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Sample records for sobre lo sublime

  1. The Sublime Corpse in Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's Women's Journal "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello" (1860)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaGreca, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article examines Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's choice to include articles depicting the advanced decay of cadavers, which are simultaneously horrible and awesome, in her women's periodical "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello". Background on Avellaneda's biography, women's print culture, and theories of the sublime provide a frame for the…

  2. The Sublime and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Jamin

    2006-01-01

    The sublime is a theory of aesthetics that reached its highest popularity in British literature during the Romantic period (c. 1785-1832). This article (1) explicates philosophers' different meanings of the sublime; (2) show how the sublime is relevant to education; and (3) show how the sublime "works" in literature by analyzing William Blake's…

  3. A sublimation heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Gary G.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-03-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid-vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation.

  4. A sublimation heat engine.

    PubMed

    Wells, Gary G; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-03-03

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid-vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation.

  5. A sublimation heat engine

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Gary G.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-01-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid–vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation. PMID:25731669

  6. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  7. The Sublime and the Vulgar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, Karen

    1990-01-01

    Explores how Edmund Burke's discourse on the sublime helps illuminate attacks on the vulgarization of culture (as typified by Allan Bloom), both for the presumedly "vulgar" reader and for the champions of high culture. (MG)

  8. Sublimation systems and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D.; McKellar, Michael G.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2016-02-09

    A system for vaporizing and sublimating a slurry comprising a fluid including solid particles therein. The system includes a first heat exchanger configured to receive the fluid including solid particles and vaporize the fluid and a second heat exchanger configured to receive the vaporized fluid and solid particles and sublimate the solid particles. A method for vaporizing and sublimating a fluid including solid particles therein is also disclosed. The method includes feeding the fluid including solid particles to a first heat exchanger, vaporizing the fluid, feeding the vaporized fluid and solid particles to a second heat exchanger and sublimating the solid particles. In some embodiments the fluid including solid particles is liquid natural gas or methane including solid carbon dioxide particles.

  9. Enantioenrichment in sublimed amino acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Viedma, Cristóbal; Ortiz, José E; de Torres, Trinidad; Cintas, Pedro

    2012-04-14

    A real amplification of an initial enantiomeric excess can be detected when two amino acids are sublimed at high temperature, even if one of the components is a racemic compound that does not convert into a conglomerate by sublimation.

  10. Eisenhower and the American Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Gorman, Ned

    2008-01-01

    This essay presents Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidential rhetoric as an iteration of an American synecdochal sublime. Eisenhower's rhetoric sought to re-aim civic sight beyond corporeal objects to the nation's transcendental essence. This rhetoric is intimately connected to prevailing political anxieties and exigencies, especially the problem of…

  11. Displacement, Substitution, Sublimation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freund worked with the mechanisms of displacement, substitution, and sublimation. These mechanisms have many similarities and have been studied diagnostically and therapeutically. Displacement and substitution seem to fit in well with phobias, hysterias, somatiyations, prejudices, and scapegoating. Phobias, prejudices, and scapegoating…

  12. Membrane evaporator/sublimator investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, J.; Ruder, J.; Strumpf, H.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented on a new evaporator/sublimator concept using a hollow fiber membrane unit with a high permeability to liquid water. The aim of the program was to obtain a more reliable, lightweight and simpler Extra Vehicular Life Support System (EVLSS) cooling concept than is currently being used.

  13. APPARATUS FOR CONDENSATION AND SUBLIMATION

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, R.J.; Fuis, F. Jr.

    1958-10-01

    An apparatus is presented for the sublimation and condensation of uranium compounds in order to obtain an improved crystalline structure of this material. The apparatus comprises a vaporizing chamber and condensing structure connected thereto. There condenser is fitted with a removable liner having a demountable baffle attached to the liner by means of brackets and a removable pin. The baffle is of spiral cross-section and is provided with cooling coils disposed between the surfaces of the baffle for circulation of a temperature controlling liquid within the baffle. The cooling coll provides for controlllng the temperature of the baffle to insure formatlon of a satisfactory condensate, and the removable liner facilitates the removal of condensate formed during tbe sublimation process.

  14. Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and the Aesthetically Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2003-01-01

    Much has been written on the relationship between Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche. Much remains to be said, however, concerning their respective theories of the sublime. In this article, the author first argues against the traditional, dialectical view of Schopenhauer's theory of the sublime that stresses the crucial role the sublime…

  15. Canopy Effects on Macroscale Snow Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoma, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Sublimation of snow cover directly affects snow accumulation, impacting ecosystem processes, soil moisture, soil porosity, biogeochemical processes, wildfire, and water resources. Available energy, the exposed surface area of a snow cover, and exposure time with the atmosphere vary greatly in complex terrain (e.g., aspect, elevation, forest cover), with latitude, and with continentality. It is therefore difficult to scale up results from site specific short term studies. Using the 32-km NARR, the 4-km PRISM, with 30-m terrain and forest cover data, meteorological variables are downscaled to simulate sublimation from canopy intercepted snow and from the snowpack over the Salt River Basin in Arizona for a wet and dry year. Simulations indicate that: (1) total sublimation is highly variable in response to variability in both sublimation rate and snow cover duration; (2) total canopy sublimation is similar for both years while ground sublimation is considerably greater during the wet year; (3) sublimation is a relatively greater contribution to the snow water budget during the dry year (28% vs. 20% of total snowfall); (4) at high elevations, ground sublimation is less in open areas than forested areas during the dry year, while the reverse is evident during the wet year as snowpack lasted longer into spring. While a reduction in leaf area index leads to a reduction of total sublimation due to less interception in both years, ground sublimation increases during the dry year, possibly due to less sheltering from solar radiation and wind. This reduction in sheltering results in a large decrease in snowpack duration (i.e., ten days in spring) at mid-elevations for the wet year, leading to a decrease in ground sublimation. This results in a 500 meter difference in the elevation of maximum sublimation reduction upon reduced leaf area index between the two years. Forest cover properties can vary considerably on short and long time scales through natural (wildfire, bark beetle

  16. Experimental Investigation of Transient Sublimator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2012-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered for operations in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a supplemental heat rejection device during mission phases where the environmental temperature or heat rejection requirement changes rapidly. This scenario may occur during low lunar orbit, low earth orbit, or other planetary orbits. In these mission phases, the need for supplemental heat rejection will vary between zero and some fraction of the overall heat load. In particular, supplemental heat rejection is required for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will describe the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. Experimental data from various scenarios is analyzed to investigate feedwater consumption efficiency under the cyclical conditions. Start up utilization tests were conducted to better understand the transient performance. This paper also provides recommendations for future sublimator design and transient operation.

  17. Coating Thermoelectric Devices To Suppress Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    A technique for suppressing sublimation of key elements from skutterudite compounds in advanced thermoelectric devices has been demonstrated. The essence of the technique is to cover what would otherwise be the exposed skutterudite surface of such a device with a thin, continuous film of a chemically and physically compatible metal. Although similar to other sublimation-suppression techniques, this technique has been specifically tailored for application to skutterudite antimonides. The primary cause of deterioration of most thermoelectric materials is thermal decomposition or sublimation - one or more elements sublime from the hot side of a thermoelectric couple, changing the stoichiometry of the device. Examples of elements that sublime from their respective thermoelectric materials are Ge from SiGe, Te from Pb/Te, and now Sb from skutterudite antimonides. The skutterudite antimonides of primary interest are CoSb3 [electron-donor (n) type] and CeFe(3-x)Co(x)Sb12 [electron-acceptor (p) type]. When these compounds are subjected to typical operating conditions [temperature of 700 C and pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa)], Sb sublimes from their surfaces, with the result that Sb depletion layers form and advance toward their interiors. As the depletion layer advances in a given device, the change in stoichiometry diminishes the thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of the device. The problem, then, is to prevent sublimation, or at least reduce it to an acceptably low level. In preparation for an experiment on suppression of sublimation, a specimen of CoSb3 was tightly wrapped in a foil of niobium, which was selected for its chemical stability. In the experiment, the wrapped specimen was heated to a temperature of 700 C in a vacuum of residual pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa), then cooled and sectioned. Examination of the sectioned specimen revealed that no depletion layer had formed, indicating the niobium foil prevented sublimation of antimony at 700 C

  18. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  19. No reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with NHCO into a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  20. NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  1. Heat of Sublimation of I-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Giles; Robarts, Ronald A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive double-beam laser photometry experiment to determine the molar heat of sublimation of I-2. The experiment employs common laboratory materials and components and gives results with a two percent to three percent accuracy. (Author/GA)

  2. Psychotherapy. Sublimation and the psychodynamics of birding.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Norman A

    2012-07-01

    An adventure in extreme birding prompted the psychoanalyst author to reflect on "why do people do this?" Like myriad human interests, vocations, and avocations, the activity of bird watching is a socially acceptable activity that is the final pathway for multiple motivations that are likely to have a long history in the individual's development. It may have origins in basic survival skills. Various psychological defense mechanisms may be involved, the most mature and successful one being sublimation. Success of a defense-like sublimation may be viewed in terms of freedom from anxiety or from obsessive extremes that interfere with the individual's wellbeing, important relationships, or physical or financial health. The author considers whether the characters in the film The Big Year exemplify such success or the lack of it.

  3. No reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid and CO or other H-atom generating species is also present or added to the gas stream.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Sublimator Performance at Transient Heat Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephen, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a topper during mission phases such as low lunar or low earth orbit. In these mission phases, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will summarize the effort put into understanding sublimator response under a transient heat load. The performance will be assessed by detailing the changes in feedwater utilization due to transient starts and stops during various feedwater timing scenarios. Sublimator start up utilization will be assessed as a possible relationship to transient performance of a sublimator. This paper will also provide recommendations for future sublimator designs and/or feedwater control.

  5. GFEChutes Lo-Fi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gist, Emily; Turner, Gary; Shelton, Robert; Vautier, Mana; Shaikh, Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    NASA needed to provide a software model of a parachute system for a manned re-entry vehicle. NASA has parachute codes, e.g., the Descent Simulation System (DSS), that date back to the Apollo Program. Since the space shuttle did not rely on parachutes as its primary descent control mechanism, DSS has not been maintained or incorporated into modern simulation architectures such as Osiris and Antares, which are used for new mission simulations. GFEChutes Lo-Fi is an object-oriented implementation of conventional parachute codes designed for use in modern simulation environments. The GFE (Government Furnished Equipment), low-fidelity (Lo-Fi) parachute model (GFEChutes Lo-Fi) is a software package capable of modeling the effects of multiple parachutes, deployed concurrently and/or sequentially, on a vehicle during the subsonic phase of reentry into planetary atmosphere. The term "low-fidelity" distinguishes models that represent the parachutes as simple forces acting on the vehicle, as opposed to independent aerodynamic bodies. GFEChutes Lo-Fi was created from these existing models to be clean, modular, certified as NASA Class C software, and portable, or "plug and play." The GFE Lo-Fi Chutes Model provides basic modeling capability of a sequential series of parachute activities. Actions include deploying the parachute, changing the reefing on the parachute, and cutting away the parachute. Multiple chutes can be deployed at any given time, but all chutes in that case are assumed to behave as individually isolated chutes; there is no modeling of any interactions between deployed chutes. Drag characteristics of a deployed chute are based on a coefficient of drag, the face area of the chute, and the local dynamic pressure only. The orientation of the chute is approximately modeled for purposes of obtaining torques on the vehicle, but the dynamic state of the chute as a separate entity is not integrated - the treatment is simply an approximation. The innovation in GFEChutes

  6. Sublimating grains model of cometary coma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Brucato, J. R.

    Billion years of space weathering produces a crust of organic matter (see e.g. Kanuchova et al. 2012) that will be released when a comet enter for the first time in the inner Solar System. New comets, coming form the Oort Colud at their first passage close to the Sun, are particularly important because they are not differentiated by the Solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of ice organic matter close to the surface. When a comet approach to the Sun, its activity is driven by the sublimation of these nucleus ices: if the heliocentric distances, R_H , is greater than 3 AU the sublimation of CO and CO_2 ices is the main source of comet activity, otherwise at shorter distances, the sublimation of water become the most important mechanism of activity. These gases, escaping from the nucleus, drag in the coma grains that can be refractory dust (silicates, carbon), water ice and/or organic ices. Oort comets at their first passage in the inner Solar System, should produce an halo of organic or water icy particles. Our group has been monitoring new, inbound, bright Oort comets (C/2011 F1, C/2012 S1, C/2012 K1, C/2013 V5, C/2012 F3, C/2013 US10, C/2013 X1) to search for these icy grains. The method consists in detecting the cloud of sublimating grains in the inner coma by using the Sigma Af function (Tozzi et al. 2007) directly from images. However this over-population of grains, beside the sublimation, can be also due to short time activity (outburst) or too big grains expanding at very slow velocity, as it has been found in comet 67P/C-G (Tozzi eta al, 2011, A&A, 531, 54). To disentangle between the phenomena it is necessary to monitor the comet both at short timescale, for the outbursts (by repeating the observations after few nights), and at long term (weeks-months). If the cloud does not expand with the decreasing of the heliocentric distance there is high probability that we are in presence of organic and/or water ice grains. We can disentangle

  7. Science Sublime: The Philosophy of the Sublime, Dewey's Aesthetics, and Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists and, in turn, science education has not accurately portrayed science to students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the classroom, this work draws on the writings of the sublime by Burke, Kant, Emerson, and Wordsworth…

  8. Reassessing Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature in the Kantian Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The sublime has been a relatively neglected topic in recent work in philosophical aesthetics, with existing discussions confined mainly to problems in Kant's theory. Given the revival of interest in his aesthetic theory and the influence of the Kantian sublime compared to other eighteenth-century accounts, this focus is not surprising. Kant's…

  9. In situ transmission electron microscopy of cadmium selenide nanorod sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Hellebusch, Daniel J.; Manthiram, Karthish; Beberwyck, Brandon J.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2015-01-23

    In situ electron microscopy is used to observe the morphological evolution of cadmium selenide nanorods as they sublime under vacuum at a series of elevated temperatures. Mass loss occurs anisotropically along the nanorod’s long axis. At temperatures close to the sublimation threshold, the phase change occurs from both tips of the nanorods and proceeds unevenly with periods of rapid mass loss punctuated by periods of relative stability. At higher temperatures, the nanorods sublime at a faster, more uniform rate, but mass loss occurs from only a single end of the rod. Furthermore, we propose a mechanism that accounts for the observed sublimation behavior based on the terrace–ledge–kink (TLK) model and how the nanorod surface chemical environment influences the kinetic barrier of sublimation.

  10. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of Cadmium Selenide Nanorod Sublimation.

    PubMed

    Hellebusch, Daniel J; Manthiram, Karthish; Beberwyck, Brandon J; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2015-02-19

    In situ electron microscopy is used to observe the morphological evolution of cadmium selenide nanorods as they sublime under vacuum at a series of elevated temperatures. Mass loss occurs anisotropically along the nanorod's long axis. At temperatures close to the sublimation threshold, the phase change occurs from both tips of the nanorods and proceeds unevenly with periods of rapid mass loss punctuated by periods of relative stability. At higher temperatures, the nanorods sublime at a faster, more uniform rate, but mass loss occurs from only a single end of the rod. We propose a mechanism that accounts for the observed sublimation behavior based on the terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model and how the nanorod surface chemical environment influences the kinetic barrier of sublimation.

  11. In situ transmission electron microscopy of cadmium selenide nanorod sublimation

    DOE PAGES

    Hellebusch, Daniel J.; Manthiram, Karthish; Beberwyck, Brandon J.; ...

    2015-01-23

    In situ electron microscopy is used to observe the morphological evolution of cadmium selenide nanorods as they sublime under vacuum at a series of elevated temperatures. Mass loss occurs anisotropically along the nanorod’s long axis. At temperatures close to the sublimation threshold, the phase change occurs from both tips of the nanorods and proceeds unevenly with periods of rapid mass loss punctuated by periods of relative stability. At higher temperatures, the nanorods sublime at a faster, more uniform rate, but mass loss occurs from only a single end of the rod. Furthermore, we propose a mechanism that accounts for themore » observed sublimation behavior based on the terrace–ledge–kink (TLK) model and how the nanorod surface chemical environment influences the kinetic barrier of sublimation.« less

  12. Sublime science: Teaching for scientific sublime experiences in middle school classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    Due to a historical separation of cognition and emotion, the affective aspects of learning are often seen as trivial in comparison to the more 'essential' cognitive qualities - particularly in the domain of science. As a result of this disconnect, feelings of awe, wonder, and astonishment as well as appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists. In turn, I believe that science education has not accurately portrayed the world of science to our students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the science classroom, I have drawn on past research in the field of aesthetic science teaching and learning as well as works by, Burke, Kant, and Dewey to explore a new construct I have called the "scientific sublime". Scientific sublime experiences represent a sophisticated treatment of the cognitive as well as affective qualities of science learning. The scientific sublime represents feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation that come from a deep understanding. It is only through this understanding of a phenomenon that we can appreciate its true complexity and intricacies, and these understandings when mixed with the emotions of awe and reverence, are sublime. Scientific sublime experiences are an attempt at the re-integration of cognition and feeling. The goal of this research was twofold: to create and teach a curriculum that fosters scientific sublime experiences in middle school science classes, and to better understand how these experiences are manifested in students. In order to create an approach to teaching for scientific sublime experiences, it was first necessary for me to identify key characteristics of such an experience and a then to create a pedagogical approach, both of which are described in detail in the dissertation. This research was conducted as two studies in two different middle schools. My pedagogical approach was used to create and teach two five-week 7 th grade science units---one on weather

  13. Development and Testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Westheimer, David T.

    2006-01-01

    Sublimators have been used for heat rejection for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Some of the attractive features of sublimators are that they are compact, lightweight, and self-regulating. One of the drawbacks of previous designs has been sensitivity to non-volatile contamination in the feedwater, which can clog relatively small pores (approx.3-6 microns) in the porous plates where ice forms and sublimates. A new design that is less sensitive to contaminants is being developed at the Johnson Space Center. This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) Engineering Development Unit (EDU).

  14. Development and Testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2007-01-01

    Sublimators have been used for heat rejection for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Some of the attractive features of sublimators are that they are compact, lightweight, and self-regulating. One of the drawbacks of previous designs has been sensitivity to non-volatile contamination in the feedwater, which can clog relatively small pores (approx. 3-6 micrometers) in the porous plates where ice forms and sublimates. A new design that is less sensitive to contaminants is being developed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) Engineering Development Unit (EDU).

  15. Scanning electron microscope observations of sublimates from Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.

    1993-01-01

    Sublimates were sampled from high-temperature (up to 800??C) fumaroles at Merapi volcano in January 1984. Sampling is accomplished by inserting silica tubes into high-temperature vents. Volcanic glass flows through the tubes and sublimates precipitate on the inner walls in response to the temperature gradient. With decreasing temperature (800-500??C) in the tubes, there are five sublimate zones. Texturally, the sublimate phases grade from large, well-formed crystals at their highest-temperature occurrence to more numerous, smaller crystals that are less perfect at lower temperatures. These changes imply that the crystal nucleation and growth rates increase and decrease, respectively, as temperature decreases. Overall, the textural data suggest that the gas is saturated or slightly super-saturated with the phases at their hottest occurrence, but that the gas becomes increasingly super-saturated with the phases at lower temperatures. -from Author

  16. Sublimation as a Landform-Shaping Process on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; White, O. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Schenk, P. M.; Beyer, R. A.; McKinnon, W. B.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Young, L. A.; Weaver, H.; Olkin, C. B.; Ennico, K.

    2016-01-01

    Several icy-world surfaces in the solar system exhibit sublimation-driven landform modification erosion, condensation, and mass wasting [1]. In addition to the obvious role of gravity, mass wasting can work in conjunction with internal disaggregation of a landform's relief-supporting material through the loss (or deteriorating alteration) of its cohesive matrix. To give a conspicuous example, Callisto's landscape exhibits widespread erosion from sublimation erosion of slopes, which results in smooth, undulating, low albedo plains composed of lag deposits, with isolated high albedo pinnacles perched on remnants of crater rims due to the re-precipitation of ice on local cold traps [2, 3, 4]. Sublimation-driven mass wasting was anticipated on Pluto prior to the encounter (see refs in [5]). Here we report on several landscapes on Pluto we interpret to be formed, or at least heavily modified, by sublimation erosion.

  17. Dynamics and Mechanisms of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus Sublimation.

    PubMed

    Fortin-Deschênes, Matthieu; Levesque, Pierre L; Martel, Richard; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2016-05-05

    We report on real time observations of the sublimation of exfoliated black phosphorus layers throughout annealing using in situ low energy electron microscopy. We found that sublimation manifests itself above 375 ± 20 °C through the nucleation and expansion of asymmetric, faceted holes with the long axis aligned along the [100] direction and sharp tips defined by edges consisting of alternating (10) and (11) steps. This thermally activated process repeats itself via successive sublimation of individual layers. Calculations and simulations using density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo allowed to determine the involved atomic pathways. Sublimation is found to occur via detachments of phosphorus dimers rather than single atoms. This behavior and the role of defects is described using an analytical model that captures all essential features. This work establishes an atomistic-level understanding of the thermal stability of exfoliated black phosphorus and defines the temperature window available for material and device processing.

  18. Nietzsche's View of Sublimation in the Educational Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Ann Margaret

    1975-01-01

    Article outlined Nietzsche's beliefs on the primary aim of education, the conscious production of the free man through the process of sublimation, the active redirecting of one's life energy in the service of creativity. (Editor/RK)

  19. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schaefer, M.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Platz, T.; Cloutis, E. A.; Christensen, U.; Kneissl, T.; Li, J.-Y.; Mengel, K.; Schmedemann, N.; Schaefer, T.; Russell, C. T.; Applin, D. M.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Keller, H. U.; O'Brien, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.; Ripken, J.; Schenk, P. M.; Schmidt, B. E.; Sierks, H.; Sykes, M. V.; Thangjam, G. S.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5, 6, 7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the ‘snow line’, which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense.

  20. Sulfur "Concrete" for Lunar Applications - Sublimation Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    2006-01-01

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form "concrete" is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  1. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres.

    PubMed

    Nathues, A; Hoffmann, M; Schaefer, M; Le Corre, L; Reddy, V; Platz, T; Cloutis, E A; Christensen, U; Kneissl, T; Li, J-Y; Mengel, K; Schmedemann, N; Schaefer, T; Russell, C T; Applin, D M; Buczkowski, D L; Izawa, M R M; Keller, H U; O'Brien, D P; Pieters, C M; Raymond, C A; Ripken, J; Schenk, P M; Schmidt, B E; Sierks, H; Sykes, M V; Thangjam, G S; Vincent, J-B

    2015-12-10

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5-7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the 'snow line', which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense.

  2. Surface and snowdrift sublimation at Princess Elisabeth station, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, W.; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; Bintanja, R.; Van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Van den Broeke, M. R.; Reijmer, C. H.; Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2012-08-01

    In the near-coastal regions of Antarctica, a significant fraction of the snow precipitating onto the surface is removed again through sublimation - either directly from the surface or from drifting snow particles. Meteorological observations from an Automatic Weather Station (AWS) near the Belgian research station Princess Elisabeth in Dronning Maud Land, East-Antarctica, are used to study surface and snowdrift sublimation and to assess their impacts on both the surface mass balance and the surface energy balance during 2009 and 2010. Comparison to three other AWSs in Dronning Maud Land with 11 to 13 yr of observations shows that sublimation has a significant influence on the surface mass balance at katabatic locations by removing 10-23% of their total precipitation, but at the same time reveals anomalously low surface and snowdrift sublimation rates at Princess Elisabeth (17 mm w.e. yr-1 compared to 42 mm w.e. yr-1 at Svea Cross and 52 mm w.e. yr-1 at Wasa/Aboa). This anomaly is attributed to local topography, which shields the station from strong katabatic influence, and, therefore, on the one hand allows for a strong surface inversion to persist throughout most of the year and on the other hand causes a lower probability of occurrence of intermediately strong winds. This wind speed class turns out to contribute most to the total snowdrift sublimation mass flux, given its ability to lift a high number of particles while still allowing for considerable undersaturation.

  3. Sublimation rates of explosive materials : method development and initial results.

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, James M.; Patton, Robert Thomas

    2004-08-01

    Vapor detection of explosives continues to be a technological basis for security applications. This study began experimental work to measure the chemical emanation rates of pure explosive materials as a basis for determining emanation rates of security threats containing explosives. Sublimation rates for TNT were determined with thermo gravimetric analysis using two different techniques. Data were compared with other literature values to provide sublimation rates from 25 to 70 C. The enthalpy of sublimation for the combined data was found to be 115 kJ/mol, which corresponds well with previously reported data from vapor pressure determinations. A simple Gaussian atmospheric dispersion model was used to estimate downrange concentrations based on continuous, steady-state conditions at 20, 45 and 62 C for a nominal exposed block of TNT under low wind conditions. Recommendations are made for extension of the experimental vapor emanation rate determinations and development of turbulent flow computational fluid dynamics based atmospheric dispersion estimates of standoff vapor concentrations.

  4. On the interaction of sublimating gas with cometary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, Jordan K.

    Sublimation of volatiles is a defining process of comet nuclei, and profoundly affects their dynamics, structure, and appearance. Central to understanding the processes by which comets formed and subsequently evolved is a careful computation of this sublimation pressure as a function of heliocentric distance. Unlike previous efforts, I develop a thermodynamic method to numerically compute the sublimation pressure of any species from limited knowledge of its physical properties. I then describe a novel cometary disruption mechanism in which this sublimation pressure induces differential stresses within the body of the nucleus that exceed its material strength, resulting in structural failure and breakup of the nucleus. I show that this mechanism is consistent with the behavior of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1), and use it to estimate the cohesive strength of ISON's nucleus, a first for a Long-Period Comet. Sublimating volatiles can also generate sublimative torques that alter the rotation state of the nucleus. However, computing these torques requires high-resolution information on the shape and activity of the nucleus, which is available only for the few nuclei visited by spacecraft. To remedy this, I develop a novel framework based on the YORP Effect (the torques asteroids experience by emitting thermal photons from their asymmetric shapes) to study the effects of sublimative torques on populations of cometary bodies. I take advantage of the similar manner in which surfaces emit both thermal photons and sublimating molecules to derive numerical relationships that describe sublimative torques by appropriately scaling the YORP torque equations. I then use this framework to explain the formation of dust striae (long linear features in the tails of Long-Period Comets that align with the Sun), which has remained an enigma for more than a century. I show that the observed ˜10-100 m chunks ejected from comet nuclei experience sublimative torques that spin them up to the point

  5. Formation of filamentary sublimate residues (FSR) from mineral grains

    SciTech Connect

    Storrs, A.D.; Fanale, F.P.; Saunders, R.S.; Stephens, J.B.

    1988-12-01

    The significant interparticle forces observed between solar system dust grains upon desorption or sublimation of excess volatiles in simulated Martian or cometary environments are presently investigated, in order to more precisely define these mechanisms and to simulate the types of deposits thereby formed. Some classes of phyllosilicate mineral grains are noted to bond together to form a highly porous filamentary sublimate residue (FSR) exhibiting an exceptionally high tensile strength for its density; this may be important in its control of erosion and sublimation in Martian and cometary environments. It is concluded that FSR formation from clean mineral grains in water ice may be important in the formation of the Martian polar layered terrain. 41 references.

  6. MALDI Imaging of Lipids after Matrix Sublimation/Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert C.; Hankin, Joseph A.; Barkley, Robert M.; Zemski Berry, Karin A.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometric techniques have been developed to record mass spectra of biomolecules including lipids as they naturally exist within tissues and thereby permit the generation of images displaying the distribution of specific lipids in tissues, organs, and intact animals. These techniques are based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) that requires matrix application onto the tissue surface prior to analysis. One technique of application that has recently shown significant advantages for lipid analysis is sublimation of matrix followed by vapor deposition directly onto the tissue. Explanations for enhanced sensitivity realized by sublimation/deposition related to sample temperature after a laser pulse and matrix crystal size are presented. Specific examples of sublimation/deposition in lipid imaging of various organs including brain, ocular tissue, and kidney are presented. PMID:21571091

  7. Micro-computed tomography observation of sublimation interface and image analysis on sublimation process during freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xin; Tao, Le-Ren; Hua, Tse-Chao

    2007-01-01

    The freeze-drying process is complicated with complex heat and mass transfer during sublimation. The sublimation interface of freeze-drying has become more attractive and meaningful recently. In this study, apple slices undergoing sublimation were scanned by a Micro-CT scanner. The cross-sectional images were reconstructed with those scanning images respectively. The technique of grey value analysis was used to recognize the procedure. The results showed that, from direct scanning images and 2-D reconstructed images, a 3-D moving mode of sublimation interface which contracted to the centre of the sample could be seen, sublimation process proceeded from edge to center gradually. The grey value of ice crystals was determined to be 154 through gauss calculation. By comparing frozen sample with freeze-dried one, the ice crystals regions in the beginning became the porous regions after drying, grey values increased correspondingly. Samples shrunk slightly after drying for 3 to 7 hours, which could be distinguished by the change in grey values.

  8. Canopy effects on snow sublimation from a central Arizona Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoma, Bohumil M.

    2017-01-01

    Guided by 30 m terrain and forest cover data, snow sublimation from the Salt River basin in the Southwest U.S. is simulated for years 2008 (wet year) and 2007 (dry year). Downscaled meteorological input correlates well (r 0.80) with independent observations at AmeriFlux sites. Additionally, model correlation and bias with eddy-covariance vapor flux observations is comparable to previous localized modeling efforts. Upon a 30% reduction in effective leaf area index, canopy sublimation decreases by 1.29 mm (27.0%) and 1.05 mm (23.0%) at the basin scale for the 2008 and 2007 simulations, respectively. Ground sublimation decreases 0.72 mm (4.75%) in 2008 and only 0.17 mm (1.5%) in 2007. Canopy snow-holding capacity and frequent unloading events at lower elevations limit the variability in canopy sublimation from wet year to dry year at the basin scale. The greater decrease in snowpack sublimation in the wet year is partly due to decreased longwave radiation from the canopy reduction over a more extensive snowpack than the dry year. This decrease overcomes the increased solar radiation and wind speed during winter. A second factor is that a greater extent of the snowpack persisted into spring in 2008 than 2007, and the large increase in shortwave flux upon canopy reduction increases melt rates, reducing duration. Only in heavily forested high elevations (>2900 m above sea level) in 2008 does the snowpack persist long enough into spring to result in increased ground sublimation upon canopy reduction. As forest cover change can occur rapidly, these results are critical from water resource and ecosystem function perspectives.

  9. Contactless prompt tumbling rebound of drops from a sublimating slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Carlo; Jung, Stefan; Wetzel, Andreas; Heer, Emmanuel; Schoch, Philippe; Moqaddam, Ali Mazloomi; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya; Marengo, Marco; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-05-01

    We have uncovered a drop rebound regime, characteristic of highly viscous liquids impacting tilted sublimating surfaces. Here the drops, rather than showing a slide, spread, recoil, and rebound behavior, exhibit a prompt tumbling rebound. As a result, glycerol surprisingly rebounds faster than three orders of magnitude less viscous water. When a viscous drop impacts a sublimating surface, part of its initial linear momentum is converted into angular momentum: Lattice Boltzmann simulations confirmed that tumbling owes its appearance to the rapid transition of the internal angular velocity prior to rebound to a constant value, as in a tumbling solid body.

  10. Enthalpy of sublimation as measured using a silicon oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hamza; Pomeroy, J. M.

    In this study, we report the enthalpy of sublimation of common gases (nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, neon, krypton, xenon, and water vapor) using a large area silicon oscillator with a sub-ng (~0.027 ng/cm2) mass sensitivity. The double paddle oscillator design enables high frequency stability (17 ppb) at cryogenic temperatures and provides a consistent technique for enthalpy measurements. The enthalpies of sublimation are derived from the rate of mass loss during programmed thermal desorption and are detected as a change in the resonance frequency of the self-tracking oscillator. These measured enthalpy values show excellent agreement with the accepted literature values.

  11. Alumina Paste Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Thermoelectric Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Alumina as a sublimation suppression barrier for a Zintl thermoelectric material in a thermoelectric power generation device operating at high temperature, e.g. at or above 1000K, is disclosed. The Zintl thermoelectric material may comprise Yb.sub.14MnSb.sub.11. The alumina may be applied as an adhesive paste dried and cured on a substantially oxide free surface of the Zintl thermoelectric material and polished to a final thickness. The sublimation suppression barrier may be finalized by baking out the alumina layer on the Zintl thermoelectric material until it becomes substantially clogged with ytterbia.

  12. Alumina Paste Layer as a Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Yb14MnSb11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Caillat, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Sublimation is a major cause of degradation of thermoelectric power generation systems. Most thermoelectric materials tend to have peak values at the temperature where sublimation occurs. A sublimation barrier is needed that is stable at operating temperatures, inert against thermoelectric materials, and able to withstand thermal cycling stress. A porous alumina paste layer is suitable as a sublimation barrier for Yb14MnSb11. It can accommodate stress generated by the thermal expansion discrepancy between the suppression layer and thermoelectric materials. Sublimation suppression is achieved by filling pores naturally with YbO2, a natural byproduct of sublimation. YbO2 generated during the sublimation of Yb14MnSb11 fills the porous structure of the alumina paste, causing sublimation to decrease with time as the pores become filled.

  13. Isotopic Fractionation of Water-Ice from Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, E.; Boyer, C.; Park, M.; Gormally, J.; Benitez, E.; Dominguez, G.

    2015-12-01

    Elizabeth Christensen, Charisa Boyer, Manesseh Park, Ezra Benitez, Gerardo Dominguez Understanding the multi-isotopic fractionation of water-ice that results from its sublimation may be important for understanding the isotopic composition of cometary ices. Here we describe an experimental setup whose purpose is to understand the effects of various astrophysical processes on the δD and δ18O and δ17O composition of water-ices. Our setup consists of an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber with oil free pumping, a closed cycle He cryostat to achieve low temperatures (capable of reaching 6K), and a vacuum line connected to the chamber via a UHV feed-through. Water isotopologues H216O, H218O, H217O, and HD16O samples can be measured after sublimation of water-ice with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (Picarro L2120-i) that is connected to the vacuum line. To perform these experiments, ambient water vapor was introduced into, frozen, and purified inside the UHV chamber (T< 150 K). Water-ice samples were sublimated for varying amounts of time to collect various fractions of the original reservoir. We will present the first results on the oxygen and deuterium isotopic fractionation of water-ice sublimation and discuss their implications for interpreting the isotopic compositions of cometary ices.

  14. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  15. Modeling the development of martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Sublimation-thermokarst landforms result from collapse of the surface when ice is lost from the subsurface. On Mars, scalloped landforms with scales of decameters to kilometers are observed in the mid-latitudes and considered likely thermokarst features. We describe a landscape evolution model that couples diffusive mass movement and subsurface ice loss due to sublimation. Over periods of tens of thousands of Mars years under conditions similar to the present, the model produces scallop-like features similar to those on the Martian surface, starting from much smaller initial disturbances. The model also indicates crater expansion when impacts occur in surfaces underlain by excess ice to some depth, with morphologies similar to observed landforms on the Martian northern plains. In order to produce these landforms by sublimation, substantial quantities of excess ice are required, at least comparable to the vertical extent of the landform, and such ice must remain in adjacent terrain to support the non-deflated surface. We suggest that Martian thermokarst features are consistent with formation by sublimation, without melting, and that significant thicknesses of very clean excess ice (up to many tens of meters, the depth of some scalloped depressions) are locally present in the Martian mid-latitudes. Climate conditions leading to melting at significant depth are not required.

  16. Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiland, Donna, Ed.; Rosenthal, Laura J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This collection of essays, "Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment," edited by Donna Heiland and Laura J. Rosenthal, represents an important new venture in the Foundation's communication program. The book is the product of many authors, including the editors, both of whom have written essays for it. But it…

  17. Modeling the development of martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-12-01

    Sublimation-thermokarst landforms result from collapse of the surface when ice is lost from the subsurface. On Mars, scalloped landforms with scales of decameters to kilometers are observed in the mid-latitudes and considered likely thermokarst features. We describe a landscape evolution model that couples diffusive mass movement and subsurface ice loss due to sublimation. Over periods of tens of thousands of Mars years under conditions similar to the present, the model produces scallop-like features similar to those on the martian surface, starting from much smaller initial disturbances. The model also indicates crater expansion when impacts occur in surfaces underlain by excess ice to some depth, with morphologies similar to observed landforms on the martian northern plains. In order to produce these landforms by sublimation, substantial quantities of excess ice are required, at least comparable to the vertical extent of the landform, and such ice must remain in adjacent terrain to support the non-deflated surface. We suggest that martian thermokarst features are consistent with formation by sublimation, without melting, and that significant thicknesses of very clean excess ice (up to many tens of meters, the depth of some scalloped depressions) are locally present in the martian mid-latitudes. Climate conditions leading to melting at significant depth are not required.

  18. The Digital Sublime: Lessons from Kelli Connell's "Double Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yi-hui

    2012-01-01

    The digital sublime refers to digital-composite photography that presents "the existence of something unpresentable" and that renders a matchless look a sophisticated fabrication, a perfect and clean composition, a maximum color saturation, a multiple-point perspective, and stunning or newfangled content. Abandoning the traditional one-shot mode…

  19. Optimization of Fast Dissolving Etoricoxib Tablets Prepared by Sublimation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Patel, D. M.; Patel, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablets of etoricoxib. Granules containing etoricoxib, menthol, crospovidone, aspartame and mannitol were prepared by wet granulation technique. Menthol was sublimed from the granules by exposing the granules to vacuum. The porous granules were then compressed in to tablets. Alternatively, tablets were first prepared and later exposed to vacuum. The tablets were evaluated for percentage friability and disintegration time. A 32 full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of 2 formulation variables: amount of menthol and crospovidone. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that for obtaining fast dissolving tablets; optimum amount of menthol and higher percentage of crospovidone should be used. A surface response plots are also presented to graphically represent the effect of the independent variables on the percentage friability and disintegration time. The validity of a generated mathematical model was tested by preparing a checkpoint batch. Sublimation of menthol from tablets resulted in rapid disintegration as compared with the tablets prepared from granules that were exposed to vacuum. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional marketed tablets for percentage drug dissolved in 30 min (Q30) and dissolution efficiency after 30 min (DE30). From the results, it was concluded that fast dissolving tablets with improved etoricoxib dissolution could be prepared by sublimation of tablets containing suitable subliming agent. PMID:20390084

  20. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, R.A.

    1989-01-24

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid. 1 fig.

  1. Differential Sublimation of Terrestrial Permafrost and the Ramifications for Terrain Features on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, T. A.; Mellon, M. T.

    2016-09-01

    Sublimation loss of ice wedge ice in CRREL Permafrost Tunnel in Alaska (2.8 mm) is linear over 386 days, while ice cemented silt sublimation follows a decreasing relationship with time over 51 years with little sublimation over the past 20 years.

  2. Relationship between molecular descriptors and the enthalpies of sublimation of natural amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Tyunina, V. V.; Girichev, G. V.; Tyunina, E. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    A multiparameter correlation between the enthalpies of sublimation and molecular descriptors of natural amino acids is proposed, based on generalized experimental and literature data on the heat effects of sublimation. The contributions from Van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bond formation, and electrostatic effects into enthalpy of sublimation has been evaluated using regression coefficients.

  3. Advances in sublimation studies for particles of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Nguyen, Viet; Fischer, Thomas; Abrishami, Tara; Papantonakis, Michael; Kendziora, Chris; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    When handling explosives, or related surfaces, the hands routinely become contaminated with particles of explosives and related materials. Subsequent contact with a solid surface results in particle crushing and deposition. These particles provide an evidentiary trail which is useful for security applications. As such, the opto-physico-chemical characteristics of these particles are critical to trace explosives detection applications in DOD or DHS arenas. As the persistence of these particles is vital to their forensic exploitation, it is important to understand which factors influence their persistence. The longevity or stability of explosives particles on a substrate is a function of several environmental parameters or particle properties including: Vapor pressure, particle geometry, airflow, particle field size, substrate topography, humidity, reactivity, adlayers, admixtures, particle areal density, and temperature. In this work we deposited particles of 2,4-dinitrotoluene on standard microscopy glass slides by particle sieving and studied their sublimation as a function of airflow velocity, areal particle density and particle field size. Analysis of 2D microscopic images was used to compute and track particle size and geometrical characteristics. The humidity, temperature and substrate type were kept constant for each experiment. A custom airflow cell, using standard microscopy glass slide, allowed in-situ photomicroscopy. Areal particle densities and airflow velocities were selected to provide relevant loadings and flow velocities for a range of potential applications. For a chemical of interest, we define the radial sublimation velocity (RSV) for the equivalent sphere of a particle as the parameter to characterize the sublimation rate. The RSV is a useful parameter because it is independent of particle size. The sublimation rate for an ensemble of particles was found to significantly depend on airflow velocity, the areal density of the particles, and the

  4. Aerosol volatility and enthalpy of sublimation of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Salo, Kent; Jonsson, Asa M; Andersson, Patrik U; Hallquist, Mattias

    2010-04-08

    The enthalpy of sublimation has been determined for nine carboxylic acids, two cyclic (pinonic and pinic acid) and seven straight-chain dicarboxylic acids (C(4) to C(10)). The enthalpy of sublimation was determined from volatility measurements of nano aerosol particles using a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) set-up. Compared to the previous use of a VTDMA, this novel method gives enthalpy of sublimation determined over an extended temperature range (DeltaT approximately 40 K). The determined enthalpy of sublimation for the straight-chain dicarboxylic acids ranged from 96 to 161 kJ mol(-1), and the calculated vapor pressures at 298 K are in the range of 10(-6)-10(-3) Pa. These values indicate that dicarboxylic acids can take part in gas-to-particle partitioning at ambient conditions and may contribute to atmospheric nucleation, even though homogeneous nucleation is unlikely. To obtain consistent results, some experimental complications in producing nanosized crystalline aerosol particles were addressed. It was demonstrated that pinonic acid "used as received" needed a further purification step before being suspended as a nanoparticle aerosol. Furthermore, it was noted from distinct differences in thermal properties that aerosols generated from pimelic acid solutions gave two types of particles. These two types were attributed to crystalline and amorphous configurations, and based on measured thermal properties, the enthalpy of vaporization was 127 kJ mol(-1) and that of sublimation was 161 kJ mol(-1). This paper describes a new method that is complementary to other similar methods and provides an extension of existing experimental data on physical properties of atmospherically relevant compounds.

  5. Surface engineering of SiC via sublimation etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokubavicius, Valdas; Yazdi, Gholam R.; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei; Iakimov, Tihomir; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Yakimova, Rositsa

    2016-12-01

    We present a technique for etching of SiC which is based on sublimation and can be used to modify the morphology and reconstruction of silicon carbide surface for subsequent epitaxial growth of various materials, for example graphene. The sublimation etching of 6H-, 4H- and 3C-SiC was explored in vacuum (10-5 mbar) and Ar (700 mbar) ambient using two different etching arrangements which can be considered as Si-C and Si-C-Ta chemical systems exhibiting different vapor phase stoichiometry at a given temperature. The surfaces of different polytypes etched under similar conditions are compared and the etching mechanism is discussed with an emphasis on the role of tantalum as a carbon getter. To demonstrate applicability of such etching process graphene nanoribbons were grown on a 4H-SiC surface that was pre-patterned using the thermal etching technique presented in this study.

  6. Effects of varying obliquity on Martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    Scalloped depressions in the Martian mid-latitudes are likely formed by sublimation of ice-rich ground. The stability of subsurface ice changes with the planetary obliquity, generally becoming less stable at lower axial tilt. As a result, the relative rates of sublimation and creep change over time. A landscape evolution model shows that these variations produce internal structure in scalloped depressions, commonly in the form of arcuate ridges, which emerge as depressions resume growth after pausing or slowing. In other scenarios, the formation of internal structure is minimal. Significant uncertainties in past climate and model parameters permit a range of scenarios. Ridges observed in some Martian scalloped depressions could date from obliquity lows or periods of low ice stability occurring <5 Ma, suggesting that the pits are young features and may be actively evolving.

  7. The enthalpy of sublimation and thermodynamic functions of fermium

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.; Gibson, J.K. , Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6375 )

    1989-12-01

    The enthalpy of sublimation of fermium (Fm), element 100, has now been determined directly by measuring the partial pressure of Fm over alloys, for the temperature range of 642 to 905 K. The partial pressures were determined using Knudsen effusion and target collection techniques. Dilute (10{sup {minus}5}--10{sup {minus}7} atom %) solid alloys of Fm and mixtures of Fm and Es in both Sm and Yb solvents were studied. The presence of Es in two of the alloys allowed a direct comparison of the behavior of Fm and Es, where the latter could be used as a reference. It was possible to calculate enthalpies of sublimation and a hypothetical vapor pressure/temperature relationship for pure Fm metal by selecting Yb as the solvent most likely to form a nearly ideal alloy with Fm. From the experimental vapor pressure data, we derived average Second Law values of 33.8{plus minus}3 kcal/mol and 23.5{plus minus}3 cal/mol deg for the enthalpy and entropy of sublimation of Fm at 298 K. Third Law enthalpy values were also calculated using the experimental partial pressure data and entropies estimated from derived free energy functions and heat capacities for the solid and gaseous forms of Fm. The average Third Law values (34.8 kcal/mol and 25.1 cal/mol deg, respectively, at 298 K) are in agreement with those obtained via the Second Law. These results establish that Fm, like Es (element 99), is a divalent metal. The finding that Fm metal is the second divalent actinide element experimentally establishes the trend towards metallic divalency expected in the second half of the actinide series.

  8. The IBEX-Lo Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Bochsler, P.; Chornay, D.; Clark, G.; Crew, G. B.; Dunn, G.; Ellis, S.; Friedmann, T.; Funsten, H. O.; Ghielmetti, A. G.; Googins, J.; Granoff, M. S.; Hamilton, J. W.; Hanley, J.; Heirtzler, D.; Hertzberg, E.; Isaac, D.; King, B.; Knauss, U.; Kucharek, H.; Kudirka, F.; Livi, S.; Lobell, J.; Longworth, S.; Mashburn, K.; McComas, D. J.; Möbius, E.; Moore, A. S.; Moore, T. E.; Nemanich, R. J.; Nolin, J.; O'Neal, M.; Piazza, D.; Peterson, L.; Pope, S. E.; Rosmarynowski, P.; Saul, L. A.; Scherrer, J. R.; Scheer, J. A.; Schlemm, C.; Schwadron, N. A.; Tillier, C.; Turco, S.; Tyler, J.; Vosbury, M.; Wieser, M.; Wurz, P.; Zaffke, S.

    2009-08-01

    The IBEX-Lo sensor covers the low-energy heliospheric neutral atom spectrum from 0.01 to 2 keV. It shares significant energy overlap and an overall design philosophy with the IBEX-Hi sensor. Both sensors are large geometric factor, single pixel cameras that maximize the relatively weak heliospheric neutral signal while effectively eliminating ion, electron, and UV background sources. The IBEX-Lo sensor is divided into four major subsystems. The entrance subsystem includes an annular collimator that collimates neutrals to approximately 7°×7° in three 90° sectors and approximately 3.5°×3.5° in the fourth 90° sector (called the high angular resolution sector). A fraction of the interstellar neutrals and heliospheric neutrals that pass through the collimator are converted to negative ions in the ENA to ion conversion subsystem. The neutrals are converted on a high yield, inert, diamond-like carbon conversion surface. Negative ions from the conversion surface are accelerated into an electrostatic analyzer (ESA), which sets the energy passband for the sensor. Finally, negative ions exit the ESA, are post-accelerated to 16 kV, and then are analyzed in a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. This triple-coincidence, TOF subsystem effectively rejects random background while maintaining high detection efficiency for negative ions. Mass analysis distinguishes heliospheric hydrogen from interstellar helium and oxygen. In normal sensor operations, eight energy steps are sampled on a 2-spin per energy step cadence so that the full energy range is covered in 16 spacecraft spins. Each year in the spring and fall, the sensor is operated in a special interstellar oxygen and helium mode during part of the spacecraft spin. In the spring, this mode includes electrostatic shutoff of the low resolution (7°×7°) quadrants of the collimator so that the interstellar neutrals are detected with 3.5°×3.5° angular resolution. These high angular resolution data are combined with

  9. Dynamic sublimation pressure and the catastrophic breakup of Comet ISON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, Jordan K.; Johnson, Brandon C.; Bowling, Timothy; Jay Melosh, H.; Minton, David; Lisse, Carey M.; Battams, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Previously proposed mechanisms have difficulty explaining the disruption of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) as it approached the Sun. We describe a novel cometary disruption mechanism whereby comet nuclei fragment and disperse through dynamic sublimation pressure, which induces differential stresses within the interior of the nucleus. When these differential stresses exceed its material strength, the nucleus breaks into fragments. We model the sublimation process thermodynamically and propose that it is responsible for the disruption of Comet ISON. We estimate the bulk unconfined crushing strength of Comet ISON's nucleus and the resulting fragments to be 0.5 Pa and 1-9 Pa, respectively, assuming typical Jupiter Family Comet (JFC) albedos. However, if Comet ISON has an albedo similar to Pluto, this strength estimate drops to 0.2 Pa for the intact nucleus and 0.6-4 Pa for its fragments. Regardless of assumed albedo, these are similar to previous strength estimates of JFCs. This suggests that, if Comet ISON is representative of dynamically new comets, then low bulk strength is a primordial property of some comet nuclei, and not due to thermal processing during migration into the Jupiter Family.

  10. D/H fractionation during the sublimation of water ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lécuyer, Christophe; Royer, Aurélien; Fourel, François; Seris, Magali; Simon, Laurent; Robert, François

    2017-03-01

    Experiments of sublimation of pure water ice have been performed in the temperature range -105 °C to -30 °C and atmospheric partial pressures ranging from 10-6 to 10-1 mb. Sampling of both vapour and residual ice fractions has been performed with the use of a vacuum line designed for the extraction and purification of gases before the measurement of their D/H ratios. Sublimation was responsible for sizable isotopic fractionation factors in the range 0.969-1.123 for temperatures lying between -105 °C and -30 °C. The fractionation factor exhibits a cross-over at temperatures around -50 °C with the water vapour fraction being D-depleted relative to the residual ice fraction at T < -50 °C (αice-vapour = 0.969-0.995). This cross-over has implications for the understanding of the atmospheric water cycle of some terrestrial planets such as the Earth or Mars. The magnitude of deuterium enrichment or depletion between ice and water vapour cannot explain the differences in the D/H ratios amongst Jupiter comets and long-period comets families nor those that have been documented between Earth's and cometary water.

  11. Thermodynamic investigations of nitroxoline sublimation by simultaneous DSC-FTIR method and isothermal TG analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Gau-Yi; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the physicochemical characteristics, thermodynamics, possible sublimation process and kinetics of nitroxoline, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), isothermal thermogravimetry (TG), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy equipped with a micro hot-stage of DSC microscopy assembly (simultaneous DSC-FTIR method) were used. The DSC result indicates that nitroxoline exhibited a sharp endothermic peak at 182 degrees C with enthalpy of 103.1 J/g due to the melting point of nitroxoline. A sublimation behavior of nitroxoline was found from 129 degrees C by gradual weight loss in TG curve. However, the nonisothermal DSC-FTIR method reveals that the temperature at 95 degrees C was the onset temperature of nitroxoline sublimation. A significant difference between DSC-FTIR method and TG analysis suggests that the simultaneous DSC-FTIR method was more sensitive than that of the TG analysis to detect the beginning temperature of nitroxoline sublimation. The sublimation kinetics of nitroxoline determined by isothermal TG analysis evidenced that the zero-order kinetics was followed over the sublimation time. The sublimation enthalpy correction was also carried out by a group additivity approach for the estimation of heat capacity. The enthalpy of nitroxoline sublimation estimated was 86.14 KJ/mol at 298.15 K.

  12. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, R L; Oliveira, A N; Alves, B X; Silva, B A; Li, M S; Wolff, W; Cesar, C L

    2015-07-01

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H2 are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  13. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sacramento, R. L.; Alves, B. X.; Silva, B. A.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.; Oliveira, A. N.; Li, M. S.

    2015-07-15

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H{sub 2} are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  14. Mass wasting triggered by seasonal CO2 sublimation under Martian atmospheric conditions: Laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvest, Matthew E.; Conway, Susan J.; Patel, Manish R.; Dixon, John C.; Barnes, Adam

    2016-12-01

    Sublimation is a recognized process by which planetary landscapes can be modified. However, interpretation of whether sublimation is involved in downslope movements on Mars and other bodies is restricted by a lack of empirical data to constrain this mechanism of sediment transport and its influence on landform morphology. Here we present the first set of laboratory experiments under Martian atmospheric conditions which demonstrate that the sublimation of CO2 ice from within the sediment body can trigger failure of unconsolidated, regolith slopes and can measurably alter the landscape. Previous theoretical studies required CO2 slab ice for movements, but we find that only frost is required. Hence, sediment transport by CO2 sublimation could be more widely applicable (in space and time) on Mars than previously thought. This supports recent work suggesting CO2 sublimation could be responsible for recent modification in Martian gullies.

  15. Direct Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from Nucleic Acids Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Schubert, Michael; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    A sublimation technique was developed to isolate purines and pyrimidines directly from lambda-deoxyribonucleic acid (lambda-DNA) and Escherichia coli cells. The sublimation of adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine from lambda-DNA was tested under reduced pressure (approx. 0.5 Torr) at temperatures of >150 C. With the exception of guanine, approximately 60 -75% of each base was sublimed directly from the lambda-DNA and recovered on a coldfinger of the sublimation apparatus after heating to 450 C. Several nucleobases including adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil were also recovered from E. coli bacteria after heating the cells to the same temperature, although some thermal decomposition of the bases also occurred. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from native E. coli DNA and RNA without any chemical treatment of the cells.

  16. Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF[sub 6] in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % [sup 235]U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

  17. The SCITEAS experiment: Optical characterizations of sublimating icy planetary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Poch, O.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Vuitel, B.; Thomas, N.

    2015-05-01

    We have designed and built a laboratory facility to investigate the spectro-photometric and morphologic properties of different types of ice-bearing planetary surface analogs and follow their evolution upon exposure to a low pressure and low temperature environment. The results obtained with this experiment are used to verify and improve our interpretations of current optical remote-sensing datasets. They also provide valuable information for the development and operation of future optical instruments. The Simulation Chamber for Imaging the Temporal Evolution of Analogue Samples (SCITEAS) is a small thermal vacuum chamber equipped with a variety of ports and feedthroughs that permit both in-situ and remote characterizations as well as interacting with the sample. A large quartz window located directly above the sample is used to observe its surface from outside with a set of visible and near-infrared cameras. The sample holder can be easily and quickly inserted and removed from the chamber and is compatible with the other measurement facilities of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern. We report here on the results of two of the first experiments performed in the SCITEAS chamber. In the first experiment, fine-grained water ice mixed with dark organic and mineral matter was left to sublime in vacuum and at low temperature, simulating the evolution of the surface of a comet nucleus approaching the Sun. We observed and characterized the formation and evolution of a crust of refractory organic and mineral matter at the surface of the sample and linked the evolution of its structure and texture to its spectro-photometric properties. In the second experiment, a frozen soil was prepared by freezing a mixture of smectite mineral and water. The sample was then left to sublime for 6 h to simulate the loss of volatiles from icy soil at high latitudes on Mars. Colour images were produced using the definitions of the

  18. Methods of conveying fluids and methods of sublimating solid particles

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-10-01

    A heat exchanger and associated methods for sublimating solid particles therein, for conveying fluids therethrough, or both. The heat exchanger includes a chamber and a porous member having a porous wall having pores in communication with the chamber and with an interior of the porous member. A first fluid is conveyed into the porous member while a second fluid is conveyed into the porous member through the porous wall. The second fluid may form a positive flow boundary layer along the porous wall to reduce or eliminate substantial contact between the first fluid and the interior of the porous wall. The combined first and second fluids are conveyed out of the porous member. Additionally, the first fluid and the second fluid may each be conveyed into the porous member at different temperatures and may exit the porous member at substantially the same temperature.

  19. Uranium hexaflouride freezer/sublimer process simulator/trainer

    SciTech Connect

    Carnal, C.L. ); Belcher, J.D.; Tapp, P.A.; Ruppel, F.R.; Wells, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a software and hardware simulation of a freezer/sublimer unit used in gaseous diffusion processing of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). The objective of the project was to build a plant simulator that reads control signals and produces plant signals to mimic the behavior of an actual plant. The model is based on physical principles and process data. Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) was used to develop the model. Once the simulation was validated with actual plant process data, the ACSL model was translated into Advanced Communication and Control Oriented Language (ACCOL). A Bristol Babcock Distributed Process Controller (DPC) Model 3330 was the hardware platform used to host the ACCOL model and process the real world signals. The DPC will be used as a surrogate plant to debug control system hardware/software and to train operators to use the new distributed control system without disturbing the process. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Estimating surface sublimation losses from snowpacks in a mountain catchment using eddy covariance and turbulent transfer calculations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sublimation is a critical component of the snow cover mass balance. While sublimation can be directly measured using eddy covariance (EC), such measurements are relatively uncommon in complex mountainous environments. EC measurements of surface snowpack sublimation from three consecutive winter sea...

  1. Sublimation Model for Formation of Martian Residual Cap Depressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, S.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2000-10-01

    In an effort for explain the formation of the 'Swiss-cheese' terrain visible on the southern residual cap of Mars, we have developed a radiative model to follow the growth/decay of an initial depression due to sublimation/condensation of carbon dioxide. The pits making up this terrain have many distinctive features, they are shallow ( 10m deep), with steep walls and flat floors and contain an interior moat which runs along the bottom of the walls. They have lateral sizes ranging from a few 10's of meters to a kilometer and are quasi-circular. The model accounts for incident sunlight, emitted thermal radiation, and scattered short and long wave radiation. We have investigated many cases involving pure dry-ice with constant albedo, albedo as a function of insolation, and differing albedo for fresh and residual frost (the latter has lower albedo). The last case mentioned shows the most promising results to date. With these conditions it is possible for the depressions to grow and develop flat central portions although they still lack the observed steep walls of the pits. In the other cases mentioned the initial depressions heal themselves and disappear into the surrounding terrain. Other processes or materials could be responsible for the remainder of the observed features. Water ice stored a few meters under a carbon dioxide covering would have dramatic effects on the growth of any depression which encounters it, both due to its low sublimation rate and its ability to store heat. We will extend the current model to include a water ice layer and account for the subsequent heat storage which could possibly follow. For water ice models, a challenge is to reproduce the low brightness temperatures that persist throughout the summer at the residual south polar cap.

  2. Contamination Effects of Getter Ion and Titanium Sublimation Pumped Systems on Optical Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visentine, James T.; Richmond, Robert G.

    1973-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that ultraclean vacuum can be produced when titanium sublimation pumps are used in conjunction with getter-ion pumps. Experiments are described in which the degrees of cleanliness of a typical getter-ion, titanium sublimation-pumped system were monitored by measuring the effects of surface contamination on the reflectance of evaporated vacuum ultraviolet mirrors. Results are presented which indicate that severe reflectance losses occurred when startup of a getter-ion pump was initiated at too high a chamber pressure. Significant reflectance losses also occurred as a result of titanium sublimation-pump operation. These data are reviewed and recommendations for improved system performance are presented.

  3. Sublimation rates of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from comets at large heliocentric distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1992-01-01

    Using a simple model for outgassing from a small flat surface area, the sublimation rates of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, two species more volatile than water ice that are known to be present in comets, are calculated for a suddenly activated discrete source on the rotating nucleus. The instantaneous sublimation rate depends upon the comet's heliocentric distance and the Sun's zenith angle at the location of the source. The values are derived for the constants of CO and CO2 in an expression that yields the local rotation-averaged sublimation rate as a function of the comet's spin parameters and the source's cometocentric latitude.

  4. Ice sublimation and rheology - Implications for the Martian polar layered deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofstadter, Mark D.; Murray, Bruce C.

    1990-01-01

    If the sublimation and creep of water ice are important processes in the Martian polar layered deposits, ice-rich scenario formation and evolution schemes must invoke a mechanism for the inhibition of sublimation, such as a dust layer derived from the residue of the sublimating deposits. This layer could be of the order of 1 m in thickness. If the deposits are ice-rich, flows of more than 1 km should have occurred. It is noted that the dust particles in question may be cemented by such ice that may be present, but that impurities may also have served to cement dust particles together even in the absence of ice.

  5. Schiller Goes to the Movies: Locating the Sublime in "Thelma and Louise."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyng, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Endeavors to make students aware of similarities between today's movie culture and the theater of the 18th century; parallels between a traditional drama and a movie script; and Schiller's understanding of the sublime. (36 references) (Author/CK)

  6. Bion and the sublime: the origins of an aesthetic paradigm.

    PubMed

    Civitarese, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    In constructing his theory Bion drew on a number of symbolic matrices: psychoanalysis, philosophy, mathematics, literature, aesthetics. The least investigated of these is the last. True, we know that Bion cites many authors of the Romantic period, such as Coleridge, Keats, Blake and Wordsworth, as well as others who were held in high esteem in the Romantic period, such as Milton. However, less is known about the influence exerted on him by the aesthetics of the sublime, which while chronologically preceding Romanticism is in fact one of its components. My working hypothesis is that tracing a number of Bion's concepts back to this secret model can serve several purposes: firstly, it contributes to the study of the sources, and, secondly, it makes these concepts appear much less occasional and idiosyncratic than we might believe, being as they are mostly those less immediately understandable but not less important (O, negative capability, nameless dread, the infinite, the language of achievement, unison etc.). Finally, connecting these notions to a matrix, that is, disclosing the meaning of elements that are not simply juxtaposed but dynamically interrelated, in my view significantly increases not only their theoretical intelligibility but also their usefulness in clinical practice. In conclusion, one could legitimately argue that Bion gradually subsumed all the other paradigms he drew on within the aesthetic paradigm.

  7. Sublimation TiN Coating of RF Power Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorkiewicz, J.; Kula, J.; Pszona, S.; Sobczak, J.; Bilinski, A.

    2008-03-01

    Titanium evaporation in a reactive atmosphere of ammonia has been chosen to deposit thin (up to 10 nm) protective surface layers containing titanium nitride and titanium oxinitrides which suppress secondary electron emission. The coating procedure, applied by the author in DESY (Hamburg) for TESLA couplers anti-multipactor protection, has been recently implemented in The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ) where a new coating device is used, equipped with a special titanium sublimation setup in a 100 1 vacuum chamber. Several arrays of cylindrical and coaxial RF coupler windows have been coated so far after optimizing the processing parameters. A check of the obtained surface layers ability to attenuate secondary electron emission has been performed; measurements of the secondary electron yield from TiN layers deposited on alumina samples were done in IPJ on as-delivered coated samples, then after vacuum bake-out and finally after additional electron bombardment of their surfaces. Also chemical composition of the surface layers has been studied using XPS in the Institute of Physical Chemistry (IChF).

  8. Rare earths behaviour during the deposition of volcanic sublimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Censi, P.; Sortino, F.; Zuddas, P.; Saiano, F.; Brusca, L.; Chiavetta, S.; Falcone, E. E.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the REE distribution between volcanic fluids and related solids in fumaroles with temperatures ranging from approximately 100 to 421 °C was investigated in different geological scenarios. The treatment of geochemical REE data was carried out by calculating the REE enrichment factors (EFREE) relative to the volcanic host rocks in studied sites under the assumption that the REE transport takes place as silicate aerosol in volcanic fluids. Shale-normalised REE concentrations in these fluids have been assessed to investigate whether the REE transport as aqueous complexes in water-saturated volcanic gas is reasonable. The REE behaviour in alkaline condensates according to the above mentioned treatments of geochemical data is very similar, being characterised by positive Ce and Gd anomalies and significant W-type tetrad effects. These evidences suggest that the geochemical behaviour of REE in fumarolic fluids is firstly influenced by the sublimate deposition along the fumarolic conduit or around the vents rather than by the transport mechanism of these elements in volcanic fluids.

  9. Possibility of graphene growth by close space sublimation.

    PubMed

    Sopinskyy, Mykola V; Khomchenko, Viktoriya S; Strelchuk, Viktor V; Nikolenko, Andrii S; Olchovyk, Genadiy P; Vishnyak, Volodymyr V; Stonis, Viktor V

    2014-04-14

    Carbon films on the Si/SiO2 substrate are fabricated using modified method of close space sublimation at atmospheric pressure. The film properties have been characterized by micro-Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and monochromatic ellipsometry methods. Ellipsometrical measurements demonstrated an increase of the silicon oxide film thickness in the course of manufacturing process. The XPS survey spectra of the as-prepared samples indicate that the main elements in the near-surface region are carbon, silicon, and oxygen. The narrow-scan spectra of C1s, Si2p, O1s regions indicate that silicon and oxygen are mainly in the SiOx (x ≈ 2) oxide form, whereas the main component of C1s spectrum at 284.4 eV comes from the sp2-hybridized carbon phase. Micro-Raman spectra confirmed the formation of graphene films with the number of layers that depended on the distance between the graphite source and substrate.

  10. Transformation of Polar Ice Sublimate Residue into Martian Circumpolar Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.; Parker, T. J.; Stephens, J. B.; Laue, E. G.; Fanale, F. P.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental demonstration that a credible Martian sand may be formed from dust-bearing ice provides a new set of possible explanations for some of the observed Martian aeolian landforms. It is hypothesized that a light-weight fluffy rind is formed on the polar caps. This could provide material easily entrainable by Martian winds, which generally blow equatorward from the poles. These winds would peel the fluffy rind from the surface of the sublimating summer polar caps and from the equatorward slopes of the polar troughs. These pieces of material would then be rolled into lumps (of high sailarea/mass ratio) by the wind. They would become pigmented as they saltate across the surface, perhaps gathering carbonaceous meteoritic dust or other impurities on their surfaces, or through chemical reactions with the ice-free environment away from their point of origin. Once they became trapped in topographic wind shadows, they would form dune structures because they are hydraulically equivalent to sand particles.

  11. Generalized Orbital Projections of a Sublimating Ice Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menkin, Evgeny; Bacon, Jack

    2006-01-01

    The issue of orbital debris resulting from human activities in space is a growing concern for the space users' community. Waste generated in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) can stay in orbit for a long time, creating significant hazards for other spacecraft flying at lower intercepting orbits. Many spacecraft, especially crewed vehicles, are required to vent fluids into space. These fluids include propellant, wastewater, excess condensate, and others. It is important to analyze the behavior of particles that result from these activities, since each individual particle is capable of damaging or destroying a spacecraft in a lower, crossing orbit, and such particles are invisible to tracking radar systems on the ground. The deorbit trajectory of an ice particle is complex. It depends on factors including attitude of the vehicle during vent, initial velocities of particles, altitude at which the vent occurred, and numerous evaporation and sublimation factors. These include contamination within the vented water, evolution of bubbles within the clear water, and sun flux factors such as time of the year and current beta angle. The purpose of this study is to examine the influences of these factors on the trajectories of ice particles resulting from condensate water dumps, and to bound the safe trajectories of spacecraft that lie below the venting spacecraft.

  12. Climatological observations and predicted sublimation rates at Lake Hoare, Antarctica.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, G.D.; McKay, C.P.; Simmons, G.M.; Wharton, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    In December 1985, an automated meteorological station was established at Lake Hoare in the dry valley region of Antarctica. Here, we report on the first year-round observations available for any site in Taylor Valley. This dataset augments the year-round data obtained at Lake Vanda (Wright Valley) by winter-over crews during the late 1960s and early 1970s. The mean annual solar flux at Lake Hoare was 92 W m-2 during 1986, the mean air temperature -17.3 degrees C, and the mean 3-m wind speed 3.3 m s-1. The local climate is controlled by the wind regime during the 4-month sunless winter and by seasonal and diurnal variations in the incident solar flux during the remainder of the year. Temperature increases of 20 degrees-30 degrees C are frequently observed during the winter due to strong fo??hn winds descending from the Polar Plateau. A model incorporating nonsteady molecular diffusion into Kolmogorov-scale eddies in the interfacial layer and similarity-theory flux-profiles in the surface sublayer, is used to determine the rate of ice sublimation from the acquired meteorological data. Despite the frequent occurrence of strong winter fo??hns, the bulk of the annual ablation occurs during the summer due to elevated temperatures and persistent moderate winds. The annual ablation from Lake Hoare is estimated to have been 35.0 +/- 6.3 cm for 1986.

