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Sample records for sodium channel na

  1. Sodium-level-sensitive sodium channel Na(x) is expressed in glial laminate processes in the sensory circumventricular organs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiji; Hiyama, Takeshi Y; Shimizu, Hidetada; Kodama, Ryuji; Hayashi, Noriko; Miyata, Seiji; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Noda, Masaharu

    2006-03-01

    Na(x) is an atypical sodium channel that is assumed to be a descendant of the voltage-gated sodium channel family. Our recent studies on the Na(x)-gene-targeting mouse revealed that Na(x) channel is localized to the circumventricular organs (CVOs), the central loci for the salt and water homeostasis in mammals, where the Na(x) channel serves as a sodium-level sensor of the body fluid. To understand the cellular mechanism by which the information sensed by Na(x) channels is transferred to the activity of the organs, we dissected the subcellular localization of Na(x) in the present study. Double-immunostaining and immunoelectron microscopic analyses revealed that Na(x) is exclusively localized to perineuronal lamellate processes extended from ependymal cells and astrocytes in the organs. In addition, glial cells isolated from the subfornical organ, one of the CVOs, were sensitive to an increase in the extracellular sodium level, as analyzed by an ion-imaging method. These results suggest that glial cells bearing the Na(x) channel are the first to sense a physiological increase in the level of sodium in the body fluid, and they regulate the neural activity of the CVOs by enveloping neurons. Close communication between inexcitable glial cells and excitable neural cells thus appears to be the basis of the central control of the salt homeostasis.

  2. Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents

    PubMed Central

    Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  3. Spontaneously active NaV1.5 sodium channels may underlie odor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Vincent E

    2016-08-01

    The olfactory system is remarkably sensitive to airborne odor molecules, but precisely how very low odor concentrations bordering on just a few molecules per olfactory sensory neuron can trigger graded changes in firing is not clear. This report reexamines signaling in olfactory sensory neurons in light of the recent account of NaV1.5 sodium channel-mediated spontaneous firing. Using a model of spontaneous channel activity, the study shows how even submillivolt changes in membrane potential elicited by odor are expected to cause meaningful changes in NaV1.5-dependent firing. The results suggest that the random window currents of NaV1.5 channels may underpin not only spontaneous firing in olfactory sensory neurons but the cellular response to odor as well, thereby ensuring the robustness and sensitivity of signaling that is especially important for low odor concentrations.

  4. Lysine and the Na+/K+ Selectivity in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mengdie

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are critical in the generation and transmission of neuronal signals in mammals. The crystal structures of several prokaryotic Nav channels determined in recent years inspire the mechanistic studies on their selection upon the permeable cations (especially between Na+ and K+ ions), a property that is proposed to be mainly determined by residues in the selectivity filter. However, the mechanism of cation selection in mammalian Nav channels lacks direct explanation at atomic level due to the difference in amino acid sequences between mammalian and prokaryotic Nav homologues, especially at the constriction site where the DEKA motif has been identified to determine the Na+/K+ selectivity in mammalian Nav channels but is completely absent in the prokaryotic counterparts. Among the DEKA residues, Lys is of the most importance since its mutation to Arg abolishes the Na+/K+ selectivity. In this work, we modeled the pore domain of mammalian Nav channels by mutating the four residues at the constriction site of a prokaryotic Nav channel (NavRh) to DEKA, and then mechanistically investigated the contribution of Lys in cation selection using molecular dynamics simulations. The DERA mutant was generated as a comparison to understand the loss of ion selectivity caused by the K-to-R mutation. Simulations and free energy calculations on the mutants indicate that Lys facilitates Na+/K+ selection by electrostatically repelling the cation to a highly Na+-selective location sandwiched by the carboxylate groups of Asp and Glu at the constriction site. In contrast, the electrostatic repulsion is substantially weakened when Lys is mutated to Arg, because of two intrinsic properties of the Arg side chain: the planar geometric design and the sparse charge distribution of the guanidine group. PMID:27584582

  5. The Mechanism of Voltage Dependent Gating of the NaChBac Prokaryotic Sodium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaen, Paul G.

    Electrical signaling in cells depends on selective conductance of ions through membrane proteins called 'voltage gated ion channels'. These channels are characterized by their ability turn on and off the flow of ionic current by opening and closing their conductive pore in response to changes in membrane potential. The opening and closing of the pore is a mechanically linked to conformational movement of the positively charged fourth transmembrane segment (S4) in 'the voltage sensor' region. How the S4 moves in response to membrane potential is a controversial subject. In this thesis, we used the prokaryotic sodium channel NaChBac as our model sodium channel to study voltage dependent movement of the S4 in the voltage sensor. We use a disulfide-locking method where we introduced pairs of cysteines in the voltage sensor that crosslink and trap the S4 in its path after depolarization. We screened over one hundred mutations of the NaChBac channel in the whole cell patch clamp assay and demonstrated discrete and sequential voltage dependent ion pair interactions that occur in at least three states between the positively charged residues of the S4 segment and the acidic residues in the S1, S2 and S3 segments. In conjunction with structural modeling of the voltage sensor and our disulfide locking data, we propose that the S4 moves in and out of the plane of the membrane 8-13 A, forming distinct gating charge interactions with counter charges of the voltage sensor and adopts a 310 helix over a portion of its structure during activation. These findings are compatible with the sliding helix model and refine our understanding of the structural determinates of voltage sensor function in voltage gated ion channels.

  6. Targeting voltage gated sodium channels NaV1.7, Na V1.8, and Na V1.9 for treatment of pathological cough.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Yukiko; Undem, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) lead to the rational hypothesis that drugs capable of selective blockade of NaV subtypes may be a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of unwanted cough. Among the nine NaV subtypes (NaV1.1-NaV1.9), the afferent nerves involved in initiating cough, in common with nociceptive neurons in the somatosensory system, express mainly NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9. Although knowledge about the effect of selectively blocking these channels on the cough reflex is limited, their biophysical properties indicate that each may contribute to the hypertussive and allotussive state that typifies subacute and chronic nonproductive cough.

  7. On the structural basis for ionic selectivity among Na+, K+, and Ca2+ in the voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Favre, I; Moczydlowski, E; Schild, L

    1996-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels and calcium channels are homologous proteins with distinctly different selectivity for permeation of inorganic cations. This difference in function is specified by amino acid residues located within P-region segments that link presumed transmembrane elements S5 and S6 in each of four repetitive Domains I, II, III, and IV. By analyzing the selective permeability of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ in various mutants of the mu 1 rat muscle sodium channel, the results in this paper support the concept that a conserved motif of four residues contributed by each of the Domains I-IV, termed the DEKA locus in sodium channels and the EEEE locus in calcium channels, determines the ionic selectivity of these channels. Furthermore, the results indicate that the Lys residue in Domain III of the sodium channel is the critical determinant that specifies both the impermeability of Ca2+ and the selective permeability of Na+ over K+. We propose that the alkylammonium ion of the Lys(III) residue acts as an endogenous cation within the ion binding site/selectivity filter of the sodium channel to tune the kinetics and affinity of inorganic cation binding within the pore in a manner analogous to ion-ion interactions that occur in the process of multi-ion channel conduction. PMID:8968582

  8. Fluorine-19 NMR and computational quantification of isoflurane binding to the voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac

    PubMed Central

    Kinde, Monica N.; Bondarenko, Vasyl; Granata, Daniele; Bu, Weiming; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Loll, Patrick J.; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) play an important role in general anesthesia. Electrophysiology measurements suggest that volatile anesthetics such as isoflurane inhibit NaV by stabilizing the inactivated state or altering the inactivation kinetics. Recent computational studies suggested the existence of multiple isoflurane binding sites in NaV, but experimental binding data are lacking. Here we use site-directed placement of 19F probes in NMR experiments to quantify isoflurane binding to the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac. 19F probes were introduced individually to S129 and L150 near the S4–S5 linker, L179 and S208 at the extracellular surface, T189 in the ion selectivity filter, and all phenylalanine residues. Quantitative analyses of 19F NMR saturation transfer difference (STD) spectroscopy showed a strong interaction of isoflurane with S129, T189, and S208; relatively weakly with L150; and almost undetectable with L179 and phenylalanine residues. An orientation preference was observed for isoflurane bound to T189 and S208, but not to S129 and L150. We conclude that isoflurane inhibits NaChBac by two distinct mechanisms: (i) as a channel blocker at the base of the selectivity filter, and (ii) as a modulator to restrict the pivot motion at the S4–S5 linker and at a critical hinge that controls the gating and inactivation motion of S6. PMID:27856739

  9. Biophysical characterization of the Varroa destructor NaV1 sodium channel and its affinity for τ-fluvalinate insecticide.

    PubMed

    Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Chahine, Mohamed

    2017-03-29

    The decline of the western honeybee (Apis mellifera) has been reported to be due to parasitism by Varroa destructor mites and to colony collapse disorder in which these mites may be involved. In-hive chemicals such as τ-fluvalinate are being used to control Vdestructor populations. This approach may lead to the chronic exposure of bees to this liposoluble chemical, which tends to accumulate in hives. We cloned a variant of the V. destructor sodium channel (VdNav1) and studied its biophysical characteristics and sensitivity to τ-fluvalinate using the Xenopus oocyte expression system and the 2-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. We compared the affinity of VdNav1 for τ-fluvalinate with the honeybee voltage-dependent sodium ortholog. Our results showed that the honeybee sodium channel is more sensitive to τ-fluvalinate than the V. destructor channel, suggesting that care must be taken when treating hives with this chemical.-Gosselin-Badaroudine, P., Chahine, M. Biophysical characterization of the Varroa destructor NaV1 sodium channel and its affinity for τ-fluvalinate insecticide.

  10. Cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 distribution in myocytes via interacting proteins: the multiple pool model.

    PubMed

    Shy, Diana; Gillet, Ludovic; Abriel, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    The cardiac sodium current (INa) is responsible for the rapid depolarization of cardiac cells, thus allowing for their contraction. It is also involved in regulating the duration of the cardiac action potential (AP) and propagation of the impulse throughout the myocardium. Cardiac INa is generated by the voltage-gated Na(+) channel, NaV1.5, a 2016-residue protein which forms the pore of the channel. Over the past years, hundreds of mutations in SCN5A, the human gene coding for NaV1.5, have been linked to many cardiac electrical disorders, including the congenital and acquired long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, conduction slowing, sick sinus syndrome, atrial fibrillation, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Similar to many membrane proteins, NaV1.5 has been found to be regulated by several interacting proteins. In some cases, these different proteins, which reside in distinct membrane compartments (i.e. lateral membrane vs. intercalated disks), have been shown to interact with the same regulatory domain of NaV1.5, thus suggesting that several pools of NaV1.5 channels may co-exist in cardiac cells. The aim of this review article is to summarize the recent works that demonstrate its interaction with regulatory proteins and illustrate the model that the sodium channel NaV1.5 resides in distinct and different pools in cardiac cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Cardiac Pathways of Differentiation, Metabolism and Contraction.

  11. Sodium channel diversity in the vestibular ganglion: NaV1.5, NaV1.8, and tetrodotoxin-sensitive currents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ping; Wooltorton, Julian R A; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Yang, Fu-Chia; Lysakowski, Anna; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2016-05-01

    Firing patterns differ between subpopulations of vestibular primary afferent neurons. The role of sodium (NaV) channels in this diversity has not been investigated because NaV currents in rodent vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) were reported to be homogeneous, with the voltage dependence and tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitivity of most neuronal NaV channels. RT-PCR experiments, however, indicated expression of diverse NaV channel subunits in the vestibular ganglion, motivating a closer look. Whole cell recordings from acutely dissociated postnatal VGNs confirmed that nearly all neurons expressed NaV currents that are TTX-sensitive and have activation midpoints between -30 and -40 mV. In addition, however, many VGNs expressed one of two other NaV currents. Some VGNs had a small current with properties consistent with NaV1.5 channels: low TTX sensitivity, sensitivity to divalent cation block, and a relatively negative voltage range, and some VGNs showed NaV1.5-like immunoreactivity. Other VGNs had a current with the properties of NaV1.8 channels: high TTX resistance, slow time course, and a relatively depolarized voltage range. In two NaV1.8 reporter lines, subsets of VGNs were labeled. VGNs with NaV1.8-like TTX-resistant current also differed from other VGNs in the voltage dependence of their TTX-sensitive currents and in the voltage threshold for spiking and action potential shape. Regulated expression of NaV channels in primary afferent neurons is likely to selectively affect firing properties that contribute to the encoding of vestibular stimuli.

  12. A sodium channel knockin mutant (NaV1.4-R669H) mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Burns, Dennis K.; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F.; Struyk, Arie F.; Cannon, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is an ion channelopathy of skeletal muscle characterized by attacks of muscle weakness associated with low serum K+. HypoPP results from a transient failure of muscle fiber excitability. Mutations in the genes encoding a calcium channel (CaV1.1) and a sodium channel (NaV1.4) have been identified in HypoPP families. Mutations of NaV1.4 give rise to a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders, with gain-of-function defects causing myotonia or hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. To address the question of specificity for the allele encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant as a cause of HypoPP and to produce a model system in which to characterize functional defects of the mutant channel and susceptibility to paralysis, we generated knockin mice carrying the ortholog of the gene encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant (referred to herein as R669H mice). Homozygous R669H mice had a robust HypoPP phenotype, with transient loss of muscle excitability and weakness in low-K+ challenge, insensitivity to high-K+ challenge, dominant inheritance, and absence of myotonia. Recovery was sensitive to the Na+/K+-ATPase pump inhibitor ouabain. Affected fibers had an anomalous inward current at hyperpolarized potentials, consistent with the proposal that a leaky gating pore in R669H channels triggers attacks, whereas a reduction in the amplitude of action potentials implies additional loss-of-function changes for the mutant NaV1.4 channels. PMID:21881211

  13. Coordinated role of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Na+/H+ exchanger in sustaining microglial activation during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad M; Sonsalla, Patricia K; Richardson, Jason R

    2013-12-01

    Persistent neuroinflammation and microglial activation play an integral role in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. We investigated the role of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) and Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHE) in the activation of immortalized microglial cells (BV-2) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. LPS (10 and 100 ng/ml) caused a dose- and time-dependent accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na(+))i] in BV-2 cells. Pre-treatment of cells with the VGSC antagonist tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 μM) abolished short-term Na(+) influx, but was unable to prevent the accumulation of (Na(+))i observed at 6 and 24h after LPS exposure. The NHE inhibitor cariporide (1 μM) significantly reduced accumulation of (Na(+))i 6 and 24h after LPS exposure. Furthermore, LPS increased the mRNA expression and protein level of NHE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced after co-treatment with TTX and/or cariporide. LPS increased production of TNF-α, ROS, and H2O2 and expression of gp91(phox), an active subunit of NADPH oxidase, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX or TTX+cariporide. Collectively, these data demonstrate a closely-linked temporal relationship between VGSC and NHE-1 in regulating function in activated microglia, which may provide avenues for therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing neuroinflammation.

  14. Structure and function of splice variants of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Annett; Walzik, Stefan; Blechschmidt, Steve; Haufe, Volker; Benndorf, Klaus; Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels mediate the rapid upstroke of the action potential in excitable tissues. The tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant isoform Na(v)1.5, encoded by the SCN5A gene, is the predominant isoform in the heart. This channel plays a key role for excitability of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and for rapid impulse propagation through the specific conduction system. During recent years, strong evidence has been accumulated in support of the expression of several Na(v)1.5 splice variants in the heart, and in various other tissues and cell lines including brain, dorsal root ganglia, breast cancer cells and neuronal stem cell lines. This review summarizes our knowledge on the structure and putative function of nine Na(v)1.5 splice variants detected so far. Attention will be paid to the distinct biophysical properties of the four functional splice variants, to the pronounced tissue- and species-specific expression, and to the developmental regulation of Na(v)1.5 splicing. The implications of alternative splicing for SCN5A channelopathies, and for a better understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations, are discussed.

  15. Sodium Channel Inhibiting Marine Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn, Lyndon E.

    Saxitoxin (STX), tetrodotoxin (TTX) and their many chemical relatives are part of our daily lives. From killing people who eat seafood containing these toxins, to being valuable research tools unveiling the invisible structures of their pharmacological receptor, their global impact is beyond measure. The pharmacological receptor for these toxins is the voltage-gated sodium channel which transports Na ions between the exterior to the interior of cells. The two structurally divergent families of STX and TTX analogues bind at the same location on these Na channels to stop the flow of ions. This can affect nerves, muscles and biological senses of most animals. It is through these and other toxins that we have developed much of our fundamental understanding of the Na channel and its part in generating action potentials in excitable cells.

  16. Distinct interactions of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} ions with the selectivity filter of the bacterial sodium channel Na{sub V}Ab

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Song; Zangerl, Eva-Maria; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► Ca{sup 2+} translocates slowly in the filter, due to lack of “loose” knock-on mechanism. ► Identification of a high affinity binding site in Na{sub V}Ab selectivity filter. ► Changes of EEEE locus triggered by electrostatic interactions with Ca{sup 2+} ions. -- Abstract: Rapid and selective ion transport is essential for the generation and regulation of electrical signaling pathways in living organisms. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to investigate how the bacterial sodium channel Na{sub V}Ab (Arcobacter butzleri) differentiates between Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} ions. Multiple nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations revealed distinct binding patterns for these two cations in the selectivity filter and suggested a high affinity calcium binding site formed by backbone atoms of residues Leu-176 and Thr-175 (S{sub CEN}) in the sodium channel selectivity filter.

  17. Identification of an axonal determinant in the C-terminus of the sodium channel Na(v)1.2.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J J; Fernandes, F; Giraud, P; Mouret, I; Pasqualini, E; Fache, M P; Jullien, F; Dargent, B

    2001-11-01

    To obtain a better understanding of how hippocampal neurons selectively target proteins to axons, we assessed whether any of the large cytoplasmic regions of neuronal sodium channel Na(v)1.2 contain sufficient information for axonal compartmentalization. We show that addition of the cytoplasmic C-terminal region of Na(v)1.2 restricted the distribution of a dendritic-axonal reporter protein to axons. The analysis of mutants revealed that a critical segment of nine amino acids encompassing a di-leucine-based motif mediates axonal compartmentalization of chimera. In addition, the Na(v)1.2 C-terminus is recognized by the clathrin endocytic pathway both in non-neuronal cells and the somatodendritic domain of hippocampal neurons. The mutation of the di-leucine motif located within the nine amino acid sequence to alanines resulted in the loss of chimera compartmentalization in axons and of internalization. These data suggest that selective elimination by endocytosis in dendrites may account for the compartmentalized distribution of some proteins in axons.

  18. NaV1.5 sodium channel window currents contribute to spontaneous firing in olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Frenz, Christopher T; Hansen, Anne; Dupuis, Nicholas D; Shultz, Nicole; Levinson, Simon R; Finger, Thomas E; Dionne, Vincent E

    2014-09-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) fire spontaneously as well as in response to odor; both forms of firing are physiologically important. We studied voltage-gated Na(+) channels in OSNs to assess their role in spontaneous activity. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings from OSNs demonstrated both tetrodotoxin-sensitive and tetrodotoxin-resistant components of Na(+) current. RT-PCR showed mRNAs for five of the nine different Na(+) channel α-subunits in olfactory tissue; only one was tetrodotoxin resistant, the so-called cardiac subtype NaV1.5. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that NaV1.5 is present in the apical knob of OSN dendrites but not in the axon. The NaV1.5 channels in OSNs exhibited two important features: 1) a half-inactivation potential near -100 mV, well below the resting potential, and 2) a window current centered near the resting potential. The negative half-inactivation potential renders most NaV1.5 channels in OSNs inactivated at the resting potential, while the window current indicates that the minor fraction of noninactivated NaV1.5 channels have a small probability of opening spontaneously at the resting potential. When the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channels were blocked by nanomolar tetrodotoxin at the resting potential, spontaneous firing was suppressed as expected. Furthermore, selectively blocking NaV1.5 channels with Zn(2+) in the absence of tetrodotoxin also suppressed spontaneous firing, indicating that NaV1.5 channels are required for spontaneous activity despite resting inactivation. We propose that window currents produced by noninactivated NaV1.5 channels are one source of the generator potentials that trigger spontaneous firing, while the upstroke and propagation of action potentials in OSNs are borne by the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channel subtypes.

  19. Sodium channel auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tsai-Tien; McMahon, Allison M; Johnson, Victoria T; Mangubat, Erwin Z; Zahm, Robert J; Pacold, Mary E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are well known for their functional roles in excitable tissues. Excitable tissues rely on voltage-gated ion channels and their auxiliary subunits to achieve concerted electrical activity in living cells. Auxiliary subunits are also known to provide functional diversity towards the transport and biogenesis properties of the principal subunits. Recent interests in pharmacological properties of these auxiliary subunits have prompted significant amounts of efforts in understanding their physiological roles. Some auxiliary subunits can potentially serve as drug targets for novel analgesics. Three families of sodium channel auxiliary subunits are described here: beta1 and beta3, beta2 and beta4, and temperature-induced paralytic E (TipE). While sodium channel beta-subunits are encoded in many animal genomes, TipE has only been found exclusively in insects. In this review, we present phylogenetic analyses, discuss potential evolutionary origins and functional data available for each of these subunits. For each family, we also correlate the functional specificity with the history of evolution for the individual auxiliary subunits.

  20. Structure-activity relationships for the action of 11 pyrethroid insecticides on rat Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.-S.; Soderlund, David M. . E-mail: dms6@cornell.edu

    2006-03-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-sensitive sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting nerve function. This paper describes the action of 11 structurally diverse commercial pyrethroid insecticides on the rat Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channel isoform, the principal carrier of the tetrodotoxin-resistant, pyrethroid-sensitive sodium current of sensory neurons, expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. All 11 compounds produced characteristic sodium tail currents following a depolarizing pulse that ranged from rapidly-decaying monoexponential currents (allethrin, cismethrin and permethrin) to persistent biexponential currents (cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin). Tail currents for the remaining compounds (bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate and tefluthrin) were monoexponential and decayed with kinetics intermediate between these extremes. Reconstruction of currents carried solely by the pyrethroid-modified subpopulation of channels revealed two types of pyrethroid-modified currents. The first type, found with cismethrin, allethrin, permethrin and tefluthrin, activated relatively rapidly and inactivated partially during a 40-ms depolarization. The second type, found with cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin and fenvalerate, activated more slowly and did not detectably inactivate during a 40-ms depolarization. Only bifenthrin did not produce modified currents that fit clearly into either of these categories. In all cases, the rate of activation of modified channels was strongly correlated with the rate of tail current decay following repolarization. Modification of Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channels by cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin was enhanced 2.3- to 3.4-fold by repetitive stimulation; this effect appeared to result from the accumulation of persistently open channels rather than preferential binding to open channel states. Fenpropathrin was the most effective compound against

  1. Solution NMR structure of Apo-calmodulin in complex with the IQ motif of human cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Chagot, Benjamin; Chazin, Walter J

    2011-02-11

    The function of the human voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.5 is regulated in part by intracellular calcium signals. The ubiquitous calcium sensor protein calmodulin (CaM) is an important part of the complex calcium-sensing apparatus in Na(V)1.5. CaM interacts with an IQ (isoleucine-glutamine) motif in the large intracellular C-terminal domain of the channel. Using co-expression and co-purification, we have been able to isolate a CaM-IQ motif complex and to determine its high-resolution structure in absence of calcium using multi-dimensional solution NMR. Under these conditions, the Na(V)1.5 IQ motif interacts with the C-terminal domain (C-lobe) of CaM, with the N-terminal domain remaining free in solution. The structure reveals that the C-lobe adopts a semi-open conformation with the IQ motif bound in a narrow hydrophobic groove. Sequence similarities between voltage-gated sodium channels and voltage-gated calcium channels suggest that the structure of the CaM-Na(V)1.5 IQ motif complex can serve as a general model for the interaction between CaM and ion channel IQ motifs under low-calcium conditions. The structure also provides insight into the biochemical basis for disease-associated mutations that map to the IQ motif in Na(V)1.5.

  2. Bacterial sodium channels: models for eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Scheuer, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels are made up of four linked homologous but different transmembrane domains. Bacteria express sodium channels comprised of four identical subunits, each being analogous to a single homologous domain of their eukaryotic counterparts. Key elements of primary structure are conserved between bacterial and eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels. The simple protein structure of the bacterial channels has allowed extensive structure-function probes of key regions as well as allowing determination of several X-ray crystallographic structures of these channels. The structures have revealed novel features of sodium and calcium channel pores and elucidated the structural importance of many of the conserved features of primary sequence. The structural information has also formed the basis for computational studies probing the basis for sodium and calcium selectivity and gating.

  3. Single Residue Substitutions That Confer Voltage-Gated Sodium Ion Channel Subtype Selectivity in the NaV1.7 Inhibitory Peptide GpTx-1.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Long, Jason; Zou, Anruo; Ligutti, Joseph; Andrews, Kristin L; Poppe, Leszek; Biswas, Kaustav; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Miranda, Les P

    2016-03-24

    There is interest in the identification and optimization of new molecular entities selectively targeting ion channels of therapeutic relevance. Peptide toxins represent a rich source of pharmacology for ion channels, and we recently reported GpTx-1 analogs that inhibit NaV1.7, a voltage-gated sodium ion channel that is a compelling target for improved treatment of pain. Here we utilize multi-attribute positional scan (MAPS) analoging, combining high-throughput synthesis and electrophysiology, to interrogate the interaction of GpTx-1 with NaV1.7 and related NaV subtypes. After one round of MAPS analoging, we found novel substitutions at multiple residue positions not previously identified, specifically glutamic acid at positions 10 or 11 or lysine at position 18, that produce peptides with single digit nanomolar potency on NaV1.7 and 500-fold selectivity against off-target sodium channels. Docking studies with a NaV1.7 homology model and peptide NMR structure generated a model consistent with the key potency and selectivity modifications mapped in this work.

  4. Molecular cloning, distribution and functional analysis of the NA(V)1.6. Voltage-gated sodium channel from human brain.

    PubMed

    Burbidge, Stephen A; Dale, Timothy J; Powell, Andrew J; Whitaker, William R J; Xie, Xin Min; Romanos, Michael A; Clare, Jeffrey J

    2002-06-30

    We have cloned and expressed the full-length human Na(V)1.6 sodium channel cDNA. Northern analysis showed that the hNa(V)1.6 gene, like its rodent orthologues, is abundantly expressed in adult brain but not other tissues including heart and skeletal muscle. Within the adult brain, hNa(V)1.6 mRNA is widely expressed with particularly high levels in the cerebellum, occipital pole and frontal lobe. When stably expressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), the hNa(V)1.6 channel was found to be very similar in its biophysical properties to human Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels [Eur. J. Neurosci. 12 (2000) 4281-4289; Pflügers Arch. 441 (2001) 425-433]. Only relatively subtle differences were observed, for example, in the voltage dependence of gating. Like hNa(V)1.3 channels, hNa(V)1.6 produced sodium currents with a prominent persistent component when expressed in HEK293 cells. These persistent currents were similar to those reported for the rat Na(V)1.2 channel [Neuron 19 (1997) 443-452], although they were not dependent on over-expression of G protein betagamma subunits. These data are consistent with the proposal that Na(V)1.6 channels may generate the persistent currents observed in cerebellar Purkinje neurons [J. Neurosci. 17 (1997) 4157-4536]. However, in our hNa(V)1.6 cell line we have been unable to detect the resurgent currents that have also been described in Purkinje cells. Although Na(V)1.6 channels have been implicated in producing these resurgent currents [Neuron 19 (1997) 881-891], our data suggest that this may require modification of the Na(V)1.6 alpha subunit by additional factors found in Purkinje neurons but not in HEK293 cells.

  5. The human macrophage sodium channel NaV1.5 regulates mycobacteria processing through organelle polarization and localized calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Carrithers, Lisette M; Hulseberg, Paul; Sandor, Matyas; Carrithers, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    Phagocytosis and intracellular processing of mycobacteria by macrophages are complex cellular processes that require spatial and temporal coordination of particle uptake, organelle movement, activation of signaling pathways, and channel-mediated ionic flux. Recent work demonstrated that human macrophage NaV1.5, an intracellular voltage-gated sodium channel expressed on late endosomes, enhances endosomal acidification and phagocytosis. Here, using bacillus Camille-Guerin (BCG) as a model of mycobacterial infection, we examined how this channel regulates phagocytosis and phagosome maturation in human macrophages. Knockdown of NaV1.5 reduced high capacity uptake of labeled BCG. BCG-containing, NaV1.5-expressing cells demonstrated localization of NaV1.5 and Rab-7 positive endosomes and mitochondria to periphagosome regions that was not observed in NaV1.5-deficient cells. Knockdown of the channel reduced the initial calcium response following bacterial challenge and prevented the generation of prolonged and localized calcium oscillations during phagosome maturation. Inhibition of the mitochondrial Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchanger also prevented prolonged calcium oscillations during phagosome maturation. These results suggest that NaV1.5 and mitochondrial-dependent calcium signaling regulate mycobacteria phagocytosis and phagosome maturation in human macrophages through spatial-temporal coordination of calcium signaling within a unique subcellular region.

  6. The cardiac sodium channel gene SCN5A and its gene product NaV1.5: Role in physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Veerman, Christiaan C; Wilde, Arthur A M; Lodder, Elisabeth M

    2015-12-01

    The gene SCN5A encodes the main cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5. This channel predominates the cardiac sodium current, INa, which underlies the fast upstroke of the cardiac action potential. As such, it plays a crucial role in cardiac electrophysiology. Over the last 60years a tremendous amount of knowledge regarding its function at the electrophysiological and molecular level has been acquired. Furthermore, genetic studies have shown that mutations in SCN5A are associated with multiple cardiac diseases (e.g. Brugada syndrome, Long QT syndrome, conduction disease and cardiomyopathy), while genetic variation in the general population has been associated with differences in cardiac conduction and risk of arrhythmia through genome wide association studies. In this review we aim to give an overview of the current knowledge (and the gaps therein) on SCN5A and NaV1.5.

  7. Spontaneous Excitation Patterns Computed for Axons with Injury-like Impairments of Sodium Channels and Na/K Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Na; Morris, Catherine E.; Joós, Béla; Longtin, André

    2012-01-01

    In injured neurons, “leaky” voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) underlie dysfunctional excitability that ranges from spontaneous subthreshold oscillations (STO), to ectopic (sometimes paroxysmal) excitation, to depolarizing block. In recombinant systems, mechanical injury to Nav1.6-rich membranes causes cytoplasmic Na+-loading and “Nav-CLS”, i.e., coupled left-(hyperpolarizing)-shift of Nav activation and availability. Metabolic injury of hippocampal neurons (epileptic discharge) results in comparable impairment: left-shifted activation and availability and hence left-shifted INa-window. A recent computation study revealed that CLS-based INa-window left-shift dissipates ion gradients and impairs excitability. Here, via dynamical analyses, we focus on sustained excitability patterns in mildly damaged nodes, in particular with more realistic Gaussian-distributed Nav-CLS to mimic “smeared” injury intensity. Since our interest is axons that might survive injury, pumps (sine qua non for live axons) are included. In some simulations, pump efficacy and system volumes are varied. Impacts of current noise inputs are also characterized. The diverse modes of spontaneous rhythmic activity evident in these scenarios are studied using bifurcation analysis. For “mild CLS injury”, a prominent feature is slow pump/leak-mediated EIon oscillations. These slow oscillations yield dynamic firing thresholds that underlie complex voltage STO and bursting behaviors. Thus, Nav-CLS, a biophysically justified mode of injury, in parallel with functioning pumps, robustly engenders an emergent slow process that triggers a plethora of pathological excitability patterns. This minimalist “device” could have physiological analogs. At first nodes of Ranvier and at nociceptors, e.g., localized lipid-tuning that modulated Nav midpoints could produce Nav-CLS, as could co-expression of appropriately differing Nav isoforms. PMID:23028273

  8. Knockdown of sodium channel NaV1.6 blocks mechanical pain and abnormal bursting activity of afferent neurons in inflamed sensory ganglia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A; Ye, Ling; Mao, Ju-Xian; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2013-08-01

    Inflammatory processes in the sensory ganglia contribute to many forms of chronic pain. We previously showed that local inflammation of the lumbar sensory ganglia rapidly leads to prolonged mechanical pain behaviors and high levels of spontaneous bursting activity in myelinated cells. Abnormal spontaneous activity of sensory neurons occurs early in many preclinical pain models and initiates many other pathological changes, but its molecular basis is not well understood. The sodium channel isoform NaV1.6 can underlie repetitive firing and excitatory persistent and resurgent currents. We used in vivo knockdown of this channel via local injection of siRNA to examine its role in chronic pain after local inflammation of the rat lumbar sensory ganglia. In normal dorsal root ganglion (DRG), quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that cells capable of firing repetitively had significantly higher relative expression of NaV1.6. In inflamed DRG, spontaneously active bursting cells expressed high levels of NaV1.6 immunoreactivity. In vivo knockdown of NaV1.6 locally in the lumbar DRG at the time of DRG inflammation completely blocked development of pain behaviors and abnormal spontaneous activity, while having only minor effects on unmyelinated C cells. Current research on isoform-specific sodium channel blockers for chronic pain is largely focused on NaV1.8 because it is present primarily in unmyelinated C fiber nociceptors, or on NaV1.7 because lack of this channel causes congenital indifference to pain. However, the results suggest that NaV1.6 may be a useful therapeutic target for chronic pain and that some pain conditions may be mediated primarily by myelinated A fiber sensory neurons.

  9. Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channel blockade by plant cannabinoids does not confer anticonvulsant effects per se.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew J; Jones, Nicholas A; Smith, Imogen; Hill, Charlotte L; Williams, Claire M; Stephens, Gary J; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2014-04-30

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive, well-tolerated, anticonvulsant plant cannabinoid, although its mechanism(s) of seizure suppression remains unknown. Here, we investigate the effect of CBD and the structurally similar cannabinoid, cannabigerol (CBG), on voltage-gated Na(+) (NaV) channels, a common anti-epileptic drug target. CBG's anticonvulsant potential was also assessed in vivo. CBD effects on NaV channels were investigated using patch-clamp recordings from rat CA1 hippocampal neurons in brain slices, human SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma) cells and mouse cortical neurons in culture. CBG effects were also assessed in SH-SY5Y cells and mouse cortical neurons. CBD and CBG effects on veratridine-stimulated human recombinant NaV1.1, 1.2 or 1.5 channels were assessed using a membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent dye high-throughput assay. The effect of CBG on pentyleneterazole-induced (PTZ) seizures was assessed in rat. CBD (10μM) blocked NaV currents in SH-SY5Y cells, mouse cortical neurons and recombinant cell lines, and affected spike parameters in rat CA1 neurons; CBD also significantly decreased membrane resistance. CBG blocked NaV to a similar degree to CBD in both SH-SY5Y and mouse recordings, but had no effect (50-200mg/kg) on PTZ-induced seizures in rat. CBD and CBG are NaV channel blockers at micromolar concentrations in human and murine neurons and recombinant cells. In contrast to previous reports investigating CBD, CBG had no effect upon PTZ-induced seizures in rat, indicating that NaV blockade per se does not correlate with anticonvulsant effects.

  10. Blocking effect of methylflavonolamine on human NaV1.5 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and on sodium currents in rabbit ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xin-rong; Ma, Ji-hua; Zhang, Pei-hua; Xing, Jun-lian

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the blocking effects of methylflavonolamine (MFA) on human NaV1.5 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and on sodium currents (INa) in rabbit ventricular myocytes. Methods: Human NaV1.5 channels were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and studied using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. INa and action potentials in rabbit ventricular myocytes were studied using the whole-cell recording. Results: MFA and lidocaine inhibited human NaV1.5 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes in a positive rate-dependent and concentration-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 72.61 μmol/L and 145.62 μmol/L, respectively. Both of them markedly shifted the steady-state activation curve of INa toward more positive potentials, shifted the steady-state inactivation curve of INa toward more negative potentials and postponed the recovery of the INa inactivation state. In rabbit ventricular myocytes, MFA inhibited INa with a shift in the steady-state inactivation curve toward more negative potentials, thereby postponing the recovery of the INa inactivation state. This shift was in a positive rate-dependent manner. Under current-clamp mode, MAF significantly decreased action potential amplitude (APA) and maximal depolarization velocity (Vmax) and shortened action potential duration (APD), but did not alter the resting membrane potential (RMP). The demonstrated that the kinetics of sodium channel blockage by MFA resemble those of class I antiarrhythmic agents such as lidocaine. Conclusion: MFA protects the heart against arrhythmias by its blocking effect on sodium channels. PMID:20173760

  11. Painful peripheral neuropathy and sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-02

    Peripheral neuropathy can lead to neuropathic pain in a subset of patients. Painful peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating disorder, reflected by a reduced quality of life. Therapeutic strategies are limited and often disappointing, as in most cases targeted treatment is not available. Elucidating pathogenetic factors for pain might provide a target for optimal treatment. Voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.7-NaV1.9 are expressed in the small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons and their axons. By a targeted gene approach, missense gain-of-function mutations of NaV1.7-NaV1.9 have been demonstrated in painful peripheral neuropathy. Functional analyses have shown that these mutations produce a spectrum of pro-excitatory changes in channel biophysics, with the shared outcome at the cellular level of dorsal root ganglion hyperexcitability. Reduced neurite outgrowth may be another consequence of sodium channel mutations, and possible therapeutic strategies include blockade of sodium channels or block of reverse operation of the sodium-calcium exchanger. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of painful peripheral neuropathy offers new targets that may provide a basis for more effective treatment.

  12. Roles of Voltage-Gated Tetrodotoxin-Sensitive Sodium Channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Quanmin; Liu, Xinming; Liu, Shiguang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common chronic medical problem worldwide; one of its complications is painful peripheral neuropathy, which can substantially erode quality of life and increase the cost of management. Despite its clinical importance, the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is complex and incompletely understood. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) link many physiological processes to electrical activity by controlling action potentials in all types of excitable cells. Two isoforms of VGSCs, NaV1.3 and NaV1.7, which are encoded by the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 3 and 9 (Scn3A and Scn9A) genes, respectively, have been identified in both peripheral nociceptive neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and pancreatic islet cells. Recent advances in our understanding of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 lead to the rational doubt about the cause–effect relation between diabetes and painful neuropathy. In this review, we summarize the roles of NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in islet cells and DRG neurons, discuss the link between DM and painful neuropathy, and present a model, which may provide a starting point for further studies aimed at identifying the mechanisms underlying diabetes and painful neuropathy. PMID:27608006

  13. Roles of Voltage-Gated Tetrodotoxin-Sensitive Sodium Channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Quanmin; Liu, Xinming; Liu, Shiguang

    2016-09-05

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common chronic medical problem worldwide; one of its complications is painful peripheral neuropathy, which can substantially erode quality of life and increase the cost of management. Despite its clinical importance, the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is complex and incompletely understood. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) link many physiological processes to electrical activity by controlling action potentials in all types of excitable cells. Two isoforms of VGSCs, NaV1.3 and NaV1.7, which are encoded by the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 3 and 9 (Scn3A and Scn9A) genes, respectively, have been identified in both peripheral nociceptive neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and pancreatic islet cells. Recent advances in our understanding of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 lead to the rational doubt about the cause-effect relation between diabetes and painful neuropathy. In this review, we summarize the roles of NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in islet cells and DRG neurons, discuss the link between DM and painful neuropathy, and present a model, which may provide a starting point for further studies aimed at identifying the mechanisms underlying diabetes and painful neuropathy.

  14. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Cannon, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na(+) current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle.

  15. Continuous delta opioid receptor activation reduces neuronal voltage gated sodium channel (NaV1.7) levels through activation of protein kinase C in painful diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Munmun; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The NaV1.7 tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel isoform plays a critical role in nociception. In rodent models of diabetic neuropathy, increased NaV1.7 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons correlates with the emergence of pain-related behaviors characteristic of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN). We examined the effect of transgene-mediated expression of enkephalin on pain-related behaviors and their biochemical correlates in DRG neurons. Transfection of DRG neurons by subcutaneous inoculation of a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based vector expressing proenkephalin (PE) reversed nocisponsive behavioral responses to heat, cold, and mechanical pressure characteristic of PDN. Vector-mediated enkephalin production in vivo prevented the increase in DRG NaV1.7 observed in PDN, an effect that correlated with inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and protein kinase C (PKC). Primary DRG neurons in vitro exposed to 45 mM glucose for 18 hrs also demonstrated an increase in NaV1.7 and increased phosphorylation of p38 and PKC; these changes were prevented by transfection in vitro with the enkephalin-expressing vector. The effect of hyperglycemia on NaV1.7 production in vitro was mimicked by exposure to PMA, and blocked by the myristolated PKC inhibitor 20–28 or the p38 inhibitor SB202190; the effect of vector-mediated enkephalin on NaV1.7 levels was prevented by naltrindole. The results of these studies suggest that activation of the presynaptic delta opioid receptor by enkephalin prevents the increase in neuronal NaV1.7 in DRG through inhibition of PKC and p38. These results establish a novel interaction between the delta opioid receptor and voltage gated sodium channels. PMID:18579738

  16. Structure and Function of FS50, a salivary protein from the flea Xenopsylla cheopis that blocks the sodium channel NaV1.5

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xueqing; Zhang, Bei; Yang, Shilong; An, Su; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring toxins have been invaluable tools for the study of structural and functional relationships of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). Few studies have been made of potential channel-modulating substances from blood-feeding arthropods. He we describe the characterization FS50, a salivary protein from the flea, Xenopsylla cheopis, that exhibits an inhibitory activity against the NaV1.5 channel with an IC50 of 1.58 μM. The pore-blocking mechanism of this toxin is evident from the kinetics of activation and inactivation suggesting that FS50 does not interfere with the voltage sensor of NaV1.5. FS50 exhibits high specificity for NaV1.5, since 10 μM FS50 had no discernable effect on voltage-gated Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglia or VGSC forms individually expressed in HEK 293T cells. Furthermore, intravenous injection of FS50 into rats and monkeys elicited recovery from arrhythmia induced by BaCl2, as would be expected from a blockade of NaV1.5. The crystal structure of FS50 revealed a βαββ domain similar to that of scorpion β toxin and a small N-terminal βαβ domain. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments have implicated a basic surface including the side chains of Arg 6, His 11 and Lys 32 as potentially important in the FS50 NaV1.5 interaction. PMID:27819327

  17. Structure and Function of FS50, a salivary protein from the flea Xenopsylla cheopis that blocks the sodium channel NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xueqing; Zhang, Bei; Yang, Shilong; An, Su; Ribeiro, José M C; Andersen, John F

    2016-11-07

    Naturally occurring toxins have been invaluable tools for the study of structural and functional relationships of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). Few studies have been made of potential channel-modulating substances from blood-feeding arthropods. He we describe the characterization FS50, a salivary protein from the flea, Xenopsylla cheopis, that exhibits an inhibitory activity against the NaV1.5 channel with an IC50 of 1.58 μM. The pore-blocking mechanism of this toxin is evident from the kinetics of activation and inactivation suggesting that FS50 does not interfere with the voltage sensor of NaV1.5. FS50 exhibits high specificity for NaV1.5, since 10 μM FS50 had no discernable effect on voltage-gated Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) channels in rat dorsal root ganglia or VGSC forms individually expressed in HEK 293T cells. Furthermore, intravenous injection of FS50 into rats and monkeys elicited recovery from arrhythmia induced by BaCl2, as would be expected from a blockade of NaV1.5. The crystal structure of FS50 revealed a βαββ domain similar to that of scorpion β toxin and a small N-terminal βαβ domain. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments have implicated a basic surface including the side chains of Arg 6, His 11 and Lys 32 as potentially important in the FS50 NaV1.5 interaction.

  18. Mediation of protection and recovery from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by macrophages expressing the human voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Rahgozar, Kusha; Wright, Erik; Carrithers, Lisette M; Carrithers, Michael D

    2013-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common nontraumatic cause of neurologic disability in young adults. Despite treatment, progressive tissue injury leads to accumulation of disability in many patients. Here, our goal was to develop an immune-mediated strategy to promote tissue repair and clinical recovery in an MS animal model. We previously demonstrated that a variant of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 is expressed intracellularly in human macrophages, and that it regulates cellular signaling. This channel is not expressed in mouse macrophages, which has limited the study of its functions. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a novel transgenic mouse model (C57BL6), in which the human macrophage NaV1.5 splice variant is expressed in vivo in mouse macrophages. These mice were protected from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the mouse model of MS. During active inflammatory disease, NaV1.5-positive macrophages were found in spinal cord lesions where they formed phagocytic cell clusters; they expressed markers of alternative activation during recovery. NaV1.5-positive macrophages that were adoptively transferred into wild-type recipients with established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis homed to lesions and promoted recovery. These results suggest that NaV1.5-positive macrophages enhance recovery from CNS inflammatory disease and could potentially be developed as a cell-based therapy for the treatment of MS.

  19. Association of rare missense variants in the second intracellular loop of NaV1.7 sodium channels with familial autism.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M; Patowary, A; Stanaway, I B; McCord, E; Nesbitt, R R; Archer, M; Scheuer, T; Nickerson, D; Raskind, W H; Wijsman, E M; Bernier, R; Catterall, W A; Brkanac, Z

    2016-12-13

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder often accompanied by intellectual disability, language impairment and medical co-morbidities. The heritability of autism is high and multiple genes have been implicated as causal. However, most of these genes have been identified in de novo cases. To further the understanding of familial autism, we performed whole-exome sequencing on five families in which second- and third-degree relatives were affected. By focusing on novel and protein-altering variants, we identified a small set of candidate genes. Among these, a novel private missense C1143F variant in the second intracellular loop of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7, encoded by the SCN9A gene, was identified in one family. Through electrophysiological analysis, we show that NaV1.7(C1143F) exhibits partial loss-of-function effects, resulting in slower recovery from inactivation and decreased excitability in cultured cortical neurons. Furthermore, for the same intracellular loop of NaV1.7, we found an excess of rare variants in a case-control variant-burden study. Functional analysis of one of these variants, M932L/V991L, also demonstrated reduced firing in cortical neurons. However, although this variant is rare in Caucasians, it is frequent in Latino population, suggesting that genetic background can alter its effects on phenotype. Although the involvement of the SCN1A and SCN2A genes encoding NaV1.1 and NaV1.2 channels in de novo ASD has previously been demonstrated, our study indicates the involvement of inherited SCN9A variants and partial loss-of-function of NaV1.7 channels in the etiology of rare familial ASD.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 13 December 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.222.

  20. Sustained inhibition of the NaV1.7 sodium channel by engineered dimers of the domain II binding peptide GpTx-1.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Biswas, Kaustav; Holder, J Ryan; Zou, Anruo; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Poppe, Leszek; Andrews, Kristin L; Lin, Fen-Fen; Meng, Shi-Yuan; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Miranda, Les P

    2015-11-01

    Many efforts are underway to develop selective inhibitors of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as new analgesics. Thus far, however, in vitro selectivity has proved difficult for small molecules, and peptides generally lack appropriate pharmacokinetic properties. We previously identified the NaV1.7 inhibitory peptide GpTx-1 from tarantula venom and optimized its potency and selectivity via structure-guided analoging. To further understand GpTx-1 binding to NaV1.7, we have mapped the binding site to transmembrane segments 1-4 of the second pseudosubunit internal repeat (commonly referred to as Site 4) using NaV1.5/NaV1.7 chimeric protein constructs. We also report that select GpTx-1 amino acid residues apparently not contacting NaV1.7 can be derivatized with a hydrophilic polymer without adversely affecting peptide potency. Homodimerization of GpTx-1 with a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker resulted in a compound with increased potency and a significantly reduced off-rate, demonstrating the ability to modulate the function and properties of GpTx-1 by linking to additional molecules.

  1. Treatment of Na(v)1.7-mediated pain in inherited erythromelalgia using a novel sodium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Yigal Paul; Price, Nicola; Namdari, Rostam; Cohen, Charles Jay; Lamers, Mieke H; Winters, Conrad; Price, James; Young, Clint E; Verschoof, Henry; Sherrington, Robin; Pimstone, Simon Neil; Hayden, Michael Reuben

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the SCN9A gene leading to deficiency of its protein product, Na(v)1.7, cause congenital indifference to pain (CIP). CIP is characterized by the absence of the ability to sense pain associated with noxious stimuli. In contrast, the opposite phenotype to CIP, inherited erythromelalgia (IEM), is a disorder of spontaneous pain caused by missense mutations resulting in gain-of-function in Na(v)1.7 that promote neuronal hyperexcitability. The primary aim of this study was to demonstrate that Na(v)1.7 antagonism could alleviate the pain of IEM, thereby demonstrating the utility of this opposite phenotype model as a tool for rapid proof-of-concept for novel analgesics. An exploratory, randomized, double-blind, 2-period crossover study was conducted in 4 SCN9A mutation-proven IEM patients. In each treatment period (2days), separated by a 2-day washout period, patients were orally administered XEN402 (400mg twice daily) or matching placebo. In 3 patients, pain was induced by heat or exercise during each treatment arm. A fourth patient, in constant severe pain, required no induction. Patient-reported outcomes of pain intensity and/or relief were recorded, and the time taken to induce pain was measured. The ability to induce pain in IEM patients was significantly attenuated by XEN402 compared with placebo. XEN402 increased the time to maximal pain induction and significantly reduced the amount of pain (42% less) after induction (P=.014). This pilot study showed that XEN402 blocks Na(v)1.7-mediated pain associated with IEM, thereby demonstrating target engagement in humans and underscoring the use of rare genetic disorders with mutant target channels as a novel approach to rapid proof-of-concept.

  2. Bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNaVs) from the soil, sea, and salt lakes enlighten molecular mechanisms of electrical signaling and pharmacology in the brain and heart

    PubMed Central

    Payandeh, Jian; Minor, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) provide the initial electrical signal that drives action potential generation in many excitable cells of the brain, heart, and nervous system. For more than 60 years, functional studies of NaVs have occupied a central place in physiological and biophysical investigation of the molecular basis of excitability. Recently, structural studies of members of a large family of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNaVs) prevalent in soil, marine, and salt lake environments that bear many of the core features of eukaryotic NaVs have reframed ideas for voltage-gated channel function, ion selectivity, and pharmacology. Here, we analyze the recent advances, unanswered questions, and potential of BacNaVs as templates for drug development efforts. PMID:25158094

  3. Renal sodium transporter/channel expression and sodium excretion in P2Y2 receptor knockout mice fed a high-NaCl diet with/without aldosterone infusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Listhrop, Raelene; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2011-03-01

    The P2Y(2) receptor (P2Y2-R) antagonizes sodium reabsorption in the kidney. Apart from its effect in distal nephron, hypothetically, P2Y(2)-R may modulate activity/abundances of sodium transporters/channel subunits along the nephron via antagonism of aldosterone or vasopressin or interaction with mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) or oxidative stress (OS). To determine the extent of the regulatory role of P2Y(2)-R in renal sodium reabsorption, in study 1, we fed P2Y(2)-R knockout (KO; n = 5) and wild-type (WT; n = 5) mice a high (3.15%)-sodium diet (HSD) for 14 days. Western blotting revealed significantly higher protein abundances for cortical and medullary bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2), medullary α-1-subunit of Na-K-ATPase, and medullary α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in KO vs. WT mice. Molecular analysis of urine showed increased excretion of nitrates plus nitrites (NOx), PGE(2), and 8-isoprostane in the KO, relative to WT mice, supporting a putative role for these molecules in determining alterations of proteins involved in sodium transport along the nephron. To determine whether genotype differences in response to aldosterone might have played a role in these differences due to HSD, in study 2 aldosterone levels were clamped (by osmotic minipump infusion). Clamping aldosterone (with HSD) led to significantly impaired natriuresis with elevated Na/H exchanger isoform 3 in the cortex, and NKCC2 in the medulla, and modest but significantly lower levels of NKCC2, and α- and β-ENaC in the cortex of KO vs. WT mice. This was associated with significantly reduced urinary NOx in the KO, although PGE(2) and 8-isoprostane remained significantly elevated vs. WT mice. Taken together, our results suggest that P2Y(2)-R is an important regulator of sodium transporters along the nephron. Pre- or postreceptor differences in the response to aldosterone, perhaps mediated via prostaglandins or changes in

  4. Development and validation of a thallium flux-based functional assay for the sodium channel NaV1.7 and its utility for lead discovery and compound profiling.

    PubMed

    Du, Yu; Days, Emily; Romaine, Ian; Abney, Kris K; Kaufmann, Kristian; Sulikowski, Gary; Stauffer, Shaun; Lindsley, Craig W; Weaver, C David

    2015-06-17

    Ion channels are critical for life, and they are targets of numerous drugs. The sequencing of the human genome has revealed the existence of hundreds of different ion channel subunits capable of forming thousands of ion channels. In the face of this diversity, we only have a few selective small-molecule tools to aid in our understanding of the role specific ion channels in physiology which may in turn help illuminate their therapeutic potential. Although the advent of automated electrophysiology has increased the rate at which we can screen for and characterize ion channel modulators, the technique's high per-measurement cost and moderate throughput compared to other high-throughput screening approaches limit its utility for large-scale high-throughput screening. Therefore, lower cost, more rapid techniques are needed. While ion channel types capable of fluxing calcium are well-served by low cost, very high-throughput fluorescence-based assays, other channel types such as sodium channels remain underserved by present functional assay techniques. In order to address this shortcoming, we have developed a thallium flux-based assay for sodium channels using the NaV1.7 channel as a model target. We show that the assay is able to rapidly and cost-effectively identify NaV1.7 inhibitors thus providing a new method useful for the discovery and profiling of sodium channel modulators.

  5. Coordinated role of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger in sustaining microglial activation during inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Muhammad M.; Sonsalla, Patricia K.; Richardson, Jason R.

