Science.gov

Sample records for sodium channel na

  1. NaChBac: The Long Lost Sodium Channel Ancestor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In excitable cells, the main mediators of sodium conductance across membranes are voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs). Eukaryotic NaVs are essential elements in neuronal signaling and muscular contraction and in humans have been causally related to a variety of neurological and cardiovascular channelopathies. They are complex heavily glycosylated intrinsic membrane proteins present in only trace quantities that have proven to be challenging objects of study. However, in recent years, a number of simpler prokaryotic sodium channels have been identified, with NaChBac from Bacillus halodurans being the most well-characterized to date. The availability of a bacterial NaV that is amenable to heterologous expression and functional characterization in both bacterial and mammalian systems has provided new opportunities for structure–function studies. This review describes features of NaChBac as an exemplar of this class of bacterial channels, compares prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaVs with respect to their structural organization, pharmacological profiling, and functional kinetics, and discusses how voltage-gated ion channels may have evolved to deal with the complex functional demands of higher organisms. PMID:21770445

  2. Catalysis of Na+ permeation in the bacterial sodium channel NaVAb

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Nilmadhab; Ing, Christopher; Payandeh, Jian; Zheng, Ning; Catterall, William A.; Pomès, Régis

    2013-01-01

    Determination of a high-resolution 3D structure of voltage-gated sodium channel NaVAb opens the way to elucidating the mechanism of ion conductance and selectivity. To examine permeation of Na+ through the selectivity filter of the channel, we performed large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of NaVAb in an explicit, hydrated lipid bilayer at 0 mV in 150 mM NaCl, for a total simulation time of 21.6 μs. Although the cytoplasmic end of the pore is closed, reversible influx and efflux of Na+ through the selectivity filter occurred spontaneously during simulations, leading to equilibrium movement of Na+ between the extracellular medium and the central cavity of the channel. Analysis of Na+ dynamics reveals a knock-on mechanism of ion permeation characterized by alternating occupancy of the channel by 2 and 3 Na+ ions, with a computed rate of translocation of (6 ± 1) × 106 ions⋅s−1 that is consistent with expectations from electrophysiological studies. The binding of Na+ is intimately coupled to conformational isomerization of the four E177 side chains lining the extracellular end of the selectivity filter. The reciprocal coordination of variable numbers of Na+ ions and carboxylate groups leads to their condensation into ionic clusters of variable charge and spatial arrangement. Structural fluctuations of these ionic clusters result in a myriad of ion binding modes and foster a highly degenerate, liquid-like energy landscape propitious to Na+ diffusion. By stabilizing multiple ionic occupancy states while helping Na+ ions diffuse within the selectivity filter, the conformational flexibility of E177 side chains underpins the knock-on mechanism of Na+ permeation. PMID:23803856

  3. Sodium-level-sensitive sodium channel Na(x) is expressed in glial laminate processes in the sensory circumventricular organs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiji; Hiyama, Takeshi Y; Shimizu, Hidetada; Kodama, Ryuji; Hayashi, Noriko; Miyata, Seiji; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Noda, Masaharu

    2006-03-01

    Na(x) is an atypical sodium channel that is assumed to be a descendant of the voltage-gated sodium channel family. Our recent studies on the Na(x)-gene-targeting mouse revealed that Na(x) channel is localized to the circumventricular organs (CVOs), the central loci for the salt and water homeostasis in mammals, where the Na(x) channel serves as a sodium-level sensor of the body fluid. To understand the cellular mechanism by which the information sensed by Na(x) channels is transferred to the activity of the organs, we dissected the subcellular localization of Na(x) in the present study. Double-immunostaining and immunoelectron microscopic analyses revealed that Na(x) is exclusively localized to perineuronal lamellate processes extended from ependymal cells and astrocytes in the organs. In addition, glial cells isolated from the subfornical organ, one of the CVOs, were sensitive to an increase in the extracellular sodium level, as analyzed by an ion-imaging method. These results suggest that glial cells bearing the Na(x) channel are the first to sense a physiological increase in the level of sodium in the body fluid, and they regulate the neural activity of the CVOs by enveloping neurons. Close communication between inexcitable glial cells and excitable neural cells thus appears to be the basis of the central control of the salt homeostasis.

  4. Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents

    PubMed Central

    Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  5. Computational Study of Binding of μ-Conotoxin GIIIA to Bacterial Sodium Channels NaVAb and NaVRh.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dharmeshkumar; Mahdavi, Somayeh; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2016-03-29

    Structures of several voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels from bacteria have been determined recently, but the same feat might not be achieved for the mammalian counterparts in the near future. Thus, at present, computational studies of the mammalian NaV channels have to be performed using homology models based on the bacterial crystal structures. A successful homology model for the mammalian NaV1.4 channel was recently constructed using the extensive mutation data for binding of μ-conotoxin GIIIA to NaV1.4, which was further validated through studies of binding of other μ-conotoxins and ion permeation. Understanding the similarities and differences between the bacterial and mammalian NaV channels is an important issue, and the NaV1.4-GIIIA system provides a good opportunity for such a comparison. To this end, we study the binding of GIIIA to the bacterial channels NaVAb and NaVRh. The complex structures are obtained using docking and molecular dynamics simulations, and the dissociation of GIIIA is studied through umbrella sampling simulations. The results are compared to those obtained from the NaV1.4-GIIIA system, and the differences in the binding modes arising from the changes in the selectivity filters are highlighted.

  6. Spontaneously active NaV1.5 sodium channels may underlie odor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Vincent E

    2016-08-01

    The olfactory system is remarkably sensitive to airborne odor molecules, but precisely how very low odor concentrations bordering on just a few molecules per olfactory sensory neuron can trigger graded changes in firing is not clear. This report reexamines signaling in olfactory sensory neurons in light of the recent account of NaV1.5 sodium channel-mediated spontaneous firing. Using a model of spontaneous channel activity, the study shows how even submillivolt changes in membrane potential elicited by odor are expected to cause meaningful changes in NaV1.5-dependent firing. The results suggest that the random window currents of NaV1.5 channels may underpin not only spontaneous firing in olfactory sensory neurons but the cellular response to odor as well, thereby ensuring the robustness and sensitivity of signaling that is especially important for low odor concentrations.

  7. Lysine and the Na+/K+ Selectivity in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mengdie

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are critical in the generation and transmission of neuronal signals in mammals. The crystal structures of several prokaryotic Nav channels determined in recent years inspire the mechanistic studies on their selection upon the permeable cations (especially between Na+ and K+ ions), a property that is proposed to be mainly determined by residues in the selectivity filter. However, the mechanism of cation selection in mammalian Nav channels lacks direct explanation at atomic level due to the difference in amino acid sequences between mammalian and prokaryotic Nav homologues, especially at the constriction site where the DEKA motif has been identified to determine the Na+/K+ selectivity in mammalian Nav channels but is completely absent in the prokaryotic counterparts. Among the DEKA residues, Lys is of the most importance since its mutation to Arg abolishes the Na+/K+ selectivity. In this work, we modeled the pore domain of mammalian Nav channels by mutating the four residues at the constriction site of a prokaryotic Nav channel (NavRh) to DEKA, and then mechanistically investigated the contribution of Lys in cation selection using molecular dynamics simulations. The DERA mutant was generated as a comparison to understand the loss of ion selectivity caused by the K-to-R mutation. Simulations and free energy calculations on the mutants indicate that Lys facilitates Na+/K+ selection by electrostatically repelling the cation to a highly Na+-selective location sandwiched by the carboxylate groups of Asp and Glu at the constriction site. In contrast, the electrostatic repulsion is substantially weakened when Lys is mutated to Arg, because of two intrinsic properties of the Arg side chain: the planar geometric design and the sparse charge distribution of the guanidine group. PMID:27584582

  8. Targeting voltage gated sodium channels NaV1.7, Na V1.8, and Na V1.9 for treatment of pathological cough.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Yukiko; Undem, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) lead to the rational hypothesis that drugs capable of selective blockade of NaV subtypes may be a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of unwanted cough. Among the nine NaV subtypes (NaV1.1-NaV1.9), the afferent nerves involved in initiating cough, in common with nociceptive neurons in the somatosensory system, express mainly NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9. Although knowledge about the effect of selectively blocking these channels on the cough reflex is limited, their biophysical properties indicate that each may contribute to the hypertussive and allotussive state that typifies subacute and chronic nonproductive cough.

  9. The Mechanism of Voltage Dependent Gating of the NaChBac Prokaryotic Sodium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaen, Paul G.

    Electrical signaling in cells depends on selective conductance of ions through membrane proteins called 'voltage gated ion channels'. These channels are characterized by their ability turn on and off the flow of ionic current by opening and closing their conductive pore in response to changes in membrane potential. The opening and closing of the pore is a mechanically linked to conformational movement of the positively charged fourth transmembrane segment (S4) in 'the voltage sensor' region. How the S4 moves in response to membrane potential is a controversial subject. In this thesis, we used the prokaryotic sodium channel NaChBac as our model sodium channel to study voltage dependent movement of the S4 in the voltage sensor. We use a disulfide-locking method where we introduced pairs of cysteines in the voltage sensor that crosslink and trap the S4 in its path after depolarization. We screened over one hundred mutations of the NaChBac channel in the whole cell patch clamp assay and demonstrated discrete and sequential voltage dependent ion pair interactions that occur in at least three states between the positively charged residues of the S4 segment and the acidic residues in the S1, S2 and S3 segments. In conjunction with structural modeling of the voltage sensor and our disulfide locking data, we propose that the S4 moves in and out of the plane of the membrane 8-13 A, forming distinct gating charge interactions with counter charges of the voltage sensor and adopts a 310 helix over a portion of its structure during activation. These findings are compatible with the sliding helix model and refine our understanding of the structural determinates of voltage sensor function in voltage gated ion channels.

  10. The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV 1.9 in visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Hockley, J R F; Winchester, W J; Bulmer, D C

    2016-03-01

    Visceral pain is a common symptom for patients with gastrointestinal (GI) disease. It is unpleasant, debilitating, and represents a large unmet medical need for effective clinical treatments. Recent studies have identified NaV 1.9 as an important regulator of afferent sensitivity in visceral pain pathways to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that NaV 1.9 could represent an important therapeutic target for the treatment of visceral pain. This potential has been highlighted by the identification of patients who have an insensitivity to pain or painful neuropathies associated with mutations in SCN11A, the gene encoding voltage-gated sodium channel subtype 1.9 (NaV 1.9). Here, we address the role of NaV 1.9 in visceral pain and what known human NaV 1.9 mutants can tell us about NaV 1.9 function in gut physiology and pathophysiology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. On the structural basis for ionic selectivity among Na+, K+, and Ca2+ in the voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Favre, I; Moczydlowski, E; Schild, L

    1996-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels and calcium channels are homologous proteins with distinctly different selectivity for permeation of inorganic cations. This difference in function is specified by amino acid residues located within P-region segments that link presumed transmembrane elements S5 and S6 in each of four repetitive Domains I, II, III, and IV. By analyzing the selective permeability of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ in various mutants of the mu 1 rat muscle sodium channel, the results in this paper support the concept that a conserved motif of four residues contributed by each of the Domains I-IV, termed the DEKA locus in sodium channels and the EEEE locus in calcium channels, determines the ionic selectivity of these channels. Furthermore, the results indicate that the Lys residue in Domain III of the sodium channel is the critical determinant that specifies both the impermeability of Ca2+ and the selective permeability of Na+ over K+. We propose that the alkylammonium ion of the Lys(III) residue acts as an endogenous cation within the ion binding site/selectivity filter of the sodium channel to tune the kinetics and affinity of inorganic cation binding within the pore in a manner analogous to ion-ion interactions that occur in the process of multi-ion channel conduction. PMID:8968582

  12. Inhibition of human Na(v)1.5 sodium channels by strychnine and its analogs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chunhua; Sun, Lirong; Zhang, Meng; Li, Shuji; Wang, Xuemin; Gao, Tianming; Zhu, Xinhong

    2011-08-15

    Strychnine and brucine from the seeds of the plant Strychnos nux vomica have been shown to have interesting pharmacological effects on several neurotransmitter receptors. In this study, we have characterized the pharmacological properties of strychnine and its analogs on human Na(v)1.5 channels to assess their potential therapeutic advantage in certain arrhythmias. Among the eight alkaloids, only strychnine and icajine exhibited inhibition potency on the Na(v)1.5 channel with the half-maximum inhibition (IC(50)) values of 83.1μM and 104.6μM, respectively. Structure-function analysis indicated that the increased bulky methoxy groups on the phenyl ring or the negatively charged oxygen atom may account for this lack of inhibition on the Na(v)1.5 channel. Strychnine and icajine may bind to the channel by cation-π interactions. The substitution with a large side chain on the phenyl ring or the increased molecular volume may alter the optimized position for the compound close to the binding sites of the channel. Strychnine and icajine bind to the Na(v)1.5 channel with a new mechanism that is different from TTX and local anesthetics. They bind to the outer vestibule of the channel pore with fast association and dissociation rates at resting state. Strychnine and icajine had little effect on steady-state fast inactivation but markedly shifted the slow inactivation of Na(v)1.5 currents toward more hyperpolarized potentials. The property of icajine influencing slow-inactivated state of Na(v)1.5 channel would be potential therapeutic advantages in certain arrhythmias. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fluorine-19 NMR and computational quantification of isoflurane binding to the voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac

    PubMed Central

    Kinde, Monica N.; Bondarenko, Vasyl; Granata, Daniele; Bu, Weiming; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Loll, Patrick J.; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) play an important role in general anesthesia. Electrophysiology measurements suggest that volatile anesthetics such as isoflurane inhibit NaV by stabilizing the inactivated state or altering the inactivation kinetics. Recent computational studies suggested the existence of multiple isoflurane binding sites in NaV, but experimental binding data are lacking. Here we use site-directed placement of 19F probes in NMR experiments to quantify isoflurane binding to the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac. 19F probes were introduced individually to S129 and L150 near the S4–S5 linker, L179 and S208 at the extracellular surface, T189 in the ion selectivity filter, and all phenylalanine residues. Quantitative analyses of 19F NMR saturation transfer difference (STD) spectroscopy showed a strong interaction of isoflurane with S129, T189, and S208; relatively weakly with L150; and almost undetectable with L179 and phenylalanine residues. An orientation preference was observed for isoflurane bound to T189 and S208, but not to S129 and L150. We conclude that isoflurane inhibits NaChBac by two distinct mechanisms: (i) as a channel blocker at the base of the selectivity filter, and (ii) as a modulator to restrict the pivot motion at the S4–S5 linker and at a critical hinge that controls the gating and inactivation motion of S6. PMID:27856739

  14. Cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 distribution in myocytes via interacting proteins: the multiple pool model.

    PubMed

    Shy, Diana; Gillet, Ludovic; Abriel, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    The cardiac sodium current (INa) is responsible for the rapid depolarization of cardiac cells, thus allowing for their contraction. It is also involved in regulating the duration of the cardiac action potential (AP) and propagation of the impulse throughout the myocardium. Cardiac INa is generated by the voltage-gated Na(+) channel, NaV1.5, a 2016-residue protein which forms the pore of the channel. Over the past years, hundreds of mutations in SCN5A, the human gene coding for NaV1.5, have been linked to many cardiac electrical disorders, including the congenital and acquired long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, conduction slowing, sick sinus syndrome, atrial fibrillation, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Similar to many membrane proteins, NaV1.5 has been found to be regulated by several interacting proteins. In some cases, these different proteins, which reside in distinct membrane compartments (i.e. lateral membrane vs. intercalated disks), have been shown to interact with the same regulatory domain of NaV1.5, thus suggesting that several pools of NaV1.5 channels may co-exist in cardiac cells. The aim of this review article is to summarize the recent works that demonstrate its interaction with regulatory proteins and illustrate the model that the sodium channel NaV1.5 resides in distinct and different pools in cardiac cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Cardiac Pathways of Differentiation, Metabolism and Contraction.

  15. Sodium channel diversity in the vestibular ganglion: NaV1.5, NaV1.8, and tetrodotoxin-sensitive currents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ping; Wooltorton, Julian R A; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Yang, Fu-Chia; Lysakowski, Anna; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2016-05-01

    Firing patterns differ between subpopulations of vestibular primary afferent neurons. The role of sodium (NaV) channels in this diversity has not been investigated because NaV currents in rodent vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) were reported to be homogeneous, with the voltage dependence and tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitivity of most neuronal NaV channels. RT-PCR experiments, however, indicated expression of diverse NaV channel subunits in the vestibular ganglion, motivating a closer look. Whole cell recordings from acutely dissociated postnatal VGNs confirmed that nearly all neurons expressed NaV currents that are TTX-sensitive and have activation midpoints between -30 and -40 mV. In addition, however, many VGNs expressed one of two other NaV currents. Some VGNs had a small current with properties consistent with NaV1.5 channels: low TTX sensitivity, sensitivity to divalent cation block, and a relatively negative voltage range, and some VGNs showed NaV1.5-like immunoreactivity. Other VGNs had a current with the properties of NaV1.8 channels: high TTX resistance, slow time course, and a relatively depolarized voltage range. In two NaV1.8 reporter lines, subsets of VGNs were labeled. VGNs with NaV1.8-like TTX-resistant current also differed from other VGNs in the voltage dependence of their TTX-sensitive currents and in the voltage threshold for spiking and action potential shape. Regulated expression of NaV channels in primary afferent neurons is likely to selectively affect firing properties that contribute to the encoding of vestibular stimuli. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Biophysical characterization of the Varroa destructor NaV1 sodium channel and its affinity for τ-fluvalinate insecticide.

    PubMed

    Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Chahine, Mohamed

    2017-03-29

    The decline of the western honeybee (Apis mellifera) has been reported to be due to parasitism by Varroa destructor mites and to colony collapse disorder in which these mites may be involved. In-hive chemicals such as τ-fluvalinate are being used to control Vdestructor populations. This approach may lead to the chronic exposure of bees to this liposoluble chemical, which tends to accumulate in hives. We cloned a variant of the V. destructor sodium channel (VdNav1) and studied its biophysical characteristics and sensitivity to τ-fluvalinate using the Xenopus oocyte expression system and the 2-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. We compared the affinity of VdNav1 for τ-fluvalinate with the honeybee voltage-dependent sodium ortholog. Our results showed that the honeybee sodium channel is more sensitive to τ-fluvalinate than the V. destructor channel, suggesting that care must be taken when treating hives with this chemical.-Gosselin-Badaroudine, P., Chahine, M. Biophysical characterization of the Varroa destructor NaV1 sodium channel and its affinity for τ-fluvalinate insecticide.

  17. A sodium channel knockin mutant (NaV1.4-R669H) mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Burns, Dennis K.; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F.; Struyk, Arie F.; Cannon, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is an ion channelopathy of skeletal muscle characterized by attacks of muscle weakness associated with low serum K+. HypoPP results from a transient failure of muscle fiber excitability. Mutations in the genes encoding a calcium channel (CaV1.1) and a sodium channel (NaV1.4) have been identified in HypoPP families. Mutations of NaV1.4 give rise to a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders, with gain-of-function defects causing myotonia or hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. To address the question of specificity for the allele encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant as a cause of HypoPP and to produce a model system in which to characterize functional defects of the mutant channel and susceptibility to paralysis, we generated knockin mice carrying the ortholog of the gene encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant (referred to herein as R669H mice). Homozygous R669H mice had a robust HypoPP phenotype, with transient loss of muscle excitability and weakness in low-K+ challenge, insensitivity to high-K+ challenge, dominant inheritance, and absence of myotonia. Recovery was sensitive to the Na+/K+-ATPase pump inhibitor ouabain. Affected fibers had an anomalous inward current at hyperpolarized potentials, consistent with the proposal that a leaky gating pore in R669H channels triggers attacks, whereas a reduction in the amplitude of action potentials implies additional loss-of-function changes for the mutant NaV1.4 channels. PMID:21881211

  18. Coordinated role of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Na+/H+ exchanger in sustaining microglial activation during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad M; Sonsalla, Patricia K; Richardson, Jason R

    2013-12-01

    Persistent neuroinflammation and microglial activation play an integral role in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. We investigated the role of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) and Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHE) in the activation of immortalized microglial cells (BV-2) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. LPS (10 and 100 ng/ml) caused a dose- and time-dependent accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na(+))i] in BV-2 cells. Pre-treatment of cells with the VGSC antagonist tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 μM) abolished short-term Na(+) influx, but was unable to prevent the accumulation of (Na(+))i observed at 6 and 24h after LPS exposure. The NHE inhibitor cariporide (1 μM) significantly reduced accumulation of (Na(+))i 6 and 24h after LPS exposure. Furthermore, LPS increased the mRNA expression and protein level of NHE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced after co-treatment with TTX and/or cariporide. LPS increased production of TNF-α, ROS, and H2O2 and expression of gp91(phox), an active subunit of NADPH oxidase, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX or TTX+cariporide. Collectively, these data demonstrate a closely-linked temporal relationship between VGSC and NHE-1 in regulating function in activated microglia, which may provide avenues for therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing neuroinflammation.

  19. Structure and function of splice variants of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Annett; Walzik, Stefan; Blechschmidt, Steve; Haufe, Volker; Benndorf, Klaus; Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels mediate the rapid upstroke of the action potential in excitable tissues. The tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant isoform Na(v)1.5, encoded by the SCN5A gene, is the predominant isoform in the heart. This channel plays a key role for excitability of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and for rapid impulse propagation through the specific conduction system. During recent years, strong evidence has been accumulated in support of the expression of several Na(v)1.5 splice variants in the heart, and in various other tissues and cell lines including brain, dorsal root ganglia, breast cancer cells and neuronal stem cell lines. This review summarizes our knowledge on the structure and putative function of nine Na(v)1.5 splice variants detected so far. Attention will be paid to the distinct biophysical properties of the four functional splice variants, to the pronounced tissue- and species-specific expression, and to the developmental regulation of Na(v)1.5 splicing. The implications of alternative splicing for SCN5A channelopathies, and for a better understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations, are discussed.

  20. Introduction to sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Peters, Colin H; Ruben, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are present in many tissue types within the human body including both cardiac and neuronal tissues. Like other channels, VGSCs activate, deactivate, and inactivate in response to changes in membrane potential. VGSCs also have a similar structure to other channels: 24 transmembrane segments arranged into four domains that surround a central pore. The structure and electrical activity of these channels allows them to create and respond to electrical signals in the body. Because of their distribution throughout the body, VGSCs are implicated in a variety of diseases including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and neuropathic pain. As such the study of these channels is essential. This brief review will introduce sodium channel structure, physiology, and pathophysiology.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of binding of µ-conotoxin GIIIA to the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.4.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Somayeh; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Homology models of mammalian voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels based on the crystal structures of the bacterial counterparts are needed to interpret the functional data on sodium channels and understand how they operate. Such models would also be invaluable in structure-based design of therapeutics for diseases involving sodium channels such as chronic pain and heart diseases. Here we construct a homology model for the pore domain of the NaV1.4 channel and use the functional data for the binding of µ-conotoxin GIIIA to NaV1.4 to validate the model. The initial poses for the NaV1.4-GIIIA complex are obtained using the HADDOCK protein docking program, which are then refined in molecular dynamics simulations. The binding mode for the final complex is shown to be in broad agreement with the available mutagenesis data. The standard binding free energy, determined from the potential of mean force calculations, is also in good agreement with the experimental value. Because the pore domains of NaV1 channels are highly homologous, the model constructed for NaV1.4 will provide an excellent template for other NaV1 channels.

  2. Sodium Channel Inhibiting Marine Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn, Lyndon E.

    Saxitoxin (STX), tetrodotoxin (TTX) and their many chemical relatives are part of our daily lives. From killing people who eat seafood containing these toxins, to being valuable research tools unveiling the invisible structures of their pharmacological receptor, their global impact is beyond measure. The pharmacological receptor for these toxins is the voltage-gated sodium channel which transports Na ions between the exterior to the interior of cells. The two structurally divergent families of STX and TTX analogues bind at the same location on these Na channels to stop the flow of ions. This can affect nerves, muscles and biological senses of most animals. It is through these and other toxins that we have developed much of our fundamental understanding of the Na channel and its part in generating action potentials in excitable cells.

  3. Development of rat chorda tympani sodium responses: evidence for age-dependent changes in global amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channel kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, S J; Stewart, R E; Heck, G L; DeSimone, J A; Hill, D L

    2000-09-01

    In rat, chorda tympani nerve taste responses to Na(+) salts increase between roughly 10 and 45 days of age to reach stable, mature magnitudes. Previous evidence from in vitro preparations and from taste nerve responses using Na(+) channel blockers suggests that the physiological basis for this developmental increase in gustatory Na(+) sensitivity is the progressive addition of functional, Na(+) transduction elements (i.e., amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels) to the apical membranes of fungiform papilla taste receptor cells. To avoid potential confounding effects of pharmacological interventions and to permit quantification of aggregate Na(+) channel behavior using a kinetic model, we obtained chorda tympani nerve responses to NaCl and sodium gluconate (NaGlu) during receptive field voltage clamp in rats aged from 12-14 to 60 days and older (60+ days). Significant, age-dependent increases in chorda tympani responses to these stimuli occurred as expected. Importantly, apical Na(+) channel density, estimated from an apical Na(+) channel kinetic model, increased monotonically with age. The maximum rate of Na(+) response increase occurred between postnatal days 12-14 and 29-31. In addition, estimated Na(+) channel affinity increased between 12-14 and 19-23 days of age, i.e., on a time course distinct from that of the maximum rate of Na(+) response increase. Finally, estimates of the fraction of clamp voltage dropped across taste receptor apical membranes decreased between 19-23 and 29-31 days of age for NaCl but remained stable for NaGlu. The stimulus dependence of this change is consistent with a developmental increase in taste bud tight junctional Cl(-) ion permeability that lags behind the developmental increase in apical Na(+) channel density. A significant, indirect anion influence on apical Na(+) channel properties was present at all ages tested. This influence was evident in the higher apparent apical Na(+) channel affinities obtained for NaCl relative to Na

  4. Distinct interactions of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} ions with the selectivity filter of the bacterial sodium channel Na{sub V}Ab

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Song; Zangerl, Eva-Maria; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► Ca{sup 2+} translocates slowly in the filter, due to lack of “loose” knock-on mechanism. ► Identification of a high affinity binding site in Na{sub V}Ab selectivity filter. ► Changes of EEEE locus triggered by electrostatic interactions with Ca{sup 2+} ions. -- Abstract: Rapid and selective ion transport is essential for the generation and regulation of electrical signaling pathways in living organisms. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to investigate how the bacterial sodium channel Na{sub V}Ab (Arcobacter butzleri) differentiates between Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} ions. Multiple nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations revealed distinct binding patterns for these two cations in the selectivity filter and suggested a high affinity calcium binding site formed by backbone atoms of residues Leu-176 and Thr-175 (S{sub CEN}) in the sodium channel selectivity filter.

  5. Do sodium channel proteolytic fragments regulate sodium channel expression?

    PubMed

    Onwuli, Donatus O; Yañez-Bisbe, Laia; Pinsach-Abuin, Mel Lina; Tarradas, Anna; Brugada, Ramon; Greenman, John; Pagans, Sara; Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro

    2017-09-03

    The cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel (gene: SCN5A, protein: NaV1.5) is responsible for the sodium current that initiates the cardiomyocyte action potential. Research into the mechanisms of SCN5A gene expression has gained momentum over the last few years. We have recently described the transcriptional regulation of SCN5A by GATA4 transcription factor. In this addendum to our study, we report our observations that 1) the linker between domains I and II (LDI-DII) of NaV1.5 contains a nuclear localization signal (residues 474-481) that is necessary to localize LDI-DII into the nucleus, and 2) nuclear LDI-DII activates the SCN5A promoter in gene reporter assays using cardiac-like H9c2 cells. Given that voltage-gated sodium channels are known targets of proteases such as calpain, we speculate that NaV1.5 degradation is signaled to the cell transcriptional machinery via nuclear localization of LDI-DII and subsequent stimulation of the SCN5A promoter.

  6. Identification of an axonal determinant in the C-terminus of the sodium channel Na(v)1.2.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J J; Fernandes, F; Giraud, P; Mouret, I; Pasqualini, E; Fache, M P; Jullien, F; Dargent, B

    2001-11-01

    To obtain a better understanding of how hippocampal neurons selectively target proteins to axons, we assessed whether any of the large cytoplasmic regions of neuronal sodium channel Na(v)1.2 contain sufficient information for axonal compartmentalization. We show that addition of the cytoplasmic C-terminal region of Na(v)1.2 restricted the distribution of a dendritic-axonal reporter protein to axons. The analysis of mutants revealed that a critical segment of nine amino acids encompassing a di-leucine-based motif mediates axonal compartmentalization of chimera. In addition, the Na(v)1.2 C-terminus is recognized by the clathrin endocytic pathway both in non-neuronal cells and the somatodendritic domain of hippocampal neurons. The mutation of the di-leucine motif located within the nine amino acid sequence to alanines resulted in the loss of chimera compartmentalization in axons and of internalization. These data suggest that selective elimination by endocytosis in dendrites may account for the compartmentalized distribution of some proteins in axons.

  7. NaV1.5 sodium channel window currents contribute to spontaneous firing in olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Frenz, Christopher T; Hansen, Anne; Dupuis, Nicholas D; Shultz, Nicole; Levinson, Simon R; Finger, Thomas E; Dionne, Vincent E

    2014-09-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) fire spontaneously as well as in response to odor; both forms of firing are physiologically important. We studied voltage-gated Na(+) channels in OSNs to assess their role in spontaneous activity. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings from OSNs demonstrated both tetrodotoxin-sensitive and tetrodotoxin-resistant components of Na(+) current. RT-PCR showed mRNAs for five of the nine different Na(+) channel α-subunits in olfactory tissue; only one was tetrodotoxin resistant, the so-called cardiac subtype NaV1.5. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that NaV1.5 is present in the apical knob of OSN dendrites but not in the axon. The NaV1.5 channels in OSNs exhibited two important features: 1) a half-inactivation potential near -100 mV, well below the resting potential, and 2) a window current centered near the resting potential. The negative half-inactivation potential renders most NaV1.5 channels in OSNs inactivated at the resting potential, while the window current indicates that the minor fraction of noninactivated NaV1.5 channels have a small probability of opening spontaneously at the resting potential. When the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channels were blocked by nanomolar tetrodotoxin at the resting potential, spontaneous firing was suppressed as expected. Furthermore, selectively blocking NaV1.5 channels with Zn(2+) in the absence of tetrodotoxin also suppressed spontaneous firing, indicating that NaV1.5 channels are required for spontaneous activity despite resting inactivation. We propose that window currents produced by noninactivated NaV1.5 channels are one source of the generator potentials that trigger spontaneous firing, while the upstroke and propagation of action potentials in OSNs are borne by the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channel subtypes.

  8. Molecular aspects of human brain sodium channel.

    PubMed

    De Rycker, C; Schoffeniels, E

    1990-01-01

    The sodium channel content of human brain was measured by tritiated tetrodotoxin specific binding. After solubilization, the sodium channel was submitted to chromatography on diethylaminoethyl(cellulose) Sephadex, hydroxylapatite and wheat germ agglutinin sepharose. An increase of tritiated tetrodotoxin binding specific activity was subsequently observed. Eluted sodium channels from wheat germ agglutinin sepharose were overlaid on a sucrose gradient. Electrophoretical analysis of the material obtained after the sedimentation step revealed two co-purified peptides, alpha (Mr = 275,000 mol. wt) and beta (Mr = 30,000-36,000 mol. wt.). Alpha showed an exceptionally high free electrophoretic mobility, which is a common feature for all sodium channels previously described. However, the high denaturation rate of the solubilized tetrodotoxin receptor site 1 did not allow tetrodotoxin receptor quantification by the tritiated toxin binding in sucrose fractions. Sodium channel effective reconstitution in liposomes was demonstrated: (1) 22Na+ influx in proteoliposomes was sensitive to sodium channel-specific neurotoxins: (2) reconstituted proteins showed a cation selectivity similar to that previously described for animal sodium channels. The sodium channel preparation obtained after four chromatographic steps shows two peptides on the electrophoretic analysis. Reconstituted sodium channels displayed some physiological properties found in intact conducting membranes.

  9. Voltage-sensor movements describe slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels I: Wild-type skeletal muscle NaV1.4

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    The number of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels available to generate action potentials in muscles and nerves is adjusted over seconds to minutes by prior electrical activity, a process called slow inactivation (SI). The basis for SI is uncertain. NaV channels have four domains (DI–DIV), each with a voltage sensor that moves in response to depolarizing stimulation over milliseconds to activate the channels. Here, SI of the skeletal muscle channel NaV1.4 is induced by repetitive stimulation and is studied by recording of sodium currents, gating currents, and changes in the fluorescence of probes on each voltage sensor to assess their movements. The magnitude, voltage dependence, and time course of the onset and recovery of SI are observed to correlate with voltage-sensor movements 10,000-fold slower than those associated with activation. The behavior of each voltage sensor is unique. Development of SI over 1–160 s correlates best with slow immobilization of the sensors in DI and DII; DIII tracks the onset of SI with less fidelity. Showing linkage to the sodium conduction pathway, pore block by tetrodotoxin affects both SI and immobilization of all the sensors, with DI and DII significantly suppressed. Recovery from SI correlates best with slow restoration of mobility of the sensor in DIII. The findings suggest that voltage-sensor movements determine SI and thereby mediate NaV channel availability. PMID:23401571

  10. Structure-activity relationships for the action of 11 pyrethroid insecticides on rat Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.-S.; Soderlund, David M. . E-mail: dms6@cornell.edu

    2006-03-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-sensitive sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting nerve function. This paper describes the action of 11 structurally diverse commercial pyrethroid insecticides on the rat Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channel isoform, the principal carrier of the tetrodotoxin-resistant, pyrethroid-sensitive sodium current of sensory neurons, expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. All 11 compounds produced characteristic sodium tail currents following a depolarizing pulse that ranged from rapidly-decaying monoexponential currents (allethrin, cismethrin and permethrin) to persistent biexponential currents (cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin). Tail currents for the remaining compounds (bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate and tefluthrin) were monoexponential and decayed with kinetics intermediate between these extremes. Reconstruction of currents carried solely by the pyrethroid-modified subpopulation of channels revealed two types of pyrethroid-modified currents. The first type, found with cismethrin, allethrin, permethrin and tefluthrin, activated relatively rapidly and inactivated partially during a 40-ms depolarization. The second type, found with cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin and fenvalerate, activated more slowly and did not detectably inactivate during a 40-ms depolarization. Only bifenthrin did not produce modified currents that fit clearly into either of these categories. In all cases, the rate of activation of modified channels was strongly correlated with the rate of tail current decay following repolarization. Modification of Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channels by cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin was enhanced 2.3- to 3.4-fold by repetitive stimulation; this effect appeared to result from the accumulation of persistently open channels rather than preferential binding to open channel states. Fenpropathrin was the most effective compound against

  11. Sodium channel auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tsai-Tien; McMahon, Allison M; Johnson, Victoria T; Mangubat, Erwin Z; Zahm, Robert J; Pacold, Mary E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are well known for their functional roles in excitable tissues. Excitable tissues rely on voltage-gated ion channels and their auxiliary subunits to achieve concerted electrical activity in living cells. Auxiliary subunits are also known to provide functional diversity towards the transport and biogenesis properties of the principal subunits. Recent interests in pharmacological properties of these auxiliary subunits have prompted significant amounts of efforts in understanding their physiological roles. Some auxiliary subunits can potentially serve as drug targets for novel analgesics. Three families of sodium channel auxiliary subunits are described here: beta1 and beta3, beta2 and beta4, and temperature-induced paralytic E (TipE). While sodium channel beta-subunits are encoded in many animal genomes, TipE has only been found exclusively in insects. In this review, we present phylogenetic analyses, discuss potential evolutionary origins and functional data available for each of these subunits. For each family, we also correlate the functional specificity with the history of evolution for the individual auxiliary subunits.

  12. Solution NMR structure of Apo-calmodulin in complex with the IQ motif of human cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Chagot, Benjamin; Chazin, Walter J

    2011-02-11

    The function of the human voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.5 is regulated in part by intracellular calcium signals. The ubiquitous calcium sensor protein calmodulin (CaM) is an important part of the complex calcium-sensing apparatus in Na(V)1.5. CaM interacts with an IQ (isoleucine-glutamine) motif in the large intracellular C-terminal domain of the channel. Using co-expression and co-purification, we have been able to isolate a CaM-IQ motif complex and to determine its high-resolution structure in absence of calcium using multi-dimensional solution NMR. Under these conditions, the Na(V)1.5 IQ motif interacts with the C-terminal domain (C-lobe) of CaM, with the N-terminal domain remaining free in solution. The structure reveals that the C-lobe adopts a semi-open conformation with the IQ motif bound in a narrow hydrophobic groove. Sequence similarities between voltage-gated sodium channels and voltage-gated calcium channels suggest that the structure of the CaM-Na(V)1.5 IQ motif complex can serve as a general model for the interaction between CaM and ion channel IQ motifs under low-calcium conditions. The structure also provides insight into the biochemical basis for disease-associated mutations that map to the IQ motif in Na(V)1.5.

  13. Single Residue Substitutions That Confer Voltage-Gated Sodium Ion Channel Subtype Selectivity in the NaV1.7 Inhibitory Peptide GpTx-1.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Long, Jason; Zou, Anruo; Ligutti, Joseph; Andrews, Kristin L; Poppe, Leszek; Biswas, Kaustav; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Miranda, Les P

    2016-03-24

    There is interest in the identification and optimization of new molecular entities selectively targeting ion channels of therapeutic relevance. Peptide toxins represent a rich source of pharmacology for ion channels, and we recently reported GpTx-1 analogs that inhibit NaV1.7, a voltage-gated sodium ion channel that is a compelling target for improved treatment of pain. Here we utilize multi-attribute positional scan (MAPS) analoging, combining high-throughput synthesis and electrophysiology, to interrogate the interaction of GpTx-1 with NaV1.7 and related NaV subtypes. After one round of MAPS analoging, we found novel substitutions at multiple residue positions not previously identified, specifically glutamic acid at positions 10 or 11 or lysine at position 18, that produce peptides with single digit nanomolar potency on NaV1.7 and 500-fold selectivity against off-target sodium channels. Docking studies with a NaV1.7 homology model and peptide NMR structure generated a model consistent with the key potency and selectivity modifications mapped in this work.

  14. Molecular cloning, distribution and functional analysis of the NA(V)1.6. Voltage-gated sodium channel from human brain.

    PubMed

    Burbidge, Stephen A; Dale, Timothy J; Powell, Andrew J; Whitaker, William R J; Xie, Xin Min; Romanos, Michael A; Clare, Jeffrey J

    2002-06-30

    We have cloned and expressed the full-length human Na(V)1.6 sodium channel cDNA. Northern analysis showed that the hNa(V)1.6 gene, like its rodent orthologues, is abundantly expressed in adult brain but not other tissues including heart and skeletal muscle. Within the adult brain, hNa(V)1.6 mRNA is widely expressed with particularly high levels in the cerebellum, occipital pole and frontal lobe. When stably expressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), the hNa(V)1.6 channel was found to be very similar in its biophysical properties to human Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels [Eur. J. Neurosci. 12 (2000) 4281-4289; Pflügers Arch. 441 (2001) 425-433]. Only relatively subtle differences were observed, for example, in the voltage dependence of gating. Like hNa(V)1.3 channels, hNa(V)1.6 produced sodium currents with a prominent persistent component when expressed in HEK293 cells. These persistent currents were similar to those reported for the rat Na(V)1.2 channel [Neuron 19 (1997) 443-452], although they were not dependent on over-expression of G protein betagamma subunits. These data are consistent with the proposal that Na(V)1.6 channels may generate the persistent currents observed in cerebellar Purkinje neurons [J. Neurosci. 17 (1997) 4157-4536]. However, in our hNa(V)1.6 cell line we have been unable to detect the resurgent currents that have also been described in Purkinje cells. Although Na(V)1.6 channels have been implicated in producing these resurgent currents [Neuron 19 (1997) 881-891], our data suggest that this may require modification of the Na(V)1.6 alpha subunit by additional factors found in Purkinje neurons but not in HEK293 cells.

  15. Bacterial sodium channels: models for eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Scheuer, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels are made up of four linked homologous but different transmembrane domains. Bacteria express sodium channels comprised of four identical subunits, each being analogous to a single homologous domain of their eukaryotic counterparts. Key elements of primary structure are conserved between bacterial and eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels. The simple protein structure of the bacterial channels has allowed extensive structure-function probes of key regions as well as allowing determination of several X-ray crystallographic structures of these channels. The structures have revealed novel features of sodium and calcium channel pores and elucidated the structural importance of many of the conserved features of primary sequence. The structural information has also formed the basis for computational studies probing the basis for sodium and calcium selectivity and gating.

  16. The human macrophage sodium channel NaV1.5 regulates mycobacteria processing through organelle polarization and localized calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Carrithers, Lisette M; Hulseberg, Paul; Sandor, Matyas; Carrithers, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    Phagocytosis and intracellular processing of mycobacteria by macrophages are complex cellular processes that require spatial and temporal coordination of particle uptake, organelle movement, activation of signaling pathways, and channel-mediated ionic flux. Recent work demonstrated that human macrophage NaV1.5, an intracellular voltage-gated sodium channel expressed on late endosomes, enhances endosomal acidification and phagocytosis. Here, using bacillus Camille-Guerin (BCG) as a model of mycobacterial infection, we examined how this channel regulates phagocytosis and phagosome maturation in human macrophages. Knockdown of NaV1.5 reduced high capacity uptake of labeled BCG. BCG-containing, NaV1.5-expressing cells demonstrated localization of NaV1.5 and Rab-7 positive endosomes and mitochondria to periphagosome regions that was not observed in NaV1.5-deficient cells. Knockdown of the channel reduced the initial calcium response following bacterial challenge and prevented the generation of prolonged and localized calcium oscillations during phagosome maturation. Inhibition of the mitochondrial Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchanger also prevented prolonged calcium oscillations during phagosome maturation. These results suggest that NaV1.5 and mitochondrial-dependent calcium signaling regulate mycobacteria phagocytosis and phagosome maturation in human macrophages through spatial-temporal coordination of calcium signaling within a unique subcellular region.

  17. Ammonia-independent sodium uptake mediated by Na(+) channels and NHEs in the freshwater ribbon leech Nephelopsis obscura.

    PubMed

    Quijada-Rodriguez, Alex R; Schultz, Aaron G; Wilson, Jonathan M; He, Yuhe; Allen, Garett J P; Goss, Greg G; Weihrauch, Dirk

    2017-09-15

    Freshwater organisms actively take up ions from their environment to counter diffusive ion losses due to inhabiting hypo-osmotic environments. The mechanisms behind active Na(+) uptake are quite well understood in freshwater teleosts; however, the mechanisms employed by invertebrates are not. Pharmacological and molecular approaches were used to investigate Na(+) uptake mechanisms and their link to ammonia excretion in the ribbon leech Nephelopsis obscura At the molecular level, we identified a Na(+) channel and a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) in the skin of N. obscura, where the NHE was up-regulated when acclimated to extremely low [Na(+)] (0.05 mmol l(-1), pH 5) conditions. Additionally, we found that leeches in dilute freshwater environments use both a vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA)-assisted uptake via a Na(+) channel and a NHE-based mechanisms for Na(+) uptake. Immunolocalization of VHA and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) indicated at least two cell types present within leech skin, VHA(+) and VHA(-) cells, where the VHA(+) cells are probably involved in Na(+) uptake. NKA was present throughout the epithelium. We also found that increasing ammonia excretion by decreasing water pH, ammonia loading leeches or exposing leeches to high environmental ammonia does not affect Na(+) uptake, providing indications that an NHE-Rh metabolon is not present and that ammonia excretion and Na(+) uptake are not coupled in N. obscura To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the mechanisms of Na(+) uptake and their links to ammonia excretion in a freshwater invertebrate, where results suggest an ammonia-independent Na(+) uptake mechanism relying on both Na(+) channels and NHEs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. The cardiac sodium channel gene SCN5A and its gene product NaV1.5: Role in physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Veerman, Christiaan C; Wilde, Arthur A M; Lodder, Elisabeth M

    2015-12-01

    The gene SCN5A encodes the main cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5. This channel predominates the cardiac sodium current, INa, which underlies the fast upstroke of the cardiac action potential. As such, it plays a crucial role in cardiac electrophysiology. Over the last 60years a tremendous amount of knowledge regarding its function at the electrophysiological and molecular level has been acquired. Furthermore, genetic studies have shown that mutations in SCN5A are associated with multiple cardiac diseases (e.g. Brugada syndrome, Long QT syndrome, conduction disease and cardiomyopathy), while genetic variation in the general population has been associated with differences in cardiac conduction and risk of arrhythmia through genome wide association studies. In this review we aim to give an overview of the current knowledge (and the gaps therein) on SCN5A and NaV1.5.

  19. Knockdown of sodium channel NaV1.6 blocks mechanical pain and abnormal bursting activity of afferent neurons in inflamed sensory ganglia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A; Ye, Ling; Mao, Ju-Xian; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2013-08-01

    Inflammatory processes in the sensory ganglia contribute to many forms of chronic pain. We previously showed that local inflammation of the lumbar sensory ganglia rapidly leads to prolonged mechanical pain behaviors and high levels of spontaneous bursting activity in myelinated cells. Abnormal spontaneous activity of sensory neurons occurs early in many preclinical pain models and initiates many other pathological changes, but its molecular basis is not well understood. The sodium channel isoform NaV1.6 can underlie repetitive firing and excitatory persistent and resurgent currents. We used in vivo knockdown of this channel via local injection of siRNA to examine its role in chronic pain after local inflammation of the rat lumbar sensory ganglia. In normal dorsal root ganglion (DRG), quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that cells capable of firing repetitively had significantly higher relative expression of NaV1.6. In inflamed DRG, spontaneously active bursting cells expressed high levels of NaV1.6 immunoreactivity. In vivo knockdown of NaV1.6 locally in the lumbar DRG at the time of DRG inflammation completely blocked development of pain behaviors and abnormal spontaneous activity, while having only minor effects on unmyelinated C cells. Current research on isoform-specific sodium channel blockers for chronic pain is largely focused on NaV1.8 because it is present primarily in unmyelinated C fiber nociceptors, or on NaV1.7 because lack of this channel causes congenital indifference to pain. However, the results suggest that NaV1.6 may be a useful therapeutic target for chronic pain and that some pain conditions may be mediated primarily by myelinated A fiber sensory neurons.

  20. Spontaneous Excitation Patterns Computed for Axons with Injury-like Impairments of Sodium Channels and Na/K Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Na; Morris, Catherine E.; Joós, Béla; Longtin, André

    2012-01-01

    In injured neurons, “leaky” voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) underlie dysfunctional excitability that ranges from spontaneous subthreshold oscillations (STO), to ectopic (sometimes paroxysmal) excitation, to depolarizing block. In recombinant systems, mechanical injury to Nav1.6-rich membranes causes cytoplasmic Na+-loading and “Nav-CLS”, i.e., coupled left-(hyperpolarizing)-shift of Nav activation and availability. Metabolic injury of hippocampal neurons (epileptic discharge) results in comparable impairment: left-shifted activation and availability and hence left-shifted INa-window. A recent computation study revealed that CLS-based INa-window left-shift dissipates ion gradients and impairs excitability. Here, via dynamical analyses, we focus on sustained excitability patterns in mildly damaged nodes, in particular with more realistic Gaussian-distributed Nav-CLS to mimic “smeared” injury intensity. Since our interest is axons that might survive injury, pumps (sine qua non for live axons) are included. In some simulations, pump efficacy and system volumes are varied. Impacts of current noise inputs are also characterized. The diverse modes of spontaneous rhythmic activity evident in these scenarios are studied using bifurcation analysis. For “mild CLS injury”, a prominent feature is slow pump/leak-mediated EIon oscillations. These slow oscillations yield dynamic firing thresholds that underlie complex voltage STO and bursting behaviors. Thus, Nav-CLS, a biophysically justified mode of injury, in parallel with functioning pumps, robustly engenders an emergent slow process that triggers a plethora of pathological excitability patterns. This minimalist “device” could have physiological analogs. At first nodes of Ranvier and at nociceptors, e.g., localized lipid-tuning that modulated Nav midpoints could produce Nav-CLS, as could co-expression of appropriately differing Nav isoforms. PMID:23028273

  1. Engineering potent and selective analogues of GpTx-1, a tarantula venom peptide antagonist of the Na(V)1.7 sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Zou, Anruo; Poppe, Leszek; Li, Hongyan; Andrews, Kristin L; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Favreau, Philippe; Stöcklin, Reto; Miranda, Les P

    2015-03-12

    NaV1.7 is a voltage-gated sodium ion channel implicated by human genetic evidence as a therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Screening fractionated venom from the tarantula Grammostola porteri led to the identification of a 34-residue peptide, termed GpTx-1, with potent activity on NaV1.7 (IC50 = 10 nM) and promising selectivity against key NaV subtypes (20× and 1000× over NaV1.4 and NaV1.5, respectively). NMR structural analysis of the chemically synthesized three disulfide peptide was consistent with an inhibitory cystine knot motif. Alanine scanning of GpTx-1 revealed that residues Trp(29), Lys(31), and Phe(34) near the C-terminus are critical for potent NaV1.7 antagonist activity. Substitution of Ala for Phe at position 5 conferred 300-fold selectivity against NaV1.4. A structure-guided campaign afforded additive improvements in potency and NaV subtype selectivity, culminating in the design of [Ala5,Phe6,Leu26,Arg28]GpTx-1 with a NaV1.7 IC50 value of 1.6 nM and >1000× selectivity against NaV1.4 and NaV1.5.

  2. Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channel blockade by plant cannabinoids does not confer anticonvulsant effects per se.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew J; Jones, Nicholas A; Smith, Imogen; Hill, Charlotte L; Williams, Claire M; Stephens, Gary J; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2014-04-30

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive, well-tolerated, anticonvulsant plant cannabinoid, although its mechanism(s) of seizure suppression remains unknown. Here, we investigate the effect of CBD and the structurally similar cannabinoid, cannabigerol (CBG), on voltage-gated Na(+) (NaV) channels, a common anti-epileptic drug target. CBG's anticonvulsant potential was also assessed in vivo. CBD effects on NaV channels were investigated using patch-clamp recordings from rat CA1 hippocampal neurons in brain slices, human SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma) cells and mouse cortical neurons in culture. CBG effects were also assessed in SH-SY5Y cells and mouse cortical neurons. CBD and CBG effects on veratridine-stimulated human recombinant NaV1.1, 1.2 or 1.5 channels were assessed using a membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent dye high-throughput assay. The effect of CBG on pentyleneterazole-induced (PTZ) seizures was assessed in rat. CBD (10μM) blocked NaV currents in SH-SY5Y cells, mouse cortical neurons and recombinant cell lines, and affected spike parameters in rat CA1 neurons; CBD also significantly decreased membrane resistance. CBG blocked NaV to a similar degree to CBD in both SH-SY5Y and mouse recordings, but had no effect (50-200mg/kg) on PTZ-induced seizures in rat. CBD and CBG are NaV channel blockers at micromolar concentrations in human and murine neurons and recombinant cells. In contrast to previous reports investigating CBD, CBG had no effect upon PTZ-induced seizures in rat, indicating that NaV blockade per se does not correlate with anticonvulsant effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Blocking effect of methylflavonolamine on human NaV1.5 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and on sodium currents in rabbit ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xin-rong; Ma, Ji-hua; Zhang, Pei-hua; Xing, Jun-lian

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the blocking effects of methylflavonolamine (MFA) on human NaV1.5 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and on sodium currents (INa) in rabbit ventricular myocytes. Methods: Human NaV1.5 channels were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and studied using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. INa and action potentials in rabbit ventricular myocytes were studied using the whole-cell recording. Results: MFA and lidocaine inhibited human NaV1.5 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes in a positive rate-dependent and concentration-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 72.61 μmol/L and 145.62 μmol/L, respectively. Both of them markedly shifted the steady-state activation curve of INa toward more positive potentials, shifted the steady-state inactivation curve of INa toward more negative potentials and postponed the recovery of the INa inactivation state. In rabbit ventricular myocytes, MFA inhibited INa with a shift in the steady-state inactivation curve toward more negative potentials, thereby postponing the recovery of the INa inactivation state. This shift was in a positive rate-dependent manner. Under current-clamp mode, MAF significantly decreased action potential amplitude (APA) and maximal depolarization velocity (Vmax) and shortened action potential duration (APD), but did not alter the resting membrane potential (RMP). The demonstrated that the kinetics of sodium channel blockage by MFA resemble those of class I antiarrhythmic agents such as lidocaine. Conclusion: MFA protects the heart against arrhythmias by its blocking effect on sodium channels. PMID:20173760

  4. Dietary Na+ inhibits the open probability of the epithelial sodium channel in the kidney by enhancing apical P2Y2-receptor tone

    PubMed Central

    Pochynyuk, Oleh; Rieg, Timo; Bugaj, Vladislav; Schroth, Jana; Fridman, Alla; Boss, Gerry R.; Insel, Paul A.; Stockand, James D.; Vallon, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Apical release of ATP and UTP can activate P2Y2 receptors in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN) and inhibit the open probability (Po) of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Little is known, however, about the regulation and physiological relevance of this system. Patch-clamp studies in freshly isolated ASDN provide evidence that increased dietary Na+ intake in wild-type mice lowers ENaC Po, consistent with a contribution to Na+ homeostasis, and is associated with increased urinary concentrations of UTP and the ATP hydrolytic product, ADP. Genetic deletion of P2Y2 receptors in mice (P2Y2−/−; littermates to wild-type mice) or inhibition of apical P2Y-receptor activation in wild-type mice prevents dietary Na+-induced lowering of ENaC Po. Although they lack suppression of ENaC Po by dietary NaCl, P2Y2−/− mice do not exhibit NaCl-sensitive blood pressure, perhaps as a consequence of compensatory down-regulation of aldosterone levels. Consistent with this hypothesis, clamping mineralocorticoid activity at high levels unmasks greater ENaC activity and NaCl sensitivity of blood pressure in P2Y2−/− mice. The studies indicate a key role of the apical ATP/UTP-P2Y2-receptor system in the inhibition of ENaC Po in the ASDN in response to an increase in Na+ intake, thereby contributing to NaCl homeostasis and blood pressure regulation.—Pochynyuk, O., Rieg, T., Bugaj, V., Schroth, J., Fridman, A., Boss, G. R., Insel, P. A., Stockand, J. D., Vallon, V. Dietary Na+ inhibits the open probability of the epithelial sodium channel in the kidney by enhancing apical P2Y2-receptor tone. PMID:20097874

  5. Roles of Voltage-Gated Tetrodotoxin-Sensitive Sodium Channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Quanmin; Liu, Xinming; Liu, Shiguang

    2016-09-05

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common chronic medical problem worldwide; one of its complications is painful peripheral neuropathy, which can substantially erode quality of life and increase the cost of management. Despite its clinical importance, the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is complex and incompletely understood. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) link many physiological processes to electrical activity by controlling action potentials in all types of excitable cells. Two isoforms of VGSCs, NaV1.3 and NaV1.7, which are encoded by the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 3 and 9 (Scn3A and Scn9A) genes, respectively, have been identified in both peripheral nociceptive neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and pancreatic islet cells. Recent advances in our understanding of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 lead to the rational doubt about the cause-effect relation between diabetes and painful neuropathy. In this review, we summarize the roles of NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in islet cells and DRG neurons, discuss the link between DM and painful neuropathy, and present a model, which may provide a starting point for further studies aimed at identifying the mechanisms underlying diabetes and painful neuropathy.

  6. Roles of Voltage-Gated Tetrodotoxin-Sensitive Sodium Channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Quanmin; Liu, Xinming; Liu, Shiguang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common chronic medical problem worldwide; one of its complications is painful peripheral neuropathy, which can substantially erode quality of life and increase the cost of management. Despite its clinical importance, the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is complex and incompletely understood. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) link many physiological processes to electrical activity by controlling action potentials in all types of excitable cells. Two isoforms of VGSCs, NaV1.3 and NaV1.7, which are encoded by the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 3 and 9 (Scn3A and Scn9A) genes, respectively, have been identified in both peripheral nociceptive neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and pancreatic islet cells. Recent advances in our understanding of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 lead to the rational doubt about the cause–effect relation between diabetes and painful neuropathy. In this review, we summarize the roles of NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in islet cells and DRG neurons, discuss the link between DM and painful neuropathy, and present a model, which may provide a starting point for further studies aimed at identifying the mechanisms underlying diabetes and painful neuropathy. PMID:27608006

  7. Painful peripheral neuropathy and sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-02

    Peripheral neuropathy can lead to neuropathic pain in a subset of patients. Painful peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating disorder, reflected by a reduced quality of life. Therapeutic strategies are limited and often disappointing, as in most cases targeted treatment is not available. Elucidating pathogenetic factors for pain might provide a target for optimal treatment. Voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.7-NaV1.9 are expressed in the small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons and their axons. By a targeted gene approach, missense gain-of-function mutations of NaV1.7-NaV1.9 have been demonstrated in painful peripheral neuropathy. Functional analyses have shown that these mutations produce a spectrum of pro-excitatory changes in channel biophysics, with the shared outcome at the cellular level of dorsal root ganglion hyperexcitability. Reduced neurite outgrowth may be another consequence of sodium channel mutations, and possible therapeutic strategies include blockade of sodium channels or block of reverse operation of the sodium-calcium exchanger. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of painful peripheral neuropathy offers new targets that may provide a basis for more effective treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mexiletine as a treatment for primary erythromelalgia: normalization of biophysical properties of mutant L858F NaV1.7 sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Cregg, R; Cox, J J; Bennett, D L H; Wood, J N; Werdehausen, R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The non-selective sodium channel inhibitor mexiletine has been found to be effective in several animal models of chronic pain and has become popular in the clinical setting as an orally available alternative to lidocaine. It remains unclear why patients with monogenic pain disorders secondary to gain-of-function SCN9a mutations benefit from a low systemic concentration of mexiletine, which does not usually induce adverse neurological side effects. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate the biophysical effects of mexiletine on the L858F primary erythromelalgia NaV1.7 mutation in vitro. Experimental Approach Human wild-type and L858F-mutated NaV1.7 channels were expressed in HEK293A cells. Whole-cell currents were recorded by voltage-clamp techniques to characterize the effect of mexiletine on channel gating properties. Key Results While the concentration-dependent tonic block of peak currents by mexiletine was similar in wild-type and L858F channels, phasic block was more pronounced in cells transfected with the L858F mutation. Moreover, mexiletine substantially shifted the pathologically-hyperpolarized voltage-dependence of steady-state activation in L858F-mutated channels towards wild-type values and the voltage-dependence of steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more hyperpolarized potentials, leading to an overall reduction in window currents. Conclusion and Implications Mexiletine has a normalizing effect on the pathological gating properties of the L858F gain-of-function mutation in NaV1.7, which, in part, might explain the beneficial effects of systemic treatment with mexiletine in patients with gain-of-function sodium channel disorders. PMID:24866741

  9. Mexiletine as a treatment for primary erythromelalgia: normalization of biophysical properties of mutant L858F NaV 1.7 sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Cregg, R; Cox, J J; Bennett, D L H; Wood, J N; Werdehausen, R

    2014-10-01

    The non-selective sodium channel inhibitor mexiletine has been found to be effective in several animal models of chronic pain and has become popular in the clinical setting as an orally available alternative to lidocaine. It remains unclear why patients with monogenic pain disorders secondary to gain-of-function SCN9a mutations benefit from a low systemic concentration of mexiletine, which does not usually induce adverse neurological side effects. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate the biophysical effects of mexiletine on the L858F primary erythromelalgia NaV 1.7 mutation in vitro. Human wild-type and L858F-mutated NaV 1.7 channels were expressed in HEK293A cells. Whole-cell currents were recorded by voltage-clamp techniques to characterize the effect of mexiletine on channel gating properties. While the concentration-dependent tonic block of peak currents by mexiletine was similar in wild-type and L858F channels, phasic block was more pronounced in cells transfected with the L858F mutation. Moreover, mexiletine substantially shifted the pathologically-hyperpolarized voltage-dependence of steady-state activation in L858F-mutated channels towards wild-type values and the voltage-dependence of steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more hyperpolarized potentials, leading to an overall reduction in window currents. Mexiletine has a normalizing effect on the pathological gating properties of the L858F gain-of-function mutation in NaV 1.7, which, in part, might explain the beneficial effects of systemic treatment with mexiletine in patients with gain-of-function sodium channel disorders. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na+ current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle. PMID:27048647

  11. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Cannon, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na(+) current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle.

  12. Continuous delta opioid receptor activation reduces neuronal voltage gated sodium channel (NaV1.7) levels through activation of protein kinase C in painful diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Munmun; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The NaV1.7 tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel isoform plays a critical role in nociception. In rodent models of diabetic neuropathy, increased NaV1.7 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons correlates with the emergence of pain-related behaviors characteristic of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN). We examined the effect of transgene-mediated expression of enkephalin on pain-related behaviors and their biochemical correlates in DRG neurons. Transfection of DRG neurons by subcutaneous inoculation of a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based vector expressing proenkephalin (PE) reversed nocisponsive behavioral responses to heat, cold, and mechanical pressure characteristic of PDN. Vector-mediated enkephalin production in vivo prevented the increase in DRG NaV1.7 observed in PDN, an effect that correlated with inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and protein kinase C (PKC). Primary DRG neurons in vitro exposed to 45 mM glucose for 18 hrs also demonstrated an increase in NaV1.7 and increased phosphorylation of p38 and PKC; these changes were prevented by transfection in vitro with the enkephalin-expressing vector. The effect of hyperglycemia on NaV1.7 production in vitro was mimicked by exposure to PMA, and blocked by the myristolated PKC inhibitor 20–28 or the p38 inhibitor SB202190; the effect of vector-mediated enkephalin on NaV1.7 levels was prevented by naltrindole. The results of these studies suggest that activation of the presynaptic delta opioid receptor by enkephalin prevents the increase in neuronal NaV1.7 in DRG through inhibition of PKC and p38. These results establish a novel interaction between the delta opioid receptor and voltage gated sodium channels. PMID:18579738

  13. ProTx-II, a selective inhibitor of NaV1.7 sodium channels, blocks action potential propagation in nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Schmalhofer, William A; Calhoun, Jeffrey; Burrows, Rachel; Bailey, Timothy; Kohler, Martin G; Weinglass, Adam B; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Garcia, Maria L; Koltzenburg, Martin; Priest, Birgit T

    2008-11-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)1) channels play a critical role in modulating the excitability of sensory neurons, and human genetic evidence points to Na(V)1.7 as an essential contributor to pain signaling. Human loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A, the gene encoding Na(V)1.7, cause channelopathy-associated indifference to pain (CIP), whereas gain-of-function mutations are associated with two inherited painful neuropathies. Although the human genetic data make Na(V)1.7 an attractive target for the development of analgesics, pharmacological proof-of-concept in experimental pain models requires Na(V)1.7-selective channel blockers. Here, we show that the tarantula venom peptide ProTx-II selectively interacts with Na(V)1.7 channels, inhibiting Na(V)1.7 with an IC(50) value of 0.3 nM, compared with IC(50) values of 30 to 150 nM for other heterologously expressed Na(V)1 subtypes. This subtype selectivity was abolished by a point mutation in DIIS3. It is interesting that application of ProTx-II to desheathed cutaneous nerves completely blocked the C-fiber compound action potential at concentrations that had little effect on Abeta-fiber conduction. ProTx-II application had little effect on action potential propagation of the intact nerve, which may explain why ProTx-II was not efficacious in rodent models of acute and inflammatory pain. Mono-iodo-ProTx-II ((125)I-ProTx-II) binds with high affinity (K(d) = 0.3 nM) to recombinant hNa(V)1.7 channels. Binding of (125)I-ProTx-II is insensitive to the presence of other well characterized Na(V)1 channel modulators, suggesting that ProTx-II binds to a novel site, which may be more conducive to conferring subtype selectivity than the site occupied by traditional local anesthetics and anticonvulsants. Thus, the (125)I-ProTx-II binding assay, described here, offers a new tool in the search for novel Na(V)1.7-selective blockers.