  13. Comparison of methods for quantifying surface sublimation over seasonally snow-covered terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexstone, Graham A.; Clow, David W.; Stannard, David I.; Fassnacht, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Snow sublimation can be an important component of the snow-cover mass balance, and there is considerable interest in quantifying the role of this process within the water and energy balance of snow-covered regions. In recent years, robust eddy covariance (EC) instrumentation has been used to quantify snow sublimation over snow-covered surfaces in complex mountainous terrain. However, EC can be challenging for monitoring turbulent fluxes in snow-covered environments because of intensive data, power, and fetch requirements, and alternative methods of estimating snow sublimation are often relied upon. To evaluate the relative merits of methods for quantifying surface sublimation, fluxes calculated by the EC, Bowen ratio–energy balance (BR), bulk aerodynamic flux (BF), and aerodynamic profile (AP) methods and their associated uncertainty were compared at two forested openings in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Biases between methods are evaluated over a range of environmental conditions, and limitations of each method are discussed. Mean surface sublimation rates from both sites ranged from 0.33 to 0.36 mm day−1, 0.14 to 0.37 mm day−1, 0.10 to 0.17 mm day−1, and 0.03 to 0.10 mm day−1 for the EC, BR, BF and AP methods, respectively. The EC and/or BF methods are concluded to be superior for estimating surface sublimation in snow-covered forested openings. The surface sublimation rates quantified in this study are generally smaller in magnitude compared with previously published studies in this region and help to refine sublimation estimates for forested openings in the Colorado Rocky Mountains.

  14. Collection-efficient, axisymmetric vacuum sublimation module for the purification of solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael; Paul, Elizabeth; Katovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    A vacuum sublimation module of axisymmetric geometry was developed and employed to purify solid-phase materials. The module provides certain practical advantages and it comprises: a metering valve, glass collector, glass lower body, main seal, threaded bushing, and glass internal cartridge (the latter to contain starting material). A complementary process was developed to de-solvate, sublime, weigh, and collect solid chemical materials exemplified by oxalic acid, ferrocene, pentachlorobenzene, chrysene, and urea. The oxalic acid sublimate was analyzed by titration, melting range, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and its (aqueous phase) electrolytically generated gas. The analytical data were consistent with a high-purity, anhydrous oxalic acid sublimate. Cyclic voltammograms of 0.11 mol. % oxalic acid in water displayed a 2.1 V window on glassy carbon electrode beyond which electrolytic decomposition occurs. During module testing, fifteen relatively pure materials were sublimed with (energy efficient) passive cooling and the solid-phase recovery averaged 95 mass %. Key module design features include: compact vertical geometry, low-angle conical collector, uniformly compressed main seal, modest power consumption, transparency, glovebox compatibility, cooling options, and preferential conductive heat transfer. To help evaluate the structural (module) heat transfer, vertical temperature profiles along the dynamically evacuated lower body were measured versus electric heater power: for example, an input of 18.6 W generated a temperature 443-K at the bottom. Experimental results and engineering calculations indicate that during sublimation, solid conduction is the primary mode of heat transfer to the starting material.

  15. Collection-efficient, axisymmetric vacuum sublimation module for the purification of solid materials.

    PubMed

    May, Michael; Paul, Elizabeth; Katovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    A vacuum sublimation module of axisymmetric geometry was developed and employed to purify solid-phase materials. The module provides certain practical advantages and it comprises: a metering valve, glass collector, glass lower body, main seal, threaded bushing, and glass internal cartridge (the latter to contain starting material). A complementary process was developed to de-solvate, sublime, weigh, and collect solid chemical materials exemplified by oxalic acid, ferrocene, pentachlorobenzene, chrysene, and urea. The oxalic acid sublimate was analyzed by titration, melting range, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and its (aqueous phase) electrolytically generated gas. The analytical data were consistent with a high-purity, anhydrous oxalic acid sublimate. Cyclic voltammograms of 0.11 mol. % oxalic acid in water displayed a 2.1 V window on glassy carbon electrode beyond which electrolytic decomposition occurs. During module testing, fifteen relatively pure materials were sublimed with (energy efficient) passive cooling and the solid-phase recovery averaged 95 mass %. Key module design features include: compact vertical geometry, low-angle conical collector, uniformly compressed main seal, modest power consumption, transparency, glovebox compatibility, cooling options, and preferential conductive heat transfer. To help evaluate the structural (module) heat transfer, vertical temperature profiles along the dynamically evacuated lower body were measured versus electric heater power: for example, an input of 18.6 W generated a temperature 443-K at the bottom. Experimental results and engineering calculations indicate that during sublimation, solid conduction is the primary mode of heat transfer to the starting material.

  16. Como Lo Hago Yo: Mielomeningocele En Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Dabdoub, Carlos F.; Dabdoub, Carlos B.; Villavicencio, Ramiro; Quevedo, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: Las malformaciones del tubo neural (MTN) representan la segunda causa más frecuente de anomalías congénitas, luego de las cardiopatías. En este grupo se destaca el mielomeningocele (MMC) por su mayor incidencia, y por ser la más incapacitante y la más compleja entre todas las demás malformaciones del sistema nervioso c`entral (SNC). En Bolivia, como en muchos países de Sudamérica, los bajos niveles socio-culturales y la debilidad en el sistema sanitario, hacen que su incidencia y su morbilidad, sean mayores que en las naciones más desarrolladas. Material y Métodos: Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo y descriptivo de 70 casos de MMC, atendidos por un equipo multidisciplinario en el Hospital Universitario Japonés (HUJ) de Santa Cruz de la Sierra, entre 2008-2011. De ellos, 60 fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente. Resultados: Se realizaron controles prenatales sólo en 27 mujeres (38.6%), diagnosticándose una disrafia espinal en apenas dos casos (7.4%). La edad de ingreso del MMC en su mayoría fue después de las 24 horas (65.6%), predominando su localización en la región lumbosacra (64.3%). De ellos, 67.2% eran abiertos, presentando un 32.9% un daño neurológico motor parcial mientras que 47.1% tenían paraplejia por debajo de la lesión. De los 70 casos, tres (4.3%) no fueron intervenidos, por presentar defectos congénitos severos o estado general grave. Las principales complicaciones posoperatorias inmediatas fueron: dehiscencia de sutura y/o infección de la herida (16.6%), fístula de líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR) (10%) e infección del SNC (11.7%). La mortalidad general y postoperatoria fue de 7.1% y 3.3%, respectivamente. Al mes de vida presentaban hidrocefalia un 80% de los pacientes operados, colocándose una derivación ventriculoperitoneal (DVP) de presión media. De 9 pacientes que tuvieron un acompanamiento de dos o más años, seis presentaron una médula anclada, que fueron intervenidas quirúrgicamente. Conclusi

  17. Estimates of the Volume of Snowpack Sublimation in Arizona's Salt River Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoma, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    The liquid equivalent volumes of snowpack sublimation, melt, and snowfall over the Salt River watershed, a major source of water for the Phoenix metropolitan area, will be estimated using the National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center's Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) for the nine water years on record (i.e., 2004-2012). SNODAS integrates data from satellites, aircraft, and ground stations with downscaled output from numerical weather prediction models and an energy/mass balance snowpack model. The SNODAS dataset contains daily values of sublimation, snow water equivalent, snowfall, and melt, among other variables, at high (< 1 km2) resolution providing the opportunity to accurately estimate the volumes of snowpack balance variables for regions with complex topography. Snowpack ablation consists of sublimation and melting. Snow particles at sub-freezing temperatures will sublimate rather than melt if surrounded by air that is below the equilibrium water vapor pressure with respect to ice. When sublimation occurs, there is a direct loss of water from the given drainage basin when the vapor is carried away by the prevailing atmospheric flow. Preliminary analyses of water years 2005 (wet El Niño), 2007 (dry El Niño), 2008 (wet La Niña), and 2012 (dry La Niña) suggest that there is a substantial amount of sublimation over the Salt River watershed. From October 1 to April 30, approximately 16 percent of snowfall sublimated during the four years, ranging from approximately 98 million cubic meters (79,884 acre-feet) in water year 2005 to approximately 208 million cubic meters (168,726 acre-feet) in water year 2012. Sublimation is the most prevalent at the highest elevations of the watershed with more than 30 percent of snowfall sublimating at elevations above 2,744 meters above sea level. Of the four years analyzed, the sublimation to snowfall ratio was the highest for the two water years with anomalously high precipitation (i.e, 2005 and 2008). This

  18. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    an additional high temperature peak at 910 °C with E{sub d} = 370 ± 10 kJ/mol that is consistent with both the dehydrogenation of surface AlOH species and H{sub 2} assisted sublimation of AlN. Similarly, N{sub 2} exhibited a similar higher temperature desorption peak with E{sub d} = 535 ± 40 kJ/mol that is consistent with the activation energy for direct sublimation of AlN.

  19. LoWMob: Intra-PAN Mobility Support Schemes for 6LoWPAN.

    PubMed

    Bag, Gargi; Raza, Muhammad Taqi; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Yoo, Seung-Wha

    2009-01-01

    Mobility in 6LoWPAN (IPv6 over Low Power Personal Area Networks) is being utilized in realizing many applications where sensor nodes, while moving, sense and transmit the gathered data to a monitoring server. By employing IEEE802.15.4 as a baseline for the link layer technology, 6LoWPAN implies low data rate and low power consumption with periodic sleep and wakeups for sensor nodes, without requiring them to incorporate complex hardware. Also enabling sensor nodes with IPv6 ensures that the sensor data can be accessed anytime and anywhere from the world. Several existing mobility-related schemes like HMIPv6, MIPv6, HAWAII, and Cellular IP require active participation of mobile nodes in the mobility signaling, thus leading to the mobility-related changes in the protocol stack of mobile nodes. In this paper, we present LoWMob, which is a network-based mobility scheme for mobile 6LoWPAN nodes in which the mobility of 6LoWPAN nodes is handled at the network-side. LoWMob ensures multi-hop communication between gateways and mobile nodes with the help of the static nodes within a 6LoWPAN. In order to reduce the signaling overhead of static nodes for supporting mobile nodes, LoWMob proposes a mobility support packet format at the adaptation layer of 6LoWPAN. Also we present a distributed version of LoWMob, named as DLoWMob (or Distributed LoWMob), which employs Mobility Support Points (MSPs) to distribute the traffic concentration at the gateways and to optimize the multi-hop routing path between source and destination nodes in a 6LoWPAN. Moreover, we have also discussed the security considerations for our proposed mobility schemes. The performance of our proposed schemes is evaluated in terms of mobility signaling costs, end-to-end delay, and packet success ratio.

  20. Experimental Study of influence on The Moving of Sublimation Interface by Precooling Rate and Drying Temperature During Freeze-drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xin; Tao, Le-Ren

    2007-06-01

    For complex heat and mass transfer during freeze-drying, the shape and the moving rate of sublimation interface have not been clearly recognized yet. In this paper, Micro-CT scanner was used to follow the moving interface during sublimation. Apple slices cut into 16mm in diameter and 8mm in thickness were used as experimental samples, they were scanned every two hours during sublimation. The scanning images were analyzed and measured, then variation curves of grey value and curves of sublimation rate in two directions were obtained. The moving rates of sublimation interface under various precooling rates and primary drying temperatures were compared. The results show that, heat and mass transfer happens both at the upper and the under surface of the sample. Also it happens at the side surface to some extent. The interface shows as a three-dimensional moving mode, contracts to the geometric centre of the sample and presents an approximately spheral shape. Apple samples frozen at low rate sublimated more quickly than those by high rate. While drying temperature was higher, the sublimation interface moved more quickly. Under slow precooling condition, the sublimation rate rose quickly near the end of sublimation not only in vertical direction, but in horizontal direction.

  1. Mechanism and kinetics for ammonium dinitramide (ADN) sublimation: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, R S; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lin, M C

    2012-11-08

    The mechanism for sublimation of NH(4)N(NO(2))(2) (ADN) has been investigated quantum-mechanically with generalized gradient approximation plane-wave density functional theory calculations; the solid surface is represented by a slab model and the periodic boundary conditions are applied. The calculated lattice constants for the bulk ADN, which were found to consist of NH(4)(+)[ON(O)NNO(2)](-) units, instead of NH(4)(+)[N(NO(2))(2)](-), agree quite well with experimental values. Results show that three steps are involved in the sublimation/decomposition of ADN. The first step is the relaxation of the surface layer with 1.6 kcal/mol energy per NH(4)ON(O)NNO(2) unit; the second step is the sublimation of the surface layer to form a molecular [NH(3)]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex with a 29.4 kcal/mol sublimation energy, consistent with the experimental observation of Korobeinichev et al. (10) The last step is the dissociation of the [H(3)N]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex to give NH(3) and HON(O)NNO(2) with the dissociation energy of 13.9 kcal/mol. Direct formation of NO(2) (g) from solid ADN costs a much higher energy, 58.3 kcal/mol. Our calculated total sublimation enthalpy for ADN(s) → NH(3)(g) + HON(O)NNO(2)) (g), 44.9 kcal/mol via three steps, is in good agreement with the value, 42.1 kcal/mol predicted for the one-step sublimation process in this work and the value 44.0 kcal/mol computed by Politzer et al. (11) using experimental thermochemical data. The sublimation rate constant for the rate-controlling step 2 can be represented as k(sub) = 2.18 × 10(12) exp (-30.5 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1), which agrees well with available experimental data within the temperature range studied. The high pressure limit decomposition rate constant for the molecular complex H(3)N···HON(O)NNO(2) can be expressed by k(dec) = 3.18 × 10(13) exp (-15.09 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1). In addition, water molecules were found to increase the sublimation enthalpy of ADN, contrary to that found in the ammonium

  2. A neurobiological enquiry into the origins of our experience of the sublime and beautiful

    PubMed Central

    Ishizu, Tomohiro; Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    Philosophies of aesthetics have posited that experience of the sublime—commonly but not exclusively derived from scenes of natural grandeur—is distinct from that of beauty and is a counterpoint to it. We wanted to chart the pattern of brain activity which correlates with the declared intensity of experience of the sublime, and to learn whether it differs from the pattern that correlates with the experience of beauty, reported in our previous studies (e.g., Ishizu and Zeki, 2011). 21 subjects participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Prior to the experiment, they viewed pictures of landscapes, which they rated on a scale of 1–5, with 5 being the most sublime and 1 being the least. This allowed us to select, for each subject, five sets of stimuli—from ones experienced as very sublime to those experienced as not at all sublime—which subjects viewed and re-rated in the scanner while their brain activity was imaged. The results revealed a distinctly different pattern of brain activity from that obtained with the experience of beauty, with none of the areas active with the latter experience also active during experience of the sublime. Sublime and beautiful experiences thus appear to engage separate and distinct brain systems. PMID:25426046

  3. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-01-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels (“araneiform” terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  4. Distributed modelling of climate change impacts on snow sublimation in Northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, F.; Schlaffer, S.; Aus der Beek, T.; Menzel, L.

    2009-08-01

    Sublimation of snow is an important factor of the hydrological cycle in Mongolia and is likely to increase according to future climate projections. In this study the hydrological model TRAIN was used to assess spatially distributed current and future sublimation rates based on interpolated daily data of precipitation, air temperature, air humidity, wind speed and solar radiation. An automated procedure for the interpolation of the input data is provided. Depending on the meteorological parameter and the data availability for the individual days, the most appropriate interpolation method is chosen automatically from inverse distance weighting, Ordinary Least Squares interpolation, Ordinary or Universal Kriging. Depending on elevation simulated annual sublimation in the period 1986-2006 was 23 to 35 mm, i.e. approximately 80% of total snowfall. Moreover, future climate projections for 2071-2100 of ECHAM5 and HadCM3, based on the A1B emission scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, were analysed with TRAIN. In the case of ECHAM5 simulated sublimation increases by up to 17% (26...41 mm) while it remains at the same level for HadCM3 (24...34 mm). The differences are mainly due to a distinct increase in winter precipitation for ECHAM5. Simulated changes of the all-season hydrological conditions, e.g. the sublimation-to-precipitation ratio, were ambiguous due to diverse precipitation patterns derived by the global circulation models.

  5. A New Method for Estimating Bacterial Abundances in Natural Samples using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Cleaves, H. James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert were heated to a temperature of 500 C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger and the amount of adenine released from the samples then determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approx. l0(exp 5) to l0(exp 9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI staining. The simplicity and robustness of the sublimation technique compared to the DAPI staining method makes this approach particularly attractive for use by spacecraft instrumentation. NASA is currently planning to send a lander to Mars in 2009 in order to assess whether or not organic compounds, especially those that might be associated with life, are present in Martian surface samples. Based on our analyses of the Atacama Desert soil samples, several million bacterial cells per gam of Martian soil should be detectable using this sublimation technique.

  6. Sublimation and Irradiation of Glycolaldehyde/Water Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Daren; Brown, W. A.; Viti, S.; Woods, P. M.; Slater, B.

    2012-05-01

    There is currently great interest among astronomers and astrobiologists in the inventory of organic molecules in space, in particular in star and planet-forming regions. Observations towards the Galactic Centre have revealed a rich and complex chemistry, from simple organic molecules such as methane (CH4) and methanol (CH3OH) to the recent detection of ethyl formate (C2H5OCHO) and n-propyl cyanide (C3H7CN). Amongst the most important organic species detected in space is glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), an isomer of methyl formate (HCOOCH3) and acetic acid (CH3COOH). Glycolaldehyde is the simplest of the monosaccharide sugars and it reacts with propenal to form ribose, a central constituent of RNA. As a consequence, it is thought that glycolaldehyde may have a role in the origins of life in our universe. We present a detailed investigation of the adsorption and desorption of glycolaldehyde and methyl formate using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) under ultra-high vacuum. The sublimation of glycolaldehyde/water and methyl formate/water containing ices from a model carbonaceous grain surface (graphite) will be presented, along with kinetic parameters for desorption (such as the binding energy, order of desorption and desorption pre-exponential factor) derived from analysis of TPD. These experimental parameters will be incorporated into astronomical models of star-forming regions. Additional experiments investigating the stability of glycolaldehyde/water containing ices to electron/UV irradiation will also be discussed. Electron irradiation (simulating the effect of cosmic ray ionisation, which produces electrons) and UV irradiation (over a range of wavelengths) is used to examine competing routes for non-thermal desorption, decomposition and formation. RAIRS and TPD will be used to identify any reaction products and to monitor the desorption/decomposition of glycolaldehyde as a function of irradiation time. This

  7. On the Size Dependences of the Metallic Nanoparticle Evaporation and Sublimation Heats: Thermodynamics and Atomistic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bembel, A. G.

    2017-02-01

    Size dependences of the nanocrystal sublimation and the evaporation heats of the corresponding nanodrops are investigated using the isothermal molecular dynamics and the tight-binding potential (on examples of Ni and Au nanoparticles). Results of computer simulation demonstrating linear dependences of the evaporation and sublimation heats on the particle reciprocal radius are compared with results of thermodynamic calculations as well as with experimental data for bulk phases of the same metals. It has been found that the size dependences of the evaporation and sublimation heats are directly related with the behavior of the size dependence of the melting heat that in its turn correlates with structural transformations in nanoparticles induced by the change of their size. The conclusion is drawn that there is some characteristic nanoparticle size (of the order of 1 nm) at which its crystal and liquid states become indistinguishable.

  8. New method for estimating bacterial cell abundances in natural samples by use of sublimation.

    PubMed

    Glavin, Daniel P; Cleaves, H James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L

    2004-10-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples, including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert, were heated to a temperature of 500 degrees C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, and the amount of adenine released from the samples was then determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approximately 10(5) to 10(9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation-based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI (4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining.

  9. Matrix Sublimation/Recrystallization for Imaging Proteins by Mass Spectrometry at High Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    We have employed matrix deposition by sublimation for protein image analysis on tissue sections using a hydration/recrystallization process that produces high quality MALDI mass spectra and high spatial resolution ion images. We systematically investigated different washing protocols, the effect of tissue section thickness, the amount of sublimated matrix per unit area and different recrystallization conditions. The results show that an organic solvent rinse followed by ethanol/water rinses substantially increased sensitivity for the detection of proteins. Both the thickness of tissue section and amount of sinapinic acid sublimated per unit area have optimal ranges for maximal protein signal intensity. Ion images of mouse and rat brain sections at 50, 20 and 10 µm spatial resolution are presented and are correlated with H&E stained optical images. For targeted analysis, histology directed imaging can be performed using this protocol where MS analysis and H&E staining are performed on the same section. PMID:21639088

  10. Sublimation and reformation of icy grains in the primitive solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Engel, Steffi; Rizk, Bashar; Horanyi, Mihaly

    1991-01-01

    The quantity of water ice that sublimates during the free fall of grains into the solar nebula from a surrounding interstellar cloud varies from over 90 percent of the grain mass as 30 AU from the nebular center to less than 10 percent at more than 100 AU. Virtually all the water that is sublimated ultimately recondenses, since the cold nebular gas lying beyond 10 AU is unable to hold more than a small portion as vapor. The return of most of the gas to solid phase near the nebular ambient temperature, of about 50 K, may result in at least two grain populations consisting, in one case, of unaltered interstellar grains which did not undergo sublimation, and in the other of water ice which cocondensed with more volatile gases at nebular ambient temperatures to yield volatile-rich amorphous phases.

  11. Conduction type control from n to p type for organic pigment films purified by reactive sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramoto, Masahiro; Ihara, Kiyoaki; Fukusumi, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Masaaki

    1995-12-01

    The effects of purification by reactive sublimation technique and bromine doping on the Fermi level and the photovoltaic properties of n-type perylene pigment films were investigated. Photovoltage arisen from the Schottky junction between n-type perylene pigment film and Au increased significantly by repeating the train sublimation under methylamine gas atmosphere. This phenomenon was revealed to be due to the negative shift of the Fermi level resulting from the effective removal of unknown but specific impurity acting as an acceptor by reactive sublimation. On the other hand, by bromine doping, Fermi level of the pigment film shifted largely to a positive direction and reached the nearby valence band, while the direction of photocurrent flow arising from the Schottky junction with Au was reversed. This result is a clear demonstration of alternating the type of conduction from n type to p type. This means that the pn control of organic semiconductors is possible.

  12. New method for estimating bacterial cell abundances in natural samples by use of sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Cleaves, H. James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples, including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert, were heated to a temperature of 500 degrees C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, and the amount of adenine released from the samples was then determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approximately 10(5) to 10(9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation-based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI (4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining.

  13. The Effect of CO2 Ice Cap Sublimation on Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Sublimation of the polar CO2 ice caps on Mars is an ongoing phenomenon that may be contributing to secular climate change on Mars. The transfer of CO2 between the surface and atmosphere via sublimation and deposition may alter atmospheric mass such that net atmospheric mass is increasing despite seasonal variations in CO2 transfer. My study builds on previous studies by Kahre and Haberle that analyze and compare data from the Phoenix and Viking Landers 1 and 2 to determine whether secular climate change is happening on Mars. In this project, I use two years worth of temperature, pressure, and elevation data from the MSL Curiosity rover to create a program that allows for successful comparison of Curiosity pressure data to Viking Lander pressure data so a conclusion can be drawn regarding whether CO2 ice cap sublimation is causing a net increase in atmospheric mass and is thus contributing to secular climate change on Mars.

  14. Static sublimation purification process and characterization of LiZnP semiconductor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, Benjamin W.; Reichenberger, Michael A.; Edwards, Nathan; Ugorowski, Philip B.; Sunder, Madhana; Weeks, Joseph; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2015-06-01

    Refinement of the class AIBIICV materials continue as a candidate for solid-state neutron detectors. Such a device would have greater efficiency, in a compact form, than present day gas-filled 3He and 10BF3 detectors. The 6Li(n,t)4He reaction yields a total Q value of 4.78 MeV, larger than 10B, and easily identified above background radiations. Hence, devices composed of either natural Li (nominally 7.5% 6Li) or enriched 6Li (usually 95% 6Li) may provide a semiconductor material for compact high efficiency neutron detectors. A sub-branch of the III-V semiconductors, the filled tetrahedral compounds, AIBIICV, known as Nowotny-Juza compounds, are known for their desirable cubic crystal structure. Starting material was synthesized by combining equimolar portions of Li, Zn, and P sealed under vacuum (10-6 Torr) in quartz ampoules, having boron nitride liners, and subsequently reacted in a compounding furnace (Montag et al., 2015, J. of Cryst. Growth). A static vacuum sublimation in quartz was performed to help purify the synthesized material. The chemical composition of the sublimed material and remaining material was confirmed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Lithium was not detected in the sublimed material, however, approximately stoichiometric concentrations of each constituent element were found in the remaining LiZnP material. X-ray diffraction phase identification scans of the remains material and sublimed material were compared, and further indicated the impurity materials were sublimed away from the synthesized materials. The resulting material from the sublimation process showed characteristics of a higher purity ternary compound.

  15. Sublimation as a Continuous and Transient Source of Water in Europa's Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.

    2016-10-01

    Europa's crust is composed primarily of water ice, which may be vaporized by sputtering and sublimation when exposed to the jovian radiation environment. Models of H2O in Europa's exosphere have focused primarily on the contribution of sputtering by energetic particles, with globally averaged production rates estimated to be ~1015 H2O m-2 s-1. Although sublimation rates at Europa's average dayside temperature of ~106 K are much lower at ~1010 H2O m-2 s-1, surfaces at low- to mid-latitude experiences temperatures in excess of 130 K, with expected sublimation rates of >1015 H2O m-2 s-1 possible. These production rates would be reduced where the surface ice is mixed with impurities, or through development of a non-ice lag deposit. In addition to the continuous flux due to sublimation, transient outgassing may be caused by exposure of fresh ice to direct sunlight, for example by mass wasting on steep slopes. Here, we revisit the process of sublimation on Europa's surface to quantify possible H2O vapor production on a range of spatial and temporal scales.The model includes solar heating, conduction, and vapor diffusion. Temperatures and sublimation rates are calculated by the instantaneous energy budget within each model layer, and outgassing to the exosphere depends on the surface vapor pressure and molecular thermal velocities. Vapor densities and line-of-sight column abundances can be directly compared to observations. Our results show that for surfaces composed of pure ice, sublimation contributes significant quantities to the dayside exosphere. The production rate declines as a sublimation lag develops, with a characteristic timescale of ~1 - 10 kyr at the equator. Freshly exposed ice may produce localized sources. For example, a fresh exposure of ice at 60° latitude with dimension ~2 km would be expected to produce a line-of-sight column abundance of ~1020 H2O m-2 near the limb. However, expansion of the plume would lead to lower column abundance at higher

  16. On the sublimation of blowing snow and of snow in canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. A.; Simon, K.; Gordon, M.; Weng, W.

    2003-04-01

    Tests have been made within the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) of various parameterizations of sublimation of blowing snow, and tested in the context of data from weather stations (Goose Bay and Resolute) in northern Canada. We will focus on parameterization schemes based on results obtained with the PIEKTUK model of blowing snow. In addition we will present preliminary results concerning the parameterization of sublimation of snow caught in tree canopies, using schemes similar to those for evaporation from wet canopies. This is considered to be a major factor in the water budgets of forested areas in northern Canada.

  17. Matrix sublimation method for the formation of high-density amorphous ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchi, A.; Hama, T.; Kimura, Y.; Hidaka, H.; Escribano, R.; Watanabe, N.

    2016-08-01

    A novel method for the formation of amorphous ice involving matrix sublimation has been developed. A CO-rich CO:H2O mixed ice was deposited at 8-10 K under ultra-high vacuum condition, which was then allowed to warm. After the sublimation of matrix CO at 35 K, amorphous ice remained. The amorphous ice formed exhibits a highly porous microscale texture; however, it also rather exhibits a density similar to that of high-density amorphous ice formed under high pressure. Furthermore, unlike conventional vapor-deposited amorphous ice, the amorphous ice is stable up to 140 K, where it transforms directly to cubic ice Ic.

  18. Sublimation of hydrofullerenes C 60H 36 and C 60H 18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorozhko, P. A.; Lobach, A. S.; Popov, A. A.; Senyavin, V. M.; Korobov, M. V.

    2001-03-01

    Thermal behavior of two hydrofullerenes, C 60H 36 and C 60H 18, was studied by means of Knudsen cell mass-spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of sublimation at T=550-685 K were measured. Sublimation of the hydrofullerenes was accompanied by partial loss of hydrogen. Decomposition of C 60H 36 was confirmed to be a stepwise process with formation of C 60H 18 as an intermediate product. The material of the Knudsen cell strongly affected the partial pressures and mass-spectra of the hydrofullerene vapor species.

  19. PRECISION POINTING OF IBEX-Lo OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hlond, M.; Bzowski, M.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Heirtzler, D.; Schwadron, N. A.; Neill, M. E. O'; Clark, G.; Crew, G. B.; Fuselier, S.; McComas, D. J. E-mail: eberhard.moebius@unh.edu E-mail: stephen.a.fuselier@linco.com E-mail: DMcComas@swri.edu

    2012-02-01

    Post-launch boresight of the IBEX-Lo instrument on board the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is determined based on IBEX-Lo Star Sensor observations. Accurate information on the boresight of the neutral gas camera is essential for precise determination of interstellar gas flow parameters. Utilizing spin-phase information from the spacecraft attitude control system (ACS), positions of stars observed by the Star Sensor during two years of IBEX measurements were analyzed and compared with positions obtained from a star catalog. No statistically significant differences were observed beyond those expected from the pre-launch uncertainty in the Star Sensor mounting. Based on the star observations and their positions in the spacecraft reference system, pointing of the IBEX satellite spin axis was determined and compared with the pointing obtained from the ACS. Again, no statistically significant deviations were observed. We conclude that no systematic correction for boresight geometry is needed in the analysis of IBEX-Lo observations to determine neutral interstellar gas flow properties. A stack-up of uncertainties in attitude knowledge shows that the instantaneous IBEX-Lo pointing is determined to within {approx}0.{sup 0}1 in both spin angle and elevation using either the Star Sensor or the ACS. Further, the Star Sensor can be used to independently determine the spacecraft spin axis. Thus, Star Sensor data can be used reliably to correct the spin phase when the Star Tracker (used by the ACS) is disabled by bright objects in its field of view. The Star Sensor can also determine the spin axis during most orbits and thus provides redundancy for the Star Tracker.

  20. Recommendations for a Kalman filter to estimate and control freeze and sublime rates of gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1992-09-01

    A signal is required to control the flow of UF{sub 6} in gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems. The original strategy envisioned for deriving a flow signal was to take the derivative of the freezer/sublimer weigh cell signal. However, the derivative of the digitized weight signal is noisy, preventing good control. In addition, a disturbance is introduced into the weight derivative signal because a refrigerant is circulated through a shell-and-tube heat exchanger inside the freezer/sublimer. The weight of the refrigerant is included in the weight measured by the weigh cell. If the circulation rate of the refrigerant is not steady state, a disturbance exists. Measurements of upstream pressure, vessel pressure, and output to the system control valve are available to the control system. Thus, if the flow through the control valve is characterized properly by these measurements, a Kalman filter can be used in conjunction with these auxiliary inputs and the weigh cell input to overcome the noise and disturbance problem and provide an improved estimate of flow rate. A discussion of the development of a Kalman filter that could be used for this application is given, and recommendations are given for its implementation.

  1. Arrays of widely spaced atomic steps on Si(1 1 1) mesas due to sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kee-Chul; Blakely, Jack M.

    2005-10-01

    Steps with spacings of microns form on top of mesas fabricated on Si(1 1 1) that is annealed at temperatures where sublimation becomes important. Upon annealing, mesas first develop ridges along their edges, effectively creating craters which then become step-free by a step flow process described in the literature [S. Tanaka, C.C. Umbach, J.M. Blakely, R.M. Tromp, M. Mankos, Appl. Phys. Lett. 69 (9) (1996) 1235; Y. Homma, N. Aizawa, T. Ogino, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 35 (2B) (1996) L241]. Due to the miscut of the average surface from (1 1 1), ridge breakdown occurs on one edge of each mesa as sublimation proceeds. The breakdown point then acts as a source of steps which spread out over the mesa surface. The distribution of steps in the resulting step train depends on the sublimation rate, direct step-step interaction and the diffusive exchange of atoms among the steps. Insight into the role of these processes on the self-organization of the wide terrace distributions is provided by computer simulations using BCF (Burton, Cabrera and Frank) theory. This shows that step spacing can be controlled by varying the annealing temperature and the deposition flux. Comparison of the experimental and predicted step distributions suggest that the dynamics of the widely spaced steps are sublimation limited.

  2. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Facilitating Active Learning of Concepts in Transport Phenomena: Experiment with a Subliming Solid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utgikar, Vivek P.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment based on the sublimation of a solid was introduced in the undergraduate Transport Phenomena course. The experiment required the students to devise their own apparatus and measurement techniques. The theoretical basis, assignment of the experiment, experimental results, and student/instructor observations are described in this paper.…

  3. How to Kill a Journalism School: The Digital Sublime in the Discourse of Discontinuance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Michael; Sindorf, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    The authors argue that journalism's uncertain identity in academia has made it vulnerable to unreflective instrumentalism in the digital era. They show how instrumentalism intertwined with the digital sublime constitutes a rhetorically resonate rationale for closing a journalism school. Evidence comes from documents and testimony associated with…

  4. Sublimation of ice-tholins mixtures: A morphological and spectro-photometric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, Olivier; Pommerol, Antoine; Jost, Bernhard; Carrasco, Nathalie; Szopa, Cyril; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Sublimation, the direct transition from solid to gas phase, is a process responsible for shaping and changing the reflectance properties of many Solar System surfaces. In this study, we have characterized the evolution of the structure/texture and of the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR) spectral reflectance of surfaces made of water ice mixed with analogues of complex extraterrestrial organic matter, named tholins, under low temperature (<-70 °C) and pressure (10-5 mbar) conditions. The experiments were carried out in the SCITEAS simulation setup recently built as part of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern (Pommerol, A. et al. [2015a]. Planet. Space Sci. 109-110, 106-122). As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a sublimation lag deposit made of a water-free porous (>90% porosity) network of organic filaments on top of the ice. The temporal evolution of the tholins and water ice spectral features (reflectance at the absorption bands wavelengths, red slope, from 0.40 to 1.90 μm) are analyzed throughout the sublimation of the samples. We studied how different mixtures of tholins with water (0.1 wt.% tholins as coating or inclusions within the water particles), and different ice particle sizes (4.5 ± 2.5 or 67 ± 31 μm) influence the morphological and spectral evolutions of the samples. The sublimation of the ice below the mantle produces a gas flow responsible for the ejection of mm to cm-sized fragments of the deposit in outbursts-like events. The results show remarkable differences between these samples in term of mantle structure, speed of mantle building, rates and surface area of mantle ejections. These data provide useful references for interpreting remote-sensing observations of icy Solar System surfaces, in particular the activity of comet nuclei where sublimation of organic-rich ices and deposition of organic-dust particles likely play a major role. Consequently, the

  5. Sublimation of natural amino acids and induction of asymmetry by meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    It is believed that the homochirality of building blocks of life like amino acids (AAs) and sugars is a prerequisite requirement for the origin and evolution of life. Among different mechanisms that might have triggered the initial disparity in the enantiomeric ratio on the primitive Earth, the key roles were assigned to: (i) local chiral symmetry breaking and (ii) the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (eg the carbonaceous meteorites containing non-racemic AAs). Recently it has been revealed that sublimation, a subject almost completely neglected for a long time, gives a pathway to enantioenrichment of natural AAs (1,2 and references herein). Sublimation is however one of the key physical processes that occur on comets. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure AA, a partial sublimation gives an important enrichment of the sublimate (1,2). The resulted disparity in the ratio between enantiomers of a partial sublimate is determined by the crystalline nature of the starting mixture: we observed a drastic difference in the behavior of (i) mixtures based on true racemic compounds and (ii) mechanical mixtures of two enantiopure solid phases. On the other hand, combination of crystallization and sublimation can lead to segregation of enantioenriched fractions starting from racemic composition of sublimable aliphatic AAs (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) in mixtures with non-volatile enantiopure ones (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) (3). The resulted sense of chirality correlates with the handedness of the non-volatile AAs: the observed changes in enantiomeric ratios clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. It is noteworthy that just these 5 (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) out of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to local symmetry breaking. On the other hand, recent data on the enantiomeric composition of the Tagish Lake, a C2-type carbonaceous meteorite, revealed a large L

  6. Spring Sublimation of the Seasonal Condensates on Mars from Omega/Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, B.; Douté, S.; Langevin, Y.; Forget, F.; Bibring, J.; Bellucci, G.; Altieri, F.; Poulet, F.; Gondet, B.

    2005-12-01

    The formation and sublimation of the seasonal deposits on Mars surface are major elements controlling its atmospheric circulation and its climate. A complex competition occurs between sublimation of CO2 frost, inter-hemispheric transports and snow deposition/condensation in the opposite polar regions. Water is released by different sources (caps, condensates, soil) but their locations and contributions are not yet well known. Before the Mars Express mission the evolution of the seasonal condensations have been essentially monitored by following the albedo and temperature changes of the surface (TES, MOC/MGS). Since January 2004 the OMEGA imaging spectrometer allows us to directly monitor the abundance, physical state and distribution of the CO2, water and dust components of the martian frosts and ices through their visible and near-infrared spectral signatures. In particular, the monitoring of the evolution of the frost composing the seasonal caps provides strong constraints on the microphysics of the sublimation/condensation/deposition processes of volatiles as well as on their seasonal cycle. The abundance of the dust co-deposited with ices should also constrain the dust loading and transport processes. We present the latitudinal evolution of the composition and physical state of the ices composing the seasonal deposits from the north pole to the crocus line, as seen by OMEGA. Then we describe the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of CO2 frost and H2O ice during spring sublimation of the northern seasonal condensates. In particular a wide annulus of a thin layer of dusty water ice forms at the fringe of the recessing CO2 seasonal cap and moves towards higher latitudes as sublimation progress. All this information allows us to draw a coupled microphysical and latitudinal evolution sketch of the seasonal frosts. Implications and constraints on Mars GCMs will be analyzed.

  7. Static sublimation purification process and characterization of LiZnAs semiconductor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, Benjamin W.; Reichenberger, Michael A.; Edwards, Nathaniel S.; Ugorowski, Philip B.; Sunder, Madhana; Weeks, Joseph; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2016-03-01

    Refinement of the class AIBIICV materials continue as a candidate for solid-state neutron detectors. Such a device would have greater efficiency, in a compact form, than present day gas-filled 3He and 10BF3 detectors. The 6Li(n,t)4He reaction yields a total Q value of 4.78 MeV, larger than 10B, and easily identified above background radiations. Hence, devices composed of either natural Li (nominally 7.5% 6Li) or enriched 6Li (usually 95% 6Li) may provide a semiconductor material for compact high efficiency neutron detectors. A sub-branch of the III-V semiconductors, the filled tetrahedral compounds, AIBIICV, known as Nowotny-Juza compounds, are known for their desirable cubic crystal structure. Starting material was synthesized by equimolar portions of Li, Zn, and As sealed under vacuum (10-6 Torr) in quartz ampoules with a boron nitride lining, and reacted in a compounding furnace [1]. The synthesized material showed signs of high impurity levels from material and electrical property characterization. In the present work, a static vacuum sublimation of synthesized LiZnAs loaded in a quartz vessel was performed to help purify the synthesized material. The chemical composition of the sublimed material and remains material was confirmed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Lithium was not detected in the sublimed material, however, near stoichiometric amounts of each constituent element were found in the remains material for LiZnAs. X-ray diffraction phase identification scans of the remains material and sublimed material were compared, and further indicated the impurity materials were removed from the synthesized materials. The remaining powder post the sublimation process showed characteristics of a higher purity ternary compound.

  8. Preparation of highly porous gastroretentive metformin tablets using a sublimation method.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tack-Oon; Kim, Ju-Young; Ha, Jung-Myung; Chi, Sang-Cheol; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Park, Chun-Woong; Park, Eun-Seok

    2013-04-01

    The present investigation is aimed to formulate floating gastroretentive tablets containing metformin using a sublimation material. In this study, the release of the drug from a matrix tablet was highly dependent on the polymer concentrations. In all formulations, initial rapid drug release was observed, possibly due to the properties of the drug and polymer. The effect of the amount of PEO on swelling and eroding of the tablets was determined. The water-uptake and erosion behavior of the gastroretentive (GR) tablets were highly dependent on the amount of PEO. The water-uptake increased with increasing PEO concentration in the tablet matrix. The weight loss from tablets decreased with increasing amounts of PEO. Camphor was used as the sublimation material to prepare GR tablets that are low-density and easily floatable. Camphor was changed to pores in the tablet during the sublimation process. SEM revealed that the GR tablets have a highly porous morphology. Floating properties of tablets and tablet density were affected by the sublimation of camphor. Prepared floating gastroretentive tablets floated for over 24 h and had no floating lag time. However, as the amount of camphor in the tablet matrix increased, the crushing strength of the tablet decreased after sublimation. Release profiles of the drug from the GR tablets were not affected by tablet density or porosity. In pharmacokinetic studies, the mean plasma concentration of the GR tablets after oral administration was greater than the concentration of glucophase XR. Also, the mean AUC(0-∞) values for the GR tablets were significantly greater than the plasma concentrations of glucophase XR.

  9. The Evolution of Starspots on LO Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Cochran, Mallory; Shank, Derek; Sweeney, Nicholas; Vesa, Oana

    2017-01-01

    LO Pegasi is an ultrarotator (P = 10.1538 hr) and young solar analog that exibits large starspots on its surface. Starspots are regions of strong magnetic field analogous to sunspots that inhibit convective transport of energy from deeper layers, causing the spots to be cooler and thus darker than the surrounding photosphere. The star's brightness varies as the spots are carried into and out of view of Earth by the star's rotation, so that photometry can provide insight into their characteristics. The amount of rotational modulation depends on the sizes, shapes, and locations of the spots, along with the inclination of the rotation axis to the line of sight, the brightness contrast between the spots and the rest of the surface, and the amount of limb darkening. The brightness contrast and limb darkening differ amond different photometric filter passbands, such that multi-filter observations provide additional information about spot latitudes compared to single-filter observations. We present surface images of LO Pegasi based on an indirect light-curve inversion algorithm applied to BVRI photometry obtained at Perkins Observatory in Delaware, OH from 2006-2016, which include variations in the size of a polar spot deduced from year-to-year variations in the star's average brightness.

  10. Lo Gnomone Clementino Astronomia Meridiana in Basilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2014-05-01

    Costruito per chiara volontà del papa 70 anni dopo il caso Galileo, lo Gnomone Clementino è un grande telescopio solare che non fa uso di lenti a 92 anni dall’invenzione del cannocchiale. Queste due caratteristiche basterebbero da sole a giustificare l’interesse verso questo strumento. L’astronomia meridiana è alla base dell’astrometria e dell’astrofisica moderna. Lo Gnomone Clementino sta oggi all’astronomia, come il veliero “Amerigo Vespucci” sta alla Marina Italiana. E’ possibile svolgere ogni genere di osservazione e studio su questo strumento, e dal 2002 vi tengo lezioni teorico-pratiche del corso di Storia dell’Astronomia e La Terra nel Sistema Solare della Sapienza, Università di Roma, Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia. Questo testo aggiunge alcuni tasselli alla ricerca storica sulla meridiana, appoggiandosi, com’è naturale, sulle spalle di giganti che mi hanno preceduto in questi studi. In particolare la misura dell’azimut della meridiana, ed il suo inquadramento tra gli strumenti simili ed alcuni studi di astrometria sui dati del 1701-1703 di Bianchini, che sono apparsi fin’ora soltanto su riviste specializzate ed in Inglese vengono qui proposti in Italiano e semplificati, per valorizzare sempre più questa straordinaria opera d’arte e di scienza.

  11. "Back-fire to lust": G. Stanley Hall, sex-segregated schooling, and the engine of sublimation.

    PubMed

    Graebner, William

    2006-08-01

    G. Stanley Hall was an advocate of sex-segregated schooling long after most Americans had accepted coeducation. His position was based in part on personal experience: observations of his father and mother, a repressed and guilt-ridden boyhood sexuality, and his conviction that his own career success was a product of sublimated sexual desire, of erotic energy converted into mental energy. Hall theorized that coeducation put sublimation at risk, and that sex-segregated schools, by contributing to proper gendered development and by prolonging and sublimating the sexual tensions of adolescence, would produce social progress.

  12. Starspots on LO Pegasi, 2006-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Berry, Dominique; Chalmers, Mark; Denison, Josh; Stevens, Don; Yuhas, Kaylee

    2015-01-01

    BVRI light curves of LO Pegasi obtained at Perkins Observatory (Ohio Wesleyan University) from 2006-2014 were used to study the evolution of starspots on its surface over that interval. We present surface maps obtained via a constrained non-linear inversion algorithm that uses variations in limb darkening as seen through different filters to improve the latitude resolution of the reconstructions. In addition, a detailed period analysis of the entire data set using the ANOVA method was performed to search for variations associated with differential rotation. No evidence of period change was found, as the periods for each year were equal to within their uncertainties. For the data set as a whole, the period of rotation was determined to be 10.1538 ± 0.0009 hr, in agreement with previously published results.

  13. Starspots on LO Pegasi, 2006-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Chalmers, Mark; Geda, Robel; Henry, Brandi; Sliupas, Viesulas

    2016-01-01

    LO Pegasi is a rapidly rotating (P = 10.154 hr) young solar analog (spectral class K5-7V) variable star of BY Dra type that exhibits dark starspots on its surface that modulate its brightness as they are carried into and out of view by the star's rotation. Surface maps of the spot distribution were produced based on BVRI photometry obtained at Perkins Observatory from 2006-2015. The maps were generated from the light curves via a non-linear inversion algorithm that uses the differences in the limb darkening through different filter passbands to improve the latitude resolution of the maps. We present an analysis of variations in the size of a polar spot suggested by changes in the average brightness and the amplitude of the rotational modulation from year to year.

  14. Three-dimensional textures and defects of soft material layering revealed by thermal sublimation

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dong Ki; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Dae Seok; Oh, Seong Dae; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Clark, Noel A.; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Layering is found and exploited in a variety of soft material systems, ranging from complex macromolecular self-assemblies to block copolymer and small-molecule liquid crystals. Because the control of layer structure is required for applications and characterization, and because defects reveal key features of the symmetries of layered phases, a variety of techniques have been developed for the study of soft-layer structure and defects, including X-ray diffraction and visualization using optical transmission and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and SEM and transmission electron microscopy, including freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy. Here, it is shown that thermal sublimation can be usefully combined with such techniques to enable visualization of the 3D structure of soft materials. Sequential sublimation removes material in a stepwise fashion, leaving a remnant layer structure largely unchanged and viewable using SEM, as demonstrated here using a lamellar smectic liquid crystal. PMID:24218602

  15. Water drops dancing on ice: how sublimation leads to drop rebound.

    PubMed

    Antonini, C; Bernagozzi, I; Jung, S; Poulikakos, D; Marengo, M

    2013-07-05

    Drop rebound is a spectacular event that appears after impact on hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surfaces but can also be induced through the so-called Leidenfrost effect. Here we demonstrate that drop rebound can also originate from another physical phenomenon, the solid substrate sublimation. Through drop impact experiments on a superhydrophobic surface, a hot plate, and solid carbon dioxide (commonly known as dry ice), we compare drop rebound based on three different physical mechanisms, which apparently share nothing in common (superhydrophobicity, evaporation, and sublimation), but lead to the same rebound phenomenon in an extremely wide temperature range, from 300 °C down to even below -79 °C. The formation and unprecedented visualization of an air vortex ring around an impacting drop are also reported.

  16. Controlling Gaussian and mean curvatures at microscale by sublimation and condensation of smectic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Seok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Kim, Mun Ho; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Soft materials with layered structure such as membranes, block copolymers and smectics exhibit intriguing morphologies with nontrivial curvatures. Here, we report restructuring the Gaussian and mean curvatures of smectic A films with free surface in the process of sintering, that is, reshaping at elevated temperatures. The pattern of alternating patches of negative, zero and positive mean curvature of the air-smectic interface has a profound effect on the rate of sublimation. As a result of sublimation, condensation and restructuring, initially equilibrium smectic films with negative and zero Gaussian curvature are transformed into structures with pronounced positive Gaussian curvature of layers packing, which are rare in the samples obtained by cooling from the isotropic melt. The observed relationship between the curvatures, bulk elastic behaviour and interfacial geometries in sintering of smectic liquid crystals might pave the way for new approaches to control soft morphologies at micron and submicron scales.

  17. Adamantane derivatives of sulfonamides: sublimation, solubility, solvation and transfer processes in biologically relevant solvents.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, G L; Volkova, T V; Sharapova, A V; Kazachenko, V P; Strakhova, N N; Proshin, A N

    2016-04-07

    Eight adamantane derivatives of sulfonamides were synthesized and characterized. Temperature dependencies of saturation vapor pressure were obtained using the transpiration method and thermodynamic functions of the sublimation processes were calculated. Solubility values of the selected compounds in buffer (pH 7.4), 1-octanol and 1-hexane were determined at different temperatures using the isothermal saturation method. Thermophysical characteristics of fusion processes (melting points and fusion enthalpies) of the substances were studied using the DSC method. Transfer processes from buffer to 1-octanol, from buffer to 1-hexane and 1-hexane to 1-octanol were analyzed. The impact of the molecules' structural modification on sublimation, solubility and solvation/hydration processes in the solvents was studied. Correlation equations connecting the thermodynamic functions with physicochemical descriptors were obtained.

  18. Darwin's sublime: the contest between reason and imagination in On the Origin of Species.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Benjamin Sylvester

    2011-01-01

    Recent Darwin scholarship has provided grounds for recognising the Origin as a literary as well as a scientific achievement. While Darwin was an acute observer, a gifted experimentalist and indefatigable theorist, this essay argues that it was also crucial to his impact that the Origin transcended the putative divide between the scientific and the literary. Analysis of Darwin's development as a writer between his journal-keeping on HMS Beagle and his construction of the Origin argues the latter draws on the pattern of the Romantic or Kantian sublime. The Origin repeatedly uses strategies which challenge the natural-theological appeal to the imagination in conceiving nature. Darwin's sublime coaches the Origin's readers into a position from which to envision nature that reduces and contains its otherwise overwhelming complexity. As such, it was Darwin's literary achievement that enabled him to fashion a new 'habit of looking at things in a given way' that is the centrepiece of the scientific revolution bearing his name.

  19. Dehydration polycondensation of dicarboxylic acids and diols using sublimating strong brønsted acids.

    PubMed

    Moyori, Takaya; Tang, Tang; Takasu, Akinori

    2012-05-14

    We investigated catalytic activities of strong brønsted acids for dehydration polycondensations of dicarboxylic acids and diols, which were carried out at low temperature (<100 °C) under reduced pressure (0.3-3 mmHg). Strong Brønsted acids, bis(perfluoroalkanesulfonyl)imide and perfluoroalkanesulfonic acid, showed higher activity than p-toluenesulfonic acid or rare-earth catalysts at 60 °C. In particular, bis(nonafluorobutanesulfonyl)imide (Nf(2)NH) showed the highest activity to synthesize not only aliphatic polyester (M(n) > 19000) but also aromatic polyester (M(n) > 7000). The used Nf(2)NH was sublimated from the reaction flask during polycondensation, and the sublimate, Nf(2)NH, was extra pure so that we can reuse the catalyst without loss of the activity in the dehydration polycondensations.

  20. Spectroscopy of lithium atoms sublimated from isolation matrix of solid Ne.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, R L; Scudeller, L A; Lambo, R; Crivelli, P; Cesar, C L

    2011-10-07

    We have studied, via laser absorption spectroscopy, the velocity distribution of (7)Li atoms released from a solid neon matrix at cryogenic temperatures. The Li atoms are implanted into the Ne matrix by laser ablation of a solid Li precursor. A heat pulse is then applied to the sapphire substrate sublimating the matrix together with the isolated atoms at around 12 K. We find interesting differences in the velocity distribution of the released Li atoms from the model developed for our previous experiment with Cr [R. Lambo, C. C. Rodegheri, D. M. Silveira, and C. L. Cesar, Phys. Rev. A 76, 061401(R) (2007)]. This may be due to the sublimation regime, which is at much lower flux for the Li experiment than for the Cr experiment, as well as to the different collisional cross sections between those species to the Ne gas. We find a drift velocity compatible with Li being thermally sublimated at 11-13 K, while the velocity dispersion around this drift velocity is low, around 5-7 K. With a slow sublimation of the matrix we can determine the penetration depth of the laser ablated Li atoms into the Ne matrix, an important information that is not usually available in most matrix isolation spectroscopy setups. The present results with Li, together with the previous results with Cr suggest this to be a general technique for obtaining cryogenic atoms, for spectroscopic studies, as well as for trap loading. The release of the isolated atoms is also a useful tool to study and confirm details of the matrix isolated atoms which are masked or poorly understood in the solid.

  1. APPARATUS FOR CHARGING A RECEPTACLE WITH A DENSE SUBLIMATE FORM OF URANIUM CHLORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, P.H.

    1959-08-18

    An apparatus for filling a tubular storage receptacle with a dense massive form of uranium chloride is described. The apparatus includes an evacuated housing divided into a vaporizing chamber and a portion adapted to receive the receptacle. A nozzle conducts vaporized uranium chloride from the chamber to the interior of the receptacle. The nozzle is withdrawable to progressively deposit the uranium chloride under controlled conditions to produce a dense sublimate which fills the receptacle.

  2. Sublimating icy planetesimals as the source of nucleation seeds for grain condensation in classical novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matese, John J.; Whitmire, D. P.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of grain nucleation during novae outbursts is a major obstacle to our understanding of dust formation in these systems. How nucleation seeds can form in the hostile post-outburst environment remains an unresolved matter. It is suggested that the material for seeding the condensation of ejecta outflow is stored in a primordial disk of icy planetesimals surrounding the system. Evidence is presented that the requisite number of nucleation seeds can be released by sublimation of the planetesimals during outbursts.

  3. Glaciers of the McMurdo dry valleys: Terrestrial analog for Martian polar sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacClune, Karen Lewis; Fountain, Andrew G.; Kargel, Jeffery S.; MacAyeal, Douglas R.

    2003-04-01

    The surfaces of the Martian north and south polar residual caps are marked by unusual ice features: Dark spiralesque troughs up to 1 km deep, 10 km wide, and 300 km long appear on both ice caps, and circular pits that make up the ``Swiss cheese'' terrain appear on the south polar cap. Both types of features are of interest to researchers as a potential means of understanding ice composition and flow rates. Some glaciers of the McMurdo dry valleys have surface features unknown elsewhere on terrestrial glaciers, including canyons over 6 km long, 100 m wide, and tens of meters deep and basins up to 100 m across. High sublimation, dust accumulation, and very little melting is key to their origin. These processes and ice landforms are suggested as terrestrial analogs for the sublimation behavior of Martian ice caps, where dust accumulation and sublimation are significant but surface melting is absent. We have developed a solar radiation model of canyon formation and have applied it to the Martian polar caps. The modeled processes do well to describe direct and reflected radiation within V grooves, a process that may be significant in the development of the spiral troughs and Swiss cheese terrain. The model fails to reproduce the low observed slopes of the Martian troughs. The grooves are too shallow, with opening angles of ~165° compared with model predictions of ~90°. The reason for the failure may be that we have not included creep closure, which should flatten their slopes.

  4. Characterization of Sulfur and Nanostructured Sulfur Battery Cathodes in Electron Microscopy Without Sublimation Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Zachman, Michael J; Werner, Jörg G; Sahore, Ritu; Nguyen, Kayla X; Han, Yimo; Xie, Baoquan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Wiesner, Ulrich; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Muller, David A

    2017-02-01

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries have the potential to provide higher energy storage density at lower cost than conventional lithium ion batteries. A key challenge for Li-S batteries is the loss of sulfur to the electrolyte during cycling. This loss can be mitigated by sequestering the sulfur in nanostructured carbon-sulfur composites. The nanoscale characterization of the sulfur distribution within these complex nanostructured electrodes is normally performed by electron microscopy, but sulfur sublimates and redistributes in the high-vacuum conditions of conventional electron microscopes. The resulting sublimation artifacts render characterization of sulfur in conventional electron microscopes problematic and unreliable. Here, we demonstrate two techniques, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning electron microscopy in air (airSEM), that enable the reliable characterization of sulfur across multiple length scales by suppressing sulfur sublimation. We use cryo-TEM and airSEM to examine carbon-sulfur composites synthesized for use as Li-S battery cathodes, noting several cases where the commonly employed sulfur melt infusion method is highly inefficient at infiltrating sulfur into porous carbon hosts.

  5. Formulation Design and Optimization of Orodispersible Tablets of Quetiapine Fumarate by Sublimation Method

    PubMed Central

    Kalyankar, P.; Panzade, P.; Lahoti, S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of present study was to formulate directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A full 32 factorial design was used to investigate the effect of two variables viz., concentration of Indion 414 and camphor. Indion 414 (3-5 % w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (5-15 % w/w) as subliming agent. The tablets were evaluated for thickness, weight variation, hardness, friability, content uniformity, wetting time, porosity, in vitro disintegration time and in vitro drug release. The formulation containing 5% w/w of Indion 414 and 5% w/w camphor was emerged as promising based on evaluation parameters. The disintegration time for optimized formulation was 18.66 s. The tablet surface was evaluated for presence of pores by scanning electron microscopy before and after sublimation. Differential scanning colorimetric study did not indicate any drug excipient incompatibility, either during mixing or after compression. The effect of independent variables on disintegration time, % drug release and friability is presented graphically by surface response plots. Short-term stability studies on the optimized formulation indicated no significant changes in drug content and in vitro disintegration time. The directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate with lower friability, greater drug release and shorter disintegration times were obtained using Indion 414 and camphor at optimum concentrations. PMID:26180271

  6. Enhancement of Sublimation of Single Graphene Layer by Interacting with Gas Molecules in Rarefied Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Ramki; Park, Jae Hyun

    2014-11-01

    Graphene has excellent mechanical properties. One of them is the resistance to high temperature environment. Since the sublimation temperature of graphene is over 4500 K, it has been used for diverse high temperature applications in order to protect the system. In this study, using extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the sublimation of graphene could be enhanced (occurs at the lower temperature) by interacting with the gas molecules. With increase in temperature, the bonds in graphene becomes so sensitive to interact with the incoming gas molecules. When the temperature is low, the graphene is stable to the impingement of gas molecules: The light H2 gases are stick to the graphene surface and remains being attached while the heavy CO2 and H2O are bounced back from the surface. However, at high temperature H2 gases are absorbed on the graphene and destroy the C -C bonds by forming C -H bonds. The local breakage of bond at the impingement spot spreads the entire graphene soon, causing a complete sublimation. Even though the heavy CO2 and H2O molecules also break the C -C bonds at high temperature,but their impingement effect is localized and the breakage does not propagate over the entire surface. This research was supported by Agency for Defence Development (ADD).

  7. Formation of the dumbbell-like nucleus of a comet by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, Dmitrii; Medvedev, Yurii; Zatitskiy, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    The nucleus of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is an elongated body with a deep groove around the middle. There are also other comets that look like dumbbells (e.g. 103P/Hartley 2, 19P/Borrelly, 1P/Halley). Two most probable interpretations are discussed in the scientific society. The first hypothesis explains the creation of such an object as sticking of two cometesimals during the process of formation. The second one suggests that the sublimation process can change the nucleus shape and make a groove in the middle.In this work we consider the second hypothesis. It was assumed that the spin axis of the nucleus is perpendicular to the plane of the cometary orbit and that initially the nucleus shape is a sphere. Thus, the problem is represented as a differential equation, which describes the change of the cometary nucleus. We solved this equation analytically. It was shown that initially a convex cometary nucleus (e.g. a sphere), consisting of homogeneous material, can not be transformed into a dumbbell-like body by the influence of sublimation. However, assuming that the density in the centre of the nucleus is less than on the surface, a groove can arise on the equator of the cometary nucleus as a result of sublimation.

  8. Formulation Design and Optimization of Orodispersible Tablets of Quetiapine Fumarate by Sublimation Method.

    PubMed

    Kalyankar, P; Panzade, P; Lahoti, S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of present study was to formulate directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A full 3(2) factorial design was used to investigate the effect of two variables viz., concentration of Indion 414 and camphor. Indion 414 (3-5 % w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (5-15 % w/w) as subliming agent. The tablets were evaluated for thickness, weight variation, hardness, friability, content uniformity, wetting time, porosity, in vitro disintegration time and in vitro drug release. The formulation containing 5% w/w of Indion 414 and 5% w/w camphor was emerged as promising based on evaluation parameters. The disintegration time for optimized formulation was 18.66 s. The tablet surface was evaluated for presence of pores by scanning electron microscopy before and after sublimation. Differential scanning colorimetric study did not indicate any drug excipient incompatibility, either during mixing or after compression. The effect of independent variables on disintegration time, % drug release and friability is presented graphically by surface response plots. Short-term stability studies on the optimized formulation indicated no significant changes in drug content and in vitro disintegration time. The directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate with lower friability, greater drug release and shorter disintegration times were obtained using Indion 414 and camphor at optimum concentrations.

  9. Formulation Development and Characterization of Meclizine Hydrochloride Sublimated Fast Dissolving Tablets.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sateesh Kumar; Vangala, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The intention of present research is to formulate and develop the meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets using sublimation method to enhance the dissolution rate. In this study an attempt was made to fasten the drug release from the oral tablets by incorporating the superdisintegrants and camphor as sublimating agent. The prepared fast dissolving tablets were subjected to precompression properties and characterized for hardness, weight variation, friability, wetting time, water absorption ratio, and disintegration time. From in vitro release studies, the formulation F9 exhibited fast release profile of about 98.61% in 30 min, and disintegration time 47 sec when compared with other formulations. The percent drug release in 30 min (Q 30) and initial dissolution rate for formulation F9 was 98.61 ± 0.25%, 3.29%/min. These were very much higher compared to marketed tablets (65.43 ± 0.57%, 2.18%/min). The dissolution efficiency was found to be 63.37 and it is increased by 1.4-fold with F9 FDT tablets compared to marketed tablets. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed that there was no possibility of interactions. Thus the development of meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets by sublimation method is a suitable approach to improve the dissolution rate.

  10. Formulation Development and Characterization of Meclizine Hydrochloride Sublimated Fast Dissolving Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Vangala, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The intention of present research is to formulate and develop the meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets using sublimation method to enhance the dissolution rate. In this study an attempt was made to fasten the drug release from the oral tablets by incorporating the superdisintegrants and camphor as sublimating agent. The prepared fast dissolving tablets were subjected to precompression properties and characterized for hardness, weight variation, friability, wetting time, water absorption ratio, and disintegration time. From in vitro release studies, the formulation F9 exhibited fast release profile of about 98.61% in 30 min, and disintegration time 47 sec when compared with other formulations. The percent drug release in 30 min (Q30) and initial dissolution rate for formulation F9 was 98.61 ± 0.25%, 3.29%/min. These were very much higher compared to marketed tablets (65.43 ± 0.57%, 2.18%/min). The dissolution efficiency was found to be 63.37 and it is increased by 1.4-fold with F9 FDT tablets compared to marketed tablets. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed that there was no possibility of interactions. Thus the development of meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets by sublimation method is a suitable approach to improve the dissolution rate. PMID:27355021

  11. Application of a Kalman filter to UF sub 6 gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1992-03-01

    A signal is required to control the flow of UF{sub 6} in gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems. The original strategy envisioned for deriving a flow signal was to take the derivative of the freezer/sublimer weigh cell signal. However, the derivative of the digitized weight signal is noisy, preventing good control. In addition, a bias is introduced into the weight derivative signal because a refrigerant is circulated through a shell-and-tube heat exchanger inside the freezer/sublimer. The weight of the refrigerant is included in the weight measured by the weigh cell. If the circulation rate of the refrigerent is not steady state, a bias exists. Measurements of upstream pressure, vessel pressure, and output to the system control valve are available to the control system. Thus, if the flow through the control valve is characterized properly by the measurements, a Kalman filter can be used in conjunction with these auxiliary inputs and the weigh cell input to overcome the noise and bias problem and provide an improve estimate of flow rate. A discussion of the development and the current status of a Kalman filter used for this application is given. 5 refs.

  12. Deviations from Ideal Sublimation Vapor Pressure Behavior in Mixtures of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds with Interacting Heteroatoms.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Jillian L; Suuberg, Eric M

    2010-08-01

    Despite the relatively small atomic fraction of a given heteroatom in a binary mixture of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC), the inclusion of heteroatomic substituted compounds can significantly impact mixture vapor pressure behavior over a wide range of temperatures. The vapor pressures of several binary PAC mixtures containing various heteroatoms show varying behavior, from practically ideal behavior following Raoult's law to significant deviations from ideality depending on the heteroatom(s) present in the mixture. Mixtures were synthesized using the quench-cool technique with equimolar amounts of two PAC, both containing heteroatoms such as aldehyde, carboxyl, nitrogen, and sulfur substituent groups. For some mixtures, deviation from ideality is inversely related to temperature, though in other cases we see deviations from ideality increasing with temperature, whereas some appear independent of temperature. Most commonly we see lower vapor pressures than predicted by Raoult's law, which indicates that the interacting heteroatoms prefer the solid mixture phase as opposed to the vapor phase. Although negative deviations predominate from Raoult's Law, the varying mixtures investigated show both higher and lower enthalpies and entropies of sublimation than predicted. In each mixture, a higher enthalpy of sublimation leads to higher entropy of sublimation than predicted, and vice versa.

  13. Properties of Filamentary Sublimation Residues from Dispersions of Clay in Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Parker, T. J.; Saunders, R. S.; Laue, E. G.; Fanale, F. P.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of sublimate residues are of considerable interest in studies of the thermal modeling of Martian and cometary ice surfaces. The study of the formation of sand grains from this mantle on Martian polar ice is also supported by these experiments. To understand these properties, a series of low temperature vacuum experiments were run during which dirty ices that might be expected to be found in Martian polar caps and in comet nuclei were made and then freeze dried. In addition to using particulate material of appropriate grain size and minerology, particle nucleated ices were simulated by dispersing the particulates in the ice so that they did not contact one another. This noncontact dispersion was the most difficult requirement to achieve but the most rewarding in that it produced a new filamentary sublimate residue that was not a relic of the frozen dispersion. If the siliceous particles are allowed to touch one another in the ice the structure of the contacting particles in the ice will remain as a relic after the ice is sublimed away.

  14. Sublimation kinetics and diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX in air by thermogravimetry.

    PubMed

    Hikal, Walid M; Weeks, Brandon L

    2014-07-01

    The diffusion coefficients of explosives are crucial in their trace detection and lifetime estimation. We report on the experimental values of diffusion coefficients of three of the most important explosives in both military and industry: TNT, PETN, and RDX. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine the sublimation rates of TNT, PETN, and RDX powders in the form of cylindrical billets. The TGA was calibrated using ferrocene as a standard material of well-characterized sublimation rates and vapor pressures to determine the vapor pressures of TNT, PETN, and RDX. The determined sublimation rates and vapor pressures were used to indirectly determine the diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX for the first time. A linear log-log dependence of the diffusion coefficients on temperature is observed for the three materials. The diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX at 273 K were determined to be 5.76×10(-6)m(2)/sec, 4.94×10(-6)m(2)/s, and 5.89×10(-6)m(2)/s, respectively. Values are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values in literature.

  15. Advances in LO2 Propellant Conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Gopal; Orth, Michael; Stone, William; Perry, Gretchen; Holt, Kimberly; Suter, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic testing and analysis that has recently been completed as part of a multi-year effort to develop a new, more robust and operable LO2 propellant conditioning system. Phase 1 of the program consisted of feasibility demonstrations ot four novel propellant conditioning concepts. A no-bleed, passive propellant conditioning option was shown for the first time to successfully provide desired propellant inlet conditions. The benefits of passive conditioning are reduced operations costs, decreased hardware costs, enhanced operability and increased reliability on future expendable launch vehicles In Phase 2 of the test program, effects of major design parameters were studied and design correlation for future vehicle design were developed. Simultaneously, analytical models were developed and validated. Over 100 tests were conducted with a full-scale feedline using LN2 as the test fluid. A circulation pump provided a range of pressure and flow conditions. The test results showed that the passive propellant conditioning system is insensitive to variations in many of the parameters. The test program provides the validation necessary to incorporate the passive conditioning system into the baseline of future vehicles. Modeling of these systems using computational fluid dynamics seems highly promising.