    2013-12-01

    Persistent neuroinflammation and microglial activation play an integral role in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. We investigated the role of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) and Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchangers (NHE) in the activation of immortalized microglial cells (BV-2) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. LPS (10 and 100 ng/ml) caused a dose- and time-dependent accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na{sup +}){sub i}] in BV-2 cells. Pre-treatment of cells with the VGSC antagonist tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 μM) abolished short-term Na{sup +} influx, but was unable to prevent the accumulation of (Na{sup +}){sub i} observed at 6 and 24 h after LPS exposure. The NHE inhibitor cariporide (1 μM) significantly reduced accumulation of (Na{sup +}){sub i} 6 and 24 h after LPS exposure. Furthermore, LPS increased the mRNA expression and protein level of NHE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced after co-treatment with TTX and/or cariporide. LPS increased production of TNF-α, ROS, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and expression of gp91{sup phox}, an active subunit of NADPH oxidase, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX or TTX + cariporide. Collectively, these data demonstrate a closely-linked temporal relationship between VGSC and NHE-1 in regulating function in activated microglia, which may provide avenues for therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing neuroinflammation. - Highlights: • LPS causes immediate increase in sodium through VGSC and subsequently through the NHE-1. • Inhibition of VGSC reduces increases in NHE-1 and gp91{sup phox}. • Inhibition of VGSC and NHE-1 reduces NADPH oxidase-mediated Tnf-α, ROS, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. • NHE-1 and Na{sub v}1.6 may be viable targets for therapeutic interventions to reduce neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disease.

  6. Comparative study of lacosamide and classical sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs on sodium channel slow inactivation.

    PubMed

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; Leclère, Nathalie; Vandenplas, Catherine; Foerch, Patrik; Wolff, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exert their therapeutic activity by modifying the inactivation properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v) ) channels. Lacosamide is unique among AEDs in that it selectively enhances the slow inactivation component. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of AEDs on Na(v) channel inactivation, a direct comparison of results cannot be made because of varying experimental conditions. In this study, the effects of different AEDs on Na(v) channel steady-state slow inactivation were investigated under identical experimental conditions using whole-cell patch-clamp in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. All drugs were tested at 100 μM, and results were compared with those from time-matched control groups. Lacosamide significantly shifted the voltage dependence of Na(v) current (I(Na) ) slow inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials (by -33 ± 7 mV), whereas the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels and the curve slope did not differ significantly. Neither SPM6953 (lacosamide inactive enantiomer), nor carbamazepine, nor zonisamide affected the voltage dependence of I(Na) slow inactivation, the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels, or the curve slope. Phenytoin significantly increased the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels (by 28% ± 9%) in a voltage-independent manner but did not affect the curve slope. Lamotrigine slightly increased the fraction of inactivated currents (by 15% ± 4%) and widened the range of the slow inactivation voltage dependence. Lamotrigine and rufinamide induced weak, but significant, shifts of I(Na) slow inactivation toward more depolarized potentials. The effects of lacosamide on Na(v) channel slow inactivation corroborate previous observations that lacosamide has a unique mode of action among AEDs that act on Na(v) channels.

  7. Enhanced expression of epithelial sodium channels causes salt-induced hypertension in mice through inhibition of the α2-isoform of Na+, K+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Leenen, Frans H H; Hou, Xiaohong; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ahmad, Monir

    2015-05-01

    Knockout of the Nedd4-2 gene in mice results in overexpression of epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) on the plasma membrane in the kidney, choroid plexus and brain nuclei. These mice exhibit enhanced pressor responses to CSF [Na(+)] as well as dietary salt-induced hypertension which both can be blocked by central infusion of the ENaC blocker benzamil. Functional studies suggest that ENaC activation in the CNS results in release of endogenous ouabain (EO) and inhibition of the α2-isoform of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase. To test this concept more specifically, we studied Nedd4-2(-/-) mice expressing the ouabain-resistant α2R/R-isoform of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase. Intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of Na(+)-rich aCSF (225 mmol/L Na(+) at 0.4 μL/min) increased MAP by 10-15 mmHg in wild-type mice and by 25-30 mmHg in Nedd4-2(-/-) mice, but by only ~5 mmHg in α2R/R and in α2R/R/Nedd4-2(-/-) mice. Icv infusion of EO-binding Fab fragments also blocked the BP response in Nedd4-2(-/-) mice. In Nedd4-2(-/-) mice, 8% high-salt diet increased MAP by 25-30 mmHg, but in α2R/R/Nedd4-2(-/-) mice, it increased by only 5-10 mmHg. In contrast, Nedd4-2(-/-) or α2R/R did not affect the hypertension caused by sc infusion of Ang II. These findings substantiate the concept that enhanced ENaC activity causes salt-induced pressor responses mainly through EO inhibiting the α2-isoform of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the brain.

  8. Local knockdown of the NaV1.6 sodium channel reduces pain behaviors, sensory neuron excitability, and sympathetic sprouting in rat models of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, as in other pain models, abnormal spontaneous activity of myelinated sensory neurons occurs early and is essential for establishing pain behaviors and other pathologies. Sympathetic sprouting into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is observed after spinal nerve ligation, and sympathectomy reduces pain behavior. Sprouting and spontaneous activity may be mutually reinforcing: blocking neuronal activity reduces sympathetic sprouting, and sympathetic spouts functionally increase spontaneous activity in vitro. However, most studies in this field have used nonspecific methods to block spontaneous activity, methods that also block evoked and normal activity. In this study, we injected small inhibitory RNA directed against the NaV1.6 sodium channel isoform into the DRG before spinal nerve ligation. This isoform can mediate high frequency repetitive firing, like that seen in spontaneously active neurons. Local knockdown of NaV1.6 markedly reduced mechanical pain behaviors induced by spinal nerve ligation, reduced sympathetic sprouting into the ligated sensory ganglion, and blocked abnormal spontaneous activity and other measures of hyperexcitability in myelinated neurons in the ligated sensory ganglion. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that sympathetic sprouting preferentially targeted NaV1.6-positive neurons. Under these experimental conditions, NaV1.6 knockdown did not prevent or strongly alter single evoked action potentials, unlike previous less specific methods used to block spontaneous activity. NaV1.6 knockdown also reduced pain behaviors in another pain model, chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve, provided the model was modified so that the lesion site was relatively close to the siRNA-injected lumbar DRGs. The results highlight the relative importance of abnormal spontaneous activity in establishing both pain behaviors and sympathetic sprouting, and suggest that the NaV1.6 isoform may have value as a

  9. Pharmacological modulation of human cardiac Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Krafte, D S; Davison, K; Dugrenier, N; Estep, K; Josef, K; Barchi, R L; Kallen, R G; Silver, P J; Ezrin, A M

    1994-02-15

    Pharmacological modulation of human sodium current was examined in Xenopus oocytes expressing human heart Na+ channels. Na+ currents activated near -50 mV with maximum current amplitudes observed at -20 mV. Steady-state inactivation was characterized by a V1/2 value of -57 +/- 0.5 mV and a slope factor (k) of 7.3 +/- 0.3 mV. Sodium currents were blocked by tetrodotoxin with an IC50 value of 1.8 microM. These properties are consistent with those of Na+ channels expressed in mammalian myocardial cells. We have investigated the effects of several pharmacological agents which, with the exception of lidocaine, have not been characterized against cRNA-derived Na+ channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Lidocaine, quinidine and flecainide blocked resting Na+ channels with IC50 values of 521 microM, 198 microM, and 41 microM, respectively. Use-dependent block was also observed for all three agents, but concentrations necessary to induce block were higher than expected for quinidine and flecainide. This may reflect differences arising due to expression in the Xenopus oocyte system or could be a true difference in the interaction between human cardiac Na+ channels and these drugs compared to other mammalian Na+ channels. Importantly, however, this result would not have been predicted based upon previous studies of mammalian cardiac Na+ channels. The effects of DPI 201-106, RWJ 24517, and BDF 9148 were also tested and all three agents slowed and/or removed Na+ current inactivation, reduced peak current amplitudes, and induced use-dependent block. These data suggest that the alpha-subunit is the site of interaction between cardiac Na+ channels and Class I antiarrhythmic drugs as well as inactivation modifiers such as DPI 201-106.

  10. Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.3 are the only tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels expressed by the adult guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sage, D; Salin, P; Alcaraz, G; Castets, F; Giraud, P; Crest, M; Mazet, B; Clerc, N

    2007-10-01

    The types of sodium channels that are expressed by neurons shape the rising phase of action potentials and influence patterns of action potential discharge. With regard to the enteric nervous system (ENS), there is uncertainty about which channels are expressed, and in particular it is unknown whether Na(v)1.7 is present. We designed specific probes for the guinea pig Na(v)1.7 alpha subunit as well as for the other tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive alpha subunits (Na(v)1.1, Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.3, and Na(v)1.6) in order to perform in situ hybridization (ISH) histochemistry on guinea pig myenteric ganglia. We established that only Na(v)1.7 mRNA and Na(v)1.3 mRNA are expressed in these ganglia. The ISH signal for Na(v)1.7 transcripts was found in seemingly all the myenteric neurons. The expression of the Na(v)1.3 alpha subunit was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in a large proportion (62%) of the myenteric neuron population. This population included enteric sensory neurons. Na(v)1.6 immunoreactivity, absent from myenteric neurons, was detected in glial cells only when a high anti-Na(v)1.6 antibody concentration was used. This suggests that the Na(v)1.6 alpha subunit and mRNA are present only at low levels, which is consistent with the fact that no Na(v)1.6 mRNA could be detected in the ENS by ISH. The fact that adult myenteric neurons are endowed with only two TTX-sensitive alpha subunits, namely, Na(v)1.3 and Na(v)1.7, emphasizes the singularity of the ENS. Both these subunits, known to have slow-inactivation kinetics, are well adapted for generating action potentials from slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials, a mode of synaptic transmission that applies to all ENS neuron types.

  11. Solution NMR structure of the C-terminal EF-hand domain of human cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Chagot, Benjamin; Potet, Franck; Balser, Jeffrey R; Chazin, Walter J

    2009-03-06

    The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 is responsible for the initial upstroke of the action potential in cardiac tissue. Levels of intracellular calcium modulate inactivation gating of NaV1.5, in part through a C-terminal EF-hand calcium binding domain. The significance of this structure is underscored by the fact that mutations within this domain are associated with specific cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. In an effort to elucidate the molecular basis for calcium regulation of channel function, we have determined the solution structure of the C-terminal EF-hand domain using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR. The structure confirms the existence of the four-helix bundle common to EF-hand domain proteins. However, the location of this domain is shifted with respect to that predicted on the basis of a consensus 12-residue EF-hand calcium binding loop in the sequence. This finding is consistent with the weak calcium affinity reported for the isolated EF-hand domain; high affinity binding is observed only in a construct with an additional 60 residues C-terminal to the EF-hand domain, including the IQ motif that is central to the calcium regulatory apparatus. The binding of an IQ motif peptide to the EF-hand domain was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The peptide binds between helices I and IV in the EF-hand domain, similar to the binding of target peptides to other EF-hand calcium-binding proteins. These results suggest a molecular basis for the coupling of the intrinsic (EF-hand domain) and extrinsic (calmodulin) components of the calcium-sensing apparatus of NaV1.5.

  12. Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Bean, B P; Cohen, C J; Tsien, R W

    1983-05-01

    Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels was studied in voltage-clamped rabbit purkinje fibers at drug concentrations ranging from 1 mM down to effective antiarrhythmic doses (5-20 muM). Dose-response curves indicated that lidocaine blocks the channel by binding one-to-one, with a voltage-dependent K(d). The half-blocking concentration varied from more than 300 muM, at a negative holding potential where inactivation was completely removed, to approximately 10 muM, at a depolarized holding potential where inactivation was nearly complete. Lidocaine block showed prominent use dependence with trains of depolarizing pulses from a negative holding potential. During the interval between pulses, repriming of I (Na) displayed two exponential components, a normally recovering component (tauless than 0.2 s), and a lidocaine-induced, slowly recovering fraction (tau approximately 1-2 s at pH 7.0). Raising the lidocaine concentration magnified the slowly recovering fraction without changing its time course; after a long depolarization, this fraction was one-half at approximately 10 muM lidocaine, just as expected if it corresponded to drug-bound, inactivated channels. At less than or equal to 20 muM lidocaine, the slowly recovering fraction grew exponentially to a steady level as the preceding depolarization was prolonged; the time course was the same for strong or weak depolarizations, that is, with or without significant activation of I(Na). This argues that use dependence at therapeutic levels reflects block of inactivated channels, rather than block of open channels. Overall, these results provide direct evidence for the "modulated-receptor hypothesis" of Hille (1977) and Hondeghem and Katzung (1977). Unlike tetrodotoxin, lidocaine shows similar interactions with Na channels of heart, nerve, and skeletal muscle.

  13. Slow inactivation in human cardiac sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, J E; Featherstone, D E; Hartmann, H A; Ruben, P C

    1998-01-01

    The available pool of sodium channels, and thus cell excitability, is regulated by both fast and slow inactivation. In cardiac tissue, the requirement for sustained firing of long-duration action potentials suggests that slow inactivation in cardiac sodium channels may differ from slow inactivation in skeletal muscle sodium channels. To test this hypothesis, we used the macropatch technique to characterize slow inactivation in human cardiac sodium channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Slow inactivation was isolated from fast inactivation kinetically (by selectively recovering channels from fast inactivation before measurement of slow inactivation) and structurally (by modification of fast inactivation by mutation of IFM1488QQQ). Time constants of slow inactivation in cardiac sodium channels were larger than previously reported for skeletal muscle sodium channels. In addition, steady-state slow inactivation was only 40% complete in cardiac sodium channels, compared to 80% in skeletal muscle channels. These results suggest that cardiac sodium channel slow inactivation is adapted for the sustained depolarizations found in normally functioning cardiac tissue. Complete slow inactivation in the fast inactivation modified IFM1488QQQ cardiac channel mutant suggests that this impairment of slow inactivation may result from an interaction between fast and slow inactivation. PMID:9635748

  14. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav 1.5 contributes to astrogliosis in an in vitro model of glial injury via reverse Na+ /Ca2+ exchange.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Laura W; Samad, Omar A; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    Astrogliosis is a prominent feature of many, if not all, pathologies of the brain and spinal cord, yet a detailed understanding of the underlying molecular pathways involved in the transformation from quiescent to reactive astrocyte remains elusive. We investigated the contribution of voltage-gated sodium channels to astrogliosis in an in vitro model of mechanical injury to astrocytes. Previous studies have shown that a scratch injury to astrocytes invokes dual mechanisms of migration and proliferation in these cells. Our results demonstrate that wound closure after mechanical injury, involving both migration and proliferation, is attenuated by pharmacological treatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX) and KB-R7943, at a dose that blocks reverse mode of the Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), and by knockdown of Nav 1.5 mRNA. We also show that astrocytes display a robust [Ca(2+) ]i transient after mechanical injury and demonstrate that this [Ca(2+) ]i response is also attenuated by TTX, KB-R7943, and Nav 1.5 mRNA knockdown. Our results suggest that Nav 1.5 and NCX are potential targets for modulation of astrogliosis after injury via their effect on [Ca(2+) ]i .

  15. Sodium channels in astroglia and microglia.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Laura W; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-10-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are required for electrogenesis in excitable cells. Their activation, triggered by membrane depolarization, generates transient sodium currents that initiate action potentials in neurons, cardiac, and skeletal muscle cells. Cells that have not traditionally been considered to be excitable (nonexcitable cells), including glial cells, also express sodium channels in physiological conditions as well as in pathological conditions. These channels contribute to multiple functional roles that are seemingly unrelated to the generation of action potentials. Here, we discuss the dynamics of sodium channel expression in astrocytes and microglia, and review evidence for noncanonical roles in effector functions of these cells including phagocytosis, migration, proliferation, ionic homeostasis, and secretion of chemokines/cytokines. We also examine possible mechanisms by which sodium channels contribute to the activity of glial cells, with an eye toward therapeutic implications for central nervous system disease. GLIA 2016;64:1628-1645.

  16. Na+ channel function, regulation, structure, trafficking and sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Shaw, Robin M; Pitt, Geoffrey S; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Sack, Jon T; Abriel, Hugues; Aldrich, Richard W; Belardinelli, Luiz; Cannell, Mark B; Catterall, William A; Chazin, Walter J; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Deschenes, Isabelle; Grandi, Eleonora; Hund, Thomas J; Izu, Leighton T; Maier, Lars S; Maltsev, Victor A; Marionneau, Celine; Mohler, Peter J; Rajamani, Sridharan; Rasmusson, Randall L; Sobie, Eric A; Clancy, Colleen E; Bers, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second of a series of three reviews published in this issue resulting from the University of California Davis Cardiovascular Symposium 2014: Systems approach to understanding cardiac excitation–contraction coupling and arrhythmias: Na+ channel and Na+ transport. The goal of the symposium was to bring together experts in the field to discuss points of consensus and controversy on the topic of sodium in the heart. The present review focuses on Na+ channel function and regulation, Na+ channel structure and function, and Na+ channel trafficking, sequestration and complexing. PMID:25772290

  17. Differential state-dependent modification of rat Na{sub v}1.6 sodium channels expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells by the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin

    SciTech Connect

    He, Bingjun; Soderlund, David M.

    2011-12-15

    We expressed rat Na{sub v}1.6 sodium channels in combination with the rat {beta}1 and {beta}2 auxiliary subunits in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and evaluated the effects of the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin on expressed sodium currents using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Both pyrethroids produced concentration-dependent, resting modification of Na{sub v}1.6 channels, prolonging the kinetics of channel inactivation and deactivation to produce persistent 'late' currents during depolarization and tail currents following repolarization. Both pyrethroids also produced concentration dependent hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage dependence of channel activation and steady-state inactivation. Maximal shifts in activation, determined from the voltage dependence of the pyrethroid-induced late and tail currents, were {approx} 25 mV for tefluthrin and {approx} 20 mV for deltamethrin. The highest attainable concentrations of these compounds also caused shifts of {approx} 5-10 mV in the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation. In addition to their effects on the voltage dependence of inactivation, both compounds caused concentration-dependent increases in the fraction of sodium current that was resistant to inactivation following strong depolarizing prepulses. We assessed the use-dependent effects of tefluthrin and deltamethrin on Na{sub v}1.6 channels by determining the effect of trains of 1 to 100 5-ms depolarizing prepulses at frequencies of 20 or 66.7 Hz on the extent of channel modification. Repetitive depolarization at either frequency increased modification by deltamethrin by {approx} 2.3-fold but had no effect on modification by tefluthrin. Tefluthrin and deltamethrin were equally potent as modifiers of Na{sub v}1.6 channels in HEK293 cells using the conditions producing maximal modification as the basis for comparison. These findings show that the actions of tefluthrin and deltamethrin of Na{sub v}1.6 channels in HEK293

  18. Ionizing Radiation Alters the Properties of Sodium Channels in Rat Brain Synaptosomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    International So, iet% for Ncurochemistry SIonizing Radiation Alters the Properties of Sodium to Channels in Rat Brain Synaptosomes Michael J. Mullin, Walter...its binding site in the channel, Ionizing radiation reduced radiation on the voltage-sensitive sodium channels in rat the veratridine-stimulated...in the order of membrane lipids. Key greatest. Batrachotoxin-stimulated 22Na’ uptake was Words: Ionizing radiation- Sodium channels-Mem- less sensitive

  19. Differential effect of D623N variant and wild-type Na(v)1.7 sodium channels on resting potential and interspike membrane potential of dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hye-Sook; Vasylyev, Dmytro V; Estacion, Mark; Macala, Lawrence J; Shah, Palak; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2013-09-05

    Sodium channel NaV1.7 is preferentially expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and sympathetic ganglion neurons. Gain-of-function NaV1.7 mutations/variants have been identified in the painful disorders inherited erythromelalgia and small-fiber neuropathy (SFN). DRG neurons transfected with these channel variants display depolarized resting potential, reduced current-threshold, increased firing-frequency and spontaneous firing. Whether the depolarizing shift in resting potential and enhanced spontaneous firing are due to persistent activity of variant channels, or to compensatory changes in other conductance(s) in response to expression of the variant channel, as shown in model systems, has not been studied. We examined the effect of wild-type NaV1.7 and a NaV1.7 mutant channel, D623N, associated with SFN, on resting potential and membrane potential during interspike intervals in DRG neurons. Resting potential in DRG neurons expressing D623N was depolarized compared to neurons expressing WT-NaV1.7. Exposure to TTX hyperpolarized resting potential by 7mV, increased current-threshold, decreased firing-frequency, and reduced NMDG-induced-hyperpolarization in DRG neurons expressing D623N. To assess the contribution of depolarized resting potential to DRG neuron excitability, we mimicked the mutant channel's depolarizing effect by current injection to produce equivalent depolarization; the depolarization decreased current threshold and increased firing-frequency. Voltage-clamp using ramp or repetitive action potentials as commands showed that D623N channels enhance the TTX-sensitive inward current, persistent at subthreshold membrane voltages, as predicted by a Hodgkin-Huxley model. Our results demonstrate that a variant of NaV1.7 associated with painful neuropathy depolarizes resting membrane potential and produces an enhanced inward current during interspike intervals, thereby contributing to DRG neuron hyperexcitability.

  20. The cellular localization of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, potassium channel, epithelial sodium channel γ and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase in human eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Xiang; Zeng, Shaopeng; Chen, Lu; Li, Xuexue; Lin, Changmin; Zhang, Mingjun; Shu, Shenyou; Xie, Sitian; He, Yunpu; Yang, Lvjun; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2014-10-01

    The secretory portions of human eccrine sweat glands secrete isotonic fluid into the lumen and then the primary fluid is rendered hypotonic during its passage to the skin surface. During the processes of sweat secretion and absorption, many enzymes and proteins play important roles. In the study, the cellular localizations of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), potassium channel (KC), epithelial sodium channel γ (γENaC) and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in human eccrine sweat glands and epidermis were detected using immunofluorescence labeling. The results revealed that in the secretory coils, the basolateral membranes showed evidence of CFTR, NHE1 and KC activities, the apical membranes showed the activities of KC and NHE1, and the nucleus showed γEaNC and V-ATPase activities; in the duct, the peripheral and luminal ductal cells showed evidence of CFTR, NHE1 and KC, the apical membranes showed the activities of CFTR and NHE1, and the nucleus showed γEaNC, V-ATPase and KC activities. The cellular localization of these proteins in eccrine sweat glands is helpful to better understand the mechanisms of sweat secretion and absorption.

  1. Magnetic and electric fields across sodium and potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Marília A. G.; Cruz, Frederico A. O.; Silva, Dilson

    2015-12-01

    We determined the magnetic field around sodium and potassium ionic channels based on a physico-mathematical model that took into account charges in the surface bilayer. For the numerical simulation, we applied the finite element method. Results show that each channel produces its specific and individual response to the ion transport, according to its individual intrinsic properties. The existence of a number of active Na+-channels in a given membrane region seems not to interfere directly in the functioning of K+-channel located among them, and vice-versa.

  2. Neuronal Sodium Channels in Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    The results of these studies have led to the cloning, sequencing and physiological characterization of at least four neuronal sodium channels. However...However, the stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride specific physiological roles distinguishing each of (TTC; see Williams et al., 2000...F. and Berwald- Netter , Y. (1992) "The glial voltage-gated sodium channel: cell- and tissue-specific mRNA expression", Dave et al., 2001) it is

  3. Epithelial Sodium and Chloride Channels and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the asthmatic pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/chlorine ion channel. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were the English articles from 1980 to 2015 from journal databases, primarily PubMed and Google Scholar. The terms used in the literature search were: (1) ENaCs; cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); asthma/asthmatic, (2) ENaC/sodium salt; CF; asthma/asthmatic, (3) CFTR/chlorine ion channels; asthma/asthmatic, (4) ENaC/sodium channel/scnn1a/scnn1b/scnn1g/scnn1d/amiloride-sensitive/amiloride-inhibtable sodium channels/sodium salt; asthma/asthmatic, lung/pulmonary/respiratory/tracheal/alveolar, and (5) CFTR; CF; asthma/asthmatic (ti). Study Selection: These studies included randomized controlled trials or studies covering asthma pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to ENaC/chlorine ion channels within the last 25 years (from 1990 to 2015). The data involving chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF obtained from individual studies were also reviewed by the authors. Results: Airway surface liquid dehydration can cause airway inflammation and obstruction. ENaC and CFTR are closely related to the airway mucociliary clearance. Ion transporters may play a critical role in pathogenesis of asthmatic exacerbations. Conclusions: Ion channels have been the center of many studies aiming to understand asthmatic pathophysiological mechanisms or to identify therapeutic targets for better control of the disease. PMID:26265620

  4. Sodium-activated potassium channels are functionally coupled to persistent sodium currents.

    PubMed

    Hage, Travis A; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2012-02-22

    We report a novel coupled system of sodium-activated potassium currents (I(KNa)) and persistent sodium currents (I(NaP)), the components of which are widely distributed throughout the brain. Its existence and importance has not been previously recognized. Although I(KNa) was known to exist in many cell types, the source of Na(+) which activates I(KNa) remained a mystery. We now show in single membrane patches generated from the somas of rat neurons that sodium influx through I(NaP) is sufficient for activation of K(Na) channels, without substantial contribution from the transient sodium current or bulk [Na(+)](i). I(NaP) was found to be active at cell membrane resting potentials, a finding that may explain why I(KNa) can be evoked from negative holding potentials. These results show an unanticipated role for I(NaP) in activating a negative feedback system countering the excitable effects I(NaP); the interrelatedness of I(NaP) and I(KNa) suggests new ways neurons can tune their excitability.

  5. Co-Localization of Sodium Channel Na[v]1.6 and the Sodium--Calcium Exchanger at Sites of Axonal Injury in the Spinal Cord in EAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craner, Matthew J.; Hains, Bryan C.; Lo, Albert C.; Black, Joel A.; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2004-01-01

    Axonal degeneration contributes to the development of non-remitting neurological deficits and disability in multiple sclerosis, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie axonal loss in multiple sclerosis are not clearly understood. Studies of white matter axonal injury have demonstrated that voltage-gated sodium channels can provide a route for…

  6. Function and role of voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 expressed in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Kentaro; Iida, Haruko; Takano, Haruhito; Morita, Toshihiro; Sata, Masataka; Nagai, Ryozo; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channel currents (I(Na)) are expressed in several types of smooth muscle cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of I(Na), its functional role, pathophysiology in cultured human (hASMCs) and rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells (rASMCs), and its association with vascular intimal hyperplasia. In whole cell voltage clamp, I(Na) was observed at potential positive to -40 mV, was blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX), and replacing extracellular Na(+) with N-methyl-d-glucamine in cultured hASMCs. In contrast to native aorta, cultured hASMCs strongly expressed SCN9A encoding Na(V)1.7, as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. I(Na) was abolished by the treatment with SCN9A small-interfering (si)RNA (P < 0.01). TTX and SCN9A siRNA significantly inhibited cell migration (P < 0.01, respectively) and horseradish peroxidase uptake (P < 0.01, respectively). TTX also significantly reduced the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 6 and 12 h after the treatment (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). However, neither TTX nor siRNA had any effect on cell proliferation. L-type Ca(2+) channel current was recorded, and I(Na) was not observed in freshly isolated rASMCs, whereas TTX-sensitive I(Na) was recorded in cultured rASMCs. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunostaining for Na(V)1.7 revealed the prominent expression of SCN9A in cultured rASMCs and aorta 48 h after balloon injury but not in native aorta. In conclusion, these studies show that I(Na) is expressed in cultured and diseased conditions but not in normal aorta. The Na(V)1.7 plays an important role in cell migration, endocytosis, and secretion. Na(V)1.7 is also expressed in aorta after balloon injury, suggesting a potential role for Na(V)1.7 in the progression of intimal hyperplasia.

  7. Sodium Channels, Mitochondria, and Axonal Degeneration in Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Persson, Anna-Karin; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Estacion, Mark; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy results from damage to peripheral nerves and is often accompanied by pain in affected limbs. Treatment represents an unmet medical need and a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying axonal injury is needed. Longer nerve fibers tend to degenerate first (length-dependence), and patients carrying pathogenic mutations throughout life usually become symptomatic in mid- or late-life (time-dependence). The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels can contribute to axonal injury and sodium channel gain-of-function mutations have been linked to peripheral neuropathy. Recent studies have implicated sodium channel activity, mitochondrial compromise, and reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange in time- and length-dependent axonal injury. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying axonal injury in peripheral neuropathy may provide new therapeutic strategies for this painful and debilitating condition.

  8. Sodium channel blockers in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kalso, Eija

    2005-01-01

    Subtypes of tetrodotoxin resistant voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in the development of certain types of neuropathic pains. After nerve injury hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing develop at the site of injury and also in the dorsal root ganglion cell bodies. This hyperexcitability results at least partly from accumulation of sodium channels at the site of injury. The facts that these sodium channels seem to exist in peripheral nerves only and that they can be blocked at the resting state (use-dependent block) offer the possibility to develop drugs, which selectively block these damaged, overexcited nerves. At the moment no such drugs are available. However, some of the most potent drugs that are currently used to manage neuropathic pain e.g. amitriptyline and other tricyclic antidepressants, also block these channels in addition to having several other mechanisms of action. Also most anticonvulsants that are used to alleviate neuropathic pain are sodium channel blockers. Lidocaine, the prototype drug, has been shown to be effective in peripheral neuropathic pain. Its use is limited by the fact that it cannot be administered orally. An oral local anesthetic type sodium channel blocker, mexiletine is an antiarrhythmic agent that is effective in neuropathic pain. However, effective doses may be difficult to achieve because of adverse effects.

  9. Upregulation of the sodium channel NaVβ4 subunit and its contributions to mechanical hypersensitivity and neuronal hyperexcitability in a rat model of radicular pain induced by local DRG inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Tan, Zhi-Yong; Barbosa, Cindy; Strong, Judith A.; Cummins, Theodore R.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    High frequency spontaneous firing in myelinated sensory neurons plays a key role in initiating pain behaviors in several different models, including the radicular pain model in which the rat lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are locally inflamed. The sodium channel isoform NaV1.6 contributes to pain behaviors and spontaneous activity in this model. Among all the isoforms in adult DRG, NaV1.6 is the main carrier of TTX-sensitive resurgent Na currents that allow high-frequency firing. Resurgent currents flow after a depolarization or action potential, as a blocking particle exits the pore. In most neurons the regulatory β4 subunit is potentially the endogenous blocker. We used in vivo siRNA mediated knockdown of NaVβ4 to examine its role in the DRG inflammation model. NaVβ4 but not control siRNA almost completely blocked mechanical hypersensitivity induced by DRG inflammation. Microelectrode recordings in isolated whole DRGs showed that NaVβ4 siRNA blocked the inflammation-induced increase in spontaneous activity of Aβ neurons, and reduced repetitive firing and other measures of excitability. NaVβ4 was preferentially expressed in larger diameter cells; DRG inflammation increased its expression and this was reversed by NaVβ4 siRNA, based on immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. NaVβ4 siRNA also reduced immunohistochemical NaV1.6 expression. Patch clamp recordings of TTX-sensitive Na currents in acutely cultured medium diameter DRG neurons showed that DRG inflammation increased transient and especially resurgent current; effects blocked by NaVβ4 siRNA. NaVβ4 may represent a more specific target for pain conditions that depend on myelinated neurons expressing NaV1.6. PMID:26785322

  10. Mutant Sodium Channel for Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, Bakhos A; Christensen, Adam P; Pike, Lisa; Wurdinger, Thomas; Perry, Katherine F; Saydam, Okay; Jacobs, Andreas H; García-Añoveros, Jaime; Weissleder, Ralph; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Corey, David P; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2009-01-01

    Viral vectors have been used to deliver a wide range of therapeutic genes to tumors. In this study, a novel tumor therapy was achieved by the delivery of a mammalian brain sodium channel, ASIC2a, carrying a mutation that renders it constitutively open. This channel was delivered to tumor cells using a herpes simplex virus-1/Epstein–Barr virus (HSV/EBV) hybrid amplicon vector in which gene expression was controlled by a tetracycline regulatory system (tet-on) with silencer elements. Upon infection and doxycycline induction of mutant channel expression in tumor cells, the open channel led to amiloride-sensitive sodium influx as assessed by patch clamp recording and sodium imaging in culture. Within hours, tumor cells swelled and died. In addition to cells expressing the mutant channel, adjacent, noninfected cells connected by gap junctions also died. Intratumoral injection of HSV/EBV amplicon vector encoding the mutant sodium channel and systemic administration of doxycycline led to regression of subcutaneous tumors in nude mice as assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The advantage of this direct mode of tumor therapy is that all types of tumor cells become susceptible and death is rapid with no time for the tumor cells to become resistant. PMID:19259066

  11. Calcium triggers reversal of calmodulin on nested anti-parallel sites in the IQ motif of the neuronal voltage-dependent sodium channel NaV1.2.

    PubMed

    Hovey, Liam; Fowler, C Andrew; Mahling, Ryan; Lin, Zesen; Miller, Mark Stephen; Marx, Dagan C; Yoder, Jesse B; Kim, Elaine H; Tefft, Kristin M; Waite, Brett C; Feldkamp, Michael D; Yu, Liping; Shea, Madeline A

    2017-03-09

    Several members of the voltage-gated sodium channel family are regulated by calmodulin (CaM) and ionic calcium. The neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.2 contains binding sites for both apo (calcium-depleted) and calcium-saturated CaM. We have determined equilibrium dissociation constants for rat NaV1.2 IQ motif [IQRAYRRYLLK] binding to apo CaM (~3nM) and (Ca(2+))4-CaM (~85nM), showing that apo CaM binding is favored by 30-fold. For both apo and (Ca(2+))4-CaM, NMR demonstrated that NaV1.2 IQ motif peptide (NaV1.2IQp) exclusively made contacts with C-domain residues of CaM (CaMC). To understand how calcium triggers conformational change at the CaM-IQ interface, we determined a solution structure (2M5E.pdb) of (Ca(2+))2-CaMC bound to NaV1.2IQp. The polarity of (Ca(2+))2-CaMC relative to the IQ motif was opposite to that seen in apo CaMC-Nav1.2IQp (2KXW), revealing that CaMC recognizes nested, anti-parallel sites in Nav1.2IQp. Reversal of CaM may require transient release from the IQ motif during calcium binding, and facilitate a re-orientation of CaMN allowing interactions with non-IQ NaV1.2 residues or auxiliary regulatory proteins interacting in the vicinity of the IQ motif.

  12. Comparison of the pharmacological properties of rat Na(V)1.8 with rat Na(V)1.2a and human Na(V)1.5 voltage-gated sodium channel subtypes using a membrane potential sensitive dye and FLIPR.

    PubMed

    Vickery, R G; Amagasu, S M; Chang, R; Mai, N; Kaufman, E; Martin, J; Hembrador, J; O'Keefe, M D; Gee, C; Marquess, D; Smith, J A M

    2004-01-01

    A novel, membrane potential sensitive dye and a fluorescence imaging plate reader (FLIPR) have been used to characterize the pharmacological properties of rat Na(v)1.8 voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) in parallel with rat Na(v)1.2a and human Na(v)1.5 VGSC subtypes, respectively. The sensitivity of recombinant Na(v)1.2a-CHO, Na(v)1.5-293-EBNA, and Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells to VGSC activators was subtype dependent. Veratridine evoked depolarization of Na(v)1.2a-CHO and Na(v)1.5-293-EBNA cells with pEC(50) values of 4.78 +/- 0.13 and 4.84 +/- 0.12, respectively (n = 3), but had negligible effect on Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells (pEC(50) < 4.5). Type I pyrethroids were without significant effect at all subtypes. In contrast, the type II pyrethroids deltamethrin and fenvalerate evoked direct depolarization of Na(v)1.8-F-11 and Na(v)1.5-293-EBNA cells. Deltamethrin potentiated the veratridine-evoked response in Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells by > or =20-fold, in contrast to a Na(v)1.2a, and Na(v)1.5 cells. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) inhibited VGSC activator-evoked depolarization of Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells with a biphasic concentration-response curve. The calculated pIC(50) values were 8.05 +/- 0.25 (n = 4) and 4.32 +/- 0.21 (n = 4), corresponding to TTX inhibition of endogenous TTX-sensitive (TTX-S), and recombinant Na(v)1.8 TTX-resistant (TTX-R) VGSCs, respectively. With the exception of TTX, the potencies of a number of ion channel blockers for the Na(v)1.8, Na(v)1.2a, and Na(v)1.5 VGSC subtypes were similar. In summary, these high-throughput FLIPR assays represent a valuable tool for the determination of the relative potencies of compounds at different VGSC subtypes and may prove useful for the identification of novel subtype-selective inhibitors.

  13. Abnormal changes in voltage-gated sodium channels Na(V)1.1, Na(V)1.2, Na(V)1.3, Na(V)1.6 and in calmodulin/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, within the brains of spontaneously epileptic rats and tremor rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoxue; Guo, Feng; Lv, Xintong; Feng, Rui; Min, Dongyu; Ma, Lihua; Liu, Yajing; Zhao, Jinsheng; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Hao, Liying; Cai, Jiqun

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a crucial role in epilepsy. The expressions of different VGSCs subtypes are varied in diverse animal models of epilepsy that may reflect their multiple phenotypes or the complexity of the mechanisms of epilepsy. In a previous study, we reported that NaV1.1 and NaV1.3 were up-regulated in the hippocampus of the spontaneously epileptic rat (SER). In this study, we further analyzed both the expression and distribution of the typical VGSC subtypes NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3 and NaV1.6 in the hippocampus and in the cortex of the temporal lobe of two genetic epileptic animal models: the SER and the tremor rat (TRM). The expressions of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) were also analyzed with the purpose of assessing the effect of the CaM/CaMKII pathway in these two models of epilepsy. Increased expression of the four VGSC subtypes and CaM, accompanied by a decrease in CaMKII was observed in the hippocampus of both the SERs and the TRM rats. However, the changes observed in the expression of VGSC subtypes and CaM were decreased with an elevated CaMKII in the cortex of their temporal lobes. Double-labeled immunofluorescence data suggested that in SERs and TRM rats, the four subtypes of the VGSC proteins were present throughout the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus and temporal lobe cortex and these were co-localized in neurons with CaM. These data represent the first evidence of abnormal changes in expression of four VGSC subtypes (NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3 and NaV1.6) and CaM/CaMKII in the hippocampus and temporal lobe cortex of SERs and TRM rats. These changes may be involved in the generation of epileptiform activity and underlie the observed seizure phenotype in these rat models of genetic epilepsy.

  14. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; McArthur, Jeff; Ostroumov, Vitaly; French, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10–70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  15. Differential thermosensitivity in mixed syndrome cardiac sodium channel mutants.

    PubMed

    Abdelsayed, Mena; Peters, Colin H; Ruben, Peter C

    2015-09-15

    Cardiac arrhythmias are often associated with mutations in SCN5A the gene that encodes the cardiac paralogue of the voltage-gated sodium channel, NaV 1.5. The NaV 1.5 mutants R1193Q and E1784K give rise to both long QT and Brugada syndromes. Various environmental factors, including temperature, may unmask arrhythmia. We sought to determine whether temperature might be an arrhythmogenic trigger in these two mixed syndrome mutants. Whole-cell patch clamp was used to measure the biophysical properties of NaV 1.5 WT, E1784K and R1193Q mutants. Recordings were performed using Chinese hamster ovary (CHOk1) cells transiently transfected with the NaV 1.5 α subunit (WT, E1784K, or R1193Q), β1 subunit, and eGFP. The channels' voltage-dependent and kinetic properties were measured at three different temperatures: 10ºC, 22ºC, and 34ºC. The E1784K mutant is more thermosensitive than either WT or R1193Q channels. When temperature is elevated from 22°C to 34°C, there is a greater increase in late INa and use-dependent inactivation in E1784K than in WT or R1193Q. However, when temperature is lowered to 10°C, the two mutants show a decrease in channel availability. Action potential modelling using Q10 fit values, extrapolated to physiological and febrile temperatures, show a larger transmural voltage gradient in E1784K compared to R1193Q and WT with hyperthermia. The E1784K mutant is more thermosensitive than WT or R1193Q channels. This enhanced thermosensitivity may be a mechanism for arrhythmogenesis in patients with E1784K sodium channels.

  16. Therapeutic potential for phenytoin: targeting Na(v)1.5 sodium channels to reduce migration and invasion in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Kozminski, David J; Wold, Lindsey A; Modak, Rohan; Calhoun, Jeffrey D; Isom, Lori L; Brackenbury, William J

    2012-07-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric membrane protein complexes containing pore-forming α subunits and smaller, non-pore-forming β subunits. VGSCs are classically expressed in excitable cells, including neurons and muscle cells, where they mediate action potential firing, neurite outgrowth, pathfinding, and migration. VGSCs are also expressed in metastatic cells from a number of cancers. The Na(v)1.5 α subunit (encoded by SCN5A) is expressed in breast cancer (BCa) cell lines, where it enhances migration and invasion. We studied the expression of SCN5A in BCa array data, and tested the effect of the VGSC-blocking anticonvulsant phenytoin (5,5-diphenylhydantoin) on Na(+) current, migration, and invasion in BCa cells. SCN5A was up-regulated in BCa samples in several datasets, and was more highly expressed in samples from patients who had a recurrence, metastasis, or died within 5 years. SCN5A was also overexpressed as an outlier in a subset of samples, and associated with increased odds of developing metastasis. Phenytoin inhibited transient and persistent Na(+) current recorded from strongly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells, and this effect was more potent at depolarized holding voltages. It may thus be an effective VGSC-blocking drug in cancer cells, which typically have depolarized membrane potentials. At a concentration within the therapeutic range used to treat epilepsy, phenytoin significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells, but had no effect on weakly metastatic MCF-7 cells, which do not express Na(+) currents. We conclude that phenytoin suppresses Na(+) current in VGSC-expressing metastatic BCa cells, thus inhibiting VGSC-dependent migration and invasion. Together, our data support the hypothesis that SCN5A is up-regulated in BCa, favoring an invasive/metastatic phenotype. We therefore propose that repurposing existing VGSC-blocking therapeutic drugs should be further investigated as a potential new strategy to improve

  17. An update on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Onwuli, Donatus O; Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential proteins in brain physiology, as they generate the sodium currents that initiate neuronal action potentials. Voltage-gated sodium channels expression, localisation and function are regulated by a range of transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Here, we review our understanding of regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels, in particular SCN1A (NaV1.1), SCN2A (NaV1.2), SCN3A (NaV1.3) and SCN8A (NaV1.6), by transcription factors, by alternative splicing, and by post-translational modifications. Our focus is strongly centred on recent research lines, and newly generated knowledge.

  18. Impaired stretch modulation in potentially lethal cardiac sodium channel mutants.

    PubMed

    Banderali, Umberto; Juranka, Peter F; Clark, Robert B; Giles, Wayne R; Morris, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    The presence of two slowly inactivating mutants of the cardiac sodium channel (hNa(V)1.5), R1623Q and R1626P, associate with sporadic Long-QT3 (LQT3) syndrome, and may contribute to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or lethal ventricular disturbances. Cardiac mechanoelectric feedback is considered a factor in such sporadic arrhythmias. Since stretch and shear forces modulate hNa(V)1.5 gating, detailed electrophysiological study of LQT-Na(V)1.5 mutant channel alpha subunit(s) might provide insights. We compared recombinant R1623Q and WT currents in control vs. stretched membrane of cell-attached patches of Xenopus oocytes. Macroscopic current was monitored before, during, and after stretch induced by pipette suction. In either mutant Na(+) channel, peak current at small depolarizations could be more than doubled by stretch. As in WT, R1623Q showed reversible and stretch intensity dependent acceleration of current onset and decay at all voltages, with kinetic coupling between these two processes retained during stretch. These two Na(V)1.5 channel alpha subunits differed in the absolute extent of kinetic acceleration for a given stretch intensity; over a range of intensities, R1623Q inactivation speed increased significantly less than did WT. The LQT3 mutant R1626P also retained its kinetic coupling during stretch. Whereas WT stretch-difference currents (I(Na)(V,t) without stretch minus I(Na)(V,t) with stretch) were mostly inhibitory (equivalent to outward current), they were substantially (R1623Q) or entirely (R1626P) excitatory for the LQT3 mutants. If stretch-modulated Na(V)1.5 current (i.e., brief excitation followed by accelerated current decay) routinely contributes to cardiac mechanoelectric feedback, then during hemodynamic load variations, the abnormal stretch-modulated components of R1623Q and R1626P current could be pro-arrhythmic.

  19. Epithelial Sodium and Acid-Sensing Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellenberger, Stephan

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are non-voltage-gated Na+ channels that form their own subfamilies within the ENaC/degenerin ion channel family. ASICs are sensors of extracellular pH, and ENaC, whose main function is trans-epithelial Na+ transport, can sense extra- and intra-cellular Na+. In aldosterone-responsive epithelial cells of the kidney, ENaC plays a critical role in the control of sodium balance, blood volume and blood pressure. In airway epithelia, ENaC has a distinct role in controlling fluid reabsorption at the air-liquid interface, thereby determining the rate of mucociliary transport. In taste receptor cells of the tongue, ENaC is involved in salt taste sensation. ASICs have emerged as key sensors for extracellular protons in central and peripheral neurons. Although not all of their physiological and pathological functions are firmly established yet, there is good evidence for a role of ASICs in the brain in learning, expression of fear, and in neurodegeneration after ischaemic stroke. In sensory neurons, ASICs are involved in nociception and mechanosensation. ENaC and ASIC subunits share substantial sequence homology and the conservation of several functional domains. This chapter summarises our current understanding of the physiological functions and of the mechanisms of ion permeation, gating and regulation of ENaC and ASICs.

  20. Modification of single Na+ channels by batrachotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, F N; Narahashi, T

    1982-01-01

    The modifications in the properties of voltage-gated Na+ channels caused by batrachotoxin were studied by using the patch clamp method for measuring single channel currents from excised membranes of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. The toxin-modified open state of the Na+ channel has a decreased conductance in comparison to that of normal Na+ channels. The lifetime of the modified open state is drastically prolonged, and channels now continue to open during a maintained depolarization so that the probability of a channel being open becomes constant. Modified and normal open states of Na+ channels coexist in batrachotoxin-exposed membrane patches. Unlike the normal condition, Na+ channels exposed to batrachotoxin open spontaneously at large negative potentials. These spontaneous openings apparently cause the toxin-induced increase in Na+ permeability which, in turn, causes membrane depolarization. PMID:6292915

  1. Voltage-gated sodium channels and cancer: is excitability their primary role?

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Sébastien; Gillet, Ludovic; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Besson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are molecular characteristics of excitable cells. Their activation, triggered by membrane depolarization, generates transient sodium currents that initiate action potentials in neurons and muscle cells. Sodium currents were discovered by Hodgkin and Huxley using the voltage clamp technique and reported in their landmark series of papers in 1952. It was only in the 1980's that sodium channel proteins from excitable membranes were molecularly characterized by Catterall and his collaborators. Non-excitable cells can also express NaV channels in physiological conditions as well as in pathological conditions. These NaV channels can sustain biological roles that are not related to the generation of action potentials. Interestingly, it is likely that the abnormal expression of NaV in pathological tissues can reflect the re-expression of a fetal phenotype. This is especially true in epithelial cancer cells for which these channels have been identified and sodium currents recorded, while it was not the case for cells from the cognate normal tissues. In cancers, the functional activity of NaV appeared to be involved in regulating the proliferative, migrative, and invasive properties of cells. This review is aimed at addressing the non-excitable roles of NaV channels with a specific emphasis in the regulation of cancer cell biology. PMID:26283962

  2. Molecular biology of insect sodium channels and pyrethroid resistance.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S

    2014-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Many of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors.

  3. Molecular Biology of Insect Sodium Channels and Pyrethroid Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Most of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors. PMID:24704279

  4. Voltage-gated sodium channels: biophysics, pharmacology, and related channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Gollob, Michael H; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit) that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (I(Na)) and can also function as cell adhesion molecules. In vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named "channel partners" or "channel interacting proteins" (ChiPs) like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin), and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics). Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium "channelopathies".  This review will outline the structure, function, and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field.

  5. Differential sensitivity of rat voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms to pyrazoline-type insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, Kristopher S.; Soderlund, David M. . E-mail: dms6@cornell.edu

    2006-07-15

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides are potent inhibitors of insect and mammalian voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In mammals, there are nine sodium channel {alpha} subunit isoforms that have unique distributions and pharmacological properties, but no published data exist that compare the relative sensitivity of these different mammalian sodium channel isoforms to inhibition by pyrazoline-type insecticides. This study employed the Xenopus oocyte expression system to examine the relative sensitivity of rat Na{sub v}1.2a, Na{sub v}1.4, Na{sub v}1.5, and Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channel {alpha} subunit isoforms to the pyrazoline-type insecticides indoxacarb, DCJW, and RH 3421. Additionally, we assessed the effect of coexpression with the rat {beta}1 auxiliary subunit on the sensitivity of the Na{sub v}1.2a and Na{sub v}1.4 isoforms to these compounds. The relative sensitivity of the four sodium channel {alpha} subunits differed for each of the three compounds we examined. With DCJW, the order of sensitivity was Na{sub v}1.4 > Na{sub v}1.2a > Na{sub v}1.5 > Na{sub v}1.8. In contrast, the relative sensitivity of these isoforms to indoxacarb differed from that to DCJW: the Na{sub v}1.8 isoform was most sensitive, the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform was completely insensitive, and the sensitivities of the Na{sub v}1.5 and Na{sub v}1.2a isoforms were intermediate between these two extremes. Moreover, the pattern of sensitivity to RH 3421 among these four isoforms was different from that for either indoxacarb or DCJW: the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform was most sensitive to RH 3421, whereas the sensitivities of the remaining three isoforms were substantially less than that of the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform and were approximately equivalent. The only statistically significant effect of coexpression of either the Na{sub v}1.2a or Na{sub v}1.4 isoforms with the {beta}1 subunit was the modest reduction in the sensitivity of the Na{sub v}1.2a isoform to RH 3421. These results demonstrate that mammalian sodium

  6. Neurological perspectives on voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Linley, John E.; Baker, Mark D.; Minett, Michael S.; Cregg, Roman; Werdehausen, Robert; Rugiero, François

    2012-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels has long been linked to disorders of neuronal excitability such as epilepsy and chronic pain. Recent genetic studies have now expanded the role of sodium channels in health and disease, to include autism, migraine, multiple sclerosis, cancer as well as muscle and immune system disorders. Transgenic mouse models have proved useful in understanding the physiological role of individual sodium channels, and there has been significant progress in the development of subtype selective inhibitors of sodium channels. This review will outline the functions and roles of specific sodium channels in electrical signalling and disease, focusing on neurological aspects. We also discuss recent advances in the development of selective sodium channel inhibitors. PMID:22961543

  7. The neuronal channel NALCN contributes resting sodium permeability and is required for normal respiratory rhythm.

    PubMed

    Lu, Boxun; Su, Yanhua; Das, Sudipto; Liu, Jin; Xia, Jingsheng; Ren, Dejian

    2007-04-20

    Sodium plays a key role in determining the basal excitability of the nervous systems through the resting "leak" Na(+) permeabilities, but the molecular identities of the TTX- and Cs(+)-resistant Na(+) leak conductance are totally unknown. Here we show that this conductance is formed by the protein NALCN, a substantially uncharacterized member of the sodium/calcium channel family. Unlike any of the other 20 family members, NALCN forms a voltage-independent, nonselective cation channel. NALCN mutant mice have a severely disrupted respiratory rhythm and die within 24 hours of birth. Brain stem-spinal cord recordings reveal reduced neuronal firing. The TTX- and Cs(+)-resistant background Na(+) leak current is absent in the mutant hippocampal neurons. The resting membrane potentials of the mutant neurons are relatively insensitive to changes in extracellular Na(+) concentration. Thus, NALCN, a nonselective cation channel, forms the background Na(+) leak conductance and controls neuronal excitability.

  8. Development and Testing of an In Vitro Assay for Screening of Potential Therapeutic Agents Active against Na Channel Neurotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-12

    to produce approximately half-maximal effects mediated through these different sodium channel sites in the assay. Thus, the binding of [3HJBTX-B should...experiments with I3H]STX, yielding the unexpected result that effects of HM-197 are not mediated through the TTX/STX sodium channel binding site. Additional...Scorpion toxin; Screening; nA Pyrethroids; Radioligand binding; Synaptoneurosomes; RA 1 ; nA I ~ I ITherapeutic agents; Sodium channel 19. ABSTRACT

  9. Direct interaction of Na-azide with the KATP channel.

    PubMed

    Trapp, S; Ashcroft, F M

    2000-11-01

    1. The effects of the metabolic inhibitor sodium azide were tested on excised macropatches from Xenopus oocytes expressing cloned ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels of the Kir6.2/SUR1 type. 2. In inside-out patches from oocytes expressing Kir6.2 delta C36 (a truncated form of Kir6.2 that expresses in the absence of SUR), intracellular Na-azide inhibited macroscopic currents with an IC50 of 11 mM. The inhibitory effect of Na-azide was mimicked by the same concentration of NaCl, but not by sucrose. 3. Na-azide and NaCl blocked Kir6.2/SUR1 currents with IC50 of 36 mM and 19 mM, respectively. Inhibition was abolished in the absence of intracellular Mg2+. In contrast, Kir6.2 delta C36 currents were inhibited by Na-azide both in the presence or absence of intracellular Mg2+. 4. Kir6.2/SUR1 currents were less sensitive to 3 mM Na-azide in the presence of MgATP. This apparent reduction in sensitivity is caused by a small activatory effect of Na-azide conferred by SUR. 5. We conclude that, in addition to its well-established inhibitory effect on cellular metabolism, which leads to activation of KATP channels in intact cells, intracellular Na-azide has direct effects on the KATP channel. Inhibition is intrinsic to Kir6.2, is mediated by Na+, and is modulated by SUR. There is also a small, ATP-dependent, stimulatory effect of Na-azide mediated by the SUR subunit. The direct effects of 3 mM Na-azide on KATP channels are negligible in comparison to the metabolic activation produced by the same Na-azide concentration.