  14. Development of a μO-Conotoxin Analogue with Improved Lipid Membrane Interactions and Potency for the Analgesic Sodium Channel NaV1.8.

    PubMed

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Dekan, Zoltan; Inserra, Marco C; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Craik, David J; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F; Mobli, Mehdi; Schroeder, Christina I; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Vetter, Irina

    2016-05-27

    The μO-conotoxins MrVIA, MrVIB, and MfVIA inhibit the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8, a well described target for the treatment of pain; however, little is known about the residues or structural elements that define this activity. In this study, we determined the three-dimensional structure of MfVIA, examined its membrane binding properties, performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis, and identified residues important for its activity at human NaV1.8. A second round of mutations resulted in (E5K,E8K)MfVIA, a double mutant with greater positive surface charge and greater affinity for lipid membranes compared with MfVIA. This analogue had increased potency at NaV1.8 and was analgesic in the mouse formalin assay. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Structure and Function of FS50, a salivary protein from the flea Xenopsylla cheopis that blocks the sodium channel NaV1.5

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xueqing; Zhang, Bei; Yang, Shilong; An, Su; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring toxins have been invaluable tools for the study of structural and functional relationships of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). Few studies have been made of potential channel-modulating substances from blood-feeding arthropods. He we describe the characterization FS50, a salivary protein from the flea, Xenopsylla cheopis, that exhibits an inhibitory activity against the NaV1.5 channel with an IC50 of 1.58 μM. The pore-blocking mechanism of this toxin is evident from the kinetics of activation and inactivation suggesting that FS50 does not interfere with the voltage sensor of NaV1.5. FS50 exhibits high specificity for NaV1.5, since 10 μM FS50 had no discernable effect on voltage-gated Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglia or VGSC forms individually expressed in HEK 293T cells. Furthermore, intravenous injection of FS50 into rats and monkeys elicited recovery from arrhythmia induced by BaCl2, as would be expected from a blockade of NaV1.5. The crystal structure of FS50 revealed a βαββ domain similar to that of scorpion β toxin and a small N-terminal βαβ domain. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments have implicated a basic surface including the side chains of Arg 6, His 11 and Lys 32 as potentially important in the FS50 NaV1.5 interaction. PMID:27819327

  16. Structure and Function of FS50, a salivary protein from the flea Xenopsylla cheopis that blocks the sodium channel NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xueqing; Zhang, Bei; Yang, Shilong; An, Su; Ribeiro, José M C; Andersen, John F

    2016-11-07

    Naturally occurring toxins have been invaluable tools for the study of structural and functional relationships of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). Few studies have been made of potential channel-modulating substances from blood-feeding arthropods. He we describe the characterization FS50, a salivary protein from the flea, Xenopsylla cheopis, that exhibits an inhibitory activity against the NaV1.5 channel with an IC50 of 1.58 μM. The pore-blocking mechanism of this toxin is evident from the kinetics of activation and inactivation suggesting that FS50 does not interfere with the voltage sensor of NaV1.5. FS50 exhibits high specificity for NaV1.5, since 10 μM FS50 had no discernable effect on voltage-gated Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) channels in rat dorsal root ganglia or VGSC forms individually expressed in HEK 293T cells. Furthermore, intravenous injection of FS50 into rats and monkeys elicited recovery from arrhythmia induced by BaCl2, as would be expected from a blockade of NaV1.5. The crystal structure of FS50 revealed a βαββ domain similar to that of scorpion β toxin and a small N-terminal βαβ domain. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments have implicated a basic surface including the side chains of Arg 6, His 11 and Lys 32 as potentially important in the FS50 NaV1.5 interaction.

  17. Mediation of protection and recovery from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by macrophages expressing the human voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Rahgozar, Kusha; Wright, Erik; Carrithers, Lisette M; Carrithers, Michael D

    2013-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common nontraumatic cause of neurologic disability in young adults. Despite treatment, progressive tissue injury leads to accumulation of disability in many patients. Here, our goal was to develop an immune-mediated strategy to promote tissue repair and clinical recovery in an MS animal model. We previously demonstrated that a variant of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 is expressed intracellularly in human macrophages, and that it regulates cellular signaling. This channel is not expressed in mouse macrophages, which has limited the study of its functions. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a novel transgenic mouse model (C57BL6), in which the human macrophage NaV1.5 splice variant is expressed in vivo in mouse macrophages. These mice were protected from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the mouse model of MS. During active inflammatory disease, NaV1.5-positive macrophages were found in spinal cord lesions where they formed phagocytic cell clusters; they expressed markers of alternative activation during recovery. NaV1.5-positive macrophages that were adoptively transferred into wild-type recipients with established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis homed to lesions and promoted recovery. These results suggest that NaV1.5-positive macrophages enhance recovery from CNS inflammatory disease and could potentially be developed as a cell-based therapy for the treatment of MS.

  18. Association of rare missense variants in the second intracellular loop of NaV1.7 sodium channels with familial autism.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M; Patowary, A; Stanaway, I B; McCord, E; Nesbitt, R R; Archer, M; Scheuer, T; Nickerson, D; Raskind, W H; Wijsman, E M; Bernier, R; Catterall, W A; Brkanac, Z

    2016-12-13

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder often accompanied by intellectual disability, language impairment and medical co-morbidities. The heritability of autism is high and multiple genes have been implicated as causal. However, most of these genes have been identified in de novo cases. To further the understanding of familial autism, we performed whole-exome sequencing on five families in which second- and third-degree relatives were affected. By focusing on novel and protein-altering variants, we identified a small set of candidate genes. Among these, a novel private missense C1143F variant in the second intracellular loop of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7, encoded by the SCN9A gene, was identified in one family. Through electrophysiological analysis, we show that NaV1.7(C1143F) exhibits partial loss-of-function effects, resulting in slower recovery from inactivation and decreased excitability in cultured cortical neurons. Furthermore, for the same intracellular loop of NaV1.7, we found an excess of rare variants in a case-control variant-burden study. Functional analysis of one of these variants, M932L/V991L, also demonstrated reduced firing in cortical neurons. However, although this variant is rare in Caucasians, it is frequent in Latino population, suggesting that genetic background can alter its effects on phenotype. Although the involvement of the SCN1A and SCN2A genes encoding NaV1.1 and NaV1.2 channels in de novo ASD has previously been demonstrated, our study indicates the involvement of inherited SCN9A variants and partial loss-of-function of NaV1.7 channels in the etiology of rare familial ASD.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 13 December 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.222.

  19. Sustained inhibition of the NaV1.7 sodium channel by engineered dimers of the domain II binding peptide GpTx-1.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Biswas, Kaustav; Holder, J Ryan; Zou, Anruo; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Poppe, Leszek; Andrews, Kristin L; Lin, Fen-Fen; Meng, Shi-Yuan; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Miranda, Les P

    2015-11-01

    Many efforts are underway to develop selective inhibitors of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as new analgesics. Thus far, however, in vitro selectivity has proved difficult for small molecules, and peptides generally lack appropriate pharmacokinetic properties. We previously identified the NaV1.7 inhibitory peptide GpTx-1 from tarantula venom and optimized its potency and selectivity via structure-guided analoging. To further understand GpTx-1 binding to NaV1.7, we have mapped the binding site to transmembrane segments 1-4 of the second pseudosubunit internal repeat (commonly referred to as Site 4) using NaV1.5/NaV1.7 chimeric protein constructs. We also report that select GpTx-1 amino acid residues apparently not contacting NaV1.7 can be derivatized with a hydrophilic polymer without adversely affecting peptide potency. Homodimerization of GpTx-1 with a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker resulted in a compound with increased potency and a significantly reduced off-rate, demonstrating the ability to modulate the function and properties of GpTx-1 by linking to additional molecules.

  20. Voltage-sensor movements describe slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels II: A periodic paralysis mutation in NaV1.4 (L689I)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, slow inactivation (SI) of NaV1.4 voltage-gated sodium channels prevents spontaneous depolarization and fatigue. Inherited mutations in NaV1.4 that impair SI disrupt activity-induced regulation of channel availability and predispose patients to hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. In our companion paper in this issue (Silva and Goldstein. 2013. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201210909), the four voltage sensors in NaV1.4 responsible for activation of channels over microseconds are shown to slowly immobilize over 1–160 s as SI develops and to regain mobility on recovery from SI. Individual sensor movements assessed via attached fluorescent probes are nonidentical in their voltage dependence, time course, and magnitude: DI and DII track SI onset, and DIII appears to reflect SI recovery. A causal link was inferred by tetrodotoxin (TTX) suppression of both SI onset and immobilization of DI and DII sensors. Here, the association of slow sensor immobilization and SI is verified by study of NaV1.4 channels with a hyperkalemic periodic paralysis mutation; L689I produces complex changes in SI, and these are found to manifest directly in altered sensor movements. L689I removes a component of SI with an intermediate time constant (∼10 s); the mutation also impedes immobilization of the DI and DII sensors over the same time domain in support of direct mechanistic linkage. A model that recapitulates SI attributes responsibility for intermediate SI to DI and DII (10 s) and a slow component to DIII (100 s), which accounts for residual SI, not impeded by L689I or TTX. PMID:23401572

  1. Treatment of Na(v)1.7-mediated pain in inherited erythromelalgia using a novel sodium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Yigal Paul; Price, Nicola; Namdari, Rostam; Cohen, Charles Jay; Lamers, Mieke H; Winters, Conrad; Price, James; Young, Clint E; Verschoof, Henry; Sherrington, Robin; Pimstone, Simon Neil; Hayden, Michael Reuben

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the SCN9A gene leading to deficiency of its protein product, Na(v)1.7, cause congenital indifference to pain (CIP). CIP is characterized by the absence of the ability to sense pain associated with noxious stimuli. In contrast, the opposite phenotype to CIP, inherited erythromelalgia (IEM), is a disorder of spontaneous pain caused by missense mutations resulting in gain-of-function in Na(v)1.7 that promote neuronal hyperexcitability. The primary aim of this study was to demonstrate that Na(v)1.7 antagonism could alleviate the pain of IEM, thereby demonstrating the utility of this opposite phenotype model as a tool for rapid proof-of-concept for novel analgesics. An exploratory, randomized, double-blind, 2-period crossover study was conducted in 4 SCN9A mutation-proven IEM patients. In each treatment period (2days), separated by a 2-day washout period, patients were orally administered XEN402 (400mg twice daily) or matching placebo. In 3 patients, pain was induced by heat or exercise during each treatment arm. A fourth patient, in constant severe pain, required no induction. Patient-reported outcomes of pain intensity and/or relief were recorded, and the time taken to induce pain was measured. The ability to induce pain in IEM patients was significantly attenuated by XEN402 compared with placebo. XEN402 increased the time to maximal pain induction and significantly reduced the amount of pain (42% less) after induction (P=.014). This pilot study showed that XEN402 blocks Na(v)1.7-mediated pain associated with IEM, thereby demonstrating target engagement in humans and underscoring the use of rare genetic disorders with mutant target channels as a novel approach to rapid proof-of-concept. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNaVs) from the soil, sea, and salt lakes enlighten molecular mechanisms of electrical signaling and pharmacology in the brain and heart

    PubMed Central

    Payandeh, Jian; Minor, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) provide the initial electrical signal that drives action potential generation in many excitable cells of the brain, heart, and nervous system. For more than 60 years, functional studies of NaVs have occupied a central place in physiological and biophysical investigation of the molecular basis of excitability. Recently, structural studies of members of a large family of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNaVs) prevalent in soil, marine, and salt lake environments that bear many of the core features of eukaryotic NaVs have reframed ideas for voltage-gated channel function, ion selectivity, and pharmacology. Here, we analyze the recent advances, unanswered questions, and potential of BacNaVs as templates for drug development efforts. PMID:25158094

  3. Anticancer drug oxaliplatin induces acute cooling-aggravated neuropathy via sodium channel subtype NaV1.6-resurgent and persistent current

    PubMed Central

    Sittl, Ruth; Lampert, Angelika; Huth, Tobias; Schuy, E. Theresa; Link, Andrea S.; Fleckenstein, Johannes; Alzheimer, Christian; Grafe, Peter; Carr, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Infusion of the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin leads to an acute and a chronic form of peripheral neuropathy. Acute oxaliplatin neuropathy is characterized by sensory paresthesias and muscle cramps that are notably exacerbated by cooling. Painful dysesthesias are rarely reported for acute oxaliplatin neuropathy, whereas a common symptom of chronic oxaliplatin neuropathy is pain. Here we examine the role of the sodium channel isoform NaV1.6 in mediating the symptoms of acute oxaliplatin neuropathy. Compound and single-action potential recordings from human and mouse peripheral axons showed that cooling in the presence of oxaliplatin (30–100 μM; 90 min) induced bursts of action potentials in myelinated A, but not unmyelinated C-fibers. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from dissociated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons revealed enhanced tetrodotoxin-sensitive resurgent and persistent current amplitudes in large, but not small, diameter DRG neurons when cooled (22 °C) in the presence of oxaliplatin. In DRG neurons and peripheral myelinated axons from Scn8amed/med mice, which lack functional NaV1.6, no effect of oxaliplatin and cooling was observed. Oxaliplatin significantly slows the rate of fast inactivation at negative potentials in heterologously expressed mNaV1.6r in ND7 cells, an effect consistent with prolonged NaV open times and increased resurgent and persistent current in native DRG neurons. This finding suggests that NaV1.6 plays a central role in mediating acute cooling-exacerbated symptoms following oxaliplatin, and that enhanced resurgent and persistent sodium currents may provide a general mechanistic basis for cold-aggravated symptoms of neuropathy. PMID:22493249

  4. Activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors coupled to NaV1.8-resistant sodium channel C-fibers causes retrograde mechanical nociceptor sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Vivancos, Gustavo Gameiro; Tambeli, Claudia Herrera; de Queiróz Cunha, Fernando; Ferreira, Sérgio Henrique

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated whether activation of presynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the spinal cord produces a retrograde nociceptor sensitization (hypernociception) to mechanical nonnoxious stimulus. By using an electronic version of the von Frey hair test (pressure meter), s.c. intraplantar administration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) (50–400 ng per paw) evoked a dose-related ipsilateral paw hypernociception. In contrast, intrathecal (i.t.) administration of NMDA (5–80 ng) and PGE2 (15–150 ng) evoked dose-related bilateral paw hypernociception. The s.c. intraplantar administration of dipyrone (80–320 μg per paw) or morphine (3 and 9 μg per paw), usually used to antagonize peripheral PGE2 (100 ng per paw), induced hypernociception and also antagonized the ipsilateral (without affecting the contralateral) paw hypernociception induced by i.t. injections of NMDA (40 ng) or PGE2 (50 ng). These doses of drugs did not modify the basal mechanical sensitivity of control paws. This result shows that intraspinal NMDA or PGE2 produces sensitization of the primary sensory neuron in response to mechanical stimulation. In a second series of experiments it was shown that the i.t. treatment with NaV1.8 (SNS/PN3) sodium channel antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, but not mismatch oligodeoxynucleotides, decreased the mRNA expression of sodium tetrodotoxin-resistant channels on the dorsal root ganglia and abolished the mechanical hypernociception induced by i.t. administration of NMDA. Thus, our results support the suggestion that glutamate release in the spinal cord during inflammation causes retrograde hypernociception of nociceptors associated with sodium tetrodotoxin-resistant channels in primary nociceptive sensory neurons. PMID:12589028

  5. Renal sodium transporter/channel expression and sodium excretion in P2Y2 receptor knockout mice fed a high-NaCl diet with/without aldosterone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Listhrop, Raelene; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M.

    2011-01-01

    The P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2-R) antagonizes sodium reabsorption in the kidney. Apart from its effect in distal nephron, hypothetically, P2Y2-R may modulate activity/abundances of sodium transporters/channel subunits along the nephron via antagonism of aldosterone or vasopressin or interaction with mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or oxidative stress (OS). To determine the extent of the regulatory role of P2Y2-R in renal sodium reabsorption, in study 1, we fed P2Y2-R knockout (KO; n = 5) and wild-type (WT; n = 5) mice a high (3.15%)-sodium diet (HSD) for 14 days. Western blotting revealed significantly higher protein abundances for cortical and medullary bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2), medullary α-1-subunit of Na-K-ATPase, and medullary α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in KO vs. WT mice. Molecular analysis of urine showed increased excretion of nitrates plus nitrites (NOx), PGE2, and 8-isoprostane in the KO, relative to WT mice, supporting a putative role for these molecules in determining alterations of proteins involved in sodium transport along the nephron. To determine whether genotype differences in response to aldosterone might have played a role in these differences due to HSD, in study 2 aldosterone levels were clamped (by osmotic minipump infusion). Clamping aldosterone (with HSD) led to significantly impaired natriuresis with elevated Na/H exchanger isoform 3 in the cortex, and NKCC2 in the medulla, and modest but significantly lower levels of NKCC2, and α- and β-ENaC in the cortex of KO vs. WT mice. This was associated with significantly reduced urinary NOx in the KO, although PGE2 and 8-isoprostane remained significantly elevated vs. WT mice. Taken together, our results suggest that P2Y2-R is an important regulator of sodium transporters along the nephron. Pre- or postreceptor differences in the response to aldosterone, perhaps mediated via prostaglandins or changes in NOS activity or

  6. Renal sodium transporter/channel expression and sodium excretion in P2Y2 receptor knockout mice fed a high-NaCl diet with/without aldosterone infusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Listhrop, Raelene; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2011-03-01

    The P2Y(2) receptor (P2Y2-R) antagonizes sodium reabsorption in the kidney. Apart from its effect in distal nephron, hypothetically, P2Y(2)-R may modulate activity/abundances of sodium transporters/channel subunits along the nephron via antagonism of aldosterone or vasopressin or interaction with mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) or oxidative stress (OS). To determine the extent of the regulatory role of P2Y(2)-R in renal sodium reabsorption, in study 1, we fed P2Y(2)-R knockout (KO; n = 5) and wild-type (WT; n = 5) mice a high (3.15%)-sodium diet (HSD) for 14 days. Western blotting revealed significantly higher protein abundances for cortical and medullary bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2), medullary α-1-subunit of Na-K-ATPase, and medullary α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in KO vs. WT mice. Molecular analysis of urine showed increased excretion of nitrates plus nitrites (NOx), PGE(2), and 8-isoprostane in the KO, relative to WT mice, supporting a putative role for these molecules in determining alterations of proteins involved in sodium transport along the nephron. To determine whether genotype differences in response to aldosterone might have played a role in these differences due to HSD, in study 2 aldosterone levels were clamped (by osmotic minipump infusion). Clamping aldosterone (with HSD) led to significantly impaired natriuresis with elevated Na/H exchanger isoform 3 in the cortex, and NKCC2 in the medulla, and modest but significantly lower levels of NKCC2, and α- and β-ENaC in the cortex of KO vs. WT mice. This was associated with significantly reduced urinary NOx in the KO, although PGE(2) and 8-isoprostane remained significantly elevated vs. WT mice. Taken together, our results suggest that P2Y(2)-R is an important regulator of sodium transporters along the nephron. Pre- or postreceptor differences in the response to aldosterone, perhaps mediated via prostaglandins or changes in

  7. Deletion mutation of sodium channel Na(V)1.7 in inherited erythromelalgia: enhanced slow inactivation modulates dorsal root ganglion neuron hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoyang; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Tyrrell, Lynda; Te Morsche, Rene H; Drenth, Joost P H; Waxman, Stephen G

    2011-07-01

    Gain-of-function missense mutations of voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.7 have been linked to the painful disorder inherited erythromelalgia. These mutations hyperpolarize activation, slow deactivation and enhance currents evoked by slow ramp stimuli (ramp currents). A correlation has recently been suggested between the age of onset of inherited erythromelalgia and the extent of hyperpolarizing shifts in mutant Na(V)1.7 channel activation; mutations causing large activation shifts have been linked to early age of onset inherited erythromelalgia, while mutations causing small activation shifts have been linked to age of onset within the second decade of life. Here, we report a family with inherited erythromelalgia with an in-frame deletion of a single residue--leucine 955 (Del-L955) in DII/S6. The proband did not show symptoms until the age of 15 years, and her affected mother only experienced mild symptoms during adolescence, which disappeared at the age of 38 years. Del-L955 shows no effect on Na(V)1.7 current density and fast inactivation, but causes an approximately -24 mV shift in activation, together with increases in amplitude of persistent currents and ramp currents. The mutation also produces an approximately -40 mV shift in slow inactivation, which reduces channel availability. Comparison of the effects of the Del-L955 mutation on dorsal root ganglion neuron hyperexcitability with those produced by another inherited erythromelalgia mutation (L858F) that does not enhance slow inactivation suggests that a delayed age of onset and milder symptoms in association with a large shift of channel activation, enhanced persistent and enhanced ramp currents may be related to the approximately -40 mV shift in slow inactivation for Del-L955, the largest shift thus far demonstrated in mutant Na(V)1.7 channels. Our results suggest that despite the pivotal role of activation shift in inherited erythromelalgia development, slow inactivation may regulate clinical

  8. Coordinated role of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger in sustaining microglial activation during inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Muhammad M.; Sonsalla, Patricia K.; Richardson, Jason R.

    2013-12-01

    Persistent neuroinflammation and microglial activation play an integral role in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. We investigated the role of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) and Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchangers (NHE) in the activation of immortalized microglial cells (BV-2) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. LPS (10 and 100 ng/ml) caused a dose- and time-dependent accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na{sup +}){sub i}] in BV-2 cells. Pre-treatment of cells with the VGSC antagonist tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 μM) abolished short-term Na{sup +} influx, but was unable to prevent the accumulation of (Na{sup +}){sub i} observed at 6 and 24 h after LPS exposure. The NHE inhibitor cariporide (1 μM) significantly reduced accumulation of (Na{sup +}){sub i} 6 and 24 h after LPS exposure. Furthermore, LPS increased the mRNA expression and protein level of NHE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced after co-treatment with TTX and/or cariporide. LPS increased production of TNF-α, ROS, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and expression of gp91{sup phox}, an active subunit of NADPH oxidase, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX or TTX + cariporide. Collectively, these data demonstrate a closely-linked temporal relationship between VGSC and NHE-1 in regulating function in activated microglia, which may provide avenues for therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing neuroinflammation. - Highlights: • LPS causes immediate increase in sodium through VGSC and subsequently through the NHE-1. • Inhibition of VGSC reduces increases in NHE-1 and gp91{sup phox}. • Inhibition of VGSC and NHE-1 reduces NADPH oxidase-mediated Tnf-α, ROS, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. • NHE-1 and Na{sub v}1.6 may be viable targets for therapeutic interventions to reduce neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disease.

  9. Development and validation of a thallium flux-based functional assay for the sodium channel NaV1.7 and its utility for lead discovery and compound profiling.

    PubMed

    Du, Yu; Days, Emily; Romaine, Ian; Abney, Kris K; Kaufmann, Kristian; Sulikowski, Gary; Stauffer, Shaun; Lindsley, Craig W; Weaver, C David

    2015-06-17

    Ion channels are critical for life, and they are targets of numerous drugs. The sequencing of the human genome has revealed the existence of hundreds of different ion channel subunits capable of forming thousands of ion channels. In the face of this diversity, we only have a few selective small-molecule tools to aid in our understanding of the role specific ion channels in physiology which may in turn help illuminate their therapeutic potential. Although the advent of automated electrophysiology has increased the rate at which we can screen for and characterize ion channel modulators, the technique's high per-measurement cost and moderate throughput compared to other high-throughput screening approaches limit its utility for large-scale high-throughput screening. Therefore, lower cost, more rapid techniques are needed. While ion channel types capable of fluxing calcium are well-served by low cost, very high-throughput fluorescence-based assays, other channel types such as sodium channels remain underserved by present functional assay techniques. In order to address this shortcoming, we have developed a thallium flux-based assay for sodium channels using the NaV1.7 channel as a model target. We show that the assay is able to rapidly and cost-effectively identify NaV1.7 inhibitors thus providing a new method useful for the discovery and profiling of sodium channel modulators.

  10. Dependence of mu-conotoxin block of sodium channels on ionic strength but not on the permeating [Na+]: implications for the distinctive mechanistic interactions between Na+ and K+ channel pore-blocking toxins and their molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Li, Ronald A; Hui, Kwokyin; French, Robert J; Sato, Kazuki; Henrikson, Charles A; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Marbán, Eduardo

    2003-08-15

    Mu-conotoxins (mu-CTXs) are Na+ channel-blocking, 22-amino acid peptides produced by the sea snail Conus geographus. Although K+ channel pore-blocking toxins show specific interactions with permeant ions and strong dependence on the ionic strength (mu), no such dependence has been reported for mu-CTX and Na+ channels. Such properties would offer insight into the binding and blocking mechanism of mu-CTX as well as functional and structural properties of the Na+ channel pore. Here we studied the effects of mu and permeant ion concentration ([Na+]) on mu-CTX block of rat skeletal muscle (mu1, Nav1.4) Na+ channels. Mu-CTX sensitivity of wild-type and E758Q channels increased significantly (by approximately 20-fold) when mu was lowered by substituting external Na+ with equimolar sucrose (from 140 to 35 mm Na+); however, toxin block was unaltered (p > 0.05) when mu was maintained by replacement of [Na+] with N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMG+), suggesting that the enhanced sensitivity at low mu was not due to reduction in [Na+]. Single-channel recordings identified the association rate constant, k(on), as the primary determinant of the changes in affinity (k(on) increased 40- and 333-fold for mu-CTX D2N/R13Q and D12N/R13Q, respectively, when symmetric 200 mm Na+ was reduced to 50 mm). In contrast, dissociation rates changed <2-fold for the same derivatives under the same conditions. Experiments with additional mu-CTX derivatives identified toxin residues Arg-1, Arg-13, and Lys-16 as important contributors to the sensitivity to external mu. Taken together, our findings indicate that mu-CTX block of Na+ channels depends critically on mu but not specifically on [Na+], contrasting with the known behavior of pore-blocking K+ channel toxins. These findings suggest that different degrees of ion interaction, underlying the fundamental conduction mechanisms of Na+ and K+ channels, are mirrored in ion interactions with pore-blocking toxins.

  11. Mutations at opposite ends of the DIII/S4-S5 linker of sodium channel NaV1.7 produce distinct pain disorders

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two groups of gain-of-function mutations in sodium channel NaV1.7, which are expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, produce two clinically-distinct pain syndromes - inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). IEM is characterized by intermittent burning pain and skin redness in the feet or hands, triggered by warmth or mild exercise, while PEPD is characterized by episodes of rectal, ocular and mandibular pain accompanied with skin flushing, triggered by bowel movement and perianal stimulation. Most of the IEM mutations are located within channel domains I and II, while most of the PEPD mutations are located within domains III and IV. The structural dichotomy parallels the biophysical effects of the two types of mutations, with IEM mutations shifting voltage-dependence of NaV1.7 activation in a hyperpolarized direction, and PEPD mutations shifting fast-inactivation of NaV1.7 in a depolarized direction. While four IEM and four PEPD mutations are located within cytoplasmic linkers joining segments 4 and 5 (S4-S5 linkers) in the different domains (IEM: domains I and II; PEPD: domains III and IV), no S4-S5 linker has been reported to house both IEM and PEPD mutations thus far. Results We have identified a new IEM mutation P1308L within the C-terminus of the DIII/S4-S5 linker of NaV1.7, ten amino acids from a known PEPD mutation V1298F which is located within the N-terminus of this linker. We used voltage-clamp to compare the biophysical properties of the two mutant channels and current-clamp to study their effects on DRG neuron excitability. We confirm that P1308L and V1298F behave as prototypical IEM and PEPD mutations, respectively. We also show that DRG neurons expressing either P1308L or V1298F become hyperexcitable, compared to DRG neurons expressing wild-type channels. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for differential roles of the DIII/S4-S5 linker N- and C-termini in channel inactivation and

  12. Enhanced expression of epithelial sodium channels causes salt-induced hypertension in mice through inhibition of the α2-isoform of Na+, K+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Leenen, Frans H H; Hou, Xiaohong; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ahmad, Monir

    2015-05-01

    Knockout of the Nedd4-2 gene in mice results in overexpression of epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) on the plasma membrane in the kidney, choroid plexus and brain nuclei. These mice exhibit enhanced pressor responses to CSF [Na(+)] as well as dietary salt-induced hypertension which both can be blocked by central infusion of the ENaC blocker benzamil. Functional studies suggest that ENaC activation in the CNS results in release of endogenous ouabain (EO) and inhibition of the α2-isoform of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase. To test this concept more specifically, we studied Nedd4-2(-/-) mice expressing the ouabain-resistant α2R/R-isoform of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase. Intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of Na(+)-rich aCSF (225 mmol/L Na(+) at 0.4 μL/min) increased MAP by 10-15 mmHg in wild-type mice and by 25-30 mmHg in Nedd4-2(-/-) mice, but by only ~5 mmHg in α2R/R and in α2R/R/Nedd4-2(-/-) mice. Icv infusion of EO-binding Fab fragments also blocked the BP response in Nedd4-2(-/-) mice. In Nedd4-2(-/-) mice, 8% high-salt diet increased MAP by 25-30 mmHg, but in α2R/R/Nedd4-2(-/-) mice, it increased by only 5-10 mmHg. In contrast, Nedd4-2(-/-) or α2R/R did not affect the hypertension caused by sc infusion of Ang II. These findings substantiate the concept that enhanced ENaC activity causes salt-induced pressor responses mainly through EO inhibiting the α2-isoform of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the brain.

  13. Local knockdown of the NaV1.6 sodium channel reduces pain behaviors, sensory neuron excitability, and sympathetic sprouting in rat models of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, as in other pain models, abnormal spontaneous activity of myelinated sensory neurons occurs early and is essential for establishing pain behaviors and other pathologies. Sympathetic sprouting into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is observed after spinal nerve ligation, and sympathectomy reduces pain behavior. Sprouting and spontaneous activity may be mutually reinforcing: blocking neuronal activity reduces sympathetic sprouting, and sympathetic spouts functionally increase spontaneous activity in vitro. However, most studies in this field have used nonspecific methods to block spontaneous activity, methods that also block evoked and normal activity. In this study, we injected small inhibitory RNA directed against the NaV1.6 sodium channel isoform into the DRG before spinal nerve ligation. This isoform can mediate high frequency repetitive firing, like that seen in spontaneously active neurons. Local knockdown of NaV1.6 markedly reduced mechanical pain behaviors induced by spinal nerve ligation, reduced sympathetic sprouting into the ligated sensory ganglion, and blocked abnormal spontaneous activity and other measures of hyperexcitability in myelinated neurons in the ligated sensory ganglion. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that sympathetic sprouting preferentially targeted NaV1.6-positive neurons. Under these experimental conditions, NaV1.6 knockdown did not prevent or strongly alter single evoked action potentials, unlike previous less specific methods used to block spontaneous activity. NaV1.6 knockdown also reduced pain behaviors in another pain model, chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve, provided the model was modified so that the lesion site was relatively close to the siRNA-injected lumbar DRGs. The results highlight the relative importance of abnormal spontaneous activity in establishing both pain behaviors and sympathetic sprouting, and suggest that the NaV1.6 isoform may have value as a

  14. Pharmacological modulation of human cardiac Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Krafte, D S; Davison, K; Dugrenier, N; Estep, K; Josef, K; Barchi, R L; Kallen, R G; Silver, P J; Ezrin, A M

    1994-02-15

    Pharmacological modulation of human sodium current was examined in Xenopus oocytes expressing human heart Na+ channels. Na+ currents activated near -50 mV with maximum current amplitudes observed at -20 mV. Steady-state inactivation was characterized by a V1/2 value of -57 +/- 0.5 mV and a slope factor (k) of 7.3 +/- 0.3 mV. Sodium currents were blocked by tetrodotoxin with an IC50 value of 1.8 microM. These properties are consistent with those of Na+ channels expressed in mammalian myocardial cells. We have investigated the effects of several pharmacological agents which, with the exception of lidocaine, have not been characterized against cRNA-derived Na+ channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Lidocaine, quinidine and flecainide blocked resting Na+ channels with IC50 values of 521 microM, 198 microM, and 41 microM, respectively. Use-dependent block was also observed for all three agents, but concentrations necessary to induce block were higher than expected for quinidine and flecainide. This may reflect differences arising due to expression in the Xenopus oocyte system or could be a true difference in the interaction between human cardiac Na+ channels and these drugs compared to other mammalian Na+ channels. Importantly, however, this result would not have been predicted based upon previous studies of mammalian cardiac Na+ channels. The effects of DPI 201-106, RWJ 24517, and BDF 9148 were also tested and all three agents slowed and/or removed Na+ current inactivation, reduced peak current amplitudes, and induced use-dependent block. These data suggest that the alpha-subunit is the site of interaction between cardiac Na+ channels and Class I antiarrhythmic drugs as well as inactivation modifiers such as DPI 201-106.

  15. Comparative study of lacosamide and classical sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs on sodium channel slow inactivation.

    PubMed

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; Leclère, Nathalie; Vandenplas, Catherine; Foerch, Patrik; Wolff, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exert their therapeutic activity by modifying the inactivation properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v) ) channels. Lacosamide is unique among AEDs in that it selectively enhances the slow inactivation component. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of AEDs on Na(v) channel inactivation, a direct comparison of results cannot be made because of varying experimental conditions. In this study, the effects of different AEDs on Na(v) channel steady-state slow inactivation were investigated under identical experimental conditions using whole-cell patch-clamp in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. All drugs were tested at 100 μM, and results were compared with those from time-matched control groups. Lacosamide significantly shifted the voltage dependence of Na(v) current (I(Na) ) slow inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials (by -33 ± 7 mV), whereas the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels and the curve slope did not differ significantly. Neither SPM6953 (lacosamide inactive enantiomer), nor carbamazepine, nor zonisamide affected the voltage dependence of I(Na) slow inactivation, the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels, or the curve slope. Phenytoin significantly increased the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels (by 28% ± 9%) in a voltage-independent manner but did not affect the curve slope. Lamotrigine slightly increased the fraction of inactivated currents (by 15% ± 4%) and widened the range of the slow inactivation voltage dependence. Lamotrigine and rufinamide induced weak, but significant, shifts of I(Na) slow inactivation toward more depolarized potentials. The effects of lacosamide on Na(v) channel slow inactivation corroborate previous observations that lacosamide has a unique mode of action among AEDs that act on Na(v) channels.

  16. Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.3 are the only tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels expressed by the adult guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sage, D; Salin, P; Alcaraz, G; Castets, F; Giraud, P; Crest, M; Mazet, B; Clerc, N

    2007-10-01

    The types of sodium channels that are expressed by neurons shape the rising phase of action potentials and influence patterns of action potential discharge. With regard to the enteric nervous system (ENS), there is uncertainty about which channels are expressed, and in particular it is unknown whether Na(v)1.7 is present. We designed specific probes for the guinea pig Na(v)1.7 alpha subunit as well as for the other tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive alpha subunits (Na(v)1.1, Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.3, and Na(v)1.6) in order to perform in situ hybridization (ISH) histochemistry on guinea pig myenteric ganglia. We established that only Na(v)1.7 mRNA and Na(v)1.3 mRNA are expressed in these ganglia. The ISH signal for Na(v)1.7 transcripts was found in seemingly all the myenteric neurons. The expression of the Na(v)1.3 alpha subunit was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in a large proportion (62%) of the myenteric neuron population. This population included enteric sensory neurons. Na(v)1.6 immunoreactivity, absent from myenteric neurons, was detected in glial cells only when a high anti-Na(v)1.6 antibody concentration was used. This suggests that the Na(v)1.6 alpha subunit and mRNA are present only at low levels, which is consistent with the fact that no Na(v)1.6 mRNA could be detected in the ENS by ISH. The fact that adult myenteric neurons are endowed with only two TTX-sensitive alpha subunits, namely, Na(v)1.3 and Na(v)1.7, emphasizes the singularity of the ENS. Both these subunits, known to have slow-inactivation kinetics, are well adapted for generating action potentials from slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials, a mode of synaptic transmission that applies to all ENS neuron types.

  17. Solution NMR structure of the C-terminal EF-hand domain of human cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Chagot, Benjamin; Potet, Franck; Balser, Jeffrey R; Chazin, Walter J

    2009-03-06

    The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 is responsible for the initial upstroke of the action potential in cardiac tissue. Levels of intracellular calcium modulate inactivation gating of NaV1.5, in part through a C-terminal EF-hand calcium binding domain. The significance of this structure is underscored by the fact that mutations within this domain are associated with specific cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. In an effort to elucidate the molecular basis for calcium regulation of channel function, we have determined the solution structure of the C-terminal EF-hand domain using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR. The structure confirms the existence of the four-helix bundle common to EF-hand domain proteins. However, the location of this domain is shifted with respect to that predicted on the basis of a consensus 12-residue EF-hand calcium binding loop in the sequence. This finding is consistent with the weak calcium affinity reported for the isolated EF-hand domain; high affinity binding is observed only in a construct with an additional 60 residues C-terminal to the EF-hand domain, including the IQ motif that is central to the calcium regulatory apparatus. The binding of an IQ motif peptide to the EF-hand domain was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The peptide binds between helices I and IV in the EF-hand domain, similar to the binding of target peptides to other EF-hand calcium-binding proteins. These results suggest a molecular basis for the coupling of the intrinsic (EF-hand domain) and extrinsic (calmodulin) components of the calcium-sensing apparatus of NaV1.5.

  18. Mechanism of tetrodotoxin block and resistance in sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2014-03-28

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been used for many decades to characterize the structure and function of biological ion channels. Yet, the precise mechanism by which TTX blocks voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels is not fully understood. Here molecular dynamics simulations are used to elucidate how TTX blocks mammalian voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels and why it fails to be effective for the bacterial sodium channel, NaVAb. We find that, in NaVAb, a sodium ion competes with TTX for the binding site at the extracellular end of the filter, thus reducing the blocking efficacy of TTX. Using a model of the skeletal muscle channel, NaV1.4, we show that the conduction properties of the channel observed experimentally are faithfully reproduced. We find that TTX occludes the entrance of NaV1.4 by forming a network of hydrogen-bonds at the outer lumen of the selectivity filter. The guanidine group of TTX adopts a lateral orientation, rather than pointing into the filter as proposed previously. The acidic residues just above the selectivity filter are important in stabilizing the hydrogen-bond network between TTX and NaV1.4. The effect of two single mutations of a critical tyrosine residue in the filter of NaV1.4 on TTX binding observed experimentally is reproduced using computational mutagenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional Expression of Drosophila para Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Warmke, Jeffrey W.; Reenan, Robert A.G.; Wang, Peiyi; Qian, Su; Arena, Joseph P.; Wang, Jixin; Wunderler, Denise; Liu, Ken; Kaczorowski, Gregory J.; Ploeg, Lex H.T. Van der; Ganetzky, Barry; Cohen, Charles J.

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila para sodium channel α subunit was expressed in Xenopus oocytes alone and in combination with tipE, a putative Drosophila sodium channel accessory subunit. Coexpression of tipE with para results in elevated levels of sodium currents and accelerated current decay. Para/TipE sodium channels have biophysical and pharmacological properties similar to those of native channels. However, the pharmacology of these channels differs from that of vertebrate sodium channels: (a) toxin II from Anemonia sulcata, which slows inactivation, binds to Para and some mammalian sodium channels with similar affinity (Kd ≅ 10 nM), but this toxin causes a 100-fold greater decrease in the rate of inactivation of Para/TipE than of mammalian channels; (b) Para sodium channels are >10-fold more sensitive to block by tetrodotoxin; and (c) modification by the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin is >100-fold more potent for Para than for rat brain type IIA sodium channels. Our results suggest that the selective toxicity of pyrethroid insecticides is due at least in part to the greater affinity of pyrethroids for insect sodium channels than for mammalian sodium channels. PMID:9236205

  20. Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Bean, BP; Cohen, CJ; Tsien, RW

    1983-01-01

    Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels was studied in voltage-clamped rabbit purkinje fibers at drug concentrations ranging from 1 mM down to effective antiarrhythmic doses (5-20 μM). Dose-response curves indicated that lidocaine blocks the channel by binding one-to-one, with a voltage-dependent K(d). The half-blocking concentration varied from more than 300 μM, at a negative holding potential where inactivation was completely removed, to approximately 10 μM, at a depolarized holding potential where inactivation was nearly complete. Lidocaine block showed prominent use dependence with trains of depolarizing pulses from a negative holding potential. During the interval between pulses, repriming of I (Na) displayed two exponential components, a normally recovering component (τless than 0.2 s), and a lidocaine-induced, slowly recovering fraction (τ approximately 1-2 s at pH 7.0). Raising the lidocaine concentration magnified the slowly recovering fraction without changing its time course; after a long depolarization, this fraction was one-half at approximately 10 μM lidocaine, just as expected if it corresponded to drug-bound, inactivated channels. At less than or equal to 20 μM lidocaine, the slowly recovering fraction grew exponentially to a steady level as the preceding depolarization was prolonged; the time course was the same for strong or weak depolarizations, that is, with or without significant activation of I(Na). This argues that use dependence at therapeutic levels reflects block of inactivated channels, rather than block of open channels. Overall, these results provide direct evidence for the “modulated-receptor hypothesis” of Hille (1977) and Hondeghem and Katzung (1977). Unlike tetrodotoxin, lidocaine shows similar interactions with Na channels of heart, nerve, and skeletal muscle. PMID:6306139

  1. Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Bean, B P; Cohen, C J; Tsien, R W

    1983-05-01

    Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels was studied in voltage-clamped rabbit purkinje fibers at drug concentrations ranging from 1 mM down to effective antiarrhythmic doses (5-20 muM). Dose-response curves indicated that lidocaine blocks the channel by binding one-to-one, with a voltage-dependent K(d). The half-blocking concentration varied from more than 300 muM, at a negative holding potential where inactivation was completely removed, to approximately 10 muM, at a depolarized holding potential where inactivation was nearly complete. Lidocaine block showed prominent use dependence with trains of depolarizing pulses from a negative holding potential. During the interval between pulses, repriming of I (Na) displayed two exponential components, a normally recovering component (tauless than 0.2 s), and a lidocaine-induced, slowly recovering fraction (tau approximately 1-2 s at pH 7.0). Raising the lidocaine concentration magnified the slowly recovering fraction without changing its time course; after a long depolarization, this fraction was one-half at approximately 10 muM lidocaine, just as expected if it corresponded to drug-bound, inactivated channels. At less than or equal to 20 muM lidocaine, the slowly recovering fraction grew exponentially to a steady level as the preceding depolarization was prolonged; the time course was the same for strong or weak depolarizations, that is, with or without significant activation of I(Na). This argues that use dependence at therapeutic levels reflects block of inactivated channels, rather than block of open channels. Overall, these results provide direct evidence for the "modulated-receptor hypothesis" of Hille (1977) and Hondeghem and Katzung (1977). Unlike tetrodotoxin, lidocaine shows similar interactions with Na channels of heart, nerve, and skeletal muscle.

  2. Slow inactivation in human cardiac sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, J E; Featherstone, D E; Hartmann, H A; Ruben, P C

    1998-01-01

    The available pool of sodium channels, and thus cell excitability, is regulated by both fast and slow inactivation. In cardiac tissue, the requirement for sustained firing of long-duration action potentials suggests that slow inactivation in cardiac sodium channels may differ from slow inactivation in skeletal muscle sodium channels. To test this hypothesis, we used the macropatch technique to characterize slow inactivation in human cardiac sodium channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Slow inactivation was isolated from fast inactivation kinetically (by selectively recovering channels from fast inactivation before measurement of slow inactivation) and structurally (by modification of fast inactivation by mutation of IFM1488QQQ). Time constants of slow inactivation in cardiac sodium channels were larger than previously reported for skeletal muscle sodium channels. In addition, steady-state slow inactivation was only 40% complete in cardiac sodium channels, compared to 80% in skeletal muscle channels. These results suggest that cardiac sodium channel slow inactivation is adapted for the sustained depolarizations found in normally functioning cardiac tissue. Complete slow inactivation in the fast inactivation modified IFM1488QQQ cardiac channel mutant suggests that this impairment of slow inactivation may result from an interaction between fast and slow inactivation. PMID:9635748

  3. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav 1.5 contributes to astrogliosis in an in vitro model of glial injury via reverse Na+ /Ca2+ exchange.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Laura W; Samad, Omar A; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    Astrogliosis is a prominent feature of many, if not all, pathologies of the brain and spinal cord, yet a detailed understanding of the underlying molecular pathways involved in the transformation from quiescent to reactive astrocyte remains elusive. We investigated the contribution of voltage-gated sodium channels to astrogliosis in an in vitro model of mechanical injury to astrocytes. Previous studies have shown that a scratch injury to astrocytes invokes dual mechanisms of migration and proliferation in these cells. Our results demonstrate that wound closure after mechanical injury, involving both migration and proliferation, is attenuated by pharmacological treatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX) and KB-R7943, at a dose that blocks reverse mode of the Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), and by knockdown of Nav 1.5 mRNA. We also show that astrocytes display a robust [Ca(2+) ]i transient after mechanical injury and demonstrate that this [Ca(2+) ]i response is also attenuated by TTX, KB-R7943, and Nav 1.5 mRNA knockdown. Our results suggest that Nav 1.5 and NCX are potential targets for modulation of astrogliosis after injury via their effect on [Ca(2+) ]i .

  4. Resurgent-like currents in mouse vas deferens myocytes are mediated by NaV1.6 voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Noriyoshi; Zhu, Hai-Lei; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Inai, Tetsuichiro; Cunnane, Thomas C

    2012-11-01

    Patch-clamp experiments were performed to investigate the molecular properties of resurgent-like currents in single smooth muscle cells dispersed from mouse vas deferens, utilizing both Na(V)1.6-null mice (Na(V)1.6(-/-)), lacking the expression of the Scn8a Na(+) channel gene, and their wild-type littermates (Na(V)1.6(+/+)). Na(V)1.6 immunoreactivity was clearly visible in dispersed smooth muscle cells obtained from Na(V)1.6(+/+), but not Na(V)1.6(-/-), vas deferens. Following a depolarization to +30 mV from a holding potential of -70 mV (to produce maximal inactivation of the Na(+) current), repolarization to voltages between -60 and +20 mV elicited a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive inward current in Na(V)1.6(+/+), but not Na(V)1.6(-/-), vas deferens myocytes. The resurgent-like current in Na(V)1.6(+/+) vas deferens myocytes peaked at approximately -20 mV in the current-voltage relationship. The peak amplitude of the resurgent-like current remained at a constant level when the membrane potential was repolarized to -20 mV following the application of depolarizing rectangular pulses to more positive potentials than +20 mV. 4,9-Anhydrotetrodotoxin (4,9-anhydroTTX), a selective Na(V)1.6 blocking toxin, purified from a crude mixture of TTX analogues by LC-FLD techniques, reversibly suppressed the resurgent-like currents. β-Pompilidotoxin, a voltage-gated Na(+) channel activator, evoked sustained resurgent-like currents in Na(V)1.6(+/+) but not Na(V)1.6(-/-) murine vas deferens myocytes. These results strongly indicate that, primarily, resurgent-like currents are generated as a result of Na(V)1.6 channel activity.

  5. Na+ channel function, regulation, structure, trafficking and sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Shaw, Robin M; Pitt, Geoffrey S; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Sack, Jon T; Abriel, Hugues; Aldrich, Richard W; Belardinelli, Luiz; Cannell, Mark B; Catterall, William A; Chazin, Walter J; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Deschenes, Isabelle; Grandi, Eleonora; Hund, Thomas J; Izu, Leighton T; Maier, Lars S; Maltsev, Victor A; Marionneau, Celine; Mohler, Peter J; Rajamani, Sridharan; Rasmusson, Randall L; Sobie, Eric A; Clancy, Colleen E; Bers, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second of a series of three reviews published in this issue resulting from the University of California Davis Cardiovascular Symposium 2014: Systems approach to understanding cardiac excitation–contraction coupling and arrhythmias: Na+ channel and Na+ transport. The goal of the symposium was to bring together experts in the field to discuss points of consensus and controversy on the topic of sodium in the heart. The present review focuses on Na+ channel function and regulation, Na+ channel structure and function, and Na+ channel trafficking, sequestration and complexing. PMID:25772290

  6. Voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsayed, Mena; Sokolov, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized by seizures and convulsions. The basis of epilepsy is an increase in neuronal excitability that, in some cases, may be caused by functional defects in neuronal voltage gated sodium channels, Nav1.1 and Nav1.2. The effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as effective therapies for epilepsy have been characterized by extensive research. Most of the classic AEDs targeting Nav share a common mechanism of action by stabilizing the channel’s fast-inactivated state. In contrast, novel AEDs, such as lacosamide, stabilize the slow-inactivated state in neuronal Nav1.1 and Nav1.7 isoforms. This paper reviews the different mechanisms by which this stabilization occurs to determine new methods for treatment. PMID:23531742

  7. The C-terminal coiled-coil of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac is not essential for tetramer formation, but stabilizes subunit-to-subunit interactions.

    PubMed

    Mio, Kazuhiro; Mio, Muneyo; Arisaka, Fumio; Sato, Masahiko; Sato, Chikara

    2010-09-01

    The NaChBac is a prokaryotic homologue of the voltage-gated sodium channel found in the genome of the alkalophilic bacterium Bacillus halodurans C-125. Like a repeating cassette of mammalian sodium channel, the NaChBac possesses hydrophobic domains corresponding to six putative transmembrane segments and a pore loop, and exerts channel function by forming a tetramer although detailed mechanisms of subunit assembly remain unclear. We generated truncated mutants from NaChBac, and investigated their ability to form tetramers in relation to their channel functions. A mutant that deletes almost all of the C-terminal coiled-coil structure lost its voltage-dependent ion permeability, although it was properly translocated to the cell surface. The mutant protein was purified as a tetramer using a reduced concentration of detergent, but the association between the subunits was shown to be much weaker than the wild type. The chemical cross-linking, blue native PAGE, sedimentation velocity experiments, size exclusion chromatography, immunoprecipitation, and electron microscopy all supported its tetrameric assembly. We further purified the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain alone and confirmed its self-oligomerization. These data suggest that the C-terminal coiled-coil structure stabilizes subunit-to-subunit interactions of NaChBac, but is not critical for their tetramer formation. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sodium channels in astroglia and microglia.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Laura W; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-10-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are required for electrogenesis in excitable cells. Their activation, triggered by membrane depolarization, generates transient sodium currents that initiate action potentials in neurons, cardiac, and skeletal muscle cells. Cells that have not traditionally been considered to be excitable (nonexcitable cells), including glial cells, also express sodium channels in physiological conditions as well as in pathological conditions. These channels contribute to multiple functional roles that are seemingly unrelated to the generation of action potentials. Here, we discuss the dynamics of sodium channel expression in astrocytes and microglia, and review evidence for noncanonical roles in effector functions of these cells including phagocytosis, migration, proliferation, ionic homeostasis, and secretion of chemokines/cytokines. We also examine possible mechanisms by which sodium channels contribute to the activity of glial cells, with an eye toward therapeutic implications for central nervous system disease. GLIA 2016;64:1628-1645.

  9. Differential state-dependent modification of rat Na{sub v}1.6 sodium channels expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells by the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin

    SciTech Connect

    He, Bingjun; Soderlund, David M.

    2011-12-15

    We expressed rat Na{sub v}1.6 sodium channels in combination with the rat {beta}1 and {beta}2 auxiliary subunits in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and evaluated the effects of the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin on expressed sodium currents using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Both pyrethroids produced concentration-dependent, resting modification of Na{sub v}1.6 channels, prolonging the kinetics of channel inactivation and deactivation to produce persistent 'late' currents during depolarization and tail currents following repolarization. Both pyrethroids also produced concentration dependent hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage dependence of channel activation and steady-state inactivation. Maximal shifts in activation, determined from the voltage dependence of the pyrethroid-induced late and tail currents, were {approx} 25 mV for tefluthrin and {approx} 20 mV for deltamethrin. The highest attainable concentrations of these compounds also caused shifts of {approx} 5-10 mV in the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation. In addition to their effects on the voltage dependence of inactivation, both compounds caused concentration-dependent increases in the fraction of sodium current that was resistant to inactivation following strong depolarizing prepulses. We assessed the use-dependent effects of tefluthrin and deltamethrin on Na{sub v}1.6 channels by determining the effect of trains of 1 to 100 5-ms depolarizing prepulses at frequencies of 20 or 66.7 Hz on the extent of channel modification. Repetitive depolarization at either frequency increased modification by deltamethrin by {approx} 2.3-fold but had no effect on modification by tefluthrin. Tefluthrin and deltamethrin were equally potent as modifiers of Na{sub v}1.6 channels in HEK293 cells using the conditions producing maximal modification as the basis for comparison. These findings show that the actions of tefluthrin and deltamethrin of Na{sub v}1.6 channels in HEK293

  10. Oxidation of multiple methionine residues impairs rapid sodium channel inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kassmann, Mario; Hansel, Alfred; Leipold, Enrico; Birkenbeil, Jan; Lu, Song-Qing; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) readily oxidize the sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine (Met). The impact of Met oxidation on the fast inactivation of the skeletal muscle sodium channel NaV1.4 expressed in human embryonic kidney cells was studied by applying the Met-preferring oxidant chloramine-T (ChT) or by irradiating the ROS-producing dye Lucifer Yellow in the patch pipettes. Both interventions dramatically slowed down inactivation of the sodium channels. Replacement of Met in the Ile-Phe-Met inactivation motif with Leu (M1305L) strongly attenuated the oxidizing effect on inactivation but did not eliminate it completely. Mutagenesis of conserved Met residues in the intracellular linkers connecting the membrane-spanning segments of the channel (M1469L and M1470L) also markedly diminished the oxidation sensitivity of the channel, while that of other conserved Met residues (442, 1139, 1154, 1316) were without any noticeable effect. The results of mutagenesis of results, assays of other NaV channel isoforms (NaV1.2, NaV1.5, NaV1.7) and the kinetics of the oxidation-induced removal of inactivation collectively indicate that multiple Met target residues need to be oxidized to completely impair inactivation. This arrangement using multiple Met residues confers a finely graded oxidative modulation of NaV channels and allows organisms to adapt to a variety of oxidative stress conditions, such as ischemic reperfusion. PMID:18369661

  11. Ionizing Radiation Alters the Properties of Sodium Channels in Rat Brain Synaptosomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    International So, iet% for Ncurochemistry SIonizing Radiation Alters the Properties of Sodium to Channels in Rat Brain Synaptosomes Michael J. Mullin, Walter...its binding site in the channel, Ionizing radiation reduced radiation on the voltage-sensitive sodium channels in rat the veratridine-stimulated...in the order of membrane lipids. Key greatest. Batrachotoxin-stimulated 22Na’ uptake was Words: Ionizing radiation- Sodium channels-Mem- less sensitive

  12. Differential effect of D623N variant and wild-type Na(v)1.7 sodium channels on resting potential and interspike membrane potential of dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hye-Sook; Vasylyev, Dmytro V; Estacion, Mark; Macala, Lawrence J; Shah, Palak; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2013-09-05

    Sodium channel NaV1.7 is preferentially expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and sympathetic ganglion neurons. Gain-of-function NaV1.7 mutations/variants have been identified in the painful disorders inherited erythromelalgia and small-fiber neuropathy (SFN). DRG neurons transfected with these channel variants display depolarized resting potential, reduced current-threshold, increased firing-frequency and spontaneous firing. Whether the depolarizing shift in resting potential and enhanced spontaneous firing are due to persistent activity of variant channels, or to compensatory changes in other conductance(s) in response to expression of the variant channel, as shown in model systems, has not been studied. We examined the effect of wild-type NaV1.7 and a NaV1.7 mutant channel, D623N, associated with SFN, on resting potential and membrane potential during interspike intervals in DRG neurons. Resting potential in DRG neurons expressing D623N was depolarized compared to neurons expressing WT-NaV1.7. Exposure to TTX hyperpolarized resting potential by 7mV, increased current-threshold, decreased firing-frequency, and reduced NMDG-induced-hyperpolarization in DRG neurons expressing D623N. To assess the contribution of depolarized resting potential to DRG neuron excitability, we mimicked the mutant channel's depolarizing effect by current injection to produce equivalent depolarization; the depolarization decreased current threshold and increased firing-frequency. Voltage-clamp using ramp or repetitive action potentials as commands showed that D623N channels enhance the TTX-sensitive inward current, persistent at subthreshold membrane voltages, as predicted by a Hodgkin-Huxley model. Our results demonstrate that a variant of NaV1.7 associated with painful neuropathy depolarizes resting membrane potential and produces an enhanced inward current during interspike intervals, thereby contributing to DRG neuron hyperexcitability.

  13. The cellular localization of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, potassium channel, epithelial sodium channel γ and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase in human eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Xiang; Zeng, Shaopeng; Chen, Lu; Li, Xuexue; Lin, Changmin; Zhang, Mingjun; Shu, Shenyou; Xie, Sitian; He, Yunpu; Yang, Lvjun; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2014-10-01

    The secretory portions of human eccrine sweat glands secrete isotonic fluid into the lumen and then the primary fluid is rendered hypotonic during its passage to the skin surface. During the processes of sweat secretion and absorption, many enzymes and proteins play important roles. In the study, the cellular localizations of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), potassium channel (KC), epithelial sodium channel γ (γENaC) and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in human eccrine sweat glands and epidermis were detected using immunofluorescence labeling. The results revealed that in the secretory coils, the basolateral membranes showed evidence of CFTR, NHE1 and KC activities, the apical membranes showed the activities of KC and NHE1, and the nucleus showed γEaNC and V-ATPase activities; in the duct, the peripheral and luminal ductal cells showed evidence of CFTR, NHE1 and KC, the apical membranes showed the activities of CFTR and NHE1, and the nucleus showed γEaNC, V-ATPase and KC activities. The cellular localization of these proteins in eccrine sweat glands is helpful to better understand the mechanisms of sweat secretion and absorption.

  14. Interaction of Tarantula Venom Peptide ProTx-II with Lipid Membranes Is a Prerequisite for Its Inhibition of Human Voltage-gated Sodium Channel NaV1.7.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Deplazes, Evelyne; Lawrence, Nicole; Cheneval, Olivier; Chaousis, Stephanie; Inserra, Marco; Thongyoo, Panumart; King, Glenn F; Mark, Alan E; Vetter, Irina; Craik, David J; Schroeder, Christina I

    2016-08-12

    ProTx-II is a disulfide-rich peptide toxin from tarantula venom able to inhibit the human voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 (hNaV1.7), a channel reported to be involved in nociception, and thus it might have potential as a pain therapeutic. ProTx-II acts by binding to the membrane-embedded voltage sensor domain of hNaV1.7, but the precise peptide channel-binding site and the importance of membrane binding on the inhibitory activity of ProTx-II remain unknown. In this study, we examined the structure and membrane-binding properties of ProTx-II and several analogues using NMR spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show a direct correlation between ProTx-II membrane binding affinity and its potency as an hNaV1.7 channel inhibitor. The data support a model whereby a hydrophobic patch on the ProTx-II surface anchors the molecule at the cell surface in a position that optimizes interaction of the peptide with the binding site on the voltage sensor domain. This is the first study to demonstrate that binding of ProTx-II to the lipid membrane is directly linked to its potency as an hNaV1.7 channel inhibitor. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Interaction of Tarantula Venom Peptide ProTx-II with Lipid Membranes Is a Prerequisite for Its Inhibition of Human Voltage-gated Sodium Channel NaV1.7*

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Deplazes, Evelyne; Lawrence, Nicole; Cheneval, Olivier; Chaousis, Stephanie; Inserra, Marco; Thongyoo, Panumart; King, Glenn F.; Mark, Alan E.; Vetter, Irina; Craik, David J.; Schroeder, Christina I.

    2016-01-01

    ProTx-II is a disulfide-rich peptide toxin from tarantula venom able to inhibit the human voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 (hNaV1.7), a channel reported to be involved in nociception, and thus it might have potential as a pain therapeutic. ProTx-II acts by binding to the membrane-embedded voltage sensor domain of hNaV1.7, but the precise peptide channel-binding site and the importance of membrane binding on the inhibitory activity of ProTx-II remain unknown. In this study, we examined the structure and membrane-binding properties of ProTx-II and several analogues using NMR spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show a direct correlation between ProTx-II membrane binding affinity and its potency as an hNaV1.7 channel inhibitor. The data support a model whereby a hydrophobic patch on the ProTx-II surface anchors the molecule at the cell surface in a position that optimizes interaction of the peptide with the binding site on the voltage sensor domain. This is the first study to demonstrate that binding of ProTx-II to the lipid membrane is directly linked to its potency as an hNaV1.7 channel inhibitor. PMID:27311819

  16. Prolongation of action potential duration and QT interval during epilepsy linked to increased contribution of neuronal sodium channels to cardiac late Na+ current: potential mechanism for sudden death in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Biet, Michael; Morin, Nathalie; Lessard-Beaudoin, Melissa; Graham, Rona K; Duss, Sandra; Gagné, Jonathan; Sanon, Nathalie T; Carmant, Lionel; Dumaine, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Arrhythmias associated with QT prolongation on the ECG often lead to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. The mechanism causing a prolongation of the QT interval during epilepsy remains unknown. Based on observations showing an upregulation of neuronal sodium channels in the brain during epilepsy, we tested the hypothesis that a similar phenomenon occurs in the heart and contributes to QT prolongation by altering cardiac sodium current properties (INa). We used the patch clamp technique to assess the effects of epilepsy on the cardiac action potential and INa in rat ventricular myocytes. Consistent with QT prolongation, epileptic rats had longer ventricular action potential durations attributable to a sustained component of INa (INaL). The increase in INaL was because of a larger contribution of neuronal Na channels characterized by their high sensitivity to tetrodotoxin. As in the brain, epilepsy was associated with an enhanced expression of the neuronal isoform NaV1.1 in cardiomyocyte. Epilepsy was also associated with a lower INa activation threshold resulting in increased cell excitability. This is the first study correlating increased expression of neuronal sodium channels within the heart to epilepsy-related cardiac arrhythmias. This represents a new paradigm in our understanding of cardiac complications related to epilepsy. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Magnetic and electric fields across sodium and potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Marília A. G.; Cruz, Frederico A. O.; Silva, Dilson

    2015-12-01

    We determined the magnetic field around sodium and potassium ionic channels based on a physico-mathematical model that took into account charges in the surface bilayer. For the numerical simulation, we applied the finite element method. Results show that each channel produces its specific and individual response to the ion transport, according to its individual intrinsic properties. The existence of a number of active Na+-channels in a given membrane region seems not to interfere directly in the functioning of K+-channel located among them, and vice-versa.

  18. Neuronal Sodium Channels in Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    The results of these studies have led to the cloning, sequencing and physiological characterization of at least four neuronal sodium channels. However...However, the stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride specific physiological roles distinguishing each of (TTC; see Williams et al., 2000...F. and Berwald- Netter , Y. (1992) "The glial voltage-gated sodium channel: cell- and tissue-specific mRNA expression", Dave et al., 2001) it is

  19. Function and role of voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 expressed in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Kentaro; Iida, Haruko; Takano, Haruhito; Morita, Toshihiro; Sata, Masataka; Nagai, Ryozo; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channel currents (I(Na)) are expressed in several types of smooth muscle cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of I(Na), its functional role, pathophysiology in cultured human (hASMCs) and rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells (rASMCs), and its association with vascular intimal hyperplasia. In whole cell voltage clamp, I(Na) was observed at potential positive to -40 mV, was blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX), and replacing extracellular Na(+) with N-methyl-d-glucamine in cultured hASMCs. In contrast to native aorta, cultured hASMCs strongly expressed SCN9A encoding Na(V)1.7, as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. I(Na) was abolished by the treatment with SCN9A small-interfering (si)RNA (P < 0.01). TTX and SCN9A siRNA significantly inhibited cell migration (P < 0.01, respectively) and horseradish peroxidase uptake (P < 0.01, respectively). TTX also significantly reduced the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 6 and 12 h after the treatment (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). However, neither TTX nor siRNA had any effect on cell proliferation. L-type Ca(2+) channel current was recorded, and I(Na) was not observed in freshly isolated rASMCs, whereas TTX-sensitive I(Na) was recorded in cultured rASMCs. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunostaining for Na(V)1.7 revealed the prominent expression of SCN9A in cultured rASMCs and aorta 48 h after balloon injury but not in native aorta. In conclusion, these studies show that I(Na) is expressed in cultured and diseased conditions but not in normal aorta. The Na(V)1.7 plays an important role in cell migration, endocytosis, and secretion. Na(V)1.7 is also expressed in aorta after balloon injury, suggesting a potential role for Na(V)1.7 in the progression of intimal hyperplasia.