  16. Impact of sublimation losses in the mass balance of glaciers in semi-arid mountain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Burlando, Paolo; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James

    2016-04-01

    Glaciers in semiarid mountain regions may lose an important part of their winter snow accumulation through sublimation processes that are enhanced by the high-elevation, intense radiation and dry atmosphere of these environments. As glaciers in these regions secure freshwater resources to lower valleys during summer and drought periods, it is important to advance in a detailed quantification of their sublimation losses. However, logistical concerns and complex meteorological features make the measuring and modelling of glacier mass balances a difficult task. In this study, we estimated the spring-summer mass balances of Tapado and Juncal Norte glaciers in the semiarid Andes of north-central Chile by running a distributed energy balance model that accounts for melt, refreezing and sublimation from the surface and blowing snow. Meteorological input data were available from on-glacier Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) that were installed during the ablation season of years 2005-06, 2008-09, 2013-14 and 2014-15. Snow pits, ablation stakes and a time-lapse camera that provided surface albedo were also available. Distributed air temperature and wind speed were dynamically downscaled from NASA MERRA reanalysis using the software WINDSIM and validated against the data from the AWSs. The rest of the meteorological variables were distributed using statistical relations with air temperature derived from the AWSs data. Initial snow conditions were estimated using satellite images and distributed manual snow depth measurements. Preliminary results show that total ablation diminishes with elevation and that, during the early ablation season (October-November), melt is the main ablation component below 4500 m with sublimation dominating the ablation above this elevation. Above 4500 m an important fraction of meltwater refreezes during night. As the ablation season advances (December-February), melt extends to higher elevations, refreezing plays a smaller role and sublimation is

  17. Snowmelt and sublimation: field experiments and modelling in the High Atlas Mountains of Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, O.; de Jong, C.

    Snow in the High Atlas Mountains is a major source for freshwater renewal and for water availability in the semi-arid lowlands of south-eastern Morocco. Snowfall- and snow-ablation monitoring and modelling is important for estimating potential water delivery from the mountain water towers to the forelands. This study is part of GLOWA-IMPETUS, an integrated management project dealing with scarce water resources in West Africa. The Ameskar study area is located to the south of the High Atlas Mountains, in their rain shadow. As a part of the M’Goun river basin within the upper Dr'valley, the study area is characterised by high radiation inputs, low atmospheric humidity and long periods with sub-zero temperatures. Its altitude ranges between 2000 m and 4000 m, with dominant north- and south-facing slopes. Snowfall occurs mainly from November to April but even summit regions can become repeatedly devoid of snow cover. Snow cover maps for the M’Goun basin (1240 km2) are derived from calculations of NDSI (Normalized Difference Snow Index) from MODIS satellite images and snow depth is monitored at four automatic weather stations between 2000-4000 m. Snowfall events are infrequent at lower altitudes. The presence of snow penitentes at altitudes above 3000 m indicates that snow sublimation is an important component of snow ablation. Snow ablation was modelled with the UEB Utah Energy Balance Model (Tarboton and Luce, 1996). This single layer, physically-based, point energy and mass balance model is driven by meteorological variables recorded at the automatic weather stations at Tounza (2960 m) and Tichki (3260 m). Data from snow pillows at Tounza and Tichki are used to validate the model’s physical performance in terms of energy and water balances for a sequence of two snowfall events in the winter of 2003/4. First UEB modelling results show good overall performance and timing of snowmelt and sublimation compared to field investigations. Up to 44% of snow ablation is

  18. Sublimating grains in the coma of new comets originating from the Oort Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Tozzi, G.; Brucato, J.; Bruni, I.; Licandro, J.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Meech, K.; Mottola, S.

    2014-07-01

    It is expected that a billion of years of space weathering (see, e.g., Kanuchova et al., 2012, Icarus, 221, 12) produces a crust of organic matter that will be released when a comet enters, for the first time, in the inner Solar System. When approaching to the Sun, a comet is at heliocentric distances r_h greater than 3 au, the sublimation of CO and CO_2 is the main source of cometary activity. At shorter distances, the sublimation of water becomes the most important mechanism of activity. The gases escaping from the nucleus cause drag for the coma grains that can be refractory dust (silicates, carbon), water ice, and/or organic ices. Oort comets at their first passage in the inner Solar System, should produce an halo of organic or water ice particles. Recently, our group started to monitor new, inbound, bright Oort comets (C/2011 F1, C/2012 S1, C/2012 K1, C/2013 V5, C/2012 F3) to search for these grains. The method consists of detecting the cloud of sublimating grains in the inner coma by using the ΣAf(ρ) function (Tozzi et al., 2007, A&A, 476, 979). However, this over-population of grains, beside the sublimation, can be also due to short-time activity (outburst) or too large grains expanding at very slow velocity, as it has been found in comet 67P/C-G (Tozzi et al., 2011, A&A, 531, 54). To discriminate between the phenomena, it is necessary to monitor the comet both at short timescales for the outbursts (by repeating the observations after a few nights), and in a longer term (weeks to months). If the cloud does not expand with decreasing heliocentric distance, there is a high probability that organic and/or water-ice grains are present. We can discriminate between organic and water-ice grains by measuring their color and spectra. In this work, we will present the results obtained from the observations of C/2011 F1 (LINEAR) and C/2012 S1 (ISON). The comparison between data and theoretical simulations, obtained with a simple model assuming sublimating grains

  19. Laboratory experiments to explore the sediment transport capacity of carbon dioxide sublimation under martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvest, Matthew; Conway, Susan; Patel, Manish; Dixon, John; Barnes, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Every spring, the solid carbon dioxide deposited over the martian high latitudes sublimates. Several, unusual surface features, including dark spots and flows on sand dunes, as well as recent activity in martian gullies, have been associated with this CO2 sublimation. Water and/or brines have also been proposed as potential agents for these events, but the timing of these phenomena suggest CO2 sublimation is more likely. However, the exact mechanism by which CO2 sublimation moves sediment is not fully understood, and this understanding is required to validate the CO2 hypothesis. Here we present the results of the first ever laboratory simulations of this process under martian conditions, and show that significant quantities of loose sediment can be transported. The centrepiece of the apparatus is a 1m diameter, 2m long Mars simulation chamber, housed at The Open University, UK. JSC Mars-1A regolith simulant was formed into a slope, inside a box, ~30 cm long, 23 cm wide by 12 cm deep. The box is constructed of coiled, copper tubing to allow cooling of the regolith by liquid nitrogen. The experimental procedure consists of four stages: 1) establishment of a dry atmosphere in the chamber, 2) cooling the regolith sufficiently to support condensation of CO2 frost at reduced pressure, 3) introduction of cooled CO2 gas above the regolith to deposit as frost, and 4) video recording the surface evolution under radiant heating (~100 mins). Two High Definition digital video cameras were mounted above the box and image pairs taken from the videos were then used to create digital elevation models (DEMs) in Agisoft Photoscan at regular intervals. In our initial experiments we performed four experimental runs where the slope was set at or near the angle of repose (~30°). In each case we observed mass wasting events triggered by the sublimation of the deposited CO2 over the whole duration of the insolation. The highest levels of activity occurred in the first third of the run

  20. Carbon deposition characteristics of LO2/HC propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Rosemary; Mercer, Steve D.

    1987-01-01

    The generation and deposition of carbon have been studied using subscale hardware with LO2/RP-1, LO2/propane, and LO2/methane at low mixture ratio conditions. The deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60, and at chamber pressures from 720 to 1650 psia. The carbon-deposition rate is a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. There is a mixture ratio that will minimize deposition for LO2/RP-1; a threshold mixture ratio for LO2/propane; and no deposition for LO2/methane at any mixture ratio tested. The turbine drive operating limits were defined for each fuel tested.

  1. Time Variability of the Dust Sublimation Zones in Pre-Main Sequence Disk Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Carpenter, W. J.; Grady, C. A.; Russel, R. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Rudy, R. J.; Mazuk, S. M.; Venturini, C. C.; Kimes, R. L.; Beerman, L. C.; Ablordeppey, K. E.; Puetter, R. C.; Wisnewski, P.; Brafford, S. M.; Polomski, E. R.; Hammel, H. B.; Perry, R. B.; Wilde, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The dust sublimation zone (DSZ) is the region of pre-main sequence (PMS) disks where dust grains most easily anneal, sublime, and condense out of the gas. Because of this, it is a location where crystalline material may be enhanced and redistributed throughout the rest of the disk. A decade-long program to monitor the thermal emission of the grains located in this region demonstrates that large changes in emitted flux occur in many systems. Changes in the thermal emission between 3 and 13.5 microns were observed in HD 31648 (MWC 480), HD 163296 (MWC 275), and DG Tau. This emission is consistent with it being produced at the DSZ, where the transition from a disk of gas to one of gas+dust occurs. In the case of DG Tau, the outbursts were accompanied by increased emission on the 10 micron silicate band on one occasion, while on another occasion it went into absorption. This requires lofting of the material above the disk into the line of sight. Such changes will affect the determination of the inner disk structure obtained through interferometry measurements, and this has been confirmed in the case of HD 163296. Cyclic variations in the heating of the DSZ will lead to the annealing of large grains, the sublimation of smaller grains, possibly followed by re-condensation as the zone enters a cooling phase. Lofting of dust above the disk plane, and outward acceleration by stellar winds and radiation pressure, can re-distribute the processed material to cooler regions of the disk, where cometesimals form. This processing is consistent with the detection of the preferential concentration of large crystalline grains in the inner few AU of PMS disks using interferometric spectroscopy with the VLTI.

  2. Measuring Enthalpy of Sublimation of Volatiles by Means of Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, Fabrizio; Palomba, Ernesto; Longobardo, Andrea; Zampetti, Emiliano

    2016-09-01

    Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances (PCM's) are widely used to study the chemical processes involving volatile compounds in any environment, such as condensation process. Since PCM's are miniaturized sensor, they are very suitable for planetary in situ missions, where can be used to detect and to measure the mass amount of astrobiologically significant compounds, such as water and organics. This work focuses on the realization and testing of a new experimental setup, able to characterize volatiles which can be found in a planetary environment. In particular the enthalpy of sublimation of some dicarboxylic acids has been measured. The importance of dicarboxylic acids in planetology and astrobiology is due to the fact that they have been detected in carbonaceous chondritic material (e.g. Murchinson), among the most pristine material present in our Solar System. In this work, a sample of acid was heated in an effusion cell up to its sublimation. For a set of temperatures (from 30 °C to 75 °C), the deposition rate on the PCM surface has been measured. From these measurements, it has been possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of Adipic acid, i.e. ΔH = 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ/mol and Succinic acid, i.e. ΔH = 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ/mol. This technique has so demonstrated to be a good choice to recognise a single compound or a mixture (with an analysis upstream) even if some improvements concerning the thermal stabilization of the system will be implemented in order to enhance the results' accuracy. The experiment has been performed in support of the VISTA (Volatile In Situ Thermogravimetry Analyzer) project, which is included in the scientific payload of the ESA MarcoPolo-R mission study.

  3. Dynamical screening of van der Waals interactions in nanostructured solids: Sublimation of fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianmin; Yang, Jing; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2015-04-01

    Sublimation energy is one of the most important properties of molecular crystals, but it is difficult to study, because the attractive long-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction plays an important role. Here, we apply efficient semilocal density functional theory (DFT), corrected with the dynamically screened vdW interaction (DFT + vdW), the Rutgers-Chalmers nonlocal vdW-DF, and the pairwise-based dispersion-corrected DFT-D2 developed by Grimme and co-workers, to study the sublimation of fullerenes. We find that the short-range part, which accounts for the interaction due to the orbital overlap between fullerenes, is negligibly small. Our calculation shows that there exists a strong screening effect on the vdW interaction arising from the valence electrons of fullerenes. On the other hand, higher-order contributions can be as important as the leading-order term. The reasons are that (i) the surface of fullerene molecules is metallic and thus highly polarizable, (ii) the band gap of fullerene solids is small (less than 2 eV), and (iii) fullerene molecules in the solid phase are so densely packed, yielding the high valence electron density and small equilibrium intermolecular distances (the first nearest neighbor distance is only about 10 Å for C60). However, these two effects make opposite contributions, leading to significant error cancellation between these two contributions. We demonstrate that, by considering higher-order contributions and the dynamical screening, the DFT + vdW method can yield sublimation energies of fullerenes in good agreement with reference values, followed by vdW-DF and DFT-D2. The insights from this study are important for a better understanding of the long-range nature of vdW interactions in nanostructured solids.

  4. Measuring Enthalpy of Sublimation of Volatiles by Means of Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances.

    PubMed

    Dirri, Fabrizio; Palomba, Ernesto; Longobardo, Andrea; Zampetti, Emiliano

    2016-09-15

    Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances (PCM's) are widely used to study the chemical processes involving volatile compounds in any environment, such as condensation process. Since PCM's are miniaturized sensor, they are very suitable for planetary in situ missions, where can be used to detect and to measure the mass amount of astrobiologically significant compounds, such as water and organics. This work focuses on the realization and testing of a new experimental setup, able to characterize volatiles which can be found in a planetary environment. In particular the enthalpy of sublimation of some dicarboxylic acids has been measured. The importance of dicarboxylic acids in planetology and astrobiology is due to the fact that they have been detected in carbonaceous chondritic material (e.g. Murchinson), among the most pristine material present in our Solar System. In this work, a sample of acid was heated in an effusion cell up to its sublimation. For a set of temperatures (from 30 °C to 75 °C), the deposition rate on the PCM surface has been measured. From these measurements, it has been possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of Adipic acid, i.e. ΔH = 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ/mol and Succinic acid, i.e. ΔH = 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ/mol. This technique has so demonstrated to be a good choice to recognise a single compound or a mixture (with an analysis upstream) even if some improvements concerning the thermal stabilization of the system will be implemented in order to enhance the results' accuracy. The experiment has been performed in support of the VISTA (Volatile In Situ Thermogravimetry Analyzer) project, which is included in the scientific payload of the ESA MarcoPolo-R mission study.

  5. Piezoelectric crystal microbalance measurements of enthalpy of sublimation of C2-C9 dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Zampetti, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present here a novel experimental set-up that is able to measure the enthalpy of sublimation of a given compound by means of piezoelectric crystal microbalances (PCMs). The PCM sensors have already been used for space measurements, such as for the detection of organic and non-organic volatile species and refractory materials in planetary environments. In Earth atmospherics applications, PCMs can be also used to obtain some physical-chemical processes concerning the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in atmospheric environments. The experimental set-up has been developed and tested on dicarboxylic acids. In this work, a temperature-controlled effusion cell was used to sublimate VOC, creating a molecular flux that was collimated onto a cold PCM. The VOC recondensed onto the PCM quartz crystal, allowing the determination of the deposition rate. From the measurements of deposition rates, it has been possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of adipic acid, i.e. ΔHsub : 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1, succinic acid, i.e. 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ mol-1, oxalic acid, i.e. 62.5 ± 3.1 kJ mol-1, and azelaic acid, i.e. 124.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol-1. The results obtained show an accuracy of 1 % for succinic, adipic, and azelaic acid and within 5 % for oxalic acid and are in very good agreement with previous works (within 6 % for adipic, succinic, and oxalic acid and within 11 % or larger for azelaic acid).

  6. Piezoelectric crystal microbalance measurements of enthalpy of sublimation of C2-C9 dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Zampetti, E.

    2015-07-01

    We present here a novel experimental setup able to measure the enthalpy of sublimation of a given compound by means of Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances (PCM). This experiment was performed in the TG-Lab facility in IAPS-INAF, dedicated to the development of TGA sensors for space measurements, such as detection of organic and non-organic volatile species and refractory materials in planetary environments. In order to study physical-chemical processes concerning the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) present in atmospheric environments, the setup has been tested on Dicarboxylic acids. Acids with low molecular weight are among the components of organic fraction of particulate matter in the atmosphere, coming from different sources (biogenic and anthropogenic). Considering their relative abundance, it is useful to consider Dicarboxylic acid as "markers" to define the biogenic or anthropogenic origin of the aerosol, thus obtaining some information of the emission sources. In this work, a temperature controlled effusion cell was used to sublimate VOC, creating a molecular flux that was collimated onto a cold PCM. The VOC re-condensed onto the PCM quartz crystal allowing the determination of the deposition rate. From the measurements of deposition rates, it was possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of Adipic acid, i.e. Δ Hsub: 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1, Succinic acid, i.e. 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ mol-1, Oxalic acid, i.e. 62.5 ± 3.1 kJ mol-1 and Azelaic acid, i.e. 124.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol-1 (weight average values). The results obtained are in very good agreement with literature within 10 % for the Adipic, Succinic and Oxalic acid.

  7. Sublimation-driven erosion on Hyperion: Topographic analysis and landform simulation model tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Schenk, Paul M.; White, Oliver L.; Spencer, John

    2012-07-01

    The unique appearance of Hyperion can be explained in part by the loss to space of ballistic ejecta during impact events, as was proposed by Thomas et al. (Thomas, P.C. et al. [2007a]. Icarus 190, 573-584). We conclude that such loss is a partial explanation, accounting for the lack of appreciable intercrater plains on a saturation-cratered surface. In order to create the smooth surfaces and the reticulate, honeycomb pattern of narrow divides between old craters, appreciable subsequent modification of crater morphology must occur through mass-wasting processes accompanied by sublimation, probably facilitated by the loss of CO2 as a component of the relief-supporting matrix of the bedrock. During early stages of crater degradation, steep, crenulate bedrock slopes occupy the upper crater walls with abrupt transitions downslope onto smooth slopes near the angle of repose mantled by mass wasting debris, as can be seen within young craters. Long-continued mass wasting eventually results in slopes totally mantled with particulate debris. This mass wasting effectively destroys small craters, at least in part accounting for the paucity of sub-kilometer craters on Hyperion. Surface temperatures measured by Cassini CIRS range from 58 K to 127 K and imply a surface thermal inertia of 11 ± 2 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 and bolometric albedo ranging from 0.05 to 0.33. Resulting H2O sublimation rates are only tens of cm per billion years for most of the surface, so the evolution of the observed landforms is likely to require sublimation of more volatile species such as CO2.

  8. Large area and structured epitaxial graphene produced by confinement controlled sublimation of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    de Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Ruan, Ming; Sprinkle, Mike; Li, Xuebin; Hu, Yike; Zhang, Baiqian; Hankinson, John; Conrad, Edward

    2011-10-11

    After the pioneering investigations into graphene-based electronics at Georgia Tech, great strides have been made developing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide (EG) as a new electronic material. EG has not only demonstrated its potential for large scale applications, it also has become an important material for fundamental two-dimensional electron gas physics. It was long known that graphene mono and multilayers grow on SiC crystals at high temperatures in ultrahigh vacuum. At these temperatures, silicon sublimes from the surface and the carbon rich surface layer transforms to graphene. However the quality of the graphene produced in ultrahigh vacuum is poor due to the high sublimation rates at relatively low temperatures. The Georgia Tech team developed growth methods involving encapsulating the SiC crystals in graphite enclosures, thereby sequestering the evaporated silicon and bringing growth process closer to equilibrium. In this confinement controlled sublimation (CCS) process, very high-quality graphene is grown on both polar faces of the SiC crystals. Since 2003, over 50 publications used CCS grown graphene, where it is known as the "furnace grown" graphene. Graphene multilayers grown on the carbon-terminated face of SiC, using the CCS method, were shown to consist of decoupled high mobility graphene layers. The CCS method is now applied on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce high mobility nano-patterned graphene structures thereby demonstrating that EG is a viable contender for next-generation electronics. Here we present for the first time the CCS method that outperforms other epitaxial graphene production methods.

  9. Dynamical screening of van der Waals interactions in nanostructured solids: Sublimation of fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Jianmin; Yang, Jing; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2015-04-28

    Sublimation energy is one of the most important properties of molecular crystals, but it is difficult to study, because the attractive long-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction plays an important role. Here, we apply efficient semilocal density functional theory (DFT), corrected with the dynamically screened vdW interaction (DFT + vdW), the Rutgers-Chalmers nonlocal vdW-DF, and the pairwise-based dispersion-corrected DFT-D2 developed by Grimme and co-workers, to study the sublimation of fullerenes. We find that the short-range part, which accounts for the interaction due to the orbital overlap between fullerenes, is negligibly small. Our calculation shows that there exists a strong screening effect on the vdW interaction arising from the valence electrons of fullerenes. On the other hand, higher-order contributions can be as important as the leading-order term. The reasons are that (i) the surface of fullerene molecules is metallic and thus highly polarizable, (ii) the band gap of fullerene solids is small (less than 2 eV), and (iii) fullerene molecules in the solid phase are so densely packed, yielding the high valence electron density and small equilibrium intermolecular distances (the first nearest neighbor distance is only about 10 Å for C{sub 60}). However, these two effects make opposite contributions, leading to significant error cancellation between these two contributions. We demonstrate that, by considering higher-order contributions and the dynamical screening, the DFT + vdW method can yield sublimation energies of fullerenes in good agreement with reference values, followed by vdW-DF and DFT-D2. The insights from this study are important for a better understanding of the long-range nature of vdW interactions in nanostructured solids.

  10. Large area and structured epitaxial graphene produced by confinement controlled sublimation of silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire; Ruan, Ming; Sprinkle, Mike; Li, Xuebin; Hu, Yike; Zhang, Baiqian; Hankinson, John; Conrad, Edward

    2011-01-01

    After the pioneering investigations into graphene-based electronics at Georgia Tech, great strides have been made developing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide (EG) as a new electronic material. EG has not only demonstrated its potential for large scale applications, it also has become an important material for fundamental two-dimensional electron gas physics. It was long known that graphene mono and multilayers grow on SiC crystals at high temperatures in ultrahigh vacuum. At these temperatures, silicon sublimes from the surface and the carbon rich surface layer transforms to graphene. However the quality of the graphene produced in ultrahigh vacuum is poor due to the high sublimation rates at relatively low temperatures. The Georgia Tech team developed growth methods involving encapsulating the SiC crystals in graphite enclosures, thereby sequestering the evaporated silicon and bringing growth process closer to equilibrium. In this confinement controlled sublimation (CCS) process, very high-quality graphene is grown on both polar faces of the SiC crystals. Since 2003, over 50 publications used CCS grown graphene, where it is known as the “furnace grown” graphene. Graphene multilayers grown on the carbon-terminated face of SiC, using the CCS method, were shown to consist of decoupled high mobility graphene layers. The CCS method is now applied on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce high mobility nano-patterned graphene structures thereby demonstrating that EG is a viable contender for next-generation electronics. Here we present for the first time the CCS method that outperforms other epitaxial graphene production methods. PMID:21960446

  11. A Novel, Sublimation-Driven YORP-like Effect, and The Formation of Dust Striae in Cometary Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, Jordan; Jacobson, Seth A.

    2014-11-01

    The dust tails of some great comets exhibit linear dust features that align with the Sun (striae). Striae are thought to form from icy chunks of dust ejected from the nucleus that are delayed in time before fragmenting [1]. Models show that striae formation is best fit through a mechanism of continuous fragmentation [2], but the physical mechanism responsible for this delayed fragmentation is unknown. We propose that striae form through a novel rotational fragmentation mechanism driven by the sublimation of volatile ices present in the ejected chunk.We note that sublimating gas molecules scatter off of the surface of a non-specular material similarly to photons (i.e. Lambertian scattering), however gas molecules carry significantly more momentum. By comparing the momentum flux from a sublimating gas with solar radiation pressure, we are able to scale the YORP timescale [3] to derive its sublimation-driven equivalent. We find that this Sublimative YORP-like timescale is significantly shorter than the YORP timescales by 4-5 orders of magnitude for H2O sublimation.We apply this mechanism to Comet West, which exhibited prominent striae in its dust tail. For ejected dust clumps to drift behind the nucleus to form the observed dust striae near 0.4 AU, [1] estimated the β-parameter of the chunks (ratio of solar radiation to solar gravitational forces) to be between 0.6 and 2.4. We equate this to a new parameter βsub (the ratio of dynamic sublimation to solar gravitational forces), which corresponds to icy chunks with radii of 5-20 cm, consistent with chunks ejected from Comet Wild 2 [4]. The sublimation-driven YORP timescales for chunks of this size is 1-3 hours, which allows for a cascade of rotational spin-up and fragmentation of daughter chunks to occur within the ~50-85 hour delay [1] between chunk ejection and striae formation. Thus, Comet West’s dust tail striae are consistent with this novel rotational fragmentation mechanism, which is driven by the sublimation

  12. Modeling of Sublimation-Driven Erosion and Ice Pinnacle Formation on Callisto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Oliver; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2014-11-01

    Most of the areas observed at high resolution on the Galilean satellite Callisto have a morphology that implies sublimation-driven landform modification and mass wasting is at work [Moore et al., 1999]. These areas comprise rolling dark plains with interspersed bright pinnacles. Howard and Moore [2008], using the MARSSIM landform evolution model, simulated evolution of this landscape as a combination of bedrock volatile sublimation, mass wasting of the dark, non-coherent residue, and redeposition of ice at high-elevation cold traps sheltered from thermal re-radiation to form the pinnacles.The goal of our study is to further investigate the details of pinnacle formation by refining this model, and by constraining values for the variable environmental parameters within the model such that they are consistent with the current understanding of Callisto’s surface environment. We present the results of the updated model and our experimentation with varying key parameters.Our refinement of the model has caused us to revise the result of Howard and Moore [2008] that the pinnacles represent an ice cover of several tens to hundreds of meters. Instead, our results indicate an ice coverage reaching several meters at most, a figure that is consistent with the prediction of Moore et al. [2004]. We have also modified the model such that ice contained within the pinnacles is now subject to sublimation itself.Using Fick’s Law to solve for the diffusive transport rate between a volatile table and an atmosphere [Moore et al., 1996], we have determined that the loss rate of H2O ice from the volatile-refractory bedrock through sublimation is too slow 10-20 kg m-2 s-1) to account for the formation of the ice pinnacles, and that a volatile mixture that contains H2O ice is necessary to facilitate its loss. We find that CO2 hydrate fulfills this role well: loss rates of CO2●6H2O 10-10 kg m-2 s-1) are sufficient to produce deposited ice thicknesses reaching several meters, with the

  13. Search of the Na in the Region of the Sublimation of the Near-Sun Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delone, A. B.; Divlekeev, M. I.; Suchanov, E. A.; Gulyaev, R. A.; Yakunina, G. V.; Porfir'eva, G. A.

    An evaluation of the Na number in the sublimation zone of the near-Sun interplanetary dust, based on a comparison with the intensity of the radiation of the Na in the Earth atmosphere, has been obtained. The abundance of the Na in the column along the line of sight is less than 2 x 108atom cm-2. This result is compared with the values, determined on the base of the brightness of the zodiacal light, F-corona and by direct measurements of the dust density with space experiments.

  14. The number of sodium atoms in the region of circumsolar sublimation of interplanetary dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delone, A. B.; Divlekeev, M. I.; Sukhanov, E. A.; Gulyaev, R. A.; Yakunina, G. V.; Porfir'eva, G. A.

    2008-02-01

    Sodium emission fromthe zone of circumsolar sublimation of interplanetary dust was searched for during the total solar eclipse of March 29, 2006, using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and interference filter transmitting at 590 nm. The upper limit for the column density sodium atoms is 2 × 108 atoms/cm2, is based on the comparison with the atmospheric sodium emission. This result is compared with the brightness of the zodiacal light and F-corona, as well as the dust density directly measured onboard spacecraft.

  15. The Anomalous Drift of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) due to Sublimating Volatiles near Perihelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, J. K.; Keane, J. V.; Milam, S.; Coulson, I.; Knight, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Prior to perihelion passage on 28 November 2013, the observed right ascension (RA) and declination (Dec) coordinates of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) significantly lagged the predicted JPL (# 53) ephemeris. We show that this "braking effect" is due to a dynamic pressure exerted by sublimating gases on the sunward side of the nucleus [1]. Comet ISON was observed November 23 through November 28 using the SCUBA-2 sub-millimeter camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Imaging is achieved simultaneously at wavelengths of 850 μm and 450 μm, with RA and Dec determined from the central peak in the coma brightness [2]. When comet ISON was first detected at 850 μm, the 1-mm-sized dust particles were tightly bound to the comet nucleus until at least November 23. Three days later, the dust was less tightly bound, elongated and diffuse, spread out over as much as 120 arc seconds (80,000 km) in the anti-solar direction, suggesting a fragmentation event. We compute the average braking velocity of the nucleus of comet ISON by first measuring the distance between the central RA position and the predicted JPL ephemeris. We then calculate the change in this distance between subsequent observations, and divide this value by the elapsed time between the two observations to yield an average drift velocity of the nucleus over this time interval. We assume that comet ISON, like a number of Jupiter Family Comets visited by spacecraft [3], has low thermal inertia. Thus, the sublimating gases are emitted predominantly on the sunward side of the nucleus. Additionally, we assume that water ice dominates the sublimating gases [4]. We then calculate the pressure on the surface of the nucleus due to the emitted gases using the procedure described in [1]. We match the average drift velocity of the nucleus due to this sublimation pressure with the observed average drift velocity from the JCMT observations, which is sensitive to the size of the body, allowing us to estimate the size of the

  16. A process simulator/trainer for the process inventory control system 20-MW freezer/sublimer

    SciTech Connect

    Tapp, P.A.; Carnal, C.L.; Wells, J.C.; Belcher, J.D.; Gibson, F.R.; Ruppel, F.R.

    1991-05-01

    This report describes the development of a process simulator/trainer for the Process Inventory Control System project. The main objective of this work was to build a plant simulator that accepts control signals from the Texas Instruments D/3 distributed control system and produces plant signals to mimic the behavior of a 20-MW freezer/sublimer unit. The simulator/trainer will be used as a surrogate plant to debug control system hardware/software and to train operators to use the new D/3 distributed control system without disturbing the processing of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. 4 refs., 28 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Sublime Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girod, Mark

    2007-01-01

    One of the shortcomings in most efforts to integrate art and science is that many people have a shallow understanding of art, which inevitably leads to shallow connections between art and science. Coloring drawings of planets, building sculptures of volcanoes, and decorating scientific diagrams are fine activities, but they do not link science and…

  18. Results for p-shell nuclei at LO, NLO, and N2LO in chiral EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, Pieter; Vary, James

    2016-09-01

    We present results for p-shell nuclei using interactions derived from chiral effective field theory up to N2LO. The many-body calculations are performed order-by-order in the chiral expansion. We show the dependence of the ground state energies on the chiral order; we also present excitation energies of narrow excited states and other observables such as magnetic and quadrupole moments of selected ground states. We discuss both the theoretical uncertainties due to the truncation of the chiral expansion, as well as the numerical uncertainties associated with the many-body method. Supported by the US DOE Grants DESC0008485 (SciDAC/NUCLEI) and DE-FG02-87ER40371. Computational resources provided by NERSC, supported under US DOE Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231, and by the ALCF, supported under US DOE Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  19. Salicylamide cocrystals: screening, crystal structure, sublimation thermodynamics, dissolution, and solid-state DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Manin, Alex N; Voronin, Alexander P; Manin, Nikolay G; Vener, Mikhail V; Shishkina, Anastasia V; Lermontov, Anatoly S; Perlovich, German L

    2014-06-19

    A new cocrystal of 2-hydroxybenzamide (A) with 4-acetamidobenzoic acid (B) has been obtained by the DSC screening method. Thermophysical analysis of the aggregate [A:B] has been conducted and a fusion diagram has been plotted. Cocrystal formation from melts was studied by using thermomicroscopy. A cocrystal single-crystal was grown and its crystal structure was determined. The pattern of noncovalent interactions has been quantified using the solid-state DFT computations coupled with the Bader analysis of the periodic electron density. The sublimation processes of A-B cocrystal have been studied and its thermodynamic functions have been calculated. The classical method of substance transfer by inert gas-carrier was chosen to investigate sublimation processes experimentally. The lattice energy is found to be 143 ± 4 kJ/mol. It is lower than the sum of the corresponding values of the cocrystal pure components. The theoretical value of the lattice energy, 156 kJ/mol, is in reasonable agreement with the experimental one. A ternary phase diagram of solubility (A-B-ethanol) has been plotted and the areas with solutions for growing thermodynamically stable cocrystals have been determined.

  20. Formation of gullies on Mars by debris flows triggered by CO2 sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilorget, C.; Forget, F.

    2016-01-01

    Martian gully landforms resemble terrestrial debris flows formed by the action of liquid water and have thus been interpreted as evidence for potential habitable environments on Mars within the past few millennia. However, ongoing gully formation has been detected under surface conditions much too cold for liquid water, but at times in the martian year when a thin layer of seasonal CO2 frost is present and defrosting above the regolith. These observations suggest that the CO2 condensation-sublimation cycle could play a role in gully formation. Here we use a thermo-physical numerical model of the martian regolith underlying a CO2 ice layer and atmosphere to show that the pores beneath the ice layer can be filled with CO2 ice and subjected to extreme pressure variations during the defrosting season. The subsequent gas fluxes can destabilize the regolith material and induce gas-lubricated debris flows with geomorphic characteristics similar to martian gullies. Moreover, we find that subsurface CO2 ice condensation, sublimation and pressurization occurs at conditions found at latitudes and slope orientations where gullies are observed. We conclude that martian gullies can result from geologic dry ice processes that have no terrestrial analogues and do not require liquid water. Such dry ice processes may have helped shape the evolution of landforms elsewhere on the martian surface.

  1. Sublimator Driven Coldplate Engineering Development Unit Test Results and Development of Second Generation SDC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Ryan A.; Sheth, Rubik B.

    2009-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially increasing reliability and reducing complexity while saving both mass and power. Furthermore, the Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate (ISDC) concept couples a coolant loop with the previously described SDC hardware. This combination allows the SDC to be used as a traditional coldplate during long mission phases. The previously developed SDC technology cannot be used for long mission phases due to the fact that it requires a consumable feedwater for heat rejection. Adding a coolant loop also provides for dissimilar redundancy on the Altair Lander ascent module thermal control system, which is the target application for this technology. Tests were performed on an Engineering Development Unit at NASA s Johnson Space Center to quantify and assess the performance of the SDC. Correlated thermal math models were developed to help explain the test data. The paper also outlines the preliminary results of an ISDC concept being developed.

  2. Formulation and evaluation of fast dissolving tablets of cinnarizine using superdisintegrant blends and subliming material

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Biswajit; Bagadiya, Abhishek; Makwana, Sagar; Vipul, Vora; Batt, Devraj; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablet of cinnarizine. A combination of super disintegrants, i.e., sodium starch glycolate (SSG) and crosscarmellose sodium (CCS) were used along with camphor as a subliming material. An optimized concentration of camphor was added to aid the porosity of the tablet. A 32 full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: Amount of SSG and CCS. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was performed to identify the physicochemical interaction between drug and polymer. IR spectroscopy showed that there is no interaction of drug with polymer. In the present study, direct compression was used to prepare the tablets. The powder mixtures were compressed into tablet using flat face multi punch tablet machine. Camphor was sublimed from the tablet by exposing the tablet to vacuum drier at 60°C for 12 hours. All the formulations were evaluated for their characteristics such as average weight, hardness, wetting time, friability, content uniformity, dispersion time (DT), and dissolution rate. An optimized tablet formulation (F 9) was found to have good hardness of 3.30 ± 0.10 kg/cm2, wetting time of 42.33 ± 4.04 seconds, DT of 34.67 ± 1.53 seconds, and cumulative drug release of not less than 99% in 16 minutes. PMID:22247895

  3. [Research on the polycrystalline CdS thin films prepared by close-spaced sublimation].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ding-Yu; Xia, Geng-Pei; Zheng, Jia-Gui; Feng, Liang-Huan; Cai, Ya-Ping

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, the factors of influence on the deposition rate of CdS films prepared by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) were first studied systematically, and it was found from the experiments that the deposition rate increased with the raised temperature of sublimation source, while decreased with the raised substrate temperature and the deposition pressure. The structure, morphology and light transmittance of the prepared samples were tested subsequently, and the results show: (1) The CdS films deposited under different oxygen partial pressure all present predominating growth lattice orientation (103), and further more the films will be strengthened after annealed under CdCl2 atmosphere. (2) The AFM images of CdS show that the films are compact and uniform in grain diameter, and the grain size becomes larger with the increased substrate temperature. Along with it, the film roughness was also augmented. (3) The transmittance in the shortwave region of visible light through the CdS films would be enhanced when its thickness is reduced, and that will help improve the shortwave spectral response of CdTe solar cells. Finally, the prepared CdS films were employed to fabricate CdTe solar cells, which have achieved a conversion efficiency of 10.29%, and thus the feasibility of CSS process in the manufacture of CdTe solar cells was validated primarily.

  4. EVOLUTION OF SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF ICY GRAINS BY SUBLIMATION AND CONDENSATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroiwa, Takuto; Sirono, Sin-iti

    2011-09-20

    In the outer part of a protoplanetary disk, dust grains consist of silicate core covered by an ice mantle. A temporal heating event in the disk results in sublimation of the ice mantle. After the end of the heating event, as the temperature decreases, H{sub 2}O molecules recondense on the surface of the dust grain. Ultimately, the dust grain is covered by an ice mantle. Because the equilibrium vapor pressure on the grain surface decreases with the grain size, a large grain grows faster than a small grain. As a result, the size of an icy dust grain changes as a result of the heating event. The change in size also affects the mechanical properties of the dust aggregates formed by the icy grains. In this paper, we investigated the evolution of the size distribution of icy dust grains during sublimation and condensation. We found that the size evolution of icy grains can be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the icy grains grow through condensation of H{sub 2}O molecules. In the second stage, the size of grains changes further as H{sub 2}O molecules are transferred between icy grains while the surrounding gas condenses. The size distribution of the icy dust grains becomes bimodal, with a small number of relatively large grains and many small grains without an icy mantle. Possible effects of the size change on the evolution of icy dust aggregates are discussed.

  5. THE EFFECTS ON BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS OF FREEZING AND DRYING BY VACUUM SUBLIMATION

    PubMed Central

    Greiff, Donald; Blumenthal, Herman; Chiga, Masahiro; Pinkerton, Henry

    1954-01-01

    The infectivity titre of influenza virus-infected allantoic fluid was determined after a variety of procedures involving cyclic slow freezing and thawing, freezing at various rates with subsequent storage at different temperatures freezing at various rates with subsequent dehydration at various temperatures, and different degrees of dehydration. All these factors were found to influence the survival rate of the virus particles. Five freeze-thaw cycles resulted in a fall in titre from 10–8.6 to 10–0.8 cycles 2, 3, and 4 causing much greater losses than cycles 1 and 5. Rapid cooling to –40°C. or slow cooling to –80 or 190°C. did not cause significant titre loss, but rapid cooling to temperatures above –40° or slow cooling to temperatures above –80°C. caused definite titre loss. Loss of titre on storage occurred only at temperatures above –40deg;C. The effect of lyophilization depends both on the preliminary treatment and on the dehydration temperature. Better conservation of titre was obtained after preliminary cooling to –190 or –80°C. than after preliminary cooling to higher temperatures. The most effective sublimation temperatures were 0 and –80°.; the least effective was +20°C. Titre losses in suspensions sublimated at –10, –30, and –60°C. were in general intermediate. No loss in titre occurred after preliminary cooling to –80 or –190°C. and subsequent dehydration at –80 or 0°C. The degree of dehydration definitely affects the survival of virus on storage at 0°C., but sublimation for 4 hours at 0°C. gave complete protection against titre loss on storage at this temperature. Possible explanations of the observations made are suggested, based on known physiochemical phenomena such as supercooling, vitrification, variations in size and shape of ice crystals with different freezing speeds, differential enzyme inactivation, changes in salt concentration, and changes in energy levels. PMID:13163341

  6. LoFASM's FPGA-based Digital Acquisition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartez, Louis P.; Jenet, F.; Creighton, T. D.; Ford, A. J.; Hicks, B.; Hinojosa, J.; Kassim, N. E.; Price, R. H.; Stovall, K.; Ray, P. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 10 to 88 MHz. LoFASM consists of antennas and front end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of 4 stations, each consisting of 12 dual-polarization dipole antenna stands. The primary science goals of LoFASM will be the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients, a high priority science goal as deemed by the National Research Council's decadal survey. The data acquisition system for the LoFASM antenna array will be using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology to implement a real time full Stokes spectrometer and data recorder. This poster presents an overview of the current design and digital architecture of a single station of the LoFASM array as well as the status of the entire project.

  7. Testing and Model Correlation of Sublimator Driven Coldplate Coupons and EDU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2009-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a more traditional thermal control system. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially saving mass, power, and complexity. Because this concept relies on evaporative heat rejection techniques, it is primarily useful for short mission durations. Additionally, the concept requires a conductive path between the heat-generating component and the heat rejection device. Therefore, it is mostly a relevant solution for a vehicle with a relatively low heat rejection requirement and/or short transport distances. Tests were performed on coupons and an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) at NASA s Johnson Space Center to better understand the basic operational principles and to validate the analytical methods being used for the SDC development. This paper outlines the results of the SDC tests, the subsequent thermal model correlation, and a description of the SDC Engineering Development Unit test results.

  8. Formation of the molecular crystal structure during the vacuum sublimation of paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.; Bordei, N. S.

    2015-04-01

    The results from structural and thermal studies on the formation of molecular crystals during the vacuum sublimation of paracetamol from its vapor phase are given. It is established that the vapor-crystal phase transition proceeds in a complicated way as the superposition of two phase transitions: a first-order phase transition with a change in density, and a second-order phase transition with a change in ordering. It is shown that the latter is a smeared phase transition that proceeds with the formation of a pretransitional phase that is irreversibly dissipated during phase transformation, leading to the formation of crystals of the rhombic syngony. Data from differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis are presented along with microphotographs.

  9. Switchover software reliability estimate for Paducah Freezer/Sublimer computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, D.M.; Davis, J.N.

    1993-04-01

    K-25 Engineering Division purchased a series of redundant computer systems and developed software for the purpose of providing continuous process monitoring and control for the Freezer/Sublimer equipment in the gaseous diffusion process at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The application software is loaded on two central processing units (CPU) so that in the event of a failure of the primary unit, the processing can switch to the backup unit and continue processing without error. It is the purpose of this document to demonstrate the reliability of this system with respect to its ability to switch properly between redundant CPU. The total reliability estimation problem -- which considers the computer hardware, the operating system software, and the application software -- has been reduced to one that considers only the application software directly involved in the switchover process. Estimates are provided for software reliability and the testing coverage. Software and hardware reliability models and reliability growth models are considered in addition to Bayesian approaches.

  10. Latent fingermark visualisation using reduced-pressure sublimation of copper phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geraint; ap Llwyd Dafydd, Hefin; Watts, Alun; McMurray, Neil

    2011-01-30

    The sublimation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) at a temperature of 400°C under conditions of reduced pressure is shown to be an effective method of developing latent fingermarks on certain types of surface. Preliminary experiments on a limited selection of surfaces including paper, plastic and ceramic tiles were carried out using a simple apparatus consisting of a vacuum desiccator and a resistive heater. CuPc from the gas phase condenses preferentially on fingermark deposits, revealing deep blue patterns with excellent ridge detail clarity on light coloured surfaces. The technique is shown to be most effective on porous surfaces such as paper, but relatively ineffective on non-porous ceramic and plastic surfaces.

  11. Near-equilibrium growth of thick, high quality beta-SiC by sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.; Fekade, Konjit; Spencer, Michael G.

    1993-01-01

    A close spaced near-equilibrium growth technique was used to produce thick, high quality epitaxial layers of beta-silicon carbide. The process utilized a sublimation method to grow morphologically smooth layers. The beta silicon carbide growth layers varied from about 200 to 750 microns in thickness. Chemical vapor deposition grown, 2-10 microns, beta silicon carbide films were used as seeds at 1860 and 1910 C growth temperatures. The respective average growth rates were 20 and 30 microns per hour. The layers are p-type with a 3.1 x 10 exp 17/cu cm carrier concentration. Electrical measurements indicate considerable improvement in the breakdown voltage of Schottky barriers on growth samples. Breakdown values ranged from 25 to 60 V. These measurements represent the highest values reported for 3C-SiC.

  12. Enthalpie de sublimation du soufre α : mesure calorimétrique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastel, R.; Ezzine, M.

    1993-04-01

    An effusion cell-calorimetric method has been used to determine the sublimation enthalpy of α sulfur at 298.15 K. The value 13.05 ± 0. 1 kJ/gram atom, is compared to literature data. L'existence d'une phase vapeur de composition complexe au-dessus de certains éléments rend délicate la définition d'une enthalpie d'évaporation par atome-gramme de l'élément : dans le cas du soufre α, nous avons utilisé une méthode calorimétrique directe qui conduit à : Δ H_{vap(298,15 K)}= 13,05± 0,1 kJ/atome-gramme.

  13. Modeling the Seasonal South Polar Cap Sublimation Rates at Dust Storm Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonev, B. P.; James, P. B.; Wolff, M. J.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Hansen, G. B.; Benson, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the principal component of the Martian atmosphere and its interaction with the polar caps forms the CO2 seasonal cycle on the planet. A significant fraction of the atmospheric constituent condenses on the surface during the polar winter and sublimes back during spring. The basic aspects of the CO2 cycle have been outlined by Leighton and Murray and a number of follow-up theoretical models ranging from energy balance to general circulation models have been used to study the physical processes involved in the cycle. This paper presents a modeling study on the seasonal south polar cap subliminiation rate under dust storm conditions. Mars Global Surveyor observations are also presented.

  14. Impact of nonintentional Al impurity to carrier lifetime and diffusion in sublimation grown 3C heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ščajev, P.; Jarašiunas, K.; Kadys, A.; Storasta, J.; Abramov, P. L.; Lebedev, S. P.; Lebedev, A. A.

    2010-11-01

    Using optical techniques, we analyzed an impact of non-intentional Al mpurity and twin boundaries to photoelectrical properties of sublimation-grown 3C heterostructures. Differential transmission techniques revealed Al related contribution to probe beam absorption with cross-section σAl = (1.8±0.5)×10-17 cm2 at 1064 nm, being four times stronger that the free-carrier absorption cross-section at given wavelength. Temperature dependent carrier recombination rates provided trap activation energy of 170 and 210 meV in two samples with different Al concentration. Saturation of probe beam absorption with excitation allowed determination of electrically active Al concentration, not gettered at grain boundaries. Increase of room-temperature mobility with injection in the highly defective layer and the corresponding lifetime decrease pointed out contribution of point and structural defects to carrier scattering.

  15. Sublimation of Ices Containing Organics and/or Minerals and Implications for Icy Bodies Surface Structure and Spectral Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Yoldi, Z.; Carrasco, N.; Szopa, C.; Thomas, N.

    2015-12-01

    The surfaces of many objects in the Solar System comprise substantial quantities of water ice either in pure form or mixed with minerals and/or organic molecules. Sublimation is a process responsible for shaping and changing the reflectance properties of these objects. We present laboratory data on the evolution of the structure and the visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance of icy surfaces made of mixtures of water ice and non-volatile components (complex organic matter and silicates), as they undergo sublimation of the water ice under low temperature and pressure conditions (Poch et al., under review). We prepared icy surfaces which are potential analogues of ices found on comets, icy satellites or trans-neptunian objects (TNOs). The experiments were carried out in the SCITEAS simulation setup recently built as part of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern (Pommerol et al., 2015a). As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a sublimation lag deposit, or sublimation mantle, made of the non-volatiles at the top of the samples. The texture (porosity, internal cohesiveness etc.), the activity (outbursts and ejection of mantle fragments) and the spectro-photometric properties of this mantle are found to differ strongly depending on the chemical nature of the non-volatiles, the size of their particles, the way they are mixed with the volatile component and the dust/ice mass ratio. The results also indicate how the band depths of the sub-surface water ice evolve during the build-up of the sublimation mantle. These data provide useful references for interpreting remote-sensing observations of Rosetta (see Pommerol et al., 2015b), and also New Horizons. Poch, O., et al., under review in IcarusPommerol, A., et al., 2015a, Planet. Space Sci. 109-110, 106-122. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2015.02.004Pommerol, A., et al., 2015b, Astronomy and Astrophysics, in press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201525977

  16. Formulation Design and Optimization of Fast Dissolving Clonazepam Tablets by Sublimation Method

    PubMed Central

    Shirsand, S. B.; Suresh, Sarasija; Kusumdevi, V.; Swamy, P. V.

    2011-01-01

    Fast dissolving tablets of clonazepam were prepared by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A 32 full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: amount of croscarmellose sodium and camphor. Croscarmellose sodium (2-8% w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (20-40% w/w) was used as subliming agent, to increase the porosity of the tablets, since it helps water to penetrate into the tablets, along with directly compressible mannitol to enhance mouth feel. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, thickness, drug content uniformity, in vitro dispersion time, wetting time and water absorption ratio. Based on in vitro dispersion time (approximately 11 s); the formulation containing 5% w/w croscarmellose sodium and 40% w/w camphor was found to be promising and tested for in vitro drug release pattern (in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer). Short-term stability (at 40°/75% relative humidity for 3 mo) and drug-excipient interaction. Surface response plots are presented to graphically represent the effect of independent variables on the in vitro dispersion time. The validity of the generated mathematical model was tested by preparing two extra-design checkpoints. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional commercial tablet formulation for drug release profiles. This formulation showed nearly nine-fold faster drug release (t50% 1.8 min) compared to the conventional commercial tablet formulation (t50% 16.4 min). Short-term stability studies on the formulation indicated that there are no significant changes in drug content and in vitro dispersion time (P<0.05). PMID:22923860

  17. Estimating snow sublimation using natural chemical and isotopic tracers across a gradient of solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, Joseph R.; Brooks, P. D.; Molotch, N. P.; Veatch, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    Changes in both climate and vegetation may dramatically impact the amount of water stored in seasonal snow cover and the timing of spring snowmelt. This study quantifies how spatial variability in solar radiation affects the spatial and temporal patterns in snow water equivalent (SWE), snow chemistry, and snow water isotopes in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico. Depth, density, stratigraphy, temperature, and snow samples were collected approximately monthly from five locations between January and April 2007 to quantify the effects of solar forcing on snowpack water and chemical balance. Locations varied in solar forcing due to topography and vegetation, while minimizing variability in precipitation, elevation, aspect, interception, and wind redistribution. Snowfall (340 ± 5 mm) was similar across all sites, but peak SWE at maximum accumulation ranged from 187 to 340 mm. Solute concentrations were highest directly under canopies, intermediate in nonshaded forest openings, and lowest in shaded forest openings. Conservative solute concentrations (SO42-, R2 = 0.80), Cl- (R2 = 0.60), and isotope values (δ18O R2 = 0.96) were inversely related to SWE at maximum accumulation. Mass balance estimates of snowpack water balance using solute concentrations and isotopes indicated that sublimation ranged from <2% to ˜20% of winter precipitation, consistent with previous studies at the site. The strong relationships between solar forcing, SWE, and chemistry suggest that snow chemistry at maximum accumulation can be used to estimate overwinter sublimation. Furthermore, variability in solar forcing also can be used to refine spatial estimates of catchment solute and isotope input at melt.

  18. Fe embedded in ice: The impacts of sublimation and energetic particle bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Icy particles containing a variety of Fe compounds are present in the upper atmospheres of planets such as the Earth and Saturn. In order to explore the role of ice sublimation and energetic ion bombardment in releasing Fe species into the gas phase, Fe-dosed ice films were prepared under UHV conditions in the laboratory. Temperature-programmed desorption studies of Fe/H2O films revealed that no Fe atoms or Fe-containing species co-desorbed along with the H2O molecules. This implies that when noctilucent ice cloud particles sublimate in the terrestrial mesosphere, the metallic species embedded in them will coalesce to form residual particles. Sputtering of the Fe-ice films by energetic Ar+ ions was shown to be an efficient mechanism for releasing Fe into the gas phase, with a yield of 0.08 (Ar+ energy=600 eV). Extrapolating with a semi-empirical sputtering model to the conditions of a proton aurora indicates that sputtering by energetic protons (>100 keV) should also be efficient. However, the proton flux in even an intense aurora will be too low for the resulting injection of Fe species into the gas phase to compete with that from meteoric ablation. In contrast, sputtering of the icy particles in the main rings of Saturn by energetic O+ ions may be the source of recently observed Fe+ in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Electron sputtering (9.5 keV) produced no detectable Fe atoms or Fe-containing species. Finally, it was observed that Fe(OH)2 was produced when Fe was dosed onto an ice film at 140 K (but not at 95 K). Electronic structure theory shows that the reaction which forms this hydroxide from adsorbed Fe has a large barrier of about 0.7 eV, from which we conclude that the reaction requires both translationally hot Fe atoms and mobile H2O molecules on the ice surface.

  19. Formulation design and optimization of fast dissolving clonazepam tablets by sublimation method.

    PubMed

    Shirsand, S B; Suresh, Sarasija; Kusumdevi, V; Swamy, P V

    2011-09-01

    Fast dissolving tablets of clonazepam were prepared by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: amount of croscarmellose sodium and camphor. Croscarmellose sodium (2-8% w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (20-40% w/w) was used as subliming agent, to increase the porosity of the tablets, since it helps water to penetrate into the tablets, along with directly compressible mannitol to enhance mouth feel. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, thickness, drug content uniformity, in vitro dispersion time, wetting time and water absorption ratio. Based on in vitro dispersion time (approximately 11 s); the formulation containing 5% w/w croscarmellose sodium and 40% w/w camphor was found to be promising and tested for in vitro drug release pattern (in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer). Short-term stability (at 40°/75% relative humidity for 3 mo) and drug-excipient interaction. Surface response plots are presented to graphically represent the effect of independent variables on the in vitro dispersion time. The validity of the generated mathematical model was tested by preparing two extra-design checkpoints. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional commercial tablet formulation for drug release profiles. This formulation showed nearly nine-fold faster drug release (t(50%) 1.8 min) compared to the conventional commercial tablet formulation (t(50%) 16.4 min). Short-term stability studies on the formulation indicated that there are no significant changes in drug content and in vitro dispersion time (P<0.05).

  20. CURVED WALLS: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, AND COMPOSITION PATTERNS IN T TAURI DISK DUST SUBLIMATION FRONTS

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L.; D'Alessio, P.; Espaillat, C.; Sargent, B.; Watson, D. M.; Hernández, J. E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu

    2013-10-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10{sup –8} to 10{sup –10} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ∼3 to 0.5 μm. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10{sup –4} of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 μm silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.

  1. Origin of Sublimation Polygons in the Antarctic Western Dry Valleys: Implications for Patterned Ground Development on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, D. R.; Head, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    Two hypotheses have been developed in order to address the age, origin, and evolution of surface polygons in the western Dry Valleys region of southern Victoria Land. Resolution of this debate has direct relevance and implications for patterned ground in ice-rich terrain on Mars. One hypothesis, the dynamic hypothesis, states that growth of sand-wedges pervasively deforms sediment across polygonal terrain, recycling sediment from troughs to polygon centers and back again over time scales of thousands of years. A second hypothesis, the stability hypothesis, states that deformation associated with sand-wedge polygons, particularly those that form over buried ice, is restricted to polygon troughs; the implication is that polygon centers may contain undisturbed soils >1 million years old. Evidence comes from field data that show that the age, origin, and morphology of polygons that form over buried ice in the western Dry Valleys region is tied collectively to the location and rate of sublimation of underlying ice. In Beacon Valley, sublimation of debris-rich ice produces a dry surface lag that insulates and slows loss of remaining ice. Sub-zero temperature cycling of near-surface ice and soil creates tensile stresses that result in a network of hexagonal cracks, extending upward from buried ice toward the ground surface. Where fines sift downward into open thermal-contraction cracks, a coarse-grained lag deposit forms on top of the ice. Owing to spatial variations in till texture, rates of sublimation vary across the ice surface. High rates occur below coarse-grained lags that cap contraction cracks; low rates are found at polygon centers beneath fine-grained low porosity/permeability debris. Measured concentrations of in-situ produced cosmogenic 3He in two depth profiles through sublimation till show a steady decrease with depth, indicating negligible recycling of surface materials on million-year time scales. These data suggest that once polygon troughs deepen

  2. Thermal alteration in carbonaceous chondrites and implications for sublimation in rock comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springmann, Alessondra; Lauretta, Dante S.; Steckloff, Jordan K.

    2015-11-01

    Rock comets are small solar system bodies in Sun-skirting orbits (perihelion q < ~0.15 AU) that form comae rich in mineral sublimation products, but lack typical cometary ice sublimation products (H2O, CO2, etc.). B-class asteroid (3200) Phaethon, considered to be the parent body of the Geminid meteor shower, is the only rock comet currently known to periodically eject dust and form a coma. Thermal fracturing or thermal decomposition of surface materials may be driving Phaethon’s cometary activity (Li & Jewitt, 2013). Phaethon-like asteroids have dynamically unstable orbits, and their perihelia can change rapidly over their ~10 Myr lifetimes (de León et al., 2010), raising the possibility that other asteroids may have been rock comets in the past. Here, we propose using spectroscopic observations of mercury (Hg) as a tracer of an asteroid’s thermal metamorphic history, and therefore as a constraint on its minimum achieved perihelion distance.B-class asteroids such as Phaethon have an initial composition similar to aqueously altered primitive meteorites such as CI- or CM-type meteorites (Clark et al., 2010). Laboratory heating experiments of ~mm sized samples of carbonaceous chondrite meteorites from 300K to 1200K at a rate of 15K/minute show mobilization and volatilization of various labile elements at temperatures that could be reached by Mercury-crossing asteroids. Samples became rapidly depleted in labile elements and, in particular, lost ~75% of their Hg content when heated from ~500-700 K, which corresponds to heliocentric distances of ~0.15-0.3 au, consistent with our thermal models. Mercury has strong emission lines in the UV (~ 185 nm) and thus its presence (or absence) relative to carbonaceous chondrite abundances would indicate if these bodies had perihelia in their dynamical histories inside of 0.15 AU, and therefore may have previously been Phaethon-like rock comets. Future space telescopes or balloon-borne observing platforms equipped with a UV

  3. A comprehensive numerical simulation of Io’s sublimation-driven atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Andrew C.; Gratiy, Sergey L.; Goldstein, David B.; Moore, Chris H.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Levin, Deborah A.; Stewart, Bénédicte

    2010-05-01

    Io's sublimation-driven atmosphere is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. These rarefied gas dynamics simulations improve upon earlier models by using a three-dimensional domain encompassing the entire planet computed in parallel. The effects of plasma heating, planetary rotation, inhomogeneous surface frost, molecular residence time of SO 2 on the exposed (non-volatile) rocky surface, and surface temperature distribution are investigated. Circumplanetary flow is predicted to develop from the warm dayside toward the cooler nightside. Io's rotation leads to a highly asymmetric frost surface temperature distribution (due to the frost's high thermal inertia) which results in circumplanetary flow that is not axi-symmetric about the subsolar point. The non-equilibrium thermal structure of the atmosphere, specifically vibrational and rotational temperatures, is also examined. Plasma heating is found to significantly inflate the atmosphere on both the dayside and nightside. The plasma energy flux causes high temperatures at high altitudes but plasma energy depletion through the dense gas column above the warmest frost permits gas temperatures cooler than the surface at low altitudes. A frost map (Douté, S., Schmitt, B., Lopes-Gautier, R., Carlson, R., Soderblom, L., Shirley, J., and the Galileo NIMS Team [2001]. Icarus 149, 107-132) is used to control the sublimated flux of SO 2 which can result in inhomogeneous column densities that vary by nearly a factor of four for the same surface temperature. A short residence time for SO 2 molecules on the "rock" component is found to smooth lateral atmospheric inhomogeneities caused by variations in the surface frost distribution, creating an atmosphere that looks nearly identical to one with uniform frost coverage. A longer residence time is found to agree better with mid-infrared observations (Spencer, J.R., Lellouch, E., Richter, M.J., López-Valverde, M.A., Jessup, K.L, Greathouse, T.K., Flaud, J

  4. BabeLO--An Extensible Converter of Programming Exercises Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queiros, R.; Leal, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, there was a proliferation of programming exercise formats that hinders interoperability in automatic assessment. In the lack of a widely accepted standard, a pragmatic solution is to convert content among the existing formats. BabeLO is a programming exercise converter providing services to a network of heterogeneous…

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cepacia Strain LO6

    PubMed Central

    Belcaid, Mahdi; Kang, Yun; Tuanyok, Apichai

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia strain LO6 is a betaproteobacterium that was isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient. Here we report the 6.4 Mb draft genome sequence assembled into 2 contigs. This genome sequence will aid the transcriptomic profiling of this bacterium and help us to better understand the mechanisms specific to pulmonary infections. PMID:26067955

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cepacia Strain LO6.

    PubMed

    Belcaid, Mahdi; Kang, Yun; Tuanyok, Apichai; Hoang, Tung T

    2015-06-11

    Burkholderia cepacia strain LO6 is a betaproteobacterium that was isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient. Here we report the 6.4 Mb draft genome sequence assembled into 2 contigs. This genome sequence will aid the transcriptomic profiling of this bacterium and help us to better understand the mechanisms specific to pulmonary infections.

  7. Low energy neutron deuteron scattering to N3LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaryan, Arman; Vanasse, Jared; Springer, Roxanne

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO) nd scattering amplitude in the framework of nonrelativistic pionless effective field theory (EFTπ/). This theory is only valid when the typical momentum exchange in the scattering is smaller then the mass of the pion. The power counting parameter for EFTπ/ is the ratio Q/Λπ /, where Q is the typical momentum exchange in the scattering and Λπ / is the EFTπ/ breakdown scale, Λπ / LO. At N3LO new 2-body forces appear, which introduce four new EFTπ/ coefficients. These coefficients are fixed by the 3PJ and 1P1 phase shifts of NN scattering. We find that these terms have an important impact. The results of this calculation at N3LO will be important for understanding spin polarization observables in nd scattering, in particular the longstanding Ay puzzle. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Award Number DE-FG02-05ER41368.

  8. Un analisis de la influencia de las fricciones de los campos no militares sobre las fricciones del campo militar presentes en la operacion de rescate de rehenes Chavin de Huantar (An Analysis of the Influence that Friction in Non-Military Fields of Action Had Upon Military Friction in the Hostage Rescue Operation Chavin de Huantar)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-16

    necesidad inmediata de eliminar la incertidumbre de lo que ocurría al interior de la residencia, por lo que el empleo de micrófonos era vital, a fin...en rarísimas ocasiones se pronuncia sobre hechos políticos y que esta solicitud directa significó una tremenda presión internacional sobre un

  9. Measuring enthalpy of sublimation of volatiles by means of micro-thermogravimetry: the case of Dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, F.; Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; Zampetti, E.; Biondi, D.; Boccaccini, A.; Saggin, B.; Bearzotti, A.; Macagnano, A.

    2013-09-01

    VISTA (Volatile In Situ Thermogravimetry Analyser) is a thermogravimeter currently under study for the proposed mission MarcoPolo-R [1,2]. In the framework of this project, we developed a set-up to measure the enthalpy of sublimation ΔH of three dicarboxylic acids, i.e. adipic, succinic and oxalic. The obtained results are in good agreement with literature, and this demonstrates the capability of our device to perform this kind of measurements.

  10. Time-Dependent SSI Multispectral Properties for Rock, Soil, Ice, and Sublimation Lags at the Phoenix Landing Site on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R. V.; Lemmon, M. T.; Arvidson, R. E.; Blaney, D. L.; Ellehoj, M. D.; Mellon, M. T.; Phoenix, S. T.

    2008-12-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on the Phoenix Lander is a 15 band multispectral imager covering the spectral range from 0.45 to 1.00 micrometers. More than 250 15-filter spectral image cubes have been obtained for surface targets at the Phoenix landing site in the north polar region of Mars. The spectra of surface soils and rocks are dominated by a ferric absorption edge from nanophase ferric oxide, and they are broadly similar to most multispectral data obtained during the Pathfinder and MER missions. Negative spectral slopes between about 0.70 and 1.00 micrometers, indicative of high concentrations of olivine in the El Dorado sand sheet at Gusev crater, were not detected. The albedo (cos(i) corrected) of Phoenix surface spectra is highly dependent on the time of sol (albedo at 0.80 micrometers varies by a factor of 2), consistent with opposition and phase function effects. Subsurface layers bearing water ice were exposed at a depth of about 4 cm by digging with the robotic arm scoop. The SSI spectra of icy materials are highly variable, ranging from typical ice (spectrally neutral and high albedo near 0.7) at the Dodo-Goldilocks trench to low albedo spectra (about 0.3 at 0.80 micrometers) with a ferric absorption edge at the Snow White trench. The differences are attributed, respectively, to low and high concentrations of fine-grained and ferric-rich material dispersed throughout the ice. The spectra of the icy surfaces are dependent on time as the ice sublimes. At Snow White, an optically thick (about 300 micrometers) sublimate lag develops within two sols. At Dodo- Goldilocks, the time scale for development of an optically thick sublimate lag is 5 to greater than 60 sols, depending on location within the trench. The spectra of sublimate lag are equivalent to those for fine-grained soil.

  11. Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from the Murchison Meteorite Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth, and possibly on other planets such as Mars, would have required the presence of liquid water and a continuous supply of prebiotic organic compounds. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by asteroids, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have contributed to the early Earth s prebiotic inventory by seeding the planet with biologically important organic compounds. A wide variety of prebiotic organic compounds have previously been detected in the Murchison CM type carbonaceous chondrite including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. These compounds dominate terrestrial biochemistry and are integral components of proteins, DNA and RNA. Several purines including adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine, as well as the pyrimidine uracil, have previously been detected in water or formic acid extracts of Murchison using ion-exclusion chromatography and ultraviolet spectroscopy. However, even after purification of these extracts, the accurate identification and quantification of nucleobases is difficult due to interfering UV absorbing compounds. In order to reduce these effects, we have developed an extraction technique using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from other non-volatile organic compounds in Murchison acid extracts.

  12. Modeling Io's Sublimation-Driven Atmosphere: Gas Dynamics and Radiation Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Andrew C.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Moore, Chris H.; Stewart, Benedicte; Gratiy, Sergey L.; Levin, Deborah A.

    2008-12-31

    Io's sublimation-driven atmosphere is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. These rarefied gas dynamics simulations improve upon earlier models by using a three-dimensional domain encompassing the entire planet computed in parallel. The effects of plasma impact heating, planetary rotation, and inhomogeneous surface frost are investigated. Circumplanetary flow is predicted to develop from the warm subsolar region toward the colder night-side. The non-equilibrium thermal structure of the atmosphere, including vibrational and rotational temperatures, is also presented. Io's rotation leads to an asymmetric surface temperature distribution which is found to strengthen circumplanetary flow near the dusk terminator. Plasma heating is found to significantly inflate the atmosphere on both day- and night-sides. The plasma energy flux also causes high temperatures at high altitudes but permits relatively cooler temperatures at low altitudes near the dense subsolar point due to plasma energy depletion. To validate the atmospheric model, a radiative transfer model was developed utilizing the backward Monte Carlo method. The model allows the calculation of the atmospheric radiation from emitting/absorbing and scattering gas using an arbitrary scattering law and an arbitrary surface reflectivity. The model calculates the spectra in the {nu}{sub 2} vibrational band of SO{sub 2} which are then compared to the observational data.

  13. Sublimation and combustion of coal particles in the erosion laser torch

    SciTech Connect

    Bulat, A.; Shumrikov, V.; Osenny, V.

    2005-07-01

    Rate of coal particles' combustion in low-temperature plasma is of interest both from application and scientific points of view. Necessity of knowing parameters of the process of coal particles' combustion in plasma torch with the temperature of 2500-3000 K is governed by arising a number of state-of-the-art technological tasks related to the problems of finding new methods of power production, generation of high-calorific synthetic gases and using carbon as a high temperature structural material in nuclear power engineering. The present work deals with a rate of combustion of the sorbed coal particles in the erosion laser torch formed by means of interaction of pulse laser radiation (wave length {lambda} = 1,06 {mu}m, power density j = 10{sup 5} - 10{sup 7} Wcm{sup 2} with coals of various grades (in the wide range of carbon concentrations (80-95 %)). Physical and mathematical modeling of the process of coal particles' sublimation and combustion in non-equilibrium plasma flows with weight-average temperature of 2500-3000 K showed a good convergence of results for the particles of 10-100 {mu}m diameter and satisfactory one for the particles of {gt} 250{mu}m diameter.

  14. The impacts of moisture transport on drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ning; Dai, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Drifting snow sublimation (DSS) is an important physical process related to moisture and heat transfer that happens in the atmospheric boundary layer, which is of glaciological and hydrological importance. It is also essential in order to understand the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheets and the global climate system. Previous studies mainly focused on the DSS of suspended snow and ignored that in the saltation layer. Here, a drifting snow model combined with balance equations for heat and moisture is established to simulate the physical DSS process in the saltation layer. The simulated results show that DSS can strongly increase humidity and cooling effects, which in turn can significantly reduce DSS in the saltation layer. However, effective moisture transport can dramatically weaken the feedback effects. Due to moisture advection, DSS rate in the saltation layer can be several orders of magnitude greater than that of the suspended particles. Thus, DSS in the saltation layer has an important influence on the distribution and mass-energy balance of snow cover.

  15. Sublimation studies of NpO sub 2 F sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinschmidt, P.D. ); Lau, K.H.; Hildenbrand, D.L. )

    1992-08-15

    Using Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry, we have identified the following reaction as the sublimation decomposition mechanism of NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}({ital s}): 2NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}({ital s})=NpO{sub 2}({ital s})+O{sub 2}({ital g})+NpF{sub 4}({ital g}). From second-law analysis of the measured pressures of NpF{sub 4}({ital g}) over the temperature range 820--985 K the derived enthalpy change at 298 K is 556.8{plus minus}12.2 kJ/mol and the entropy change is 342.4 {plus minus}13.8 J/K mol. From these values and enthalpies of formation and entropies reported in the literature for the other species we calculate the enthalpy of formation of NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}({ital s}) to be {minus}1608{plus minus}10 kJ/mol and the entropy to be 147{plus minus}9 J/K mol.