  10. Indoxacarb, Metaflumizone, and Other Sodium Channel Inhibitor Insecticides: Mechanism and Site of Action on Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    von Stein, Richard T; Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2013-07-01

    Sodium channel inhibitor (SCI) insecticides were discovered almost four decades ago but have only recently yielded important commercial products (eg., indoxacarb and metaflumizone). SCI insecticides inhibit sodium channel function by binding selectively to slow-inactivated (non-conducting) sodium channel states. Characterization of the action of SCI insecticides on mammalian sodium channels using both biochemical and electrophysiological approaches demonstrates that they bind at or near a drug receptor site, the "local anesthetic (LA) receptor." This mechanism and site of action on sodium channels differentiates SCI insecticides from other insecticidal agents that act on sodium channels. However, SCI insecticides share a common mode of action with drugs currently under investigation as anticonvulsants and treatments for neuropathic pain. In this paper we summarize the development of the SCI insecticide class and the evidence that this structurally diverse group of compounds have a common mode of action on sodium channels. We then review research that has used site-directed mutagenesis and heterologous expression of cloned mammalian sodium channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes to further elucidate the site and mechanism of action of SCI insecticides. The results of these studies provide new insight into the mechanism of action of SCI insecticides on voltage-gated sodium channels, the location of the SCI insecticide receptor, and its relationship to the LA receptor that binds therapeutic SCI agents.

  11. Pacemaker rate and depolarization block in nigral dopamine neurons: a somatic sodium channel balancing act

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Kristal R.; Huertas, Marco A.; Horn, John P.; Canavier, Carmen C.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2012-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons are slow intrinsic pacemakers that undergo depolarization (DP) block upon moderate stimulation. Understanding DP block is important because it has been correlated with the clinical efficacy of chronic antipsychotic drug treatment. Here we describe how voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels regulate DP block and pacemaker activity in DA neurons of the substantia nigra using rat brain slices. The distribution, density and gating of NaV currents were manipulated by blocking native channels with tetrodotoxin and by creating virtual channels and anti-channels with dynamic clamp. Although action potentials initiate in the axon initial segment (AIS) and NaV channels are distributed in multiple dendrites, selective reduction of NaV channel activity in the soma was sufficient to decrease pacemaker frequency and increase susceptibility to DP block. Conversely, increasing somatic NaV current density raised pacemaker frequency and lowered susceptibility to DP block. Finally, when NaV currents were restricted to the soma, pacemaker activity occurred at abnormally high rates due to excessive local subthreshold NaV current. Together with computational simulations, these data show that both the slow pacemaker rate and the sensitivity to DP block that characterizes DA neurons result from the low density of somatic NaV channels. More generally, we conclude that the somatodendritic distribution of NaV channels is a major determinant of repetitive spiking frequency. PMID:23077037

  12. Sodium channel slow inactivation interferes with open channel block

    PubMed Central

    Hampl, Martin; Eberhardt, Esther; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Lampert, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 are linked to inherited pain syndromes such as erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). PEPD mutations impair Nav1.7 fast inactivation and increase persistent currents. PEPD mutations also increase resurgent currents, which involve the voltage-dependent release of an open channel blocker. In contrast, IEM mutations, whenever tested, leave resurgent currents unchanged. Accordingly, the IEM deletion mutation L955 (ΔL955) fails to produce resurgent currents despite enhanced persistent currents, which have hitherto been considered a prerequisite for resurgent currents. Additionally, ΔL955 exhibits a prominent enhancement of slow inactivation (SI). We introduced mutations into Nav1.7 and Nav1.6 that either enhance or impair SI in order to investigate their effects on resurgent currents. Our results show that enhanced SI is accompanied by impaired resurgent currents, which suggests that SI may interfere with open-channel block. PMID:27174182

  13. Functional protein expression of multiple sodium channel alpha- and beta-subunit isoforms in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Susann G; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Zechner, Christoph; Maass, Alexander H; Bischoff, Sebastian; Muck, Jenny; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Scheuer, Todd; Maier, Sebastian K G

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are composed of pore-forming alpha- and auxiliary beta-subunits and are responsible for the rapid depolarization of cardiac action potentials. Recent evidence indicates that neuronal tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunits are expressed in the heart in addition to the predominant cardiac TTX-resistant Na(v)1.5 sodium channel alpha-subunit. These TTX-sensitive isoforms are preferentially localized in the transverse tubules of rodents. Since neonatal cardiomyocytes have yet to develop transverse tubules, we determined the complement of sodium channel subunits expressed in these cells. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were stained with antibodies specific for individual isoforms of sodium channel alpha- and beta-subunits. alpha-actinin, a component of the z-line, was used as an intracellular marker of sarcomere boundaries. TTX-sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunit isoforms Na(v)1.1, Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.4 and Na(v)1.6 were detected in neonatal rat heart but at levels reduced compared to the predominant cardiac alpha-subunit isoform, Na(v)1.5. Each of the beta-subunit isoforms (beta1-beta4) was also expressed in neonatal cardiac cells. In contrast to adult cardiomyocytes, the alpha-subunits are distributed in punctate clusters across the membrane surface of neonatal cardiomyocytes; no isoform-specific subcellular localization is observed. Voltage clamp recordings in the absence and presence of 20 nM TTX provided functional evidence for the presence of TTX-sensitive sodium current in neonatal ventricular myocardium which represents between 20 and 30% of the current, depending on membrane potential and experimental conditions. Thus, as in the adult heart, a range of sodium channel alpha-subunits are expressed in neonatal myocytes in addition to the predominant TTX-resistant Na(v)1.5 alpha-subunit and they contribute to the total sodium current.

  14. Design of a specific activator for skeletal muscle sodium channels uncovers channel architecture.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lior; Ilan, Nitza; Gur, Maya; Stühmer, Walter; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2007-10-05

    Gating modifiers of voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)s) are important tools in neuroscience research and may have therapeutic potential in medicinal disorders. Analysis of the bioactive surface of the scorpion beta-toxin Css4 (from Centruroides suffusus suffusus) toward rat brain (rNa(v)1.2a) and skeletal muscle (rNa(v)1.4) channels using binding studies revealed commonality but also substantial differences, which were used to design a specific activator, Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R), of rNa(v)1.4 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The therapeutic potential of Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R) was tested using an rNa(v)1.4 mutant carrying the same mutation present in the genetic disorder hypokalemic periodic paralysis. The activator restored the impaired gating properties of the mutant channel expressed in oocytes, thus offering a tentative new means for treatment of neuromuscular disorders with reduced muscle excitability. Mutant double cycle analysis employing toxin residues involved in the construction of Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R) and residues whose equivalents in the rat brain channel rNa(v)1.2a were shown to affect Css4 binding revealed significant coupling energy (>1.3 kcal/mol) between F14A and E592A at Domain-2/voltage sensor segments 1-2 (D2/S1-S2), R27Q and E1251N at D3/SS2-S6, and E28R with both E650A at D2/S3-S4 and E1251N at D3/SS2-S6. These results show that despite the differences in interactions with the rat brain and skeletal muscle Na(v)s, Css4 recognizes a similar region on both channel subtypes. Moreover, our data indicate that the S3-S4 loop of the voltage sensor module in Domain-2 is in very close proximity to the SS2-S6 segment of the pore module of Domain-3 in rNa(v)1.4. This is the first experimental evidence that the inter-domain spatial organization of mammalian Na(v)s resembles that of voltage-gated potassium channels.

  15. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhorov, Boris S.; Dong, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr), in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel. PMID:27809228

  16. Several types of sodium-conducting channel in human carcinoma A-431 cells.

    PubMed

    Negulyaev YuA; Vedernikova, E A; Mozhayeva, G N

    1994-08-24

    Patch clamp method in outside-out configuration was used to search for cation channels which possibly mediate sodium influx through plasma membrane in A-431 carcinoma cells. We found four types of nonvoltage-gated Na-conducting channel. The first of 9-10 pS conductance (145 mM Na+, 30 degrees C) seems to be Na-selective; three others were characterized with conductance values of 24, 35 and 65 pS and lower selectivity among cations. Na-selective channels (9-10 pS) were not blocked by tetrodotoxin (1 microM). External application of amiloride (0.1-2 mM) resulted in a reversible inhibition of single currents through Na-selective channels.

  17. RING1B contributes to Ewing sarcoma development by repressing the NaV1.6 sodium channel and the NF-κB pathway, independently of the fusion oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Rodriguez, Eva; Fernández-Mariño, Ana Isabel; Pardo-Pastor, Carlos; Bahamonde, María Isabel; Fernández-Fernández, José M.; García-Domínguez, Daniel J.; Hontecillas-Prieto, Lourdes; Lavarino, Cinzia; Carcaboso, Angel M.; de Torres, Carmen; Tirado, Oscar M.; de Alava, Enrique; Mora, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is an aggressive tumor defined by EWSR1 gene fusions that behave as an oncogene. Here we demonstrate that RING1B is highly expressed in primary ES tumors, and its expression is independent of the fusion oncogene. RING1B-depleted ES cells display an expression profile enriched in genes functionally involved in hematological development but RING1B depletion does not induce cellular differentiation. In ES cells, RING1B directly binds the SCN8A sodium channel promoter and its depletion results in enhanced Nav1.6 expression and function. The signaling pathway most significantly modulated by RING1B is NF-κB. RING1B depletion results in enhanced p105/p50 expression, which sensitizes ES cells to apoptosis by FGFR/SHP2/STAT3 blockade. Reduced NaV1.6 function protects ES cells from apoptotic cell death by maintaining low NF-κB levels. Our findings identify RING1B as a trait of the cell-of-origin and provide a potential targetable vulnerability. PMID:27317769

  18. Voltage-gated sodium channel blockers as immunomodulators.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Francesco; Livrea, Paolo; Jirillo, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    Several Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels (VGSC) are widely expressed on lymphocytes and macrophages but their role in immune function is still debated. Nevertheless, Na(+) influx through VGSC is required for lymphocytes activation and proliferation, since these responses are blocked by Na(+)-free medium or by VGSC blockers. These effects may be mediated by the reduced intracellular Na(+) levels, which in turn may impair the activity of Na(+)/Ca(++) exchanger resulting in reduced intracellular Ca(++) levels during lymphocyte activation. Furthermore, in Jurkat cell line VGSC appear to be involved in cell volume regulation, migration in artificial matrix and cell death by apoptosis. VGSC play a role in macrophage function as well, and VGSC blockers impair both phagocytosis and inflammatory responses. Several VGSC blockers have shown immunomodulatory properties in mice models, skewing the immune response toward a Th2-mediated response, while suppressing Th1-mediated responses, and VGSC already used in clinical practice are known to modulate immunoglobulin (Ig) levels both in mice and in humans. These effects suggest that VGSC blockers may find clinical application in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disease. However, many of these drugs induce a number of severe side effects. The relevance of VGSC function in immune regulation suggest that the testing of newly patented VGSC blockers for their effect on immunity may be worthwhile.

  19. Selective alteration of sodium channel gating by Australian funnel-web spider toxins.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, G M; Little, M J; Tyler, M; Narahashi, T

    1996-01-01

    The actions of potent mammalian neurotoxins isolated from the venom of two Australian funnel-web spiders were investigated using both electrophysiological and neurochemical techniques. Whole-cell patch clamp recording of sodium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons revealed that versutoxin (VTX), isolated from the venom of Hadronyche versuta, produced a concentration-dependent slowing or removal of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium current inactivation and a reduction in peak TTX-S sodium current. In contrast, VTX had no effect on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium currents or potassium currents. VTX also shifted the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation in the hyperpolarizing direction and increased the rate of recovery from inactivation. Ion flux studies performed in rat brain synaptosomes also revealed that robustoxin (RTX), from the venom of Atrax robustus, and VTX both produced a partial activation of 22Na+ flux and an inhibition of batrachotoxin-activated 22Na+ flux. This inhibition of flux through batrachotoxin-activated channels was not due to an interaction with neurotoxin receptor site 1 since [3H]saxitoxin binding was unaffected. In addition, the partial activation of 22Na+ flux was not enhanced in the presence of alpha-scorpion toxin and further experiments suggest that VTX also enhances [3H]batrachotoxin binding. These selective actions of funnel-web spider toxins on sodium channel function are comparable to those of alpha-scorpion and sea anemone toxins which bind to neurotoxin receptor site 3 on the channel to slow channel inactivation profoundly. Also, these modifications of sodium channel gating and kinetics are consistent with actions of the spider toxins to produce repetitive firing of action potentials.

  20. Metaflumizone is a novel sodium channel blocker insecticide.

    PubMed

    Salgado, V L; Hayashi, J H

    2007-12-15

    Metaflumizone is a novel semicarbazone insecticide, derived chemically from the pyrazoline sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs) discovered at Philips-Duphar in the early 1970s, but with greatly improved mammalian safety. This paper describes studies confirming that the insecticidal action of metaflumizone is due to the state-dependent blockage of sodium channels. Larvae of the moth Spodoptera eridania injected with metaflumizone became paralyzed, concomitant with blockage of all nerve activity. Furthermore, tonic firing of abdominal stretch receptor organs from Spodoptera frugiperda was blocked by metaflumizone applied in the bath, consistent with the block of voltage-dependent sodium channels. Studies on native sodium channels, in primary-cultured neurons isolated from the CNS of the larvae of the moth Manduca sexta and on Para/TipE sodium channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus (African clawed frog) oocytes, confirmed that metaflumizone blocks sodium channels by binding selectively to the slow-inactivated state, which is characteristic of the SCBIs. The results confirm that metaflumizone is a novel sodium channel blocker insecticide.

  1. Down-regulation of voltage-dependent sodium channels initiated by sodium influx in developing neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dargent, B.; Couraud, F. )

    1990-08-01

    To address the issue of whether regulatory feedback exists between the electrical activity of a neuron and ion-channel density, the authors investigated the effect of Na{sup +}-channel activators (scorpion {alpha} toxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) on the density of Na{sup +} channels in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. A partial but rapid (t{sub 1/2}, 15 min) disappearance of surface Na{sup +} channels was observed as measured by a decrease in the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)saxitoxin and {sup 125}I-labeled scorpion {beta} toxin and a decrease in specific {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake. Moreover, the increase in the number of Na{sup +} channels that normally occurs during neuronal maturation in vitro was inhibited by chronic channel activator treatment. The induced disappearance of Na{sup +} channels was abolished by tetrodotoxin, was found to be dependent on the external Na{sup +} concentration, and was prevented when either choline (a nonpermeant ion) or Li{sup +} (a permeant ion) was substituted for Na{sup +}. Amphotericin B, a Na{sup +} ionophore, and monensin were able to mimick the effect of Na{sup +}-channel activators, while a KCl depolarization failed to do this. This feedback regulation seems to be a neuronal property since Na{sup +}-channel density in cultured astrocytes was not affected by channel activator treatment or by amphotericin B. The present evidence suggests that an increase in intracellular Na{sup +} concentration, whether elicited by Na{sup +}-channel activators or mediated by a Na{sup +} ionophore, can induce a decrease in surface Na{sup +} channels and therefore is involved in down-regulation of Na{sup +}-channel density in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro.

  2. Down-regulation of voltage-dependent sodium channels initiated by sodium influx in developing neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Dargent, B; Couraud, F

    1990-01-01

    To address the issue of whether regulatory feedback exists between the electrical activity of a neuron and ion-channel density, we investigated the effect of Na(+)-channel activators (scorpion alpha toxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) on the density of Na+ channels in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. A partial but rapid (t1/2, 15 min) disappearance of surface Na+ channels was observed as measured by a decrease in the specific binding of [3H]saxitoxin and 125I-labeled scorpion beta toxin and a decrease in specific 22Na+ uptake. Moreover, the increase in the number of Na+ channels that normally occurs during neuronal maturation in vitro was inhibited by chronic channel activator treatment. The induced disappearance of Na+ channels was abolished by tetrodotoxin, was found to be dependent on the external Na+ concentration, and was prevented when either choline (a nonpermeant ion) or Li+ (a permeant ion) was substituted for Na+. Amphotericin B, a Na+ ionophore, and monensin were able to mimick the effect of Na(+)-channel activators, while a KCl depolarization failed to do this. This feedback regulation seems to be a neuronal property since Na(+)-channel density in cultured astrocytes was not affected by channel activator treatment or by amphotericin B. The present evidence suggests that an increase in intracellular Na+ concentration, whether elicited by Na(+)-channel activators or mediated by a Na+ ionophore, can induce a decrease in surface Na+ channels and therefore is involved in down-regulation of Na(+)-channel density in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. PMID:2165609

  3. Venus Flytrap HKT1-Type Channel Provides for Prey Sodium Uptake into Carnivorous Plant Without Conflicting with Electrical Excitability.

    PubMed

    Böhm, J; Scherzer, S; Shabala, S; Krol, E; Neher, E; Mueller, T D; Hedrich, R

    2016-03-07

    The animal diet of the carnivorous Venus flytrap, Dionaea muscipula, contains a sodium load that enters the capture organ via an HKT1-type sodium channel, expressed in special epithelia cells on the inner trap lobe surface. DmHKT1 expression and sodium uptake activity is induced upon prey contact. Here, we analyzed the HKT1 properties required for prey sodium osmolyte management of carnivorous Dionaea. Analyses were based on homology modeling, generation of model-derived point mutants, and their functional testing in Xenopus oocytes. We showed that the wild-type HKT1 and its Na(+)- and K(+)-permeable mutants function as ion channels rather than K(+) transporters driven by proton or sodium gradients. These structural and biophysical features of a high-capacity, Na(+)-selective ion channel enable Dionaea glands to manage prey-derived sodium loads without confounding the action potential-based information management of the flytrap.

  4. Venus Flytrap HKT1-Type Channel Provides for Prey Sodium Uptake into Carnivorous Plant Without Conflicting with Electrical Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, J.; Scherzer, S.; Shabala, S.; Krol, E.; Neher, E.; Mueller, T.D.; Hedrich, R.

    2016-01-01

    The animal diet of the carnivorous Venus flytrap, Dionaea muscipula, contains a sodium load that enters the capture organ via an HKT1-type sodium channel, expressed in special epithelia cells on the inner trap lobe surface. DmHKT1 expression and sodium uptake activity is induced upon prey contact. Here, we analyzed the HKT1 properties required for prey sodium osmolyte management of carnivorous Dionaea. Analyses were based on homology modeling, generation of model-derived point mutants, and their functional testing in Xenopus oocytes. We showed that the wild-type HKT1 and its Na+- and K+-permeable mutants function as ion channels rather than K+ transporters driven by proton or sodium gradients. These structural and biophysical features of a high-capacity, Na+-selective ion channel enable Dionaea glands to manage prey-derived sodium loads without confounding the action potential-based information management of the flytrap. PMID:26455461

  5. The Na4(+3) Clusters in Sodium Sodalite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-15

    ATES COVOIN0i-15-92 Technical 06-01-91 to 05-31-92 4. TITLE ANA SUGTITLE S. RNORNG NUMBER The Na4+ 3 Clusters in Sodium Sodalite NN l14-e0-J-se59a 𔄀...3 [AlSiO 4]3 sodalite prepared by high vacuum deposition of sodium atoms. The samples with a Na 43 +:Na33+ cluster ratio up to 1:10 show a single...absorption feature with -m. = 628 nm (1.99 eV). The absorption originates from the individual sodalite cages containing Na 43+ cluster. For the Na 43+:Na

  6. A comparative study of the action of tolperisone on seven different voltage dependent sodium channel isoforms.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Doris; Lohberger, Birgit; Steinecker, Bibiane; Schmidt, Kurt; Quasthoff, Stefan; Schreibmayer, Wolfgang

    2006-05-24

    The specific, acute interaction of tolperisone, an agent used as a muscle relaxant and for the treatment of chronic pain conditions, with the Na(v1.2), Na(v1.3), Na(v1.4), Na(v1.5), Na(v1.6), Na(v1.7), and Na(v1.8) isoforms of voltage dependent sodium channels was investigated and compared to that of lidocaine. Voltage dependent sodium channels were expressed in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system and sodium currents were recorded with the two electrode voltage clamp technique. Cumulative dose response relations revealed marked differences in IC(50) values between the two drugs on identical isoforms, as well as between isoforms. A detailed kinetic analysis uncovered that tolperisone as well as lidocaine exhibited their blocking action not only via state dependent association/dissociation with voltage dependent sodium channels, but a considerable fraction of inhibition is tonic, i.e. permanent and basic in nature. Voltage dependent activation was affected to a minor extent only. A shift in steady-state inactivation to more negative potentials could be observed for most drug/isoform combinations. The contribution of this shift to overall block was, however, small at drug concentrations resulting in considerable overall block. Recovery from inactivation was affected notably by both drugs. Lidocaine application led to a pronounced prolongation of the time constant of the fast recovery process for the Na(v1.3), Na(v1.5), and Na(v1.7) isoforms, indicating common structural properties in the local anesthetic receptor site of these three proteins. Interestingly, this characteristic drug action was not observed for tolperisone.

  7. Batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels in planar lipid bilayers. Ion permeation and block

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Batrachotoxin-modified, voltage-dependent sodium channels from canine forebrain were incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. Single-channel conductances were studied for [Na+] ranging between 0.02 and 3.5 M. Typically, the single-channel currents exhibited a simple two-state behavior, with transitions between closed and fully open states. Two other conductance states were observed: a subconductance state, usually seen at [NaCl] greater than or equal to 0.5 M, and a flickery state, usually seen at [NaCl] less than or equal to 0.5 M. The flickery state became more frequent as [NaCl] was decreased below 0.5 M. The K+/Na+ permeability ratio was approximately 0.16 in 0.5 and 2.5 M salt, independent of the Na+ mole fraction, which indicates that there are no interactions among permeant ions in the channels. Impermeant and permeant blocking ions (tetraethylammonium, Ca++, Zn++, and K+) have different effects when added to the extracellular and intracellular solutions, which indicates that the channel is asymmetrical and has at least two cation-binding sites. The conductance vs. [Na+] relation saturated at high concentrations, but could not be described by a Langmuir isotherm, as the conductance at low [NaCl] is higher than predicted from the data at [NaCl] greater than or equal to 1.0 M. At low [NaCl] (less than or equal to 0.1 M), increasing the ionic strength by additions of impermeant monovalent and divalent cations reduced the conductance, as if the magnitude of negative electrostatic potentials at the channel entrances were reduced. The conductances were comparable for channels in bilayers that carry a net negative charge and bilayers that carry no net charge. Together, these results lead to the conclusion that negative charges on the channel protein near the channel entrances increase the conductance, while lipid surface charges are less important. PMID:2440977

  8. Activity-induced internalization and rapid degradation of sodium channels in cultured fetal neurons

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A regulatory mechanism for neuronal excitability consists in controlling sodium channel density at the plasma membrane. In cultured fetal neurons, activation of sodium channels by neurotoxins, e.g., veratridine and alpha-scorpion toxin (alpha-ScTx) that enhance the channel open state probability induced a rapid down-regulation of surface channels. Evidence that the initial step of activity-induced sodium channel down-regulation is mediated by internalization was provided by using 125I-alpha-ScTx as both a channel probe and activator. After its binding to surface channels, the distribution of 125I-alpha-ScTx into five subcellular compartments was quantitatively analyzed by EM autoradiography. 125I-alpha-ScTx was found to accumulate in tubulovesicular endosomes and disappear from the cell surface in a time-dependent manner. This specific distribution was prevented by addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a channel blocker. By using a photoreactive derivative to covalently label sodium channels at the surface of cultured neurons, we further demonstrated that they are degraded after veratridine-induced internalization. A time-dependent decrease in the amount of labeled sodium channel alpha subunit was observed after veratridine treatment. After 120 min of incubation, half of the alpha subunits were cleaved. This degradation was prevented totally by TTX addition and was accompanied by the appearance of an increasing amount of a 90-kD major proteolytic fragment that was already detected after 45-60 min of veratridine treatment. Exposure of the photoaffinity-labeled cells to amphotericin B, a sodium ionophore, gave similar results. In this case, degradation was prevented when Na+ ions were substituted by choline ions and not blocked by TTX. After veratridine- or amphotericin B-induced internalization of sodium channels, breakdown of the labeled alpha subunit was inhibited by leupeptin, while internalization was almost unaffected. Thus, cultured fetal neurons are capable of

  9. Phylogeny Unites Animal Sodium Leak Channels with Fungal Calcium Channels in an Ancient, Voltage-Insensitive Clade

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hillis, David M.; Zakon, Harold H.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins in the superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels mediate behavior across the tree of life. These proteins regulate the movement of ions across cell membranes by opening and closing a central pore that controls ion flow. The best-known members of this superfamily are the voltage-gated potassium, calcium (Cav), and sodium (Nav) channels, which underlie impulse conduction in nerve and muscle. Not all members of this family are opened by changes in voltage, however. NALCN (NA+ leak channel nonselective) channels, which encode a voltage-insensitive “sodium leak” channel, have garnered a growing interest. This study examines the phylogenetic relationship among Nav/Cav voltage-gated and voltage-insensitive channels in the eukaryotic group Opisthokonta, which includes animals, fungi, and their unicellular relatives. We show that NALCN channels diverged from voltage-gated channels before the divergence of fungi and animals and that the closest relatives of NALCN channels are fungal calcium channels, which they functionally resemble. PMID:22821012

  10. Sodium channel selectivity and conduction: prokaryotes have devised their own molecular strategy.

    PubMed

    Finol-Urdaneta, Rocio K; Wang, Yibo; Al-Sabi, Ahmed; Zhao, Chunfeng; Noskov, Sergei Y; French, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Striking structural differences between voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels from prokaryotes (homotetramers) and eukaryotes (asymmetric, four-domain proteins) suggest the likelihood of different molecular mechanisms for common functions. For these two channel families, our data show similar selectivity sequences among alkali cations (relative permeability, Pion/PNa) and asymmetric, bi-ionic reversal potentials when the Na/K gradient is reversed. We performed coordinated experimental and computational studies, respectively, on the prokaryotic Nav channels NaChBac and NavAb. NaChBac shows an "anomalous," nonmonotonic mole-fraction dependence in the presence of certain sodium-potassium mixtures; to our knowledge, no comparable observation has been reported for eukaryotic Nav channels. NaChBac's preferential selectivity for sodium is reduced either by partial titration of its highly charged selectivity filter, when extracellular pH is lowered from 7.4 to 5.8, or by perturbation-likely steric-associated with a nominally electro-neutral substitution in the selectivity filter (E191D). Although no single molecular feature or energetic parameter appears to dominate, our atomistic simulations, based on the published NavAb crystal structure, revealed factors that may contribute to the normally observed selectivity for Na over K. These include: (a) a thermodynamic penalty to exchange one K(+) for one Na(+) in the wild-type (WT) channel, increasing the relative likelihood of Na(+) occupying the binding site; (b) a small tendency toward weaker ion binding to the selectivity filter in Na-K mixtures, consistent with the higher conductance observed with both sodium and potassium present; and (c) integrated 1-D potentials of mean force for sodium or potassium movement that show less separation for the less selective E/D mutant than for WT. Overall, tight binding of a single favored ion to the selectivity filter, together with crucial inter-ion interactions within the pore, suggests

  11. Actions of ethanol on voltage-sensitive sodium channels: effects on neurotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake in synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Mullin, M J; Hunt, W A

    1985-02-01

    Exposure of rat brain synaptosomes to ethanol in vitro reduced the neurotoxin-stimulated uptake of 22Na+. This effect of ethanol was concentration-dependent, occurred with concentrations of ethanol achieved in vivo and was fully reversible. The inhibitory effect of ethanol on neurotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake was due to a decrease in the maximal effect of the neurotoxins. Ethanol reduced the rate of batrachotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake when measured at 3, 5 and 7 but not 10 or 20 sec after the addition of 22Na+. In a series of aliphatic alcohols, there was a good correlation between potency for inhibition of batrachotoxin-stimulated 22Na+ uptake and the membrane/buffer partition coefficient, suggesting that a hydrophobic site in the membrane was involved in the action of the alcohols. Ethanol did not affect the scorpion venom-induced enhancement of batrachotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake. The inhibitory potency of tetrodotoxin was also unaffected by ethanol. These results demonstrate that ethanol has an inhibitory effect on neurotoxin-stimulated sodium influx occurring in voltage-sensitive sodium channels of brain tissue.

  12. Biophysical characterisation of the persistent sodium current of the Nav1.6 neuronal sodium channel: a single-channel analysis.

    PubMed

    Chatelier, Aurélien; Zhao, Juan; Bois, Patrick; Chahine, Mohamed

    2010-06-01

    Na(v)1.6 is the major voltage-gated sodium channel at nodes of Ranvier. This channel has been shown to produce a robust persistent inward current in whole-cell experiments. Na(v)1.6 plays an important role in axonal conduction and may significantly contribute to the pathophysiology of the injured nervous system through this persistent current. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and regulation of the persistent current are not well understood. Using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique, we investigated the Na(v)1.6 transient and persistent currents in HEK-293. Previous studies have shown that the persistent current depended on the content of the patch electrode. Therefore, we characterised the single-channel properties of the persistent current with an intact intracellular medium using the cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique. In HEK-293 cells, the Na(v)1.6 persistent current recorded in the whole-cell configuration was 3-5% of the peak transient current. In single-channel recording, the ratio between peak and persistent open probability confirmed the magnitude of the persistent current observed in the whole-cell configuration. The cell-attached configuration revealed that the molecular mechanism of the whole-cell persistent current is a consequence of single Na(v)1.6 channels reopening.

  13. Channels, carriers, and pumps in the pathogenesis of sodium-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Giovambattista; Cantone, Alessandra; Evangelista, Ciriana; Zacchia, Miriam; Trepiccione, Francesco; Acone, Daria; Rizzo, Maria

    2005-11-01

    Sodium-sensitive hypertension is thought to be dependent on primary alterations in renal tubular sodium reabsorption. The major apical plasma membrane Na(+) transporters include the proximal tubular Na(+)-H(+) exchanger, the thick ascending limb Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransport system, the distal tubular Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter, and the collecting duct epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). This article explores the role of each transporter in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Although the contribution of the proximal tubule Na(+)-H(+) exchanger is not yet defined completely, more convincing data have been generated about the importance of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-). Indeed at least 2 forms of hypertension appear to be related to the up-regulation of the transporter: the so-called programmed hypertension induced by low-protein diet during pregnancy and the early phase of hypertension in the Milan strain of rats. With respect to the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter this may be overactive caused by inactivating mutation of WNK4 as in the Gordon syndrome, although it is the main actor for the maintenance phase of the hypertension found in the Milan strain of rats. Finally, the contribution of the ENaC has been established clearly; indeed, in the Liddle syndrome the mutation of the ENaC gene leads to a longer retention of the channel on the cell surface of collecting duct principal cells, thus inducing stronger sodium reabsorption along this segment. All these examples clearly indicate that renal sodium transporters may be responsible for various types of sodium-sensitive hypertension.

  14. Regulation of Sodium Channel Activity by Capping of Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Shumilina, Ekaterina V.; Negulyaev, Yuri A.; Morachevskaya, Elena A.; Hinssen, Horst; Khaitlina, Sofia Yu

    2003-01-01

    Ion transport in various tissues can be regulated by the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Specifically, involvement of actin dynamics in the regulation of nonvoltage-gated sodium channels has been shown. Herein, inside-out patch clamp experiments were performed to study the effect of the heterodimeric actin capping protein CapZ on sodium channel regulation in leukemia K562 cells. The channels were activated by cytochalasin-induced disruption of actin filaments and inactivated by G-actin under ionic conditions promoting rapid actin polymerization. CapZ had no direct effect on channel activity. However, being added together with G-actin, CapZ prevented actin-induced channel inactivation, and this effect occurred at CapZ/actin molar ratios from 1:5 to 1:100. When actin was allowed to polymerize at the plasma membrane to induce partial channel inactivation, subsequent addition of CapZ restored the channel activity. These results can be explained by CapZ-induced inhibition of further assembly of actin filaments at the plasma membrane due to the modification of actin dynamics by CapZ. No effect on the channel activity was observed in response to F-actin, confirming that the mechanism of channel inactivation does not involve interaction of the channel with preformed filaments. Our data show that actin-capping protein can participate in the cytoskeleton-associated regulation of sodium transport in nonexcitable cells. PMID:12686620

  15. Sodium channel haploinsufficiency and structural change in ventricular arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jeevaratnam, K; Guzadhur, L; Goh, Y M; Grace, A A; Huang, C L-H

    2016-02-01

    Normal cardiac excitation involves orderly conduction of electrical activation and recovery dependent upon surface membrane, voltage-gated, sodium (Na(+) ) channel α-subunits (Nav 1.5). We summarize experimental studies of physiological and clinical consequences of loss-of-function Na(+) channel mutations. Of these conditions, Brugada syndrome (BrS) and progressive cardiac conduction defect (PCCD) are associated with sudden, often fatal, ventricular tachycardia (VT) or fibrillation. Mouse Scn5a(+/-) hearts replicate important clinical phenotypes modelling these human conditions. The arrhythmic phenotype is associated not only with the primary biophysical change but also with additional, anatomical abnormalities, in turn dependent upon age and sex, each themselves exerting arrhythmic effects. Available evidence suggests a unified binary scheme for the development of arrhythmia in both BrS and PCCD. Previous biophysical studies suggested that Nav 1.5 deficiency produces a background electrophysiological defect compromising conduction, thereby producing an arrhythmic substrate unmasked by flecainide or ajmaline challenge. More recent reports further suggest a progressive decline in conduction velocity and increase in its dispersion particularly in ageing male Nav 1.5 haploinsufficient compared to WT hearts. This appears to involve a selective appearance of slow conduction at the expense of rapidly conducting pathways with changes in their frequency distributions. These changes were related to increased cardiac fibrosis. It is thus the combination of the structural and biophysical changes both accentuating arrhythmic substrate that may produce arrhythmic tendency. This binary scheme explains the combined requirement for separate, biophysical and structural changes, particularly occurring in ageing Nav 1.5 haploinsufficient males in producing clinical arrhythmia.

  16. Convergent Evolution of Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Sodium Channels in Predators and Prey.

    PubMed

    Toledo, G; Hanifin, C; Geffeney, S; Brodie, E D

    2016-01-01

    Convergent evolution of similar adaptive traits may arise from either common or disparate molecular and physiological mechanisms. The forces that determine the degree of underlying mechanistic similarities across convergent phenotypes are highly debated and poorly understood. Some garter snakes are able to consume newts that possess the channel blocking compound tetrodotoxin (TTX). Despite belonging to unrelated lineages, both the predators and prey have independently evolved remarkably similar physiological mechanisms of resistance to TTX that involve chemical and structural changes in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV). The evolution of TTX resistance in this predator-prey pair constitutes a natural experiment that allows us to explore the causes of molecular convergence. Here, we review broad patterns of convergence at the level of amino acid changes in NaV channels of animals that evolved TTX resistance and make comparisons to known TTX-resistant channels that did not evolve under the selective pressures imposed by TTX. We conclude that convergence likely stems from the interplay of the target specificity of TTX and functional constraints of NaV that are shared among taxa. These and other factors can limit channel evolution to favor a few functionally permissible paths of adaptation, which can explain the observed predictability of changes to channel structure. By studying the functional causes of convergence in NaV channels, we can further our understanding of the role of these important channel proteins at the center of the evolution of the nervous system.

  17. The Epithelial Sodium Channel and the Processes of Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) mediates passive sodium transport across the apical membranes of sodium absorbing epithelia, like the distal nephron, the intestine, and the lung airways. Additionally, the channel has been involved in the transduction of mechanical stimuli, such as hydrostatic pressure, membrane stretch, and shear stress from fluid flow. Thus, in vascular endothelium, it participates in the control of the vascular tone via its activity both as a sodium channel and as a shear stress transducer. Rather recently, ENaC has been shown to participate in the processes of wound healing, a role that may also involve its activities as sodium transporter and as mechanotransducer. Its presence as the sole channel mediating sodium transport in many tissues and the diversity of its functions probably underlie the complexity of its regulation. This brief review describes some aspects of ENaC regulation, comments on evidence about ENaC participation in wound healing, and suggests possible regulatory mechanisms involved in this participation. PMID:27493961

  18. A highly polarized excitable cell separates sodium channels from sodium-activated potassium channels by more than a millimeter

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin E.; Markham, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The bioelectrical properties and resulting metabolic demands of electrogenic cells are determined by their morphology and the subcellular localization of ion channels. The electric organ cells (electrocytes) of the electric fish Eigenmannia virescens generate action potentials (APs) with Na+ currents >10 μA and repolarize the AP with Na+-activated K+ (KNa) channels. To better understand the role of morphology and ion channel localization in determining the metabolic cost of electrocyte APs, we used two-photon three-dimensional imaging to determine the fine cellular morphology and immunohistochemistry to localize the electrocytes' ion channels, ionotropic receptors, and Na+-K+-ATPases. We found that electrocytes are highly polarized cells ∼1.5 mm in anterior-posterior length and ∼0.6 mm in diameter, containing ∼30,000 nuclei along the cell periphery. The cell's innervated posterior region is deeply invaginated and vascularized with complex ultrastructural features, whereas the anterior region is relatively smooth. Cholinergic receptors and Na+ channels are restricted to the innervated posterior region, whereas inward rectifier K+ channels and the KNa channels that terminate the electrocyte AP are localized to the anterior region, separated by >1 mm from the only sources of Na+ influx. In other systems, submicrometer spatial coupling of Na+ and KNa channels is necessary for KNa channel activation. However, our computational simulations showed that KNa channels at a great distance from Na+ influx can still terminate the AP, suggesting that KNa channels can be activated by distant sources of Na+ influx and overturning a long-standing assumption that AP-generating ion channels are restricted to the electrocyte's posterior face. PMID:25925327

  19. Slack, Slick, and Sodium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    The Slack and Slick genes encode potassium channels that are very widely expressed in the central nervous system. These channels are activated by elevations in intracellular sodium, such as those that occur during trains of one or more action potentials, or following activation of nonselective cationic neurotransmitter receptors such as AMPA receptors. This review covers the cellular and molecular properties of Slack and Slick channels and compares them with findings on the properties of sodium-activated potassium currents (termed KNa currents) in native neurons. Human mutations in Slack channels produce extremely severe defects in learning and development, suggesting that KNa channels play a central role in neuronal plasticity and intellectual function. PMID:24319675

  20. Block of sodium channels by internal mono- and divalent guanidinium analogues. Modulation by sodium ion concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Danko, M; Smith-Maxwell, C; McKinney, L; Begenisich, T

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the block of squid axon sodium channels by mono- and divalent guanidinium analogues. The action of these compounds on steady state sodium currents was independent of the presence or absence of the normal inactivation process. Block by both mono- and divalent analogues was voltage-dependent, but was a steeper function of potential for divalent molecules. The voltage-dependence could not, in general, be reproduced by a simple model based on Boltzmann's equation. Inhibition of steady state currents by guanidinium ions with 50 mM internal sodium was reasonably well described by a 1:1 drug/channel binding function. Increasing the internal sodium ion concentration increased both the degree and voltage-dependence of current inhibition. This is in sharp contrast to the decrease in inactivation caused by internal sodium. Changes in the external sodium concentration had very little effect on drug block. These results are consistent with a model of the sodium channel as a multi-ion pore. Only a small increase in block can be produced by increased internal sodium in a three-barrier two-site model, but a four-barrier three-site model can reproduce these experimental findings. The implications of these results for physical models of inactivation are discussed. PMID:2420382

  1. Simultaneous modifications of sodium channel gating by two scorpion toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G K; Strichartz, G

    1982-01-01

    The effects of purified scorpion toxins from two different species on the kinetics of sodium currents were evaluated in amphibian myelinated nerves under voltage clamp. A toxin from Leiurus quinquestriatus slowed and prevented sodium channel inactivation, exclusively, and a toxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing reduced transient sodium currents during a maintained depolarization, and induced a novel inward current that appeared following repolarization, as previously reported by Cahalan (1975, J. Physiol. [Lond.]. 244:511-534) for the crude scorpion venom. Both of these effects were observed in fibers treated with both of these toxins, and the kinetics of the induced current were modified in a way that showed that the same sodium channels were modified simultaneously by both toxins. Although the toxins can act on different sites, the time course of the action of C. sculpturatus toxin was accelerated in the presence of the L. quinquestriatus toxin, indicating some form of interaction between the two toxin binding sites. PMID:6293596

  2. Voltage-gated sodium channel modulation by scorpion α-toxins

    PubMed Central

    Bosmans, Frank; Tytgat, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels are integral membrane proteins that function as a gateway for a selective permeation of sodium ions across biological membranes. In this way, they are crucial players for the generation of action potentials in excitable cells. Voltage-gated Na+ channels are encoded by at least nine genes in mammals. The different isoforms have remarkably similar functional properties, but small changes in function and pharmacology are biologically well-defined, as underscored by mutations that cause several diseases and by modulation of a myriad of compounds respectively. This review will stress on the modulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels by scorpion alpha-toxins. Nature has designed these two classes of molecules as if they were predestined to each other: an inevitable ‘encounter’ between a voltage-gated Na+ channel isoform and an alpha-toxin from scorpion venom indeed results in a dramatically changed Na+ current phenotype with clear-cut consequences on electrical excitability and sometimes life or death. This fascinating aspect justifies an overview on scorpion venoms, their alpha-toxins and the Na+ channel targets they are built for, as well as on the molecular determinants that govern the selectivity and affinity of this ‘inseparable duo’. PMID:17087986

  3. Voltage-gated sodium channel isoform-specific effects of pompilidotoxins.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Emanuele; Stevens, Marijke; Zaharenko, André J; Konno, Katsuhiro; Tytgat, Jan; Wanke, Enzo

    2010-02-01

    Pompilidotoxins (PMTXs, alpha and beta) are small peptides consisting of 13 amino acids purified from the venom of the solitary wasps Anoplius samariensis (alpha-PMTX) and Batozonellus maculifrons (beta-PMTX). They are known to facilitate synaptic transmission in the lobster neuromuscular junction, and to slow sodium channel inactivation. By using beta-PMTX, alpha-PMTX and four synthetic analogs with amino acid changes, we conducted a thorough study of the effects of PMTXs on sodium current inactivation in seven mammalian voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) isoforms and one insect VGSC (DmNa(v)1). By evaluating three components of which the inactivating current is composed (fast, slow and steady-state components), we could distinguish three distinct groups of PMTX effects. The first group concerned the insect and Na(v)1.6 channels, which showed a large increase in the steady-state current component without any increase in the slow component. Moreover, the dose-dependent increase in this steady-state component was correlated with the dose-dependent decrease in the fast component. A second group of effects concerned the Na(v)1.1, Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.3 and Na(v)1.7 isoforms, which responded with a large increase in the slow component, and showed only a small steady-state component. As with the first group of effects, the slow component was dose-dependent and correlated with the decrease in the fast component. Finally, a third group of effects concerned Na(v)1.4 and Na(v)1.5, which did not show any change in the slow or steady-state component. These data shed light on the complex and intriguing behavior of VGSCs in response to PMTXs, helping us to better understand the molecular determinants explaining isoform-specific effects.

  4. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, I; Luchinsky, D G; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2013-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations to study the ionic conduction and valence selectivity of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as functions of the fixed charge Q(f) at its selectivity filter. We are thus able to reconcile the discrete calcium conduction bands recently revealed in our BD simulations, M0 (Q(f)=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e), with a set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5e), L1 (1.5e), thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands vs Q(f) for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Q(f) leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium-selective, nonblocking channel) → M0 (nonselective channel) → L1 (sodium-selective channel with divalent block) → M1 (calcium-selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L0 band is putatively identified with the eukaryotic sodium channel The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced transformations between nonselective channels, sodium-selective channels, and calcium-selective channels, which we interpret as transitions between different rows of the identification table. By considering the potential energy changes during permeation, we show explicitly that the multi-ion conduction bands of calcium and sodium channels arise as the result of resonant barrierless conduction. The pattern of periodic conduction bands is explained on the basis of sequential neutralization taking account of self-energy, as Q(f)(z,i)=ze(1/2+i), where i is the order of the band and z is the valence of the ion. Our results confirm the crucial influence of electrostatic interactions on conduction and on the Ca(2+)/Na(+) valence selectivity of calcium and sodium ion channels. The model and results could be also applicable to biomimetic nanopores with charged walls.

  5. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels. Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in Synaptosomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    concentration in the nonaqueuus (membrane) phase (Lyon et aL, 1981). Concentration- effect summarized in table 1 . When sodium channels were activated curves were...Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels : Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in DT (7 Synaptosomes E L C MICHAEL J. MULLIN’ and WALTER A. HUNT...1984). At the present time, the 8 1 structural and functional properties of the voltage-sensitive sodium channels are understood most completely

  6. Conotoxins That Could Provide Analgesia through Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Munasinghe, Nehan R.; Christie, MacDonald J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain creates a large socio-economic burden around the world. It is physically and mentally debilitating, and many sufferers are unresponsive to current therapeutics. Many drugs that provide pain relief have adverse side effects and addiction liabilities. Therefore, a great need has risen for alternative treatment strategies. One rich source of potential analgesic compounds that has emerged over the past few decades are conotoxins. These toxins are extremely diverse and display selective activity at ion channels. Voltage gated sodium (NaV) channels are one such group of ion channels that play a significant role in multiple pain pathways. This review will explore the literature around conotoxins that bind NaV channels and determine their analgesic potential. PMID:26690478

  7. Barium, TEA and sodium sensitive potassium channels are present in the human placental syncytiotrophoblast apical membrane.

    PubMed

    Díaz, P; Vallejos, C; Guerrero, I; Riquelme, G

    2008-10-01

    The human placental syncytiotrophoblast (hSTB) is a polarized epithelial structure, without paracellular routes, forming the main barrier for materno-fetal exchange. There is ample evidence suggesting the presence of potassium (K(+)) channels in the placental apical membrane; which could contribute to membrane potential and volume regulation. We have therefore examined the K(+) currents of isolated apical membranes from human term placenta using electrophysiological methods: reconstitution of ion channels from apical membranes into giant liposomes (single channel recordings, patch clamp method) or their functional transplantation into Xenopus laevis oocytes (total currents recording, voltage clamp method). Single channel recording experiments show the presence of K(+) channels in the hSTB microvillous membrane sensitive to Tetraethylammonium (TEA) and Barium (Ba(+2)). Patch current activity was diminished 50% and 70% by 20 mmol/L TEA and 5 mmol/L Ba(+2) respectively. The more frequent conductance was approximately 73pS, however several levels of current were detected suggesting the presence of more than one type of K(+) channel. In addition, sodium (Na(+)) sensitivity was detected in the patch current thus, over 10 mmol/L Na(+) reduced the seal current to 38%. These results were corroborated by the total current experiments where the K(+) current elicited in injected oocytes with apical purified membrane was blocked by Ba(+2) and TEA. The total current was also affected by Na(+), becoming larger when a Na(+)-free solution was used. Our results show the existence of at least two types of Ba(+2)-sensitive K(+) channels including a TEA sensitive sub-population, and some of them Na(+) sensitive K(+) channels. These channels could be the conductive pathways proposed previously for this cation in placental hSTB. Our novel contribution has been to successfully obtain K(+) channel recordings in systems suitable for electrophysiological studies of isolated apical membranes.

  8. Time-dependent molecular memory in single voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan K; Sikdar, S K

    2007-10-01

    Excitability in neurons is associated with firing of action potentials and requires the opening of voltage-gated sodium channels with membrane depolarization. Sustained membrane depolarization, as seen in pathophysiological conditions like epilepsy, can have profound implications on the biophysical properties of voltage-gated ion channels. Therefore, we sought to characterize the effect of sustained membrane depolarization on single voltage-gated Na+ channels. Single-channel activity was recorded in the cell-attached patch-clamp mode from the rNa(v)1.2 alpha channels expressed in CHO cells. Classical statistical analysis revealed complex nonlinear changes in channel dwell times and unitary conductance of single Na+ channels as a function of conditioning membrane depolarization. Signal processing tools like weighted wavelet Z (WWZ) and discrete Fourier transform analyses attributed a "pseudo-oscillatory" nature to the observed nonlinear variation in the kinetic parameters. Modeling studies using the hidden Markov model (HMM) illustrated significant changes in kinetic states and underlying state transition rate constants upon conditioning depolarization. Our results suggest that sustained membrane depolarization induces novel nonlinear properties in voltage-gated Na+ channels. Prolonged membrane depolarization also induced a "molecular memory" phenomenon, characterized by clusters of dwell time events and strong autocorrelation in the dwell time series similar to that reported recently for single enzyme molecules. The persistence of such molecular memory was found to be dependent on the duration of depolarization. Voltage-gated Na+ channel with the observed time-dependent nonlinear properties and the molecular memory phenomenon may determine the functional state of the channel and, in turn, the excitability of a neuron.

  9. Sodium channels in presynaptic nerve terminals. Regulation by neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Regulation of Na+ channels by neurotoxins has been studied in pinched- off nerve endings (synaptosomes) from rat brain. Activation of Na+ channels by the steroid batrachotoxin and by the alkaloid veratridine resulted in an increase in the rate of influx of 22Na into the synaptosomes. In the presence of 145 mM Na+, these agents also depolarized the synaptosomes, as indicated by increased fluorescence in the presence of a voltage-sensitive oxacarbocyanine dye [diO-C5(3)]. Polypeptide neurotoxins from the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus and from the sea anemone Anthopleura xanthogrammica potentiated the stimulatory effects of batrachotoxin and veratridine on the influx of 22Na into synaptosomes. Saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin blocked the stimulatory effects of batrachotoxin and veratridine, both in the presence and absence of the polypeptide toxins, but did not affect control 22Na influx or resting membrane potential. A three-state model for Na+ channel operation can account for the effects of these neurotoxins on Na+ channels as determined both by Na+ flux measurements in vitro and by electrophysiological experiments in intact nerve and muscle. PMID:6252277

  10. Effects of Ethanol on the Functional Properties of Sodium Channels in Brain Synaptosomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Sodium Channels in Brain Synaptosomes Michael J. Mullin and Walter A.- Haint AbutiseL Voltage-sensitive sodium channels in excitable cell membranes are...responsible for the rapid increase in permeability to sodium ions that occurs during depolarizration. Neuurotoxins that bind with high~ affinity and...specificity to voltage-sensitive sodium channels have been widely used lo identify and characterize the structure and function of sodium channels in

  11. Interactions between anemone toxin II and veratridine on single neuronal sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Castillo, C; Piernavieja, C; Recio-Pinto, E

    1996-09-16

    The nature of the known positive cooperativity between alkaloid and alpha-polypeptide toxins on macroscopic sodium currents was studied at the single-channel level. We have previously characterized the single-channel function of veratridine (VTD)-modified and anemone toxin II (ATX)-modified channels from lobster leg nerve. VTD and ATX are known to potentiate each other's effects in stimulating 22Na flux into vesicles containing sodium channels from lobster leg nerve. These channels, therefore, provided an excellent model for further investigation of the interactions between the toxins. A variety of such interactions were found, some of which would contribute to the positive cooperativity between these toxins. These included first, a decrease in the frequency of occurrence, but not in the lifetime, of the long channel closed state (minute range). This effect resulted in a hyperpolarization shift of the voltage dependence of the overall channel fractional open time. The second effect was a decrease in the apparent-unbinding rate of ATX at -60 mV. These interactions, which could not have been predicted by the effects of the individual toxins, were observed at negative but not at positive potentials, and led to increases in sodium channel currents. Some of the observed interactions could not contribute to the positive cooperativity between these toxins. These included the elimination of the high-conductance state of ATX-modified channels, the predominance of the VTD effect on the voltage dependence of the fast-process, the predominance of the ATX effect on the rate of decay of sodium currents at +60 mV, and the resulting intermediate toxin effect on the level of the noisy open state.

  12. The Permeability of the Sodium Channel to Metal Cations in Myelinated Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil

    1972-01-01

    The relative permeability of sodium channels to eight metal cations is studied in myelinated nerve fibers. Ionic currents under voltage-clamp conditions are measured in Na-free solutions containing the test ion. Measured reversal potentials and the Goldman equation are used to calculate the permeability sequence: Na+ ≈ Li+ > Tl+ > K+. The ratio PK/PNa is 1/12. The permeabilities to Rb+, Cs+, Ca++, and Mg++ are too small to measure. The permeability ratios agree with observations on the squid giant axon and show that the reversal potential ENa differs significantly from the Nernst potential for Na+ in normal axons. Opening and closing rates for sodium channels are relatively insensitive to the ionic composition of the bathing medium, implying that gating is a structural property of the channel rather than a result of the movement or accumulation of particular ions around the channel. A previously proposed pore model of the channel accommodates the permeant metal cations in a partly hydrated form. The observed sequence of permeabilities follows the order expected for binding to a high field strength anion in Eisenman's theory of ion exchange equilibria. PMID:5025743

  13. Domain 2 of Drosophila para voltage-gated sodium channel confers insect properties to a rat brain channel.

    PubMed

    Shichor, Iris; Zlotkin, Eliahu; Ilan, Nitza; Chikashvili, Dodo; Stuhmer, Walter; Gordon, Dalia; Lotan, Ilana

    2002-06-01

    The ability of the excitatory anti-insect-selective scorpion toxin AahIT (Androctonus australis hector) to exclusively bind to and modify the insect voltage-gated sodium channel (NaCh) makes it a unique tool to unravel the structural differences between mammalian and insect channels, a prerequisite in the design of selective pesticides. To localize the insect NaCh domain that binds AahIT, we constructed a chimeric channel composed of rat brain NaCh alpha-subunit (rBIIA) in which domain-2 (D2) was replaced by that of Drosophila Para (paralytic temperature-sensitive). The choice of D2 was dictated by the similarity between AahIT and scorpion beta-toxins pertaining to both their binding and action and the essential role of D2 in the beta-toxins binding site on mammalian channels. Expression of the chimera rBIIA-ParaD2 in Xenopus oocytes gave rise to voltage-gated and TTX-sensitive NaChs that, like rBIIA, were sensitive to scorpion alpha-toxins and regulated by the auxiliary subunit beta(1) but not by the insect TipE. Notably, like Drosophila Para/TipE, but unlike rBIIA/beta(1), the chimera gained sensitivity to AahIT, indicating that the phyletic selectivity of AahIT is conferred by the insect NaCh D2. Furthermore, the chimera acquired additional insect channel properties; its activation was shifted to more positive potentials, and the effect of alpha-toxins was potentiated. Our results highlight the key role of D2 in the selective recognition of anti-insect excitatory toxins and in the modulation of NaCh gating. We also provide a methodological approach to the study of ion channels that are difficult to express in model expression systems.