  20. Co-Localization of Sodium Channel Na[v]1.6 and the Sodium--Calcium Exchanger at Sites of Axonal Injury in the Spinal Cord in EAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craner, Matthew J.; Hains, Bryan C.; Lo, Albert C.; Black, Joel A.; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2004-01-01

    Axonal degeneration contributes to the development of non-remitting neurological deficits and disability in multiple sclerosis, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie axonal loss in multiple sclerosis are not clearly understood. Studies of white matter axonal injury have demonstrated that voltage-gated sodium channels can provide a route for…

  1. Co-Localization of Sodium Channel Na[v]1.6 and the Sodium--Calcium Exchanger at Sites of Axonal Injury in the Spinal Cord in EAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craner, Matthew J.; Hains, Bryan C.; Lo, Albert C.; Black, Joel A.; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2004-01-01

    Axonal degeneration contributes to the development of non-remitting neurological deficits and disability in multiple sclerosis, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie axonal loss in multiple sclerosis are not clearly understood. Studies of white matter axonal injury have demonstrated that voltage-gated sodium channels can provide a route for…

  2. Sodium-activated potassium channels are functionally coupled to persistent sodium currents.

    PubMed

    Hage, Travis A; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2012-02-22

    We report a novel coupled system of sodium-activated potassium currents (I(KNa)) and persistent sodium currents (I(NaP)), the components of which are widely distributed throughout the brain. Its existence and importance has not been previously recognized. Although I(KNa) was known to exist in many cell types, the source of Na(+) which activates I(KNa) remained a mystery. We now show in single membrane patches generated from the somas of rat neurons that sodium influx through I(NaP) is sufficient for activation of K(Na) channels, without substantial contribution from the transient sodium current or bulk [Na(+)](i). I(NaP) was found to be active at cell membrane resting potentials, a finding that may explain why I(KNa) can be evoked from negative holding potentials. These results show an unanticipated role for I(NaP) in activating a negative feedback system countering the excitable effects I(NaP); the interrelatedness of I(NaP) and I(KNa) suggests new ways neurons can tune their excitability.

  3. Upregulation of the sodium channel NaVβ4 subunit and its contributions to mechanical hypersensitivity and neuronal hyperexcitability in a rat model of radicular pain induced by local DRG inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Tan, Zhi-Yong; Barbosa, Cindy; Strong, Judith A.; Cummins, Theodore R.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    High frequency spontaneous firing in myelinated sensory neurons plays a key role in initiating pain behaviors in several different models, including the radicular pain model in which the rat lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are locally inflamed. The sodium channel isoform NaV1.6 contributes to pain behaviors and spontaneous activity in this model. Among all the isoforms in adult DRG, NaV1.6 is the main carrier of TTX-sensitive resurgent Na currents that allow high-frequency firing. Resurgent currents flow after a depolarization or action potential, as a blocking particle exits the pore. In most neurons the regulatory β4 subunit is potentially the endogenous blocker. We used in vivo siRNA mediated knockdown of NaVβ4 to examine its role in the DRG inflammation model. NaVβ4 but not control siRNA almost completely blocked mechanical hypersensitivity induced by DRG inflammation. Microelectrode recordings in isolated whole DRGs showed that NaVβ4 siRNA blocked the inflammation-induced increase in spontaneous activity of Aβ neurons, and reduced repetitive firing and other measures of excitability. NaVβ4 was preferentially expressed in larger diameter cells; DRG inflammation increased its expression and this was reversed by NaVβ4 siRNA, based on immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. NaVβ4 siRNA also reduced immunohistochemical NaV1.6 expression. Patch clamp recordings of TTX-sensitive Na currents in acutely cultured medium diameter DRG neurons showed that DRG inflammation increased transient and especially resurgent current; effects blocked by NaVβ4 siRNA. NaVβ4 may represent a more specific target for pain conditions that depend on myelinated neurons expressing NaV1.6. PMID:26785322

  4. Epithelial Sodium and Chloride Channels and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the asthmatic pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/chlorine ion channel. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were the English articles from 1980 to 2015 from journal databases, primarily PubMed and Google Scholar. The terms used in the literature search were: (1) ENaCs; cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); asthma/asthmatic, (2) ENaC/sodium salt; CF; asthma/asthmatic, (3) CFTR/chlorine ion channels; asthma/asthmatic, (4) ENaC/sodium channel/scnn1a/scnn1b/scnn1g/scnn1d/amiloride-sensitive/amiloride-inhibtable sodium channels/sodium salt; asthma/asthmatic, lung/pulmonary/respiratory/tracheal/alveolar, and (5) CFTR; CF; asthma/asthmatic (ti). Study Selection: These studies included randomized controlled trials or studies covering asthma pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to ENaC/chlorine ion channels within the last 25 years (from 1990 to 2015). The data involving chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF obtained from individual studies were also reviewed by the authors. Results: Airway surface liquid dehydration can cause airway inflammation and obstruction. ENaC and CFTR are closely related to the airway mucociliary clearance. Ion transporters may play a critical role in pathogenesis of asthmatic exacerbations. Conclusions: Ion channels have been the center of many studies aiming to understand asthmatic pathophysiological mechanisms or to identify therapeutic targets for better control of the disease. PMID:26265620

  5. Sodium Channels, Mitochondria, and Axonal Degeneration in Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Persson, Anna-Karin; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Estacion, Mark; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy results from damage to peripheral nerves and is often accompanied by pain in affected limbs. Treatment represents an unmet medical need and a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying axonal injury is needed. Longer nerve fibers tend to degenerate first (length-dependence), and patients carrying pathogenic mutations throughout life usually become symptomatic in mid- or late-life (time-dependence). The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels can contribute to axonal injury and sodium channel gain-of-function mutations have been linked to peripheral neuropathy. Recent studies have implicated sodium channel activity, mitochondrial compromise, and reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange in time- and length-dependent axonal injury. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying axonal injury in peripheral neuropathy may provide new therapeutic strategies for this painful and debilitating condition.

  6. Sodium channel blockers in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kalso, Eija

    2005-01-01

    Subtypes of tetrodotoxin resistant voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in the development of certain types of neuropathic pains. After nerve injury hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing develop at the site of injury and also in the dorsal root ganglion cell bodies. This hyperexcitability results at least partly from accumulation of sodium channels at the site of injury. The facts that these sodium channels seem to exist in peripheral nerves only and that they can be blocked at the resting state (use-dependent block) offer the possibility to develop drugs, which selectively block these damaged, overexcited nerves. At the moment no such drugs are available. However, some of the most potent drugs that are currently used to manage neuropathic pain e.g. amitriptyline and other tricyclic antidepressants, also block these channels in addition to having several other mechanisms of action. Also most anticonvulsants that are used to alleviate neuropathic pain are sodium channel blockers. Lidocaine, the prototype drug, has been shown to be effective in peripheral neuropathic pain. Its use is limited by the fact that it cannot be administered orally. An oral local anesthetic type sodium channel blocker, mexiletine is an antiarrhythmic agent that is effective in neuropathic pain. However, effective doses may be difficult to achieve because of adverse effects.

  7. Biophysical Adaptations of Prokaryotic Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Vien, T N; DeCaen, P G

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the adaptive features found in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These two families are distinct, having diverged early in evolutionary history but maintain a surprising degree of convergence in function. While prokaryotic NaVs are required for growth and motility, eukaryotic NaVs selectively conduct fast electrical currents for short- and long-range signaling across cell membranes in mammalian organs. Current interest in prokaryotic NaVs is stoked by their resolved high-resolution structures and functional features which are reminiscent of eukaryotic NaVs. In this chapter, comparisons between eukaryotic and prokaryotic NaVs are made to highlight the shared and unique aspects of ion selectivity, voltage sensitivity, and pharmacology. Examples of prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaV convergent evolution will be discussed within the context of their structural features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of the pharmacological properties of rat Na(V)1.8 with rat Na(V)1.2a and human Na(V)1.5 voltage-gated sodium channel subtypes using a membrane potential sensitive dye and FLIPR.

    PubMed

    Vickery, R G; Amagasu, S M; Chang, R; Mai, N; Kaufman, E; Martin, J; Hembrador, J; O'Keefe, M D; Gee, C; Marquess, D; Smith, J A M

    2004-01-01

    A novel, membrane potential sensitive dye and a fluorescence imaging plate reader (FLIPR) have been used to characterize the pharmacological properties of rat Na(v)1.8 voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) in parallel with rat Na(v)1.2a and human Na(v)1.5 VGSC subtypes, respectively. The sensitivity of recombinant Na(v)1.2a-CHO, Na(v)1.5-293-EBNA, and Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells to VGSC activators was subtype dependent. Veratridine evoked depolarization of Na(v)1.2a-CHO and Na(v)1.5-293-EBNA cells with pEC(50) values of 4.78 +/- 0.13 and 4.84 +/- 0.12, respectively (n = 3), but had negligible effect on Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells (pEC(50) < 4.5). Type I pyrethroids were without significant effect at all subtypes. In contrast, the type II pyrethroids deltamethrin and fenvalerate evoked direct depolarization of Na(v)1.8-F-11 and Na(v)1.5-293-EBNA cells. Deltamethrin potentiated the veratridine-evoked response in Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells by > or =20-fold, in contrast to a Na(v)1.2a, and Na(v)1.5 cells. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) inhibited VGSC activator-evoked depolarization of Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells with a biphasic concentration-response curve. The calculated pIC(50) values were 8.05 +/- 0.25 (n = 4) and 4.32 +/- 0.21 (n = 4), corresponding to TTX inhibition of endogenous TTX-sensitive (TTX-S), and recombinant Na(v)1.8 TTX-resistant (TTX-R) VGSCs, respectively. With the exception of TTX, the potencies of a number of ion channel blockers for the Na(v)1.8, Na(v)1.2a, and Na(v)1.5 VGSC subtypes were similar. In summary, these high-throughput FLIPR assays represent a valuable tool for the determination of the relative potencies of compounds at different VGSC subtypes and may prove useful for the identification of novel subtype-selective inhibitors.

  9. Calcium triggers reversal of calmodulin on nested anti-parallel sites in the IQ motif of the neuronal voltage-dependent sodium channel NaV1.2.

    PubMed

    Hovey, Liam; Fowler, C Andrew; Mahling, Ryan; Lin, Zesen; Miller, Mark Stephen; Marx, Dagan C; Yoder, Jesse B; Kim, Elaine H; Tefft, Kristin M; Waite, Brett C; Feldkamp, Michael D; Yu, Liping; Shea, Madeline A

    2017-03-09

    Several members of the voltage-gated sodium channel family are regulated by calmodulin (CaM) and ionic calcium. The neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.2 contains binding sites for both apo (calcium-depleted) and calcium-saturated CaM. We have determined equilibrium dissociation constants for rat NaV1.2 IQ motif [IQRAYRRYLLK] binding to apo CaM (~3nM) and (Ca(2+))4-CaM (~85nM), showing that apo CaM binding is favored by 30-fold. For both apo and (Ca(2+))4-CaM, NMR demonstrated that NaV1.2 IQ motif peptide (NaV1.2IQp) exclusively made contacts with C-domain residues of CaM (CaMC). To understand how calcium triggers conformational change at the CaM-IQ interface, we determined a solution structure (2M5E.pdb) of (Ca(2+))2-CaMC bound to NaV1.2IQp. The polarity of (Ca(2+))2-CaMC relative to the IQ motif was opposite to that seen in apo CaMC-Nav1.2IQp (2KXW), revealing that CaMC recognizes nested, anti-parallel sites in Nav1.2IQp. Reversal of CaM may require transient release from the IQ motif during calcium binding, and facilitate a re-orientation of CaMN allowing interactions with non-IQ NaV1.2 residues or auxiliary regulatory proteins interacting in the vicinity of the IQ motif.

  10. Mutant Sodium Channel for Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, Bakhos A; Christensen, Adam P; Pike, Lisa; Wurdinger, Thomas; Perry, Katherine F; Saydam, Okay; Jacobs, Andreas H; García-Añoveros, Jaime; Weissleder, Ralph; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Corey, David P; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2009-01-01

    Viral vectors have been used to deliver a wide range of therapeutic genes to tumors. In this study, a novel tumor therapy was achieved by the delivery of a mammalian brain sodium channel, ASIC2a, carrying a mutation that renders it constitutively open. This channel was delivered to tumor cells using a herpes simplex virus-1/Epstein–Barr virus (HSV/EBV) hybrid amplicon vector in which gene expression was controlled by a tetracycline regulatory system (tet-on) with silencer elements. Upon infection and doxycycline induction of mutant channel expression in tumor cells, the open channel led to amiloride-sensitive sodium influx as assessed by patch clamp recording and sodium imaging in culture. Within hours, tumor cells swelled and died. In addition to cells expressing the mutant channel, adjacent, noninfected cells connected by gap junctions also died. Intratumoral injection of HSV/EBV amplicon vector encoding the mutant sodium channel and systemic administration of doxycycline led to regression of subcutaneous tumors in nude mice as assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The advantage of this direct mode of tumor therapy is that all types of tumor cells become susceptible and death is rapid with no time for the tumor cells to become resistant. PMID:19259066

  11. Multiple sodium channel variants in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    He, Lin; Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Liu, Nannan

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the target sites of both DDT and pyrethroid insecticides. The importance of alternative splicing as a key mechanism governing the structural and functional diversity of sodium channels and the resulting development of insecticide and acaricide resistance is widely recognized, as shown by the extensive research on characterizing alternative splicing and variants of sodium channels in medically and agriculturally important insect species. Here we present the first comparative study of multiple variants of the sodium channel transcripts in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. The variants were classified into two categories, CxNa-L and CxNa-S based on their distinguishing sequence sizes of ~6.5 kb and ~4.0 kb, respectively, and generated via major extensive alternative splicing with minor small deletions/ insertions in susceptible S-Lab, low resistant HAmCq(G0), and highly resistant HAmCq(G8)Culex strains. Four alternative Cx-Na-L splice variants were identified, including three full length variants with three optional exons (2, 5, and 21i) and one with in-frame-stop codons. Large, multi-exon-alternative splices were identified in the CxNa-S category. All CxNa-S splicing variants in the S-Lab and HAmCq(G0) strains contained in-frame stop codons, suggesting that any resulting proteins would be truncated. The ~1000 to ~3000-fold lower expression of these splice variants with stop codons compared with the CxNa-L splicing variants may support the lower importance of these variants in S-Lab and HAmCq(G0). Interestingly, two alternative splicing variants of CxNa-S in HAmCq(G8) included entire ORFs but lacked exons 5 to18 and these two variants had much higher expression levels in HAmCq(G8) than in S-Lab and HAmCq(G0). These results provide a functional basis for further characterizing how alternative splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel contributes to diversity in neuronal signaling in mosquitoes in response to pyrethroids, and

  12. Abnormal changes in voltage-gated sodium channels Na(V)1.1, Na(V)1.2, Na(V)1.3, Na(V)1.6 and in calmodulin/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, within the brains of spontaneously epileptic rats and tremor rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoxue; Guo, Feng; Lv, Xintong; Feng, Rui; Min, Dongyu; Ma, Lihua; Liu, Yajing; Zhao, Jinsheng; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Hao, Liying; Cai, Jiqun

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a crucial role in epilepsy. The expressions of different VGSCs subtypes are varied in diverse animal models of epilepsy that may reflect their multiple phenotypes or the complexity of the mechanisms of epilepsy. In a previous study, we reported that NaV1.1 and NaV1.3 were up-regulated in the hippocampus of the spontaneously epileptic rat (SER). In this study, we further analyzed both the expression and distribution of the typical VGSC subtypes NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3 and NaV1.6 in the hippocampus and in the cortex of the temporal lobe of two genetic epileptic animal models: the SER and the tremor rat (TRM). The expressions of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) were also analyzed with the purpose of assessing the effect of the CaM/CaMKII pathway in these two models of epilepsy. Increased expression of the four VGSC subtypes and CaM, accompanied by a decrease in CaMKII was observed in the hippocampus of both the SERs and the TRM rats. However, the changes observed in the expression of VGSC subtypes and CaM were decreased with an elevated CaMKII in the cortex of their temporal lobes. Double-labeled immunofluorescence data suggested that in SERs and TRM rats, the four subtypes of the VGSC proteins were present throughout the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus and temporal lobe cortex and these were co-localized in neurons with CaM. These data represent the first evidence of abnormal changes in expression of four VGSC subtypes (NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3 and NaV1.6) and CaM/CaMKII in the hippocampus and temporal lobe cortex of SERs and TRM rats. These changes may be involved in the generation of epileptiform activity and underlie the observed seizure phenotype in these rat models of genetic epilepsy.

  13. Inhibition of Sodium Ion Channel Function with Truncated Forms of Batrachotoxin.

    PubMed

    Toma, Tatsuya; Logan, Matthew M; Menard, Frederic; Devlin, A Sloan; Du Bois, J

    2016-10-19

    A novel family of small molecule inhibitors of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) based on the structure of batrachotoxin (BTX), a well-known channel agonist, is described. Protein mutagenesis and electrophysiology experiments reveal the binding site as the inner pore region of the channel, analogous to BTX, alkaloid toxins, and local anesthetics. Homology modeling of the eukaryotic channel based on recent crystallographic analyses of bacterial NaVs suggests a mechanism of action for ion conduction block.

  14. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in Synaptosomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    e o t .brane. Using the squid giant axon, Hodgkin and Huxley (1952)R ceived f r publication April 20, 19P4. ’ Supported in part by a Postdoctoral...neurotoxin receptor sites I (TTX) voltage-dependent sodium channel. Biophys. J. 45: 31-34, 1984. CArTERALL, W. A.: Activation of the action potential Na...venom whichactivates the action potential Na* ionophore. J. Biol. Chem. 251: 5528-5536, Recent studies with fluorescent derivatives of sodium chan

  15. Therapeutic potential for phenytoin: targeting Na(v)1.5 sodium channels to reduce migration and invasion in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Kozminski, David J; Wold, Lindsey A; Modak, Rohan; Calhoun, Jeffrey D; Isom, Lori L; Brackenbury, William J

    2012-07-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric membrane protein complexes containing pore-forming α subunits and smaller, non-pore-forming β subunits. VGSCs are classically expressed in excitable cells, including neurons and muscle cells, where they mediate action potential firing, neurite outgrowth, pathfinding, and migration. VGSCs are also expressed in metastatic cells from a number of cancers. The Na(v)1.5 α subunit (encoded by SCN5A) is expressed in breast cancer (BCa) cell lines, where it enhances migration and invasion. We studied the expression of SCN5A in BCa array data, and tested the effect of the VGSC-blocking anticonvulsant phenytoin (5,5-diphenylhydantoin) on Na(+) current, migration, and invasion in BCa cells. SCN5A was up-regulated in BCa samples in several datasets, and was more highly expressed in samples from patients who had a recurrence, metastasis, or died within 5 years. SCN5A was also overexpressed as an outlier in a subset of samples, and associated with increased odds of developing metastasis. Phenytoin inhibited transient and persistent Na(+) current recorded from strongly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells, and this effect was more potent at depolarized holding voltages. It may thus be an effective VGSC-blocking drug in cancer cells, which typically have depolarized membrane potentials. At a concentration within the therapeutic range used to treat epilepsy, phenytoin significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells, but had no effect on weakly metastatic MCF-7 cells, which do not express Na(+) currents. We conclude that phenytoin suppresses Na(+) current in VGSC-expressing metastatic BCa cells, thus inhibiting VGSC-dependent migration and invasion. Together, our data support the hypothesis that SCN5A is up-regulated in BCa, favoring an invasive/metastatic phenotype. We therefore propose that repurposing existing VGSC-blocking therapeutic drugs should be further investigated as a potential new strategy to improve

  16. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; McArthur, Jeff; Ostroumov, Vitaly; French, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10–70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  17. Differential thermosensitivity in mixed syndrome cardiac sodium channel mutants.

    PubMed

    Abdelsayed, Mena; Peters, Colin H; Ruben, Peter C

    2015-09-15

    Cardiac arrhythmias are often associated with mutations in SCN5A the gene that encodes the cardiac paralogue of the voltage-gated sodium channel, NaV 1.5. The NaV 1.5 mutants R1193Q and E1784K give rise to both long QT and Brugada syndromes. Various environmental factors, including temperature, may unmask arrhythmia. We sought to determine whether temperature might be an arrhythmogenic trigger in these two mixed syndrome mutants. Whole-cell patch clamp was used to measure the biophysical properties of NaV 1.5 WT, E1784K and R1193Q mutants. Recordings were performed using Chinese hamster ovary (CHOk1) cells transiently transfected with the NaV 1.5 α subunit (WT, E1784K, or R1193Q), β1 subunit, and eGFP. The channels' voltage-dependent and kinetic properties were measured at three different temperatures: 10ºC, 22ºC, and 34ºC. The E1784K mutant is more thermosensitive than either WT or R1193Q channels. When temperature is elevated from 22°C to 34°C, there is a greater increase in late INa and use-dependent inactivation in E1784K than in WT or R1193Q. However, when temperature is lowered to 10°C, the two mutants show a decrease in channel availability. Action potential modelling using Q10 fit values, extrapolated to physiological and febrile temperatures, show a larger transmural voltage gradient in E1784K compared to R1193Q and WT with hyperthermia. The E1784K mutant is more thermosensitive than WT or R1193Q channels. This enhanced thermosensitivity may be a mechanism for arrhythmogenesis in patients with E1784K sodium channels.

  18. An update on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Onwuli, Donatus O; Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential proteins in brain physiology, as they generate the sodium currents that initiate neuronal action potentials. Voltage-gated sodium channels expression, localisation and function are regulated by a range of transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Here, we review our understanding of regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels, in particular SCN1A (NaV1.1), SCN2A (NaV1.2), SCN3A (NaV1.3) and SCN8A (NaV1.6), by transcription factors, by alternative splicing, and by post-translational modifications. Our focus is strongly centred on recent research lines, and newly generated knowledge.

  19. Impaired stretch modulation in potentially lethal cardiac sodium channel mutants.

    PubMed

    Banderali, Umberto; Juranka, Peter F; Clark, Robert B; Giles, Wayne R; Morris, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    The presence of two slowly inactivating mutants of the cardiac sodium channel (hNa(V)1.5), R1623Q and R1626P, associate with sporadic Long-QT3 (LQT3) syndrome, and may contribute to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or lethal ventricular disturbances. Cardiac mechanoelectric feedback is considered a factor in such sporadic arrhythmias. Since stretch and shear forces modulate hNa(V)1.5 gating, detailed electrophysiological study of LQT-Na(V)1.5 mutant channel alpha subunit(s) might provide insights. We compared recombinant R1623Q and WT currents in control vs. stretched membrane of cell-attached patches of Xenopus oocytes. Macroscopic current was monitored before, during, and after stretch induced by pipette suction. In either mutant Na(+) channel, peak current at small depolarizations could be more than doubled by stretch. As in WT, R1623Q showed reversible and stretch intensity dependent acceleration of current onset and decay at all voltages, with kinetic coupling between these two processes retained during stretch. These two Na(V)1.5 channel alpha subunits differed in the absolute extent of kinetic acceleration for a given stretch intensity; over a range of intensities, R1623Q inactivation speed increased significantly less than did WT. The LQT3 mutant R1626P also retained its kinetic coupling during stretch. Whereas WT stretch-difference currents (I(Na)(V,t) without stretch minus I(Na)(V,t) with stretch) were mostly inhibitory (equivalent to outward current), they were substantially (R1623Q) or entirely (R1626P) excitatory for the LQT3 mutants. If stretch-modulated Na(V)1.5 current (i.e., brief excitation followed by accelerated current decay) routinely contributes to cardiac mechanoelectric feedback, then during hemodynamic load variations, the abnormal stretch-modulated components of R1623Q and R1626P current could be pro-arrhythmic.

  20. Epithelial Sodium and Acid-Sensing Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellenberger, Stephan

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are non-voltage-gated Na+ channels that form their own subfamilies within the ENaC/degenerin ion channel family. ASICs are sensors of extracellular pH, and ENaC, whose main function is trans-epithelial Na+ transport, can sense extra- and intra-cellular Na+. In aldosterone-responsive epithelial cells of the kidney, ENaC plays a critical role in the control of sodium balance, blood volume and blood pressure. In airway epithelia, ENaC has a distinct role in controlling fluid reabsorption at the air-liquid interface, thereby determining the rate of mucociliary transport. In taste receptor cells of the tongue, ENaC is involved in salt taste sensation. ASICs have emerged as key sensors for extracellular protons in central and peripheral neurons. Although not all of their physiological and pathological functions are firmly established yet, there is good evidence for a role of ASICs in the brain in learning, expression of fear, and in neurodegeneration after ischaemic stroke. In sensory neurons, ASICs are involved in nociception and mechanosensation. ENaC and ASIC subunits share substantial sequence homology and the conservation of several functional domains. This chapter summarises our current understanding of the physiological functions and of the mechanisms of ion permeation, gating and regulation of ENaC and ASICs.

  1. Voltage-gated sodium channels and cancer: is excitability their primary role?

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Sébastien; Gillet, Ludovic; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Besson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are molecular characteristics of excitable cells. Their activation, triggered by membrane depolarization, generates transient sodium currents that initiate action potentials in neurons and muscle cells. Sodium currents were discovered by Hodgkin and Huxley using the voltage clamp technique and reported in their landmark series of papers in 1952. It was only in the 1980's that sodium channel proteins from excitable membranes were molecularly characterized by Catterall and his collaborators. Non-excitable cells can also express NaV channels in physiological conditions as well as in pathological conditions. These NaV channels can sustain biological roles that are not related to the generation of action potentials. Interestingly, it is likely that the abnormal expression of NaV in pathological tissues can reflect the re-expression of a fetal phenotype. This is especially true in epithelial cancer cells for which these channels have been identified and sodium currents recorded, while it was not the case for cells from the cognate normal tissues. In cancers, the functional activity of NaV appeared to be involved in regulating the proliferative, migrative, and invasive properties of cells. This review is aimed at addressing the non-excitable roles of NaV channels with a specific emphasis in the regulation of cancer cell biology. PMID:26283962

  2. Purified and unpurified sodium channels from eel electroplax in planar lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Highly purified sodium channel protein from the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, was reconstituted into liposomes and incorporated into planar bilayers made from neutral phospholipids dissolved in decane. The purest sodium channel preparations consisted of only the large, 260-kD tetrodotoxin (TTX)-binding polypeptide. For all preparations, batrachotoxin (BTX) induced long-lived single-channel currents (25 pS at 500 mM NaCl) that showed voltage-dependent activation and were blocked by TTX. This block was also voltage dependent, with negative potentials increasing block. The permeability ratios were 4.7 for Na+:K+ and 1.6 for Na+:Li+. The midpoint for steady state activation occurred around -70 mV and did not shift significantly when the NaCl concentration was increased from 50 to 1,000 mM. Veratridine-induced single-channel currents were about half the size of those activated by BTX. Unpurified, nonsolubilized sodium channels from E. electricus membrane fragments were also incorporated into planar bilayers. There were no detectable differences in the characteristics of unpurified and purified sodium channels, although membrane stability was considerably higher when purified material was used. Thus, in the eel, the large, 260-kD polypeptide alone is sufficient to demonstrate single-channel activity like that observed for mammalian sodium channel preparations in which smaller subunits have been found. PMID:2443607

  3. Molecular biology of insect sodium channels and pyrethroid resistance.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S

    2014-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Many of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors.

  4. Molecular Biology of Insect Sodium Channels and Pyrethroid Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Most of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors. PMID:24704279

  5. Voltage-gated sodium channels: biophysics, pharmacology, and related channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Gollob, Michael H; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit) that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (I(Na)) and can also function as cell adhesion molecules. In vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named "channel partners" or "channel interacting proteins" (ChiPs) like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin), and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics). Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium "channelopathies".  This review will outline the structure, function, and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field.

  6. Excitability constraints on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Angelino, Elaine; Brenner, Michael P

    2007-09-01

    We study how functional constraints bound and shape evolution through an analysis of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels. The primary function of sodium channels is to allow the propagation of action potentials. Since Hodgkin and Huxley, mathematical models have suggested that sodium channel properties need to be tightly constrained for an action potential to propagate. There are nine mammalian genes encoding voltage-gated sodium channels, many of which are more than approximately 90% identical by sequence. This sequence similarity presumably corresponds to similarity of function, consistent with the idea that these properties must be tightly constrained. However, the multiplicity of genes encoding sodium channels raises the question: why are there so many? We demonstrate that the simplest theoretical constraints bounding sodium channel diversity--the requirements of membrane excitability and the uniqueness of the resting potential--act directly on constraining sodium channel properties. We compare the predicted constraints with functional data on mammalian sodium channel properties collected from the literature, including 172 different sets of measurements from 40 publications, wild-type and mutant, under a variety of conditions. The data from all channel types, including mutants, obeys the excitability constraint; on the other hand, channels expressed in muscle tend to obey the constraint of a unique resting potential, while channels expressed in neuronal tissue do not. The excitability properties alone distinguish the nine sodium channels into four different groups that are consistent with phylogenetic analysis. Our calculations suggest interpretations for the functional differences between these groups.

  7. Epithelial sodium channel is a key mediator of growth hormone-induced sodium retention in acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Kamenicky, Peter; Viengchareun, Say; Blanchard, Anne; Meduri, Geri; Zizzari, Philippe; Imbert-Teboul, Martine; Doucet, Alain; Chanson, Philippe; Lombes, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Acromegalic patients present with volume expansion and arterial hypertension but the renal sites and molecular mechanisms of direct antinatriuretic action of growth hormone (GH) remain unclear. Here, we show that acromegalic GC rats, which are chronically exposed to very high levels of GH, exhibited a decrease of furosemide-induced natriuresis and an increase of amiloride-stimulated natriuresis compared to controls. Enhanced Na+,K+-ATPase activity and altered proteolytic maturation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunits in the cortical collecting ducts (CCD) of GC rats provided additional evidence for an increased sodium reabsorption in the late distal nephron under chronic GH excess. In vitro experiments on KC3AC1 cells, a murine CCD cell model revealed the expression of functional GH receptors (GHR) and IGF-1 receptors coupled to activation of JAK2/STAT5, ERK and AKT signaling pathways. That GH directly controls sodium reabsorption in CCD cells is supported by i) stimulation of transepithelial sodium transport inhibited by GHR antagonist pegvisomant ii) induction of αENaC mRNA expression iii) identification of STAT5 binding to a response element located in the αENaC promoter, indicative of the transcriptional regulation of αENaC by GH. Our findings provide first evidence that GH, in concert with IGF-1, stimulates ENaC-mediated sodium transport in the late distal nephron, accounting for the pathogenesis of sodium retention in acromegaly. PMID:18388193

  8. Calmodulin limits pathogenic Na+ channel persistent current

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Haidun; Wang, Chaojian; Marx, Steven O.

    2017-01-01

    Increased “persistent” current, caused by delayed inactivation, through voltage-gated Na+ (NaV) channels leads to cardiac arrhythmias or epilepsy. The underlying molecular contributors to these inactivation defects are poorly understood. Here, we show that calmodulin (CaM) binding to multiple sites within NaV channel intracellular C-terminal domains (CTDs) limits persistent Na+ current and accelerates inactivation across the NaV family. Arrhythmia or epilepsy mutations located in NaV1.5 or NaV1.2 channel CTDs, respectively, reduce CaM binding either directly or by interfering with CTD–CTD interchannel interactions. Boosting the availability of CaM, thus shifting its binding equilibrium, restores wild-type (WT)–like inactivation in mutant NaV1.5 and NaV1.2 channels and likewise diminishes the comparatively large persistent Na+ current through WT NaV1.6, whose CTD displays relatively low CaM affinity. In cerebellar Purkinje neurons, in which NaV1.6 promotes a large physiological persistent Na+ current, increased CaM diminishes the persistent Na+ current, suggesting that the endogenous, comparatively weak affinity of NaV1.6 for apoCaM is important for physiological persistent current. PMID:28087622

  9. Differential sensitivity of rat voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms to pyrazoline-type insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, Kristopher S.; Soderlund, David M. . E-mail: dms6@cornell.edu

    2006-07-15

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides are potent inhibitors of insect and mammalian voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In mammals, there are nine sodium channel {alpha} subunit isoforms that have unique distributions and pharmacological properties, but no published data exist that compare the relative sensitivity of these different mammalian sodium channel isoforms to inhibition by pyrazoline-type insecticides. This study employed the Xenopus oocyte expression system to examine the relative sensitivity of rat Na{sub v}1.2a, Na{sub v}1.4, Na{sub v}1.5, and Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channel {alpha} subunit isoforms to the pyrazoline-type insecticides indoxacarb, DCJW, and RH 3421. Additionally, we assessed the effect of coexpression with the rat {beta}1 auxiliary subunit on the sensitivity of the Na{sub v}1.2a and Na{sub v}1.4 isoforms to these compounds. The relative sensitivity of the four sodium channel {alpha} subunits differed for each of the three compounds we examined. With DCJW, the order of sensitivity was Na{sub v}1.4 > Na{sub v}1.2a > Na{sub v}1.5 > Na{sub v}1.8. In contrast, the relative sensitivity of these isoforms to indoxacarb differed from that to DCJW: the Na{sub v}1.8 isoform was most sensitive, the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform was completely insensitive, and the sensitivities of the Na{sub v}1.5 and Na{sub v}1.2a isoforms were intermediate between these two extremes. Moreover, the pattern of sensitivity to RH 3421 among these four isoforms was different from that for either indoxacarb or DCJW: the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform was most sensitive to RH 3421, whereas the sensitivities of the remaining three isoforms were substantially less than that of the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform and were approximately equivalent. The only statistically significant effect of coexpression of either the Na{sub v}1.2a or Na{sub v}1.4 isoforms with the {beta}1 subunit was the modest reduction in the sensitivity of the Na{sub v}1.2a isoform to RH 3421. These results demonstrate that mammalian sodium

  10. Effects of the β1 auxiliary subunit on modification of Rat Na(v)1.6 sodium channels expressed in HEK293 cells by the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    He, Bingjun; Soderlund, David M

    2016-01-15

    We expressed rat Nav1.6 sodium channels with or without the rat β1 subunit in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and evaluated the effects of the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin on whole-cell sodium currents. In assays with the Nav1.6 α subunit alone, both pyrethroids prolonged channel inactivation and deactivation and shifted the voltage dependence of channel activation and steady-state inactivation toward hyperpolarization. Maximal shifts in activation were ~18 mV for tefluthrin and ~24 mV for deltamethrin. These compounds also caused hyperpolarizing shifts of ~10-14 mV in the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation and increased in the fraction of sodium current that was resistant to inactivation. The effects of pyrethroids on the voltage-dependent gating greatly increased the size of sodium window currents compared to unmodified channels; modified channels exhibited increased probability of spontaneous opening at membrane potentials more negative than the normal threshold for channel activation and incomplete channel inactivation. Coexpression of Nav1.6 with the β1 subunit had no effect on the kinetic behavior of pyrethroid-modified channels but had divergent effects on the voltage-dependent gating of tefluthrin- or deltamethrin-modified channels, increasing the size of tefluthrin-induced window currents but decreasing the size of corresponding deltamethrin-induced currents. Unexpectedly, the β1 subunit did not confer sensitivity to use-dependent channel modification by either tefluthrin or deltamethrin. We conclude from these results that functional reconstitution of channels in vitro requires careful attention to the subunit composition of channel complexes to ensure that channels in vitro are faithful functional and pharmacological models of channels in neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Direct interaction of Na-azide with the KATP channel.

    PubMed

    Trapp, S; Ashcroft, F M

    2000-11-01

    1. The effects of the metabolic inhibitor sodium azide were tested on excised macropatches from Xenopus oocytes expressing cloned ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels of the Kir6.2/SUR1 type. 2. In inside-out patches from oocytes expressing Kir6.2 delta C36 (a truncated form of Kir6.2 that expresses in the absence of SUR), intracellular Na-azide inhibited macroscopic currents with an IC50 of 11 mM. The inhibitory effect of Na-azide was mimicked by the same concentration of NaCl, but not by sucrose. 3. Na-azide and NaCl blocked Kir6.2/SUR1 currents with IC50 of 36 mM and 19 mM, respectively. Inhibition was abolished in the absence of intracellular Mg2+. In contrast, Kir6.2 delta C36 currents were inhibited by Na-azide both in the presence or absence of intracellular Mg2+. 4. Kir6.2/SUR1 currents were less sensitive to 3 mM Na-azide in the presence of MgATP. This apparent reduction in sensitivity is caused by a small activatory effect of Na-azide conferred by SUR. 5. We conclude that, in addition to its well-established inhibitory effect on cellular metabolism, which leads to activation of KATP channels in intact cells, intracellular Na-azide has direct effects on the KATP channel. Inhibition is intrinsic to Kir6.2, is mediated by Na+, and is modulated by SUR. There is also a small, ATP-dependent, stimulatory effect of Na-azide mediated by the SUR subunit. The direct effects of 3 mM Na-azide on KATP channels are negligible in comparison to the metabolic activation produced by the same Na-azide concentration.

  12. Neurological perspectives on voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Linley, John E.; Baker, Mark D.; Minett, Michael S.; Cregg, Roman; Werdehausen, Robert; Rugiero, François

    2012-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels has long been linked to disorders of neuronal excitability such as epilepsy and chronic pain. Recent genetic studies have now expanded the role of sodium channels in health and disease, to include autism, migraine, multiple sclerosis, cancer as well as muscle and immune system disorders. Transgenic mouse models have proved useful in understanding the physiological role of individual sodium channels, and there has been significant progress in the development of subtype selective inhibitors of sodium channels. This review will outline the functions and roles of specific sodium channels in electrical signalling and disease, focusing on neurological aspects. We also discuss recent advances in the development of selective sodium channel inhibitors. PMID:22961543

  13. The neuronal channel NALCN contributes resting sodium permeability and is required for normal respiratory rhythm.

    PubMed

    Lu, Boxun; Su, Yanhua; Das, Sudipto; Liu, Jin; Xia, Jingsheng; Ren, Dejian

    2007-04-20

    Sodium plays a key role in determining the basal excitability of the nervous systems through the resting "leak" Na(+) permeabilities, but the molecular identities of the TTX- and Cs(+)-resistant Na(+) leak conductance are totally unknown. Here we show that this conductance is formed by the protein NALCN, a substantially uncharacterized member of the sodium/calcium channel family. Unlike any of the other 20 family members, NALCN forms a voltage-independent, nonselective cation channel. NALCN mutant mice have a severely disrupted respiratory rhythm and die within 24 hours of birth. Brain stem-spinal cord recordings reveal reduced neuronal firing. The TTX- and Cs(+)-resistant background Na(+) leak current is absent in the mutant hippocampal neurons. The resting membrane potentials of the mutant neurons are relatively insensitive to changes in extracellular Na(+) concentration. Thus, NALCN, a nonselective cation channel, forms the background Na(+) leak conductance and controls neuronal excitability.

  14. Pacemaker rate and depolarization block in nigral dopamine neurons: a somatic sodium channel balancing act

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Kristal R.; Huertas, Marco A.; Horn, John P.; Canavier, Carmen C.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2012-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons are slow intrinsic pacemakers that undergo depolarization (DP) block upon moderate stimulation. Understanding DP block is important because it has been correlated with the clinical efficacy of chronic antipsychotic drug treatment. Here we describe how voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels regulate DP block and pacemaker activity in DA neurons of the substantia nigra using rat brain slices. The distribution, density and gating of NaV currents were manipulated by blocking native channels with tetrodotoxin and by creating virtual channels and anti-channels with dynamic clamp. Although action potentials initiate in the axon initial segment (AIS) and NaV channels are distributed in multiple dendrites, selective reduction of NaV channel activity in the soma was sufficient to decrease pacemaker frequency and increase susceptibility to DP block. Conversely, increasing somatic NaV current density raised pacemaker frequency and lowered susceptibility to DP block. Finally, when NaV currents were restricted to the soma, pacemaker activity occurred at abnormally high rates due to excessive local subthreshold NaV current. Together with computational simulations, these data show that both the slow pacemaker rate and the sensitivity to DP block that characterizes DA neurons result from the low density of somatic NaV channels. More generally, we conclude that the somatodendritic distribution of NaV channels is a major determinant of repetitive spiking frequency. PMID:23077037

  15. Indoxacarb, Metaflumizone, and Other Sodium Channel Inhibitor Insecticides: Mechanism and Site of Action on Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    von Stein, Richard T; Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2013-07-01

    Sodium channel inhibitor (SCI) insecticides were discovered almost four decades ago but have only recently yielded important commercial products (eg., indoxacarb and metaflumizone). SCI insecticides inhibit sodium channel function by binding selectively to slow-inactivated (non-conducting) sodium channel states. Characterization of the action of SCI insecticides on mammalian sodium channels using both biochemical and electrophysiological approaches demonstrates that they bind at or near a drug receptor site, the "local anesthetic (LA) receptor." This mechanism and site of action on sodium channels differentiates SCI insecticides from other insecticidal agents that act on sodium channels. However, SCI insecticides share a common mode of action with drugs currently under investigation as anticonvulsants and treatments for neuropathic pain. In this paper we summarize the development of the SCI insecticide class and the evidence that this structurally diverse group of compounds have a common mode of action on sodium channels. We then review research that has used site-directed mutagenesis and heterologous expression of cloned mammalian sodium channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes to further elucidate the site and mechanism of action of SCI insecticides. The results of these studies provide new insight into the mechanism of action of SCI insecticides on voltage-gated sodium channels, the location of the SCI insecticide receptor, and its relationship to the LA receptor that binds therapeutic SCI agents.

  16. Functional protein expression of multiple sodium channel alpha- and beta-subunit isoforms in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Susann G; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Zechner, Christoph; Maass, Alexander H; Bischoff, Sebastian; Muck, Jenny; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Scheuer, Todd; Maier, Sebastian K G

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are composed of pore-forming alpha- and auxiliary beta-subunits and are responsible for the rapid depolarization of cardiac action potentials. Recent evidence indicates that neuronal tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunits are expressed in the heart in addition to the predominant cardiac TTX-resistant Na(v)1.5 sodium channel alpha-subunit. These TTX-sensitive isoforms are preferentially localized in the transverse tubules of rodents. Since neonatal cardiomyocytes have yet to develop transverse tubules, we determined the complement of sodium channel subunits expressed in these cells. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were stained with antibodies specific for individual isoforms of sodium channel alpha- and beta-subunits. alpha-actinin, a component of the z-line, was used as an intracellular marker of sarcomere boundaries. TTX-sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunit isoforms Na(v)1.1, Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.4 and Na(v)1.6 were detected in neonatal rat heart but at levels reduced compared to the predominant cardiac alpha-subunit isoform, Na(v)1.5. Each of the beta-subunit isoforms (beta1-beta4) was also expressed in neonatal cardiac cells. In contrast to adult cardiomyocytes, the alpha-subunits are distributed in punctate clusters across the membrane surface of neonatal cardiomyocytes; no isoform-specific subcellular localization is observed. Voltage clamp recordings in the absence and presence of 20 nM TTX provided functional evidence for the presence of TTX-sensitive sodium current in neonatal ventricular myocardium which represents between 20 and 30% of the current, depending on membrane potential and experimental conditions. Thus, as in the adult heart, a range of sodium channel alpha-subunits are expressed in neonatal myocytes in addition to the predominant TTX-resistant Na(v)1.5 alpha-subunit and they contribute to the total sodium current.

  17. Sodium channel slow inactivation interferes with open channel block

    PubMed Central

    Hampl, Martin; Eberhardt, Esther; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Lampert, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 are linked to inherited pain syndromes such as erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). PEPD mutations impair Nav1.7 fast inactivation and increase persistent currents. PEPD mutations also increase resurgent currents, which involve the voltage-dependent release of an open channel blocker. In contrast, IEM mutations, whenever tested, leave resurgent currents unchanged. Accordingly, the IEM deletion mutation L955 (ΔL955) fails to produce resurgent currents despite enhanced persistent currents, which have hitherto been considered a prerequisite for resurgent currents. Additionally, ΔL955 exhibits a prominent enhancement of slow inactivation (SI). We introduced mutations into Nav1.7 and Nav1.6 that either enhance or impair SI in order to investigate their effects on resurgent currents. Our results show that enhanced SI is accompanied by impaired resurgent currents, which suggests that SI may interfere with open-channel block. PMID:27174182

  18. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF A VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNEL

    PubMed Central

    Payandeh, Jian; Scheuer, Todd; Zheng, Ning; Catterall, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate electrical signaling in excitable cells and are the molecular targets for drugs and disease mutations, but the structural basis for their voltage-dependent activation, ion selectivity, and drug block is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a voltage-gated Na+-channel from Arcobacter butzleri (NavAb) captured in a closed-pore conformation with four activated voltage-sensors at 2.7 Å resolution. The arginine gating charges make multiple hydrophilic interactions within the voltage-sensor, including unanticipated hydrogen bonds to the protein backbone. Comparisons to previous open-pore potassium channel structures suggest that the voltage-sensor domains and the S4-S5 linkers dilate the central pore by pivoting together around a hinge at the base of the pore module. The NavAb selectivity filter is short, ~6.5 Å wide, and water-filled, with four acidic side-chains surrounding the narrowest part of the ion conduction pathway. This unique structure presents a high field-strength anionic coordination site, which confers Na+-selectivity through partial dehydration via direct interaction with glutamate side-chains. Fenestrations in the sides of the pore module are unexpectedly penetrated by fatty acyl chains that extend into the central cavity, and these portals are large enough for the entry of small, hydrophobic pore-blocking drugs. PMID:21743477

  19. Design of a specific activator for skeletal muscle sodium channels uncovers channel architecture.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lior; Ilan, Nitza; Gur, Maya; Stühmer, Walter; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2007-10-05

    Gating modifiers of voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)s) are important tools in neuroscience research and may have therapeutic potential in medicinal disorders. Analysis of the bioactive surface of the scorpion beta-toxin Css4 (from Centruroides suffusus suffusus) toward rat brain (rNa(v)1.2a) and skeletal muscle (rNa(v)1.4) channels using binding studies revealed commonality but also substantial differences, which were used to design a specific activator, Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R), of rNa(v)1.4 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The therapeutic potential of Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R) was tested using an rNa(v)1.4 mutant carrying the same mutation present in the genetic disorder hypokalemic periodic paralysis. The activator restored the impaired gating properties of the mutant channel expressed in oocytes, thus offering a tentative new means for treatment of neuromuscular disorders with reduced muscle excitability. Mutant double cycle analysis employing toxin residues involved in the construction of Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R) and residues whose equivalents in the rat brain channel rNa(v)1.2a were shown to affect Css4 binding revealed significant coupling energy (>1.3 kcal/mol) between F14A and E592A at Domain-2/voltage sensor segments 1-2 (D2/S1-S2), R27Q and E1251N at D3/SS2-S6, and E28R with both E650A at D2/S3-S4 and E1251N at D3/SS2-S6. These results show that despite the differences in interactions with the rat brain and skeletal muscle Na(v)s, Css4 recognizes a similar region on both channel subtypes. Moreover, our data indicate that the S3-S4 loop of the voltage sensor module in Domain-2 is in very close proximity to the SS2-S6 segment of the pore module of Domain-3 in rNa(v)1.4. This is the first experimental evidence that the inter-domain spatial organization of mammalian Na(v)s resembles that of voltage-gated potassium channels.

  20. RING1B contributes to Ewing sarcoma development by repressing the NaV1.6 sodium channel and the NF-κB pathway, independently of the fusion oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Rodriguez, Eva; Fernández-Mariño, Ana Isabel; Pardo-Pastor, Carlos; Bahamonde, María Isabel; Fernández-Fernández, José M.; García-Domínguez, Daniel J.; Hontecillas-Prieto, Lourdes; Lavarino, Cinzia; Carcaboso, Angel M.; de Torres, Carmen; Tirado, Oscar M.; de Alava, Enrique; Mora, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is an aggressive tumor defined by EWSR1 gene fusions that behave as an oncogene. Here we demonstrate that RING1B is highly expressed in primary ES tumors, and its expression is independent of the fusion oncogene. RING1B-depleted ES cells display an expression profile enriched in genes functionally involved in hematological development but RING1B depletion does not induce cellular differentiation. In ES cells, RING1B directly binds the SCN8A sodium channel promoter and its depletion results in enhanced Nav1.6 expression and function. The signaling pathway most significantly modulated by RING1B is NF-κB. RING1B depletion results in enhanced p105/p50 expression, which sensitizes ES cells to apoptosis by FGFR/SHP2/STAT3 blockade. Reduced NaV1.6 function protects ES cells from apoptotic cell death by maintaining low NF-κB levels. Our findings identify RING1B as a trait of the cell-of-origin and provide a potential targetable vulnerability. PMID:27317769

  1. RING1B contributes to Ewing sarcoma development by repressing the NaV1.6 sodium channel and the NF-κB pathway, independently of the fusion oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Figuerola, Elisabeth; Sanchez-Molina, Sara; Rodriguez, Eva; Fernández-Mariño, Ana Isabel; Pardo-Pastor, Carlos; Bahamonde, María Isabel; Fernández-Fernández, José M; García-Domínguez, Daniel J; Hontecillas-Prieto, Lourdes; Lavarino, Cinzia; Carcaboso, Angel M; de Torres, Carmen; Tirado, Oscar M; de Alava, Enrique; Mora, Jaume

    2016-07-19

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is an aggressive tumor defined by EWSR1 gene fusions that behave as an oncogene. Here we demonstrate that RING1B is highly expressed in primary ES tumors, and its expression is independent of the fusion oncogene. RING1B-depleted ES cells display an expression profile enriched in genes functionally involved in hematological development but RING1B depletion does not induce cellular differentiation. In ES cells, RING1B directly binds the SCN8A sodium channel promoter and its depletion results in enhanced Nav1.6 expression and function. The signaling pathway most significantly modulated by RING1B is NF-κB. RING1B depletion results in enhanced p105/p50 expression, which sensitizes ES cells to apoptosis by FGFR/SHP2/STAT3 blockade. Reduced NaV1.6 function protects ES cells from apoptotic cell death by maintaining low NF-κB levels. Our findings identify RING1B as a trait of the cell-of-origin and provide a potential targetable vulnerability.

  2. Several types of sodium-conducting channel in human carcinoma A-431 cells.

    PubMed

    Negulyaev YuA; Vedernikova, E A; Mozhayeva, G N

    1994-08-24

    Patch clamp method in outside-out configuration was used to search for cation channels which possibly mediate sodium influx through plasma membrane in A-431 carcinoma cells. We found four types of nonvoltage-gated Na-conducting channel. The first of 9-10 pS conductance (145 mM Na+, 30 degrees C) seems to be Na-selective; three others were characterized with conductance values of 24, 35 and 65 pS and lower selectivity among cations. Na-selective channels (9-10 pS) were not blocked by tetrodotoxin (1 microM). External application of amiloride (0.1-2 mM) resulted in a reversible inhibition of single currents through Na-selective channels.

  3. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhorov, Boris S.; Dong, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr), in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel. PMID:27809228

  4. Voltage-gated sodium channel blockers as immunomodulators.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Francesco; Livrea, Paolo; Jirillo, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    Several Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels (VGSC) are widely expressed on lymphocytes and macrophages but their role in immune function is still debated. Nevertheless, Na(+) influx through VGSC is required for lymphocytes activation and proliferation, since these responses are blocked by Na(+)-free medium or by VGSC blockers. These effects may be mediated by the reduced intracellular Na(+) levels, which in turn may impair the activity of Na(+)/Ca(++) exchanger resulting in reduced intracellular Ca(++) levels during lymphocyte activation. Furthermore, in Jurkat cell line VGSC appear to be involved in cell volume regulation, migration in artificial matrix and cell death by apoptosis. VGSC play a role in macrophage function as well, and VGSC blockers impair both phagocytosis and inflammatory responses. Several VGSC blockers have shown immunomodulatory properties in mice models, skewing the immune response toward a Th2-mediated response, while suppressing Th1-mediated responses, and VGSC already used in clinical practice are known to modulate immunoglobulin (Ig) levels both in mice and in humans. These effects suggest that VGSC blockers may find clinical application in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disease. However, many of these drugs induce a number of severe side effects. The relevance of VGSC function in immune regulation suggest that the testing of newly patented VGSC blockers for their effect on immunity may be worthwhile.

  5. Down-regulation of voltage-dependent sodium channels initiated by sodium influx in developing neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Dargent, B; Couraud, F

    1990-01-01

    To address the issue of whether regulatory feedback exists between the electrical activity of a neuron and ion-channel density, we investigated the effect of Na(+)-channel activators (scorpion alpha toxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) on the density of Na+ channels in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. A partial but rapid (t1/2, 15 min) disappearance of surface Na+ channels was observed as measured by a decrease in the specific binding of [3H]saxitoxin and 125I-labeled scorpion beta toxin and a decrease in specific 22Na+ uptake. Moreover, the increase in the number of Na+ channels that normally occurs during neuronal maturation in vitro was inhibited by chronic channel activator treatment. The induced disappearance of Na+ channels was abolished by tetrodotoxin, was found to be dependent on the external Na+ concentration, and was prevented when either choline (a nonpermeant ion) or Li+ (a permeant ion) was substituted for Na+. Amphotericin B, a Na+ ionophore, and monensin were able to mimick the effect of Na(+)-channel activators, while a KCl depolarization failed to do this. This feedback regulation seems to be a neuronal property since Na(+)-channel density in cultured astrocytes was not affected by channel activator treatment or by amphotericin B. The present evidence suggests that an increase in intracellular Na+ concentration, whether elicited by Na(+)-channel activators or mediated by a Na+ ionophore, can induce a decrease in surface Na+ channels and therefore is involved in down-regulation of Na(+)-channel density in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. PMID:2165609

  6. Down-regulation of voltage-dependent sodium channels initiated by sodium influx in developing neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dargent, B.; Couraud, F. )

    1990-08-01

    To address the issue of whether regulatory feedback exists between the electrical activity of a neuron and ion-channel density, the authors investigated the effect of Na{sup +}-channel activators (scorpion {alpha} toxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) on the density of Na{sup +} channels in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. A partial but rapid (t{sub 1/2}, 15 min) disappearance of surface Na{sup +} channels was observed as measured by a decrease in the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)saxitoxin and {sup 125}I-labeled scorpion {beta} toxin and a decrease in specific {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake. Moreover, the increase in the number of Na{sup +} channels that normally occurs during neuronal maturation in vitro was inhibited by chronic channel activator treatment. The induced disappearance of Na{sup +} channels was abolished by tetrodotoxin, was found to be dependent on the external Na{sup +} concentration, and was prevented when either choline (a nonpermeant ion) or Li{sup +} (a permeant ion) was substituted for Na{sup +}. Amphotericin B, a Na{sup +} ionophore, and monensin were able to mimick the effect of Na{sup +}-channel activators, while a KCl depolarization failed to do this. This feedback regulation seems to be a neuronal property since Na{sup +}-channel density in cultured astrocytes was not affected by channel activator treatment or by amphotericin B. The present evidence suggests that an increase in intracellular Na{sup +} concentration, whether elicited by Na{sup +}-channel activators or mediated by a Na{sup +} ionophore, can induce a decrease in surface Na{sup +} channels and therefore is involved in down-regulation of Na{sup +}-channel density in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro.

  7. Selective alteration of sodium channel gating by Australian funnel-web spider toxins.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, G M; Little, M J; Tyler, M; Narahashi, T

    1996-01-01

    The actions of potent mammalian neurotoxins isolated from the venom of two Australian funnel-web spiders were investigated using both electrophysiological and neurochemical techniques. Whole-cell patch clamp recording of sodium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons revealed that versutoxin (VTX), isolated from the venom of Hadronyche versuta, produced a concentration-dependent slowing or removal of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium current inactivation and a reduction in peak TTX-S sodium current. In contrast, VTX had no effect on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium currents or potassium currents. VTX also shifted the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation in the hyperpolarizing direction and increased the rate of recovery from inactivation. Ion flux studies performed in rat brain synaptosomes also revealed that robustoxin (RTX), from the venom of Atrax robustus, and VTX both produced a partial activation of 22Na+ flux and an inhibition of batrachotoxin-activated 22Na+ flux. This inhibition of flux through batrachotoxin-activated channels was not due to an interaction with neurotoxin receptor site 1 since [3H]saxitoxin binding was unaffected. In addition, the partial activation of 22Na+ flux was not enhanced in the presence of alpha-scorpion toxin and further experiments suggest that VTX also enhances [3H]batrachotoxin binding. These selective actions of funnel-web spider toxins on sodium channel function are comparable to those of alpha-scorpion and sea anemone toxins which bind to neurotoxin receptor site 3 on the channel to slow channel inactivation profoundly. Also, these modifications of sodium channel gating and kinetics are consistent with actions of the spider toxins to produce repetitive firing of action potentials.

  8. Venus Flytrap HKT1-Type Channel Provides for Prey Sodium Uptake into Carnivorous Plant Without Conflicting with Electrical Excitability.

    PubMed

    Böhm, J; Scherzer, S; Shabala, S; Krol, E; Neher, E; Mueller, T D; Hedrich, R

    2016-03-07

    The animal diet of the carnivorous Venus flytrap, Dionaea muscipula, contains a sodium load that enters the capture organ via an HKT1-type sodium channel, expressed in special epithelia cells on the inner trap lobe surface. DmHKT1 expression and sodium uptake activity is induced upon prey contact. Here, we analyzed the HKT1 properties required for prey sodium osmolyte management of carnivorous Dionaea. Analyses were based on homology modeling, generation of model-derived point mutants, and their functional testing in Xenopus oocytes. We showed that the wild-type HKT1 and its Na(+)- and K(+)-permeable mutants function as ion channels rather than K(+) transporters driven by proton or sodium gradients. These structural and biophysical features of a high-capacity, Na(+)-selective ion channel enable Dionaea glands to manage prey-derived sodium loads without confounding the action potential-based information management of the flytrap.

  9. Venus Flytrap HKT1-Type Channel Provides for Prey Sodium Uptake into Carnivorous Plant Without Conflicting with Electrical Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, J.; Scherzer, S.; Shabala, S.; Krol, E.; Neher, E.; Mueller, T.D.; Hedrich, R.

    2016-01-01

    The animal diet of the carnivorous Venus flytrap, Dionaea muscipula, contains a sodium load that enters the capture organ via an HKT1-type sodium channel, expressed in special epithelia cells on the inner trap lobe surface. DmHKT1 expression and sodium uptake activity is induced upon prey contact. Here, we analyzed the HKT1 properties required for prey sodium osmolyte management of carnivorous Dionaea. Analyses were based on homology modeling, generation of model-derived point mutants, and their functional testing in Xenopus oocytes. We showed that the wild-type HKT1 and its Na+- and K+-permeable mutants function as ion channels rather than K+ transporters driven by proton or sodium gradients. These structural and biophysical features of a high-capacity, Na+-selective ion channel enable Dionaea glands to manage prey-derived sodium loads without confounding the action potential-based information management of the flytrap. PMID:26455461

  10. Metaflumizone is a novel sodium channel blocker insecticide.

    PubMed

    Salgado, V L; Hayashi, J H

    2007-12-15

    Metaflumizone is a novel semicarbazone insecticide, derived chemically from the pyrazoline sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs) discovered at Philips-Duphar in the early 1970s, but with greatly improved mammalian safety. This paper describes studies confirming that the insecticidal action of metaflumizone is due to the state-dependent blockage of sodium channels. Larvae of the moth Spodoptera eridania injected with metaflumizone became paralyzed, concomitant with blockage of all nerve activity. Furthermore, tonic firing of abdominal stretch receptor organs from Spodoptera frugiperda was blocked by metaflumizone applied in the bath, consistent with the block of voltage-dependent sodium channels. Studies on native sodium channels, in primary-cultured neurons isolated from the CNS of the larvae of the moth Manduca sexta and on Para/TipE sodium channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus (African clawed frog) oocytes, confirmed that metaflumizone blocks sodium channels by binding selectively to the slow-inactivated state, which is characteristic of the SCBIs. The results confirm that metaflumizone is a novel sodium channel blocker insecticide.

  11. The Na4(+3) Clusters in Sodium Sodalite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-15

    ATES COVOIN0i-15-92 Technical 06-01-91 to 05-31-92 4. TITLE ANA SUGTITLE S. RNORNG NUMBER The Na4+ 3 Clusters in Sodium Sodalite NN l14-e0-J-se59a 𔄀...3 [AlSiO 4]3 sodalite prepared by high vacuum deposition of sodium atoms. The samples with a Na 43 +:Na33+ cluster ratio up to 1:10 show a single...absorption feature with -m. = 628 nm (1.99 eV). The absorption originates from the individual sodalite cages containing Na 43+ cluster. For the Na 43+:Na

  12. Conduction of Na+ and K+ through the NaK Channel: Molecular and Brownian Dynamics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Taira; Bisset, David; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2008-01-01

    Conduction of ions through the NaK channel, with M0 helix removed, was studied using both Brownian dynamics and molecular dynamics. Brownian dynamics simulations predict that the truncated NaK has approximately a third of the conductance of the related KcsA K+ channel, is outwardly rectifying, and has a Michaelis-Menten current-concentration relationship. Current magnitude increases when the glutamine residue located near the intracellular gate is replaced with a glutamate residue. The channel is blocked by extracellular Ca2+. Molecular dynamics simulations show that, under the influence of a strong applied potential, both Na+ and K+ move across the selectivity filter, although conduction rates for Na+ ions are somewhat lower. The mechanism of conduction of Na+ differs significantly from that of K+ in that Na+ is preferentially coordinated by single planes of pore-lining carbonyl oxygens, instead of two planes as in the usual K+ binding sites. The water-containing filter pocket resulting from a single change in the selectivity filter sequence (compared to potassium channels) disrupts several of the planes of carbonyl oxygens, and thus reduces the filter's ability to discriminate against sodium. PMID:18456826

  13. Conduction of Na+ and K+ through the NaK channel: molecular and Brownian dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Vora, Taira; Bisset, David; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2008-08-01

    Conduction of ions through the NaK channel, with M0 helix removed, was studied using both Brownian dynamics and molecular dynamics. Brownian dynamics simulations predict that the truncated NaK has approximately a third of the conductance of the related KcsA K+ channel, is outwardly rectifying, and has a Michaelis-Menten current-concentration relationship. Current magnitude increases when the glutamine residue located near the intracellular gate is replaced with a glutamate residue. The channel is blocked by extracellular Ca2+. Molecular dynamics simulations show that, under the influence of a strong applied potential, both Na+ and K+ move across the selectivity filter, although conduction rates for Na+ ions are somewhat lower. The mechanism of conduction of Na+ differs significantly from that of K+ in that Na+ is preferentially coordinated by single planes of pore-lining carbonyl oxygens, instead of two planes as in the usual K+ binding sites. The water-containing filter pocket resulting from a single change in the selectivity filter sequence (compared to potassium channels) disrupts several of the planes of carbonyl oxygens, and thus reduces the filter's ability to discriminate against sodium.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of ion transport through an open model of voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Sun, Ruining; Liu, Huihui; Gong, Haipeng

    2017-05-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are critical in the signal transduction of excitable cells. In this work, we modeled the open conformation for the pore domain of a prokaryotic NaV channel (NaVRh), and used molecular dynamics simulations to track the translocation of dozens of Na(+) ions through the channel in the presence of a physiological transmembrane ion concentration gradient and a transmembrane electrical field that was closer to the physiological one than previous studies. Channel conductance was then estimated from simulations on the wide-type and DEKA mutant of NaVRh. Interestingly, the conductivity predicted from the DEKA mutant agrees well with experimental measurement on eukaryotic NaV1.4 channel. Moreover, the wide-type and DEKA mutant of NaVRh exhibited markedly distinct ion permeation patterns, which thus implies the mechanistic difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaV channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A comparative study of the action of tolperisone on seven different voltage dependent sodium channel isoforms.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Doris; Lohberger, Birgit; Steinecker, Bibiane; Schmidt, Kurt; Quasthoff, Stefan; Schreibmayer, Wolfgang

    2006-05-24

    The specific, acute interaction of tolperisone, an agent used as a muscle relaxant and for the treatment of chronic pain conditions, with the Na(v1.2), Na(v1.3), Na(v1.4), Na(v1.5), Na(v1.6), Na(v1.7), and Na(v1.8) isoforms of voltage dependent sodium channels was investigated and compared to that of lidocaine. Voltage dependent sodium channels were expressed in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system and sodium currents were recorded with the two electrode voltage clamp technique. Cumulative dose response relations revealed marked differences in IC(50) values between the two drugs on identical isoforms, as well as between isoforms. A detailed kinetic analysis uncovered that tolperisone as well as lidocaine exhibited their blocking action not only via state dependent association/dissociation with voltage dependent sodium channels, but a considerable fraction of inhibition is tonic, i.e. permanent and basic in nature. Voltage dependent activation was affected to a minor extent only. A shift in steady-state inactivation to more negative potentials could be observed for most drug/isoform combinations. The contribution of this shift to overall block was, however, small at drug concentrations resulting in considerable overall block. Recovery from inactivation was affected notably by both drugs. Lidocaine application led to a pronounced prolongation of the time constant of the fast recovery process for the Na(v1.3), Na(v1.5), and Na(v1.7) isoforms, indicating common structural properties in the local anesthetic receptor site of these three proteins. Interestingly, this characteristic drug action was not observed for tolperisone.