  16. The growth of sublimation crystals and surface hoar on the Antarctic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, J.-C.; Domine, F.; Savarino, J.; Dumont, M.; Brun, E.

    2014-07-01

    On the Antarctic plateau, precipitation quantities are so low that the surface mass budget is for an important part determined by exchanges of water vapor between the snow surface and the atmosphere surface. At Dome C (75° S, 123° E), we have frequently observed the growth of crystals on the snow surface under calm sunny weather. Here we present the time variations of specific surface area (SSA) and density of these crystals. Using the detailed snow model Crocus, we conclude that the formation of these crystals was very likely due to the nighttime formation of surface hoar crystals and to the daytime formation of sublimation crystals. These latter crystals form by processes similar to those involved in the formation of frost flowers on young sea ice. The formation of these crystals impacts the albedo, mass and energy budget of the Antarctic plateau. In particular, the SSA variations of the surface layer can induce an instantaneous forcing at the snow surface up to -10 W m-2 at noon, resulting in a surface temperature drop of 0.45 K. This result confirms that snow SSA is a crucial variable to consider in the energy budget and climate of snow-covered surfaces.

  17. Fluctuations and instabilities of steps in the growth and sublimation of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaha, Makio; Saito, Yukio; Sato, Masahide

    1995-01-01

    Asymmetry in step kinetics (Schwoebel effect) has drastic effects on the motion of steps, and we study them theoretically and by simulation. With asymmetric step kinetics a step becomes smooth when it melts, whereas it becomes increasingly rough when it grows. When the Mullins-Sekerka type of instability takes place, the step does not form any stable pattern but shows a chaotic behavior although the crystal anisotropy influences the morphology. For a vicinal face consisting of equidistant steps, a similar enhancement of the step fluctuation in growth occurs while the fluctuation of step separation (terrace width) is suppressed because of the interference of the diffusion field. In sublimation, on the other hand, the step width is reduced but the fluctuation of the terrace width is enhanced. This leads to a bunching instability of steps. With one-sided step kinetics, steps always form pairwise bound states which have a hierarchical structure. In general various types of bound states appear, some of which lead to a morphological instability of the vicinal face.

  18. Selective crystallization of indigo B by a modified sublimation method and its redetermined structure

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Florian; Hüter, Lucie; Schäfer, Johanna; Röder, Konstantin; Purgahn, Uta; Krautscheid, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Good-quality single crystals of the title compound, indigo B [systematic name: 2-(3-oxoindolin-2-yl­idene)indolin-3-one], C16H10N2O2, have been prepared with high selectivity by a sublimation process. The previous structure of indigo B [Süsse & Wolf (1980 ▶). Naturwissenschaften, 67, 453], which showed that the complete mol­ecule is generated by crystallographic inversion symmetry has been confirmed, but the present study reports more realistic geometrical parameters and modern standards of precision (e.g. σ for C—C bonds = 0.002–0.003 Å). Each mol­ecule features two intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by strong face-to-face π–π stacking inter­actions involving both the six- and five-membered rings [centroid–centroid separations = 3.6290 (14) and 3.6506 (14) Å] and inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:22219907

  19. Selective crystallization of indigo B by a modified sublimation method and its redetermined structure.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Florian; Hüter, Lucie; Schäfer, Johanna; Röder, Konstantin; Purgahn, Uta; Krautscheid, Harald

    2011-11-01

    Good-quality single crystals of the title compound, indigo B [systematic name: 2-(3-oxoindolin-2-yl-idene)indolin-3-one], C(16)H(10)N(2)O(2), have been prepared with high selectivity by a sublimation process. The previous structure of indigo B [Süsse & Wolf (1980 ▶). Naturwissenschaften, 67, 453], which showed that the complete mol-ecule is generated by crystallographic inversion symmetry has been confirmed, but the present study reports more realistic geometrical parameters and modern standards of precision (e.g. σ for C-C bonds = 0.002-0.003 Å). Each mol-ecule features two intra-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by strong face-to-face π-π stacking inter-actions involving both the six- and five-membered rings [centroid-centroid separations = 3.6290 (14) and 3.6506 (14) Å] and inter-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  20. Coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation and condensation with application to freeze-drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Arnab

    Freeze-drying is a low-pressure, low-temperature condensation pumping process widely used in the manufacture of bio-pharmaceuticals for removal of solvents by sublimation. The goal of the process is to provide a stable dosage form by removing the solvent in such a way that the sensitive molecular structure of the active substance is least disturbed. The vacuum environment presents unique challenges for understanding and controlling heat and mass transfer in the process. As a result, the design of equipment and associated processes has been largely empirical, slow and inefficient. A comprehensive simulation framework to predict both, process and equipment performance is critical to improve current practice. A part of the dissertation is aimed at performing coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation-condensation processes typical of freeze-drying technologies. Both, experimental and computational models are used to first understand the key heat transfer modes during the process. A modeling and computational framework, validated with experiments for analysis of sublimation, water-vapor flow and condensation in application to pharmaceutical freeze-drying is developed. Augmented with computational fluid dynamics modeling, the simulation framework presented here allows to predict for the first time, dynamic product/process conditions taking into consideration specifics of equipment design. Moreover, by applying the modeling framework to process design based on a design-space approach, it has demonstrated that there is a viable alternative to empiricism.

  1. STRUCTURAL CHANGES OF THE SUBLIMATION WALL IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS DUE TO VARYING ACCRETION ILLUMINATION: A MECHANISM FOR RAPID INFRARED VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, E.; Flaherty, K. M.; Muzerolle, J.

    2015-08-01

    We study the changes in the sublimation wall structure due to variable illumination of a stellar hot spot on the dusty surroundings of a young star. The model includes the settling of large grains toward the disk midplane and the effect of the vertical density profile on the shaping of the sublimation wall. From a survey of objects in the young cluster IC 348, we extract three objects (LRLL 32, 40, and 63) that present typical variability in the [3.6] and [4.5] IRAC bands. We use the Spitzer photometry and ground-based 2–5 μm spectra for comparison with the models. Even though there is a correlation between accretion luminosity and dust emission based on the observations, we conclude from the modeling that the systems with lower mass accretion rates (LRLL 32 and 63) cannot be explained simply by a variable hot spot illuminating a sublimation wall. The observed variability amplitude for LRLL 40 (the system with the largest value of the mass accretion rate) can be obtained using the mechanism presented here. When considering a wide range of hot spot sizes and temperatures, the models can reproduce the infrared fluctuations seen in recent surveys, but only with accretion rate fluctuations that are orders of magnitude larger than is typically observed. These results highlight the relevance of accretion as a variability mechanism as well as its limitations in producing the full extent of the observed infrared variability.

  2. Application of a Kalman filter to UF{sub 6} gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1992-03-01

    A signal is required to control the flow of UF{sub 6} in gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems. The original strategy envisioned for deriving a flow signal was to take the derivative of the freezer/sublimer weigh cell signal. However, the derivative of the digitized weight signal is noisy, preventing good control. In addition, a bias is introduced into the weight derivative signal because a refrigerant is circulated through a shell-and-tube heat exchanger inside the freezer/sublimer. The weight of the refrigerant is included in the weight measured by the weigh cell. If the circulation rate of the refrigerent is not steady state, a bias exists. Measurements of upstream pressure, vessel pressure, and output to the system control valve are available to the control system. Thus, if the flow through the control valve is characterized properly by the measurements, a Kalman filter can be used in conjunction with these auxiliary inputs and the weigh cell input to overcome the noise and bias problem and provide an improve estimate of flow rate. A discussion of the development and the current status of a Kalman filter used for this application is given. 5 refs.

  3. Properties of filamentary sublimation residues from dispersions of clay in ice. [on Martian poles, comet nuclei, and icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.; Parker, T. J.; Stephens, J. B.; Fanale, F. P.; Sutton, S.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from experimental studies of the formation of ice mixed with mineral particles in an effort to simulate similar processes on natural surfaces such as at the Martian poles, on comet nuclei and on icy satellites. The study consisted of low-pressure, low-temperature sublimations of water ice from dilutions of water-clay (montmorillonite and Cabosil) dispersions of various component ratios. Liquid dispersions were sprayed into liquid nitrogen to form droplets at about -50 C. Both clay-water dispersions left a filamentary residue on the bottom of the Dewar after the water ice had sublimated off. The residue was studied with optical and SEM microscopy, the latter method revealing a high electrical conductivity in the residue. The results suggest that the sublimation of the water ice can leave a surface crust, which may be analogous to processes at the Martian poles and on comet nuclei. The process could proceed by the attachment of water molecules to salt crystals during the hottest part of the Martian year. The residue remaining was found to remain stable up to 370 C, be porous, and remain resilient, which could allow it to insulate ice bodies such as comets in space.

  4. Characterization of the Sublimation and Vapor Pressure of 2-(2-Nitrovinyl) Furan (G-0) Using Thermogravimetric Analysis: Effects of Complexation with Cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Ruz, Vivian; González, Mirtha Mayra; Winant, Danny; Rodríguez, Zenaida; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2015-08-19

    In the present work, the sublimation of crystalline solid 2-(2-nitrovinyl) furan (G-0) in the temperature range of 35 to 60 °C (below the melting point of the drug) was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The sublimated product was characterized using Fourier-transformed-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thin layer chromatography (TLC). The sublimation rate at each temperature was obtained using the slope of the linear regression model and followed apparent zero-order kinetics. The sublimation enthalpy from 35 to 60 °C was obtained from the Eyring equation. The Gückel method was used to estimate the sublimation rate and vapor pressure at 25 °C. Physical mixtures, kneaded and freeze-dried complexes were prepared with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) and analyzed using isothermal TGA at 50 °C. The complexation contributed to reducing the sublimation process. The best results were achieved using freeze-dried complexes with both cyclodextrins.

  5. In-Situ Growth of Yb2O3 Layer for Sublimation Suppression for Yb14MnSb11 Thermoelectric Material for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    The compound Yb14MnSb11 is a p-type thermoelectric material of interest to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a candidate replacement for the state-of-the-art Si-Ge used in current radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Ideally, the hot end of this leg would operate at 1000 C in the vacuum of space. Although Yb14MnSb11 shows the potential to double the value of the thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) over that of Si-Ge at 1000 C, it suffers from a high sublimation rate at elevated temperatures and would require a coating in order to survive the required RTG lifetime of 14 years. The purpose of the present work is to measure the sublimation rate of Yb14MnSb11 and to investigate sublimation suppression for this material. This paper reports on the sublimation rate of Yb14MnSb11 at 1000 C (approximately 3 x 10(exp -3) grams per square centimeter hour) and efforts to reduce the sublimation rate with an in situ grown Yb2O3 layer. Despite the success in forming thin, dense, continuous, and adherent oxide scales on Yb14MnSb11, the scales did not prove to be sublimation barriers.

  6. Meteorological conditions associated to high sublimation amounts in semiarid high-elevation Andes decrease the performance of empirical melt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James; Burlando, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Empirical melt (EM) models are often preferred to surface energy balance (SEB) models to calculate melt amounts of snow and ice in hydrological modelling of high-elevation catchments. The most common reasons to support this decision are that, in comparison to SEB models, EM models require lower levels of meteorological data, complexity and computational costs. However, EM models assume that melt can be characterized by means of a few index variables only, and their results strongly depend on the transferability in space and time of the calibrated empirical parameters. In addition, they are intrinsically limited in accounting for specific process components, the complexity of which cannot be easily reconciled with the empirical nature of the model. As an example of an EM model, in this study we use the Enhanced Temperature Index (ETI) model, which calculates melt amounts using air temperature and the shortwave radiation balance as index variables. We evaluate the performance of the ETI model on dry high-elevation sites where sublimation amounts - that are not explicitly accounted for the EM model - represent a relevant percentage of total ablation (1.1 to 8.7%). We analyse a data set of four Automatic Weather Stations (AWS), which were collected during the ablation season 2013-14, at elevations between 3466 and 4775 m asl, on the glaciers El Tapado, San Francisco, Bello and El Yeso, which are located in the semiarid Andes of central Chile. We complement our analysis using data from past studies in Juncal Norte Glacier (Chile) and Haut Glacier d'Arolla (Switzerland), during the ablation seasons 2008-09 and 2006, respectively. We use the results of a SEB model, applied to each study site, along the entire season, to calibrate the ETI model. The ETI model was not designed to calculate sublimation amounts, however, results show that their ability is low also to simulate melt amounts at sites where sublimation represents larger percentages of total ablation. In fact, we

  7. Liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Gretchen L. E.; Orth, Michael S.; Mehta, Gopal K.

    1993-01-01

    Testing of a simplified LO2 propellant conditioning concept for future expendable launch vehicles is discussed. Four different concepts are being investigated: no-bleed, low-bleed, use of a recirculation line, and He bubbling. A full-scale test article, which is a facsimile of a propellant feed duct with an attached section to simulate heat input from an LO2 turbopump, is to be tested at the Cold Flow Facility of the Marshall Space Flight Center West Test Area. Work to date includes: design and fabrication of the test article, design of the test facility and initial fabrication, development of a test matrix and test procedures, initial predictions of test output, and heat leak calibration and heat exchanger tests on the test articles.

  8. Liquid Oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Gretchen L. E.; Orth, Michael S.; Mehta, Gopal K.

    1993-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and industry contractors have undertaken activities to develop a simplified liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept for future expendable launch vehicles. The objective of these activities is to reduce operations costs and timelines and to improve safety of these vehicles. The approach followed has been to identify novel concepts through system level studies and demonstrate the feasibility of these concepts through small-scale and full-scale testing. Testing will also provide data for design guidelines and validation of analytical models. Four different concepts are being investigated: no-bleed, low-bleed, use of a recirculation line, and helium (He) bubbling. This investigation is being done under a Joint Institutional Research and Development (JIRAD) program currently in effect between MSFC and General Dynamics Space Systems (GDSS). A full-scale test article, which is a facsimile of a propellant feed duct with an attached section to simulate heat input from a LO2 turbopump, will be tested at the Cold Flow Facility at MSFC's West Test Area. Liquid nitrogen (LN2), which has similar properties to LO2, will be used in place of LO2 for safety and budget reasons. Work to date includes design and fabrication of the test article, design of the test facility and initial fabrication, development of a test matrix and test procedures, initial predictions of test output, and heat leak calibration and heat exchanger tests on the test article. The tests for all propellant conditioning concepts will be conducted in the summer of 1993, with the final report completed by October, 1993.

  9. Quadrature mixture LO suppression via DSW DAC noise dither

    DOEpatents

    Dubbert, Dale F.; Dudley, Peter A.

    2007-08-21

    A Quadrature Error Corrected Digital Waveform Synthesizer (QECDWS) employs frequency dependent phase error corrections to, in effect, pre-distort the phase characteristic of the chirp to compensate for the frequency dependent phase nonlinearity of the RF and microwave subsystem. In addition, the QECDWS can employ frequency dependent correction vectors to the quadrature amplitude and phase of the synthesized output. The quadrature corrections cancel the radars' quadrature upconverter (mixer) errors to null the unwanted spectral image. A result is the direct generation of an RF waveform, which has a theoretical chirp bandwidth equal to the QECDWS clock frequency (1 to 1.2 GHz) with the high Spurious Free Dynamic Range (SFDR) necessary for high dynamic range radar systems such as SAR. To correct for the problematic upconverter local oscillator (LO) leakage, precision DC offsets can be applied over the chirped pulse using a pseudo-random noise dither. The present dither technique can effectively produce a quadrature DC bias which has the precision required to adequately suppress the LO leakage. A calibration technique can be employed to calculate both the quadrature correction vectors and the LO-nulling DC offsets using the radar built-in test capability.

  10. The ClearfLo project - Understanding London's meteorology and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, Stephen; Bohnenstengel, Sylvia

    2014-05-01

    ClearfLo is a large multi-institutional project funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). ClearfLo established integrated measurements of meteorology, gaseous and particulate composition/loading of London's (UK) urban atmosphere in 2011 and 2012 to understand the processes underlying poor air quality. A new and unique long-term measurement infrastructure was established in London at street level, urban background and elevated sites and contrasted against rural locations to determine the urban increment in meteorology and pollution. This approach enables understanding the seasonal variations in the meteorology and composition together with the controlling processes. In addition two intensive observation periods (IOPs) provide more detail in winter 2012 and during the Olympics in summer 2012 focusing upon the vertical structure and evolution of the urban boundary layer, chemical controls on nitrogen dioxide and ozone production, in particular the role of volatile organic compounds, and processes controlling the evolution, size, distribution and composition of particulate matter. In this talk we present early analysis of the meteorology and air quality measurements within ClearfLo. In particular we show measurements that indicate the dominant regimes of London's boundary layer.

  11. 77 FR 2715 - D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on December 29, 2011, D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC (D'Lo), 1002 East St. Mary Blvd., Lafayette, Louisiana 70503, filed in... D'Lo to construct, operate, and maintain a new natural gas storage project to be located in...

  12. Formation of dust-rich planetesimals from sublimated pebbles inside of the snow line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, S.; Guillot, T.

    2016-11-01

    Context. For up to a few millions of years, pebbles must provide a quasi-steady inflow of solids from the outer parts of protoplanetary disks to their inner regions. Aims: We wish to understand how a significant fraction of the pebbles grows into planetesimals instead of being lost to the host star. Methods: We examined analytically how the inward flow of pebbles is affected by the snow line and under which conditions dust-rich (rocky) planetesimals form. When calculating the inward drift of solids that is due to gas drag, we included the back-reaction of the gas to the motion of the solids. Results: We show that in low-viscosity protoplanetary disks (with a monotonous surface density similar to that of the minimum-mass solar nebula), the flow of pebbles does not usually reach the required surface density to form planetesimals by streaming instability. We show, however, that if the pebble-to-gas-mass flux exceeds a critical value, no steady solution can be found for the solid-to-gas ratio. This is particularly important for low-viscosity disks (α< 10-3) where we show that inside of the snow line, silicate-dust grains ejected from sublimating pebbles can accumulate, eventually leading to the formation of dust-rich planetesimals directly by gravitational instability. Conclusions: This formation of dust-rich planetesimals may occur for extended periods of time, while the snow line sweeps from several au to inside of 1 au. The rock-to-ice ratio may thus be globally significantly higher in planetesimals and planets than in the central star.

  13. AdS/QCD, Light-Front Holography, and Sublimated Gluons

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    The gauge/gravity duality leads to a simple analytical and phenomenologically compelling nonperturbative approximation to the full light-front QCD Hamiltonian - 'Light-Front Holography', which provides a Lorentz-invariant first-approximation to QCD, and successfully describes the spectroscopy of light-quark meson and baryons, their elastic and transition form factors, and other hadronic properties. The bound-state Schroedinger and Dirac equations of the soft-wall AdS/QCD model predict linear Regge trajectories which have the same slope in orbital angular momentum L and radial quantum number n for both mesons and baryons. Light-front holography connects the fifth-dimensional coordinate of AdS space z to an invariant impact separation variable {zeta} in 3+1 space at fixed light-front time. A key feature is the determination of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons - the relativistic analogs of the Schroedinger wavefunctions of atomic physics which allow one to compute form factors, transversity distributions, spin properties of the valence quarks, jet hadronization, and other hadronic observables. One thus obtains a one-parameter color-confining model for hadron physics at the amplitude level. AdS/QCD also predicts the form of the non-perturbative effective coupling {alpha}{sub s}{sup AdS} (Q) and its {beta}-function with an infrared fixed point which agrees with the effective coupling a{sub g1} (Q{sup 2}) extracted from measurements of the Bjorken sum rule below Q{sup 2} < 1 GeV{sup 2}. This is consistent with a flux-tube interpretation of QCD where soft gluons with virtualities Q{sup 2} < 1 GeV{sup 2} are sublimated into a color-confining potential for quarks. We discuss a number of phenomenological hadronic properties which support this picture.

  14. SUBLIMATION-DRIVEN ACTIVITY IN MAIN-BELT COMET 313P/GIBBS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Hainaut, Olivier; Novaković, Bojan; Bolin, Bryce; Denneau, Larry; Haghighipour, Nader; Kleyna, Jan; Meech, Karen J.; Schunova, Eva; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Kokotanekova, Rosita; Snodgrass, Colin; Lacerda, Pedro; Micheli, Marco; Moskovitz, Nick; Wasserman, Lawrence; Waszczak, Adam

    2015-02-10

    We present an observational and dynamical study of newly discovered main-belt comet 313P/Gibbs. We find that the object is clearly active both in observations obtained in 2014 and in precovery observations obtained in 2003 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, strongly suggesting that its activity is sublimation-driven. This conclusion is supported by a photometric analysis showing an increase in the total brightness of the comet over the 2014 observing period, and dust modeling results showing that the dust emission persists over at least three months during both active periods, where we find start dates for emission no later than 2003 July 24 ± 10 for the 2003 active period and 2014 July 28 ± 10 for the 2014 active period. From serendipitous observations by the Subaru Telescope in 2004 when the object was apparently inactive, we estimate that the nucleus has an absolute R-band magnitude of H{sub R} = 17.1 ± 0.3, corresponding to an effective nucleus radius of r{sub e} ∼ 1.00 ± 0.15 km. The object’s faintness at that time means we cannot rule out the presence of activity, and so this computed radius should be considered an upper limit. We find that 313P’s orbit is intrinsically chaotic, having a Lyapunov time of T{sub l} = 12,000 yr and being located near two three-body mean-motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn, 11J-1S-5A and 10J+12S-7A, yet appears stable over >50 Myr in an apparent example of stable chaos. We furthermore find that 313P is the second main-belt comet, after P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS), to belong to the ∼155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.

  15. Sublimation process and physical properties of vapor grown γ-In2Se3 platelet crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayakumar, C. J.; Kunjomana, A. G.

    2016-11-01

    Indium selenide (γ-In2Se3) crystals have been grown by the closed tube sublimation process in the absence of seed crystals and chemical transporting agents. The composition, structure and morphology of the samples grown under different vacuum conditions were examined by energy dispersive analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscope. Structural features of the crystals obtained in a vacuum of 10-3 mbar exhibited a few reflections not belonging to γ phase, whereas X-ray diffraction spectra of the crystals deposited under a vacuum of 10-6 mbar revealed evidence of sharp peaks with high intensities of γ-In2Se3 crystalline phase. When growth runs were performed for 72 h, voids were observed on the surface whereas for a duration of 120 h, platelet crystals were obtained. Optical properties of these samples were investigated using the FT-IR and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The average transmittance of the platelets in the visible and near infrared region of solar spectrum was found to be ∼81% and an optical band gap of ∼2.05 eV was computed from the transmission spectrum. Photoluminescence spectra of the grown In2Se3 crystals recorded at room temperature using an excitation laser of wavelength 355 nm showed a peak in the near band edge emission (NBE) corresponding to an energy of 2.01 eV. Under an illumination power of 12 mW/cm2, the photocurrent increased linearly with applied voltage and the dark current was found to be 2.5×10-9 A for 10 V. These results suggest that the as-grown γ-In2Se3 platelets crystallized from vapor deposition, possess superior optoelectronic properties than the other phases for solar cell applications.

  16. Aluminum Nitride-Silicon Carbide Alloy Crystals Grown on SiC Substrates by Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Z; Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Payzant, E Andrew; Walker, Larry R; Liu, R; Engelhard, M H

    2005-01-01

    AlN-SiC alloy crystals, with a thickness greater than 500μm, were grown on 4H- and 6H-SiC substrates from a mixture of AlN and SiC powders by the sublimation-recondensation method at 1860-1990 C. On-axis SiC substrates produced a rough surface covered with hexagonal grains, while 6H- and 4H- off-axis SiC substrates with different miscut angles (8 or 3.68 ) formed a relatively smooth surface with terraces and steps. The substrate misorientation ensured that the AlNSiC alloy crystals grew two dimensionally as identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Xray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that the AlN-SiC alloys had the wurtzite structure. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrated that the resultant alloy crystals had non-stoichiometric ratios of Al:N and Si:C and a uniform composition throughout the alloy crystal from the interface to the surface. The composition ratio of Al:Si of the alloy crystals changed with the growth temperature, and differed from the original source composition, which was consistent with the results predicted by thermodynamic calculation of the solid-vapor distribution of each element. XPS detected the bonding between Si-C, Si-N, Si-O for the Si 2p spectra. The dislocation density decreased with the growth, which was lower than 10^6cm-2 at the alloy surface, more than two orders of magnitude lower compared to regions close to the crystal/substrate interface, as determined by TEM.

  17. Mass removal by oxidation and sublimation of porous graphite during fiber laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Grady T.; Bauer, William A.; Fox, Charles D.; Gonzales, Ashley E.; Herr, Nicholas C.; Gosse, Ryan C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2017-01-01

    The various effects of laser heating of carbon materials are key to assessing laser weapon effectiveness. Porous graphite plates, cylinders, and cones with densities of 1.55 to 1.82 g/cm3 were irradiated by a 10-kW fiber laser at 0.075 to 3.525 kW/cm2 for 120 s to study mass removal and crater formation. Surface temperatures reached steady state values as high as 3767 K. The total decrease in sample mass ranged from 0.06 to 6.29 g, with crater volumes of 0.52 to 838 mm3, and penetration times for 12.7-mm-thick plates as short as 38 s. Minor contaminants in the graphite samples produced calcium and iron oxide to be redeposited on the graphite surface. Dramatic graphite crystalline structures are also produced at higher laser irradiances. Significantly increased porosity of the sample is observed even outside the laser-irradiated region. Total mass removed increases with deposited laser energy at a rate of 4.83 g/MJ for medium extruded graphite with an apparent threshold of 0.15 MJ. At ˜3.5 kW/cm2, the fractions of the mass removed from the cylindrical samples in the crater, surrounding trench, and outer region of decreased porosity are 38%, 47%, and 15%, respectively. Graphite is particularly resistant to damage by high power lasers. The new understanding of graphite combustion and sublimation during laser irradiation is vital to the more complex behavior of carbon composites.

  18. CdZnS thin films sublimated by closed space using mechanical mixing: A new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Waqar; Shah, Nazar Abbas

    2014-06-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is a prominent material for its tunable band gap used as a window layer in II-VI semiconductor solar cells. The light trapping capability of window layer is one of the powerful tools to enhance the efficiency of the cell. CdS and zinc (Zn) powders were mixed mechanically with different weight percents to make CdZnS (CZS) powder. CZS was deposited onto an ultrasonically cleaned glass substrate using close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. CZS as-deposited thin films were characterized for structural, surface morphology with energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) and optical properties for the use of window layer in CdS/CdTe based solar cells. The different Zn concentrations in CZS played a vital role on crystallite size in structural analysis and optical properties e.g. transmission, absorption coefficient and energy band gap, etc. The crystallite size of as-deposited CZS thin films were increased as Zn concentration was increased up to certain value. The energy band gap varies from 2.42 eV to 2.57 eV for as-deposited CZS thin films with increasing Zn concentrations and surface morphology changes also. These changes were occurred due to zinc diffusion in CdS thin films. An angle resolved transmission data was taken to check the behavior of CdS and CZS thin film at different angles. A comparative study was carried out between CdS thin films and CZS thin films for the use of good window layer material.

  19. Balmer Absorption Lines in FeLoBALs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, K.; Iwata, I.; Ohta, K.; Tamura, N.; Ando, M.; Akiyama, M.; Kiuchi, G.; Nakanishi, K.

    2007-10-01

    We discovered non-stellar Balmer absorption lines in two many-narrow-trough FeLoBALs (mntBALs) by the near-infrared spectroscopy with Subaru/CISCO. Presence of the non-stellar Balmer absorption lines is known to date only in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151; thus our discovery is the first cases for quasars. Since all known active galactic nuclei with Balmer absorption lines share similar characteristics, it is suggested that there is a population of BAL quasars which have unique structures at their nuclei or unique evolutionary phase.

  20. Photometry of LO Pegasi in B, V, R colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csorvási, R.

    2006-09-01

    Variable magnetic activity manifested by starspot distribution is investigated on the single K5-K7 dwarf LO Peg, using one month long photometric observations. We supposed three circular spots for light curve solution. We find variable spot temperature, whose average is 3960 K. The sizes of spots were stable for two spots and one spot showed a significant decrease. Different migration periods on two spots indicate differential rotation, the magnitude of the migration is slow. During the measured 90 stellar rotations (38.5 days) the location of the activity remained on the same hemisphere of the star.

  1. Age and stability of sublimation till over buried glacier ice, inferred from 21Ne measurements, Ong Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibby, T.; Putkonen, J.; Morgan, D. J.; Balco, G.

    2014-12-01

    Ong Valley, in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, contains three distinct glacial drifts deposited by past advances of the Argosy glacier into the valley. Massive ice occurs below two of the till deposits. Potentially, such buried ice under shallow regolith cover could provide access to past climate and biological records more easily than deep ice coring. We measured cosmic-ray produced 21Ne in these tills as a means of constraining the age and stability of the three drifts, as well as the ice below them. We collected samples in vertical profiles from two hand-dug sections through each drift. The pits from two drifts overlying buried ice extended to the buried ice surface. The hypothesis that these are sublimation tills implies that 21Ne concentrations are a function of i) any inheritance from prior exposure; ii) the age since emplacement of the ice and till; iii) the sublimation rate of the ice; and iv) the surface erosion rate of the till. 21Ne concentrations in the youngest drift are ca. 10 M atoms/g and invariant with depth, indicating that they are predominantly due to inheritance, and provide only a weak maximum age constraint of ca. 0.1 Mya. The two older drifts have surface 21Ne concentrations of 200-250 M atoms/ g and depth concentration profiles consistent with a sublimation till origin. Given that 21Ne concentrations in the deepest samples in each of the two older drifts provide an upper limit on the inherited 21Ne concentration, these imply minimum ages of 1 Mya for the middle drift and 1.6 Mya for the oldest. This implies a 1 Mya minimum age for the ice underlying the middle drift.

  2. Sublimation rates of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from comet nuclei at large distances from the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1991-01-01

    One of the more attractive among the plausible scenarios for the major emission event recently observed on Comet Halley at a heliocentric distance of 14.3 AU is activation of a source of ejecta driven by an icy substance much more volatile than water. As prerequisite for the forthcoming detailed analysis of the imaging observations of this event, a simple model is proposed that yields the sublimation rate versus time at any location on the surface of a rotating cometary nucleus for two candidate ices: carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The model's variable parameters are the comet's heliocentric distance r and the Sun's instantaneous zenith angle z.

  3. Hg1-xCdxTe vapor deposition on CdZnTe substrates by Closed Space Sublimation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, Sandra; Sochinskii, Nikolai V.; Repiso, Eva; Tsybrii, Zinoviia; Sizov, Fiodor; Plaza, Jose Luis; Diéguez, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Closed Space Sublimation (CSS) technique has been studied to deposit Hg1-xCdxTe polycrystalline films on CdZnTe substrates at the improved pressure-temperature conditions. The experimental results on film characterization suggest that the CSS optimal conditions are the argon atmospheric pressure (1013 mbar) and the deposition temperature in the range of 500-550 °C. These conditions provide macro-defect free Hg1-xCdxTe films with the uniform size and surface distribution of polycrystals.

  4. Effect of acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from a sublimating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Kastner, O.; Durst, F.

    2000-04-01

    particles much smaller than the sound wavelength. Good agreement between experiment and the theory of Yarin et al. is demonstrated. The time-averaged heat and mass transfer rates over a sphere surface are greatest at the sphere's equator and least at its poles in the experiment as predicted by the theory (the ultrasonic standing wave spans the vertical axis passing through the poles). The measured distribution of the mass transfer rate over the sphere surface also agrees with the theoretical predictions, which shows that in strong acoustic fields sublimation (or evaporation) results from the acoustic streaming.

  5. Advanced liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning concept testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, G. L. E.; Suter, J. D.; Turner, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    Advanced methods of liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant conditioning were studied as part of an effort for increasing reliability and operability while reducing cost of future heavy lift launch vehicles. The most promising conditioning concept evaluated was no-bleed (passive recirculation) followed by low-bleed, helium injection, and use of a recirculation line. Full-scale cryogenic testing was performed with a sloped feedline test article to validate models of behavior of LO2 in the feedline and to prove no-bleed feasibility. Test data are also intended to help generate design guidelines for the development of a main propulsion system feed duct. A design-of-experiments matrix of over 100 tests was developed to test all four propellant conditioning concepts and the impact of design parameters on the concepts. Liquid nitrogen was used as the test fluid. The work for this project was conducted from October 1992 through January 1994 at the hydrogen cold flow facility of the west test area of MSFC. Test data have shown that satisfactory temperatures are being obtained for the no-bleed conditioning concept.

  6. Fast optically sectioned fluorescence HiLo endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daryl; Mertz, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We describe a nonscanning, fiber bundle endomicroscope that performs optically sectioned fluorescence imaging with fast frame rates and real-time processing. Our sectioning technique is based on HiLo imaging, wherein two widefield images are acquired under uniform and structured illumination and numerically processed to reject out-of-focus background. This work is an improvement upon an earlier demonstration of widefield optical sectioning through a flexible fiber bundle. The improved device features lateral and axial resolutions of 2.6 and 17 μm, respectively, a net frame rate of 9.5 Hz obtained by real-time image processing with a graphics processing unit (GPU) and significantly reduced motion artifacts obtained by the use of a double-shutter camera. We demonstrate the performance of our system with optically sectioned images and videos of a fluorescently labeled chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in the developing G. gallus embryo. HiLo endomicroscopy is a candidate technique for low-cost, high-speed clinical optical biopsies. PMID:22463023

  7. Volcanic Activity on lo at the Time of the Ulysses Encounter.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J R; Howell, R R; Clark, B E; Klassen, D R; O'connor, D

    1992-09-11

    The population of heavy ions in lo's torus is ultimately derived from lo volcanism. Groundbased infrared observations of lo between October 1991 and March 1992, contemporaneous with the 8 February 1992 Ulysses observations of the lo torus, show that volcanic thermal emission was at the low end of the normal range at all lo longitudes during this period. In particular, the dominant hot spot Loki was quiescent. Resolved images show that there were at least four hot spots on lo's Jupiter-facing hemisphere, including Loki and a long-lived spot on the leading hemisphere (Kanehekili), of comparable 3.5-micrometer brightness but higher temperature.

  8. Ontogeny of fetal CD8lo4lo thymocytes: expression of CD44, CD25 and early expression of TcR alpha mRNA.

    PubMed

    Andjelić, S; Jain, N; Nikolić-Zugić, J

    1993-09-01

    CD8lo4lo cells are the immediate precursors of immature CD8hi4loTcRlo, CD8lo4hiTcRlo and CD8hi4hiTcRlo double-positive (DP) thymocytes in the adult murine thymus. These cells are the first subset in the adult thymus to express accessory CD8 and CD4 molecules, to rearrange the T cell receptor (TcR) alpha chain genes and to express the TcR alpha beta heterodimer at low levels at the surface. Here, we investigate the fetal ontogeny of CD8lo4lo cells. We detect these cells on day 15 of fetal development. They dominate the thymus on day 15.5, to become progressively less prominent thereafter. An important characteristic of fetal CD8lo4lo cells is the early expression of TcR alpha mRNA (on fetal day 15, 36-48 h earlier than reported previously). Our results also suggest, but do not prove, that the receptor may be expressed on the surface as early as day 15.5. Fetal CD8lo4lo cells, like their adult counterparts, become DP in vitro. However, early fetal CD8lo4lo thymocytes express both CD44 and CD25--unlike the adult subset--and that links them to their putative precursors, fetal CD44+CD25+ double-negative cells. This finding underscores the difference between adult and fetal thymocytes in turnover of membrane molecules and/or the kinetics of progression through phenotypic stages.

  9. Redetermination of the crystal structure of boron subphthalocyanine chloride (Cl-BsubPc) enabled by slow train sublimation.

    PubMed

    Virdo, Jessica D; Lough, Alan J; Bender, Timothy P

    2016-04-01

    The crystal structure of boron subphthalocyanine chloride [systematic name: chlorido(subphthalocyaninato)boron], C24H12BClN6, a material of widespread interest in organic electronic device applications, has been redetermined with a higher precision using large single crystals obtained via slow train sublimation. Details are given for the construction and operation of the train sublimation system, which has been designed to reproducibly yield single crystals suitable for diffraction experiments in a manner which approximates the vacuum deposition conditions commonly used to fabricate organic electronic devices. Diffraction experiments were conducted using two crystal samples and four temperatures (90, 123, 147 and 295 K), enabling a discussion of changes in the unit cell and intermolecular interactions with respect to temperature and in comparison to two previously published structures of Cl-BsubPc. The redetermined structure confirms the original structure published 41 years ago [Meller & Ossko (1972). Monatsh. Chem. 103, 150-155], with significantly improved precision for the geometric parameters. Analysis of the crystal structure revealed three intersecting ribbon motifs formed through a combination of π-π and halogen-π (specifically B-Cl...π) interactions. H atoms were refined independently in order to facilitate a thorough discussion of these intermolecular interactions using Hirshfeld surface analysis.

  10. Vacuum chamber with distributed titanium sublimation pumping for the G-line wiggler at Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; He, Y.; Mistry, N. B.

    2003-07-01

    This article describes a 3-m-long vacuum chamber for the new wiggler magnet at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) for the synchrotron light beam line of the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). Copper was chosen as the main chamber material for its good electric and thermal conductivities. Proper mechanical design and welding procedure were implemented to meet very tight tolerances to ensure adequate vertical aperture for the stored beams in CESR while allowing the required small wiggler gap. Distributed titanium sublimation pumping is incorporated along the 3 m length of the chamber to provide sufficient pumping speed and capacity for CESR and CHESS operations. The chamber pumping performance was evaluated prior to installation. Linear distributed pumping speeds at the beam line of ~720 l/s/m for N2 and CO and ~4000 l/s/m for H2 were measured. The measured pumping capacities for N2, CO and H2 are ~1.0, ~2.0 and ~77 Torr l, respectively, for each titanium sublimation cycle. Measurements also showed that CO molecules adsorb on the N2 and H2 saturated titanium films with virtually the same initial sticking coefficient as on a fresh titanium film. Analyses indicated very different CO adsorption mechanisms between the N2 and H2 saturated titanium films. While the replacement of surface H2 by CO was observed, little desorption of nitrogen was measured. Operational experience showed excellent vacuum pumping performance over two years after the chamber installation.

  11. A centre-triggered magnesium fuelled cathodic arc thruster uses sublimation to deliver a record high specific impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Patrick R. C.; Bilek, Marcela; McKenzie, David R.

    2016-08-01

    The cathodic arc is a high current, low voltage discharge that operates in vacuum and provides a stream of highly ionised plasma from a solid conducting cathode. The high ion velocities, together with the high ionisation fraction and the quasineutrality of the exhaust stream, make the cathodic arc an attractive plasma source for spacecraft propulsion applications. The specific impulse of the cathodic arc thruster is substantially increased when the emission of neutral species is reduced. Here, we demonstrate a reduction of neutral emission by exploiting sublimation in cathode spots and enhanced ionisation of the plasma in short, high-current pulses. This, combined with the enhanced directionality due to the efficient erosion profiles created by centre-triggering, substantially increases the specific impulse. We present experimentally measured specific impulses and jet power efficiencies for titanium and magnesium fuels. Our Mg fuelled source provides the highest reported specific impulse for a gridless ion thruster and is competitive with all flight rated ion thrusters. We present a model based on cathode sublimation and melting at the cathodic arc spot explaining the outstanding performance of the Mg fuelled source. A further significant advantage of an Mg-fuelled thruster is the abundance of Mg in asteroidal material and in space junk, providing an opportunity for utilising these resources in space.

  12. An enhanced model of the contemporary and long-term (200 ka) sublimation of the massive subsurface ice in Beacon Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu; Sletten, Ronald S.; Hagedorn, Birgit; Hallet, Bernard; McKay, Christopher P.; Stone, John O.

    2015-08-01

    A massive ice body buried under several decimeters of dry regolith in Beacon Valley, Antarctica, is believed to be more than 1 Ma old and perhaps over 8.1 Ma; however, vapor diffusion models suggest that subsurface ice in this region is not stable under current climate conditions. To better understand the controls on sublimation rates and stability of this massive ice, we have modeled vapor diffusion using 12 years of climate and soil temperature data from 1999 to 2011, including field measurements of episodic snow cover and snowmelt events that have not been represented in previous models of ground ice sublimation. The model is then extended to reconstruct the sublimation history over the last 200 ka using paleotemperatures estimated from ice core data from nearby Taylor Dome and a relationship between atmospheric temperature and humidity derived from our meteorological records. The model quantifies the impact of episodic snow events; they account for a nearly 30% reduction in the massive ice loss. The sublimation rate of ground ice averages 0.11 mm a-1 between 1999 and 2011 in Beacon Valley. Parameterized with past environmental conditions and assuming the same regolith thickness, the modeled sublimation rate of ground ice in Beacon Valley averages 0.09 mm a-1 for the last 200 ka, comparable to the long-term average rate estimated independently from various studies based on cosmogenic isotopes. This study provides a realistic estimate of the long-term sublimation history and supports the inference that the buried ice in Beacon Valley is older than 1 Ma.

  13. Responsivity calibration of the LoWEUS spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boyle, D.

    2016-09-02

    We performed an in situ calibration of the relative responsivity function of the Long-Wavelength Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (LoWEUS), while operating on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The calibration was accomplished by measuring oxygen lines, which are typically present in LTX plasmas. The measured spectral line intensities of each oxygen charge state were then compared to the calculated emission strengths given in the CHIANTI atomic database. Normalizing the strongest line in each charge state to the CHIANTI predictions, we obtained the differences between the measured and predicted values for the relative strengths of the other lines of a given charge state. We find that a 3rd degree polynomial function provides a good fit to the data points. Lastly, our measurements show that the responsivity between about 120 and 300 Å varies by factor of ~30.

  14. Responsivity calibration of the LoWEUS spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boyle, D.

    2016-11-01

    We performed an in situ calibration of the relative responsivity function of the Long-Wavelength Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (LoWEUS), while operating on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The calibration was accomplished by measuring oxygen lines, which are typically present in LTX plasmas. The measured spectral line intensities of each oxygen charge state were then compared to the calculated emission strengths given in the CHIANTI atomic database. Normalizing the strongest line in each charge state to the CHIANTI predictions, we obtained the differences between the measured and predicted values for the relative strengths of the other lines of a given charge state. We find that a 3rd degree polynomial function provides a good fit to the data points. Our measurements show that the responsivity between about 120 and 300 Å varies by factor of ˜30.

  15. Responsivity calibration of the LoWEUS spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Kaita, R.; ...

    2016-09-02

    We performed an in situ calibration of the relative responsivity function of the Long-Wavelength Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (LoWEUS), while operating on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The calibration was accomplished by measuring oxygen lines, which are typically present in LTX plasmas. The measured spectral line intensities of each oxygen charge state were then compared to the calculated emission strengths given in the CHIANTI atomic database. Normalizing the strongest line in each charge state to the CHIANTI predictions, we obtained the differences between the measured and predicted values for the relative strengths of the other linesmore » of a given charge state. We find that a 3rd degree polynomial function provides a good fit to the data points. Lastly, our measurements show that the responsivity between about 120 and 300 Å varies by factor of ~30.« less

  16. MaTeLo: Automated Testing Suite for Software Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiotto, A.; Acquaroli, B.; Martelli, A.

    It is universally known that testing has a predominant role when developing software: more and more efforts are spent on testing to detect programming faults, to evaluate the code reliability or performance, to ensure that a critical function of a system meets given requirements. The ratio of time spent on testing should not be neglected and this explains why there is a real need to improve the development process, especially as systems are becoming larger and larger. It is necessary to keep under control the schedule and budget of developments, and controlling the testing phase is a real issue, often underestimated in many industrial sectors. The industry is heightened at different stages regarding testing, and the MaTeLo project is committed to promote the use of statistical tools &methods to answer European industry's needs: • have the ability to choose relevant test cases instead of a human- biased selection • know when to stop testing (definition of a stopping criteria) instead of a vague and informal criteria • adopt an identical strategy for different developments • automate the testing process, and thus to make testing not human error prone MaTeLo (Markov Test Logic) study is a study currently under development in the frame of the IST program of the European Community. The aim of the project is to define, implement and validate a new approach for supporting the software testing activities in various industrial fields. One of the major goals is in particular to provide the software teams with a new tool able to automatically produce and execute the Test Cases starting from the software specifications. Further, the tool is conceived to provide metrics that could help technical staff to determine software quality and to evaluate how much expected results are met. The tool is based on Markov chains theory and belongs to statistical testing software tools family [Runeson] [Whittaker].

  17. The not-so-sublime early Earth recorded in Hadean zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavosie, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    oxygen isotope ratios (up to 7.5 %) are evidence that the early formed crust was evolved (granitic), rather than primitive (gabbroic). (4) Variable oxygen and Li isotope ratios in zircon record processes of surface alteration and subsequent magmatic recycling of altered crust, constraining the appearance of low surface temperatures and liquid water oceans by 4.3 to 4.2 Ga. (5) Evidence for the Late Heavy Bombardment has not been identified in Hadean zircons; planar microstructures known to form in shock metamorphosed zircon have not been found in Hadean grains. (6) Other claims, including reports of modern-style plate interactions based on zircon mineral inclusion barometry, and the presence of diamond inclusions in Hadean zircons, remain controversial, and open to interpretation. Many aspects of the Hadean are therefore similar to the Archean; distinguishing the two eons thus remains a challenge. However, the cooling and condensation of liquid surface water and its subsequent effect on magma chemistry, as recorded in Hadean zircons from 4.3 to 4.2 Ga, suggests a global-scale process that created habitats for life, and clearly marked the end of 'hell-like' Hadean surface conditions. As the timescale and processes active on the early Earth become better quantified through careful documentation and measurement of these ancient zircons, the Hadean becomes somewhat less sublime.

  18. Investigations in Martian geology. Part 1: Nature of the mantling deposit in the heavily cratered terrain of northeastern Arabia, Mars. Part 2: Experimental studies of clean and dust-or-sand-covered ice sublimation under Mars-like conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation consists of two parts. Part 1 describes the geomorphology of a portion of northeastern Arabia, Mars. This surface is covered by an extensive, layered deposit which has been, in places, substantially eroded. Speculative origins for the deposit include formation as a differentially welded pyroclastic tuff, or a differentially compacted, zonally indurated aeolian dust deposit. Part 2 is an experimental study of the sublimation rate of H{sub 2}O ice, both from clean surfaces and from under thin layers of dust or sand, in a Mars-like environment. The major conclusions drawn from the results of this experiment are: (1) even very thin layers of dust greatly lower the sublimation rate of an underlying ice substrate being heated from above, whereas thin layers of sand suppress the sublimation rate of underlying ice being heated from above to a significantly lesser extent; (2) thin layers of dust or sand only mildly suppress the sublimation rate of an underlying ice substrate when sample is wholly isothermal; (3) even a low-flux, desiccated gas flow over the sample surface significantly increases the sublimation rate of any given sample; (4) dry sublimation of ice underlying thin layers of dust or sand may modify the surface texture as a function of particle cohesion and as the ratio of particle layer thickness to the amount by which the surface was lowered; and (5) the actual sublimation rate of clean ice is several factors lower than the sublimation rate predicted by a commonly used formula.

  19. Pan-Observation Results on Snow Sublimation and its Parameterization in Both forested and Open Environment in Taiga of Eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Kubota, J.; Kadota, T.; Ohata, T.

    2002-12-01

    In the sub-arctic region of Siberia, like the Lena and Bikal basins, the snow cover is a dominant hydrological component to affect the river discharge and regional water resource. Sublimation from snow surface, which can sustained about seven months (later October to earlier May), has been identified as important hydrological process in high altitude and latitude region, which, as result of particularly complex mass and energy exchanges, remain incompletely, understood, though there has been recent progress in process studies. A survey of snow sublimation values from North American and Russian mass balance studies (Mcnay et al., 1988; Barry, 1991;) suggests that in boreal, montane and subalpine forests 25-45 % of the annual snowfall can sublimate from snow (Pomeroy and Gray, 1995). This range has been confirmed for other snowy environments such as maritime Japan (Nakai et al., 1993). From March to May of 2002, intensive observations on snow sublimation using pan method and meteorological condition of near ground surface atmosphere were made in Mogot experimental watershed, which is located in the southern mountain region of eastern Siberia (55.5°N, 124.7°E) approximately 60 km north of Tynda, in the Amur region, Russia. The land surface is predominantly covered by larch forest, but birch forest partly covers the ridge area and higher elevations are covered by pine forest. The observations, including the snow and meteorological elements, were conducted at three sites with different vegetation cover and surface condition: A sparse larch forest covers Site LF; Site OP is grassland and Site ES contains a sparse larch forest of east slope. The transparent plastic pan used for sublimation measurement was in diameter of 22 cm and depth of 20 cm. A natural snow bulk of the same size and shape as the pan was set at the 1 cm higher level than surrounding snow surface. The snow bulk in the pan was renewed according its temperature difference with surrounding snow. But it

  20. Origin, Evolution, and Preservation of Cold Based Debris Covered Glaciers: Quantifying Sublimation Rates of Ancient Buried Ice in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, D. E.; Marchant, D. R.

    2007-12-01

    Growing interest in our planet's climate history has placed a premium on acquiring detailed records of past climate change. Of considerable interest are archives of ancient atmosphere trapped within the debris-covered alpine glaciers of the western Dry Valleys region of Antarctica. The Mullins Valley debris-covered glacier (~8 km in length) is sourced from local snowfall at the steep headwall of the valley. The first 1.2 km of this glacier is generally free of overlying debris except for isolated cobbles and boulders. Thereafter, the ice surface is covered with a thin, continuous sheet of dolerite-rich rubble. Factors that influence the origin and modification of this ice include atmospheric temperature and relative humidity, precipitation, incoming solar radiance, surface albedo, till texture, winds, surface roughness, salts, and secondary ice lenses. We applied a diffusion model to track vapor flux within a sublimation till overlying the Mullins Valley debris-covered glacier, purportedly the world's oldest debris-covered alpine glacier. As input, we used meteorological data from HOBO data loggers that captured climate change and till temperatures. Results show that vapor flows into and out of the sublimation till at rates dependent on the non-linear variation of soil temperature with depth. Sublimation rates along the Mullins Glacier varied as a function of till thickness, local climate (using a calculated regional lapse rate of 0.88°C per 100 m), and till texture. Ice loss during the study interval (November 27, 2006 to December 24, 2006) ranged from as high as 2.12 mm for exposed glacier ice in the upper ablation zone, to as low as 0.01 mm for buried ice beneath till >50 cm in thickness. Averaged over the entire ablation zone (6.7 km2), this yields a net ice-surface lowering of 0.32 mm during the study interval. Numerical modeling suggests that a modest ice accumulation rate at the headwall of ~1 cm a-1 appears sufficient to maintain current ice volumes

  1. Material composition assessment and discovering sublimation activity on asteroids 145 Adeona, 704 Interamnia, 779 Nina, and 1474 Beira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busarev, V. V.; Barabanov, S. I.; Puzin, V. B.

    2016-07-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of 145 Adeona, 704 Interamnia, 779 Nina, and 1474 Beira—asteroids of close primitive types—allowed us to detect similar mineralogical absorption bands in their reflectance spectra centered in the range 0.35 to 0.92 μm; the bands are at 0.38, 0.44, and 0.67-0.71 μm. On the same asteroids, the spectral signs of simultaneous sublimation activity were found for the first time. Namely, there are maxima at ˜0.35-0.60 μm in the reflectance spectra of Adeona, Interamnia, and Nina and at ˜0.55-075 μm in the spectra of Beira. We connect this activity with small heliocentric distances of the asteroids and, consequently, with a high insolation at their surfaces. Examination of the samples of probable analogues allowed us to identify Fe3+ and Fe2+ in the material of these asteroids through the mentioned absorption bands. For analogues, we took powdered samples of carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil (CI), Mighei (CM2), Murchison (CM2), and Boriskino (CM2), as well as hydrosilicates of the serpentine group. Laboratory spectral reflectance study of the samples of low-iron Mg serpentines (<2 wt % FeO) showed that the equivalent width of the absorption band centered at 0.44-0.46 μm strongly correlates with the content of Fe3+ in octahedral and tetrahedral coordinations. Our conclusion is that this absorption band can be used as a qualitative indicator of Fe3+ in the surface matter of asteroids and other solid celestial bodies. The comparison of the listed analog samples and the asteroids by parameters of the spectral features suggests that the silicate component of the asteroids' surface material is a mixture of hydrated and oxidized compounds, including oxides and hydroxides of bivalent and trivalent iron and carbonaceous-chondritic material. At the same time, the sublimation activity of Adeona, Interamnia, Nina, and Beira at high surface temperatures points to a substantial content of water ice in their material. This contradicts the

  2. Measuring enthalpy of sublimation of volatiles by means of micro-thermogravimetry for the study of water and organic in planetary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Zampetti, E.; Biondi, D.; Boccaccini, A.; Pantalei, S.; Zinzi, A.

    In this work, we present a new experimental set up to infer the enthalpy of sublimation for a known specie of dicarboxylic acid, i.e. adipic acid. This type of acids, with various concentrations are present in different environments (e.g. marine, rural, urban). The experiment is performed in the framework of the VISTA (Volatile In Situ Thermogravimetry Analyser) project, an instrument currently under study for the ESA Cosmic Vision proposed mission MarcoPolo-R. The enthalpy of sublimation of adipic acid was measured by means of micro-thermogravimetric analysis (mu -TGA), a widely used technique to investigate condensation/sublimation and absorption/desorption processes of volatile compounds. The measurements were performed with a 10 MHz temperature controlled piezoelectric crystal microbalance (PCM), placed in a vacuum chamber (10-6 mbar). The obtained enthalpy of sublimation is (123±16) kJ× mol-1, a value in good agreement with literature within 10%. This result (connected to the deposition rate curve, from 30 o to 75 oC), demonstrates the capability of our device to perform this kind of measurements.

  3. On the sublimation of ice particles on the surface of Mars; with applications to the 2007/8 Phoenix Scout mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Peter A.; Baibakov, Konstantin; Brown, Stephen; Hecht, Michael H.; Hudson, Troy L.; Li, P.-Y.; Lange, Carlos F.; Prieto, Luis; Savelyev, Sergiy

    2006-04-01

    Experimental studies related to the sublimation of ice, in bulk or as small particles, alone or mixed with dust similar to that expected on the surface of Mars, are reported. The experiments, a cloud physics particle sublimation model, and a convection model presented by Ingersoll, all indicate a strong dependence of sublimation rate on temperature, and this appears to be the dominant factor, assuming that the relative humidity of the air is fairly low. In addition the rate of loss of water vapour appears to depend primarily on exposed surface area and less on particle size and the total mass of the sample, or the mass of ice in the sample. The 2007/8 Phoenix Scout mission plans to obtain and analyse samples of sub-surface ice from about 70° N on Mars. A concern is that these samples, in the form of ice chips of size about 1 mm diameter, could be prone to sublimation when exposed for prolonged periods (many hours) to a relatively warm and dry atmosphere. Our laboratory simulations confirm that this could be a problem if particles are simply left lying on the surface, but also indicate that samples kept suitably cold and collected together in confined piles will survive long enough for the collection and delivery (to the analysis instruments) procedure to be completed.

  4. The Role of Sublimation and Condensation in the Dynamics of Aeolian Ice Sedimentation Waves on the North Polar Cap of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herny, C.; Carpy, S.; Bourgeois, O.; Spiga, A.; Rodriguez, S.; Massé, M.; Le Mouélic, S.

    2016-09-01

    We explore the role of sublimation and condensation of water vapor in the development of ice sedimentation waves on the North Polar Cap of Mars. Our observations and simulations are in accordance with the hypothesis that sedimentation waves can migrate upwind or downwind.

  5. Method of fabricating conducting oxide-silicon solar cells utilizing electron beam sublimation and deposition of the oxide

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1979-01-01

    In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40.degree. and 70.degree. and preferably between 55.degree. and 65.degree. when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40.degree. and 70.degree. when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. gi The Government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Department of Energy Contract No. EY-76-C-03-1283.

  6. The role of oxygen in CdS/CdTe solar cells deposited by close-spaced sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.H.; Levi, D.H.; Matson, R.J.

    1996-05-01

    The presence of oxygen during close-spaced sublimation (CSS) of CdTe has been previously reported to be essential for high-efficiency CdS/CdTe solar cells because it increases the acceptor density in the absorber. The authors find that the presence of oxygen during CSS increases the nucleation site density of CdTe, thus decreasing pinhole density and grain size. Photoluminescence showed that oxygen decreases material quality in the bulk of the CdTe film, but positively impacts the critical CdS/CdTe interface. Through device characterization the authors were unable to verify an increase in acceptor density with increased oxygen. These results, along with the achievement of high-efficiency cells (13% AM1.5) without the use of oxygen, led the authors to conclude that the use of oxygen during CSS deposition of CdTe can be useful but is not essential.

  7. Volatilization, transport and sublimation of metallic and non-metallic elements in high temperature gases at Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Rose, William I.; Reed, M.H.; Lichte, F.E.; Finnegan, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Condensates, silica tube sublimates and incrustations were sampled from 500-800??C fumaroles and lava samples were collected at Merapi Volcano, Indonesia in Jan.-Feb., 1984. With respect to the magma, Merapi gases are enriched by factors greater than 105 in Se, Re, Bi and Cd; 104-105 in Au, Br, In, Pb and W; 103-104 in Mo, Cl, Cs, S, Sn and Ag; 102-103 in As, Zn, F and Rb; and 1-102 in Cu, K, Na, Sb, Ni, Ga, V, Fe, Mn and Li. The fumaroles are transporting more than 106 grams/day ( g d) of S, Cl and F; 104-106 g/d of Al, Br, Zn, Fe, K and Mg; 103-104 g d of Pb, As, Mo, Mn, V, W and Sr; and less than 103 g d of Ni, Cu, Cr, Ga, Sb, Bi, Cd, Li, Co and U. With decreasing temperature (800-500??C) there were five sublimate zones found in silica tubes: 1) cristobalite and magnetite (first deposition of Si, Fe and Al); 2) K-Ca sulfate, acmite, halite, sylvite and pyrite (maximum deposition of Cl, Na, K, Si, S, Fe, Mo, Br, Al, Rb, Cs, Mn, W, P, Ca, Re, Ag, Au and Co); 3) aphthitalite (K-Na sulfate), sphalerite, galena and Cs-K. sulfate (maximum deposition of Zn, Bi, Cd, Se and In; higher deposition of Pb and Sn); 4) Pb-K chloride and Na-K-Fe sulfate (maximum deposition of Pb, Sn and Cu); and 5) Zn, Cu and K-Pb sulfates (maximum deposition of Pb, Sn, Ti, As and Sb). The incrustations surrounding the fumaroles are also chemically zoned. Bi, Cd, Pb, W, Mo, Zn, Cu, K, Na, V, Fe and Mn are concentrated most in or very close to the vent as expected with cooling, atmospheric contamination and dispersion. The highly volatile elements Br, Cl, As and Sb are transported primarily away from high temperature vents. Ba, Si, P, Al, Ca and Cr are derived from wall rock reactions. Incomplete degassing of shallow magma at 915??C is the origin of most of the elements in the Merapi volcanic gas, although it is partly contaminated by particles or wall rock reactions. The metals are transported predominantly as chloride species. As the gas cools in the fumarolic environment, it becomes saturated

  8. Numerical simulation of temperature fields during the sublimation growth of SiC single crystals, using WIAS-HiTNIHS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiser, Jürgen; Klein, Olaf; Philip, Peter

    2007-05-01

    We present numerical computations of the temperature fields in axisymmetric growth apparatus for sublimation growth of silicon carbide (SiC) bulk single crystals by physical vapor transport (PVT) (modified Lely method). The results are computed using our software WIAS-HiTNIHS, the WIAS High Temperature Numerical Induction Heating Simulator; pronunciation: ˜hit-nice, by solving the energy balance in the entire growth apparatus, taking into account the heat conduction in the solid parts as well as in gas cavities, and also accounting for the radiative heat transfer between the surfaces of the gas cavities. The insulation in a PVT growth apparatus usually consists of graphite felt, where the fibers are aligned in one particular direction, resulting in an anisotropic thermal conductivity. We show that neglecting this anisotropy can overestimate the SiC crystal's temperature by 70 K or underestimate the required heating power by 800 W.

  9. Volatilization, transport and sublimation of metallic and non-metallic elements in high temperature gases at Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symonds, Robert B.; Rose, William I.; Reed, Mark H.; Lichte, Frederick E.; Finnegan, David L.

    1987-08-01

    Condensates, silica tube sublimates and incrustations were sampled from 500-800°C fumaroles and lava samples were collected at Merapi Volcano, Indonesia in Jan.-Feb., 1984. With respect to the magma, Merapi gases are enriched by factors greater than 10 5 in Se, Re, Bi and Cd; 10 4-10 5 in Au, Br, In, Pb and W; 10 3-10 4 in Mo, Cl, Cs, S, Sn and Ag; 10 2-10 3 in As, Zn, F and Rb; and 1-10 2 in Cu, K, Na, Sb, Ni, Ga, V, Fe, Mn and Li. The fumaroles are transporting more than 10 6 grams/day ( g/d) of S, Cl and F; 10 4-10 6 g/d of Al, Br, Zn, Fe, K and Mg; 10 3-10 4g/d of Pb, As, Mo, Mn, V, W and Sr; and less than 10 3g/d of Ni, Cu, Cr, Ga, Sb, Bi, Cd, Li, Co and U. With decreasing temperature (800-500°C) there were five sublimate zones found in silica tubes: 1) cristobalite and magnetite (first deposition of Si, Fe and Al); 2) K-Ca sulfate, acmite, halite, sylvite and pyrite (maximum deposition of Cl, Na, K, Si, S, Fe, Mo, Br, Al, Rb, Cs, Mn, W, P, Ca, Re, Ag, Au and Co); 3) aphthitalite (K-Na sulfate), sphalerite, galena and Cs-K. sulfate (maximum deposition of Zn, Bi, Cd, Se and In; higher deposition of Pb and Sn); 4) Pb-K chloride and Na-K-Fe sulfate (maximum deposition of Pb, Sn and Cu); and 5) Zn, Cu and K-Pb sulfates (maximum deposition of Pb, Sn, Ti, As and Sb). The incrustations surrounding the fumaroles are also chemically zoned. Bi, Cd, Pb, W, Mo, Zn, Cu, K, Na, V, Fe and Mn are concentrated most in or very close to the vent as expected with cooling, atmospheric contamination and dispersion. The highly volatile elements Br, Cl, As and Sb are transported primarily away from high temperature vents. Ba, Si, P, Al, Ca and Cr are derived from wall rock reactions. Incomplete degassing of shallow magma at 915°C is the origin of most of the elements in the Merapi volcanic gas, although it is partly contaminated by particles or wall rock reactions. The metals are transported predominantly as chloride species. As the gas cools in the fumarolic environment, it

  10. A macroscale mixture theory analysis of deposition and sublimation rates during heat and mass transfer in dry snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. C.; Foslien, W. E.

    2015-09-01

    The microstructure of a dry alpine snowpack is a dynamic environment where microstructural evolution is driven by seasonal density profiles and weather conditions. Notably, temperature gradients on the order of 10-20 K m-1, or larger, are known to produce a faceted snow microstructure exhibiting little strength. However, while strong temperature gradients are widely accepted as the primary driver for kinetic growth, they do not fully account for the range of experimental observations. An additional factor influencing snow metamorphism is believed to be the rate of mass transfer at the macroscale. We develop a mixture theory capable of predicting macroscale deposition and/or sublimation in a snow cover under temperature gradient conditions. Temperature gradients and mass exchange are tracked over periods ranging from 1 to 10 days. Interesting heat and mass transfer behavior is observed near the ground, near the surface, as well as immediately above and below dense ice crusts. Information about deposition (condensation) and sublimation rates may help explain snow metamorphism phenomena that cannot be accounted for by temperature gradients alone. The macroscale heat and mass transfer analysis requires accurate representations of the effective thermal conductivity and the effective mass diffusion coefficient for snow. We develop analytical models for these parameters based on first principles at the microscale. The expressions derived contain no empirical adjustments, and further, provide self consistent values for effective thermal conductivity and the effective diffusion coefficient for the limiting cases of air and solid ice. The predicted values for these macroscale material parameters are also in excellent agreement with numerical results based on microscale finite element analyses of representative volume elements generated from X-ray tomography.

  11. Pedestal Craters in Utopia Planitia and Malea Planum: Evidence for a Past Ice-Rich Substrate from Marginal Sublimation Pits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadish, S. J.; Head, J. W.; Barlow, N. G.; Marchant, D. R.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction: Pedestal craters (Pd) are a subclass of impact craters unique to Mars [1] characterized by a crater perched near the center of a pedestal (mesa or plateau) that is surrounded by a quasi-circular, outward-facing scarp. The marginal scarp is usually several crater diameters from the crater rim (Figs. 2,4,5), and tens to over 100 meters above the surrounding plains (Fig. 2). Pd have been interpreted to form by armoring of the proximal substrate during the impact event. Hypotheses for the armoring mechanism include an ejecta covering [e.g., 3], increased ejecta mobilization caused by volatile substrates [4], distal glassy/melt-rich veneers [5], and/or an atmospheric blast/thermal effect [6]. Subsequently, a marginal scarp forms by preferential erosion of the substrate surrounding the armored region, most commonly thought to involve eolian removal of fine-grained, non-armored material [e.g., 3]. An understanding of the distribution of Pd, which form predominantly poleward of ~40°N and S latitude [7-9] (Fig. 1), and the role of redistribution of ice and dust during periods of climate change [e.g., 10-11], suggests that the substrate might have been volatile-rich [8-9, 12-14]. As such, some researchers [e.g., 8-9] have proposed a model for Pd formation that involves impact during periods of higher obliquity, when mid- to high-latitude substrates were characterized by thick deposits of snow and ice [e.g., 15]. Subsequent sublimation of the volatile units, except below the armored regions, yielded the perched Pd. Thus, this model predicts that thick deposits of snow/ice should underlie Pd. This is in contrast to the eolian model [3], which calls primarily for deflation of sand and dust. Here, we show the results of our study [8,16] that has documented and characterized 2461 Pd on Mars equatorward of ~65° N and S latitude (Fig. 1) in order to test these hypotheses for the origin of pedestal craters. In particular, we report on the detection of 50 Pd in Utopia

  12. Sorbent, Sublimation, and Icing Modeling Methods: Experimental Validation and Application to an Integrated MTSA Subassembly Thermal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Chad; Padilla, Sebastian; Iacomini, Christie; Paul, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper details the validation of modeling methods for the three core components of a Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) subassembly, developed for use in a Portable Life Support System (PLSS). The first core component in the subassembly is a sorbent bed, used to capture and reject metabolically produced carbon dioxide (CO2). The sorbent bed performance can be augmented with a temperature swing driven by a liquid CO2 (LCO2) sublimation heat exchanger (SHX) for cooling the sorbent bed, and a condensing, icing heat exchanger (CIHX) for warming the sorbent bed. As part of the overall MTSA effort, scaled design validation test articles for each of these three components have been independently tested in laboratory conditions. Previously described modeling methodologies developed for implementation in Thermal Desktop and SINDA/FLUINT are reviewed and updated, their application in test article models outlined, and the results of those model correlations relayed. Assessment of the applicability of each modeling methodology to the challenge of simulating the response of the test articles and their extensibility to a full scale integrated subassembly model is given. The independent verified and validated modeling methods are applied to the development of a MTSA subassembly prototype model and predictions of the subassembly performance are given. These models and modeling methodologies capture simulation of several challenging and novel physical phenomena in the Thermal Desktop and SINDA/FLUINT software suite. Novel methodologies include CO2 adsorption front tracking and associated thermal response in the sorbent bed, heat transfer associated with sublimation of entrained solid CO2 in the SHX, and water mass transfer in the form of ice as low as 210 K in the CIHX.

  13. Experimental and theoretical simulation of sublimating dusty water ice with implications for D/H ratios of water ice on Comets and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Lauretta, Dante S.; Smith, Peter H.

