon phases containing Span 83 and homogenizing. n-Heptane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-tetradecane were used to obtain a range of solubilities. A linear increase in the cube of the droplet size with time was observed (within the initial period of 1-2 h after emulsion preparation), supporting the LSW theory. Based on this linear relationship, Ostwald ripening rates were determined to be 3.0 x 10(-24), 2.3 x 10(-24), 1.8 x 10(-24), and 5.8 x 10(-25) m3 s(-1) for water-in-heptane, water-in-decane, water-in-dodecane, and water-in-tetradecane emulsions, respectively. These values are in agreement with theoretical predictions calculated using the LSW equation. It was observed that the ripening process gradually slowed, resulting in deviations from the LSW theory. This was attributed to the effect of the interfacial surfactant film through which the dispersed material has to diffuse during Ostwald ripening. This effect is not taken into consideration by the LSW theory. The results showed that Ostwald ripening of W/O emulsions was less sensitive to the nature of oil used and slower compared to O/W emulsions consisting of the same hydrocarbons.

  11. Food-grade Pickering emulsions stabilised with solid lipid particles.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Aleksandra; Kurukji, Daniel; Norton, Ian; Spyropoulos, Fotis

    2016-06-15

    Aqueous dispersions of tripalmitin particles (with a minimum size of 130 nm) were produced, via a hot sonication method, with and without the addition of food-grade emulsifiers. Depending on their relative size and chemistry, the emulsifiers altered the properties of the fat particles (e.g. crystal form, dispersion state and surface properties) by two proposed mechanisms. Firstly, emulsifiers modify the rate and/or extent of polymorphic transitions, resulting in the formation of fat crystals with a range of polarities. Secondly, the adsorption of emulsifiers at the particle interface modifies crystal surface properties. Such emulsifier-modified fat particles were then used to stabilise emulsions. As the behaviour of these particles was predisposed by the kind of emulsifier employed for their manufacture, the resulting particles showed different preferences to which of the emulsion phases (oil or water) became the continuous one. The polarity of the fat particles decreased as follows: Whey Protein Isolate > Soy Lecithin > Soy Lecithin + Tween 20 > Tween 20 > Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate > no emulsifier. Consequently, particles stabilised with WPI formed oil-in-water emulsions (O/W); particles stabilised solely with lecithin produced a highly unstable W/O emulsion; and particles stabilised with a mixture of lecithin and Tween 20 gave a stable W/O emulsion with drop size up to 30 μm. Coalescence stable, oil-continuous emulsions (W/O) with drop sizes between 5 and 15 μm were produced when the tripalmitin particles were stabilised with solely with Tween 20, solely with polyglycerol polyricinoleate, or with no emulsifier at all. It is proposed that the stability of the latter three emulsions was additionally enhanced by sintering of fat particles at the oil-water interface, providing a mechanical barrier against coalescence.

  12. Breaking oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by yeast.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Guilherme F; Picone, Carolina S F; Cuellar, Maria C; Cunha, Rosiane L

    2015-04-01

    Several biotechnological processes can show an undesirable formation of emulsions making difficult phase separation and product recovery. The breakup of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by yeast was studied using different physical and chemical methods. These emulsions were composed by deionized water, hexadecane and commercial yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The stability of the emulsions was evaluated varying the yeast concentration from 7.47 to 22.11% (w/w) and the phases obtained after gravity separation were evaluated on chemical composition, droplet size distribution, rheological behavior and optical microscopy. The cream phase showed kinetic stability attributed to mechanisms as electrostatic repulsion between the droplets, a possible Pickering-type stabilization and the viscoelastic properties of the concentrated emulsion. Oil recovery from cream phase was performed using gravity separation, centrifugation, heating and addition of demulsifier agents (alcohols and magnetic nanoparticles). Long centrifugation time and high centrifugal forces (2 h/150,000×g) were necessary to obtain a complete oil recovery. The heat treatment (60°C) was not enough to promote a satisfactory oil separation. Addition of alcohols followed by centrifugation enhanced oil recovery: butanol addition allowed almost complete phase separation of the emulsion while ethanol addition resulted in 84% of oil recovery. Implementation of this method, however, would require additional steps for solvent separation. Addition of charged magnetic nanoparticles was effective by interacting electrostatically with the interface, resulting in emulsion destabilization under a magnetic field. This method reached almost 96% of oil recovery and it was potentially advantageous since no additional steps might be necessary for further purifying the recovered oil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    PubMed Central

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including multiple emulsions and Janus droplets which contain hemispheres of differing material, are of increasing importance1 in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics2, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules3–5 for food6, in chemical separations7, in cosmetics8, and in dynamic optics9. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets’ physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes10, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods11,12. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have greatly increased utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of

  14. The Morphology of Emulsion Polymerized Latex Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wignall, G. D.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Linne, M. A.; Klein, A.; Sperling, L. H.; Wai, M. P.; Gelman, R. A.; Fatica, M. G.; Hoerl, R. H.; Fisher, L. W.

    1987-11-01

    Under monomer starved feed conditions, emulsion polymerization of perdeuterated methyl methacrylate and styrene in the presence of preformed polymethylmethacrylate latexes resulted in particles with a core-shell morphology, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis for a hollow sphere. The locus of polymerization of the added deuterated monomer is therefore at the particle surface. In similar measurements a statistical copolymer of styrene and methyl methacrylate was used as seed particles for further polymerization of trideuteromethyl methacrylate. The resulting polymer latex was again shown to have a core-shell morphological structure as determined by SANS. SANS experiments were also undertaken on polystyrene latexes polymerized by equilibrium swelling methods, with deuterated polymer forming the first or second step. The experiments covered a molecular weight range of 6 x 10{sup 4} 10{sup 6} the molecular weights are consistent with the experimental errors, indicating that the deuterium labeled molecules are randomly distributed in the latex. These results led to the finding that the polymer chains were constrained in the latex particles by factors of 2 to 4 from the relaxed coil dimensions. For M < 10{sup 6} g/mol SANS gave zero angle scattering intensities much higher than expected on the basis of a random distribution of labeled molecules. Several models were examined, including the possible development of core-shell structures at lower molecular weights.

  15. Switching dynamics in cholesteric liquid crystal emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadda, F.; Gonnella, G.; Marenduzzo, D.; Orlandini, E.; Tiribocchi, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this work we numerically study the switching dynamics of a 2D cholesteric emulsion droplet immersed in an isotropic fluid under an electric field, which is either uniform or rotating with constant speed. The overall dynamics depend strongly on the magnitude and on the direction (with respect to the cholesteric axis) of the applied field, on the anchoring of the director at the droplet surface and on the elasticity. If the surface anchoring is homeotropic and a uniform field is parallel to the cholesteric axis, the director undergoes deep elastic deformations and the droplet typically gets stuck into metastable states which are rich in topological defects. When the surface anchoring is tangential, the effects due to the electric field are overall less dramatic, as a small number of topological defects form at equilibrium. The application of the field perpendicular to the cholesteric axis usually has negligible effects on the defect dynamics. The presence of a rotating electric field of varying frequency fosters the rotation of the defects and of the droplet as well, typically at a lower speed than that of the field, due to the inertia of the liquid crystal. If the surface anchoring is homeotropic, a periodic motion is found. Our results represent a first step to understand the dynamical response of a cholesteric droplet under an electric field and its possible application in designing novel liquid crystal-based devices.

  16. The morphology of emulsion polymerized latex particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wignall, G.D.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Linne, M.A.; Klein, A.; Sperling, L.H.; Wai, M.P.; Gelman, R.A.; Fatica, M.G.; Hoerl, R.H.; Fisher, L.W.

    1987-11-01

    Under monomer starved feed conditions, emulsion polymerization of perdeuterated methyl methacrylate and styrene in the presence of preformed polymethylmethacrylate latexes resulted in particles with a core-shell morphology, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis for a hollow sphere. The locus of polymerization of the added deuterated monomer is therefore at the particle surface. In similar measurements a statistical copolymer of styrene and methyl methacrylate was used as seed particles for further polymerization of trideuteromethyl methacrylate. The resulting polymer latex was again shown to have a core-shell morphological structre as determined by SANS. SANS experiments were also undertaken on polystyrene latexes polymerized by equilibrium swelling methods, with deuterated polymer forming the first or second step. The experiments covered a molecular weight range of 6 x 10/sup 4/ < M < 6 x 10/sup 6/ g/mol. For M > 10/sup 6/ the molecular weights are consistent with the experimental errors, indicating that the deuterium labeled molecules are randomly distributed in the latex. These results led to the finding that the polymer chains were constrained in the latex particles by factors of 2 to 4 from the relaxed coil dimensions. For M < 10/sup 6/ g/mol SANS gave zero angle scattering intensities much higher than expected on the basis of a random distribution of labeled molecules. Several models were examined, including the possible development of core-shell structures at lower molecular weights. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Recent applications of nuclear track emulsion technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zarubin, P. I.

    2016-12-15

    A survey of recent results obtained using the nuclear track emulsion (NTE) technique in low energy applications is given. NTE irradiation with 60 MeV {sup 8}He nuclei provides identification of their decays at stopping, evaluation of the possibility of α range spectrometry, and observation of drift of thermalized {sup 8}He atoms. Correlations of α particles studied in {sup 12}C → 3α splitting induced by 14.1 MeV neutrons indicate the presence of a superposition of 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} states of the {sup 8}Be nucleus in the ground state of {sup 12}C. Angular correlations of fragments are studied in boron-enriched NTE, and the prospects of NTE application in radioactivity and nuclear fission research are discussed. It is proposed to use an automated microscope to search for collinear tripartition of heavy nuclei implanted in NTE. Surface irradiation of NTE by a {sup 252}Cf source is started. Planar events containing fragment pairs and long range α particles, as well as fragment triples, are studied. NTE samples are calibrated using Kr and Xe ions with an energy of 1.2 and 3 A MeV.

  18. In Situ Characterization of Oil-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Surfactant and Salt Using Microsensors.

    PubMed

    Church, Jared; Paynter, Danielle M; Lee, Woo Hyoung

    2017-09-26

    Chemically stabilized emulsions are difficult to break because of micelle stability. Many physical and chemical processes have been used for emulsion breaking/separation; however, most operational parameters are based on empirical data and bulk analysis. A multiscale understanding of emulsions is required before these processes can advance further. This study utilized needle-type microsensors and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for characterizing simulated bilge water emulsions with different types of surfactants (Triton X-100 and sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]) under various NaCl concentrations at microscale. Using microsensors, a diffusion process was clearly visualized across the oil/water interface which appears to be related to emulsion formation kinetics and mass transfer. While emulsion stability decreased with NaCl concentrations, SDS (anionic surfactant) is more likely to form emulsion as salinity increases, requiring more salinity to coalesce SDS emulsions than Triton X-100 (nonionic surfactant) emulsions. Triton X-100 emulsions showed the potential to exhibit particle stabilized emulsions with NaCl concentration below 10(-2.5) M. The research demonstrated that the use of nonionic surfactant allows better oil-in-water separation than anionic surfactant. Significant pH changes of emulsions from unknown additives have implications when operating pH-sensitive emulsion breaking/separation processes (e.g., electrocoagulation).

  19. Enhanced electromagnetic loss of polybenzoxazole copolymerized with etched multiwalled carbon nanotube via direct Friedel-Crafts acylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Qian, Jun; Teng, Xin; Zhang, Kan; Zhuang, Qixin; Han, Zhewen

    2014-04-01

    Etched multiwalled carbon nanotube (EMCNT) was prepared via an in situ reaction between Si and MCNT induced by the reaction between Na and I2. Subsequently, EMCNTs was subjected to a copolymerization reaction with 4,6-diaminoresorcinol salt (DAR·2HCl) and terephthalic acid (TA) in polyphosphoric acid (PPA) by Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction without any acid treatment or modification. The structure and morphology of the as-prepared poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (PBO)/EMCNT nanocomposites were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The scanning electronic microscope (SEM) images indicated that the EMCNTs can disperse in PBO matrix uniformly without agglomeration. And the electromagnetic properties of the obtained PBO/EMCNT nanocomposites characterized by vector network analyzer (VNA) showed that the introduced PBO/EMCNT composites exhibited a greater enhancement in dielectric loss and magnetic loss than PBO.

  20. (Salen)CrIIIX catalysts for the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides: role of the initiator and cocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Mackiewicz, Ryan M; Rodgers, Jody L; Phelps, Andrea L

    2004-03-22

    The copolymerization of CO(2) and cyclohexene or propylene oxide has been examined employing (salen)Cr(III)Nu complexes (Nu = Cl or N(3)) as catalysts. The addition of various cocatalysts, including phosphines and PPN+ or Bu4N+ Cl- salts serves to greatly enhance the rate of copolymer production. In these instances, the mechanism of the initiation step appears to be unimolecular in catalyst concentration, unlike the bimolecular process cocatalyzed by N-methylimidazole. The copolymers were produced with >95% carbonate linkages with TOFs in the range 39-494 mol epoxide consumed/mol Cr.h. In the presence of phosphine cocatalysts, no cyclic carbonate was produced as a byproduct.