  16. Genomic organization of the human skeletal muscle sodium channel gene

    SciTech Connect

    George, A.L. Jr.; Iyer, G.S.; Kleinfield, R.; Kallen, R.G.; Barchi, R.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Voltage-dependent sodium channels are essential for normal membrane excitability and contractility in adult skeletal muscle. The gene encoding the principal sodium channel [alpha]-subunit isoform in human skeletal muscle (SCN4A) has recently been shown to harbor point mutations in certain hereditary forms of periodic paralysis. The authors have carried out an analysis of the detailed structure of this gene including delination of intron-exon boundaries by genomic DNA cloning and sequence analysis. The complete coding region of SCN4A is found in 32.5 kb of genomic DNA and consists of 24 exons (54 to >2.2 kb) and 23 introns (97 bp-4.85 kb). The exon organization of the gene shows no relationship to the predicted functional domains of the channel protein and splice junctions interrupt many of the transmembrane segments. The genomic organization of sodium channels may have been partially conserved during evolution as evidenced by the observation that 10 of the 24 splice junctions in SCN4A are positioned in homologous locations in a putative sodium channel gene in Drosophila (para). The information presented here should be extremely useful both for further identifying sodium channel mutations and for gaining a better understanding of sodium channel evolution. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Sodium reduction in margarine using NaCl substitutes.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Carla; Rodrigues, Jéssica; Júnior, Heraldo; Carneiro, João; Freire, Tassyana; Freire, Luísa

    2017-08-17

    Sodium chloride is traditionally used as a food additive in food processing. However, because of its high sodium content, NaCl has been associated with chronic diseases. Margarine is a popular product that is used in several preparations, but it includes high sodium content; therefore, it is among the products whose sodium content should be reduced. Thus, the objective of this study was to produce margarines with reduced sodium content prepared using a salt mixture. The following 4 margarine formulations were prepared: Formulation A (control - 0% sodium reduction), Formulation B (20.8% less sodium), Formulation C (33.0% less sodium) and Formulation D (47.4% less sodium). The low sodium formulations were produced using a salt mixture consisting of NaCl, KCl, and monosodium glutamate at different concentrations. The margarines were evaluated using an acceptance test and descriptive tests: time-intensity and temporal dominance of sensations. The mixture used is a good alternative for preparing low sodium margarine because the low sodium formulations feature equal salinity and do not produce a strange or bad taste. Furthermore, it may be possible to prepare margarines with up to 47.4% less sodium and that are acceptable to consumers.

  18. Phylogeny Unites Animal Sodium Leak Channels with Fungal Calcium Channels in an Ancient, Voltage-Insensitive Clade

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hillis, David M.; Zakon, Harold H.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins in the superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels mediate behavior across the tree of life. These proteins regulate the movement of ions across cell membranes by opening and closing a central pore that controls ion flow. The best-known members of this superfamily are the voltage-gated potassium, calcium (Cav), and sodium (Nav) channels, which underlie impulse conduction in nerve and muscle. Not all members of this family are opened by changes in voltage, however. NALCN (NA+ leak channel nonselective) channels, which encode a voltage-insensitive “sodium leak” channel, have garnered a growing interest. This study examines the phylogenetic relationship among Nav/Cav voltage-gated and voltage-insensitive channels in the eukaryotic group Opisthokonta, which includes animals, fungi, and their unicellular relatives. We show that NALCN channels diverged from voltage-gated channels before the divergence of fungi and animals and that the closest relatives of NALCN channels are fungal calcium channels, which they functionally resemble. PMID:22821012

  19. Activity-induced internalization and rapid degradation of sodium channels in cultured fetal neurons

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A regulatory mechanism for neuronal excitability consists in controlling sodium channel density at the plasma membrane. In cultured fetal neurons, activation of sodium channels by neurotoxins, e.g., veratridine and alpha-scorpion toxin (alpha-ScTx) that enhance the channel open state probability induced a rapid down-regulation of surface channels. Evidence that the initial step of activity-induced sodium channel down-regulation is mediated by internalization was provided by using 125I-alpha-ScTx as both a channel probe and activator. After its binding to surface channels, the distribution of 125I-alpha-ScTx into five subcellular compartments was quantitatively analyzed by EM autoradiography. 125I-alpha-ScTx was found to accumulate in tubulovesicular endosomes and disappear from the cell surface in a time-dependent manner. This specific distribution was prevented by addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a channel blocker. By using a photoreactive derivative to covalently label sodium channels at the surface of cultured neurons, we further demonstrated that they are degraded after veratridine-induced internalization. A time-dependent decrease in the amount of labeled sodium channel alpha subunit was observed after veratridine treatment. After 120 min of incubation, half of the alpha subunits were cleaved. This degradation was prevented totally by TTX addition and was accompanied by the appearance of an increasing amount of a 90-kD major proteolytic fragment that was already detected after 45-60 min of veratridine treatment. Exposure of the photoaffinity-labeled cells to amphotericin B, a sodium ionophore, gave similar results. In this case, degradation was prevented when Na+ ions were substituted by choline ions and not blocked by TTX. After veratridine- or amphotericin B-induced internalization of sodium channels, breakdown of the labeled alpha subunit was inhibited by leupeptin, while internalization was almost unaffected. Thus, cultured fetal neurons are capable of

  20. Animal Toxins Influence Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, John

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are essential contributors to neuronal excitability, making them the most commonly targeted ion channel family by toxins found in animal venoms. These molecules can be used to probe the functional aspects of Nav channels on a molecular level and to explore their physiological role in normal and diseased tissues. This chapter summarizes our existing knowledge of the mechanisms by which animal toxins influence Nav channels as well as their potential application in designing therapeutic drugs. PMID:24737238

  1. Sodium channel selectivity and conduction: prokaryotes have devised their own molecular strategy.

    PubMed

    Finol-Urdaneta, Rocio K; Wang, Yibo; Al-Sabi, Ahmed; Zhao, Chunfeng; Noskov, Sergei Y; French, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Striking structural differences between voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels from prokaryotes (homotetramers) and eukaryotes (asymmetric, four-domain proteins) suggest the likelihood of different molecular mechanisms for common functions. For these two channel families, our data show similar selectivity sequences among alkali cations (relative permeability, Pion/PNa) and asymmetric, bi-ionic reversal potentials when the Na/K gradient is reversed. We performed coordinated experimental and computational studies, respectively, on the prokaryotic Nav channels NaChBac and NavAb. NaChBac shows an "anomalous," nonmonotonic mole-fraction dependence in the presence of certain sodium-potassium mixtures; to our knowledge, no comparable observation has been reported for eukaryotic Nav channels. NaChBac's preferential selectivity for sodium is reduced either by partial titration of its highly charged selectivity filter, when extracellular pH is lowered from 7.4 to 5.8, or by perturbation-likely steric-associated with a nominally electro-neutral substitution in the selectivity filter (E191D). Although no single molecular feature or energetic parameter appears to dominate, our atomistic simulations, based on the published NavAb crystal structure, revealed factors that may contribute to the normally observed selectivity for Na over K. These include: (a) a thermodynamic penalty to exchange one K(+) for one Na(+) in the wild-type (WT) channel, increasing the relative likelihood of Na(+) occupying the binding site; (b) a small tendency toward weaker ion binding to the selectivity filter in Na-K mixtures, consistent with the higher conductance observed with both sodium and potassium present; and (c) integrated 1-D potentials of mean force for sodium or potassium movement that show less separation for the less selective E/D mutant than for WT. Overall, tight binding of a single favored ion to the selectivity filter, together with crucial inter-ion interactions within the pore, suggests

  2. Distribution and function of sodium channel subtypes in human atrial myocardium.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Susann G; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Maass, Alexander H; Lange, Volkmar; Renner, Andre; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Bonz, Andreas; Muck, Jenny; Ertl, Georg; Catterall, William A; Scheuer, Todd; Maier, Sebastian K G

    2013-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels composed of a pore-forming α subunit and auxiliary β subunits are responsible for the upstroke of the action potential in cardiac muscle. However, their localization and expression patterns in human myocardium have not yet been clearly defined. We used immunohistochemical methods to define the level of expression and the subcellular localization of sodium channel α and β subunits in human atrial myocytes. Nav1.2 channels are located in highest density at intercalated disks where β1 and β3 subunits are also expressed. Nav1.4 and the predominant Nav1.5 channels are located in a striated pattern on the cell surface at the z-lines together with β2 subunits. Nav1.1, Nav1.3, and Nav1.6 channels are located in scattered puncta on the cell surface in a pattern similar to β3 and β4 subunits. Nav1.5 comprised approximately 88% of the total sodium channel staining, as assessed by quantitative immunohistochemistry. Functional studies using whole cell patch-clamp recording and measurements of contractility in human atrial cells and tissue showed that TTX-sensitive (non-Nav1.5) α subunit isoforms account for up to 27% of total sodium current in human atrium and are required for maximal contractility. Overall, our results show that multiple sodium channel α and β subunits are differentially localized in subcellular compartments in human atrial myocytes, suggesting that they play distinct roles in initiation and conduction of the action potential and in excitation-contraction coupling. TTX-sensitive sodium channel isoforms, even though expressed at low levels relative to TTX-sensitive Nav1.5, contribute substantially to total cardiac sodium current and are required for normal contractility. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Na(+) Regulation in Cardiac Myocytes". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Distribution and function of sodium channel subtypes in human atrial myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Maass, Alexander H.; Lange, Volkmar; Renner, Andre; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Bonz, Andreas; Muck, Jenny; Ertl, Georg; Catterall, William A.; Scheuer, Todd; Maier, Sebastian K.G.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels composed of a pore-forming α subunit and auxiliary β subunits are responsible for the upstroke of the action potential in cardiac muscle. However, their localization and expression patterns in human myocardium have not yet been clearly defined. We used immunohistochemical methods to define the level of expression and the subcellular localization of sodium channel α and β subunits in human atrial myocytes. Nav1.2 channels are located in highest density at intercalated disks where β1 and β3 subunits are also expressed. Nav1.4 and the predominant Nav1.5 channels are located in a striated pattern on the cell surface at the z-lines together with β2 subunits. Nav1.1, Nav1.3, and Nav1.6 channels are located in scattered puncta on the cell surface in a pattern similar to β3 and β4 subunits. Nav1.5 comprised approximately 88% of the total sodium channel staining, as assessed by quantitative immunohistochemistry. Functional studies using whole cell patch-clamp recording and measurements of contractility in human atrial cells and tissue showed that TTX-sensitive (non-Nav1.5) α subunit isoforms account for up to 27% of total sodium current in human atrium and are required for maximal contractility. Overall, our results show that multiple sodium channel α and β subunits are differentially localized in subcellular compartments in human atrial myocytes, suggesting that they play distinct roles in initiation and conduction of the action potential and in excitation–contraction coupling. TTX-sensitive sodium channel isoforms, even though expressed at low levels relative to TTX-sensitive Nav1.5, contribute substantially to total cardiac sodium current and are required for normal contractility. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Na+ Regulation in Cardiac Myocytes”. PMID:23702286

  4. Biophysical characterisation of the persistent sodium current of the Nav1.6 neuronal sodium channel: a single-channel analysis.

    PubMed

    Chatelier, Aurélien; Zhao, Juan; Bois, Patrick; Chahine, Mohamed

    2010-06-01

    Na(v)1.6 is the major voltage-gated sodium channel at nodes of Ranvier. This channel has been shown to produce a robust persistent inward current in whole-cell experiments. Na(v)1.6 plays an important role in axonal conduction and may significantly contribute to the pathophysiology of the injured nervous system through this persistent current. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and regulation of the persistent current are not well understood. Using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique, we investigated the Na(v)1.6 transient and persistent currents in HEK-293. Previous studies have shown that the persistent current depended on the content of the patch electrode. Therefore, we characterised the single-channel properties of the persistent current with an intact intracellular medium using the cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique. In HEK-293 cells, the Na(v)1.6 persistent current recorded in the whole-cell configuration was 3-5% of the peak transient current. In single-channel recording, the ratio between peak and persistent open probability confirmed the magnitude of the persistent current observed in the whole-cell configuration. The cell-attached configuration revealed that the molecular mechanism of the whole-cell persistent current is a consequence of single Na(v)1.6 channels reopening.

  5. Potential Roles of Amiloride-Sensitive Sodium Channels in Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Siguang; Liu, Cui; Ma, Yana; Ji, Hong-Long; Li, Xiumin

    2016-01-01

    The ENaC/degenerin ion channel superfamily includes the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and acid sensitive ionic channel (ASIC). ENaC is a multimeric ion channel formed by heteromultimeric membrane glycoproteins, which participate in a multitude of biological processes by mediating the transport of sodium (Na+) across epithelial tissues such as the kidney, lungs, bladder, and gut. Aberrant ENaC functions contribute to several human disease states including pseudohypoaldosteronism, Liddle syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and salt-sensitive hypertension. Increasing evidence suggests that ion channels not only regulate ion homeostasis and electric signaling in excitable cells but also play important roles in cancer cell behaviors such as proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and migration. Indeed, ENaCs/ASICs had been reported to be associated with cancer characteristics. Given their cell surface localization and pharmacology, pharmacological strategies to target ENaC/ASIC family members may be promising cancer therapeutics. PMID:27403419

  6. Actions of ethanol on voltage-sensitive sodium channels: effects on neurotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake in synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Mullin, M J; Hunt, W A

    1985-02-01

    Exposure of rat brain synaptosomes to ethanol in vitro reduced the neurotoxin-stimulated uptake of 22Na+. This effect of ethanol was concentration-dependent, occurred with concentrations of ethanol achieved in vivo and was fully reversible. The inhibitory effect of ethanol on neurotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake was due to a decrease in the maximal effect of the neurotoxins. Ethanol reduced the rate of batrachotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake when measured at 3, 5 and 7 but not 10 or 20 sec after the addition of 22Na+. In a series of aliphatic alcohols, there was a good correlation between potency for inhibition of batrachotoxin-stimulated 22Na+ uptake and the membrane/buffer partition coefficient, suggesting that a hydrophobic site in the membrane was involved in the action of the alcohols. Ethanol did not affect the scorpion venom-induced enhancement of batrachotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake. The inhibitory potency of tetrodotoxin was also unaffected by ethanol. These results demonstrate that ethanol has an inhibitory effect on neurotoxin-stimulated sodium influx occurring in voltage-sensitive sodium channels of brain tissue.

  7. Evolutionarily conserved intracellular gate of voltage-dependent sodium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelstrom, Kevin; Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel P.; Holmgren, Miguel; Chanda, Baron

    2014-03-01

    Members of the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily (VGIC) regulate ion flux and generate electrical signals in excitable cells by opening and closing pore gates. The location of the gate in voltage-gated sodium channels, a founding member of this superfamily, remains unresolved. Here we explore the chemical modification rates of introduced cysteines along the S6 helix of domain IV in an inactivation-removed background. We find that state-dependent accessibility is demarcated by an S6 hydrophobic residue; substituted cysteines above this site are not modified by charged thiol reagents when the channel is closed. These accessibilities are consistent with those inferred from open- and closed-state structures of prokaryotic sodium channels. Our findings suggest that an intracellular gate composed of a ring of hydrophobic residues is not only responsible for regulating access to the pore of sodium channels, but is also a conserved feature within canonical members of the VGIC superfamily.

  8. Evolutionarily conserved intracellular gate of voltage-dependent sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Oelstrom, Kevin; Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel P.; Holmgren, Miguel; Chanda, Baron

    2014-01-01

    Members of the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily (VGIC) regulate ion flux and generate electrical signals in excitable cells by opening and closing pore gates. The location of the gate in voltage-gated sodium channels, a founding member of this superfamily, remains unresolved. Here we explore the chemical modification rates of introduced cysteines along the S6 helix of domain IV in an inactivation-removed background. We find that state-dependent accessibility is demarcated by an S6 hydrophobic residue; substituted cysteines above this site are not modified by charged thiol reagents when the channel is closed. These accessibilities are consistent with those inferred from open- and closed-state structures of prokaryotic sodium channels. Our findings suggest that an intracellular gate composed of a ring of hydrophobic residues is not only responsible for regulating access to the pore of sodium channels, but is also a conserved feature within canonical members of the VGIC superfamily. PMID:24619022

  9. Channels, carriers, and pumps in the pathogenesis of sodium-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Giovambattista; Cantone, Alessandra; Evangelista, Ciriana; Zacchia, Miriam; Trepiccione, Francesco; Acone, Daria; Rizzo, Maria

    2005-11-01

    Sodium-sensitive hypertension is thought to be dependent on primary alterations in renal tubular sodium reabsorption. The major apical plasma membrane Na(+) transporters include the proximal tubular Na(+)-H(+) exchanger, the thick ascending limb Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransport system, the distal tubular Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter, and the collecting duct epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). This article explores the role of each transporter in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Although the contribution of the proximal tubule Na(+)-H(+) exchanger is not yet defined completely, more convincing data have been generated about the importance of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-). Indeed at least 2 forms of hypertension appear to be related to the up-regulation of the transporter: the so-called programmed hypertension induced by low-protein diet during pregnancy and the early phase of hypertension in the Milan strain of rats. With respect to the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter this may be overactive caused by inactivating mutation of WNK4 as in the Gordon syndrome, although it is the main actor for the maintenance phase of the hypertension found in the Milan strain of rats. Finally, the contribution of the ENaC has been established clearly; indeed, in the Liddle syndrome the mutation of the ENaC gene leads to a longer retention of the channel on the cell surface of collecting duct principal cells, thus inducing stronger sodium reabsorption along this segment. All these examples clearly indicate that renal sodium transporters may be responsible for various types of sodium-sensitive hypertension.

  10. Batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels from squid optic nerve in planar bilayers. Ion conduction and gating properties

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Squid optic nerve sodium channels were characterized in planar bilayers in the presence of batrachotoxin (BTX). The channel exhibits a conductance of 20 pS in symmetrical 200 mM NaCl and behaves as a sodium electrode. The single-channel conductance saturates with increasing the concentration of sodium and the channel conductance vs. sodium concentration relation is well described by a simple rectangular hyperbola. The apparent dissociation constant of the channel for sodium is 11 mM and the maximal conductance is 23 pS. The selectivity determined from reversal potentials obtained in mixed ionic conditions is Na+ approximately Li+ greater than K+ greater than Rb+ greater than Cs+. Calcium blocks the channel in a voltage-dependent manner. Analysis of single-channel membranes showed that the probability of being open (Po) vs. voltage relation is sigmoidal with a value of 0.5 between -90 and -100 mV. The fitting of Po requires at least two closed and one open state. The apparent gating charge required to move through the whole transmembrane voltage during the closed-open transition is four to five electronic charges per channel. Distribution of open and closed times are well described by single exponentials in most of the voltage range tested and mean open and mean closed times are voltage dependent. The number of charges associated with channel closing is 1.6 electronic charges per channel. Tetrodotoxin blocked the BTX-modified channel being the blockade favored by negative voltages. The apparent dissociation constant at zero potential is 16 nM. We concluded that sodium channels from the squid optic nerve are similar to other BTX- modified channels reconstituted in bilayers and to the BTX-modified sodium channel detected in the squid giant axon. PMID:2536797

  11. Down regulation of sodium channels in the central nervous system of hibernating snails.

    PubMed

    Kiss, T; Battonyai, I; Pirger, Z

    2014-05-28

    Hibernation, as behavior, is an evolutionary mode of adaptation of animal species to unfavorable environmental conditions. It is generally characterized by suppressed metabolism, which also includes down regulation of the energy consuming ion-channel functioning. Experimental data regarding decreased ion-channel function are scarce. Therefore, our goal was to study the possible down regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) subtypes in the neurons of hibernating snails. Our immunohistochemical experiments revealed that the expression of NaV1.8-like channels in the central nervous system was substantially down regulated in hibernating animals. In contrast to NaV1.8-like, the NaV1.9-like channels were present in neurons independently from hibernating and non-hibernating states. Our western blot data supported the immunohistochemical results according to which the band of the NaV1.8-like channel protein was less intensively labeled in the homogenate of the hibernating snails. The NaV1.9-like immunoreactivity was equally present both in hibernating and active snails. Micro-electrophysiological experiments show that in hibernating snails both NaV1.8- and NaV1.9-like currents are substantially decreased compared to that of the active snails. The contradictory electrophysiological and immunohistochemical or western blot data suggest that the molecular mechanisms of the "channel arrest" could be different in diverse NaV channel subtypes. Climate changes will affect temperature extremes and a question is how different species beyond their physiological tolerance will or able to adapt to changing environment. Hibernation is an important mode of adaptation to extreme climatic variations, and pursuant to this the present results may contribute to the study of the behavioral ecology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of Sodium Channel Activity by Capping of Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Shumilina, Ekaterina V.; Negulyaev, Yuri A.; Morachevskaya, Elena A.; Hinssen, Horst; Khaitlina, Sofia Yu

    2003-01-01

    Ion transport in various tissues can be regulated by the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Specifically, involvement of actin dynamics in the regulation of nonvoltage-gated sodium channels has been shown. Herein, inside-out patch clamp experiments were performed to study the effect of the heterodimeric actin capping protein CapZ on sodium channel regulation in leukemia K562 cells. The channels were activated by cytochalasin-induced disruption of actin filaments and inactivated by G-actin under ionic conditions promoting rapid actin polymerization. CapZ had no direct effect on channel activity. However, being added together with G-actin, CapZ prevented actin-induced channel inactivation, and this effect occurred at CapZ/actin molar ratios from 1:5 to 1:100. When actin was allowed to polymerize at the plasma membrane to induce partial channel inactivation, subsequent addition of CapZ restored the channel activity. These results can be explained by CapZ-induced inhibition of further assembly of actin filaments at the plasma membrane due to the modification of actin dynamics by CapZ. No effect on the channel activity was observed in response to F-actin, confirming that the mechanism of channel inactivation does not involve interaction of the channel with preformed filaments. Our data show that actin-capping protein can participate in the cytoskeleton-associated regulation of sodium transport in nonexcitable cells. PMID:12686620

  13. Sodium Channels in Pain and Cancer: New Therapeutic Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Luiz, Ana Paula; Wood, John N

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) underpin electrical activity in the nervous system through action potential propagation. First predicted by the modeling studies of Hodgkin and Huxley, they were subsequently identified at the molecular level by groups led by Catterall and Numa. VGSC dysfunction has long been linked to neuronal and cardiac disorders with some nonselective sodium channel blockers in current use in the clinic. The lack of selectivity means that side effect issues are a major impediment to the use of broad spectrum sodium channel blockers. Nine different sodium channels are known to exist, and selective blockers are now being developed. The potential utility of these drugs to target diseases ranging from migraine, multiple sclerosis, muscle, and immune system disorders, to cancer and pain is being explored. Four channels are potential targets for pain disorders. This conclusion comes from mouse knockout studies and human mutations that prove the involvement of Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in the development and maintenance of acute and chronic pain. In this chapter, we present a short overview of the possible role of Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in human pain and the emerging and unexpected role of sodium channels in cancer pathogenesis. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sodium channel haploinsufficiency and structural change in ventricular arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jeevaratnam, K; Guzadhur, L; Goh, Y M; Grace, A A; Huang, C L-H

    2016-02-01

    Normal cardiac excitation involves orderly conduction of electrical activation and recovery dependent upon surface membrane, voltage-gated, sodium (Na(+) ) channel α-subunits (Nav 1.5). We summarize experimental studies of physiological and clinical consequences of loss-of-function Na(+) channel mutations. Of these conditions, Brugada syndrome (BrS) and progressive cardiac conduction defect (PCCD) are associated with sudden, often fatal, ventricular tachycardia (VT) or fibrillation. Mouse Scn5a(+/-) hearts replicate important clinical phenotypes modelling these human conditions. The arrhythmic phenotype is associated not only with the primary biophysical change but also with additional, anatomical abnormalities, in turn dependent upon age and sex, each themselves exerting arrhythmic effects. Available evidence suggests a unified binary scheme for the development of arrhythmia in both BrS and PCCD. Previous biophysical studies suggested that Nav 1.5 deficiency produces a background electrophysiological defect compromising conduction, thereby producing an arrhythmic substrate unmasked by flecainide or ajmaline challenge. More recent reports further suggest a progressive decline in conduction velocity and increase in its dispersion particularly in ageing male Nav 1.5 haploinsufficient compared to WT hearts. This appears to involve a selective appearance of slow conduction at the expense of rapidly conducting pathways with changes in their frequency distributions. These changes were related to increased cardiac fibrosis. It is thus the combination of the structural and biophysical changes both accentuating arrhythmic substrate that may produce arrhythmic tendency. This binary scheme explains the combined requirement for separate, biophysical and structural changes, particularly occurring in ageing Nav 1.5 haploinsufficient males in producing clinical arrhythmia.

  15. Convergent Evolution of Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Sodium Channels in Predators and Prey.

    PubMed

    Toledo, G; Hanifin, C; Geffeney, S; Brodie, E D

    2016-01-01

    Convergent evolution of similar adaptive traits may arise from either common or disparate molecular and physiological mechanisms. The forces that determine the degree of underlying mechanistic similarities across convergent phenotypes are highly debated and poorly understood. Some garter snakes are able to consume newts that possess the channel blocking compound tetrodotoxin (TTX). Despite belonging to unrelated lineages, both the predators and prey have independently evolved remarkably similar physiological mechanisms of resistance to TTX that involve chemical and structural changes in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV). The evolution of TTX resistance in this predator-prey pair constitutes a natural experiment that allows us to explore the causes of molecular convergence. Here, we review broad patterns of convergence at the level of amino acid changes in NaV channels of animals that evolved TTX resistance and make comparisons to known TTX-resistant channels that did not evolve under the selective pressures imposed by TTX. We conclude that convergence likely stems from the interplay of the target specificity of TTX and functional constraints of NaV that are shared among taxa. These and other factors can limit channel evolution to favor a few functionally permissible paths of adaptation, which can explain the observed predictability of changes to channel structure. By studying the functional causes of convergence in NaV channels, we can further our understanding of the role of these important channel proteins at the center of the evolution of the nervous system.

  16. A highly polarized excitable cell separates sodium channels from sodium-activated potassium channels by more than a millimeter

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin E.; Markham, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The bioelectrical properties and resulting metabolic demands of electrogenic cells are determined by their morphology and the subcellular localization of ion channels. The electric organ cells (electrocytes) of the electric fish Eigenmannia virescens generate action potentials (APs) with Na+ currents >10 μA and repolarize the AP with Na+-activated K+ (KNa) channels. To better understand the role of morphology and ion channel localization in determining the metabolic cost of electrocyte APs, we used two-photon three-dimensional imaging to determine the fine cellular morphology and immunohistochemistry to localize the electrocytes' ion channels, ionotropic receptors, and Na+-K+-ATPases. We found that electrocytes are highly polarized cells ∼1.5 mm in anterior-posterior length and ∼0.6 mm in diameter, containing ∼30,000 nuclei along the cell periphery. The cell's innervated posterior region is deeply invaginated and vascularized with complex ultrastructural features, whereas the anterior region is relatively smooth. Cholinergic receptors and Na+ channels are restricted to the innervated posterior region, whereas inward rectifier K+ channels and the KNa channels that terminate the electrocyte AP are localized to the anterior region, separated by >1 mm from the only sources of Na+ influx. In other systems, submicrometer spatial coupling of Na+ and KNa channels is necessary for KNa channel activation. However, our computational simulations showed that KNa channels at a great distance from Na+ influx can still terminate the AP, suggesting that KNa channels can be activated by distant sources of Na+ influx and overturning a long-standing assumption that AP-generating ion channels are restricted to the electrocyte's posterior face. PMID:25925327

  17. Crystal structure of a voltage-gated sodium channel in two potentially inactivated states.

    PubMed

    Payandeh, Jian; Gamal El-Din, Tamer M; Scheuer, Todd; Zheng, Ning; Catterall, William A

    2012-05-20

    In excitable cells, voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels activate to initiate action potentials and then undergo fast and slow inactivation processes that terminate their ionic conductance. Inactivation is a hallmark of Na(V) channel function and is critical for control of membrane excitability, but the structural basis for this process has remained elusive. Here we report crystallographic snapshots of the wild-type Na(V)Ab channel from Arcobacter butzleri captured in two potentially inactivated states at 3.2 Å resolution. Compared to previous structures of Na(V)Ab channels with cysteine mutations in the pore-lining S6 helices (ref. 4), the S6 helices and the intracellular activation gate have undergone significant rearrangements: one pair of S6 helices has collapsed towards the central pore axis and the other S6 pair has moved outward to produce a striking dimer-of-dimers configuration. An increase in global structural asymmetry is observed throughout our wild-type Na(V)Ab models, reshaping the ion selectivity filter at the extracellular end of the pore, the central cavity and its residues that are analogous to the mammalian drug receptor site, and the lateral pore fenestrations. The voltage-sensing domains have also shifted around the perimeter of the pore module in wild-type Na(V)Ab, compared to the mutant channel, and local structural changes identify a conserved interaction network that connects distant molecular determinants involved in Na(V) channel gating and inactivation. These potential inactivated-state structures provide new insights into Na(V) channel gating and novel avenues to drug development and therapy for a range of debilitating Na(V) channelopathies.

  18. Sodium channel selectivity and conduction: Prokaryotes have devised their own molecular strategy

    PubMed Central

    Finol-Urdaneta, Rocio K.; Wang, Yibo; Al-Sabi, Ahmed; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Striking structural differences between voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels from prokaryotes (homotetramers) and eukaryotes (asymmetric, four-domain proteins) suggest the likelihood of different molecular mechanisms for common functions. For these two channel families, our data show similar selectivity sequences among alkali cations (relative permeability, Pion/PNa) and asymmetric, bi-ionic reversal potentials when the Na/K gradient is reversed. We performed coordinated experimental and computational studies, respectively, on the prokaryotic Nav channels NaChBac and NavAb. NaChBac shows an “anomalous,” nonmonotonic mole-fraction dependence in the presence of certain sodium–potassium mixtures; to our knowledge, no comparable observation has been reported for eukaryotic Nav channels. NaChBac’s preferential selectivity for sodium is reduced either by partial titration of its highly charged selectivity filter, when extracellular pH is lowered from 7.4 to 5.8, or by perturbation—likely steric—associated with a nominally electro-neutral substitution in the selectivity filter (E191D). Although no single molecular feature or energetic parameter appears to dominate, our atomistic simulations, based on the published NavAb crystal structure, revealed factors that may contribute to the normally observed selectivity for Na over K. These include: (a) a thermodynamic penalty to exchange one K+ for one Na+ in the wild-type (WT) channel, increasing the relative likelihood of Na+ occupying the binding site; (b) a small tendency toward weaker ion binding to the selectivity filter in Na–K mixtures, consistent with the higher conductance observed with both sodium and potassium present; and (c) integrated 1-D potentials of mean force for sodium or potassium movement that show less separation for the less selective E/D mutant than for WT. Overall, tight binding of a single favored ion to the selectivity filter, together with crucial inter-ion interactions within the pore

  19. The Epithelial Sodium Channel and the Processes of Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) mediates passive sodium transport across the apical membranes of sodium absorbing epithelia, like the distal nephron, the intestine, and the lung airways. Additionally, the channel has been involved in the transduction of mechanical stimuli, such as hydrostatic pressure, membrane stretch, and shear stress from fluid flow. Thus, in vascular endothelium, it participates in the control of the vascular tone via its activity both as a sodium channel and as a shear stress transducer. Rather recently, ENaC has been shown to participate in the processes of wound healing, a role that may also involve its activities as sodium transporter and as mechanotransducer. Its presence as the sole channel mediating sodium transport in many tissues and the diversity of its functions probably underlie the complexity of its regulation. This brief review describes some aspects of ENaC regulation, comments on evidence about ENaC participation in wound healing, and suggests possible regulatory mechanisms involved in this participation. PMID:27493961

  20. Conduction velocity is regulated by sodium channel inactivation in unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges

    PubMed Central

    De Col, Roberto; Messlinger, Karl; Carr, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    Axonal conduction velocity varies according to the level of preceding impulse activity. In unmyelinated axons this typically results in a slowing of conduction velocity and a parallel increase in threshold. It is currently held that Na+–K+-ATPase-dependent axonal hyperpolarization is responsible for this slowing but this has long been equivocal. We therefore examined conduction velocity changes during repetitive activation of single unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges. In direct contradiction to the currently accepted postulate, Na+–K+-ATPase blockade actually enhanced activity-induced conduction velocity slowing, while the degree of velocity slowing was curtailed in the presence of lidocaine (10–300 μm) and carbamazepine (30–500 μm) but not tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10–80 nm). This suggests that a change in the number of available sodium channels is the most prominent factor responsible for activity-induced changes in conduction velocity in unmyelinated axons. At moderate stimulus frequencies, axonal conduction velocity is determined by an interaction between residual sodium channel inactivation following each impulse and the retrieval of channels from inactivation by a concomitant Na+–K+-ATPase-mediated hyperpolarization. Since the process is primarily dependent upon sodium channel availability, tracking conduction velocity provides a means of accessing relative changes in the excitability of nociceptive neurons. PMID:18096592

  1. Slack, Slick, and Sodium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    The Slack and Slick genes encode potassium channels that are very widely expressed in the central nervous system. These channels are activated by elevations in intracellular sodium, such as those that occur during trains of one or more action potentials, or following activation of nonselective cationic neurotransmitter receptors such as AMPA receptors. This review covers the cellular and molecular properties of Slack and Slick channels and compares them with findings on the properties of sodium-activated potassium currents (termed KNa currents) in native neurons. Human mutations in Slack channels produce extremely severe defects in learning and development, suggesting that KNa channels play a central role in neuronal plasticity and intellectual function. PMID:24319675

  2. Structure, dynamics and selectivity of the sodium channel blocker µ-conotoxin SIIIA†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Shenggen; Zhang, Minmin; Yoshikami, Doju; Azam, Layla; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Norton, Raymond S.

    2014-01-01

    µ-SIIIA, a novel µ-conotoxin from Conus striatus, appeared to be a selective blocker of tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels in frog preparations. It also exhibited potent analgesic activity in mice, although its selectivity profile against mammalian sodium channels remained unknown. We have determined the structure of µ-SIIIA in aqueous solution and characterized its backbone dynamics by NMR and its functional properties electrophysiologically. Consistent with the absence of hydroxyprolines, µ-SIIIA adopts a single conformation with all peptide bonds in the trans conformation. The C-terminal region contains a well-defined helix encompassing residues 11–16, while residues 3–5 in the N-terminal region form a helix-like turn resembling 310 helix. The Trp12 and His16 side chains are in close proximity, as in the related conotoxin µ-SmIIIA, but Asn2 is further away. Dynamics measurements show that the N-terminus and Ser9 have larger magnitude motions on the sub-ns timescale, while the C-terminus is more rigid. Cys4, Trp12 and Cys13 undergo significant conformational exchange on µs - ms timescales. µ-SIIIA is a potent, nearly irreversible blocker of NaV1.2, but also blocks NaV1.4 and NaV1.6 with submicromolar potency. The selectivity profile of µ-SIIIA, including poor activity against the cardiac sodium channel, NaV1.5, is similar to that of the closely related µ-KIIIA, suggesting that the C-terminal regions of both are critical for blocking neuronal NaV1.2. The structural and functional characterization described in this paper of an analgesic µ-conotoxin that targets neuronal subtypes of mammalian sodium channels provides a basis for the design of novel analogues with an improved selectivity profile. PMID:18798648

  3. Voltage-gated sodium channel modulation by scorpion α-toxins

    PubMed Central

    Bosmans, Frank; Tytgat, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels are integral membrane proteins that function as a gateway for a selective permeation of sodium ions across biological membranes. In this way, they are crucial players for the generation of action potentials in excitable cells. Voltage-gated Na+ channels are encoded by at least nine genes in mammals. The different isoforms have remarkably similar functional properties, but small changes in function and pharmacology are biologically well-defined, as underscored by mutations that cause several diseases and by modulation of a myriad of compounds respectively. This review will stress on the modulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels by scorpion alpha-toxins. Nature has designed these two classes of molecules as if they were predestined to each other: an inevitable ‘encounter’ between a voltage-gated Na+ channel isoform and an alpha-toxin from scorpion venom indeed results in a dramatically changed Na+ current phenotype with clear-cut consequences on electrical excitability and sometimes life or death. This fascinating aspect justifies an overview on scorpion venoms, their alpha-toxins and the Na+ channel targets they are built for, as well as on the molecular determinants that govern the selectivity and affinity of this ‘inseparable duo’. PMID:17087986

  4. Block of sodium channels by internal mono- and divalent guanidinium analogues. Modulation by sodium ion concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Danko, M; Smith-Maxwell, C; McKinney, L; Begenisich, T

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the block of squid axon sodium channels by mono- and divalent guanidinium analogues. The action of these compounds on steady state sodium currents was independent of the presence or absence of the normal inactivation process. Block by both mono- and divalent analogues was voltage-dependent, but was a steeper function of potential for divalent molecules. The voltage-dependence could not, in general, be reproduced by a simple model based on Boltzmann's equation. Inhibition of steady state currents by guanidinium ions with 50 mM internal sodium was reasonably well described by a 1:1 drug/channel binding function. Increasing the internal sodium ion concentration increased both the degree and voltage-dependence of current inhibition. This is in sharp contrast to the decrease in inactivation caused by internal sodium. Changes in the external sodium concentration had very little effect on drug block. These results are consistent with a model of the sodium channel as a multi-ion pore. Only a small increase in block can be produced by increased internal sodium in a three-barrier two-site model, but a four-barrier three-site model can reproduce these experimental findings. The implications of these results for physical models of inactivation are discussed. PMID:2420382

  5. Voltage-gated sodium channel isoform-specific effects of pompilidotoxins.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Emanuele; Stevens, Marijke; Zaharenko, André J; Konno, Katsuhiro; Tytgat, Jan; Wanke, Enzo

    2010-02-01

    Pompilidotoxins (PMTXs, alpha and beta) are small peptides consisting of 13 amino acids purified from the venom of the solitary wasps Anoplius samariensis (alpha-PMTX) and Batozonellus maculifrons (beta-PMTX). They are known to facilitate synaptic transmission in the lobster neuromuscular junction, and to slow sodium channel inactivation. By using beta-PMTX, alpha-PMTX and four synthetic analogs with amino acid changes, we conducted a thorough study of the effects of PMTXs on sodium current inactivation in seven mammalian voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) isoforms and one insect VGSC (DmNa(v)1). By evaluating three components of which the inactivating current is composed (fast, slow and steady-state components), we could distinguish three distinct groups of PMTX effects. The first group concerned the insect and Na(v)1.6 channels, which showed a large increase in the steady-state current component without any increase in the slow component. Moreover, the dose-dependent increase in this steady-state component was correlated with the dose-dependent decrease in the fast component. A second group of effects concerned the Na(v)1.1, Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.3 and Na(v)1.7 isoforms, which responded with a large increase in the slow component, and showed only a small steady-state component. As with the first group of effects, the slow component was dose-dependent and correlated with the decrease in the fast component. Finally, a third group of effects concerned Na(v)1.4 and Na(v)1.5, which did not show any change in the slow or steady-state component. These data shed light on the complex and intriguing behavior of VGSCs in response to PMTXs, helping us to better understand the molecular determinants explaining isoform-specific effects.

  6. Comparative evaluation of in vitro and in vivo high glucose-induced alterations in voltage-gated tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel: Effects attenuated by sodium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Kharatmal, S B; Singh, J N; Sharma, S S

    2015-10-01

    Glucose uptake in neurons depends on their cellular/physiological activity and the extracellular concentration of glucose around the cell. High concentration of extra-cellular glucose, as under hyperglycemic conditions or pathological condition in diabetes, may persist for extended periods of time in neurons and trigger cellular damage by altering voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), the exact mechanism of which remains unclear. Therefore, we hypothesized that high glucose may directly affect kinetics of the VGSCs in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. DRG neurons were exposed to normal glucose (NG: 5.5 mM) and high glucose (HG: 30 mM) for 24 h. In another set of experiments, diabetic DRG neurons were also isolated from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Effects of sodium channel blockers on nociceptive parameters and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channel kinetics were elucidated by whole-cell patch-clamp in HG exposure and diabetes-induced rat DRG neurons. HG exposure and diabetes-induced DRG neurons demonstrated significant increase in TTX-R Na(+) current (INa) densities in comparison to the control. Both HG-exposed and diabetic DRG neurons demonstrated similar biophysical characteristics of INa. Lidocaine and tetracaine significantly decreased TTX-R INa density in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner. Steady-state fast inactivation of INa was shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction whereas voltage-dependent activation was shifted in the rightward direction. Diabetic rats treated with lidocaine and tetracaine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia and motor nerve conduction velocity with a significant inhibition of TTX-R INa density as compared to the diabetic control. These results suggest that HG exposure increases the TTX-R Na(+) channel activity sensitive to Na(+) channel blockers, lidocaine and tetracaine. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous modifications of sodium channel gating by two scorpion toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G K; Strichartz, G

    1982-01-01

    The effects of purified scorpion toxins from two different species on the kinetics of sodium currents were evaluated in amphibian myelinated nerves under voltage clamp. A toxin from Leiurus quinquestriatus slowed and prevented sodium channel inactivation, exclusively, and a toxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing reduced transient sodium currents during a maintained depolarization, and induced a novel inward current that appeared following repolarization, as previously reported by Cahalan (1975, J. Physiol. [Lond.]. 244:511-534) for the crude scorpion venom. Both of these effects were observed in fibers treated with both of these toxins, and the kinetics of the induced current were modified in a way that showed that the same sodium channels were modified simultaneously by both toxins. Although the toxins can act on different sites, the time course of the action of C. sculpturatus toxin was accelerated in the presence of the L. quinquestriatus toxin, indicating some form of interaction between the two toxin binding sites. PMID:6293596

  8. Proton Sensors in the Pore Domain of the Cardiac Voltage-gated Sodium Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David K.; Peters, Colin H.; Allard, Charlene R.; Claydon, Tom W.; Ruben, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Protons impart isoform-specific modulation of inactivation in neuronal, skeletal muscle, and cardiac voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels. Although the structural basis of proton block in NaV channels has been well described, the amino acid residues responsible for the changes in NaV kinetics during extracellular acidosis are as yet unknown. We expressed wild-type (WT) and two pore mutant constructs (H880Q and C373F) of the human cardiac NaV channel, NaV1.5, in Xenopus oocytes. C373F and H880Q both attenuated proton block, abolished proton modulation of use-dependent inactivation, and altered pH modulation of the steady-state and kinetic parameters of slow inactivation. Additionally, C373F significantly reduced the maximum probability of use-dependent inactivation and slow inactivation, relative to WT. H880Q also significantly reduced the maximum probability of slow inactivation and shifted the voltage dependence of activation and fast inactivation to more positive potentials, relative to WT. These data suggest that Cys-373 and His-880 in NaV1.5 are proton sensors for use-dependent and slow inactivation and have implications in isoform-specific modulation of NaV channels. PMID:23283979

  9. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, I; Luchinsky, D G; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2013-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations to study the ionic conduction and valence selectivity of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as functions of the fixed charge Q(f) at its selectivity filter. We are thus able to reconcile the discrete calcium conduction bands recently revealed in our BD simulations, M0 (Q(f)=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e), with a set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5e), L1 (1.5e), thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands vs Q(f) for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Q(f) leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium-selective, nonblocking channel) → M0 (nonselective channel) → L1 (sodium-selective channel with divalent block) → M1 (calcium-selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L0 band is putatively identified with the eukaryotic sodium channel The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced transformations between nonselective channels, sodium-selective channels, and calcium-selective channels, which we interpret as transitions between different rows of the identification table. By considering the potential energy changes during permeation, we show explicitly that the multi-ion conduction bands of calcium and sodium channels arise as the result of resonant barrierless conduction. The pattern of periodic conduction bands is explained on the basis of sequential neutralization taking account of self-energy, as Q(f)(z,i)=ze(1/2+i), where i is the order of the band and z is the valence of the ion. Our results confirm the crucial influence of electrostatic interactions on conduction and on the Ca(2+)/Na(+) valence selectivity of calcium and sodium ion channels. The model and results could be also applicable to biomimetic nanopores with charged walls.

  10. Conotoxins That Could Provide Analgesia through Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Munasinghe, Nehan R.; Christie, MacDonald J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain creates a large socio-economic burden around the world. It is physically and mentally debilitating, and many sufferers are unresponsive to current therapeutics. Many drugs that provide pain relief have adverse side effects and addiction liabilities. Therefore, a great need has risen for alternative treatment strategies. One rich source of potential analgesic compounds that has emerged over the past few decades are conotoxins. These toxins are extremely diverse and display selective activity at ion channels. Voltage gated sodium (NaV) channels are one such group of ion channels that play a significant role in multiple pain pathways. This review will explore the literature around conotoxins that bind NaV channels and determine their analgesic potential. PMID:26690478

  11. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Mechanistic Insights From Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Oakes, V; Furini, S; Domene, C

    2016-01-01

    The permeation of ions and other molecules across biological membranes is an inherent requirement of all cellular organisms. Ion channels, in particular, are responsible for the conduction of charged species, hence modulating the propagation of electrical signals. Despite the universal physiological implications of this property, the molecular functioning of ion channels remains ambiguous. The combination of atomistic structural data with computational methodologies, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, is now considered routine to investigate structure-function relationships in biological systems. A fuller understanding of conduction, selectivity, and gating, therefore, is steadily emerging due to the applicability of these techniques to ion channels. However, because their structure is known at atomic resolution, studies have consistently been biased toward K(+) channels, thus the molecular determinants of ionic selectivity, activation, and drug blockage in Na(+) channels are often overlooked. The recent increase of available crystallographic data has eminently encouraged the investigation of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels via computational methods. Here, we present an overview of simulation studies that have contributed to our understanding of key principles that underlie ionic conduction and selectivity in Na(+) channels, in comparison to the K(+) channel analogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Barium, TEA and sodium sensitive potassium channels are present in the human placental syncytiotrophoblast apical membrane.

    PubMed

    Díaz, P; Vallejos, C; Guerrero, I; Riquelme, G

    2008-10-01

    The human placental syncytiotrophoblast (hSTB) is a polarized epithelial structure, without paracellular routes, forming the main barrier for materno-fetal exchange. There is ample evidence suggesting the presence of potassium (K(+)) channels in the placental apical membrane; which could contribute to membrane potential and volume regulation. We have therefore examined the K(+) currents of isolated apical membranes from human term placenta using electrophysiological methods: reconstitution of ion channels from apical membranes into giant liposomes (single channel recordings, patch clamp method) or their functional transplantation into Xenopus laevis oocytes (total currents recording, voltage clamp method). Single channel recording experiments show the presence of K(+) channels in the hSTB microvillous membrane sensitive to Tetraethylammonium (TEA) and Barium (Ba(+2)). Patch current activity was diminished 50% and 70% by 20 mmol/L TEA and 5 mmol/L Ba(+2) respectively. The more frequent conductance was approximately 73pS, however several levels of current were detected suggesting the presence of more than one type of K(+) channel. In addition, sodium (Na(+)) sensitivity was detected in the patch current thus, over 10 mmol/L Na(+) reduced the seal current to 38%. These results were corroborated by the total current experiments where the K(+) current elicited in injected oocytes with apical purified membrane was blocked by Ba(+2) and TEA. The total current was also affected by Na(+), becoming larger when a Na(+)-free solution was used. Our results show the existence of at least two types of Ba(+2)-sensitive K(+) channels including a TEA sensitive sub-population, and some of them Na(+) sensitive K(+) channels. These channels could be the conductive pathways proposed previously for this cation in placental hSTB. Our novel contribution has been to successfully obtain K(+) channel recordings in systems suitable for electrophysiological studies of isolated apical membranes.

  13. Time-dependent molecular memory in single voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan K; Sikdar, S K

    2007-10-01

    Excitability in neurons is associated with firing of action potentials and requires the opening of voltage-gated sodium channels with membrane depolarization. Sustained membrane depolarization, as seen in pathophysiological conditions like epilepsy, can have profound implications on the biophysical properties of voltage-gated ion channels. Therefore, we sought to characterize the effect of sustained membrane depolarization on single voltage-gated Na+ channels. Single-channel activity was recorded in the cell-attached patch-clamp mode from the rNa(v)1.2 alpha channels expressed in CHO cells. Classical statistical analysis revealed complex nonlinear changes in channel dwell times and unitary conductance of single Na+ channels as a function of conditioning membrane depolarization. Signal processing tools like weighted wavelet Z (WWZ) and discrete Fourier transform analyses attributed a "pseudo-oscillatory" nature to the observed nonlinear variation in the kinetic parameters. Modeling studies using the hidden Markov model (HMM) illustrated significant changes in kinetic states and underlying state transition rate constants upon conditioning depolarization. Our results suggest that sustained membrane depolarization induces novel nonlinear properties in voltage-gated Na+ channels. Prolonged membrane depolarization also induced a "molecular memory" phenomenon, characterized by clusters of dwell time events and strong autocorrelation in the dwell time series similar to that reported recently for single enzyme molecules. The persistence of such molecular memory was found to be dependent on the duration of depolarization. Voltage-gated Na+ channel with the observed time-dependent nonlinear properties and the molecular memory phenomenon may determine the functional state of the channel and, in turn, the excitability of a neuron.

  14. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels. Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in Synaptosomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    concentration in the nonaqueuus (membrane) phase (Lyon et aL, 1981). Concentration- effect summarized in table 1 . When sodium channels were activated curves were...Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels : Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in DT (7 Synaptosomes E L C MICHAEL J. MULLIN’ and WALTER A. HUNT...1984). At the present time, the 8 1 structural and functional properties of the voltage-sensitive sodium channels are understood most completely

  15. Axonal sodium channel distribution shapes the depolarized action potential threshold of dentate granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Geraldine J.; Dowling, Margaret; Eisenman, Lawrence N.; Mennerick, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsic excitability is a key feature dictating neuronal response to synaptic input. Here we investigate the recent observation that dentate granule neurons exhibit a more depolarized voltage threshold for action potential initiation than CA3 pyramidal neurons. We find no evidence that tonic GABA currents, leak or voltage-gated potassium conductances, or the expression of sodium channel isoform differences can explain this depolarized threshold. Axonal initial segment voltage-gated sodium channels, which are dominated by the NaV1.6 isoform in both cell types, distribute more proximally and exhibit lower overall density in granule neurons than in CA3 neurons. To test possible contributions of sodium channel distributions to voltage threshold and to test whether morphological differences participate, we performed simulations of dentate granule neurons and of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These simulations revealed that cell morphology and sodium channel distribution combine to yield the characteristic granule neuron action potential upswing and voltage threshold. Proximal axon sodium channel distribution strongly contributes to the higher voltage threshold of dentate granule neurons for two reasons. First, action potential initiation closer to the somatodendritic current sink causes the threshold of the initiating axon compartment to rise. Second, the proximity of the action potential initiation site to the recording site causes somatic recordings to more faithfully reflect the depolarized threshold of the axon than in cells like CA3 neurons, with distally initiating action potentials. Our results suggest that the proximal location of axon sodium channel in dentate granule neurons contributes to the intrinsic excitability differences between DG and CA3 neurons and may participate in the low-pass filtering function of dentate granule neurons. PMID:19603521

  16. Pain disorders and erythromelalgia caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Dabby, Ron

    2012-02-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels play a pivotal role in pain transmission. They are widely expressed in nociceptive neurons, and participate in the generation of action potentials. Alteration in ionic conduction of these channels causes abnormal electrical firing, thus renders neurons hyperexcitable. So far, mutations in the Na(v)1.7 sodium channel, which is expressed in the dorsal root ganglia cells and sympathetic neurons, have been described to cause perturbations in pain sensation. Until recently, gain-of-function Na(v)1.7 mutations were known to cause two neuropathic pain syndromes: inherited erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain syndrome. These syndromes are inherited in a dominant trait; they usually begin in childhood or infancy, and are characterized by attacks of severe neuropathic pain accompanied with autonomic symptoms. Recently, small fiber neuropathy and chronic nonparoxysmal pain have been described in patients harboring gain-of-function mutations in Na(v)1.7 channel. Loss-of-function mutations in Na(v)1.7 are extremely rare, and invariably cause congenital inability to perceive pain.

  17. Calcium-mediated dual-mode regulation of cardiac sodium channel gating.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subrata; DiSilvestre, Deborah; Tian, Yanli; Halperin, Victoria L; Tomaselli, Gordon F

    2009-04-10

    Intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) can trigger dual-mode regulation of the voltage gated cardiac sodium channel (Na(V)1.5). The channel components of the Ca(2+) regulatory system are the calmodulin (CaM)-binding IQ motif and the Ca(2+) sensing EF hand-like (EFL) motif in the carboxyl terminus of the channel. Mutations in either motif have been associated with arrhythmogenic changes in expressed Na(V)1.5 currents. Increases in [Ca(2+)](i) shift the steady-state inactivation of Na(V)1.5 in the depolarizing direction and slow entry into inactivated states. Mutation of the EFL (Na(V)1.5(4X)) shifts inactivation in the hyperpolarizing direction compared with the wild-type channel and eliminates the Ca(2+) sensitivity of inactivation gating. Modulation of the steady-state availability of Na(V)1.5 by [Ca(2+)](i) is more pronounced after the truncation of the carboxyl terminus proximal to the IQ motif (Na(V)1.5(Delta1885)), which retains the EFL. Mutating the EFL (Na(V)1.5(4X)) unmasks CaM-mediated regulation of the kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation. This latent CaM modulation of inactivation is eliminated by mutation of the IQ motif (Na(V)1.5(4X-IQ/AA)). The LQT3 EFL mutant channel Na(V)1.5(D1790G) exhibits Ca(2+) insensitivity and unmasking of CaM regulation of inactivation gating. The enhanced effect of CaM on Na(V)1.5(4X) gating is associated with significantly greater fluorescence resonance energy transfer between enhanced cyan fluorescent protein-CaM and Na(V)1.5(4X) channels than is observed with wild-type Na(V)1.5. Unlike other isoforms of the Na channel, the IQ-CaM interaction in the carboxyl terminus of Na(V)1.5 is latent under physiological conditions but may become manifest in the presence of disease causing mutations in the CT of Na(V)1.5 (particularly in the EFL), contributing to the production of potentially lethal ventricular arrhythmias.

  18. Domain 2 of Drosophila para voltage-gated sodium channel confers insect properties to a rat brain channel.

    PubMed

    Shichor, Iris; Zlotkin, Eliahu; Ilan, Nitza; Chikashvili, Dodo; Stuhmer, Walter; Gordon, Dalia; Lotan, Ilana

    2002-06-01

    The ability of the excitatory anti-insect-selective scorpion toxin AahIT (Androctonus australis hector) to exclusively bind to and modify the insect voltage-gated sodium channel (NaCh) makes it a unique tool to unravel the structural differences between mammalian and insect channels, a prerequisite in the design of selective pesticides. To localize the insect NaCh domain that binds AahIT, we constructed a chimeric channel composed of rat brain NaCh alpha-subunit (rBIIA) in which domain-2 (D2) was replaced by that of Drosophila Para (paralytic temperature-sensitive). The choice of D2 was dictated by the similarity between AahIT and scorpion beta-toxins pertaining to both their binding and action and the essential role of D2 in the beta-toxins binding site on mammalian channels. Expression of the chimera rBIIA-ParaD2 in Xenopus oocytes gave rise to voltage-gated and TTX-sensitive NaChs that, like rBIIA, were sensitive to scorpion alpha-toxins and regulated by the auxiliary subunit beta(1) but not by the insect TipE. Notably, like Drosophila Para/TipE, but unlike rBIIA/beta(1), the chimera gained sensitivity to AahIT, indicating that the phyletic selectivity of AahIT is conferred by the insect NaCh D2. Furthermore, the chimera acquired additional insect channel properties; its activation was shifted to more positive potentials, and the effect of alpha-toxins was potentiated. Our results highlight the key role of D2 in the selective recognition of anti-insect excitatory toxins and in the modulation of NaCh gating. We also provide a methodological approach to the study of ion channels that are difficult to express in model expression systems.

  19. Inhibition by pregnenolone sulphate, a metabolite of the neurosteroid pregnenolone, of voltage-gated sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Horishita, Takafumi; Ueno, Susumu; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Sudo, Yuka; Uezono, Yasuhito; Okura, Dan; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Neurosteroids are known as allosteric modulators of the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) play an important role in mediating excitotoxic damages. Here we report the effects of neurosteroids on the function of Na(v), using voltage-clamp techniques in Xenopus oocytes expressed with the Na(v)1.2 α subunit. Pregnenolone sulphate, but not pregnenolone, inhibited sodium currents (I(Na)) at 3 - 100 μmol/L. The suppression of I(Na) by pregnenolone sulphate was due to increased inactivation with little change in activation. These findings suggest that pregnenolone sulphate, a metabolite of pregnenolone, suppresses the function of Na(v) via increased inactivation, which may contribute to the neuroprotection.

  20. Interactions between anemone toxin II and veratridine on single neuronal sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Castillo, C; Piernavieja, C; Recio-Pinto, E

    1996-09-16

    The nature of the known positive cooperativity between alkaloid and alpha-polypeptide toxins on macroscopic sodium currents was studied at the single-channel level. We have previously characterized the single-channel function of veratridine (VTD)-modified and anemone toxin II (ATX)-modified channels from lobster leg nerve. VTD and ATX are known to potentiate each other's effects in stimulating 22Na flux into vesicles containing sodium channels from lobster leg nerve. These channels, therefore, provided an excellent model for further investigation of the interactions between the toxins. A variety of such interactions were found, some of which would contribute to the positive cooperativity between these toxins. These included first, a decrease in the frequency of occurrence, but not in the lifetime, of the long channel closed state (minute range). This effect resulted in a hyperpolarization shift of the voltage dependence of the overall channel fractional open time. The second effect was a decrease in the apparent-unbinding rate of ATX at -60 mV. These interactions, which could not have been predicted by the effects of the individual toxins, were observed at negative but not at positive potentials, and led to increases in sodium channel currents. Some of the observed interactions could not contribute to the positive cooperativity between these toxins. These included the elimination of the high-conductance state of ATX-modified channels, the predominance of the VTD effect on the voltage dependence of the fast-process, the predominance of the ATX effect on the rate of decay of sodium currents at +60 mV, and the resulting intermediate toxin effect on the level of the noisy open state.

  1. The Permeability of the Sodium Channel to Metal Cations in Myelinated Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil

    1972-01-01

    The relative permeability of sodium channels to eight metal cations is studied in myelinated nerve fibers. Ionic currents under voltage-clamp conditions are measured in Na-free solutions containing the test ion. Measured reversal potentials and the Goldman equation are used to calculate the permeability sequence: Na+ ≈ Li+ > Tl+ > K+. The ratio PK/PNa is 1/12. The permeabilities to Rb+, Cs+, Ca++, and Mg++ are too small to measure. The permeability ratios agree with observations on the squid giant axon and show that the reversal potential ENa differs significantly from the Nernst potential for Na+ in normal axons. Opening and closing rates for sodium channels are relatively insensitive to the ionic composition of the bathing medium, implying that gating is a structural property of the channel rather than a result of the movement or accumulation of particular ions around the channel. A previously proposed pore model of the channel accommodates the permeant metal cations in a partly hydrated form. The observed sequence of permeabilities follows the order expected for binding to a high field strength anion in Eisenman's theory of ion exchange equilibria. PMID:5025743

  2. To4, the first Tityus obscurus β-toxin fully electrophysiologically characterized on human sodium channel isoforms.

    PubMed

    Duque, Harry Morales; Mourão, Caroline Barbosa Farias; Tibery, Diogo Vieira; Barbosa, Eder Alves; Campos, Leandro Ambrósio; Schwartz, Elisabeth Ferroni

    2017-09-01

    Many scorpion toxins that act on sodium channels (NaScTxs) have been characterized till date. These toxins may act modulating the inactivation or the activation of sodium channels and are named α- or β-types, respectively. Some venom toxins from Tityus obscurus (Buthidae), a scorpion widely distributed in the Brazilian Amazon, have been partially characterized in previous studies; however, little information about their electrophysiological role on sodium ion channels has been published. In the present study, we describe the purification, identification and electrophysiological characterization of a NaScTx, which was first described as Tc54 and further fully sequenced and renamed To4. This toxin shows a marked β-type effect on different sodium channel subtypes (hNav1.1-hNav1.7) at low concentrations, and has more pronounced activity on hNav1.1, hNav1.2 and hNav1.4. By comparing To4 primary structure with other Tityus β-toxins which have already been electrophysiologically tested, it is possible to establish some key amino acid residues for the sodium channel activity. Thus, To4 is the first toxin from T. obscurus fully electrophysiologically characterized on different human sodium channel isoforms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Drosotoxin, a selective inhibitor of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunyi; Gao, Bin; Deng, Meichun; Yuan, Yuzhe; Luo, Lan; Peigneur, Steve; Xiao, Yucheng; Liang, Songping; Tytgat, Jan

    2010-10-15

    The design of animal toxins with high target selectivity has long been a goal in protein engineering. Based on evolutionary relationship between the Drosophila antifungal defensin (drosomycin) and scorpion depressant Na(+) channel toxins, we exploited a strategy to create a novel chimeric molecule (named drosotoxin) with high selectivity for channel subtypes, which was achieved by using drosomycin to substitute the structural core of BmKITc, a depressant toxin acting on both insect and mammalian Na(+) channels. Recombinant drosotoxin selectively inhibited tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 2.6+/-0.5muM. This chimeric peptide showed no activity on K(+), Ca(2+) and TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) Na(+) channels in rat DRG neurons and Drosophila para/tipE channels at micromolar concentrations. Drosotoxin represents the first chimeric toxin and example of a non-toxic core scaffold with high selectivity on mammalian TTX-R Na(+) channels.