  14. Calcium-mediated dual-mode regulation of cardiac sodium channel gating.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subrata; DiSilvestre, Deborah; Tian, Yanli; Halperin, Victoria L; Tomaselli, Gordon F

    2009-04-10

    Intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) can trigger dual-mode regulation of the voltage gated cardiac sodium channel (Na(V)1.5). The channel components of the Ca(2+) regulatory system are the calmodulin (CaM)-binding IQ motif and the Ca(2+) sensing EF hand-like (EFL) motif in the carboxyl terminus of the channel. Mutations in either motif have been associated with arrhythmogenic changes in expressed Na(V)1.5 currents. Increases in [Ca(2+)](i) shift the steady-state inactivation of Na(V)1.5 in the depolarizing direction and slow entry into inactivated states. Mutation of the EFL (Na(V)1.5(4X)) shifts inactivation in the hyperpolarizing direction compared with the wild-type channel and eliminates the Ca(2+) sensitivity of inactivation gating. Modulation of the steady-state availability of Na(V)1.5 by [Ca(2+)](i) is more pronounced after the truncation of the carboxyl terminus proximal to the IQ motif (Na(V)1.5(Delta1885)), which retains the EFL. Mutating the EFL (Na(V)1.5(4X)) unmasks CaM-mediated regulation of the kinetics and voltage dependence of inactivation. This latent CaM modulation of inactivation is eliminated by mutation of the IQ motif (Na(V)1.5(4X-IQ/AA)). The LQT3 EFL mutant channel Na(V)1.5(D1790G) exhibits Ca(2+) insensitivity and unmasking of CaM regulation of inactivation gating. The enhanced effect of CaM on Na(V)1.5(4X) gating is associated with significantly greater fluorescence resonance energy transfer between enhanced cyan fluorescent protein-CaM and Na(V)1.5(4X) channels than is observed with wild-type Na(V)1.5. Unlike other isoforms of the Na channel, the IQ-CaM interaction in the carboxyl terminus of Na(V)1.5 is latent under physiological conditions but may become manifest in the presence of disease causing mutations in the CT of Na(V)1.5 (particularly in the EFL), contributing to the production of potentially lethal ventricular arrhythmias.

  15. Inhibition by pregnenolone sulphate, a metabolite of the neurosteroid pregnenolone, of voltage-gated sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Horishita, Takafumi; Ueno, Susumu; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Sudo, Yuka; Uezono, Yasuhito; Okura, Dan; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Neurosteroids are known as allosteric modulators of the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) play an important role in mediating excitotoxic damages. Here we report the effects of neurosteroids on the function of Na(v), using voltage-clamp techniques in Xenopus oocytes expressed with the Na(v)1.2 α subunit. Pregnenolone sulphate, but not pregnenolone, inhibited sodium currents (I(Na)) at 3 - 100 μmol/L. The suppression of I(Na) by pregnenolone sulphate was due to increased inactivation with little change in activation. These findings suggest that pregnenolone sulphate, a metabolite of pregnenolone, suppresses the function of Na(v) via increased inactivation, which may contribute to the neuroprotection.

  16. Drosotoxin, a selective inhibitor of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunyi; Gao, Bin; Deng, Meichun; Yuan, Yuzhe; Luo, Lan; Peigneur, Steve; Xiao, Yucheng; Liang, Songping; Tytgat, Jan

    2010-10-15

    The design of animal toxins with high target selectivity has long been a goal in protein engineering. Based on evolutionary relationship between the Drosophila antifungal defensin (drosomycin) and scorpion depressant Na(+) channel toxins, we exploited a strategy to create a novel chimeric molecule (named drosotoxin) with high selectivity for channel subtypes, which was achieved by using drosomycin to substitute the structural core of BmKITc, a depressant toxin acting on both insect and mammalian Na(+) channels. Recombinant drosotoxin selectively inhibited tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 2.6+/-0.5muM. This chimeric peptide showed no activity on K(+), Ca(2+) and TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) Na(+) channels in rat DRG neurons and Drosophila para/tipE channels at micromolar concentrations. Drosotoxin represents the first chimeric toxin and example of a non-toxic core scaffold with high selectivity on mammalian TTX-R Na(+) channels.

  17. Cell volume-sensitive sodium channels upregulated by glucocorticoids in U937 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gamper, N; Huber, S M; Badawi, K; Lang, F

    2000-12-01

    Glucocorticoids exert their anti-inflammatory action in part by influencing macrophages. As regulation of macrophage function involves ion channels, the present study was performed to elucidate the influence of glucocorticoids on macrophage ion channel activity. To this end, the effects of corticosteroids on the sodium conductance in human monocytic cells (U937) was studied using whole-cell and outside-out patch-clamp techniques. Increasing extracellular osmolarity from 310 to 420 mosmol/kg led to cell shrinkage followed by marked activation of inward whole-cell current from -36+/-2 to -72+/-9 pA (n=13; recorded at -150 mV voltage with CsCl intracellular solution, NaCl extracellular solution) while outward current remained unchanged. The increase of inward current was accompanied by a positive shift of reversal potential and was sensitive to amiloride (100 microM). The activation of inward current by shrinkage was not observed when external sodium was replaced by potassium, indicating that the shrinkage-stimulated conductance is sodium selective. Outside-out single-channel measurements revealed a unitary conductance of 6+/-1 pS (n=5) for the sodium-selective amiloride-sensitive current. Pretreating the cells with deoxycorticosterone (100 nM/6 h) markedly upregulated the shrinkage-activated Na+ current. In conclusion, human macrophage-like U937 cells express a sodium-selective shrinkage-activated channel which is upregulated by corticosteroids. Activation of the channel may increase cell volume, an effect of glucocorticoids in other cells.

  18. Open-channel block by the cytoplasmic tail of sodium channel beta4 as a mechanism for resurgent sodium current.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Tina M; Malhotra, Jyoti D; Chen, Chunling; Isom, Lori L; Raman, Indira M

    2005-01-20

    Voltage-gated sodium channels with "resurgent" kinetics are specialized for high-frequency firing. The alpha subunits interact with a blocking protein that binds open channels upon depolarization and unbinds upon repolarization, producing resurgent sodium current. By limiting classical inactivation, the cycle of block and unblock shortens refractory periods. To characterize the blocker in Purkinje neurons, we briefly exposed inside-out patches to substrate-specific proteases. Trypsin and chymotrypsin each removed resurgent current, consistent with established roles for positively charged and hydrophobic/aromatic groups in blocking sodium channels. In Purkinje cells, the only known sodium channel-associated subunit that has a cytoplasmic sequence with several positive charges and clustered hydrophobic/aromatic residues is beta4 (KKLITFILKKTREK; beta4(154-167)). After enzymatic removal of block, beta4(154-167) fully reconstituted resurgent current, whereas scrambled or point-mutated peptides were ineffective. In CA3 pyramidal neurons, which lack beta4 and endogenous block, beta4(154-167) generated resurgent current. Thus, beta4 may be the endogenous open-channel blocker responsible for resurgent kinetics.

  19. Chloride channels mediate sodium sulphide-induced relaxation in rat uteri

    PubMed Central

    Mijušković, Ana; Kokić, Aleksandra Nikolić; Dušić, Zorana Oreščanin; Slavić, Marija; Spasić, Mihajlo B; Blagojević, Duško

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hydrogen sulphide reduces uterine contractility and is of potential interest as a treatment for uterine disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of sodium sulphide (Na2S)-induced relaxation of rat uterus, investigate the importance of redox effects and ion channel-mediated mechanisms, and any interactions between these two mechanisms. Experimental Approach Organ bath studies were employed to assess the pharmacological effects of Na2S in uterine strips by exposing them to Na2S with or without Cl− channel blockers (DIDS, NFA, IAA-94, T16Ainh-A01, TA), raised KCl (15 and 75 mM), K+ channel inhibitors (glibenclamide, TEA, 4-AP), L-type Ca2+ channel activator (S-Bay K 8644), propranolol and methylene blue. The activities of antioxidant enzymes were measured in homogenates of treated uteri. The expression of bestrophin channel 1 (BEST-1) was determined by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Key Results Na2S caused concentration-dependent reversible relaxation of spontaneously active and calcium-treated uteri, affecting both amplitude and frequency of contractions. Uteri exposed to 75 mM KCl were less sensitive to Na2S compared with uteri in 15 mM KCl. Na2S-induced relaxations were abolished by DIDS, but unaffected by other modulators or by the absence of extracellular HCO3−, suggesting the involvement of chloride ion channels. Na2S in combination with different modulators provoked specific changes in the anti-oxidant profiles of uteri. The expression of BEST-1, both mRNA and protein, was demonstrated in rat uteri. Conclusions and Implications The relaxant effects of Na2S in rat uteri are mediated mainly via a DIDS-sensitive Cl−-pathway. Components of the relaxation are redox- and Ca2+-dependent. PMID:25857480

  20. A sodium channel gene SCN9A polymorphism that increases nociceptor excitability.

    PubMed

    Estacion, Mark; Harty, T Patrick; Choi, Jin-Sung; Tyrrell, Lynda; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2009-12-01

    Sodium channel Na(V)1.7, encoded by the SCN9A gene, is preferentially expressed in nociceptive primary sensory neurons, where it amplifies small depolarizations. In studies on a family with inherited erythromelalgia associated with Na(V)1.7 gain-of-function mutation A863P, we identified a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism within SCN9A in the affected proband and several unaffected family members; this polymorphism (c. 3448C&T, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms database rs6746030, which produces the amino acid substitution R1150W in human Na(V)1.7 [hNa(V)1.7]) is present in 1.1 to 12.7% of control chromosomes, depending on ethnicity. In this study, we examined the effect of the R1150W substitution on function of the hNa(V)1.7 channel, and on the firing of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in which this channel is normally expressed. We show that this polymorphism depolarizes activation (7.9-11mV in different assays). Current-clamp analysis shows that the 1150W allele depolarizes (6mV) resting membrane potential and increases ( approximately 2-fold) the firing frequency in response to depolarization in DRG neurons in which it is present. Our results suggest that polymorphisms in the Na(V)1.7 channel may influence susceptibility to pain.

  1. Two recombinant depressant scorpion neurotoxins differentially affecting mammalian sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuzhe; Luo, Lan; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Zhu, Shunyi

    2010-07-01

    The scorpion depressant toxins are a group of evolutionarily conserved polypeptides targeting sodium channels, which show preferential ability to induce flaccid paralysis in insects, making them attractive candidates for the construction of transgenic plants or viral vectors to control pests. In this study, two new depressant toxin-like peptides (BmKITc and BmKITc2) differing only at position 52 (Lys for Thr) were produced in Escherichia coli. Circular dichroism analysis indicated that these two recombinant peptides display a typical structural feature similar to native scorpion toxins. They both cause a maintained current component at the last phase of inactivation of the insect sodium channel DmNav1/tipE expressed in Xenopus oocytes and interestingly, they do not produce a beta effect despite of their primary structure as beta-toxins. Furthermore, an inhibitory effect with BmKITc but not with BmKITc2 was observed on TTX-R sodium currents in rat DRG neurons. We hypothesize that such differential potency highlights a crucial role of lysine 52 in channel selectivity. Our results therefore indicate that, in spite of the general idea, not all scorpion depressant toxins interact with mammalian and/or insect sodium channels in the same manner.

  2. Simulating the Activation of Voltage Sensing Domain for a Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Using Polarizable Force Field.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-Ning; Gong, Haipeng

    2017-03-02

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels play vital roles in the signal transduction of excitable cells. Upon activation of a NaV channel, the change of transmembrane voltage triggers conformational change of the voltage sensing domain, which then elicits opening of the pore domain and thus allows an influx of Na(+) ions. Description of this process with atomistic details is in urgent demand. In this work, we simulated the partial activation process of the voltage sensing domain of a prokaryotic NaV channel using a polarizable force field. We not only observed the conformational change of the voltage sensing domain from resting to preactive state, but also rigorously estimated the free energy profile along the identified reaction pathway. Comparison with the control simulation using an additive force field indicates that voltage-gating thermodynamics of NaV channels may be inaccurately described without considering the electrostatic polarization effect.

  3. Phyla- and Subtype-Selectivity of CgNa, a Na Channel Toxin from the Venom of the Giant Caribbean Sea Anemone Condylactis Gigantea.

    PubMed

    Billen, Bert; Debaveye, Sarah; Béress, Lászlo; Garateix, Anoland; Tytgat, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Because of their prominent role in electro-excitability, voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels have become the foremost important target of animal toxins. These toxins have developed the ability to discriminate between closely related Na(V) subtypes, making them powerful tools to study Na(V) channel function and structure. CgNa is a 47-amino acid residue type I toxin isolated from the venom of the Giant Caribbean Sea Anemone Condylactis gigantea. Previous studies showed that this toxin slows the fast inactivation of tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(V) currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. To illuminate the underlying Na(V) subtype-selectivity pattern, we have assayed the effects of CgNa on a broad range of mammalian isoforms (Na(V)1.2-Na(V)1.8) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. This study demonstrates that CgNa selectively slows the fast inactivation of rNa(V)1.3/β(1), mNa(V)1.6/β(1) and, to a lesser extent, hNa(V)1.5/β(1), while the other mammalian isoforms remain unaffected. Importantly, CgNa was also examined on the insect sodium channel DmNa(V)1/tipE, revealing a clear phyla-selectivity in the efficacious actions of the toxin. CgNa strongly inhibits the inactivation of the insect Na(V) channel, resulting in a dramatic increase in peak current amplitude and complete removal of fast and steady-state inactivation. Together with the previously determined solution structure, the subtype-selective effects revealed in this study make of CgNa an interesting pharmacological probe to investigate the functional role of specific Na(V) channel subtypes. Moreover, further structural studies could provide important information on the molecular mechanism of Na(V) channel inactivation.

  4. Structural, electronic, sodium diffusion and elastic properties of Na-P alloy anode for Na-ion batteries: Insight from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Huansheng; Xu, Bo; Shi, Jing; Wu, Musheng; Hu, Yinquan; Ouyang, Chuying

    2016-11-01

    Sodium-ion batteries (NIBs) as an alternative to lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have recently received great attentions because of the relatively high abundance of sodium. Searching for suitable anode materials has always been a hot topic in the field of NIB study. Recent reports show that phosphorus-based materials are potential as the anode materials for NIBs. Using first-principles calculations, herein, we study the atomic and electronic structures, diffusion dynamics and intrinsic elastic properties of various Na-P alloy compounds (NaP5, Na3P11, NaP and Na3P) as the intermediate phases during Na extraction/insertion in phosphorus-based anode materials. It is found that all the crystalline phases of Na-P alloy phases considered in our study are semiconductors with band gaps larger than that of black phosphorus (BP). The calculations of Na diffusion dynamics indicate a relatively fast Na diffusion in these materials, which is important for good rate performance. In addition, the diffusion channels of sodium ions are one-dimensional in NaP5 phase and three-dimensional in other three phases (Na3P11, NaP and Na3P). Elastic constant calculations indicate that all four phases are mechanically stable. Among them, however, NaP5, Na3P11 and NaP alloy phases are ductile, while the fully sodiated phase Na3P is brittle. In order to improve the electrochemical performance of Na-P alloy anodes for NIBs, thus, promoting ductility of Na-P phase with high sodium concentration may be an effective way.

  5. Sodium-dependent inhibition of the epithelial sodium channel by an arginyl-specific reagent.

    PubMed

    Garty, H; Yeger, O; Asher, C

    1988-04-25

    Effects of the arginyl- and lysyl-specific reagent phenylglyoxal (PGO) on the epithelial Na+ channel were evaluated by measuring the amiloride-blockable 22Na+ fluxes in membrane vesicles derived from the toad bladder epithelium. Incubating whole cells or isolated membranes with PGO readily and irreversibly blocked the channel-mediated tracer flux. Na+ ions present during the interaction of membranes with PGO could protect channels from inactivation by PGO. This effect required the presence of Na+ at the luminal side of the membrane and was characterized by an IC50 of 79 mM Na+. Amiloride, too, could desensitize channels to PGO, but its effect was significant only when whole cells were interacted with the protein-modifying reagent. The data are compatible with a model in which the conductive path of the channel contains a functional arginine, possibly forming a salt bridge with a carboxylic group, which is involved in Na+ translocation and amiloride binding. It was also shown that the augmentation of transport induced by incubating whole cells in Ca2+-free solution (Garty, H., and Asher, C. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 8330-8335) involves the activation or recruitment of channels that are not vulnerable to PGO prior to incubation.

  6. Sodium-dependent inhibition of the epithelial sodium channel by an arginyl-specific reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, H.; Yeger, O.; Asher, C.

    1988-04-25

    Effects of the arginyl- and lysyl-specific reagent phenylglyoxal (PGO) on the epithelial Na+ channel were evaluated by measuring the amiloride-blockable /sup 22/Na+ fluxes in membrane vesicles derived from the toad bladder epithelium. Incubating whole cells or isolated membranes with PGO readily and irreversibly blocked the channel-mediated tracer flux. Na+ ions present during the interaction of membranes with PGO could protect channels from inactivation by PGO. This effect required the presence of Na+ at the luminal side of the membrane and was characterized by an IC50 of 79 mM Na+. Amiloride, too, could desensitize channels to PGO, but its effect was significant only when whole cells were interacted with the protein-modifying reagent. The data are compatible with a model in which the conductive path of the channel contains a functional arginine, possibly forming a salt bridge with a carboxylic group, which is involved in Na+ translocation and amiloride binding. It was also shown that the augmentation of transport induced by incubating whole cells in Ca2+-free solution involves the activation or recruitment of channels that are not vulnerable to PGO prior to incubation.

  7. Current—voltage curve of sodium channels and concentration dependence of sodium permeability in frog skin

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, W.; Larsen, E. Hviid; Lindemann, B.

    1977-01-01

    1. The inward facing membranes of in vitro frog skin epithelium were depolarized with solutions of high K concentration. The electrical properties of the epithelium are then expected to be governed by the outward facing, Na-selective membrane. 2. In this state, the transepithelial voltage (V) was clamped to zero and step-changes of Na activity in the outer solution ((Na)o) were performed with a fast-flow chamber at constant ionic strength, while the short-circuit current was recorded. 3. At pre-selected times after a step-change of (Na)o the current response (I) to a fast voltage staircase was recorded. This procedure was repeated after blocking the Na channels with amiloride to obtain the current—voltage curve of transmembrane and paracellular shunt pathways. The current—voltage curve of the Na channels was computed by subtracting the shunt current from the total current. 4. The instantaneous INa—V curve thus obtained at a given (Na)o could easily be fitted with the constant field equation in the range between -50 and zero mV. This fit yielded approximate estimates of PNa, the Na— permeability of the Na-selective membrane (at this (Na)o) and the cellular Na activity, (Na)c. As residual properties of the serosal membrane were ignored the computed values are expected to underestimate the true ones. 5. At constant (Na)c, the steady-state value of 1/PNa increases linearly with (Na)o. Error analysis and the effect of drugs show that the dependence is not due to the residual properties of the inward facing membranes but reflects the true behaviour of PNa. 6. The steady-state PNa at a given (Na)o is smaller than the transient PNa observed right after a stepwise increase of (Na)o to this value. The time constant of PNa-relaxation is in the order of seconds. 7. In conclusion, Na transport through open Na-selective channels of the outward facing membrane of the stratum granulosum cells can be described as an electrodiffusion process which as such does not saturate

  8. Multiple sodium channel isoforms mediate the pathological effects of Pacific ciguatoxin-1.

    PubMed

    Inserra, Marco C; Israel, Mathilde R; Caldwell, Ashlee; Castro, Joel; Deuis, Jennifer R; Harrington, Andrea M; Keramidas, Angelo; Garcia-Caraballo, Sonia; Maddern, Jessica; Erickson, Andelain; Grundy, Luke; Rychkov, Grigori Y; Zimmermann, Katharina; Lewis, Richard J; Brierley, Stuart M; Vetter, Irina

    2017-02-22

    Human intoxication with the seafood poison ciguatoxin, a dinoflagellate polyether that activates voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV), causes ciguatera, a disease characterised by gastrointestinal and neurological disturbances. We assessed the activity of the most potent congener, Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1), on NaV1.1-1.9 using imaging and electrophysiological approaches. Although P-CTX-1 is essentially a non-selective NaV toxin and shifted the voltage-dependence of activation to more hyperpolarising potentials at all NaV subtypes, an increase in the inactivation time constant was observed only at NaV1.8, while the slope factor of the conductance-voltage curves was significantly increased for NaV1.7 and peak current was significantly increased for NaV1.6. Accordingly, P-CTX-1-induced visceral and cutaneous pain behaviours were significantly decreased after pharmacological inhibition of NaV1.8 and the tetrodotoxin-sensitive isoforms NaV1.7 and NaV1.6, respectively. The contribution of these isoforms to excitability of peripheral C- and A-fibre sensory neurons, confirmed using murine skin and visceral single-fibre recordings, reflects the expression pattern of NaV isoforms in peripheral sensory neurons and their contribution to membrane depolarisation, action potential initiation and propagation.

  9. Multiple sodium channel isoforms mediate the pathological effects of Pacific ciguatoxin-1

    PubMed Central

    Inserra, Marco C.; Israel, Mathilde R.; Caldwell, Ashlee; Castro, Joel; Deuis, Jennifer R.; Harrington, Andrea M.; Keramidas, Angelo; Garcia-Caraballo, Sonia; Maddern, Jessica; Erickson, Andelain; Grundy, Luke; Rychkov, Grigori Y.; Zimmermann, Katharina; Lewis, Richard J.; Brierley, Stuart M.; Vetter, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Human intoxication with the seafood poison ciguatoxin, a dinoflagellate polyether that activates voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV), causes ciguatera, a disease characterised by gastrointestinal and neurological disturbances. We assessed the activity of the most potent congener, Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1), on NaV1.1–1.9 using imaging and electrophysiological approaches. Although P-CTX-1 is essentially a non-selective NaV toxin and shifted the voltage-dependence of activation to more hyperpolarising potentials at all NaV subtypes, an increase in the inactivation time constant was observed only at NaV1.8, while the slope factor of the conductance-voltage curves was significantly increased for NaV1.7 and peak current was significantly increased for NaV1.6. Accordingly, P-CTX-1-induced visceral and cutaneous pain behaviours were significantly decreased after pharmacological inhibition of NaV1.8 and the tetrodotoxin-sensitive isoforms NaV1.7 and NaV1.6, respectively. The contribution of these isoforms to excitability of peripheral C- and A-fibre sensory neurons, confirmed using murine skin and visceral single-fibre recordings, reflects the expression pattern of NaV isoforms in peripheral sensory neurons and their contribution to membrane depolarisation, action potential initiation and propagation. PMID:28225079

  10. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; ...

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmospheremore » during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.« less

  11. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Guo, Yu -Guo

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmosphere during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.

  12. A single residue differentiates between human cardiac and skeletal muscle Na+ channel slow inactivation.

    PubMed

    Vilin, Y Y; Fujimoto, E; Ruben, P C

    2001-05-01

    Slow inactivation determines the availability of voltage-gated sodium channels during prolonged depolarization. Slow inactivation in hNa(V)1.4 channels occurs with a higher probability than hNa(V)1.5 sodium channels; however, the precise molecular mechanism for this difference remains unclear. Using the macropatch technique we show that the DII S5-S6 p-region uniquely confers the probability of slow inactivation from parental hNa(V)1.5 and hNa(V)1.4 channels into chimerical constructs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to test whether a specific region within DII S5-S6 controls the probability of slow inactivation. We found that substituting V754 in hNa(V)1.4 with isoleucine from the corresponding position (891) in hNa(V)1.5 produced steady-state slow inactivation statistically indistinguishable from that in wild-type hNa(V)1.5 channels, whereas other mutations have little or no effect on slow inactivation. This result indicates that residues V754 in hNa(V)1.4 and I891in hNa(V)1.5 are unique in determining the probability of slow inactivation characteristic of these isoforms. Exchanging S5-S6 linkers between hNa(V)1.4 and hNa(V)1.5 channels had no consistent effect on the voltage-dependent slow time inactivation constants [tau(V)]. This suggests that the molecular structures regulating rates of entry into and exit from the slow inactivated state are different from those controlling the steady-state probability and reside outside the p-regions.

  13. The L1014F point mutation in the house fly Vssc1 sodium channel confers knockdown resistance to pyrethroids.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Lee, S H; Ingles, P J; Knipple, D C; Soderlund, D M

    1997-10-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels encoded by a full-length cDNA corresponding to the Vssc1 gene of the house fly (Musca domestica) were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes either alone or in combination with the tipE gene product of Drosophila melanogaster and were characterized by two-electrode voltage clamp. Vssc1 cRNA alone produced very small (50-150 nA) sodium currents, whereas the combination of Vssc1 and tipE cRNAs produced robust (0.5-3 microA), rapidly inactivating sodium currents. The pyrethroid insecticide cismethrin prolonged the sodium current carried by Vssc1/tipE sodium channels during a depolarizing pulse and induced a tail current after repolarization. The Vssc1 cDNA was specifically mutated to substitute phenylalanine for leucine at position 1014 of the inferred amino acid sequence (L1014F), a polymorphism shown previously to be associated with the kdr (knockdown resistance) trait of the house fly. The L1014F substitution reduced the sensitivity of expressed house fly sodium channels to cismethrin at least 10-fold and increased the rate of decay of pyrethroid-induced sodium tail currents. These results demonstrate that the resistance-associated L1014F mutation confers a reduction in the sensitivity of house fly sodium channels to pyrethroids that is sufficient to account for the kdr resistance trait.

  14. Sodium channel inactivation in the crayfish giant axon. Must channels open before inactivating

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.

    1981-09-01

    Experiments on sodium channel inactivation kinetics were performed on voltage-clamped crayfish giant axons. The primary goals was to investigate whether channels must open before activating. Voltage-clamp artifacts were minimized by the use of low-sodium solutions and full series resistance compensation, and the spatial uniformity of the currents was checked with a closely spaced pair of electrodes used to measure local current densities. For membrane potentials between -40 and +40 mV, sodium currents decay to zero with a single exponential time-course. The time constant for decay is a steep function of membrane potential. The time-course of inactivation measured with the double-pulse method is very similar to the decay of current at the same potential. Steady-state inactivation curves measured with different test pulses are identical. The time-course of doubling pulse inactivation shows a lag that roughly correlates with the opening of sodium channels, but it is not strictly necessary for channels to open before inactivating. Measurements of the potential dependence of the integral of sodium conductance are also inconsistent with the simplest cases of models in which channels must open before activating.

  15. Novel wasp toxin discriminates between neuronal and cardiac sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, E; Maejima, H; Yamaoka, K; Konno, K; Kawai, N; Shimizu, E; Yokote, S; Nakayama, H; Seyama, I

    2001-06-01

    Pompilidotoxins (PMTXs), derived from the venom of solitary wasp has been known to facilitate synaptic transmission in the lobster neuromuscular junction, and a recent further study from rat trigeminal neurons revealed that the toxin slows Na+ channel inactivation without modifying activation process. Here we report that beta-PMTX modifies rat brain type II Na+ channel alpha-subunit (rBII) expressed in human embryonic kidney cells but fails to act on the rat heart alpha-subunit (rH1) at similar concentrations. We constructed a series of chimeric mutants of rBII and rH1 Na+ channels and compared modification of the steady-state Na+ currents by beta-PMTX. We found that a difference in a single amino acid between Glu-1616 in rBII and Gln-1615 in rH1 at the extracellular loop of D4S3-S4 is crucial for the action of beta-PMTX. PMTXs, which are small peptides with 13 amino acids, would be a potential tool for exploring a new functional moiety of Na+ channels.

  16. Molecular modeling and dynamics of the sodium channel inactivation gate.

    PubMed Central

    Sirota, Fernanda L; Pascutti, Pedro G; Anteneodo, Celia

    2002-01-01

    The intracellular linker L(III-IV) of voltage-gated sodium channels is known to be involved in their mechanism of inactivation. Its primary sequence is well conserved in sodium channels from different tissues and species. However, the role of charged residues in this region, first thought to play an important role in inactivation, has not been well identified, whereas the IFM triad (I1488-M1490) has been characterized as the crucial element for inactivation. In this work, we constructed theoretical models and performed molecular dynamics simulations, exploring the role of L(III-IV)-charged residues in the presence of a polar/nonpolar planar interface represented by a dielectric discontinuity. From structural predictions, two alpha-helical segments are proposed. Moreover, from dynamics simulations, a time-conserved motif is detected and shown to play a relevant role in guiding the inactivation particle toward its receptor site. PMID:11867438

  17. The depressant scorpion neurotoxin LqqIT2 selectively modulates the insect voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Frank; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Tytgat, Jan

    2005-03-15

    LqqIT2 is a depressant neurotoxin present in the venom of the Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus scorpion, one of the world's most dangerous scorpions endemic to dry habitats in Africa and Asia. In order to determine its efficacy, potency and selectivity, LqqIT2 was subjected for the first time to an electrophysiological and pharmacological comparison between two different cloned sodium channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Aside from typical beta-toxin effects, LqqIT2 also affected the inactivation process and ion selectivity of the insect voltage-gated sodium channel. The most interesting feature of LqqIT2 is its total insect-selectivity. At a concentration of 1 microM, the insect-voltage-gated sodium channel, para, was profoundly modulated while its mammalian counterpart, the rat brain Na(v)1.2 channel, was not affected. This trait offers excellent prospects for the development of novel insecticides.

  18. Single Na+ channels activated by veratridine and batrachotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive Na+ channels from rat skeletal muscle plasma membrane vesicles were inserted into planar lipid bilayers in the presence of either of the alkaloid toxins veratridine (VT) or batrachotoxin (BTX). Both of these toxins are known to cause persistent activation of Na+ channels. With BTX as the channel activator, single channels remain open nearly all the time. Channels activated with VT open and close on a time scale of 1-10 s. Increasing the VT concentration enhances the probability of channel opening, primarily by increasing the rate constant of opening. The kinetics and voltage dependence of channel block by 21-sulfo-11-alpha-hydroxysaxitoxin are identical for VT and BTX, as is the ionic selectivity sequence determined by bi-ionic reversal potential (Na+ approximately Li+ greater than K+ greater than Rb+ greater than Cs+). However, there are striking quantitative differences in open channel conduction for channels in the presence of the two activators. Under symmetrical solution conditions, the single channel conductance for Na+ is about twice as high with BTX as with VT. Furthermore, the symmetrical solution single channel conductances show a different selectivity for BTX (Na+ greater than Li+ greater than K+) than for VT (Na+ greater than K+ greater than Li+). Open channel current-voltage curves in symmetrical Na+ and Li+ are roughly linear, while those in symmetrical K+ are inwardly rectifying. Na+ currents are blocked asymmetrically by K+ with both BTX and VT, but the voltage dependence of K+ block is stronger with BTX than with VT. The results show that the alkaloid neurotoxins not only alter the gating process of the Na+ channel, but also affect the structure of the open channel. We further conclude that the rate-determining step for conduction by Na+ does not occur at the channel's "selectivity filter," where poorly permeating ions like K+ are excluded. PMID:2435846

  19. Clopidogrel attenuates lithium-induced alterations in renal water and sodium channels/transporters in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, János; Heiney, Kristina M; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Carlson, Noel G; Müller, Christa E; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2015-12-01

    Lithium (Li) administration causes deranged expression and function of renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters resulting in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Extracellular nucleotides (ATP/ADP/UTP), via P2 receptors, regulate these transport functions. We tested whether clopidogrel bisulfate (CLPD), an antagonist of ADP-activated P2Y(12) receptor, would affect Li-induced alterations in renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters. Adult mice were treated for 14 days with CLPD and/or Li and euthanized. Urine and kidneys were collected for analysis. When administered with Li, CLPD ameliorated polyuria, attenuated the rise in urine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and resulted in significantly higher urinary arginine vasopressin (AVP) and aldosterone levels as compared to Li treatment alone. However, urine sodium excretion remained elevated. Semi-quantitative immunoblotting revealed that CLPD alone increased renal aquaporin 2 (AQP2), Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2), Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), and the subunits of the epithelial Na channel (ENaC) in medulla by 25-130 %. When combined with Li, CLPD prevented downregulation of AQP2, Na-K-ATPase, and NKCC2 but was less effective against downregulation of cortical α- or γ-ENaC (70 kDa band). Thus, CLPD primarily attenuated Li-induced downregulation of proteins involved in water conservation (AVP-sensitive), with modest effects on aldosterone-sensitive proteins potentially explaining sustained natriuresis. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed strong labeling for P2Y(12)-R in proximal tubule brush border and blood vessels in the cortex and less intense labeling in medullary thick ascending limb and the collecting ducts. Therefore, there is the potential for CLPD to be directly acting at the tubule sites to mediate these effects. In conclusion, P2Y(12)-R may represent a novel therapeutic target for Li-induced NDI.

  20. The hitchhiker’s guide to the voltage-gated sodium channel galaxy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels contribute to the rising phase of action potentials and served as an early muse for biophysicists laying the foundation for our current understanding of electrical signaling. Given their central role in electrical excitability, it is not surprising that (a) inherited mutations in genes encoding for Nav channels and their accessory subunits have been linked to excitability disorders in brain, muscle, and heart; and (b) Nav channels are targeted by various drugs and naturally occurring toxins. Although the overall architecture and behavior of these channels are likely to be similar to the more well-studied voltage-gated potassium channels, eukaryotic Nav channels lack structural and functional symmetry, a notable difference that has implications for gating and selectivity. Activation of voltage-sensing modules of the first three domains in Nav channels is sufficient to open the channel pore, whereas movement of the domain IV voltage sensor is correlated with inactivation. Also, structure–function studies of eukaryotic Nav channels show that a set of amino acids in the selectivity filter, referred to as DEKA locus, is essential for Na+ selectivity. Structures of prokaryotic Nav channels have also shed new light on mechanisms of drug block. These structures exhibit lateral fenestrations that are large enough to allow drugs or lipophilic molecules to gain access into the inner vestibule, suggesting that this might be the passage for drug entry into a closed channel. In this Review, we will synthesize our current understanding of Nav channel gating mechanisms, ion selectivity and permeation, and modulation by therapeutics and toxins in light of the new structures of the prokaryotic Nav channels that, for the time being, serve as structural models of their eukaryotic counterparts. PMID:26712848

  1. The paranodal cytoskeleton clusters Na(+) channels at nodes of Ranvier.

    PubMed

    Amor, Veronique; Zhang, Chuansheng; Vainshtein, Anna; Zhang, Ao; Zollinger, Daniel R; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Brophy, Peter J; Rasband, Matthew N; Peles, Elior

    2017-01-30

    A high density of Na(+) channels at nodes of Ranvier is necessary for rapid and efficient action potential propagation in myelinated axons. Na+ channel clustering is thought to depend on two axonal cell adhesion molecules that mediate interactions between the axon and myelinating glia at the nodal gap (i.e., NF186) and the paranodal junction (i.e., Caspr). Here we show that while Na(+) channels cluster at nodes in the absence of NF186, they fail to do so in double conditional knockout mice lacking both NF186 and the paranodal cell adhesion molecule Caspr, demonstrating that a paranodal junction-dependent mechanism can cluster Na(+) channels at nodes. Furthermore, we show that paranode-dependent clustering of nodal Na(+) channels requires axonal βII spectrin which is concentrated at paranodes. Our results reveal that the paranodal junction-dependent mechanism of Na(+)channel clustering is mediated by the spectrin-based paranodal axonal cytoskeleton.

  2. Studies of multimodal gating of the sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Keynes, Richard D

    2002-01-01

    Chandler and Meves found that in squid axons perfused with NaF a small flow of Na+ ions persisted in the inactivated state, and that the Na+ channel therefore has more than one open state. Studies by Correa and Bezanilla on single patches in squid axons showed that such steady currents arose from reopening of the channel at a relatively low frequency. Currents with comparable properties are generated in mammalian brain cells and elsewhere. The existence of a third mode of gating was established by Patlak and Ortiz when they showed that in frog muscle fibres there were occasionally quite large bursts of late openings. Again, similar behaviour has been observed in other types of muscle and in brain cells. It is suggested that the voltage gating of all ionic channels involves a screw-helical mechanism, operating in steps each transferring unit charge. For segment S4 in domain IV of Na+ channels, three charges have to be transferred to reach the initial open state, and a fourth for fast inactivation to take place. The single late openings in the inactivated steady state may be explained by the transfer of a fifth charge in IVS4, while the larger bursts of reopening involve a modulation of the mechanism of fast inactivation.

  3. The up-regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels subtypes coincides with an increased sodium current in hippocampal neuronal culture model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Xu, Xiaoxue; Cai, Jiqun; Hu, Huiyuan; Sun, Wei; He, Guilin; Shao, Dongxue; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Zhu, Tong; Hao, Liying

    2013-02-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) have been linked to inherited forms of epilepsy. The expression and biophysical properties of VGSC in the hippocampal neuronal culture model have not been clarified. In order to evaluate mechanisms of epileptogenesis that are related to VGSC, we examined the expression and function of VGSC in the hippocampal neuronal culture model in vitro and spontaneously epileptic rats (SER) in vivo. Our data showed that the peak amplitude of transient, rapidly-inactivating Na(+) current (I(Na,T)) in model neurons was significantly increased compared with control neurons, and the activation curve was shifted to the negative potentials in model neurons in whole cell recording by patch-clamp. In addition, channel activity of persistent, non-inactivating Na(+) current (I(Na,P)) was obviously increased in the hippocampal neuronal culture model as judged by single-channel patch-clamp recording. Furthermore, VGSC subtypes Na(V)1.1, Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 were up-regulated at the protein expression level in model neurons and SER as assessed by Western blotting. Four subtypes of VGSC proteins in SER were clearly present throughout the hippocampus, including CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus regions, and neurons expressing VGSC immunoreactivity were also detected in hippocampal neuronal culture model by immunofluorescence. These findings suggested that the up-regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels subtypes in neurons coincided with an increased sodium current in the hippocampal neuronal culture model, providing a possible explanation for the observed seizure discharge and enhanced excitability in epilepsy.

  4. Structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel pore reveals essential gating elements and an outer ion binding site common to eukaryotic channels.

    PubMed

    Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Arrigoni, Cristina; Wong, Stephanie; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Loussouarn, Gildas; Minor, Daniel L

    2014-01-23

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are central elements of cellular excitation. Notwithstanding advances from recent bacterial NaV (BacNaV) structures, key questions about gating and ion selectivity remain. Here, we present a closed conformation of NaVAe1p, a pore-only BacNaV derived from NaVAe1, a BacNaV from the arsenite oxidizer Alkalilimnicola ehrlichei found in Mono Lake, California, that provides insight into both fundamental properties. The structure reveals a pore domain in which the pore-lining S6 helix connects to a helical cytoplasmic tail. Electrophysiological studies of full-length BacNaVs show that two elements defined by the NaVAe1p structure, an S6 activation gate position and the cytoplasmic tail "neck", are central to BacNaV gating. The structure also reveals the selectivity filter ion entry site, termed the "outer ion" site. Comparison with mammalian voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) selectivity filters, together with functional studies, shows that this site forms a previously unknown determinant of CaV high-affinity calcium binding. Our findings underscore commonalities between BacNaVs and eukaryotic voltage-gated channels and provide a framework for understanding gating and ion permeation in this superfamily.

  5. Structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel pore reveals essential gating elements and an outer ion binding site common to eukaryotic channels

    PubMed Central

    Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Arrigoni, Cristina; Wong, Stephanie; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Loussouarn, Gildas; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are central elements of cellular excitation. Notwithstanding advances from recent bacterial NaV (BacNaV) structures, key questions about gating and ion selectivity remain. Here, we present a closed conformation of NaVAe1p, a pore-only BacNaV derived from NaVAe1, a BacNaV from the arsenite oxidizer Alkalilimnicola ehrlichei found in Mono Lake, California, that provides insight into both fundamental properties. The structure reveals a pore domain in which the pore-lining S6 helix connects to a helical cytoplasmic tail. Electrophysiological studies of full-length BacNaVs show that two elements defined by the NaVAe1p structure, an S6 activation gate position and the cytoplasmic tail ‘neck’, are central to BacNaV gating. The structure also reveals the selectivity filter ion entry site, termed the ‘outer ion’ site. Comparison with mammalian voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) selectivity filters, together with functional studies shows that this site forms a previously unknown determinant of CaV high affinity calcium binding. Our findings underscore commonalities between BacNaVs and eukaryotic voltage-gated channels and provide a framework for understanding gating and ion permeation in this superfamily. PMID:24120938

  6. Rat epileptic seizures evoked by BmK {alpha}IV and its possible mechanisms involved in sodium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Zhifang; Bai Zhantao; Zhang Xuying; Liu Tong; Pang Xueyan; Ji Yonghua . E-mail: yhji@server.shcnc.ac.cn

    2007-05-01

    This study showed that rat unilateral intracerebroventricular injection of BmK {alpha}IV, a sodium channel modulator derived from scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, induced clusters of spikes, epileptic discharges and convulsion-related behavioral changes. BmK {alpha}IV potently promoted the release of endogenous glutamate from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. In vitro examination of the effect of BmK {alpha}IV on intrasynaptosomal free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and sodium concentration [Na{sup +}]{sub i} revealed that BmK {alpha}IV-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was associated with an increase in Ca{sup 2+} and Na{sup +} influx. Moreover, BmK {alpha}IV-mediated glutamate release and ion influx was completely blocked by tetrodotoxin, a blocker of sodium channel. Together, these results suggest that the induction of BmK {alpha}IV-evoked epileptic seizures may be involved in the modulation of BmK {alpha}IV on tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels located on the nerve terminal, which subsequently enhances the Ca{sup 2+} influx to cause an increase of glutamate release. These findings may provide some insight regarding the mechanism of neuronal action of BmK {alpha}IV in the central nervous system for understanding epileptogenesis involved in sodium channels.

  7. Sodium channel from rat brain. Reconstitution of voltage-dependent scorpion toxin binding in vesicles of defined lipid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D.J.; Talvenheimo, J.A.; Catterall, W.A.

    1985-09-25

    Purified sodium channels incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles mediate neurotoxin-activated SSNa influx but do not bind the alpha-scorpion toxin from Leiurus quinquestriatus (LqTx) with high affinity. Addition of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or phosphatidylserine to the reconstitution mixture restores high affinity LqTx binding with KD = 1.9 nM for PC/PE vesicles at -90 mV and 36 degrees C in sucrose-substituted medium. Other lipids tested were markedly less effective. The binding of LqTx in vesicles of PC/PE (65:35) is sensitive to both the membrane potential formed by sodium gradients across the reconstituted vesicle membrane and the cation concentration in the extravesicular medium. Binding of LqTx is reduced 3- to 4-fold upon depolarization to 0 mV from -50 to -60 mV in experiments in which (Na+)out/(Na+)in is varied by changing (Na+)in or (Na+)out at constant extravesicular ionic strength. It is concluded that the purified sodium channel contains the receptor site for LqTx in functional form and that restoration of high affinity, voltage-dependent binding of LqTx by the purified sodium channel requires an appropriate ratio of PC to PE and/or phosphatidylserine in the vesicle membrane.

  8. The epithelial sodium channel in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi)

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Maejima, Sho; Yoshie, Sumio; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Konno, Norifumi; Joss, Jean M. P.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a Na+-selective, aldosterone-stimulated ion channel involved in sodium transport homeostasis. ENaC is rate-limiting for Na+ absorption in the epithelia of osmoregulatory organs of tetrapods. Although the ENaC/degenerin gene family is proposed to be present in metazoans, no orthologues or paralogues for ENaC have been found in the genome databases of teleosts. We studied full-length cDNA cloning and tissue distributions of ENaCα, β and γ subunits in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, which is the closest living relative of tetrapods. Neoceratodus ENaC (nENaC) comprised three subunits: nENaCα, β and γ proteins. The nENaCα, β and γ subunits are closely related to amphibian ENaCα, β and γ subunits, respectively. Three ENaC subunit mRNAs were highly expressed in the gills, kidney and rectum. Amiloride-sensitive sodium current was recorded from Xenopus oocytes injected with the nENaCαβγ subunit complementary RNAs under a two-electrode voltage clamp. nENaCα immunoreactivity was observed in the apical cell membrane of the gills, kidney and rectum. Thus, nENaC may play a role in regulating sodium transport of the lungfish, which has a renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system. This is interesting because there may have been an ENaC sodium absorption system controlled by aldosterone before the conquest of land by vertebrates. PMID:23055064

  9. The epithelial sodium channel in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Maejima, Sho; Yoshie, Sumio; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Konno, Norifumi; Joss, Jean M P

    2012-12-07

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a Na(+)-selective, aldosterone-stimulated ion channel involved in sodium transport homeostasis. ENaC is rate-limiting for Na(+) absorption in the epithelia of osmoregulatory organs of tetrapods. Although the ENaC/degenerin gene family is proposed to be present in metazoans, no orthologues or paralogues for ENaC have been found in the genome databases of teleosts. We studied full-length cDNA cloning and tissue distributions of ENaCα, β and γ subunits in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, which is the closest living relative of tetrapods. Neoceratodus ENaC (nENaC) comprised three subunits: nENaCα, β and γ proteins. The nENaCα, β and γ subunits are closely related to amphibian ENaCα, β and γ subunits, respectively. Three ENaC subunit mRNAs were highly expressed in the gills, kidney and rectum. Amiloride-sensitive sodium current was recorded from Xenopus oocytes injected with the nENaCαβγ subunit complementary RNAs under a two-electrode voltage clamp. nENaCα immunoreactivity was observed in the apical cell membrane of the gills, kidney and rectum. Thus, nENaC may play a role in regulating sodium transport of the lungfish, which has a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This is interesting because there may have been an ENaC sodium absorption system controlled by aldosterone before the conquest of land by vertebrates.

  10. Protein assemblies of sodium and inward rectifier potassium channels control cardiac excitability and arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Willis, B. Cicero; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of how cardiac ion channels function in the normal and the diseased heart has greatly increased over the last four decades thanks to the advent of patch-clamp technology and, more recently, the emergence of genetics, as well as cellular and molecular cardiology. However, our knowledge of how these membrane-embedded proteins physically interact with each other within macromolecular complexes remains incomplete. This review focuses on how the main cardiac inward sodium channel (NaV1.5) and the strong inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir2.1) function within macromolecular complexes to control cardiac excitability. It has become increasingly clear that these two important ion channel proteins physically interact with multiple other protein partners and with each other from early stages of protein trafficking and targeting through membrane anchoring, recycling, and degradation. Recent findings include compartmentalized regulation of NaV1.5 channel expression and function through a PDZ (postsynaptic density protein, Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor, and zonula occludens-1 protein) domain-binding motif, and interaction of caveolin-3 with Kir2.1 and ankyrin-G as a molecular platform for NaV1.5 signaling. At the cardiomyocyte membrane, NaV1.5 and Kir2.1 interact through at least two distinct PDZ domain-scaffolding proteins (synapse-associated protein-97 and α1-syntrophin), thus modulating reciprocally their cell-surface expression at two different microdomains. Emerging evidence also shows that inheritable mutations in plakophilin-2, ankyrin-G, dystrophin, syntrophin, synapse-associated protein-97, and caveolin-3, among others, modify functional expression and/or localization in the cardiac cell of NaV1.5, Kir2.1 or both to give rise to arrhythmogenic diseases. Unveiling the mechanistic underpinnings of macromolecular interactions should increase our understanding of inherited and acquired arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases and may lead to advances

  11. Protein assemblies of sodium and inward rectifier potassium channels control cardiac excitability and arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Willis, B Cicero; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Jalife, José

    2015-06-15

    The understanding of how cardiac ion channels function in the normal and the diseased heart has greatly increased over the last four decades thanks to the advent of patch-clamp technology and, more recently, the emergence of genetics, as well as cellular and molecular cardiology. However, our knowledge of how these membrane-embedded proteins physically interact with each other within macromolecular complexes remains incomplete. This review focuses on how the main cardiac inward sodium channel (NaV1.5) and the strong inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir2.1) function within macromolecular complexes to control cardiac excitability. It has become increasingly clear that these two important ion channel proteins physically interact with multiple other protein partners and with each other from early stages of protein trafficking and targeting through membrane anchoring, recycling, and degradation. Recent findings include compartmentalized regulation of NaV1.5 channel expression and function through a PDZ (postsynaptic density protein, Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor, and zonula occludens-1 protein) domain-binding motif, and interaction of caveolin-3 with Kir2.1 and ankyrin-G as a molecular platform for NaV1.5 signaling. At the cardiomyocyte membrane, NaV1.5 and Kir2.1 interact through at least two distinct PDZ domain-scaffolding proteins (synapse-associated protein-97 and α1-syntrophin), thus modulating reciprocally their cell-surface expression at two different microdomains. Emerging evidence also shows that inheritable mutations in plakophilin-2, ankyrin-G, dystrophin, syntrophin, synapse-associated protein-97, and caveolin-3, among others, modify functional expression and/or localization in the cardiac cell of NaV1.5, Kir2.1 or both to give rise to arrhythmogenic diseases. Unveiling the mechanistic underpinnings of macromolecular interactions should increase our understanding of inherited and acquired arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases and may lead to advances

  12. Expression of diverse Na+ channel messenger RNAs in rat myocardium. Evidence for a cardiac-specific Na+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Sills, M N; Xu, Y C; Baracchini, E; Goodman, R H; Cooperman, S S; Mandel, G; Chien, K R

    1989-01-01

    This study examined the diversity of Na+ channel gene expression in intact cardiac tissue and purified myocardial cells. The screening of neonatal rat myocardial cell cDNA libraries with a conserved rat brain Na+ channel cDNA probe, resulted in the isolation and characterization of a putative rat cardiac Na+ channel cDNA probe (pCSC-1). The deduced amino acid sequence of pCSC-1 displayed a striking degree of homology with the eel, rat brain-1, and rat brain-2 Na+ channel, thereby identifying pCSC-1 as a related member of the family of Na+ channel genes. Northern blot analysis revealed the expression of a 7-kb CSC-1 transcript in rat cardiac tissue and purified myocardial cells, but little or no detectable expression of CSC-1 in rat brain, skeletal muscle, denervated skeletal muscle, or liver. Using RNase protection and Northern blot hybridization with specific rat brain Na+ channel gene probes, expression of the rat brain-1 Na+ channel was observed in rat myocardium, but no detectable expression of the rat brain-2 gene was found. This study provides evidence for the expression of diverse Na+ channel mRNAs in rat myocardium and presents the initial characterization of a new, related member of the family of Na+ channel genes, which appears to be expressed in a cardiac-specific manner. Images PMID:2544627

  13. Regulation of epithelial sodium channels by cGMP/PKGII

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Hong-Guang; Chen, Lan; Han, Dong-Yun; Li, Jun; Song, Wei-Feng; Wei, Shi-Peng; Fang, Xiao-Hui; Gu, Xiu; Matalon, Sadis; Ji, Hong-Long

    2009-01-01

    Airway and alveolar fluid clearance is mainly governed by vectorial salt movement via apically located rate-limiting Na+ channels (ENaC) and basolateral Na+/K+-ATPases. ENaC is regulated by a spectrum of protein kinases, i.e. protein kinase A (PKA), C (PKC), and G (PKG). However, the molecular mechanisms for the regulation of ENaC by cGMP/PKG remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we studied the pharmacological responses of native epithelial Na+ channels in human Clara cells and human αβγδ ENaCs expressed in oocytes to cGMP. 8-pCPT-cGMP increased amiloride-sensitive short-circuit current (Isc) across H441 monolayers and heterologously expressed αβγδ ENaC activity in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, 8-pCPT-cGMP (a PKGII activator) but not 8-Br-cGMP (a PKGI activator) increased amiloride-sensitive whole cell currents in H441 cells in the presence of CFTRinh-172 and diltiazem. In all cases, the cGMP-activated Na+ channel activity was inhibited by Rp-8-pCPT-cGMP, a specific PKGII inhibitor. This was substantiated by the evidence that PKGII was the sole isoform expressed in H441 cells at the protein level. Importantly, intratracheal instillation of 8-pCPT-cGMP in BALB/c mice increased amiloride-sensitive alveolar fluid clearance by ∼30%, consistent with the in vitro results. We therefore conclude that PKGII is an activator of lung epithelial Na+ channels, which may expedite the resolution of oedematous fluid in alveolar sacs. PMID:19359370

  14. Screening for voltage-gated sodium channel interacting peptides.

    PubMed

    Meng, Er; Cai, Tian-Fu; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Si; Li, Meng-Jie; Li, Wen-Ying; Huang, Peng-Fei; Liu, Kai; Wu, Lei; Zhu, Ling-Yun; Liu, Long; Peng, Kuan; Dai, Xian-Dong; Jiang, Hui; Zeng, Xiong-Zhi; Liang, Song-Ping; Zhang, Dong-Yi

    2014-04-02

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) interacting peptide is of special interest for both basic research and pharmaceutical purposes. In this study, we established a yeast-two-hybrid based strategy to detect the interaction(s) between neurotoxic peptide and the extracellular region of VGSC. Using a previously reported neurotoxin JZTX-III as a model molecule, we demonstrated that the interactions between JZTX-III and the extracellular regions of its target hNav1.5 are detectable and the detected interactions are directly related to its activity. We further applied this strategy to the screening of VGSC interacting peptides. Using the extracellular region of hNav1.5 as the bait, we identified a novel sodium channel inhibitor SSCM-1 from a random peptide library. This peptide selectively inhibits hNav1.5 currents in the whole-cell patch clamp assays. This strategy might be used for the large scale screening for target-specific interacting peptides of VGSCs or other ion channels.