  1. Metal-Organic Framework Supported on Processable Polymer Matrix by In Situ Copolymerization for Enhanced Iron(III) Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sen; Chen, Min; Tian, Jia-Yue; Wang, Lei; Li, Min; Fang, Shao-Ming; Wang, Xi; Zhou, Li-Ming; Wang, Zhuo-Wei; Du, Miao

    2017-03-17

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) represent a promising class of porous materials. However, MOFs show poor processability that impedes their full potential in applications. This work develops a composite strategy to skillfully load MOFs on a polymer plate to afford processability for these powder materials. A predesigned mesoporous MOF with active -NH2 groups around the pore walls was prepared and its copolymerization with the -NCO groups of macromonomers (polyurethane acrylate) could be facilely induced by an initiator under mild conditions. Notably, the target MOF-polymer composite is transparent, elastic, and shows enhanced Fe(3+) detection compared with that of the individual MOF functional component. This result can be ascribed to the synergistic effect of the composite with newly formed chemical bonds between the MOF particle and polymer matrix. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Plasma-induced graft copolymerization of poly(methacrylic acid) on electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanofiber membrane.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Satinderpal; Ma, Zuwei; Gopal, Renuga; Singh, Gurdev; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Matsuura, Takeshi

    2007-12-18

    Electrospun nanofibrous membranes (ENM) which have a porous structure have a huge potential for various liquid filtration applications. In this paper, we explore the viability of using plasma-induced graft copolymerization to reduce the pore sizes of ENMs. Poly(vinylidene) fluoride (PVDF) was electrospun to produce a nonwoven membrane, comprised of nanofibers with diameters in the range of 200-600 nm. The surface of the ENM was exposed to argon plasma and subsequently graft-copolymerized with methacrylic acid. The effect of plasma exposure time on grafting was studied for both the ENM and a commercial hydrophobic PVDF (HVHP) membrane. The grafting density was quantitatively measured with toluidine blue-O. The degree of grafting increased steeply with an increase in plasma exposure time for the ENM, attaining a maximum of 180 nmol/mg after 120 s of plasma treatment. However, the increase in the grafting density on the surface of the HVHP membrane was not as drastic, reaching a plateau of 65 nmol/mg after 60 s. The liquid entry permeation of water dropped extensively for both membranes, indicating a change in surface properties. Field emission scanning electron microscopy micrographs revealed an alteration in the surface pore structure for both membranes after grafting. Bubble point measurements of the ENM reduced from 3.6 to 0.9 um after grafting. The pore-size distribution obtained using the capillary flow porometer for the grafted ENM revealed that it had a similar profile to that of a commercial hydrophilic commercial PVDF (HVLP) membrane. More significantly, water filtration studies revealed that the grafted ENM had a better flux throughput than the HVLP membrane. This suggests that ENMs can be successfully engineered through surface modification to achieve smaller pores while retaining their high flux performance.

  3. Principles of emulsion stabilization with special reference to polymeric surfactants.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Tharwat

    2006-01-01

    This overview summarizes the basic principles of emulsion stabilization with particular reference to polymeric surfactants. The main breakdown processes in emulsions are briefly described. A section is devoted to the structure of polymeric surfactants and their conformation at the interface. Particular attention is given to two polymeric surfactants that are suitable for oil-in-water (O/W) and water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions. For O/W emulsions, a hydrophobically modified inulin (HMI), obtained by grafting several alkyl groups on the backbone of the inulin (polyfructose) chain, is the most suitable. For W/O emulsions, an A-B-A block copolymer of polydroxystearic acid (PHS), the A chains, and polyethylene oxide (PEO), the B chain, is the most suitable. The conformation of both polymeric surfactants at the O/W and W/O interfaces is described. A section is devoted to the interaction between emulsion droplets containing adsorbed polymer surfactant molecules. This interaction is referred to as steric stabilization, and it is a combination of two main effects, namely, unfavorable mixing of the A chains, referred to as the mixing interaction, Gmix, and loss of configurational entropy on significant overlap of the stabilizing chains, referred to as elastic interaction, Gel. The criteria for effective steric stabilization are summarized. O/W emulsions based on HMI are described, and their stability in water and in aqueous electrolyte solutions is investigated using optical microscopy. Very stable emulsions can be produced both at room temperature and at 50 degrees C. The reason for this high stability is described in terms of the multipoint anchoring of the polymeric surfactant (by several alkyl groups), the strong hydration of the inulin (polyfructose) chains, and the high concentration of inulin in the adsorbed layer. W/O emulsions using PHS-PEO-PHS block copolymer can be prepared at a high volume fraction of water, varphi, and these emulsions remain fluid up to high varphi

  4. Olive oil-based fat emulsion versus soy oil-based fat emulsion in abdominal oncologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Onar, Pelin; Yildiz, Baris Dogu; Yildiz, Emine Akal; Besler, Tanju; Abbasoglu, Osman

    2011-02-01

    In parenteral nutrition (PN), essential fatty acids are provided by soy oil-based fat emulsions, which may exert adverse effects on the immune system and lipid peroxidation. Olive oil -based fat emulsions have been said to prevent these undesired effects. This study compares effects of olive oil - and soy oil -based fat emulsions in 22 patients who underwent abdominal surgery for cancer. The first group (n = 10) received soy oil -based fat emulsion; the second group (n = 10) received olive oil -based fat emulsion. Body temperature, body mass index, (BMI) and biochemical variables were measured on days 0 and 7. There were no differences between the groups with regard to BMI or temperature. On day 7, the first group (compared with day 0) had significant increases in plasma alkaline phosphatase (81.70 ± 16.03 vs 117.60 ± 11.1), γ-glutamyl transferase (39.90 ± 15.40 vs 137.70 ± 24.09), and mean body temperature (36.72°C ± 0.14°C vs 37.20°C ± 0.17°C) (P < .01). Second group had increases in alkaline phosphatase (85.80 ± 13.46 vs 147.20 ± 34.17), γ-glutamyl transferase (48.40 ± 12.86 vs 129.40 ± 42.03), total protein (5.14 ± 0.19 vs 6.06 ± 0.49), and albumin (2.62 ± 0.14 vs 3.00 ± 0.18) (P < .05). Changes in thiobutyric acid levels were not statistically significant in either group. In postoperative cancer patients, olive oil-based fat emulsion had similar effects on BMI, body temperature, biochemical values, and thiobutyric acid levels as soy oil-based fat emulsions.

  5. Investigation of different emulsion systems for dermal delivery of nicotinamide.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Sakine; Özer, Özgen

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide (NA) has been shown to have beneficial effects on several skin diseases such as tumor, acne vulgaris, photodamage, cellulite and atopic dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to develop a multiple emulsion and a microemulsion formulation as delivery systems for NA. A two-step process was used to prepare the W/O/W multiple emulsion. Optimum microemulsion formulation was selected by using construction of pseudo-ternary phase diagram. The physicochemical properties such as droplet size and viscosity measurements, stability studies were also evaluated. Ex-vivo permeation studies were performed with Franz-type diffusion cells and the samples were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The permeation data showed that there was no significant difference between multiple emulsion and microemulsion (p > 0.05). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was also measured. As a result of TEWL studies, a slight increase of TEWL values was observed for microemulsion formulation on rat skin when compared with multiple emulsion and commercial formulation. The results suggested that microemulsion and multiple emulsion formulations could be new and alternative dosage forms for topical application of NA.

  6. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, is used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improving the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study are: Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems; Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system; Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit; Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system; Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts; Work for the coming year will focus on the determination of toxicity of various solvents, selection of the emulsifying agents, as well as characterizing the mass transfer of hollow-fiber contactors.

  7. Emulsion Inks for 3D Printing of High Porosity Materials.

    PubMed

    Sears, Nicholas A; Dhavalikar, Prachi S; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    Photocurable emulsion inks for use with solid freeform fabrication (SFF) to generate constructs with hierarchical porosity are presented. A high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) templating technique was utilized to prepare water-in-oil emulsions from a hydrophobic photopolymer, surfactant, and water. These HIPEs displayed strong shear thinning behavior that permitted layer-by-layer deposition into complex shapes and adequately high viscosity at low shear for shape retention after extrusion. Each layer was actively polymerized with an ultraviolet cure-on-dispense (CoD) technique and compositions with sufficient viscosity were able to produce tall, complex scaffolds with an internal lattice structure and microscale porosity. Evaluation of the rheological and cure properties indicated that the viscosity and cure rate both played an important role in print fidelity. These 3D printed polyHIPE constructs benefit from the tunable pore structure of emulsion templated material and the designed architecture of 3D printing. As such, these emulsion inks can be used to create ultra high porosity constructs with complex geometries and internal lattice structures not possible with traditional manufacturing techniques.

  8. Thermodynamically Stable Pickering Emulsions Stabilized by Janus Dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Fuquan; Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Daeyeon

    2013-03-01

    Janus particles have two sides with different, often opposite, surface properties. Janus dumbbell is one type of Janus particles that consists of two partially fused spherical lobes. It is possible to independently control the geometry and surface wettability of Janus dumbbells. Janus dumbbells can also be produced in a large quantity, making them useful for practical applications such as emulsion stabilization. In this work, we calculate the free energy of emulsion formation using amphiphilic Janus dumbbells as solid surfactants. In contrast to kinetically stable emulsions stabilized by homogeneous particles, emulsion stabilized by Janus dumbbells can be thermodynamically stable. There also exists an optimal radius of droplets that can be stabilized by infinite or limited number of amphiphilic dumbbells in the continuous phase. We demonstrate that the optimal radius of dumbbell-stabilized droplets can be predicted based on the volume of the dispersed phase and the volume fraction of dumbbells in the continuous phase. We believe our calculation will provide guidelines for using Janus dumbbells as colloid surfactants to generate stable emulsions.

  9. Induced phase transitions of nanoparticle-stabilized emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frijters, Stefan; Günther, Florian; Harting, Jens

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticles can stabilize fluid-fluid interfaces over long timescales and are nowadays commonly used, e.g. in emulsions. However, their fundamental properties are as of yet poorly understood. Nanoparticle-stabilized emulsions can exhibit different phases, such as Pickering emulsions or bijels, which can be characterized by their different topologies and rheology. We investigate the effect of various initial conditions on random mixtures of two fluids and nanoparticles - in particular, the final state these systems will reach. For this, we use the well-established 3D lattice Boltzmann method, extended to allow for the added nanoparticles. After the evolution of the emulsions has stopped, we induce transitions from one state to another by gradually changing the wettability of the nanoparticles over time. This changes the preferential local curvature of the interfaces, which strongly affects the global state. We observe strong hysteresis effects because of the energy barrier presented by the necessary massive reordering of the particles. Being able to change emulsion states in situ has potential application possibilities in filtering technology, or creating particle scaffolds.

  10. Structure and rheology of highly concentrated emulsions: a modern look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, A. Ya; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2015-08-01

    The review concerns modern physicochemical, chemical and physical approaches to research into structural features that determine the rheological properties of highly concentrated emulsions. The structures and properties of various systems (suspensions, emulsions as well as transient forms including micellar colloidal solutions) are considered. The formation of highly concentrated emulsions is treated as the concentration glass transition leading to suppression of the molecular and supermolecular mobility and, subsequently, to the existence of a solid-like state of the systems in question. The emphasis is placed on analysis of visco-plasticity which manifests itself in the possibility for emulsions (unlike suspensions) to undergo irreversible deformation (to flow) at stresses exceeding some threshold (critical value) called the yield stress. The thixotropic nature of the transition through the yield stress, governed by the kinetics of the breakup/recovery of the inherent structure is considered in detail. It has been shown that structure formation in highly concentrated emulsions can extend to a macroscopic level and result in the onset of heterogeneity of a flow in the form of shear bands. The bibliography includes 202 references.

  11. Cellulose Nanocrystals as Water in Water Emulsion Stabilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddireddy, Karthik Reddy; Capron, Isabelle; Nicolai, Taco; Benyahia, Lazhar

    Cellulose is the most abundant polymer on the earth. Thus, it is very much desirable to find as many practical applications as possible for it. Cellulose, in its original form, contains both amorphous and crystalline parts. It is possible to separate both parts by dissolving the amorphous part in concentrated sulfuric acid. The remaining crystalline cellulose part exist in the form of rod-like particles. The dimensions of the particles depend on the source. We produce the particles from the acid hydrolysis of cotton cellulose fibers. It results in cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with dimensions of ~150 nm x 6 nm x 6 nm. It is well known that CNCs could very efficiently stabilize oil in water (O/W) emulsions by forming very dense monolayers of CNCs at O-W interfaces. However, it is not yet known whether they could also stabilize water in water (W/W) emulsions. The W/W emulsions can be produced by any two incompatible polymers. It is challenging to find effective stabilizers for W/W emulsions due to ultralow interfacial tension and large interfacial thickness. In this talk, I will show the efficiency and effectiveness of these one-dimensional rods as W/W emulsion stabilizers.