  4. Two tarantula venom peptides as potent and differential Na(V) channels blockers.

    PubMed

    Cherki, Ronit S; Kolb, Ela; Langut, Yael; Tsveyer, Lior; Bajayo, Nissim; Meir, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Voltage dependent sodium (Na(V)) channels are large membrane spanning proteins which lie in the basis of action potential generation and propagation in excitable cells and hence are essential mediators of neuronal signaling. Inhibition of Na(V) channel activity is one of the core mechanisms to treat conditions related to neuronal hyperexcitability, such as epilepsy in the clinic. Na(V) channel blockers are also extensively used to locally inhibit action potential generation and related pain perceptions in the form of local anesthetics. Here we describe the isolation, biochemical characterization, synthesis and in vitro characterization of two potent Na(V) channel blockers from the venom of the Paraphysa scrofa (Phrixotrichus auratus) tarantula spider. Both Voltage sensor toxin 3 (VSTx-3, κ-theraphotoxin-Gr4a) and GTx1-15 (Toxin Gtx1-15), were originally isolated from the venom of the related tarantula Grammostola rosea and described as K(V) and Ca(V) channel blockers, respectively. In our hands, GTx1-15 was shown to be a potent inhibitor of tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive channels (IC₅₀ 0.007 μM for hNa(V)1.7 and 0.12 μM for hNa(V)1.3 channels), with very little effect on TTX-resistant (Na(V)1.5 and NaV1.8) channels. VSTx-3 was demonstrated to be a potent, TTX-sensitive sodium channel blocker and especially, potent blocker of Na(V)1.8 channels (IC₅₀ 0.19 μM for hNa(V)1.3, 0.43 μM for hNa(V)1.7 and 0.77 μM for hNa(V)1.8 channels). Such potent inhibitors with differential selectivity among Na(V) channel isoforms may be used as tools to study the roles of the different channels in processes related to hyperexcitability and as lead compounds to treat pathological pain conditions. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative study of the gating motif and C-type inactivation in prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Irie, Katsumasa; Kitagawa, Kazuya; Nagura, Hitoshi; Imai, Tomoya; Shimomura, Takushi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2010-02-05

    Prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) are homotetramers and are thought to inactivate through a single mechanism, named C-type inactivation. Here we report the voltage dependence and inactivation rate of the NaChBac channel from Bacillus halodurans, the first identified prokaryotic Na(V), as well as of three new homologues cloned from Bacillus licheniformis (Na(V)BacL), Shewanella putrefaciens (Na(V)SheP), and Roseobacter denitrificans (Na(V)RosD). We found that, although activated by a lower membrane potential, Na(V)BacL inactivates as slowly as NaChBac. Na(V)SheP and Na(V)RosD inactivate faster than NaChBac. Mutational analysis of helix S6 showed that residues corresponding to the "glycine hinge" and "PXP motif" in voltage-gated potassium channels are not obligatory for channel gating in these prokaryotic Na(V)s, but mutations in the regions changed the inactivation rates. Mutation of the region corresponding to the glycine hinge in Na(V)BacL (A214G), Na(V)SheP (A216G), and NaChBac (G219A) accelerated inactivation in these channels, whereas mutation of glycine to alanine in the lower part of helix S6 in NaChBac (G229A), Na(V)BacL (G224A), and Na(V)RosD (G217A) reduced the inactivation rate. These results imply that activation gating in prokaryotic Na(V)s does not require gating motifs and that the residues of helix S6 affect C-type inactivation rates in these channels.

  6. The pore, not cytoplasmic domains, underlies inactivation in a prokaryotic sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Evgeny; Bladen, Christopher; Winkfein, Robert; Diao, Catherine; Dhaliwal, Perry; French, Robert J

    2005-07-01

    Kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation of a prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channel (NaChBac) were investigated in an effort to understand its molecular mechanism. NaChBac inactivation kinetics show strong, bell-shaped voltage dependence with characteristic time constants ranging from approximately 50 ms at depolarized voltages to a maximum of approximately 100 s at the inactivation midpoint. Activation and inactivation parameters for four different covalently linked tandem dimer or tandem tetramer constructs were indistinguishable from those of the wild-type channel. Point mutations in the outer part of the pore revealed an important influence of the S195 residue on the process of inactivation. For two mutants (S195D and S195E), the maximal and minimal rates of inactivation observed were increased by approximately 2.5-fold, and the midpoint of the steady-state inactivation curve was shifted approximately 20 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction, compared to the wild-type channel. Our data suggest that pore vestibule structure is an important determinant of NaChBac inactivation, whereas the inactivation mechanism is independent of the number of free cytoplasmic N- and C-termini in the functional channel. In these respects, NaChBac inactivation resembles C-type or slow inactivation modes observed in other voltage-gated K and Na channels.

  7. Cell volume-sensitive sodium channels upregulated by glucocorticoids in U937 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gamper, N; Huber, S M; Badawi, K; Lang, F

    2000-12-01

    Glucocorticoids exert their anti-inflammatory action in part by influencing macrophages. As regulation of macrophage function involves ion channels, the present study was performed to elucidate the influence of glucocorticoids on macrophage ion channel activity. To this end, the effects of corticosteroids on the sodium conductance in human monocytic cells (U937) was studied using whole-cell and outside-out patch-clamp techniques. Increasing extracellular osmolarity from 310 to 420 mosmol/kg led to cell shrinkage followed by marked activation of inward whole-cell current from -36+/-2 to -72+/-9 pA (n=13; recorded at -150 mV voltage with CsCl intracellular solution, NaCl extracellular solution) while outward current remained unchanged. The increase of inward current was accompanied by a positive shift of reversal potential and was sensitive to amiloride (100 microM). The activation of inward current by shrinkage was not observed when external sodium was replaced by potassium, indicating that the shrinkage-stimulated conductance is sodium selective. Outside-out single-channel measurements revealed a unitary conductance of 6+/-1 pS (n=5) for the sodium-selective amiloride-sensitive current. Pretreating the cells with deoxycorticosterone (100 nM/6 h) markedly upregulated the shrinkage-activated Na+ current. In conclusion, human macrophage-like U937 cells express a sodium-selective shrinkage-activated channel which is upregulated by corticosteroids. Activation of the channel may increase cell volume, an effect of glucocorticoids in other cells.

  8. Phyla- and Subtype-Selectivity of CgNa, a Na Channel Toxin from the Venom of the Giant Caribbean Sea Anemone Condylactis Gigantea.

    PubMed

    Billen, Bert; Debaveye, Sarah; Béress, Lászlo; Garateix, Anoland; Tytgat, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Because of their prominent role in electro-excitability, voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels have become the foremost important target of animal toxins. These toxins have developed the ability to discriminate between closely related Na(V) subtypes, making them powerful tools to study Na(V) channel function and structure. CgNa is a 47-amino acid residue type I toxin isolated from the venom of the Giant Caribbean Sea Anemone Condylactis gigantea. Previous studies showed that this toxin slows the fast inactivation of tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(V) currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. To illuminate the underlying Na(V) subtype-selectivity pattern, we have assayed the effects of CgNa on a broad range of mammalian isoforms (Na(V)1.2-Na(V)1.8) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. This study demonstrates that CgNa selectively slows the fast inactivation of rNa(V)1.3/β(1), mNa(V)1.6/β(1) and, to a lesser extent, hNa(V)1.5/β(1), while the other mammalian isoforms remain unaffected. Importantly, CgNa was also examined on the insect sodium channel DmNa(V)1/tipE, revealing a clear phyla-selectivity in the efficacious actions of the toxin. CgNa strongly inhibits the inactivation of the insect Na(V) channel, resulting in a dramatic increase in peak current amplitude and complete removal of fast and steady-state inactivation. Together with the previously determined solution structure, the subtype-selective effects revealed in this study make of CgNa an interesting pharmacological probe to investigate the functional role of specific Na(V) channel subtypes. Moreover, further structural studies could provide important information on the molecular mechanism of Na(V) channel inactivation.

  9. Chloride channels mediate sodium sulphide-induced relaxation in rat uteri.

    PubMed

    Mijušković, Ana; Kokić, Aleksandra Nikolić; Dušić, Zorana Oreščanin; Slavić, Marija; Spasić, Mihajlo B; Blagojević, Duško

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen sulphide reduces uterine contractility and is of potential interest as a treatment for uterine disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of sodium sulphide (Na2 S)-induced relaxation of rat uterus, investigate the importance of redox effects and ion channel-mediated mechanisms, and any interactions between these two mechanisms. Organ bath studies were employed to assess the pharmacological effects of Na2 S in uterine strips by exposing them to Na2 S with or without Cl(-) channel blockers (DIDS, NFA, IAA-94, T16Ainh-A01, TA), raised KCl (15 and 75 mM), K(+) channel inhibitors (glibenclamide, TEA, 4-AP), L-type Ca(2+) channel activator (S-Bay K 8644), propranolol and methylene blue. The activities of antioxidant enzymes were measured in homogenates of treated uteri. The expression of bestrophin channel 1 (BEST-1) was determined by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Na2 S caused concentration-dependent reversible relaxation of spontaneously active and calcium-treated uteri, affecting both amplitude and frequency of contractions. Uteri exposed to 75 mM KCl were less sensitive to Na2 S compared with uteri in 15 mM KCl. Na2 S-induced relaxations were abolished by DIDS, but unaffected by other modulators or by the absence of extracellular HCO3 (-) , suggesting the involvement of chloride ion channels. Na2 S in combination with different modulators provoked specific changes in the anti-oxidant profiles of uteri. The expression of BEST-1, both mRNA and protein, was demonstrated in rat uteri. The relaxant effects of Na2 S in rat uteri are mediated mainly via a DIDS-sensitive Cl(-) -pathway. Components of the relaxation are redox- and Ca(2+) -dependent. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Chloride channels mediate sodium sulphide-induced relaxation in rat uteri

    PubMed Central

    Mijušković, Ana; Kokić, Aleksandra Nikolić; Dušić, Zorana Oreščanin; Slavić, Marija; Spasić, Mihajlo B; Blagojević, Duško

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hydrogen sulphide reduces uterine contractility and is of potential interest as a treatment for uterine disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of sodium sulphide (Na2S)-induced relaxation of rat uterus, investigate the importance of redox effects and ion channel-mediated mechanisms, and any interactions between these two mechanisms. Experimental Approach Organ bath studies were employed to assess the pharmacological effects of Na2S in uterine strips by exposing them to Na2S with or without Cl− channel blockers (DIDS, NFA, IAA-94, T16Ainh-A01, TA), raised KCl (15 and 75 mM), K+ channel inhibitors (glibenclamide, TEA, 4-AP), L-type Ca2+ channel activator (S-Bay K 8644), propranolol and methylene blue. The activities of antioxidant enzymes were measured in homogenates of treated uteri. The expression of bestrophin channel 1 (BEST-1) was determined by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Key Results Na2S caused concentration-dependent reversible relaxation of spontaneously active and calcium-treated uteri, affecting both amplitude and frequency of contractions. Uteri exposed to 75 mM KCl were less sensitive to Na2S compared with uteri in 15 mM KCl. Na2S-induced relaxations were abolished by DIDS, but unaffected by other modulators or by the absence of extracellular HCO3−, suggesting the involvement of chloride ion channels. Na2S in combination with different modulators provoked specific changes in the anti-oxidant profiles of uteri. The expression of BEST-1, both mRNA and protein, was demonstrated in rat uteri. Conclusions and Implications The relaxant effects of Na2S in rat uteri are mediated mainly via a DIDS-sensitive Cl−-pathway. Components of the relaxation are redox- and Ca2+-dependent. PMID:25857480

  11. A sodium channel gene SCN9A polymorphism that increases nociceptor excitability.

    PubMed

    Estacion, Mark; Harty, T Patrick; Choi, Jin-Sung; Tyrrell, Lynda; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2009-12-01

    Sodium channel Na(V)1.7, encoded by the SCN9A gene, is preferentially expressed in nociceptive primary sensory neurons, where it amplifies small depolarizations. In studies on a family with inherited erythromelalgia associated with Na(V)1.7 gain-of-function mutation A863P, we identified a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism within SCN9A in the affected proband and several unaffected family members; this polymorphism (c. 3448C&T, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms database rs6746030, which produces the amino acid substitution R1150W in human Na(V)1.7 [hNa(V)1.7]) is present in 1.1 to 12.7% of control chromosomes, depending on ethnicity. In this study, we examined the effect of the R1150W substitution on function of the hNa(V)1.7 channel, and on the firing of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in which this channel is normally expressed. We show that this polymorphism depolarizes activation (7.9-11mV in different assays). Current-clamp analysis shows that the 1150W allele depolarizes (6mV) resting membrane potential and increases ( approximately 2-fold) the firing frequency in response to depolarization in DRG neurons in which it is present. Our results suggest that polymorphisms in the Na(V)1.7 channel may influence susceptibility to pain.

  12. Open-channel block by the cytoplasmic tail of sodium channel beta4 as a mechanism for resurgent sodium current.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Tina M; Malhotra, Jyoti D; Chen, Chunling; Isom, Lori L; Raman, Indira M

    2005-01-20

    Voltage-gated sodium channels with "resurgent" kinetics are specialized for high-frequency firing. The alpha subunits interact with a blocking protein that binds open channels upon depolarization and unbinds upon repolarization, producing resurgent sodium current. By limiting classical inactivation, the cycle of block and unblock shortens refractory periods. To characterize the blocker in Purkinje neurons, we briefly exposed inside-out patches to substrate-specific proteases. Trypsin and chymotrypsin each removed resurgent current, consistent with established roles for positively charged and hydrophobic/aromatic groups in blocking sodium channels. In Purkinje cells, the only known sodium channel-associated subunit that has a cytoplasmic sequence with several positive charges and clustered hydrophobic/aromatic residues is beta4 (KKLITFILKKTREK; beta4(154-167)). After enzymatic removal of block, beta4(154-167) fully reconstituted resurgent current, whereas scrambled or point-mutated peptides were ineffective. In CA3 pyramidal neurons, which lack beta4 and endogenous block, beta4(154-167) generated resurgent current. Thus, beta4 may be the endogenous open-channel blocker responsible for resurgent kinetics.

  13. Predictably Convergent Evolution of Sodium Channels in the Arms Race between Predators and Prey.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2015-09-01

    Evolution typically arrives at convergent phenotypic solutions to common challenges of natural selection. However, diverse molecular and physiological mechanisms may generate phenotypes that appear similar at the organismal level. How predictable are the molecular mechanisms of adaptation that underlie adaptive convergence? Interactions between toxic prey and their predators provide an excellent avenue to investigate the question of predictability because both taxa must adapt to the presence of defensive poisons. The evolution of resistance to tetrodotoxin (TTX), which binds to and blocks voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV1) in nerves and muscle, has been remarkably parallel across deep phylogenetic divides. In both predators and prey, representing three major vertebrate groups, TTX resistance has arisen through structural changes in NaV1 proteins. Fish, amphibians and reptiles, though they differ in the total number of NaV1 paralogs in their genomes, have each evolved common amino acid substitutions in the orthologous skeletal muscle NaV1.4. Many of these substitutions involve not only the same positions in the protein, but also the identical amino acid residues. Similarly, predictable convergence is observed across the family of sodium channel genes expressed in different tissues in puffer fish and in garter snakes. Trade-offs between the fundamental role of NaV1 proteins in selective permeability of Na+ and their ability to resist binding by TTX generate a highly constrained adaptive landscape at the level of the protein. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Structural, electronic, sodium diffusion and elastic properties of Na-P alloy anode for Na-ion batteries: Insight from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Huansheng; Xu, Bo; Shi, Jing; Wu, Musheng; Hu, Yinquan; Ouyang, Chuying

    2016-11-01

    Sodium-ion batteries (NIBs) as an alternative to lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have recently received great attentions because of the relatively high abundance of sodium. Searching for suitable anode materials has always been a hot topic in the field of NIB study. Recent reports show that phosphorus-based materials are potential as the anode materials for NIBs. Using first-principles calculations, herein, we study the atomic and electronic structures, diffusion dynamics and intrinsic elastic properties of various Na-P alloy compounds (NaP5, Na3P11, NaP and Na3P) as the intermediate phases during Na extraction/insertion in phosphorus-based anode materials. It is found that all the crystalline phases of Na-P alloy phases considered in our study are semiconductors with band gaps larger than that of black phosphorus (BP). The calculations of Na diffusion dynamics indicate a relatively fast Na diffusion in these materials, which is important for good rate performance. In addition, the diffusion channels of sodium ions are one-dimensional in NaP5 phase and three-dimensional in other three phases (Na3P11, NaP and Na3P). Elastic constant calculations indicate that all four phases are mechanically stable. Among them, however, NaP5, Na3P11 and NaP alloy phases are ductile, while the fully sodiated phase Na3P is brittle. In order to improve the electrochemical performance of Na-P alloy anodes for NIBs, thus, promoting ductility of Na-P phase with high sodium concentration may be an effective way.

  15. Use-dependent block of single sodium channels by lidocaine in guinea pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, T V; Courtney, K R; Clusin, W T

    1989-01-01

    Single sodium channel openings have been recorded from cell-attached patches of isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes. A paired pulse protocol was used to test the hypothesis that channel openings are required for lidocaine block. While the averaged ensemble current during the test pulse was much reduced, there was no correlation between the appearance of channel openings during the conditioning pulse and the subsequent test pulse. Analysis of single channel records demonstrated that the unit conductance of open channels was not changed by lidocaine. The block of ensemble INa was explained by roughly equal reductions in number of open channel events, and in the average duration of opening for each event. These results suggest that lidocaine binding to Na+ channels is dependent upon voltage, but may occur before channel opening. A lidocaine-modified channel can still open, but will be less likely to remain open than a drug-free channel. These results are consistent with block of a pre-open state of the channel. PMID:2548633

  16. Two recombinant depressant scorpion neurotoxins differentially affecting mammalian sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuzhe; Luo, Lan; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Zhu, Shunyi

    2010-07-01

    The scorpion depressant toxins are a group of evolutionarily conserved polypeptides targeting sodium channels, which show preferential ability to induce flaccid paralysis in insects, making them attractive candidates for the construction of transgenic plants or viral vectors to control pests. In this study, two new depressant toxin-like peptides (BmKITc and BmKITc2) differing only at position 52 (Lys for Thr) were produced in Escherichia coli. Circular dichroism analysis indicated that these two recombinant peptides display a typical structural feature similar to native scorpion toxins. They both cause a maintained current component at the last phase of inactivation of the insect sodium channel DmNav1/tipE expressed in Xenopus oocytes and interestingly, they do not produce a beta effect despite of their primary structure as beta-toxins. Furthermore, an inhibitory effect with BmKITc but not with BmKITc2 was observed on TTX-R sodium currents in rat DRG neurons. We hypothesize that such differential potency highlights a crucial role of lysine 52 in channel selectivity. Our results therefore indicate that, in spite of the general idea, not all scorpion depressant toxins interact with mammalian and/or insect sodium channels in the same manner.

  17. Subtype-selective targeting of voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    England, Steve; de Groot, Marcel J

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are key to the initiation and propagation of action potentials in electrically excitable cells. Molecular characterization has shown there to be nine functional members of the family, with a high degree of sequence homology between the channels. This homology translates into similar biophysical and pharmacological properties. Confidence in some of the channels as drug targets has been boosted by the discovery of human mutations in the genes encoding a number of them, which give rise to clinical conditions commensurate with the changes predicted from the altered channel biophysics. As a result, they have received much attention for their therapeutic potential. Sodium channels represent well-precedented drug targets as antidysrhythmics, anticonvulsants and local anaesthetics provide good clinical efficacy, driven through pharmacology at these channels. However, electrophysiological characterization of clinically useful compounds in recombinant expression systems shows them to be weak, with poor selectivity between channel types. This has led to the search for subtype-selective modulators, which offer the promise of treatments with improved clinical efficacy and better toleration. Despite developments in high-throughput electrophysiology platforms, this has proven very challenging. Structural biology is beginning to offer us a greater understanding of the three-dimensional structure of voltage-gated ion channels, bringing with it the opportunity to do real structure-based drug design in the future. This discipline is still in its infancy, but developments with the expression and purification of prokaryotic sodium channels offer the promise of structure-based drug design in the not too distant future. PMID:19845672

  18. A single residue differentiates between human cardiac and skeletal muscle Na+ channel slow inactivation.

    PubMed

    Vilin, Y Y; Fujimoto, E; Ruben, P C

    2001-05-01

    Slow inactivation determines the availability of voltage-gated sodium channels during prolonged depolarization. Slow inactivation in hNa(V)1.4 channels occurs with a higher probability than hNa(V)1.5 sodium channels; however, the precise molecular mechanism for this difference remains unclear. Using the macropatch technique we show that the DII S5-S6 p-region uniquely confers the probability of slow inactivation from parental hNa(V)1.5 and hNa(V)1.4 channels into chimerical constructs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to test whether a specific region within DII S5-S6 controls the probability of slow inactivation. We found that substituting V754 in hNa(V)1.4 with isoleucine from the corresponding position (891) in hNa(V)1.5 produced steady-state slow inactivation statistically indistinguishable from that in wild-type hNa(V)1.5 channels, whereas other mutations have little or no effect on slow inactivation. This result indicates that residues V754 in hNa(V)1.4 and I891in hNa(V)1.5 are unique in determining the probability of slow inactivation characteristic of these isoforms. Exchanging S5-S6 linkers between hNa(V)1.4 and hNa(V)1.5 channels had no consistent effect on the voltage-dependent slow time inactivation constants [tau(V)]. This suggests that the molecular structures regulating rates of entry into and exit from the slow inactivated state are different from those controlling the steady-state probability and reside outside the p-regions.

  19. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Guo, Yu -Guo

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmosphere during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.

  20. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; ...

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmospheremore » during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.« less

  1. Simulating the Activation of Voltage Sensing Domain for a Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Using Polarizable Force Field.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-Ning; Gong, Haipeng

    2017-03-02

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels play vital roles in the signal transduction of excitable cells. Upon activation of a NaV channel, the change of transmembrane voltage triggers conformational change of the voltage sensing domain, which then elicits opening of the pore domain and thus allows an influx of Na(+) ions. Description of this process with atomistic details is in urgent demand. In this work, we simulated the partial activation process of the voltage sensing domain of a prokaryotic NaV channel using a polarizable force field. We not only observed the conformational change of the voltage sensing domain from resting to preactive state, but also rigorously estimated the free energy profile along the identified reaction pathway. Comparison with the control simulation using an additive force field indicates that voltage-gating thermodynamics of NaV channels may be inaccurately described without considering the electrostatic polarization effect.

  2. Activation of Drosophila Sodium Channels Promotes Modification by Deltamethrin

    PubMed Central

    Vais, Horia; Williamson, Martin S.; Goodson, Susannah J.; Devonshire, Alan L.; Warmke, Jeffrey W.; Usherwood, Peter N.R.; Cohen, Charles J.

    2000-01-01

    kdr and super-kdr are mutations in houseflies and other insects that confer 30- and 500-fold resistance to the pyrethroid deltamethrin. They correspond to single (L1014F) and double (L1014F+M918T) mutations in segment IIS6 and linker II(S4–S5) of Na channels. We expressed Drosophila para Na channels with and without these mutations and characterized their modification by deltamethrin. All wild-type channels can be modified by <10 nM deltamethrin, but high affinity binding requires channel opening: (a) modification is promoted more by trains of brief depolarizations than by a single long depolarization, (b) the voltage dependence of modification parallels that of channel opening, and (c) modification is promoted by toxin II from Anemonia sulcata, which slows inactivation. The mutations reduce channel opening by enhancing closed-state inactivation. In addition, these mutations reduce the affinity for open channels by 20- and 100-fold, respectively. Deltamethrin inhibits channel closing and the mutations reduce the time that channels remain open once drug has bound. The super-kdr mutations effectively reduce the number of deltamethrin binding sites per channel from two to one. Thus, the mutations reduce both the potency and efficacy of insecticide action. PMID:10694259

  3. Prokaryotic NavMs channel as a structural and functional model for eukaryotic sodium channel antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Bagnéris, Claire; DeCaen, Paul G.; Naylor, Claire E.; Pryde, David C.; Nobeli, Irene; Clapham, David E.; Wallace, B. A.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are important targets for the development of pharmaceutical drugs, because mutations in different human sodium channel isoforms have causal relationships with a range of neurological and cardiovascular diseases. In this study, functional electrophysiological studies show that the prokaryotic sodium channel from Magnetococcus marinus (NavMs) binds and is inhibited by eukaryotic sodium channel blockers in a manner similar to the human Nav1.1 channel, despite millions of years of divergent evolution between the two types of channels. Crystal complexes of the NavMs pore with several brominated blocker compounds depict a common antagonist binding site in the cavity, adjacent to lipid-facing fenestrations proposed to be the portals for drug entry. In silico docking studies indicate the full extent of the blocker binding site, and electrophysiology studies of NavMs channels with mutations at adjacent residues validate the location. These results suggest that the NavMs channel can be a valuable tool for screening and rational design of human drugs. PMID:24850863

  4. Voltage-gated sodium channels and pain-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Kanellopoulos, Alexandros H; Matsuyama, Ayako

    2016-12-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric transmembrane protein complexes. Nine homologous members, SCN1A-11A, make up the VGSC gene family. Sodium channel isoforms display a wide range of kinetic properties endowing different neuronal types with distinctly varied firing properties. Among the VGSCs isoforms, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are preferentially expressed in the peripheral nervous system. These isoforms are known to be crucial in the conduction of nociceptive stimuli with mutations in these channels thought to be the underlying cause of a variety of heritable pain disorders. This review provides an overview of the current literature concerning the role of VGSCs in the generation of pain and heritable pain disorders. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Animal peptides targeting voltage-activated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Billen, Bert; Bosmans, Frank; Tytgat, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Throughout millions of years of evolution, nature has supplied various organisms with a massive arsenal of venoms to defend themselves against predators or to hunt prey. These venoms are rich cocktails of diverse bioactive compounds with divergent functions, extremely effective in immobilizing or killing the recipient. In fact, venom peptides from various animals have been shown to specifically act on ion channels and other cellular receptors, and impair their normal functioning. Because of their key role in the initiation and propagation of electrical signals in excitable tissue, it is not very surprising that several isoforms of voltage-activated sodium channels are specifically targeted by many of these venom peptides. Therefore, these peptide toxins provide tremendous opportunities to design drugs with a higher efficacy and fewer undesirable side effects. This review puts venom peptides from spiders, scorpions and cone snails that target voltage-activated sodium channels in the spotlight, and addresses their potential therapeutical applications.

  6. Multiple sodium channel isoforms mediate the pathological effects of Pacific ciguatoxin-1

    PubMed Central

    Inserra, Marco C.; Israel, Mathilde R.; Caldwell, Ashlee; Castro, Joel; Deuis, Jennifer R.; Harrington, Andrea M.; Keramidas, Angelo; Garcia-Caraballo, Sonia; Maddern, Jessica; Erickson, Andelain; Grundy, Luke; Rychkov, Grigori Y.; Zimmermann, Katharina; Lewis, Richard J.; Brierley, Stuart M.; Vetter, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Human intoxication with the seafood poison ciguatoxin, a dinoflagellate polyether that activates voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV), causes ciguatera, a disease characterised by gastrointestinal and neurological disturbances. We assessed the activity of the most potent congener, Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1), on NaV1.1–1.9 using imaging and electrophysiological approaches. Although P-CTX-1 is essentially a non-selective NaV toxin and shifted the voltage-dependence of activation to more hyperpolarising potentials at all NaV subtypes, an increase in the inactivation time constant was observed only at NaV1.8, while the slope factor of the conductance-voltage curves was significantly increased for NaV1.7 and peak current was significantly increased for NaV1.6. Accordingly, P-CTX-1-induced visceral and cutaneous pain behaviours were significantly decreased after pharmacological inhibition of NaV1.8 and the tetrodotoxin-sensitive isoforms NaV1.7 and NaV1.6, respectively. The contribution of these isoforms to excitability of peripheral C- and A-fibre sensory neurons, confirmed using murine skin and visceral single-fibre recordings, reflects the expression pattern of NaV isoforms in peripheral sensory neurons and their contribution to membrane depolarisation, action potential initiation and propagation. PMID:28225079

  7. Multiple sodium channel isoforms mediate the pathological effects of Pacific ciguatoxin-1.

    PubMed

    Inserra, Marco C; Israel, Mathilde R; Caldwell, Ashlee; Castro, Joel; Deuis, Jennifer R; Harrington, Andrea M; Keramidas, Angelo; Garcia-Caraballo, Sonia; Maddern, Jessica; Erickson, Andelain; Grundy, Luke; Rychkov, Grigori Y; Zimmermann, Katharina; Lewis, Richard J; Brierley, Stuart M; Vetter, Irina

    2017-02-22

    Human intoxication with the seafood poison ciguatoxin, a dinoflagellate polyether that activates voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV), causes ciguatera, a disease characterised by gastrointestinal and neurological disturbances. We assessed the activity of the most potent congener, Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1), on NaV1.1-1.9 using imaging and electrophysiological approaches. Although P-CTX-1 is essentially a non-selective NaV toxin and shifted the voltage-dependence of activation to more hyperpolarising potentials at all NaV subtypes, an increase in the inactivation time constant was observed only at NaV1.8, while the slope factor of the conductance-voltage curves was significantly increased for NaV1.7 and peak current was significantly increased for NaV1.6. Accordingly, P-CTX-1-induced visceral and cutaneous pain behaviours were significantly decreased after pharmacological inhibition of NaV1.8 and the tetrodotoxin-sensitive isoforms NaV1.7 and NaV1.6, respectively. The contribution of these isoforms to excitability of peripheral C- and A-fibre sensory neurons, confirmed using murine skin and visceral single-fibre recordings, reflects the expression pattern of NaV isoforms in peripheral sensory neurons and their contribution to membrane depolarisation, action potential initiation and propagation.

  8. Regulation of Sodium Channel Function by Bilayer Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lundbæk, Jens A.; Birn, Pia; Hansen, Anker J.; Søgaard, Rikke; Nielsen, Claus; Girshman, Jeffrey; Bruno, Michael J.; Tape, Sonya E.; Egebjerg, Jan; Greathouse, Denise V.; Mattice, Gwendolyn L.; Koeppe, Roger E.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2004-01-01

    Membrane proteins are regulated by the lipid bilayer composition. Specific lipid–protein interactions rarely are involved, which suggests that the regulation is due to changes in some general bilayer property (or properties). The hydrophobic coupling between a membrane-spanning protein and the surrounding bilayer means that protein conformational changes may be associated with a reversible, local bilayer deformation. Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies, and the energetic cost of the bilayer deformation contributes to the total energetic cost of the protein conformational change. The energetics and kinetics of the protein conformational changes therefore will be regulated by the bilayer elasticity, which is determined by the lipid composition. This hydrophobic coupling mechanism has been studied extensively in gramicidin channels, where the channel–bilayer hydrophobic interactions link a “conformational” change (the monomer↔dimer transition) to an elastic bilayer deformation. Gramicidin channels thus are regulated by the lipid bilayer elastic properties (thickness, monolayer equilibrium curvature, and compression and bending moduli). To investigate whether this hydrophobic coupling mechanism could be a general mechanism regulating membrane protein function, we examined whether voltage-dependent skeletal-muscle sodium channels, expressed in HEK293 cells, are regulated by bilayer elasticity, as monitored using gramicidin A (gA) channels. Nonphysiological amphiphiles (β-octyl-glucoside, Genapol X-100, Triton X-100, and reduced Triton X-100) that make lipid bilayers less “stiff”, as measured using gA channels, shift the voltage dependence of sodium channel inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials. At low amphiphile concentration, the magnitude of the shift is linearly correlated to the change in gA channel lifetime. Cholesterol-depletion, which also reduces bilayer stiffness, causes a similar shift in sodium channel inactivation. These results

  9. Sodium-dependent inhibition of the epithelial sodium channel by an arginyl-specific reagent.

    PubMed

    Garty, H; Yeger, O; Asher, C

    1988-04-25

    Effects of the arginyl- and lysyl-specific reagent phenylglyoxal (PGO) on the epithelial Na+ channel were evaluated by measuring the amiloride-blockable 22Na+ fluxes in membrane vesicles derived from the toad bladder epithelium. Incubating whole cells or isolated membranes with PGO readily and irreversibly blocked the channel-mediated tracer flux. Na+ ions present during the interaction of membranes with PGO could protect channels from inactivation by PGO. This effect required the presence of Na+ at the luminal side of the membrane and was characterized by an IC50 of 79 mM Na+. Amiloride, too, could desensitize channels to PGO, but its effect was significant only when whole cells were interacted with the protein-modifying reagent. The data are compatible with a model in which the conductive path of the channel contains a functional arginine, possibly forming a salt bridge with a carboxylic group, which is involved in Na+ translocation and amiloride binding. It was also shown that the augmentation of transport induced by incubating whole cells in Ca2+-free solution (Garty, H., and Asher, C. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 8330-8335) involves the activation or recruitment of channels that are not vulnerable to PGO prior to incubation.

  10. Sodium-dependent inhibition of the epithelial sodium channel by an arginyl-specific reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, H.; Yeger, O.; Asher, C.

    1988-04-25

    Effects of the arginyl- and lysyl-specific reagent phenylglyoxal (PGO) on the epithelial Na+ channel were evaluated by measuring the amiloride-blockable /sup 22/Na+ fluxes in membrane vesicles derived from the toad bladder epithelium. Incubating whole cells or isolated membranes with PGO readily and irreversibly blocked the channel-mediated tracer flux. Na+ ions present during the interaction of membranes with PGO could protect channels from inactivation by PGO. This effect required the presence of Na+ at the luminal side of the membrane and was characterized by an IC50 of 79 mM Na+. Amiloride, too, could desensitize channels to PGO, but its effect was significant only when whole cells were interacted with the protein-modifying reagent. The data are compatible with a model in which the conductive path of the channel contains a functional arginine, possibly forming a salt bridge with a carboxylic group, which is involved in Na+ translocation and amiloride binding. It was also shown that the augmentation of transport induced by incubating whole cells in Ca2+-free solution involves the activation or recruitment of channels that are not vulnerable to PGO prior to incubation.

  11. Current—voltage curve of sodium channels and concentration dependence of sodium permeability in frog skin

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, W.; Larsen, E. Hviid; Lindemann, B.

    1977-01-01

    1. The inward facing membranes of in vitro frog skin epithelium were depolarized with solutions of high K concentration. The electrical properties of the epithelium are then expected to be governed by the outward facing, Na-selective membrane. 2. In this state, the transepithelial voltage (V) was clamped to zero and step-changes of Na activity in the outer solution ((Na)o) were performed with a fast-flow chamber at constant ionic strength, while the short-circuit current was recorded. 3. At pre-selected times after a step-change of (Na)o the current response (I) to a fast voltage staircase was recorded. This procedure was repeated after blocking the Na channels with amiloride to obtain the current—voltage curve of transmembrane and paracellular shunt pathways. The current—voltage curve of the Na channels was computed by subtracting the shunt current from the total current. 4. The instantaneous INa—V curve thus obtained at a given (Na)o could easily be fitted with the constant field equation in the range between -50 and zero mV. This fit yielded approximate estimates of PNa, the Na— permeability of the Na-selective membrane (at this (Na)o) and the cellular Na activity, (Na)c. As residual properties of the serosal membrane were ignored the computed values are expected to underestimate the true ones. 5. At constant (Na)c, the steady-state value of 1/PNa increases linearly with (Na)o. Error analysis and the effect of drugs show that the dependence is not due to the residual properties of the inward facing membranes but reflects the true behaviour of PNa. 6. The steady-state PNa at a given (Na)o is smaller than the transient PNa observed right after a stepwise increase of (Na)o to this value. The time constant of PNa-relaxation is in the order of seconds. 7. In conclusion, Na transport through open Na-selective channels of the outward facing membrane of the stratum granulosum cells can be described as an electrodiffusion process which as such does not saturate

  12. Ionic selectivity and thermal adaptations within the voltage-gated sodium channel family of alkaliphilic Bacillus.

    PubMed

    DeCaen, Paul G; Takahashi, Yuka; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro; Clapham, David E

    2014-11-11

    Entry and extrusion of cations are essential processes in living cells. In alkaliphilic prokaryotes, high external pH activates voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), which allows Na(+) to enter and be used as substrate for cation/proton antiporters responsible for cytoplasmic pH homeostasis. Here, we describe a new member of the prokaryotic voltage-gated Na(+) channel family (NsvBa; Non-selective voltage-gated, Bacillus alcalophilus) that is nonselective among Na(+), Ca(2+) and K(+) ions. Mutations in NsvBa can convert the nonselective filter into one that discriminates for Na(+) or divalent cations. Gain-of-function experiments demonstrate the portability of ion selectivity with filter mutations to other Bacillus Nav channels. Increasing pH and temperature shifts their activation threshold towards their native resting membrane potential. Furthermore, we find drugs that target Bacillus Nav channels also block the growth of the bacteria. This work identifies some of the adaptations to achieve ion discrimination and gating in Bacillus Nav channels.

  13. RING finger protein 121 facilitates the degradation and membrane localization of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Low, Sean E; Yamada, Kenta; Saint-Amant, Louis; Zhou, Weibin; Muto, Akira; Asakawa, Kazuhide; Nakai, Junichi; Kawakami, Koichi; Kuwada, John Y; Hirata, Hiromi

    2015-03-03

    Following their synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are transported to the membranes of excitable cells, where they often cluster, such as at the axon initial segment of neurons. Although the mechanisms by which NaV channels form and maintain clusters have been extensively examined, the processes that govern their transport and degradation have received less attention. Our entry into the study of these processes began with the isolation of a new allele of the zebrafish mutant alligator, which we found to be caused by mutations in the gene encoding really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein 121 (RNF121), an E3-ubiquitin ligase present in the ER and cis-Golgi compartments. Here we demonstrate that RNF121 facilitates two opposing fates of NaV channels: (i) ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation and (ii) membrane localization when coexpressed with auxiliary NaVβ subunits. Collectively, these results indicate that RNF121 participates in the quality control of NaV channels during their synthesis and subsequent transport to the membrane.

  14. Definition of epitopes for monoclonal antibodies developed against purified sodium channel protein: implications for channel structure.

    PubMed

    Kolibal, S S; Brady, C; Cohen, S A

    1998-09-01

    To test sodium channel structural models, we defined the epitopes for nineteen independently cloned monoclonal antibodies previously generated against purified, detergent-solubilized, adult rat skeletal muscle sodium channel protein using channel proteolysis, synthetic peptides, and fusion proteins. All identified epitopes were continuous and unique to the skeletal muscle subtype alpha-subunit. Of the nineteen independent clones, seventeen had epitopes located either in the origin of the amino-terminus or in the interdomain 2-3 region while only two antibodies had epitopes located in the mid-portion of the interdomain 1-2 region. No immunogenic regions were identified on the alpha-subunit's extracellular regions, interdomain 3-4 segment, or carboxyl-terminus or on channel beta-subunits. While immune tolerance may explain the lack of immunogenicity of extracellular regions, the lack of immunogenicity of most of the channel's cytoplasmic mass may be due to segment inaccessibility from organization of these regions as globular domains, to insertion of parts of these regions into the membrane phase, or to interaction with other protein elements. The definition of monoclonal antibody epitopes allows us to reinterpret previously reported monoclonal antibody competition studies, providing independent support for our model of sodium channel cytoplasmic domain structure. In addition, these data suggest additional testable hypotheses concerning the interactions of the sodium channel amino- and carboxyl-termini with each other as well as with other protein elements.

  15. The L1014F point mutation in the house fly Vssc1 sodium channel confers knockdown resistance to pyrethroids.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Lee, S H; Ingles, P J; Knipple, D C; Soderlund, D M

    1997-10-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels encoded by a full-length cDNA corresponding to the Vssc1 gene of the house fly (Musca domestica) were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes either alone or in combination with the tipE gene product of Drosophila melanogaster and were characterized by two-electrode voltage clamp. Vssc1 cRNA alone produced very small (50-150 nA) sodium currents, whereas the combination of Vssc1 and tipE cRNAs produced robust (0.5-3 microA), rapidly inactivating sodium currents. The pyrethroid insecticide cismethrin prolonged the sodium current carried by Vssc1/tipE sodium channels during a depolarizing pulse and induced a tail current after repolarization. The Vssc1 cDNA was specifically mutated to substitute phenylalanine for leucine at position 1014 of the inferred amino acid sequence (L1014F), a polymorphism shown previously to be associated with the kdr (knockdown resistance) trait of the house fly. The L1014F substitution reduced the sensitivity of expressed house fly sodium channels to cismethrin at least 10-fold and increased the rate of decay of pyrethroid-induced sodium tail currents. These results demonstrate that the resistance-associated L1014F mutation confers a reduction in the sensitivity of house fly sodium channels to pyrethroids that is sufficient to account for the kdr resistance trait.

  16. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome-Associated Mutations in the Sodium Channel Beta Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bi-Hua; Pundi, Kavitha N; Van Norstrand, David W; Valdivia, Carmen R; Tester, David J; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 10% of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) may stem from potentially lethal cardiac channelopathies, with approximately half of channelopathic SIDS involving the NaV1.5 cardiac sodium channel. Recently, NaV beta subunits have been implicated in various cardiac arrhythmias. Thus, the four genes encoding NaV beta subunits represent plausible candidate genes for SIDS. Objective To determine the spectrum, prevalence and functional consequences of sodium channel beta subunit mutations in a SIDS cohort. Methods In this IRB-approved study, mutational analysis of the 4 beta subunit genes: SCN1B – 4B was performed using PCR, DHPLC, and direct DNA sequencing of DNA derived from 292 SIDS cases. Engineered mutations were co-expressed with SCN5A in HEK 293 cells, and whole cell patch clamped. One of the putative SIDS-associated mutations was similarly studied in adenovirally transduced adult rat ventricular myocytes. Results 3 rare (absent in 200–800 reference alleles) missense mutations (β3-V36M, β3-V54G and β4-S206L) were identified in 3/292 SIDS cases. Compared to SCN5A+β3-WT, β3-V36M significantly decreased peak INa and increased late INa while β3-V54G resulted in a marked loss-of-function. β4-S206L accentuated late INa and positively shifted the midpoint of inactivation compared to SCN5A+β4-WT. In native cardiomyocytes, β4-S206L accentuated late INa and increased the ventricular action potential duration (APD) compared to β4-WT. Conclusion This study provides the first molecular and functional evidence to implicate the NaV beta subunits in SIDS pathogenesis. Altered NaV1.5 sodium channel function due to beta subunit mutations may account for the molecular pathogenic mechanism underlying approximately 1% of SIDS. PMID:20226894

  17. Interpreting the functional role of a novel interaction motif in prokaryotic sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Sula, Altin; Wallace, B A

    2017-06-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels enable the translocation of sodium ions across cell membranes and play crucial roles in electrical signaling by initiating the action potential. In humans, mutations in sodium channels give rise to several neurological and cardiovascular diseases, and hence they are targets for pharmaceutical drug developments. Prokaryotic sodium channel crystal structures have provided detailed views of sodium channels, which by homology have suggested potentially important functionally related structural features in human sodium channels. A new crystal structure of a full-length prokaryotic channel, NavMs, in a conformation we proposed to represent the open, activated state, has revealed a novel interaction motif associated with channel opening. This motif is associated with disease when mutated in human sodium channels and plays an important and dynamic role in our new model for channel activation. © 2017 Sula and Wallace.

  18. A novel tarantula toxin stabilizes the deactivated voltage sensor of bacterial sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Nguyen, Phuong Tran; Zhang, Yunxiao; Hu, Zhaotun; Zhang, Changxin; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; DeCaen, Paul G; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2017-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are activated by transiting the voltage sensor from the deactivated to the activated state. The crystal structures of several bacterial NaVs have captured the voltage sensor module (VSM) in an activated state, but structure of the deactivated voltage sensor remains elusive. In this study, we sought to identify peptide toxins stabilizing the deactivated VSM of bacterial NaVs. We screened fractions from several venoms and characterized a cystine knot toxin called JZTx-27 from the venom of tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao as a high-affinity antagonist of the prokaryotic NaVs NsVBa (nonselective voltage-gated Bacillus alcalophilus) and NaChBac (bacterial sodium channel from Bacillus halodurans) (IC50 = 112 nM and 30 nM, respectively). JZTx-27 was more efficacious at weaker depolarizing voltages and significantly slowed the activation but accelerated the deactivation of NsVBa, whereas the local anesthetic drug lidocaine was shown to antagonize NsVBa without affecting channel gating. Mutation analysis confirmed that JZTx-27 bound to S3-4 linker of NsVBa, with F98 being the critical residue in determining toxin affinity. All electrophysiological data and in silico analysis suggested that JZTx-27 trapped VSM of NsVBa in one of the deactivated states. In mammalian NaVs, JZTx-27 preferably inhibited the inactivation of NaV1.5 by targeting the fourth transmembrane domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of peptide antagonist for prokaryotic NaVs. More important, we proposed that JZTx-27 stabilized the NsVBa VSM in the deactivated state and may be used as a probe to determine the structure of the deactivated VSM of NaVs.-Tang, C., Zhou, X., Nguyen, P. T., Zhang, Y., Hu, Z., Zhang, C., Yarov-Yarovoy, V., DeCaen, P. G., Liang, S., Liu, Z. A novel tarantula toxin stabilizes the deactivated voltage sensor of bacterial sodium channel. © FASEB.

  19. Single Na+ channels activated by veratridine and batrachotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive Na+ channels from rat skeletal muscle plasma membrane vesicles were inserted into planar lipid bilayers in the presence of either of the alkaloid toxins veratridine (VT) or batrachotoxin (BTX). Both of these toxins are known to cause persistent activation of Na+ channels. With BTX as the channel activator, single channels remain open nearly all the time. Channels activated with VT open and close on a time scale of 1-10 s. Increasing the VT concentration enhances the probability of channel opening, primarily by increasing the rate constant of opening. The kinetics and voltage dependence of channel block by 21-sulfo-11-alpha-hydroxysaxitoxin are identical for VT and BTX, as is the ionic selectivity sequence determined by bi-ionic reversal potential (Na+ approximately Li+ greater than K+ greater than Rb+ greater than Cs+). However, there are striking quantitative differences in open channel conduction for channels in the presence of the two activators. Under symmetrical solution conditions, the single channel conductance for Na+ is about twice as high with BTX as with VT. Furthermore, the symmetrical solution single channel conductances show a different selectivity for BTX (Na+ greater than Li+ greater than K+) than for VT (Na+ greater than K+ greater than Li+). Open channel current-voltage curves in symmetrical Na+ and Li+ are roughly linear, while those in symmetrical K+ are inwardly rectifying. Na+ currents are blocked asymmetrically by K+ with both BTX and VT, but the voltage dependence of K+ block is stronger with BTX than with VT. The results show that the alkaloid neurotoxins not only alter the gating process of the Na+ channel, but also affect the structure of the open channel. We further conclude that the rate-determining step for conduction by Na+ does not occur at the channel's "selectivity filter," where poorly permeating ions like K+ are excluded. PMID:2435846

  20. Sodium channel inactivation in the crayfish giant axon. Must channels open before inactivating

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.

    1981-09-01

    Experiments on sodium channel inactivation kinetics were performed on voltage-clamped crayfish giant axons. The primary goals was to investigate whether channels must open before activating. Voltage-clamp artifacts were minimized by the use of low-sodium solutions and full series resistance compensation, and the spatial uniformity of the currents was checked with a closely spaced pair of electrodes used to measure local current densities. For membrane potentials between -40 and +40 mV, sodium currents decay to zero with a single exponential time-course. The time constant for decay is a steep function of membrane potential. The time-course of inactivation measured with the double-pulse method is very similar to the decay of current at the same potential. Steady-state inactivation curves measured with different test pulses are identical. The time-course of doubling pulse inactivation shows a lag that roughly correlates with the opening of sodium channels, but it is not strictly necessary for channels to open before inactivating. Measurements of the potential dependence of the integral of sodium conductance are also inconsistent with the simplest cases of models in which channels must open before activating.

  1. Role of Epithelial Sodium Channels and Their Regulators in Hypertension*

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Rama; Pearce, David; Hughey, Rebecca P.; Kleyman, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    The kidney has a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, in large part through its role in the regulated reabsorption of filtered Na+. Epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs) are expressed in the most distal segments of the nephron and are a target of volume regulatory hormones. A variety of factors regulate ENaC activity, including several aldosterone-induced proteins that are present within an ENaC regulatory complex. Proteases also regulate ENaC by cleaving the channel and releasing intrinsic inhibitory tracts. Polymorphisms or mutations within channel subunits or regulatory pathways that enhance channel activity may contribute to an increase in blood pressure in individuals with essential hypertension. PMID:20624922

  2. The paranodal cytoskeleton clusters Na(+) channels at nodes of Ranvier.

    PubMed

    Amor, Veronique; Zhang, Chuansheng; Vainshtein, Anna; Zhang, Ao; Zollinger, Daniel R; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Brophy, Peter J; Rasband, Matthew N; Peles, Elior

    2017-01-30

    A high density of Na(+) channels at nodes of Ranvier is necessary for rapid and efficient action potential propagation in myelinated axons. Na+ channel clustering is thought to depend on two axonal cell adhesion molecules that mediate interactions between the axon and myelinating glia at the nodal gap (i.e., NF186) and the paranodal junction (i.e., Caspr). Here we show that while Na(+) channels cluster at nodes in the absence of NF186, they fail to do so in double conditional knockout mice lacking both NF186 and the paranodal cell adhesion molecule Caspr, demonstrating that a paranodal junction-dependent mechanism can cluster Na(+) channels at nodes. Furthermore, we show that paranode-dependent clustering of nodal Na(+) channels requires axonal βII spectrin which is concentrated at paranodes. Our results reveal that the paranodal junction-dependent mechanism of Na(+)channel clustering is mediated by the spectrin-based paranodal axonal cytoskeleton.

  3. Molecular Basis of Paraltyic Neurotoxin Action on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-14

    toxins, Brevetoxins. and Conotoxins . B. Monoclonal antibodies with high affinity for the mammalian neuronal sodium channel were developed and methods...site on the sodium channel. 3. Actions of Conotoxins on Sodium Channels, We have carried out a preliminary characterization of the electrophysiological

  4. Novel wasp toxin discriminates between neuronal and cardiac sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, E; Maejima, H; Yamaoka, K; Konno, K; Kawai, N; Shimizu, E; Yokote, S; Nakayama, H; Seyama, I

    2001-06-01

    Pompilidotoxins (PMTXs), derived from the venom of solitary wasp has been known to facilitate synaptic transmission in the lobster neuromuscular junction, and a recent further study from rat trigeminal neurons revealed that the toxin slows Na+ channel inactivation without modifying activation process. Here we report that beta-PMTX modifies rat brain type II Na+ channel alpha-subunit (rBII) expressed in human embryonic kidney cells but fails to act on the rat heart alpha-subunit (rH1) at similar concentrations. We constructed a series of chimeric mutants of rBII and rH1 Na+ channels and compared modification of the steady-state Na+ currents by beta-PMTX. We found that a difference in a single amino acid between Glu-1616 in rBII and Gln-1615 in rH1 at the extracellular loop of D4S3-S4 is crucial for the action of beta-PMTX. PMTXs, which are small peptides with 13 amino acids, would be a potential tool for exploring a new functional moiety of Na+ channels.

  5. The depressant scorpion neurotoxin LqqIT2 selectively modulates the insect voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Frank; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Tytgat, Jan

    2005-03-15

    LqqIT2 is a depressant neurotoxin present in the venom of the Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus scorpion, one of the world's most dangerous scorpions endemic to dry habitats in Africa and Asia. In order to determine its efficacy, potency and selectivity, LqqIT2 was subjected for the first time to an electrophysiological and pharmacological comparison between two different cloned sodium channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Aside from typical beta-toxin effects, LqqIT2 also affected the inactivation process and ion selectivity of the insect voltage-gated sodium channel. The most interesting feature of LqqIT2 is its total insect-selectivity. At a concentration of 1 microM, the insect-voltage-gated sodium channel, para, was profoundly modulated while its mammalian counterpart, the rat brain Na(v)1.2 channel, was not affected. This trait offers excellent prospects for the development of novel insecticides.

  6. Molecular modeling and dynamics of the sodium channel inactivation gate.

    PubMed Central

    Sirota, Fernanda L; Pascutti, Pedro G; Anteneodo, Celia

    2002-01-01

    The intracellular linker L(III-IV) of voltage-gated sodium channels is known to be involved in their mechanism of inactivation. Its primary sequence is well conserved in sodium channels from different tissues and species. However, the role of charged residues in this region, first thought to play an important role in inactivation, has not been well identified, whereas the IFM triad (I1488-M1490) has been characterized as the crucial element for inactivation. In this work, we constructed theoretical models and performed molecular dynamics simulations, exploring the role of L(III-IV)-charged residues in the presence of a polar/nonpolar planar interface represented by a dielectric discontinuity. From structural predictions, two alpha-helical segments are proposed. Moreover, from dynamics simulations, a time-conserved motif is detected and shown to play a relevant role in guiding the inactivation particle toward its receptor site. PMID:11867438

  7. Structure and function of μ-conotoxins, peptide-based sodium channel blockers with analgesic activity.

    PubMed

    Green, Brad R; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Norton, Raymond S

    2014-10-01

    μ-Conotoxins block voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and compete with tetrodotoxin for binding to the sodium conductance pore. Early efforts identified µ-conotoxins that preferentially blocked the skeletal muscle subtype (NaV1.4). However, the last decade witnessed a significant increase in the number of µ-conotoxins and the range of VGSC subtypes inhibited (NaV1.2, NaV1.3 or NaV1.7). Twenty µ-conotoxin sequences have been identified to date and structure-activity relationship studies of several of these identified key residues responsible for interactions with VGSC subtypes. Efforts to engineer-in subtype specificity are driven by in vivo analgesic and neuromuscular blocking activities. This review summarizes structural and pharmacological studies of µ-conotoxins, which show promise for development of selective blockers of NaV1.2, and perhaps also NaV1.1,1.3 or 1.7.

  8. Structure and function of μ-conotoxins, peptide-based sodium channel blockers with analgesic activity

    PubMed Central

    Green, Brad R; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Norton, Raymond S

    2015-01-01

    μ-Conotoxins block voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and compete with tetrodotoxin for binding to the sodium conductance pore. Early efforts identified μ-conotoxins that preferentially blocked the skeletal muscle subtype (NaV1.4). However, the last decade witnessed a significant increase in the number of μ-conotoxins and the range of VGSC subtypes inhibited (NaV1.2, NaV1.3 or NaV1.7). Twenty μ-conotoxin sequences have been identified to date and structure–activity relationship studies of several of these identified key residues responsible for interactions with VGSC subtypes. Efforts to engineer-in subtype specificity are driven by in vivo analgesic and neuromuscular blocking activities. This review summarizes structural and pharmacological studies of μ-conotoxins, which show promise for development of selective blockers of NaV1.2, and perhaps also NaV1.1,1.3 or 1.7. PMID:25406007

  9. Amiloride-sensitive sodium channel is linked to the cytoskeleton in renal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.; Saccomani, G.; Benos, D.J. ); Eun-Hye, J.; Angelides, K.J. )

    1991-08-15

    Amiloride-sensitive sodium channels are localized to the microvillar domain of apical membranes in sodium-transporting renal epithelial cells. To elucidate the elements that maintain sodium channel distribution at the apical membrane, the authors searched for specific proteins associating with the channel. Triton X-100 extraction of A6 epithelial cells reveals that sodium channels are associated with detergent-insoluble and assembled cytoskeleton. Indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy show that sodium channels are segregated to the apical microvillar membrane and colocalize with ankyrin, fodrin, and actin. They document by immunoblot analysis that ankyrin and fodrin remain associated with sodium channels after isolation and purification form bovine renal papillae. {sup 125}I-labeled ankyrin can be precipitated by anti-sodium-channel antibodies only in the presence of purified bovine sodium-channel complex. Direct binding of {sup 125}I-labeled ankyrin shows ankyrin binds to the 150-kDa sub-unit of the channel. Fluorescence photobleach lateral-diffusion measurements indicate sodium channels are severely restricted in their lateral mobility. They conclude that ankyrin links the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel to the underlying cytoskeleton and this association may sequester sodium channels at apical microvilli and maintain their polarized distribution in renal epithelial cells.

  10. Clopidogrel attenuates lithium-induced alterations in renal water and sodium channels/transporters in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, János; Heiney, Kristina M; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Carlson, Noel G; Müller, Christa E; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2015-12-01

    Lithium (Li) administration causes deranged expression and function of renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters resulting in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Extracellular nucleotides (ATP/ADP/UTP), via P2 receptors, regulate these transport functions. We tested whether clopidogrel bisulfate (CLPD), an antagonist of ADP-activated P2Y(12) receptor, would affect Li-induced alterations in renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters. Adult mice were treated for 14 days with CLPD and/or Li and euthanized. Urine and kidneys were collected for analysis. When administered with Li, CLPD ameliorated polyuria, attenuated the rise in urine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and resulted in significantly higher urinary arginine vasopressin (AVP) and aldosterone levels as compared to Li treatment alone. However, urine sodium excretion remained elevated. Semi-quantitative immunoblotting revealed that CLPD alone increased renal aquaporin 2 (AQP2), Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2), Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), and the subunits of the epithelial Na channel (ENaC) in medulla by 25-130 %. When combined with Li, CLPD prevented downregulation of AQP2, Na-K-ATPase, and NKCC2 but was less effective against downregulation of cortical α- or γ-ENaC (70 kDa band). Thus, CLPD primarily attenuated Li-induced downregulation of proteins involved in water conservation (AVP-sensitive), with modest effects on aldosterone-sensitive proteins potentially explaining sustained natriuresis. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed strong labeling for P2Y(12)-R in proximal tubule brush border and blood vessels in the cortex and less intense labeling in medullary thick ascending limb and the collecting ducts. Therefore, there is the potential for CLPD to be directly acting at the tubule sites to mediate these effects. In conclusion, P2Y(12)-R may represent a novel therapeutic target for Li-induced NDI.

  11. The hitchhiker’s guide to the voltage-gated sodium channel galaxy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels contribute to the rising phase of action potentials and served as an early muse for biophysicists laying the foundation for our current understanding of electrical signaling. Given their central role in electrical excitability, it is not surprising that (a) inherited mutations in genes encoding for Nav channels and their accessory subunits have been linked to excitability disorders in brain, muscle, and heart; and (b) Nav channels are targeted by various drugs and naturally occurring toxins. Although the overall architecture and behavior of these channels are likely to be similar to the more well-studied voltage-gated potassium channels, eukaryotic Nav channels lack structural and functional symmetry, a notable difference that has implications for gating and selectivity. Activation of voltage-sensing modules of the first three domains in Nav channels is sufficient to open the channel pore, whereas movement of the domain IV voltage sensor is correlated with inactivation. Also, structure–function studies of eukaryotic Nav channels show that a set of amino acids in the selectivity filter, referred to as DEKA locus, is essential for Na+ selectivity. Structures of prokaryotic Nav channels have also shed new light on mechanisms of drug block. These structures exhibit lateral fenestrations that are large enough to allow drugs or lipophilic molecules to gain access into the inner vestibule, suggesting that this might be the passage for drug entry into a closed channel. In this Review, we will synthesize our current understanding of Nav channel gating mechanisms, ion selectivity and permeation, and modulation by therapeutics and toxins in light of the new structures of the prokaryotic Nav channels that, for the time being, serve as structural models of their eukaryotic counterparts. PMID:26712848

  12. The hitchhiker's guide to the voltage-gated sodium channel galaxy.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Christopher A; Payandeh, Jian; Bosmans, Frank; Chanda, Baron

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels contribute to the rising phase of action potentials and served as an early muse for biophysicists laying the foundation for our current understanding of electrical signaling. Given their central role in electrical excitability, it is not surprising that (a) inherited mutations in genes encoding for Nav channels and their accessory subunits have been linked to excitability disorders in brain, muscle, and heart; and (b) Nav channels are targeted by various drugs and naturally occurring toxins. Although the overall architecture and behavior of these channels are likely to be similar to the more well-studied voltage-gated potassium channels, eukaryotic Nav channels lack structural and functional symmetry, a notable difference that has implications for gating and selectivity. Activation of voltage-sensing modules of the first three domains in Nav channels is sufficient to open the channel pore, whereas movement of the domain IV voltage sensor is correlated with inactivation. Also, structure-function studies of eukaryotic Nav channels show that a set of amino acids in the selectivity filter, referred to as DEKA locus, is essential for Na(+) selectivity. Structures of prokaryotic Nav channels have also shed new light on mechanisms of drug block. These structures exhibit lateral fenestrations that are large enough to allow drugs or lipophilic molecules to gain access into the inner vestibule, suggesting that this might be the passage for drug entry into a closed channel. In this Review, we will synthesize our current understanding of Nav channel gating mechanisms, ion selectivity and permeation, and modulation by therapeutics and toxins in light of the new structures of the prokaryotic Nav channels that, for the time being, serve as structural models of their eukaryotic counterparts.

  13. Structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel pore reveals essential gating elements and an outer ion binding site common to eukaryotic channels.

    PubMed

    Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Arrigoni, Cristina; Wong, Stephanie; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Loussouarn, Gildas; Minor, Daniel L

    2014-01-23

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are central elements of cellular excitation. Notwithstanding advances from recent bacterial NaV (BacNaV) structures, key questions about gating and ion selectivity remain. Here, we present a closed conformation of NaVAe1p, a pore-only BacNaV derived from NaVAe1, a BacNaV from the arsenite oxidizer Alkalilimnicola ehrlichei found in Mono Lake, California, that provides insight into both fundamental properties. The structure reveals a pore domain in which the pore-lining S6 helix connects to a helical cytoplasmic tail. Electrophysiological studies of full-length BacNaVs show that two elements defined by the NaVAe1p structure, an S6 activation gate position and the cytoplasmic tail "neck", are central to BacNaV gating. The structure also reveals the selectivity filter ion entry site, termed the "outer ion" site. Comparison with mammalian voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) selectivity filters, together with functional studies, shows that this site forms a previously unknown determinant of CaV high-affinity calcium binding. Our findings underscore commonalities between BacNaVs and eukaryotic voltage-gated channels and provide a framework for understanding gating and ion permeation in this superfamily. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel pore reveals essential gating elements and an outer ion binding site common to eukaryotic channels

    PubMed Central

    Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Arrigoni, Cristina; Wong, Stephanie; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Loussouarn, Gildas; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are central elements of cellular excitation. Notwithstanding advances from recent bacterial NaV (BacNaV) structures, key questions about gating and ion selectivity remain. Here, we present a closed conformation of NaVAe1p, a pore-only BacNaV derived from NaVAe1, a BacNaV from the arsenite oxidizer Alkalilimnicola ehrlichei found in Mono Lake, California, that provides insight into both fundamental properties. The structure reveals a pore domain in which the pore-lining S6 helix connects to a helical cytoplasmic tail. Electrophysiological studies of full-length BacNaVs show that two elements defined by the NaVAe1p structure, an S6 activation gate position and the cytoplasmic tail ‘neck’, are central to BacNaV gating. The structure also reveals the selectivity filter ion entry site, termed the ‘outer ion’ site. Comparison with mammalian voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) selectivity filters, together with functional studies shows that this site forms a previously unknown determinant of CaV high affinity calcium binding. Our findings underscore commonalities between BacNaVs and eukaryotic voltage-gated channels and provide a framework for understanding gating and ion permeation in this superfamily. PMID:24120938

  15. The up-regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels subtypes coincides with an increased sodium current in hippocampal neuronal culture model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Xu, Xiaoxue; Cai, Jiqun; Hu, Huiyuan; Sun, Wei; He, Guilin; Shao, Dongxue; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Zhu, Tong; Hao, Liying

    2013-02-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) have been linked to inherited forms of epilepsy. The expression and biophysical properties of VGSC in the hippocampal neuronal culture model have not been clarified. In order to evaluate mechanisms of epileptogenesis that are related to VGSC, we examined the expression and function of VGSC in the hippocampal neuronal culture model in vitro and spontaneously epileptic rats (SER) in vivo. Our data showed that the peak amplitude of transient, rapidly-inactivating Na(+) current (I(Na,T)) in model neurons was significantly increased compared with control neurons, and the activation curve was shifted to the negative potentials in model neurons in whole cell recording by patch-clamp. In addition, channel activity of persistent, non-inactivating Na(+) current (I(Na,P)) was obviously increased in the hippocampal neuronal culture model as judged by single-channel patch-clamp recording. Furthermore, VGSC subtypes Na(V)1.1, Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 were up-regulated at the protein expression level in model neurons and SER as assessed by Western blotting. Four subtypes of VGSC proteins in SER were clearly present throughout the hippocampus, including CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus regions, and neurons expressing VGSC immunoreactivity were also detected in hippocampal neuronal culture model by immunofluorescence. These findings suggested that the up-regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels subtypes in neurons coincided with an increased sodium current in the hippocampal neuronal culture model, providing a possible explanation for the observed seizure discharge and enhanced excitability in epilepsy.