    2012-12-01

    Sublimation experiments have been carried out to determine the effect of the mineral dust content of porous ices on the isotopic composition of the sublimate gas over medium (days to weeks) timescales. Whenever mineral dust of any kind was present, the D/H ratio of the sublimated gas was seen to decrease with time from the bulk ratio. Fractionations of up to 2.5 were observed for dust mixing ratios of 9 wt% and higher of JSC MARS-1 regolith simulant 1-10 μm crushed and sieved fraction. These favored the presence of the light isotope, H2O, in the gas phase. The more dust was added to the mixture, the more pronounced was this effect. Theoretical modeling of gas migration within the porous samples and adsorption on the excavated dust grains was undertaken to explain the results. Adsorption onto the dust grains is able to explain the low D/H ratios in the sublimate gas if adsorption favors retention of HDO over H2O. This leads to significant isotopic enrichment of HDO on the dust over time and depletion in the amount of HDO escaping the system as sublimate gas. This effect is significant for planetary bodies on which water moves mainly through the gas phase and a significant surface reservoir of dust may be found, such as on Comets and Mars. For each of these, inferences about the bulk water D/H ratio as inferred from gas phase measurements needs to be reassessed in light of the volatile cycling history of each body.

  14. Experimental and theoretical simulation of sublimating dusty water ice with implications for D/H ratios of water ice on Comets and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Lauretta, Dante S.; Smith, Peter H.

    2012-04-01

    Sublimation experiments have been carried out to determine the effect of the mineral dust content of porous ices on the isotopic composition of the sublimate gas over medium (days to weeks) timescales. Whenever mineral dust of any kind was present, the D/H ratio of the sublimated gas was seen to decrease with time from the bulk ratio. Fractionations of up to 2.5 were observed for dust mixing ratios of 9 wt% and higher of JSC MARS-1 regolith simulant 1-10 μm crushed and sieved fraction. These favored the presence of the light isotope, H2O, in the gas phase. The more dust was added to the mixture, the more pronounced was this effect. Theoretical modeling of gas migration within the porous samples and adsorption on the excavated dust grains was undertaken to explain the results. Adsorption onto the dust grains is able to explain the low D/H ratios in the sublimate gas if adsorption favors retention of HDO over H2O. This leads to significant isotopic enrichment of HDO on the dust over time and depletion in the amount of HDO escaping the system as sublimate gas. This effect is significant for planetary bodies on which water moves mainly through the gas phase and a significant surface reservoir of dust may be found, such as on Comets and Mars. For each of these, inferences about the bulk water D/H ratio as inferred from gas phase measurements needs to be reassessed in light of the volatile cycling history of each body.

  15. A field study of the geomorphic effects of sublimating CO2 blocks on dune slopes at Coral Pink Dunes, Utah.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Mary; Nield, Jo; Diniega, Serina; Hansen, Candy; McElwaine, Jim

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal sublimation of CO2 ice is an active driver of present-day surface change on Mars. Diniega et al (2013) proposed that a discrete type of Martian gully, found on southern hemisphere dunes, were formed by the movement of CO2 seasonal ice blocks. These 'Linear Gullies' consist primarily of long (100 m - 2.5 km) grooves with near-uniform width (few-10 m wide), and typical depth of <2 m. They are near-linear throughout most of their length but sometimes contains zones of low-to-high sinuosity. They are commonly bounded by levées. The groove is generally prefaced by a small alcove that originates at the dune brink. We present the results of a set of field experiments that were undertaken at the Coral Pink sand dunes, Utah. These are sister experiments to those undertaken in Arizona (Bourke et al, 2016). The experiments were undertaken on an active barchan dune with a 16 m long lee slope (30.3°). Ambient air temperature was 30°C and relative humidity was 25%; sand surface temperatures were 26.5°C. A CO2 ice block (60x205x210 mm) was placed at the dune brink and with a gentle nudge it moved downslope. The dynamics of the block movement were recorded using a pair of high resolution video cameras. Geomorphological observations were noted and topographic change was quantified using a Leica P20 terrestrial laser scanner with a resolution of 0.8 mm at 10 m, and change detection limits less than 3 mm. The block run was repeated a total of 10 times and launched from the same location at the dune brink. The experiment ran for 45 minutes. The block size was reduced to (45 x 190 x 195 mm) by the end of the run series. The resultant geomorphology shows that the separate block runs occupied different tracks leading to a triangular plan form shape with a maximum width of 3.5 m. This is different from the findings in Arizona where a narrower track span was recorded (1.7m) (Bourke et al, 2016). Similar block dynamics were observed at both sites (as blocks moved straight

  16. Adsorptive fractionation of HDO on JSC MARS-1 during sublimation with implications for the regolith of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, John E.; Smith, Peter H.; Boynton, William V.

    2011-02-01

    A chamber was constructed to simulate the boundary between the ice table, regolith and atmosphere of Mars and to examine fractionation between H 2O and HDO during sublimation under realistic martian conditions of temperature and pressure. Thirteen experimental runs were conducted with regolith overlying the ice. The thickness and characteristic grain size of the regolith layer as well as the temperature of the underlying ice was varied. From these runs, values for the effective diffusivity, taking into account the effects of adsorption, of the regolith were derived. These effective diffusivities ranged from 1.8 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 to 2.2 × 10 -3 m 2 s -1 for bare ice and from 2.4 × 10 -11 m 2 s -1 to 2.0 × 10 -9 m 2 s -1 with an adsorptive layer present. From these, latent heats of adsorption of 8.6 ± 2.6 kJ mol -1 and 9.3 ± 2.8 kJ mol -1 were derived at ice-surface temperatures above 223 ± 8 K and 96 ± 28 kJ mol -1 and 104 ± 31 kJ mol -1 respectively for H 2O and HDO were derived at colder temperatures. For temperatures below 223 K, the effective diffusivity of HDO was found to be lower than the diffusivity of H 2O by 40% on average, suggesting that the regolith was adsorptively fractionating the sublimating gas with a fractionation factor of 1.96 ± 0.74. Applying these values to Mars predicts that adsorbed water on the regolith is enriched in HDO compared to the atmosphere, particularly where the regolith is colder. Based on current observations, the D/H ratio of the regolith may be as high as 21 ± 8 times VSMOW at 12°S and L S = 357° if the regolith is hydrated primarily by the atmosphere, neglecting any hydration from subsurface ice.

  17. HMT production and sublimation during thermal process of cometary organic analogs. Implications for its detection with the ROSETTA instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briani, Giacomo; Fray, Nicolas; Cottin, Hervé; Benilan, Yves; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Perrier, Sebastien

    2013-09-01

    One important component of refractory organic residues synthesized from interstellar/cometary ice analogues is hexamethylenetetramine (HMT, C6H12N4). However, HMT has never been observed in any astrophysical or planetary environment so far. We investigated thermal evolution of HMT above ambient temperature. The synthesis of the organic residue (ice deposition, photolysis and warming) as well as its heating to temperatures higher than 300 K are performed by means of the same experimental apparatus. The later also allows in situ continuous monitoring of both the solid organic residue (by FTIR spectrometry) and of the gas species (by mass spectrometry). Two different ice mixtures, composed of H2O:CH3OH:NH3 = 10:1:1 and H2O:CH3OH:NH3:CO2 = 10:1:1:2, were deposited and simultaneously photolyzed at 29 K. Warming these photolyzed ices up to 300 K allows the production of refractory organic residues. At 300 K the organic residues clearly show the presence of HMT, but also some difference, in particular in their oxygenated components. Different evolutions of the organic residues are observed for temperatures >300 K. We characterized the organic residue thermal evolution for temperatures up to 500 K. We observed that HMT is still produced at temperatures higher than 300 K. Production of solid HMT and sublimation are simultaneous. HMT observed in the solid phase could be only a minor fraction of the total HMT production, the major fraction being sublimated. The kinetics of the HMT thermal evolution strongly depends on the organic residue composition at 300 K and seems to depend on the exact nature of the oxygenated fraction of the organic residue. The maximum temperature at which solid HMT is observed is 450 K. As HMT forms only for temperatures greater than 280 K in laboratory conditions, it implies that the detection of solid HMT in extraterrestrial samples will provide a strong indication of their thermal history. Consequently, the search for HMT in both solid cometary

  18. Resonant tunnelling diode oscillator as an alternative LO for SIS receiver applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blundell, R.; Papa, D. C.; Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    The resonant tunnelling diode (RTD) oscillator has been demonstrated for the first time as a local oscillator (LO) in a heterodyne receiver. Noise measurements made on a sensitive 200 GHz superconductor-insulator-superconductor receiver using both a multiplied Gunn diode and an RTD oscillator as the LO revealed no difference in receiver noise as a function of oscillator type.

  19. 75 FR 61478 - D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Petition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... formation for natural gas storage, all as more fully set forth in the application, which is on file with the... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Petition September 24, 2010. Take notice that on September 21, 2010, D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC (Petitioner), 1002 East St. Mary...

  20. THE NATURE OF LoBAL QSOs. I. SEDs AND MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarova, Mariana S.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Lacy, Mark; Sajina, Anna E-mail: gabriela.canalizo@ucr.edu E-mail: Anna.Sajina@tufts.edu

    2012-08-10

    We have obtained Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra and MIPS 24, 70, and 160 {mu}m photometry for a volume-limited sample of 22 Sloan Digital Sky Survey selected low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBALs) QSOs at 0.5 < z < 0.6. By comparing their mid-IR spectral properties and far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with those of a control sample of 35 non-LoBALs matched in M{sub i} , we investigate the differences between the two populations in terms of their infrared emission and star formation (SF) activity. Twenty-five percent of the LoBALs show polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features and 45% have weak 9.7 {mu}m silicate dust emission. We model the SEDs and decouple the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and starburst contributions to the far-infrared luminosity in LoBALs and in non-LoBALs. Their median total, starburst, and AGN infrared luminosities are comparable. Twenty percent (but no more than 60%) of the LoBALs and 26% of the non-LoBALs are ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L{sub IR} > 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }). We estimate star formation rates (SFRs) corrected for the AGN contribution to the FIR flux and find that LoBALs have comparable levels of SF activity to non-LoBALs when considering the entire samples. However, the SFRs of the IR-luminous LoBALs are 80% higher than those of their counterparts in the control sample. The median contribution of SF to the total far-infrared flux in LoBALs and in non-LoBALs is estimated to be 40%-50%, in agreement with previous results for Palomar-Green (PG) QSOs. Overall, our results show that there is no strong evidence from the mid- and far-IR properties that LoBALs are drawn from a different parent population than non-LoBALs.

  1. A ROACH Based Data Acquisition System for the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartez, Louis P.; Jenet, F.; Cohen, S.; Creighton, T. D.; Ford, A.; Garcia, A.; Hicks, B.; Hinojosa, J.; Kassim, N. E.; Longoria, C.; Lunsford, G.; Mata, A.; Miller, R. B.; Price, R. H.; Quintero, L.; Ray, P. S.; Reser, J.; Rivera, J.; Stovall, K.; Taylor, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 5 to 88 MHz. The primary science goals will be the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients. LoFASM consists of antennas and front end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of 4 stations, each consisting of 12 dual-polarization dipole antenna stands. The signals received by LoFASM are digitized and processed using Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware (ROACH) boards. This poster will describe the LoFASM project with an emphasis on the ROACH data processing pipe-line.

  2. In-Space Propulsion Engine Architecture Based on Sublimation of Planetary Resources: From Exploration Robots to NED Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Mantovani, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile solids occur naturally on most planetary bodies including the Moon, Mars, asteroids and comets. Examples of recent discoveries include water ice, frozen carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons. The ability to utilize readily available resources for in-space propulsion and for powering surface systems during a planetary mission will help minimize the overall cost and extend the op.erational life of a mission. The utilization of volatile solids to achieve these goals is attractive for its simplicity. We have investigated the potential of subliming in situ volatiles and silicate minerals to power propulsion engines for a wide range of in-space applications where environmental conditions are favorable. This paper addresses the' practicality of using planetary solid volatiles as a power source for propulsion and surface systems by presenting results of modeling involving thermodynamic and physical mechanics calculations, and laboratory testing to measure the thrust obtained from ,a volatile solid engine (VSE). Applications of a VSE for planetary exploration are discussed as a means for propulsion and for mechanical actuators and surface mobility platforms.

  3. Characterization of CdMnTe films deposited from polycrystalline powder source using closed-space sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jianming; Wang, Junnan; Wang, Lin; Ji, Huanhuan; Xu, Run; Zhang, Jijun; Huang, Jian; Shen, Yue; Min, Jiahua; Wang, Linjun Xia, Yiben

    2015-09-15

    CdMnTe films were prepared on quartz substrates by closed-space sublimation of polycrystalline Cd{sub 0.74}Mn{sub 0.26}Te powders. This was performed at different substrate temperatures (T{sub s} = 200, 300, 350, and 400 °C). The interfacial adhesion strength between the films and substrates, when fabricated from polycrystalline powders, was greater than that of films grown using a bulk source. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the as-deposited films had a zinc blende structure with a preferential (111) orientation. Precipitation of Te occurred in the films deposited at T{sub s} = 200 °C, as confirmed using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. The growth mode and re-evaporation dependence on the value of T{sub s} of the films were investigated. Our results suggested that materials suitable for radiation detection can be grown from a powder source at lower substrate temperatures then when grown from a bulk source.

  4. Solid sulfur in vacuum: Sublimation effects on surface microtexture, color and spectral reflectance, and applications to planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    A form of sulfur that is white at room temperature and very fluffy in texture has been found in laboratory experiments on the effects of vacuum sublimation (evaporation) on solid sulfur. This work is an outgrowth of proton sputtering experiments on sulfur directed toward understanding Jovian magnetospheric effects on the surface of Io. Fluffy white sulfur is formed on the surface of solid yellow, tan, or brown sulfur melt freezes in vacuum by differential (fractional) evaporation of two or more sulfur molecular species present in the original sulfur; S(8) ring sulfur is thought to be the dominant sublimination phase lost to the vacuum sink, and polymeric chain sulfur S(u) the dominant residual phase that remains in place, forming the residual fluffy surface layer. The reflectance spectrum of the original sulfur surface is greaty modified by formation of the fluffy layer: the blue absorption band-edge and shoulder move 0.05 to 0.06 microns toward shorter wavelengths resulting in a permanent increase in reflectivity near 0.42 to 0.46 microns; the UV reflectivity below 0.40 microns is reduced. This form of sulfur should exist in large quantity on the surface of Io, especially in hotspot regions if there is solid free sulfur there that has solidified from a melt. Its color and spectra will indicate relative crystallization age on a scale of days to months and/or surface temperature distribution history.

  5. 12% efficient CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells deposited by low-temperature close space sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, Judith; Motzko, Markus; Tueschen, Alexander; Swirschuk, Andreas; Schimper, Hermann-Josef; Klein, Andreas; Modes, Thomas; Zywitzki, Olaf; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2011-09-01

    We report 12% efficient CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells prepared by low temperature close space sublimation (CSS). Both semiconductor films, CdS and CdTe, were deposited by high vacuum CSS in superstrate configuration on glass substrates with fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) front contact. The CdTe deposition was carried out at a substrate temperature (Tsub) of ≤340 ∘C, which is much lower than that used in conventional processes (>500 ∘C). The CdTe films were treated with the usual CdCl2 activation process. Different optimal annealing times and temperatures were found for low-temperature cells (Tsub≤ 340 ∘C) compared to high-temperature cells (Tsub = 520 ∘C). The influence of the activation step on the morphology of high-temperature and low-temperature CdTe is determined by XRD, AFM, SEM top views, and SEM cross-sections. Grain growth, strong recrystallization, and a reduction of planar defects during the activation step are observed, especially for low-temperature CdTe. Further, the influence of CdS deposition parameters on the solar cell performance is investigated by using three different sets of parameters with different deposition rates and substrate temperatures for the CdS preparation. Efficiencies about 10.9% with a copper-free back contact and 12.0% with a copper-containing back contact were achieved using the low temperature CdTe process.

  6. CO2 jets formed by sublimation beneath translucent slab ice in Mars' seasonal south polar ice cap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Christensen, P.R.; Titus, T.N.

    2006-01-01

    The martian polar caps are among the most dynamic regions on Mars, growing substantially in winter as a significant fraction of the atmosphere freezes out in the form of CO2 ice. Unusual dark spots, fans and blotches form as the south-polar seasonal CO2 ice cap retreats during spring and summer. Small radial channel networks are often associated with the location of spots once the ice disappears. The spots have been proposed to be simply bare, defrosted ground; the formation of the channels has remained uncertain. Here we report infrared and visible observations that show that the spots and fans remain at CO2 ice temperatures well into summer, and must be granular materials that have been brought up to the surface of the ice, requiring a complex suite of processes to get them there. We propose that the seasonal ice cap forms an impermeable, translucent slab of CO2 ice that sublimates from the base, building up high-pressure gas beneath the slab. This gas levitates the ice, which eventually ruptures, producing high-velocity CO 2 vents that erupt sand-sized grains in jets to form the spots and erode the channels. These processes are unlike any observed on Earth. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. CO2 jets formed by sublimation beneath translucent slab ice in Mars' seasonal south polar ice cap.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Hugh H; Christensen, Philip R; Titus, Timothy N

    2006-08-17

    The martian polar caps are among the most dynamic regions on Mars, growing substantially in winter as a significant fraction of the atmosphere freezes out in the form of CO2 ice. Unusual dark spots, fans and blotches form as the south-polar seasonal CO2 ice cap retreats during spring and summer. Small radial channel networks are often associated with the location of spots once the ice disappears. The spots have been proposed to be simply bare, defrosted ground; the formation of the channels has remained uncertain. Here we report infrared and visible observations that show that the spots and fans remain at CO2 ice temperatures well into summer, and must be granular materials that have been brought up to the surface of the ice, requiring a complex suite of processes to get them there. We propose that the seasonal ice cap forms an impermeable, translucent slab of CO2 ice that sublimates from the base, building up high-pressure gas beneath the slab. This gas levitates the ice, which eventually ruptures, producing high-velocity CO2 vents that erupt sand-sized grains in jets to form the spots and erode the channels. These processes are unlike any observed on Earth.

  8. HiRISE observations of gas sublimation-driven activity in Mars’ southern polar regions: III. Models of processes involving translucent ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Markiewicz, Wojciech J.; Thomas, Nicolas; Hansen, Candice J.; Milazzo, Moses

    2010-01-01

    Enigmatic surface features, known as 'spiders', found at high southern martian latitudes, are probably caused by sublimation-driven erosion under the seasonal carbon dioxide ice cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) has imaged this terrain in unprecedented details throughout southern spring. It has been postulated [Kieffer, H.H., Titus, T.N., Mullins, K.F., Christensen, P.R., 2000. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 9653-9700] that translucent CO slab ice traps gas sublimating at the ice surface boundary. Wherever the pressure is released the escaping gas jet entrains loose surface material and carries it to the top of the ice where it is carried downslope and/or downwind and deposited in a fan shape. Here we model two stages of this scenario: first, the cleaning of CO slab ice from dust, and then, the breaking of the slab ice plate under the pressure built below it by subliming ice. Our modeling results and analysis of HiRISE images support the gas jet hypothesis and show that outbursts happen very early in spring.

  9. HiRISE observations of gas sublimation-driven activity in Mars' southern polar regions: III. Models of processes involving translucent ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Portyankina, G.; Markiewicz, W.J.; Thomas, N.; Hansen, C.J.; Milazzo, M.

    2010-01-01

    Enigmatic surface features, known as 'spiders', found at high southern martian latitudes, are probably caused by sublimation-driven erosion under the seasonal carbon dioxide ice cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) has imaged this terrain in unprecedented details throughout southern spring. It has been postulated [Kieffer, H.H., Titus, T.N., Mullins, K.F., Christensen, P.R., 2000. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 9653-9700] that translucent CO2 slab ice traps gas sublimating at the ice surface boundary. Wherever the pressure is released the escaping gas jet entrains loose surface material and carries it to the top of the ice where it is carried downslope and/or downwind and deposited in a fan shape. Here we model two stages of this scenario: first, the cleaning of CO2 slab ice from dust, and then, the breaking of the slab ice plate under the pressure built below it by subliming ice. Our modeling results and analysis of HiRISE images support the gas jet hypothesis and show that outbursts happen very early in spring. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A redetermination of the ice/vapor ratio of Enceladus’ plumes: Implications for sublimation and the lack of a liquid water reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, Susan W.; Lu, Xinli; McFarquhar, Greg; Wohletz, Kenneth H.

    2009-09-01

    The discovery of plumes of H 2O vapor and ice particles erupting from the south pole of Enceladus, the tiny frigid satellite of Saturn, sparked controversy over whether these plumes are produced by boiling, or by sublimation with subsequent recondensation of the sublimated vapor [Porco, C.C., Helfenstein, P., Thomas, P.C., Ingersoll, A.P., Wisdom, J., West, R., Neukum, G., Denk, T., Wagner, R., Roatsch, T., Kieffer, S., Turtle, E., McEwen, A., Johnson, T.V., Rathbun, J., Veverka, J., Wilson, D., Perry, J., Spitale, J., Brahic, A., Burns, J.A., DelGenio, A.D., Dones, L., Murray, C.D., Squyres, S., 2006. Science 311, 1393-1401]. Porco et al.'s analysis that the masses of ice (I) and vapor (V) in the plume were comparable was taken to argue against the occurrence of sublimation and recondensation, leading to the hypothesis that the reservoir was boiling water, possibly as close as 7 m to the surface. Thus, it has been advocated that Enceladus should be a target for astrobiology exploration. Here we show, with recalculations using the original data and methodologies, as well as with new sensitivity studies, that the mass of ice in the column is significantly less than the mass of water vapor, and that by considering three additional effects, I/V is likely to be <0.2-0.1. This means that the plume is dominated by vapor that the thermodynamics permits to be easily produced by sublimation with recondensation. The low I/V ratio provides no compelling criterion for consideration of a liquid water reservoir. The uncertainties on the I/V ratio have not previously been discussed in the literature. Although the I/V ratio is sensitive to particle sizes and size distributions, the masses of ice (I) and vapor (V) are not comparable in any scenario constrained by available observations. We thus discuss the implications of sublimation from a thermodynamic point of view in a context that has not been presented previously. Constraints on I/V ratio from future spacecraft measurements

  11. Contrast Invariant Interest Point Detection by Zero-Norm LoG Filter.

    PubMed

    Zhenwei Miao; Xudong Jiang; Kim-Hui Yap

    2016-01-01

    The Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) filter is widely used in interest point detection. However, low-contrast image structures, though stable and significant, are often submerged by the high-contrast ones in the response image of the LoG filter, and hence are difficult to be detected. To solve this problem, we derive a generalized LoG filter, and propose a zero-norm LoG filter. The response of the zero-norm LoG filter is proportional to the weighted number of bright/dark pixels in a local region, which makes this filter be invariant to the image contrast. Based on the zero-norm LoG filter, we develop an interest point detector to extract local structures from images. Compared with the contrast dependent detectors, such as the popular scale invariant feature transform detector, the proposed detector is robust to illumination changes and abrupt variations of images. Experiments on benchmark databases demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed zero-norm LoG detector in terms of the repeatability and matching score of the detected points as well as the image recognition rate under different conditions.

  12. LoCoH: nonparameteric kernel methods for constructing home ranges and utilization distributions.

    PubMed

    Getz, Wayne M; Fortmann-Roe, Scott; Cross, Paul C; Lyons, Andrew J; Ryan, Sadie J; Wilmers, Christopher C

    2007-02-14

    Parametric kernel methods currently dominate the literature regarding the construction of animal home ranges (HRs) and utilization distributions (UDs). These methods frequently fail to capture the kinds of hard boundaries common to many natural systems. Recently a local convex hull (LoCoH) nonparametric kernel method, which generalizes the minimum convex polygon (MCP) method, was shown to be more appropriate than parametric kernel methods for constructing HRs and UDs, because of its ability to identify hard boundaries (e.g., rivers, cliff edges) and convergence to the true distribution as sample size increases. Here we extend the LoCoH in two ways: "fixed sphere-of-influence," or r-LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a fixed radius r of each reference point), and an "adaptive sphere-of-influence," or a-LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a radius a such that the distances of all points within the radius to the reference point sum to a value less than or equal to a), and compare them to the original "fixed-number-of-points," or k-LoCoH (all kernels constructed from k-1 nearest neighbors of root points). We also compare these nonparametric LoCoH to parametric kernel methods using manufactured data and data collected from GPS collars on African buffalo in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our results demonstrate that LoCoH methods are superior to parametric kernel methods in estimating areas used by animals, excluding unused areas (holes) and, generally, in constructing UDs and HRs arising from the movement of animals influenced by hard boundaries and irregular structures (e.g., rocky outcrops). We also demonstrate that a-LoCoH is generally superior to k- and r-LoCoH (with software for all three methods available at http://locoh.cnr.berkeley.edu).

  13. LoCoH: Nonparameteric Kernel Methods for Constructing Home Ranges and Utilization Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Wayne M.; Fortmann-Roe, Scott; Wilmers, Christopher C.

    2007-01-01

    Parametric kernel methods currently dominate the literature regarding the construction of animal home ranges (HRs) and utilization distributions (UDs). These methods frequently fail to capture the kinds of hard boundaries common to many natural systems. Recently a local convex hull (LoCoH) nonparametric kernel method, which generalizes the minimum convex polygon (MCP) method, was shown to be more appropriate than parametric kernel methods for constructing HRs and UDs, because of its ability to identify hard boundaries (e.g., rivers, cliff edges) and convergence to the true distribution as sample size increases. Here we extend the LoCoH in two ways: “fixed sphere-of-influence,” or r-LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a fixed radius r of each reference point), and an “adaptive sphere-of-influence,” or a-LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a radius a such that the distances of all points within the radius to the reference point sum to a value less than or equal to a), and compare them to the original “fixed-number-of-points,” or k-LoCoH (all kernels constructed from k-1 nearest neighbors of root points). We also compare these nonparametric LoCoH to parametric kernel methods using manufactured data and data collected from GPS collars on African buffalo in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our results demonstrate that LoCoH methods are superior to parametric kernel methods in estimating areas used by animals, excluding unused areas (holes) and, generally, in constructing UDs and HRs arising from the movement of animals influenced by hard boundaries and irregular structures (e.g., rocky outcrops). We also demonstrate that a-LoCoH is generally superior to k- and r-LoCoH (with software for all three methods available at http://locoh.cnr.berkeley.edu). PMID:17299587

  14. LoCoH: Non-parameteric kernel methods for constructing home ranges and utilization distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Getz, Wayne M.; Fortmann-Roe, Scott; Cross, Paul C.; Lyons, Andrew J.; Ryan, Sadie J.; Wilmers, Christopher C.

    2007-01-01

    Parametric kernel methods currently dominate the literature regarding the construction of animal home ranges (HRs) and utilization distributions (UDs). These methods frequently fail to capture the kinds of hard boundaries common to many natural systems. Recently a local convex hull (LoCoH) nonparametric kernel method, which generalizes the minimum convex polygon (MCP) method, was shown to be more appropriate than parametric kernel methods for constructing HRs and UDs, because of its ability to identify hard boundaries (e.g., rivers, cliff edges) and convergence to the true distribution as sample size increases. Here we extend the LoCoH in two ways: ‘‘fixed sphere-of-influence,’’ or r -LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a fixed radius r of each reference point), and an ‘‘adaptive sphere-of-influence,’’ or a -LoCoH (kernels constructed from all points within a radius a such that the distances of all points within the radius to the reference point sum to a value less than or equal to a ), and compare them to the original ‘‘fixed-number-of-points,’’ or k -LoCoH (all kernels constructed from k -1 nearest neighbors of root points). We also compare these nonparametric LoCoH to parametric kernel methods using manufactured data and data collected from GPS collars on African buffalo in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our results demonstrate that LoCoH methods are superior to parametric kernel methods in estimating areas used by animals, excluding unused areas (holes) and, generally, in constructing UDs and HRs arising from the movement of animals influenced by hard boundaries and irregular structures (e.g., rocky outcrops). We also demonstrate that a -LoCoH is generally superior to k - and r -LoCoH (with software for all three methods available at http://locoh.cnr.berkeley.edu).

  15. Holographic wavefront sensor based on Karhunen-Loève decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzuola, Esdras; Zepp, Andreas; Gladysz, Szymon; Stein, Karin

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce the use of Karhunen-Loève functions as a basis set to decompose atmospheric phase aberrations in a digital holographic wavefront sensor (HWS). We show that the intermodal crosstalk when using Karhunen-Loève functions is reduced in comparison to the Zernike decomposition. Additionally, the sensor's response showed an improved linearity and better robustness to scintillation. Intermodal crosstalk remains a significant problem for this sensor but operation of an adaptive optics system based on HWS is less challenging when using Karhunen-Loève functions instead of Zernike polynomials.

  16. Higgs boson gluon-fusion production beyond threshold in N3LO QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; ...

    2015-03-18

    In this study, we compute the gluon fusion Higgs boson cross-section at N3LO through the second term in the threshold expansion. This calculation constitutes a major milestone towards the full N3LO cross section. Our result has the best formal accuracy in the threshold expansion currently available, and includes contributions from collinear regions besides subleading corrections from soft and hard regions, as well as certain logarithmically enhanced contributions for general kinematics. We use our results to perform a critical appraisal of the validity of the threshold approximation at N3LO in perturbative QCD.

  17. Cadmium sulfide thin films deposited by close spaced sublimation and cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinskiy, Dmitriy Nikolaevich

    1998-12-01

    One of the applications of CdS films is as a window layer in CdTe and Cu(In,Ga)Sesb2 solar cells. The study of the optical and structural properties of CdS films deposited by close spaced sublimation as well as their influence on CdS/CdTe solar cell performance is part of the CdTe solar cell program at the University of South Florida. CdS films have been deposited by the close-spaced sublimation technique. The influence of the main process parameters, the substrate and source temperatures, and the ambient in the deposition chamber has been investigated. As-deposited films have been subjected to heat treatments in Hsb2 ambient, in CdClsb2 atmosphere, and in atmosphere with small amounts of oxygen. A special annealing chamber was built to carry out the annealing experiments in the presence of CdClsb2 vapor and oxygen. Several CSS chambers were assembled to study the influence of various process parameters simultaneously and validate the results. Results of scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements have been used as the primary characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, and transmission measurements have also been carried out. It was found that as deposited CdS films have a hexagonal structure independent of the process parameters used. The presence of a CdO phase was detected in the samples grown with the highest oxygen concentration in the ambient. The resistivity of CdS films is controlled by intergrain barriers. Photoluminescence measurements showed the presence of oxygen-acceptor transition and a wide variation in the intensity of deep emission bands. The variation in the intensities was correlated with the variation in the deposition and annealing conditions. However, no correlation was found between the PL intensities of defect bands and cell performance. CdS/CdTe junctions have been fabricated using standard deposition and postgrowth techniques developed in the USF solar cells laboratory. All cells have

  18. Recent ice-rich deposits formed at high latitudes on Mars by sublimation of unstable equatorial ice during low obliquity.

    PubMed

    Levrard, Benjamin; Forget, François; Montmessin, Franck; Laskar, Jacques

    2004-10-28

    Observations from the gamma-ray spectrometer instrument suite on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft have been interpreted as indicating the presence of vast reservoirs of near-surface ice in high latitudes of both martian hemispheres. Ice concentrations are estimated to range from 70 per cent at 60 degrees latitude to 100 per cent near the poles, possibly overlain by a few centimetres of ice-free material in most places. This result is supported by morphological evidence of metres-thick layered deposits that are rich in water-ice and periglacial-like features found only at high latitudes. Diffusive exchange of water between the pore space of the regolith and the atmosphere has been proposed to explain this distribution, but such a degree of concentration is difficult to accommodate with such processes. Alternatively, there are suggestions that ice-rich deposits form by transport of ice from polar reservoirs and direct redeposition in high latitudes during periods of higher obliquity, but these results have been difficult to reproduce with other models. Here we propose instead that, during periods of low obliquity (less than 25 degrees), high-latitude ice deposits form in both hemispheres by direct deposition of ice, as a result of sublimation from an equatorial ice reservoir that formed earlier, during a prolonged high-obliquity excursion. Using the ice accumulation rates estimated from global climate model simulations we show that, over the past ten million years, large variations of Mars' obliquity have allowed the formation of such metres-thick, sedimentary layered deposits in high latitude and polar regions.

  19. Proposal for a New LoD and Multi-Representation Concept for CityGML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwner, M.-O.; Gröger, G.; Benner, J.; Biljecki, F.; Nagel, C.

    2016-10-01

    The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) CityGML standard offers a Level of Detail (LoD) concept that enables the representation of CityGML features from a very detailed to a less detailed description. Due to a rising application variety, the current LoD concept seems to be too inflexible. Here, we present a multi representation concept (MRC) that enables a user-defined definition of LoDs. Because CityGML is an international standard, official profiles of the MRC are proposed. However, encoding of the defined profiles reveals many problems including mapping the conceptual model to the normative encoding, missing technologies and so on. Therefore, we propose to use the MRC as a meta model for the further definition of an LoD concept for CityGML 3.0.

  20. LINDLEY NURSERY COMPLEX NORTH loOKING SOUTHEAST ACROSS FORMER FIELDS THROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LINDLEY NURSERY COMPLEX NORTH loOKING SOUTHEAST ACROSS FORMER FIELDS THROUGH MORNING MIST - Overhills, Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Approximately 15 miles NW of Fayetteville, Overhills, Harnett County, NC

  1. LoPSiL: A Location-Based Policy-Specification Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligatti, Jay; Rickey, Billy; Saigal, Nalin

    This paper describes the design of LoPSiL, a language for specifying location-dependent security and privacy policies. Policy- specification languages like LoPSiL are domain-specific programming languages intended to simplify the tasks of specifying and enforcing sound security policies on untrusted (i.e., potentially insecure) software. As far as we are aware, LoPSiL is the first imperative policy-specification language to provide abstractions specifically tailored to location-dependent policies for mobile-device applications. We have implemented a proof-of-concept compiler that inputs a LoPSiL policy P and a mobile-device application program A and outputs a new application program A' equivalent to A, except that A' contains inlined enforcement code that ensures that A' satisfies P at runtime. We report our experiences using this compiler to design and implement several policies for mobile-device applications.

  2. Development of HiLo Microscope and its use in In-Vivo Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Shreyas J.

    The functionality of achieving optical sectioning in biomedical research is invaluable as it allows for visualization of a biological sample at different depths while being free of background scattering. Most current microscopy techniques that offer optical sectioning, unfortunately, require complex instrumentation and thus are generally costly. HiLo microscopy, on the other hand, offers the same functionality and advantage at a relatively low cost. Hence, the work described in this thesis involves the design, build, and application of a HiLo microscope. More specifically, a standalone HiLo microscope was built in addition to implementing HiLo microscopy on a standard fluorescence microscope. In HiLo microscopy, optical sectioning is achieved by acquiring two different types of images per focal plane. One image is acquired under uniform illumination and the other is acquired under speckle illumination. These images are processed using an algorithm that extracts in-focus information and removes features and glare that occur as a result of background fluorescence. To show the benefits of the HiLo microscopy, several imaging experiments on various samples were performed under a HiLo microscope and compared against a traditional fluorescence microscope and a confocal microscope, which is considered the gold standard in optical imaging. In-vitro and ex-vivo imaging was performed on a set of pollen grains, and optically cleared mouse brain and heart slices. Each of these experiments showed great reduction in background scattering at different depths under HiLo microscopy. More importantly, HiLo imaging of optically cleared heart slice demonstrated emergence of different vasculature at different depths. Reduction of out-of-focus light increased the spatial resolution and allowed better visualization of capillary vessels. Furthermore, HiLo imaging was tested in an in-vivo model of a rodent dorsal window chamber model. When imaging the same sample under confocal microscope

  3. Effect of Propellant Flowrate and Purity on Carbon Deposition in LO2/Methane Gas Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossard, J. A.; Burkhardt, W. M.; Niiya, K. Y.; Braam, F.

    1989-01-01

    The generation and deposition of carbon was studied in the Carbon Deposition Program using subscale hardware with LO2/Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) and LO2/Methane propellants at low mixture ratios. The purpose of the testing was to evaluate the effect of methane purity and full scale injection density on carbon deposition. The LO2/LNG gas generator/preburner testing was performed at mixture ratios between 0.24 and 0.58 and chamber pressures from 5.8 to 9.4 MPa (840 to 1370 psia). A total of seven 200 second duration tests were performed. The LNG testing occurred at low injection densities, similar to the previous LO2/RP-1, LO2/propane, and LO2/methane testing performed on the carbon deposition program. The current LO2/methane test series occurred at an injection density factor of approximately 10 times higher than the previous testing. The high injection density LO2/methane testing was performed at mixture ratios between from 0.23 to 0.81 and chamber pressures from 6.4 to 15.2 MPa (925 to 2210 psia). A total of nine high injection density tests were performed. The testing performed demonstrated that low purity methane (LNG) did not produce any detectable change in carbon deposition when compared to pure methane. In addition, the C* performance and the combustion gas temperatures measured were similar to those obtained for pure methane. Similar results were obtained testing pure methane at higher propellant injection densities with coarse injector elements.

  4. Fate of outflow channel effluents in the northern lowlands of Mars: The Vastitas Borealis Formation as a sublimation residue from frozen ponded bodies of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.

    2002-12-01

    We analyze the fate of the Hesperian-aged outflow channel effluents emplaced into the northern lowlands of Mars. We have modeled the evolution of these effluents under the assumption that they were emplaced under a range of atmospheric conditions comparable to those of today and thought to have prevailed in the Hesperian. Under these conditions we find that the evolution of the sediment-loaded water after it left the channels includes three phases. Phase 1: Emplacement and intensive cooling: Violent emplacement of water followed by a short period of intensive evaporation from the surface and near-surface layer, and intensive convection. During this phase the water maintained and redistributed its large suspended sediment load. Water vapor strongly influenced the climate, at least for a geologically short time. When the temperature of the water reached the temperature of the maximum density or the freezing point, boiling and intensive convection ceased and the water deposited the sediments. Phase 2: Freezing solid: Geologically rapid freezing of the water body accompanied by weak convective water movement occurred over a period of the order of ~104 years. Phase 3: Sublimation and loss: This period involved sublimation of the ice and lasted longer than the freezing phase. The rate and latitudinal dependence of the sublimation, as well as the location of water vapor condensation, crucially depend on the planetary obliquity, climate, and sedimentary veneering of the ice. Phase 3 would have been very short geologically (~105-106 years) if an insulating sedimentary layer did not build up rapidly. If such an insulating layer did form rapidly, sublimation could cease and residual ice hundreds of meters thick could remain below the surface today. The northern lowlands of Mars are largely covered by the Late Hesperian-aged Vastitas Borealis Formation (VBF), which has sharp boundaries clearly seen in the map of kilometer-scale roughness, and a distinctive kilometer

  5. THE DUST SUBLIMATION RADIUS AS AN OUTER ENVELOPE TO THE BULK OF THE NARROW Fe Kα LINE EMISSION IN TYPE 1 AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Poshak; Hönig, Sebastian F.; Kishimoto, Makoto

    2015-10-20

    The Fe Kα emission line is the most ubiquitous feature in the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but the origin of its narrow core remains uncertain. Here, we investigate the connection between the sizes of the Fe Kα core emission regions and the measured sizes of the dusty tori in 13 local Type 1 AGNs. The observed Fe Kα emission radii (R{sub Fe}) are determined from spectrally resolved line widths in X-ray grating spectra, and the dust sublimation radii (R{sub dust}) are measured either from optical/near-infrared (NIR) reverberation time lags or from resolved NIR interferometric data. This direct comparison shows, on an object-by-object basis, that the dust sublimation radius forms an outer envelope to the bulk of the Fe Kα emission. R{sub Fe} matches R{sub dust} well in the AGNs, with the best constrained line widths currently. In a significant fraction of objects without a clear narrow line core, R{sub Fe} is similar to, or smaller than, the radius of the optical broad line region. These facts place important constraints on the torus geometries for our sample. Extended tori in which the solid angle of fluorescing gas peaks at well beyond the dust sublimation radius can be ruled out. We also test for luminosity scalings of R{sub Fe}, finding that the Eddington ratio is not a prime driver in determining the line location in our sample. We also discuss in detail potential caveats of data analysis and instrumental limitations, simplistic line modeling, uncertain black hole masses, and sample selection, showing that none of these is likely to bias our core result. The calorimeter on board Astro-H will soon vastly increase the parameter space over which line measurements can be made, overcoming many of these limitations.

  6. Sublimation of icy aggregates in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko detected with the OSIRIS cameras on board Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, A.; Vincent, J.-B.; Agarwal, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bertini, I.; Bodewits, D.; Sierks, H.; Lin, Z.-Y.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Keller, H. U.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Besse, S.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B.; Debei, S.; Deller, J.; De Cecco, M.; Frattin, E.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Fornasier, S.; Fulle, M.; Groussin, O.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Gutiérrez-Marquez, P.; Güttler, C.; Höfner, S.; Hofmann, M.; Hu, X.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Knollenberg, J.; Kovacs, G.; Kramm, J.-R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Moreno, J. J. Lopez; Lowry, S.; Marzari, F.; Masoumzadeh, N.; Massironi, M.; Moreno, F.; Mottola, S.; Naletto, G.; Oklay, N.; Pajola, M.; Pommerol, A.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Shi, X.; Thomas, N.; Toth, I.; Tubiana, C.

    2016-11-01

    Beginning in 2014 March, the OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) cameras began capturing images of the nucleus and coma (gas and dust) of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using both the wide angle camera (WAC) and the narrow angle camera (NAC). The many observations taken since July of 2014 have been used to study the morphology, location, and temporal variation of the comet's dust jets. We analysed the dust monitoring observations shortly after the southern vernal equinox on 2015 May 30 and 31 with the WAC at the heliocentric distance Rh = 1.53 AU, where it is possible to observe that the jet rotates with the nucleus. We found that the decline of brightness as a function of the distance of the jet is much steeper than the background coma, which is a first indication of sublimation. We adapted a model of sublimation of icy aggregates and studied the effect as a function of the physical properties of the aggregates (composition and size). The major finding of this paper was that through the sublimation of the aggregates of dirty grains (radius a between 5 and 50 μm) we were able to completely reproduce the radial brightness profile of a jet beyond 4 km from the nucleus. To reproduce the data, we needed to inject a number of aggregates between 8.5 × 1013 and 8.5 × 1010 for a = 5 and 50 μm, respectively, or an initial mass of H2O ice around 22 kg.

  7. Deep analysis of Raman spectra of ZnO:Mo and ZnO:In sprayed thin films along with LO and TA+LO bands investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souissi, A.; Amlouk, M.; Khemakhem, H.; Guermazi, S.

    2016-04-01

    ZnO and Mo, In doped ZnO thin films with the molar ratios (Mo/Zn) and (In/Zn) were dosed at 1%, 2% and 3%, respectively. These films were deposited on amorphous SiO2 substrate at 460 °C by the spray-pyrolysis process. A useful and concise reminder of the spatial resolutions of Raman spectroscopy was presented. The vibrational responses of these films at high doping exhibited strong fluctuations that were resolved by successive digital processing, choice of the optimal profile of the baseline, suppression of fluorescence and/or photoluminescence, and noise reduction. These treated spectra have allowed to identify possible multi-modes in highly doped studied samples and revealed the presence of LO and TA+LO broad bands, whose second was at cascade and could be explored in optoelectronic and sensitive systems.

  8. First-order feasibility analysis of a space suit radiator concept based on estimation of water mass sublimation using Apollo mission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metts, Jonathan G.; Klaus, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal control of a space suit during extravehicular activity (EVA) is typically accomplished by sublimating water to provide system cooling. Spacecraft, on the other hand, primarily rely on radiators to dissipate heat. Integrating a radiator into a space suit has been proposed as an alternative design that does not require mass consumption for heat transfer. While providing cooling without water loss offers potential benefits for EVA application, it is not currently practical to rely on a directional, fixed-emissivity radiator to maintain thermal equilibrium of a spacesuit where the radiator orientation, environmental temperature, and crew member metabolic heat load fluctuate unpredictably. One approach that might make this feasible, however, is the use of electrochromic devices that are capable of infrared emissivity modulation and can be actively controlled across the entire suit surface to regulate net heat flux for the system. Integrating these devices onto the irregular, compliant space suit material requires that they be fabricated on a flexible substrate, such as Kapton film. An initial assessment of whether or not this candidate technology presents a feasible design option was conducted by first characterizing the mass of water loss from sublimation that could theoretically be saved if an electrochromic suit radiator was employed for thermal control. This is particularly important for lunar surface exploration, where the expense of transporting water from Earth is excessive, but the technology is potentially beneficial for other space missions as well. In order to define a baseline for this analysis by comparison to actual data, historical documents from the Apollo missions were mined for comprehensive, detailed metabolic data from each lunar surface outing, and related data from NASA's more recent "Advanced Lunar Walkback" tests were also analyzed. This metabolic database was then used to validate estimates for sublimator water consumption during surface

  9. Gas-phase enthalpies of formation and enthalpies of sublimation of amino acids based on isodesmic reaction calculations.

    PubMed

    Dorofeeva, Olga V; Ryzhova, Oxana N

    2014-05-15

    Accurate gas-phase enthalpies of formation (ΔfH298°) of 20 common α-amino acids, seven uncommon amino acids, and three small peptides were calculated by combining G4 theory calculations with an isodesmic reaction approach. The internal consistency over a set of ΔfH298°(g) values was achieved by sequential adjustment of their values through the isodesmic reactions. Four amino acids, alanine, β-alanine, sarcosine, and glycine, with reliable internally self-consistent experimental data, were chosen as the key reference compounds. These amino acids together with about 100 compounds with reliable experimental data (their accuracy was supported by G4 calculations) were used to estimate the enthalpies of formation of remaining amino acids. All of the amino acids with the previously established enthalpies of formation were later used as the reference species in the isodesmic reactions for the other amino acids. A systematic comparison was made of 14 experimentally determined enthalpies of formation with the results of calculations. The experimental enthalpies of formation for 10 amino acids were reproduced with good accuracy, but the experimental and calculated values for 4 compounds differed by 11–21 kJ/mol. For these species, the theoretical ΔfH298°(g) values were suggested as more reliable than the experimental values. On the basis of theoretical results, the recommended values for the gas-phase enthalpies of formation were also provided for amino acids for which the experimental ΔfH298°(g) were not available. The enthalpies of sublimation were evaluated for all compounds by taking into account the literature data on the solid-phase enthalpies of formation and the ΔfH298°(g) values recommended in our work. A special attention was paid to the accurate prediction of enthalpies of formation of amino acids from the atomization reactions. The problems associated with conformational flexibility of these compounds and harmonic treatment of low frequency torsional

  10. Structure-Function Elucidation of a New α-Conotoxin, Lo1a, from Conus longurionis

    PubMed Central

    Lebbe, Eline K. M.; Peigneur, Steve; Maiti, Mohitosh; Devi, Prabha; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian; Lescrinier, Eveline; Ulens, Chris; Waelkens, Etienne; D'Souza, Lisette; Herdewijn, Piet; Tytgat, Jan

    2014-01-01

    α-Conotoxins are peptide toxins found in the venom of marine cone snails and potent antagonists of various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). nAChRs are cholinergic receptors forming ligand-gated ion channels in the plasma membranes of certain neurons and the neuromuscular junction. Because nAChRs have an important role in regulating transmitter release, cell excitability, and neuronal integration, nAChR dysfunctions have been implicated in a variety of severe pathologies such as epilepsy, myasthenic syndromes, schizophrenia, Parkinson disease, and Alzheimer disease. To expand the knowledge concerning cone snail toxins, we examined the venom of Conus longurionis. We isolated an 18-amino acid peptide named α-conotoxin Lo1a, which is active on nAChRs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first characterization of a conotoxin from this species. The peptide was characterized by electrophysiological screening against several types of cloned nAChRs expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The three-dimensional solution structure of the α-conotoxin Lo1a was determined by NMR spectroscopy. Lo1a, a member of the α4/7 family, blocks the response to acetylcholine in oocytes expressing α7 nAChRs with an IC50 of 3.24 ± 0.7 μm. Furthermore, Lo1a shows a high selectivity for neuronal versus muscle subtype nAChRs. Because Lo1a has an unusual C terminus, we designed two mutants, Lo1a-ΔD and Lo1a-RRR, to investigate the influence of the C-terminal residue. Lo1a-ΔD has a C-terminal Asp deletion, whereas in Lo1a-RRR, a triple-Arg tail replaces the Asp. They blocked the neuronal nAChR α7 with a lower IC50 value, but remarkably, both adopted affinity for the muscle subtype α1β1δϵ. PMID:24567324

  11. An Orientation Dependent Size Illusion Is Underpinned by Processing in the Extrastriate Visual Area, LO1

    PubMed Central

    Mikellidou, Kyriaki; Gouws, André D.; Clawson, Hannah; Thompson, Peter; Morland, Antony B.

    2016-01-01

    We use the simple, but prominent Helmholtz’s squares illusion in which a vertically striped square appears wider than a horizontally striped square of identical physical dimensions to determine whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) BOLD responses in V1 underpin illusions of size. We report that these simple stimuli which differ in only one parameter, orientation, to which V1 neurons are highly selective elicited activity in V1 that followed their physical, not perceived size. To further probe the role of V1 in the illusion and investigate plausible extrastriate visual areas responsible for eliciting the Helmholtz squares illusion, we performed a follow-up transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) experiment in which we compared perceptual judgments about the aspect ratio of perceptually identical Helmholtz squares when no TMS was applied against selective stimulation of V1, LO1, or LO2. In agreement with fMRI results, we report that TMS of area V1 does not compromise the strength of the illusion. Only stimulation of area LO1, and not LO2, compromised significantly the strength of the illusion, consistent with previous research that LO1 plays a role in the processing of orientation information. These results demonstrate the involvement of a specific extrastriate area in an illusory percept of size. PMID:27733896

  12. Optically sectioned in vivo imaging with speckle illumination HiLo microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Daryl; Ford, Tim N.; Chu, Kengyeh K.; Mertz, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple wide-field imaging technique, called HiLo microscopy, that is capable of producing optically sectioned images in real time, comparable in quality to confocal laser scanning microscopy. The technique is based on the fusion of two raw images, one acquired with speckle illumination and another with standard uniform illumination. The fusion can be numerically adjusted, using a single parameter, to produce optically sectioned images of varying thicknesses with the same raw data. Direct comparison between our HiLo microscope and a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope is made on the basis of sectioning strength and imaging performance. Specifically, we show that HiLo and confocal 3-D imaging of a GFP-labeled mouse brain hippocampus are comparable in quality. Moreover, HiLo microscopy is capable of faster, near video rate imaging over larger fields of view than attainable with standard confocal microscopes. The goal of this paper is to advertise the simplicity, robustness, and versatility of HiLo microscopy, which we highlight with in vivo imaging of common model organisms including planaria, C. elegans, and zebrafish.

  13. A close-space sublimation driven pathway for the manipulation of substrate-supported micro- and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Aarthi

    gold beneath the grid selectively attaches to it due to the surface energy gradient which drives gold from the low surface energy oxide surface to the higher surface energy nickel mesh. With this process being confined to areas adjacent to and in contact with the grid surface the film ruptures at well-defined locations to form isolated islands of gold and subsequently, a periodic array of microstructures. The process can be carried out on substrates of different crystallographic orientations leading to nanostructures which are formed epitaxially and have orientations based on underlying substrate orientations. The process can be extended by placing a metallic foil of Pt or Ni over preformed templates, in which case a reduction in the size of the initial structures is observed. Placing a foil on structures with random placement and a wide size distribution results, not only in a size reduction, but also a narrowed size distribution. Additive processes are carried out by using materials which possess high vapor pressures much below the sublimation temperature of the template materials. In this case a germanium substrate was used as a source of germanium adatoms while gold or silver nanostructures were used as heterogeneous nucleation sites. At elevated temperatures the adatoms collect in sufficient quantities to transform each site into a liquid alloy which, upon cooling, phase separates into elemental components sharing a common interface and, hence, resulting in the formation of heterodimers and hollowed metal nanocrescents upon etching away the Ge. A process which combined aspects of the additive and subtractive process was carried out by using a metallic foil with a high vapor pressure and higher surface energy than the substrate surface (in this case Pd foil). This process resulted in the initial preformed gold templates being annihilated and replaced by nanostructures of palladium, thereby altering their chemical composition. The assembly process relies on the

  14. Temperature dependence of the LO phonon sidebands in free exciton emission of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. J.; Li, G. Q.; Xiong, S.-J.; Che, C. M.

    2006-04-01

    Temperature-dependent radiative recombination of free excitons involving one or two LO phonons in GaN is investigated in detail. It is found that both phonon sidebands possess asymmetric lineshapes and their energy spacings from the zero-phonon line strongly deviate from the characteristic energy of LO phonons as the temperature increases. Furthermore, the deviation rates of one- and two-phonon sidebands are significantly different. Segall-Mahan [Phys. Rev. 171, 935 (1968)] theory, taking the exciton-photon and exciton-phonon interactions into account, is employed to calculate the sidebands of one or two LO phonons for free excitons in a wide temperature range. Excellent agreement between the theory and experiment is achieved by using only one adjustable parameter, which leads to determination of the effective mass of heavy holes (~0.5m0).

  15. A Study of LoRa: Long Range & Low Power Networks for the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Aloÿs; Yi, Jiazi; Clausen, Thomas; Townsley, William Mark

    2016-01-01

    LoRa is a long-range, low-power, low-bitrate, wireless telecommunications system, promoted as an infrastructure solution for the Internet of Things: end-devices use LoRa across a single wireless hop to communicate to gateway(s), connected to the Internet and which act as transparent bridges and relay messages between these end-devices and a central network server. This paper provides an overview of LoRa and an in-depth analysis of its functional components. The physical and data link layer performance is evaluated by field tests and simulations. Based on the analysis and evaluations, some possible solutions for performance enhancements are proposed. PMID:27618064

  16. Implementation and Evaluation of the Enhanced Header Compression (IPHC) for 6LoWPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovici, Alessandro; Calveras, Anna; Catalan, Marisa; Gómez, Carles; Paradells, Josep

    6LoWPAN defines how to carry IPv6 packets over IEEE 802.15.4 low power wireless or sensor networks. Limited bandwidth, memory and energy resources require a careful application of IPv6 in a LoWPAN. The IEEE 802.15.4 standard defines a maximum frame size of 127 bytes that decreases to 102 bytes considering the header overhead. A further reduction is due to the security, network and transport protocols header overhead that, in case of IPv6 and UDP, leave only 33 bytes for application data. A compression algorithm is necessary in order to reduce the overhead and save space in data payload. This paper describes and compares the proposed IPv6 header compression mechanisms for 6LoWPAN environments.

  17. Finite-Range Separable Pairing Interaction Within New N3LO DFT Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselý, P.; Dobaczewski, J.; Michel, N.; Toivanen, J.

    2011-10-01

    For over four decades, the Skyrme functional within various parametrizations has been used to calculate nuclear properties. In the last few years there was a number of attempts to improve its performance and introduce generalized forms. In particular, the most general phenomenologi-cal quasi-local energy density functional, which contains all combinations of density, spin-density, and their derivatives up to the sixth order (N3LO), was proposed in reference [1]. Since in the phe-nomenological functional approaches the particle-particle (pp) interaction channel is treated independently from the particle-hole (ph) channel, there remains a question of what pairing interaction is suitable to use within the N3LO energy functional. In our study, we use the separable, finite-range, translationally invariant form given in [2], which we generalize to the arbitrary angular momentum channel. We discuss the application of this pairing interaction within the N3LO energy functional.

  18. A Study of LoRa: Long Range & Low Power Networks for the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Aloÿs; Yi, Jiazi; Clausen, Thomas; Townsley, William Mark

    2016-09-09

    LoRa is a long-range, low-power, low-bitrate, wireless telecommunications system, promoted as an infrastructure solution for the Internet of Things: end-devices use LoRa across a single wireless hop to communicate to gateway(s), connected to the Internet and which act as transparent bridges and relay messages between these end-devices and a central network server. This paper provides an overview of LoRa and an in-depth analysis of its functional components. The physical and data link layer performance is evaluated by field tests and simulations. Based on the analysis and evaluations, some possible solutions for performance enhancements are proposed.

  19. The Thermodynamic Characteristics of Sublimation of Aluminum and Indium Complexes with Tetraphenylporphin according to the High-Temperature Mass Spectrometry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuzhina, O. V.; Lomova, T. N.; Pelipets, O. V.; Girichev, G. V.

    2008-02-01

    The thermodynamic characteristics of vaporization of meso-tetraphenylporphin complexes (X)MTPP (M = Al, In; X = Cl, OH; TPP is the meso-tetraphenylporphin H2TPP dianion) were studied by the Knudsen effusion method with mass spectrometric control of vapor composition. Chloride complexes sublimed as monomers over the temperature range 480-590 K. The hydroxo complex of aluminotetraphenylporphin was transferred into the gas phase in the form of the μ-oxo dimer. The temperature dependences of saturated vapor pressure were used to determine the enthalpies of sublimation of metalloporphyrins, which were found to be 203 ± 3.5 and 207 ± 6 kJ/mol for the chloride complexes of In and Al, respectively, and 206 ± 8 and 406 ± 40 kJ/mol for the monomer and μ-oxo dimer of (hydroxy)aluminum(III)porphyrin, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters of vaporization and the melting point of (OH)AlTPP were also determined (ΔvapH° = 116 ± 6 kJ/mol, ΔapS° = 72 ± 11 J/(mol K), and Tm = 579 K). Composition-thermodynamic property correlations were analyzed for metalloporphyrins.

  20. A Low-Noise Terahertz SIS Mixer Incorporating a Waveguide Directional Coupler for LO Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takafumi; Kuroiwa, Kouichi; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Kroug, Matthias; Takeda, Masanori; Fujii, Yasunori; Kaneko, Keiko; Miyachi, Akihira; Wang, Zhen; Ogawa, Hideo

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a low-noise heterodyne waveguide Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) mixer with a novel local oscillator (LO) injection scheme for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) band 10, over the frequency range 0.78-0.95 THz. The SIS mixer uses radio frequency (RF) and LO receiving horns separately and a waveguide 10 dB LO coupler integrated in the mixer block. The insertion loss of the waveguide and coupling factor of the coupler were evaluated at terahertz frequencies at both room and cryogenic temperatures. The double-sideband (DSB) receiver noise temperatures were below 330 K (7.5 hf/ k B) at LO frequencies in the range 0.801-0.945 THz. The minimum temperature was 221 K at 0.873 THz over the intermediate frequency range of 4-12 GHz at an operating temperature of 4 K. This waveguide heterodyne SIS mixer exhibits great potential for practical applications, such as high-frequency receivers of the ALMA.

  1. Structural Validity of the Professional Development Profile of the LoTi Digital-Age Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Vandhana; Hull, Darrell M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was used to examine the structural construct validity of the Professional Development Profile of the LoTi Digital-Age Survey, a measure of teacher instructional practices with technology in the classroom. Teacher responses ("N" = 2,840) from across the United States were used to assess factor structure of the instrument…

  2. The Karhunen-Loève Transform for bioastronomy and SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, C.

    2006-02-01

    I present here a short description of the Karhunen-Loève Transform (KLT) used to detect very weak radio signals over narrow-band and wide-band extraterrestrial telecommunications out of the cosmic background noise. It appears that the KLT is more appropriate than the well known Fourier Transform (FT).

  3. A Simultaneous Discovery: The Case of Johannes Stark and Antonino Lo Surdo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Matteo; Paoletti, Alessandro; Robotti, Nadia

    2004-09-01

    In 1913 the German physicist Johannes Stark (1874 1957) and the Italian physicist Antonino Lo Surdo (1880 1949)discovered virtually simultaneously and independently that hydrogen spectral lines are split into components by an external electric field. Both of their discoveries ensued from studies on the same phenomenon, the Doppler effect in canal rays, but they arose in different theoretical contexts. Stark had been working within the context of the emerging quantum theory, following a research program aimed at studying the effect of an electric field on spectral lines. Lo Surdo had been working within the context of the classical theory, and his was an accidental discovery. Both discoveries, however, played important roles in the history of physics: Stark’s discovery contributed to the establishment of both the old and the new quantum theories; Lo Surdo’s discovery led Antonio Garbasso (1871 1933)to introduce research on the quantum theory into Italian physics. Ironically, soon after their discoveries, both Stark and Lo Surdo rejected developments in modern physics and allied themselves with the political and racial programs of Hitler and Mussolini.

  4. Numerical Investigation of LO2 and LCH4 Storage Tanks on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moder, Jeff; Barsi, Stephen; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Currently NASA is developing technologies to enable human exploration of the lunar surface for duration of up to 210 days. While trade studies are still underway, a cryogenic ascent stage using liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid methane (LCH4) is being considered for the Altair lunar lander. For a representative Altair cryogenic ascent stage, we present a detailed storage analysis of the LO2 and LCH4 propellant tanks on the lunar surface for durations of up to 210 days. Both the LO2 and LCH4 propellant tanks are assumed to be pressurized with gaseous helium at launch. A two-phase lumped-vapor computational fluid dynamics model has been developed to account for the presence of a noncondensable gas in the ullage. The CFD model is used to simulate the initial pressure response of the propellant tanks while they are subjected to representative heat leak rates on the lunar surface. Once a near stationary state is achieved within the liquid phase, multizone model is used to extrapolate the solution farther in time. For fixed propellant mass and tank size, the long-term pressure response for different helium mass fractions in both the LO2 and LCH4 tanks is examined.

  5. Forwarding techniques for IP fragmented packets in a real 6LoWPAN network.

    PubMed

    Ludovici, Alessandro; Calveras, Anna; Casademont, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are attracting more and more interest since they offer a low-cost solution to the problem of providing a means to deploy large sensor networks in a number of application domains. We believe that a crucial aspect to facilitate WSN diffusion is to make them interoperable with external IP networks. This can be achieved by using the 6LoWPAN protocol stack. 6LoWPAN enables the transmission of IPv6 packets over WSNs based on the IEEE 802.15.4 standard. IPv6 packet size is considerably larger than that of IEEE 802.15.4 data frame. To overcome this problem, 6LoWPAN introduces an adaptation layer between the network and data link layers, allowing IPv6 packets to be adapted to the lower layer constraints. This adaptation layer provides fragmentation and header compression of IP packets. Furthermore, it also can be involved in routing decisions. Depending on which layer is responsible for routing decisions, 6LoWPAN divides routing in two categories: mesh under if the layer concerned is the adaptation layer and route over if it is the network layer. In this paper we analyze different routing solutions (route over, mesh under and enhanced route over) focusing on how they forward fragments. We evaluate their performance in terms of latency and energy consumption when transmitting IP fragmented packets. All the tests have been performed in a real 6LoWPAN implementation. After consideration of the main problems in forwarding of mesh frames in WSN, we propose and analyze a new alternative scheme based on mesh under, which we call controlled mesh under.

  6. XYZ-like spectra from Laplace sum rule at N2LO in the chiral limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, R.; Narison, S.; Fanomezana, F.; Rabemananjara, A.; Rabetiarivony, D.; Randriamanatrika, G.

    2016-12-01

    We present new compact integrated expressions of QCD spectral functions of heavy-light molecules and four-quark XY Z-like states at lowest order (LO) of perturbative (PT) QCD and up to d = 8 condensates of the Operator Product Expansion (OPE). Then, by including up to next-to-next leading order (N2LO) PT QCD corrections, which we have estimated by assuming the factorization of the four-quark spectral functions, we improve previous LO results from QCD spectral sum rules (QSSR), on the XY Z-like masses and decay constants which suffer from the ill-defined heavy quark mass. PT N3LO corrections are estimated using a geometric growth of the PT series and are included in the systematic errors. Our optimal results based on stability criteria are summarized in Tables 11-14 and compared, in Sec. 10, with experimental candidates and some LO QSSR results. We conclude that the masses of the XZ observed states are compatible with (almost) pure JPC = 1+±, 0++ molecule or/and four-quark states. The ones of the 1-±, 0-± molecule/four-quark states are about 1.5 GeV above the Yc,b mesons experimental candidates and hadronic thresholds. We also find that the couplings of these exotics to the associated interpolating currents are weaker than that of ordinary D,B mesons (fDD ≈ 10-3f D) and may behave numerically as 1/m¯b3/2 (respectively 1/m¯b) for the 1+, 0+ (respectively 1-, 0-) states which can stimulate further theoretical studies of these decay constants.

  7. Lo Que los Padres y los Maestros Deberian Saber sobre la...Aceleraction (What Parents and Teachers Should Know about Academic Acceleration).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, Alex

    Designed for Spanish-speaking educators and parents, this pamphlet discusses academic acceleration for gifted children. Major types of academic acceleration and their benefits are described. These include: (1) early admission to kindergarten that saves parents of gifted children the expenses of a year of preschool, allows children to be…

  8. Otra perspectiva sobre lo que los ninos deben estar aprendiendo (Another Look at What Young Children Should Be Learning). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Lilian G.

    This Spanish-language ERIC Digest addresses the question of what young children should be learning that will best serve their development and learning in the long term. Two major dimensions of development--normative and dynamic--are explored, and four categories of learning goals are discussed: (1) knowledge; (2) skills; (3) dispositions; and (4)…

  9. Enhanced performance of CdS/CdTe thin-film devices through temperature profiling techniques applied to close-spaced sublimation deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaonan Li; Sheldon, P.; Moutinho, H.; Matson, R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe a methodology developed and applied to the close-spaced sublimation technique for thin-film CdTe deposition. The developed temperature profiles consisted of three discrete temperature segments, which the authors called the nucleation, plugging, and annealing temperatures. They have demonstrated that these temperature profiles can be used to grow large-grain material, plug pinholes, and improve CdS/CdTe photovoltaic device performance by about 15%. The improved material and device properties have been obtained while maintaining deposition temperatures compatible with commercially available substrates. This temperature profiling technique can be easily applied to a manufacturing environment by adjusting the temperature as a function of substrate position instead of time.

  10. Phase Transition Enthalpy Measurements of Organic and Organometallic Compounds and Ionic Liquids. Sublimation, Vaporization, and Fusion Enthalpies from 1880 to 2015. Part 2. C11-C192

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acree, William; Chickos, James S.

    2017-03-01

    The second part of this compendium concludes with a collection of phase change enthalpies of organic molecules inclusive of C11-C192 reported over the period 1880-2015. Also included are phase change enthalpies including fusion, vaporization, and sublimation enthalpies for organometallic, ionic liquids, and a few inorganic compounds. Paper I of this compendium, published separately, includes organic compounds from C1 to C10 and describes a group additivity method for evaluating solid, liquid, and gas phase heat capacities as well as temperature adjustments of phase changes. Paper II of this compendium also includes an updated version of a group additivity method for evaluating total phase change entropies which together with the fusion temperature can be useful in estimating total phase change enthalpies. Other uses include application in identifying potential substances that either form liquid or plastic crystals or exhibit additional phase changes such as undetected solid-solid transitions or behave anisotropically in the liquid state.

  11. The effect of substrate temperature on material properties and the device performance of close-spaced sublimation deposited CdTe/CdS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Albin, D.; Asher, S.; Moutinho, H.; Keyes, B.; Matson, R.; Hasoon, F.; Sheldon, P.

    1996-01-01

    High-efficiency polycrystalline CdS/CdTe solar cells have been fabricated using CdTe absorber layers deposited by close-spaced sublimation (CSS). CSS employs high substrate temperatures (Tsub) during film growth, which can promote the formation of larger grains and higher Voc's yielding better device performance. However, as Tsub increases beyond 610 °C, voids or pinholes begin to form in the CdTe layer. When the back contact is applied, these voids serve as shunt paths that effectively lower Voc. In this fashion, benefits associated with higher substrate temperatures are seriously compromised. Concurrent with voiding is the observation that higher temperatures promote interdiffusion at the CdS/CdTe interface such that the effective thickness of the CdS layer is reduced. Variations in processing that correct for these detrimental effects have led to a total-area device efficiency of 12%.

  12. Towards an understanding of the molecular mechanism of solvation of drug molecules: a thermodynamic approach by crystal lattice energy, sublimation, and solubility exemplified by paracetamol, acetanilide, and phenacetin.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, German L; Volkova, Tatyana V; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2006-10-01

    Temperature dependencies of saturated vapor pressure for the monoclinic modification of paracetamol (acetaminophen), acetanilide, and phenacetin (acetophenetidin) were measured and thermodynamic functions of sublimation calculated (paracetamol: DeltaGsub298=60.0 kJ/mol; DeltaHsub298=117.9+/-0.7 kJ/mol; DeltaSsub298=190+/-2 J/mol.K; acetanilide: DeltaGsub298=40.5 kJ/mol; DeltaHsub298=99.8+/-0.8 kJ/mol; DeltaSsub298=197+/-2 J/mol.K; phenacetin: DeltaGsub298=52.3 kJ/mol; DeltaHsub298=121.8+/-0.7 kJ/mol; DeltaSsub298=226+/-2 J/mol.K). Analysis of packing energies based on geometry optimization of molecules in the crystal lattices using diffraction data and the program Dmol3 was carried out. Parameters analyzed were: (a) energetic contribution of van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding to the total packing energy; (b) contributions of fragments of the molecules to the packing energy. The fraction of hydrogen bond energy in the packing energy increases as: phenacetin (17.5%)sublimation and fusion. Activity coefficients of the drugs in n-octanol were calculated from cryoscopic data and by estimation of dilution enthalpy obtained from solubility and calorimetric experiments (for infinite dissolution). Solubility temperature dependencies in n-octanol and n-hexane were measured. The thermodynamic functions of solubility and solvation processes were deduced. Specific and nonspecific solvation terms were distinguished using the transfer from the "inert" n-hexane to the other solvents. The transfer of the molecules from water to n-octanol is enthalpy driven for paracetamol; for acetanilide and phenacetin, entropy driven.