  12. Oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium phosphorylated chitosan.

    PubMed

    Chongprakobkit, Suchada; Maniratanachote, Rawiwan; Tachaboonyakiat, Wanpen

    2013-07-01

    Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions with sodium phosphorylated chitosan (PCTS) were obtained via simple emulsification. PCTS in aqueous solution was amphiphilic with a hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) of 19 and a critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of 0.13% w/v. The emulsifying efficiency and emulsion stability of PCTS over oil droplets were evaluated in terms of the droplet size, droplet size distribution and microscopic observation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. PCTS preferred to cover oil droplets to produce an O/W emulsion and formed long term stable particles (90 days storage at room temperature) when using PCTS concentrations from above the CAC to 3% w/v. However, emulsions formed from PCTS concentrations below the CAC or over 3% w/v were unstable with particle agglomeration by flocculation after only 7 days storage, although they reverted to individual droplets that retained their integrity in acidic conditions. Overall, PCTS forms effective stable O/W encapsulated particles with potential applications in lipophilic drug encapsulation via a simple emulsion system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural studies of commercial fat emulsions used in parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Caldwell, K D

    1994-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that by employing a combination of sedimentation field-flow fractionation (sedFFF) and other characterization techniques, such as photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and freeze-fracture electron microscopy (EM), it is possible to show that commercial fat emulsions of similar overall chemical compositions not only may exhibit different size distributions but may have different densities as well. A closer look at the density difference between droplet and suspension medium, on the one hand, and the droplet size, on the other, demonstrates that fat emulsions may have structures other than the traditional oil droplet surrounded by a monolayer of surfactant. From our determined and simulated density differences, we propose that these emulsion droplets may have a multilayered surfactant arrangement as well as an inclusion of water vesicles in the oil phase of the emulsion. Freeze-fracture EM observations provide evidence to confirm the existence of such complex structures. These findings are supported by recent EM work from other laboratories, as well as through chemical verification of elevated water contents in the oil droplets of these emulsions.

  14. Delivery of Chlorambucil Using an Acoustically-Triggered, Perfluoropentane Emulsion

    PubMed Central

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Sebastian, Ian E.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound-mediated delivery systems have mainly focused on microbubble contrast agents as carriers of drugs or genetic material. This study utilizes micron-sized, perfluoropentane (PFP) emulsions as carriers for chlorambucil (CHL), a lipophilic chemotherapeutic. The release of CHL is achieved via acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), whereby the superheated emulsion is converted into gas bubbles using ultrasound. Emulsions were made using an albumin shell and soybean oil as the CHL carrier. The ratio of the PFP to soybean oil phases in the droplets, as well as the fraction of droplets that vaporize per ultrasound exposure were shown to correlate with droplet diameter. A 60-minute incubation with the CHL-loaded emulsion caused a 46.7% cellular growth inhibition, whereas incubation with the CHL-loaded emulsion that was exposed to ultrasound at 6.3 MHz caused an 84.3% growth inhibition. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01), signifying that ADV can be used as a method to substantially enhance drug delivery. PMID:20691925

  15. Influence of processing parameters on morphology of polymethoxyflavone in emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ting, Yuwen; Li, Colin C; Wang, Yin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Huang, Qingrong

    2015-01-21

    Polymethoxyflavones (PMFs) are groups of compounds isolated from citrus peels that have been documented with wide arrays of health-promoting bioactivities. Because of their hydrophobic structure and high melting point, crystallized PMFs usually have poor systemic bioavailability when consumed orally. To improve the oral efficiency of PMFs, a viscoelastic emulsion system was formulated. Because of the crystalline nature, the inclusion of PMFs into the emulsion system faces great challenges in having sufficient loading capacity and stabilities. In this study, the process of optimizing the quality of emulsion-based formulation intended for PMF oral delivery was systematically studied. With alteration of the PMF loading concentration, processing temperature, and pressure, the emulsion with the desired droplet and crystal size can be effectively fabricated. Moreover, storage temperatures significantly influenced the stability of the crystal-containing emulsion system. The results from this study are a good illustration of system optimization and serve as a great reference for future formulation design of other hydrophobic crystalline compounds.

  16. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes at the Interface of Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Nicholas M; Weston, Javen S; Li, Brian; Venkataramani, Deepika; Aichele, Clint P; Harwell, Jeffrey H; Crossley, Steven P

    2015-12-08

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit very unique properties in biphasic systems. Their interparticle attraction leads to reduced droplet coalescence rates and corresponding improvements in emulsion stability. Here we use covalent and noncovalent techniques to modify the hydrophilicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and study their resulting behavior at an oil-water interface. By using both paraffin wax/water and dodecane/water systems, the thickness of the layer of MWNTs at the interface and resulting emulsion stability are shown to vary significantly with the approach used to modify the MWNTs. Increased hydrophilicity of the MWNTs shifts the emulsions from water-in-oil to oil-in-water. The stability of the emulsion is found to correlate with the thickness of nanotubes populating the oil-water interface and relative strength of the carbon nanotube network. The addition of a surfactant decreases the thickness of nanotubes at the interface and enhances the overall interfacial area stabilized at the expense of increased droplet coalescence rates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the interfacial thickness of modified carbon nanotubes has been quantified and correlated to emulsion stability.

  17. Engineering of acidic O/W emulsions with pectin.

    PubMed

    Alba, K; Sagis, L M C; Kontogiorgos, V

    2016-09-01

    Pectins with distinct molecular design were isolated by aqueous extraction at pH 2.0 or 6.0 and were examined in terms of their formation and stabilisation capacity of model n-alkane-in-water emulsions at acidic pH (pH 2.0). The properties and stability of the resulting emulsions were examined by means of droplet size distribution analysis, Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner modelling, bulk rheology, interfacial composition analysis, large-amplitude oscillatory surface dilatational rheology, electrokinetic analysis and fluorescence microscopy. Both pectin preparations were able to emulsify alkanes in water but exhibited distinct ageing characteristics. Emulsions prepared using pectin isolated at pH 6.0 were remarkably stable with respect to droplet growth after thirty days of ageing, while those prepared with pectin isolated at pH 2.0 destabilised rapidly. Examination of chemical composition of interfacial layers indicated multi-layered adsorption of pectins at the oil-water interface. The higher long-term stability of emulsions prepared with pectin isolated at high pH is attributed to mechanically stronger interfaces, the highly branched nature and the low hydrodynamic volume of the chains that result in effective steric stabilisation whereas acetyl and methyl contents do not contribute to the long-term stability. The present work shows that it is possible by tailoring the fine structure of pectin to engineer emulsions that operate in acidic environments.

  18. Microfluidic angle of repose test for Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, L. A.; Baret, J. C.

    2017-10-01

    Pickering emulsions are appealing systems for droplet-based microfluidic technology. However, to date, their implementation in experiments is limited by their intrinsic characteristics: they present a strong gel-like behaviour and their flowability is lower than their surfactant-stabilized counterpart. Measuring the rheological properties of Pickering emulsions is therefore of interest but very few methods provide measurements using low volumes (< 1 ml). Here, we propose a microfluidic version of the angle of repose method to study the flow behaviour of fluorinated Pickering emulsions adapted to small volumes of the sample. We observed a strong link between the nanoparticle level of fluorination and the flow behaviour of the water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions, obtaining a dramatic change from an empirically very poor flow behaviour to a good one by increasing the particles wettability by the fluorinated phase. Our method combines the advantages of microfluidic rheometers, such as low sample consumption and visual monitoring of the complex fluid elements, and allows the study of emulsions with a strong level of aggregation between the droplets.

  19. Application of pork fat diacylglycerols in meat emulsions.

    PubMed

    Miklos, Rikke; Xu, Xuebing; Lametsch, René

    2011-03-01

    The properties of fat are of major importance when meat products are produced. By enzymatic modification triacylglycerols (TAGs) can be converted to diacylglycerols (DAGs) resulting in changes of the physical and chemical properties of the fat. In this study the texture as well as the hydration and binding properties were investigated in meat emulsions prepared with lard substituted with different amounts of DAGs derived from the lard. In emulsions prepared with DAGs the percentage of total expressible fluid decreased from 28.2% in products prepared with lard to 11.8% in emulsions prepared with 100% DAGs. The fat separation decreased from 10.9% to 7.8% when 10% of DAGs were applied and no fat separation was observed for emulsions prepared with 50% and 100% DAGs. Emulsions containing DAGs were more elastic and solid reflected in a significant increase in Young's modulus and the maximum hardness. The results suggest future opportunities for the application of DAGs to improve the quality of meat products. Copyright © 2010 The American Meat Science Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Density and microviscosity studies of palm oil/water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Arboleya, Juan Carlos; Sutcliffe, Leslie H; Wilde, Peter J; Fairhurst, Shirley A

    2005-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and densitometry were used to measure the temperature- and rate-dependent formation of fat crystals in emulsion droplets in hardened palm kernel oil in water emulsions. The solid fat content in emulsions can be critical for the functionality of the emulsions in a wide variety of applications. Therefore, new and accessible methods are needed to monitor solid fat content in order to control the functional properties of these emulsions. EPR measurements showed that the microviscosity within the oil droplets could be measured as a function of temperature and that the storage temperature below the main fat melting point is crucial for an increase in the microviscosity, due to fat solidification. The microviscosity of the oil droplets could be an important parameter for defining functional performance (e.g., rheology and partial coalescence). Density measurements provided a simple and accurate method for monitoring changes in phase state of the oil. The phase behavior agreed well with the EPR results, demonstrating that accurate density measurements could prove to be a valuable tool for monitoring fat crystallization processes.

  1. Treatment methods for breaking certain oil and water emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Sealock, Jr., L. John; Baker, Eddie G.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed are treatment methods for breaking emulsions of petroleum oil and salt water, fatty oil and water, and those resulting from liquefication of organic material. The emulsions are broken by heating to a predetermined temperature at or above about 200.degree. C. and pressurizing to a predetermined pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the predetermined temperature to produce a heated and pressurized fluid. The heated and pressurized fluid is contained in a single vessel at the predetermined temperature and pressure for a predetermined period of time to effectively separate the emulsion into substantially distinct first and second phases, the first phase comprising primarily the petroleum oil, the second phase comprising primarily the water. The first and second phases are separately withdrawn from the vessel at a withdraw temperature between about 200.degree. C. and 374.degree. C. and a withdraw pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the withdraw temperature. Where solids are present in the certain emulsions, the above described treatment may also effectively separate the certain emulsion into a substantially distinct third phase comprising primarily the solids.

  2. Double emulsion formation through hierarchical flow-focusing microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarmanesh, Milad; Farhadi, Mousa; Azizian, Pooya

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic device is presented for creating double emulsions, controlling their sizes and also manipulating encapsulation processes. As a result of three immiscible liquids' interaction using dripping instability, double emulsions can be produced elegantly. Effects of dimensionless numbers are investigated which are Weber number of the inner phase (Wein), Capillary number of the inner droplet (Cain), and Capillary number of the outer droplet (Caout). They affect the formation process, inner and outer droplet size, and separation frequency. Direct numerical simulation of governing equations was done using volume of fluid method and adaptive mesh refinement technique. Two kinds of double emulsion formation, the two-step and the one-step, were simulated in which the thickness of the sheath of double emulsions can be adjusted. Altering each dimensionless number will change detachment location, outer droplet size and droplet formation period. Moreover, the decussate regime of the double-emulsion/empty-droplet is observed in low Wein. This phenomenon can be obtained by adjusting the Wein in which the maximum size of the sheath is discovered. Also, the results show that Cain has significant influence on the outer droplet size in the two-step process, while Caout affects the sheath in the one-step formation considerably.

  3. Microgravity as a tool for studies on emulsion stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggieri, Libero; Ferrari, Michele; Passerone, Alberto; Ravera, Francesca; Loglio, Giuseppe; Pandolfini, Piero; Steinchen, Annie; Antoni, Michael; Sanfeld, Albert; Miller, Reinhard; Fainerman, Valentin B.; Grigoriev, Dmitri O.; Kovalchuk, Vladimir I.; Krägel, Jürgen; Makievski, Alexander V.; Clausse, Danièle; Komunjer, Ljepsa; Gomez, F.; Noik, Christine; Dalmazzone, Christine; di Lullo, Alberto; del Gaudio, Lucilla; Leser, Martin E.; Michel, Martin

    2005-10-01

    The definition of methodologies for the stabilisation or destabilisation of liquid disperse systems, such as foams and emulsions, is an important scientific and technological goal, with spin-offs for a vast number of technologies, processes and products. Progresses in this area require intensive investigation and modelling of the processes occurring on different timescales and dimensions: the physical chemistry of liquid interfaces and films, droplet interaction and internal dynamics of the emulsion. Through the damping of convection and the suppression of buoyancy, microgravity conditions provide unique opportunities for studies: a purely diffusive environment for the investigation of transport and adsorption of surface active molecules and the possibility of studying droplet coalescence and aggregation processes decoupled from sedimentation or creaming. The fundamental and Applied Studies in Emulsion Stability (FASES) MAP project was set up to study the links between the properties of droplet interfaces and films, and the basic mechanisms (aggregation and coalescence) involved in the destabilisation of emulsions. Key microgravity experiments will provide data and/or tests of the developed models, in conjunction with extensive ground investigations. To this end, two International Space Station facilities are under development: Facility for Adsorption and Surface Tension study (FASTER) to investigate the physical chemistry of the single interfaces and liquid-liquid films, and the FASES Experiment Container for the Fluid Science Laboratory to investigate emulsion dynamics and the drops interaction.