  16. Effects of blockers of Ca2+ channels and other ion channels on in vitro excystment of Paragonimus ohirai metacercariae induced by sodium cholate.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teruaki

    2004-11-01

    The inhibitory effects of various ion channel blockers were examined on in vitro excystment of Paragonimus ohirai metacercariae induced by a bile salt, sodium cholate. At a concentration of 10 microM, bepridil, a non-selective Ca(2+) channel blocker, completely inhibited in vitro excystment, whereas TEA, lidocaine, and R(+)-IAA-94, channel blockers against K(+), Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, respectively, benzamil, an Na(+)/H(+) and Na(+)/Ca(2+) ion exchanger blocker, and R(+)-DIOA, a [K(+), Cl(-)] cotransporter inhibitor, did not. Considering the previous result that Ca(2+) ionophores are also efficient inducing factors for in vitro excystment of P. ohirai metacercariae and the present result, bile salts appear to induce the excystment of P. ohirai metacercariae through evoking the Ca(2+) channels of target cells within the metacercarial juveniles.

  17. Expression of diverse Na+ channel messenger RNAs in rat myocardium. Evidence for a cardiac-specific Na+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Sills, M N; Xu, Y C; Baracchini, E; Goodman, R H; Cooperman, S S; Mandel, G; Chien, K R

    1989-01-01

    This study examined the diversity of Na+ channel gene expression in intact cardiac tissue and purified myocardial cells. The screening of neonatal rat myocardial cell cDNA libraries with a conserved rat brain Na+ channel cDNA probe, resulted in the isolation and characterization of a putative rat cardiac Na+ channel cDNA probe (pCSC-1). The deduced amino acid sequence of pCSC-1 displayed a striking degree of homology with the eel, rat brain-1, and rat brain-2 Na+ channel, thereby identifying pCSC-1 as a related member of the family of Na+ channel genes. Northern blot analysis revealed the expression of a 7-kb CSC-1 transcript in rat cardiac tissue and purified myocardial cells, but little or no detectable expression of CSC-1 in rat brain, skeletal muscle, denervated skeletal muscle, or liver. Using RNase protection and Northern blot hybridization with specific rat brain Na+ channel gene probes, expression of the rat brain-1 Na+ channel was observed in rat myocardium, but no detectable expression of the rat brain-2 gene was found. This study provides evidence for the expression of diverse Na+ channel mRNAs in rat myocardium and presents the initial characterization of a new, related member of the family of Na+ channel genes, which appears to be expressed in a cardiac-specific manner. Images PMID:2544627

  18. Peptides of arachnid venoms with insecticidal activity targeting sodium channels.

    PubMed

    De Lima, M E; Figueiredo, S G; Pimenta, A M C; Santos, D M; Borges, M H; Cordeiro, M N; Richardson, M; Oliveira, L C; Stankiewicz, M; Pelhate, M

    2007-01-01

    Arachnids have a venom apparatus and secrete a complex chemical mixture of low molecular mass organic molecules, enzymes and polypeptide neurotoxins designed to paralyze or kill their prey. Most of these toxins are specific for membrane voltage-gated sodium channels, although some may also target calcium or potassium channels and other membrane receptors. Scorpions and spiders have provided the greatest number of the neurotoxins studied so far, for which, a good number of primary and 3D structures have been obtained. Structural features, comprising a folding that determines a similar spatial distribution of charged and hydrophobic side chains of specific amino acids, are strikingly common among the toxins from spider and scorpion venoms. Such similarities are, in turn, the key feature to target and bind these proteins to ionic channels. The search for new insecticidal compounds, as well as the study of their modes of action, constitutes a current approach to rationally design novel insecticides. This goal tends to be more relevant if the resistance to the conventional chemical products is considered. A promising alternative seems to be the biotechnological approach using toxin-expressing recombinant baculovirus. Spider and scorpion toxins having insecticidal activity are reviewed here considering their structures, toxicities and action mechanisms in sodium channels of excitable membranes.

  19. A structural and dynamic molecular model for the sodium channel of Electrophorus electricus.

    PubMed

    Kosower, E M

    1985-03-25

    Chemical logic and single group rotation (SGR) theory are applied to the primary structure determined by Noda et al. [(1984) Nature 312, 121-127] to construct a molecular model of the sodium channel of Electrophorus electricus. Both structural and dynamic aspects of the channel are accounted for, including gating current, sensitivity to changes in membrane potential, channel opening, a binding site for sodium, selectivity for sodium over potassium, capacity for rapid sodium flow, sensitivity to batrachotoxin (or other toxins) and inactivation.

  20. Single-channel properties of the reconstituted voltage-regulated Na channel isolated from the electroplax of Electrophorus electricus.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, R L; Tomiko, S A; Agnew, W S

    1984-01-01

    The tetrodotoxin-binding protein purified from electroplax of Electrophorus electricus has been reincorporated into multilamellar vesicles that were used for patch recording. When excised patches of these reconstituted membranes were voltage clamped in the absence of neurotoxins, voltage-dependent single-channel currents were recorded. These displayed properties qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those reported for Na channels from nerve and muscle cells, including uniform single-channel conductances of the appropriate magnitude (approximately equal to 11 pS in 95 mM Na+), mean open times of approximately equal to 1.9 msec, and 7-fold selectively for Na+ over K+. Currents averaged from many depolarizations showed initial voltage-dependent activation and subsequent inactivation. In the presence of batrachotoxin, channels were observed with markedly different properties, including conductances of 20-25 pS (95 mM Na+), mean open times of approximately equal to 28 msec, and no indication of inactivation. Collectively, these findings indicate that the tetrodotoxin-binding protein of electroplax is a voltage-regulated sodium channel. PMID:6089214

  1. Rat epileptic seizures evoked by BmK {alpha}IV and its possible mechanisms involved in sodium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Zhifang; Bai Zhantao; Zhang Xuying; Liu Tong; Pang Xueyan; Ji Yonghua . E-mail: yhji@server.shcnc.ac.cn

    2007-05-01

    This study showed that rat unilateral intracerebroventricular injection of BmK {alpha}IV, a sodium channel modulator derived from scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, induced clusters of spikes, epileptic discharges and convulsion-related behavioral changes. BmK {alpha}IV potently promoted the release of endogenous glutamate from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. In vitro examination of the effect of BmK {alpha}IV on intrasynaptosomal free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and sodium concentration [Na{sup +}]{sub i} revealed that BmK {alpha}IV-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was associated with an increase in Ca{sup 2+} and Na{sup +} influx. Moreover, BmK {alpha}IV-mediated glutamate release and ion influx was completely blocked by tetrodotoxin, a blocker of sodium channel. Together, these results suggest that the induction of BmK {alpha}IV-evoked epileptic seizures may be involved in the modulation of BmK {alpha}IV on tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels located on the nerve terminal, which subsequently enhances the Ca{sup 2+} influx to cause an increase of glutamate release. These findings may provide some insight regarding the mechanism of neuronal action of BmK {alpha}IV in the central nervous system for understanding epileptogenesis involved in sodium channels.

  2. Sodium channel from rat brain. Reconstitution of voltage-dependent scorpion toxin binding in vesicles of defined lipid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D.J.; Talvenheimo, J.A.; Catterall, W.A.

    1985-09-25

    Purified sodium channels incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles mediate neurotoxin-activated SSNa influx but do not bind the alpha-scorpion toxin from Leiurus quinquestriatus (LqTx) with high affinity. Addition of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or phosphatidylserine to the reconstitution mixture restores high affinity LqTx binding with KD = 1.9 nM for PC/PE vesicles at -90 mV and 36 degrees C in sucrose-substituted medium. Other lipids tested were markedly less effective. The binding of LqTx in vesicles of PC/PE (65:35) is sensitive to both the membrane potential formed by sodium gradients across the reconstituted vesicle membrane and the cation concentration in the extravesicular medium. Binding of LqTx is reduced 3- to 4-fold upon depolarization to 0 mV from -50 to -60 mV in experiments in which (Na+)out/(Na+)in is varied by changing (Na+)in or (Na+)out at constant extravesicular ionic strength. It is concluded that the purified sodium channel contains the receptor site for LqTx in functional form and that restoration of high affinity, voltage-dependent binding of LqTx by the purified sodium channel requires an appropriate ratio of PC to PE and/or phosphatidylserine in the vesicle membrane.

  3. Protein assemblies of sodium and inward rectifier potassium channels control cardiac excitability and arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Willis, B. Cicero; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of how cardiac ion channels function in the normal and the diseased heart has greatly increased over the last four decades thanks to the advent of patch-clamp technology and, more recently, the emergence of genetics, as well as cellular and molecular cardiology. However, our knowledge of how these membrane-embedded proteins physically interact with each other within macromolecular complexes remains incomplete. This review focuses on how the main cardiac inward sodium channel (NaV1.5) and the strong inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir2.1) function within macromolecular complexes to control cardiac excitability. It has become increasingly clear that these two important ion channel proteins physically interact with multiple other protein partners and with each other from early stages of protein trafficking and targeting through membrane anchoring, recycling, and degradation. Recent findings include compartmentalized regulation of NaV1.5 channel expression and function through a PDZ (postsynaptic density protein, Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor, and zonula occludens-1 protein) domain-binding motif, and interaction of caveolin-3 with Kir2.1 and ankyrin-G as a molecular platform for NaV1.5 signaling. At the cardiomyocyte membrane, NaV1.5 and Kir2.1 interact through at least two distinct PDZ domain-scaffolding proteins (synapse-associated protein-97 and α1-syntrophin), thus modulating reciprocally their cell-surface expression at two different microdomains. Emerging evidence also shows that inheritable mutations in plakophilin-2, ankyrin-G, dystrophin, syntrophin, synapse-associated protein-97, and caveolin-3, among others, modify functional expression and/or localization in the cardiac cell of NaV1.5, Kir2.1 or both to give rise to arrhythmogenic diseases. Unveiling the mechanistic underpinnings of macromolecular interactions should increase our understanding of inherited and acquired arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases and may lead to advances

  4. Protein assemblies of sodium and inward rectifier potassium channels control cardiac excitability and arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Willis, B Cicero; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Jalife, José

    2015-06-15

    The understanding of how cardiac ion channels function in the normal and the diseased heart has greatly increased over the last four decades thanks to the advent of patch-clamp technology and, more recently, the emergence of genetics, as well as cellular and molecular cardiology. However, our knowledge of how these membrane-embedded proteins physically interact with each other within macromolecular complexes remains incomplete. This review focuses on how the main cardiac inward sodium channel (NaV1.5) and the strong inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir2.1) function within macromolecular complexes to control cardiac excitability. It has become increasingly clear that these two important ion channel proteins physically interact with multiple other protein partners and with each other from early stages of protein trafficking and targeting through membrane anchoring, recycling, and degradation. Recent findings include compartmentalized regulation of NaV1.5 channel expression and function through a PDZ (postsynaptic density protein, Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor, and zonula occludens-1 protein) domain-binding motif, and interaction of caveolin-3 with Kir2.1 and ankyrin-G as a molecular platform for NaV1.5 signaling. At the cardiomyocyte membrane, NaV1.5 and Kir2.1 interact through at least two distinct PDZ domain-scaffolding proteins (synapse-associated protein-97 and α1-syntrophin), thus modulating reciprocally their cell-surface expression at two different microdomains. Emerging evidence also shows that inheritable mutations in plakophilin-2, ankyrin-G, dystrophin, syntrophin, synapse-associated protein-97, and caveolin-3, among others, modify functional expression and/or localization in the cardiac cell of NaV1.5, Kir2.1 or both to give rise to arrhythmogenic diseases. Unveiling the mechanistic underpinnings of macromolecular interactions should increase our understanding of inherited and acquired arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases and may lead to advances

  5. Epithelial Na+ Channel (ENaC), Hormones, and Hypertension*

    PubMed Central

    Bubien, James K.

    2010-01-01

    This minireview examines both the basic science and clinical observations over the past 20 years to show how and why overstimulation of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) expressed by epithelial principal cells of the renal collecting duct may be responsible for a large portion of hypertension in modern society. This idea is based on the finding that, in Liddle syndrome, a mutation of the β- and/or γ-subunits of ENaC produces an activated ion channel, in turn resulting in severe hypertension that is resistant to most forms of conventional antihypertensive therapy. ENaC can also be stimulated to conduct sodium by two hormones: aldosterone and insulin. These hormones are both often elevated in obese individuals with therapy-resistant hypertension. Thus, overstimulation of ENaC by metabolic abnormalities in obese individuals may be a likely cause of the hypertension that accompanies obesity. The molecular mechanisms underlying both Liddle syndrome and obesity-related hypertension are different (i.e. genetic and hormonal, respectively), but both have the same end result, namely increased ENaC activity. PMID:20460373

  6. The epithelial sodium channel in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi)

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Maejima, Sho; Yoshie, Sumio; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Konno, Norifumi; Joss, Jean M. P.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a Na+-selective, aldosterone-stimulated ion channel involved in sodium transport homeostasis. ENaC is rate-limiting for Na+ absorption in the epithelia of osmoregulatory organs of tetrapods. Although the ENaC/degenerin gene family is proposed to be present in metazoans, no orthologues or paralogues for ENaC have been found in the genome databases of teleosts. We studied full-length cDNA cloning and tissue distributions of ENaCα, β and γ subunits in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, which is the closest living relative of tetrapods. Neoceratodus ENaC (nENaC) comprised three subunits: nENaCα, β and γ proteins. The nENaCα, β and γ subunits are closely related to amphibian ENaCα, β and γ subunits, respectively. Three ENaC subunit mRNAs were highly expressed in the gills, kidney and rectum. Amiloride-sensitive sodium current was recorded from Xenopus oocytes injected with the nENaCαβγ subunit complementary RNAs under a two-electrode voltage clamp. nENaCα immunoreactivity was observed in the apical cell membrane of the gills, kidney and rectum. Thus, nENaC may play a role in regulating sodium transport of the lungfish, which has a renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system. This is interesting because there may have been an ENaC sodium absorption system controlled by aldosterone before the conquest of land by vertebrates. PMID:23055064

  7. The epithelial sodium channel in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Maejima, Sho; Yoshie, Sumio; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Konno, Norifumi; Joss, Jean M P

    2012-12-07

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a Na(+)-selective, aldosterone-stimulated ion channel involved in sodium transport homeostasis. ENaC is rate-limiting for Na(+) absorption in the epithelia of osmoregulatory organs of tetrapods. Although the ENaC/degenerin gene family is proposed to be present in metazoans, no orthologues or paralogues for ENaC have been found in the genome databases of teleosts. We studied full-length cDNA cloning and tissue distributions of ENaCα, β and γ subunits in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, which is the closest living relative of tetrapods. Neoceratodus ENaC (nENaC) comprised three subunits: nENaCα, β and γ proteins. The nENaCα, β and γ subunits are closely related to amphibian ENaCα, β and γ subunits, respectively. Three ENaC subunit mRNAs were highly expressed in the gills, kidney and rectum. Amiloride-sensitive sodium current was recorded from Xenopus oocytes injected with the nENaCαβγ subunit complementary RNAs under a two-electrode voltage clamp. nENaCα immunoreactivity was observed in the apical cell membrane of the gills, kidney and rectum. Thus, nENaC may play a role in regulating sodium transport of the lungfish, which has a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This is interesting because there may have been an ENaC sodium absorption system controlled by aldosterone before the conquest of land by vertebrates.

  8. Sigma receptor activation inhibits voltage-gated sodium channels in rat intracardiac ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongling; Katnik, Christopher; Cuevas, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Sigma (σ) receptors have been shown to regulate multiple ion channel types in intracardiac ganglion neurons, including voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels. However, the inhibition of these channels alone cannot fully account for σ receptor-induced changes in neuronal excitability previously reported. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments were conducted under current-clamp mode in isolated intracardiac neurons from neonatal rats to assess the effects of σ receptor activation on the active membrane properties of these cells. Bath application of the pan-selective σ receptor agonist, 1,3-Di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), and the σ-1-selective agonist, (+)-pentazocine, significantly increased the action potential latency and decreased action potential overshoot in response to depolarizing current ramps, which suggests inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels. Whole-cell voltage clamp experiments showed that these σ agonists reversibly decrease depolarization-activated Na+ currents in these cells at all potentials tested. The peak currents generated by membrane depolarizations were decreased in a dose dependent manner with IC50 values for DTG and (+)-pentazocine of 32 μM and 49 μM, respectively. The σ-1 receptor-selective antagonist, BD 1063 (100 nM), inhibited DTG (30 μM) block of Na+ currents by ∼ 50%, suggesting that the effects are mediated by activation of σ-1 receptors. DTG also shifted the steady-state inactivation curve of Na+ channels to more negative potentials, with the membrane potential of half-activation shifting from -49 mV to -63 mV in the absence and presence of 30 μM DTG, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that σ-1 receptor activation decreases intracardiac ganglion neuron excitability by modulating voltage-gated Na+ channels. PMID:21383893

  9. Unveiling the sodium intercalation properties in Na1.86□0.14Fe3(PO4)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essehli, R.; Ben Yahia, H.; Maher, K.; Sougrati, M. T.; Abouimrane, A.; Park, J.-B.; Sun, Y.-K.; Al-Maadeed, M. A.; Belharouak, I.

    2016-08-01

    The new compound Na1.86□0.14Fe3(PO4)3 was successfully synthesized via hydrothermal synthesis and its crystal structure was determined using powder X-ray diffraction data. Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 was also characterized by operando XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and galvanostatic cycling. Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 crystallizes with the alluaudite-type structure with the eight coordinated Na1 and Na2 sodium atoms located within the channels. The combination of the Rietveld- and Mössbauer-analyses confirms that the sodium vacancies in the Na1 site are linked to a partial oxidation of Fe2+ during synthesis. The electrochemical tests indicated that Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 is a 3 V sodium intercalating cathode. At the current densities of 5, 10, and 20 mA g-1, the material delivers the specific capacities of 109, 97, and 80 mA h g-1, respectively. After 100 charge and discharge cycles, Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 exhibited good sodium removal and uptake behavior although no optimizations of particle size, morphology, and carbon coating were performed.

  10. mu-conotoxin GIIIA, a peptide ligand for muscle sodium channels: Chemical synthesis, radiolabeling, and receptor characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, L.J.; Kupryszewski, G.; LeCheminant, G.W.; Gray, W.R.; Olivera, B.M.; Rivier, J.

    1989-04-18

    The peptide conotoxin GIIIA from Conus geographus L. venom, which specifically blocks sodium channels in muscle, has been synthesized by a solid-phase method. The three disulfide bridges were formed by air oxidation. After HPLC purification, the synthetic product was shown to be identical with the native conotoxin GIIIA from Conus geographus. A high specific activity, /sup 125/I derivative of mu-conotoxin was prepared and used for binding assays to the Na channel from Electrophorus electric organ. Specific binding could be abolished by competition with tetrodotoxin. The radiolabeled toxin was specifically cross-linked to the Na channel. These studies demonstrate that mu-conotoxin GIIIA can be used to define the guanidinium toxin binding site and will be a useful ligand for understanding functionally important differences between Na channel subtypes.

  11. Regulation of epithelial sodium channels by cGMP/PKGII

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Hong-Guang; Chen, Lan; Han, Dong-Yun; Li, Jun; Song, Wei-Feng; Wei, Shi-Peng; Fang, Xiao-Hui; Gu, Xiu; Matalon, Sadis; Ji, Hong-Long

    2009-01-01

    Airway and alveolar fluid clearance is mainly governed by vectorial salt movement via apically located rate-limiting Na+ channels (ENaC) and basolateral Na+/K+-ATPases. ENaC is regulated by a spectrum of protein kinases, i.e. protein kinase A (PKA), C (PKC), and G (PKG). However, the molecular mechanisms for the regulation of ENaC by cGMP/PKG remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we studied the pharmacological responses of native epithelial Na+ channels in human Clara cells and human αβγδ ENaCs expressed in oocytes to cGMP. 8-pCPT-cGMP increased amiloride-sensitive short-circuit current (Isc) across H441 monolayers and heterologously expressed αβγδ ENaC activity in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, 8-pCPT-cGMP (a PKGII activator) but not 8-Br-cGMP (a PKGI activator) increased amiloride-sensitive whole cell currents in H441 cells in the presence of CFTRinh-172 and diltiazem. In all cases, the cGMP-activated Na+ channel activity was inhibited by Rp-8-pCPT-cGMP, a specific PKGII inhibitor. This was substantiated by the evidence that PKGII was the sole isoform expressed in H441 cells at the protein level. Importantly, intratracheal instillation of 8-pCPT-cGMP in BALB/c mice increased amiloride-sensitive alveolar fluid clearance by ∼30%, consistent with the in vitro results. We therefore conclude that PKGII is an activator of lung epithelial Na+ channels, which may expedite the resolution of oedematous fluid in alveolar sacs. PMID:19359370

  12. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R.; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E.; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E.; Cima, Robert R.; Larson, David W.; Dozois, Eric J.; Kline, Crystal F.; Mohler, Peter J.; Beyder, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na+ current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na+ current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na+ currents (−1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na+ peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na+ current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na+ current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. PMID:26185330

  13. Sodium channel selectivity filter regulates antiarrhythmic drug binding.

    PubMed

    Sunami, A; Dudley, S C; Fozzard, H A

    1997-12-09

    Local anesthetic antiarrhythmic drugs block Na+ channels and have important clinical uses. However, the molecular mechanism by which these drugs block the channel has not been established. The family of drugs is characterized by having an ionizable amino group and a hydrophobic tail. We hypothesized that the charged amino group of the drug may interact with charged residues in the channel's selectivity filter. Mutation of the putative domain III selectivity filter residue of the adult rat skeletal muscle Na+ channel (micro1) K1237E increased resting lidocaine block, but no change was observed in block by neutral analogs of lidocaine. An intermediate effect on the lidocaine block resulted from K1237S and there was no effect from K1237R, implying an electrostatic effect of Lys. Mutation of the other selectivity residues, D400A (domain I), E755A (domain II), and A1529D (domain IV) allowed block by externally applied quaternary membrane-impermeant derivatives of lidocaine (QX314 and QX222) and accelerated recovery from block by internal QX314. Neo-saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin, which occlude the channel pore, reduced the amount of QX314 bound in D400A and A1529D, respectively. Block by outside QX314 in E755A was inhibited by mutation of residues in transmembrane segment S6 of domain IV that are thought to be part of an internal binding site. The results demonstrate that the Na+ channel selectivity filter is involved in interactions with the hydrophilic part of the drugs, and it normally limits extracellular access to and escape from their binding site just within the selectivity filter. Participation of the selectivity ring in antiarrhythmic drug binding and access locates this structure adjacent to the S6 segment.

  14. δ-opioid receptors protect from anoxic disruption of Na+ and K+ homeostasis via Na+ channel regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xuezhi; Chao, Dongman; Gu, Quanbao; Ding, Guanghong; Wang, Yingwei; Balboni, Gianfranco; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Xia, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxic/ischemic disruption of ionic homeostasis, especially Na+ influx and K+ leakage, is a critical trigger of neuronal injury/death in the brain. There is, however, no promising strategy against such pathophysiological changes to protect the brain from hypoxic/ischemic injury. Here we present an exciting finding that activation of delta-opioid receptor (DOR), which is highly expressed in the cortex, reduced anoxic Na+ influx and K+ leakage in the cortex by restricting Na+ influx through voltage-gated Na+ channels. Furthermore, we show for the first time with direct evidence that DOR expression/activation indeed plays an inhibitory role in Na+ channel regulation by decreasing the amplitude of sodium currents and increasing activation threshold of Na+ channels. These first data have far-reaching impacts on understanding the intrinsic mechanism of neuronal responses to stress and provide novel insights into better solutions of hypoxic/ischemic encephalopathy and other neurological disorders such as epilepsy and pain. PMID:19756387

  15. Ethanol stimulates epithelial sodium channels by elevating reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hui-Fang; Song, John Z; Duke, Billie J; Ma, He-Ping; Denson, Donald D; Eaton, Douglas C

    2012-12-01

    Alcohol affects total body sodium balance, but the molecular mechanism of its effect remains unclear. We used single-channel methods to examine how ethanol affects epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in A6 distal nephron cells. The data showed that ethanol significantly increased both ENaC open probability (P(o)) and the number of active ENaC in patches (N). 1-Propanol and 1-butanol also increased ENaC activity, but iso-alcohols did not. The effects of ethanol were mimicked by acetaldehyde, the first metabolic product of ethanol, but not by acetone, the metabolic product of 2-propanol. Besides increasing open probability and apparent density of active channels, confocal microscopy and surface biotinylation showed that ethanol significantly increased α-ENaC protein in the apical membrane. The effects of ethanol on ENaC P(o) and N were abolished by a superoxide scavenger, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPOL) and blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. Consistent with an effect of ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) on ENaC, primary alcohols and acetaldehyde elevated intracellular ROS, but secondary alcohols did not. Taken together with our previous finding that ROS stimulate ENaC, the current results suggest that ethanol stimulates ENaC by elevating intracellular ROS probably via its metabolic product acetaldehyde.

  16. Ethanol stimulates epithelial sodium channels by elevating reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hui-Fang; Song, John Z.; Duke, Billie J.; Ma, He-Ping; Denson, Donald D.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol affects total body sodium balance, but the molecular mechanism of its effect remains unclear. We used single-channel methods to examine how ethanol affects epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in A6 distal nephron cells. The data showed that ethanol significantly increased both ENaC open probability (Po) and the number of active ENaC in patches (N). 1-Propanol and 1-butanol also increased ENaC activity, but iso-alcohols did not. The effects of ethanol were mimicked by acetaldehyde, the first metabolic product of ethanol, but not by acetone, the metabolic product of 2-propanol. Besides increasing open probability and apparent density of active channels, confocal microscopy and surface biotinylation showed that ethanol significantly increased α-ENaC protein in the apical membrane. The effects of ethanol on ENaC Po and N were abolished by a superoxide scavenger, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPOL) and blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. Consistent with an effect of ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) on ENaC, primary alcohols and acetaldehyde elevated intracellular ROS, but secondary alcohols did not. Taken together with our previous finding that ROS stimulate ENaC, the current results suggest that ethanol stimulates ENaC by elevating intracellular ROS probably via its metabolic product acetaldehyde. PMID:22895258

  17. Screening for voltage-gated sodium channel interacting peptides.

    PubMed

    Meng, Er; Cai, Tian-Fu; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Si; Li, Meng-Jie; Li, Wen-Ying; Huang, Peng-Fei; Liu, Kai; Wu, Lei; Zhu, Ling-Yun; Liu, Long; Peng, Kuan; Dai, Xian-Dong; Jiang, Hui; Zeng, Xiong-Zhi; Liang, Song-Ping; Zhang, Dong-Yi

    2014-04-02

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) interacting peptide is of special interest for both basic research and pharmaceutical purposes. In this study, we established a yeast-two-hybrid based strategy to detect the interaction(s) between neurotoxic peptide and the extracellular region of VGSC. Using a previously reported neurotoxin JZTX-III as a model molecule, we demonstrated that the interactions between JZTX-III and the extracellular regions of its target hNav1.5 are detectable and the detected interactions are directly related to its activity. We further applied this strategy to the screening of VGSC interacting peptides. Using the extracellular region of hNav1.5 as the bait, we identified a novel sodium channel inhibitor SSCM-1 from a random peptide library. This peptide selectively inhibits hNav1.5 currents in the whole-cell patch clamp assays. This strategy might be used for the large scale screening for target-specific interacting peptides of VGSCs or other ion channels.

  18. The complete structure of an activated open sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Sula, Altin; Booker, Jennifer; Ng, Leo C. T.; Naylor, Claire E.; DeCaen, Paul G.; Wallace, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) play essential roles in excitable tissues, with their activation and opening resulting in the initial phase of the action potential. The cycling of Navs through open, closed and inactivated states, and their closely choreographed relationships with the activities of other ion channels lead to exquisite control of intracellular ion concentrations in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here we present the 2.45 Å resolution crystal structure of the complete NavMs prokaryotic sodium channel in a fully open conformation. A canonical activated conformation of the voltage sensor S4 helix, an open selectivity filter leading to an open activation gate at the intracellular membrane surface and the intracellular C-terminal domain are visible in the structure. It includes a heretofore unseen interaction motif between W77 of S3, the S4–S5 interdomain linker, and the C-terminus, which is associated with regulation of opening and closing of the intracellular gate. PMID:28205548

  19. Cardiac sodium channel mutations: why so many phenotypes?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Yang, Kai-Chien; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the cardiac sodium channel (Nav1.5) can induce gain or loss of channel function. Gain-of-function mutations can cause long QT syndrome type 3 and possibly atrial fibrillation, whereas loss-of-function mutations are associated with a variety of phenotypes, such as Brugada syndrome, cardiac conduction disease, sick sinus syndrome, and possibly dilated cardiomyopathy. The phenotypes produced by Nav1.5 mutations vary according to the direct effect of the mutation on channel biophysics, but also with age, sex, body temperature, and between regions of the heart. This phenotypic variability makes genotype–phenotype correlations difficult. In this Perspectives article, we propose that phenotypic variability not ascribed to mutation-dependent changes in channel function might be the result of additional modifiers of channel behaviour, such as other genetic variation and alterations in transcription, RNA processing, translation, post-translational modifications, and protein degradation. Consideration of these modifiers might help to improve genotype–phenotype correlations and lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:24958080

  20. Acute Regulation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel in Airway Epithelia by Proteases and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Myerburg, Michael M.; Harvey, Peter R.; Heidrich, Elisa M.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Butterworth, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Effective clearance of inhaled pathogens is the primary innate defense mechanism in the lung, and requires the maintenance of a proper airway surface liquid (ASL) volume to facilitate ciliary beat and optimize mucociliary clearance. Na+ absorption via the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is tightly regulated and, together with chloride movement, provides the optimal osmotic gradients to absorb excessive fluid in the airway lumen while preventing excessive ASL dehydration, which would compromise mucus clearance from the lung. To absorb excessive fluid from the luminal surface, a local mechanism of ENaC activation allows for an increase in Na+ absorption at times when the ASL volume is expanded. To help define these regulatory mechanisms, we examined the effects of ASL volume expansion on ENaC activity in primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cell cultures. We found that ENaC activity increases dramatically after rapid dilution of endogenous ASL. Approximately 35% of the increase in Na+ absorption was attributable to activation of ENaC by proteases. The remainder of the increase in Na+ current was prevented when membrane trafficking was disrupted with brefeldin A, nocodazole, or myosin light chain kinase inhibitors, demonstrating that trafficking is involved with ENaC regulation in the airway. These findings demonstrate that Na+ absorption in the airway is acutely modulated by the coordinated trafficking of channels to the luminal surface and by the proteolytic activation of ENaC in response to ASL volume expansion. PMID:20097829

  1. Deciphering voltage-gated Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels by studying prokaryotic ancestors.

    PubMed

    Catterall, William A; Zheng, Ning

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) and calcium channels (CaVs) are involved in electrical signaling, contraction, secretion, synaptic transmission, and other physiological processes activated in response to depolarization. Despite their physiological importance, the structures of these closely related proteins have remained elusive because of their size and complexity. Bacterial NaVs have structures analogous to a single domain of eukaryotic NaVs and CaVs and are their likely evolutionary ancestor. Here we review recent work that has led to new understanding of NaVs and CaVs through high-resolution structural studies of their prokaryotic ancestors. New insights into their voltage-dependent activation and inactivation, ion conductance, and ion selectivity provide realistic structural models for the function of these complex membrane proteins at the atomic level. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Primary erythromelalgia in a 12-year-old boy: positive response to sodium channel blockers despite negative SCN9A mutations.

    PubMed

    Jakob, A; Creutzfeldt, R; Staszewski, O; Winterpacht, A; Berner, R; Hufnagel, M

    2012-09-01

    Erythromelalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent pain attacks, swelling and redness in the distal extremities. The primary forms of the disorder are caused by mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels. Treatment is difficult and controlled therapeutic studies offer little to no guidance. We report on a 12-year-old boy and his first occurrence of primary erythromelalgia. Genetic findings for mutations in the SCN9A gene, which encodes for the α-subunit of sodium channel NaV1.7, were negative. Although initial treatment with sodium nitroprusside was ineffective, subsequent medication with lidocaine and mexiletine, in combination with gabapentin, was successful. Despite negative findings for mutations in the sodium channels, the use of sodium channel blockers should be considered in these patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. The role of inactivation in open-channel block of the sodium channel: studies with inactivation-deficient mutant channels.

    PubMed

    Grant, A O; John, J E; Nesterenko, V V; Starmer, C F; Moorman, J R

    1996-12-01

    Inactivation has been implicated as an important determinant of the block of Na+ channel by local anesthetic-class drugs. This proposition has been difficult to examine because agents used to modify inactivation change other channel properties and both inactivated and blocked channels do not conduct. We used site-directed mutagenesis of Phe1304 to glutamine in the linker between the third and fourth domains of the mu-1 Na+ channel to slow inactivation. Wild-type and mutant channels were expressed in frog oocytes. Macropatch and single-channel currents were recorded in cell-attached membrane patches. The F1304Q mutation increased mean open time (1.7 fold at -20 mV) and reduced the probability that the channel would fail to open. Closed times were best fit by a double-exponential function, suggesting that the inactivated state transitions were no longer absorbing. In wild-type channels, 100 microM disopyramide decreased mean open time from 1.64 +/- 0.08 to 0.34 +/- 0.04 msec. Total open time per trial was decreased 2-fold. There also was a marked increase in the fraction of null sweeps. In the inactivation-deficient mutant channel, mean and total open times were also reduced. These data indicate that even when inactivation is slowed by a localized specific mutation, open-channel block by disopyramide persists. Inactivation may not be a necessary requirement for open-channel block.

  4. Sodium channel selectivity filter regulates antiarrhythmic drug binding

    PubMed Central

    Sunami, Akihiko; Dudley, Samuel C.; Fozzard, Harry A.

    1997-01-01

    Local anesthetic antiarrhythmic drugs block Na+ channels and have important clinical uses. However, the molecular mechanism by which these drugs block the channel has not been established. The family of drugs is characterized by having an ionizable amino group and a hydrophobic tail. We hypothesized that the charged amino group of the drug may interact with charged residues in the channel’s selectivity filter. Mutation of the putative domain III selectivity filter residue of the adult rat skeletal muscle Na+ channel (μ1) K1237E increased resting lidocaine block, but no change was observed in block by neutral analogs of lidocaine. An intermediate effect on the lidocaine block resulted from K1237S and there was no effect from K1237R, implying an electrostatic effect of Lys. Mutation of the other selectivity residues, D400A (domain I), E755A (domain II), and A1529D (domain IV) allowed block by externally applied quaternary membrane-impermeant derivatives of lidocaine (QX314 and QX222) and accelerated recovery from block by internal QX314. Neo-saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin, which occlude the channel pore, reduced the amount of QX314 bound in D400A and A1529D, respectively. Block by outside QX314 in E755A was inhibited by mutation of residues in transmembrane segment S6 of domain IV that are thought to be part of an internal binding site. The results demonstrate that the Na+ channel selectivity filter is involved in interactions with the hydrophilic part of the drugs, and it normally limits extracellular access to and escape from their binding site just within the selectivity filter. Participation of the selectivity ring in antiarrhythmic drug binding and access locates this structure adjacent to the S6 segment. PMID:9391164

  5. Surface expression of sodium channels and transporters in rat kidney: effects of dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Frindt, Gustavo; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2009-11-01

    The abundance of Na transport proteins in the luminal membrane of the rat kidney was assessed using in situ biotinylation and immunoblotting. When animals were fed an Na-deficient diet for 1 wk, the amounts of epithelial Na channel (ENaC) beta-subunit (beta-ENaC) and gamma-subunit (gamma-ENaC) and Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) protein in the surface fraction increased relative to controls by 1.9-, 3.5-, and 1.5-fold, respectively. The amounts of the luminal Na/H exchanger (NHE3) and the luminal Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) did not change significantly. The increases in ENaC subunits were mimicked by administration of aldosterone for 1 wk, but the increase in NCC was not. When the animals were fed a high-Na (5% NaCl) diet for 1 wk, the surface expression of beta-ENaC increased by 50%, whereas that of the other membrane proteins did not change, relative to controls. The biochemical parameter most strongly affected by dietary Na was the abundance of the 65-kDa cleaved form of gamma-ENaC at the surface. This increased by 8.5-fold with Na depletion and decreased by 40% with Na loading. The overall 14-fold change reflected regulation of the total abundance of the subunit as well as the fraction of the subunit protein in the cleaved form. We conclude that cleavage of gamma-ENaC and its expression at the apical surface play a major role in the regulation of renal Na reabsorption.

  6. Sodium channels in membrane vesicles from cultured toad bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, C.; Moran, A.; Rossier, B.C.; Garty, H. Ben Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva Institut de Pharmacologie de l'Universite de Lausanne )

    1988-04-01

    Electrical potential-driven {sup 22}Na{sup +} fluxes were measured in membrane vesicles prepared from TBM-18(cl23) cells (a clone of the established cell line TB-M). Fifty to seventy percent of the tracer uptake in vesicles derived from cells that were cultivated on a porous support were blocked by the diuretic amiloride. The amiloride inhibition constant was <0.1 {mu}M, indicating that this flux is mediated by the apical Na{sup +}-specific channels. Vesicles prepared from cells that were not grown on a porous support exhibited much smaller amiloride-sensitive fluxes. Two Ca{sup 2+}-dependent processes that down-regulated the channel conductance and were previously identified in native epithelia were found in the cultured cells as well. Vesicles isolated from cells that were preincubated with 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M aldosterone for 16-20 h exhibited higher amiloride-sensitive conductance than vesicles derived from control, steroid-depleted cells. Thus membrane derived from TBM-18(cl23) cells can be used to characterize the epithelial Na{sup +} channel and its hormonal regulation.

  7. Mapping of scorpion toxin receptor sites at voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Gurevitz, Michael

    2012-09-15

    Scorpion alpha and beta toxins interact with voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)s) at two pharmacologically distinct sites. Alpha toxins bind at receptor site-3 and inhibit channel inactivation, whereas beta toxins bind at receptor site-4 and shift the voltage-dependent activation toward more hyperpolarizing potentials. The two toxin classes are subdivided to distinct pharmacological groups according to their binding preferences and ability to compete for the receptor sites at Na(v) subtypes. To elucidate the toxin-channel surface of interaction at both receptor sites and clarify the molecular basis of varying toxin preferences, an efficient bacterial system for their expression in recombinant form was established. Mutagenesis accompanied by toxicity, binding and electrophysiological assays, in parallel to determination of the three-dimensional structure using NMR and X-ray crystallography uncovered a bipartite bioactive surface in toxin representatives of all pharmacological groups. Exchange of external loops between the mammalian brain channel rNa(v)1.2a and the insect channel DmNa(v)1 highlighted channel regions involved in the varying sensitivity to assorted toxins. In parallel, thorough mutagenesis of channel external loops illuminated points of putative interaction with the toxins. Amino acid substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain II of rNa(v)1.2a had prominent impact on the activity of the beta-toxin Css4 (from Centruroides suffusus suffusus), and substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain IV affected the activity of the alpha-toxin Lqh2 (from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus). Rosetta modeling of toxin-Na(v) interaction using the voltage sensor module of the potassium channel as template raises commonalities in the way alpha and beta toxins interact with the channel. Css4 interacts with rNa(v)1.2a at a crevice between S1-S2 and S3-S4 transmembrane segments in domain

  8. Recent progress in sodium channel modulators for pain.

    PubMed

    Bagal, Sharan K; Chapman, Mark L; Marron, Brian E; Prime, Rebecca; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2014-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) are an important family of transmembrane ion channel proteins and Nav drug discovery is an exciting field. Pharmaceutical investment in Navs for pain therapeutics has expanded exponentially due to genetic data such as SCN10A mutations and an improved ability to establish an effective screen sequence for example IonWorks Barracuda®, Synchropatch® and Qube®. Moreover, emerging clinical data (AZD-3161, XEN402, CNV1014802, PF-05089771, PF-04531083) combined with recent breakthroughs in Nav structural biology pave the way for a future of fruitful prospective Nav drug discovery. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Sodium channel β subunits: emerging targets in channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Heather A.; Isom, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are responsible for initiation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. VGSCs in mammalian brain are heterotrimeric complexes of α and β subunits. Originally called “auxiliary,” we now know that β subunit proteins are multifunctional signaling molecules that play roles in both excitable and non-excitable cell types, and with or without the pore-forming α subunit present. β subunits function in VGSC and potassium channel modulation, cell adhesion, and gene regulation, with particularly important roles in brain development. Mutations in the genes encoding β subunits are linked to a number of diseases, including epilepsy, sudden death syndromes like SUDEP and SIDS, and cardiac arrhythmia. While VGSC β subunit-specific drugs have not yet been developed, this protein family is an emerging therapeutic target. PMID:25668026

  10. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-08-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10-3 S cm-1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor.

  11. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10−3 S cm−1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  12. Encapsulation of Metallic Na in an Electrically Conductive Host with Porous Channels as a Highly Stable Na Metal Anode.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Shaomao; Dai, Jiaqi; Hitz, Emily; Li, Yiju; Yang, Chunpeng; Chen, Chaoji; Liu, Boyang; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-06-14

    Room-temperature Na ion batteries (NIBs) have attracted great attention because of the widely available, abundant sodium resources and potentially low cost. Currently, the challenge of the NIB development is due primarily to the lack of a high-performance anode, while the Na metal anode holds great promise considering its highest specific capacity of 1165 mA h/g and lowest anodic potential. However, an uneven deposit, relatively infinite volume change, and dendritic growth upon plating/stripping cycles cause a low Coulombic efficiency, poor cycling performance, and severe safety concerns. Here, a stable Na carbonized wood (Na-wood) composite anode was fabricated via a rapid melt infusion (about 5 s) into channels of carbonized wood by capillary action. The channels function as a high-surface-area, conductive, mechanically stable skeleton, which lowers the effective current density, ensures a uniform Na nucleation, and restricts the volume change over cycles. As a result, the Na-wood composite anode exhibited flat plating/stripping profiles with smaller overpotentials and stable cycling performance over 500 h at 1.0 mA/cm(2) in a common carbonate electrolyte system. In sharp comparison, the planar Na metal electrode showed a much shorter cycle life of 100 h under the same test conditions.

  13. Characterization of two Bunodosoma granulifera toxins active on cardiac sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Goudet, Cyril; Ferrer, Tania; Galàn, Loipa; Artiles, Adriana; Batista, Cesar F V; Possani, Lourival D; Alvarez, Julio; Aneiros, Abel; Tytgat, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Two sodium channel toxins, BgII and BgIII, have been isolated and purified from the sea anemone Bunodosoma granulifera. Combining different techniques, we have investigated the electrophysiological properties of these toxins. We examined the effect of BgII and BgIII on rat ventricular strips. These toxins prolong action potentials with EC50 values of 60 and 660 nM and modify the resting potentials. The effect on Na+ currents in rat cardiomyocytes was studied using the patch-clamp technique. BgII and BgIII slow the rapid inactivation process and increase the current density with EC50 values of 58 and 78 nM, respectively. On the cloned hH1 cardiac Na+ channel expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, BgII and BgIII slow the inactivation process of Na+ currents (respective EC50 values of 0.38 and 7.8 μM), shift the steady-state activation and inactivation parameters to more positive potentials and the reversal potential to more negative potentials. The amino acid sequences of these toxins are almost identical except for an asparagine at position 16 in BgII which is replaced by an aspartic acid in BgIII. In all experiments, BgII was more potent than BgIII suggesting that this conservative residue is important for the toxicity of sea anemone toxins. We conclude that BgII and BgIII, generally known as neurotoxins, are also cardiotoxic and combine the classical effects of sea anemone Na+ channels toxins (slowing of inactivation kinetics, shift of steady-state activation and inactivation parameters) with a striking decrease on the ionic selectivity of Na+ channels. PMID:11704639

  14. Tetrodotoxin block of sodium channels in rabbit Purkinje fibers. Interactions between toxin binding and channel gating

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) block of cardiac sodium channels was studied in rabbit Purkinje fibers using a two-microelectrode voltage clamp to measure sodium current. INa decreases with TTX as if one toxin molecule blocks one channel with a dissociation constant KD approximately equal to 1 microM. KD remains unchanged when INa is partially inactivated by steady depolarization. Thus, TTX binding and channel inactivation are independent at equilibrium. Interactions between toxin binding and gating were revealed, however, by kinetic behavior that depends on rates of equilibration. For example, frequent suprathreshold pulses produce extra use-dependent block beyond the tonic block seen with widely spaced stimuli. Such lingering aftereffects of depolarization were characterized by double-pulse experiments. The extra block decays slowly enough (tau approximately equal to 5 s) to be easily separated from normal recovery from inactivation (tau less than 0.2 s at 18 degrees C). The amount of extra block increases to a saturating level with conditioning depolarizations that produce inactivation without detectable activation. Stronger depolarizations that clearly open channels give the same final level of extra block, but its development includes a fast phase whose voltage- and time-dependence resemble channel activation. Thus, TTX block and channel gating are not independent, as believed for nerve. Kinetically, TTX resembles local anesthetics, but its affinity remains unchanged during maintained depolarization. On this last point, comparison of our INa results and earlier upstroke velocity (Vmax) measurements illustrates how much these approaches can differ. PMID:6270235

  15. Conductance of the sodium channel in myelinated nerve fibres with modified sodium inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, F; Hille, B; Neumcke, B; Nonner, W; Stämpfli, R

    1976-01-01

    1. Na current fluctuations in nodes of Ranvier were measured under voltage clamp conditions as described in the preceding paper (Conti, Hille, Neumcke, Nonner & Stämpfli, 1976) and analysed in terms of power spectral density calculated for frequencies between 30 Hz and 5 kHz. 2. External (10(-5) g/ml.) Leiurus scorpion venom or Anemonia Toxin II (3 X 10(-5) g/ml.) or internal 20 mM iodate were applied in order to remove or slow down inactivation in part of the Na channels. The treatment increased the steady-state Na current during the noise measurement one-to eight fold over that in normal fibres. 3. Noise spectra were interpreted as the sum of 1/f noise and noise SNa(f) due to all-or-none, open-close transitions of single Na channels. The drug effects on the inactivation could be accounted for either by assuming two populations of channels, one with and one without inactivation, or by postulating a single population with modified inactivation characteristics. 4. Except for an increase in amplitude, the fluctuation spectra SNa(f) were similar to the ones in normal nodes. Again, the time constants taum obtained from the fit of the spectra agreed within a factor of 2 with the values of taum found in the macroscopic Na currents. 5. From the fluctuation spectra, single Na channel conductances gamma of 5-4 +/- 0-4 pS (iodate), 6-7 +/- 0-5 pS (Leiurus) and 7-0 +/- 0-6 pS (Anemonia) were calculated. The value of gamma was not significantly voltage dependent. 6. Our observations indicate that inactivation of Na channels can be modified with at most small effects on the microscopic properties of the activation process and on the conductance of the open channel. They suggest that the h mechanism normally produces all-or-none, open-close changes of conductance. PMID:1087644

  16. The Sodium Channel as a Target for Local Anesthetic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fozzard, Harry A.; Sheets, Michael F.; Hanck, Dorothy A.

    2011-01-01

    Na channels are the source of excitatory currents for the nervous system and muscle. They are the target for a class of drugs called local anesthetics (LA), which have been used for local and regional anesthesia and for excitatory problems such as epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia. These drugs are prototypes for new analgesic drugs. The drug-binding site has been localized to the inner pore of the channel, where drugs interact mainly with a phenylalanine in domain IV S6. Drug affinity is both voltage- and use-dependent. Voltage-dependency is the result of changes in the conformation of the inner pore during channel activation and opening, allowing high energy interaction of drugs with the phenylalanine. LA drugs also reduce the gating current of Na channels, which represents the movement of charged residues in the voltage sensors. Specifically, drug binding to phenylalanine locks the domain III S4 in its outward (activated) position, and slows recovery of the domain IV S4. Although strongly affecting gating, LA drugs almost certainly also block by steric occlusion of the pore. Molecular definition of the binding and blocking interactions may help in new drug development. PMID:22053156

  17. Resurgent current of voltage-gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda H; Raman, Indira M

    2014-01-01

    Resurgent Na+ current results from a distinctive form of Na+ channel gating, originally identified in cerebellar Purkinje neurons. In these neurons, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels responsible for action potential firing have specialized mechanisms that reduce the likelihood that they accumulate in fast inactivated states, thereby shortening refractory periods and permitting rapid, repetitive, and/or burst firing. Under voltage clamp, step depolarizations evoke transient Na+ currents that rapidly activate and quickly decay, and step repolarizations elicit slower channel reopening, or a ‘resurgent’ current. The generation of resurgent current depends on a factor in the Na+ channel complex, probably a subunit such as NaVβ4 (Scn4b), which blocks open Na+ channels at positive voltages, competing with the fast inactivation gate, and unblocks at negative voltages, permitting recovery from an open channel block along with a flow of current. Following its initial discovery, resurgent Na+ current has been found in nearly 20 types of neurons. Emerging research suggests that resurgent current is preferentially increased in a variety of clinical conditions associated with altered cellular excitability. Here we review the biophysical, molecular and structural mechanisms of resurgent current and their relation to the normal functions of excitable cells as well as pathophysiology. PMID:25172941

  18. Increased renal sodium absorption by inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis during fasting in healthy man. A possible role of the epithelial sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment with prostaglandin inhibitors can reduce renal function and impair renal water and sodium excretion. We tested the hypotheses that a reduction in prostaglandin synthesis by ibuprofen treatment during fasting decreased renal water and sodium excretion by increased absorption of water and sodium via the aquaporin2 water channels and the epithelial sodium channels. Methods The effect of ibuprofen, 600 mg thrice daily, was measured during fasting in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded crossover study of 17 healthy humans. The subjects received a standardized diet on day 1, fasted at day 2, and received an IV infusion of 3% NaCl on day 3. The effect variables were urinary excretions of aquaporin2 (u-AQP2), the beta-fraction of the epithelial sodium channel (u-ENaCbeta), cyclic-AMP (u-cAMP), prostaglandin E2 (u-PGE2). Free water clearance (CH2O), fractional excretion of sodium (FENa), and plasma concentrations of vasopressin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, atrial-, and brain natriuretic peptide. Results Ibuprofen decreased u-AQP2, u-PGE2, and FENa at all parts of the study. During the same time, ibuprofen significantly increased u-ENaCbeta. Ibuprofen did not change the response in p-AVP, u-c-AMP, urinary output, and free water clearance during any of these periods. Atrial-and brain natriuretic peptide were higher. Conclusion During inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, urinary sodium excretion decreased in parallel with an increase in sodium absorption and increase in u-ENaCbeta. U-AQP2 decreased indicating that water transport via AQP2 fell. The vasopressin-c-AMP-axis did not mediate this effect, but it may be a consequence of the changes in the natriuretic peptide system and/or the angiotensin-aldosterone system Trial Registration Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT00281762 PMID:21029429

  19. Mechanism and molecular basis for the sodium channel subtype specificity of µ-conopeptide CnIIIC

    PubMed Central

    Markgraf, René; Leipold, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Paolini-Bertrand, Marianne; Hartley, Oliver; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV channels) are key players in the generation and propagation of action potentials, and selective blockade of these channels is a promising strategy for clinically useful suppression of electrical activity. The conotoxin µ-CnIIIC from the cone snail Conus consors exhibits myorelaxing activity in rodents through specific blockade of skeletal muscle (NaV1.4) NaV channels. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We investigated the activity of µ-CnIIIC on human NaV channels and characterized its inhibitory mechanism, as well as the molecular basis, for its channel specificity. KEY RESULTS Similar to rat paralogs, human NaV1.4 and NaV1.2 were potently blocked by µ-CnIIIC, the sensitivity of NaV1.7 was intermediate, and NaV1.5 and NaV1.8 were insensitive. Half-channel chimeras revealed that determinants for the insensitivity of NaV1.8 must reside in both the first and second halves of the channel, while those for NaV1.5 are restricted to domains I and II. Furthermore, domain I pore loop affected the total block and therefore harbours the major determinants for the subtype specificity. Domain II pore loop only affected the kinetics of toxin binding and dissociation. Blockade by µ-CnIIIC of NaV1.4 was virtually irreversible but left a residual current of about 5%, reflecting a ‘leaky’ block; therefore, Na+ ions still passed through µ-CnIIIC-occupied NaV1.4 to some extent. TTX was excluded from this binding site but was trapped inside the pore by µ-CnIIIC. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Of clinical significance, µ-CnIIIC is a potent and persistent blocker of human skeletal muscle NaV1.4 that does not affect activity of cardiac NaV1.5. PMID:22537004

  20. Arrangement and mobility of the voltage sensor domain in prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Takushi; Irie, Katsumasa; Nagura, Hitoshi; Imai, Tomoya; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-03-04

    Prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) form homotetramers with each subunit contributing six transmembrane α-helices (S1-S6). Helices S5 and S6 form the ion-conducting pore, and helices S1-S4 function as the voltage sensor with helix S4 thought to be the essential element for voltage-dependent activation. Although the crystal structures have provided insight into voltage-gated K channels (K(V)s), revealing a characteristic domain arrangement in which the voltage sensor domain of one subunit is close to the pore domain of an adjacent subunit in the tetramer, the structural and functional information on Na(V)s remains limited. Here, we show that the domain arrangement in NaChBac, a firstly cloned prokaryotic Na(V), is similar to that in K(V)s. Cysteine substitutions of three residues in helix S4, Q107C, T110C, and R113C, effectively induced intersubunit disulfide bond formation with a cysteine introduced in helix S5, M164C, of the adjacent subunit. In addition, substituting two acidic residues with lysine, E43K and D60K, shifted the activation of the channel to more positive membrane potentials and consistently shifted the preferentially formed disulfide bond from T110C/M164C to Q107C/M164C. Because Gln-107 is located closer to the extracellular side of helix S4 than Thr-110, this finding suggests that the functional shift in the voltage dependence of activation is related to a restriction of the position of helix S4 in the lipid bilayer. The domain arrangement and vertical mobility of helix S4 in NaChBac indicate that the structure and the mechanism of voltage-dependent activation in prokaryotic Na(V)s are similar to those in canonical K(V)s.

  1. The C-terminal helical bundle of the tetrameric prokaryotic sodium channel accelerates the inactivation rate

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Katsumasa; Shimomura, Takushi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    Most tetrameric channels have cytosolic domains to regulate their functions, including channel inactivation. Here we show that the cytosolic C-terminal region of NavSulP, a prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channel cloned from Sulfitobacter pontiacus, accelerates channel inactivation. The crystal structure of the C-terminal region of NavSulP grafted into the C-terminus of a NaK channel revealed that the NavSulP C-terminal region forms a four-helix bundle. Point mutations of the residues involved in the intersubunit interactions of the four-helix bundle destabilized the tetramer of the channel and reduced the inactivation rate. The four-helix bundle was directly connected to the inner helix of the pore domain, and a mutation increasing the rigidity of the inner helix also reduced the inactivation rate. These findings suggest that the NavSulP four-helix bundle has important roles not only in stabilizing the tetramer, but also in accelerating the inactivation rate, through promotion of the conformational change of the inner helix. PMID:22531178

  2. Biophysical costs associated with tetrodotoxin resistance in the sodium channel pore of the garter snake, Thamnophis sirtalis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong Hyun; Jones, David K; Ahern, Christopher; Sarhan, Maen F; Ruben, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent toxin that specifically binds to voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV). TTX binding physically blocks the flow of sodium ions through NaV, thereby preventing action potential generation and propagation. TTX has different binding affinities for different NaV isoforms. These differences are imparted by amino acid substitutions in positions within, or proximal to, the TTX-binding site in the channel pore. These substitutions confer TTX-resistance to a variety of species. The garter snake Thamnophis sirtalis has evolved TTX-resistance over the course of an arms race, allowing some populations of snakes to feed on tetrodotoxic newts, including Taricha granulosa. Different populations of the garter snake have different degrees of TTX-resistance, which is closely related to the number of amino acid substitutions. We tested the biophysical properties and ion selectivity of NaV of three garter snake populations from Bear Lake, Idaho; Warrenton, Oregon; and Willow Creek, California. We observed changes in gating properties of TTX-resistant (TTXr) NaV. In addition, ion selectivity of TTXr NaV was significantly different from that of TTX-sensitive NaV. These results suggest TTX-resistance comes at a cost to performance caused by changes in the biophysical properties and ion selectivity of TTXr NaV.

  3. Negative-dominance phenomenon with genetic variants of the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5.

    PubMed

    Sottas, Valentin; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    During the past two decades, many pathological genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene encoding the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac (monomeric) sodium channel Na(v)1.5, have been described. Negative dominance is a classical genetic concept involving a "poison" mutant peptide that negatively interferes with the co-expressed wild-type protein, thus reducing its cellular function. This phenomenon has been described for genetic variants of multimeric K(+) channels, which mechanisms are well understood. Unexpectedly, several pathologic SCN5A variants that are linked to Brugada syndrome also demonstrate such a dominant-negative (DN) effect. The molecular determinants of these observations, however, are not yet elucidated. This review article summarizes recent findings that describe the mechanisms underlying the DN phenomenon of genetic variants of K(+), Ca(2+), Cl(-) and Na(+) channels, and in particular Brugada syndrome variants of Na(v)1.5. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  4. Calmodulin and Ca(2+) control of voltage gated Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Yoder, Jesse B; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Amzel, L Mario

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the cytosolic portion of voltage activated sodium channels (CTNav) in complexes with calmodulin and other effectors in the presence and the absence of calcium provide information about the mechanisms by which these effectors regulate channel activity. The most studied of these complexes, those of Nav1.2 and Nav1.5, show details of the conformations and the specific contacts that are involved in channel regulation. Another voltage activated sodium channel, Nav1.4, shows significant calcium dependent inactivation, while its homolog Nav1.5 does not. The available structures shed light on the possible localization of the elements responsible for this effect. Mutations in the genes of these 3 Nav channels are associated with several disease conditions: Nav1.2, neurological conditions; Nav1.4, syndromes involving skeletal muscle; and Nav1.5, cardiac arrhythmias. Many of these disease-specific mutations are located at the interfaces involving CTNav and its effectors.

  5. Effective contractile response to voltage-gated Na+ channels revealed by a channel activator.

    PubMed

    Ho, W-S Vanessa; Davis, Alison J; Chadha, Preet S; Greenwood, Iain A

    2013-04-15

    This study investigated the molecular identity and impact of enhancing voltage-gated Na(+) (Na(V)) channels in the control of vascular tone. In rat isolated mesenteric and femoral arteries mounted for isometric tension recording, the vascular actions of the Na(V) channel activator veratridine were examined. Na(V) channel expression was probed by molecular techniques and immunocytochemistry. In mesenteric arteries, veratridine induced potent contractions (pEC(50) = 5.19 ± 0.20, E(max) = 12.0 ± 2.7 mN), which were inhibited by 1 μM TTX (a blocker of all Na(V) channel isoforms, except Na(V)1.5, Na(V)1.8, and Na(V)1.9), but not by selective blockers of Na(V)1.7 (ProTx-II, 10 nM) or Na(V)1.8 (A-80347, 1 μM) channels. The responses were insensitive to endothelium removal but were partly (~60%) reduced by chemical destruction of sympathetic nerves by 6-hydroxydopamine (2 mM) or antagonism at the α1-adrenoceptor by prazosin (1 μM). KB-R7943, a blocker of the reverse mode of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (3 μM), inhibited veratridine contractions in the absence or presence of prazosin. T16A(inh)-A01, a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel blocker (10 μM), also inhibited the prazosin-resistant contraction to veratridine. Na(V) channel immunoreactivity was detected in freshly isolated mesenteric myocytes, with apparent colocalization with the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Veratridine induced similar contractile effects in the femoral artery, and mRNA transcripts for Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels were evident in both vessel types. We conclude that, in addition to sympathetic nerves, NaV channels are expressed in vascular myocytes, where they are functionally coupled to the reverse mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, causing contraction. The TTX-sensitive Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels are likely involved in vascular control.

  6. Controlling epithelial sodium channels with light using photoswitchable amilorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönberger, Matthias; Althaus, Mike; Fronius, Martin; Clauss, Wolfgang; Trauner, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    Amiloride is a widely used diuretic that blocks epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs). These heterotrimeric transmembrane proteins, assembled from β, γ and α or δ subunits, effectively control water transport across epithelia and sodium influx into non-epithelial cells. The functional role of δβγENaC in various organs, including the human brain, is still poorly understood and no pharmacological tools are available for the functional differentiation between α- and δ-containing ENaCs. Here we report several photoswitchable versions of amiloride. One compound, termed PA1, enables the optical control of ENaC channels, in particular the δβγ isoform, by switching between blue and green light, or by turning on and off blue light. PA1 was used to modify functionally δβγENaC in amphibian and mammalian cells. We also show that PA1 can be used to differentiate between δβγENaC and αβγENaC in a model for the human lung epithelium.

  7. The enigmatic drug binding site for sodium channel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mike, Arpad; Lukacs, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Local anesthetics have been in clinical use since 1884, and different aspects of the local anesthetic binding site have been studied in enormous detail. In spite of all these efforts, some of the most fundamental questions--such as which exact residues constitute the binding site, how many binding sites exist, do local anesthetics share their binding site(s) with other sodium channel inhibitors, and what are the mechanisms of inhibition--are still largely unanswered. We review accumulated data on the "local anesthetic receptor"and discuss controversial points, such as possible mechanisms of inhibition, the possibility of additional binding sites, the orientation of S6 helices, and the internal vs. external position of the anticonvulsant binding site. We describe the four following specific groups of functionally important residues: i) conserved asparagines six residues below the hinge residues; we propose that they are oriented toward the external surface of S6 helices, and have a critical role in the coupling of voltage sensors to gating, ii) residues lining the inner vestibule and constructing the "orthodox" binding site, iii) residues around the outer vestibule, which have been proposed to constitute an alternative external binding site, and iv) residues determining external access for quaternary amine inhibitors, such as QX314. We conclude that sodium channel inhibitors must be heterogenous in terms of binding sites and inhibition mechanisms, and propose that this heterogeneity should be taken into consideration during drug development.

  8. High-affinity blockade of voltage-operated skeletal muscle and neuronal sodium channels by halogenated propofol analogues

    PubMed Central

    Haeseler, G; Karst, M; Foadi, N; Gudehus, S; Roeder, A; Hecker, H; Dengler, R; Leuwer, M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Voltage-operated sodium channels constitute major target sites for local anaesthetic-like action. The clinical use of local anaesthetics is still limited by severe side effects, in particular, arrhythmias and convulsions. These side effects render the search for new local anaesthetics a matter of high interest. Experimental approach: We have investigated the effects of three halogenated structural analogues of propofol on voltage-operated human skeletal muscle sodium channels (NaV1.4) and the effect of one compound (4-chloropropofol) on neuronal sodium channels (NaV1.2) heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney cell line 293. Key results: 4-Iodo-, 4-bromo- and 4-chloropropofol reversibly suppressed depolarization-induced whole-cell sodium inward currents with high potency. The IC50 for block of resting channels at −150 mV was 2.3, 3.9 and 11.3 μM in NaV1.4, respectively, and 29.2 μM for 4-chloropropofol in NaV1.2. Membrane depolarization inducing inactivation strongly increased the blocking potency of all compounds. Estimated affinities for the fast-inactivated channel state were 81 nM, 312 nM and 227 nM for 4-iodopropofol, 4-bromopropofol and 4-chloropropofol in NaV1.4, and 450 nM for 4-chloropropofol in NaV1.2. Recovery from fast inactivation was prolonged in the presence of drug leading to an accumulation of block during repetitive stimulation at high frequencies (100 Hz). Conclusions and implications: Halogenated propofol analogues constitute a novel class of sodium channel-blocking drugs possessing almost 100-fold higher potency compared with the local anaesthetic and anti-arrhythmic drug lidocaine. Preferential drug binding to inactivated channel states suggests that halogenated propofol analogues might be especially effective in suppressing ectopic discharges in a variety of pathological conditions. PMID:18574460

  9. Neuroprotective activity of stiripentol with a possible involvement of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Verleye, Marc; Buttigieg, Dorothée; Steinschneider, Rémy

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of data has shown that recurrent epileptic seizures may be caused by an excessive release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the brain. Glutamatergic overstimulation results in massive neuronal influxes of calcium and sodium through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and kainic acid glutamate subtype receptors and also through voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels. These persistent and abnormal sodium and calcium entry points have deleterious consequences (neurotoxicity) for neuronal function. The therapeutic value of an antiepileptic drug would include not only control of seizure activity but also protection of neuronal tissue. The present study examines the in vitro neuroprotective effects of stiripentol, an antiepileptic compound with γ-aminobutyric acidergic properties, on neuronal-astroglial cultures from rat cerebral cortex exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) or to glutamate (40 µM for 20 min), two in vitro models of brain injury. In addition, the affinity of stiripentol for the different glutamate receptor subtypes and the interaction with the cell influx of Na(+) and of Ca(2+) enhanced by veratridine and NMDA, respectively, are assessed. Stiripentol (10-100 µM) included in the culture medium during OGD or with glutamate significantly increased the number of surviving neurons relative to controls. Stiripentol displayed no binding affinity for different subtypes of glutamate receptors (IC50  >100 µM) but significantly blocked the entry of Na(+) and Ca(2+) activated by veratridine and NMDA, respectively. These results suggest that Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels could contribute to the neuroprotective properties of sitiripentol.