  13. Sedimentation survey of Lago Loíza, Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico, July 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soler-López, Luis R.; Licha-Soler, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Lago Loíza is a reservoir formed at the confluence of Río Gurabo and Río Grande de Loíza in the municipality of Trujillo Alto in central Puerto Rico, about 10 kilometers (km) north of the town of Caguas, about 9 km northwest of Gurabo, and about 3 km south of Trujillo Alto (fig. 1). The Carraizo Dam is owned and operated by the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority (PRASA), and was constructed in 1953 as a water-supply reservoir for the San Juan Metropolitan area. The dam is a concrete gravity structure that is located in a shallow valley and has a gently sloping left abutment and steep right abutment. Non-overflow sections flank the spillway section. Waterways include an intake structure for the pumping station and power plant, sluiceways, a trash sluice, and a spillway. The reservoir was built to provide a storage capacity of 26.8 million cubic meters (Mm3) of water at the maximum pool elevation of 41.14 meters (m) above mean sea level (msl) for the Sergio Cuevas Filtration Plant that serves the San Juan metropolitan area. The reservoir has a drainage area of 538 square kilometers (km2) and receives an annual mean rainfall that ranges from 1,600 to 5,000 millimeters per year (mm/yr). The principal streams that drain into Lago Loíza are the Río Grande de Loíza, Río Gurabo, and Río Cañas. Two other rivers, the Río Bairoa and Río Cagüitas, discharge into the Río Grande de Loíza just before it enters the reservoir. The combined mean annual runoff of the Río Grande de Loíza and the Río Gurabo for the 1960–2009 period of record is 323 Mm3. Flow from these streams constitutes about 89 percent of the total mean annual inflow of 364 Mm3 to the reservoir (U.S. Geological Survey, 2009). Detailed information about Lago Loíza reservoir structures, historical sediment accumulation, and a dredge conducted in 1999 are available in Soler-López and Gómez-Gómez (2005). During July 8–15, 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Caribbean Water Science

  14. 100-LBF LO2/LCH4 - Reaction Control Engine Technology Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Smith, Timothy D.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has identified liquid oxygen (LO2)/liquid methane (LCH4) propulsion systems as promising options for some future space vehicles. NASA issued a contract to Aerojet to develop a 100-lbf (445 N) LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine (RCE) aimed at reducing the risk of utilizing a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) on a space vehicle. Aerojet utilized innovative design solutions to develop an RCE that can ignite reliably over a broad range of inlet temperatures, perform short minimum impulse bits (MIB) at small electrical pulse widths (EPW), and produce excellent specific impulse (Isp) across a range of engine mixture ratios (MR). These design innovations also provide a start transient with a benign MR, ensuring good thrust chamber compatibility and long life. In addition, this RCE can successfully operate at MRs associated with main engines, enabling the RCE to provide emergency backup propulsion to minimize vehicle propellant load and overall system mass.

  15. Neutron matter from chiral two- and three-nucleon calculations up to N3LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drischler, C.; Carbone, A.; Hebeler, K.; Schwenk, A.

    2016-11-01

    Neutron matter is an ideal laboratory for nuclear interactions derived from chiral effective field theory since all contributions are predicted up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO ) in the chiral expansion. By making use of recent advances in the partial-wave decomposition of three-nucleon (3 N ) forces, we include for the first time N3LO 3 N interactions in many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) up to third order and in self-consistent Green's function theory (SCGF). Using these two complementary many-body frameworks we provide improved predictions for the equation of state of neutron matter at zero temperature and also analyze systematically the many-body convergence for different chiral EFT interactions. Furthermore, we present an extension of the normal-ordering framework to finite temperatures. These developments open the way to improved calculations of neutron-rich matter including estimates of theoretical uncertainties for astrophysical applications.

  16. Co-expression of COX-2 and 5-LO in primary glioblastoma is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingfu; Chen, Yupeng; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Lifeng; Liu, Xueyong; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiaoling; Chen, Dayang

    2015-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) are important factors in tumorigenesis and malignant progression; however, studies of their roles in glioblastoma have produced conflicting results. To define the frequencies of COX-2 and 5-LO expression and their correlation with clinicopathological features and prognosis, tumor tissues from 76 cases of newly diagnosed primary ordinary glioblastoma were examined for COX-2 and 5-LO expression by immunohistochemistry. The expression levels of COX-2 and 5-LO and the relationships between the co-expression of COX-2/5-LO and patient age and gender, edema index (EI), Karnofsky Performance Scale and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. COX-2 and 5-LO were expressed in 73.7 % (56/76) and 92.1 % (70/76) of the samples, respectively. Among the clinicopathological characteristics, only age (>60 years) exhibited a significant association with the high expression of COX-2. No statistically significant correlations were found in the 5-LO cohort. A significant positive correlation was revealed between the COX-2 and 5-LO scores (r = 0.374; p = 0.001). The elevated co-expression of COX-2 and 5-LO was observed primarily in the patients over the age of 60 years. Patients with a high expression of COX-2 had a significantly shorter OS (p < 0.01), whereas the immunoexpression of 5-LO was not associated with the OS of patients with glioblastoma. Survival analysis indicated that simultaneous high levels of COX-2 and 5-LO expression were significantly correlated with poor OS and, conversely, that a low/low expression pattern of these two proteins was significantly associated with better OS (p < 0.05). Moreover, the Cox multivariable proportional hazard model showed that a high expression of COX-2, high co-expression of COX-2 and 5-LO, and a high Ki-67 index were significant predictors of shorter OS in primary glioblastoma, independent of age, gender, EI, 5-LO expression and p53 status. The hazard ratios for OS were 2.347 (95 % CI 1

  17. Combination of Vandetanib, Radiotherapy, and Irinotecan in the LoVo Human Colorectal Cancer Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsberger, Phyllis; Burd, Randy; Ryan, Anderson; Daskalakis, Constantine; Dicker, Adam P.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The tumor growth kinetics of the human LoVo colorectal xenograft model was assessed in response to vandetanib, an orally available receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, radiotherapy (RT), or irinotecan (CPT-11), as single therapies and in combination. Methods and Materials: LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the right hind limb (5x10{sup 6} cells in 100muL phosphate-buffered saline) of athymic NCR NUM mice and tumors were grown to a volume of 200-300 mm{sup 3} before treatment. Vandetanib was administered at 50 mg/kg daily orally for 14 days starting on Day 1. RT was given as three fractions (3x3 Gy) on Days 1, 2, and 3. CPT-11 was given at 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally on Days 1 and 3. Tumor volumes were measured on a daily basis and calculated by measuring tumor diameters with digital calipers in two orthogonal dimensions. Results: All three single treatments (vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation) significantly slowed LoVo colorectal tumor growth. Vandetanib significantly increased the antitumor effects of CPT-11 and radiation when given in combination with either of these treatments. These treatment combinations resulted in a slow tumor growth rate during the 2 weeks of vandetanib administration. The triple combination of vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation produced the most marked improvement in response as observed by measurable shrinkage of tumors during the first week of treatment. Conclusions: The tumor growth delay kinetics observed in this study of the LoVo colorectal model suggest concurrent and sustained post-sequencing of vandetanib with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial in tumors of this type.

  18. LoFASM: A Low Frequency All Sky Monitor for Radio Transients and Student Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-02

    Emission (STARGATE) project, a public-private partnership between UTB’s Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy and SpaceX , focused on RF technology...Corporation ( SpaceX ) to build a commercial orbital launch facility in South Texas. As a result of interactions between SpaceX engineers and LoFASM students...and faculty, SpaceX and CARA have joined forces to create the Spacecraft Tracking and Astronomical Research into Gigahertz Astrophysical

  19. Infra red active modes due to coupling of cyclotron excitation and LO phonons in polar semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ratna; Dubey, Swati; Ghosh, S.

    2013-06-01

    Effects of free carrier concentration, external magnetic field and Callen effective charge on infra red active modes in a polar semiconductor have been analytically investigated using simple harmonic oscillator model. Callen effective charge considerably enhances reflectivity and shifts minima towards lower values of energy. Presence of magnetic field leads towards the coupling of collective cyclotron excitations with LO phonon giving rise to maximum reflectivity whereas cyclotron resonance absorption results into minimum reflectivity.

  20. A local framework for calculating coupled cluster singles and doubles excitation energies (LoFEx-CCSD)

    DOE PAGES

    Baudin, Pablo; Bykov, Dmytro; Liakh, Dmitry I.; ...

    2017-02-22

    Here, the recently developed Local Framework for calculating Excitation energies (LoFEx) is extended to the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) model. In the new scheme, a standard CCSD excitation energy calculation is carried out within a reduced excitation orbital space (XOS), which is composed of localised molecular orbitals and natural transition orbitals determined from time-dependent Hartree–Fock theory. The presented algorithm uses a series of reduced second-order approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles (CC2) calculations to optimise the XOS in a black-box manner. This ensures that the requested CCSD excitation energies have been determined to a predefined accuracy compared tomore » a conventional CCSD calculation. We present numerical LoFEx-CCSD results for a set of medium-sized organic molecules, which illustrate the black-box nature of the approach and the computational savings obtained for transitions that are local compared to the size of the molecule. In fact, for such local transitions, the LoFEx-CCSD scheme can be applied to molecular systems where a conventional CCSD implementation is intractable.« less

  1. The First Photometric Study of the Short-period Shallow Contact System LO Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Han, Q. W.; Liu, J. Z.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the first complete photometric light curves in the B, V, and R passbands for an eclipsing binary LO Com are presented, and the photometric solution for the LO Com is derived by analyzing these light curves by using the Wilson and Devinney code. From the photometric solution, it is found that the LO Com is a W-type W UMa binary with a mass ratio of q={m}2/{m}1=2.478 and a contact degree of f=(3.2+/- 0.25) % . By combining the two new minimum times with those published earlier in the literature, we have found that the (O - C) curve shows a downward parabolic variation corresponding to a long-term decrease in the orbital period with a rate of {{d}}P/{{d}}t=-1.18× {10}-7 days yr-1. This long-term decrease in its orbital period may be caused by mass transfer from the more massive component to the less massive one.

  2. Nature of the X(5568) — A critical Laplace sum rule analysis at N2LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, R.; Narison, S.; Rabemananjara, A.; Rabetiarivony, D.

    2016-06-01

    We scrutinize recent QCD spectral sum rules (QSSR) results to lowest order (LO) predicting the masses of the BK molecule and (su)(bd¯) four-quark states. We improve these results by adding NLO and N2LO corrections to the PT contributions giving a more precise meaning on the b-quark mass definition used in the analysis. We extract our optimal predictions using Laplace sum rule (LSR) within the standard stability criteria versus the changes of the external free parameters (τ-sum rule variable, tc continuum threshold and subtraction constant μ). The smallness of the higher order PT corrections justifies (a posteriori) the LO order results ⊕ the uses of the ambiguous heavy quark mass to that order. However, our predicted spectra in the range (5173 ˜ 5226) MeV, summarized in Table 7, for exotic hadrons built with four different flavors (buds), do not support some previous interpretations of the D0 candidate,1 X(5568), as a pure molecule or a four-quark state. If experimentally confirmed, it could result from their mixing with an angle: sin 2𝜃 ≈ 0.15. One can also scan the region (2327 ˜ 2444) MeV (where the Ds0∗(2317) might be a good candidate) and the one (5173 ˜ 5226) MeV for detecting these (cuds) and (buds) unmixed exotic hadrons (if any) via, eventually, their radiative or π+hadrons decays.

  3. Fast Calcium Imaging with Optical Sectioning via HiLo Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Marcel A; Ronzitti, Emiliano; Sternberg, Jenna R; Wyart, Claire; Emiliani, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Imaging intracellular calcium concentration via reporters that change their fluorescence properties upon binding of calcium, referred to as calcium imaging, has revolutionized our way to probe neuronal activity non-invasively. To reach neurons densely located deep in the tissue, optical sectioning at high rate of acquisition is necessary but difficult to achieve in a cost effective manner. Here we implement an accessible solution relying on HiLo microscopy to provide robust optical sectioning with a high frame rate in vivo. We show that large calcium signals can be recorded from dense neuronal populations at high acquisition rates. We quantify the optical sectioning capabilities and demonstrate the benefits of HiLo microscopy compared to wide-field microscopy for calcium imaging and 3D reconstruction. We apply HiLo microscopy to functional calcium imaging at 100 frames per second deep in biological tissues. This approach enables us to discriminate neuronal activity of motor neurons from different depths in the spinal cord of zebrafish embryos. We observe distinct time courses of calcium signals in somata and axons. We show that our method enables to remove large fluctuations of the background fluorescence. All together our setup can be implemented to provide efficient optical sectioning in vivo at low cost on a wide range of existing microscopes.

  4. A Network Access Control Framework for 6LoWPAN Networks

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Luís M. L.; Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.; de Sousa, Amaro F.; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Low power over wireless personal area networks (LoWPAN), in particular wireless sensor networks, represent an emerging technology with high potential to be employed in critical situations like security surveillance, battlefields, smart-grids, and in e-health applications. The support of security services in LoWPAN is considered a challenge. First, this type of networks is usually deployed in unattended environments, making them vulnerable to security attacks. Second, the constraints inherent to LoWPAN, such as scarce resources and limited battery capacity, impose a careful planning on how and where the security services should be deployed. Besides protecting the network from some well-known threats, it is important that security mechanisms be able to withstand attacks that have not been identified before. One way of reaching this goal is to control, at the network access level, which nodes can be attached to the network and to enforce their security compliance. This paper presents a network access security framework that can be used to control the nodes that have access to the network, based on administrative approval, and to enforce security compliance to the authorized nodes. PMID:23334610

  5. A network access control framework for 6LoWPAN networks.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luís M L; Rodrigues, Joel J P C; de Sousa, Amaro F; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-18

    Low power over wireless personal area networks (LoWPAN), in particular wireless sensor networks, represent an emerging technology with high potential to be employed in critical situations like security surveillance, battlefields, smart-grids, and in e-health applications. The support of security services in LoWPAN is considered a challenge. First, this type of networks is usually deployed in unattended environments, making them vulnerable to security attacks. Second, the constraints inherent to LoWPAN, such as scarce resources and limited battery capacity, impose a careful planning on how and where the security services should be deployed. Besides protecting the network from some well-known threats, it is important that security mechanisms be able to withstand attacks that have not been identified before. One way of reaching this goal is to control, at the network access level, which nodes can be attached to the network and to enforce their security compliance. This paper presents a network access security framework that can be used to control the nodes that have access to the network, based on administrative approval, and to enforce security compliance to the authorized nodes.

  6. Y4lO of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 is a symbiotic determinant required for symbiosome differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Juan; Cheng, Li-Li; Zhang, Ling; Dai, Wei-Jun; Liu, Zhe; Yao, Nan; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2009-02-01

    Type 3 (T3) effector proteins, secreted by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia with a bacterial T3 secretion system, affect the nodulation of certain host legumes. The open reading frame y4lO of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 encodes a protein with sequence similarities to T3 effectors from pathogenic bacteria (the YopJ effector family). Transcription studies showed that the promoter activity of y4lO depended on the transcriptional activator TtsI. Recombinant Y4lO protein expressed in Escherichia coli did not acetylate two representative mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (human MKK6 and MKK1 from Medicago truncatula), indicating that YopJ-like proteins differ with respect to their substrate specificities. The y4lO gene was mutated in NGR234 (strain NGROmegay4lO) and in NGR Omega nopL, a mutant that does not produce the T3 effector NopL (strain NGR Omega nopLOmegay4lO). When used as inoculants, the symbiotic properties of the mutants differed. Tephrosia vogelii, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Yudou No. 1, and Vigna unguiculata cv. Sui Qing Dou Jiao formed pink effective nodules with NGR234 and NGR Omega nopL Omega y4lO. Nodules induced by NGR Omega y4lO were first pink but rapidly turned greenish (ineffective nodules), indicating premature senescence. An ultrastructural analysis of the nodules induced by NGR Omega y4lO revealed abnormal formation of enlarged infection droplets in ineffective nodules, whereas symbiosomes harboring a single bacteroid were frequently observed in effective nodules induced by NGR234 or NGR Omega nopL Omega y4lO. It is concluded that Y4lO is a symbiotic determinant involved in the differentiation of symbiosomes. Y4lO mitigated senescence-inducing effects caused by the T3 effector NopL, suggesting synergistic effects for Y4lO and NopL in nitrogen-fixing nodules.

  7. The Modeling of Fuzzy Systems Based on Lee-Oscillatory Chaotic Fuzzy Model (LoCFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Max H. Y.; Liu, James N. K.; Shum, Dennis T. F.; Lee, Raymond S. T.

    This paper introduces a new fuzzy membership function — LEE-oscillatory Chaotic Fuzzy Model (LoCFM). The development of this model is based on fuzzy logic and the incorporation of chaos theory — LEE Oscillator. Prototype systems are being developed for handling imprecise problems, typically involving linguistic expression and fuzzy semantic meaning. In addition, the paper also examines the mechanism of the LEE Oscillator through analyzing its structure and neural dynamics. It demonstrates the potential application of the model in future development.

  8. G-LoSA: An efficient computational tool for local structure-centric biological studies and drug design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2016-04-01

    Molecular recognition by protein mostly occurs in a local region on the protein surface. Thus, an efficient computational method for accurate characterization of protein local structural conservation is necessary to better understand biology and drug design. We present a novel local structure alignment tool, G-LoSA. G-LoSA aligns protein local structures in a sequence order independent way and provides a GA-score, a chemical feature-based and size-independent structure similarity score. Our benchmark validation shows the robust performance of G-LoSA to the local structures of diverse sizes and characteristics, demonstrating its universal applicability to local structure-centric comparative biology studies. In particular, G-LoSA is highly effective in detecting conserved local regions on the entire surface of a given protein. In addition, the applications of G-LoSA to identifying template ligands and predicting ligand and protein binding sites illustrate its strong potential for computer-aided drug design. We hope that G-LoSA can be a useful computational method for exploring interesting biological problems through large-scale comparison of protein local structures and facilitating drug discovery research and development. G-LoSA is freely available to academic users at http://im.compbio.ku.edu/GLoSA/.

  9. Higgs boson gluon-fusion production beyond threshold in N3LO QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Gehrmann, Thomas; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-03-18

    In this study, we compute the gluon fusion Higgs boson cross-section at N3LO through the second term in the threshold expansion. This calculation constitutes a major milestone towards the full N3LO cross section. Our result has the best formal accuracy in the threshold expansion currently available, and includes contributions from collinear regions besides subleading corrections from soft and hard regions, as well as certain logarithmically enhanced contributions for general kinematics. We use our results to perform a critical appraisal of the validity of the threshold approximation at N3LO in perturbative QCD.

  10. Soft Expansion of Double-Real-Virtual Corrections to Higgs Production at N$^3$LO

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-05-15

    We present methods to compute higher orders in the threshold expansion for the one-loop production of a Higgs boson in association with two partons at hadron colliders. This process contributes to the N3LO Higgs production cross section beyond the soft-virtual approximation. We use reverse unitarity to expand the phase-space integrals in the small kinematic parameters and to reduce the coefficients of the expansion to a small set of master integrals. We describe two methods for the calculation of the master integrals. The first was introduced for the calculation of the soft triple-real radiation relevant to N3LO Higgs production. The second uses a particular factorization of the three body phase-space measure and the knowledge of the scaling properties of the integral itself. Our result is presented as a Laurent expansion in the dimensional regulator, although some of the master integrals are computed to all orders in this parameter.

  11. Time-of-Flight Detector System with Low Background Performance for the IBEX-lo Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Granoff, M.; King, B.; Longworth, S.; Saul, L.; Fuselier, S.; Hertzberg, E.; Livi, S.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C.; Scheer, J.; Wurz, P.; Wieser, M.

    2006-12-01

    Over the course of the IBEX Mission the IBEX-lo sensor will provide images of energetic neutral H atoms (ENA) from the termination shock in the energy range 10 2000 eV as well as the directional flow distribution of interstellar neutral O in spring and fall. The sensor combines a mechanical collimator to restrict the detectable arrival directions, an atom to negative ion conversion surface, an electrostatic analyzer, post-acceleration of up to 20 keV, and time-of-flight (TOF) mass analysis. In this combination the TOF system provides the necessary mass separation to distinguish different species and effective background suppression through coincidence detection techniques. Because the flux of the heliospheric ENAs is very low and generates rather low count rates a triple coincidence system is used with secondary electrons produced in two consecutive carbon foils, followed by the final detection of the ions in a micro-channelplate. These three signals are combined into three independent TOF measurements. A flight-like engineering test unit of the IBEX-lo TOF subsystem has been built and tested. Meanwhile the flight model of the sensor is in fabrication. It will be shown that the combination of several TOF measurements provides very effective means to suppress background and to identify minor species, whose fluxes are several orders of magnitude below the main species. Results from the testing of the engineering unit will be discussed in the light of the IBEX science objectives.

  12. LO Peg: surface differential rotation, flares, and spot-topographic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Subhajeet; Pandey, J. C.; Savanov, I. S.; Taş, G.; Pandey, S. B.; Misra, K.; Joshi, S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.; Sakamoto, T.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.

    2016-07-01

    Using the wealth of ˜24 yr multiband data, we present an in-depth study of the star-spot cycles, surface differential rotations (SDR), optical flares, evolution of star-spot distributions, and coronal activities on the surface of young, single, main-sequence, ultrafast rotator LO Peg. From the long-term V-band photometry, we derive rotational period of LO Peg to be 0.4231 ± 0.0001 d. Using the seasonal variations on the rotational period, the SDR pattern is investigated, and shows a solar-like pattern of SDR. A cyclic pattern with period of ˜2.7 yr appears to be present in rotational period variation. During the observations, 20 optical flares are detected with a flare frequency of ˜1 flare per two days and with flare energy of ˜1031-34 erg. The surface coverage of cool spots is found to be in the range of ˜9-26 per cent. It appears that the high- and low-latitude spots are interchanging their positions. Quasi-simultaneous observations in X-ray, UV, and optical photometric bands show a signature of an excess of X-ray and UV activities in spotted regions.

  13. Soft Expansion of Double-Real-Virtual Corrections to Higgs Production at N$^3$LO

    DOE PAGES

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; ...

    2015-05-15

    We present methods to compute higher orders in the threshold expansion for the one-loop production of a Higgs boson in association with two partons at hadron colliders. This process contributes to the N3LO Higgs production cross section beyond the soft-virtual approximation. We use reverse unitarity to expand the phase-space integrals in the small kinematic parameters and to reduce the coefficients of the expansion to a small set of master integrals. We describe two methods for the calculation of the master integrals. The first was introduced for the calculation of the soft triple-real radiation relevant to N3LO Higgs production. The secondmore » uses a particular factorization of the three body phase-space measure and the knowledge of the scaling properties of the integral itself. Our result is presented as a Laurent expansion in the dimensional regulator, although some of the master integrals are computed to all orders in this parameter.« less

  14. Comparison study of close-spaced sublimated and chemical bath deposited CdS films: Effects on CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D.; Rose, D.; Dhere, R.; Levi, D.; Woods, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Sheldon, P.

    1997-12-31

    Close-spaced-sublimated (CSS) CdS films exhibit strong fundamental edge luminescence, high optical absorption, and a bandgap of {approximately}2.41 eV. Structurally, these films show good crystallinity with thickness-dependent grain sizes that vary between 100--400 nm. In contrast, chemical-bath, deposited (CBD) CdS exhibits subband luminescence, lower absorption, and a thickness-dependent bandgap. These films have CdS grains typically less than 50 nm in size and poorer crystallinity. However, CdTe devices fabricated with these lower quality CBD CdS films yield higher V{sub oc}`s and fill factors. Carrier lifetimes in finished CSS CdS devices measured between 100 and 200 ps while lifetimes in CBD CdS devices were much higher (>500 ps). Compositional differences in the Cd/(S+Te) ratio at the interface suggest the possibility of lower CdS doping and higher CdTe compensation as one reason for lower V{sub oc}`s in CSS CdS devices.

  15. Structure and sublimation of water ice films grown in vacuo at 120-190 K studied by positron and positronium annihilation.

    PubMed

    Townrow, S; Coleman, P G

    2014-03-26

    The crystalline structure of ∼ 5-20 μm water ice films grown at 165 and 172 K has been probed by measuring the fraction of positrons forming ortho-positronium (ortho-Ps) and decaying into three gamma photons. It has been established that films grown at slower rates (water vapour pressure ≥ 1 mPa) have lower concentrations of lattice defects and closed pores, which act as Ps traps, than those grown at higher rates (vapour pressure ∼ 100 mPa), evidenced by ortho-Ps diffusion lengths being approximately four times greater in the former. By varying the growth temperature between 162 and 182 K it was found that films become less disordered at temperatures above ∼ 172 K, with the ortho-Ps diffusion length rising by ∼ 60%, in this range. The sublimation energy for water ice films grown on copper has been measured to be 0.462(5) eV using the time dependence of positron annihilation parameters from 165 to 195 K, in agreement with earlier studies and with no measurable dependence on growth rate and thermal history.

  16. Thin-Layer Matrix Sublimation with Vapor-Sorption Induced Co-Crystallization for Sensitive and Reproducible SAMDI-TOF MS Analysis of Protein Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Michael J.; Kim, Jaekuk; Maresh, Erica M.; Plymire, Daniel A.; Corbett, John R.; Zhang, Junmei; Patrie, Steven M.

    2012-10-01

    Coupling immunoassays on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) provides improved assay selectivity compared with traditional photometric detection techniques. We show that thin-layer-transfer (TLT) of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnaminic acid (CHCA) MALDI matrix via vacuum sublimation followed by organic solvent-based vapor-sorption induced co-crystallization (VIC) results in unique matrix/analyte co-crystallization tendencies that optimizes assay reproducibility and sensitivity. Unique matrix crystal morphologies resulted from VIC solvent vapors, indicating nucleation and crystal growth characteristics depend upon VIC parameters. We observed that CHCA microcrystals generated by methanol VIC resulted in >10× better sensitivity, increased analyte charging, and improved precision compared with dried droplet measurements. The uniformity of matrix/analyte co-crystallization across planar immunoassays directed at intact proteins yielded low spectral variation for single shot replicates (18.5 % relative standard deviation, RSD) and signal averaged spectra (<10 % RSD). We envision that TLT and VIC for MALDI-TOF will enable high-throughput, reproducible array-based immunoassays for protein molecular diagnostic assays in diverse biochemical and clinical applications.

  17. Hysteresis and change of transition temperature in thin films of Fe{[Me2Pyrz]3BH}2, a new sublimable spin-crossover molecule.

    PubMed

    Davesne, V; Gruber, M; Studniarek, M; Doh, W H; Zafeiratos, S; Joly, L; Sirotti, F; Silly, M G; Gaspar, A B; Real, J A; Schmerber, G; Bowen, M; Weber, W; Boukari, S; Da Costa, V; Arabski, J; Wulfhekel, W; Beaurepaire, E

    2015-05-21

    Thin films of the spin-crossover (SCO) molecule Fe{[Me2Pyrz]3BH}2 (Fe-pyrz) were sublimed on Si/SiO2 and quartz substrates, and their properties investigated by X-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopies, optical absorption, atomic force microscopy, and superconducting quantum interference device. Contrary to the previously studied Fe(phen)2(NCS)2, the films are not smooth but granular. The thin films qualitatively retain the typical SCO properties of the powder sample (SCO, thermal hysteresis, soft X-ray induced excited spin-state trapping, and light induced excited spin-state trapping) but present intriguing variations even in micrometer-thick films: the transition temperature decreases when the thickness is decreased, and the hysteresis is affected. We explain this behavior in the light of recent studies focusing on the role of surface energy in the thermodynamics of the spin transition in nano-structures. In the high-spin state at room temperature, the films have a large optical gap (∼5 eV), decreasing at thickness below 50 nm, possibly due to film morphology.

  18. Hysteresis and change of transition temperature in thin films of Fe{[Me2Pyrz]3BH}2, a new sublimable spin-crossover molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davesne, V.; Gruber, M.; Studniarek, M.; Doh, W. H.; Zafeiratos, S.; Joly, L.; Sirotti, F.; Silly, M. G.; Gaspar, A. B.; Real, J. A.; Schmerber, G.; Bowen, M.; Weber, W.; Boukari, S.; Da Costa, V.; Arabski, J.; Wulfhekel, W.; Beaurepaire, E.

    2015-05-01

    Thin films of the spin-crossover (SCO) molecule Fe{[Me2Pyrz]3BH}2 (Fe-pyrz) were sublimed on Si/SiO2 and quartz substrates, and their properties investigated by X-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopies, optical absorption, atomic force microscopy, and superconducting quantum interference device. Contrary to the previously studied Fe(phen)2(NCS)2, the films are not smooth but granular. The thin films qualitatively retain the typical SCO properties of the powder sample (SCO, thermal hysteresis, soft X-ray induced excited spin-state trapping, and light induced excited spin-state trapping) but present intriguing variations even in micrometer-thick films: the transition temperature decreases when the thickness is decreased, and the hysteresis is affected. We explain this behavior in the light of recent studies focusing on the role of surface energy in the thermodynamics of the spin transition in nano-structures. In the high-spin state at room temperature, the films have a large optical gap (˜5 eV), decreasing at thickness below 50 nm, possibly due to film morphology.

  19. Structural and optical properties of AgAlTe{sub 2} layers grown on sapphire substrates by closed space sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Uruno, A. Usui, A.; Kobayashi, M.

    2014-11-14

    AgAlTe{sub 2} layers were grown on a- and c-plane sapphire substrates using a closed space sublimation method. Grown layers were confirmed to be single phase layers of AgAlTe{sub 2} by X-ray diffraction. AgAlTe{sub 2} layers were grown to have a strong preference for the (112) orientation on both kinds of substrates. The variation in the orientation of grown layers was analyzed in detail using the X-ray diffraction pole figure measurement, which revealed that the AgAlTe{sub 2} had a preferential epitaxial relationship with the c-plane sapphire substrate. The atomic arrangement between the (112) AgAlTe{sub 2} layer and sapphire substrates was compared. It was considered that the high order of the lattice arrangement symmetry probably effectively accommodated the lattice mismatch. The optical properties of the grown layer were also evaluated by transmittance measurements. The bandgap energy was found to be around 2.3 eV, which was in agreement with the theoretical bandgap energy of AgAlTe{sub 2}.

  20. Structural properties and dielectric function of graphene grown by high-temperature sublimation on 4H-SiC(000-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhafs, C. Darakchieva, V.; Persson, I. L.; Persson, P. O. Å.; Yakimova, R.; Tiberj, A.; Paillet, M.; Zahab, A.-A.; Landois, P.; Juillaguet, S.; Schöche, S.; Schubert, M.

    2015-02-28

    Understanding and controlling growth of graphene on the carbon face (C-face) of SiC presents a significant challenge. In this work, we study the structural, vibrational, and dielectric function properties of graphene grown on the C-face of 4H-SiC by high-temperature sublimation in an argon atmosphere. The effect of growth temperature on the graphene number of layers and crystallite size is investigated and discussed in relation to graphene coverage and thickness homogeneity. An amorphous carbon layer at the interface between SiC and the graphene is identified, and its evolution with growth temperature is established. Atomic force microscopy, micro-Raman scattering spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy are combined to determine and correlate thickness, stacking order, dielectric function, and interface properties of graphene. The role of surface defects and growth temperature on the graphene growth mechanism and stacking is discussed, and a conclusion about the critical factors to achieve decoupled graphene layers is drawn.

  1. The causal role of the occipital face area (OFA) and lateral occipital (LO) cortex in symmetry perception.

    PubMed

    Bona, Silvia; Cattaneo, Zaira; Silvanto, Juha

    2015-01-14

    Symmetry is an important cue in face and object perception. Here we used fMRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to shed light on the role of the occipital face area (OFA), a key region in face processing, and the lateral occipital (LO) cortex, a key area in object processing, in symmetry detection. In the first experiment, we applied TMS over the rightOFA, its left homolog (leftOFA), rightLO, and vertex (baseline) while participants were discriminating between symmetric and asymmetric dot patterns. Stimulation of rightOFA and rightLO impaired performance, causally implicating these two regions in detection of symmetry in low-level dot configurations. TMS over rightLO but not rightOFA also significantly impaired detection of nonsymmetric shapes defined by collinear Gabor patches, demonstrating that rightOFA responds to symmetry but not to all cues mediating figure-ground segregation. The second experiment showed a causal role for rightOFA but not rightLO in facial symmetry detection. Overall, our results demonstrate that both the rightOFA and rightLO are sensitive to symmetry in dot patterns, whereas only rightOFA is causally involved in facial symmetry detection.

  2. 'Introducing Michael Gove to Loïc Wacquant': Why Social Work Needs Critical Sociology.

    PubMed

    Michael Garrett, Paul

    2016-06-01

    In 2013, Michael Gove, then Secretary of State for Education and Health in the UK coalition government, criticised social workers for laying insufficient emphasis on the 'agency' of individuals and for being too preoccupied with social and economic inequalities. Such a perspective, which is not unique to Gove, needs to be countered by reaffirming the significance of an expansively critical sociology for social work. In this context, the thematic concerns of the French theorist, Loïc Wacquant, illuminates key aspects of social work engagement with clients which Gove and his ideological associates appear intent on ignoring. The issues raised have significant political resonances given the pending UK General Election taking place in May 2015.

  3. Screening materials with the XIA UltraLo alpha particle counter at Southern Methodist University

    SciTech Connect

    Nakib, M. Z.; Cooley, J.; Kara, B.; Qiu, H.; Scorza, S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Rielage, K.; Schnee, R. W.

    2013-08-08

    Southern Methodist University houses one of five existing commercially available UltraLo 1800 production model alpha counters made by XIA LLC. The instrument has an electron drift chamber with a 707 cm{sup 2} or 1800 cm{sup 2} counting region which is determined by selecting the inner electrode size. The SMU team operating this device is part of the SuperCDMS screening working group, and uses the alpha counter to study the background rates from the decay of radon in materials used to construct the SuperCDMS experiment. We have studied four acrylic samples obtained from the MiniCLEAN direct dark matter search with the XIA instrument demonstrating its utility in low background experiments by investigating the plate-out of {sup 210}Pb and comparing the effectiveness of cleaning procedures in removing {sup 222}Rn progenies from the samples.

  4. The Eclipsing Central Stars of the Planetary Nebulae Lo 16 and PHR J1040-5417

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillwig, Todd C.; Frew, David; Jones, David; Crispo, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Binary central stars of planetary nebula are a valuable tool in understanding common envelope evolution. In these cases both the resulting close binary system and the expanding envelope (the planetary nebula) can be studied directly. In order to compare observed systems with common envelope evolution models we need to determine precise physical parameters of the binaries and the nebulae. Eclipsing central stars provide us with the best opportunity to determine high precision values for mass, radius, and temperature of the component stars in these close binaries. We present photometry and spectroscopy for two of these eclipsing systems; the central stars of Lo 16 and PHR 1040-5417. Using light curves and radial velocity curves along with binary modeling we provide physical parameters for the stars in both of these systems.

  5. Diagnosing the Neutral Interstellar Gas Flow at 1 AU with IBEX-Lo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Clark, G.; O'Neill, M.; Petersen, L.; Bzowski, M.; Saul, L.; Wurz, P.; Fuselier, S. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; McComas, D. J.; Müller, H. R.; Alexashov, D. B.

    2009-08-01

    Every year in fall and spring the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) will observe directly the interstellar gas flow at 1 AU over periods of several months. The IBEX-Lo sensor employs a powerful triple time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It can distinguish and image the O and He flow distributions in the northern fall and spring, making use of sensor viewing perpendicular to the Sun-pointing spin axis. To effectively image the narrow flow distributions IBEX-Lo has a high angular resolution quadrant in its collimator. This quadrant is employed selectively for the interstellar gas flow viewing in the spring by electrostatically shutting off the remainder of the aperture. The operational scenarios, the expected data, and the necessary modeling to extract the interstellar parameters and the conditions in the heliospheric boundary are described. The combination of two key interstellar species will facilitate a direct comparison of the pristine interstellar flow, represented by He, which has not been altered in the heliospheric boundary region, with a flow that is processed in the outer heliosheath, represented by O. The O flow distribution consists of a depleted pristine component and decelerated and heated neutrals. Extracting the latter so-called secondary component of interstellar neutrals will provide quantitative constraints for several important parameters of the heliosheath interaction in current global heliospheric models. Finding the fraction and width of the secondary component yields an independent value for the global filtration factor of species, such as O and H. Thus far filtration can only be inferred, barring observations in the local interstellar cloud proper. The direction of the secondary component will provide independent information on the interstellar magnetic field strength and orientation, which has been inferred from SOHO SWAN Ly- α backscattering observations and the two Voyager crossings of the termination shock.

  6. Bayesian estimation of Karhunen-Loève expansions; A random subspace approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, Kenny; Najm, Habib N.

    2016-08-01

    One of the most widely-used procedures for dimensionality reduction of high dimensional data is Principal Component Analysis (PCA). More broadly, low-dimensional stochastic representation of random fields with finite variance is provided via the well known Karhunen-Loève expansion (KLE). The KLE is analogous to a Fourier series expansion for a random process, where the goal is to find an orthogonal transformation for the data such that the projection of the data onto this orthogonal subspace is optimal in the L2 sense, i.e., which minimizes the mean square error. In practice, this orthogonal transformation is determined by performing an SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) on the sample covariance matrix or on the data matrix itself. Sampling error is typically ignored when quantifying the principal components, or, equivalently, basis functions of the KLE. Furthermore, it is exacerbated when the sample size is much smaller than the dimension of the random field. In this paper, we introduce a Bayesian KLE procedure, allowing one to obtain a probabilistic model on the principal components, which can account for inaccuracies due to limited sample size. The probabilistic model is built via Bayesian inference, from which the posterior becomes the matrix Bingham density over the space of orthonormal matrices. We use a modified Gibbs sampling procedure to sample on this space and then build probabilistic Karhunen-Loève expansions over random subspaces to obtain a set of low-dimensional surrogates of the stochastic process. We illustrate this probabilistic procedure with a finite dimensional stochastic process inspired by Brownian motion.

  7. Downregulation of MDM2 expression by RNAi inhibits LoVo human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells growth and the treatment of LoVo cells with mdm2siRNA3 enhances the sensitivity to cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yan . E-mail: gyfyuyan@hotmail.com; Sun Ping . E-mail: sunny19750502@hotmail.com; Sun Lichun; Liu Guoyi; Chen Guohua . E-mail: olivebranch_82@hotmail.com; Shang Lihua . E-mail: leval1000@sina.com; Wu Hongbo . E-mail: whpwl@sina.com; Hu Jing; Li Yue; Mao Yinling; Sui Guangjie; Sun Xiwen

    2006-01-06

    To investigate the biological effect of mdm2 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells, three mdm2siRNA constructions were recombinated and transient transfected into human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells with low differentiation character in vitro. The results showed that mdm2siRNA3 reduced mRNA level of mdm2 and protein level of mdm2, leading to proliferation inhibition on LoVo cells, and reduced tumor growth in nude mice. It was found that depletion of MDM2 in this pattern promoted apoptosis of LoVo cells and Cisplatin (DDP) treated in the mdm2siRNA3 transfected cell population would result in a substantial decrease by MTT colorimetry. Decreasing the MDM2 protein level in LoVo cells by RNAi could significantly inhibit tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo, which indicated that mdm2 gene played a definite role in the development and aggressiveness of human colon carcinoma. It also could be a therapeutic target in colorectal carcinoma. The synergistic activation of RNAi and cell toxicity agents indicated that the combination of chemotherapy and gene therapy will be a promising approach in the future.

  8. Re-analysis of martian gully orientation and slope for comparison with climate model predictions of freeze-thaw and dry-ice sublimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Susan; Harrison, Tanya; Lewis, Stephen; Balme, Matthew; Soare, Richard; Britton, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Gullies on Mars are kilometre-scale landforms, comprising an erosional alcove and channel and a terminal debris apron/fan. These landforms are similar to features on Earth carved by the flow of liquid water, or by the action of water rich debris flows. The majority gullies on Mars are believed to be (at most) ˜5 Ma old and both erosion and deposition within these features have been observed within the last 10 years of orbital observations. At present liquid water is not thermodynamically stable at the martian surface and many of the recent changes in surface morphology occur during winter and early spring, when temperatures are too low for even metastable liquid water to be produced. Therefore, researchers have proposed an alternative mechanism for gully-formation - the sublimation of solid CO2, which is deposited on the maritan surface every winter. Previous studies have revealed that gully-density and orientation varies systematically with latitude - a fact that led to the development of many climate-based hypotheses for their formation. Here, we use the global database of martian gullies and extract the orientation and slope-angle of gully-hosting-slopes. We find that gully-orientation is more even strongly controlled by latitude than previous studies, where more sparse data were used. From ˜30-40° latitude in both hemispheres, gullies are almost never found on equator-facing slopes, and polewards of 40° gullies have a tendency to be located on equator-facing slopes. We use a 1D version of the LMD Mars climate model physics to simulate surface temperature on slopes up to 35° , oriented to face north or south, for all latitudes (5° spacing), and for orbital obliquities of 5-55° . We otherwise use current orbital conditions (ellipticity, date of perihelion) and we use a constant thermal inertia of the substrate of 1000 Jm-2K-1s-1/2and a bare soil albedo of 0.2. We extracted two pieces of information from a complete annual cycle: (i) The number of hours

  9. Discussions about the Nature of Science in a Course on the History of Astronomy. (Spanish Title: Discusiones sobre la Naturaleza de la Ciencia en un Curso sobre Historia de la Astronomía.) Discussões sobre a Natureza da Ciência em um Curso sobre a História da Astronomia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires de Andrade, Victória Flório; L'Astorina, Bruno

    2010-07-01

    There are an increasing number of researches in science education that affirm the importance of discussions on the "nature of science" in basic education level as well as in teacher training. The history of science applied to education is a way to contextualize epistemological discussions, allowing both the understanding of scientific content and learning about science concepts. We present some reasonably consensual definitions on the nature of science that have been widely discussed by the academic community. We show also some episodes in the history of astronomy which can lead to discussions involving some aspects of the nature of science, and how they can do it. Hay un número creciente de investigaciones en la enseñanza de las ciencias que afirman la importancia de debates sobre la "naturaleza de la ciencia" en la educación básica y formación del profesorado. La historia de la ciencia aplicada a la educación es una manera de contextualizar los debates de la epistemología, lo que permite tanto la comprensión de los contenidos científicos como el aprendizaje de conceptos científicos. En esto trabajo, presentamos algunas definiciones bastante consensuales sobre la naturaleza de la ciencia que han sido ampliamente discutidas por la comunidad académica y mostramos cómo algunos episodios en la historia de la astronomía pueden llevar a discusiones sobre algunos aspectos de la naturaleza de la ciencia. Há um número crescente de pesquisas na área de ensino de ciências que afirmam a importância de discussões sobre a "natureza da ciência" na educação básica e na formação de professores. A história da ciência aplicada ao ensino é uma maneira de contextualizar discussões epistemológicas, permitindo tanto a compreensão de conteúdos científicos quanto o aprendizado de noções sobre as ciências. Neste trabalho apresentamos algumas definições razoavelmente consensuais sobre a natureza da ciência que foram amplamente discutidas pela

  10. [Spectral analyzing effects of atmosphere states on the structure and characteristics of CdTe polycrystalline thin films made by close-spaced sublimation].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua-jing; Zheng, Jia-gui; Feng, Liang-huan; Zhang, Jing-quan; Xie, Er-qing

    2005-07-01

    The structure and characteristics of CdTe thin films are dependent on the working atmosphere states in close-spaced sublimation. In the present paper, CdTe polycrystalline thin films were deposited by CSS in mixture atmosphere of argon and oxygen. The physical mechanism of CSS was analyzed, and the temperature distribution in CSS system was measured. The dependence of preliminary nucleus creation on the atmosphere states (involving component and pressure) was studied. Transparencies were measured and optic energy gaps were calculated. The results show that: (1) The CdTe films deposited in different atmospheres are cubic structure. With increasing oxygen concentration, a increases and reaches the maximum at 6% oxygen concentration, then reduces, and increases again after passing the point at 12% oxygen concentration. Among them, the sample depositing at 9% oxygen concentration is the best. The optic energy gaps are 1.50-1.51 eV for all CdTe films. (2) The samples depositing at different pressures at 9% oxygen concentration are all cubical structure of CdTe, and the diffraction peaks of CdS and SnO2:F still appear. With the gas pressure increasing, the crystal size of CdTe minishes, the transparency of the thin film goes down, and the absorption side shifts to the short-wave direction. (3) The polycrystalline thin films with high quality deposit in 4 minutes under the depositing condition that the substrate temperature is 550 degrees C, and source temperature is 620 degrees C at 9% oxygen concentration.

  11. The influence of snow sublimation and meltwater evaporation on δD of water vapor in the atmospheric boundary layer of central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christner, Emanuel; Kohler, Martin; Schneider, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Post-depositional fractionation of stable water isotopes due to fractionating surface evaporation introduces uncertainty to various isotope applications such as the reconstruction of paleotemperatures, paleoaltimetry, and the investigation of groundwater formation. In this study, we investigate isotope fractionation at snow-covered moisture sources by combining 17 months of observations of isotope concentration ratios [HD16O] / [H216O] in low-level water vapor in central Europe with a new Lagrangian isotope model. The isotope model is capable of reproducing variations of the observed isotope ratios with a correlation coefficient R of 0.82. Observations from 38 days were associated with cold snaps and moisture uptake in snow-covered regions. Deviations between modeled and measured isotope ratios during the cold snaps were related to differences in skin temperatures (Tskin). Analysis of Tskin provided by the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) of the NCEP implies the existence of two regimes of Tskin with different types of isotope fractionation during evaporation: a cold regime with Tskin < Tsubl,max = -7.7 °C, which is dominated by non-fractionating sublimation of snow, and a warmer regime with Tsubl,max < Tskin < 0 °C, which is dominated by fractionating evaporation of meltwater. Based on a sensitivity study, we assess an uncertainty range of the determined Tsubl,max of -11.9 to -2.9 °C. The existence of the two fractionation regimes has important implications for the interpretation of isotope records from snow-covered regions as well as for a more realistic modeling of isotope fractionation at snow-covered moisture sources. For these reasons, more detailed experimental studies at snow-covered sites are needed to better constrain the Tsubl,max and to further investigate isotope fractionation in the two regimes.

  12. Summary of LO2/Ethanol OMS/RCS Technology and Advanced Development 99-2744

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Leslie A.; Hurlbert, Eric A.

    1999-01-01

    NASA is pursuing non-toxic propellant technologies applicable to RLV and Space Shuttle orbital maneuvering system (OMS) and reaction control system (RCS). The primary objectives of making advancements in an OMS/RCS system are improved safety, reliability, and reduced operations and maintenance cost, while meeting basic operational and performance requirements. An OMS/RCS has a high degree of direct interaction with the vehicle and crew and requires subsystem and components that are compatible with integration into the vehicle with regard to external mold-line, power, and thermal control. In July 1997, a Phase I effort for the technology and advanced development of an upgrade of the space shuttle was conducted to define the system architecture, propellant tank, feed system, RCS thrusters, and OMS engine. Phase I of the project ran from July 1997 to October 1998. Phase II is currently being planned for the development and test of full-scale prototype of the system in 1999 and 2000. The choice of pressure-fed liquid oxygen (LO2) and ethanol is the result of numerous trade studies conducted from 1980 to 1996. Liquid oxygen and ethanol are clean burning, high-density propellants that provide a high degree of commonality with other spacecraft subsystems including life support, power, and thermal control, and with future human exploration and development of space missions. The key to this pressure-fed system is the use of subcooled liquid oxygen at 350 psia. In this approach, there is 80 degrees R of subcooling, which means that boil-off will not occur until the temperature has risen 80 R. The sub-cooling results naturally from loading propellants at 163 R, which is the saturation temperature at 14.7 psia, and then pressurizing to 350 psia on the launch pad. Thermal insulation and conditioning techniques are then used to limit the LO2 temperature to 185 R maximum, and maintain the sub-cooling. The other key is the wide temperature range of ethanol, -173 F to +300 F, which

  13. Study of LO-phonon decay in semiconductors for hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levard, Hugo; Vidal, Julien; Laribi, Sana; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of phonon decay is of crucial importance when studying basic properties of semiconductors, since they are closely related to Raman linewidth and non-equilibrium-hot-carriers cooling. The latter indeed cools down to the bottom of the conduction band within a picosecond range because of electron-phonon interaction. The eventual emitted hot phonons then decay in few picoseconds. The hot carriers cooling can be slowed down by considering the decay rate dependence of phonon on conservation rules, whose tuning may reduce the allowed two-phonon final states density. This is of direct interest for the third generation photovoltaic devices that are Hot Carrier Solar Cells (HCSC), in which the photoexcited carriers are extracted at an energy higher than thermal equilibrium. One of the HCSC main challenges then is to find an absorber material in which the hot phonons has a relaxation time longer than the carriers cooling time, so that we can expect the electron to ``reabsorb'' a phonon, slowing down the electronic cooling. HCSC yield is ultimately limited by LO phonon decay, though. In this work, we present theoretical results obtained from ab initio calculations of phonon lifetime in III-V and IV-IV semiconductors through a three-phonon process. Common approximations in the literature are questioned. In particular, we show that the usual ``zone-center approximation'' is not valid in some specific semiconductors. The analysis allows to correctly investigate phonon decay mechanisms in bulk and nanostructured materials.

  14. Infinite-Cutoff Renormalization of the Chiral Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction up to N3LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeoli, Ch.; Machleidt, R.; Entem, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Naively, the "best" method of renormalization is the one where a momentum cutoff is taken to infinity while maintaining stable results due to a cutoff-dependent adjustment of counterterms. We have applied this renormalization method in the non-perturbative calculation of phase-shifts for nucleon-nucleon ( NN) scattering using chiral NN potentials up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO). For lower partial waves, we find that there is either no convergence with increasing order or, if convergence occurs, the results do not always converge to the empirical values. For higher partial waves, we always observe convergence to the empirical phase shifts (except for the 3G5 state). Furthermore, no matter what the order is, one can use only one or no counterterm per partial wave, creating a rather erratic scheme of power counting that does not allow for a systematic order-by-order improvement of the predictions. The conclusion is that infinite-cutoff renormalization is inappropriate for chiral NN interactions, which should not come as a surprise, since the chiral effective field theory (chiral EFT), these interactions are based upon, is designed for momenta below the chiral-symmetry breaking scale of about 1 GeV. Therefore, this value for the hard scale should also be perceived as the appropriate upper limit for the momentum cutoff.

  15. Aggregation of LoD 1 building models as an optimization problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guercke, R.; Götzelmann, T.; Brenner, C.; Sester, M.

    3D city models offered by digital map providers typically consist of several thousands or even millions of individual buildings. Those buildings are usually generated in an automated fashion from high resolution cadastral and remote sensing data and can be very detailed. However, not in every application such a high degree of detail is desirable. One way to remove complexity is to aggregate individual buildings, simplify the ground plan and assign an appropriate average building height. This task is computationally complex because it includes the combinatorial optimization problem of determining which subset of the original set of buildings should best be aggregated to meet the demands of an application. In this article, we introduce approaches to express different aspects of the aggregation of LoD 1 building models in the form of Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) problems. The advantage of this approach is that for linear (and some quadratic) MIP problems, sophisticated software exists to find exact solutions (global optima) with reasonable effort. We also propose two different heuristic approaches based on the region growing strategy and evaluate their potential for optimization by comparing their performance to a MIP-based approach.

  16. Image Steganography using Karhunen-Loève Transform and Least Bit Substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadha, Ankit; Satam, Neha; Sood, Rakshak; Bade, Dattatray

    2013-10-01

    As communication channels are increasing in number, reliability of faithful communication is reducing. Hacking and tempering of data are two major issues for which security should be provided by channel. This raises the importance of steganography. In this paper, a novel method to encode the message information inside a carrier image has been described. It uses Karhunen-Lo\\`eve Transform for compression of data and Least Bit Substitution for data encryption. Compression removes redundancy and thus also provides encoding to a level. It is taken further by means of Least Bit Substitution. The algorithm used for this purpose uses pixel matrix which serves as a best tool to work on. Three different sets of images were used with three different numbers of bits to be substituted by message information. The experimental results show that algorithm is time efficient and provides high data capacity. Further, it can decrypt the original data effectively. Parameters such as carrier error and message error were calculated for each set and were compared for performance analysis.

  17. Optimized suppression of coherent noise from seismic data using the Karhunen-Loève transform.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Raúl; Vasconcelos, Giovani L

    2006-07-01

    Signals obtained in land seismic surveys are usually contaminated with coherent noise, among which the ground roll (Rayleigh surface waves) is of major concern for it can severely degrade the quality of the information obtained from the seismic record. This paper presents an optimized filter based on the Karhunen-Loève transform for processing seismic images contaminated with ground roll. In this method, the contaminated region of the seismic record, to be processed by the filter, is selected in such way as to correspond to the maximum of a properly defined coherence index. The main advantages of the method are that the ground roll is suppressed with negligible distortion of the remnant reflection signals and that the filtering procedure can be automated. The image processing technique described in this study should also be relevant for other applications where coherent structures embedded in a complex spatiotemporal pattern need to be identified in a more refined way. In particular, it is argued that the method is appropriate for processing optical coherence tomography images whose quality is often degraded by coherent noise (speckle).

  18. Pseudo-scalar Higgs boson production at N^3LO_{ {A}}+N^3LL'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Taushif; Bonvini, Marco; Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Rana, Narayan; Ravindran, V.; Rottoli, Luca

    2016-12-01

    We consider the production of a pseudo-scalar particle A at the LHC, and present accurate theoretical predictions for its inclusive cross section in gluon fusion. The prediction is based on combining fixed-order perturbation theory and all-order threshold resummation. At fixed order we include the exact next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) plus an approximate next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N^3LO_A) which is based on the recent computation at this order for the scalar case. We then add threshold resummation at next-to-next-to-next-to leading logarithmic accuracy (N^3LL^' ). Various forms of threshold resummation are considered, differing by the treatment of subleading terms, allowing a robust estimate of the theoretical uncertainties due to missing higher orders. With particular attention to pseudo-scalar masses of 200 and 750 GeV, we also observe that perturbative convergence is much improved when resummation is included. Additionally, results obtained with threshold resummation in direct QCD are compared with analogous results as computed in soft-collinear effective theory, which turn out to be in good agreement. We provide precise predictions for pseudo-scalar inclusive cross section at 13 TeV LHC for a wide range of masses. The results are available through updated versions of the public codes ggHiggs and TROLL.

  19. 3D Building Modeling in LoD2 Using the CityGML Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preka, D.; Doulamis, A.

    2016-10-01

    Over the last decade, scientific research has been increasingly focused on the third dimension in all fields and especially in sciences related to geographic information, the visualization of natural phenomena and the visualization of the complex urban reality. The field of 3D visualization has achieved rapid development and dynamic progress, especially in urban applications, while the technical restrictions on the use of 3D information tend to subside due to advancements in technology. A variety of 3D modeling techniques and standards has already been developed, as they gain more traction in a wide range of applications. Such a modern standard is the CityGML, which is open and allows for sharing and exchanging of 3D city models. Within the scope of this study, key issues for the 3D modeling of spatial objects and cities are considered and specifically the key elements and abilities of CityGML standard, which is used in order to produce a 3D model of 14 buildings that constitute a block at the municipality of Kaisariani, Athens, in Level of Detail 2 (LoD2), as well as the corresponding relational database. The proposed tool is based upon the 3DCityDB package in tandem with a geospatial database (PostgreSQL w/ PostGIS 2.0 extension). The latter allows for execution of complex queries regarding the spatial distribution of data. The system is implemented in order to facilitate a real-life scenario in a suburb of Athens.

  20. Thymoquinone suppresses migration of LoVo human colon cancer cells by reducing prostaglandin E2 induced COX-2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Lin, Yueh-Min; Li, Shin-Yi; Tu, Chuan-Chou; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Shih, Hui-Nung; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify potential anti-cancer constituents in natural extracts that inhibit cancer cell growth and migration. METHODS Our experiments used high dose thymoquinone (TQ) as an inhibitor to arrest LoVo (a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line) cancer cell growth, which was detected by cell proliferation assay and immunoblotting assay. Low dose TQ did not significantly reduce LoVo cancer cell growth. Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) is an enzyme that is involved in the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in humans. PGE2 can promote COX-2 protein expression and tumor cell proliferation and was used as a control. RESULTS Our results showed that 20 μmol/L TQ significantly reduced human LoVo colon cancer cell proliferation. TQ treatment reduced the levels of p-PI3K, p-Akt, p-GSK3β, and β-catenin and thereby inhibited the downstream COX-2 expression. Results also showed that the reduction in COX-2 expression resulted in a reduction in PGE2 levels and the suppression of EP2 and EP4 activation. Further analysis showed that TG treatment inhibited the nuclear translocation of β-catenin in LoVo cancer cells. The levels of the cofactors LEF-1 and TCF-4 were also decreased in the nucleus following TQ treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with low dose TQ inhibited the COX-2 expression at the transcriptional level and the regulation of COX-2 expression efficiently reduced LoVo cell migration. The results were further verified in vivo by confirming the effects of TQ and/or PGE2 using tumor xenografts in nude mice. CONCLUSION TQ inhibits LoVo cancer cell growth and migration, and this result highlights the therapeutic advantage of using TQ in combination therapy against colorectal cancer. PMID:28275297

  1. Effects of anaesthesia on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of LoVo colon cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y J; Li, S Y; Cheng, Q; Chen, W K; Wang, S L; Ren, Y; Miao, C H

    2016-02-01

    Tumour cell proliferation, invasion and apoptosis are crucial steps in tumour metastasis. We evaluated the effect of serum from patients undergoing colon cancer surgery receiving thoracic epidural and propofol anaesthesia on colon cancer cell biology. Patients were randomly assigned to receive propofol anaesthesia with a concomitant thoracic epidural (PEA, n = 20) or sevoflurane anaesthesia with opioid analgesia (SGA, n = 20). Venous blood was obtained before induction of anaesthesia and 24 hours postoperatively. The LoVo colon cancer cells were cultured with patient serum from both groups and the effects on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis were measured. Twenty-four hours after surgery, the absorbance value of LoVo cells at 10% serum concentration from PEA was decreased when compared with SGA (0.302 (0.026) vs 0.391 (0.066), p = 0.005). The inhibitory rate of LoVo cells at 10% serum concentration from PEA was higher than that from SGA (p = 0.004) 24 h after surgery. The number of invasive LoVo cells at 10% serum concentration from PEA was reduced when compared with SGA (44 (4) vs 62 (4), p < 0.001). Exposure of LoVo cells to postoperative serum from patients receiving PEA led to a higher luminescence ratio (apoptosis) than those receiving SGA (0.36 (0.04) vs 0.27 (0.05), p < 0.001). Serum from patients receiving PEA for colon cancer surgery inhibited proliferation and invasion of LoVo cells and induced apoptosis in vitro more than that from patients receiving SGA. Anaesthetic technique might influence the serum milieu in a way that affects cancer cell biology and, thereby, tumour metastastasis.

  2. Cellular stress induced by photodynamic reaction with CoTPPS and MnTMPyPCl5 in combination with electroporation in human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (LoVo and LoVoDX).

    PubMed

    Kulbacka, J; Kotulska, M; Rembiałkowska, N; Choromańska, A; Kamińska, I; Garbiec, A; Rossowska, J; Daczewska, M; Jachimska, B; Saczko, J

    2013-11-01

    Two porphyrins, CoTPPS and MnTMPyPCl5, were tested for their photodynamic activity and potential novel use in a therapy of human cancers. We investigated an effect of photodynamic reaction (PDR), electroporation (EP) and their combination (electro-photodynamic reaction [EP-PDR]) on human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (LoVo and resistant to doxorubicin LoVoDX), human breast adenocarcinoma (wild type MCF-7/WT and resistant to doxorubicin MCF-7/DOX), and human melanoma (Me45). The efficiency of macromolecules transport was examined with cytofluorymetry by assessing the degree of propidium iodide (PI) penetration. Additionally, cellular ultrastructure after EP was evaluated. We determined cyto- and photo-cytotoxic effect on the cells viability (MTT assay) after standard PDR and PDR combined with EP. Intracellular distribution and mitochondrial colocalization of both porphyrins was also performed. The experiments proved that both complexes exhibit desirable photodynamic properties on LoVo LoVoDX cells, and EP effectively supports photodynamic method in this type of cancer. The application of EP provided shorter time of incubation (only 10 min) and enhanced effect of applied therapy. The porphyrins did not affect the MCF-7 and Me45 cell lines.

  3. Balm mint extract (Lo-701) for topical treatment of recurring herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    Koytchev, R; Alken, R G; Dundarov, S

    1999-10-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was carried out with the aim of proving efficacy of standardized balm mint cream [active ingredient: 1% Lo-701--dried extract from Melissa officinalis L. leaves (70:1)] for the therapy of herpes simplex labialis. Sixty six patients with a history of recurrent herpes labialis (at least four episodes per year) in one center were treated topically; 34 of them with verum and 32 with placebo. The cream had to be smeared on the affected area four times daily over five days. A combined symptom score of the values for complaints, size of affected area and blisters at day 2 of therapy was formed as the primary target parameter. There was a significant difference in the values of the primary target parameter between both treatment groups: verum 4.03 +/- 0.33 (3.0); placebo 4.94 +/- 0.40 (5.0); values given are mean +/- SEM (median) of the symptoms score on day 2 of therapy. The tested formulation is effective for the treatment of herpes simplex labialis. The significant difference in the combined symptom score on the second day of treatment is of particular importance having in mind that the complaints in patients suffering from herpes labialis are usually most intensive at that time. In addition to the shortening of the healing period, the prevention of a spreading of the infection and the rapid effect on typical symptoms of herpes like itching, tingling, burning, stabbing, swelling, tautness and erythema, the balm mint cream has a further advantage. The different mechanism of action of the balm mint extract rules out the development of resistance of the herpes virus. Some indication exists that the intervals between the periods with herpes might be prolonged with balm mint cream treatment.

  4. Spark Ignition Characteristics of a LO2/LCH4 Engine at Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Sarmiento, Charles; Marshall, William

    2012-01-01

    The use of non-toxic propellants in future exploration vehicles would enable safer, more cost effective mission scenarios. One promising "green" alternative to existing hypergols is liquid methane/liquid oxygen. To demonstrate performance and prove feasibility of this propellant combination, a 100lbf LO2/LCH4 engine was developed and tested under the NASA Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project. Since high ignition energy is a perceived drawback of this propellant combination, a test program was performed to explore ignition performance and reliability versus delivered spark energy. The sensitivity of ignition to spark timing and repetition rate was also examined. Three different exciter units were used with the engine's augmented (torch) igniter. Propellant temperature was also varied within the liquid range. Captured waveforms indicated spark behavior in hot fire conditions was inconsistent compared to the well-behaved dry sparks (in quiescent, room air). The escalating pressure and flow environment increases spark impedance and may at some point compromise an exciter.s ability to deliver a spark. Reduced spark energies of these sparks result in more erratic ignitions and adversely affect ignition probability. The timing of the sparks relative to the pressure/flow conditions also impacted the probability of ignition. Sparks occurring early in the flow could trigger ignition with energies as low as 1-6mJ, though multiple, similarly timed sparks of 55-75mJ were required for reliable ignition. An optimum time interval for spark application and ignition coincided with propellant introduction to the igniter and engine. Shifts of ignition timing were manifested by changes in the characteristics of the resulting ignition.

  5. More food, low pollution (mo fo lo Po): a grand challenge for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Eric A; Suddick, Emma C; Rice, Charles W; Prokopy, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    Synthetic nitrogen fertilizer has been a double-edged sword, greatly improving human nutrition during the 20th century but also posing major human health and environmental challenges for the 21st century. In August 2013, about 160 agronomists, scientists, extension agents, crop advisors, economists, social scientists, farmers, representatives of regulatory agencies and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and other agricultural experts gathered to discuss the vexing challenge of how to produce more food to nourish a growing population while minimizing pollution to the environment. This collection of 14 papers authored by conference participants provides a much needed analysis of the many technical, economic, and social impediments to improving nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in crop and animal production systems. These papers demonstrate that the goals of producing more food with low pollution (Mo Fo Lo Po) will not be achieved by technological developments alone but will also require policies that recognize the economic and social factors affecting farmer decision-making. Take-home lessons from this extraordinary interdisciplinary effort include the need (i) to develop partnerships among private and public sectors to demonstrate the most current, economically feasible, best management NUE practices at local and regional scales; (ii) to improve continuing education to private sector retailers and crop advisers; (iii) to tie nutrient management to performance-based indicators on the farm and in the downwind and downstream environment; and (iv) to restore investments in research, education, extension, and human resources that are essential for developing the interdisciplinary knowledge and innovative skills needed to achieve agricultural sustainability goals.

  6. Transport phenomena in the close-spaced sublimation deposition process for manufacture of large-area cadmium telluride photovoltaic panels: Modeling and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, C. P.

    With increasing national and global demand for energy and concerns about the effect of fossil fuels on global climate change, there is an increasing emphasis on the development and use of renewable sources of energy. Solar cells or photovoltaics constitute an important renewable energy technology but the major impediment to their widespread adoption has been their high initial cost. Although thin-film photovoltaic semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride (CdS/CdTe) can potentially be inexpensively manufactured using large area deposition techniques such as close-spaced sublimation (CSS), their low stability has prevented them from becoming an alternative to traditional polycrystalline silicon solar cells. A key factor affecting the stability of CdS/CdTe cells is the uniformity of deposition of the thin films. Currently no models exist that can relate the processing parameters in a CSS setup with the film deposition uniformity. Central to the development of these models is a fundamental understanding of the complex transport phenomena which constitute the deposition process which include coupled conduction and radiation as well as transition regime rarefied gas flow. This thesis is aimed at filling these knowledge gaps and thereby leading to the development of the relevant models. The specific process under consideration is the CSS setup developed by the Materials Engineering Group at the Colorado State University (CSU). Initially, a 3-D radiation-conduction model of a single processing station was developed using the commercial finite-element software ABAQUS and validated against data from steady-state experiments carried out at CSU. A simplified model was then optimized for maximizing the steady-state thermal uniformity within the substrate. It was inferred that contrary to traditional top and bottom infrared lamp heating, a lamp configuration that directs heat from the periphery of the sources towards the center results in the minimum temperature

  7. Modeling of the effects of different substrate materials on the residual thermal stresses in the aluminum nitride crystal grown by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. G.; Idesman, A.; Nyakiti, L.; Chaudhuri, J.

    2009-02-01

    A three-dimensional numerical finite element modeling method is applied to compare interfacial residual thermal stress distribution in AlN single crystals grown by using different substrates such as silicon carbide, boron nitride, tungsten, tantalum carbide, and niobium carbide. A dimensionless coordinate system is used which reduces the numbers of computations and hence simplifies the stress analysis. All components of the stress distribution, both in the film and in the substrate, including the normal stress along the growth direction as well as in-plane normal stresses and shear stresses are fully investigated. This information about the stress distribution provides insight into understanding and controlling the AlN single crystal growth by the sublimation technique. The normal stress in the film at the interface along the growth direction and the shear stresses are zero except at the edges, whereas in-plane stresses are nonzero. The in-plane stresses are compressive when TaC and NbC substrates are used. A small compressive stress might be beneficial in prohibiting crack growth in the film. The compressive stress in the AlN is lower for the TaC substrate than that for the NbC. Tensile in-plane stresses are formed in the AlN for 6H-SiC, BN, and W substrates. This tensile stress in the film is detrimental as it will assist in the crack growth. The stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film at the interface is compressive in nature when TaC and NbC are used as a substrate. This causes the film to bend downward (i.e., convex shape) and assist it to adhere to the substrate. The AlN film curves upward or in a concave shape when SiC, BN, and W substrates are used since the stress concentration at the edges of the AlN film is tensile at the interface and this may cause detachment of the film from the substrate.

  8. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-05-23

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p < 0.0001). Human hepatic CXCR6+ NK had an immature phenotype (predominantly CD56(bright)CD16-CD57-), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6- fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity.