  4. Study on Formation of High Performance Ice Slurry by Emulsion in Ice Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Oikawa, Ken; Okada, Masashi; Teraoka, Yoshikazu; Kawagoe, Tetsuo

    This study is focused on an emulsion as a new thermal storage material for ice storage. Two types of emulsions are made of oil-water mixture with a little additive. Oils used are silicone, light and lump oils. Water contents of emulsions are 70,80 and 90 %. The additive is amino group modified silicone oil, and there is no depression of freezing point for the emulsions because of its hydrophobic property. In order to know structures of emulsions, those electric resistances were measured. And components of liquids separating from emulsions were investigated. From above results, it was found that one was W/O type and the other was O/W type. And then, adaptability of two emulsions to the ice storage was discussed, and then, it was found that a high performance ice slurry could be formed by the W/O type emulsion.

  5. An update on safety and immunogenicity of vaccines containing emulsion-based adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher B; Haensler, Jean

    2013-07-01

    With the exception of alum, emulsion-based vaccine adjuvants have been administered to far more people than any other adjuvant, especially since the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. The number of clinical safety and immunogenicity evaluations of vaccines containing emulsion adjuvants has correspondingly mushroomed. In this review, the authors introduce emulsion adjuvant composition and history before detailing the most recent findings from clinical and postmarketing data regarding the effects of emulsion adjuvants on vaccine immunogenicity and safety, with emphasis on the most widely distributed emulsion adjuvants, MF59® and AS03. The authors also present a summary of other emulsion adjuvants in clinical development and indicate promising avenues for future emulsion-based adjuvant development. Overall, emulsion adjuvants have demonstrated potent adjuvant activity across a number of disease indications along with acceptable safety profiles.

  6. Glycerol: major contributor to the short term protein sparing effect of fat emulsions in normal man.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M F; Fitzpatrick, G F; Cohen, K H; Moore, F D

    1975-10-01

    Intravenous fat emulsions have been advocated as acceptable alternatives to hyperosmolar glucose solutions in parenteral nutrition. The ability of a fat emulsion (soy bean oil suspended in glycerol) to produce nitrogen sparing in the absence of nitrogen intake was examined in normal man. The protein conservation obtained by the fat emulsion can be duplicated by the infusion of glycerol alone in the same amount as that available from the fat emulsion.

  7. Rapid enumeration of phage in monodisperse emulsions.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Burnham, Sean; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-17

    Phage-based detection assays have been developed for the detection of viable bacteria for applications in clinical diagnosis, monitoring of water quality, and food safety. The majority of these assays deliver a positive readout in the form of newly generated progeny phages by the bacterial host of interest. Progeny phages are often visualized as plaques, or holes, in a lawn of bacteria on an agar-filled Petri dish; however, this rate-limiting step requires up to 12 h of incubation time. We have previously described an amplification of bacteriophages M13 inside droplets of media suspended in perfluorinated oil; a single phage M13 in a droplet yields 10(7) copies in 3-4 h. Here, we describe that encapsulation of reporter phages, both lytic T4-LacZ and nonlytic M13, in monodisperse droplets can also be used for rapid enumeration of phage. Compartmentalization in droplets accelerated the development of the signal from the reporter enzyme; counting of "positive" droplets yields accurate enumeration of phage particles ranging from 10(2) to 10(6) pfu/mL. For enumeration of T4-LacZ phage, the fluorescent signal appeared in as little as 90 min. Unlike bulk assays, quantification in emulsion is robust and insensitive to fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g., temperature). Power-free emulsification using gravity-driven flow in the absence of syringe pumps and portable fluorescence imaging solutions makes this technology promising for use at the point of care in low-resource environments. This droplet-based phage enumeration method could accelerate and simplify point-of-care detection of the pathogens for which reporter bacteriophages have been developed.

  8. The complexity of prescribing intravenous lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky; Torrinhas, Raquel Susana

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsions (LEs) are relevant for patients receiving parenteral nutrition because they prevent the depletion of essential fatty acids (FAs) and, as a highly dense energy source, enable the reduction of glucose provision, thereby decreasing the risks of hyperglycemia and hepatic impairment. The prescription of LEs is complex, due mainly to their distinct FA components, which may alter the immune response in different ways and distinctly influence inflammation, oxidative stress and blood coagulation according to their biochemical properties. In addition, an excess of other LE components, such as phospholipids and phytosterols, may be associated with hepatic steatosis and dysfunction. These associations do not represent direct risks or obstacles to LE use in metabolically stable patients but can render the choice of the best LE for hypermetabolic patients difficult. The infusion of LEs according to the available guidelines provides more benefit than harm and should be part of exclusive parenteral nutrition regimens or complement enteral nutrition when appropriate. The patient's metabolic profile should guide the type of FA and amount of lipids that are provided. For critically ill hypermetabolic patients, growing evidence indicates that standard LEs based solely on soybean oil should be avoided in favor of new LEs containing medium-chain triglycerides, olive oil, or fish oil to decrease the provision of potentially oxidative, inflammatory/immunosuppressive, and prothrombotic n-6 FAs. In addition, as sources of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, LEs containing fish oil may be important for critically ill patients because they allow better modulation of the immune response and likely reduce the length of intensive care unity stay. However, current evidence precludes the recommendation of a specific LE for clinical use in this patient population.

  9. Shear dynamics of an inverted nematic emulsion.

    PubMed

    Tiribocchi, A; Da Re, M; Marenduzzo, D; Orlandini, E

    2016-10-04

    Here we study theoretically the dynamics of a 2D and a 3D isotropic droplet in a nematic liquid crystal under a shear flow. We find a large repertoire of possible nonequilibrium steady states as a function of the shear rate and of the anchoring of the nematic director field at the droplet surface. We first discuss homeotropic anchoring. For weak anchoring, we recover the typical behaviour of a sheared isotropic droplet in a binary fluid, which rotates, stretches and can be broken by the applied flow. For intermediate anchoring, new possibilities arise due to elastic effects in the nematic fluid. We find that in this regime the 2D droplet can tilt and move in the flow, or tumble incessantly at the centre of the channel. For sufficiently strong anchoring, finally, one or both of the topological defects which form close to the surface of the isotropic droplet in equilibrium detach from it and get dragged deep into the nematic state by the flow. In 3D, instead, the Saturn ring associated with the normal anchoring disclination line can be deformed and shifted downstream by the flow, but remains always localized in the proximity of the droplet, at least for the parameter range we explored. Tangential anchoring in 2D leads to a different dynamic response, as the boojum defects characteristic of this situation can unbind from the droplet under a weaker shear with respect to the normal anchoring case. Our results should stimulate further experiments with inverted liquid crystal emulsions under shear, as most of the predictions can be testable in principle by monitoring the evolution of liquid crystalline orientation patterns or by tracking the position and shape of the droplet over time.

  10. Automated Track Recognition and Event Reconstruction in Nuclear Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deines-Jones, P.; Cherry, M. L.; Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Jones, W. V.; Kolganova, E. D.; Kudzia, D.; Nilsen, B. S.; Olszewski, A.; Pozharova, E. A.; Sengupta, K.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Waddington, C, J.; Wefel, J. P.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.

    1998-01-01

    The major advantages of nuclear emulsion for detecting charged particles are its submicron position resolution and sensitivity to minimum ionizing particles. These must be balanced, however, against the difficult manual microscope measurement by skilled observers required for the analysis. We have developed an automated system to acquire and analyze the microscope images from emulsion chambers. Each emulsion plate is analyzed independently, allowing coincidence techniques to be used in order to reject back- ground and estimate error rates. The system has been used to analyze a sample of high-multiplicity Pb-Pb interactions (charged particle multiplicities approx. 1100) produced by the 158 GeV/c per nucleon Pb-208 beam at CERN. Automatically reconstructed track lists agree with our best manual measurements to 3%. We describe the image analysis and track reconstruction techniques, and discuss the measurement and reconstruction uncertainties.

  11. High speed automated microtomography of nuclear emulsions and recent application

    SciTech Connect

    Tioukov, V.; Aleksandrov, A.; Consiglio, L.; De Lellis, G.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-12-31

    The development of high-speed automatic scanning systems was the key-factor for massive and successful emulsions application for big neutrino experiments like OPERA. The emulsion detector simplicity, the unprecedented sub-micron spatial resolution and the unique ability to provide intrinsically 3-dimensional spatial information make it a perfect device for short-living particles study, where the event topology should be precisely reconstructed in a 10-100 um scale vertex region. Recently the exceptional technological progress in image processing and automation together with intensive R&D done by Italian and Japanese microscopy groups permit to increase the scanning speed to unbelievable few years ago m{sup 2}/day scale and so greatly extend the range of the possible applications for emulsion-based detectors to other fields like: medical imaging, directional dark matter search, nuclear physics, geological and industrial applications.

  12. Processable high internal phase Pickering emulsions using depletion attraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, KyuHan; Kim, Subeen; Ryu, Jiheun; Jeon, Jiyoon; Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Hyunjun; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Im, Won Bin; Han, Yosep; Kim, Hyunjung; Choi, Siyoung Q

    2017-02-01

    High internal phase emulsions have been widely used as templates for various porous materials, but special strategies are required to form, in particular, particle-covered ones that have been more difficult to obtain. Here, we report a versatile strategy to produce a stable high internal phase Pickering emulsion by exploiting a depletion interaction between an emulsion droplet and a particle using water-soluble polymers as a depletant. This attractive interaction facilitating the adsorption of particles onto the droplet interface and simultaneously suppressing desorption once adsorbed. This technique can be universally applied to nearly any kind of particle to stabilize an interface with the help of various non- or weakly adsorbing polymers as a depletant, which can be solidified to provide porous materials for many applications.

  13. Emulsion liquid membrane for textile dye removal: Stability study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumastuti, Adhi; Syamwil, Rodia; Anis, Samsudin

    2017-03-01

    Although textile dyes is basically available in very low concentration; it should be removed due to the toxicity to human body and environment. Among the existing methods, emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) is a promising method by providing high interfacial area and the ability to remove a very low concentration of the solute. The optimal emulsions were produced using commercially supplied homogeniser. The drop size was measured by the aid of microscope and image J software. Initially, methylene blue in simulated wastewater was extracted using a stirrer. Methylene blue concentration was determined using spectrophotometer. The research obtained optimal emulsion at surfactant concentration of 4 wt. %, kerosene as diluent, emulsification time of 30 min, emulsification speed of 2000 rpm. The lowest membrane breakage and the longest stability time were about 0.11% and 150 min, respectively.

  14. Sensitivities of droplet size and stability in monomeric emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Fontenot, K.; Schork, F.J. )

    1993-02-01

    The stability of a monomeric emulsion is directly dependent on the size of the monomer droplets. The droplet diameter is in turn significantly influenced by a variety of parameters. Both size and stability are important when emulsions consisting of small droplets are polymerized. These parameters were studied for the monomer methyl methacrylate, although the monomers styrene and vinyl acetate were also considered. Conductance was developed as a predictive tool for providing a measurement of emulsion stability. These indications were verified by shelf life stabilities and droplet size measurements. The key parameters which affect size and stability were found to be cosurfactant concentration and monomer water solubility. Coalescence was found to play an important role in stability as well.

  15. Synthesis of Fluorosurfactants for Emulsion-Based Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Microemulsion represents an attractive platform for fundamental and applied biomedical research because the emulsified droplets can serve as millions of compartmentalized micrometer-sized reactors amenable to high-throughput screening or online monitoring. However, establishing stable emulsions with surfactants that are compatible with biological applications remains a significant challenge. Motivated by the lack of commercially available surfactants suitable for microemulsion-based biological assays, this study describes the facile synthesis of a biocompatible fluorosurfactant with nonionic tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl (Tris) polar head groups. We have further demonstrated compatibility of the developed surfactant with diverse emulsion-based applications, including DNA polymeric nanoparticle synthesis, enzymatic activity assay, and bacterial or mammalian cell culture, in the setup of both double- and multiphases of emulsions. PMID:24646088

  16. Processable high internal phase Pickering emulsions using depletion attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyuhan; Kim, Subeen; Ryu, Jiheun; Jeon, Jiyoon; Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Hyunjun; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Im, Won Bin; Han, Yosep; Kim, Hyunjung; Choi, Siyoung Q.

    2017-02-01

    High internal phase emulsions have been widely used as templates for various porous materials, but special strategies are required to form, in particular, particle-covered ones that have been more difficult to obtain. Here, we report a versatile strategy to produce a stable high internal phase Pickering emulsion by exploiting a depletion interaction between an emulsion droplet and a particle using water-soluble polymers as a depletant. This attractive interaction facilitating the adsorption of particles onto the droplet interface and simultaneously suppressing desorption once adsorbed. This technique can be universally applied to nearly any kind of particle to stabilize an interface with the help of various non- or weakly adsorbing polymers as a depletant, which can be solidified to provide porous materials for many applications.