  10. Modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels hyperpolarizes the voltage threshold for activation in spinal motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Power, Kevin E; Carlin, Kevin P; Fedirchuk, Brent

    2012-03-01

    Previous work has shown that motoneurone excitability is enhanced by a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential at which an action potential is initiated (V(th)) at the onset, and throughout brainstem-evoked fictive locomotion in the adult decerebrate cat and neonatal rat. Modeling work has suggested the modulation of Na(+) conductance as a putative mechanism underlying this state-dependent change in excitability. This study sought to determine whether modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels could induce V(th) hyperpolarization. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from antidromically identified lumbar spinal motoneurones in an isolated neonatal rat spinal cord preparation. Recordings were made with and without the bath application of veratridine, a plant alkaloid neurotoxin that acts as a sodium channel modulator. As seen in HEK 293 cells expressing Nav1.2 channels, veratridine-modified channels demonstrated a hyperpolarizing shift in their voltage-dependence of activation and a slowing of inactivation that resulted in an enhanced inward current in response to voltage ramp stimulations. In the native rat motoneurones, veratridine-modified sodium channels induced a hyperpolarization of V(th) in all 29 neonatal rat motoneurones examined (mean hyperpolarization: -6.6 ± 4.3 mV). V(th) hyperpolarization was not due to the effects on Ca(2+) and/or K(+) channels as blockade of these currents did not alter V(th). Veratridine also significantly increased the amplitude of persistent inward currents (PICs; mean increase: 72.5 ± 98.5 pA) evoked in response to slow depolarizing current ramps. However, the enhancement of the PIC amplitude had a slower time course than the hyperpolarization of V(th), and the PIC onset voltage could be either depolarized or hyperpolarized, suggesting that PIC facilitation did not mediate the V(th) hyperpolarization. We therefore suggest that central neuronal circuitry in mammals could affect V(th) in a mechanism similar to that of

  11. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin Binding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Exprnmantal Trherpeutics Ped in I.SA. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin Binding1 MICHAEL J. MULLIN 2 and... sodium channels. This indirect allosteric mechanism for inhibition of [H]BTX-B binding. effect orethanol was concentration-dependent and was affected...ethanol increased the equilibrium binding constant without af- that ethanol can affect the voltage-sensitive sodium channels in fecting the apparent

  13. Molecular Basis of Paralytic Neurotoxin Action on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-20

    have concentrated on our efforts on identification of sodium channel receptor site for Cc- scorpion toxins by analysis with sequence-dihcted antibodies...and on determination of the effects of sequence-directed antibodies on sodium channel function. I. Photolabeling of the Scorpion Toxin Receptor Site on...present on voltage-sensitive sodium channels (Ritchie and Rogart, 1977; Catterall, 1980, 1988; Couraud et al., 1982; Poli et al., 1986). a- scorpion

  14. Sodium channels as gateable non-photonic sensors for membrane-delimited reactive species

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Navin K.; Nematian-Ardestani, Ehsan; Neugebauer, Sophie; Borowski, Benjamin; El-Hussein, Ahmed; Hoshi, Toshinori; Leipold, Enrico; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) play crucial roles in physiological processes. While excessive ROS damages cells, small fluctuations in ROS levels represent physiological signals important for vital functions. Despite the physiological importance of ROS, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, such as which types of ROS occur in cells, how they distribute inside cells, and how long they remain in an active form. The current study presents a ratiometric sensor of intracellular ROS levels based on genetically engineered voltage-gated sodium channels (roNaV). roNaV can be used for detecting oxidative modification that occurs near the plasma membrane with a sensitivity similar to existing fluorescence-based ROS sensors. Moreover, roNaV has several advantages over traditional sensors because it does not need excitation light for sensing, and thus, can be used to detect phototoxic cellular modifications. In addition, the ROS dynamic range of roNaV is easily manipulated in real time by means of the endogenous channel inactivation mechanism. Measurements on ROS liberated from intracellular Lucifer Yellow and genetically encoded KillerRed has revealed an assessment of ROS lifetime in individual mammalian cells. Flashlight-induced ROS concentration decayed with two major time constants of about 10 and 1000 ms. PMID:24513256

  15. Design of a nested eight-channel sodium and four-channel proton coil for 7T knee imaging.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan; Madelin, Guillaume; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Chang, Gregory; Regatte, Ravinder R; Sodickson, Daniel K; Wiggins, Graham C

    2013-07-01

    The critical design aim for a sodium/proton coil is to maximize sodium sensitivity and transmit field homogeneity while simultaneously providing adequate proton sensitivity and homogeneity. While most dual-frequency coils use lossy high-impedance trap circuits or PIN diodes to allow dual-resonance, we explored a nested-coil design for sodium/proton knee imaging at 7 T. A stand-alone eight-channel sodium receive array was implemented without standard dual-resonance circuitry to provide improved sodium signal-to-noise ratio. A detunable sodium birdcage was added for homogeneous sodium excitation and a four-channel proton transmit-receive array was added to provide anatomical reference imaging and B0 shimming capabilities. Both additional modules were implemented with minimal disturbance to the eight-channel sodium array by managing their respective resonances and geometrical arrangement. In vivo sodium signal-to-noise ratio was 1.2-1.7 times greater in the developed eight-channel array than in a mononuclear sodium birdcage coil, whereas the developed four-channel proton array provided signal-to-noise ratio similar to that of a commercial mononuclear proton birdcage coil. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effects of ethanol and other intoxicant-anesthetics on voltage-dependent sodium channels of brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Harris, R A; Bruno, P

    1985-02-01

    Ethanol, diethylether, halothane and enflurane inhibited the veratridine-dependent uptake of 24Na by synaptosomes isolated from rodent brain. The inhibitory action of ethanol was similar for uptake periods of 1 to 10 sec and also was observed with batrachotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake, demonstrating an inhibition of sodium influx through voltage-dependent channels. The inhibitory action of tetrodotoxin on sodium uptake was not altered by ethanol, indicating this site on the sodium channel was not altered by ethanol. The action of ethanol was selective for different brain regions and was more potent in inhibiting sodium uptake in cortex than in cerebellum. Investigation of the effects of temperature on veratridine-stimulated uptake and ethanol actions demonstrated that an increase in temperature (13 degrees-33 degrees C) decreased both the apparent KD of veratridine and the Vmax of the uptake. Ethanol decreased the apparent Vmax at all temperatures and decreased the apparent KD at low 13 degrees and 18 degrees C) but not at higher (30 degrees and 33 degrees C) temperatures. Thus, an increase in temperature mimicked some, but not all, of the effects of ethanol. These results, together with those from other studies, suggest that the disordering of membrane lipids by ethanol and other intoxicant-anesthetic drugs is an important factor in the inhibition of sodium channel function by these drugs.

  17. Hypertonic saline inhibits luminal sodium channels in respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hebestreit, Alexandra; Kersting, Ulrich; Hebestreit, Helge

    2007-05-01

    Physical exercise with increased ventilation leads to a considerable rise in water loss from the airways. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of transepithelial fluid transport necessary to compensate for these losses are unknown but may include changes in luminal ion channel conductance. The present study was designed to examine the effects of an increase in luminal chloride and sodium concentrations which may locally occur during hyperventilation on luminal ion conductance in the respiratory epithelium of healthy controls and patients diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (CF). Changes in luminal chloride and sodium conductance were inferred by recording nasal potential difference in eight healthy subjects and 10 patients with CF, using superfusing solutions based on isotonic saline (150 mM) on one occasion and solutions based on hypertonic saline (300 mM) on the other. Switching from isotonic to hypertonic saline superfusion decreased potential difference in controls and CF patients significantly. Amiloride induced a decrease of potential difference which was larger with isotonic than with hypertonic saline (controls 9.5 +/- 6.1 vs. 3.7 +/- 4.6 mV; CF 17.2 +/- 7.2 vs. 9.8 +/- 7.6 mV). Chloride conductance stimulated with solutions low in chloride and containing isoproterenol was not significantly changed by hypertonic saline solutions compared with isotonic solutions in both groups. The findings indicate a significant inhibition of luminal sodium conductance by high luminal sodium concentrations. This mechanism may be involved in the regulation of fluid transport across the respiratory epithelium during exercise and in the improvement of mucociliary clearance and lung functions with inhalation of hypertonic saline in CF.

  18. Hydrogen Sulfide Prevents Advanced Glycation End-Products Induced Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiushi; Song, Binlin; Jiang, Shuai; Liang, Chen; Chen, Xiao; Shi, Jing; Li, Xinyuan; Sun, Yingying; Wu, Mingming; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Ma, He-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are complex and heterogeneous compounds implicated in diabetes. Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) at the distal nephron plays an important role in diabetic hypertension. Here, we report that H2S antagonizes AGEs-induced ENaC activation in A6 cells. ENaC open probability (P O ) in A6 cells was significantly increased by exogenous AGEs and that this AGEs-induced ENaC activity was abolished by NaHS (a donor of H2S) and TEMPOL. Incubating A6 cells with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT) mimicked the effects of AGEs on ENaC activity, but did not induce any additive effect. We found that the expression levels of catalase were significantly reduced by AGEs and both AGEs and 3-AT facilitated ROS uptake in A6 cells, which were significantly inhibited by NaHS. The specific PTEN and PI3K inhibitors, BPV(pic) and LY294002, influence ENaC activity in AGEs-pretreated A6 cells. Moreover, after removal of AGEs from AGEs-pretreated A6 cells for 72 hours, ENaC P O remained at a high level, suggesting that an AGEs-related "metabolic memory" may be involved in sodium homeostasis. Our data, for the first time, show that H2S prevents AGEs-induced ENaC activation by targeting the ROS/PI3K/PTEN pathway.

  19. Use dependence of peripheral nociceptive conduction in the absence of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel subtypes.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Tal; Kistner, Katrin; Nassar, Mohammed; Reeh, Peter W; Weidner, Christian

    2016-10-01

    This study examines conduction in peripheral nerves and its use dependence in tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTXr) sodium channel (Nav 1.8, Nav 1.9) knockout and wildtype animals. We observed use-dependent decreases of single fibre and compound action potential amplitude in peripheral mouse C-fibres (wildtype). This matches the previously published hypothesis that increased Na/K-pump activity is not the underlying mechanism for use-dependent changes of neural conduction. Knocking out TTXr sodium channels influences use-dependent changes of conductive properties (action potential amplitude, latency, conduction safety) in the order Nav 1.8 KO > Nav 1.9KO > wildtype. This is most likely explained by different subsets of presumably (relatively) Nav 1.7-rich conducting fibres in knockout animals as compared to wildtypes, in combination with reduced per-pulse sodium influx. Use dependency of peripheral nerves, especially of nociceptors, correlates with receptive properties. Slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels has been discussed to be the underlying mechanism - pointing to a receptive class-related difference of sodium channel equipment. Using electrophysiological recordings of single unmyelinated cutaneous fibres and their compound action potential (AP), we evaluated use-dependent changes in mouse peripheral nerves, and the contribution of the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTXr) sodium channels Nav 1.8 and Nav 1.9 to these changes. Nerve fibres were electrically stimulated using single or double pulses at 2 Hz. Use-dependent changes of latency, AP amplitude, and duration as well as the fibres' ability to follow the stimulus were evaluated. AP amplitudes substantially diminished in used fibres from C57BL/6 but increased in Nav 1.8 knockout (KO) mice, with Nav 1.9 KO in between. Activity-induced latency slowing was in contrast the most pronounced in Nav 1.8 KOs and the least in wildtype mice. The genotype was also predictive of how long fibres could follow the

  20. Sodium channel activation mechanisms. Insights from deuterium oxide substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Alicata, D.A.; Rayner, M.D.; Starkus, J.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Schauf and Bullock, using Myxicola giant axons, demonstrated that solvent substitution with deuterium oxide (D2O) significantly affects both sodium channel activation and inactivation kinetics without corresponding changes in gating current or tail current rates. They concluded that (a) no significant component of gating current derives from the final channel opening step, and (b) channels must deactivate (during tail currents) by a different pathway from that used in channel opening. By contrast, Oxford found in squid axons that when a depolarizing pulse is interrupted by a brief (approximately 100 microseconds) return to holding potential, subsequent reactivation (secondary activation) is very rapid and shows almost monoexponential kinetics. Increasing the interpulse interval resulted in secondary activation rate returning towards control, sigmoid (primary activation) kinetics. He concluded that channels open and close (deactivate) via the same pathway. We have repeated both sets of observations in crayfish axons, confirming the results obtained in both previous studies, despite the apparently contradictory conclusions reached by these authors. On the other hand, we find that secondary activation after a brief interpulse interval (50 microseconds) is insensitive to D2O, although reactivation after longer interpulse intervals (approximately 400 microseconds) returns towards a D2O sensitivity similar to that of primary activation. We conclude that D2O-sensitive primary activation and D2O-insensitive tail current deactivation involve separate pathways. However, D2O-insensitive secondary activation involves reversal of the D2O-insensitive deactivation step. These conclusions are consistent with parallel gate models, provided that one gating particle has a substantially reduced effective valence.

  1. Sodium channel activation augments NMDA receptor function and promotes neurite outgrowth in immature cerebrocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    George, Joju; Dravid, Shashank M.; Prakash, Anand; Xie, Jun; Peterson, Jennifer; Jabba, Sairam V.; Baden, Daniel G.; Murray, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    A range of extrinsic signals, including afferent activity, affect neuronal growth and plasticity. Neuronal activity regulates intracellular Ca2+ and activity-dependent calcium signaling has been shown to regulate dendritic growth and branching (Konur and Ghosh, 2005). NMDA receptor (NMDAR) stimulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase signaling cascades has moreover been demonstrated to regulate neurite/axonal outgrowth (Wayman et al., 2004). We used a sodium channel activator, brevetoxin (PbTx-2), to explore the relationship between intracellular [Na+] and NMDAR-dependent development. PbTx-2 alone, at a concentration of 30 nM, did not affect Ca2+ dynamics in DIV-2 cerebrocortical neurons; however, this treatment robustly potentiated NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx. The 30 nM PbTx-2 treatment produced a maximum [Na+]i of 16.9 ± 1.5 mM representing an increment of 8.8 ± 1.8 mM over basal. The corresponding membrane potential change produced by 30 nM PbTx-2 was modest and therefore insufficient to relieve the voltage-dependent Mg2+ block of NMDARs. To unambiguously demonstrate the enhancement of NMDA receptor function by PbTx-2, we recorded single-channel currents from cell-attached patches. PbTx-2 treatment was found to increase both the mean open time and open probability of NMDA receptors. These effects of PbTx-2 on NMDA receptor function were dependent on extracellular Na+ and activation of Src kinase. The functional consequences of PbTx-2-induced enhancement of NMDAR function were evaluated in immature cerebrocortical neurons. PbTx-2 concentrations between 3 and 300 nM enhanced neurite outgrowth. Voltage-gated sodium channel activators may accordingly represent a novel pharmacologic strategy to regulate neuronal plasticity through an NMDA receptor and Src family kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:19279266

  2. Molecular Action of Lidocaine on the Voltage Sensors of Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Michael F.; Hanck, Dorothy A.

    2003-01-01

    Block of sodium ionic current by lidocaine is associated with alteration of the gating charge-voltage (Q-V) relationship characterized by a 38% reduction in maximal gating charge (Qmax) and by the appearance of additional gating charge at negative test potentials. We investigated the molecular basis of the lidocaine-induced reduction in cardiac Na channel–gating charge by sequentially neutralizing basic residues in each of the voltage sensors (S4 segments) in the four domains of the human heart Na channel (hH1a). By determining the relative reduction in the Qmax of each mutant channel modified by lidocaine we identified those S4 segments that contributed to a reduction in gating charge. No interaction of lidocaine was found with the voltage sensors in domains I or II. The largest inhibition of charge movement was found for the S4 of domain III consistent with lidocaine completely inhibiting its movement. Protection experiments with intracellular MTSET (a charged sulfhydryl reagent) in a Na channel with the fourth outermost arginine in the S4 of domain III mutated to a cysteine demonstrated that lidocaine stabilized the S4 in domain III in a depolarized configuration. Lidocaine also partially inhibited movement of the S4 in domain IV, but lidocaine's most dramatic effect was to alter the voltage-dependent charge movement of the S4 in domain IV such that it accounted for the appearance of additional gating charge at potentials near −100 mV. These findings suggest that lidocaine's actions on Na channel gating charge result from allosteric coupling of the binding site(s) of lidocaine to the voltage sensors formed by the S4 segments in domains III and IV. PMID:12566542

  3. Resveratrol attenuates cortical neuron activity: roles of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels and voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Jean; Chan, Ming-Huan; Chen, Linyi; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Hwei-Hisen

    2016-05-21

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in grapes and red wine, exhibits diverse pharmacological activities. However, relatively little is known about whether resveratrol modulates the ion channels in cortical neurons. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BKCa) and voltage-gated sodium channels were expressed in cortical neurons and play important roles in regulation of neuronal excitability. The present study aimed to determine the effects of resveratrol on BKCa currents and voltage-gated sodium currents in cortical neurons. Resveratrol concentration-dependently increased the current amplitude and the opening activity of BKCa channels, but suppressed the amplitude of voltage-gated sodium currents. Similar to the BKCa channel opener NS1619, resveratrol decreased the firing rate of action potentials. In addition, the enhancing effects of BKCa channel blockers tetraethylammonium (TEA) and paxilline on action potential firing were sensitive to resveratrol. Our results indicated that the attenuation of action potential firing rate by resveratrol might be mediated through opening the BKCa channels and closing the voltage-gated sodium channels. As BKCa channels and sodium channels are critical molecular determinants for seizure generation, our findings suggest that regulation of these two channels in cortical neurons probably makes a considerable contribution to the antiseizure activity of resveratrol.

  4. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders.

    PubMed

    Drenth, Joost P H; Waxman, Stephen G

    2007-12-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pain disorders. Gain-of-function missense mutations in Na(v)1.7 have been shown to cause primary erythermalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, while nonsense mutations in Na(v)1.7 result in loss of Na(v)1.7 function and a condition known as channelopathy-associated insensitivity to pain, a rare disorder in which affected individuals are unable to feel physical pain. This review highlights these recent developments and discusses the critical role of Na(v)1.7 in pain sensation in humans.

  5. Evolutionary Diversification of Mesobuthus α-Scorpion Toxins Affecting Sodium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shunyi; Peigneur, Steve; Gao, Bin; Lu, Xiuxiu; Cao, Chunyang; Tytgat, Jan

    2012-01-01

    α-Scorpion toxins constitute a family of peptide modulators that induce a prolongation of the action potential of excitable cells by inhibiting voltage-gated sodium channel inactivation. Although they all adopt a conserved structural scaffold, the potency and phylogentic preference of these toxins largely vary, which render them an intriguing model for studying evolutionary diversification among family members. Here, we report molecular characterization of a new multigene family of α-toxins comprising 13 members (named MeuNaTxα-1 to MeuNaTxα-13) from the scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus. Of them, five native toxins (MeuNaTxα-1 to -5) were purified to homogeneity from the venom and the solution structure of MeuNaTxα-5 was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance. A systematic functional evaluation of MeuNaTxα-1, -2, -4, and -5 was conducted by two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings on seven cloned mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav1.2 to Nav1.8) and the insect counterpart DmNav1 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Results show that all these four peptides slow inactivation of DmNav1 and are inactive on Nav1.8 at micromolar concentrations. However, they exhibit differential specificity for the other six channel isoforms (Nav1.2 to Nav1.7), in which MeuNaTxα-4 shows no activity on these isoforms and thus represents the first Mesobuthus-derived insect-selective α-toxin identified so far with a half maximal effective concentration of 130 ± 2 nm on DmNav1 and a half maximal lethal dose of about 200 pmol g−1 on the insect Musca domestica; MeuNaTxα-2 only affects Nav1.4; MeuNaTxα-1 and MeuNaTxα-5 have a wider range of channel spectrum, the former active on Nav1.2, Nav1.3, Nav1.6, and Nav1.7, whereas the latter acting on Nav1.3–Nav1.7. Remarkably, MeuNaTxα-4 and MeuNaTxα-5 are two nearly identical peptides differing by only one point mutation at site 50 (A50V) but exhibit rather different channel subtype selectivity, highlighting a switch role of this site in

  6. Molecular model of the action potential sodium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Guy, H R; Seetharamulu, P

    1986-01-01

    Secondary and tertiary structural models of sodium channel transmembrane segments were developed from its recently determined primary sequence in Electrophorus electricus. The model has four homologous domains, and each domain has eight homologous transmembrane segments, S1 through S8. Each domain contains three relatively apolar segments (S1, S2 and S3) and two very apolar segments (S5 and S8), all postulated to be transmembrane alpha-helices. S4 segments have positively charged residues, mainly arginines, at every third residue. The model channel lining is formed by four S4 transmembrane alpha-helices and four negatively charged S7 segments. S7 segments are postulated to be short, partially transmembrane amphipathic alpha-helices in three domains and a beta-strand in the last domain. S7 segments are preceded by short apolar segments (S6) postulated to be alpha-helices in three domains and a beta-strand in the last domain. Positively charged side chains of S4 form salt bridges with negatively charged side chains on S7 and near the ends of S1 and S3. Putative extracellular segments that contain 5 of the 10 potential N-glycosylation sites link S5 to S6. Channel activation may involve a 'helical screw' mechanism in which S4 helices rotate around their axes as they move toward the extracellular surface. Images PMID:2417247

  7. Tetrodotoxin binding sites in human heart and human brain sodium channels. Final report, 28 June 1991-27 June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.M.; Hartmann, H.A.

    1994-07-28

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) are potent and lethal threats to exposed soldiers. The development of an antidote or site-specific antibodies for low affinity TTX/STX cardiac sodium channels and high affinity TTX/STX brain and peripheral nerve sodium channels requires a data base not only of the primary structure of the toxin receptor site(s) but also insight into the secondary structures of these site(s). Five goals or tasks were attempted and the first three were completed. Full-length human cardiac and brain sodium channel cDNAs have been cloned and expressed as functional proteins in Xenopus oocytes. Silent restriction sites have been introduced around the pore or P-region of the Na+ channel repeats. Site-directed mutagenesis has identified critical residues in the pore from the primary structure involved in sensitivity to TTX and STX and other pore properties. Chemical modification of cysteine mutants of these initial residues by methanethiosulfonate compounds produces an expanded data base of the secondary structure of the toxins` receptors. Specific peptides which mimic these receptors will be made to compete with the natural receptor for the toxins. We have successfully cloned the cDNAs for both human heart and brain sodium channels and expressed functional proteins. The initial chemical modification data suggests file receptor sites for TTX/STX are not interchangeable and are not the same site.

  8. Urinary prostasin: a candidate marker of epithelial sodium channel activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Oliviero; Castagna, Annalisa; Guarini, Patrizia; Chiecchi, Laura; Sabaini, Gherardo; Pizzolo, Francesca; Corrocher, Roberto; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2005-10-01

    Prostasin is a serine peptidase hypothesized to regulate epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity in animals or on in vitro cultured cells. We investigated whether urinary prostasin may be a candidate marker of ENaC activation in humans. We studied 10 healthy volunteers and 8 hypertensive patients with raised aldosterone-to-renin ratio before and after spironolactone or saline/Florinef suppression test, respectively. Four healthy subjects were also studied before and after saline. Urinary prostasin was evaluated by SDS-PAGE, 2D maps, and Western blotting. Every sample of normotensive individuals was compared with the corresponding sample of urine collected after spironolactone or saline; every sample of hypertensive patients was compared with the corresponding sample of urine collected after saline or Florinef. Prostasin was detectable in all subjects regardless of gender, dietary sodium intake, and spironolactone treatment. Spironolactone (100 mg) increased urinary Na+/K+ ratio and decreased urinary prostasin in normotensives in whom the renin/aldosterone axis was activated by a low Na+ intake, but it was ineffective in individuals with high Na+ intake. Saline infusion also reduced prostasin in normotensive subjects. In contrast, prostasin paradoxically increased in urine of patients affected by primary aldosteronism after volume expansion. By 2D immunoblotting, several protein isoforms were observed, some of them being overexpressed after inhibition tests in patients with primary aldosteronism. In addition to a "basal" aliquot of prostasin, constitutively released in human urine regardless of sodium balance and aldosterone activation, there exists a second "aldosterone-responsive" aliquot modulated by Na+ intake and potentially suitable as candidate marker of ENaC activation.

  9. Determination of Na channel blockers in paralytic shellfish toxins and pufferfish toxins with a tissue biosensor.

    PubMed

    Cheun, B S; Takagi, S; Hayashi, T; Nagashima, Y; Watanabe, E

    1998-06-01

    The biosensor consisted of a sodium electrode and covered with the frog bladder membrane within a flow cell was tested for the estimation of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX). This sensor was applied to detect very low amounts of the Na+ channel blockers, STX and TTX, in different shellfishes and swellfishes. A good agreement was obtained between TTX activities determined by mouse assay and amounts of Na+ channel blockers estimated by frog membrane sensor. The lowest level of TTX (fg) that can be determined by frog membrane sensor does not cause human poisoning. The channel blockers in short-necked clam, which was assumed to be STX, were monitored by this sensor continuously every week for one year. It was discovered that the STX content increased from July until September and then decreased from October until March. The biosensor proposed here may be used for the estimation of STX and TTX conventionally in the future.

  10. The paranodal cytoskeleton clusters Na+ channels at nodes of Ranvier

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Veronique; Zhang, Chuansheng; Vainshtein, Anna; Zhang, Ao; Zollinger, Daniel R; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Brophy, Peter J; Rasband, Matthew N; Peles, Elior

    2017-01-01

    A high density of Na+ channels at nodes of Ranvier is necessary for rapid and efficient action potential propagation in myelinated axons. Na+ channel clustering is thought to depend on two axonal cell adhesion molecules that mediate interactions between the axon and myelinating glia at the nodal gap (i.e., NF186) and the paranodal junction (i.e., Caspr). Here we show that while Na+ channels cluster at nodes in the absence of NF186, they fail to do so in double conditional knockout mice lacking both NF186 and the paranodal cell adhesion molecule Caspr, demonstrating that a paranodal junction-dependent mechanism can cluster Na+ channels at nodes. Furthermore, we show that paranode-dependent clustering of nodal Na+ channels requires axonal βII spectrin which is concentrated at paranodes. Our results reveal that the paranodal junction-dependent mechanism of Na+channel clustering is mediated by the spectrin-based paranodal axonal cytoskeleton. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21392.001 PMID:28134616

  11. Pyrethroid Insecticides Directly Activate Microglia Through Interaction With Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad M; Liu, Jason; Richardson, Jason R

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are considered to be the resident immune cells of the central nervous system and contribute significantly to ongoing neuroinflammation in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, we and others identified that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are present on microglia cells and contribute to excessive accumulation of intracellular Na(+ )and release of major pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Based on this finding and the fact that pyrethroid pesticides act on VGSC, we hypothesized that exposure of microglia to the pyrethroid pesticides, permethrin and deltamethrin, would activate microglia and increase the release of TNF-α. BV2 cells or primary microglia were treated with 0-5 µM deltamethrin or permethrin in the presence or absence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a VGSC blocker for 24-48 h. Both pyrethroids caused a rapid Na(+ )influx and increased accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na(+))i] in the microglia in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX. Furthermore, deltamethrin and permethrin increased the release of TNF-α in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by pre-treatment of cells with TTX. These results demonstrate that pyrethroid pesticides may directly activate microglial cells through their interaction with microglial VGSC. Because neuroinflammation plays a key role in many neurodegenerative diseases, these data provide an additional mechanism by which exposure to pyrethroid insecticides may contribute to neurodegeneration.

  12. Protease modulation of the activity of the epithelial sodium channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Chraïbi, A; Vallet, V; Firsov, D; Hess, S K; Horisberger, J D

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of extracellular proteases on the amiloride-sensitive Na+ current (INa) in Xenopus oocytes expressing the three subunits alpha, beta, and gamma of the rat or Xenopus epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). Low concentrations of trypsin (2 microg/ml) induced a large increase of INa within a few minutes, an effect that was fully prevented by soybean trypsin inhibitor, but not by amiloride. A similar effect was observed with chymotrypsin, but not with kallikrein. The trypsin-induced increase of INa was observed with Xenopus and rat ENaC, and was very large (approximately 20-fold) with the channel obtained by coexpression of the alpha subunit of Xenopus ENaC with the beta and gamma subunits of rat ENaC. The effect of trypsin was selective for ENaC, as shown by the absence of effect on the current due to expression of the K+ channel ROMK2. The effect of trypsin was not prevented by intracellular injection of EGTA nor by pretreatment with GTP-gammaS, suggesting that this effect was not mediated by G proteins. Measurement of the channel protein expression at the oocyte surface by antibody binding to a FLAG epitope showed that the effect of trypsin was not accompanied by an increase in the channel protein density, indicating that proteolysis modified the activity of the channel present at the oocyte surface rather than the cell surface expression. At the single channel level, in the cell-attached mode, more active channels were observed in the patch when trypsin was present in the pipette, while no change in channel activity could be detected when trypsin was added to the bath solution around the patch pipette. We conclude that extracellular proteases are able to increase the open probability of the epithelial sodium channel by an effect that does not occur through activation of a G protein-coupled receptor, but rather through proteolysis of a protein that is either a constitutive part of the channel itself or closely associated with it.

  13. DROSOPHILA SODIUM CHANNEL MUTATIONS: CONTRIBUTIONS TO SEIZURE-SUSCEPTIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Jason R.; Saras, Arunesh; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews Drosophila voltage-gated Na+ channel mutations encoded by the para (paralytic) gene and their contributions to seizure disorders in the fly. Numerous mutations cause seizure-sensitivity, for example, parabss1, with phenotypes that resemble human intractable epilepsy in some aspects. Seizure phenotypes are also seen with human GEFS+ spectrum mutations that have been knocked into the Drosophila para gene, paraGEFS+ and paraDS alleles. Other para mutations, paraST76 and paraJS act as seizure-suppressor mutations reverting seizure phenotypes in other mutants. Seizure-like phenotypes are observed from mutations and other conditions that cause a persistent Na+ current through either changes in mRNA splicing or protein structure. PMID:26093037

  14. Voltage-gated sodium channels and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na (+) channels (VGSCs) are macromolecular protein complexes containing a pore-forming α subunit and smaller non-pore-forming β subunits. VGSCs are expressed in metastatic cells from a number of cancers. In these cells, Na (+) current carried by α subunits enhances migration, invasion and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, the β subunits mediate cellular adhesion and process extension. The prevailing hypothesis is that VGSCs are upregulated in cancer, in general favoring an invasive/metastatic phenotype, although the mechanisms are still not fully clear. Expression of the Nav 1.5 α subunit associates with poor prognosis in clinical breast cancer specimens, suggesting that VGSCs may have utility as prognostic markers for cancer progression. Furthermore, repurposing existing VGSC-blocking therapeutic drugs may provide a new strategy to improve outcomes in patients suffering from metastatic disease, which is the major cause of cancer-related deaths, and for which there is currently no cure.

  15. The antipsychotic drug loxapine is an opener of the sodium-activated potassium channel slack (Slo2.2).

    PubMed

    Biton, B; Sethuramanujam, S; Picchione, Kelly E; Bhattacharjee, A; Khessibi, N; Chesney, F; Lanneau, C; Curet, O; Avenet, P

    2012-03-01

    Sodium-activated potassium (K(Na)) channels have been suggested to set the resting potential, to modulate slow after-hyperpolarizations, and to control bursting behavior or spike frequency adaptation (Trends Neurosci 28:422-428, 2005). One of the genes that encodes K(Na) channels is called Slack (Kcnt1, Slo2.2). Studies found that Slack channels were highly expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons and modulated their firing frequency (J Neurosci 30:14165-14172, 2010). Therefore, Slack channel openers are of significant interest as putative analgesic drugs. We screened the library of pharmacologically active compounds with recombinant human Slack channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, by using rubidium efflux measurements with atomic absorption spectrometry. Riluzole at 500 μM was used as a reference agonist. The antipsychotic drug loxapine and the anthelmintic drug niclosamide were both found to activate Slack channels, which was confirmed by using manual patch-clamp analyses (EC(50) = 4.4 μM and EC(50) = 2.9 μM, respectively). Psychotropic drugs structurally related to loxapine were also evaluated in patch-clamp experiments, but none was found to be as active as loxapine. Loxapine properties were confirmed at the single-channel level with recombinant rat Slack channels. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, loxapine was found to behave as an opener of native K(Na) channels and to increase the rheobase of action potential. This study identifies new K(Na) channel pharmacological tools, which will be useful for further Slack channel investigations.

  16. Cardiac sodium channel palmitoylation regulates channel availability and myocyte excitability with implications for arrhythmia generation

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zifan; Xiao, Yucheng; Meng, Jingwei; Hudmon, Andy; Cummins, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav1.5) play an essential role in regulating cardiac electric activity by initiating and propagating action potentials in the heart. Altered Nav1.5 function is associated with multiple cardiac diseases including long-QT3 and Brugada syndrome. Here, we show that Nav1.5 is subject to palmitoylation, a reversible post-translational lipid modification. Palmitoylation increases channel availability and late sodium current activity, leading to enhanced cardiac excitability and prolonged action potential duration. In contrast, blocking palmitoylation increases closed-state channel inactivation and reduces myocyte excitability. We identify four cysteines as possible Nav1.5 palmitoylation substrates. A mutation of one of these is associated with cardiac arrhythmia (C981F), induces a significant enhancement of channel closed-state inactivation and ablates sensitivity to depalmitoylation. Our data indicate that alterations in palmitoylation can substantially control Nav1.5 function and cardiac excitability and this form of post-translational modification is likely an important contributor to acquired and congenital arrhythmias. PMID:27337590

  17. Loss-of-function mutations in sodium channel Nav1.7 cause anosmia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jan; Pyrski, Martina; Jacobi, Eric; Bufe, Bernd; Willnecker, Vivienne; Schick, Bernhard; Zizzari, Philippe; Gossage, Samuel J; Greer, Charles A; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Woods, C Geoffrey; Wood, John N; Zufall, Frank

    2011-04-14

    Loss of function of the gene SCN9A, encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.7, causes a congenital inability to experience pain in humans. Here we show that Na(v)1.7 is not only necessary for pain sensation but is also an essential requirement for odour perception in both mice and humans. We examined human patients with loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A and show that they are unable to sense odours. To establish the essential role of Na(v)1.7 in odour perception, we generated conditional null mice in which Na(v)1.7 was removed from all olfactory sensory neurons. In the absence of Na(v)1.7, these neurons still produce odour-evoked action potentials but fail to initiate synaptic signalling from their axon terminals at the first synapse in the olfactory system. The mutant mice no longer display vital, odour-guided behaviours such as innate odour recognition and avoidance, short-term odour learning, and maternal pup retrieval. Our study creates a mouse model of congenital general anosmia and provides new strategies to explore the genetic basis of the human sense of smell.

  18. Shellfish toxins targeting voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-11-28

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management.

  19. Shellfish Toxins Targeting Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management. PMID:24287955

  20. Functional coupling between sodium-activated potassium channels and voltage-dependent persistent sodium currents in cricket Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Izumi; Yoshino, Masami

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we examined the functional coupling between Na(+)-activated potassium (KNa) channels and Na(+) influx through voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Single-channel activity of KNa channels was recorded with the cell-attached patch configuration. The open probability (Po) of KNa channels increased with increasing Na(+) concentration in a bath solution, whereas it decreased by the substitution of Na(+) with an equimolar concentration of Li(+). The Po of KNa channels was also found to be reduced by bath application of a high concentration of TTX (1 μM) and riluzole (100 μM), which inhibits both fast (INaf) and persistent (INaP) Na(+) currents, whereas it was unaffected by a low concentration of TTX (10 nM), which selectively blocks INaf. Bath application of Cd(2+) at a low concentration (50 μM), as an inhibitor of INaP, also decreased the Po of KNa channels. Conversely, bath application of the inorganic Ca(2+)-channel blockers Co(2+) and Ni(2+) at high concentrations (500 μM) had little effect on the Po of KNa channels, although Cd(2+) (500 μM) reduced the Po of KNa channels. Perforated whole cell clamp analysis further indicated the presence of sustained outward currents for which amplitude was dependent on the amount of Na(+) influx. Taken together, these results indicate that KNa channels could be activated by Na(+) influx passing through voltage-dependent persistent Na(+) channels. The functional significance of this coupling mechanism was discussed in relation to the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells and its possible role in the formation of long-term memory. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. The sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) associate.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Abinash C; Wynne, Brandi M; Yu, Ling; Tomilin, Viktor; Yue, Qiang; Zhou, Yiqun; Al-Khalili, Otor; Mallick, Rickta; Cai, Hui; Alli, Abdel A; Ko, Benjamin; Mattheyses, Alexa; Bao, Hui-Fang; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Theilig, Franziska; Eaton, Douglas C; Hoover, Robert S

    2016-10-01

    The thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) are two of the most important determinants of salt balance and thus systemic blood pressure. Abnormalities in either result in profound changes in blood pressure. There is one segment of the nephron where these two sodium transporters are coexpressed, the second part of the distal convoluted tubule. This is a key part of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron, the final regulator of salt handling in the kidney. Aldosterone is the key hormonal regulator for both of these proteins. Despite these shared regulators and coexpression in a key nephron segment, associations between these proteins have not been investigated. After confirming apical localization of these proteins, we demonstrated the presence of functional transport proteins and native association by blue native PAGE. Extensive coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated a consistent interaction of NCC with α- and γ-ENaC. Mammalian two-hybrid studies demonstrated direct binding of NCC to ENaC subunits. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and immunogold EM studies confirmed that these transport proteins are within appropriate proximity for direct binding. Additionally, we demonstrate that there are functional consequences of this interaction, with inhibition of NCC affecting the function of ENaC. This novel finding of an association between ENaC and NCC could alter our understanding of salt transport in the distal tubule. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Mutations in the transmembrane helix S6 of domain IV confer cockroach sodium channel resistance to sodium channel blocker insecticides and local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dingxin; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Wang, Xingliang; Wu, Yidong; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Indoxacarb and metaflumizone are two sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs). They preferably bind to and trap sodium channels in the slow-inactivated non-conducting state, a mode of action similar to that of local anesthetics (LAs). Recently, two sodium channel mutations, F1845Y (F(4i15)Y) and V1848I (V(4i18)I), in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain IV (IVS6), were identified to be associated with indoxacarb resistance in Plutella xylostella. F(4i15) is known to be critical for the action of LAs on mammalian sodium channels. Previously, mutation F(4i15)A in a cockroach sodium channel, BgNav1-1a, has been shown to reduce the action of lidocaine, a LA, but not the action of SCBIs. In this study, we introduced mutations F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)A/I individually into the cockroach sodium channel, BgNav1-1a, and conducted functional analysis of the three mutants in Xenopus oocytes. We found that both the F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations reduced the inhibition of sodium current by indoxacarb, DCJW (an active metabolite of indoxacarb) and metaflumizone. F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations also reduced the use-dependent block of sodium current by lidocaine. In contrast, substitution V(4i18)A enhanced the action metaflumizone and lidocaine. These results show that both F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations may contribute to target-site resistance to SCBIs, and provide the first molecular evidence for common amino acid determinants on insect sodium channels involved in action of SCBIs and LA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Distribution of TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory endings of mammalian muscle spindles.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Dario I; Vincent, Jacob A; Cope, Timothy C

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying signaling of mechanical stimuli by muscle spindles remains incomplete. In particular, the ionic conductances that sustain tonic firing during static muscle stretch are unknown. We hypothesized that tonic firing by spindle afferents depends on sodium persistent inward current (INaP) and tested for the necessary presence of the appropriate voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels in primary sensory endings. The NaV1.6 isoform was selected for both its capacity to produce INaP and for its presence in other mechanosensors that fire tonically. The present study shows that NaV1.6 immunoreactivity (IR) is concentrated in heminodes, presumably where tonic firing is generated, and we were surprised to find NaV1.6 IR strongly expressed also in the sensory terminals, where mechanotransduction occurs. This spatial pattern of NaV1.6 IR distribution was consistent for three mammalian species (rat, cat, and mouse), as was tonic firing by primary spindle afferents. These findings meet some of the conditions needed to establish participation of INaP in tonic firing by primary sensory endings. The study was extended to two additional NaV isoforms, selected for their sensitivity to TTX, excluding TTX-resistant NaV channels, which alone are insufficient to support firing by primary spindle endings. Positive immunoreactivity was found for NaV1.1, predominantly in sensory terminals together with NaV1.6 and for NaV1.7, mainly in preterminal axons. Differential distribution in primary sensory endings suggests specialized roles for these three NaV isoforms in the process of mechanosensory signaling by muscle spindles.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The molecular mechanisms underlying mechanosensory signaling responsible for proprioceptive functions are not completely elucidated. This study provides the first evidence that voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are expressed in the spindle primary sensory ending, where NaVs are found at every site involved in

  4. Steady-state gating of batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels. Variability and electrolyte-dependent modulation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The steady-state gating of individual batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels in neutral phospholipid bilayers exhibits spontaneous, reversible changes in channel activation, such that the midpoint potential (Va) for the gating curves may change, by 30 mV or more, with or without a change in the apparent gating valence (za). Consequently, estimates for Va and, in particular, za from ensemble-averaged gating curves differ from the average values for Va and za from single-channel gating curves. In addition to these spontaneous variations, the average Va shifts systematically as a function of [NaCl] (being -109, -88, and - 75 mV at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 M NaCl), with no systematic variation in the average za (approximately 3.7). The [NaCl]-dependent shifts in Va were interpreted in terms of screening of fixed charges near the channels' gating machinery. Estimates for the extracellular and intracellular apparent charge densities (sigma e = -0.7 and sigma i = -0.08 e/nm2) were obtained from experiments in symmetrical and asymmetrical NaCl solutions using the Gouy-Chapman theory. In 0.1 M NaCl the extracellular and intracellular surface potentials are estimated to be - 94 and -17 mV, respectively. The intrinsic midpoint potential, corrected for the surface potentials, is thus about -30 mV, and the standard free energy of activation is approximately -12 kJ/mol. In symmetrical 0.1 M NaCl, addition of 0.005 M Ba2+ to the extracellular solution produced a 17-mV depolarizing shift in Va and a slight reduction in za. The shift is consistent with predictions using the Gouy-Chapman theory and the above estimate for sigma e. Subsequent addition of 0.005 M Ba2+ to the intracellular solution produced a approximately 5-mV hyperpolarizing shift in the ensemble-averaged gating curve and reduced za by approximately 1. This Ba(2+)-induced shift is threefold larger than predicted, which together with the reduction in za implies that Ba2+ may bind at the intracellular channel surface. PMID

  5. Scorpion β-toxin interference with NaV channel voltage sensor gives rise to excitatory and depressant modes

    PubMed Central

    Leipold, Enrico; Borges, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Scorpion β toxins, peptides of ∼70 residues, specifically target voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels to cause use-dependent subthreshold channel openings via a voltage–sensor trapping mechanism. This excitatory action is often overlaid by a not yet understood depressant mode in which NaV channel activity is inhibited. Here, we analyzed these two modes of gating modification by β-toxin Tz1 from Tityus zulianus on heterologously expressed NaV1.4 and NaV1.5 channels using the whole cell patch-clamp method. Tz1 facilitated the opening of NaV1.4 in a use-dependent manner and inhibited channel opening with a reversed use dependence. In contrast, the opening of NaV1.5 was exclusively inhibited without noticeable use dependence. Using chimeras of NaV1.4 and NaV1.5 channels, we demonstrated that gating modification by Tz1 depends on the specific structure of the voltage sensor in domain 2. Although residue G658 in NaV1.4 promotes the use-dependent transitions between Tz1 modification phenotypes, the equivalent residue in NaV1.5, N803, abolishes them. Gating charge neutralizations in the NaV1.4 domain 2 voltage sensor identified arginine residues at positions 663 and 669 as crucial for the outward and inward movement of this sensor, respectively. Our data support a model in which Tz1 can stabilize two conformations of the domain 2 voltage sensor: a preactivated outward position leading to NaV channels that open at subthreshold potentials, and a deactivated inward position preventing channels from opening. The results are best explained by a two-state voltage–sensor trapping model in that bound scorpion β toxin slows the activation as well as the deactivation kinetics of the voltage sensor in domain 2. PMID:22450487

  6. Scorpion β-toxin interference with NaV channel voltage sensor gives rise to excitatory and depressant modes.

    PubMed

    Leipold, Enrico; Borges, Adolfo; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2012-04-01

    Scorpion β toxins, peptides of ∼70 residues, specifically target voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels to cause use-dependent subthreshold channel openings via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism. This excitatory action is often overlaid by a not yet understood depressant mode in which Na(V) channel activity is inhibited. Here, we analyzed these two modes of gating modification by β-toxin Tz1 from Tityus zulianus on heterologously expressed Na(V)1.4 and Na(V)1.5 channels using the whole cell patch-clamp method. Tz1 facilitated the opening of Na(V)1.4 in a use-dependent manner and inhibited channel opening with a reversed use dependence. In contrast, the opening of Na(V)1.5 was exclusively inhibited without noticeable use dependence. Using chimeras of Na(V)1.4 and Na(V)1.5 channels, we demonstrated that gating modification by Tz1 depends on the specific structure of the voltage sensor in domain 2. Although residue G658 in Na(V)1.4 promotes the use-dependent transitions between Tz1 modification phenotypes, the equivalent residue in Na(V)1.5, N803, abolishes them. Gating charge neutralizations in the Na(V)1.4 domain 2 voltage sensor identified arginine residues at positions 663 and 669 as crucial for the outward and inward movement of this sensor, respectively. Our data support a model in which Tz1 can stabilize two conformations of the domain 2 voltage sensor: a preactivated outward position leading to Na(V) channels that open at subthreshold potentials, and a deactivated inward position preventing channels from opening. The results are best explained by a two-state voltage-sensor trapping model in that bound scorpion β toxin slows the activation as well as the deactivation kinetics of the voltage sensor in domain 2.

  7. High Resolution Structure of the Open NaK Channel

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Amer; Jiang, Youxing

    2008-01-01

    We report the crystal structure of the non-selective cation channel NaK from b. cereus at a resolution of 1.6 Å. The structure reveals the intracellular gate in an open state compared to the closed form reported previously, making NaK the only channel for which the three-dimensional structures of both conformations are known. Channel opening follows a conserved mechanism of inner helix bending utilizing a flexible glycine residue, the gating hinge, seen in MthK and most other tetrameric cation channels. Additionally, distinct inter and intra-subunit rearrangements involved in channel gating are seen and characterized for the first time along with inner helix twisting motions. Furthermore, we identify a residue deeper within the cavity of the channel pore, Phe92, which likely forms a constriction point within the open pore, restricting ion flux through the channel. Mutating this residue to Ala causes a subsequent increase in ion conduction rates as measured by 86Rb flux assays. The structures of both the open and closed conformations of the NaK channel correlate very well with those of equivalent K+ channel conformations, namely MthK and KcsA, respectively. PMID:19098917

  8. State-dependent trapping of flecainide in the cardiac sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Eugene; O'Leary, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    Flecainide is a Class I antiarrhythmic drug and a potent inhibitor of the cardiac (Nav1.5) sodium channel. Although the flecainide inhibition of Nav1.5 is typically enhanced by depolarization, the contributions of the open and inactivated states to flecainide binding and inhibition remain controversial. We further investigated the state-dependent binding of flecainide by examining its inhibition of rapidly inactivating and non-inactivating mutants of Nav1.5 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Applying flecainide while briefly depolarizing from a relatively negative holding potential resulted in a low-affinity inhibition of the channel (IC50 = 345 μm). Increasing the frequency of stimulation potentiated the flecainide inhibition (IC50 = 7.4 μm), which progressively increased over the range of voltages where Nav1.5 channels activated. This contrasts with sustained depolarizations that effectively stabilize the channels in inactivated states, which failed to promote significant flecainide inhibition. The voltage sensitivity and strong dependence of the flecainide inhibition on repetitive depolarization suggests that flecainide binding is facilitated by channel opening and that the drug does not directly bind to closed or inactivated channels. The binding of flecainide to open channels was further investigated in a non-inactivating mutant of Nav1.5. Flecainide produced a time-dependent decay in the current of the non-inactivating mutant that displayed kinetics consistent with a simple pore blocking mechanism (KD = 11 μm). At hyperpolarized voltages, flecainide slowed the recovery of both the rapidly inactivating (τ = 81 ± 3 s) and non-inactivating (τ = 42 ± 3 s) channels. Mutation of a conserved isoleucine of the D4S6 segment (I1756C) creates an alternative pathway that permits the rapid diffusion of anaesthetics out of the Nav1.5 channel. The I1756C mutation accelerated the recovery of both the rapidly inactivating (τ = 12.6 ± 0.4 s) and non-inactivating (τ = 7

  9. The amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel PPK28 is essential for drosophila gustatory water reception.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zijing; Wang, Qingxiu; Wang, Zuoren

    2010-05-05

    Water sensation is a specific taste modality in the fruit fly. Water-induced hypoosmolarity activates specific gustatory receptor neurons; however, the molecular identity of the putative osmolarity sensor in these neurons remains unknown. We found that amiloride and its analogs specifically antagonized the response of water gustatory receptor neurons and the behavior of flies toward water stimulation. Deletion of the gene that encodes the amiloride-sensitive PPK28 channel, a DEG/eNaC (degenerin/epithelial sodium channel) family member, abolished the water-induced activity of water gustatory receptor neurons and greatly diminished the behavioral response of flies to water. Ectopic expression of the PPK28 channel in the bitter cells within the intermediate-type sensilla renders these sensilla responsive to water stimuli. Thus, the amiloride-sensitive PPK28 channel may serve as the osmolarity sensor for gustatory water reception in the fruit fly.

  10. Cytosolic Na+ controls and epithelial Na+ channel via the Go guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Komwatana, P; Dinudom, A; Young, J A; Cook, D I

    1996-01-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the fate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-beta-S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the alpha-subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8755611

  11. Cytosolic Na+ Controls an Epithelial Na+ Channel Via the Go Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Regulatory Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komwatana, P.; Dinudom, A.; Young, J. A.; Cook, D. I.

    1996-07-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the rate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-β -S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the α -subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-.

  12. The sodium leak channel, NALCN, in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cochet-Bissuel, Maud; Lory, Philippe; Monteil, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are crucial components of cellular excitability and are involved in many neurological diseases. This review focuses on the sodium leak, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)-activated NALCN channel that is predominantly expressed in neurons where it regulates the resting membrane potential and neuronal excitability. NALCN is part of a complex that includes not only GPCRs, but also UNC-79, UNC-80, NLF-1 and src family of Tyrosine kinases (SFKs). There is growing evidence that the NALCN channelosome critically regulates its ion conduction. Both in mammals and invertebrates, animal models revealed an involvement in many processes such as locomotor behaviors, sensitivity to volatile anesthetics, and respiratory rhythms. There is also evidence that alteration in this NALCN channelosome can cause a wide variety of diseases. Indeed, mutations in the NALCN gene were identified in Infantile Neuroaxonal Dystrophy (INAD) patients, as well as in patients with an Autosomal Recessive Syndrome with severe hypotonia, speech impairment, and cognitive delay. Deletions in NALCN gene were also reported in diseases such as 13q syndrome. In addition, genes encoding NALCN, NLF- 1, UNC-79, and UNC-80 proteins may be susceptibility loci for several diseases including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, autism, epilepsy, alcoholism, cardiac diseases and cancer. Although the physiological role of the NALCN channelosome is poorly understood, its involvement in human diseases should foster interest for drug development in the near future. Toward this goal, we review here the current knowledge on the NALCN channelosome in physiology and diseases. PMID:24904279

  13. Kinetics of 9-aminoacridine block of single Na channels

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of 9-aminoacridine (9-AA) block of single Na channels in neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells were studied using the gigohm seal, patch clamp technique, under the condition in which the Na current inactivation had been eliminated by treatment with N-bromoacetamide (NBA). Following NBA treatment, the current flowing through individual Na channels was manifested by square-wave open events lasting from several to tens of milliseconds. When 9-AA was applied to the cytoplasmic face of Na channels at concentrations ranging from 30 to 100 microM, it caused repetitive rapid transitions (flickering) between open and blocked states within single openings of Na channels, without affecting the amplitude of the single channel current. The histograms for the duration of blocked states and the histograms for the duration of open states could be fitted with a single-exponential function. The mean open time (tau o) became shorter as the drug concentration was increased, while the mean blocked time (tau b) was concentration independent. The association (blocking) rate constant, kappa, calculated from the slope of the curve relating the reciprocal mean open time to 9-AA concentration, showed little voltage dependence, the rate constant being on the order of 1 X 10(7) M-1s-1. The dissociation (unblocking) rate constant, l, calculated from the mean blocked time, was strongly voltage dependent, the mean rate constant being 214 s-1 at 0 mV and becoming larger as the membrane being hyperpolarized. The voltage dependence suggests that a first-order blocking site is located at least 63% of the way through the membrane field from the cytoplasmic surface. The equilibrium dissociation constant for 9-AA to block the Na channel, defined by the relation of l/kappa, was calculated to be 21 microM at 0 mV. Both tau -1o and tau -1b had a Q10 of 1.3, which suggests that binding reaction was diffusion controlled. The burst time in the presence of 9-AA, which is the sum of open times and blocked

  14. The Formation of Sodium Stannate from Mineral Cassiterite by the Alkaline Decomposition Process with Sodium Carbonate (Na2CO3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyah, L.; Lalasari, L. H.; Manaf, A.

    2017-02-01

    Extraction of cassiterite using alkaline decomposition of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) has been studied. Cassiterite (SnO2) is a mineral ore that contains tin (Sn) about 57.82 wt% and impurities like quartz, ilmenite, monazite, rutile and zircon. The initial step for the process was to remove the impurities in cassiterite through washing and separation by a high magnetic separator (HTS). The aim of this research is to increase the added value of cassiterite from local area Indonesia that using alkaline decomposition to form sodium stannate (Na2SnO3). The result shows that cassiterite from Indonesia can form sodium stannate (Na2SnO3) which soluble with water in the leaching process. The longer the time for decomposition, the more phases of sodium stannate that will be formed. Optimum result reached when the decomposition process was done in 850 °C for 4 hours with a mole ratio Na2CO3 to cassiterite 3:2. High Score Plus (HSP) was used in this research to analyze the mass of sodium stannate (Na2SnO3). HSP analysis showed that mass of sodium stannate (Na2SnO3) is 70.3 wt%.

  15. Fluorescent Saxitoxins for Live Cell Imaging of Single Voltage-Gated Sodium Ion Channels beyond the Optical Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Ondrus, Alison E.; Lee, Hsiao-lu D.; Iwanaga, Shigeki; Parsons, William H.; Andresen, Brian M.; Moerner, W.E.; Bois, J. Du

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A desire to better understand the role of voltagegated sodium channels (NaVs) in signal conduction and their dysregulation in specific disease states motivates the development of high precision tools for their study. Nature has evolved a collection of small molecule agents, including the shellfish poison (+)-saxitoxin, that bind to the extracellular pore of select NaV isoforms. As described in this report, de novo chemical synthesis has enabled the preparation of fluorescently labeled derivatives of (+)-saxitoxin, STX-Cy5, and STX-DCDHF, which display reversible binding to NaVs in live cells. Electrophysiology and confocal fluorescence microscopy studies confirm that these STX-based dyes function as potent and selective NaV labels. The utility of these probes is underscored in single-molecule and super-resolution imaging experiments, which reveal NaV distributions well beyond the optical diffraction limit in subcellular features such as neuritic spines and filopodia. PMID:22840778

  16. A gain-of-function mutation in the sodium channel gene Scn2a results in seizures and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kearney, J A; Plummer, N W; Smith, M R; Kapur, J; Cummins, T R; Waxman, S G; Goldin, A L; Meisler, M H

    2001-01-01

    The GAL879-881QQQ mutation in the cytoplasmic S4-S5 linker of domain 2 of the rat brain IIA sodium channel (Na(v)1.2) results in slowed inactivation and increased persistent current when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The neuron-specific enolase promoter was used to direct in vivo expression of the mutated channel in transgenic mice. Three transgenic lines exhibited seizures, and line Q54 was characterized in detail. The seizures in these mice began at two months of age and were accompanied by behavioral arrest and stereotyped repetitive behaviors. Continuous electroencephalogram monitoring detected focal seizure activity in the hippocampus, which in some instances generalized to involve the cortex. Hippocampal CA1 neurons isolated from presymptomatic Q54 mice exhibited increased persistent sodium current which may underlie hyperexcitability in the hippocampus. During the progression of the disorder there was extensive cell loss and gliosis within the hippocampus in areas CA1, CA2, CA3 and the hilus. The lifespan of Q54 mice was shortened and only 25% of the mice survived beyond six months of age. Four independent transgenic lines expressing the wild-type sodium channel were examined and did not exhibit any abnormalities. The transgenic Q54 mice provide a genetic model that will be useful for testing the effect of pharmacological intervention on progression of seizures caused by sodium channel dysfunction. The human ortholog, SCN2A, is a candidate gene for seizure disorders mapped to chromosome 2q22-24.

  17. Identification of PN1, a Predominant Voltage-Dependent Sodium Channel Expressed Principally in Peripheral Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Aral, Juan J.; Moss, Brenda L.; He, Zhi-Jun; Koszowski, Adam G.; Whisenand, Teri; Levinson, Simon R.; Wolf, John J.; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Halegoua, Simon; Mandel, Gail

    1997-02-01

    Membrane excitability in different tissues is due, in large part, to the selective expression of distinct genes encoding the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Although the predominant sodium channels in brain, skeletal muscle, and cardiac muscle have been identified, the major sodium channel types responsible for excitability within the peripheral nervous system have remained elusive. We now describe the deduced primary structure of a sodium channel, peripheral nerve type 1 (PN1), which is expressed at high levels throughout the peripheral nervous system and is targeted to nerve terminals of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Studies using cultured PC12 cells indicate that both expression and targeting of PN1 is induced by treatment of the cells with nerve growth factor. The preferential localization suggests that the PN1 sodium channel plays a specific role in nerve excitability.

  18. Use dependence of tetrodotoxin block of sodium channels: a revival of the trapped-ion mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, F; Gheri, A; Pusch, M; Moran, O

    1996-01-01

    The use-dependent block of sodium channels by tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been studied in cRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes expressing the alpha-subunit of rat brain IIA channels. The kinetics of stimulus-induced extra block are consistent with an underlying relaxation process involving only three states. Cumulative extra block induced by repetitive stimulations increases with hyperpolarization, with TTX concentration, and with extracellular Ca2+ concentration. We have developed a theoretical model based on the suggestion by Salgado et al. that TTX blocks the extracellular mouth of the ion pore less tightly when the latter has its external side occupied by a cation, and that channel opening favors a tighter binding by allowing the escape of the trapped ion. The model provides an excellent fit of the data, which are consistent with Ca2+ being more efficient than Na+ in weakening TTX binding and with bound Ca2+ stabilizing the closed state of the channel, as suggested by Armstrong and Cota. Reports arguing against the trapped-ion mechanism are critically discussed. PMID:8874004

  19. Characterization of Sodium Mobility and Binding by (23) Na NMR Spectroscopy in a Model Lipoproteic Emulsion Gel for Sodium Reduction.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kyle S; Lee, Youngsoo

    2017-07-01

    The effects of formulation and processing parameters on sodium availability in a model lipid/protein-based emulsion gel were studied for purposes of sodium reduction. Heat-set model gels were prepared with varying levels of protein, lipid, and NaCl contents and high pressure homogenization treatments. Single quantum and double quantum-filtered (23) Na NMR spectroscopy experiments were used to characterize sodium mobility, structural order around "bound" (restricted mobility) sodium, and sodium binding, which have been correlated to saltiness perception in food systems previously. Total sodium mobility was lower in gels with higher protein or fat content, and was not affected by changes in homogenization pressure. The gels with increased protein, fat, or homogenization pressure had increased structure surrounding "bound" sodium and more relative "bound" sodium due to increased interfacial protein interactions. The data obtained in this study provide information on factors affecting sodium availability, which can be applied towards sodium reduction in lipid/protein-based foods. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  20. Identification of an ovarian voltage-activated Na+-channel type: hints to involvement in luteolysis.

    PubMed

    Bulling, A; Berg, F D; Berg, U; Duffy, D M; Stouffer, R L; Ojeda, S R; Gratzl, M; Mayerhofer, A

    2000-07-01

    An endocrine type of voltage-activated sodium channel (eNaCh) was identified in the human ovary and human luteinized granulosa cells (GC). Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed that the eNaCh in GC is functional and tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive. The luteotrophic hormone human CG (hCG) was found to decrease the peak amplitude of the sodium current within seconds. Treatment with hCG for 24-48 h suppressed not only eNaCh mRNA levels, but also mean Na+ peak currents and resting membrane potentials. An unexpected role for eNaChs in regulating cell morphology and function was indicated after pharmacological modulation of presumed eNaCh steady-state activity in GC cultures for 24-48 h using TTX (NaCh blocker) and veratridine (NaCh activator). TTX preserved a highly differentiated cellular phenotype. Veratridine not only increased the number of secondary lysosomes but also led to a significantly reduced progesterone production. Importantly, endocrine cells of the nonhuman primate corpus luteum (CL), which represent in vivo counterparts of luteinized GC, also contain eNaCh mRNA. Although the mechanism of channel activity under physiological conditions is not clear, it may include persistent Na+ currents. As observed in GC in culture, abundant secondary lysosomes were particularly evident in the regressing CL, suggesting a functional link between eNaCh activity and this form of cellular regression in vivo. Our results identify eNaCh in ovarian endocrine cells and demonstrate that their expression is under the inhibitory control of hCG. Activation of eNaChs in luteal cells, due to loss of gonadotropin support, may initiate a cascade of events leading to decreased CL function, a process that involves lysosomal activation and autophagy. These results imply that ovarian eNaChs are involved in the physiological demise of the temporary endocrine organ CL in the primate ovary during the menstrual cycle. Because commonly used drugs, including phenytoin, target NaChs, these results

  1. Probing the Redox States of Sodium Channel Cysteines at the Binding Site of μO§-Conotoxin GVIIJ.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min-Min; Gajewiak, Joanna; Azam, Layla; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Olivera, Baldomero M; Yoshikami, Doju

    2015-06-30

    μO§-Conotoxin GVIIJ is a 35-amino acid peptide that readily blocks six of eight tested NaV1 subunit isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels. μO§-GVIIJ is unusual in having an S-cysteinylated cysteine (at residue 24). A proposed reaction scheme involves the peptide-channel complex stabilized by a disulfide bond formed via thiol-disulfide exchange between Cys24 of the peptide and a Cys residue at neurotoxin receptor site 8 in the pore module of the channel (specifically, Cys910 of rat NaV1.2). To examine this model, we synthesized seven derivatives of μO§-GVIIJ in which Cys24 was disulfide-bonded to various thiols (or SR groups) and tested them on voltage-clamped Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing NaV1.2. In the proposed model, the SR moiety is a leaving group that is no longer present in the final peptide-channel complex; thus, the same koff value should be obtained regardless of the SR group. We observed that all seven derivatives, whose kon values varied over a 30-fold range, had the same koff value. Concordant results were observed with NaV1.6, for which the koff was 17-fold larger. Additionally, we tested two μO§-GVIIJ derivatives (where SR was glutathione or a free thiol) on two NaV1.2 Cys replacement mutants (NaV1.2[C912A] and NaV1.2[C918A]) without and with reduction of channel disulfides by dithiothreitol. The results indicate that Cys910 in wild-type NaV1.2 has a free thiol and conversely suggest that in NaV1.2[C912A] and NaV1.2[C918A], Cys910 is disulfide-bonded to Cys918 and Cys912, respectively. Redox states of extracellular cysteines of sodium channels have hitherto received scant attention, and further experiments with GVIIJ may help fill this void.