  9. Circulating CXCR5+CXCR3+PD-1lo Tfh-like cells in HIV-1 controllers with neutralizing antibody breadth

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Gayo, Enrique; Cronin, Jacqueline; Hickman, Taylor; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Lindqvist, Madelene; Kolb, Kellie E.; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Cubas, Rafael; Porichis, Filippos; Shalek, Alex K.; van Lunzen, Jan; Haddad, Elias K.; Walker, Bruce D.; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Yu, Xu G.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1–specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) typically develop in individuals with continuous high-level viral replication and increased immune activation, conditions that cannot be reproduced during prophylactic immunization. Understanding mechanisms supporting bnAb development in the absence of high-level viremia may be important for designing bnAb-inducing immunogens. Here, we show that the breadth of neutralizing antibody responses in HIV-1 controllers was associated with a relative enrichment of circulating CXCR5+CXCR3+PD-1lo CD4+ T cells. These CXCR3+PD-1lo Tfh-like cells were preferentially induced in vitro by functionally superior dendritic cells from controller neutralizers, and able to secrete IL-21 and support B cells. In addition, these CXCR3+PD-1lo Tfh-like cells contained higher proportions of stem cell–like memory T cells, and upon antigenic stimulation differentiated into PD-1hi Tfh-like cells in a Notch-dependent manner. Together, these data suggest that CXCR5+CXCR3+PD-1lo cells represent a dendritic cell–primed precursor cell population for PD-1hi Tfh-like cells that may contribute to the generation of bnAbs in the absence of high-level viremia. PMID:28138558

  10. Nonlinear Analysis of the Space Shuttle Superlightweight LO2 Tank. Part 1; Bahavior Under Booster Ascent Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Results of linear bifurcation and nonlinear analyses of the Space Shuttle superlightweight (SLWT) external liquid-oxygen (LO2) tank for an important early booster ascent loading condition are presented. These results for thin-walled linear elastic shells that are subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads illustrate an important type of response mode that may be encountered in the design of other liquid-fuel launch vehicles. Linear bifurcation analyses are presented that predict several nearly equal eigenvalues that correspond to local buckling modes in the forward ogive section of the LO2 tank. In contrast, the nonlinear response phenomenon is shown to consist of short-wavelength bending deformations in the forward ogive and barrel sections of the LO2 tank that growing amplitude in a stable manner increasing load. Imperfection sensitivity analyses are presented that show that the presence of several nearly equal eigenvalues does not lead to a premature general instability mode for the forward ogive section. For the linear bifurcation and nonlinear analyses, the results show that accurate predictions of the response of the shield generally require a large-scale, high-fidelity finite-element model. Results are also presented that show that the SLWT LO2 tank can support loads in excess of approximately 2.6 times the values of the operational loads considered.

  11. The LO Model and the Traditional French Organisational Culture: A Paradigmatic Contradiction Leading to a Limited Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belet, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the issue of the very weak implementation of the LO model in France, although it appears as an appealing new management paradigm that can allow companies to better face a fast changing environment. The author argues that there is a strong philosophical contradiction between this innovative management model and the still…

  12. The Repression of the Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haronian, Frank

    1977-01-01

    Psychosynthesis is one approach that strives to reach from the lower unconscious to the self, helping man to recognize his higher as well as his lower impulses, to accept the responsibility of deciding which to express and which to renounce, and to deal with the anxiety that is an inescapable aspect of the process of self-actualization. (Author)

  13. Volatile organic compound fluxes and concentrations in London (ClearfLo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valach, Amy; Langford, Ben; Nemitz, Eiko; MacKenzie, Rob; Hewitt, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from anthropogenic sources such as fuel combustion or evaporative emissions can directly and indirectly affect human health. Some VOCs, such as benzene and 1,3- butadiene are carcinogens. These and other VOCs contribute to the formation of ozone (O3) and aerosol particles, which have effects on human health and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Although in the UK VOC emissions are subject to control under European Commission Directive 2008/50/EC and emission reducing technologies have been implemented, urban air pollution remains a concern. Urban air quality is likely to remain a priority since currently >50% of the global population live in urban areas with trends in urbanization and population migration predicted to increase. The ClearfLo project is a large multi-institutional consortium funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and provides integrated measurements of meteorology, gas phase and particulate composition of the atmosphere over London. Both long term and IOP measurements were made at street and elevated locations at a range of sites across London and its surroundings during 2011 and 2012. Mixing ratios of a selection of nine VOCs were measured using a high sensitivity proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) at a ground level urban background (North Kensington) and kerbside (Marylebone Road) site during the winter IOP. VOC fluxes were measured by virtually disjunct eddy covariance (vDEC) at an elevated urban site (King's College Strand) in Aug-Dec 2012. Our results for the first IOP showed that most of the selected compound concentrations depended on traffic emissions, although there was a marked difference between the urban background and kerbside sites. We identified some temperature effects on VOC concentrations. We also present the first analyses of VOC flux measurements over London. Preliminary analyses indicate most compounds associated with vehicle emissions closely

  14. Conceptos Basicos Sobre el Gas Natural

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-01

    El gas natural abastece cerca de 150.000 vehiculos en los Estados Unidos y aproximadamente 22 millones de vehiculos en todo el mundo. Los vehiculos de gas natural (NGV, por sus siglas en ingles) son una buena opcion para las flotas de vehiculos de alto kilometraje, tales como autobuses, taxis, vehiculos de recoleccion de basura, los cuales son alimentados centralmente u operan dentro de un area limitada o a lo largo de una ruta con estaciones de servicio de gas natural. Las ventajas del gas natural como combustible alternativo incluyen su disponibilidad interna, la red de distribucion establecida, un costo relativamente bajo, y los beneficios de las emisiones.

  15. Analyzing the interstellar neutral He bulk flow parameters with IBEX-Lo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Trevor W.

    2016-08-01

    Our Sun is immersed in a local galactic environment which is composed of a warm, dilute, and partially ionized gas. Due to the Sun's motion relative to this environment, the interstellar neutral (ISN) gas flows through the heliosphere providing the opportunity to perform in-situ observations of the ISN gas from Earth's orbit. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has observed the ISN gas flow over the past 7 years from a highly elliptical orbit around the Earth. The first observations of ISN H, O, and Ne were recorded by IBEX, along with the most detailed observation of ISN He. Since He is minimally influenced by ionization and charge exchange, the ISN He flow provides a sample of the pristine interstellar environment. Surprisingly, the analysis of the early IBEX observations of the ISN He flow in 2009 and 2010 with two separate analysis techniques indicated a somewhat different ISN He parameter set than the previous neutral gas observations with Ulysses GAS. One analysis technique employs the Warsaw Test Particle Model (WTPM) to simulate the ISN atom trajectories numerically from the observer position to the boundary of the heliosphere at 150 AU with spatial and temporal dependent ionization rates. A computational intensive global chi-squared minimization of the WTPM to IBEX-Lo observations is performed to characterize the ISN He flow. The second analysis technique, and the subject of this study, takes advantage of simplifications possible due to the IBEX viewing geometry of ISN atoms close to perihelion in their hyperbolic trajectories. The analytical model is based on Liouville's Theorem with the assumption that the ISN He distribution is a drifting Maxwellian in the local interstellar medium. The analytical model is used to make a 3-step approach to determining the ISN He flow vector and temperature, rather than a global chi-squared minimization. The first step determines the location of the peak ISN He flux at Earth orbit to fix the relationship between

  16. A study of the coupling between LO phonons and plasmons in InP p-i-n diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thao, Dinh Nhu

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports a study investigating the coupling between longitudinal optical (LO) phonons and plasmons in InP p-i-n diodes by a numerical simulation. A significant change is observed in the Fourier transform spectra of transient electric field when taking the coupling into account. The findings show two separate peaks instead of a single plasma peak as for non-coupling case. In addition, the bulk-like dispersion relations of the frequencies of those two peaks on the carrier density are found. Therefore, it is proposed that those behaviors manifest the LO phonon-plasmon coupling in the diodes. Also, there is evidence of the peak clipping by the diode itself, a phenomenon not being seen in the bulk InP semiconductor.

  17. 445 N (100-lbf) LO 2/LCH 4 reaction control engine technology development for future space vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Smith, Timothy D.

    2010-03-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have identified liquid oxygen (LO2)/liquid methane (LCH4) propulsion systems as promising options for some future space vehicles. NASA issued a contract to Aerojet to develop a 445 N (100-lbf) LO 2/LCH 4 Reaction Control Engine (RCE) aimed at reducing the risk of utilizing a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) on a space vehicle. Aerojet utilized innovative design solutions to develop an RCE that can ignite reliably over a broad range of inlet temperatures, perform short minimum impulse bits (MIB) at small electrical pulse widths (EPW), and produce excellent specific impulse (Isp) across a range of engine mixture ratios (MR). These design innovations also provide a start transient with a benign mixture ratio (MR), ensuring good thrust chamber compatibility and long life. In addition, this RCE can successfully operate at MRs associated with main engines, enabling the RCE to provide emergency backup propulsion to minimize vehicle propellant load and overall system mass.

  18. 100-Lb(f) LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine Technology Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Smith, Timothy D.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has identified liquid oxygen (LO2)/liquid methane (LCH4) propulsion systems as promising options for some future space vehicles. NASA issued a contract to Aerojet to develop a 100-lbf (445 N) LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine (RCE) aimed at reducing the risk of utilizing a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) on a space vehicle. Aerojet utilized innovative design solutions to develop an RCE that can ignite reliably over a broad range of inlet temperatures, perform short minimum impulse bits (MIB) at small electrical pulse widths (EPW), and produce excellent specific impulse (Isp) across a range of engine mixture ratios (MR). These design innovations also provide a start transient with a benign MR, ensuring good thrust chamber compatibility and long life. In addition, this RCE can successfully operate at MRs associated with main engines, enabling the RCE to provide emergency backup propulsion to minimize vehicle propellant load and overall system mass.

  19. Temperature dependence of the A1(LO) and E2 (high) phonons in hexagonal InN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Jian, J. K.; Wang, G.; Bao, H. Q.; Chen, X. L.

    2007-06-01

    The frequencies and dampings of the zone-center optical phonon modes of A1(LO) (longitudinal-optical) and E2 (high) in wurtzite InN nanowires have been investigated by micro-Raman scattering in the temperature range from 80 to 300 K. Our results reveal that the phonon frequencies decrease and the linewidths broaden with increasing temperature. The obtained experimental data of the frequencies and linewidths at various temperatures can be well described by an empirical model which takes into account the contribution of the thermal expansion of lattice and symmetric decay of phonons into two and three identical phonons with lower energy. The results show that decay into two phonons is the probable channel for the A1(LO) mode and three-phonon decay dominates the E2 (high) mode.

  20. LoTo: a graphlet based method for the comparison of local topology between gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Riquelme, Sebastián; Dominguez, Calixto; Perez-Acle, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    One of the main challenges of the post-genomic era is the understanding of how gene expression is controlled. Changes in gene expression lay behind diverse biological phenomena such as development, disease and the adaptation to different environmental conditions. Despite the availability of well-established methods to identify these changes, tools to discern how gene regulation is orchestrated are still required. The regulation of gene expression is usually depicted as a Gene Regulatory Network (GRN) where changes in the network structure (i.e., network topology) represent adjustments of gene regulation. Like other networks, GRNs are composed of basic building blocks; small induced subgraphs called graphlets. Here we present LoTo, a novel method that using Graphlet Based Metrics (GBMs) identifies topological variations between different states of a GRN. Under our approach, different states of a GRN are analyzed to determine the types of graphlet formed by all triplets of nodes in the network. Subsequently, graphlets occurring in a state of the network are compared to those formed by the same three nodes in another version of the network. Once the comparisons are performed, LoTo applies metrics from binary classification problems calculated on the existence and absence of graphlets to assess the topological similarity between both network states. Experiments performed on randomized networks demonstrate that GBMs are more sensitive to topological variation than the same metrics calculated on single edges. Additional comparisons with other common metrics demonstrate that our GBMs are capable to identify nodes whose local topology changes between different states of the network. Notably, due to the explicit use of graphlets, LoTo captures topological variations that are disregarded by other approaches. LoTo is freely available as an online web server at http://dlab.cl/loto. PMID:28265516

  1. LoTo: a graphlet based method for the comparison of local topology between gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Martin, Alberto J; Contreras-Riquelme, Sebastián; Dominguez, Calixto; Perez-Acle, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    One of the main challenges of the post-genomic era is the understanding of how gene expression is controlled. Changes in gene expression lay behind diverse biological phenomena such as development, disease and the adaptation to different environmental conditions. Despite the availability of well-established methods to identify these changes, tools to discern how gene regulation is orchestrated are still required. The regulation of gene expression is usually depicted as a Gene Regulatory Network (GRN) where changes in the network structure (i.e., network topology) represent adjustments of gene regulation. Like other networks, GRNs are composed of basic building blocks; small induced subgraphs called graphlets. Here we present LoTo, a novel method that using Graphlet Based Metrics (GBMs) identifies topological variations between different states of a GRN. Under our approach, different states of a GRN are analyzed to determine the types of graphlet formed by all triplets of nodes in the network. Subsequently, graphlets occurring in a state of the network are compared to those formed by the same three nodes in another version of the network. Once the comparisons are performed, LoTo applies metrics from binary classification problems calculated on the existence and absence of graphlets to assess the topological similarity between both network states. Experiments performed on randomized networks demonstrate that GBMs are more sensitive to topological variation than the same metrics calculated on single edges. Additional comparisons with other common metrics demonstrate that our GBMs are capable to identify nodes whose local topology changes between different states of the network. Notably, due to the explicit use of graphlets, LoTo captures topological variations that are disregarded by other approaches. LoTo is freely available as an online web server at http://dlab.cl/loto.

  2. Design, Calibration, and Expected On-Orbit Performance of the GOES-R MPS-LO Suprathermal Plasma Analyzer Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, M. J.; McGarity, J. O.; Dichter, B. K.; Galica, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The next generation U.S. geosynchronous weather satellite—GOES series R-U—will include for the first time a suprathermal plasma analyzer. The Magnetospheric Particle Sensor-Low (MPS-LO), an electrostatic analyzer utilizing triquadrispheric geometry (270° turn)deflection electrodes, will measure the flux of electrons and ions with energies between 30 eV - 30 keV in fifteen logarithmically-spaced differential energy channels and arrival direction in twelve angular bins. MPS-LO consists of two sensor heads mounted in a common electronics box. Each sensor head contains a set of deflection electrodes, microchannel plates, and segmented detector anodes. The common electronics box provides the power and I/O interface with a data processing unit, voltage supplies for all of the instrument's electronics, high voltage for the deflection electrodes, in-flight calibration pulsers, and the digital electronics to process signals from sensor heads' detector anodes. Great care was taken in the manufacture and mounting of the triquadrisphere deflection electrodes; each electrode was machined from a single piece of aluminum and specific electrode combinations were mounted with precision machined spacers and matched drilling. The precise fabrication and assembly resulted in near perfect spherical electric fields between the electrodes. The triquadrispheric electrode shape also prevents photons from reaching the detection elements-as a result, MPS-LO is solar blind. The combined field-of-view for the two sensor heads is 180° x 5°, with the larger angle in a plane perpendicular to the spacecraft's orbit and its central axis oriented anti-Earthward. An incident particle's arrival direction is determined in one of twelve 15° x 5° angular zones. A set of shielded anodes is used to measure the background caused by penetrating charged particles that reach the MCPs; this background data is used to correct the MPS-LO data. The instrument's energy resolution ΔE/E is 5.8%.

  3. The Physical Constraints on a New LoBAL QSO at z = 4.82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weimin; Green, Richard; Bai, Jin-Ming; Wang, Tinggui; Grier, Catherine J.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Brandt, William N.; Zuo, Wenwen; Yang, Jinyi; Wang, Feige; Yang, Chenwei; Wu, Xue-Bing; Zhou, Hongyan; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Yang, Qian; Varricatt, Watson; Kerr, Tom; Milne, Peter; Benigni, Sam; Wang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Jujia; Wang, Fang; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Xin, Yu-Xin; Fan, Yu-Feng; Chang, Liang; Zhang, Xiliang; Lun, Bao-Li

    2017-04-01

    Very few low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) QSOs have been found at high redshifts, to date. One high-redshift LoBAL QSO, J0122+1216, was recently discovered by the Lijiang 2.4 m Telescope, with an initial redshift determination of 4.76. Aiming to investigate its physical properties, we carried out follow-up observations in the optical and near-IR spectroscopy. Near-IR spectra from UKIRT and P200 confirm that it is a LoBAL, with a new redshift determination of 4.82 ± 0.01 based on the Mg ii emission-line. The new Mg ii redshift determination reveals strong blueshifts and asymmetry of the high-ionization emission lines. We estimate a black hole mass of ∼2.3 × 109 M ⊙ and Eddington ratio of ∼1.0 according to the empirical Mg ii-based single-epoch relation and bolometric correction factor. It is possible that strong outflows are the result of an extreme quasar environment driven by the high Eddington ratio. A lower limit on the outflowing kinetic power (>0.9% L Edd) is derived from both emission and absorption lines, indicating that these outflows play a significant role in the feedback process that regulates the growth of its black hole, as well as host galaxy evolution.

  4. Lava bubble-wall fragments formed by submarine hydrovolcanic explosions on Lo'ihi Seamount and Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Davis, A.S.; Bischoff, J.L.; Dixon, J.E.; Geyer, R.

    2000-01-01

    Glassy bubble-wall fragments, morphologically similar to littoral limu o Pele, have been found in volcanic sands erupted on Lo'ihi Seamount and along the submarine east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano. The limu o Pele fragments are undegassed with respect to H2O and S and formed by mild steam explosions. Angular glass sand fragments apparently form at similar, and greater, depths by cooling-contraction granulation. The limu o Pele fragments from Lo'ihi Seamount are dominantly tholeiitic basalt containing 6.25-7.25% MgO. None of the limu o Pele samples from Lo'ihi Seamount contains less than 5.57% MgO, suggesting that higher viscosity magmas do not form lava bubbles. The dissolved CO2 and H2O contents of 7 of the limu o Pele fragments indicate eruption at 1200??300 m depth (120??30 bar). These pressures exceed that generally thought to limit steam explosions. We conclude that hydrovolcanic eruptions are possible, with appropriate pre-mixing conditions, at pressures as great as 120 bar.

  5. Comments on Virginia LoCastro's "Learning Strategies and Learning Environments." Making Sense of Learning Strategy Assessment: Toward a Higher Standard of Research Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxford, Rebecca L.; Green, John M.

    1995-01-01

    Critiques an article by Virginia LoCastro that contrasted quantitative data (using the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning, or SILL) and qualitative data (using group interviews) and finds the conclusions drawn from the comparison unjustified on various grounds. A reply by LoCastro is included. (Contains a combined total of 20 references.)…

  6. Towards a general scenario for spring sublimation of volatiles in the South Polar Regions of Mars: insights from MRO high-resolution observations by HiRISE and CRISM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, Antoine; Portyankina, Ganna; Thomas, Nicolas; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Vincendon, Mathieu; Langevin, Yves

    The sublimation of the seasonal deposits of volatiles during Martian spring results in strong temporal variations of the appearance of the southern Polar Regions terrains. The intense dust and CO2 jet-like activity [1] is the most spectacular manifestation of these processes. The high spatial resolution capabilities of the MRO instruments now offer the possibility of new analyses at an unprecedented level of detail. Results from the analyses of HiRISE images as well as complementary work on the physical modeling of the involved processes have recently been published [2,3,4]. We are now completing this work by extending the number of regions of interest and by including CRISM spectral information in our analyses. We have derived the temporal evolution of albedo during spring in ten different areas from the HiRISE and CRISM datasets. In addition, the evolution of the strengths of the CO2-and H2O-ice spectral features are extracted from the CRISM observations. The color imaging capabilities of HiRISE were extensively used to discriminate the different terrains. Composite color images built from spectra measured by CRISM in the visible spectral range provide the ideal context for the HiRISE images. Together, our observations allow us to propose a plausible scenario for the progressive subli-mation of the volatiles deposits that involves a succession of three steps characterized by the predominance of different processes. This updates and enhances the previous work of [5]. First, an intense and early episode of jet activity results in the deposition of large dust fans accom-panied by the condensation of fined grained CO2 frost. In an apparent contradiction with the "Kieffer model" [5], we do not observe the spectral signature of the hypothetical clean slab of CO2-ice at that time. The clean ice is hidden by a quasi-homogeneous layer that is highly contaminated by mineral dust, as already revealed by the OMEGA instrument [6]. We propose a hypothesis to bypass this

  7. Characteristics of Offshore Hawai';i Island Seismicity and Velocity Structure, including Lo';ihi Submarine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, D. K.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Thurber, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Island of Hawai';i is home to the most active volcanoes in the Hawaiian Islands. The island's isolated nature, combined with the lack of permanent offshore seismometers, creates difficulties in recording small magnitude earthquakes with accuracy. This background offshore seismicity is crucial in understanding the structure of the lithosphere around the island chain, the stresses on the lithosphere generated by the weight of the islands, and how the volcanoes interact with each other offshore. This study uses the data collected from a 9-month deployment of a temporary ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) network fully surrounding Lo';ihi volcano. This allowed us to widen the aperture of earthquake detection around the Big Island, lower the magnitude detection threshold, and better constrain the hypocentral depths of offshore seismicity that occurs between the OBS network and the Hawaii Volcano Observatory's land based network. Although this study occurred during a time of volcanic quiescence for Lo';ihi, it establishes a basis for background seismicity of the volcano. More than 480 earthquakes were located using the OBS network, incorporating data from the HVO network where possible. Here we present relocated hypocenters using the double-difference earthquake location algorithm HypoDD (Waldhauser & Ellsworth, 2000), as well as tomographic images for a 30 km square area around the summit of Lo';ihi. Illuminated by using the double-difference earthquake location algorithm HypoDD (Waldhauser & Ellsworth, 2000), offshore seismicity during this study is punctuated by events locating in the mantle fault zone 30-50km deep. These events reflect rupture on preexisting faults in the lower lithosphere caused by stresses induced by volcano loading and flexure of the Pacific Plate (Wolfe et al., 2004; Pritchard et al., 2007). Tomography was performed using the double-difference seismic tomography method TomoDD (Zhang & Thurber, 2003) and showed overall velocities to be slower than

  8. The origins of metamodality in visual object area LO: Bodily topographical biases and increased functional connectivity to S1

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Zohar; Geva, Ran; Amedi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence from blind participants suggests that visual areas are task-oriented and sensory modality input independent rather than sensory-specific to vision. Specifically, visual areas are thought to retain their functional selectivity when using non-visual inputs (touch or sound) even without having any visual experience. However, this theory is still controversial since it is not clear whether this also characterizes the sighted brain, and whether the reported results in the sighted reflect basic fundamental a-modal processes or are an epiphenomenon to a large extent. In the current study, we addressed these questions using a series of fMRI experiments aimed to explore visual cortex responses to passive touch on various body parts and the coupling between the parietal and visual cortices as manifested by functional connectivity. We show that passive touch robustly activated the object selective parts of the lateral–occipital (LO) cortex while deactivating almost all other occipital–retinotopic-areas. Furthermore, passive touch responses in the visual cortex were specific to hand and upper trunk stimulations. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis suggests that LO is functionally connected to the hand area in the primary somatosensory homunculus (S1), during hand and shoulder stimulations but not to any of the other body parts. We suggest that LO is a fundamental hub that serves as a node between visual-object selective areas and S1 hand representation, probably due to the critical evolutionary role of touch in object recognition and manipulation. These results might also point to a more general principle suggesting that recruitment or deactivation of the visual cortex by other sensory input depends on the ecological relevance of the information conveyed by this input to the task/computations carried out by each area or network. This is likely to rely on the unique and differential pattern of connectivity for each visual area with the rest of the

  9. Hydrogeology and analysis of ground-water withdrawal in the Mendenhall-D'Lo area, Simpson County, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strom, E.W.; Oakley, W.T.

    1995-01-01

    The cities of Mendenhall and D'Lo, located in Simpson County, rely on ground water for their public supply and industrial needs. Most of the ground water comes from an aquifer of Miocene age. A study began in 1991 to describe the hydrogeology, analyze effects of ground-water withdrawal by making a drawdown map, and estimate the effects increased ground-water withdrawal might have on water levels in the Miocene age aquifer in the Mendenhall-D'Lo area. The most significant withdrawals of ground water in the study area are from 10 wells screened in the lower sand of the Catahoula Formation of Miocene age. Analysis of the effect of withdrawals from the 10 wells was made using the Theis non- equilibrium equation and applying the principle of superposition. Analysis of 1994 conditions was based on the pumpage history and aquifer properties deter- mined for each well. The drawdown surface resulting from the analysis indicates three general cones of depression. One cone is in the northwestern D'Lo area, one in the south-central Mendenhall area, and one about 1-1/2 miles east of Mendenhall. Calculated drawdown ranges from 21 to 47 feet. Potential drawdown-surface maps were made for 10 years and 20 years beyond 1994 using a constant pumpage. The map made for 10 years beyond 1994 indicates an average total increase in drawdown of about 5.3 feet. The map made for 20 years beyond 1994 indicates an average total increase in drawdown of about 7.3 feet.

  10. Interstellar Hydrogen Fluxes Measured by IBEX-Lo in 2009: Numerical Modeling and Comparison with the Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we perform numerical modeling of the interstellar hydrogen fluxes measured by IBEX-Lo during orbit 23 (spring 2009) using a state-of-the-art kinetic model of the interstellar neutral hydrogen distribution in the heliosphere. This model takes into account the temporal and heliolatitudinal variations of the solar parameters as well as the non-Maxwellian kinetic properties of the hydrogen distribution due to charge exchange in the heliospheric interface. We found that there is a qualitative difference between the IBEX-Lo data and the modeling results obtained with the three-dimensional, time-dependent model. Namely, the model predicts a larger count rate in energy bin 2 (20-41 eV) than in energy bin 1 (11-21 eV), while the data shows the opposite case. We perform study of the model parameter effects on the IBEX-Lo fluxes and the ratio of fluxes in two energy channels. We show that the most important parameter, which has a major influence on the ratio of the fluxes in the two energy bins, is the solar radiation pressure. The parameter fitting procedure shows that the best agreement between the model result and the data occurs when the ratio of the solar radiation pressure to the solar gravitation, μ0, is {1.26}-0.076+0.06, and the total ionization rate of hydrogen at 1 AU is {β }E,0={3.7}-0.35+0.39× {10}-7 s-1. We have found that the value of μ0 is much larger than μ0 = 0.89, which is the value derived from the integrated solar Lyα flux data for the period of time studied. We discuss possible reasons for the differences.

  11. Investigation of lightweight designs and materials for LO2 and LH2 propellant tanks for space vehicles, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Design, analysis, and fabrication studies were performed on nonintegral (suspended) tanks using a representative space tug design. The LH2 and LO2 tank concept selection was developed. Tank geometries and support relationships were investigated using tug design propellant inertias and ullage pressures, then compared based on total tug systems effects. The tank combinations which resulted in the maximum payload were selected. Tests were conducted on samples of membrane material which was processed in a manner simulating production tank fabrication operations to determine fabrication effects on the fracture toughness of the tank material. Fracture mechanics analyses were also performed to establish a preliminary set of allowables for initial defects.

  12. LO-CO-GRAF (Low Cost Graphics): Generating Maps to Support Command and Control/Crisis Management Using Small Computers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    RF 40 3- ET HR%AT -ONLO*A FSA AD-" IIIEI NIH16 % % % - ,NI ILE 0 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California DTlO $ ELECTE JN161988 ekD D THESIS LO... Thesis Advisor Joseph S. Stewart, II A.. *Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ,-I ’ S _--- . .. .. , . -, ., ,. .. ., 5.,. . *5*5...Time Covered 14 Date of Report (year, month, day) 15 Page Count Master’s Thesis From To March 1988 157 16 Supplementary Notation The views expressed in

  13. Optical and X-ray studies of chromospherically active stars: FR Cancri, HD 95559 and LO Pegasi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, J. C.; Singh, K. P.; Drake, S. A.; Sagar, R.

    2005-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of three chromospherically active stars, namely FR Cnc (= BD +16 degrees 1753), HD 95559 and LO Peg (=BD +22 degrees 4409), including newly obtained optical photometry, (for FR Cnc) low-resolution optical spectroscopy, as well as archival IR and X-ray observations. The BVR photometry carried out during the years 2001 - 2004 has found significant photometric variability to be present in all three stars. For FR Cnc, a photometric period 0.826685 +/- 0.000034 d has been established. The strong variation in the phase and amplitude of the FR Cnc light curves when folded on this period implies the presence of evolving and migrating spots or spot groups on its surface. Two independent spots with migration periods of 0.97 and 0.93 years respectively are inferred. The photometry of HD 95559 suggests the formation of a spot (group) during the interval of our observations. We infer the existence of two independent spots or groups in the photosphere of LO Peg, one of which has a migration period of 1.12 years. The optical spectroscopy of FR Cnc carried out during 2002-2003, reveals the presence of strong and variable Ca I1 H and K, H(sub beta) and H(sub alpha) emission features indicative of high level of chromospheric activity. The value of 5.3 for the ratio of the excess emission in H(sub alpha) to H(sub beta), EH(sub alpha)/EH(sub beta), suggests that the chromospheric emission may arise from an extended off-limb region. We have searched for the presence of color excesses in the near-IR JHK bands of these stars using 2MASS data, but none of them appear to have any significant color excess. We have also analyzed archival X-ray observations of HD 95559 and LO Peg carried out by with the ROSAT observatory. The best fit models to their X-ray spectra imply the presence of two coronal plasma components of differing temperatures and with sub-solar metal abundances. The inferred emission measures and temperatures of these systems are similar to

  14. Design of combinatorial libraries for the exploration of virtual hits from fragment space searches with LoFT.

    PubMed

    Lessel, Uta; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Fischer, J Robert; Rarey, Matthias

    2012-02-27

    A case study is presented illustrating the design of a focused CDK2 library. The scaffold of the library was detected by a feature trees search in a fragment space based on reactions from combinatorial chemistry. For the design the software LoFT (Library optimizer using Feature Trees) was used. The special feature called FTMatch was applied to restrict the parts of the queries where the reagents are permitted to match. This way a 3D scoring function could be simulated. Results were compared with alternative designs by GOLD docking and ROCS 3D alignments.

  15. Seasonality and paleoecology of the late Cretaceous multi-taxa vertebrate assemblage of "Lo Hueco" (central eastern Spain).

    PubMed

    Domingo, Laura; Barroso-Barcenilla, Fernando; Cambra-Moo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic studies of multi-taxa terrestrial vertebrate assemblages allow determination of paleoclimatic and paleoecological aspects on account of the different information supplied by each taxon. The late Campanian-early Maastrichtian "Lo Hueco" Fossil-Lagerstätte (central eastern Spain), located at a subtropical paleolatitude of ~31°N, constitutes an ideal setting to carry out this task due to its abundant and diverse vertebrate assemblage. Local δ18OPO4 values estimated from δ18OPO4 values of theropods, sauropods, crocodyliforms, and turtles are close to δ18OH2O values observed at modern subtropical latitudes. Theropod δ18OH2O values are lower than those shown by crocodyliforms and turtles, indicating that terrestrial endothermic taxa record δ18OH2O values throughout the year, whereas semiaquatic ectothermic taxa δ18OH2O values represent local meteoric waters over a shorter time period when conditions are favorable for bioapatite synthesis (warm season). Temperatures calculated by combining theropod, crocodyliform, and turtle δ18OH2O values and gar δ18OPO4 have enabled us to estimate seasonal variability as the difference between mean annual temperature (MAT, yielded by theropods) and temperature of the warmest months (TWMs, provided by crocodyliforms and turtles). ΔTWMs-MAT value does not point to a significantly different seasonal thermal variability when compared to modern coastal subtropical meteorological stations and Late Cretaceous rudists from eastern Tethys. Bioapatite and bulk organic matter δ13C values point to a C3 environment in the "Lo Hueco" area. The estimated fractionation between sauropod enamel and diet is ~15‰. While waiting for paleoecological information yielded by the ongoing morphological study of the "Lo Hueco" crocodyliforms, δ13C and δ18OCO3 results point to incorporation of food items with brackish influence, but preferential ingestion of freshwater. "Lo Hueco" turtles showed the lowest δ13C and δ18OCO3 values of the

  16. Seasonality and Paleoecology of the Late Cretaceous Multi-Taxa Vertebrate Assemblage of “Lo Hueco” (Central Eastern Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Laura; Barroso-Barcenilla, Fernando; Cambra-Moo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic studies of multi-taxa terrestrial vertebrate assemblages allow determination of paleoclimatic and paleoecological aspects on account of the different information supplied by each taxon. The late Campanian-early Maastrichtian “Lo Hueco” Fossil-Lagerstätte (central eastern Spain), located at a subtropical paleolatitude of ~31°N, constitutes an ideal setting to carry out this task due to its abundant and diverse vertebrate assemblage. Local δ18OPO4 values estimated from δ18OPO4 values of theropods, sauropods, crocodyliforms, and turtles are close to δ18OH2O values observed at modern subtropical latitudes. Theropod δ18OH2O values are lower than those shown by crocodyliforms and turtles, indicating that terrestrial endothermic taxa record δ18OH2O values throughout the year, whereas semiaquatic ectothermic taxa δ18OH2O values represent local meteoric waters over a shorter time period when conditions are favorable for bioapatite synthesis (warm season). Temperatures calculated by combining theropod, crocodyliform, and turtle δ18OH2O values and gar δ18OPO4 have enabled us to estimate seasonal variability as the difference between mean annual temperature (MAT, yielded by theropods) and temperature of the warmest months (TWMs, provided by crocodyliforms and turtles). ΔTWMs-MAT value does not point to a significantly different seasonal thermal variability when compared to modern coastal subtropical meteorological stations and Late Cretaceous rudists from eastern Tethys. Bioapatite and bulk organic matter δ13C values point to a C3 environment in the “Lo Hueco” area. The estimated fractionation between sauropod enamel and diet is ~15‰. While waiting for paleoecological information yielded by the ongoing morphological study of the “Lo Hueco” crocodyliforms, δ13C and δ18OCO3 results point to incorporation of food items with brackish influence, but preferential ingestion of freshwater. “Lo Hueco” turtles showed the lowest δ13C and δ18OCO3

  17. Intracranial self-stimulation reward thresholds during morphine withdrawal in rats bred for high (HiS) and low (LoS) saccharin intake

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Nathan A.; Radke, Anna K.; Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Harris, Andrew C.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Rational Sweet preference is a marker of vulnerability to substance use disorders, and rats selectively bred for high (HiS) vs. low saccharin (LoS) intake display potentiated drug-seeking behaviors. Recent work indicated that LoS rats were more responsive to the negative effects of drugs in several assays. Objective The current study used the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure to investigate the anhedonic component of morphine withdrawal in male HiS and LoS rats. Methods Rats were administered morphine (10 mg/kg) or saline for 8 days. To evaluate withdrawal effects, reward thresholds were measured 24 and 28 h following the 8th morphine injection (spontaneous withdrawal) and again for 4 days following daily acute morphine and naloxone (1 mg/kg) administration (precipitated withdrawal). Results Twenty-four hr following the final morphine injection, reward thresholds in LoS rats were significantly elevated compared to reward thresholds in LoS controls, indicating spontaneous withdrawal. This effect was not observed in HiS rats. LoS rats also showed greater elevations of reward thresholds on several days during naloxone-precipitated withdrawal compared to their HiS counterparts. Conclusions LoS rats were more sensitive to morphine withdrawal-mediated elevations in ICSS thresholds than HiS rats. While these differences were generally modest, our data suggest that severity of the negative affective component of opiate withdrawal may be influenced by genotypes related to addiction vulnerability. PMID:25582876

  18. Titanosaur Osteoderms from the Upper Cretaceous of Lo Hueco (Spain) and Their Implications on the Armor of Laurasian Titanosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Daniel; Ortega, Francisco; Sanz, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Titanosaurs are the only sauropod dinosaurs known to bear a dermal armor. Their osteoderms are relatively rare finds, with few more than a hundred specimens recovered worldwide. Also, little is known about their intra-individual, intra-specific or inter-specific variability. The macrovertebrate site of Lo Hueco (Upper Cretaceous; Cuenca, Spain) has yielded several complete specimens of osteoderms, some associated with fairly articulated specimens. They are all variations of the morphotype known as bulb and root. The presence of only this morphotype in Europe, which is considered as the primitive condition among titanosaurs, seems to indicate that the known Upper Cretaceous Laurasian titanosaurs only bore these referred bulb and root osteoderms. An eliptic Fourier analysis on the outline of complete specimens from this morphotype reveals: i) that they truly are part of a morphological cline; and ii) the existence of a consistent correlation between the outline and the morphology of the bulb. Such variation along a cline is more consistent with intra-individual rather than inter-specific variation. The osteoderms associated with a single titanosaur individual from Lo Hueco reinforce this hypothesis. PMID:25118985

  19. CD133+CD24lo defines a 5-Fluorouracil-resistant colon cancer stem cell-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Paschall, Amy V.; Yang, Dafeng; Lu, Chunwan; Redd, Priscilla S.; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Heaton, Christopher M.; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Nayak-Kapoor, Asha; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most commonly used drug for patients with advanced colon cancer. However, development of resistance to 5-FU is inevitable in almost all patients. The mechanism by which colon cancer develops 5-FU resistance is still unclear. One recently proposed theory is that cancer stem-like cells underlie colon cancer 5-FU resistance, but the phenotypes of 5-FU-resistant colon cancer stem cells are still controversial. We report here that 5-FU treatment selectively enriches a subset of CD133+ colon cancer cells in vitro. 5-FU chemotherapy also increases CD133+ tumor cells in human colon cancer patients. However, sorted CD133+ colon cancer cells exhibit no increased resistance to 5-FU, and CD133 levels exhibit no correlation with colon cancer patient survival or cancer recurrence. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression between sorted CD133+ colon cancer cells and 5-FU-selected colon cancer cells identifies 207 differentially expressed genes. CD24 is one of the genes whose expression level is lower in the CD133+ and 5-FU-resistant colon cancer cells as compared to CD133+ and 5-FU-sensitive colon cancer cells. Consequently, CD133+CD24lo cells exhibit decreased sensitivity to 5-FU. Therefore, we determine that CD133+CD24lo phenotype defines 5-FU-resistant human colon cancer stem cell-like cells. PMID:27659530

  20. Metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced a time-dependent metabolic and transcriptional alteration.

    PubMed

    He, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Ningning; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2015-11-30

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with potential anti-tumor activity. However, little is known about its global metabolic and transcriptional impacts on tumor cells. In current study, we performed a metabolic profiling on human-derived colon cancer LoVo cells treated by 10 mM metformin for 8, 24 and 48 h. An obvious time-dependent metabolic alteration was observed from 8 to 48 h, prior to the reduction of cell viability. A total of 47, 45 and 66 differential metabolites were identified between control and metformin-treated cells at three time points. Most of the metabolites were up-regulated at 8 h, but down-regulated at 24 and 48 h by metformin. These metabolites were mainly involved in carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides metabolism pathways. Meanwhile, the transcirptomic profile revealed 134 and 3061 differentially expressed genes at 8 and 24 h by metformin. In addition to the cancer signaling pathways, expression of genes involved in cell energy metabolism pathways was significantly altered, which were further validated with genes in glucose metabolism pathway. Altogether, our current data indicate that metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells, which may be due to the modulation on cell energy metabolism at both metabolic and transcriptional levels in a time-dependent way.

  1. PRL-3 promotes the proliferation of LoVo cells via the upregulation of KCNN4 channels.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei; Chen, Shuang; Wu, Heng; Guan, Yufeng; Liu, Lu; Zeng, Yujie; Zhao, Haiyan; Jiang, Jianmin; Chu, Zhonghua

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3) plays an important role in the metastasis and proliferation of tumor cells. However, the mechanism by which PRL-3 controls the cell cycle of tumor cells remains unknown. In the present study, considering that the K+ channels strictly control cell proliferation, we examined whether K+ channels participate in the proliferation of tumor cells induced by PRL-3. Interestingly, the expression of intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (KCNN4) was upregulated in an NF-κB-dependent manner when PRL-3 was transfected into LoVo cells. Also, we identified two NF-κB binding sites in the promoter region of KCNN4. Use of the specific inhibitor 1-[(2-chlorophenyl) diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34) significantly inhibited the proliferation induced by PRL-3 and blocked the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Meanwhile, the level of phosphorylation of Cdc2 was increased in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, TRAM-34 also inhibited tumor formation of PRL-3 cell xenografts implanted by injection in nude mice. In conclusion, PRL-3 promoted the proliferation of LoVo cells through upregulation of KCNN4 channels which facilitated the G2/M transition.

  2. Navier-Stokes computations with finite-rate chemistry for LO2/LH2 rocket engine plume flow studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, N. Sam; Liu, Baw-Lin

    1991-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics methods have been developed and applied to Space Shuttle Main Engine LO2/LH2 plume flow simulation/analysis of airloading and convective base heating effects on the vehicle at high flight velocities and altitudes. New methods are described which were applied to the simulation of a Return-to-Launch-Site abort where the vehicle would fly briefly at negative angles of attack into its own plume. A simplified two-perfect-gases-mixing approach is used where one gas is the plume and the other is air at 180-deg and 135-deg flight angle of attack. Related research has resulted in real gas multiple-plume interaction methods with finite-rate chemistry described herein which are applied to the same high-altitude-flight conditions of 0 deg angle of attack. Continuing research plans are to study Orbiter wake/plume flows at several Mach numbers and altitudes during ascent and then to merge this model with the Shuttle 'nose-to-tail' aerodynamic and SRB plume models for an overall 'nose-to-plume' capability. These new methods are also applicable to future launch vehicles using clustered-engine LO2/LH2 propulsion.

  3. Adaptation of the wine bacterium Oenococcus oeni to ethanol stress: role of the small heat shock protein Lo18 in membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Maitre, Magali; Weidmann, Stéphanie; Dubois-Brissonnet, Florence; David, Vanessa; Covès, Jacques; Guzzo, Jean

    2014-05-01

    Malolactic fermentation in wine is often carried out by Oenococcus oeni. Wine is a stressful environment for bacteria because ethanol is a toxic compound that impairs the integrity of bacterial membranes. The small heat shock protein (sHsp) Lo18 is an essential actor of the stress response in O. oeni. Lo18 prevents the thermal aggregation of proteins and plays a crucial role in membrane quality control. Here, we investigated the interaction between Lo18 and four types of liposomes: one was prepared from O. oeni grown under optimal growth conditions (here, control liposomes), one was prepared from O. oeni grown in the presence of 8% ethanol (here, ethanol liposomes), one was prepared from synthetic phospholipids, and one was prepared from phospholipids from Bacillus subtilis or Lactococcus lactis. We observed the strongest interaction between Lo18 and control liposomes. The lipid binding activity of Lo18 required the dissociation of oligomeric structures into dimers. Protein protection experiments carried out in the presence of the liposomes from O. oeni suggested that Lo18 had a higher affinity for control liposomes than for a model protein. In anisotropy experiments, we mimicked ethanol action by temperature-dependent fluidization of the liposomes. Results suggest that the principal determinant of Lo18-membrane interaction is lipid bilayer phase behavior rather than phospholipid composition. We suggest a model to describe the ethanol adaptation of O. oeni. This model highlights the dual role of Lo18 in the protection of proteins from aggregation and membrane stabilization and suggests how modifications of phospholipid content may be a key factor determining the balance between these two functions.

  4. Investigation of lightweight designs and materials for LO2 and LH2 propellant tanks for space vehicles, phase 2 and phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Full size Tug LO2 and LH2 tank configurations were defined, based on selected tank geometries. These configurations were then locally modeled for computer stress analysis. A large subscale test tank, representing the selected Tug LO2 tank, was designed and analyzed. This tank was fabricated using procedures which represented production operations. An evaluation test program was outlined and a test procedure defined. The necessary test hardware was also fabricated.

  5. A Passive Thermal Carrier (LoTEC(c )) for Temperature Sensitive Materials Being Moved to and From ISS and for Shuttle (STS) Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessling, F. C.; Blackwood, J. M.; Holt, H. R.

    2002-01-01

    the use of power for transporting temperature sensitive materials to and from the International Space Station. LoTEC uses a combination of high thermal resistance insulation, careful thermal design and phase change materials to maintain temperature. It has been tested with phase change materials for three different interior temperatures (-16C, 0C, +4C). These temperatures are usable for preservation of many biological materials during transport. The exterior dimensions of LoTEC are approximately 250.7 x 436.9 x 514.1 mm. Thus, LoTEC fits into a standard mid-deck locker, an Express Rack, a SpaceHab rack or a rack in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM). LoTEC has an empty mass of approximately 9.6 kg and an internal volume of 22 Liters. This volume is reduced by the amount and type of phase change material (PCM) used. For example, eight kg of water ice and its containers would take up approximately half of the internal volume, leaving 11 Liters of space for the payload. Several different configurations have been considered to accommodate different payload dimensions.The interior dimensions of LoTEC are approximately 406 x 343 x 158 mm. Measured energy gain by LoTEC is approximately 0.14 watts per degrees Celsius. Performance data in the form of temperature versus time curves are included. Eight kg of PCM gives approximately eight days of constant temperature at typical STS interior temperatures. The temperature distribution in LoTEC is dependent on the PCM containers, the PCM used, and the location of the containers in LoTEC. Small, stand-alone data loggers record the temperatures. Refreezing of phase change materials depends on the facilities on board the ISS or the STS. Various methods of refreezing of phase change materials on the ISS are discussed.

  6. Symbolic computation of the Hartree-Fock energy from a chiral EFT three-nucleon interaction at N 2LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremariam, B.; Bogner, S. K.; Duguet, T.

    2010-06-01

    We present the first of a two-part Mathematica notebook collection that implements a symbolic approach for the application of the density matrix expansion (DME) to the Hartree-Fock (HF) energy from a chiral effective field theory (EFT) three-nucleon interaction at N 2LO. The final output from the notebooks is a Skyrme-like energy density functional that provides a quasi-local approximation to the non-local HF energy. In this paper, we discuss the derivation of the HF energy and its simplification in terms of the scalar/vector-isoscalar/isovector parts of the one-body density matrix. Furthermore, a set of steps is described and illustrated on how to extend the approach to other three-nucleon interactions. Program summaryProgram title: SymbHFNNN Catalogue identifier: AEGC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 96 666 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 378 083 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica 7.1 Computer: Any computer running Mathematica 6.0 and later versions Operating system: Windows Xp, Linux/Unix RAM: 256 Mb Classification: 5, 17.16, 17.22 Nature of problem: The calculation of the HF energy from the chiral EFT three-nucleon interaction at N 2LO involves tremendous spin-isospin algebra. The problem is compounded by the need to eventually obtain a quasi-local approximation to the HF energy, which requires the HF energy to be expressed in terms of scalar/vector-isoscalar/isovector parts of the one-body density matrix. The Mathematica notebooks discussed in this paper solve the latter issue. Solution method: The HF energy from the chiral EFT three-nucleon interaction at N 2LO is cast into a form suitable for an automatic simplification of

  7. Modelling Miscible Fluid Displacements in Porous Media Using Karhunen-Loéve Decomposition and Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaoui, Nejib; Gharbi, Ridha

    2000-11-01

    An approach to model fluid displacements in porous media that combines two powerful techniques, namely Karhunen-Loéve (KL) decomposition and artificial neural networks (ANNs) is descibed. KL decomposition known, for data compression and feature identification, is used to extract coherent structures or eigenfunctions using fluid concentration maps obtained from fine-mesh numerical simulations of miscible fluid displacements of oil by solvent in a two-dimensional vertical cross-section. Twenty KL eigenfunctions that capture 98.8% of the total energy are extracted. Corresponding data coefficients are constructed by projecting the fluid concentration maps of the numerical simulations onto the KL eigenfunctions. Processing these data coefficients through an ANN is found to be a powerful tool in predicting the fluid displacements of the fine-mesh numerical simulations without actually performing these simulations.

  8. ‘Introducing Michael Gove to Loïc Wacquant’: Why Social Work Needs Critical Sociology

    PubMed Central

    Michael Garrett, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, Michael Gove, then Secretary of State for Education and Health in the UK coalition government, criticised social workers for laying insufficient emphasis on the ‘agency’ of individuals and for being too preoccupied with social and economic inequalities. Such a perspective, which is not unique to Gove, needs to be countered by reaffirming the significance of an expansively critical sociology for social work. In this context, the thematic concerns of the French theorist, Loïc Wacquant, illuminates key aspects of social work engagement with clients which Gove and his ideological associates appear intent on ignoring. The issues raised have significant political resonances given the pending UK General Election taking place in May 2015. PMID:27559203

  9. Modelling and simulation of passive Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) based micromixer for clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikat, Chakraborty; Sharath, M.; Srujana, M.; Narayan, K.; Pattnaik, Prasant Kumar

    2016-03-01

    In biomedical application, micromixer is an important component because of many processes requires rapid and efficient mixing. At micro scale, the flow is Laminar due to small channel size which enables controlled rapid mixing. The reduction in analysis time along with high throughput can be achieved with the help of rapid mixing. In LoC application, micromixer is used for mixing of fluids especially for the devices which requires efficient mixing. Micromixer of this type of microfluidic devices with a rapid mixing is useful in application such as DNA/RNA synthesis, drug delivery system & biological agent detection. In this work, we design and simulate a microfluidic based passive rapid micromixer for lab-on-a-chip application.

  10. Simulating the Compton-Getting effect for hydrogen flux measurements: Implications for IBEX-Hi and -Lo observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX), launched in 2008 October, has improved our understanding of the solar wind-local interstellar medium interaction through its detection of neutral atoms, particularly that of hydrogen (H). IBEX is able to create full maps of the sky in six-month intervals as the Earth orbits the Sun, detecting H with energies between ∼0.01 and 6 keV. Due to the relative motion of IBEX to the solar inertial frame, measurements made in the spacecraft frame introduce a Compton-Getting (CG) effect, complicating measurements at the lowest energies. In this paper we provide results from a numerical simulation that calculates fluxes of H atoms at 1 AU in the inertial and spacecraft frames (both ram and anti-ram), at energies relevant to IBEX-Hi and -Lo. We show theory behind the numerical simulations, applying a simple frame transformation to derived flux equations that provides a straightforward way to simulate fluxes in the spacecraft frame. We then show results of H energetic neutral atom fluxes simulated at IBEX-Hi energy passbands 2-6 in all frames, comparing with IBEX-Hi data along selected directions, and also show results simulated at energies relevant to IBEX-Lo. Although simulations at IBEX-Hi energies agree reasonably well with the CG correction method used for IBEX-Hi data, we demonstrate the importance of properly modeling low energy H fluxes due to inherent complexities involved with measurements made in moving frames, as well as dynamic radiation pressure effects close to the Sun.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Augmented Spark Ignition of a LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine at Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Sarmiento, Charles; Marshall, William

    2012-01-01

    The use of nontoxic propellants in future exploration vehicles would enable safer, more cost-effective mission scenarios. One promising green alternative to existing hypergols is liquid methane (LCH4) with liquid oxygen (LO2). A 100 lbf LO2/LCH4 engine was developed under the NASA Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development project and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center Altitude Combustion Stand in a low pressure environment. High ignition energy is a perceived drawback of this propellant combination; so this ignition margin test program examined ignition performance versus delivered spark energy. Sensitivity of ignition to spark timing and repetition rate was also explored. Three different exciter units were used with the engine s augmented (torch) igniter. Captured waveforms indicated spark behavior in hot fire conditions was inconsistent compared to the well-behaved dry sparks. This suggests that rising pressure and flow rate increase spark impedance and may at some point compromise an exciter s ability to complete each spark. The reduced spark energies of such quenched deliveries resulted in more erratic ignitions, decreasing ignition probability. The timing of the sparks relative to the pressure/flow conditions also impacted the probability of ignition. Sparks occurring early in the flow could trigger ignition with energies as low as 1 to 6 mJ, though multiple, similarly timed sparks of 55 to 75 mJ were required for reliable ignition. Delayed spark application and reduced spark repetition rate both correlated with late and occasional failed ignitions. An optimum time interval for spark application and ignition therefore coincides with propellant introduction to the igniter.

  12. Preliminary base heating environments for a generalized ALS LO2/LH2 launch vehicle, appendix 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Robert L.; Reardon, John E.

    1989-01-01

    A secondary objective of contract NAS8-39141 is to provide base heating assessments, as required, to support Advanced Launch System (ALS) preliminary launch vehicle and propulsion system design studies. The ALS propulsion systems integration working group meeting (No. 3) recently completed in San Diego, California, focused attention on the need for base heating environment determination to provide preliminary requirements for LO2/LH2 propulsion systems currently being considered for ALS. We were requested to provide these environments for a range of possible propellant mixture and nozzle area ratios. Base heating environments can only be determined as a function of altitude when the engine operating conditions and vehicle base region geometry (engine arrangement) are known. If time dependent environments are needed to assess thermal loads, a trajectory must also be provided. These parameters are not fixed at this time since the ALS configurations and propulsion operating conditions are varied and continue to be studied by Phase B contractors. Therefore, for this study, a generalized LO2/LH2 system was selected along with a vehicle configuration consisting of a seven-engine booster and a three-engine core. MSFC provided guidance for the selection. We also selected a limited number of body points on the booster and core vehicles and engines for the environment estimates. Environments at these locations are representative of maximum heating conditions in the base region and are provided as a function of altitude only. Guidelines and assumptions for this assessment, methodology for determining the environments, and preliminary results are provided in this technical note. Refinements in the environments will be provided as the ALS design matures.

  13. Observation of the distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the IBEX-Lo all-sky maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Kucharek, H.; Moebius, E.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the spatial distribution of heavy energetic neutral atoms, mostly oxygen and neon, in the sky maps taken with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) in 2009 - 2011. The IBEX-Lo sensor, one of two highly sensitive single-pixel cameras on the IBEX spacecraft, measures neutral particles within an energy range from 0.01 to 2 keV. In the time-of-flight detector of IBEX-Lo these neutral atoms can be identified as hydrogen or heavier atoms, such as oxygen. These measurements have provided all-sky maps of neutral hydrogen and oxygen. The dominant feature in these maps is the interstellar oxygen and neon gas flow. Its peak location is approximately consistent with the interstellar helium gas flow (Möbius et al., 2009, Science, 326, 969). The flow distribution is distributed over 210° - 240° ecliptic longitude and -6° - 12° ecliptic latitude. Another prominent feature in the oxygen sky maps at 0.2 to 0.8 keV is an extended tail of the oxygen signal toward lower longitude and higher positive latitude (180° - 210° ecliptic longitude and 0° - 24° ecliptic latitude). The measured peak rates in the extended tail is 3 - 5% of the maximum count rate in the primary oxygen and neon gas flow, but is four times higher than any other surrounding oxygen signals. The extended tail may indicate the secondary component of the interstellar oxygen, which is likely generated by charge exchange between local O+ ions and interstellar neutral H in the outer heliosheath. In this poster, we will discuss these two most prominent features in the oxygen sky maps and their implications for the source and the mechanism generating an extended tail in the oxygen signal.

  14. Preliminary base heating environments for a generalized ALS LO2/LH2 launch vehicle, appendix 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Robert L.; Reardon, John E.

    1989-10-01

    A secondary objective of contract NAS8-39141 is to provide base heating assessments, as required, to support Advanced Launch System (ALS) preliminary launch vehicle and propulsion system design studies. The ALS propulsion systems integration working group meeting (No. 3) recently completed in San Diego, California, focused attention on the need for base heating environment determination to provide preliminary requirements for LO2/LH2 propulsion systems currently being considered for ALS. We were requested to provide these environments for a range of possible propellant mixture and nozzle area ratios. Base heating environments can only be determined as a function of altitude when the engine operating conditions and vehicle base region geometry (engine arrangement) are known. If time dependent environments are needed to assess thermal loads, a trajectory must also be provided. These parameters are not fixed at this time since the ALS configurations and propulsion operating conditions are varied and continue to be studied by Phase B contractors. Therefore, for this study, a generalized LO2/LH2 system was selected along with a vehicle configuration consisting of a seven-engine booster and a three-engine core. MSFC provided guidance for the selection. We also selected a limited number of body points on the booster and core vehicles and engines for the environment estimates. Environments at these locations are representative of maximum heating conditions in the base region and are provided as a function of altitude only. Guidelines and assumptions for this assessment, methodology for determining the environments, and preliminary results are provided in this technical note. Refinements in the environments will be provided as the ALS design matures.

  15. Anti-CD3ε induces splenic B220lo B-cell expansion following anti-CD20 treatment in a mouse model of allosensitization.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tsuyoshi; Wu, Gordon; Chai, Ning-ning; He, Yao; Martins, Gislaine; Gupta, Ankur; Fair, Jeffrey; Liu, Nai-you; Jordan, Stanley; Klein, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    Antibodies targeting T cells and B cells are increasingly used for immunosuppression in clinical transplantation. However, the impact of T-cell depletion by antibodies on B-cell homeostasis is poorly understood. Using a mouse model of allosensitization with skin allograft, we investigated whether targeting T cells by anti-CD3ε alters peripheral B-cell homeostasis and alloantibody responses following B-cell depletion by anti-CD20. We found that anti-CD3ε induced a discrete B220(lo), but not a conventional B220(hi) subset, in the spleens of the allosensitized mice 14 days after anti-CD20 treatment. The splenic B220(lo) cells were refractory to anti-CD20 depletion. Flow cytometry revealed that the splenic B220(lo) cells were phenotypically similar to the B220(lo) AA4.1(+) CD23(-) sIgM(lo) sIgD(-) developing B cells (pre-B to immature B) normally presented in the bone marrow. Despite the presence of the splenic B220(lo) cells, mice treated with combined anti-CD3ε/CD20 produced limited alloantibodies in response to the primary skin allografts. Alloantibody production increased significantly in the mice following re-immunization by donor-specific splenocytes. We conclude that anti-CD3ε can induce an expansion of B220(lo) B cells in the spleens after B-cell depletion by anti-CD20. These B cells are not producing alloantibodies, but re-immunization of the mice with alloantigen leads to risk of alloantibody response.

  16. Availability of Lo's mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Lo, S C

    1990-07-13

    The name of the reviewer of The History of Modern Mathematics [David F. Rowe and John McCleary, Eds. (Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1989)] (22 June, p. 1561) was incorrectly printed. It should have been Joan L. Richards, not "Juan" L. Richards.

  17. LoVo colon cancer cells resistant to oxaliplatin overexpress c-MET and VEGFR-1 and respond to VEGF with dephosphorylation of c-MET.

    PubMed

    Mezquita, Belén; Pineda, Estela; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Pau; Pau, Montserrat; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva; Mora, Conchi; Maurel, Joan; Mezquita, Cristóbal

    2016-05-01

    Oxaliplatin-resistant LoVo colon cancer cells overexpressing c-MET and VEGFR-1 were selected to study several signaling pathways involved in chemoresistance, as well as the effect of increasing amounts of VEGF in the regulation of c-MET. In comparison with chemosensitive LoVo colon cancer cells, oxaliplatin-resistant cells (LoVoR) overexpress and phosphorylate c-MET, upregulate the expression of transmembrane and soluble VEGFR-1 and, unexpectedly, downregulate VEGF. In addition, LoVoR cells activate other transduction pathways involved in chemoresistance such as Akt, β-catenin-TCF4 and E-cadherin. While c-MET is phosphorylated in LoVoR cells expressing low levels of VEGF, c-MET phosphorylation decreases when recombinant VEGF is added into the culture medium. Inhibition of c-MET by VEGF is mediated by VEGFR-1, since phosphorylation of c-MET in the presence of VEGF is restored after silencing VEGFR-1. Dephosphorylation of c-MET by VEGF suggests that tumors coexpressing VEGFR-1 and c-MET may activate c-MET as a result of anti-VEGF therapy.

  18. Doxorubicin-resistant LoVo adenocarcinoma cells display resistance to apoptosis induction by some but not all inhibitors of ser/thr phosphatases 1 and 2A.

    PubMed

    Sieder, S; Richter, E; Becker, K; Heins, R; Steinfelder, H J

    1999-06-15

    LoVo adenocarcinoma cells are fairly sensitive to cytostatic drugs, e.g. doxorubicin, but can develop drug resistance by expression of a P-glycoprotein-mediated MDR1 phenotype. LoVo cells respond with apoptosis to nanomolar concentrations of okadaic acid and micromolar concentrations of cantharidic acid. Interestingly, LoVoDx cells which had become about 10-fold less sensitive to doxorubicin by incubation in increasing concentrations of this cytostatic drug were also less sensitive to the toxicity of okadaic acid. Resistance to both agents was lost or significantly reduced by incubation in drug-free medium for about 4 months. On the other hand, LoVoDx cells did not lose responsiveness to the structurally different phosphatase inhibitor cantharidic acid but were about twofold more sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of this agent. Thus, MDR expression protects LoVo cells from the toxicity of phosphatase inhibitors that presumably are substrates of the P-glycoprotein, e.g. okadaic acid and its derivatives but not cantharidic acid, despite the fact that both agents are potent inducers of apoptotic cell death via ser/thr phosphatase inhibition.

  19. The Statistical Analysis of Global Oxygen ENAs Sky Maps from IBEX-Lo: Implication on the ENA sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Kucharek, H.; Moebius, E.; Bochsler, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) created in the interstellar medium and heliospheric interface have been observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) orbiting the Earth on a highly elliptical trajectory since 2008. The science payload on this small spacecraft consists of two highly sensitive single-pixel ENA cameras: the IBEX-Lo sensor covering the energy ranges from 0.01 to 2 keV and the IBEX-Hi sensor covering the energy ranges from 0.3 to 6 keV. In order to measure the incident ENAs, the IBEX-Lo sensor uses a conversion surface to convert neutrals to negative ions. After passing an electrostatic analyzer, they are separated by species (H and heavier species) via a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. All-sky H ENA maps over three years were completed and show two significant features: the interstellar H and He neutral flow is shown at the low energy ranges (0.01 to 0.11 keV) and the ribbon appears at the higher energies (0.21 to 1.35 keV). Like in the hydrogen sky maps, the interstellar O+Ne neutral flow appears in all-sky O ENA maps at the energy ranges from 0.21 to 0.87 keV The distributed heliospheric Oxygen ENAs over the entire energy ranges is determined from very low counting statistics. In this study, we therefore apply the Cash's C statistics (Cash, 1979) and determine the upper and lower confidence limits (Gehrels, 1986) for the statistical significance among all events in all-sky O ENA maps. These newly created sky maps specifically show the distributed heliospheric O ENA flux surrounding the interstellar O+Ne neutral flow. This enhancement distributed ENA flux will provide us new insights into the ion population creation the ENA emission. It seems that there is no signature of ribbon in all-sky O ENA maps. If one assumes that the generation mechanism of the ribbon is the same for hydrogen and oxygen, the location of source ion population may be closer to the heliosheath. In this poster we will discuss all the results of this study and their

  20. Sobre el estado evolutivo de β Pictoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunini, A.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    Desde el descubrimiento de fuertes excesos infrarrojos en β Pictoris, esta estrella ha sido muy estudiada y es considerada candidata a poseer un sistema planetario propio. β Pic está rodeada de un disco asimétrico de polvo que se observa de canto y que esta vacío a distancias <= 40 AU. Esto se considera una fuerte evidencia en favor de la presencia de (al menos) un planeta gigante. Recientemente se han observado líneas de material circunestelar que se han interpretado como consecuencia de la caída de objetos cometarios sobre esta estrella. Recientemente se ha utilizado la existencia del disco de polvo para atribuir una edad corta (pre - secuencia principal) a βPic. Sin embargo, la evaporación de estos cometas provee suficiente polvo como para explicar la presencia del disco observado sin necesidad de edades cortas. En este trabajo mostramos que la comparación entre la tasa de impactos cometarios estimada en el Sistema Solar para diferentes etapas de su evolución y los datos observados en β Pic indica edades avanzadas para β Pic. Esta estimación debe tomarse con cautela ya que depende de la estructura de los sistemas planetarios. Además mostramos que, desde el punto de vista de la evolución estelar y con las incertezas presentes en la luminosidad y la temperatura efectiva, existe un continuo de edades posible para β Pic. Sin embargo, empleando los datos provenientes de los flujos cometarios encontramos que una edad prolongada es consistente con ambos tratamientos.

  1. Hysteresis and change of transition temperature in thin films of Fe([Me{sub 2}Pyrz]{sub 3}BH){sub 2}, a new sublimable spin-crossover molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Davesne, V.; Gruber, M.; Studniarek, M.; Doh, W. H.; Zafeiratos, S.; Joly, L.; Schmerber, G.; Bowen, M.; Weber, W.; Boukari, S.; Da Costa, V.; Arabski, J.; Beaurepaire, E.; Sirotti, F.; Silly, M. G.; Gaspar, A. B.; Real, J. A. [Institut de Ciència Molecular , Universitat de València, C and others

    2015-05-21

    Thin films of the spin-crossover (SCO) molecule Fe([Me{sub 2}Pyrz]{sub 3}BH){sub 2} (Fe-pyrz) were sublimed on Si/SiO{sub 2} and quartz substrates, and their properties investigated by X-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopies, optical absorption, atomic force microscopy, and superconducting quantum interference device. Contrary to the previously studied Fe(phen){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}, the films are not smooth but granular. The thin films qualitatively retain the typical SCO properties of the powder sample (SCO, thermal hysteresis, soft X-ray induced excited spin-state trapping, and light induced excited spin-state trapping) but present intriguing variations even in micrometer-thick films: the transition temperature decreases when the thickness is decreased, and the hysteresis is affected. We explain this behavior in the light of recent studies focusing on the role of surface energy in the thermodynamics of the spin transition in nano-structures. In the high-spin state at room temperature, the films have a large optical gap (∼5 eV), decreasing at thickness below 50 nm, possibly due to film morphology.

  2. Qualification of a sublimation tool applied to the case of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} from In(tmhd){sub 3} as a solid precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Szkutnik, P. D. Jiménez, C.; Angélidès, L.; Todorova, V.

    2016-02-15

    A solid delivery system consisting of a source canister, a gas management, and temperature controlled enclosure designed and manufactured by Air Liquide Electronics Systems was tested in the context of gas-phase delivery of the In(tmhd){sub 3} solid precursor. The precursor stream was delivered to a thermal metalorganic chemical vapor deposition reactor to quantify deposition yield under various conditions of carrier gas flow and sublimation temperature. The data collected allowed the determination of characteristic parameters such as the maximum precursor flow rate (18.2 mg min{sup −1} in specified conditions) and the critical mass (defined as the minimum amount of precursor able to attain the maximum flow rate) found to be about 2.4 g, as well as an understanding of the influence of powder distribution inside the canister. Furthermore, this qualification enabled the determination of optimal delivery conditions which allowed for stable and reproducible precursor flow rates over long deposition times (equivalent to more than 47 h of experiment). The resulting In{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers was compared with those elaborated via pulsed liquid injection obtained in the same chemical vapor deposition chamber and under the same deposition conditions.

  3. Concepciones y concepciones alternativas de estudiantes universitarios/as de biologia y futuros maestros/as de Ciencia de escuela secundaria sobre la teoria de evolucion biologica por seleccion natural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Ramos, Egda M.

    La teoria de evolucion biologica (TEB) por seleccion natural es uno de los conceptos unificadores mas importantes del curriculo de Biologia. En Puerto Rico se han hecho pocas investigaciones que abunden sobre las concepciones y concepciones alternativas (CA) que tienen los estudiantes universitarios/as de Biologia y los maestros/as de Ciencia del nivel secundario sobre esta teoria. La politica publica educativa actual establece mediante documentos normativos como los Estandares de contenido y Expectativas de grado del Programa de Ciencias [Puerto Rico Core Standards] la ensenanza de esta teoria. Sin embargo, no se encontraron preguntas sobre la seleccion natural en los ejercicios de practica provistos por el Departamento de Educacion para las pruebas estandarizadas lo cual puede influir para que no se ensene adecuadamente. Las preguntas de investigacion fueron 1. ¿Cuales son las concepciones y concepciones alternativas de estudiantes universitarios/as y de los futuros maestros y maestras de Ciencia sobre la TEB? 2. ¿Cuales conceptos que seleccionan los estudiantes universitarios/as y los futuros maestros y maestras de Ciencia sobre la TEB coinciden con lo aceptado como valido por la comunidad cientifica? y 3. ¿Como comparan las respuestas de la prueba original. v. Entendiendo el cambio biologico que mide concepciones y CA sobre la TEB por seleccion natural, con las de la traducida al idioma espanol? Se utilizo el metodo cuantitativo con un diseno de investigacion transversal por encuesta. La tecnica principal para recopilar los datos fue una prueba con doce items, que formo parte de un instrumento para el cual se recopilaron diversas fuentes de evidencia acerca de su validez. Las muestras estuvieron formadas por 69 estudiantes de Ciencias Naturales y por 16 estudiantes futuros maestros y maestras del nivel secundario de la UPR-RP. Se utilizaron estadisticas descriptivas, analisis de Ji cuadrado y se calcularon los coeficientes alfa de Cronbach y de Spearman

  4. Local coupling (LoCo) vs. large-scale coupled (LsCo) land-atmosphere interactions in idealized experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentine, P.; Lintner, B. R.; Findell, K. L.; Rochetin, N.; Sobel, A. H.; Anber, U. M.