  17. Anionic Emulsion-Mediated Synthesis of Zeolite Beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Zhang, Ying; Gao, Wei; Cui, Lishan

    Well-crystallized zeolite beta is first synthesized in the anionic emulsion systems of cyclohexane/sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate(SDBS)/pentanol/zeolite synthesis mixture. Beta materials are then characterized by XRD, SEM, and N2-adsorption techniques. Compared to beta samples grown using the same synthesis mixture in the absence of the anionic emulsion, the as-synthesized beta presents uniform and well-defined larger crystals. Interestingly, N2-adsorption results show that such beta sample possesses both ordered mesopores at 3.9 nm and macropores centered at 60.5 nm. These pores combined with the intricate micropores of the Beta crystal comprise the hierarchical porosity. The hierarchical pore-structured zeolite beta may have potential catalysis application in reactions involving large molecules. Additionally, control experiments are also performed to ascertain the effects of the individual emulsion components. Further synthesis study finds the transformation of zeolite beta to ZSM-5 through increasing oil contents, crystallization temperature and time.

  18. Fat emulsion for intravenous administration: clinical experience with intralipid 10%.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L M; Hardie, B S; Hidalgo, J

    1976-01-01

    A 10% soybean oil emulsion (Intralipid 10%), used extensively in Europe for intravenous alimentation, has now been clinically evaluated in the United States. Controlled studies have shown that the soybean oil emulsion can be substituted for glucose to supply one-third to two-thirds of the total calories, and can be administered peripherally without significant vein irritation. Essential fatty acid deficiencies, frequently encountered in patients dependent on parenteral alimentation with fat-free solutions, are prevented and corrected by use of this preparation. Data on long-term tolerance to Intralipid 10% infusions are presented for 292 patients treated for more than 6,000 patient days. The soybean oil emulsion was usually well tolerated. Side effects were reported in two of 133 adults and 12 of 159 pediatric patients. PMID:820291

  19. Real time study of development process in holographic emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fimia, A.; Blaya, S.; Carretero, L.; Madrigal, R. F.; Mallavia, R.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present the theoretical and experimental study using a real time technique for the measurement of the optical density when the emulsion is developing. Good agreement was observed between theory and experiment. We exposed an Agfa Gevaert 8E56HD emulsion with an Argon laser tuned at 514 nm and we measured the variation in optical density when the emulsion was put into the developer bath at 20°C. This method allows us to study the dynamics of different developers at different energy of storage. It also provides a way to optimize the composition of developers as a function of the chemical composition, temperature and other secondary factors as superadditivity and non-linear processes.

  20. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana; Petrina Jáuregui, Estrella; Elizondo Armendáriz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a particularly important problem in patients who need this type of nutritional support for a long time. Prevalence of the condition is highly variable depending on the series, and its clinical presentation is different in adults and children. The etiology of PNALD is not well defined, and participation of several factors at the same time has been suggested. When a bilirubin level >2 mg/dl is detected for a long time, other causes of liver disease should be ruled out and risk factors should be minimized. The composition of lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition is one of the factors related to PNALD. This article reviews the different types of lipid emulsions and the potential benefits of emulsions enriched with omega-3 fatty acids. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Janus emulsion mediated porous scaffold bio-fabrication.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Ildiko; Rumschöttel, Jens; Friberg, Stig E; Koetz, Joachim

    2016-09-01

    A three dimensional biopolymer network structure with incorporated nano-porous calcium phosphate (CaP) balls was fabricated by using gelatin-chitosan (GC) polymer blend and GC stabilized olive/silicone oil Janus emulsions, respectively. The emulsions were freeze-dried, and the oil droplets were washed out in order to prepare porous scaffolds with larger surface area. The morphology, pore size, chemical composition, thermal and swelling behavior was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and micro-Differential Scanning Calorimetry (micro-DSC). Microscopic analysis confirmed that the pore size of the GC based sponges after freeze-drying may be drastically reduced by using Janus emulsions. Besides, the incorporation of nanoporous calcium phosphate balls is also lowering the pore size and enhancing thermal stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Processable high internal phase Pickering emulsions using depletion attraction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, KyuHan; Kim, Subeen; Ryu, Jiheun; Jeon, Jiyoon; Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Hyunjun; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Im, Won Bin; Han, Yosep; Kim, Hyunjung; Choi, Siyoung Q.

    2017-01-01

    High internal phase emulsions have been widely used as templates for various porous materials, but special strategies are required to form, in particular, particle-covered ones that have been more difficult to obtain. Here, we report a versatile strategy to produce a stable high internal phase Pickering emulsion by exploiting a depletion interaction between an emulsion droplet and a particle using water-soluble polymers as a depletant. This attractive interaction facilitating the adsorption of particles onto the droplet interface and simultaneously suppressing desorption once adsorbed. This technique can be universally applied to nearly any kind of particle to stabilize an interface with the help of various non- or weakly adsorbing polymers as a depletant, which can be solidified to provide porous materials for many applications. PMID:28145435

  3. [Gel-emulsion systems. I. Physical-chemical characterisation].

    PubMed

    Szucs, Mária; Budai, Szabolcs; Eros, István

    2008-01-01

    Emulsion gels prepared with polyacrylic acid-alkyl acrylate diblock copolymer surfactants were studied. It was supposed that the polymer surfactants surrounding the oil droplets formed a microgel structure and this structure stabilized the emulsions sterically. This assumption was verified by thermoanalytic investigation. The effect of polymer concentration and the amount of oil on the rheological characteristics, the rate of water evaporation and droplet size distribution was analysed. It was established that gel emulsions had viscoelastic the properties, the viscosity increased exponentially with increasing emulsifier concentration and amount of oil. Water was present in two forms: i) in microgel surrounding oil droplets and ii) in dispersion medium. The distribution of droplet size was generally a monodisperse one, the average droplet size decreased with polymer concentration.

  4. High speed automated microtomography of nuclear emulsions and recent application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tioukov, V.; Aleksandrov, A.; Consiglio, L.; De Lellis, G.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-12-01

    The development of high-speed automatic scanning systems was the key-factor for massive and successful emulsions application for big neutrino experiments like OPERA. The emulsion detector simplicity, the unprecedented sub-micron spatial resolution and the unique ability to provide intrinsically 3-dimensional spatial information make it a perfect device for short-living particles study, where the event topology should be precisely reconstructed in a 10-100 um scale vertex region. Recently the exceptional technological progress in image processing and automation together with intensive R&D done by Italian and Japanese microscopy groups permit to increase the scanning speed to unbelievable few years ago m2/day scale and so greatly extend the range of the possible applications for emulsion-based detectors to other fields like: medical imaging, directional dark matter search, nuclear physics, geological and industrial applications.

  5. Flocculation of protein-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Eric

    2010-11-01

    The flocculation properties of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by proteins are reviewed from the colloid science perspective. Emphasis is placed on insight from systematic studies of the stability of emulsions prepared with a milk protein ingredient as the sole emulsifying agent. The main factors considered are pH, ionic strength, calcium ion concentration, thermal processing, and the presence of cosolutes (alcohol, sugars). Contrasting dependences of the flocculation behaviour on these factors are observed for the pH-sensitive disordered caseins (alpha(s1)-casein or beta-casein) and the heat-sensitive globular proteins (especially beta-lactoglobulin). In comparing characteristic emulsion properties obtained with different proteins, we consider the relative importance of the different kinds of molecular and colloidal interactions-electrostatic, steric, hydrophobic and covalent.

  6. Arrested of coalescence of emulsion droplets of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Burke, Christopher; Blair, Donald W.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    With applications ranging from food products to cosmetics via targeted drug delivery systems, structured anisotropic colloids provide an efficient way to control the structure, properties and functions of emulsions. When two fluid emulsion droplets are brought in contact, a reduction of the interfacial tension drives their coalescence into a larger droplet of the same total volume and reduced exposed area. This coalescence can be partially or totally hindered by the presence of nano or micron-size particles that coat the interface as in Pickering emulsions. We investigate numerically the dependance of the mechanical stability of these arrested shapes on the particles size, their shape anisotropy, their polydispersity, their interaction with the solvent, and the particle-particle interactions. We discuss structural shape changes that can be induced by tuning the particles interactions after arrest occurs, and provide design parameters for the relevant experiments.

  7. Destabilising Pickering emulsions by drop flocculation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Catherine P; Khairul Anwar, Hunainah; Hughes, James

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated how emulsions of water drops coated by organoclay particles destabilise in organic solvents. The drops destabilise and the emulsions undergo a fluid-solid transition if the particles are poorly wetted by the solvent. We show that the drops adhere together and form three-dimensional networks as the fraction of the poor-quality solvent in the mixture increases. Microscopic observations revealed that the drops coalesce into buckled, non-spherical shapes in mixtures rich in poor-quality solvent. A key finding is that destabilisation is favoured under conditions where the energy of adhesion between the particle layers coating drops is comparable to the energy required to detach the particles from the drops. Rupture of the interfacial layer produces particle flocs and uncoated, unstable water drops that settle out of the emulsion.

  8. Nonlinear Dynamic Characteristics of Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhaoqi; Han, Yunfeng; Ren, Yingyu; Yang, Qiuyi; Jin, Ningde

    2016-08-01

    In this article, the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of oil-in-water emulsions under the addition of surfactant were experimentally investigated. Firstly, based on the vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow experiment in 20 mm inner diameter (ID) testing pipe, dynamic response signals of oil-in-water emulsions were recorded using vertical multiple electrode array (VMEA) sensor. Afterwards, the recurrence plot (RP) algorithm and multi-scale weighted complexity entropy causality plane (MS-WCECP) were employed to analyse the nonlinear characteristics of the signals. The results show that the certainty is decreasing and the randomness is increasing with the increment of surfactant concentration. This article provides a novel method for revealing the nonlinear dynamic characteristics, complexity, and randomness of oil-in-water emulsions with experimental measurement signals.

  9. Behavior of Malondialdehyde in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Vandemoortele, Angelique; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2015-06-17

    The impact of temperature, emulsifier, and protein type on the reactivity of malondialdehyde in oil-in-water emulsions was elucidated. Malondialdehyde recoveries in aqueous buffer, protein solutions, saturated oil, and fully hydrogenated coconut oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by whey proteins or Tween 20 at 4 or 40 °C were compared. At both temperatures, the reactivity of malondialdehyde in aqueous buffer was the same. In protein solutions, malondialdehyde concentrations were reduced further and its decrease was protein-dependent. Similar trends were found for emulsions. Surprisingly, malondialdehyde was very reactive in saturated oil because only 15% was recovered at 40 °C. However, the degradation in oil proved to be strongly temperature-dependent; at 4 °C, losses amounted to only 8%. This study revealed that malondialdehyde is a very reactive molecule, both in the presence and absence of proteins. Its use as a general oxidation marker should therefore be considered with care.

  10. Electrochemical Stimulated Pickering Emulsion for Recycling of Enzyme in Biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liao; Feng, Anchao; Liu, Senyang; Huo, Meng; Fang, Tommy; Wang, Ke; Wei, Yen; Wang, Xiaosong; Yuan, Jinying

    2016-11-02

    Potential-stimulated Pickering emulsions, using electrochemical responsive microgels as particle stabilizers, are prepared and used for biocatalysis. The microgels are constructed from cyclodextrin functionalized 8-arm poly(ethylene glycol) (8A PEG-CD) and ferrocene modified counterparts (8A PEG-Fc) via CD/Fc host-guest chemistry. Taking advantage of the redox reaction of Fc, the formation and deformation of the microgels and corresponding Pickering emulsions can be reversibly stimulated by external potential, and have been used for the hydrolysis of triacetin and kinetic resolution reaction of (R,S)-1-phenylethanol catalyzed by lipases. Potential stimulated destabilization of the emulsion realizes an effective separation of the products and enzyme recycling.

  11. Influence of thickness in the holographic emulsion composed by rosin and BPB dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, Juan C.; Ortiz-Gutierrez, Mauricio; Olivares-Perez, Arturo; Perez-Cortes, Mario

    2004-10-01

    We analyze diffraction gratings behavior recorded on a phase holographic emulsion. This emulsion is composed with resin and bromophenol blue dye (BPB) they have a diffraction efficiency (η) from 0.22 to 0.615% order, and their thickness are different in the holographic emulsion.

  12. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  13. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  14. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  15. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber...

  16. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb...

  17. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb...

  18. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb...

  19. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber...