  15. Ethanol stimulates epithelial sodium channels by elevating reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hui-Fang; Song, John Z; Duke, Billie J; Ma, He-Ping; Denson, Donald D; Eaton, Douglas C

    2012-12-01

    Alcohol affects total body sodium balance, but the molecular mechanism of its effect remains unclear. We used single-channel methods to examine how ethanol affects epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in A6 distal nephron cells. The data showed that ethanol significantly increased both ENaC open probability (P(o)) and the number of active ENaC in patches (N). 1-Propanol and 1-butanol also increased ENaC activity, but iso-alcohols did not. The effects of ethanol were mimicked by acetaldehyde, the first metabolic product of ethanol, but not by acetone, the metabolic product of 2-propanol. Besides increasing open probability and apparent density of active channels, confocal microscopy and surface biotinylation showed that ethanol significantly increased α-ENaC protein in the apical membrane. The effects of ethanol on ENaC P(o) and N were abolished by a superoxide scavenger, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPOL) and blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. Consistent with an effect of ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) on ENaC, primary alcohols and acetaldehyde elevated intracellular ROS, but secondary alcohols did not. Taken together with our previous finding that ROS stimulate ENaC, the current results suggest that ethanol stimulates ENaC by elevating intracellular ROS probably via its metabolic product acetaldehyde.

  16. The complete structure of an activated open sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Sula, Altin; Booker, Jennifer; Ng, Leo C. T.; Naylor, Claire E.; DeCaen, Paul G.; Wallace, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) play essential roles in excitable tissues, with their activation and opening resulting in the initial phase of the action potential. The cycling of Navs through open, closed and inactivated states, and their closely choreographed relationships with the activities of other ion channels lead to exquisite control of intracellular ion concentrations in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here we present the 2.45 Å resolution crystal structure of the complete NavMs prokaryotic sodium channel in a fully open conformation. A canonical activated conformation of the voltage sensor S4 helix, an open selectivity filter leading to an open activation gate at the intracellular membrane surface and the intracellular C-terminal domain are visible in the structure. It includes a heretofore unseen interaction motif between W77 of S3, the S4–S5 interdomain linker, and the C-terminus, which is associated with regulation of opening and closing of the intracellular gate. PMID:28205548

  17. Cardiac sodium channel mutations: why so many phenotypes?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Yang, Kai-Chien; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the cardiac sodium channel (Nav1.5) can induce gain or loss of channel function. Gain-of-function mutations can cause long QT syndrome type 3 and possibly atrial fibrillation, whereas loss-of-function mutations are associated with a variety of phenotypes, such as Brugada syndrome, cardiac conduction disease, sick sinus syndrome, and possibly dilated cardiomyopathy. The phenotypes produced by Nav1.5 mutations vary according to the direct effect of the mutation on channel biophysics, but also with age, sex, body temperature, and between regions of the heart. This phenotypic variability makes genotype–phenotype correlations difficult. In this Perspectives article, we propose that phenotypic variability not ascribed to mutation-dependent changes in channel function might be the result of additional modifiers of channel behaviour, such as other genetic variation and alterations in transcription, RNA processing, translation, post-translational modifications, and protein degradation. Consideration of these modifiers might help to improve genotype–phenotype correlations and lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:24958080

  18. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine.

  19. Unveiling the sodium intercalation properties in Na1.86□0.14Fe3(PO4)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essehli, R.; Ben Yahia, H.; Maher, K.; Sougrati, M. T.; Abouimrane, A.; Park, J.-B.; Sun, Y.-K.; Al-Maadeed, M. A.; Belharouak, I.

    2016-08-01

    The new compound Na1.86□0.14Fe3(PO4)3 was successfully synthesized via hydrothermal synthesis and its crystal structure was determined using powder X-ray diffraction data. Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 was also characterized by operando XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and galvanostatic cycling. Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 crystallizes with the alluaudite-type structure with the eight coordinated Na1 and Na2 sodium atoms located within the channels. The combination of the Rietveld- and Mössbauer-analyses confirms that the sodium vacancies in the Na1 site are linked to a partial oxidation of Fe2+ during synthesis. The electrochemical tests indicated that Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 is a 3 V sodium intercalating cathode. At the current densities of 5, 10, and 20 mA g-1, the material delivers the specific capacities of 109, 97, and 80 mA h g-1, respectively. After 100 charge and discharge cycles, Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 exhibited good sodium removal and uptake behavior although no optimizations of particle size, morphology, and carbon coating were performed.

  20. Primary erythromelalgia in a 12-year-old boy: positive response to sodium channel blockers despite negative SCN9A mutations.

    PubMed

    Jakob, A; Creutzfeldt, R; Staszewski, O; Winterpacht, A; Berner, R; Hufnagel, M

    2012-09-01

    Erythromelalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent pain attacks, swelling and redness in the distal extremities. The primary forms of the disorder are caused by mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels. Treatment is difficult and controlled therapeutic studies offer little to no guidance. We report on a 12-year-old boy and his first occurrence of primary erythromelalgia. Genetic findings for mutations in the SCN9A gene, which encodes for the α-subunit of sodium channel NaV1.7, were negative. Although initial treatment with sodium nitroprusside was ineffective, subsequent medication with lidocaine and mexiletine, in combination with gabapentin, was successful. Despite negative findings for mutations in the sodium channels, the use of sodium channel blockers should be considered in these patients.

  1. Sodium channel β subunits: emerging targets in channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Heather A.; Isom, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are responsible for initiation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. VGSCs in mammalian brain are heterotrimeric complexes of α and β subunits. Originally called “auxiliary,” we now know that β subunit proteins are multifunctional signaling molecules that play roles in both excitable and non-excitable cell types, and with or without the pore-forming α subunit present. β subunits function in VGSC and potassium channel modulation, cell adhesion, and gene regulation, with particularly important roles in brain development. Mutations in the genes encoding β subunits are linked to a number of diseases, including epilepsy, sudden death syndromes like SUDEP and SIDS, and cardiac arrhythmia. While VGSC β subunit-specific drugs have not yet been developed, this protein family is an emerging therapeutic target. PMID:25668026

  2. Sodium channel selectivity filter regulates antiarrhythmic drug binding

    PubMed Central

    Sunami, Akihiko; Dudley, Samuel C.; Fozzard, Harry A.

    1997-01-01

    Local anesthetic antiarrhythmic drugs block Na+ channels and have important clinical uses. However, the molecular mechanism by which these drugs block the channel has not been established. The family of drugs is characterized by having an ionizable amino group and a hydrophobic tail. We hypothesized that the charged amino group of the drug may interact with charged residues in the channel’s selectivity filter. Mutation of the putative domain III selectivity filter residue of the adult rat skeletal muscle Na+ channel (μ1) K1237E increased resting lidocaine block, but no change was observed in block by neutral analogs of lidocaine. An intermediate effect on the lidocaine block resulted from K1237S and there was no effect from K1237R, implying an electrostatic effect of Lys. Mutation of the other selectivity residues, D400A (domain I), E755A (domain II), and A1529D (domain IV) allowed block by externally applied quaternary membrane-impermeant derivatives of lidocaine (QX314 and QX222) and accelerated recovery from block by internal QX314. Neo-saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin, which occlude the channel pore, reduced the amount of QX314 bound in D400A and A1529D, respectively. Block by outside QX314 in E755A was inhibited by mutation of residues in transmembrane segment S6 of domain IV that are thought to be part of an internal binding site. The results demonstrate that the Na+ channel selectivity filter is involved in interactions with the hydrophilic part of the drugs, and it normally limits extracellular access to and escape from their binding site just within the selectivity filter. Participation of the selectivity ring in antiarrhythmic drug binding and access locates this structure adjacent to the S6 segment. PMID:9391164

  3. The role of inactivation in open-channel block of the sodium channel: studies with inactivation-deficient mutant channels.

    PubMed

    Grant, A O; John, J E; Nesterenko, V V; Starmer, C F; Moorman, J R

    1996-12-01

    Inactivation has been implicated as an important determinant of the block of Na+ channel by local anesthetic-class drugs. This proposition has been difficult to examine because agents used to modify inactivation change other channel properties and both inactivated and blocked channels do not conduct. We used site-directed mutagenesis of Phe1304 to glutamine in the linker between the third and fourth domains of the mu-1 Na+ channel to slow inactivation. Wild-type and mutant channels were expressed in frog oocytes. Macropatch and single-channel currents were recorded in cell-attached membrane patches. The F1304Q mutation increased mean open time (1.7 fold at -20 mV) and reduced the probability that the channel would fail to open. Closed times were best fit by a double-exponential function, suggesting that the inactivated state transitions were no longer absorbing. In wild-type channels, 100 microM disopyramide decreased mean open time from 1.64 +/- 0.08 to 0.34 +/- 0.04 msec. Total open time per trial was decreased 2-fold. There also was a marked increase in the fraction of null sweeps. In the inactivation-deficient mutant channel, mean and total open times were also reduced. These data indicate that even when inactivation is slowed by a localized specific mutation, open-channel block by disopyramide persists. Inactivation may not be a necessary requirement for open-channel block.

  4. Surface expression of sodium channels and transporters in rat kidney: effects of dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Frindt, Gustavo; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2009-11-01

    The abundance of Na transport proteins in the luminal membrane of the rat kidney was assessed using in situ biotinylation and immunoblotting. When animals were fed an Na-deficient diet for 1 wk, the amounts of epithelial Na channel (ENaC) beta-subunit (beta-ENaC) and gamma-subunit (gamma-ENaC) and Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) protein in the surface fraction increased relative to controls by 1.9-, 3.5-, and 1.5-fold, respectively. The amounts of the luminal Na/H exchanger (NHE3) and the luminal Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) did not change significantly. The increases in ENaC subunits were mimicked by administration of aldosterone for 1 wk, but the increase in NCC was not. When the animals were fed a high-Na (5% NaCl) diet for 1 wk, the surface expression of beta-ENaC increased by 50%, whereas that of the other membrane proteins did not change, relative to controls. The biochemical parameter most strongly affected by dietary Na was the abundance of the 65-kDa cleaved form of gamma-ENaC at the surface. This increased by 8.5-fold with Na depletion and decreased by 40% with Na loading. The overall 14-fold change reflected regulation of the total abundance of the subunit as well as the fraction of the subunit protein in the cleaved form. We conclude that cleavage of gamma-ENaC and its expression at the apical surface play a major role in the regulation of renal Na reabsorption.

  5. Sodium channels in membrane vesicles from cultured toad bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, C.; Moran, A.; Rossier, B.C.; Garty, H. Ben Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva Institut de Pharmacologie de l'Universite de Lausanne )

    1988-04-01

    Electrical potential-driven {sup 22}Na{sup +} fluxes were measured in membrane vesicles prepared from TBM-18(cl23) cells (a clone of the established cell line TB-M). Fifty to seventy percent of the tracer uptake in vesicles derived from cells that were cultivated on a porous support were blocked by the diuretic amiloride. The amiloride inhibition constant was <0.1 {mu}M, indicating that this flux is mediated by the apical Na{sup +}-specific channels. Vesicles prepared from cells that were not grown on a porous support exhibited much smaller amiloride-sensitive fluxes. Two Ca{sup 2+}-dependent processes that down-regulated the channel conductance and were previously identified in native epithelia were found in the cultured cells as well. Vesicles isolated from cells that were preincubated with 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M aldosterone for 16-20 h exhibited higher amiloride-sensitive conductance than vesicles derived from control, steroid-depleted cells. Thus membrane derived from TBM-18(cl23) cells can be used to characterize the epithelial Na{sup +} channel and its hormonal regulation.

  6. Conductance of the sodium channel in myelinated nerve fibres with modified sodium inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, F; Hille, B; Neumcke, B; Nonner, W; Stämpfli, R

    1976-01-01

    1. Na current fluctuations in nodes of Ranvier were measured under voltage clamp conditions as described in the preceding paper (Conti, Hille, Neumcke, Nonner & Stämpfli, 1976) and analysed in terms of power spectral density calculated for frequencies between 30 Hz and 5 kHz. 2. External (10(-5) g/ml.) Leiurus scorpion venom or Anemonia Toxin II (3 X 10(-5) g/ml.) or internal 20 mM iodate were applied in order to remove or slow down inactivation in part of the Na channels. The treatment increased the steady-state Na current during the noise measurement one-to eight fold over that in normal fibres. 3. Noise spectra were interpreted as the sum of 1/f noise and noise SNa(f) due to all-or-none, open-close transitions of single Na channels. The drug effects on the inactivation could be accounted for either by assuming two populations of channels, one with and one without inactivation, or by postulating a single population with modified inactivation characteristics. 4. Except for an increase in amplitude, the fluctuation spectra SNa(f) were similar to the ones in normal nodes. Again, the time constants taum obtained from the fit of the spectra agreed within a factor of 2 with the values of taum found in the macroscopic Na currents. 5. From the fluctuation spectra, single Na channel conductances gamma of 5-4 +/- 0-4 pS (iodate), 6-7 +/- 0-5 pS (Leiurus) and 7-0 +/- 0-6 pS (Anemonia) were calculated. The value of gamma was not significantly voltage dependent. 6. Our observations indicate that inactivation of Na channels can be modified with at most small effects on the microscopic properties of the activation process and on the conductance of the open channel. They suggest that the h mechanism normally produces all-or-none, open-close changes of conductance. PMID:1087644

  7. Mapping of scorpion toxin receptor sites at voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Gurevitz, Michael

    2012-09-15

    Scorpion alpha and beta toxins interact with voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)s) at two pharmacologically distinct sites. Alpha toxins bind at receptor site-3 and inhibit channel inactivation, whereas beta toxins bind at receptor site-4 and shift the voltage-dependent activation toward more hyperpolarizing potentials. The two toxin classes are subdivided to distinct pharmacological groups according to their binding preferences and ability to compete for the receptor sites at Na(v) subtypes. To elucidate the toxin-channel surface of interaction at both receptor sites and clarify the molecular basis of varying toxin preferences, an efficient bacterial system for their expression in recombinant form was established. Mutagenesis accompanied by toxicity, binding and electrophysiological assays, in parallel to determination of the three-dimensional structure using NMR and X-ray crystallography uncovered a bipartite bioactive surface in toxin representatives of all pharmacological groups. Exchange of external loops between the mammalian brain channel rNa(v)1.2a and the insect channel DmNa(v)1 highlighted channel regions involved in the varying sensitivity to assorted toxins. In parallel, thorough mutagenesis of channel external loops illuminated points of putative interaction with the toxins. Amino acid substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain II of rNa(v)1.2a had prominent impact on the activity of the beta-toxin Css4 (from Centruroides suffusus suffusus), and substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain IV affected the activity of the alpha-toxin Lqh2 (from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus). Rosetta modeling of toxin-Na(v) interaction using the voltage sensor module of the potassium channel as template raises commonalities in the way alpha and beta toxins interact with the channel. Css4 interacts with rNa(v)1.2a at a crevice between S1-S2 and S3-S4 transmembrane segments in domain

  8. The Sodium Channel as a Target for Local Anesthetic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fozzard, Harry A.; Sheets, Michael F.; Hanck, Dorothy A.

    2011-01-01

    Na channels are the source of excitatory currents for the nervous system and muscle. They are the target for a class of drugs called local anesthetics (LA), which have been used for local and regional anesthesia and for excitatory problems such as epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia. These drugs are prototypes for new analgesic drugs. The drug-binding site has been localized to the inner pore of the channel, where drugs interact mainly with a phenylalanine in domain IV S6. Drug affinity is both voltage- and use-dependent. Voltage-dependency is the result of changes in the conformation of the inner pore during channel activation and opening, allowing high energy interaction of drugs with the phenylalanine. LA drugs also reduce the gating current of Na channels, which represents the movement of charged residues in the voltage sensors. Specifically, drug binding to phenylalanine locks the domain III S4 in its outward (activated) position, and slows recovery of the domain IV S4. Although strongly affecting gating, LA drugs almost certainly also block by steric occlusion of the pore. Molecular definition of the binding and blocking interactions may help in new drug development. PMID:22053156

  9. Characterization of two Bunodosoma granulifera toxins active on cardiac sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Goudet, Cyril; Ferrer, Tania; Galàn, Loipa; Artiles, Adriana; Batista, Cesar F V; Possani, Lourival D; Alvarez, Julio; Aneiros, Abel; Tytgat, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Two sodium channel toxins, BgII and BgIII, have been isolated and purified from the sea anemone Bunodosoma granulifera. Combining different techniques, we have investigated the electrophysiological properties of these toxins. We examined the effect of BgII and BgIII on rat ventricular strips. These toxins prolong action potentials with EC50 values of 60 and 660 nM and modify the resting potentials. The effect on Na+ currents in rat cardiomyocytes was studied using the patch-clamp technique. BgII and BgIII slow the rapid inactivation process and increase the current density with EC50 values of 58 and 78 nM, respectively. On the cloned hH1 cardiac Na+ channel expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, BgII and BgIII slow the inactivation process of Na+ currents (respective EC50 values of 0.38 and 7.8 μM), shift the steady-state activation and inactivation parameters to more positive potentials and the reversal potential to more negative potentials. The amino acid sequences of these toxins are almost identical except for an asparagine at position 16 in BgII which is replaced by an aspartic acid in BgIII. In all experiments, BgII was more potent than BgIII suggesting that this conservative residue is important for the toxicity of sea anemone toxins. We conclude that BgII and BgIII, generally known as neurotoxins, are also cardiotoxic and combine the classical effects of sea anemone Na+ channels toxins (slowing of inactivation kinetics, shift of steady-state activation and inactivation parameters) with a striking decrease on the ionic selectivity of Na+ channels. PMID:11704639

  10. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10−3 S cm−1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  11. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-08-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10‑3 S cm‑1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor.

  12. Controlling epithelial sodium channels with light using photoswitchable amilorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönberger, Matthias; Althaus, Mike; Fronius, Martin; Clauss, Wolfgang; Trauner, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    Amiloride is a widely used diuretic that blocks epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs). These heterotrimeric transmembrane proteins, assembled from β, γ and α or δ subunits, effectively control water transport across epithelia and sodium influx into non-epithelial cells. The functional role of δβγENaC in various organs, including the human brain, is still poorly understood and no pharmacological tools are available for the functional differentiation between α- and δ-containing ENaCs. Here we report several photoswitchable versions of amiloride. One compound, termed PA1, enables the optical control of ENaC channels, in particular the δβγ isoform, by switching between blue and green light, or by turning on and off blue light. PA1 was used to modify functionally δβγENaC in amphibian and mammalian cells. We also show that PA1 can be used to differentiate between δβγENaC and αβγENaC in a model for the human lung epithelium.

  13. Negative-dominance phenomenon with genetic variants of the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5.

    PubMed

    Sottas, Valentin; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    During the past two decades, many pathological genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene encoding the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac (monomeric) sodium channel Na(v)1.5, have been described. Negative dominance is a classical genetic concept involving a "poison" mutant peptide that negatively interferes with the co-expressed wild-type protein, thus reducing its cellular function. This phenomenon has been described for genetic variants of multimeric K(+) channels, which mechanisms are well understood. Unexpectedly, several pathologic SCN5A variants that are linked to Brugada syndrome also demonstrate such a dominant-negative (DN) effect. The molecular determinants of these observations, however, are not yet elucidated. This review article summarizes recent findings that describe the mechanisms underlying the DN phenomenon of genetic variants of K(+), Ca(2+), Cl(-) and Na(+) channels, and in particular Brugada syndrome variants of Na(v)1.5. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  14. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin Binding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Exprnmantal Trherpeutics Ped in I.SA. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin Binding1 MICHAEL J. MULLIN 2 and... sodium channels. This indirect allosteric mechanism for inhibition of [H]BTX-B binding. effect orethanol was concentration-dependent and was affected...ethanol increased the equilibrium binding constant without af- that ethanol can affect the voltage-sensitive sodium channels in fecting the apparent

  15. Modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels hyperpolarizes the voltage threshold for activation in spinal motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Power, Kevin E; Carlin, Kevin P; Fedirchuk, Brent

    2012-03-01

    Previous work has shown that motoneurone excitability is enhanced by a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential at which an action potential is initiated (V(th)) at the onset, and throughout brainstem-evoked fictive locomotion in the adult decerebrate cat and neonatal rat. Modeling work has suggested the modulation of Na(+) conductance as a putative mechanism underlying this state-dependent change in excitability. This study sought to determine whether modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels could induce V(th) hyperpolarization. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from antidromically identified lumbar spinal motoneurones in an isolated neonatal rat spinal cord preparation. Recordings were made with and without the bath application of veratridine, a plant alkaloid neurotoxin that acts as a sodium channel modulator. As seen in HEK 293 cells expressing Nav1.2 channels, veratridine-modified channels demonstrated a hyperpolarizing shift in their voltage-dependence of activation and a slowing of inactivation that resulted in an enhanced inward current in response to voltage ramp stimulations. In the native rat motoneurones, veratridine-modified sodium channels induced a hyperpolarization of V(th) in all 29 neonatal rat motoneurones examined (mean hyperpolarization: -6.6 ± 4.3 mV). V(th) hyperpolarization was not due to the effects on Ca(2+) and/or K(+) channels as blockade of these currents did not alter V(th). Veratridine also significantly increased the amplitude of persistent inward currents (PICs; mean increase: 72.5 ± 98.5 pA) evoked in response to slow depolarizing current ramps. However, the enhancement of the PIC amplitude had a slower time course than the hyperpolarization of V(th), and the PIC onset voltage could be either depolarized or hyperpolarized, suggesting that PIC facilitation did not mediate the V(th) hyperpolarization. We therefore suggest that central neuronal circuitry in mammals could affect V(th) in a mechanism similar to that of

  16. Neuroprotective activity of stiripentol with a possible involvement of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Verleye, Marc; Buttigieg, Dorothée; Steinschneider, Rémy

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of data has shown that recurrent epileptic seizures may be caused by an excessive release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the brain. Glutamatergic overstimulation results in massive neuronal influxes of calcium and sodium through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and kainic acid glutamate subtype receptors and also through voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels. These persistent and abnormal sodium and calcium entry points have deleterious consequences (neurotoxicity) for neuronal function. The therapeutic value of an antiepileptic drug would include not only control of seizure activity but also protection of neuronal tissue. The present study examines the in vitro neuroprotective effects of stiripentol, an antiepileptic compound with γ-aminobutyric acidergic properties, on neuronal-astroglial cultures from rat cerebral cortex exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) or to glutamate (40 µM for 20 min), two in vitro models of brain injury. In addition, the affinity of stiripentol for the different glutamate receptor subtypes and the interaction with the cell influx of Na(+) and of Ca(2+) enhanced by veratridine and NMDA, respectively, are assessed. Stiripentol (10-100 µM) included in the culture medium during OGD or with glutamate significantly increased the number of surviving neurons relative to controls. Stiripentol displayed no binding affinity for different subtypes of glutamate receptors (IC50  >100 µM) but significantly blocked the entry of Na(+) and Ca(2+) activated by veratridine and NMDA, respectively. These results suggest that Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels could contribute to the neuroprotective properties of sitiripentol.

  17. Hypertonic saline inhibits luminal sodium channels in respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hebestreit, Alexandra; Kersting, Ulrich; Hebestreit, Helge

    2007-05-01

    Physical exercise with increased ventilation leads to a considerable rise in water loss from the airways. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of transepithelial fluid transport necessary to compensate for these losses are unknown but may include changes in luminal ion channel conductance. The present study was designed to examine the effects of an increase in luminal chloride and sodium concentrations which may locally occur during hyperventilation on luminal ion conductance in the respiratory epithelium of healthy controls and patients diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (CF). Changes in luminal chloride and sodium conductance were inferred by recording nasal potential difference in eight healthy subjects and 10 patients with CF, using superfusing solutions based on isotonic saline (150 mM) on one occasion and solutions based on hypertonic saline (300 mM) on the other. Switching from isotonic to hypertonic saline superfusion decreased potential difference in controls and CF patients significantly. Amiloride induced a decrease of potential difference which was larger with isotonic than with hypertonic saline (controls 9.5 +/- 6.1 vs. 3.7 +/- 4.6 mV; CF 17.2 +/- 7.2 vs. 9.8 +/- 7.6 mV). Chloride conductance stimulated with solutions low in chloride and containing isoproterenol was not significantly changed by hypertonic saline solutions compared with isotonic solutions in both groups. The findings indicate a significant inhibition of luminal sodium conductance by high luminal sodium concentrations. This mechanism may be involved in the regulation of fluid transport across the respiratory epithelium during exercise and in the improvement of mucociliary clearance and lung functions with inhalation of hypertonic saline in CF.

  18. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes.

  19. Effects of ethanol and other intoxicant-anesthetics on voltage-dependent sodium channels of brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Harris, R A; Bruno, P

    1985-02-01

    Ethanol, diethylether, halothane and enflurane inhibited the veratridine-dependent uptake of 24Na by synaptosomes isolated from rodent brain. The inhibitory action of ethanol was similar for uptake periods of 1 to 10 sec and also was observed with batrachotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake, demonstrating an inhibition of sodium influx through voltage-dependent channels. The inhibitory action of tetrodotoxin on sodium uptake was not altered by ethanol, indicating this site on the sodium channel was not altered by ethanol. The action of ethanol was selective for different brain regions and was more potent in inhibiting sodium uptake in cortex than in cerebellum. Investigation of the effects of temperature on veratridine-stimulated uptake and ethanol actions demonstrated that an increase in temperature (13 degrees-33 degrees C) decreased both the apparent KD of veratridine and the Vmax of the uptake. Ethanol decreased the apparent Vmax at all temperatures and decreased the apparent KD at low 13 degrees and 18 degrees C) but not at higher (30 degrees and 33 degrees C) temperatures. Thus, an increase in temperature mimicked some, but not all, of the effects of ethanol. These results, together with those from other studies, suggest that the disordering of membrane lipids by ethanol and other intoxicant-anesthetic drugs is an important factor in the inhibition of sodium channel function by these drugs.

  20. Sodium channels as gateable non-photonic sensors for membrane-delimited reactive species

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Navin K.; Nematian-Ardestani, Ehsan; Neugebauer, Sophie; Borowski, Benjamin; El-Hussein, Ahmed; Hoshi, Toshinori; Leipold, Enrico; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) play crucial roles in physiological processes. While excessive ROS damages cells, small fluctuations in ROS levels represent physiological signals important for vital functions. Despite the physiological importance of ROS, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, such as which types of ROS occur in cells, how they distribute inside cells, and how long they remain in an active form. The current study presents a ratiometric sensor of intracellular ROS levels based on genetically engineered voltage-gated sodium channels (roNaV). roNaV can be used for detecting oxidative modification that occurs near the plasma membrane with a sensitivity similar to existing fluorescence-based ROS sensors. Moreover, roNaV has several advantages over traditional sensors because it does not need excitation light for sensing, and thus, can be used to detect phototoxic cellular modifications. In addition, the ROS dynamic range of roNaV is easily manipulated in real time by means of the endogenous channel inactivation mechanism. Measurements on ROS liberated from intracellular Lucifer Yellow and genetically encoded KillerRed has revealed an assessment of ROS lifetime in individual mammalian cells. Flashlight-induced ROS concentration decayed with two major time constants of about 10 and 1000 ms. PMID:24513256

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide Prevents Advanced Glycation End-Products Induced Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiushi; Song, Binlin; Jiang, Shuai; Liang, Chen; Chen, Xiao; Shi, Jing; Li, Xinyuan; Sun, Yingying; Wu, Mingming; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Ma, He-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are complex and heterogeneous compounds implicated in diabetes. Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) at the distal nephron plays an important role in diabetic hypertension. Here, we report that H2S antagonizes AGEs-induced ENaC activation in A6 cells. ENaC open probability (PO) in A6 cells was significantly increased by exogenous AGEs and that this AGEs-induced ENaC activity was abolished by NaHS (a donor of H2S) and TEMPOL. Incubating A6 cells with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT) mimicked the effects of AGEs on ENaC activity, but did not induce any additive effect. We found that the expression levels of catalase were significantly reduced by AGEs and both AGEs and 3-AT facilitated ROS uptake in A6 cells, which were significantly inhibited by NaHS. The specific PTEN and PI3K inhibitors, BPV(pic) and LY294002, influence ENaC activity in AGEs-pretreated A6 cells. Moreover, after removal of AGEs from AGEs-pretreated A6 cells for 72 hours, ENaC PO remained at a high level, suggesting that an AGEs-related “metabolic memory” may be involved in sodium homeostasis. Our data, for the first time, show that H2S prevents AGEs-induced ENaC activation by targeting the ROS/PI3K/PTEN pathway. PMID:26078825

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Prevents Advanced Glycation End-Products Induced Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiushi; Song, Binlin; Jiang, Shuai; Liang, Chen; Chen, Xiao; Shi, Jing; Li, Xinyuan; Sun, Yingying; Wu, Mingming; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Ma, He-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are complex and heterogeneous compounds implicated in diabetes. Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) at the distal nephron plays an important role in diabetic hypertension. Here, we report that H2S antagonizes AGEs-induced ENaC activation in A6 cells. ENaC open probability (P O ) in A6 cells was significantly increased by exogenous AGEs and that this AGEs-induced ENaC activity was abolished by NaHS (a donor of H2S) and TEMPOL. Incubating A6 cells with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT) mimicked the effects of AGEs on ENaC activity, but did not induce any additive effect. We found that the expression levels of catalase were significantly reduced by AGEs and both AGEs and 3-AT facilitated ROS uptake in A6 cells, which were significantly inhibited by NaHS. The specific PTEN and PI3K inhibitors, BPV(pic) and LY294002, influence ENaC activity in AGEs-pretreated A6 cells. Moreover, after removal of AGEs from AGEs-pretreated A6 cells for 72 hours, ENaC P O remained at a high level, suggesting that an AGEs-related "metabolic memory" may be involved in sodium homeostasis. Our data, for the first time, show that H2S prevents AGEs-induced ENaC activation by targeting the ROS/PI3K/PTEN pathway.

  3. Sodium channel activation mechanisms. Insights from deuterium oxide substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Alicata, D.A.; Rayner, M.D.; Starkus, J.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Schauf and Bullock, using Myxicola giant axons, demonstrated that solvent substitution with deuterium oxide (D2O) significantly affects both sodium channel activation and inactivation kinetics without corresponding changes in gating current or tail current rates. They concluded that (a) no significant component of gating current derives from the final channel opening step, and (b) channels must deactivate (during tail currents) by a different pathway from that used in channel opening. By contrast, Oxford found in squid axons that when a depolarizing pulse is interrupted by a brief (approximately 100 microseconds) return to holding potential, subsequent reactivation (secondary activation) is very rapid and shows almost monoexponential kinetics. Increasing the interpulse interval resulted in secondary activation rate returning towards control, sigmoid (primary activation) kinetics. He concluded that channels open and close (deactivate) via the same pathway. We have repeated both sets of observations in crayfish axons, confirming the results obtained in both previous studies, despite the apparently contradictory conclusions reached by these authors. On the other hand, we find that secondary activation after a brief interpulse interval (50 microseconds) is insensitive to D2O, although reactivation after longer interpulse intervals (approximately 400 microseconds) returns towards a D2O sensitivity similar to that of primary activation. We conclude that D2O-sensitive primary activation and D2O-insensitive tail current deactivation involve separate pathways. However, D2O-insensitive secondary activation involves reversal of the D2O-insensitive deactivation step. These conclusions are consistent with parallel gate models, provided that one gating particle has a substantially reduced effective valence.

  4. Resurgent current of voltage-gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda H; Raman, Indira M

    2014-01-01

    Resurgent Na+ current results from a distinctive form of Na+ channel gating, originally identified in cerebellar Purkinje neurons. In these neurons, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels responsible for action potential firing have specialized mechanisms that reduce the likelihood that they accumulate in fast inactivated states, thereby shortening refractory periods and permitting rapid, repetitive, and/or burst firing. Under voltage clamp, step depolarizations evoke transient Na+ currents that rapidly activate and quickly decay, and step repolarizations elicit slower channel reopening, or a ‘resurgent’ current. The generation of resurgent current depends on a factor in the Na+ channel complex, probably a subunit such as NaVβ4 (Scn4b), which blocks open Na+ channels at positive voltages, competing with the fast inactivation gate, and unblocks at negative voltages, permitting recovery from an open channel block along with a flow of current. Following its initial discovery, resurgent Na+ current has been found in nearly 20 types of neurons. Emerging research suggests that resurgent current is preferentially increased in a variety of clinical conditions associated with altered cellular excitability. Here we review the biophysical, molecular and structural mechanisms of resurgent current and their relation to the normal functions of excitable cells as well as pathophysiology. PMID:25172941

  5. Sodium channel activation augments NMDA receptor function and promotes neurite outgrowth in immature cerebrocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    George, Joju; Dravid, Shashank M.; Prakash, Anand; Xie, Jun; Peterson, Jennifer; Jabba, Sairam V.; Baden, Daniel G.; Murray, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    A range of extrinsic signals, including afferent activity, affect neuronal growth and plasticity. Neuronal activity regulates intracellular Ca2+ and activity-dependent calcium signaling has been shown to regulate dendritic growth and branching (Konur and Ghosh, 2005). NMDA receptor (NMDAR) stimulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase signaling cascades has moreover been demonstrated to regulate neurite/axonal outgrowth (Wayman et al., 2004). We used a sodium channel activator, brevetoxin (PbTx-2), to explore the relationship between intracellular [Na+] and NMDAR-dependent development. PbTx-2 alone, at a concentration of 30 nM, did not affect Ca2+ dynamics in DIV-2 cerebrocortical neurons; however, this treatment robustly potentiated NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx. The 30 nM PbTx-2 treatment produced a maximum [Na+]i of 16.9 ± 1.5 mM representing an increment of 8.8 ± 1.8 mM over basal. The corresponding membrane potential change produced by 30 nM PbTx-2 was modest and therefore insufficient to relieve the voltage-dependent Mg2+ block of NMDARs. To unambiguously demonstrate the enhancement of NMDA receptor function by PbTx-2, we recorded single-channel currents from cell-attached patches. PbTx-2 treatment was found to increase both the mean open time and open probability of NMDA receptors. These effects of PbTx-2 on NMDA receptor function were dependent on extracellular Na+ and activation of Src kinase. The functional consequences of PbTx-2-induced enhancement of NMDAR function were evaluated in immature cerebrocortical neurons. PbTx-2 concentrations between 3 and 300 nM enhanced neurite outgrowth. Voltage-gated sodium channel activators may accordingly represent a novel pharmacologic strategy to regulate neuronal plasticity through an NMDA receptor and Src family kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:19279266

  6. Calmodulin and Ca(2+) control of voltage gated Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Yoder, Jesse B; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Amzel, L Mario

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the cytosolic portion of voltage activated sodium channels (CTNav) in complexes with calmodulin and other effectors in the presence and the absence of calcium provide information about the mechanisms by which these effectors regulate channel activity. The most studied of these complexes, those of Nav1.2 and Nav1.5, show details of the conformations and the specific contacts that are involved in channel regulation. Another voltage activated sodium channel, Nav1.4, shows significant calcium dependent inactivation, while its homolog Nav1.5 does not. The available structures shed light on the possible localization of the elements responsible for this effect. Mutations in the genes of these 3 Nav channels are associated with several disease conditions: Nav1.2, neurological conditions; Nav1.4, syndromes involving skeletal muscle; and Nav1.5, cardiac arrhythmias. Many of these disease-specific mutations are located at the interfaces involving CTNav and its effectors.

  7. Tetrodotoxin binding sites in human heart and human brain sodium channels. Final report, 28 June 1991-27 June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.M.; Hartmann, H.A.

    1994-07-28

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) are potent and lethal threats to exposed soldiers. The development of an antidote or site-specific antibodies for low affinity TTX/STX cardiac sodium channels and high affinity TTX/STX brain and peripheral nerve sodium channels requires a data base not only of the primary structure of the toxin receptor site(s) but also insight into the secondary structures of these site(s). Five goals or tasks were attempted and the first three were completed. Full-length human cardiac and brain sodium channel cDNAs have been cloned and expressed as functional proteins in Xenopus oocytes. Silent restriction sites have been introduced around the pore or P-region of the Na+ channel repeats. Site-directed mutagenesis has identified critical residues in the pore from the primary structure involved in sensitivity to TTX and STX and other pore properties. Chemical modification of cysteine mutants of these initial residues by methanethiosulfonate compounds produces an expanded data base of the secondary structure of the toxins` receptors. Specific peptides which mimic these receptors will be made to compete with the natural receptor for the toxins. We have successfully cloned the cDNAs for both human heart and brain sodium channels and expressed functional proteins. The initial chemical modification data suggests file receptor sites for TTX/STX are not interchangeable and are not the same site.

  8. Effective contractile response to voltage-gated Na+ channels revealed by a channel activator.

    PubMed

    Ho, W-S Vanessa; Davis, Alison J; Chadha, Preet S; Greenwood, Iain A

    2013-04-15

    This study investigated the molecular identity and impact of enhancing voltage-gated Na(+) (Na(V)) channels in the control of vascular tone. In rat isolated mesenteric and femoral arteries mounted for isometric tension recording, the vascular actions of the Na(V) channel activator veratridine were examined. Na(V) channel expression was probed by molecular techniques and immunocytochemistry. In mesenteric arteries, veratridine induced potent contractions (pEC(50) = 5.19 ± 0.20, E(max) = 12.0 ± 2.7 mN), which were inhibited by 1 μM TTX (a blocker of all Na(V) channel isoforms, except Na(V)1.5, Na(V)1.8, and Na(V)1.9), but not by selective blockers of Na(V)1.7 (ProTx-II, 10 nM) or Na(V)1.8 (A-80347, 1 μM) channels. The responses were insensitive to endothelium removal but were partly (~60%) reduced by chemical destruction of sympathetic nerves by 6-hydroxydopamine (2 mM) or antagonism at the α1-adrenoceptor by prazosin (1 μM). KB-R7943, a blocker of the reverse mode of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (3 μM), inhibited veratridine contractions in the absence or presence of prazosin. T16A(inh)-A01, a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel blocker (10 μM), also inhibited the prazosin-resistant contraction to veratridine. Na(V) channel immunoreactivity was detected in freshly isolated mesenteric myocytes, with apparent colocalization with the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Veratridine induced similar contractile effects in the femoral artery, and mRNA transcripts for Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels were evident in both vessel types. We conclude that, in addition to sympathetic nerves, NaV channels are expressed in vascular myocytes, where they are functionally coupled to the reverse mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, causing contraction. The TTX-sensitive Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels are likely involved in vascular control.

  9. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders.

    PubMed

    Drenth, Joost P H; Waxman, Stephen G

    2007-12-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pain disorders. Gain-of-function missense mutations in Na(v)1.7 have been shown to cause primary erythermalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, while nonsense mutations in Na(v)1.7 result in loss of Na(v)1.7 function and a condition known as channelopathy-associated insensitivity to pain, a rare disorder in which affected individuals are unable to feel physical pain. This review highlights these recent developments and discusses the critical role of Na(v)1.7 in pain sensation in humans.

  10. Urinary prostasin: a candidate marker of epithelial sodium channel activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Oliviero; Castagna, Annalisa; Guarini, Patrizia; Chiecchi, Laura; Sabaini, Gherardo; Pizzolo, Francesca; Corrocher, Roberto; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2005-10-01

    Prostasin is a serine peptidase hypothesized to regulate epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity in animals or on in vitro cultured cells. We investigated whether urinary prostasin may be a candidate marker of ENaC activation in humans. We studied 10 healthy volunteers and 8 hypertensive patients with raised aldosterone-to-renin ratio before and after spironolactone or saline/Florinef suppression test, respectively. Four healthy subjects were also studied before and after saline. Urinary prostasin was evaluated by SDS-PAGE, 2D maps, and Western blotting. Every sample of normotensive individuals was compared with the corresponding sample of urine collected after spironolactone or saline; every sample of hypertensive patients was compared with the corresponding sample of urine collected after saline or Florinef. Prostasin was detectable in all subjects regardless of gender, dietary sodium intake, and spironolactone treatment. Spironolactone (100 mg) increased urinary Na+/K+ ratio and decreased urinary prostasin in normotensives in whom the renin/aldosterone axis was activated by a low Na+ intake, but it was ineffective in individuals with high Na+ intake. Saline infusion also reduced prostasin in normotensive subjects. In contrast, prostasin paradoxically increased in urine of patients affected by primary aldosteronism after volume expansion. By 2D immunoblotting, several protein isoforms were observed, some of them being overexpressed after inhibition tests in patients with primary aldosteronism. In addition to a "basal" aliquot of prostasin, constitutively released in human urine regardless of sodium balance and aldosterone activation, there exists a second "aldosterone-responsive" aliquot modulated by Na+ intake and potentially suitable as candidate marker of ENaC activation.

  11. Pyrethroid Insecticides Directly Activate Microglia Through Interaction With Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad M; Liu, Jason; Richardson, Jason R

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are considered to be the resident immune cells of the central nervous system and contribute significantly to ongoing neuroinflammation in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, we and others identified that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are present on microglia cells and contribute to excessive accumulation of intracellular Na(+ )and release of major pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Based on this finding and the fact that pyrethroid pesticides act on VGSC, we hypothesized that exposure of microglia to the pyrethroid pesticides, permethrin and deltamethrin, would activate microglia and increase the release of TNF-α. BV2 cells or primary microglia were treated with 0-5 µM deltamethrin or permethrin in the presence or absence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a VGSC blocker for 24-48 h. Both pyrethroids caused a rapid Na(+ )influx and increased accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na(+))i] in the microglia in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX. Furthermore, deltamethrin and permethrin increased the release of TNF-α in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by pre-treatment of cells with TTX. These results demonstrate that pyrethroid pesticides may directly activate microglial cells through their interaction with microglial VGSC. Because neuroinflammation plays a key role in many neurodegenerative diseases, these data provide an additional mechanism by which exposure to pyrethroid insecticides may contribute to neurodegeneration.

  12. Voltage-gated sodium channels and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na (+) channels (VGSCs) are macromolecular protein complexes containing a pore-forming α subunit and smaller non-pore-forming β subunits. VGSCs are expressed in metastatic cells from a number of cancers. In these cells, Na (+) current carried by α subunits enhances migration, invasion and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, the β subunits mediate cellular adhesion and process extension. The prevailing hypothesis is that VGSCs are upregulated in cancer, in general favoring an invasive/metastatic phenotype, although the mechanisms are still not fully clear. Expression of the Nav 1.5 α subunit associates with poor prognosis in clinical breast cancer specimens, suggesting that VGSCs may have utility as prognostic markers for cancer progression. Furthermore, repurposing existing VGSC-blocking therapeutic drugs may provide a new strategy to improve outcomes in patients suffering from metastatic disease, which is the major cause of cancer-related deaths, and for which there is currently no cure.

  13. DROSOPHILA SODIUM CHANNEL MUTATIONS: CONTRIBUTIONS TO SEIZURE-SUSCEPTIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Jason R.; Saras, Arunesh; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews Drosophila voltage-gated Na+ channel mutations encoded by the para (paralytic) gene and their contributions to seizure disorders in the fly. Numerous mutations cause seizure-sensitivity, for example, parabss1, with phenotypes that resemble human intractable epilepsy in some aspects. Seizure phenotypes are also seen with human GEFS+ spectrum mutations that have been knocked into the Drosophila para gene, paraGEFS+ and paraDS alleles. Other para mutations, paraST76 and paraJS act as seizure-suppressor mutations reverting seizure phenotypes in other mutants. Seizure-like phenotypes are observed from mutations and other conditions that cause a persistent Na+ current through either changes in mRNA splicing or protein structure. PMID:26093037

  14. Protease modulation of the activity of the epithelial sodium channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Chraïbi, A; Vallet, V; Firsov, D; Hess, S K; Horisberger, J D

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of extracellular proteases on the amiloride-sensitive Na+ current (INa) in Xenopus oocytes expressing the three subunits alpha, beta, and gamma of the rat or Xenopus epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). Low concentrations of trypsin (2 microg/ml) induced a large increase of INa within a few minutes, an effect that was fully prevented by soybean trypsin inhibitor, but not by amiloride. A similar effect was observed with chymotrypsin, but not with kallikrein. The trypsin-induced increase of INa was observed with Xenopus and rat ENaC, and was very large (approximately 20-fold) with the channel obtained by coexpression of the alpha subunit of Xenopus ENaC with the beta and gamma subunits of rat ENaC. The effect of trypsin was selective for ENaC, as shown by the absence of effect on the current due to expression of the K+ channel ROMK2. The effect of trypsin was not prevented by intracellular injection of EGTA nor by pretreatment with GTP-gammaS, suggesting that this effect was not mediated by G proteins. Measurement of the channel protein expression at the oocyte surface by antibody binding to a FLAG epitope showed that the effect of trypsin was not accompanied by an increase in the channel protein density, indicating that proteolysis modified the activity of the channel present at the oocyte surface rather than the cell surface expression. At the single channel level, in the cell-attached mode, more active channels were observed in the patch when trypsin was present in the pipette, while no change in channel activity could be detected when trypsin was added to the bath solution around the patch pipette. We conclude that extracellular proteases are able to increase the open probability of the epithelial sodium channel by an effect that does not occur through activation of a G protein-coupled receptor, but rather through proteolysis of a protein that is either a constitutive part of the channel itself or closely associated with it.

  15. Cardiac sodium channel palmitoylation regulates channel availability and myocyte excitability with implications for arrhythmia generation

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zifan; Xiao, Yucheng; Meng, Jingwei; Hudmon, Andy; Cummins, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav1.5) play an essential role in regulating cardiac electric activity by initiating and propagating action potentials in the heart. Altered Nav1.5 function is associated with multiple cardiac diseases including long-QT3 and Brugada syndrome. Here, we show that Nav1.5 is subject to palmitoylation, a reversible post-translational lipid modification. Palmitoylation increases channel availability and late sodium current activity, leading to enhanced cardiac excitability and prolonged action potential duration. In contrast, blocking palmitoylation increases closed-state channel inactivation and reduces myocyte excitability. We identify four cysteines as possible Nav1.5 palmitoylation substrates. A mutation of one of these is associated with cardiac arrhythmia (C981F), induces a significant enhancement of channel closed-state inactivation and ablates sensitivity to depalmitoylation. Our data indicate that alterations in palmitoylation can substantially control Nav1.5 function and cardiac excitability and this form of post-translational modification is likely an important contributor to acquired and congenital arrhythmias. PMID:27337590

  16. Shellfish toxins targeting voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-11-28

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management.

  17. Shellfish Toxins Targeting Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management. PMID:24287955

  18. Mutations in the transmembrane helix S6 of domain IV confer cockroach sodium channel resistance to sodium channel blocker insecticides and local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dingxin; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Wang, Xingliang; Wu, Yidong; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Indoxacarb and metaflumizone are two sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs). They preferably bind to and trap sodium channels in the slow-inactivated non-conducting state, a mode of action similar to that of local anesthetics (LAs). Recently, two sodium channel mutations, F1845Y (F(4i15)Y) and V1848I (V(4i18)I), in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain IV (IVS6), were identified to be associated with indoxacarb resistance in Plutella xylostella. F(4i15) is known to be critical for the action of LAs on mammalian sodium channels. Previously, mutation F(4i15)A in a cockroach sodium channel, BgNav1-1a, has been shown to reduce the action of lidocaine, a LA, but not the action of SCBIs. In this study, we introduced mutations F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)A/I individually into the cockroach sodium channel, BgNav1-1a, and conducted functional analysis of the three mutants in Xenopus oocytes. We found that both the F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations reduced the inhibition of sodium current by indoxacarb, DCJW (an active metabolite of indoxacarb) and metaflumizone. F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations also reduced the use-dependent block of sodium current by lidocaine. In contrast, substitution V(4i18)A enhanced the action metaflumizone and lidocaine. These results show that both F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations may contribute to target-site resistance to SCBIs, and provide the first molecular evidence for common amino acid determinants on insect sodium channels involved in action of SCBIs and LA.

  19. The antipsychotic drug loxapine is an opener of the sodium-activated potassium channel slack (Slo2.2).

    PubMed

    Biton, B; Sethuramanujam, S; Picchione, Kelly E; Bhattacharjee, A; Khessibi, N; Chesney, F; Lanneau, C; Curet, O; Avenet, P

    2012-03-01

    Sodium-activated potassium (K(Na)) channels have been suggested to set the resting potential, to modulate slow after-hyperpolarizations, and to control bursting behavior or spike frequency adaptation (Trends Neurosci 28:422-428, 2005). One of the genes that encodes K(Na) channels is called Slack (Kcnt1, Slo2.2). Studies found that Slack channels were highly expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons and modulated their firing frequency (J Neurosci 30:14165-14172, 2010). Therefore, Slack channel openers are of significant interest as putative analgesic drugs. We screened the library of pharmacologically active compounds with recombinant human Slack channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, by using rubidium efflux measurements with atomic absorption spectrometry. Riluzole at 500 μM was used as a reference agonist. The antipsychotic drug loxapine and the anthelmintic drug niclosamide were both found to activate Slack channels, which was confirmed by using manual patch-clamp analyses (EC(50) = 4.4 μM and EC(50) = 2.9 μM, respectively). Psychotropic drugs structurally related to loxapine were also evaluated in patch-clamp experiments, but none was found to be as active as loxapine. Loxapine properties were confirmed at the single-channel level with recombinant rat Slack channels. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, loxapine was found to behave as an opener of native K(Na) channels and to increase the rheobase of action potential. This study identifies new K(Na) channel pharmacological tools, which will be useful for further Slack channel investigations.

  20. Loss-of-function mutations in sodium channel Nav1.7 cause anosmia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jan; Pyrski, Martina; Jacobi, Eric; Bufe, Bernd; Willnecker, Vivienne; Schick, Bernhard; Zizzari, Philippe; Gossage, Samuel J; Greer, Charles A; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Woods, C Geoffrey; Wood, John N; Zufall, Frank

    2011-04-14

    Loss of function of the gene SCN9A, encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.7, causes a congenital inability to experience pain in humans. Here we show that Na(v)1.7 is not only necessary for pain sensation but is also an essential requirement for odour perception in both mice and humans. We examined human patients with loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A and show that they are unable to sense odours. To establish the essential role of Na(v)1.7 in odour perception, we generated conditional null mice in which Na(v)1.7 was removed from all olfactory sensory neurons. In the absence of Na(v)1.7, these neurons still produce odour-evoked action potentials but fail to initiate synaptic signalling from their axon terminals at the first synapse in the olfactory system. The mutant mice no longer display vital, odour-guided behaviours such as innate odour recognition and avoidance, short-term odour learning, and maternal pup retrieval. Our study creates a mouse model of congenital general anosmia and provides new strategies to explore the genetic basis of the human sense of smell.

  1. Functional coupling between sodium-activated potassium channels and voltage-dependent persistent sodium currents in cricket Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Izumi; Yoshino, Masami

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we examined the functional coupling between Na(+)-activated potassium (KNa) channels and Na(+) influx through voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Single-channel activity of KNa channels was recorded with the cell-attached patch configuration. The open probability (Po) of KNa channels increased with increasing Na(+) concentration in a bath solution, whereas it decreased by the substitution of Na(+) with an equimolar concentration of Li(+). The Po of KNa channels was also found to be reduced by bath application of a high concentration of TTX (1 μM) and riluzole (100 μM), which inhibits both fast (INaf) and persistent (INaP) Na(+) currents, whereas it was unaffected by a low concentration of TTX (10 nM), which selectively blocks INaf. Bath application of Cd(2+) at a low concentration (50 μM), as an inhibitor of INaP, also decreased the Po of KNa channels. Conversely, bath application of the inorganic Ca(2+)-channel blockers Co(2+) and Ni(2+) at high concentrations (500 μM) had little effect on the Po of KNa channels, although Cd(2+) (500 μM) reduced the Po of KNa channels. Perforated whole cell clamp analysis further indicated the presence of sustained outward currents for which amplitude was dependent on the amount of Na(+) influx. Taken together, these results indicate that KNa channels could be activated by Na(+) influx passing through voltage-dependent persistent Na(+) channels. The functional significance of this coupling mechanism was discussed in relation to the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells and its possible role in the formation of long-term memory.