    2014-12-01

    We will present two idealized epxeriments/methodologies to investigate local (LoCo) and large-scale (LsCo) coupling between the surface and the atmsophere: the contiental Radiative-Convective Equilibrium (RCE) and the continental Weak Temperature Gradient (WTG). The RCE defines an equilibrium state of coupling between the surafce and the atmosphere isolated from any large-scale dependence, which were investigated within the single column model of the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD) coupled to a simple bucket land model. This studies emphasizes the role of low-level cloud and the diurnal cylce of the boundary layer on the final state of the system. In the WTG we investigate the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere during the dry and wet season of the Amazon with the WRF model coupled to the NOAH land-surface model. Large-scale coupling is obtained with the WTG. The dry and wet season demonstrate very fundamental behavior: in the dry season deep convection is generated by radiative cooling in the higher troposhere and is disconnected from the surface. In the wet season the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere is much tighter. We suggest that the WTG is a powerful tool to investigate the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere, which solves two major issues: the limited resolution of convection in GCMs and the lack of large-scale coupling in CRM. Later investigation will look at the effect of deforestation, water table and distance from the ocean.

  5. Karhunen-Loève treatment to remove noise and facilitate data analysis in sensing, spectroscopy and other applications.

    PubMed

    Zaharov, V V; Farahi, R H; Snyder, P J; Davison, B H; Passian, A

    2014-11-21

    Resolving weak spectral variations in the dynamic response of materials that are either dominated or excited by stochastic processes remains a challenge. Responses that are thermal in origin are particularly relevant examples due to the delocalized nature of heat. Despite its inherent properties in dealing with stochastic processes, the Karhunen-Loève expansion has not been fully exploited in measurement of systems that are driven solely by random forces or can exhibit large thermally driven random fluctuations. Here, we present experimental results and analysis of the archetypes (a) the resonant excitation and transient response of an atomic force microscope probe by the ambient random fluctuations and nanoscale photothermal sample response, and (b) the photothermally scattered photons in pump-probe spectroscopy. In each case, the dynamic process is represented as an infinite series with random coefficients to obtain pertinent frequency shifts and spectral peaks and demonstrate spectral enhancement for a set of compounds including the spectrally complex biomass. The considered cases find important applications in nanoscale material characterization, biosensing, and spectral identification of biological and chemical agents.

  6. Time-of-Flight Detector System of the IBEX-Lo Sensor with Low Background Performance for Heliospheric ENA Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, E.; Fuselier, S.; Granoff, M.; Hertzberg, E.; King, B.; Kucharek, H.; Livi, S.; Longworth, S.; Paschalidis, N.; Saul, L.; Scheer, J.; Schlemm, C.; Wieser, M.; Wurz, P.

    IBEX-lo on the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) will image energetic neutral H atoms (ENA) from the termination shock at 10 - 2000 eV and the flow distribution of interstellar O in spring and fall. The sensor combines a mechanical collimator to restrict the detectable arrival directions, an atom to negative ion conversion surface, an electrostatic analyzer, post-acceleration up to 20 keV, and time-of-flight (TOF) analysis, providing species separation and effective background suppression. Because the flux of the heliospheric ENAs is very low a triple coincidence system is used with secondary electrons produced at two consecutive carbon foils, followed by detection of the ions in a micro-channelplate. These signals are combined into three independent TOF measurements. Meanwhile the flight model of the TOF subsystem has been fabricated, tested and calibrated. It will be shown how the combination of several TOF measurements is very effective to suppress background to unprecedented levels and to identify minor species, whose fluxes are several orders of magnitude below the main species. Results from the testing of both the engineering and the flight unit will be discussed in the light of the IBEX science objectives to study the termination shock and the heliosheath.

  7. Analysis of 100-lb(sub f) (445-N) LO2-LCH4 Reaction Control Engine Impulse Bit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William M.; Klenhenz, Julie E.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, liquid oxygen-liquid methane (LO2-LCH4) has been considered as a potential green propellant alternative for future exploration missions. The Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project was tasked by NASA to develop this propulsion combination to enable safe and cost-effective exploration missions. To date, limited experience with such combinations exist, and as a result a comprehensive test program is critical to demonstrating with the viability of implementing such a system. The NASA Glenn Research Center conducted a test program of a 100-lbf (445-N) reaction control engine (RCE) at the Center s Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS), focusing on altitude testing over a wide variety of operational conditions. The ACS facility includes unique propellant conditioning feed systems (PCFS), which allow precise control of propellant inlet conditions to the engine. Engine performance as a result of these inlet conditions was examined extensively during the test program. This paper is a companion to the previous specific impulse testing paper, and discusses the pulsed-mode operation portion of testing, with a focus on minimum impulse bit (MIB) and repeatable pulse performance. The engine successfully demonstrated target MIB performance at all conditions, as well as successful demonstration of repeatable pulse widths. Some anomalous conditions experienced during testing are also discussed, including a double pulse phenomenon, which was not noted in previous test programs for this engine.

  8. Reduced Il17a expression distinguishes a Ly6c(lo)MHCII(hi) macrophage population promoting wound healing.

    PubMed

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Hodgson, Samantha S; Hollier, Brett; Combadiere, Christophe; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2013-03-01

    Macrophages are the main components of inflammation during skin wound healing. They are critical in wound closure and in excessive inflammation, resulting in defective healing observed in chronic wounds. Given the heterogeneity of macrophage phenotypes and functions, we here hypothesized that different subpopulations of macrophages would have different and sometimes opposing effects on wound healing. Using multimarker flow cytometry and RNA expression array analyses on macrophage subpopulations from wound granulation tissue, we identified a Ly6c(lo)MHCII(hi) "noninflammatory" subset that increased both in absolute number and proportion during normal wound healing and was missing in Ob/Ob and MYD88-/- models of delayed healing. We also identified IL17 as the main cytokine distinguishing this population from proinflammatory macrophages and demonstrated that inhibition of IL17 by blocking Ab or in IL17A-/- mice accelerated normal and delayed healing. These findings dissect the complexity of the role and activity of the macrophages during wound inflammation and may contribute to the development of therapeutic approaches to restore healing in chronic wounds.

  9. Interpreting atmospheric composition measurements around London during the ClearfLo campaign using the NAME dispersion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Zoë; Bohnenstengel, Sylvia; Lee, James; Monks, Paul

    2013-04-01

    In order to interpret composition measurements taken in London during the ClearfLo (Clean Air for London) campaign from 2011 to the present (with intensive measurement campaigns in summer and winter 2012), atmospheric dispersion modelling with the NAME model was undertaken. Measurements of a variety of trace gases, aerosols and meteorology were taken at five sites to the west of London, in central London and east of the city. Dispersion modelling showed when each site received the same air masses and whether the evolution of the air mass composition could be tracked as the air crossed the city. Variability in the level of pollutants and trace gases could be assigned to changes in air mass origin at certain times but more local events were too small scale to be assigned with this dispersion model. Dispersion modelling and using the resulting air mass footprints was found to be a useful visualisation as well as quantitative tool to interpret the many trace gas measurements at strategically different geographical locations around a city and help explain the complex air quality influences on London and the South east of England.

  10. Long interspersed nucleotide acid element-1 ORF-1 protein promotes proliferation and invasion of human colorectal cancer LoVo cells through enhancing ETS-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Li, M Y; Zhu, M; Feng, F; Cai, F Y; Fan, K C; Jiang, H; Wang, Z Q; Linghu, E Q

    2014-04-14

    The human proto-oncogene long interspersed nucleotide acid element-1 (LINE-1) open reading frame-1 protein (ORF-1p) is involved in the progress of several cancers. The transcription factor ETS-1 can mediate the transcription of some downstream genes that play specific roles in the regulation of cancerous cell invasion and metastasis. In this study, the effects of LINE-1 ORF-1p on ETS-1 activity and on the proliferation and invasion of human colorectal cancer LoVo cells were investigated. Results showed that the overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p enhanced the transcription of ETS-1 downstream genes and increased their protein levels, and downregulation of the LINE-1 ORF-1p level by small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the transcriptional activation of ETS-1. In addition, overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p promoted LoVo cell proliferation and anchor-independent growth, and a knockdown of the LINE-1 protein level by siRNA reduced the proliferation and anchor-independent growth ability of LoVo cells. In vivo data revealed that LINE-1 ORF-1p overexpression increased LoVo tumor growth in nude mice, whereas the siRNA knockdown of endogenous LINE-1 ORF-1p expression decreased LoVo cell growth in nude mice. Therefore, LINE- 1 ORF-1p could promote LoVo cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it might be a useful molecular target for the treatment of human colorectal cancer.

  11. Sea-Level Flight Demonstration and Altitude Characterization of a LO2/LCH4 Based Accent Propulsion Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jacob; Hurlbert, Eric; Romig, Kris; Melcher, John; Hobson, Aaron; Eaton, Phil

    2009-01-01

    A 1,500 lbf thrust-class liquid oxygen (LO2)/Liquid Methane (LCH4) rocket engine was developed and tested at both sea-level and simulated altitude conditions. The engine was fabricated by Armadillo Aerospace (AA) in collaboration with NASA Johnson Space Center. Sea level testing was conducted at Armadillo Aerospace facilities at Caddo Mills, TX. Sea-level tests were conducted using both a static horizontal test bed and a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) test bed capable of lift-off and hover-flight in low atmosphere conditions. The vertical test bed configuration is capable of throttling the engine valves to enable liftoff and hover-flight. Simulated altitude vacuum testing was conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), which is capable of providing altitude simulation greater than 120,000 ft equivalent. The engine tests demonstrated ignition using two different methods, a gas-torch and a pyrotechnic igniter. Both gas torch and pyrotechnic ignition were demonstrated at both sea-level and vacuum conditions. The rocket engine was designed to be configured with three different nozzle configurations, including a dual-bell nozzle geometry. Dual-bell nozzle tests were conducted at WSTF and engine performance data was achieved at both ambient pressure and simulated altitude conditions. Dual-bell nozzle performance data was achieved over a range of altitude conditions from 90,000 ft to 50,000 ft altitude. Thrust and propellant mass flow rates were measured in the tests for specific impulse (Isp) and C* calculations.

  12. Nonlinear Analysis of the Space Shuttle Superlightweight LO2 Tank. Part 2; Behavior Under 3g End-of-Flight Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Young, Richard D.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H.,Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Results of linear bifurcation and nonlinear analyses of the Space Shuttle super lightweight (SLWT) external liquid-oxygen (LO2) tank are presented for an important end-of-flight loading condition. These results illustrate an important type of response mode for thin-walled shells, that are subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads, that may be encountered in the design of other liquid-fuel launch vehicles. Linear bifurcation analyses are presented that predict several nearly equal eigenvalues that correspond to local buckling modes in the aft dome of the LO2 tank. In contrast, the nonlinear response phenomenon is shown to consist of a short-wavelength bending deformation in the aft elliptical dome of the LO2 tank that grows in amplitude in a stable manner with increasing load. Imperfection sensitivity analyses are presented that show that the presence of several nearly equal eigenvalues does not lead to a premature general instability mode for the aft dome. For the linear bifurcation and nonlinear analyses, the results show that accurate predictions of the response of the shell generally require a large-scale, high fidelity finite-element model. Results are also presented that show that the SLWT LO2 tank can support loads in excess of approximately 1.9 times the values of the operational loads considered.

  13. Representations of Mexican American Migrant Childhood in Rivera's "...y no se lo trago la tierra" and Viramontes's "Under the Feet of Jesus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Scott A.; Rangel, Dolores E.

    2009-01-01

    This article gives an analysis of two books: Thomas Rivera's "...y no se lo trago la tierra" and Helena Maria Viramontes's "Under the Feet of Jesus". The two books are strong and important literary texts that stand in close relation to each other. Both texts treat the subject of migrant childhood by affirming central themes of Chicano literature.…

  14. Higher locomotor response to cocaine in female (vs. male) rats selectively bred for high (HiS) and low (LoS) saccharin intake

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Marilyn E.; Anderson, Marissa M.; Morgan, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Rats selectively bred for high saccharin consumption (HiS) self-administer more oral ethanol and i.v. cocaine than those selectively bred for low saccharin consumption (LoS). Male and female drug-seeking-prone (HiS) and –resistant (LoS) rats were used in the present experiment to test the prediction that cocaine-induced locomotor activity and sensitization varied with sex and their selective breeding status (HiS and LoS). All rats were intermittently exposed over 2 weeks to pairs of sequential saline and cocaine injections, separated by 45 min. The first 5 pairs of injections, each separated by 2-3 days (10-12 days total), were given to examine the development of cocaine-induced locomotor activity and the development of locomotor sensitization, which was determined by comparing the effects of cocaine injection 1 with injection 6, which was given 2 weeks after the 5 pairs of intermittent injections. Results indicated that after the first injection pair (saline, cocaine) the HiS and LoS groups did not differ (saline vs. cocaine) in locomotor activity; however, after cocaine injections 1, 5 and 6, HiS females were more active than HiS males and LoS females. There were also significant phenotype differences (HiS > LoS) in locomotor activity after cocaine injections 5 and 6. There was only a weak sensitization effect in cocaine-induced locomotor activity in HiS females after cocaine injection 5 (compared to 1); however it was not present after injection 6 or in other groups. The lack of a strong sensitization effect under these temporal and dose conditions was inconsistent with previous reports. However, the results showing HiS > LoS and females > males on cocaine-induced activity measures are consistent with several measures of cocaine-seeking behavior (acquisition, maintenance, escalation, extinction, and reinstatement), and they suggest that cocaine-induced locomotor activity and sensitization are behavioral markers of drug-seeking phenotypes. PMID:17707494

  15. Conversation with Lara about the Earth and Land. (Spanish Title: Conversando con Lara sobre la Tierra y la Teirra.) Conversando com Lara sobre a Terra e a Terra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Conceição Barbosa-Lima, Maria

    2010-12-01

    The present article is the analysis of a conversation between the author and Lara, a four-yearold- girl, enrolled in nursery school, while she makes a drawing of the Earth. It took place outside school environment and without any other person around to avoid interference during the interview. According to Ferreira & Silva (2004), a researcher can only comprehend a child's drawing, or form, by listening to him/her while he/she is creating it. Lara presented the traditional flat drawing, picturing the sky parallel to the ground, as reported by Nardi & Carvalho (1996). However, when asked to draw the World - term used by Butterworth et al. (2002), in order to avoid unnecessary confusion - she represented it by a circle, with herself on the surface. Her drawings led to the conclusion that such girl does not know yet the World in which she lives is the Earth, and probably because of that, within her age and consequent maturity, she accurately differentiates the concepts of land and Earth. El presente artículo analiza una entrevista libre, mientras una niña de 4 años y 4 meses, matriculada en el pregrado, dibuja la Tierra. Esta entrevista se realizó fuera del ambiente escolar y sin otra persona alrededor que pudiera interferir. De acuerdo con Ferreira Silva (2004), para quien investiga es posible conocer realmente lo que un niño o una niña pone en el papel a través de grafismos y/o dibujos si se lo escucha durante el proceso de creación de la escritura con imágenes. La niña, en este caso, representa la Tierra con el tradicional dibujo plano y el "cielo" paralelo al suelo, conforme analizaron Nardi & Carvalho (1996). Pero, cuando se Le solicita dibujar el "Mundo" - palabra empleada en un trabajo de Butterworth et al. (2002), con intención de no provocar "confusiones" innecesarias a sus sujetos de investigación- lo representa de forma circular, poniéndose sobre su superficie. Sus dibujos llevan a concluir que esta niña aún no tiene conocimiento que el mundo

  16. Core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS heterostructure synthesized by super-close-space sublimation for broadband down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Meng, Fanzhi; Yu, Yingning; Han, Lin; Liu, Xiaojuan; Meng, Jian

    2014-04-01

    Combination with semiconductors is a promising approach to the realization of broadband excitation of light conversion materials based on rare earth compounds, to boost the energy efficiency of silicon solar cells. Cd1-xZnxS is a wide bandgap semiconductor with large exciton binding energy. By changing its composition, the bandgap of Cd1-xZnxS can be tuned to match the absorption of trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions, which makes it a competent energy donor for the Ln3+-Yb3+ couple. In this work, we designed a clean route to a broadband down-converter based on a core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/Cd0.81Zn0.19S (CdZnS) heterostructure. By hot-pressing and subsequent annealing of a Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS mixture, highly pure CdZnS was sublimated and deposited on the Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+] grains while maintaining the original composition of the precursor. The CdZnS shell acted as a light absorber and energy donor for the Tb3+-Yb3+ quantum cutting couple. Because the use of solvents was avoided during the formation of the heterostructures, few impurities were incorporated into the samples, and the non-radiative transition was therefore markedly suppressed. The Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS heterostructures possess strong near-infrared (NIR) luminescence from Yb3+. Broadband down-conversion to the Yb3+ NIR emission was obtained in a wide range of 250-650 nm.

  17. Core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS heterostructure synthesized by super-close-space sublimation for broadband down-conversion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Meng, Fanzhi; Yu, Yingning; Han, Lin; Liu, Xiaojuan; Meng, Jian

    2014-05-07

    Combination with semiconductors is a promising approach to the realization of broadband excitation of light conversion materials based on rare earth compounds, to boost the energy efficiency of silicon solar cells. Cd(1-x)Zn(x)S is a wide bandgap semiconductor with large exciton binding energy. By changing its composition, the bandgap of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)S can be tuned to match the absorption of trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions, which makes it a competent energy donor for the Ln(3+)-Yb(3+) couple. In this work, we designed a clean route to a broadband down-converter based on a core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb(3+)-Yb(3+)), Li(+)]/Cd0.81Zn0.19S (CdZnS) heterostructure. By hot-pressing and subsequent annealing of a Y2O3:[(Tb(3+)-Yb(3+)), Li(+)]/CdZnS mixture, highly pure CdZnS was sublimated and deposited on the Y2O3:[(Tb(3+)-Yb(3+)), Li(+)] grains while maintaining the original composition of the precursor. The CdZnS shell acted as a light absorber and energy donor for the Tb(3+)-Yb(3+) quantum cutting couple. Because the use of solvents was avoided during the formation of the heterostructures, few impurities were incorporated into the samples, and the non-radiative transition was therefore markedly suppressed. The Y2O3:[(Tb(3+)-Yb(3+)), Li(+)]/CdZnS heterostructures possess strong near-infrared (NIR) luminescence from Yb(3+). Broadband down-conversion to the Yb(3+) NIR emission was obtained in a wide range of 250-650 nm.

  18. [Lo stile di attaccamento insicuro è un fattore di rischio di ridotta densità minerale ossea in donne in menopausa. Uno studio pilota].

    PubMed

    Niolu, Cinzia; Bianciardi, Emanuela; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Nicolai, Sara; Celi, Monica; Ribolsi, Michele; Pietropolli, Adalgisa; Ticconi, Carlo; Tarantino, Umberto; Siracusano, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    RIASSUNTO. Introduzione. La depressione maggiore (MD) e l'osteoporosi sono malattie ad alta prevalenza nel genere femminile, associate a morbosità e mortalità. Sebbene alcuni studi abbiano dimostrato un'associazione tra MD, ridotta densità minerale ossea (BMD) e osteoporosi, non sono stati chiariti i meccanismi causali. Lo stile di attaccamento insicuro è stato messo in relazione con la patogenesi e il decorso di malattie croniche come la MD e le malattie cardiovascolari. Obiettivo di questo studio pilota è esplorare la relazione tra MD e BMD. Si ipotizza che lo stile di attaccamento possa agire da mediatore. Metodi. Il campione è formato da 101 donne in menopausa, 49 con MD e 52 controlli sani. La diagnosi di MD è stata formulata con l'intervista clinica e la Beck Depression Inventory. Lo stile di attaccamento è stato esplorato usando il Relationship Questionnaire, la BMD con la Mineralometria Ossea Computerizzata con tecnica DXA (Dual energy X-ray Absorptiometry). Risultati. L'analisi univariata ha mostrato che le donne con MD avevano valori di BMD inferiori rispetto ai controlli sani. Nelle analisi di regressione multipla la MD non è emersa come predittore significativo di ridotta BMD. Lo stile di attaccamento insicuro "preoccupato" è risultato un predittore significativo di ridotta BMD in tutti i siti scheletrici misurati con la DXA: colonna vertebrale lombare (p=0,008) e segmenti femorali: "femoral neck" (p=0,011), "total hip" (p=0,002). Conclusioni. Questo è il primo studio che esplora il possibile ruolo di MD e stile di attaccamento sulla BMD. Lo stile di attaccamento è risultato un predittore di ridotta BMD, indipendentemente dalla MD. L'attaccamento insicuro potrebbe avere un ruolo nella patogenesi dell'osteoporosi anche indipendente dalla MD. Se questi risultati saranno confermati, gli interventi terapeutici focalizzati sullo stile di attaccamento potrebbero contribuire al miglioramento della comorbilità psichiatrica e medica legata all'osteoporosi.

  19. TLR7/9-mediated monocytosis and maturation of Gr-1(hi) inflammatory monocytes towards Gr-1(lo) resting monocytes implicated in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Raber, Marie-Laure; Baudino, Lucie; Alvarez, Montserrat; van Rooijen, Nico; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Izui, Shozo

    2011-11-01

    Circulating monocytes are divided into two major, phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets: Gr-1(hi) "inflammatory" and Gr-1(lo) "resting" monocytes. One of the unique cellular abnormalities in lupus-prone mice is monocytosis, which is characterized by a selective expansion of Gr-1(lo) monocytes and dependent on the expression of stimulatory IgG Fc receptors (FcγR). We speculated that IgG immune complexes containing nuclear antigens could stimulate Gr-1(hi) monocytes through interaction with FcγRs and then TLR7 and TLR9, thereby promoting the maturation towards Gr-1(lo) monocytes. In the present study, we assessed this hypothesis by analyzing effects of TLR9 or TLR7 agonist on monocytes in vivo. The analysis of various surface markers differentially expressed on both subsets of monocytes in combination with selective depletion of either subset revealed that within 48 h after injection of the TLR9 agonist CpG, approximately one third of Gr-1(hi) monocytes became phenotypically identical to Gr-1(lo) monocytes. In addition, we observed approximately two-fold increases in the total monocyte population 8-24 h after injection of CpG. Moreover, the activation of TLR9 resulted in an increased expression of stimulatory FcγRIV relative to inhibitory FcγRIIB on monocytes, thereby enhancing their responsiveness to IgG immune complexes. Essentially identical results were obtained after stimulation of TLR7 with a synthetic agonist (1V136). Our results indicate that the activation of TLR7 and TLR9 not only induced the maturation of a fraction of Gr-1(hi) monocytes towards Gr-1(lo) monocytes but also promoted the overall generation of monocytes, thereby supporting the critical role of TLR7 and TLR9 for the development of monocytosis in lupus-prone mice.

  20. Establishing an Appropriate Level of Detail (LoD) for a Building Information Model (BIM) - West Block, Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fai, S.; Rafeiro, J.

    2014-05-01

    In 2011, Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) embarked on a comprehensive rehabilitation of the historically significant West Block of Canada's Parliament Hill. With over 17 thousand square meters of floor space, the West Block is one of the largest projects of its kind in the world. As part of the rehabilitation, PWGSC is working with the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) to develop a building information model (BIM) that can serve as maintenance and life-cycle management tool once construction is completed. The scale and complexity of the model have presented many challenges. One of these challenges is determining appropriate levels of detail (LoD). While still a matter of debate in the development of international BIM standards, LoD is further complicated in the context of heritage buildings because we must reconcile the LoD of the BIM with that used in the documentation process (terrestrial laser scan and photogrammetric survey data). In this paper, we will discuss our work to date on establishing appropriate LoD within the West Block BIM that will best serve the end use. To facilitate this, we have developed a single parametric model for gothic pointed arches that can be used for over seventy-five unique window types present in the West Block. Using the AEC (CAN) BIM as a reference, we have developed a workflow to test each of these window types at three distinct levels of detail. We have found that the parametric Gothic arch significantly reduces the amount of time necessary to develop scenarios to test appropriate LoD.

  1. The long-period binary central stars of the planetary nebulae NGC 1514 and LoTr 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Van Winckel, H.; Aller, A.; Exter, K.; De Marco, O.

    2017-04-01

    The importance of long-period binaries for the formation and evolution of planetary nebulae is still rather poorly understood, which in part is due to the lack of central star systems that are known to comprise such long-period binaries. Here, we report on the latest results from the on-going Mercator-HERMES survey for variability in the central stars of planetary nebulae. We present a study of the central stars of NGC 1514, BD+30°623, the spectrum of which shows features associated with a hot nebular progenitor as well as a possible A-type companion. Cross-correlation of high-resolution HERMES spectra against synthetic spectra shows the system to be a highly eccentric (e 0.5) double-lined binary with a period of 3300 days. Previous studies indicated that the cool component might be a horizontal branch star of mass 0.55 M⊙, but the observed radial velocity amplitudes rule out such a low mass. If we assume that the nebular symmetry axis and binary orbital plane are perpendicular, then the data are more consistent with a post-main-sequence star ascending towards the giant branch. We also present the continued monitoring of the central star of LoTr 5, HD 112313, which has now completed one full cycle, allowing the orbital period (P 2700 days) and eccentricity (e 0.3) to be derived. To date, the orbital periods of BD+30°623 and HD 112313 are the longest to have been measured spectroscopically in the central stars of planetary nebulae. Furthermore, these systems, along with BD+33°2642, comprise the only spectroscopic wide-binary central stars currently known. Based on observations made with the Mercator Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma by the Flemish Community, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.The radial velocity data for both objects are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  2. A New Titanosaurian Braincase from the Cretaceous "Lo Hueco" Locality in Spain Sheds Light on Neuroanatomical Evolution within Titanosauria.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Fabien; Witmer, Lawrence M; Ridgely, Ryan C; Ortega, Francisco; Sanz, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Despite continuous improvements, our knowledge of the neurocranial anatomy of sauropod dinosaurs as a whole is still poor, which is especially true for titanosaurians even though their postcranial remains are common in many Upper Cretaceous sites worldwide. Here we describe a braincase from the uppermost Cretaceous locality of ''Lo Hueco" in Spain that is one of the most complete titanosaurian braincases found so far in Europe. Although the titanosaurian Ampelosaurus sp. is known from the same locality, this specimen is clearly a distinct taxon and presents a number of occipital characters found in Antarctosaurus and Jainosaurus, which are approximately coeval taxa from southern Gondwana. The specimen was subjected to X-ray computed tomographic (CT) scanning, allowing the generation of 3D renderings of the endocranial cavity enclosing the brain, cranial nerves, and blood vessels, as well as the labyrinth of the inner ear. These findings add considerable knowledge to the field of sauropod paleoneuroanatomy in general and titanosaurian endocast diversity in particular. Compared with that of many sauropodomorphs, the endocast appears only slightly flexed in lateral view and bears similarities (e.g., reduction of the rostral dural expansion) with Gondwanan titanosaurians such as Jainosaurus, Bonatitan, and Antarctosaurus. The vestibular system of the inner ear is somewhat contracted (i.e., the radius of the semicircular canals is small), but less so than expected in derived titanosaurians. However, as far as the new specimen and Jainosaurus can be contrasted, and with the necessary caution due to the small sample of comparative data currently available, the two taxa appear more similar to one another in endocast morphology than to other titanosaurians. Recent phylogenetic analyses of titanosaurians have not included virtually any of the taxa under consideration here, and thus the phylogenetic position of the new Spanish titanosaurian--even its generic, let alone

  3. Measurement of NOx fluxes by eddy covariance from the BT tower, London during the ClearfLo project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, James; Helfter, Carole; Nemitz, Eiko; Tremper, Anja; Stocker, Jenny; Carruthers, David

    2014-05-01

    The vast majority of air pollutants are emitted directly into the atmosphere from activities occurring at the Earth's surface. One of the key anthropogenic pollutants is NOx (defined as the sum of NO and NO2), which is emitted as a result of most anthropogenic combustion processes. Whilst the chemical reactions and atmospheric processing of NOx are reasonably well understood, and can be modelled with some skill, large uncertainties arise in models due to uncertainty associated with the rate of emissions. In recent years it has become clear that measured trends in certain pollutants, for example NO2, have not followed trends predicted by inventories. Continued exceedances of certain air pollution targets are of significant concern to governments, who have identified reducing this uncertainty associated with emissions as key evidence need. As part of the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project, concentrations and fluxes of NOx were measured from the top of the BT tower, which is a 188m high telecommunications tower, situated in central London (51o31'17.4'N; 0o8'20.04W). The tower is surrounded by a mixture of commercial and residential buildings with an average height of 15 m. The typical daytime flux footprint of the tower is dominated by commercial/residential buildings and roads (82%) but also includes urban parkland (13%) and impervious ground (5%). High time resolution (10 Hz) chemiluminescence measurements of NO and NO2 (photolytic conversion to NO followed by chemiluminescence) were combined with fast turbulence measurements from a sonic anemometer to calculate fluxes using the eddy covariance technique. In brief, NOx fluxes per notional half-hourly averaging period were obtained by maximising the covariance between instantaneous (i.e. mean for the averaging period subtracted from each 10 Hz data point) fluctuations of NOx mixing ratio and vertical wind velocity. 24 hour NOx flux measurements were made on 36 days

  4. LoMA-B: a simple and versatile lab-on-a-chip system based on single-channel bisulfite conversion for DNA methylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaeyun; Park, Mi Kyoung; Lee, Tae Yoon; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Shin, Yong

    2015-09-07

    Miniaturized lab-on-a-chip (LOC) systems have been developed for genetic and epigenetic analyses in clinical applications because of advantages such as reduced sample size and reagent consumption, rapid processing speed, simplicity, and enhanced sensitivity. Despite tremendous efforts made towards developing LOC systems for use in the clinical setting, the development of LOC systems to analyze DNA methylation, which is an emerging epigenetic marker causing the abnormal silencing of genes including tumor suppressor genes, is still challenging because of the gold standard methods involving a bisulfite conversion step. Existing bisulfite conversion-based techniques are not suitable for clinical use due to their long processing time, labor intensiveness, and the purification steps involved. Here, we present a lab-on-a-chip system for DNA methylation analysis based on bisulfite conversion (LoMA-B), which couples a sample pre-processing module for on-chip bisulfite conversion and a label-free, real-time detection module for rapid analysis of DNA methylation status using an isothermal DNA amplification/detection technique. The methylation status of the RARβ gene in human genomic DNA extracted from MCF-7 cells was analyzed by the LoMA-B system within 80 min (except 16 h for sensor preparation) compared to conventional MS-PCR within 24 h. Furthermore, the LoMA-B system is highly sensitive and can detect as little as 1% methylated DNA in a methylated/unmethylated cell mixture. Therefore, the LoMA-B system is an efficient diagnostic tool for the simple, versatile, and quantitative evaluation of DNA methylation patterns for clinical applications.

  5. CHRNA7 inhibits cell invasion and metastasis of LoVo human colorectal cancer cells through PI3K/Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tao; Yu, Feng; Fei, Rushan; Qian, Jing; Chen, Wenbin

    2016-02-01

    The α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) is widely expressed in both the brain and periphery whereas its encoding protein of α7 neuronal acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) belongs to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor family. Considerable evidence suggests that α7nAChR plays an important role in chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain signaling and thus has been proposed as a potential target for treating cognitive deficits in patients with schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of endogenous α7nAChR signaling in human colorectal cancer growth and metastasis. pLVX‑CHRNA7 encoding the full length of CHRNA7 was constructed and transfected into LoVo human colorectal cancer cells. Cell proliferation was measured by Cell Counting Kit‑8 (CCK‑8), and cell migration and invasion were detected by Transwell chamber assays. Expression and activity of metastasis‑related metalloproteinases (MMPs) were analyzed by western blotting and gelatin zymography, respectively. Activation of metastasis-related signaling molecules was detected by western blotting. LY294002 was used to specifically block the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase/v‑akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue (PI3K/Akt) pathway. We showed that concomitantly with an increase in α7nAChR expression after transfection, LoVo cells presented reduced abilities for migration and invasion, which was accompanied by reduced expression levels of MMP‑1 and MMP‑9 as well as activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. The application of LY294002 restored the migration and invasion abilities of the LoVo cells bearing CHRNA7. Collectively, we conclude that overexpression of CHRNA7 negatively controls colorectal cancer LoVo cell invasion and metastasis via PI3K/Akt pathway activation and may serve as either a diagnostic marker or a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer metastasis.

  6. Regulation of COLx1(1), LO and COX-1 mRNA Expression by Prostaglandin E2 in Human Embryonic Fibroblasts, IMR-90.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    synthesis of LO [Roy et al., 1996] which is an active participant during collagen deposition [ Pinnell and Martin, 1968]. In * 2 addition, these two cytokines...groups of lysyl or hydroxylysyl residues in collagen fibrils to peptidyl o-aminoadipic-8-semialdehyde [ Pinnell and Martin, 1968]. This process yields...macrophage which is considered a central cell in the cytokine network of the lung [Scheule et al., 1992]. In any case , in a bleomycin-induced pulmonary

  7. Inhibition of NF-κB and metastasis in irinotecan (CPT-11)-resistant LoVo colon cancer cells by thymoquinone via JNK and p38.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Cheng; Lee, Nien-Hung; Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Tu, Chuan-Chou; Chen, Ray-Jade; Lin, Yueh-Min; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-02-01

    Clinically used chemotherapeutics can effectively eliminate most tumor cells. However, they cause unwanted side effects and result in chemoresistance. To overcome such problems, phytochemicals are now used to treat cancers by means of targeted therapy. Thymoquinone (TQ) is used to treat different cancers (including colon cancer) and is an NF-κB inhibitor. Irinotecan resistant (CPT-11-R) LoVo colon cancer cell line was previous constructed by step-wise CPT-11 challenges to un-treated parental LoVo cells and expresses EGFR/IKKα/β/NF-κB pathway. TQ resulted in reduced total and phosphorylation of IKKα/β and NF-κB and decreased metastasis in CPT-11-R cells. TQ not only reduced activity of ERK1/2 and PI3K but also activated JNK and p38. Furthermore, TQ was also found to suppress metastasis through activation of JNK and p38. Therefore, TQ suppressed metastasis through NF-κB inhibition and activation of JNK and p38 in CPT-11-R LoVo colon cancer cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 669-678, 2017.

  8. Bio-guided isolation of the cytotoxic terpenoids from the roots of Euphorbia kansui against human normal cell lines L-O2 and GES-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Gao, Lan; Li, Zhengjun; Yan, Xiaojing; Yang, Yanjing; Tang, Yuping; Cao, Yudan; Ding, Anwei

    2012-01-01

    The dried roots of Euphorbia kansui (kansui) have been used for centuries in China as a herbal medicine for edema, ascites, and asthma. The 95% ethanol extract showed a significant inhibition of cell proliferation against human normal cell lines L-O2 and GES-1. Bioassay-guided separation of the 95% ethanol extract from the roots of E. kansui led to the isolation of 12 diverse terpenoids whose structures were identified by (1)H, (13)C NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS as kansuinine A (1), kansuinine B (2), kansuinine C (3), kansuiphorin C (4), 3-O-(2'E,4'Z-decadienoyl)-20-O-acetylingenol (5), 3-O-(2'E,4'Edecadienoyl)-20-O-acetylingenol (6), 3-O-(2'E,4'Z-decadienoyl)-20-deoxyingenol (7), 3-O-benzoyl-20-deoxyingenol (8), 5-O-benzoyl-20-deoxyingenol (9), kansenone (10), epi-kansenone (11), euphol (12). All these 12 terpernoids were evaluated in vitro for cytotoxicity on L-O2 and GES-1 cell lines. Most ingenane-type diterpenoids and 8-ene-7-one triterpenoids (5-11) exhibited a relatively lower IC(50) value; therefore, these compounds had stronger cytotoxicity against human normal cell lines L-O2 and GES-1 with dose-dependent relationships. These results will be significantly helpful to reveal the mechanism of toxicity of kansui and to effectively guide safer clinical application of this herb.

  9. No reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    A method of reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with an amount of HNCO at a temperature effective for heat-induced decomposition of HNCO, said amount and temperature being effective for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream, said solid agent being particulate and having a particle size of less than 90 .mu.m.

  10. NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, R.A.

    1993-01-19

    A method of reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with an amount of HNCO at a temperature effective for heat-induced decomposition of HNCO, said amount and temperature being effective for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream, said solid agent being particulate and having a particle size of less than 90 [mu]m.

  11. Sublimation of Iodine at Various Pressures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, Ilya A.

    2005-01-01

    Various phenomena that are observed in the process of heating solid iodine in closed vessels at different pressures and temperatures are described. When solid iodine is heated in an evacuated ampoule where the pressure is less than 10(super -3), no noticeable color appears and immediate condensation of tiny iodine crystals is visible higher up on…

  12. Disorders, sublime menu: the DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Danny

    2013-09-01

    The release of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) is the culmination of a long and remarkably public discussion which was accompanied by a great deal of controversy. Diagnostic criteria for many disorders have changed, the structure of the DSM is different, and there remain significant concerns about the forensic application of the DSM. This column briefly covers the primary changes and summarises the debate about various diagnoses, with a particular focus on diagnoses of relevance to medico-legal psychiatry and the legal system. Underlying concerns about the validity of diagnostic criteria and their applicability to forensic issues are discussed. Concerns about the DSM-5 are not only due to the specific diagnoses and their criteria, but the methodology of checklist criteria. This is amplified in medico-legal settings, but is also in part necessary. Clinicians, lawyers, and judges will all need to think carefully about how they use the DSM and its ilk in forensic settings.

  13. Sublimation-Condensation of Multiscale Tellurium Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2013-03-11

    This paper presents a simple technique for making tellurium (Te) nano and microtubes of widely varying dimensions with Multi-Scale Processing (MSP). In this process, the Te metal is placed in a reaction vessel (e.g., borosilicate or fused quartz), the vessel is evacuated, and then sealed under vacuum with a torch. The vessel is heat-treated in a temperature gradient where a portion of the tube that can also contain an additional substrate, is under a decreasing temperature gradient. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies have shown that multifaceted crystalline tubes have been formed extending from nano- up to micron-scale with diameters ranging from 51.2 ± 5.9 to 1042 ± 134 nm between temperatures of 157 and 224 °C, respectively. One-dimensional tubular features are seen at lower temperatures, while three-dimensional features, at the higher temperatures. These features have been characterized with X-ray diffraction and found to be trigonal Te with space group P3121. Our results show that the MSP can adequately be described using a simple Arrhenius equation.

  14. NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, R.A.

    1996-05-21

    A method of reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with an amount of HNCO at a temperature effective for heat-induced decomposition of cyanuric acid, said amount and temperature being effective for the resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream, said cyanuric acid being particulate and having a particle size of less than 90 {micro}m. 1 fig.

  15. Cute, Creepy and Sublime Unnamed Childhood Monstrosities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesar, Marek; Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka

    2016-01-01

    Strangers, Gods, and monsters are all names for the experience of alterity and otherness within and amongst us. We need monsters in our lives. In this paper we use philosophy as a method to explore language, developmental and cultural instabilities, and terrifying (and discursive) monstrosity located within children's literature and childhood…

  16. Circulating precursor CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) CXCR5⁺ CD4⁺ T cells indicate Tfh cell activity and promote antibody responses upon antigen reexposure.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Tsai, Louis M; Leong, Yew Ann; Hu, Xin; Ma, Cindy S; Chevalier, Nina; Sun, Xiaolin; Vandenberg, Kirsten; Rockman, Steve; Ding, Yan; Zhu, Lei; Wei, Wei; Wang, Changqi; Karnowski, Alexander; Belz, Gabrielle T; Ghali, Joanna R; Cook, Matthew C; Riminton, D Sean; Veillette, André; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Mackay, Fabienne; Brink, Robert; Tangye, Stuart G; Vinuesa, Carola G; Mackay, Charles R; Li, Zhanguo; Yu, Di

    2013-10-17

    Follicular B helper T (Tfh) cells support high affinity and long-term antibody responses. Here we found that within circulating CXCR5⁺ CD4⁺ T cells in humans and mice, the CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) subset has a partial Tfh effector phenotype, whereas CCR7(hi)PD-1(lo) cells have a resting phenotype. The circulating CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) subset was indicative of active Tfh differentiation in lymphoid organs and correlated with clinical indices in autoimmune diseases. Thus the CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) subset provides a biomarker to monitor protective antibody responses during infection or vaccination and pathogenic antibody responses in autoimmune diseases. Differentiation of both CCR7(hi)PD-1(lo) and CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) subsets required ICOS and BCL6, but not SAP, suggesting that circulating CXCR5⁺ helper T cells are primarily generated before germinal centers. Upon antigen reencounter, CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) CXCR5⁺ precursors rapidly differentiate into mature Tfh cells to promote antibody responses. Therefore, circulating CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) CXCR5⁺ CD4⁺ T cells are generated during active Tfh differentiation and represent a new mechanism of immunological early memory.

  17. Diagnosing the Local Land-Atmosphere Coupling (LoCo) in Models and Observations: A Study of Dry/Wet Extremes in the U. S. Southern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santanello, J. A.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Kumar, S.; Dong, X.; Kennedy, A. D.

    2010-12-01

    Land-atmosphere interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture states. The degree of coupling between the land surface and PBL in numerical weather prediction and climate models remains largely unexplored and undiagnosed due to the complex interactions and feedbacks present across a range of scales. Further, uncoupled systems or experiments (e.g., the Project for Intercomparison of Land Parameterization Schemes, PILPS) may lead to inaccurate water and energy cycle process understanding by neglecting feedback processes such as PBL-top entrainment. In this study, a framework for diagnosing local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) is presented using a coupled mesoscale model with a suite of PBL and land surface model (LSM) options along with observations during the summers of 2006/7 in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. Specifically, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been coupled to NASA's Land Information System (LIS), which provides a flexible and high-resolution representation and initialization of land surface physics and states. A range of diagnostics exploring the links and feedbacks between soil moisture and precipitation are examined for the dry/wet extremes of this region, along with the sensitivity of PBL-LSM coupling to perturbations in soil moisture. As such, this methodology provides a potential pathway to study factors controlling local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) using the LIS-WRF system, which is serving as a testbed for LoCo experiments to evaluate coupling diagnostics within the community.

  18. [A chromatographic method of determining the levels of organic solvents in the air, the components of the offset lacquer LO-2].

    PubMed

    Dobecki, M; Czerczak, S

    1987-01-01

    A gas chromatographic method was worked out to determine the mixture of ethyl acetate, toluene, buthyl acetate, p,m-xylene, o-xylene and ethyl ethylene glycol vapours. These solvents are used as some components of offset lacquer LO-2. Optimum separation conditions were achieved on 3-metre SS column filled with 10% FFAP on Chormosorb W AW DMCS 80-100 mesh. Air samples were collected on activated charcoal placed in glass tubes. The components tested were desorbed from the sorbent material by 10% acetone solution in CS2. The method enables to determine the concentrations of each compound, corresponding to one fifth of their TLVs.

  19. Up to N{sup 3}LO heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory calculation for the M1 properties of three-nucleon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Lazauskas, Rimantas; Park, Tae-Sun

    2009-06-15

    M1 properties, comprising magnetic moments and radiative capture of thermal neutron observables, are studied in two- and three-nucleon systems. We use meson exchange current derived up to N{sup 3}LO using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory a la Weinberg. Calculations have been performed for several qualitatively different realistic nuclear Hamiltonians, which permits us to analyze model dependence of our results. Our results are found to be strongly correlated with the effective range parameters such as binding energies and the scattering lengths. Taking into account such correlations, the results are in good agreement with the experimental data with small model dependence.

  20. Estudio de la estructura logica utilizada en la ensenanza y el aprendizaje de los conceptos sobre el comportamiento de gases en el curso introductorio de quimica a nivel universitario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Diaz, Agnes

    El estudio que se presenta es de caracter cualitativo, un estudio multicasos donde se estudia la estructura logica utilizada por cuatro (4) profesores universitarios que ensenan el curso introductorio de quimica, en la planificacion, presentacion y evaluacion del tema sobre el comportamiento de los gases. Se utilizaron varias fuentes de informacion como: cuestionarios de profesores y estudiantes, entrevistas, grabaciones videomagnetofonicas, materiales didacticos y una prueba conceptual, entre otros. La informacion recopilada fue analizada de acuerdo al orden logico del contenido presentado, el estilo de ensenanza del profesor, las tecnicas y estrategias utilizadas para el desarrollo de destrezas de pensamiento, el ambiente fisico en el salon de clase y los instrumentos de evaluacion y avaluo. El estudio demuestra que lo que los profesores piensan y planifican para hacer sus presentaciones no necesariamente es lo que ocurre en el salon de clases. El desarrollo de destrezas de pensamiento, que constituye una prioridad de los profesores, no se elaboran efectivamente. El uso de las estrategias de resolucion de problemas numericos predomino. La participacion del estudiante en el salon de clases fue limitada y no se logro demostrar el desarrollo de las destrezas de pensamiento deseadas. Aunque los profesores tienen su propio estilo de ensenanza, el orden logico del contenido presentado en clase fue el mismo o siguio muy de cerca el orden establecido por el libro de texto. Los profesores utilizaron preferentemente la tiza y la pizarra para sus presentaciones y la dinamica en el salon de clases fue esencialmente tradicional. Los profesores hicieron su presentacion y los estudiantes copiaron pasivamente la informacion. Las evaluaciones de los estudiantes fueron esencialmente, pruebas escritas de seleccion multiple de acuerdo con el estilo en que se les enseno. El avaluo fue casi inexistente. La prueba conceptual administrada revela un aprendizaje pobre en los conceptos mas

  1. Curcumol Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis of Colorectal Cancer LoVo Cell Line via IGF-1R and p38 MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Fengxiang; Bai, Zhun; Chi, Bixia; Wu, Jiacai; Chen, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Curcumol, isolated from the traditional medical plant Rhizoma Curcumae, is the bioactive component of Zedoary oil, whose potential anti-tumor effect has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Though many researchers have reported curcumol and its bioactivity, the potential molecular mechanism for its anti-cancer effect in colorectal cancer LoVo cells still remains unclear. In the present study, we found that curcumol showed growth inhibition and induced apoptosis of LoVo cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The occurrence of its proliferation inhibition and apoptosis came with suppression of IGF-1R expression, and then increased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), which might result in a cascade response by inhibiting the CREB survival pathway and finally triggered Bax/Bcl-2 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) apoptosis signals. Moreover, curcumol inhibited colorectal cancer in xenograft models of nude mice. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis revealed that curcumol could decrease the expression of ki-67, Bcl-2 as well as CREB1, and increase the expression of Bax and the phosphorylation of p38, which were consistent with our in vitro study. Overall, our in vitro and in vivo data confirmed the anti-cancer activity of curcumol, which was related to a significant inhibition of IGF-1R and activation of p38 MAPKs, indicating that curcumol may be a potential anti-tumor agent for colorectal carcinoma therapy. PMID:26307972

  2. Curcumol Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis of Colorectal Cancer LoVo Cell Line via IGF-1R and p38 MAPK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Fengxiang; Bai, Zhun; Chi, Bixia; Wu, Jiacai; Chen, Xu

    2015-08-20

    Curcumol, isolated from the traditional medical plant Rhizoma Curcumae, is the bioactive component of Zedoary oil, whose potential anti-tumor effect has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Though many researchers have reported curcumol and its bioactivity, the potential molecular mechanism for its anti-cancer effect in colorectal cancer LoVo cells still remains unclear. In the present study, we found that curcumol showed growth inhibition and induced apoptosis of LoVo cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The occurrence of its proliferation inhibition and apoptosis came with suppression of IGF-1R expression, and then increased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), which might result in a cascade response by inhibiting the CREB survival pathway and finally triggered Bax/Bcl-2 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) apoptosis signals. Moreover, curcumol inhibited colorectal cancer in xenograft models of nude mice. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis revealed that curcumol could decrease the expression of ki-67, Bcl-2 as well as CREB1, and increase the expression of Bax and the phosphorylation of p38, which were consistent with our in vitro study. Overall, our in vitro and in vivo data confirmed the anti-cancer activity of curcumol, which was related to a significant inhibition of IGF-1R and activation of p38 MAPKs, indicating that curcumol may be a potential anti-tumor agent for colorectal carcinoma therapy.

  3. LoColms: an innovative approach of enhancing traditional classroom form of education by promoting web-based distance learning in the poorer countries.

    PubMed

    Ngarambe, Donart; Pan, Yun-he; Chen, De-ren

    2003-01-01

    There have been numerous attempts recently to promote technology based education (Shrestha, 1997) in the poorer third world countries, but so far all these have not provided a sustainable solution as they are either centered and controlled from abroad and relying solely on foreign donors for their sustenance or they are not web-based, which make distribution problematic, and some are not affordable by most of the local population in these places. In this paper we discuss an application, the Local College Learning Management System (LoColms), which we are developing, that is both sustainable and economical to suit the situation in these countries. The application is a web-based system, and aims at improving the traditional form of education by empowering the local universities. Its economy comes from the fact that it is supported by traditional communication technology, the public switching telephone network system, PSTN, which eliminates the need for packet switched or dedicated private virtual networks (PVN) usually required in similar situations. At a later stage, we shall incorporate ontology and paging tools to improve resource sharing and storage optimization in the Proxy Caches (ProCa) and LoColms servers. The system is based on the client/server paradigm and its infrastructure consists of the PSTN, ProCa, with the learning centers accessing the universities by means of point-to-point protocol (PPP).

  4. Taiwanin E inhibits cell migration in human LoVo colon cancer cells by suppressing MMP-2/9 expression via p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Li, Shin-Yi; Chang, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Hui-Nung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-11-03

    Taiwanin E is a natural compound which is structurally analogous to estrogen II and is abundantly found in Taiwania cryptomerioides. It has been previously reported for its anticancer effects; however, the pharmaceutical effect of Taiwanin E on Human LoVo colon cancer cells is not clear. In this study, we investigated the effects of Taiwanin E on metastasis and the associated mechanism of action on Human LoVo colon cancer cells with respect to the modulations in their cell migration and signaling pathways associated with migration. The results showed that Taiwanin E inhibited cell migration ability correlated with reduced expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. In addition, Taiwanin E induced activation of p38 through phosphorylation. Inhibition of p38α/β significantly abolished the effect of Taiwanin E on cell migration and MMP-2/-9 activity. Our results conclude that Taiwanin E inhibited cell migration chiefly via p38α MAPK pathway and in a lesser extend via p38β MAPK. The results elucidate the potential of the phytoestrogen natural compound Taiwanin E as a cancer therapeutic agent in inhibiting the cell migration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2016.

  5. Composition dependence of the in-plane Cu-O bond-stretching LO phonon mode in YBa2Cu3O6+x

    SciTech Connect

    Stercil, F.; Egami, T.; Mook Jr, Herbert A; Yethiraj, Mohana; Chung, J.-H.; Arai, M.; Frost, C.; Dogan, F.

    2008-01-01

    An inelastic pulsed neutron scattering study was performed on the dependence of the dispersion and spectral intensity of the in-plane Cu-O bond-stretching LO phonon mode on doped charge density. The measurements were made in the time-of-flight mode with the multiangle position sensitive spectrometer of the ISIS facility on single crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (x=0.15, 0.35, 0.6, 0.7, and 0.95). The focus of the study is the in-plane Cu-O bond-stretching LO phonon mode, which is known for strong electron-phonon coupling and unusual dependence on composition and temperature. It is shown that the dispersions for the samples with x=0.35, 0.6, and 0.7 are similar to the superposition of those for x=0.15 and 0.95 samples, and cannot be explained in terms of the structural anisotropy. It is suggested that the results are consistent with the model of nanoscale electronic phase separation, with the fraction of the phases being dependent on the doped charge density.

  6. Sobre os sistemas de referência celeste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, P. C. R.; Martin, V. A. F.

    2003-02-01

    Apresentamos neste trabalho, algumas discussões sobre os sistemas de referência utilizados em Astronomia. Claramente, não é possível esgotar todo este assunto num único texto, mas esperamos, contudo, que o presente material possa ser apreciado nos cursos de Introdução à Astronomia, que estão cada vez mais presentes nas atuais propostas curriculares das graduações de Física. As discussões pertinentes às "Bases de Referência Celeste", serão apresentadas em um outro trabalho.

  7. Solution of self-consistent equations for the N 3LO nuclear energy density functional in spherical symmetry. The program HOSPHE (v1.02)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, B. G.; Dobaczewski, J.; Toivanen, J.; Veselý, P.

    2010-09-01

    We present solution of self-consistent equations for the N 3LO nuclear energy density functional. We derive general expressions for the mean fields expressed as differential operators depending on densities and for the densities expressed in terms of derivatives of wave functions. These expressions are then specified to the case of spherical symmetry. We also present the computer program HOSPHE (v1.02), which solves the self-consistent equations by using the expansion of single-particle wave functions on the spherical harmonic oscillator basis. Program summaryProgram title: HOSPHE (v1.02) Catalogue identifier: AEGK_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGK_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 45 809 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 290 514 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran-90 Computer: PCs and workstations Operating system: Linux RAM: 50 MB Classification: 17.22 External routines: LAPACK ( http://www.netlib.org/lapack/), BLAS ( http://www.netlib.org/blas/) Nature of problem: The nuclear mean-field methods constitute principal tools of a description of nuclear states in heavy nuclei. Within the Local Density Approximation with gradient corrections up to N 3LO [1], the nuclear mean-field is local and contains derivative operators up to sixth order. The locality allows for an effective and fast solution of the self-consistent equations. Solution method: The program uses the spherical harmonic oscillator basis to expand single-particle wave functions of neutrons and protons for the nuclear state being described by the N 3LO nuclear energy density functional [1]. The expansion coefficients are determined by the iterative diagonalization of the mean-field Hamiltonian, which depends non

  8. Aspects cliniques et thérapeutiques des anomalies de la jonction pyélo-urétérale au CHU du point G

    PubMed Central

    Tembely, Aly; Kassogué, Amadou; Berthé, Honoré; Ouattara, Zanafon

    2016-01-01

    Cette étude a été faite pour analyser les aspects cliniques et thérapeutiques des anomalies de la jonction pyélo-urétérale. Etude transversale et descriptive portant sur 35 cas d'anomalies de la jonction pyélo-urétérale (AJPU) colligés au service d'Urologie du CHU du Point G durant une période de 4 ans (Janvier 2010 au Décembre 2014). Les données ont été recueillies sur les fiches d'enquête, les dossiers médicaux et les registres du bloc. Les données sociodémographique, clinique et thérapeutique ont été saisies sur Microsoft Word 2007 et analysées sur Excel 2007 et SPSS 18.0. 35 cas d'AJPU ont été colligés en 4 ans. La moyenne d’âge était de 29,3 ans. La douleur lombaire était le motif de consultation le plus fréquent soit 40%. 20% des patients ont été en consultation pour la première fois 10 ans d’évolution symptomatique. Une destruction rénale avait été observée dans 28,6%. Le couple Echographie + UIV a permis d’établir le diagnostic chez 37,1%. La complication lithiasique était présente chez 17,1% des patients. 51,4% des patients ont reçu une pyéloplastie à ciel ouvert selon Anderson KUSS. L'anomalie de la jonction pyélo-urétérale dans notre étude a été caractérisée par un retard de consultation avec des complications redoutables. La chirurgie à ciel ouvert a été le gold standard avec des résultats satisfaisants. L'endopyéloplastie, la cure de la jonction coelioscopique sont des chirurgies mini invasives non disponible chez nous mais à encourager et à intégrer dans l'arsenal thérapeutique. PMID:27516821

  9. On kissing and sighing: Renaissance homoerotic love from Ficino's De Amore and Sopra Lo Amore to Cesare Trevisani's L'impresa (1569).

    PubMed

    Maggi, Armando

    2005-01-01

    This essay investigates the homoerotic connotations present in the so-called treatises on love, a popular philosophical and literary genre of the Italian Renaissance. The referential text of this sixteenth- century genre is Marsilio Ficino's De amore (1484), a deeply innovative interpretation of Plato's Symposium. Focusing on the initial section of Ficino's text, Maggi highlights some important structural differences between the De amore and the Symposium. Moreover, by comparing Ficino's Latin text with his own subsequent Italian translation (Sopra lo amore, 1544), Maggi examines how Ficino interprets some key terms such as appearance and splendor. The second part of the essay studies Cesare Trevisani's L'impresa (1569), a later treatise on love with an explicit homoerotic foundation.

  10. Importance of direct anthropogenic emissions of formic acid measured by a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS) during the Winter ClearfLo Campaign in London, January 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas J.; Bacak, Asan; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Booth, A. Murray; Jones, Benjamin; Le Breton, Michael; Leather, Kimberley E.; Ghalaieny, Mohamed; Xiao, Ping; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Percival, Carl J.

    2014-02-01

    Formic acid, an ubiquitous trace gas in the atmosphere, was measured using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS) during the winter ClearfLo campaign in London, 2012. Daily calibrations of formic acid gave sensitivities of 3 ion counts s-1 pptv-1 for the complete campaign and a limit of detection of 2 ppt. No correlation with nitric acid was observed, R2 of 0.137, indicating no significant secondary source of formic acid. However, a strong positive correlation with NOx, CO, and production in line with rush hour periods indicated a direct anthropogenic emission of formic acid from vehicle emissions. Peaks of 6.7 ppb of formic acid were observed with a mean of 610 ppt. Global models indicated that this emission source dominates in the northern hemisphere where global models underestimate formic acid most significantly, thus increasing the accuracy of modelling of global formic acid emissions.

  11. Extensive scaling and nonuniformity of the Karhunen-Lo{grave e}ve decomposition for the spiral-defect chaos state

    SciTech Connect

    Zoldi, S.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.; Greenside, H.S.

    1998-12-01

    By analyzing large-aspect-ratio spiral-defect chaos (SDC) convection images, we show that the Karhunen-Lo{grave e}ve decomposition (KLD) scales extensively for subsystem sizes larger than 4d ({ital d} is the fluid depth), which strongly suggests that SDC is extensively chaotic. From this extensive scaling, the intensive length {xi}{sub KLD} is computed and found to have a different dependence on the Rayleigh number than the two-point correlation length {xi}{sub 2}. Local computations of {xi}{sub KLD} reveal a spatial nonuniformity of SDC images that extends over radii 18d{lt}r{lt}45d in a {Gamma}=109 aspect-ratio cell. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Final Progress Report for Collaborative Research: Aging of Black Carbon during Atmospheric Transport: Understanding Results from the DOE’s 2010 CARES and 2012 ClearfLo Campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzoleni, Claudio; Subramanian, R.

    2016-08-31

    Over the course of this project, we have analyzed data and samples from the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the Clear air for London (ClearfLo) campaign, as well as conducted or participated in laboratory experiments designed to better understand black carbon mixing state and climate-relevant properties. The laboratory campaigns took place at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Carnegie Mellon University to study various climate-relevant aerosol properties of different sources of soot mixing with secondary organic aerosol precursors. Results from some of these activities were summarized in the previous progress report. This final report presents the manuscripts that have been published (many in the period since the last progress report), lists presentations at different conferences based on grant-related activities, and presents some results that are likely to be submitted for publication in the near future.

  13. Phosphoramidate protides of five flavones and their antiproliferative activity against HepG2 and L-O2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue-qing; Yang, Fei; Wang, Liu; Cao, Zhi; Han, Tian-jiao; Duan, Zhe-ang; Li, Zhen; Zhao, Wei-Jie

    2016-04-13

    A series of flavone-7-phosphoramidate derivatives were synthesized and tested for their antiproliferative activity in vitro against human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and human normal hepatic cell line L-O2. Compound 8d, 16d and 17d, incorporating the amino acid alanine, exhibited high inhibitory activity on HepG2 cell line with IC50 values of 9.0 μmol/L, 5.5 μmol/L and 6.6 μmol/L. The introduction of acyl groups played a pivotal role in the selective inhibition toward human hepatoma HepG2 cells, except for compound 8a, 9a and 16b. Compound 8d, 16d and 17d could significantly induce G2/M arrest in HepG2 cells. Specially, Compound 16d could lead early apoptosis in HepG2 cells.

  14. LO-TO splittings, effective charges and interactions in electro-optic meta-nitroaniline crystal as studied by polarized IR reflection and transmission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, M. M.; Le Calvé, N.; Romain, F.; Pasquier, B.

    1994-10-01

    The polarized IR reflection spectra of the meta-nitroaniline ( m-NA) single crystal along the a, b and c crystallographic axes as well as the b and c polarized transmission spectra have been measured in the 100-400 cm -1 region. The LO-TO splitting values have been calculated from the reflection spectra by fitting them with the four parameter dielectric function. The dipole moment derivatives, relevant to dynamic effective charges, of the vibrations have also been calculated and used to check the applicability of the oriented gas model (OGM) to reflection spectra. The discrepancies from the OGM have been discussed in terms of vibronic couplings, weak hydrogen bondings (HB) and intramolecular charge transfer.

  15. Vitamin fluctuations in the blood of female baboons in relation to normal menstrual cycles, treatments with Lo-Ovral or Depo-Provera and a selected vitamin supplement.

    PubMed

    Boots, L R; Cornwell, P E; Donahue, M A; Bradley, E L

    1983-04-01

    Both endogenous and exogenous sex steriods may induce changes in plasma vitamin levels by altering availability, transport, binding, or use of vitamins. This study investigated some of those mechanisms by observing in a primate model (baboon), the blood levels of carotene, folate, vitamins A, B12, and C, and the status of vitamin B6, riboflavin, and thiamin. The latter three vitamins were studied by determining their relationship to asparate aminotransferase, glutathione reductase, and thiamin transketolase, respectively. The vitamin screen was obtained throughout normal menstrual cycles in 10 baboons and weekly for 55 wk in five baboons receiving Lo-Ovral and in four baboons receiving Provera. During the last 16 wk of hormonal treatment, all baboons received a vitamin supplement containing pyridoxine, riboflavin, and thiamin. Only carotene (p less than 0.0001), vitamin A (p less than 0.05), glutathione reductase (p less than 0.05), and thiamin transketolase (p less than 0.05) levels fluctuated significantly during normal menstrual cycles. Long-term treatment with Lo-Ovral and Provera resulted in numerous changes but there were very few differences between the two hormone treatments. Compared to control levels, vitamin C was elevated during treatment while all three enzyme activities were lowered. Vitamin supplementation raised asparate aminotransferase and glutathione reductase activity and the levels of folic acid, vitamin A, and carotene. This study demonstrates that interactions between hormones and vitamins and among vitamins themselves, are complex but it is likely that the treatments used here caused no physiologically significant vitamin alterations.

  16. Stochastic uncertainty analysis for solute transport in randomly heterogeneous media using a Karhunen-Loève-based moment equation approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Gaisheng; Lu, Zhiming; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2007-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for solving solute transport problems in randomly heterogeneous media using the Karhunen-Loève-based moment equation (KLME) technique proposed by Zhang and Lu (2004). The KLME approach combines the Karhunen-Loève decomposition of the underlying random conductivity field and the perturbative and polynomial expansions of dependent variables including the hydraulic head, flow velocity, dispersion coefficient, and solute concentration. The equations obtained in this approach are sequential, and their structure is formulated in the same form as the original governing equations such that any existing simulator, such as Modular Three-Dimensional Multispecies Transport Model for Simulation of Advection, Dispersion, and Chemical Reactions of Contaminants in Groundwater Systems (MT3DMS), can be directly applied as the solver. Through a series of two-dimensional examples, the validity of the KLME approach is evaluated against the classical Monte Carlo simulations. Results indicate that under the flow and transport conditions examined in this work, the KLME approach provides an accurate representation of the mean concentration. For the concentration variance, the accuracy of the KLME approach is good when the conductivity variance is 0.5. As the conductivity variance increases up to 1.0, the mismatch on the concentration variance becomes large, although the mean concentration can still be accurately reproduced by the KLME approach. Our results also indicate that when the conductivity variance is relatively large, neglecting the effects of the cross terms between velocity fluctuations and local dispersivities, as done in some previous studies, can produce noticeable errors, and a rigorous treatment of the dispersion terms becomes more appropriate.

  17. Simulating secondary organic aerosol from missing diesel-related intermediate-volatility organic compound emissions during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ots, Riinu; Young, Dominique E.; Vieno, Massimo; Xu, Lu; Dunmore, Rachel E.; Allan, James D.; Coe, Hugh; Williams, Leah R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Ng, Nga L.; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Bergström, Robert; Di Marco, Chiara; Nemitz, Eiko; Mackenzie, Ian A.; Kuenen, Jeroen J. P.; Green, David C.; Reis, Stefan; Heal, Mathew R.

    2016-05-01

    We present high-resolution (5 km × 5 km) atmospheric chemical transport model (ACTM) simulations of the impact of newly estimated traffic-related emissions on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation over the UK for 2012. Our simulations include additional diesel-related intermediate-volatility organic compound (IVOC) emissions derived directly from comprehensive field measurements at an urban background site in London during the 2012 Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign. Our IVOC emissions are added proportionally to VOC emissions, as opposed to proportionally to primary organic aerosol (POA) as has been done by previous ACTM studies seeking to simulate the effects of these missing emissions. Modelled concentrations are evaluated against hourly and daily measurements of organic aerosol (OA) components derived from aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements also made during the ClearfLo campaign at three sites in the London area. According to the model simulations, diesel-related IVOCs can explain on average ˜ 30 % of the annual SOA in and around London. Furthermore, the 90th percentile of modelled daily SOA concentrations for the whole year is 3.8 µg m-3, constituting a notable addition to total particulate matter. More measurements of these precursors (currently not included in official emissions inventories) is recommended. During the period of concurrent measurements, SOA concentrations at the Detling rural background location east of London were greater than at the central London location. The model shows that this was caused by an intense pollution plume with a strong gradient of imported SOA passing over the rural location. This demonstrates the value of modelling for supporting the interpretation of measurements taken at different sites or for short durations.

  18. Tracing the outflow of a z = 0.334 FeLoBAL: New constraints from low-ionization absorbers in FBQS J1151+3822

    SciTech Connect

    Lucy, Adrian B.; Leighly, Karen M.; Terndrup, Donald M.; Dietrich, Matthias; Gallagher, Sarah C.

    2014-03-01

    We show for the first time that FBQS J1151+3822 is an iron low-ionization broad absorption line quasar (FeLoBAL QSO), the second-brightest and second-closest known example of this class. He I* and Fe II together act as an effective analytical tool, allowing us to obtain useful kinematic constraints from photoionization models of the outflow without needing to assume any particular acceleration model. The main outflow's log ionization parameter is –1.5, the log hydrogen density (cm{sup –3}) 5.5-8, the log hydrogen column density (cm{sup –2}) 21.7-21.9, the absorption radius 7.2-127 pc, and the kinetic luminosity is 0.16%-4.5% of the bolometric luminosity. We obtain line-of-sight covering fractions of ∼0.25 for strong Fe II, ∼0.5 for He I*, and ∼0.6 for Mg II. Narrower and shallower absorption lines from weaker Fe II and Mn II with an outflow velocity of ∼3400 km s{sup –1} have appeared between 2005 and 2011, suggesting that dense cores may have condensed inside the main outflow. Consideration of the literature might suggest that the FBQS J1151+3822 outflow is a member of a rare and distinct subclass of FeLoBALs with high densities and correspondingly small absorption radii. We find, however, that such outflows are not necessarily a distinct subclass, and that their apparent rarity could be a symptom of selection bias in studies using density-sensitive lines.

  19. Avisos de salud sobre el PFOA y PFOS en el agua potable

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    La EPA estableció avisos de salud sobre el ácido perfluorooctanoico (PFOA) y el sulfonato de perfluorooctano (PFOS) para proporcionar información a los operadores de sistemas de agua potable y funcionarios estatales, tribales y locales sobre los riesgos de

  20. Como Lo Hago Yo: Myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Lazareff, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Fortificación con ádico fólico es efectiva, pero aún falta conciencia en los jóvenes. La legalidad del aborto aumenta la importancia de la consulta prenatal. Realizo la cirugía bajo microcoscopio por razones didácticas. Irrigación continua para reducir la temperatura del tejido. Trato a la plaqueta como tejido viable. No suturo la plaqueta. No cierro músculo. ATB por una semana después de cirugía. Hidrocefalia: Válvula en todos los casos de ventriculomegalia. Médula anclada: Desanclar una sola vez. Chiari II: Revisar la válvula. Incluir en el seguimiento rendimiento escolar, puede indicar obstrucción de la válvula o médula anclada. PMID:24791217