  20. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  1. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  2. SAFETY AND UTILITY OF I.V. FAT EMULSION FOR HUMAN INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The initial clinical experiences of our group with a European fat emulsion called Intralipid is reported. This emulsion is composed of soy bean oil...failed to show correlation between febrile response and rapidity with which clearing of the emulsion occurred. It is concluded that Intralipid is not a safe or suitable product for routine clinical use. (Author)

  3. Properties and oxidative stability of emulsions prepared with myofibrillar protein and lard diacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xiaoqin; Guan, Haining; Zhao, Xinxin; Chen, Qian; Kong, Baohua

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the emulsifying properties and oxidative stability of emulsions prepared with porcine myofibrillar proteins (MPs) and different lipids, including lard, glycerolized lard (GL) and purified glycerolized lard (PGL). The GL and PGL emulsions had significantly higher emulsifying activity indices and emulsion stability indices than the lard emulsion (P<0.05). The PGL emulsion presented smaller droplet sizes, thus decreasing particle aggregation and improving emulsion stability. The static and dynamic rheological observations of the emulsions showed that the emulsions had pseudo-plastic behavior, and the PGL emulsion presented a larger viscosity and a higher storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G'') compared with the other two emulsions (P<0.05). The formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, carbonyl contents and total sulfhydryl contents was not significantly different between the emulsions with PGL, GL and lard (P<0.05). In general, lard diacylglycerols enhanced emulsifying abilities and had no adverse effects on the oxidation stability of the emulsions prepared with MPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the United...

  5. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the...

  6. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the...

  7. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the United...

  8. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the...

  9. Increased bioavailability of a transdermal application of a nano-sized emulsion preparation.

    PubMed

    Kotyla, T; Kuo, F; Moolchandani, V; Wilson, T; Nicolosi, R

    2008-01-22

    The aim of this study was to compare the transdermal application of a nano-sized emulsion versus a micron-sized emulsion preparation of delta tocopherol as it relates to particle size and bioavailability. Two separate experiments were performed using seven F1B Syrian Golden hamsters, 1 week apart. Each emulsion preparation consisted of canola oil, polysorbate 80, deionized water and delta tocopherol; the only difference between the two preparations was processing the nano-sized emulsion with the Microfluidizer Processor. Both were formulated into a cream and applied to the shaven dorsal area. The particle size of the micron-sized emulsion preparation was 2788 nm compared to 65 nm for the nano-sized emulsion formulation. Two hours post-application, hamsters that were applied the nano-sized emulsion had a 36-fold significant increase of plasma delta tocopherol, where as hamsters that were applied the micron-sized emulsion only had a 9-fold significant increase, compared to baseline, respectively. At 3h post-application, plasma delta tocopherol had significantly increased 68-fold for hamsters applied the nano-sized emulsion, whereas only an 11-fold significant increase was observed in hamsters applied the micron-sized emulsion, compared to baseline, respectively. Significant differences were also observed between the nano-sized and micron-sized emulsion at 2 and 3h post-application. This study suggests that nano-sized emulsions significantly increase the bioavailability of transdermally applied delta tocopherol.

  10. Adsorption of the Three-phase Emulsion on Various Solid Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Yasutaka; Imai, Yoko; Tajima, Kazuo

    2017-07-01

    The present study investigates the adsorption of the three-phase emulsion on various solid/water interfaces. Vesicles can be used as emulsifiers in the three-phase emulsions and act as an independent phase unlike the surfactant used in conventional emulsions; therefore, it is expected that the three-phase emulsion formed by the adhesion of vesicles to the oil/water interface will adsorb on various solid/water interfaces. The cationic three-phase emulsion was prepared to encourage emulsion adsorption on negatively charged solid substrates in water. The emulsifier polyoxyethylene-(10) hydrogenated castor oil was rendered cationic by mixing with the surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and then used to prepare the cationic three-phase emulsion of hexadecane-in-water. Three solid substrates (silicon, glass, and copper) were dipped in the cationic emulsion and the emulsion was found to adsorb on the solid substrates while maintaining its structure. The amount of hexadecane adsorbed on the various surfaces was investigated by gas chromatography and found to increase with increasing hexadecane concentration in the emulsion and eventually plateaued just like molecular adsorption. The maximum surface coverage of the emulsion on the substrates was approximately 80%. However, even the equivalent nonionic three-phase emulsion was found to adsorb on the three solid surfaces. This was attributed to a novel mechanism of irreversible adhesion via the van der Waals attractive force.

  11. Dynamics of water separation in destruction of water-in-oil emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmenko, E. A.; Usheva, N. V.; Moyzes, O. E.; Polyakova, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of drop formation and settling processes in breaking water-in-oil emulsions of the West Siberian oil fields was experimentally studied. The investigation results of drop formation in the water-in-oil emulsions were presented. The residual water content in oil was determined after the settling process at the varied initial water content, temperature, and hydrodynamic conditions of emulsion formation.

  12. Evaporation of Particle-Stabilized Emulsion Sunscreen Films.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Marinopoulos, Ioannis; Crowther, Jonathan M; Thompson, Michael A

    2016-08-24

    We recently showed (Binks et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acsami.6b02696) how evaporation of sunscreen films consisting of solutions of molecular UV filters leads to loss of UV light absorption and derived sun protection factor (SPF). In the present work, we investigate evaporation-induced effects for sunscreen films consisting of particle-stabilized emulsions containing a dissolved UV filter. The emulsions contained either droplets of propylene glycol (PG) in squalane (SQ), droplets of SQ in PG or droplets of decane in PG. In these different emulsion types, the SQ is involatile and shows no evaporation, the PG is volatile and evaporates relatively slowly, whereas the decane is relatively very volatile and evaporates quickly. We have measured the film mass and area, optical micrographs of the film structure, and the UV absorbance spectra during evaporation. For emulsion films containing the involatile SQ, evaporation of the PG causes collapse of the emulsion structure with some loss of specular UV absorbance due to light scattering. However, for these emulsions with droplets much larger than the wavelength of light, the light is scattered only at small forward angles so does not contribute to the diffuse absorbance and the film SPF. The UV filter remains soluble throughout the evaporation and thus the UV absorption by the filter and the SPF remain approximately constant. Both PG-in-SQ and SQ-in-PG films behave similarly and do not show area shrinkage by dewetting. In contrast, the decane-in-PG film shows rapid evaporative loss of the decane, followed by slower loss of the PG resulting in precipitation of the UV filter and film area shrinkage by dewetting which cause the UV absorbance and derived SPF to decrease. Measured UV spectra during evaporation are in reasonable agreement with spectra calculated using models discussed here.

  13. Lipid composition and structure of commercial parenteral emulsions.

    PubMed

    Férézou, J; Nguyen, T L; Leray, C; Hajri, T; Frey, A; Cabaret, Y; Courtieu, J; Lutton, C; Bach, A C

    1994-07-14

    In order to study the influence of the phospholipid/triacylglycerol (PL/TG) ratio of parenteral emulsions on the distribution and the physico-chemical properties of their fat particles, commercial 10, 20 or 30% fat formulas were fractionated by centrifugation into an upper lipid cake (resuspended in aqueous glycerol) and a subnatant or mesophase, from which a PL-rich subfraction (d = 1.010-1.030 g/l) was purified by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Chemical and 31P-NMR analyses of these fractions indicated that at least two types of fat particles coexist in parenteral emulsions: (i) TG-rich particles (mean diameter: 330, 400, 470 nm in the 10, 20, 30% emulsion) which contain practically all the TG and esterified phytosterols of native emulsions, but only a fraction of their PL, unesterified cholesterol and phytosterols, and other minor lipids; (ii) PL-bilayer particles or liposomes (mean diameter: 80-100 nm) which are constituted with the remaining PL and relatively very small amounts of TG and other lipids. The higher the oil content of the emulsion, the lower the amount of these PL-rich particles, which represent the major particle population of the mesophase. Indeed, minute amounts of TG-rich particles (probably the smallest ones) are also present in the mesophase, even in the PL-rich subfraction which contains the bulk of liposomal PL. Since the PL-rich particles of the infused emulsion generate lipoprotein X-like particles, only the large TG-rich particles can be considered as true chylomicron counterparts.

  14. Emulsion of Chloramphenicol: an Overwhelming Approach for Ocular Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ashara, Kalpesh C; Shah, Ketan V

    2017-03-01

    Ophthalmic formulations of chloramphenicol have poor bioavailability of chloramphenicol in the ocular cavity. The present study aimed at exploring the impact of different oil mixtures in the form of emulsion on the permeability of chloramphenicol after ocular application. Selection of oil mixture and ratio of the components was made by an equilibrium solubility method. An emulsifier was chosen according to its emulsification properties. A constrained simplex centroid design was used for the assessment of the emulsion development. Emulsions were evaluated for physicochemical properties; zone of inhibition, in-vitro diffusion and ex-vivo local accumulation of chloramphenicol. Validation of the design using check-point batch and reduced polynomial equations were also developed. Optimization of the emulsion was developed by software Design® expert 6.0.8. Assessment of the osmolarity, ocular irritation, sterility testing and isotonicity of optimized batch were also made. Parker Neem®, olive and peppermint oils were selected as an oil phase in the ratio 63.64:20.2:16.16. PEG-400 was selected as an emulsifier according to a pseudo-ternary phase diagram. Constrained simplex-centroid design was applied in the range of 25-39% water, 55-69% PEG-400, 5-19% optimized oil mixture, and 1% chloramphenicol. Unpaired Student's t-test showed for in-vitro and ex-vivo studies that there was a significant difference between the optimized batch of emulsion and Chloramphenicol eye caps (a commercial product) according to both were equally safe. The optimized batch of an emulsion of chloramphenicol was found to be as safe as and more effective than Chloramphenicol eye caps.

  15. Surface electric properties of emulsions of apolar reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Baichenko, A.A.; Baran, A.A.

    1986-09-01

    This article presents the results of studies of surface electric properties of kerosene and AAR-2 (apolar aromatized reagent) emulsons in water, which can be used in coal slime flotation, in presence of various salts and high-molecular flocculants. The data obtained were compared with the effect of electrolytes on the surface electric properties of a model emulsion of heptane in water stabilized by sodium hapthenate. The studies indicate that similarity of changes in the electrokinetic properties of various emulsions in presence of electrolytes and flocculants.

  16. Rapid and medium setting high float bituminous emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, P.; Schreuders, H.G.

    1987-06-30

    This patent describes a rapid set high float aqueous bituminous emulsion-comprising bitumen, water, and from about 0.4% to about 0.6%, based on the weight of the emulsion, of an anionic emulsifier comprised of an alkaline solution of a combination of (1) 20% to 80% fatty acids selected from the group consisting of tall oil fatty acids, tallow fatty acids, and mixtures. (2) 20% to 80% of a product of the reaction of the fatty acids with a member of the group consists of acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, fumaric acid, and maleic anhydride.

  17. Viscoelastic properties of sterically stabilised emulsions and their stability.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Tharwat

    2015-08-01

    The interaction forces between emulsion droplets containing adsorbed polymeric surfactants and the theory of steric stabilisation are briefly described. The results for the viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions that are stabilised with partially hydrolysed poly(vinyl acetate) that is commonly referred to as poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 4% vinyl acetate are given. The effect of the oil volume fraction, addition of electrolytes and increasing temperature is described. This allows one to obtain various parameters such as the adsorbed layer thickness, the critical flocculation concentration of electrolyte (CFC) and critical flocculation temperature (CFT) at constant electrolyte concentration. The viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyethylene oxide (A) and polypropylene oxide (B) are described. These emulsions behave as viscoelastic liquids showing a cross-over-point between G' (the elastic component of the complex modulus) and G″ (the viscous component of the complex modulus) at a characteristic frequency. Plots of G' and G″ versus oil volume fraction ϕ show the transition from predominantly viscous to predominantly elastic response at a critical volume fraction ϕ(c). The latter can be used to estimate the adsorbed layer thickness of the polymeric surfactants. Results are also shown for W/O emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyhydroxystearic acid (PHS, A) and polyethylene oxide (PEO, B). The viscosity volume fraction curves could be fitted to the Dougherty-Krieger equation for hard-spheres. The results could be applied to give an estimate of the adsorbed layer thickness Δ which shows a decrease with increase of the water volume fraction. This is due to the interpenetration and/or compression of the PHS layers on close approach of the water droplets on increasing the water volume fraction. The last section of the review gives an example of O/W emulsion stability using an AB(n) graft

  18. Numerical analysis of electromagnetic cascades in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plyasheshnikov, A. V.; Vorobyev, K. V.

    1985-01-01

    A new calculational scheme of the Monte Carlo method assigned for the investigation of the development of high and extremely high energy electromagnetic cascades (EMC) in the matter was elaborated. The scheme was applied to the analysis of angular and radial distributions of EMC electrons in the atmosphere. By means of this scheme the EMC development in dense medium is investigated and some preliminary data are presented on the behavior of EMC in emulsion chambers. The results of more detailed theoretical analysis of the EMC development in emulsion chambers are discussed.

  19. Conditioning in laser skin resurfacing - betulin emulsion and skin recovery.

    PubMed

    Metelmann, Hans-Robert; Podmelle, Fred; Waite, Peter D; Müller-Debus, Charlotte Friederieke; Hammes, Stefan; Funk, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Laser skin resurfacing of the face by CO₂-laser ablation is causing superficial wounds that need rapid recovery to reduce the risk of infection, the risk of chronification and as a result the risk of unaesthetic scars. The question being addressed by this study is to demonstrate benefit of betulin emulsion skin care after CO₂-laser wounds. The outcome of this aesthetic comparison between betulin emulsion, moist wound dressing and gauze covering in promoting the recovery process in laser skin ablation is to demonstrate improved aesthetic benefit for the patient.