  2. State-dependent trapping of flecainide in the cardiac sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Eugene; O'Leary, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    Flecainide is a Class I antiarrhythmic drug and a potent inhibitor of the cardiac (Nav1.5) sodium channel. Although the flecainide inhibition of Nav1.5 is typically enhanced by depolarization, the contributions of the open and inactivated states to flecainide binding and inhibition remain controversial. We further investigated the state-dependent binding of flecainide by examining its inhibition of rapidly inactivating and non-inactivating mutants of Nav1.5 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Applying flecainide while briefly depolarizing from a relatively negative holding potential resulted in a low-affinity inhibition of the channel (IC50 = 345 μm). Increasing the frequency of stimulation potentiated the flecainide inhibition (IC50 = 7.4 μm), which progressively increased over the range of voltages where Nav1.5 channels activated. This contrasts with sustained depolarizations that effectively stabilize the channels in inactivated states, which failed to promote significant flecainide inhibition. The voltage sensitivity and strong dependence of the flecainide inhibition on repetitive depolarization suggests that flecainide binding is facilitated by channel opening and that the drug does not directly bind to closed or inactivated channels. The binding of flecainide to open channels was further investigated in a non-inactivating mutant of Nav1.5. Flecainide produced a time-dependent decay in the current of the non-inactivating mutant that displayed kinetics consistent with a simple pore blocking mechanism (KD = 11 μm). At hyperpolarized voltages, flecainide slowed the recovery of both the rapidly inactivating (τ = 81 ± 3 s) and non-inactivating (τ = 42 ± 3 s) channels. Mutation of a conserved isoleucine of the D4S6 segment (I1756C) creates an alternative pathway that permits the rapid diffusion of anaesthetics out of the Nav1.5 channel. The I1756C mutation accelerated the recovery of both the rapidly inactivating (τ = 12.6 ± 0.4 s) and non-inactivating (τ = 7

  3. Steady-state gating of batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels. Variability and electrolyte-dependent modulation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The steady-state gating of individual batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels in neutral phospholipid bilayers exhibits spontaneous, reversible changes in channel activation, such that the midpoint potential (Va) for the gating curves may change, by 30 mV or more, with or without a change in the apparent gating valence (za). Consequently, estimates for Va and, in particular, za from ensemble-averaged gating curves differ from the average values for Va and za from single-channel gating curves. In addition to these spontaneous variations, the average Va shifts systematically as a function of [NaCl] (being -109, -88, and - 75 mV at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 M NaCl), with no systematic variation in the average za (approximately 3.7). The [NaCl]-dependent shifts in Va were interpreted in terms of screening of fixed charges near the channels' gating machinery. Estimates for the extracellular and intracellular apparent charge densities (sigma e = -0.7 and sigma i = -0.08 e/nm2) were obtained from experiments in symmetrical and asymmetrical NaCl solutions using the Gouy-Chapman theory. In 0.1 M NaCl the extracellular and intracellular surface potentials are estimated to be - 94 and -17 mV, respectively. The intrinsic midpoint potential, corrected for the surface potentials, is thus about -30 mV, and the standard free energy of activation is approximately -12 kJ/mol. In symmetrical 0.1 M NaCl, addition of 0.005 M Ba2+ to the extracellular solution produced a 17-mV depolarizing shift in Va and a slight reduction in za. The shift is consistent with predictions using the Gouy-Chapman theory and the above estimate for sigma e. Subsequent addition of 0.005 M Ba2+ to the intracellular solution produced a approximately 5-mV hyperpolarizing shift in the ensemble-averaged gating curve and reduced za by approximately 1. This Ba(2+)-induced shift is threefold larger than predicted, which together with the reduction in za implies that Ba2+ may bind at the intracellular channel surface. PMID

  4. Determination of Na channel blockers in paralytic shellfish toxins and pufferfish toxins with a tissue biosensor.

    PubMed

    Cheun, B S; Takagi, S; Hayashi, T; Nagashima, Y; Watanabe, E

    1998-06-01

    The biosensor consisted of a sodium electrode and covered with the frog bladder membrane within a flow cell was tested for the estimation of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX). This sensor was applied to detect very low amounts of the Na+ channel blockers, STX and TTX, in different shellfishes and swellfishes. A good agreement was obtained between TTX activities determined by mouse assay and amounts of Na+ channel blockers estimated by frog membrane sensor. The lowest level of TTX (fg) that can be determined by frog membrane sensor does not cause human poisoning. The channel blockers in short-necked clam, which was assumed to be STX, were monitored by this sensor continuously every week for one year. It was discovered that the STX content increased from July until September and then decreased from October until March. The biosensor proposed here may be used for the estimation of STX and TTX conventionally in the future.

  5. The sodium leak channel, NALCN, in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cochet-Bissuel, Maud; Lory, Philippe; Monteil, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are crucial components of cellular excitability and are involved in many neurological diseases. This review focuses on the sodium leak, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)-activated NALCN channel that is predominantly expressed in neurons where it regulates the resting membrane potential and neuronal excitability. NALCN is part of a complex that includes not only GPCRs, but also UNC-79, UNC-80, NLF-1 and src family of Tyrosine kinases (SFKs). There is growing evidence that the NALCN channelosome critically regulates its ion conduction. Both in mammals and invertebrates, animal models revealed an involvement in many processes such as locomotor behaviors, sensitivity to volatile anesthetics, and respiratory rhythms. There is also evidence that alteration in this NALCN channelosome can cause a wide variety of diseases. Indeed, mutations in the NALCN gene were identified in Infantile Neuroaxonal Dystrophy (INAD) patients, as well as in patients with an Autosomal Recessive Syndrome with severe hypotonia, speech impairment, and cognitive delay. Deletions in NALCN gene were also reported in diseases such as 13q syndrome. In addition, genes encoding NALCN, NLF- 1, UNC-79, and UNC-80 proteins may be susceptibility loci for several diseases including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, autism, epilepsy, alcoholism, cardiac diseases and cancer. Although the physiological role of the NALCN channelosome is poorly understood, its involvement in human diseases should foster interest for drug development in the near future. Toward this goal, we review here the current knowledge on the NALCN channelosome in physiology and diseases. PMID:24904279

  6. The paranodal cytoskeleton clusters Na+ channels at nodes of Ranvier

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Veronique; Zhang, Chuansheng; Vainshtein, Anna; Zhang, Ao; Zollinger, Daniel R; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Brophy, Peter J; Rasband, Matthew N; Peles, Elior

    2017-01-01

    A high density of Na+ channels at nodes of Ranvier is necessary for rapid and efficient action potential propagation in myelinated axons. Na+ channel clustering is thought to depend on two axonal cell adhesion molecules that mediate interactions between the axon and myelinating glia at the nodal gap (i.e., NF186) and the paranodal junction (i.e., Caspr). Here we show that while Na+ channels cluster at nodes in the absence of NF186, they fail to do so in double conditional knockout mice lacking both NF186 and the paranodal cell adhesion molecule Caspr, demonstrating that a paranodal junction-dependent mechanism can cluster Na+ channels at nodes. Furthermore, we show that paranode-dependent clustering of nodal Na+ channels requires axonal βII spectrin which is concentrated at paranodes. Our results reveal that the paranodal junction-dependent mechanism of Na+channel clustering is mediated by the spectrin-based paranodal axonal cytoskeleton. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21392.001 PMID:28134616

  7. Identification of PN1, a Predominant Voltage-Dependent Sodium Channel Expressed Principally in Peripheral Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Aral, Juan J.; Moss, Brenda L.; He, Zhi-Jun; Koszowski, Adam G.; Whisenand, Teri; Levinson, Simon R.; Wolf, John J.; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Halegoua, Simon; Mandel, Gail

    1997-02-01

    Membrane excitability in different tissues is due, in large part, to the selective expression of distinct genes encoding the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Although the predominant sodium channels in brain, skeletal muscle, and cardiac muscle have been identified, the major sodium channel types responsible for excitability within the peripheral nervous system have remained elusive. We now describe the deduced primary structure of a sodium channel, peripheral nerve type 1 (PN1), which is expressed at high levels throughout the peripheral nervous system and is targeted to nerve terminals of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Studies using cultured PC12 cells indicate that both expression and targeting of PN1 is induced by treatment of the cells with nerve growth factor. The preferential localization suggests that the PN1 sodium channel plays a specific role in nerve excitability.

  8. A gain-of-function mutation in the sodium channel gene Scn2a results in seizures and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kearney, J A; Plummer, N W; Smith, M R; Kapur, J; Cummins, T R; Waxman, S G; Goldin, A L; Meisler, M H

    2001-01-01

    The GAL879-881QQQ mutation in the cytoplasmic S4-S5 linker of domain 2 of the rat brain IIA sodium channel (Na(v)1.2) results in slowed inactivation and increased persistent current when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The neuron-specific enolase promoter was used to direct in vivo expression of the mutated channel in transgenic mice. Three transgenic lines exhibited seizures, and line Q54 was characterized in detail. The seizures in these mice began at two months of age and were accompanied by behavioral arrest and stereotyped repetitive behaviors. Continuous electroencephalogram monitoring detected focal seizure activity in the hippocampus, which in some instances generalized to involve the cortex. Hippocampal CA1 neurons isolated from presymptomatic Q54 mice exhibited increased persistent sodium current which may underlie hyperexcitability in the hippocampus. During the progression of the disorder there was extensive cell loss and gliosis within the hippocampus in areas CA1, CA2, CA3 and the hilus. The lifespan of Q54 mice was shortened and only 25% of the mice survived beyond six months of age. Four independent transgenic lines expressing the wild-type sodium channel were examined and did not exhibit any abnormalities. The transgenic Q54 mice provide a genetic model that will be useful for testing the effect of pharmacological intervention on progression of seizures caused by sodium channel dysfunction. The human ortholog, SCN2A, is a candidate gene for seizure disorders mapped to chromosome 2q22-24.

  9. Fluorescent Saxitoxins for Live Cell Imaging of Single Voltage-Gated Sodium Ion Channels beyond the Optical Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Ondrus, Alison E.; Lee, Hsiao-lu D.; Iwanaga, Shigeki; Parsons, William H.; Andresen, Brian M.; Moerner, W.E.; Bois, J. Du

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A desire to better understand the role of voltagegated sodium channels (NaVs) in signal conduction and their dysregulation in specific disease states motivates the development of high precision tools for their study. Nature has evolved a collection of small molecule agents, including the shellfish poison (+)-saxitoxin, that bind to the extracellular pore of select NaV isoforms. As described in this report, de novo chemical synthesis has enabled the preparation of fluorescently labeled derivatives of (+)-saxitoxin, STX-Cy5, and STX-DCDHF, which display reversible binding to NaVs in live cells. Electrophysiology and confocal fluorescence microscopy studies confirm that these STX-based dyes function as potent and selective NaV labels. The utility of these probes is underscored in single-molecule and super-resolution imaging experiments, which reveal NaV distributions well beyond the optical diffraction limit in subcellular features such as neuritic spines and filopodia. PMID:22840778

  10. Scorpion β-toxin interference with NaV channel voltage sensor gives rise to excitatory and depressant modes.

    PubMed

    Leipold, Enrico; Borges, Adolfo; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2012-04-01

    Scorpion β toxins, peptides of ∼70 residues, specifically target voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels to cause use-dependent subthreshold channel openings via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism. This excitatory action is often overlaid by a not yet understood depressant mode in which Na(V) channel activity is inhibited. Here, we analyzed these two modes of gating modification by β-toxin Tz1 from Tityus zulianus on heterologously expressed Na(V)1.4 and Na(V)1.5 channels using the whole cell patch-clamp method. Tz1 facilitated the opening of Na(V)1.4 in a use-dependent manner and inhibited channel opening with a reversed use dependence. In contrast, the opening of Na(V)1.5 was exclusively inhibited without noticeable use dependence. Using chimeras of Na(V)1.4 and Na(V)1.5 channels, we demonstrated that gating modification by Tz1 depends on the specific structure of the voltage sensor in domain 2. Although residue G658 in Na(V)1.4 promotes the use-dependent transitions between Tz1 modification phenotypes, the equivalent residue in Na(V)1.5, N803, abolishes them. Gating charge neutralizations in the Na(V)1.4 domain 2 voltage sensor identified arginine residues at positions 663 and 669 as crucial for the outward and inward movement of this sensor, respectively. Our data support a model in which Tz1 can stabilize two conformations of the domain 2 voltage sensor: a preactivated outward position leading to Na(V) channels that open at subthreshold potentials, and a deactivated inward position preventing channels from opening. The results are best explained by a two-state voltage-sensor trapping model in that bound scorpion β toxin slows the activation as well as the deactivation kinetics of the voltage sensor in domain 2.

  11. Scorpion β-toxin interference with NaV channel voltage sensor gives rise to excitatory and depressant modes

    PubMed Central

    Leipold, Enrico; Borges, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Scorpion β toxins, peptides of ∼70 residues, specifically target voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels to cause use-dependent subthreshold channel openings via a voltage–sensor trapping mechanism. This excitatory action is often overlaid by a not yet understood depressant mode in which NaV channel activity is inhibited. Here, we analyzed these two modes of gating modification by β-toxin Tz1 from Tityus zulianus on heterologously expressed NaV1.4 and NaV1.5 channels using the whole cell patch-clamp method. Tz1 facilitated the opening of NaV1.4 in a use-dependent manner and inhibited channel opening with a reversed use dependence. In contrast, the opening of NaV1.5 was exclusively inhibited without noticeable use dependence. Using chimeras of NaV1.4 and NaV1.5 channels, we demonstrated that gating modification by Tz1 depends on the specific structure of the voltage sensor in domain 2. Although residue G658 in NaV1.4 promotes the use-dependent transitions between Tz1 modification phenotypes, the equivalent residue in NaV1.5, N803, abolishes them. Gating charge neutralizations in the NaV1.4 domain 2 voltage sensor identified arginine residues at positions 663 and 669 as crucial for the outward and inward movement of this sensor, respectively. Our data support a model in which Tz1 can stabilize two conformations of the domain 2 voltage sensor: a preactivated outward position leading to NaV channels that open at subthreshold potentials, and a deactivated inward position preventing channels from opening. The results are best explained by a two-state voltage–sensor trapping model in that bound scorpion β toxin slows the activation as well as the deactivation kinetics of the voltage sensor in domain 2. PMID:22450487

  12. The Formation of Sodium Stannate from Mineral Cassiterite by the Alkaline Decomposition Process with Sodium Carbonate (Na2CO3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyah, L.; Lalasari, L. H.; Manaf, A.

    2017-02-01

    Extraction of cassiterite using alkaline decomposition of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) has been studied. Cassiterite (SnO2) is a mineral ore that contains tin (Sn) about 57.82 wt% and impurities like quartz, ilmenite, monazite, rutile and zircon. The initial step for the process was to remove the impurities in cassiterite through washing and separation by a high magnetic separator (HTS). The aim of this research is to increase the added value of cassiterite from local area Indonesia that using alkaline decomposition to form sodium stannate (Na2SnO3). The result shows that cassiterite from Indonesia can form sodium stannate (Na2SnO3) which soluble with water in the leaching process. The longer the time for decomposition, the more phases of sodium stannate that will be formed. Optimum result reached when the decomposition process was done in 850 °C for 4 hours with a mole ratio Na2CO3 to cassiterite 3:2. High Score Plus (HSP) was used in this research to analyze the mass of sodium stannate (Na2SnO3). HSP analysis showed that mass of sodium stannate (Na2SnO3) is 70.3 wt%.

  13. Use dependence of tetrodotoxin block of sodium channels: a revival of the trapped-ion mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, F; Gheri, A; Pusch, M; Moran, O

    1996-01-01

    The use-dependent block of sodium channels by tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been studied in cRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes expressing the alpha-subunit of rat brain IIA channels. The kinetics of stimulus-induced extra block are consistent with an underlying relaxation process involving only three states. Cumulative extra block induced by repetitive stimulations increases with hyperpolarization, with TTX concentration, and with extracellular Ca2+ concentration. We have developed a theoretical model based on the suggestion by Salgado et al. that TTX blocks the extracellular mouth of the ion pore less tightly when the latter has its external side occupied by a cation, and that channel opening favors a tighter binding by allowing the escape of the trapped ion. The model provides an excellent fit of the data, which are consistent with Ca2+ being more efficient than Na+ in weakening TTX binding and with bound Ca2+ stabilizing the closed state of the channel, as suggested by Armstrong and Cota. Reports arguing against the trapped-ion mechanism are critically discussed. PMID:8874004

  14. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C; Stevens, Troy

    2015-02-15

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1.

  15. Modified kinetics and selectivity of sodium channels in frog skeletal muscle fibers treated with aconitine

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the plant alkaloid aconitine on sodium channel kinetics, ionic selectivity, and blockage by protons and tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been studied in frog skeletal muscle. Treatment with 0.25 or 0.3 mM aconitine alters sodium channels so that the threshold of activation is shifted 40-50 mV in the hyperpolarized direction. In contrast to previous results in frog nerve, inactivation is complete for depolarizations beyond about -60 mV. After aconitine treatment, the steady state level of inactivation is shifted approximately 20 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction. Concomitant with changes in channel kinetics, the relative permeability of the sodium channel to NH4,K, and Cs is increased. This altered selectivity is not accompanied by altered block by protons or TTX. The results suggest that sites other than those involved in channel block by protons and TTX are important in determining sodium channel selectivity. PMID:6294221

  16. Glycosylation-dependent activation of epithelial sodium channel by solnatide.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Waheed; Tzotzos, Susan; Bedak, Minela; Aufy, Mohammad; Willam, Anita; Kraihammer, Martin; Holzner, Alexander; Czikora, Istvan; Scherbaum-Hazemi, Parastoo; Fischer, Hendrik; Pietschmann, Helmut; Fischer, Bernhard; Lucas, Rudolf; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa

    2015-12-15

    Dysfunction of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), which regulates salt and water homeostasis in epithelia, causes several human pathological conditions, including pulmonary oedema. This is a potentially lethal complication of acute lung injury at least partially caused by dysfunctional alveolar liquid clearance, which in turn impairs alveolar gas exchange. Solnatide (named TIP-peptide, AP301), a 17 residue peptide mimicking the lectin-like domain of TNF has been shown to activate ENaC in several experimental animal models of acute lung injury and is being evaluated as a potential therapy for pulmonary oedema. The peptide has recently completed phase 1 and 2a clinical trials. In this study, we identify a glycosylation-dependent mechanism that preserves ENaC function and expression. Since our previous data suggested that the pore-forming subunits of ENaC are essential for maximal current activation by solnatide, we performed single- and multi-N-glycosylation site mutations in αN232,293,312,397,511Q- and δN166,211,384Q-subunits, in order to identify crucial residues for interaction with solnatide within the extracellular loop of the channel. Additionally, we generated αL576X and αN232,293,312,397,511Q,L576X deletion mutants of ENaC-α, since we have previously demonstrated that the carboxy terminal domain of this subunit is also involved in its interaction with solnatide. In cells expressing αN232,293,312,397,511Q,L576Xβγ-hENaC or δN166,311,384Q,D552Xβγ-hENaC activation by solnatide, as measured in whole cell patch clamp mode, was completely abolished, whereas it was attenuated in αL576Xβγ-hENaC- and δD552Xβγ-hENaC-expressing cells. Taken together, our findings delineate an N-glycan dependent interaction between the TIP-peptide and ENaC leading to normalization of both sodium and fluid absorption in oedematous alveoli to non-oedematous levels.

  17. MTSET modification of D4S6 cysteines stabilize the fast inactivated state of Nav1.5 sodium channels.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Michael E; Chahine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The transmembrane S6 segments of Na(+) sodium channels form the cytoplasmic entrance of the channel and line the internal aspects of the aqueous pore. This region of the channel has been implicated in Na(+) channel permeation, gating, and pharmacology. In this study we utilized cysteine substitutions and methanethiosulfonate reagent (MTSET) to investigate the role of the S6 segment of homologous domain 4 (D4S6) in the gating of the cardiac (Nav1.5) channel. D4S6 cysteine mutants were heterologously expressed in tsA201 cells and currents recorded using whole-cell patch clamp. Internal MTSET reduced the peak Na(+) currents, induced hyperpolarizing shifts in steady-state inactivation and slowed the recovery of mutant channels with cysteines inserted near the middle (F1760C, V1763C) and C-terminus (Y1767C) of the D4S6. These findings suggested a link between the MTSET inhibition and fast inactivation. This was confirmed by expressing the V1763C and Y1767C mutations in non-inactivating Nav1.5 channels. Removing inactivation abolished the MTSET inhibition of the V1763C and Y1767C mutants. The data indicate that the MTSET-induced reduction in current primarily results from slower recovery from inactivation that produces hyperpolarizing shifts in fast inactivation and decreases the steady-state availability of the channels. This contrasted with a cysteine inserted near the C-terminus of the D4S6 (I1770C) where MTSET increased the persistent Na(+) current at depolarized voltages consistent with impaired fast inactivation. Covalent modification of D4S6 cysteines with MTSET adduct appears to reduce the mobility of the D4S6 segment and stabilize the channels in the fast inactivated state. These findings indicate that residues located near the middle and C-terminus of the D4S6 play an important role in fast inactivation.

  18. Cytosolic Na+ Controls an Epithelial Na+ Channel Via the Go Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Regulatory Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komwatana, P.; Dinudom, A.; Young, J. A.; Cook, D. I.

    1996-07-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the rate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-β -S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the α -subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-.

  19. Cytosolic Na+ controls and epithelial Na+ channel via the Go guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Komwatana, P; Dinudom, A; Young, J A; Cook, D I

    1996-01-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the fate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-beta-S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the alpha-subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8755611

  20. Kinetics of 9-aminoacridine block of single Na channels

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of 9-aminoacridine (9-AA) block of single Na channels in neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells were studied using the gigohm seal, patch clamp technique, under the condition in which the Na current inactivation had been eliminated by treatment with N-bromoacetamide (NBA). Following NBA treatment, the current flowing through individual Na channels was manifested by square-wave open events lasting from several to tens of milliseconds. When 9-AA was applied to the cytoplasmic face of Na channels at concentrations ranging from 30 to 100 microM, it caused repetitive rapid transitions (flickering) between open and blocked states within single openings of Na channels, without affecting the amplitude of the single channel current. The histograms for the duration of blocked states and the histograms for the duration of open states could be fitted with a single-exponential function. The mean open time (tau o) became shorter as the drug concentration was increased, while the mean blocked time (tau b) was concentration independent. The association (blocking) rate constant, kappa, calculated from the slope of the curve relating the reciprocal mean open time to 9-AA concentration, showed little voltage dependence, the rate constant being on the order of 1 X 10(7) M-1s-1. The dissociation (unblocking) rate constant, l, calculated from the mean blocked time, was strongly voltage dependent, the mean rate constant being 214 s-1 at 0 mV and becoming larger as the membrane being hyperpolarized. The voltage dependence suggests that a first-order blocking site is located at least 63% of the way through the membrane field from the cytoplasmic surface. The equilibrium dissociation constant for 9-AA to block the Na channel, defined by the relation of l/kappa, was calculated to be 21 microM at 0 mV. Both tau -1o and tau -1b had a Q10 of 1.3, which suggests that binding reaction was diffusion controlled. The burst time in the presence of 9-AA, which is the sum of open times and blocked

  1. The discovery of a novel sodium channel in the cockroach Periplaneta americana: evidence for an early duplication of the para-like gene.

    PubMed

    Moignot, Bénédicte; Lemaire, Christophe; Quinchard, Sophie; Lapied, Bruno; Legros, Christian

    2009-11-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v) channels) belong to a superfamily of ion channels which play an essential role in membrane excitability. Only one gene encoding Na(v) channels has been characterized so far in insects. Here, we have cloned one full-length cDNA encoding a conventional insect Na(v) channel (PaNa(v)1) and two full-length cDNAs encoding putative insect Na(v) channels (PaFPC1 and PaFPC2) in Periplaneta americana, a model insect for neurophysiological studies. The ORFs of PaFPC1 and PaFPC2 contained 4662 bp and encoded 1553 amino acid residues, and the ORF of PaNa(v)1 contained 6153 bp and encoded 2051 amino acid residues. PaFPC1 and PaFPC2 are two isoforms, which differ by eight single amino acid substitutions. PaFPC1 shares 37.5-55% protein identities with known insect Na(v) channels, while PaNa(v)1 shares 70-97.5% protein identities with these latter. Both PaFPC1 and PaFPC2 possess the molecular hallmarks of Na(v) channels except the motif involved in fast inactivation. Contrary to PaNa(v)1 transcripts which are expressed mainly in the central nervous system, those ones of PaFPC are also expressed in non-neuronal tissues (muscles, gut and mushroom-shaped accessory glands). A detailed phylogenetic analysis confirmed that PaNa(v)1 and PaFPC are evolutionarily closely related to insect Na(v) channel genes.

  2. Action of insecticidal N-alkylamides at site 2 of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ottea, J.A.; Payne, G.T.; Soderlund, D.M. )

    1990-08-01

    Nine synthetic N-alkylamides were examined as inhibitors of the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)batrachotoxinin A 20{alpha}-benzoate (({sup 3}H)BTX-B) to sodium channels and as activators of sodium uptake in mouse brain synaptoneurosomes. In the presence of scorpion (Leiurus quinquestriatus) venom, the six insecticidal analogues were active as both inhibitors of ({sup 3}H)BTX-B binding and stimulators of sodium uptake. These findings are consistent with an action of these compounds at the alkaloid activator recognition site (site 2) of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel. The three noninsecticidal N-alkylamides also inhibited ({sup 3}H)BTX-B binding but were ineffective as activators of sodium uptake. Concentration-response studies revealed that some of the insecticidal amides also enhanced sodium uptake through a second, high-affinity interaction that does not involve site 2, but this secondary effect does not appear to be correlated with insecticidal activity. The activities of N-alkylamides as sodium channel activators were influenced by the length of the alkenyl chain and the location of unsaturation within the molecule. These results further define the actions of N-alkylamides on sodium channels and illustrate the significance of the multiple binding domains of the sodium channel as target sites for insect control agents.

  3. 980-nm infrared laser modulation of sodium channel kinetics in a neuron cell linearly mediated by photothermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinyu; Liu, Jia; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Changsen

    2014-10-01

    Photothermal effect (PE) plays a major role in the near-infrared laser interaction with biological tissue. But, quite few interactions can be quantitatively depicted. Here, a two-step model is proposed to describe a 980-nm infrared laser interaction with neuron cell in vitro. First, the laser-induced temperature rises in the cell surrounding area were measured by using an open pipette method and also calculated by solving the heat conduction equation. Second, we recorded the modifications on sodium (Na) channel current in neuron cells directly by using a patch clamp to synchronize the 980-nm laser irradiation and obtained how the electrophysiological function of neuron cells respond to the temperature rise. Then, the activation time constants, τm, were extracted by fitting the sodium currents with the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The infrared laser modulation effect on sodium currents kinetics was examined by taking a ratio between the time constants with and without the laser irradiations. The analysis revealed that the averaged ratio at a specific laser exposure could be well related to the temperature properties of the Na channel protein. These results proved that the modulation of sodium current kinetics of a neuron cell in vitro by 980-nm laser with different-irradiation levels was linearly mediated corresponding to the laser-induced PE.

  4. Identification of an ovarian voltage-activated Na+-channel type: hints to involvement in luteolysis.

    PubMed

    Bulling, A; Berg, F D; Berg, U; Duffy, D M; Stouffer, R L; Ojeda, S R; Gratzl, M; Mayerhofer, A

    2000-07-01

    An endocrine type of voltage-activated sodium channel (eNaCh) was identified in the human ovary and human luteinized granulosa cells (GC). Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed that the eNaCh in GC is functional and tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive. The luteotrophic hormone human CG (hCG) was found to decrease the peak amplitude of the sodium current within seconds. Treatment with hCG for 24-48 h suppressed not only eNaCh mRNA levels, but also mean Na+ peak currents and resting membrane potentials. An unexpected role for eNaChs in regulating cell morphology and function was indicated after pharmacological modulation of presumed eNaCh steady-state activity in GC cultures for 24-48 h using TTX (NaCh blocker) and veratridine (NaCh activator). TTX preserved a highly differentiated cellular phenotype. Veratridine not only increased the number of secondary lysosomes but also led to a significantly reduced progesterone production. Importantly, endocrine cells of the nonhuman primate corpus luteum (CL), which represent in vivo counterparts of luteinized GC, also contain eNaCh mRNA. Although the mechanism of channel activity under physiological conditions is not clear, it may include persistent Na+ currents. As observed in GC in culture, abundant secondary lysosomes were particularly evident in the regressing CL, suggesting a functional link between eNaCh activity and this form of cellular regression in vivo. Our results identify eNaCh in ovarian endocrine cells and demonstrate that their expression is under the inhibitory control of hCG. Activation of eNaChs in luteal cells, due to loss of gonadotropin support, may initiate a cascade of events leading to decreased CL function, a process that involves lysosomal activation and autophagy. These results imply that ovarian eNaChs are involved in the physiological demise of the temporary endocrine organ CL in the primate ovary during the menstrual cycle. Because commonly used drugs, including phenytoin, target NaChs, these results

  5. Rate-dependent activation failure in isolated cardiac cells and tissue due to Na+ channel block

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, Anthony J.; Paterson, David; Noble, Denis

    2015-01-01

    While it is well established that class-I antiarrhythmics block cardiac sodium channels, the mechanism of action of therapeutic levels of these drugs is not well understood. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments, we studied the failure of activation of action potentials in single ventricular cells and in tissue caused by Na+ channel block. Our computations of block and unblock of sodium channels by a theoretical class-Ib antiarrhythmic agent predict differences in the concentrations required to cause activation failure in single cells as opposed to multicellular preparations. We tested and confirmed these in silico predictions with in vitro experiments on isolated guinea-pig ventricular cells and papillary muscles stimulated at various rates (2–6.67 Hz) and exposed to various concentrations (5 × 10−6 to 500 × 10−6 mol/l) of lidocaine. The most salient result was that whereas large doses (5 × 10−4 mol/l or higher) of lidocaine were required to inhibit action potentials temporarily in single cells, much lower doses (5 × 10−6 mol/l), i.e., therapeutic levels, were sufficient to have the same effect in papillary muscles: a hundredfold difference. Our experimental results and mathematical analysis indicate that the syncytial nature of cardiac tissue explains the effects of clinically relevant doses of Na+ channel blockers. PMID:26342072

  6. Chronic ciguatoxin treatment induces synaptic scaling through voltage gated sodium channels in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Martín, Víctor; Vale, Carmen; Rubiolo, Juan A; Roel, Maria; Hirama, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shuji; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luís M

    2015-06-15

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channels activators that cause ciguatera, one of the most widespread nonbacterial forms of food poisoning, which presents with long-term neurological alterations. In central neurons, chronic perturbations in activity induce homeostatic synaptic mechanisms that adjust the strength of excitatory synapses and modulate glutamate receptor expression in order to stabilize the overall activity. Immediate early genes, such as Arc and Egr1, are induced in response to activity changes and underlie the trafficking of glutamate receptors during neuronal homeostasis. To better understand the long lasting neurological consequences of ciguatera, it is important to establish the role that chronic changes in activity produced by ciguatoxins represent to central neurons. Here, the effect of a 30 min exposure of 10-13 days in vitro (DIV) cortical neurons to the synthetic ciguatoxin CTX 3C on Arc and Egr1 expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction approaches. Since the toxin increased the mRNA levels of both Arc and Egr1, the effect of CTX 3C in NaV channels, membrane potential, firing activity, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and glutamate receptors expression in cortical neurons after a 24 h exposure was evaluated using electrophysiological and western blot approaches. The data presented here show that CTX 3C induced an upregulation of Arc and Egr1 that was prevented by previous coincubation of the neurons with the NaV channel blocker tetrodotoxin. In addition, chronic CTX 3C caused a concentration-dependent shift in the activation voltage of NaV channels to more negative potentials and produced membrane potential depolarization. Moreover, 24 h treatment of cortical neurons with 5 nM CTX 3C decreased neuronal firing and induced synaptic scaling mechanisms, as evidenced by a decrease in the amplitude of mEPSCs and downregulation in the protein level of glutamate receptors that was also prevented by tetrodotoxin

  7. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue.

  8. Evolutionary diversification of TTX-resistant sodium channels in a predator-prey interaction.

    PubMed

    Geffeney, Shana L; Fujimoto, Esther; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D; Ruben, Peter C

    2005-04-07

    Understanding the molecular genetic basis of adaptations provides incomparable insight into the genetic mechanisms by which evolutionary diversification takes place. Whether the evolution of common traits in different lineages proceeds by similar or unique mutations, and the degree to which phenotypic evolution is controlled by changes in gene regulation as opposed to gene function, are fundamental questions in evolutionary biology that require such an understanding of genetic mechanisms. Here we identify novel changes in the molecular structure of a sodium channel expressed in snake skeletal muscle, tsNa(V)1.4, that are responsible for differences in tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistance among garter snake populations coevolving with toxic newts. By the functional expression of tsNa(V)1.4, we show how differences in the amino-acid sequence of the channel affect TTX binding and impart different levels of resistance in four snake populations. These results indicate that the evolution of a physiological trait has occurred through a series of unique functional changes in a gene that is otherwise highly conserved among vertebrates.

  9. Expression and Purification of the Alpha Subunit of the Epithelial Sodium Channel, ENaC

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Bharat G.; Dai, Qun; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Fuller, Catherine M.; Kappes, John C.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) plays a critical role in maintaining Na+ homeostasis in various tissues throughout the body. An understanding of the structure of the ENaC subunits has been developed from homology modeling based on the related acid sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1) protein structure, as well as electrophysiological approaches. However, ENaC has several notable functional differences compared to ASIC1, thereby providing justification for determination of its three-dimensional structure. Unfortunately, this goal remains elusive due to several experimental challenges. Of the subunits that comprise a physiological hetero-trimeric αβγENaC, the α-subunit is unique in that it is capable of forming a homo-trimeric structure that conducts Na+ ions. Despite functional and structural interest in αENaC, a key factor complicating structural studies has been its interaction with multiple other proteins, disrupting its homogeneity. In order to address this issue, a novel protocol was used to reduce the number of proteins that associate and co-purify with αENaC. In this study, we describe a novel expression system coupled with a two-step affinity purification approach using NiNTA, followed by a GFP antibody column as a rapid procedure to improve the purity and yield of rat αENaC. PMID:26394093

  10. Kinetic approach with ab initio MO method on ionic selectivity and size in sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Tani, S; Imamura, A; Kanda, K

    1989-10-23

    Three kinds of models for ionic selectivity and size of the filter in sodium channel have been treated by using ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculations with MINI-3 and MIDI-3* basis sets. A three-components system, HCO2M-H2O (M = Li+, Na+ or K+), is acceptable for describing experimental facts well. Thermochemical parameters obtained from harmonic vibrational analysis with MINI-3 basis sets, for the translocation of the permeant metal cations in the HCO2M-H2O system, are that the activation enthalpies for Li+, Na+ and K+ are 7.0, 6.4 and 23.4 kJ/mol, and also the free energies of activation are 10.6, 1.5 and 19.0 kJ/mol, respectively. These results are qualitatively in good correspondence with experimental facts of the ion selectivity of the channel. One of water molecule was found to have a key role in the translocation of the permeant cations.

  11. The Sodium-Activated Potassium Channel Slack Is Required for Optimal Cognitive Flexibility in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausch, Anne E.; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    "Kcnt1" encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual…

  12. Discovery of triazolopyridine GS-458967, a late sodium current inhibitor (Late INai) of the cardiac NaV 1.5 channel with improved efficacy and potency relative to ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Koltun, Dmitry O; Parkhill, Eric Q; Elzein, Elfatih; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Notte, Gregory T; Kalla, Rao; Jiang, Robert H; Li, Xiaofen; Perry, Thao D; Avila, Belem; Wang, Wei-Qun; Smith-Maxwell, Catherine; Dhalla, Arvinder K; Rajamani, Sridharan; Stafford, Brian; Tang, Jennifer; Mollova, Nevena; Belardinelli, Luiz; Zablocki, Jeff A

    2016-07-01

    We started with a medium throughput screen of heterocyclic compounds without basic amine groups to avoid hERG and β-blocker activity and identified [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine as an early lead. Optimization of substituents for Late INa current inhibition and lack of Peak INa inhibition led to the discovery of 4h (GS-458967) with improved anti-arrhythmic activity relative to ranolazine. Unfortunately, 4h demonstrated use dependent block across the sodium isoforms including the central and peripheral nervous system isoforms that is consistent with its low therapeutic index (approximately 5-fold in rat, 3-fold in dog). Compound 4h represents our initial foray into a 2nd generation Late INa inhibitor program and is an important proof-of-concept compound. We will provide additional reports on addressing the CNS challenge in a follow-up communication.

  13. Evaluation of toxicity equivalent factors of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in seven human sodium channels types by an automated high throughput electrophysiology system.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Eva; Alfonso, Amparo; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2016-02-01

    Although voltage-gated sodium channels (Na v ) are the cellular target of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins and that patch clamp electrophysiology is the most effective way of studying direct interaction of molecules with these channels, nowadays, this technique is still reduced to more specific analysis due to the difficulties of transforming it in a reliable throughput system. Actual functional methods for PSP detection are based in binding assays using receptors but not functional Na v channels. Currently, the availability of automated patch clamp platforms and also of stably transfected cell lines with human Na v channels allow us to introduce this specific and selective method for fast screenings in marine toxin detection. Taking advantage of the accessibility to pure PSP standards, we calculated the toxicity equivalent factors (TEFs) for nine PSP analogs obtaining reliable TEFs in human targets to fulfill the deficiencies of the official analytic methods and to verify automated patch clamp technology as a fast and reliable screening method for marine toxins that interact with the sodium channel. The main observation of this work was the large variation of TEFs depending on the channel subtype selected, being remarkable the variation of potency in the 1.7 channel subtype and the suitability of Na v 1.6 and 1.2 channels for PSP screening.

  14. Functional identification and characterization of sodium binding sites in Na symporters.

    PubMed

    Loo, Donald D F; Jiang, Xuan; Gorraitz, Edurne; Hirayama, Bruce A; Wright, Ernest M

    2013-11-19

    Sodium cotransporters from several different gene families belong to the leucine transporter (LeuT) structural family. Although the identification of Na(+) in binding sites is beyond the resolution of the structures, two Na(+) binding sites (Na1 and Na2) have been proposed in LeuT. Na2 is conserved in the LeuT family but Na1 is not. A biophysical method has been used to measure sodium dissociation constants (Kd) of wild-type and mutant human sodium glucose cotransport (hSGLT1) proteins to identify the Na(+) binding sites in hSGLT1. The Na1 site is formed by residues in the sugar binding pocket, and their mutation influences sodium binding to Na1 but not to Na2. For the canonical Na2 site formed by two -OH side chains, S392 and S393, and three backbone carbonyls, mutation of S392 to cysteine increased the sodium Kd by sixfold. This was accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the apparent sugar and phlorizin affinities. We suggest that mutation of S392 in the Na2 site produces a structural rearrangement of the sugar binding pocket to disrupt both the binding of the second Na(+) and the binding of sugar. In contrast, the S393 mutations produce no significant changes in sodium, sugar, and phlorizin affinities. We conclude that the Na2 site is conserved in hSGLT1, the side chain of S392 and the backbone carbonyl of S393 are important in the first Na(+) binding, and that Na(+) binding to Na2 promotes binding to Na1 and also sugar binding.

  15. Characterization of an insect heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channel with unique alternative splicing mode.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Pei, Yu-Xia; Lei, Wei; Wang, Ke-Yi; Shang, Feng; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Recent discovery of the heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) in two aphid species, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae, aroused interest in exploring whether this kind of channel is conserved for aphids. Herewith, we aim to provide evidence for the conservation of heterodimeric Navs in aphids and investigate whether they have unique splicing patterns. We found that the only identifiable Nav from Toxoptera citricida consisted of two subunits, forming a heterodimeric Nav, which carried an atypical "DENS" ion selectivity filter and a conventional "MFM" inactivation gate, confirming the heterodimeric Navs' conservation within aphids. These unique heterodimeric channels may form a new Nav subfamily, specific to aphids. A more ancient member of four-domain Nav homolog was well preserved in T. citricida, carrying a typical "DEEA" and "MFL" motif. The presence of "DENS" in mammalian Naxs and "DEKT" in a fungus Nav suggested that the heterodimeric Navs may still preserve Na(+) permeability. Sequencing 46 clones from nymphs and adults exposed unique splicing patterns for this heterodimeric Nav from T. citricida, revealing 7 alternatively spliced exons, evidencing that exon 5 was no longer unique to Bombyx mori, and exon k/l was semi-mutually exclusive. Two previously undescribed optional exons and a SNP site seemingly unique to aphids were identified. In conclusion, the dimeric Navs might form a new aphids-specific heterodimeric Nav subfamily. This dimeric Nav from T. citricida was characterized with distinguishable alternative splicing modes, exemplified by the discovery of two novel alternative exons and unique usage patterns of alternative exons.

  16. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is intracellularly located as a tetramer.

    PubMed

    Dijkink, Lisette; Hartog, Anita; van Os, Carel H; Bindels, René J M

    2002-07-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) plays an important role in Na(+) homeostasis by determining the Na(+) transport rate in so-called end-organs such as the renal collecting duct, distal colon, salivary and sweat gland ducts. ENaC is formed by heteromultimerization of three homologous subunits, termed alpha, beta, and gamma ENaC. The number of subunits and stoichiometry remain a matter of debate. In this study, sucrose gradient analysis of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing rENaC revealed that ENaC forms heterotetramers, when the membrane fraction was solubilized in 0.1% (wt/vol) Na-deoxycholate. However, solubilization of the membrane proteins in higher concentrations of detergents dissociated the ENaC subunits of the tetramers in dimers. Co-immunoprecipitation studies with FLAG-tagged ENaC subunits suggest that during dissociation of ENaC tetramers the composition of dimers is completely random. Glycosidase digestion studies show that the ENaC subunits are retarded in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and pre-Golgi, whereas only a small fraction is inserted into the plasma membrane. Immunocytochemical analysis confirmed that ENaC is primarily located intracellularly. In addition, these findings are not restricted to the oocyte expression system, since identical results were found in rabbit connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct cells in primary culture and in rabbit colon.

  17. The molecular interactions of pyrethroid insecticides with insect and mammalian sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Vais, H; Williamson, M S; Devonshire, A L; Usherwood, P N

    2001-10-01

    Recent progress in the cloning of alpha (para) and beta (TipE) Na channel sub-units from Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) and Musca domestica (housefly) have facilitated functional expression studies of insect Na channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes, assayed by voltage clamp techniques. The effects of Type I and Type III pyrethroids on the biophysical properties of these channels are critically reviewed. Pyrethroid resistance mutations (termed kdr and super-kdr) that reduce the sensitivity of the insect Na channel to pyrethroids have been identified in a range of insect species. Some of these mutations (e.g. L1014F, M918T and T929I) have been incorporated into the para Na channel of Drosophila, either individually or in combination, to investigate their effects on the sensitivity of this channel to pyrethroids. The kdr mutation (L1014F) shifts the voltage dependence of both activation and steady-state inactivation by approximately 5 mV towards more positive potentials and facilitates Na channel inactivation. Incorporation of the super-kdr mutation (M918T) into the Drosophila Na channel also increases channel inactivation and causes a > 100-fold reduction in deltamethrin sensitivity. These effects are shared by T929I, an alternative mutation that confers super-kdr-like resistance. Parallel studies have been undertaken using the rat IIA Na channel to investigate the molecular basis for the low sensitivity of mammalian brain Na channels to pyrethroids. Rat IIA channels containing the mutation L1014F exhibit a shift in their mid-point potential for Na activation, but their overall sensitivity to permethrin remains similar to that of the wild-type rat channel (i.e. both are 1000-fold less sensitive than the wild-type insect channel). Mammalian neuronal Na channels have an isoleucine rather than a methionine at the position (874) corresponding to the super-kdr (M918) residue of the insect channel. Replacement of the isoleucine of the wild-type rat IIA Na channel with a

  18. Regulation of the epithelial Na+ channel by the mTORC2/SGK1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lang, Florian; Pearce, David

    2016-02-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) is decisive for sodium reabsorption by the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN) of the kidney. ENaC is regulated by the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1), a kinase genomically upregulated by several hormones including glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. SGK1 is activated by the serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) isoform mTORC2. SGK1 knockout (sgk1(-/-) mice) impairs renal Na(+) retention during salt depletion. The mTOR catalytic site inhibitor, PP242, but not mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, inhibits ENaC, decreases Na(+) flux in isolated perfused tubules and induces natriuresis in wild-type mice. PP242 does not lead to further impairment of Na(+) reabsorption in sgk1(-/-) mice. The mTORC2/SGK1 sensitive renal Na(+) retention leads to extracellular volume expansion with increase of blood pressure. A SGK1 gene variant (prevalence ∼ 3-5% in Caucasians, ∼ 10% in Africans) predisposes to hypertension, stroke, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Future studies will be required to define the role of mTORC2 in the regulation of further SGK1 sensitive transport proteins, such as further ion channels, carriers and the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Moreover, studies are required disclosing the impact of mTORC2 on SGK1 sensitive disorders, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes, thrombosis, stroke, inflammation, autoimmune disease, fibrosis and tumour growth.

  19. Charge Immobilization of Skeletal Muscle Na+ Channels: Role of Residues in the Inactivation Linker

    PubMed Central

    Groome, James R.; Dice, Margaret C.; Fujimoto, Esther; Ruben, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated structural determinants of fast inactivation and deactivation in sodium channels by comparing ionic flux and charge movement in skeletal muscle channels, using mutations of DIII-DIV linker charges. Charge altering and substituting mutations at K-1317, K-1318 depolarized the g(V) curve but hyperpolarized the h∞ curve. Charge reversal and substitution at this locus reduced the apparent voltage sensitivity of open- and closed-state fast inactivation. These effects were not observed with charge reversal at E-1314, E-1315. Mutations swapping or neutralizing the negative cluster at 1314, 1315 and the positive cluster at 1317, 1318 indicated that local interactions dictate the coupling of activation to fast inactivation. Gating charge was immobilized before channel entry into fast inactivation in hNaV1.4 but to a lesser extent in mutations at K-1317, K-1318. These results suggest that charge is preferentially immobilized in channels inactivating from the open state. Recovery of gating charge proceeded with a single, fast phase in the double mutation K-1317R, K-1318R. This mutation also partially uncoupled recovery from deactivation. Our findings indicate that charged residues near the fast inactivation “particle” allosterically interact with voltage sensors to control aspects of gating in sodium channels. PMID:17513361

  20. Inhibition of frog skeletal muscle sodium channels by newly synthesized chiral derivatives of mexiletine and tocainide.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Natuzzi, F; Falcone, G; Duranti, A; Lentini, G; Franchini, C; Tortorella, V; Camerino, D C

    1997-12-01

    To search for potent use-dependent blockers of skeletal muscle sodium channels as potential antimyotonic agents, the actions of newly synthesized chiral analogs of mexiletine and tocainide were tested in vitro on sodium currents of single fibers of frog semitendinosus muscle by vaseline-gap voltage clamp method. The effect of each drug on the maximal peak Na+ transient (I(Na) max) was evaluated as both tonic and use-dependent block by using infrequent depolarizing stimulation and trains of pulses at 2-10 Hz frequency, respectively. The mexiletine analog 3-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamine (Me2), having an increased distance between the phenyl and the amino groups, was less potent than mexiletine in producing a tonic block but produced a remarkable use-dependent block. In fact, the half-maximal concentration (IC50) for tonic block of S(-)-Me2 was 108 microM vs. 54.5 microM of R(-)-mexiletine, but the IC50 was 6.2 times lowered by the 10 Hz stimulation with respect to the 2.4 fold decrease observed with mexiletine. The R(-)-mexiletine and the S(-)-Me2 were about twofold more potent than the corresponding enantiomers in producing a tonic block, but the stereoselectivity attenuated during use-dependent blockade. The more lipophilic 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)-1-phenylethylamine (Me1), presently available as raceme, produced a potent and irreversible tonic block of the sodium currents with an IC50 of 29 microM, but had a less pronounced use-dependent inhibition, with a 1.9 fold decrease of the IC50 at 10 Hz. The R(-) isomer of 2',6'-valinoxylidide (To1), a tocainide derivative with an increased hindrance on the chiral carbon atom, was twofold (IC50 = 209 microM) and tenfold (IC50 = 27.4 microM) more potent than R(-)-tocainide in tonic and use-dependent block, respectively. Tocainide was almost devoid of stereoselectivity, whereas the eudismic ratio of To1 [(IC50 S(+)-To1/IC50 R(-)-To1] was 1.7. As for mexiletine and Me2, the stereoselectivity of To1 was the

  1. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Liu Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an {alpha}-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G{sup 1111} and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G{sup 1111} in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G{sup 1111}, a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G{sup 1111} had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  2. The Role of Epithelial Sodium Channel ENaC and the Apical Cl-/HCO3- Exchanger Pendrin in Compensatory Salt Reabsorption in the Setting of Na-Cl Cotransporter (NCC) Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Patel-Chamberlin, Mina; Varasteh Kia, Mujan; Xu, Jie; Barone, Sharon; Zahedi, Kamyar; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2016-01-01

    Background The absence of NCC does not cause significant salt wasting in NCC deficient mice under basal conditions. We hypothesized that ENaC and pendrin play important roles in compensatory salt absorption in the setting of NCC inactivation, and their inhibition and/or downregulation can cause significant salt wasting in NCC KO mice. Methods WT and NCC KO mice were treated with a daily injection of either amiloride, an inhibitor of ENaC, or acetazolamide (ACTZ), a blocker of salt and bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubule and an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrases in proximal tubule and intercalated cells, or a combination of acetazolamide plus amiloride for defined durations. Animals were subjected to daily balance studies. At the end of treatment, kidneys were harvested and examined. Blood samples were collected for electrolytes and acid base analysis. Results Amiloride injection significantly increased the urine output (UO) in NCC KO mice (from 1.3 ml/day before to 2.5 ml/day after amiloride, p<0.03, n = 4) but caused only a slight change in UO in WT mice (p>0.05). The increase in UO in NCC KO mice was associated with a significant increase in sodium excretion (from 0.25 mmol/24 hrs at baseline to 0.35 mmol/24 hrs after amiloride injection, p<0.05, n = 4). Daily treatment with ACTZ for 6 days resulted in >80% reduction of kidney pendrin expression in both WT and NCC KO mice. However, ACTZ treatment noticeably increased urine output and salt excretion only in NCC KO mice (with urine output increasing from a baseline of 1.1 ml/day to 2.3 ml/day and sodium excretion increasing from 0.22 mmole/day before to 0.31 mmole/day after ACTZ) in NCC KO mice; both parameters were significantly higher than in WT mice. Western blot analysis demonstrated significant enhancement in ENaC expression in medulla and cortex of NCC KO and WT mice in response to ACTZ injection for 6 days, and treatment with amiloride in ACTZ-pretreated mice caused a robust increase in salt

  3. CRMP2 protein SUMOylation modulates NaV1.7 channel trafficking.

    PubMed

    Dustrude, Erik T; Wilson, Sarah M; Ju, Weina; Xiao, Yucheng; Khanna, Rajesh

    2013-08-23

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) trafficking is incompletely understood. Post-translational modifications of NaVs and/or auxiliary subunits and protein-protein interactions have been posited as NaV-trafficking mechanisms. Here, we tested if modification of the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) by a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) could affect NaV trafficking; CRMP2 alters the extent of NaV slow inactivation conferred by the anti-epileptic (R)-lacosamide, implying NaV-CRMP2 functional coupling. Expression of a CRMP2 SUMOylation-incompetent mutant (CRMP2-K374A) in neuronal model catecholamine A differentiated (CAD) cells did not alter lacosamide-induced NaV slow inactivation compared with CAD cells expressing wild type CRMP2. Like wild type CRMP2, CRMP2-K374A expressed robustly in CAD cells. Neurite outgrowth, a canonical CRMP2 function, was moderately reduced by the mutation but was still significantly higher than enhanced GFP-transfected cortical neurons. Notably, huwentoxin-IV-sensitive NaV1.7 currents, which predominate in CAD cells, were significantly reduced in CAD cells expressing CRMP2-K374A. Increasing deSUMOylation with sentrin/SUMO-specific protease SENP1 or SENP2 in wild type CRMP2-expressing CAD cells decreased NaV1.7 currents. Consistent with a reduction in current density, biotinylation revealed a significant reduction in surface NaV1.7 levels in CAD cells expressing CRMP2-K374A; surface NaV1.7 expression was also decreased by SENP1 + SENP2 overexpression. Currents in HEK293 cells stably expressing NaV1.7 were reduced by CRMP2-K374A in a manner dependent on the E2-conjugating enzyme Ubc9. No decrement in current density was observed in HEK293 cells co-expressing CRMP2-K374A and NaV1.1 or NaV1.3. Diminution of sodium currents, largely NaV1.7, was recapitulated in sensory neurons expressing CRMP2-K374A. Our study elucidates a novel regulatory mechanism that utilizes CRMP2 SUMOylation to choreograph NaV1.7 trafficking.

  4. Alpha2-adrenoceptor-independent inhibition of acetylcholine receptor channel and sodium channel by dexmedetomidine in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Tang, J; Dong, J; Zheng, J

    2015-03-19

    Both central and peripheral sympathetic nervous systems contribute to the cardiovascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DMED), a highly selective and widely used a2-adrenoceptor agonist for sedation, analgesia, and stress management. The central sympatholytic effects are augmented by peripheral inhibition of sympathetic ganglion transmission. The mechanism is not clear. In this research, using conventional patch-clamp recordings we investigated the direct effects of DMED on sodium (Na(+)) channel currents (INa) and nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChRs) channel currents (IACh) in rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons to explore the possible mechanisms of sympathetic ganglion transmission inhibition by DMED. DMED voltage-dependently suppressed INa with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 67.2±9.6μM and 26.1±5.3μM at holding potentials of -80mV and -60mV, respectively. The inhibition of Na(+) channels by DMED was also frequency dependent. 100μM DMED shifted the Na(+) channel inactivation curves to the hyperpolarizing direction by 9.8mV (P<0.01) and slowed the recovery from inactivation by 8.9ms (P<0.01), but no effects were seen on the shape of the current-voltage relationship or Na(+) channels activation curves. DMED dose-dependently inhibited IACh with an IC50 value of 5.5±2.4μM in SCG neurons, and this inhibition was voltage-independent. DMED pretreatment followed by fast co-application of DMED and ACh produced a significantly larger IACh inhibition than without DMED pretreatment. Yohimbine, phentolamine, and atropine pretreatment did not alter the inhibitory effects of DMED on INa and IACh. In conclusion, DMED dose-dependently inhibits INa and IACh in rat SCG neurons by preferential binding to the inactivated state of the Na(+) channels and the closed state (resting) of nAChR channels respectively. Both inhibitions are a2-adrenoceptor independent. Furthermore, the nAChR channels in rat SCG neurons are much more sensitive to

  5. Diversity and Convergence of Sodium Channel Mutations Involved in Resistance to Pyrethroids

    PubMed Central

    Rinkevich, Frank D.; Du, Yuzhe; Dong, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides target voltage-gated sodium channels, which are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system. The intensive use of pyrethroids in controlling arthropod pests and disease vectors has led to many instances of pyrethroid resistance around the globe. In the past two decades, studies have identified a large number of sodium channel mutations that are associated with resistance to pyrethroids. The purpose of this review is to summarize both common and unique sodium channel mutations that have been identified in arthropod pests of importance to agriculture or human health. Identification of these mutations provides valuable molecular markers for resistance monitoring in the field and helped the discovery of the elusive pyrethroid receptor site(s) on the sodium channel. PMID:24019556

  6. Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels: Not Just for Conduction.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Larisa C; Isom, Lori L

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), composed of a pore-forming α subunit and up to two associated β subunits, are critical for the initiation of the action potential (AP) in excitable tissues. Building on the monumental discovery and description of sodium current in 1952, intrepid researchers described the voltage-dependent gating mechanism, selectivity of the channel, and general structure of the VGSC channel. Recently, crystal structures of bacterial VGSC α subunits have confirmed many of these studies and provided new insights into VGSC function. VGSC β subunits, first cloned in 1992, modulate sodium current but also have nonconducting roles as cell-adhesion molecules and function in neurite outgrowth and neuronal pathfinding. Mutations in VGSC α and β genes are associated with diseases caused by dysfunction of excitable tissues such as epilepsy. Because of the multigenic and drug-resistant nature of some of these diseases, induced pluripotent stem cells and other novel approaches are being used to screen for new drugs and further understand how mutations in VGSC genes contribute to pathophysiology.