  2. Removal of sodium channel inactivation in squid giant axons by n- bromoacetamide

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The group-specific protein reagents, N-bromacetamide (NBA) and N- bromosuccinimide (NBS), modify sodium channel gating when perfused inside squid axons. The normal fast inactivation of sodium channels is irreversibly destroyed by 1 mM NBA or NBS near neutral pH. NBA apparently exhibits an all-or-none destruction of the inactivation process at the single channel level in a manner similar to internal perfusion of Pronase. Despite the complete removal of inactivation by NBA, the voltage-dependent activation of sodium channels remains unaltered as determined by (a) sodium current turn-on kinetics, (b) sodium tail current kinetics, (c) voltage dependence of steady-state activation, and (d) sensitivity of sodium channels to external calcium concentration. NBA and NBS, which can cleave peptide bonds only at tryptophan, tyrosine, or histidine residues and can oxidize sulfur- containing amino acids, were directly compared with regard to effects on sodium inactivation to several other reagents exhibiting overlapping protein reactivity spectra. N-acetylimidazole, a tyrosine-specific reagent, was the only other compound examined capable of partially mimicking NBA. Our results are consistent with recent models of sodium inactivation and support the involvement of a tyrosine residue in the inactivation gating structure of the sodium channel. PMID:650167

  3. A double-tuned (1)H/(23)Na dual resonator system for tissue sodium concentration measurements in the rat brain via Na-MRI.

    PubMed

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Tabbert, Martin; Junge, Sven; Gallagher, Lindsay; Macrae, I Mhairi; Fagan, Andrew J

    2010-12-21

    A method for quantifying the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the rat brain from ²³Na-MR images was developed. TSC is known to change in a variety of common human diseases and holds considerable potential to contribute to their study; however, its accurate measurement in small laboratory animals has been hindered by the extremely low signal to noise ratio (SNR) in ²³Na images. To address this, the design, construction and characterization of a double-tuned ¹H/²³Na dual resonator system for ¹H-guided quantitative ²³Na-MRI are described. This system comprises an SNR-optimized surface detector coil for ²³Na image acquisition, and a volume resonator producing a highly homogeneous B₁ field (<5% inhomogeneity) for the Na channel across the rat head. The resonators incorporated channel-independent balanced matching and tuning capabilities with active decoupling circuitry at the ²³Na resonance frequency. A quantification accuracy of TSC of <10 mM was achieved in Na-images with 1.2 µl voxel resolution acquired in 10 min. The potential of the quantification technique was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment of a rat model of cerebral stroke, where the evolution of the TSC was successfully monitored for 8 h after the stroke was induced.

  4. Rate-dependent activation failure in isolated cardiac cells and tissue due to Na+ channel block

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, Anthony J.; Paterson, David; Noble, Denis

    2015-01-01

    While it is well established that class-I antiarrhythmics block cardiac sodium channels, the mechanism of action of therapeutic levels of these drugs is not well understood. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments, we studied the failure of activation of action potentials in single ventricular cells and in tissue caused by Na+ channel block. Our computations of block and unblock of sodium channels by a theoretical class-Ib antiarrhythmic agent predict differences in the concentrations required to cause activation failure in single cells as opposed to multicellular preparations. We tested and confirmed these in silico predictions with in vitro experiments on isolated guinea-pig ventricular cells and papillary muscles stimulated at various rates (2–6.67 Hz) and exposed to various concentrations (5 × 10−6 to 500 × 10−6 mol/l) of lidocaine. The most salient result was that whereas large doses (5 × 10−4 mol/l or higher) of lidocaine were required to inhibit action potentials temporarily in single cells, much lower doses (5 × 10−6 mol/l), i.e., therapeutic levels, were sufficient to have the same effect in papillary muscles: a hundredfold difference. Our experimental results and mathematical analysis indicate that the syncytial nature of cardiac tissue explains the effects of clinically relevant doses of Na+ channel blockers. PMID:26342072

  5. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. The Receptor Site and Mechanism of Action of Sodium Channel Blocker Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Du, Yuzhe; Jiang, Dingxin; Behnke, Caitlyn; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2016-09-16

    Sodium channels are excellent targets of both natural and synthetic insecticides with high insect selectivity. Indoxacarb, its active metabolite DCJW, and metaflumizone (MFZ) belong to a relatively new class of sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs) with a mode of action distinct from all other sodium channel-targeting insecticides, including pyrethroids. Electroneutral SCBIs preferably bind to and trap sodium channels in the inactivated state, a mechanism similar to that of cationic local anesthetics. Previous studies identified several SCBI-sensing residues that face the inner pore of sodium channels. However, the receptor site of SCBIs, their atomic mechanisms, and the cause of selective toxicity of MFZ remain elusive. Here, we have built a homology model of the open-state cockroach sodium channel BgNav1-1a. Our computations predicted that SCBIs bind in the inner pore, interact with a sodium ion at the focus of P1 helices, and extend their aromatic moiety into the III/IV domain interface (fenestration). Using model-driven mutagenesis and electrophysiology, we identified five new SCBI-sensing residues, including insect-specific residues. Our study proposes the first three-dimensional models of channel-bound SCBIs, sheds light on the molecular basis of MFZ selective toxicity, and suggests that a sodium ion located in the inner pore contributes to the receptor site for electroneutral SCBIs. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Relationship between action potential sodium channels and muscarinic receptors in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Cholinergic agonists and antagonists were tested for their ability to influence stimulated and unstimulated /sup 22/Na uptake in preparations of forebrain and hindbrain in mice in vitro. In mouse forebrain, atropine and pirenzepine decreased stimulated sodium uptake. Dicyclomine decreased stimulated uptake in both the forebrain and hindbrain. McN-A-343 decreased stimulated sodium uptake in the forebrain. The effects of sodium channel ligands on muscarinic receptors was investigated in forebrain and hindbrain preparations. In the forebrain, veratridine and aconitine appeared to inhibit the binding of (/sup 3/H)QNB in a competitive manner. Tetrodotoxin alone had not effect on binding, but enhanced the inhibition by veratridine, with no effect on aconitine inhibition. In the hindbrain, veratridine appeared to inhibit (/sup 3/H)QNB binding non-competitively and competitively. The addition of magnesium increased the K/sub i/ value in the veratridine inhibition. GTP enhanced the inhibition by veratridine. Tetrodotoxin increased the K/sub i/ value of the veratridine inhibition curve. Tetrodotoxin alone also inhibited (/sup 3/H)QNB binding. Tetrodotoxin inhibited QNB binding in both a non-competitive and uncompetitive manner.

  8. Modified kinetics and selectivity of sodium channels in frog skeletal muscle fibers treated with aconitine

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the plant alkaloid aconitine on sodium channel kinetics, ionic selectivity, and blockage by protons and tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been studied in frog skeletal muscle. Treatment with 0.25 or 0.3 mM aconitine alters sodium channels so that the threshold of activation is shifted 40-50 mV in the hyperpolarized direction. In contrast to previous results in frog nerve, inactivation is complete for depolarizations beyond about -60 mV. After aconitine treatment, the steady state level of inactivation is shifted approximately 20 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction. Concomitant with changes in channel kinetics, the relative permeability of the sodium channel to NH4,K, and Cs is increased. This altered selectivity is not accompanied by altered block by protons or TTX. The results suggest that sites other than those involved in channel block by protons and TTX are important in determining sodium channel selectivity. PMID:6294221

  9. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C; Stevens, Troy

    2015-02-15

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1.

  10. MTSET modification of D4S6 cysteines stabilize the fast inactivated state of Nav1.5 sodium channels.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Michael E; Chahine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The transmembrane S6 segments of Na(+) sodium channels form the cytoplasmic entrance of the channel and line the internal aspects of the aqueous pore. This region of the channel has been implicated in Na(+) channel permeation, gating, and pharmacology. In this study we utilized cysteine substitutions and methanethiosulfonate reagent (MTSET) to investigate the role of the S6 segment of homologous domain 4 (D4S6) in the gating of the cardiac (Nav1.5) channel. D4S6 cysteine mutants were heterologously expressed in tsA201 cells and currents recorded using whole-cell patch clamp. Internal MTSET reduced the peak Na(+) currents, induced hyperpolarizing shifts in steady-state inactivation and slowed the recovery of mutant channels with cysteines inserted near the middle (F1760C, V1763C) and C-terminus (Y1767C) of the D4S6. These findings suggested a link between the MTSET inhibition and fast inactivation. This was confirmed by expressing the V1763C and Y1767C mutations in non-inactivating Nav1.5 channels. Removing inactivation abolished the MTSET inhibition of the V1763C and Y1767C mutants. The data indicate that the MTSET-induced reduction in current primarily results from slower recovery from inactivation that produces hyperpolarizing shifts in fast inactivation and decreases the steady-state availability of the channels. This contrasted with a cysteine inserted near the C-terminus of the D4S6 (I1770C) where MTSET increased the persistent Na(+) current at depolarized voltages consistent with impaired fast inactivation. Covalent modification of D4S6 cysteines with MTSET adduct appears to reduce the mobility of the D4S6 segment and stabilize the channels in the fast inactivated state. These findings indicate that residues located near the middle and C-terminus of the D4S6 play an important role in fast inactivation.

  11. The discovery of a novel sodium channel in the cockroach Periplaneta americana: evidence for an early duplication of the para-like gene.

    PubMed

    Moignot, Bénédicte; Lemaire, Christophe; Quinchard, Sophie; Lapied, Bruno; Legros, Christian

    2009-11-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v) channels) belong to a superfamily of ion channels which play an essential role in membrane excitability. Only one gene encoding Na(v) channels has been characterized so far in insects. Here, we have cloned one full-length cDNA encoding a conventional insect Na(v) channel (PaNa(v)1) and two full-length cDNAs encoding putative insect Na(v) channels (PaFPC1 and PaFPC2) in Periplaneta americana, a model insect for neurophysiological studies. The ORFs of PaFPC1 and PaFPC2 contained 4662 bp and encoded 1553 amino acid residues, and the ORF of PaNa(v)1 contained 6153 bp and encoded 2051 amino acid residues. PaFPC1 and PaFPC2 are two isoforms, which differ by eight single amino acid substitutions. PaFPC1 shares 37.5-55% protein identities with known insect Na(v) channels, while PaNa(v)1 shares 70-97.5% protein identities with these latter. Both PaFPC1 and PaFPC2 possess the molecular hallmarks of Na(v) channels except the motif involved in fast inactivation. Contrary to PaNa(v)1 transcripts which are expressed mainly in the central nervous system, those ones of PaFPC are also expressed in non-neuronal tissues (muscles, gut and mushroom-shaped accessory glands). A detailed phylogenetic analysis confirmed that PaNa(v)1 and PaFPC are evolutionarily closely related to insect Na(v) channel genes.

  12. Glycosylation-dependent activation of epithelial sodium channel by solnatide.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Waheed; Tzotzos, Susan; Bedak, Minela; Aufy, Mohammad; Willam, Anita; Kraihammer, Martin; Holzner, Alexander; Czikora, Istvan; Scherbaum-Hazemi, Parastoo; Fischer, Hendrik; Pietschmann, Helmut; Fischer, Bernhard; Lucas, Rudolf; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa

    2015-12-15

    Dysfunction of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), which regulates salt and water homeostasis in epithelia, causes several human pathological conditions, including pulmonary oedema. This is a potentially lethal complication of acute lung injury at least partially caused by dysfunctional alveolar liquid clearance, which in turn impairs alveolar gas exchange. Solnatide (named TIP-peptide, AP301), a 17 residue peptide mimicking the lectin-like domain of TNF has been shown to activate ENaC in several experimental animal models of acute lung injury and is being evaluated as a potential therapy for pulmonary oedema. The peptide has recently completed phase 1 and 2a clinical trials. In this study, we identify a glycosylation-dependent mechanism that preserves ENaC function and expression. Since our previous data suggested that the pore-forming subunits of ENaC are essential for maximal current activation by solnatide, we performed single- and multi-N-glycosylation site mutations in αN232,293,312,397,511Q- and δN166,211,384Q-subunits, in order to identify crucial residues for interaction with solnatide within the extracellular loop of the channel. Additionally, we generated αL576X and αN232,293,312,397,511Q,L576X deletion mutants of ENaC-α, since we have previously demonstrated that the carboxy terminal domain of this subunit is also involved in its interaction with solnatide. In cells expressing αN232,293,312,397,511Q,L576Xβγ-hENaC or δN166,311,384Q,D552Xβγ-hENaC activation by solnatide, as measured in whole cell patch clamp mode, was completely abolished, whereas it was attenuated in αL576Xβγ-hENaC- and δD552Xβγ-hENaC-expressing cells. Taken together, our findings delineate an N-glycan dependent interaction between the TIP-peptide and ENaC leading to normalization of both sodium and fluid absorption in oedematous alveoli to non-oedematous levels.

  13. The A-kinase anchoring protein 15 regulates feedback inhibition of the epithelial Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Bengrine, Abderrahmane; Li, Jinqing; Awayda, Mouhamed S

    2007-04-01

    Protein kinase A anchoring proteins or AKAPs regulate the activity of many ion channels. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a well-recognized target of AKAPs, with other kinases now emerging as additional targets. We examined the roles of epithelial-expressed AKAPs in regulating the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). Experiments used heterologous expression with AKAP15, AKAP-KL, and AKAP79 in Xenopus oocytes. Experiments were carried out under high and low Na+ conditions, as Na+ loading is known to affect the baseline activity of ENaC in a PKC-dependent mechanism. ENaC activity was unaffected by AKAP79 and AKAP-KL expression. However, oocytes coexpressing AKAP15 exhibited an 80% and 91% reduction in the amiloride-sensitive, whole-cell conductance in high and low Na+ conditions, respectively. The reduced channel activity was unaffected by PKA activation or inhibition, indicating a PKA-independent mechanism. Expression with a membrane-targeting domain, mutant form of AKAP15 (AKAP15m) prevented the decrease of ENaC activity, but only under low Na+ conditions. In high sodium conditions, coexpression with AKAP15m led to an increase of ENaC activity to levels similar to those observed under low Na+. These results indicate that membrane-associated AKAP15 reduces ENaC activity whereas the cytoplasmically associated one may participate in the channel's feedback inhibition by intracellular Na+, a process known to involve PKC. This hypothesis was further confirmed in coexpression experiments, which demonstrated functional and physical interaction between AKAP15 and PKCalpha. We propose that AKAP15 regulates ENaC via a novel PKA-independent pathway.

  14. Discovery of triazolopyridine GS-458967, a late sodium current inhibitor (Late INai) of the cardiac NaV 1.5 channel with improved efficacy and potency relative to ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Koltun, Dmitry O; Parkhill, Eric Q; Elzein, Elfatih; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Notte, Gregory T; Kalla, Rao; Jiang, Robert H; Li, Xiaofen; Perry, Thao D; Avila, Belem; Wang, Wei-Qun; Smith-Maxwell, Catherine; Dhalla, Arvinder K; Rajamani, Sridharan; Stafford, Brian; Tang, Jennifer; Mollova, Nevena; Belardinelli, Luiz; Zablocki, Jeff A

    2016-07-01

    We started with a medium throughput screen of heterocyclic compounds without basic amine groups to avoid hERG and β-blocker activity and identified [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine as an early lead. Optimization of substituents for Late INa current inhibition and lack of Peak INa inhibition led to the discovery of 4h (GS-458967) with improved anti-arrhythmic activity relative to ranolazine. Unfortunately, 4h demonstrated use dependent block across the sodium isoforms including the central and peripheral nervous system isoforms that is consistent with its low therapeutic index (approximately 5-fold in rat, 3-fold in dog). Compound 4h represents our initial foray into a 2nd generation Late INa inhibitor program and is an important proof-of-concept compound. We will provide additional reports on addressing the CNS challenge in a follow-up communication.

  15. Functional identification and characterization of sodium binding sites in Na symporters.

    PubMed

    Loo, Donald D F; Jiang, Xuan; Gorraitz, Edurne; Hirayama, Bruce A; Wright, Ernest M

    2013-11-19

    Sodium cotransporters from several different gene families belong to the leucine transporter (LeuT) structural family. Although the identification of Na(+) in binding sites is beyond the resolution of the structures, two Na(+) binding sites (Na1 and Na2) have been proposed in LeuT. Na2 is conserved in the LeuT family but Na1 is not. A biophysical method has been used to measure sodium dissociation constants (Kd) of wild-type and mutant human sodium glucose cotransport (hSGLT1) proteins to identify the Na(+) binding sites in hSGLT1. The Na1 site is formed by residues in the sugar binding pocket, and their mutation influences sodium binding to Na1 but not to Na2. For the canonical Na2 site formed by two -OH side chains, S392 and S393, and three backbone carbonyls, mutation of S392 to cysteine increased the sodium Kd by sixfold. This was accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the apparent sugar and phlorizin affinities. We suggest that mutation of S392 in the Na2 site produces a structural rearrangement of the sugar binding pocket to disrupt both the binding of the second Na(+) and the binding of sugar. In contrast, the S393 mutations produce no significant changes in sodium, sugar, and phlorizin affinities. We conclude that the Na2 site is conserved in hSGLT1, the side chain of S392 and the backbone carbonyl of S393 are important in the first Na(+) binding, and that Na(+) binding to Na2 promotes binding to Na1 and also sugar binding.

  16. 980-nm infrared laser modulation of sodium channel kinetics in a neuron cell linearly mediated by photothermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinyu; Liu, Jia; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Changsen

    2014-10-01

    Photothermal effect (PE) plays a major role in the near-infrared laser interaction with biological tissue. But, quite few interactions can be quantitatively depicted. Here, a two-step model is proposed to describe a 980-nm infrared laser interaction with neuron cell in vitro. First, the laser-induced temperature rises in the cell surrounding area were measured by using an open pipette method and also calculated by solving the heat conduction equation. Second, we recorded the modifications on sodium (Na) channel current in neuron cells directly by using a patch clamp to synchronize the 980-nm laser irradiation and obtained how the electrophysiological function of neuron cells respond to the temperature rise. Then, the activation time constants, τm, were extracted by fitting the sodium currents with the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The infrared laser modulation effect on sodium currents kinetics was examined by taking a ratio between the time constants with and without the laser irradiations. The analysis revealed that the averaged ratio at a specific laser exposure could be well related to the temperature properties of the Na channel protein. These results proved that the modulation of sodium current kinetics of a neuron cell in vitro by 980-nm laser with different-irradiation levels was linearly mediated corresponding to the laser-induced PE.

  17. Chronic ciguatoxin treatment induces synaptic scaling through voltage gated sodium channels in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Martín, Víctor; Vale, Carmen; Rubiolo, Juan A; Roel, Maria; Hirama, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shuji; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luís M

    2015-06-15

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channels activators that cause ciguatera, one of the most widespread nonbacterial forms of food poisoning, which presents with long-term neurological alterations. In central neurons, chronic perturbations in activity induce homeostatic synaptic mechanisms that adjust the strength of excitatory synapses and modulate glutamate receptor expression in order to stabilize the overall activity. Immediate early genes, such as Arc and Egr1, are induced in response to activity changes and underlie the trafficking of glutamate receptors during neuronal homeostasis. To better understand the long lasting neurological consequences of ciguatera, it is important to establish the role that chronic changes in activity produced by ciguatoxins represent to central neurons. Here, the effect of a 30 min exposure of 10-13 days in vitro (DIV) cortical neurons to the synthetic ciguatoxin CTX 3C on Arc and Egr1 expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction approaches. Since the toxin increased the mRNA levels of both Arc and Egr1, the effect of CTX 3C in NaV channels, membrane potential, firing activity, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and glutamate receptors expression in cortical neurons after a 24 h exposure was evaluated using electrophysiological and western blot approaches. The data presented here show that CTX 3C induced an upregulation of Arc and Egr1 that was prevented by previous coincubation of the neurons with the NaV channel blocker tetrodotoxin. In addition, chronic CTX 3C caused a concentration-dependent shift in the activation voltage of NaV channels to more negative potentials and produced membrane potential depolarization. Moreover, 24 h treatment of cortical neurons with 5 nM CTX 3C decreased neuronal firing and induced synaptic scaling mechanisms, as evidenced by a decrease in the amplitude of mEPSCs and downregulation in the protein level of glutamate receptors that was also prevented by tetrodotoxin

  18. Regulation of the epithelial Na+ channel by the mTORC2/SGK1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lang, Florian; Pearce, David

    2016-02-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) is decisive for sodium reabsorption by the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN) of the kidney. ENaC is regulated by the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1), a kinase genomically upregulated by several hormones including glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. SGK1 is activated by the serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) isoform mTORC2. SGK1 knockout (sgk1(-/-) mice) impairs renal Na(+) retention during salt depletion. The mTOR catalytic site inhibitor, PP242, but not mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, inhibits ENaC, decreases Na(+) flux in isolated perfused tubules and induces natriuresis in wild-type mice. PP242 does not lead to further impairment of Na(+) reabsorption in sgk1(-/-) mice. The mTORC2/SGK1 sensitive renal Na(+) retention leads to extracellular volume expansion with increase of blood pressure. A SGK1 gene variant (prevalence ∼ 3-5% in Caucasians, ∼ 10% in Africans) predisposes to hypertension, stroke, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Future studies will be required to define the role of mTORC2 in the regulation of further SGK1 sensitive transport proteins, such as further ion channels, carriers and the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Moreover, studies are required disclosing the impact of mTORC2 on SGK1 sensitive disorders, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes, thrombosis, stroke, inflammation, autoimmune disease, fibrosis and tumour growth.

  19. Action of insecticidal N-alkylamides at site 2 of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ottea, J.A.; Payne, G.T.; Soderlund, D.M. )

    1990-08-01

    Nine synthetic N-alkylamides were examined as inhibitors of the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)batrachotoxinin A 20{alpha}-benzoate (({sup 3}H)BTX-B) to sodium channels and as activators of sodium uptake in mouse brain synaptoneurosomes. In the presence of scorpion (Leiurus quinquestriatus) venom, the six insecticidal analogues were active as both inhibitors of ({sup 3}H)BTX-B binding and stimulators of sodium uptake. These findings are consistent with an action of these compounds at the alkaloid activator recognition site (site 2) of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel. The three noninsecticidal N-alkylamides also inhibited ({sup 3}H)BTX-B binding but were ineffective as activators of sodium uptake. Concentration-response studies revealed that some of the insecticidal amides also enhanced sodium uptake through a second, high-affinity interaction that does not involve site 2, but this secondary effect does not appear to be correlated with insecticidal activity. The activities of N-alkylamides as sodium channel activators were influenced by the length of the alkenyl chain and the location of unsaturation within the molecule. These results further define the actions of N-alkylamides on sodium channels and illustrate the significance of the multiple binding domains of the sodium channel as target sites for insect control agents.

  20. Evaluation of toxicity equivalent factors of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in seven human sodium channels types by an automated high throughput electrophysiology system.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Eva; Alfonso, Amparo; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2016-02-01

    Although voltage-gated sodium channels (Na v ) are the cellular target of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins and that patch clamp electrophysiology is the most effective way of studying direct interaction of molecules with these channels, nowadays, this technique is still reduced to more specific analysis due to the difficulties of transforming it in a reliable throughput system. Actual functional methods for PSP detection are based in binding assays using receptors but not functional Na v channels. Currently, the availability of automated patch clamp platforms and also of stably transfected cell lines with human Na v channels allow us to introduce this specific and selective method for fast screenings in marine toxin detection. Taking advantage of the accessibility to pure PSP standards, we calculated the toxicity equivalent factors (TEFs) for nine PSP analogs obtaining reliable TEFs in human targets to fulfill the deficiencies of the official analytic methods and to verify automated patch clamp technology as a fast and reliable screening method for marine toxins that interact with the sodium channel. The main observation of this work was the large variation of TEFs depending on the channel subtype selected, being remarkable the variation of potency in the 1.7 channel subtype and the suitability of Na v 1.6 and 1.2 channels for PSP screening.

  1. Kinetic approach with ab initio MO method on ionic selectivity and size in sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Tani, S; Imamura, A; Kanda, K

    1989-10-23

    Three kinds of models for ionic selectivity and size of the filter in sodium channel have been treated by using ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculations with MINI-3 and MIDI-3* basis sets. A three-components system, HCO2M-H2O (M = Li+, Na+ or K+), is acceptable for describing experimental facts well. Thermochemical parameters obtained from harmonic vibrational analysis with MINI-3 basis sets, for the translocation of the permeant metal cations in the HCO2M-H2O system, are that the activation enthalpies for Li+, Na+ and K+ are 7.0, 6.4 and 23.4 kJ/mol, and also the free energies of activation are 10.6, 1.5 and 19.0 kJ/mol, respectively. These results are qualitatively in good correspondence with experimental facts of the ion selectivity of the channel. One of water molecule was found to have a key role in the translocation of the permeant cations.

  2. Expression and Purification of the Alpha Subunit of the Epithelial Sodium Channel, ENaC

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Bharat G.; Dai, Qun; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Fuller, Catherine M.; Kappes, John C.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) plays a critical role in maintaining Na+ homeostasis in various tissues throughout the body. An understanding of the structure of the ENaC subunits has been developed from homology modeling based on the related acid sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1) protein structure, as well as electrophysiological approaches. However, ENaC has several notable functional differences compared to ASIC1, thereby providing justification for determination of its three-dimensional structure. Unfortunately, this goal remains elusive due to several experimental challenges. Of the subunits that comprise a physiological hetero-trimeric αβγENaC, the α-subunit is unique in that it is capable of forming a homo-trimeric structure that conducts Na+ ions. Despite functional and structural interest in αENaC, a key factor complicating structural studies has been its interaction with multiple other proteins, disrupting its homogeneity. In order to address this issue, a novel protocol was used to reduce the number of proteins that associate and co-purify with αENaC. In this study, we describe a novel expression system coupled with a two-step affinity purification approach using NiNTA, followed by a GFP antibody column as a rapid procedure to improve the purity and yield of rat αENaC. PMID:26394093

  3. Constraint shapes convergence in tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels of snakes.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Chris R; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D; Pfrender, Michael E

    2012-03-20

    Natural selection often produces convergent changes in unrelated lineages, but the degree to which such adaptations occur via predictable genetic paths is unknown. If only a limited subset of possible mutations is fixed in independent lineages, then it is clear that constraint in the production or function of molecular variants is an important determinant of adaptation. We demonstrate remarkably constrained convergence during the evolution of resistance to the lethal poison, tetrodotoxin, in six snake species representing three distinct lineages from around the globe. Resistance-conferring amino acid substitutions in a voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(v)1.4, are clustered in only two regions of the protein, and a majority of the replacements are confined to the same three positions. The observed changes represent only a small fraction of the experimentally validated mutations known to increase Na(v)1.4 resistance to tetrodotoxin. These results suggest that constraints resulting from functional tradeoffs between ion channel function and toxin resistance led to predictable patterns of evolutionary convergence at the molecular level. Our data are consistent with theoretical predictions and recent microcosm work that suggest a predictable path is followed during an adaptive walk along a mutational landscape, and that natural selection may be frequently constrained to produce similar genetic outcomes even when operating on independent lineages.

  4. Evolutionary diversification of TTX-resistant sodium channels in a predator-prey interaction.

    PubMed

    Geffeney, Shana L; Fujimoto, Esther; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D; Ruben, Peter C

    2005-04-07

    Understanding the molecular genetic basis of adaptations provides incomparable insight into the genetic mechanisms by which evolutionary diversification takes place. Whether the evolution of common traits in different lineages proceeds by similar or unique mutations, and the degree to which phenotypic evolution is controlled by changes in gene regulation as opposed to gene function, are fundamental questions in evolutionary biology that require such an understanding of genetic mechanisms. Here we identify novel changes in the molecular structure of a sodium channel expressed in snake skeletal muscle, tsNa(V)1.4, that are responsible for differences in tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistance among garter snake populations coevolving with toxic newts. By the functional expression of tsNa(V)1.4, we show how differences in the amino-acid sequence of the channel affect TTX binding and impart different levels of resistance in four snake populations. These results indicate that the evolution of a physiological trait has occurred through a series of unique functional changes in a gene that is otherwise highly conserved among vertebrates.

  5. Charge Immobilization of Skeletal Muscle Na+ Channels: Role of Residues in the Inactivation Linker

    PubMed Central

    Groome, James R.; Dice, Margaret C.; Fujimoto, Esther; Ruben, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated structural determinants of fast inactivation and deactivation in sodium channels by comparing ionic flux and charge movement in skeletal muscle channels, using mutations of DIII-DIV linker charges. Charge altering and substituting mutations at K-1317, K-1318 depolarized the g(V) curve but hyperpolarized the h∞ curve. Charge reversal and substitution at this locus reduced the apparent voltage sensitivity of open- and closed-state fast inactivation. These effects were not observed with charge reversal at E-1314, E-1315. Mutations swapping or neutralizing the negative cluster at 1314, 1315 and the positive cluster at 1317, 1318 indicated that local interactions dictate the coupling of activation to fast inactivation. Gating charge was immobilized before channel entry into fast inactivation in hNaV1.4 but to a lesser extent in mutations at K-1317, K-1318. These results suggest that charge is preferentially immobilized in channels inactivating from the open state. Recovery of gating charge proceeded with a single, fast phase in the double mutation K-1317R, K-1318R. This mutation also partially uncoupled recovery from deactivation. Our findings indicate that charged residues near the fast inactivation “particle” allosterically interact with voltage sensors to control aspects of gating in sodium channels. PMID:17513361

  6. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue.

  7. The Sodium-Activated Potassium Channel Slack Is Required for Optimal Cognitive Flexibility in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausch, Anne E.; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    "Kcnt1" encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual…

  8. The Sodium-Activated Potassium Channel Slack Is Required for Optimal Cognitive Flexibility in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausch, Anne E.; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    "Kcnt1" encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual…

  9. CRMP2 protein SUMOylation modulates NaV1.7 channel trafficking.

    PubMed

    Dustrude, Erik T; Wilson, Sarah M; Ju, Weina; Xiao, Yucheng; Khanna, Rajesh

    2013-08-23

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) trafficking is incompletely understood. Post-translational modifications of NaVs and/or auxiliary subunits and protein-protein interactions have been posited as NaV-trafficking mechanisms. Here, we tested if modification of the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) by a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) could affect NaV trafficking; CRMP2 alters the extent of NaV slow inactivation conferred by the anti-epileptic (R)-lacosamide, implying NaV-CRMP2 functional coupling. Expression of a CRMP2 SUMOylation-incompetent mutant (CRMP2-K374A) in neuronal model catecholamine A differentiated (CAD) cells did not alter lacosamide-induced NaV slow inactivation compared with CAD cells expressing wild type CRMP2. Like wild type CRMP2, CRMP2-K374A expressed robustly in CAD cells. Neurite outgrowth, a canonical CRMP2 function, was moderately reduced by the mutation but was still significantly higher than enhanced GFP-transfected cortical neurons. Notably, huwentoxin-IV-sensitive NaV1.7 currents, which predominate in CAD cells, were significantly reduced in CAD cells expressing CRMP2-K374A. Increasing deSUMOylation with sentrin/SUMO-specific protease SENP1 or SENP2 in wild type CRMP2-expressing CAD cells decreased NaV1.7 currents. Consistent with a reduction in current density, biotinylation revealed a significant reduction in surface NaV1.7 levels in CAD cells expressing CRMP2-K374A; surface NaV1.7 expression was also decreased by SENP1 + SENP2 overexpression. Currents in HEK293 cells stably expressing NaV1.7 were reduced by CRMP2-K374A in a manner dependent on the E2-conjugating enzyme Ubc9. No decrement in current density was observed in HEK293 cells co-expressing CRMP2-K374A and NaV1.1 or NaV1.3. Diminution of sodium currents, largely NaV1.7, was recapitulated in sensory neurons expressing CRMP2-K374A. Our study elucidates a novel regulatory mechanism that utilizes CRMP2 SUMOylation to choreograph NaV1.7 trafficking.

  10. Cadmium trapping in an epithelial sodium channel pore mutant.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Armelle-Natsuo; Gautschi, Ivan; van Bemmelen, Miguel X; Schild, Laurent

    2007-11-02

    The putative selectivity filter of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) comprises a three-residue sequence G/SXS, but it remains uncertain whether the backbone atoms of this sequence or whether their side chains are lining the pore. It has been reported that the S589C mutation in the selectivity filter of alphaENaC renders the channel sensitive to block by externally applied Cd2+; this was interpreted as evidence for Cd2+ coordination with the thiol group of the side chain of alpha589C, pointing toward the pore lumen. Because the alphaS589C mutation alters the monovalent to divalent cation selectivity ratio of ENaC and because internally applied Cd2+ blocks wild-type ENaC with high affinity, we hypothesized that the inhibition of alphaS589C ENaC by Cd2+ results rather from the coordination of this cation with native cysteine residues located in the internal pore of ENaC. We show here that Cd2+ inhibits not only ENaC alphaS589C and alphaS589D but also alphaS589N mutants and that Ca2+ weakly interacts with the S589D mutant. The block of alphaS589C, -D, and -N mutants is characterized by a slow on-rate, is nearly irreversible, is voltage-dependent, and can be prevented by amiloride. The C546S mutation in the second transmembrane helix of gamma subunit in the background of the ENaC alphaS589C, -D, or -N mutants reduces the sensitivity to block by Cd2+ and renders the block rapidly reversible. We conclude therefore that the block by Cd2+ of the alphaS589C, -D, and -N mutants results from the trapping of Cd2+ ions in the internal pore of the channel and involves Cys-546 in the second transmembrane helix of the gammaENaC subunit.

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide Prevents Advanced Glycation End-Products Induced Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiushi; Song, Binlin; Jiang, Shuai; Liang, Chen; Chen, Xiao; Shi, Jing; Li, Xinyuan; Sun, Yingying; Wu, Mingming; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Ma, He-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are complex and heterogeneous compounds implicated in diabetes. Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) at the distal nephron plays an important role in diabetic hypertension. Here, we report that H2S antagonizes AGEs-induced ENaC activation in A6 cells. ENaC open probability (P O) in A6 cells was significantly increased by exogenous AGEs and that this AGEs-induced ENaC activity was abolished by NaHS (a donor of H2S) and TEMPOL. Incubating A6 cells with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT) mimicked the effects of AGEs on ENaC activity, but did not induce any additive effect. We found that the expression levels of catalase were significantly reduced by AGEs and both AGEs and 3-AT facilitated ROS uptake in A6 cells, which were significantly inhibited by NaHS. The specific PTEN and PI3K inhibitors, BPV(pic) and LY294002, influence ENaC activity in AGEs-pretreated A6 cells. Moreover, after removal of AGEs from AGEs-pretreated A6 cells for 72 hours, ENaC P O remained at a high level, suggesting that an AGEs-related “metabolic memory” may be involved in sodium homeostasis. Our data, for the first time, show that H2S prevents AGEs-induced ENaC activation by targeting the ROS/PI3K/PTEN pathway. PMID:26078825

  12. Characterization of an insect heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channel with unique alternative splicing mode.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Pei, Yu-Xia; Lei, Wei; Wang, Ke-Yi; Shang, Feng; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Recent discovery of the heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) in two aphid species, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae, aroused interest in exploring whether this kind of channel is conserved for aphids. Herewith, we aim to provide evidence for the conservation of heterodimeric Navs in aphids and investigate whether they have unique splicing patterns. We found that the only identifiable Nav from Toxoptera citricida consisted of two subunits, forming a heterodimeric Nav, which carried an atypical "DENS" ion selectivity filter and a conventional "MFM" inactivation gate, confirming the heterodimeric Navs' conservation within aphids. These unique heterodimeric channels may form a new Nav subfamily, specific to aphids. A more ancient member of four-domain Nav homolog was well preserved in T. citricida, carrying a typical "DEEA" and "MFL" motif. The presence of "DENS" in mammalian Naxs and "DEKT" in a fungus Nav suggested that the heterodimeric Navs may still preserve Na(+) permeability. Sequencing 46 clones from nymphs and adults exposed unique splicing patterns for this heterodimeric Nav from T. citricida, revealing 7 alternatively spliced exons, evidencing that exon 5 was no longer unique to Bombyx mori, and exon k/l was semi-mutually exclusive. Two previously undescribed optional exons and a SNP site seemingly unique to aphids were identified. In conclusion, the dimeric Navs might form a new aphids-specific heterodimeric Nav subfamily. This dimeric Nav from T. citricida was characterized with distinguishable alternative splicing modes, exemplified by the discovery of two novel alternative exons and unique usage patterns of alternative exons.

  13. The molecular interactions of pyrethroid insecticides with insect and mammalian sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Vais, H; Williamson, M S; Devonshire, A L; Usherwood, P N

    2001-10-01

    Recent progress in the cloning of alpha (para) and beta (TipE) Na channel sub-units from Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) and Musca domestica (housefly) have facilitated functional expression studies of insect Na channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes, assayed by voltage clamp techniques. The effects of Type I and Type III pyrethroids on the biophysical properties of these channels are critically reviewed. Pyrethroid resistance mutations (termed kdr and super-kdr) that reduce the sensitivity of the insect Na channel to pyrethroids have been identified in a range of insect species. Some of these mutations (e.g. L1014F, M918T and T929I) have been incorporated into the para Na channel of Drosophila, either individually or in combination, to investigate their effects on the sensitivity of this channel to pyrethroids. The kdr mutation (L1014F) shifts the voltage dependence of both activation and steady-state inactivation by approximately 5 mV towards more positive potentials and facilitates Na channel inactivation. Incorporation of the super-kdr mutation (M918T) into the Drosophila Na channel also increases channel inactivation and causes a > 100-fold reduction in deltamethrin sensitivity. These effects are shared by T929I, an alternative mutation that confers super-kdr-like resistance. Parallel studies have been undertaken using the rat IIA Na channel to investigate the molecular basis for the low sensitivity of mammalian brain Na channels to pyrethroids. Rat IIA channels containing the mutation L1014F exhibit a shift in their mid-point potential for Na activation, but their overall sensitivity to permethrin remains similar to that of the wild-type rat channel (i.e. both are 1000-fold less sensitive than the wild-type insect channel). Mammalian neuronal Na channels have an isoleucine rather than a methionine at the position (874) corresponding to the super-kdr (M918) residue of the insect channel. Replacement of the isoleucine of the wild-type rat IIA Na channel with a

  14. The tarantula toxin β/δ-TRTX-Pre1a highlights the importance of the S1-S2 voltage-sensor region for sodium channel subtype selectivity.

    PubMed

    Wingerd, Joshua S; Mozar, Christine A; Ussing, Christine A; Murali, Swetha S; Chin, Yanni K-Y; Cristofori-Armstrong, Ben; Durek, Thomas; Gilchrist, John; Vaughan, Christopher W; Bosmans, Frank; Adams, David J; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F; Mobli, Mehdi; Christie, Macdonald J; Rash, Lachlan D

    2017-04-20

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are essential for the transmission of pain signals in humans making them prime targets for the development of new analgesics. Spider venoms are a rich source of peptide modulators useful to study ion channel structure and function. Here we describe β/δ-TRTX-Pre1a, a 35-residue tarantula peptide that selectively interacts with neuronal NaV channels inhibiting peak current of hNaV1.1, rNaV1.2, hNaV1.6, and hNaV1.7 while concurrently inhibiting fast inactivation of hNaV1.1 and rNaV1.3. The DII and DIV S3-S4 loops of NaV channel voltage sensors are important for the interaction of Pre1a with NaV channels but cannot account for its unique subtype selectivity. Through analysis of the binding regions we ascertained that the variability of the S1-S2 loops between NaV channels contributes substantially to the selectivity profile observed for Pre1a, particularly with regards to fast inactivation. A serine residue on the DIV S2 helix was found to be sufficient to explain Pre1a's potent and selective inhibitory effect on the fast inactivation process of NaV1.1 and 1.3. This work highlights that interactions with both S1-S2 and S3-S4 of NaV channels may be necessary for functional modulation, and that targeting the diverse S1-S2 region within voltage-sensing domains provides an avenue to develop subtype selective tools.

  15. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is intracellularly located as a tetramer.

    PubMed

    Dijkink, Lisette; Hartog, Anita; van Os, Carel H; Bindels, René J M

    2002-07-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) plays an important role in Na(+) homeostasis by determining the Na(+) transport rate in so-called end-organs such as the renal collecting duct, distal colon, salivary and sweat gland ducts. ENaC is formed by heteromultimerization of three homologous subunits, termed alpha, beta, and gamma ENaC. The number of subunits and stoichiometry remain a matter of debate. In this study, sucrose gradient analysis of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing rENaC revealed that ENaC forms heterotetramers, when the membrane fraction was solubilized in 0.1% (wt/vol) Na-deoxycholate. However, solubilization of the membrane proteins in higher concentrations of detergents dissociated the ENaC subunits of the tetramers in dimers. Co-immunoprecipitation studies with FLAG-tagged ENaC subunits suggest that during dissociation of ENaC tetramers the composition of dimers is completely random. Glycosidase digestion studies show that the ENaC subunits are retarded in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and pre-Golgi, whereas only a small fraction is inserted into the plasma membrane. Immunocytochemical analysis confirmed that ENaC is primarily located intracellularly. In addition, these findings are not restricted to the oocyte expression system, since identical results were found in rabbit connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct cells in primary culture and in rabbit colon.

  16. The Role of Epithelial Sodium Channel ENaC and the Apical Cl-/HCO3- Exchanger Pendrin in Compensatory Salt Reabsorption in the Setting of Na-Cl Cotransporter (NCC) Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Patel-Chamberlin, Mina; Varasteh Kia, Mujan; Xu, Jie; Barone, Sharon; Zahedi, Kamyar; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2016-01-01

    Background The absence of NCC does not cause significant salt wasting in NCC deficient mice under basal conditions. We hypothesized that ENaC and pendrin play important roles in compensatory salt absorption in the setting of NCC inactivation, and their inhibition and/or downregulation can cause significant salt wasting in NCC KO mice. Methods WT and NCC KO mice were treated with a daily injection of either amiloride, an inhibitor of ENaC, or acetazolamide (ACTZ), a blocker of salt and bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubule and an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrases in proximal tubule and intercalated cells, or a combination of acetazolamide plus amiloride for defined durations. Animals were subjected to daily balance studies. At the end of treatment, kidneys were harvested and examined. Blood samples were collected for electrolytes and acid base analysis. Results Amiloride injection significantly increased the urine output (UO) in NCC KO mice (from 1.3 ml/day before to 2.5 ml/day after amiloride, p<0.03, n = 4) but caused only a slight change in UO in WT mice (p>0.05). The increase in UO in NCC KO mice was associated with a significant increase in sodium excretion (from 0.25 mmol/24 hrs at baseline to 0.35 mmol/24 hrs after amiloride injection, p<0.05, n = 4). Daily treatment with ACTZ for 6 days resulted in >80% reduction of kidney pendrin expression in both WT and NCC KO mice. However, ACTZ treatment noticeably increased urine output and salt excretion only in NCC KO mice (with urine output increasing from a baseline of 1.1 ml/day to 2.3 ml/day and sodium excretion increasing from 0.22 mmole/day before to 0.31 mmole/day after ACTZ) in NCC KO mice; both parameters were significantly higher than in WT mice. Western blot analysis demonstrated significant enhancement in ENaC expression in medulla and cortex of NCC KO and WT mice in response to ACTZ injection for 6 days, and treatment with amiloride in ACTZ-pretreated mice caused a robust increase in salt

  17. The Role of Epithelial Sodium Channel ENaC and the Apical Cl-/HCO3- Exchanger Pendrin in Compensatory Salt Reabsorption in the Setting of Na-Cl Cotransporter (NCC) Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Patel-Chamberlin, Mina; Varasteh Kia, Mujan; Xu, Jie; Barone, Sharon; Zahedi, Kamyar; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2016-01-01

    The absence of NCC does not cause significant salt wasting in NCC deficient mice under basal conditions. We hypothesized that ENaC and pendrin play important roles in compensatory salt absorption in the setting of NCC inactivation, and their inhibition and/or downregulation can cause significant salt wasting in NCC KO mice. WT and NCC KO mice were treated with a daily injection of either amiloride, an inhibitor of ENaC, or acetazolamide (ACTZ), a blocker of salt and bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubule and an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrases in proximal tubule and intercalated cells, or a combination of acetazolamide plus amiloride for defined durations. Animals were subjected to daily balance studies. At the end of treatment, kidneys were harvested and examined. Blood samples were collected for electrolytes and acid base analysis. Amiloride injection significantly increased the urine output (UO) in NCC KO mice (from 1.3 ml/day before to 2.5 ml/day after amiloride, p<0.03, n = 4) but caused only a slight change in UO in WT mice (p>0.05). The increase in UO in NCC KO mice was associated with a significant increase in sodium excretion (from 0.25 mmol/24 hrs at baseline to 0.35 mmol/24 hrs after amiloride injection, p<0.05, n = 4). Daily treatment with ACTZ for 6 days resulted in >80% reduction of kidney pendrin expression in both WT and NCC KO mice. However, ACTZ treatment noticeably increased urine output and salt excretion only in NCC KO mice (with urine output increasing from a baseline of 1.1 ml/day to 2.3 ml/day and sodium excretion increasing from 0.22 mmole/day before to 0.31 mmole/day after ACTZ) in NCC KO mice; both parameters were significantly higher than in WT mice. Western blot analysis demonstrated significant enhancement in ENaC expression in medulla and cortex of NCC KO and WT mice in response to ACTZ injection for 6 days, and treatment with amiloride in ACTZ-pretreated mice caused a robust increase in salt excretion in both NCC KO and WT

  18. Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels: Not Just for Conduction.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Larisa C; Isom, Lori L

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), composed of a pore-forming α subunit and up to two associated β subunits, are critical for the initiation of the action potential (AP) in excitable tissues. Building on the monumental discovery and description of sodium current in 1952, intrepid researchers described the voltage-dependent gating mechanism, selectivity of the channel, and general structure of the VGSC channel. Recently, crystal structures of bacterial VGSC α subunits have confirmed many of these studies and provided new insights into VGSC function. VGSC β subunits, first cloned in 1992, modulate sodium current but also have nonconducting roles as cell-adhesion molecules and function in neurite outgrowth and neuronal pathfinding. Mutations in VGSC α and β genes are associated with diseases caused by dysfunction of excitable tissues such as epilepsy. Because of the multigenic and drug-resistant nature of some of these diseases, induced pluripotent stem cells and other novel approaches are being used to screen for new drugs and further understand how mutations in VGSC genes contribute to pathophysiology.

  19. Synergistic and Antagonistic Interactions between Tetrodotoxin and μ-Conotoxin in Blocking Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min-Min; McArthur, Jeff R.; Azam, Layla; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Olivera, Baldomero M; French, Robert J; Yoshikami, Doju

    2010-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is the quintessential ligand of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs). Like TTX, μ-conotoxin peptides are pore blockers, and both toxins have helped to define the properties of neurotoxin receptor Site 1 of NaVs. Here, we report unexpected results showing that the recently discovered μ-conotoxin KIIIA and TTX can simultaneously bind to Site 1 and act in concert. Results with saturating concentrations of peptide applied to voltage-clamped Xenopus oocytes expressing brain NaV1.2, and single-channel recordings from brain channels in lipid bilayers, show that KIIIA or its analog, KIIIA[K7A], block partially, with a residual current that can be completely blocked by TTX. In addition, the kinetics of block by TTX and peptide are each affected by the prior presence of the other toxin. For example, bound peptide slows subsequent binding of TTX (an antagonistic interaction) and slows TTX dissociation when both toxins are bound (a synergistic effect on block). The overall functional consequence resulting from the combined action of the toxins depends on the quantitative balance between these opposing actions. The results lead us to postulate that in the bi-liganded NaV complex, TTX is bound between the peptide and the selectivity filter. These observations refine our view of Site 1 and open new possibilities in NaV pharmacology. PMID:19221510

  20. Semisynthesis of NaK; a Na+ and K+ conducting ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Kellie M.; Derebe, Mehebaw G.; Jiang, Youxing; Valiyaveetil, Francis I.

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution, we describe the semisynthesis of NaK, a bacterial non-selective cation channel. In the semisynthesis, the NaK polypeptide is assembled from a recombinantly expressed thioester peptide and a chemically synthesized peptide using the native chemical ligation reaction. We describe a temporary tagging strategy for the purification of the hydrophobic synthetic peptide and demonstrate the efficient ligation of the synthetic peptide with the recombinant peptide thioester to form the semisynthetic NaK polypeptide. Following assembly, the NaK polypeptide is folded in vitro to the native state using lipid vesicles. Functional characterization of the folded semisynthetic NaK channels indicates that it is functionally similar to the wild type protein. We used semisynthesis to substitute aspartate 66 in the selectivity filter region of the NaK channel with the unnatural amino acids, homoserine and cysteine sulfonic acid. Functional analysis of these mutants suggests that the presence of a negatively charged residue in the vicinity of the ion binding sites is necessary for optimal flux of ions through the NaK channel. PMID:20415433

  1. Semisynthesis of NaK, a Na(+) and K(+) conducting ion channel.

    PubMed

    Linn, Kellie M; Derebe, Mehabaw G; Jiang, Youxing; Valiyaveetil, Francis I

    2010-06-01

    In this contribution, we describe the semisynthesis of NaK, a bacterial nonselective cation channel. In the semisynthesis, the NaK polypeptide is assembled from a recombinantly expressed thioester peptide and a chemically synthesized peptide using the native chemical ligation reaction. We describe a temporary tagging strategy for the purification of the hydrophobic synthetic peptide and demonstrate the efficient ligation of the synthetic peptide with the recombinant peptide thioester to form the semisynthetic NaK polypeptide. Following assembly, the NaK polypeptide is folded in vitro to the native state using lipid vesicles. Functional characterization of the folded semisynthetic NaK channels indicates that it is functionally similar to the wild-type protein. We used semisynthesis to substitute aspartate 66 in the selectivity filter region of the NaK channel with the unnatural amino acids homoserine and cysteine sulfonic acid. Functional analysis of these mutants suggests that the presence of a negatively charged residue in the vicinity of the ion binding sites is necessary for optimal flux of ions through the NaK channel.

  2. Phosphate derivatives of thiamine and Na+ channel in conducting membranes.

    PubMed

    Schoffeniels, E; Dandrifosse, G; Bettendorff, L

    1984-07-01

    The results show that thiamine derivatives are copurified with the specific proteins forming the Na+ channel in conducting membranes. Therefore, thiamine derivatives could well play a specific role in the molecular aspects of bioelectrogenesis , an interpretation that could help explain the neurological symptoms observed in human pathology as well as in animals experimentally rendered deficient in vitamin B1.

  3. Inhibition of frog skeletal muscle sodium channels by newly synthesized chiral derivatives of mexiletine and tocainide.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Natuzzi, F; Falcone, G; Duranti, A; Lentini, G; Franchini, C; Tortorella, V; Camerino, D C

    1997-12-01

    To search for potent use-dependent blockers of skeletal muscle sodium channels as potential antimyotonic agents, the actions of newly synthesized chiral analogs of mexiletine and tocainide were tested in vitro on sodium currents of single fibers of frog semitendinosus muscle by vaseline-gap voltage clamp method. The effect of each drug on the maximal peak Na+ transient (I(Na) max) was evaluated as both tonic and use-dependent block by using infrequent depolarizing stimulation and trains of pulses at 2-10 Hz frequency, respectively. The mexiletine analog 3-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamine (Me2), having an increased distance between the phenyl and the amino groups, was less potent than mexiletine in producing a tonic block but produced a remarkable use-dependent block. In fact, the half-maximal concentration (IC50) for tonic block of S(-)-Me2 was 108 microM vs. 54.5 microM of R(-)-mexiletine, but the IC50 was 6.2 times lowered by the 10 Hz stimulation with respect to the 2.4 fold decrease observed with mexiletine. The R(-)-mexiletine and the S(-)-Me2 were about twofold more potent than the corresponding enantiomers in producing a tonic block, but the stereoselectivity attenuated during use-dependent blockade. The more lipophilic 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)-1-phenylethylamine (Me1), presently available as raceme, produced a potent and irreversible tonic block of the sodium currents with an IC50 of 29 microM, but had a less pronounced use-dependent inhibition, with a 1.9 fold decrease of the IC50 at 10 Hz. The R(-) isomer of 2',6'-valinoxylidide (To1), a tocainide derivative with an increased hindrance on the chiral carbon atom, was twofold (IC50 = 209 microM) and tenfold (IC50 = 27.4 microM) more potent than R(-)-tocainide in tonic and use-dependent block, respectively. Tocainide was almost devoid of stereoselectivity, whereas the eudismic ratio of To1 [(IC50 S(+)-To1/IC50 R(-)-To1] was 1.7. As for mexiletine and Me2, the stereoselectivity of To1 was the

  4. Alpha2-adrenoceptor-independent inhibition of acetylcholine receptor channel and sodium channel by dexmedetomidine in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Tang, J; Dong, J; Zheng, J

    2015-03-19

    Both central and peripheral sympathetic nervous systems contribute to the cardiovascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DMED), a highly selective and widely used a2-adrenoceptor agonist for sedation, analgesia, and stress management. The central sympatholytic effects are augmented by peripheral inhibition of sympathetic ganglion transmission. The mechanism is not clear. In this research, using conventional patch-clamp recordings we investigated the direct effects of DMED on sodium (Na(+)) channel currents (INa) and nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChRs) channel currents (IACh) in rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons to explore the possible mechanisms of sympathetic ganglion transmission inhibition by DMED. DMED voltage-dependently suppressed INa with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 67.2±9.6μM and 26.1±5.3μM at holding potentials of -80mV and -60mV, respectively. The inhibition of Na(+) channels by DMED was also frequency dependent. 100μM DMED shifted the Na(+) channel inactivation curves to the hyperpolarizing direction by 9.8mV (P<0.01) and slowed the recovery from inactivation by 8.9ms (P<0.01), but no effects were seen on the shape of the current-voltage relationship or Na(+) channels activation curves. DMED dose-dependently inhibited IACh with an IC50 value of 5.5±2.4μM in SCG neurons, and this inhibition was voltage-independent. DMED pretreatment followed by fast co-application of DMED and ACh produced a significantly larger IACh inhibition than without DMED pretreatment. Yohimbine, phentolamine, and atropine pretreatment did not alter the inhibitory effects of DMED on INa and IACh. In conclusion, DMED dose-dependently inhibits INa and IACh in rat SCG neurons by preferential binding to the inactivated state of the Na(+) channels and the closed state (resting) of nAChR channels respectively. Both inhibitions are a2-adrenoceptor independent. Furthermore, the nAChR channels in rat SCG neurons are much more sensitive to

  5. Properties of single cardiac Na channels at 35 degrees C

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Single Na channel currents were recorded in cell-attached patches of mouse ventricular myocytes with an improved patch clamp technique. Using patch pipettes with a pore diameter in the range of 200 nm, seals with a resistance of up to 4 T omega were obtained. Under those conditions, total noise could be reduced to levels as low as 0.590 pA rms at 20 kHz band width. At this band width, properties of single- channel Na currents were studied at 35 degrees C. Six out of a total of 23 patches with teraohm seals contained channel activity and five of these patches contained one and only one active channel. Amplitude histograms excluding transition points showed heterogenous distributions of levels. In one patch, part of the openings was approximately Gaussian distributed at different potentials yielding a slope conductance of 27 pS. The respective peak open probability at -10 mV was 0.26. The mean open time was determined at voltages between -60 and -10 mV by evaluation of the distribution of the event-related gaps in the center of the baseline noise to be approximately 40 microseconds at -60 mV and 50-74 microseconds between -50 and -10 mV. It is concluded that single cardiac Na channels open at 35 degrees C frequently with multiple levels and with open times in the range of several tens of microseconds. PMID:7876824

  6. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Liu Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an {alpha}-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G{sup 1111} and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G{sup 1111} in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G{sup 1111}, a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G{sup 1111} had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  7. Sodium-difluoro(oxalato)borate (NaDFOB): a new electrolyte salt for Na-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juner; Huang, Zhenguo; Wang, Caiyun; Porter, Spencer; Wang, Baofeng; Lie, Wilford; Liu, Hua Kun

    2015-06-18

    A new electrolyte salt, sodium-difluoro(oxalato)borate (NaDFOB), was synthesized and studied, which enables excellent reversible capacity and high rate capability when used in Na/Na0.44MnO2 half cells. NaDFOB has excellent compatibility with various common solvents used in Na-ion batteries, in strong contrast to the solvent dependent performances of NaClO4 and NaPF6. In addition, NaDFOB possesses good stability and generates no toxic or dangerous products when exposed to air and water. All these properties demonstrate that NaDFOB could be used to prepare high performance electrolytes for emerging Na-ion batteries.

  8. Characteristics and pharmacological regulation of epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and epithelial Na+ transport.

    PubMed

    Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial Na(+) transport participates in control of various body functions and conditions: e.g., homeostasis of body fluid content influencing blood pressure, control of amounts of fluids covering the apical surface of alveolar epithelial cells at appropriate levels for normal gas exchange, and prevention of bacterial/viral infection. Epithelial Na(+) transport via the transcellular pathway is mediated by the entry step of Na(+) across the apical membrane via Epithelial Na(+) Channel (ENaC) located at the apical membrane, and the extrusion step of Na(+) across the basolateral membrane via the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase located at the basolateral membrane. The rate-limiting step of the epithelial Na(+) transport via the transcellular pathway is generally recognized to be the entry step of Na(+) across the apical membrane via ENaC. Thus, up-/down-regulation of ENaC essentially participates in regulatory systems of blood pressure and normal gas exchange. Amount of ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport is determined by the number of ENaCs located at the apical membrane, activity (open probability) of individual ENaC located at the apical membrane, single channel conductance of ENaC located at the apical membrane, and driving force for the Na(+) entry via ENaCs across the apical membrane. In the present review article, I discuss the characteristics of ENaC and how these factors are regulated.

  9. Rufinamide Improves Functional and Behavioral Deficits via Blockade of Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Sodium Channels in Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kharatmal, Shivsharan B; Singh, Jitendra N; Sharma, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Rufinamide is a structurally novel, antiepileptic drug approved for the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Its mechanism of action involves inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) with possible membrane-stabilizing effects. VGSCs play a significant role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Therefore, we investigated the effects of rufinamide on tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium current (TTX-R I(Na)) in acutely dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons isolated from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by using whole-cell voltage-clamp configuration. In addition, the functional and behavioural nociceptive parameters were evaluated to assess its potential in diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic rats demonstrated the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia with reduced nerve perfusion and conduction velocity as compared to control. Rufinamide treatments (3 and 10 mg/kg) significantly improved these functional and nociceptive deficits. Diabetic rat DRG neurons exhibited increased TTX-R I(Na) density as compared to control. The voltage-dependent activation and steady-state inactivation curves for TTX-R I(Na) in DRG neurons from diabetic rats were shifted negatively as compared to control. Rufinamide treatments significantly blocked the TTX-R Na+ channel activity as evident from significant reduction in I(Na) density and hyperpolarizing shift in activation and inactivation curves as compared to diabetic control. This suggests that rufinamide acts on TTX-R Na+ channels, reduces channel activity and attenuates nerve functional and behavioral parameters in diabetic rats. Altogether, these results indicate therapeutic potential of rufinamide in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  10. Enhancement of carbon nanotube FET performance via direct synthesis of poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) in the transistor channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toader, M.; Schubel, R.; Hartmann, M.; Scharfenberg, L.; Jordan, R.; Mertig, M.; Schulz, S. E.; Gessner, T.; Hermann, S.

    2016-09-01

    Direct synthesis of poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (P(NaSS)) inside the channel of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field-effect transistors (FETs), is shown to be highly beneficial in improving the device parameters. Starting with monomeric compounds, the FET-channel was in-situ polymerized, using the self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization process. Upon formation of the P(NaSS) polymer matrix, we report improved device-to-device consistency, lower variability in the threshold voltage, higher drain currents and higher on/off ratios. Annealing in vacuum was shown to further improve the device performance and induce an ambipolar behavior. Moreover, those FET devices showed a long-term stability even under ambient environment.

  11. Diversity and Convergence of Sodium Channel Mutations Involved in Resistance to Pyrethroids

    PubMed Central

    Rinkevich, Frank D.; Du, Yuzhe; Dong, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides target voltage-gated sodium channels, which are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system. The intensive use of pyrethroids in controlling arthropod pests and disease vectors has led to many instances of pyrethroid resistance around the globe. In the past two decades, studies have identified a large number of sodium channel mutations that are associated with resistance to pyrethroids. The purpose of this review is to summarize both common and unique sodium channel mutations that have been identified in arthropod pests of importance to agriculture or human health. Identification of these mutations provides valuable molecular markers for resistance monitoring in the field and helped the discovery of the elusive pyrethroid receptor site(s) on the sodium channel. PMID:24019556

  12. Differential effects of crambescins and crambescidin 816 in voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels in neurons.

    PubMed

    Martín, Víctor; Vale, Carmen; Bondu, Stéphanie; Thomas, Olivier P; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luís M

    2013-01-18

    Crambescins and crambescidins are two families of guanidine alkaloids from the marine sponge Crambe crambe. Although very little information about their biological effect has been reported, it is known that crambescidin 816 (Cramb816) blocks calcium channels in a neuroblastoma X glioma cell line. Taking this into account, and the fact that ion channels are frequent targets for natural toxins, we examined the effect of Cramb816 and three compounds from the crambescin family, norcrambescin A2 (NcrambA2), crambescin A2 (CrambA2), and crambescin C1 (CrambC1), in the main voltage-dependent ion channels in neurons: sodium, potassium, and calcium channels. Electrophysiological recordings of voltage gated sodium, potassium, and calcium currents, in the presence of these guanidine alkaloids, were performed in cortical neurons from embryonic mice. Different effects were discovered: crambescins inhibited K(+) currents with the following potency: NcrambA2 > CrambC1 > CrambA2, while Cramb816 lacked an effect. Only CrambC1 and Cramb816 partially blocked Na(+) total current. However, Cramb816 partially blocked Ca(2+) , while NcrambA2 did not. Since the blocking effect of Cramb816 on calcium currents has not been previously reported in detail, we further pharmacologically isolated the two main fractions of HVA Ca(2+) channels in neurons and investigated the Cramb816 effect on them. Here, we revealed that Cav1 or L-type calcium channels are the main target for Cramb816. These two families of guanidine alkaloids clearly showed a structure-activity relationship with the crambescins acting on voltage-gated potassium channels, while Cramb816 blocks the voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1 with higher potency than nifedipine. The novel evidence that Cramb816 partially blocked CaV and NaV channels in neurons suggests that this compound might be involved in decreasing the neurotransmitter release and synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. The findings presented here provide

  13. Sodium channels near end-plates and nuclei of snake skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, W M

    1987-01-01

    1. The spatial distribution of the two predominant types of voltage-gated channels in the sarcolemma, Na+ channels and delayed K+ channels, was studied in skeletal muscle fibres of garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis) using loose-seal patch recordings. 2. The average Na+-current density was five times larger in the perijunctional sarcolemma (within 25 microns of the visible edge of the end-plate) than at distant locations. K+ currents were not larger near end-plates. The apparent membrane capacitance, 3-6 microF/cm2, was the same in perijunctional and extrajunctional regions, indicating that differences in Na+-current density reflect differences in the number of Na+ channels per unit membrane area. 3. Perijunctional Na+ channels had the same voltage dependence, gating kinetics and sensitivity to tetrodotoxin as extrajunctional Na+ channels, suggesting that these cells express a