  20. Preparation of Fine Oxide Powders by Emulsion Precipitation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-31

    anionic and non-ionic commercial emulsifying agents were tried, including Aerosol-OT, Arlacel 83, Span 60, Span 80, Tween 80 , Tween 85, Pluronic L62 and...w/o type emulsion with all three organic liquids, while other o/w or w/o type emulsions are produced by Tween 80 and Tween 85, depending upon the...of 72 v/o toluene; aqueous 25 v/o 0.4M Y(N03 )3 and 3 v/o * emulsifier (1.6 Span 60 + 1.4 Tween 80 ), which was stirred for 15 minutes with a magnetic

  1. Detonation Characteristics of Mixtures of HMX and Emulsion Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    mechanical properties appear to be potentially available. Of particular interest to the NWE technical community is the use of emulsions that can be... community . These advantages are a result of the physical and chemical nature of the emulsion structure. The salt solution (oxidizer) is discontinous and is...8217to MO CI Nio I0 Nc I 0 uI 0 -I I ’ I I I 0 0 N 0 -# I 0 I 0 I 0 26 SECTION 4 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION SUNKARY OF EXPERIENTAL RESULTS The experimental

  2. Emulsions stability, from dilute to dense emulsions -- role of drops deformation.

    PubMed

    Sanfeld, Albert; Steinchen, Annie

    2008-07-01

    The present paper starts with a review of fundamental descriptions based on physico-chemical laws derived for emulsions with a special interest for eventual evidences of drops deformation. A critical analysis of theories and experiments is given that leads the authors to propose new static and dynamic models for the approach to flocculation and coalescence of two deformable drops in dense and dilute environments of other neighboring drops. The model developed is based on an old paper by Albers and Overbeek for W/O dense emulsions with non-deformable particles, that has been improved recently first by Sengupta and Papadopoulos and then by Mishchuk et al. to account for all the interaction forces (electrostatic, van der Waals and steric). The basic idea here rests in the assumption that the flat surface area of the two coalescing drops, interacting in the field of other particles, increases when the distance between the particles decreases according to an exponential law with a characteristic length related to the disjoining force in the inter-particle film and to the capillary pressure that opposes flattening. The difficulty lies, indeed, in manifold interpretations on experimental observations so that no clear conclusion can be derived on mechanisms responsible for the deformation of droplets. This is why, from a pure theoretical and physical point of view, according to rather complicated models, we propose a much more simple approach that permits to define a capillary length as part of virtual operations. In a static approach, this length is based on analogy with electricity, namely repulsion leads to flatness while attraction to hump. Therefore this brings us to a definition of a length depending on the maximum value of the disjoining pressure in competition with the capillary pressure. Gravity also promotes flocculation, therefore we compare the maximum values of the surface forces acting between the surfaces of two floculating particles to gravity. Finally

  3. Effects of silicone emulsifiers on in vitro skin permeation of sunscreens from cosmetic emulsions.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Lucia; Paolino, Donatella; Puglisi, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    The effects of different silicone emulsifiers on the in vitro permeation through human skin of two sunscreens (octylmethoxycinnamate, OMC, and butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane, BMBM) were investigated from cosmetic emulsions. The formulations being tested were prepared using the same oil and aqueous phase ingredients and the following silicone emulsifiers: dimethicone copolyol and cyclomethicone (emulsion 1), cetyldimethicone copolyol (emulsion 2), polyglyceryl-4-isostearate and cetyldimethicone copolyol and hexyllaurate (emulsion 3), lauryldimethicone copolyol (emulsion 4), and cyclomethicone and dimethicone copolyol (emulsion 5). The cumulative amount of OMC that permeated in vitro through human skin after 22 h from emulsions 1-5 decreased in the order 2 approximate, equals 1 > 5 > 4 approximate, equals 3 and was about twofold higher from emulsion 2 compared to emulsion 4. As for BMBM, no significant difference was observed in regard to its skin permeation from the emulsions being tested. In vitro release experiments of OMC and BMBM from emulsions 1-5 were performed through cellulose acetate membranes using Franz diffusion cells. Emulsions 1-3 showed an initial slow release of BMBM followed by a fast release phase, while the release of OMC showed a different pattern since the sunscreen was released very rapidly at the beginning of the experiment and then a plateau was observed followed by a second step of fast release. A pseudo-first-order release rate was observed only for BMBM from emulsion 4, while emulsion 5 released very small amounts of both sunscreens during 22 h. These findings could be attributed both to changes in sunscreen thermodynamic activity in the vehicle and to modified interactions between the active ingredient and the formulation components. The results of this study suggest that the type of silicone emulsifier used to prepare sunscreen emulsions should be carefully chosen in order to prevent the percutaneous absorption of sunscreens from these

  4. DIMENSION STABILIZED FIXED PHOTOGRAPHIC TYPE EMULSION AND A METHOD FOR PRODUCING SAME

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, F.C.

    1962-03-13

    A process is given for stabilizing the dimensions of fixed gelatin-base photographic type emulsions containing silver halide, and particularly to such emulsions containing large amounts of silver chloride for use as nuclear track emulsions, so that the dimensions of the final product are the same as or in a predetermined fixed ratio to the dimensions of the emulsions prior to exposure. The process comprises contacting an exposed, fixed emulsion with a solution of wood rosin dissolved in ethyl alcohol for times corresponding to the dimensions desired, and thereafter permitting the alcohol to evaporate. (AEC)

  5. Impact of Providing a Combination Lipid Emulsion Compared With a Standard Soybean Oil Lipid Emulsion in Children Receiving Parenteral Nutrition: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Finn, Kristen Lawler; Chung, Mei; Rothpletz-Puglia, Pamela; Byham-Gray, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Soybean oil lipid emulsion may compromise immune function and promote hepatic damage due to its composition of long-chain fatty acids, phytosterols, high proportion of ω-6 fatty acids, and low α-tocopherol levels. Combination lipid emulsions have been developed using medium-chain triglyceride oil, fish oil, and/or olive oil, which provide adequate essential fatty acids, a smaller concentration of ω-6 fatty acids, and lower levels of phytosterols. The purpose of this systematic review is to determine if combination lipid emulsions have a more favorable impact on bilirubin levels, triglyceride levels, and incidence of infection compared with soybean oil lipid emulsions in children receiving parenteral nutrition. This study comprises a systematic review of published studies. Data were sufficient and homogeneous to conduct a meta-analysis for total bilirubin and infection. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis showed that combination lipid emulsion decreased total bilirubin by a mean difference of 2.09 mg/dL (95% confidence interval, -4.42 to 0.24) compared with soybean oil lipid emulsion, although the result was not statistically significant (P = .08). Meta-analysis revealed no statistically significant difference in incidence of infection between the combination lipid emulsion and the soybean oil lipid emulsion groups (P = .846). None of the 4 studies that included triglyceride as an outcome detected a significant difference in triglyceride levels between the combination lipid emulsion and soybean oil lipid emulsion groups. There is inadequate evidence that combination lipid emulsions offer any benefit regarding bilirubin levels, triglyceride levels, or incidence of infection compared with soybean oil lipid emulsions. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  6. Graft copolymerization onto cellulose-based filter paper and its further development as silver nanoparticles loaded antibacterial food-packaging material.

    PubMed

    Tankhiwale, Rasika; Bajpai, S K

    2009-03-01

    The present work describes ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) initiated graft copolymerization of acrylamide onto cellulose-based filter paper followed by entrapment of silver nanoparticles. The copolymerization was carried out in aqueous solution, containing 2M acrylamide monomer and 16mM N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (MB) crosslinker. The optimum initiation time and grafting reaction temperature were found to be 15min and 30 degrees C, respectively. The silver nanoparticles were loaded into grafted filter paper by equilibration in silver nitrate solution followed by citrate reduction. The formation of silver nanoparticles has been confirmed by TEM and SAED analysis. The novel nano silver loaded filter paper has been investigated for its antimicrobial properties against E.coli. This newly developed material shows strong antibacterial property and thus offers its candidature for possible use as antibacterial food-packaging material.

  7. Alternating copolymerization of propylene oxide with biorenewable terpene-based cyclic anhydrides: a sustainable route to aliphatic polyesters with high glass transition temperatures.

    PubMed

    Van Zee, Nathan J; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2015-02-23

    The alternating copolymerization of propylene oxide with terpene-based cyclic anhydrides catalyzed by chromium, cobalt, and aluminum salen complexes is reported. The use of the Diels-Alder adduct of α-terpinene and maleic anhydride as the cyclic anhydride comonomer results in amorphous polyesters that exhibit glass transition temperatures (Tg ) of up to 109 °C. The polymerization conditions and choice of catalyst have a dramatic impact on the molecular weight distribution, the relative stereochemistry of the diester units along the polymer chain, and ultimately the Tg of the resulting polymer. The aluminum salen complex exhibits exceptional selectivity for copolymerization without transesterification or epimerization side reactions. The resulting polyesters are highly alternating and have high molecular weights and narrow polydispersities.

  8. Copolymerization as a Strategy to Combine Epoxidized Linseed Oil and Furfuryl Alcohol: The Design of a Fully Bio-Based Thermoset.

    PubMed

    Pin, Jean-Mathieu; Guigo, Nathanaël; Vincent, Luc; Sbirrazzuoli, Nicolas; Mija, Alice

    2015-12-21

    Epoxidized linseed oil and furfuryl alcohol are bio-sourced monomers known for their high-potential applications in materials science. In this work, we propose the association of these monomers through copolymerization reactions with the target to design fully bio-based thermosets. Herein, investigations on cationic polymerization reactivity have been explored using differential scanning calorimetry. The obtained structures have been confirmed by IR spectroscopy and 2 D NMR spectroscopy, which revealed the principal chain connections. In spite of the multiple capabilities of chemical connections, which include copolymerization and cross-linking, the obtained networks are homogeneous as confirmed by dynamic mechanical analysis and SEM. Furthermore, the copolymer demonstrates a semiductile behavior if subjected to tensile measurements (tensile strain at break ≈40 %), which is a significant advance in terms of its applications as a furanic bio-based thermoset material.

  9. Copolymerizations of epsilon-caprolactone and glycolide-a comparison of tin(II)octanoate and bismuth(III)subsalicylate as initiators.

    PubMed

    Kricheldorf, Hans R; Rost, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Copolymerizations of epsilon-caprolactone (epsilonCL) and glycolide (GL) were conducted in bulk at 120 degrees C with variation of the reaction time. Either Sn(II) 2-ethylhexanoate (SnOct(2)) or bismuth(III)subsalicylate (BiSS) were used as initiators combined with tetra(ethylene glycol) as co-initiator. The resulting copolyesters were analyzed by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy with regard to the total molar composition and to the sequence of the comonomers. Furthermore, two series of copolymerizations (either Sn- or Bi-initiated) were performed at constant time with variation of the temperature. It was found that BiSS favors alternating sequences more than SnOct(2). Time-conversion curves and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of homopolymerization suggest that SnOct(2) is the more efficient transesterification catalyst. A hypothetical reaction mechanism is discussed.

  10. Template copolymerization to control site structure around metal ions: Applications towards sensing and gas storage and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell-Koch, Jeremy T.

    The development of functional materials for sensing and gas storage and release is useful in a number of chemical and biological applications. Investigating function of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP), often used for these purposes, has relied on circumstantial evidence because direct examination of immobilized sites is not possible. Described in this dissertation is the design, synthesis, characterization and function studies of materials synthesized by template copolymerization methods. Metal ions exhibit unique spectroscopic properties and their utilization makes site examination more feasible. Ligand binding modulates these properties such that the event can be measured by spectroscopy. The metal ion's secondary coordination environment can also be tuned to increase or decrease function of the material. In Chapter Two the utilization of template copolymerization to immobilize a europium-containing compound for the detection of volatile organic compounds is described. Luminescence of the immobilized complex is quenched in the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOC). The quenching effect is dependent on concentration of VOC and the nature of polymeric host. Chapters Three and Four describe the development of materials for the photolytic release of nitric oxide (NO). In Chapter Three, a novel manipulation of the immobilized complex is employed to produce binding sites that contain ligands covalently embedded into the host in a position to bind the metal ion upon NO release in order to block rebinding. Incompatible binding affinities of the iron-containing templates made it impossible to study NO photo-release from this material. Second-row transition metals are more compatible with NO binding, and Chapter Four describes a ruthenium salen-containing polymer that releases NO in response to light. Additionally, transfer of NO to a metalloporphyrin and myoglobin has been achieved. This is the first report of photolytic heterogeneous NO transfer by a material

  11. Drug delivery to the ocular posterior segment using lipid emulsion via eye drop administration: effect of emulsion formulations and surface modification.