  7. Enhancement of carbon nanotube FET performance via direct synthesis of poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) in the transistor channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toader, M.; Schubel, R.; Hartmann, M.; Scharfenberg, L.; Jordan, R.; Mertig, M.; Schulz, S. E.; Gessner, T.; Hermann, S.

    2016-09-01

    Direct synthesis of poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (P(NaSS)) inside the channel of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field-effect transistors (FETs), is shown to be highly beneficial in improving the device parameters. Starting with monomeric compounds, the FET-channel was in-situ polymerized, using the self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization process. Upon formation of the P(NaSS) polymer matrix, we report improved device-to-device consistency, lower variability in the threshold voltage, higher drain currents and higher on/off ratios. Annealing in vacuum was shown to further improve the device performance and induce an ambipolar behavior. Moreover, those FET devices showed a long-term stability even under ambient environment.

  8. Functional expression of Drosophila para sodium channels. Modulation by the membrane protein TipE and toxin pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Warmke, J W; Reenan, R A; Wang, P; Qian, S; Arena, J P; Wang, J; Wunderler, D; Liu, K; Kaczorowski, G J; Van der Ploeg, L H; Ganetzky, B; Cohen, C J

    1997-08-01

    The Drosophila para sodium channel alpha subunit was expressed in Xenopus oocytes alone and in combination with tipE, a putative Drosophila sodium channel accessory subunit. Coexpression of tipE with para results in elevated levels of sodium currents and accelerated current decay. Para/TipE sodium channels have biophysical and pharmacological properties similar to those of native channels. However, the pharmacology of these channels differs from that of vertebrate sodium channels: (a) toxin II from Anemonia sulcata, which slows inactivation, binds to Para and some mammalian sodium channels with similar affinity (Kd congruent with 10 nM), but this toxin causes a 100-fold greater decrease in the rate of inactivation of Para/TipE than of mammalian channels; (b) Para sodium channels are >10-fold more sensitive to block by tetrodotoxin; and (c) modification by the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin is >100-fold more potent for Para than for rat brain type IIA sodium channels. Our results suggest that the selective toxicity of pyrethroid insecticides is due at least in part to the greater affinity of pyrethroids for insect sodium channels than for mammalian sodium channels.

  9. Sodium channels near end-plates and nuclei of snake skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, W M

    1987-01-01

    1. The spatial distribution of the two predominant types of voltage-gated channels in the sarcolemma, Na+ channels and delayed K+ channels, was studied in skeletal muscle fibres of garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis) using loose-seal patch recordings. 2. The average Na+-current density was five times larger in the perijunctional sarcolemma (within 25 microns of the visible edge of the end-plate) than at distant locations. K+ currents were not larger near end-plates. The apparent membrane capacitance, 3-6 microF/cm2, was the same in perijunctional and extrajunctional regions, indicating that differences in Na+-current density reflect differences in the number of Na+ channels per unit membrane area. 3. Perijunctional Na+ channels had the same voltage dependence, gating kinetics and sensitivity to tetrodotoxin as extrajunctional Na+ channels, suggesting that these cells express a single type of Na+ channel. 4. Myonuclei were found to cluster near end-plates and to avoid regions where a nerve branch or blood vessel crossed a fibre's surface. 5. Na+-current density in the sarcolemma above a nucleus was no larger than away from nuclei, indicating that functional Na+ channels are probably not inserted near nuclei. 6. Maps spanning several millimetres of fibre length showed up to sixfold differences in current density between widely separated patches. Differences between patches separated by 50 or 100 microns were much smaller. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2443690

  10. Sodium-difluoro(oxalato)borate (NaDFOB): a new electrolyte salt for Na-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juner; Huang, Zhenguo; Wang, Caiyun; Porter, Spencer; Wang, Baofeng; Lie, Wilford; Liu, Hua Kun

    2015-06-18

    A new electrolyte salt, sodium-difluoro(oxalato)borate (NaDFOB), was synthesized and studied, which enables excellent reversible capacity and high rate capability when used in Na/Na0.44MnO2 half cells. NaDFOB has excellent compatibility with various common solvents used in Na-ion batteries, in strong contrast to the solvent dependent performances of NaClO4 and NaPF6. In addition, NaDFOB possesses good stability and generates no toxic or dangerous products when exposed to air and water. All these properties demonstrate that NaDFOB could be used to prepare high performance electrolytes for emerging Na-ion batteries.

  11. Molecular identity of axonal sodium channels in human cortical pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Cuiping; Wang, Kaiyan; Ke, Wei; Guo, Hui; Shu, Yousheng

    2014-01-01

    Studies in rodents revealed that selective accumulation of Na+ channel subtypes at the axon initial segment (AIS) determines action potential (AP) initiation and backpropagation in cortical pyramidal cells (PCs); however, in human cortex, the molecular identity of Na+ channels distributed at PC axons, including the AIS and the nodes of Ranvier, remains unclear. We performed immunostaining experiments in human cortical tissues removed surgically to cure brain diseases. We found strong immunosignals of Na+ channels and two channel subtypes, NaV1.2 and NaV1.6, at the AIS of human cortical PCs. Although both channel subtypes were expressed along the entire AIS, the peak immunosignals of NaV1.2 and NaV1.6 were found at proximal and distal AIS regions, respectively. Surprisingly, in addition to the presence of NaV1.6 at the nodes of Ranvier, NaV1.2 was also found in a subpopulation of nodes in the adult human cortex, different from the absence of NaV1.2 in myelinated axons in rodents. NaV1.1 immunosignals were not detected at either the AIS or the nodes of Ranvier of PCs; however, they were expressed at interneuron axons with different distribution patterns. Further experiments revealed that parvalbumin-positive GABAergic axon cartridges selectively innervated distal AIS regions with relatively high immunosignals of NaV1.6 but not the proximal NaV1.2-enriched compartments, suggesting an important role of axo-axonic cells in regulating AP initiation in human PCs. Together, our results show that both NaV1.2 and NaV1.6 (but not NaV1.1) channel subtypes are expressed at the AIS and the nodes of Ranvier in adult human cortical PCs, suggesting that these channel subtypes control neuronal excitability and signal conduction in PC axons. PMID:25294986

  12. Effect of N-bromoacetamide on single sodium channel currents in excised membrane patches

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the effect of N-bromoacetamide (NBA) on the behavior of single sodium channel currents in excised patches of rat myotube membrane at 10 degree C. Inward sodium currents were activated by voltage steps from holding potentials of about -100 mV to test potentials of -40 mV. The cytoplasmic-face solution was isotonic CsF. Application of NBA or pronase to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane irreversibly removed sodium channel inactivation, as determined by averaged single-channel records. Teh lifetime of the open channel at - 40 mV was increased about 10-fold by NBA treatment without affecting the amplitude of single-channel currents. A binomial analysis was used both before and after treatment to determine the number of channels within the excised patch. NBA was shown to have little effect on activation kinetics, as determined by an examination of both the rising phase of averaged currents and measurements f the delay between the start of the pulse and the first channel opening. Our data support a kinetic model of sodium channel activation in which the rate constant leading back from the open state to the last closed state is slower than expected from a strict Hodgkin-Huxley model. The data also suggest that the normal open-channel lifetime is primarily determined by the inactivation process in the voltage range we have examined. PMID:6281357

  13. β-Scorpion Toxin Modifies Gating Transitions in All Four Voltage Sensors of the Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fabiana V.; Chanda, Baron; Beirão, Paulo S.L.; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Several naturally occurring polypeptide neurotoxins target specific sites on the voltage-gated sodium channels. Of these, the gating modifier toxins alter the behavior of the sodium channels by stabilizing transient intermediate states in the channel gating pathway. Here we have used an integrated approach that combines electrophysiological and spectroscopic measurements to determine the structural rearrangements modified by the β-scorpion toxin Ts1. Our data indicate that toxin binding to the channel is restricted to a single binding site on domain II voltage sensor. Analysis of Cole-Moore shifts suggests that the number of closed states in the activation sequence prior to channel opening is reduced in the presence of toxin. Measurements of charge–voltage relationships show that a fraction of the gating charge is immobilized in Ts1-modified channels. Interestingly, the charge–voltage relationship also shows an additional component at hyperpolarized potentials. Site-specific fluorescence measurements indicate that in presence of the toxin the voltage sensor of domain II remains trapped in the activated state. Furthermore, the binding of the toxin potentiates the activation of the other three voltage sensors of the sodium channel to more hyperpolarized potentials. These findings reveal how the binding of β-scorpion toxin modifies channel function and provides insight into early gating transitions of sodium channels. PMID:17698594

  14. Nalcn Is a “Leak” Sodium Channel That Regulates Excitability of Brainstem Chemosensory Neurons and Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yingtang; Abe, Chikara; Holloway, Benjamin B.; Shu, Shaofang; Kumar, Natasha N.; Weaver, Janelle L.; Sen, Josh; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of background potassium and sodium channels determines neuronal excitability, but physiological roles for “leak” Na+ channels in specific mammalian neurons have not been established. Here, we show that a leak Na+ channel, Nalcn, is expressed in the CO2/H+-sensitive neurons of the mouse retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) that regulate breathing. In RTN neurons, Nalcn expression correlated with higher action potential discharge over a more alkalized range of activity; shRNA-mediated depletion of Nalcn hyperpolarized RTN neurons, and reduced leak Na+ current and firing rate. Nalcn depletion also decreased RTN neuron activation by the neuropeptide, substance P, without affecting pH-sensitive background K+ currents or activation by a cotransmitter, serotonin. In vivo, RTN-specific knockdown of Nalcn reduced CO2-evoked neuronal activation and breathing; hypoxic hyperventilation was unchanged. Thus, Nalcn regulates RTN neuronal excitability and stimulation by CO2, independent of direct pH sensing, potentially contributing to respiratory effects of Nalcn mutations; transmitter modulation of Nalcn may underlie state-dependent changes in breathing and respiratory chemosensitivity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Breathing is an essential, enduring rhythmic motor activity orchestrated by dedicated brainstem circuits that require tonic excitatory drive for their persistent function. A major source of drive is from a group of CO2/H+-sensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), whose ongoing activity is critical for breathing. The ionic mechanisms that support spontaneous activity of RTN neurons are unknown. We show here that Nalcn, a unique channel that generates “leak” sodium currents, regulates excitability and neuromodulation of RTN neurons and CO2-stimulated breathing. Thus, this work defines a specific function for this enigmatic channel in an important physiological context. PMID:27488637

  15. A novel SCN9A mutation responsible for primary erythromelalgia and is resistant to the treatment of sodium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Tzu; Huang, Po-Yuan; Yen, Chen-Tung; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Primary erythromelalgia (PE) is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder characterized by severe burning pain and erythema in the extremities upon heat stimuli or exercise. Mutations in human SCN9A gene, encoding the α-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(v)1.7, were found to be responsible for PE. Three missense mutations of SCN9A gene have recently been identified in Taiwanese patients including a familial (I136V) and two sporadic mutations (I848T, V1316A). V1316A is a novel mutation and has not been characterized yet. Topologically, I136V is located in DI/S1 segment and both I848T and V1316A are located in S4-S5 linker region of DII and DIII domains, respectively. To characterize the elelctrophysiological manifestations, the channel conductance with whole-cell patch clamp was recorded on the over-expressed Chinese hamster overy cells. As compared with wild type, the mutant channels showed a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage dependent activation and a depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation. The recovery time from channel inactivation is faster in the mutant than in the wild type channels. Since warmth can trigger and exacerbate symptoms, we then examine the influence of tempearture on the sodium channel conduction. At 35°C, I136V and V1316A mutant channels exhibit a further hyperpolarizing shift at activation as compared with wild type channel, even though wild type channel also produced a significant hyperpolarizing shift compared to that of 25°C. High temperature caused a significant depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation in all three mutant channels. These findings may confer to the hyperexcitability of sensory neurons, especially at high temperature. In order to identifying an effective treatment, we tested the IC₅₀ values of selective sodium channel blockers, lidocaine and mexiletine. The IC₅₀ for mexiletine is lower for I848T mutant channel as compared to that of the wild type and other two

  16. Negative-shift activation, current reduction and resurgent currents induced by β-toxins from Centruroides scorpions in sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Emanuele; Pedraza-Escalona, Martha; Gurrola, Georgina B; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Corzo, Gerardo; Wanke, Enzo; Possani, Lourival D

    2012-02-01

    The β-toxins purified from the New World scorpion venoms of the Centruroides species affect several voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and thus are essential tools not only for the discrimination of different channel sub-types but also for studying the structure-function relationship between channels and toxins. This communication reports the results obtained with four different peptides purified from three species of Centruroides scorpions and assayed on seven distinct isoforms of VGSC (Na(v)1.1-Na(v)1.7) by specific functional analysis conducted through single cell electrophysiology. The toxins studied were CssII from Centruroides suffusus suffusus, Cll1 and Cll2 from Centruroides limpidus limpidus and a novel toxin from Centruroides noxius, which was characterized for the first time here. It has 67 amino acid residues and four disulfide bridges with a molecular mass of 7626 Da. Three different functional features were identified: current reduction of macroscopic conductance, left shift of the voltage-dependent activation and induction of resurgent currents at negative voltages following brief, strong depolarizations. The isoforms which revealed to be more affected resulted to be Na(v)1.6 > 1.1 > 1.2 and, for the first time, a β-toxin is here shown to induce resurgent current also in isoforms different from Na(v)1.6. Additionally, these results were analyzed with molecular modelling. In conclusion, although the four toxins have a high degree of identity, they display tri-modal function, each of which shows selectivity among the different sub-types of Na+ -channels. Thus, they are invaluable as tools for structure-function studies of β-toxins and offer a basis for the design of novel ion channel-specific drugs.

  17. Structure and Sodium Channel Activity of an Excitatory I1-Superfamily Conotoxin †

    PubMed Central

    Buczek, Olga; Wei, Daxiu; Babon, Jeffrey J.; Yang, Xiaodong; Fiedler, Brian; Chen, Ping; Yoshikami, Doju; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Norton, Raymond S.

    2008-01-01

    Conotoxin ι-RXIA, from the fish-hunting species Conus radiatus, is a member of the recently characterized I1-superfamily, which contains eight cysteine residues arranged in a −C-C-CC-CC-C-C- pattern. ι-RXIA (formerly designated r11a) is one of three characterized I1 peptides in which the third last residue is post-translationally isomerized to the d- configuration. Naturally occurring ι-RXIA with d-Phe44 is significantly more active as an excitotoxin than the l-Phe analogue both in vitro and in vivo. We have determined the solution structures of both forms by NMR spectroscopy, the first for an I1-superfamily member. The disulfide connectivities were determined from structure calculations and confirmed chemically as 5-19, 12-22, 18-27, and 21-38, suggesting that ι-RXIA has an ICK structural motif with one additional disulfide (21-38). Indeed, apart from the first few residues, the structure is well defined up to around residue 35 and does adopt an ICK structure. The C-terminal region, including Phe44, is disordered. Comparison of the d-Phe44 and l-Phe44 forms indicates that the switch from one enantiomer to the other has very little effect on the structure, even though it is clearly important for receptor interaction based on activity data. Finally, we identify the target of ι-RXIA as a voltage-gated sodium channel; ι-RXIA is an agonist, shifting the voltage dependence of activation of mouse NaV1.6 expressed in Xenopus oocytes to more hyperpolarized potentials. Thus, there is a convergence of structure and function in ι-RXIA, as its disulfide pairing and structure resemble those of funnel web spider toxins that also target sodium channels. PMID:17696362

  18. Molecular basis of the remarkable species selectivity of an insecticidal sodium channel toxin from the African spider Augacephalus ezendami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzig, Volker; Ikonomopoulou, Maria; Smith, Jennifer J.; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Gilchrist, John; Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Rezende, Fernanda Oliveira; Moreira, Luciano Andrade; Nicholson, Graham M.; Bosmans, Frank; King, Glenn F.

    2016-07-01

    The inexorable decline in the armament of registered chemical insecticides has stimulated research into environmentally-friendly alternatives. Insecticidal spider-venom peptides are promising candidates for bioinsecticide development but it is challenging to find peptides that are specific for targeted pests. In the present study, we isolated an insecticidal peptide (Ae1a) from venom of the African spider Augacephalus ezendami (family Theraphosidae). Injection of Ae1a into sheep blowflies (Lucilia cuprina) induced rapid but reversible paralysis. In striking contrast, Ae1a was lethal to closely related fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) but induced no adverse effects in the recalcitrant lepidopteran pest Helicoverpa armigera. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that Ae1a potently inhibits the voltage-gated sodium channel BgNaV1 from the German cockroach Blattella germanica by shifting the threshold for channel activation to more depolarized potentials. In contrast, Ae1a failed to significantly affect sodium currents in dorsal unpaired median neurons from the American cockroach Periplaneta americana. We show that Ae1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor and that sensitivity to the toxin is conferred by natural sequence variations in the S1–S2 loop of domain II. The phyletic specificity of Ae1a provides crucial information for development of sodium channel insecticides that target key insect pests without harming beneficial species.

  19. Molecular basis of the remarkable species selectivity of an insecticidal sodium channel toxin from the African spider Augacephalus ezendami.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Volker; Ikonomopoulou, Maria; Smith, Jennifer J; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Gilchrist, John; Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Rezende, Fernanda Oliveira; Moreira, Luciano Andrade; Nicholson, Graham M; Bosmans, Frank; King, Glenn F

    2016-07-07

    The inexorable decline in the armament of registered chemical insecticides has stimulated research into environmentally-friendly alternatives. Insecticidal spider-venom peptides are promising candidates for bioinsecticide development but it is challenging to find peptides that are specific for targeted pests. In the present study, we isolated an insecticidal peptide (Ae1a) from venom of the African spider Augacephalus ezendami (family Theraphosidae). Injection of Ae1a into sheep blowflies (Lucilia cuprina) induced rapid but reversible paralysis. In striking contrast, Ae1a was lethal to closely related fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) but induced no adverse effects in the recalcitrant lepidopteran pest Helicoverpa armigera. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that Ae1a potently inhibits the voltage-gated sodium channel BgNaV1 from the German cockroach Blattella germanica by shifting the threshold for channel activation to more depolarized potentials. In contrast, Ae1a failed to significantly affect sodium currents in dorsal unpaired median neurons from the American cockroach Periplaneta americana. We show that Ae1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor and that sensitivity to the toxin is conferred by natural sequence variations in the S1-S2 loop of domain II. The phyletic specificity of Ae1a provides crucial information for development of sodium channel insecticides that target key insect pests without harming beneficial species.

  20. Molecular basis of the remarkable species selectivity of an insecticidal sodium channel toxin from the African spider Augacephalus ezendami

    PubMed Central

    Herzig, Volker; Ikonomopoulou, Maria; Smith, Jennifer J.; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Gilchrist, John; Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Rezende, Fernanda Oliveira; Moreira, Luciano Andrade; Nicholson, Graham M.; Bosmans, Frank; King, Glenn F.

    2016-01-01

    The inexorable decline in the armament of registered chemical insecticides has stimulated research into environmentally-friendly alternatives. Insecticidal spider-venom peptides are promising candidates for bioinsecticide development but it is challenging to find peptides that are specific for targeted pests. In the present study, we isolated an insecticidal peptide (Ae1a) from venom of the African spider Augacephalus ezendami (family Theraphosidae). Injection of Ae1a into sheep blowflies (Lucilia cuprina) induced rapid but reversible paralysis. In striking contrast, Ae1a was lethal to closely related fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) but induced no adverse effects in the recalcitrant lepidopteran pest Helicoverpa armigera. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that Ae1a potently inhibits the voltage-gated sodium channel BgNaV1 from the German cockroach Blattella germanica by shifting the threshold for channel activation to more depolarized potentials. In contrast, Ae1a failed to significantly affect sodium currents in dorsal unpaired median neurons from the American cockroach Periplaneta americana. We show that Ae1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor and that sensitivity to the toxin is conferred by natural sequence variations in the S1–S2 loop of domain II. The phyletic specificity of Ae1a provides crucial information for development of sodium channel insecticides that target key insect pests without harming beneficial species. PMID:27383378

  1. Characteristics and pharmacological regulation of epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and epithelial Na+ transport.

    PubMed

    Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial Na(+) transport participates in control of various body functions and conditions: e.g., homeostasis of body fluid content influencing blood pressure, control of amounts of fluids covering the apical surface of alveolar epithelial cells at appropriate levels for normal gas exchange, and prevention of bacterial/viral infection. Epithelial Na(+) transport via the transcellular pathway is mediated by the entry step of Na(+) across the apical membrane via Epithelial Na(+) Channel (ENaC) located at the apical membrane, and the extrusion step of Na(+) across the basolateral membrane via the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase located at the basolateral membrane. The rate-limiting step of the epithelial Na(+) transport via the transcellular pathway is generally recognized to be the entry step of Na(+) across the apical membrane via ENaC. Thus, up-/down-regulation of ENaC essentially participates in regulatory systems of blood pressure and normal gas exchange. Amount of ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport is determined by the number of ENaCs located at the apical membrane, activity (open probability) of individual ENaC located at the apical membrane, single channel conductance of ENaC located at the apical membrane, and driving force for the Na(+) entry via ENaCs across the apical membrane. In the present review article, I discuss the characteristics of ENaC and how these factors are regulated.

  2. Sodium-ion diffusion mechanisms in the low cost high voltage cathode material Na(2+δ)Fe(2-δ/2)(SO4)3.

    PubMed

    Wong, L L; Chen, H M; Adams, S

    2015-04-14

    Bond-valence site energy modelling, classical molecular dynamics and DFT simulations were employed to clarify Na(+) ion migration in monoclinic Na2+δFe2-δ/2(SO4)3, the recently reported first representative of a new promising class of alluaudite-type high voltage cathode materials for sodium-ion batteries. Empirical potential parameters derived from our softBV bond valence parameter set reproduce experimental unit-cell parameters. Migration energy barrier calculations based on both these empirical and on ab initio approaches consistently show a strongly anisotropic and fairly fast Na(+) ion mobility along partially occupied Na(3) channels in the c-direction. Nominally fully occupied Na(1) sites are attached to these paths with a moderate activation energy as sources of mobile ions. At elevated temperatures separate parallel Na(2) channels contribute to the ionic conductivity. As such one-dimensional pathways are highly vulnerable to blocking by structural defects, the experimentally observed favourable rate performance can only be understood as a consequence of cross-linking of the channels to a more robust higher-dimensional migration pathway network. Our static and dynamic bond valence pathway models for representative local structure models reveal that this cross-linking is achieved by the iron deficiency of the compound: iron vacancies act as low-lying interstitial sites that can be reached from both types of channels with moderate activation energies. Structural relaxations around the vacancies however reduce the sodium mobility along the channels. An analogous dual effect of blocking migration along the channels and promoting perpendicular migration would result from Na(+)/Fe(2+) antisite defects. Hence, further new alluaudite type transition metal sulphates can only be expected to yield a high rate performance, if their synthesis ensures the presence of a comparable transition metal sub-stoichiometry and/or a suitably tailored concentration of sodium

  3. Nerve compression activates selective nociceptive pathways and upregulates peripheral sodium channel expression in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Frieboes, Laura Rummler; Palispis, Winnie Anne; Gupta, Ranjan

    2010-06-01

    Chronic nerve compression (CNC) injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, are common musculoskeletal conditions that affect patients with debilitating loss of sensory function and pain. Although early detection and treatment are important, our understanding of pain-related molecular mechanisms remains largely unclear. Here we investigate these mechanisms using an animal model for CNC injury. To confirm that CNC injury induces pain, we assessed expression of c-fos, a gene that is rapidly expressed in spinal sensory afferents in response to painful peripheral stimuli, and TNF-alpha and IL-6, two proinflammatory cytokines that are crucial to development of inflammatory-mediated pain. Results show c-fos upregulation 1-2 weeks postinjury in the absence of TNF-alpha or IL-6 expression, indicating increased neural sensitivity without an inflammatory response. This is consistent with previous studies that showed no morphologic evidence of inflammation in the CNC model. Surprisingly, we also found de novo expression of Na(V)1.8, a sodium channel linked to the development of neuropathic pain, in endoneurial Schwann cells following injury. Until now, Na(V)1.8 expression was thought to be restricted to sensory neurons. CNC injury appears to be a unique model of noninflammatory neuropathic pain. Further investigation of the underlying molecular basis could yield promising targets for early diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Neurotoxins and Their Binding Areas on Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Marijke; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are large transmembrane proteins that conduct sodium ions across the membrane and by doing so they generate signals of communication between many kinds of tissues. They are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, in close collaboration with other channels like potassium channels. Therefore, genetic defects in sodium channel genes can cause a wide variety of diseases, generally called “channelopathies.” The first insights into the mechanism of action potentials and the involvement of sodium channels originated from Hodgkin and Huxley for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1963. These concepts still form the basis for understanding the function of VGSCs. When VGSCs sense a sufficient change in membrane potential, they are activated and consequently generate a massive influx of sodium ions. Immediately after, channels will start to inactivate and currents decrease. In the inactivated state, channels stay refractory for new stimuli and they must return to the closed state before being susceptible to a new depolarization. On the other hand, studies with neurotoxins like tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) also contributed largely to our today’s understanding of the structure and function of ion channels and of VGSCs specifically. Moreover, neurotoxins acting on ion channels turned out to be valuable lead compounds in the development of new drugs for the enormous range of diseases in which ion channels are involved. A recent example of a synthetic neurotoxin that made it to the market is ziconotide (Prialt®, Elan). The original peptide, ω-MVIIA, is derived from the cone snail Conus magus and now FDA/EMA-approved for the management of severe chronic pain by blocking the N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in pain fibers. This review focuses on the current status of research on neurotoxins acting on VGSC, their contribution to further unravel the structure and

  5. Cytogenetic and molecular localization of tipE: A gene affecting sodium channels in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, G.; Deak, P.; Hall, L.M.

    1995-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels play a key role in nerve cells where they are responsible for the increase in sodium permeability during the rising phase of action potentials. In Drosophila melanogaster a subset of temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations affect sodium channel function. One such mutation is temperature-induced paralysis locus E (tipE), which has been shown by electrophysiology and ligand binding studies to reduce sodium channel numbers. Three new {gamma}-ray-induced tipE alleles associated with either visible deletions in 64AB or a translocation breakpoint within 64B2 provide landmarks for positional cloning of tipE. Beginning with the flanking cloned gene Ras2, a 140-kb walk across the translocation breakpoint was completed. Germline transformation using a 42-kb cosmid clone and successively smaller subclones localized the tipE gene within a 7.4-kb genomic DNA segment. Although this chromosome region is rich in transcripts, only three overlapping mRNAs (5.4, 4.4, and 1.7 kb) lie completely within the smallest rescuing construct. The small sizes of the rescuing construct and transcripts suggests that tipE does not encode a standard sodium channel {alpha}-subunit with four homologous repeats. Sequencing these transcripts will elucidate the role of the tipE gene product in sodium channel functional regulation. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Cytogenetic and molecular localization of tipE: a gene affecting sodium channels in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Feng, G; Deák, P; Kasbekar, D P; Gil, D W; Hall, L M

    1995-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels play a key role in nerve cells where they are responsible for the increase in sodium permeability during the rising phase of action potentials. In Drosophila melanogaster a subset of temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations affect sodium channel function. One such mutation is temperature-induced paralysis locus E (tipE), which has been shown by electrophysiology and ligand binding studies to reduce sodium channel numbers. Three new gamma-ray-induced tipE alleles associated with either visible deletions in 64AB or a translocation breakpoint within 64B2 provide landmarks for positional cloning of tipE. Beginning with the flanking cloned gene Ras2, a 140-kb walk across the translocation breakpoint was completed. Germline transformation using a 42-kb cosmid clone and successively smaller subclones localized the tipE gene within a 7.4-kb genomic DNA segment. Although this chromosome region is rich in transcripts, only three overlapping mRNAs (5.4, 4.4, and 1.7 kb) lie completely within the smallest rescuing construct. The small sizes of the rescuing construct and transcripts suggest that tipE does not encode a standard sodium channel alpha-subunit with four homologous repeats. Sequencing these transcripts will elucidate the role of the tipE gene product in sodium channel functional regulation.

  7. Discovery of Diphenyl Amine Based Sodium Channel Blockers, Effective Against hNav1.2

    PubMed Central

    Hudgens, Debjani P.; Taylor, Catherine; Batts, Timothy W.; Patel, Manoj K.; Brown, Milton L.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new therapies for chronic pain is an area of unmet medical need. Central to pathways of chronic pain is the upregulation of voltage gated sodium channels. The use of tricyclic antidepressants, which also have sodium channel activity, in chronic pain therapy prompted us to develop novel compounds from this scaffold. Herein, we show that the tricyclic moiety is not needed for effective inhibition of the [3H]-BTX binding site and sodium currents of hNav1.2. Our lead compound (6), containing a diphenyl amine motif demonstrated a 53.2% inhibitory block of Nav1.2 current at 10 μM, which is greater than 50% increase in current block in comparison to the amitriptyline standard. Altogether our study establishes that the tricyclic motif is unnecessary for hNav1.2 activity and modification of the amine portion is detrimental to sodium channel block. PMID:17035036

  8. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects of Acute and Chronic Ethanol Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    No. 2 C4"ght 0 1967 by "he Amusca Soiety for Pharmacolog and Kxporuont Therpadu" Prud m U.S.A. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium ...inhibitory effect of ethanol in vitro on sodium benzoate binding to neuronal sodium channels were studi-d in uptake for up to 20 days after withdrawal...adapt rapidly to some sodium uptake in the absence of ethanol in vitro, however, a effects of ethanol and that chronic ethanol administration can

  9. Antillatoxin, a novel lipopeptide, enhances neurite outgrowth in immature cerebrocortical neurons through activation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Jabba, S V; Prakash, A; Dravid, S M; Gerwick, W H; Murray, T F

    2010-03-01

    Antillatoxin (ATX) is a structurally novel lipopeptide that activates voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) leading to sodium influx in cerebellar granule neurons and cerebrocortical neurons 8 to 9 days in vitro (Li et al., 2001; Cao et al., 2008). However, the precise recognition site for ATX on the VGSC remains to be defined. Inasmuch as elevation of intracellular sodium ([Na(+)](i)) may increase N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated Ca(2+) influx, Na(+) may function as a signaling molecule. We hypothesized that ATX may enhance neurite outgrowth in cerebrocortical neurons by elevating [Na(+)](i) and augmenting NMDAR function. ATX (30-100 nM) robustly stimulated neurite outgrowth, and this enhancement was sensitive to the VGSC antagonist, tetrodotoxin. To unambiguously demonstrate the enhancement of NMDA receptor function by ATX, we recorded single-channel currents from cell-attached patches. ATX was found to increase the open probability of NMDA receptors. Na(+)-dependent up-regulation of NMDAR function has been shown to be regulated by Src family kinase (SFK) (Yu and Salter, 1998). The Src kinase inhibitor PP2 abrogated ATX-enhanced neurite outgrowth, suggesting a SFK involvement in this response. ATX-enhanced neurite outgrowth was also inhibited by the NMDAR antagonist, (5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801), and the calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibitor, 1,8-naphthoylene benzimidazole-3-carboxylic acid (STO-609), demonstrating the requirement for NMDAR activation with subsequent downstream engagement of the Ca(2+)-dependent CaMKK pathway. These results with the structurally and mechanistically novel natural product, ATX, confirm and generalize our earlier results with a neurotoxin site 5 ligand. These data suggest that VGSC activators may represent a novel pharmacological strategy to regulate neuronal plasticity through NMDAR-dependent mechanisms.

  10. Insight toward epithelial Na+ channel mechanism revealed by the acid-sensing ion channel 1 structure.

    PubMed

    Stockand, James D; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Booth, Rachell E; Silverthorn, Dee U

    2008-09-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) protein family includes a diverse group of ion channels, including nonvoltage-gated Na(+) channels of epithelia and neurons, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1). In mammalian epithelia, ENaC helps regulate Na(+) and associated water transport, making it a critical determinant of systemic blood pressure and pulmonary mucosal fluidity. In the nervous system, ENaC/DEG proteins are related to sensory transduction. While the importance and physiological function of these ion channels are established, less is known about their structure. One hallmark of the ENaC/DEG channel family is that each channel subunit has only two transmembrane domains connected by an exceedingly large extracellular loop. This subunit structure was recently confirmed when Jasti and colleagues determined the crystal structure of chicken ASIC1, a neuronal acid-sensing ENaC/DEG channel. By mapping ENaC to the structural coordinates of cASIC1, as we do here, we hope to provide insight toward ENaC structure. ENaC, like ASIC1, appears to be a trimeric channel containing 1alpha, 1beta, and 1gamma subunit. Heterotrimeric ENaC and monomeric ENaC subunits within the trimer possibly contain many of the major secondary, tertiary, and quaternary features identified in cASIC1 with a few subtle but critical differences. These differences are expected to have profound effects on channel behavior. In particular, they may contribute to ENaC insensitivity to acid and to its constitutive activity in the absence of time- and ligand-dependent inactivation. Experiments resulting from this comparison of cASIC1 and ENaC may help clarify unresolved issues related to ENaC architecture, and may help identify secondary structures and residues critical to ENaC function.

  11. Cerebral regulation of renal sodium excretion in sheep infused intravenously with hypertonic NaCl.

    PubMed Central

    Chodobski, A; McKinley, M J

    1989-01-01

    1. The natriuretic response to intravenous infusion of 2 M-NaCl was investigated in six conscious sheep. This hypertonic NaCl load resulted in relatively small, physiological (2-3 mmol l-1) increases in plasma Na+ concentration and was followed by a natriuresis with a maximum mean urinary sodium excretion 5 times higher than pre-infusion values. 2. Intravenous infusion of isotonic NaCl, delivering the same Na+ load as hypertonic NaCl infusion, did not induce natriuresis. This suggested, therefore, that with the hypertonic sodium load administered in the present study, the rise in plasma Na+ and/or tonicity rather than increase in blood volume is important in evoking the natriuretic response. 3. Intracerebroventricular infusion of low-Na+ artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reduced CSF Na+ concentration, decreased plasma vasopressin (AVP) levels and caused a copious water diuresis. This was associated with excessive loss of water and large increases in plasma Na+ concentration and osmolality. 4. The natriuresis induced by intravenous hypertonic NaCl load could be blocked by lowering CSF Na+ concentration in situations where water diuresis was either prevented or reduced by intravenous infusion of AVP or by delayed intracerebroventricular infusion of low-Na+ CSF, respectively. 5. The results of the present study provide further evidence that renal sodium excretion can be controlled by the central nervous system. PMID:2621619

  12. Functional properties of sodium channels do not depend on the cytoskeleton integrity.

    PubMed

    Moran, O; Tammaro, P; Nizzari, M; Conti, F

    2000-09-16

    Several observations suggest an interaction of the sodium channel alpha-subunit with the cytoskeletal structures. However, there is a wide variability in the results of experiments of heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes and studies on mammalian cells are sometimes contradictory. In general, there has been no direct demonstration that ad hoc large perturbations of the cytoskeleton modify the intrinsic properties of the sodium channels expressed endogenously or heterologously in plasma membranes. We have studied in CHO cells transfected with the rat muscle sodium channel alpha-subunit the effects of two substances expected to produce drastic perturbations of the cytoskeletal structure: Cytochalasin-D, which depolymerizes microfilaments, and Colchicine, which inhibits the microtubules polymerization. We observed no significant differences in the voltage dependence, kinetic parameters and surface density of the expressed sodium channels after treatment of the cells with these substances. We conclude that the two known main components of the cytoskeleton do not interfere directly with the sodium channel function or with the heterologous expression of channels in the cell membrane.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Laboratory spectroscopy of sodium chloride (NaCl) (Cabezas+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Cernicharo, J.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Pena, I.; Agundez, M.; Velilla Prieto, L.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Zuniga, J.; Bastida, A.; Alonso, J. L.; Requena, A.

    2016-09-01

    The rotational spectrum of sodium chloride (NaCl) has been obtained using two different Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometers constructed at the University of Valladolid. See section 2.1 for further explanations. (8 data files).

  14. Modulation of neuronal sodium channels by the sea anemone peptide BDS-I.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin; Jo, Sooyeon; Bean, Bruce P

    2012-06-01

    Blood-depressing substance I (BDS-I), a 43 amino-acid peptide from sea anemone venom, is used as a specific inhibitor of Kv3-family potassium channels. We found that BDS-I acts with even higher potency to modulate specific types of voltage-dependent sodium channels. In rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, 3 μM BDS-I strongly enhanced tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium current but weakly inhibited TTX-resistant sodium current. In rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons, which express only TTX-sensitive sodium current, BDS-I enhanced current elicited by small depolarizations and slowed decay of currents at all voltages (EC(50) ∼ 300 nM). BDS-I acted with exceptionally high potency and efficacy on cloned human Nav1.7 channels, slowing inactivation by 6-fold, with an EC(50) of approximately 3 nM. BDS-I also slowed inactivation of sodium currents in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells (mainly from Nav1.3 channels), with an EC(50) ∼ 600 nM. In hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons (mouse) and cerebellar Purkinje neurons (mouse and rat), BDS-I had only small effects on current decay (slowing inactivation by 20-50%), suggesting relatively weak sensitivity of Nav1.1 and Nav1.6 channels. The biggest effect of BDS-I in central neurons was to enhance resurgent current in Purkinje neurons, an effect reflected in enhancement of sodium current during the repolarization phase of Purkinje neuron action potentials. Overall, these results show that BDS-I acts to modulate sodium channel gating in a manner similar to previously known neurotoxin receptor site 3 anemone toxins but with different isoform sensitivity. Most notably, BDS-I acts with very high potency on human Nav1.7 channels.

  15. Sodium channel genes and the evolution of diversity in communication signals of electric fishes: convergent molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Zakon, Harold H; Lu, Ying; Zwickl, Derrick J; Hillis, David M

    2006-03-07

    We investigated whether the evolution of electric organs and electric signal diversity in two independently evolved lineages of electric fishes was accompanied by convergent changes on the molecular level. We found that a sodium channel gene (Na(v)1.4a) that is expressed in muscle in nonelectric fishes has lost its expression in muscle and is expressed instead in the evolutionarily novel electric organ in both lineages of electric fishes. This gene appears to be evolving under positive selection in both lineages, facilitated by its restricted expression in the electric organ. This view is reinforced by the lack of evidence for selection on this gene in one electric species in which expression of this gene is retained in muscle. Amino acid replacements occur convergently in domains that influence channel inactivation, a key trait for shaping electric communication signals. Some amino acid replacements occur at or adjacent to sites at which disease-causing mutations have been mapped in human sodium channel genes, emphasizing that these replacements occur in functionally important domains. Selection appears to have acted on the final step in channel inactivation, but complementarily on the inactivation "ball" in one lineage, and its receptor site in the other lineage. Thus, changes in the expression and sequence of the same gene are associated with the independent evolution of signal complexity.

  16. Characterization of cromolyn sodium hydrates and its formulation by (23) Na-multiquantum and magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Umino, Makoto; Higashi, Kenjirou; Masu, Hyuma; Limwikrant, Waree; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2013-08-01

    We characterized cromolyn sodium (CS) hydrates and evaluated their molecular states in low-dose formulations using Na-multiquantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Two CS hydrates, low-water-content hydrated form and high-water-content hydrated form containing 2-3 and 5-6 hydrates, respectively, were prepared by humidification. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that these CS hydrates contained sodium channel structures and that water molecules were adsorbed on the sodium nucleus. (13) C-cross-polarization/MAS NMR spectra of these hydrates revealed similar results, confirming that the water molecules were adsorbed not on the cromolyn skeletons but mainly on the sodium nucleus. In contrast, (23) Na-MQMAS NMR analysis allowed us to clearly distinguish these hydrates without discernible effects from quadrupolar interaction. Thus, MQMAS NMR analysis is a valuable tool for evaluating salt drugs and their formulations.

  17. SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels mediates the early response to acute hypoxia in central neurons

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D; Marks, Jeremy D; Goldstein, Steve AN

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism for the earliest response of central neurons to hypoxia—an increase in voltage-gated sodium current (INa)—has been unknown. Here, we show that hypoxia activates the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) pathway in rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) and that SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels increases INa. The time-course for SUMOylation of single NaV1.2 channels at the cell surface and changes in INa coincide, and both are prevented by mutation of NaV1.2-Lys38 or application of a deSUMOylating enzyme. Within 40 s, hypoxia-induced linkage of SUMO1 to the channels is complete, shifting the voltage-dependence of channel activation so that depolarizing steps evoke larger sodium currents. Given the recognized role of INa in hypoxic brain damage, the SUMO pathway and NaV1.2 are identified as potential targets for neuroprotective interventions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20054.001 PMID:28029095

  18. Insecticide sensitivity of native chloride and sodium channels in a mosquito cell line.

    PubMed

    Jenson, Lacey J; Anderson, Troy D; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of cultured Anopheles gambiae Sua1B cells for insecticide screening applications without genetic engineering or other treatments. Sua1B cells were exposed to the known insecticidal compounds lindane and DIDS, which inhibited cell growth at micromolar concentrations. In patch clamp studies, DIDS produced partial inhibition (69%) of chloride current amplitudes, and an IC50 of 5.1μM was determined for Sua1B cells. A sub-set of chloride currents showed no response to DIDS; however, inhibition (64%) of these currents was achieved using a low chloride saline solution, confirming their identity as chloride channels. In contrast, lindane increased chloride current amplitude (EC50=116nM), which was reversed when cells were bathed in calcium-free extracellular solution. Voltage-sensitive chloride channels were also inhibited by the presence of fenvalerate, a type 2 pyrethroid, but not significantly blocked by type 1 allethrin, an effect not previously shown in insects. Although no evidence of fast inward currents typical of sodium channels was observed, studies with fenvalerate in combination with veratridine, a sodium channel activator, revealed complete inhibition of cell growth that was best fit by a two-site binding model. The high potency effect was completely inhibited in the presence of tetrodotoxin, a specific sodium channel blocker, suggesting the presence of some type of sodium channel. Thus, Sua1B cells express native insect ion channels with potential utility for insecticide screening.

  19. Functional Interaction between the Scaffold Protein Kidins220/ARMS and Neuronal Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Cesca, Fabrizia; Satapathy, Annyesha; Ferrea, Enrico; Nieus, Thierry; Benfenati, Fabio; Scholz-Starke, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Kidins220 (kinase D-interacting substrate of 220 kDa)/ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning (ARMS) acts as a signaling platform at the plasma membrane and is implicated in a multitude of neuronal functions, including the control of neuronal activity. Here, we used the Kidins220−/− mouse model to study the effects of Kidins220 ablation on neuronal excitability. Multielectrode array recordings showed reduced evoked spiking activity in Kidins220−/− hippocampal networks, which was compatible with the increased excitability of GABAergic neurons determined by current-clamp recordings. Spike waveform analysis further indicated an increased sodium conductance in this neuronal subpopulation. Kidins220 association with brain voltage-gated sodium channels was shown by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and Na+ current recordings in transfected HEK293 cells, which revealed dramatic alterations of kinetics and voltage dependence. Finally, an in silico interneuronal model incorporating the Kidins220-induced Na+ current alterations reproduced the firing phenotype observed in Kidins220−/− neurons. These results identify Kidins220 as a novel modulator of Nav channel activity, broadening our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating network excitability. PMID:26037926

  20. Voltage-gated sodium channel modulation by sigma-receptors in cardiac myocytes and heterologous systems.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Molly; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Riemer, Logan; Ramos-Serrano, Andrea; Ruoho, Arnold E; Jackson, Meyer B

    2009-05-01

    The sigma-receptor, a broadly distributed integral membrane protein with a novel structure, is known to modulate various voltage-gated K(+) and Ca(2+) channels through a mechanism that involves neither G proteins nor phosphorylation. The present study investigated the modulation of the heart voltage-gated Na(+) channel (Na(v)1.5) by sigma-receptors. The sigma(1)-receptor ligands [SKF-10047 and (+)-pentazocine] and sigma(1)/sigma(2)-receptor ligands (haloperidol and ditolylguanidine) all reversibly inhibited Na(v)1.5 channels to varying degrees in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells and COS-7 cells, but the sigma(1)-receptor ligands were less effective in COS-7 cells. The same four ligands also inhibited Na(+) current in neonatal mouse cardiac myocytes. In sigma(1)-receptor knockout myocytes, the sigma(1)-receptor-specific ligands were far less effective in modulating Na(+) current, but the sigma(1)/sigma(2)-receptor ligands modulated Na(+) channels as well as in wild type. Photolabeling with the sigma(1)-receptor photoprobe [(125)I]-iodoazidococaine demonstrated that sigma(1)-receptors were abundant in heart and HEK-293 cells, but scarce in COS-7 cells. This difference was consistent with the greater efficacy of sigma(1)-receptor-specific ligands in HEK-293 cells than in COS-7 cells. sigma-Receptors modulated Na(+) channels despite the omission of GTP and ATP from the patch pipette solution. sigma-Receptor-mediated inhibition of Na(+) current had little if any voltage dependence and produced no change in channel kinetics. Na(+) channels represent a new addition to the large number of voltage-gated ion channels modulated by sigma-receptors. The modulation of Na(v)1.5 channels by sigma-receptors in the heart suggests an important pathway by which drugs can alter cardiac excitability and rhythmicity.

  1. Developmental regulation of voltage-sensitive sodium channels in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The developmental regulation of the voltage-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel in rat skeletal muscle was studied in vivo and in vitro. In triceps surae muscle developing in vivo the development of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel occurred primarily during the first three postnatal weeks as determined by the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)saxitoxin. This development proceeded in two separate phases. The first phase occurs independently of continuing motor neuron innervation and accounts for 60% of the adult density of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channels. The second phase, which begins about day 11, requires innervation. Muscle cells in primary culture were found to have both TTX-sensitive and insensitive Na/sup +/ channels. The development of the TTX-sensitive channel, in vitro, paralleled the initial innervation-independent phase of development observed in vivo. The density of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channels in cultured muscle cells was regulated by electrical activity and cytosolic Ca/sup + +/ levels. Pharmacological blockade of the spontaneous electrical activity present in these cells lead to a nearly 2-fold increase in the surface density of TTX-sensitive channels. The turnover time of the TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel was measured by blocking the incorporation of newly synthesized channels with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked protein glycosylation. The regulation of channel density by electrical activity, cytosolic Ca/sup + +/levels, and agents affecting cyclic neucleotide levels had no effect on the turnover time of the TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel, indicating that these regulatory agents instead affect the synthesis of the channel.

  2. Flufenamic acid decreases neuronal excitability through modulation of voltage-gated sodium channel gating.

    PubMed

    Yau, Hau-Jie; Baranauskas, Gytis; Martina, Marco

    2010-10-15

    The electrophysiological phenotype of individual neurons critically depends on the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated channels they express. Differences in sodium channel gating are instrumental in determining the different firing phenotypes of pyramidal cells and interneurons; moreover, sodium channel modulation represents an important mechanism of action for many widely used CNS drugs. Flufenamic acid (FFA) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been long used as a blocker of calcium-dependent cationic conductances. Here we show that FFA inhibits voltage-gated sodium currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons; this effect is dose-dependent with IC(50) = 189 μm. We used whole-cell and nucleated patch recordings to investigate the mechanisms of FFA modulation of TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium current. Our data show that flufenamic acid slows down the inactivation process of the sodium current, while shifting the inactivation curve ~10 mV toward more hyperpolarized potentials. The recovery from inactivation is also affected in a voltage-dependent way, resulting in slower recovery at hyperpolarized potentials. Recordings from acute slices demonstrate that FFA reduces repetitive- and abolishes burst-firing in CA1 pyramidal neurons. A computational model based on our data was employed to better understand the mechanisms of FFA action. Simulation data support the idea that FFA acts via a novel mechanism by reducing the voltage dependence of the sodium channel fast inactivation rates. These effects of FFA suggest that it may be an effective anti-epileptic drug.

  3. Increased renal epithelial na channel expression and activity correlate with elevation of blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Haloui, Mounsif; Tremblay, Johanne; Seda, Ondrej; Koltsova, Svetlana V; Maksimov, Georgy V; Orlov, Sergei N; Hamet, Pavel

    2013-10-01

    Elevation of blood pressure with age is one of the hallmarks of hypertension in both males and females. This study examined transcriptomic profiles in the kidney of 12-, 40-, and 80-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats and 4 recombinant inbred strains in search for functional genetic elements supporting temporal dynamics of blood pressure elevation. We found that both in males and females of spontaneously hypertensive rats and hypertensive recombinant inbred strains age-dependent blood pressure increment was accompanied by 50% heightened expression of epithelial sodium channel β- and γ-subunits. Epithelial sodium channel subunit expression correlated positively with blood pressure but correlated negatively with renin expression. Increased epithelial sodium channel activity was observed in cultured epithelial cells isolated from the kidney medulla of 80-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats but not in age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto. This difference remained evident after 24-hour treatment with aldosterone. 22Na uptake in the perfused kidney medulla was increased whereas the urinary Na/K ratio was decreased in old spontaneously hypertensive rats compared with normotensive controls. The difference was eliminated by the administration of epithelial sodium channel inhibitor benzamil. Observations in recombinant inbred strains representing various mixtures of parental hypertensive and normotensive genomes suggest that Scnn1g and Scnn1b genes themselves are not implicated in heightened expression and that the increased expression is neither secondary nor required for a partial elevation of blood pressure in contrast to spontaneously hypertensive rats. We suggest that spontaneously hypertensive rats display an intact negative feed-back between renin-angiotensin-system and epithelial Na channel activity whose upregulated expression is supported by a yet unknown mechanism.

  4. Amyloid Precursor Protein Enhances Nav1.6 Sodium Channel Cell Surface Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Tan, Francis Chee Kuan; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Dawe, Gavin S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is commonly associated with Alzheimer disease, but its physiological function remains unknown. Nav1.6 is a key determinant of neuronal excitability in vivo. Because mouse models of gain of function and loss of function of APP and Nav1.6 share some similar phenotypes, we hypothesized that APP might be a candidate molecule for sodium channel modulation. Here we report that APP colocalized and interacted with Nav1.6 in mouse cortical neurons. Knocking down APP decreased Nav1.6 sodium channel currents and cell surface expression. APP-induced increases in Nav1.6 cell surface expression were Go protein-dependent, enhanced by a constitutively active Go protein mutant, and blocked by a dominant negative Go protein mutant. APP also regulated JNK activity in a Go protein-dependent manner. JNK inhibition attenuated increases in cell surface expression of Nav1.6 sodium channels induced by overexpression of APP. JNK, in turn, phosphorylated APP. Nav1.6 sodium channel surface expression was increased by T668E and decreased by T668A, mutations of APP695 mimicking and preventing Thr-668 phosphorylation, respectively. Phosphorylation of APP695 at Thr-668 enhanced its interaction with Nav1.6. Therefore, we show that APP enhances Nav1.6 sodium channel cell surface expression through a Go-coupled JNK pathway. PMID:25767117

  5. Development and Testing of an In-Vitro Assay for Screening of Potential Therapeutic Agents Active against Na Channel Neurotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-08

    effect to inhibit the binding of [3H]BTX-B is not mediated through an interaction at sodium ...compounds acting at the sodium channel 29 Figure 2. Sodium channel /ot-scorpion toxin sequence homology 30 Figure 3. Effects of nesacaine, benzimidazole...the channel , and alters the single channel conductance. In considering this broad spectrum of effects , one is led to invoke a model for sodium channel

  6. Identification of novel interaction sites that determine specificity between fibroblast growth factor homologous factors and voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaojian; Wang, Chuan; Hoch, Ethan G; Pitt, Geoffrey S

    2011-07-08

    Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs, FGF11-14) bind to the C termini (CTs) of specific voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) and thereby regulate their function. The effect of an individual FHF on a specific VGSC varies greatly depending upon the individual FHF isoform. How individual FHFs impart distinctive effects on specific VGSCs is not known and the specificity of these pairwise interactions is not understood. Using several biochemical approaches combined with functional analysis, we mapped the interaction site for FGF12B on the Na(V)1.5 C terminus and discovered previously unknown determinants necessary for FGF12 interaction. Also, we demonstrated that FGF12B binds to some, but not all Na(V)1 CTs, suggesting specificity of interaction. Exploiting a human single nucleotide polymorphism in the core domain of FGF12 (P149Q), we identified a surface proline that contributes a part of this pairwise specificity. This proline is conserved among all FHFs, and mutation of the homologous residue in FGF13 also leads to loss of interaction with a specific VGSC CT (Na(V)1.1) and loss of modulation of the resultant Na(+) channel function. We hypothesized that some of the specificity mediated by this proline may result from differences in the affinity of the binding partners. Consistent with this hypothesis, surface plasmon resonance data showed that the P149Q mutation decreased the binding affinity between FHFs and VGSC CTs. Moreover, immunocytochemistry revealed that the mutation prevented proper subcellular targeting of FGF12 to the axon initial segment in neurons. Together, these results give new insights into details of the interactions between FHFs and Na(V)1.x CTs, and the consequent regulation of Na(+) channels.