    PubMed

    Ying, Lin; Tahara, Kohei; Takeuchi, Hirofumi

    2013-09-10

    This work explored submicron-sized lipid emulsion as potential carriers for intraocular drug delivery to the posterior segment via eye drops. The effects of physicochemical properties of lipid emulsion on drug delivery were evaluated in vivo using mice. Different formulations of submicron-sized lipid emulsions were prepared using a high pressure homogenization system. Using coumairn-6 as a model drug and fluorescent marker, fluorescence could be observed in the retina after administration of the lipid emulsion. The fluorescence intensity observed after administration of medium chain triglycerides containing the same amount of coumarin-6 was much lower than that observed after administration of lipid emulsions. The inner oil property and phospholipid emulsifier did not affect the drug delivery efficiency to the retina. However, compared with unmodified emulsions, the fluorescence intensity in the retina increased by surface modification using a positive charge inducer and the functional polymers chitosan (CS) and poloxamer 407 (P407). CS-modified lipid emulsions could be electrostatically interacted with the eye surface. By its adhesive property, poloxamer 407, a surface modifier, possibly increased the lipid emulsion retention time on the eye surface. In conclusion, we suggested that surface-modified lipid emulsions could be promising vehicles of hydrophobic drug delivery to the ocular posterior segment. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Physicochemical properties of structured phosphatidylcholine in drug carrier lipid emulsions for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Emi; Shimokawa, Ken-ichi; Ishii, Fumiyoshi

    2008-03-15

    Drug carrier emulsions were prepared with structured phosphatidylcholine (PC-LM) which has both a long hydrocarbon chain and a medium hydrocarbon chain, and the characteristics of PC-LM as an emulsifier were investigated by measuring the creaming ratio, the surface tension of the emulsion system, and the mean particle size and zeta potential of the oil droplets in emulsions. The emulsion prepared with PC-LM as an emulsifier kept the condition and the ratio of separation was lower than those with purified egg yolk lecithin (PEL). The mean particle size of the emulsion prepared with PC-LM was smaller than that with PEL when using only sonication, approximately 250 nm. When using a high-pressure homogenizer after sonication, the mean emulsion size with PC-LM was also smaller than with PEL, approximately 150 nm. The surface tension of the various emulsions and the zeta potential of the emulsion droplets were measured to investigate the stability of the systems. In emulsions with PC-LM or PEL, the surface tension as an index of stability increased as the pressure of the homogenizer increased. Moreover, the zeta potential of the emulsion droplets prepared with PC-LM also increased with an increase in pressure of the homogenizer. As a result, it was found that the drug carrier emulsion prepared with PC-LM had significant advantages in terms of stability and mean diameter. We considered it could be used for the preparations of nanoparticle dispersion systems in drug delivery systems.

  13. Submicron lipid emulsion as a drug delivery system for nalbuphine and its prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jhi-Joung; Sung, K C; Hu, Oliver Yoa-Pu; Yeh, Chih-Hui; Fang, Jia-You

    2006-10-10

    This study investigates the submicron lipid emulsion as a potential parenteral drug delivery system for nalbuphine and its ester prodrugs. Submicron emulsions were prepared using egg phospholipid as the main emulsifier, various co-emulsifiers were also incorporated, including Brij 30, Brij 98, and stearylamine. Squalene as the oil phase formed stable emulsions with small particles. Drug release was affected by incorporating various co-emulsifiers and drugs with various lipophilicity. The loading of nalbuphine into lipid emulsions resulted in the slower and sustained release of nalbuphine. Lipid emulsions containing Brij 98 could further enhance the release of prodrugs as compared to the aqueous solution (control) especially for nalbuphine enanthate (NAE). Hemolysis caused by the interaction between erythrocytes and lipid emulsions was investigated. Brij 30 and Brij 98 could shield the hemolytic activity of phospholipids in the oil/water interface, decreasing the acute toxicological potential of the emulsions. The in vivo analgesic activity of various emulsions was examined by a cold ethanol tail-flick test. The analgesic duration and potency were significantly increased by incorporating nalbuphine and NAE into Brij 98-containing emulsions. There was no need for nalbuphine benzoate (NAB) to show a controlled delivery manner by encapsulating into emulsions, since NAB itself could prolong the analgesic duration of nalbuphine due to the slow enzyme degradation. The in vivo analgesic activity correlated well to the profiles of in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles. The study demonstrates the feasibility of using submicron lipid emulsion as the parenteral drug delivery system for nalbuphine and its prodrugs.

  14. Enhanced stabilization of cloudy emulsions with gum Arabic and whey protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Klein, Miri; Aserin, Abraham; Svitov, Inna; Garti, Nissim

    2010-05-01

    Cloudy emulsions are oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions normally prepared as concentrates, further diluted, per request, into the final beverage. The cloudy emulsion provides flavor, color, and cloud (turbidity) to the soft drink. These systems are stabilized by emulsifiers and/or amphiphilic polysaccharides. Cloudy emulsions based on naturally occurring food grade emulsifiers were studied in the present work. Two charged natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum Arabic (GA), are interacted in aqueous solution to form charge-charge interactions improving the emulsion stability. The emulsions were high sheared (Microfluidizer) and characterized by particle size distribution analysis (DLS), optical centrifugation (LUMiFuge), optical microscopy observations, and turbidity measurements. Emulsions obtained from 10wt% of 3:1wt. ratio WPI:GA, at pH 7 (10wt% canola oil) show better stability than emulsions stabilized by GA or WPI alone. The droplet sizes were smaller than 1microm and did not grow significantly during 1 month of incubation at 25 degrees C. The D-limonene-based emulsion droplets were larger (> 2microm) than those made with vegetable oils immediately after preparation and underwent significant droplet size increase (coalescence) within 1 month (>8 microm). The emulsion with turbidity suitable as a cloudy emulsion was composed of 3wt% WPI:GA (3:1) and 20wt% canola oil.

  15. Influence of droplet charge on the chemical stability of citral in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Jun; Decker, Eric Andrew; Henson, Lulu; Popplewell, L Michael; McClements, David Julian

    2010-08-01

    The chemical stability of citral, a flavor component widely used in beverage, food, and fragrance products, in oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by surfactants with different charge characteristics was investigated. Emulsions were prepared using cationic (lauryl alginate, LAE), non-ionic (polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether, Brij 35), and anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) surfactants at pH 3.5. The citral concentration decreased over time in all the emulsions, but the rate of decrease depended on surfactant type. After 7 d storage, the citral concentrations remaining in the emulsions were around 60% for LAE- or Brij 35-stabilized emulsions and 10% for SDS-stabilized emulsions. An increase in the local proton (H(+)) concentration around negatively charged droplet surfaces may account for the more rapid citral degradation observed in SDS-stabilized emulsions. A strong metal ion chelator (EDTA), which has previously been shown to be effective at increasing the oxidative stability of labile components, had no effect on citral stability in LAE- or Brij 35-stabilized emulsions, but it slightly decreased the initial rate of citral degradation in SDS-stabilized emulsions. These results suggest the surfactant type used to prepare emulsions should be controlled to improve the chemical stability of citral in emulsion systems.

  16. Immunomodulatory and Physical Effects of Oil Composition in Vaccine Adjuvant Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Christopher B.; Baldwin, Susan L.; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Reed, Steven G.; Vedvick, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    Squalene-based oil-in-water emulsions have been used for years in some seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. However, concerns have been expressed regarding squalene source and potential biological activities. Little information is available regarding the immunomodulatory activity of squalene in comparison with other metabolizable oils in the context of oil-in-water emulsions formulated with vaccines. The present work describes the manufacture and physical characterization of emulsions composed of different classes of oils, including squalene, long chain triglycerides, a medium chain triglyceride, and a perfluorocarbon, all emulsified with egg phosphatidylcholine. Some differences were apparent among the non-squalene oils in terms of emulsion stability, including higher size polydispersity in the perfluorocarbon emulsion, more rapid visual instability at 60 °C for the long-chain triglyceride and perfluorocarbon emulsions, and an increased creaming rate in the medium-chain triglyceride emulsion at 60 °C as detected by laser scattering optical profiling. The biological activity of each of these emulsions was compared when formulated with either a recombinant malaria antigen or a split-virus inactivated influenza vaccine. Overall, vaccines containing the squalene emulsion elicited higher antibody titers and more abundant long-lived plasma cells than vaccines containing emulsions based on other oils. Since squalene-based emulsions show higher adjuvant potency compared to the other oils tested, non-squalene oils may be more suitable as carriers of amphiphilic or hydrophobic immunostimulatory molecules (such as TLR agonists) rather than as stand-alone adjuvants. PMID:21906648

  17. Characteristics of meat emulsion systems as influenced by different levels of lemon albedo.

    PubMed

    Sarıçoban, C; Ozalp, B; Yılmaz, M T; Ozen, G; Karakaya, M; Akbulut, M

    2008-11-01

    The effect of the addition of lemon albedo on the functional properties of emulsions was studied by using a model system. Oil/water (O/W) model emulsion systems were prepared by the addition of two types of lemon albedo (raw and dehydrated) at five concentrations (0.0%, 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5% and 10%) to mechanically deboned chicken meat. The emulsion capacity, stability, viscosity and flow properties of the prepared model emulsions were analyzed. In addition, the colour parameters of cooked emulsion gel were determined. The addition of lemon albedo increased the emulsion capacity (EC) and the highest EC value was reached with 5% of albedo added. However, further increase in the albedo concentration caused an inverse trend in the EC values. A similar trend was observed in the emulsion stability (ES) values. Dehydrated albedo (DA) addition caused higher EC and ES values than did raw albedo (RA). DA increased the L(∗), a(∗) and b(∗) values of the cooked emulsion gels. Emulsion viscosity (EV) values were positively correlated with an increase in albedo concentration and the highest EV value was obtained from the emulsions with 10% albedo. Albedo addition did not change the flow properties of the emulsions and, in addition, increased the pseudoplasticity. As a consequence, the use of lemon albedo might be a potential dietary fiber source to enhance the functional and technological properties for frankfurter-type meat products.

  18. Isoselective 3,4-(co)polymerization of bio-renewable myrcene using NSN-ligated rare-earth metal precursor: an approach to a new elastomer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Li, Lei; Sun, Guangping; Liu, Dongtao; Li, Shihui; Cui, Dongmei

    2015-01-21

    The polymerization of bio-renewable myrcene (MY), using a cationic β-diimidosulfonate lutetium catalyst in high activity, afforded an unprecedented isotactic 3,4-polymyrcene (PMY) with a low Tg (-42 °C). Based on this result, the random and block copolymerization of myrcene and isoprene (IP) resulted in novel elastomers that comprise the amorphous iso-3,4-PMY and iso-3,4-PIP sequences.

  19. Preparation of Syndiotactic Poly(vinyl alcohol)/Poly(vinyl pivalate/vinyl acetate) Microspheres with Radiopacity Using Suspension Copolymerization and Saponification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok Lyoo, Won; Wook Cha, Jin; Young Kwak, Kun; Jae Lee, Young; Yong Jeon, Han; Sik Chung, Yong; Kyun Noh, Seok

    2010-06-01

    To prepare Poly(vinyl pivalate/vinyl acetate) [P(VPi/VAc)] microspheres with radiopacity, the suspension copolymerization approach in the presence of aqueous radiopaque nanoparticles was used. After, The P(VPi/VAc) microspheres with radiopacity were saponified in heterogeneous system, and then P(VPi/VAc) microspheres without aggregates were converted to s-PVA/P(VPi/VAc) microspheres of skin/core structure through the heterogeneous surface saponification. Radiopacity of microspheres was confirmed with Computed tomography (CT).

  20. Copolymerization and terpolymerization of carbon dioxide/propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride using a (salen)Co(III) complex tethering four quaternary ammonium salts

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jong Yeob; Eo, Seong Chan; Varghese, Jobi Kodiyan

    2014-01-01

    Summary The (salen)Co(III) complex 1 tethering four quaternary ammonium salts, which is a highly active catalyst in CO2/epoxide copolymerizations, shows high activity for propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride (PO/PA) copolymerizations and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations. In the PO/PA copolymerizations, full conversion of PA was achieved within 5 h, and strictly alternating copolymers of poly(1,2-propylene phthalate)s were afforded without any formation of ether linkages. In the PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations, full conversion of PA was also achieved within 4 h. The resulting polymers were gradient poly(1,2-propylene carbonate-co-phthalate)s because of the drift in the PA concentration during the terpolymerization. Both polymerizations showed immortal polymerization character; therefore, the molecular weights were determined by the activity (g/mol-1) and the number of chain-growing sites per 1 [anions in 1 (5) + water (present as impurity) + ethanol (deliberately fed)], and the molecular weight distributions were narrow (M w/M n, 1.05–1.5). Because of the extremely high activity of 1, high-molecular-weight polymers were generated (M n up to 170,000 and 350,000 for the PO/PA copolymerization and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerization, respectively). The terpolymers bearing a substantial number of PA units (f PA, 0.23) showed a higher glass-transition temperature (48 °C) than the CO2/PO alternating copolymer (40 °C). PMID:25161738