  7. Seizure suppression through manipulating splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao

    2015-01-01

    Seizure can result from increased voltage-gated persistent sodium current expression. Although many clinically-approved antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated persistent sodium current, none exclusively repress this current without also adversely affecting the transient voltage-gated sodium current. Achieving a more selective block has significant potential for the treatment of epilepsy. Recent studies show that voltage-gated persistent sodium current amplitude is regulated by alternative splicing offering the possibility of a novel route for seizure control. In this study we identify 291 splicing regulators that, on knockdown, alter splicing of the Drosophila voltage-gated sodium channel to favour inclusion of exon K, rather than the mutually exclusive exon L. This change is associated with both a significant reduction in voltage-gated persistent sodium current, without change to transient voltage-gated sodium current, and to rescue of seizure in this model insect. RNA interference mediated knock-down, in two different seizure mutants, shows that 95 of these regulators are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration. Moreover, most suppress seizure activity in both mutants, indicative that they are part of well conserved pathways and likely, therefore, to be optimal candidates to take forward to mammalian studies. We provide proof-of-principle for such studies by showing that inhibition of a selection of regulators, using small molecule inhibitors, is similarly effective to reduce seizure. Splicing of the Drosophila sodium channel shows many similarities to its mammalian counterparts, including altering the amplitude of voltage-gated persistent sodium current. Our study provides the impetus to investigate whether manipulation of splicing of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels may be exploitable to provide effective seizure control. PMID:25681415

  8. Ligand- and structure-based virtual screening for clathrodin-derived human voltage-gated sodium channel modulators.

    PubMed

    Tomašić, Tihomir; Hartzoulakis, Basil; Zidar, Nace; Chan, Fiona; Kirby, Robert W; Madge, David J; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Kikelj, Danijel

    2013-12-23

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are attractive targets for drug discovery because of the broad therapeutic potential of their modulators. On the basis of the structure of marine alkaloid clathrodin, we have recently discovered novel subtype-selective VGSC modulators I and II that were used as starting points for two different ligand-based virtual screening approaches for discovery of novel VGSC modulators. Similarity searching in the ZINC database of drug-like compounds based on compound I resulted in five state-dependent Na(v)1.3 and Na(v)1.7 modulators with improved activity compared to I (IC₅₀ < 20 μM). Compounds 2 and 16 that blocked sodium permeation in Na(v)1.7 with IC₅₀ values of 7 and 9 μM, respectively, are among the most potent clathrodin analogs discovered so far. In the case of compound II, 3D similarity searching in the same database was followed by docking of an enriched compound library into our human Na(v)1.4 open-pore homology model. Although some of the selected compounds, e.g., 31 and 32 displayed 21% and 22% inactivated state I(peak) block of Na(v)1.4 at 10 μM, respectively, none showed better Na(v)1.4 modulatory activity than compound II. Taken together, virtual screening yielded compounds 2 and 16, which represent novel scaffolds for the discovery of human Na(v)1.7 modulators.

  9. Kinetics of veratridine action on Na channels of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sutro, JB

    1986-01-01

    Veratridine bath-applied to frog muscle makes inactivation of INa incomplete during a depolarizing voltage-clamp pulse and leads to a persistent veratridine-induced Na tail current. During repetitive depolarizations, the size of successive tail currents grows to a plateau and then gradually decreases. When pulsing is stopped, the tail current declines to zero with a time constant of approximately 3 s. Higher rates of stimulation result in a faster build-up of the tail current and a larger maximum value. I propose that veratridine binds only to open channels and, when bound, prevents normal fast inactivation and rapid shutting of the channel on return to rest. Veratridine-modified channels are also subject to a "slow" inactivation during long depolarizations or extended pulse trains. At rest, veratridine unbinds with a time constant of approximately 3 s. Three tests confirm these hypotheses: (a) the time course of the development of veratridine-induced tail currents parallels a running time integral of gNa during the pulse; (b) inactivating prepulses reduce the ability to evoke tails, and the voltage dependence of this reduction parallels the voltage dependence of h infinity; (c) chloramine-T, N-bromoacetamide, and scorpion toxin, agents that decrease inactivation in Na channels, each greatly enhance the tail currents and alter the time course of the appearance of the tails as predicted by the hypothesis. Veratridine-modified channels shut during hyperpolarizations from -90 mV and reopen on repolarization to -90 mV, a process that resembles normal activation gating. Veratridine appears to bind more rapidly during larger depolarizations. PMID:2419478

  10. A surface plasmon resonance approach to monitor toxin interactions with an isolated voltage-gated sodium channel paddle motif.

    PubMed

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Ferracci, Géraldine; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E

    2015-02-01

    Animal toxins that inhibit voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) channel fast inactivation can do so through an interaction with the S3b-S4 helix-turn-helix region, or paddle motif, located in the domain IV voltage sensor. Here, we used surface plasmon resonance (SPR), an optical approach that uses polarized light to measure the refractive index near a sensor surface to which a molecule of interest is attached, to analyze interactions between the isolated domain IV paddle and Na(v) channel-selective α-scorpion toxins. Our SPR analyses showed that the domain IV paddle can be removed from the Na(v) channel and immobilized on sensor chips, and suggest that the isolated motif remains susceptible to animal toxins that target the domain IV voltage sensor. As such, our results uncover the inherent pharmacological sensitivities of the isolated domain IV paddle motif, which may be exploited to develop a label-free SPR approach for discovering ligands that target this region.

  11. Brain and heart sodium channel subtype mRNA expression in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Yarowsky, P J; Krueger, B K; Olson, C E; Clevinger, E C; Koos, R D

    1991-01-01

    The expression of mRNAs coding for the alpha subunit of rat brain and rat heart sodium channels has been studied in adult and neonatal rat cerebral cortex using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Rat brain sodium channel subtype I, II, IIA, and III sequences were simultaneously amplified in the same PCR using a single oligonucleotide primer pair matched to all four subtype sequences. Identification of each subtype-specific product was inferred from the appearance of unique fragments when the product was digested with specific restriction enzymes. By using this RT-PCR method, products arising from mRNAs for all four brain sodium channel subtypes were identified in RNA extracted from adult rat cerebral cortex. The predominant component was type IIA with lesser levels of types I, II, and III. In contrast, the type II and IIA sequences were the predominant RT-PCR products in neonatal rat cortex, with slightly lower levels of type III and undetectable levels of type I. Thus, from neonate to adult, type II mRNA levels decrease relative to type IIA levels. Using a similar approach, we detected mRNA coding for the rat heart sodium channel in neonatal and adult rat cerebral cortex and in adult rat heart. These results reveal that mRNAs coding for the heart sodium channel and all four previously sequenced rat brain sodium channel subtypes are expressed in cerebral cortex and that type II and IIA channels may be differentially regulated during development. Images PMID:1658783

  12. Sodium channel inhibitor drug discovery using automated high throughput electrophysiology platforms.

    PubMed

    Castle, Neil; Printzenhoff, David; Zellmer, Shannon; Antonio, Brett; Wickenden, Alan; Silvia, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Voltage dependent sodium channels are widely recognized as valuable targets for the development of therapeutic interventions for neuroexcitatory disorders such as epilepsy and pain as well as cardiac arrhythmias. An ongoing challenge for sodium channel drug discovery is the ability to readily evaluate state dependent interactions, which are known to underlie inhibition by many clinically used local anesthetic, antiepileptic and antiarrhythmic sodium channel blockers. While patch-clamp electrophysiology is still considered the most effective way of measuring ion channel function and pharmacology, it does not have the throughput to be useful in early stages of drug discovery in which there is often a need to evaluate many thousands to hundreds of thousands of compounds. Fortunately over the past five years, there has been significant progress in developing much higher throughput electrophysiology platforms like the PatchXpress and IonWorks, which are now widely used in drug discovery. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of these two high throughput devices for use in sodium channel inhibitor drug discovery programs. Overall, the PatchXpress and IonWorks electrophysiology platforms have individual strengths that make them complementary to each other. Both platforms are capable of measuring state dependent modulation of sodium channels. IonWorks has the throughput to allow for effective screening of libraries of tens of thousands of compounds whereas the PatchXpress has more flexibility to provide quantitative voltage clamp, which is useful in structure activity evaluations for the hit-to-lead and lead optimization stages of sodium channel drug discovery.

  13. Effect of sulfhydryl oxidoreduction on permeability of cardiac tetrodotoxin-insensitive sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Y; Hisatome, I; Tsuboi, M; Uenishi, H; Zhang, G; Oyaizu, M; Sato, R; Imanishi, S

    1998-01-01

    Effects of sulfhydryl oxidizing and reducing agents on permeability of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-insensitive Na-channel were investigated in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Mercury chloride (HgCl2) at 1-100 microM irreversibly blocked Na+ currents with no significant changes in the gating kinetics. In contrast, the hydrophilic sulfhydryl oxidizing agent, thimerosal at 50-100 microM little affected Na+ permeation through the Na-channel. The Hg2+-induced block of Na+ current could be readily reversed by 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT), an agent that reduces disulfide bonds. These results indicate that the formation of sulfur-Hg-sulfur bridge is essential for Hg2+ block. Pretreatment with DTT prevented the Hg2+ block of Na+ current, whereas Zn2+ and Cd2+ retained their abilities to block Na+ current after DTT treatment. An application of Zn2+ or Cd2+ resulted in the restoration of Hg2+ sensitivity of the DTT-treated channel. A conformational model for the Na-channel with multiple free sulfhydryl groups and native disulfide bonds could account for our experimental data regarding the effects of sulfhydryl modifying agents on the channel permeability. We conclude that the cardiac TTX-insensitive Na-channel contains functionally important free sulfhydryl groups and disulfide bonds which are accessible from the extracellular side by an aqueous pathway. These sulfhydryls would be capable of modulating the Na-channel permeability by affecting the conformation of channel pore region.

  14. Regulation of persistent Na current by interactions between beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels.

    PubMed

    Aman, Teresa K; Grieco-Calub, Tina M; Chen, Chunling; Rusconi, Raffaella; Slat, Emily A; Isom, Lori L; Raman, Indira M

    2009-02-18

    The beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels (Scnxb) regulate the gating of pore-forming alpha subunits, as well as their trafficking and localization. In heterologous expression systems, beta1, beta2, and beta3 subunits influence inactivation and persistent current in different ways. To test how the beta4 protein regulates Na channel gating, we transfected beta4 into HEK (human embryonic kidney) cells stably expressing Na(V)1.1. Unlike a free peptide with a sequence from the beta4 cytoplasmic domain, the full-length beta4 protein did not block open channels. Instead, beta4 expression favored open states by shifting activation curves negative, decreasing the slope of the inactivation curve, and increasing the percentage of noninactivating current. Consequently, persistent current tripled in amplitude. Expression of beta1 or chimeric subunits including the beta1 extracellular domain, however, favored inactivation. Coexpressing Na(V)1.1 and beta4 with beta1 produced tiny persistent currents, indicating that beta1 overcomes the effects of beta4 in heterotrimeric channels. In contrast, beta1(C121W), which contains an extracellular epilepsy-associated mutation, did not counteract the destabilization of inactivation by beta4 and also required unusually large depolarizations for channel opening. In cultured hippocampal neurons transfected with beta4, persistent current was slightly but significantly increased. Moreover, in beta4-expressing neurons from Scn1b and Scn1b/Scn2b null mice, entry into inactivated states was slowed. These data suggest that beta1 and beta4 have antagonistic roles, the former favoring inactivation, and the latter favoring activation. Because increased Na channel availability may facilitate action potential firing, these results suggest a mechanism for seizure susceptibility of both mice and humans with disrupted beta1 subunits.

  15. A distinct de novo expression of Nav1.5 sodium channels in human atrial fibroblasts differentiated into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chatelier, Aurélien; Mercier, Aurélie; Tremblier, Boris; Thériault, Olivier; Moubarak, Majed; Benamer, Najate; Corbi, Pierre; Bois, Patrick; Chahine, Mohamed; Faivre, Jean François

    2012-09-01

    Fibroblasts play a major role in heart physiology. They are at the origin of the extracellular matrix renewal and production of various paracrine and autocrine factors. In pathological conditions, fibroblasts proliferate, migrate and differentiate into myofibroblasts leading to cardiac fibrosis. This differentiated status is associated with changes in expression profile leading to neo-expression of proteins such as ionic channels. The present study investigates further electrophysiological changes associated with fibroblast differentiation focusing on the activity of voltage-gated sodium channels in human atrial fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Using the patch clamp technique we show that human atrial myofibroblasts display a fast inward voltage gated sodium current with a density of 13.28 ± 2.88 pA pF(-1) whereas no current was detectable in non-differentiated fibroblasts. Quantitative RT-PCR reveals a large amount of transcripts encoding the Na(v)1.5 α-subunit with a fourfold increased expression level in myofibroblasts when compared to fibroblasts. Accordingly, half of the current was blocked by 1 μm of tetrodotoxin and immunocytochemistry experiments reveal the presence of Na(v)1.5 proteins. Overall, this current exhibits similar biophysical characteristics to sodium currents found in cardiac myocytes except for the window current that is enlarged for potentials between -100 and -20 mV. Since fibrosis is one of the fundamental mechanisms implicated in atrial fibrillation, it is of great interest to investigate how this current could influence myofibroblast properties. Moreover, since several Na(v)1.5 mutations are related to cardiac pathologies, this study offers a new avenue on the fibroblasts involvement of these mutations.

  16. Threshold fluctuations in an N sodium channel model of the node of Ranvier.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, J T

    1995-01-01

    Computer simulations of stochastic single-channel open-close kinetics are applied to an N sodium channel model of a node of Ranvier. Up to 32,000 voltage-gated sodium channels have been simulated with modified amphibian sodium channel kinetics. Poststimulus time histograms are obtained with 1000 monophasic pulse stimuli, and measurements are made of changes in the relative spread of threshold (RS) with changes in the model parameters. RS is found to be invariant with pulse durations from 100 microseconds to 3 ms. RS is approximately of inverse proportion to square-root of N. It decreases with increasing temperature and is dependent on passive electrical properties of the membrane as well as the single-channel conductance. The simulated RS and its independence of pulse duration is consistent with experimental results from the literature. Thus, the microscopic fluctuations of single, voltage-sensitive sodium channels in the amphibian peripheral node of Ranvier are sufficient to account for the macroscopic fluctuation if threshold to electrical stimulation. PMID:7756544

  17. Putative resolution of the EEEE selectivity paradox in L-type Ca2+ and bacterial Na+ biological ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, I. Kh; Luchinsky, D. G.; Gibby, W. A. T.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Eisenberg, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    The highly selective permeation of ions through biological ion channels can be described and explained in terms of fluctuational dynamics under the influence of powerful electrostatic forces. Hence valence selectivity, e.g. between Ca2+ and Na+ in calcium and sodium channels, can be described in terms of ionic Coulomb blockade, which gives rise to distinct conduction bands and stop-bands as the fixed negative charge Q f at the selectivity filter of the channel is varied. This picture accounts successfully for a wide range of conduction phenomena in a diversity of ion channels. A disturbing anomaly, however, is that what appears to be the same electrostatic charge and structure (the so-called EEEE motif) seems to select Na+ conduction in bacterial channels but Ca2+ conduction in mammalian channels. As a possible resolution of this paradox it is hypothesised that an additional charged protein residue on the permeation path of the mammalian channel increases |{{Q}f}| by e, thereby altering the selectivity from Na+ to Ca2+. Experiments are proposed that will enable the hypothesis to be tested.

  18. Sodium Leak Channels in Neuronal Excitability and Rhythmic Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Dejian

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular K+, Na+, and Ca2+ ions all influence the resting membrane potential of the neuron. However, the mechanisms by which extracellular Na+ and Ca2+ regulate basal neuronal excitability are not well understood. Recent findings suggest that NALCN, in association with UNC79 and UNC80, contributes a basal Na+ leak conductance in neurons. Mutations in Nalcn, Unc79, or Unc80 lead to severe phenotypes that include neonatal lethality and disruption in rhythmic behaviors. This review discusses the properties of the NALCN complex, its regulation, and its contribution to neuronal function and animal behavior. PMID:22196327

  19. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei-Wan; Li, Xin-Yuan; Liu, Hui-Bin; Wang, Zi-Rui; Hu, Qing-Qing; Li, Yu-Xia; Song, Bin-Lin; Lou, Jie; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Ma, He-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (P O ). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and P O . Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells.

  20. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Yuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells. PMID:27635187

  1. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels by Conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ*

    PubMed Central

    Green, Brad R.; Gajewiak, Joanna; Chhabra, Sandeep; Skalicky, Jack J.; Zhang, Min-Min; Rivier, Jean E.; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Yoshikami, Doju

    2016-01-01

    Cone snail toxins are well known blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels, a property that is of broad interest in biology and therapeutically in treating neuropathic pain and neurological disorders. Although most conotoxin channel blockers function by direct binding to a channel and disrupting its normal ion movement, conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ channel blocking is unique, using both favorable binding interactions with the channel and a direct tether via an intermolecular disulfide bond. Disulfide exchange is possible because conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ contains an S-cysteinylated Cys-24 residue that is capable of exchanging with a free cysteine thiol on the channel surface. Here, we present the solution structure of an analog of μO§-GVIIJ (GVIIJ[C24S]) and the results of structure-activity studies with synthetic μO§-GVIIJ variants. GVIIJ[C24S] adopts an inhibitor cystine knot structure, with two antiparallel β-strands stabilized by three disulfide bridges. The loop region linking the β-strands (loop 4) presents residue 24 in a configuration where it could bind to the proposed free cysteine of the channel (Cys-910, rat NaV1.2 numbering; at site 8). The structure-activity study shows that three residues (Lys-12, Arg-14, and Tyr-16) located in loop 2 and spatially close to residue 24 were also important for functional activity. We propose that the interaction of μO§-GVIIJ with the channel depends on not only disulfide tethering via Cys-24 to a free cysteine at site 8 on the channel but also the participation of key residues of μO§-GVIIJ on a distinct surface of the peptide. PMID:26817840

  2. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels by Conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ.

    PubMed

    Green, Brad R; Gajewiak, Joanna; Chhabra, Sandeep; Skalicky, Jack J; Zhang, Min-Min; Rivier, Jean E; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Olivera, Baldomero M; Yoshikami, Doju; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-03-25

    Cone snail toxins are well known blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels, a property that is of broad interest in biology and therapeutically in treating neuropathic pain and neurological disorders. Although most conotoxin channel blockers function by direct binding to a channel and disrupting its normal ion movement, conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ channel blocking is unique, using both favorable binding interactions with the channel and a direct tether via an intermolecular disulfide bond. Disulfide exchange is possible because conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ contains anS-cysteinylated Cys-24 residue that is capable of exchanging with a free cysteine thiol on the channel surface. Here, we present the solution structure of an analog of μO§-GVIIJ (GVIIJ[C24S]) and the results of structure-activity studies with synthetic μO§-GVIIJ variants. GVIIJ[C24S] adopts an inhibitor cystine knot structure, with two antiparallel β-strands stabilized by three disulfide bridges. The loop region linking the β-strands (loop 4) presents residue 24 in a configuration where it could bind to the proposed free cysteine of the channel (Cys-910, rat NaV1.2 numbering; at site 8). The structure-activity study shows that three residues (Lys-12, Arg-14, and Tyr-16) located in loop 2 and spatially close to residue 24 were also important for functional activity. We propose that the interaction of μO§-GVIIJ with the channel depends on not only disulfide tethering via Cys-24 to a free cysteine at site 8 on the channel but also the participation of key residues of μO§-GVIIJ on a distinct surface of the peptide.

  3. Effect of dietary sodium on the Na-K ATPase inhibitor in patients with essential hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Ashida, T.; Kuramochi, M.; Kojima, S.; Yoshimi, H.; Kawano, Y.; Kimura, G.; Abe, H.; Imanishi, M.; Yoshida, K.; Kawamura, M. )

    1989-07-01

    To study the circulating humoral factor modifying transmembrane sodium transport, plasma was obtained from 12 patients with essential hypertension (EH) fed a high sodium diet (NaCl 15 to 17 g/d) for seven days and thereafter a low sodium diet (NaCl 2 to 3 g/d) for seven days. Ouabain-sensitive {sup 86}Rb+ influx into the red blood cells (RBC) obtained from a healthy subject, and incubated with the plasma obtained during the high sodium diet was significantly lower than that incubated with the plasma obtained during the low sodium diet (3.74 +/- 0.26 v 3.97 +/- 0.30 nmol/10(8) cells, P less than .05). The changes in mean blood pressure from the high to low sodium diet showed a significant positive correlation with the changes in the ouabain-sensitive Rb influx into RBC in the plasma from the high to low sodium diet. These results suggest that a humoral factor modifying the sodium pump might be altered by sodium balance in EH, especially in salt-sensitive hypertension.

  4. Use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels by quaternary derivatives of lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Gintant, G A; Hoffman, B F

    1984-02-01

    Modulation of the reduction of fast inward sodium current by local anesthetics due to changes in electrical activity has been termed use-dependent block ( Courtney 1975). To determine the mechanisms responsible for use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels and to compare use-dependent block in cardiac and nerve preparations, we investigated use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels by the quaternary lidocaine analogues QX -314 and QX -222 (two agents previously studied in nerve). We used canine cardiac Purkinje fibers, and assessed changes in the fast inward sodium current using changes in the maximum rate of rise of the action potential upstroke (Vmax). Two microelectrode voltage clamp and current clamp techniques were used to control membrane potential prior to stimulated upstrokes . Use-dependent block was not affected by shortening the action potential duration during rapid stimulation. Partial recovery from use-dependent block was observed during rapid stimulation with brief depolarizing prepulses terminating immediately prior to the upstroke. Similar prepulses also prevented the development of use-dependent block following an abrupt increase in the stimulation rate. Hyperpolarizing prepulses during rapid stimulation caused recovery from use-dependent block; recovery was greater and more rapid with increasingly negative prepulses . Hyperpolarization during periods of electrical quiescence also caused greater recovery. These results, interpreted using the modulated receptor hypothesis ( Hille 1977; Hondeghem and Katzung 1977), suggest that use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels by quaternary local anesthetics is due to drug association with the inactivated sodium channel receptor which occurs only after these drugs gain access to the receptor site through open sodium channels.

  5. (Pro)renin receptor contributes to regulation of renal epithelial sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Quadri, Syed; Siragy, Helmy M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies reported increased (Pro)renin receptor (PRR) expression during low-salt intake. We hypothesized that PRR plays a role in regulation of renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) through serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase isoform 1 (SGK-1)-neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 4–2 (Nedd4–2) signaling pathway. Male Sprague–Dawley rats on normal-sodium diet and mouse renal inner medullary collecting duct cells treated with NaCl at 130 mmol/l (normal salt), or 63 mmol/l (low salt) were studied. PRR and α-ENaC expressions were evaluated 1 week after right uninephrectomy and left renal interstitial administration of 5% dextrose, scramble shRNA, or PRR shRNA (n = 6 each treatment). In-vivo PRR shRNA significantly reduced expressions of PRR throughout the kidney and α-ENaC subunits in the renal medulla. In inner medullary collecting duct cells, low salt or angiopoietin II (Ang II) augmented the mRNA and protein expressions of PRR (P < 0.05), SGK-1 (P < 0.05), and α-ENaC (P < 0.05). Low salt or Ang II increased the phosphorylation of Nedd4–2. In cells treated with low salt or Ang II, PRR siRNA significantly downregulated the mRNA and protein expressions of PRR (P < 0.05), SGK-1 (P < 0.05), and α-ENaC expression (P < 0.05). We conclude that PRR contributes to the regulation of α-ENaC via SGK-1-Nedd4–2 signaling pathway. PMID:26771338

  6. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Song Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Dong Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  7. Current view on regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels by calcium and auxiliary proteins.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Geoffrey S; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-09-01

    In cardiac and skeletal myocytes, and in most neurons, the opening of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV channels) triggers action potentials, a process that is regulated via the interactions of the channels' intercellular C-termini with auxiliary proteins and/or Ca(2+) . The molecular and structural details for how Ca(2+) and/or auxiliary proteins modulate NaV channel function, however, have eluded a concise mechanistic explanation and details have been shrouded for the last decade behind controversy about whether Ca(2+) acts directly upon the NaV channel or through interacting proteins, such as the Ca(2+) binding protein calmodulin (CaM). Here, we review recent advances in defining the structure of NaV intracellular C-termini and associated proteins such as CaM or fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) to reveal new insights into how Ca(2+) affects NaV function, and how altered Ca(2+) -dependent or FHF-mediated regulation of NaV channels is perturbed in various disease states through mutations that disrupt CaM or FHF interaction.

  8. Modification of the cell based assay for brevetoxins using human cardiac voltage dependent sodium channels expressed in HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed

    Fairey, E R; Bottein Dechraoui, M Y; Sheets, M F; Ramsdell, J S

    2001-09-01

    Assays using living cells provide an effective means to generate activity measurements of toxins, especially in situations where the toxins are part of a complex mixture or in an unfamiliar form such as natural or synthetic derivatives or bioactive metabolites. An important step in the refinement of cell based assays is to simplify the cellular reactions needed or required to generate the functional response of interest. Advances in the engineering of functional responses in cells provide a means to direct the response to given toxins. In this report, we describe the homogeneous high level expression of the initial target for brevetoxin, the voltage dependent sodium channel in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293). HEK cells stably transfected with a 6.208 kb cDNA of human heart voltage-dependent Na(+) channel (hH1a) were examined as an alternative to mouse neuroblastoma cells (N2A). The HEK-hH1a cells showed a reduced dependence on cofactors, increased sensitivity to brevetoxin and a useful means to assure absolute selectivity to the sodium channel. We next assessed the assay in a reporter gene format. Expression of a panel of minimal response elements as well as the c-fos promoter failed to provide a response to brevetoxin, indicating that the HEK cells lack a necessary intermediate signaling component. The expression of voltage dependent sodium channels in HEK cells is anticipated to provide enhanced performance for cell-based detection of toxins for drug and natural product discovery, biomonitoring and environmental monitoring.

  9. Nanoscale stabilization of sodium oxides: implications for Na-O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Kang, ShinYoung; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2014-02-12

    The thermodynamic stability of materials can depend on particle size due to the competition between surface and bulk energy. In this Letter, we show that, while sodium peroxide (Na2O2) is the stable bulk phase of Na in an oxygen environment at standard conditions, sodium superoxide (NaO2) is considerably more stable at the nanoscale. As a consequence, the superoxide requires a much lower nucleation energy than the peroxide, explaining why it can be observed as the discharge product in some Na-O2 batteries. As the superoxide can be recharged (decomposed) at much lower overpotentials than the peroxide, these findings are important to create highly reversible Na-O2 batteries. We derive the specific electrochemical conditions to nucleate and retain Na-superoxides and comment on the importance of considering the nanophase thermodynamics when optimizing an electrochemical system.

  10. Comparative effects of sodium channel blockers in short term rat whole embryo culture

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Mats F; Sköld, Anna-Carin; Ericson, Ann-Christin; Annas, Anita; Villar, Rodrigo Palma; Cebers, Gvido; Hellmold, Heike; Gustafson, Anne-Lee; Webster, William S

    2013-10-15

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect on the rat embryonic heart of two experimental drugs (AZA and AZB) which are known to block the sodium channel Nav1.5, the hERG potassium channel and the L-type calcium channel. The sodium channel blockers bupivacaine, lidocaine, and the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine were used as reference substances. The experimental model was the gestational day (GD) 13 rat embryo cultured in vitro. In this model the embryonic heart activity can be directly observed, recorded and analyzed using computer assisted image analysis as it responds to the addition of test drugs. The effect on the heart was studied for a range of concentrations and for a duration up to 3 h. The results showed that AZA and AZB caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia of the embryonic heart and at high concentrations heart block. These effects were reversible on washout. In terms of potency to cause bradycardia the compounds were ranked AZB > bupivacaine > AZA > lidocaine > nifedipine. Comparison with results from previous studies with more specific ion channel blockers suggests that the primary effect of AZA and AZB was sodium channel blockage. The study shows that the short-term rat whole embryo culture (WEC) is a suitable system to detect substances hazardous to the embryonic heart. - Highlights: • Study of the effect of sodium channel blocking drugs on embryonic heart function • We used a modified method rat whole embryo culture with image analysis. • The drugs tested caused a concentration dependent bradycardia and heart block. • The effect of drugs acting on multiple ion channels is difficult to predict. • This method may be used to detect cardiotoxicity in prenatal development.

  11. Isoform-specific lidocaine block of sodium channels explained by differences in gating.

    PubMed

    Nuss, H B; Kambouris, N G; Marbán, E; Tomaselli, G F; Balser, J R

    2000-01-01

    When depolarized from typical resting membrane potentials (V(rest) approximately -90 mV), cardiac sodium (Na) currents are more sensitive to local anesthetics than brain or skeletal muscle Na currents. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, lidocaine block of hH1 (human cardiac) Na current greatly exceeded that of mu1 (rat skeletal muscle) at membrane potentials near V(rest), whereas hyperpolarization to -140 mV equalized block of the two isoforms. Because the isoform-specific tonic block roughly parallels the drug-free voltage dependence of channel availability, isoform differences in the voltage dependence of fast inactivation could underlie the differences in block. However, after a brief (50 ms) depolarizing pulse, recovery from lidocaine block is similar for the two isoforms despite marked kinetic differences in drug-free recovery, suggesting that differences in fast inactivation cannot entirely explain the isoform difference in lidocaine action. Given the strong coupling between fast inactivation and other gating processes linked to depolarization (activation, slow inactivation), we considered the possibility that isoform differences in lidocaine block are explained by differences in these other gating processes. In whole-cell recordings from HEK-293 cells, the voltage dependence of hH1 current activation was approximately 20 mV more negative than that of mu1. Because activation and closed-state inactivation are positively coupled, these differences in activation were sufficient to shift hH1 availability to more negative membrane potentials. A mutant channel with enhanced closed-state inactivation gating (mu1-R1441C) exhibited increased lidocaine sensitivity, emphasizing the importance of closed-state inactivation in lidocaine action. Moreover, when the depolarization was prolonged to 1 s, recovery from a "slow" inactivated state with intermediate kinetics (I(M)) was fourfold longer in hH1 than in mu1, and recovery from lidocaine block in hH1 was similarly

  12. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on membrane processes. Sodium channels, calcium channels, and exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A patch-clamp study under high hydrostatic pressure was performed by transferring cells or membrane patches into a pressure vessel (Heinemann, S. H., W. Stuhmer, and F. Conti, 1987, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 84:3229-3233). Whole-cell Na currents as well as Ca currents were measured at pressures up to 40 MPa (approximately 400 atm; 1 MPa = 9.87 atm) in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Ca currents were found to be independent of pressure within experimental resolution. The mean amplitude and the gating kinetics of Na currents were affected by less than 20% at 10 MPa. This lack of a pronounced effect is surprising since the high-pressure nervous syndrome (HPNS), a disorder at high pressures known to result from impaired nervous transmission, manifests itself at pressures as low as 5 MPa. The results show that ion channels involved in transmission cannot be implicated in HPNS. However, when exocytosis was studied at high pressure by monitoring the cell capacitance (Neher, E., and A. Marty, 1982, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 79:6712- 6716), more drastic effects were seen. The degranulation evoked by dialyzing the cell with 1 microM free Ca2+ could be slowed by a factor of 2 by application of 10 MPa. The same effect was observed for the degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated with 40 microM of the GTP analogue GTP-gamma-S. According to these results, the process of exocytosis is the most likely site at which hydrostatic pressure can act to produce nervous disorders. Furthermore, we demonstrate that pressure can be a useful tool in the investigation of other cellular responses, since we were able to separate different steps occurring during exocytosis owing to their different activation volumes. PMID:2450167

  13. Inhibitors of voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7: patent applications since 2010.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaoyi; Cohen, Charles J; Dehnhardt, Christoph M

    2014-09-01

    There has been intense interest in developing inhibitors of the sodium channel Nav1.7 because genetic studies have established very strong validation for the efficacy to alleviate both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. This review summarizes patent applications targeting Nav1.7 since 2010 until May, 2014. We have classified the patents into three categories as follows: small molecules with well-defined molecular selectivity among sodium channel isoforms; biologicals with well-defined molecular selectivity; and, small molecules that inhibit Nav1.7 with unknown molecular selectivity. Most of the review is dedicated to small molecule selective compounds.

  14. Jingzhaotoxin-I, a novel spider neurotoxin preferentially inhibiting cardiac sodium channel inactivation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yucheng; Tang, Jianzhou; Hu, Weijun; Xie, Jinyun; Maertens, Chantal; Tytgat, Jan; Liang, Songping

    2005-04-01

    Jingzhaotoxin-I (JZTX-I), a 33-residue polypeptide, is derived from the Chinese tarantula Chilobrachys jing-zhao venom based on its ability to evidently increase the strength and the rate of vertebrate heartbeats. The toxin has three disulfide bonds with the linkage of I-IV, II-V, and III-VI that is a typical pattern found in inhibitor cystine knot molecules. Its cDNA determined by rapid amplification of 3'- and 5'-cDNA ends encoded a 62-residue precursor with a small proregion of eight residues. Whole-cell configuration indicated that JZTX-I was a novel neurotoxin preferentially inhibiting cardiac sodium channel inactivation by binding to receptor site 3. Although JZTX-I also exhibits the interaction with channel isoforms expressing in mammalian and insect sensory neurons, its affinity for tetrodotoxin-resistant subtype in mammalian cardiac myocytes (IC50 = 31.6 nm) is approximately 30-fold higher than that for tetrodotoxin-sensitive subtypes in latter tissues. Not affecting outward delay-rectified potassium channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in mammal sensory neurons, JZTX-I hopefully represents a potent ligand to discriminate cardiac sodium channels from neuronal tetrodotoxin-resistant isoforms. Furthermore, different from any reported spider toxins, the toxin neither modifies the current-voltage relationships nor shifts the steady-state inactivation of sodium channels. Therefore, JZTX-I defines a new subclass of spider sodium channel toxins. JZTX-I is an alpha-like toxin first reported from spider venoms. The result provides an important witness for a convergent functional evolution between spider and other animal venoms.

  15. Stochastic theory of ion movement in channels with single-ion occupancy. Application to sodium permeation of gramicidin channels.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, E; Chiu, S W

    1987-01-01

    The electrodiffusion equations were solved for the one-ion channel both by the analytical method due to Levitt and also by Brownian dynamic simulations. For both types of calculations equilibration of ion distribution between the bath and the ends of the channel was assumed. Potential profiles were found that give good fits to published data on Na+ permeation of gramicidin channels. The data were best fit by profiles that have no relative energy maximum at the mouth of the channel. This finding suggests that alignment of waters or channel charged groups inside the channel in response to an ion's approach may provide an energetically favorable situation for entry sufficient to overcome the energy required for removing bulk waters of hydration. An alternative possibility is that the barrier to ion entry is situated outside the region restricted to single-ion occupancy. Replacement of valine with more polar amino acids at the No. 1 location was found to correspond to a deepening of the potential minima near the channel mouths, an increase in height of the central barrier to ion translocation across the channel, and possibly a reduction in the mobility of the ion-water complex in the channel. The Levitt theory was extended to calculate passage times for ions to cross the channel and the blocking effects of ions that entered the channel but didn't cross. These quantities were also calculated by the Brownian dynamics method. PMID:2440492

  16. Static and dynamic polarizabilities of Na{sup -} within a variationally stable coupled-channel hyperspherical method

    SciTech Connect

    Masili, Mauro; Groote, J.J. de

    2004-11-01

    Using a model potential representation combined with a variationally stable method, we present a precise calculation of the electric dipole polarizabilities of the sodium negative ion (Na{sup -}). The effective two-electron eigensolutions for Na{sup -} are obtained from a hyperspherical coupled-channel calculation. This approach allows efficient error control and insight into the system's properties through one-dimensional potential curves. Our result of 1018.3 a.u. for the static dipole polarizability is in agreement with previous calculations and supports our results for the dynamic polarizability, which has scarcely been investigated hitherto.

  17. Marked difference in saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin affinity for the human nociceptive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.7) [corrected].

    PubMed

    Walker, James R; Novick, Paul A; Parsons, William H; McGregor, Malcolm; Zablocki, Jeff; Pande, Vijay S; Du Bois, J

    2012-10-30

    Human nociceptive voltage-gated sodium channel (Na(v)1.7), a target of significant interest for the development of antinociceptive agents, is blocked by low nanomolar concentrations of (-)-tetrodotoxin(TTX) but not (+)-saxitoxin (STX) and (+)-gonyautoxin-III (GTX-III). These findings question the long-accepted view that the 1.7 isoform is both tetrodotoxin- and saxitoxin-sensitive and identify the outer pore region of the channel as a possible target for the design of Na(v)1.7-selective inhibitors. Single- and double-point amino acid mutagenesis studies along with whole-cell electrophysiology recordings establish two domain III residues (T1398 and I1399), which occur as methionine and aspartate in other Na(v) isoforms, as critical determinants of STX and gonyautoxin-III binding affinity. An advanced homology model of the Na(v) pore region is used to provide a structural rationalization for these surprising results.

  18. Estragole blocks neuronal excitability by direct inhibition of Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Alves, K.S.; Ferreira-da-Silva, F.W.; Peixoto-Neves, D.; Viana-Cardoso, K.V.; Moreira-Júnior, L.; Oquendo, M.B.; Oliveira-Abreu, K.; Albuquerque, A.A.C.; Coelho-de-Souza, A.N.; Leal-Cardoso, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Estragole is a volatile terpenoid, which occurs naturally as a constituent of the essential oils of many plants. It has several pharmacological and biological activities. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of action of estragole on neuronal excitability. Intact and dissociated dorsal root ganglion neurons of rats were used to record action potential and Na+ currents with intracellular and patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Estragole blocked the generation of action potentials in cells with or without inflexions on their descendant (repolarization) phase (Ninf and N0 neurons, respectively) in a concentration-dependent manner. The resting potentials and input resistances of Ninf and N0 cells were not altered by estragole (2, 4, and 6 mM). Estragole also inhibited total Na+ current and tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 3.2 and 3.6 mM, respectively). Kinetic analysis of Na+ current in the presence of 4 mM estragole showed a statistically significant reduction of fast and slow inactivation time constants, indicating an acceleration of the inactivation process. These data demonstrate that estragole blocks neuronal excitability by direct inhibition of Na+ channel conductance activation. This action of estragole is likely to be relevant to the understanding of the mechanisms of several pharmacological effects of this substance. PMID:24345915

  19. Exploring conformational states of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb via molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cristiano; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L; Treptow, Werner

    2012-12-26

    The X-ray structure of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb has been reported in a conformation with a closed conduction pore. Comparison between this structure and the activated-open and resting-closed structures of the voltage-gated Kv1.2 potassium channel suggests that the voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) of the reported structure are not fully activated. Using the aforementioned structures of Kv1.2 as templates, molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify analogous functional conformations of NavAb. Specifically, starting from the NavAb crystal structure, conformations of the membrane-bound channel are sampled along likely pathways for activation of the VSD and opening of the pore domain. Gating charge computations suggest that a structural rearrangement comparable to that occurring between activated-open and resting-closed states is required to explain experimental values of the gating charge, thereby confirming that the reported VSD structure is likely an intermediate along the channel activation pathway. Our observation that the X-ray structure exhibits a low pore domain-opening propensity further supports this notion. The present molecular dynamics study also identifies conformations of NavAb that are seemingly related to the resting-closed and activated-open states. Our findings are consistent with recent structural and functional studies of the orthologous channels NavRh, NaChBac, and NavMs and offer possible structures for the functionally relevant conformations of NavAb.

  20. α- And β-subunit composition of voltage-gated sodium channels investigated with μ-conotoxins and the recently discovered μO§-conotoxin GVIIJ

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael J.; Zhang, Min-Min; Gajewiak, Joanna; Azam, Layla; Rivier, Jean E.; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the identities of the isoforms of the α (NaV1)- and β (NaVβ)-subunits of voltage-gated sodium channels, including those responsible for action potentials in rodent sciatic nerves. To examine α-subunits, we used seven μ-conotoxins, which target site 1 of the channel. With the use of exogenously expressed channels, we show that two of the μ-conotoxins, μ-BuIIIB and μ-SxIIIA, are 50-fold more potent in blocking NaV1.6 from mouse than that from rat. Furthermore, we observed that μ-BuIIIB and μ-SxIIIA are potent blockers of large, myelinated A-fiber compound action potentials (A-CAPs) [but not small, unmyelinated C-fiber CAPs (C-CAPs)] in the sciatic nerve of the mouse (unlike A-CAPs of the rat, previously shown to be insensitive to these toxins). To investigate β-subunits, we used two synthetic derivatives of the recently discovered μO§-conotoxin GVIIJ that define site 8 of the channel, as previously characterized with cloned rat NaV1- and NaVβ-subunits expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, where it was shown that μO§-GVIIJ is a potent inhibitor of several NaV1-isoforms and that coexpression of NaVβ2 or -β4 (but not NaVβ1 or -β3) totally protects against block by μO§-GVIIJ. We report here the effects of μO§-GVIIJ on 1) sodium currents of mouse NaV1.6 coexpressed with various combinations of NaVβ-subunits in oocytes; 2) A- and C-CAPs of mouse and rat sciatic nerves; and 3) sodium currents of small and large neurons dissociated from rat dorsal root ganglia. Our overall results lead us to conclude that action potentials in A-fibers of the rodent sciatic nerve are mediated primarily by NaV1.6 associated with NaVβ2 or NaVβ4. PMID:25632083

  1. Effect of dronedarone on Na+, Ca2+ and HCN channels.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Roman; Goegelein, Heinz; Ruetten, Hartmut

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies showed that amiodarone causes state-dependent inhibition of Na(+) channels thereby mediating an atrial-selective drug effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of the new antiarrhythmic compound dronedarone on Na(+), Ca(2+) and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels. Monophasic action potentials (MAP) and effective refractory period (ERP) were studied in arterially perfused left atria and ventricular wedge preparations of the pig. Fast Na(+) and Ca(2+) currents in isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes as well as human HCN4 channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were investigated with the patch-clamp technique. In left atrial epicardial tissue, dronedarone (3 μM) had no effect on the MAP duration, but the drug caused a significant prolongation of the ERP from 145 ± 9 to 184 ± 17 ms (n = 6; p < 0.05). In guinea pig ventricular myocytes, dronedarone exhibited a state-dependent inhibition of the fast Na(+) channel current with an IC(50) of 0.7 ± 0.1 μM, when the holding potential (V (hold)) was -80 mV. The maximal block at the highest concentration used was 77 ± 8%. In contrast, when V (hold) was -100 mV, inhibition with 10 μM dronedarone was only 9 ± 3% (n = 7). Dronedarone blocked Ca(2+) currents elicited by rectangular pulses at V (hold) = -40 mV with an IC(50) value of 0.4 ± 0.1 μM (maximal block by 10 μM dronedarone, 80 ± 6%), whereas at V (hold) = -80 mV, 10 μM dronedarone blocked only 20 ± 6% (n = 4) of the current. Applying an action potential clamp (V (hold) = -80 mV) yielded an IC(50) of 0.4 ± 0.3 μM. Human HCN4 channels expressed in CHO cells were blocked by dronedarone with an IC(50) of 1.0 ± 0.1 μM. Inhibition of fast Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels by dronedarone depends on the cell's resting membrane potential (state-dependent block) favouring an atrial-selective mode of

  2. Sodium channel γENaC mediates IL-17 synergized high salt induced inflammatory stress in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Amara, Suneetha; Ivy, Michael T; Myles, Elbert L; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup

    2016-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is known to play a critical role in the development of cancer. Recent evidence suggests that high salt in the tissue microenvironment induces chronic inflammatory milieu. In this report, using three breast cancer-related cell lines, we determined the molecular basis of the potential synergistic inflammatory effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) with interleukin-17 (IL-17). Combined treatment of high NaCl (0.15M) with sub-effective IL-17 (0.1 nM) induced enhanced growth in breast cancer cells along with activation of reactive nitrogen and oxygen (RNS/ROS) species known to promote cancer. Similar effect was not observed with equi-molar mannitol. This enhanced of ROS/RNS activity correlates with upregulation of γENaC an inflammatory sodium channel. The similar culture conditions have also induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNFα etc. Taken together, these data suggest that high NaCl in the cellular microenvironment induces a γENaC mediated chronic inflammatory response with a potential pro-carcinogenic effect.

  3. Activation of the epithelial Na+ channel in the collecting duct by vasopressin contributes to water reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, Vladislav; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Stockand, James D

    2009-11-01

    We used patch-clamp electrophysiology on isolated, split-open murine collecting ducts (CD) to test the hypothesis that regulation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity is a physiologically important effect of vasopressin. Surprisingly, this has not been tested directly before. We ask whether vasopressin affects ENaC activity distinguishing between acute and chronic effects, as well as, parsing the cellular signaling pathway and molecular mechanism of regulation. In addition, we quantified possible synergistic regulation of ENaC by vasopressin and aldosterone associating this with a requirement for distal nephron Na+ reabsorption during water conservation vs. maintenance of Na+ balance. We find that vasopressin significantly increases ENaC activity within 2-3 min by increasing open probability (P(o)). This activation was dependent on adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA. Water restriction (18-24 h) and pretreatment of isolated CD with vasopressin (approximately 30 min) resulted in a similar increase in P(o). In addition, this also increased the number (N) of active ENaC in the apical membrane. Similar to P(o), increases in N were sensitive to inhibitors of AC. Stressing animals with water and salt restriction separately and jointly revealed an important effect of vasopressin: conservation of water and Na+ each independently increased ENaC activity and jointly had a synergistic effect on channel activity. These results demonstrate a quantitatively important action of vasopressin on ENaC suggesting that distal nephron Na+ reabsorption mediated by this channel contributes to maintenance of water reabsorption. In addition, our results support that the combined actions of vasopressin and aldosterone are required to achieve maximally activated ENaC.

  4. Conservation of Ca2+/Calmodulin Regulation across Na and Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Yang, Philemon S.; Niu, Jacqueline; Yang, Wanjun; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, David T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+channels comprise distinct ion-channel superfamilies, yet the carboxy tails of these channels exhibit high homology hinting at a long-shared and purposeful module. For different Ca2+ channels, carboxyl-tail inter actions with calmodulin do elaborate robust and similar forms of Ca2+ regulation. However, Na channels have only shown subtler Ca2+modulation that differs among reports, challenging attempts at unified understanding. Here, by rapid Ca2+photoreleaseon to Na channels, we reset this view of Na channel regulation. For cardiac muscle channels (NaV1.5), reported effects from which most mechanistic proposals derive, we observe no Ca2+modulation. Conversely, for skeletal-muscle channels (NaV1.4), we uncover fast Ca2+ regulation eerily similar to that of Ca2+ channels. Channel opathic myotonia mutations halve NaV1.4 Ca2+ regulation, and transplanting the NaV1.4 carboxy tail onto Ca2+ channels recapitulates Ca2+ regulation. Thus we argue for the persistence and physiological relevance of an ancient Ca2+ regulatory module across Na and Ca2+ channels. PMID:24949975

  5. Sodium Sulfur Battery Cell Experiment (NaSBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, J. Christopher

    1997-01-01

    The Ford Motor Company published papers describing new types of secondary battery comprised of: solid, sodium ion conducting electrolyte; liquid metal electrode; redox electrode; operating temperature between 300 and 400 deg. C; specific energy of 150 Wh/kg; and a nominal voltage of 2.0 V.

  6. Molecular Basis of Paralytic Neurotoxin Action on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-20

    channels in intact membranes (Messner et al, 1986; Tejedor & Catterall, 1988). The a subunits of the sodium channels in these reconstimtpd vesicles...1986; Tejedor & Catterall, 1988). In preliminary experiments, proteases were screened to find experimental conditions under which the a subunit could...1688, Tejctor, FJ. and Catterall, W.A. (1988) Biochemistry, in press, Tejedor , F.J. and Catterall, W.A. (1988) Proc. Nail, Acad. Sci. USA, in press

  7. Fragile X mental retardation protein controls gating of the sodium-activated potassium channel Slack

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Maile R.; Kronengold, Jack; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Chen, Yi; Strumbos, John G.; Sigworth, Fred J.; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2010-01-01

    In humans, absence of Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein, results in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. Here we report through biochemical and electrophysiological studies that FMRP binds the C-terminus of the Slack sodium-activated potassium channel to activate the channel. The findings suggest that Slack activity may provide a link between patterns of neuronal firing and changes in protein translation. PMID:20512134

  8. Mechanisms of cation permeation in cardiac sodium channel: description by dynamic pore model.

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Y; Sato, R; Hisatome, I; Imanishi, S

    1999-01-01

    The selective permeability to monovalent metal cations, as well as the relationship between cation permeation and gating kinetics, was investigated for native tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na-channels in guinea pig ventricular myocytes using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. By the measurement of inward unidirectional currents and biionic reversal potentials, we demonstrate that the cardiac Na-channel is substantially permeable to all of the group Ia and IIIa cations tested, with the selectivity sequence Na(+) >/= Li(+) > Tl(+) > K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+). Current kinetics was little affected by the permeant cation species and concentrations tested (Na-channel. The permeability ratios determined from biionic reversal potentials were concentration and orientation dependent: the selectivity to Na(+) increased with increasing internal [K(+)] or external [Tl(+)]. The dynamic pore model describing the conformational transition of the Na-channel pore between different selectivity states could account for all the experimental data, whereas conventional static pore models failed to fit the concentration-dependent permeability ratio data. We conclude that the dynamic pore mechanism, independent of the gating machinery, may play an important physiological role in regulating the selective permeability of native Na-channels. PMID:10512810

  9. Towards a unified theory of calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+ channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca2+ and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms. PMID:25966688

  10. Towards a Unified Theory of Calmodulin Regulation (Calmodulation) of Voltage-Gated Calcium and Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Dick, Ivy E; Sang, Lingjie; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Kang, Po Wei; Niu, Jacqueline; Banerjee, Rahul; Yang, Wanjun; Babich, Jennifer S; Issa, John B; Lee, Shin Rong; Namkung, Ho; Li, Jiangyu; Zhang, Manning; Yang, Philemon S; Bazzazi, Hojjat; Adams, Paul J; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, Daniel N; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca(2+) channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca(2+) and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms.

  11. Local anesthetic and antiepileptic drug access and binding to a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; French, Robert J; French, Christopher; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Allen, Toby W

    2014-09-09

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are important targets in the treatment of a range of pathologies. Bacterial channels, for which crystal structures have been solved, exhibit modulation by local anesthetic and anti-epileptic agents, allowing molecular-level investigations into sodium channel-drug interactions. These structures reveal no basis for the "hinged lid"-based fast inactivation, seen in eukaryotic Nav channels. Thus, they enable examination of potential mechanisms of use- or state-dependent drug action based on activation gating, or slower pore-based inactivation processes. Multimicrosecond simulations of NavAb reveal high-affinity binding of benzocaine to F203 that is a surrogate for FS6, conserved in helix S6 of Domain IV of mammalian sodium channels, as well as low-affinity sites suggested to stabilize different states of the channel. Phenytoin exhibits a different binding distribution owing to preferential interactions at the membrane and water-protein interfaces. Two drug-access pathways into the pore are observed: via lateral fenestrations connecting to the membrane lipid phase, as well as via an aqueous pathway through the intracellular activation gate, despite being closed. These observations provide insight into drug modulation that will guide further developments of Nav inhibitors.

  12. Expression pattern of neuronal and skeletal muscle voltage-gated Na+ channels in the developing mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Haufe, Volker; Camacho, Juan A; Dumaine, Robert; Günther, Bernd; Bollensdorff, Christian; von Banchet, Gisela Segond; Benndorf, Klaus; Zimmer, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In the mammalian heart, a variety of voltage-gated Na+ channel transcripts and proteins have been detected. However, little quantitative information is available on the abundance of each transcript during development, or the contribution of TTX-sensitive Na+ channels to the cardiac sodium current (INa). Using competitive and real-time RT-PCR we investigated the transcription of six Na+ channels (Nav1.1–Nav1.6) and the β1 subunit during mouse heart development. Nav1.5 was predominantly expressed in the adult heart, whereas the splice variant Nav1.5a was the major Na+ channel isoform in embryonic hearts. The TTX-resistant Na+ channel transcripts (Nav1.5 and Nav1.5a) increased 1.7-fold during postnatal development. Transcripts encoding TTX-sensitive Na+ channels (Nav1.1–Nav1.4) and the β1 subunit gradually increased up to fourfold from postnatal day (P)1 to P126, while the Nav1.6 transcript level remained low and constant over the same period. In adults, TTX-sensitive channel mRNA accounted for 30–40% of the channel pool in whole-heart preparations (Nav1.3 > Nav1.4 > Nav1.2 ≫ Nav1.1 ∼ Nav1.6), and 16% in mRNA from isolated cardiomyocytes (Nav1.4 > Nav1.3 > Nav1.2 > Nav1.1 > Nav1.6). Confocal immunofluorescence on ventricular myocytes suggested that Nav1.1 and Nav1.2 were localized at the intercalated disks and in the t tubules. Nav1.3 labelling predominantly produced a diffuse but strong intracellular signal. Nav1.6 fluorescence was detected only along the Z lines. Electrophysiological recordings showed that TTX-sensitive and TTX-resistant Na+ channels, respectively, accounted for 8% and 92% of the INa in adult ventricular cardiomyocytes. Our data suggest that neuronal and skeletal muscle Na+ channels contribute to the action potential of cardiomyocytes in the adult mammalian heart. PMID:15746173

  13. A monoclonal antibody that targets a NaV1.7 channel voltage sensor for pain and itch relief

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Park, Chul-Kyu; Chen, Gang; Han, Qingjian; Xie, Rou-Gang; Liu, Tong; Ji, Ru-Rong; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Summary Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels control the upstroke of the action potentials in excitable cells. Multiple studies have shown distinct roles of NaV channel subtypes in human physiology and diseases, but subtype-specific therapeutics are lacking and the current efforts have been limited to small molecules. Here we present a monoclonal antibody that targets the voltage-sensor paddle of NaV1.7, the subtype critical for pain sensation. This antibody not only inhibits NaV1.7 with high selectivity but also effectively suppresses inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice. Interestingly, the antibody inhibits acute and chronic itch, despite well-documented differences in pain and itch modulation. Using this antibody, we discovered that NaV1.7 plays a key role in spinal cord nociceptive and pruriceptive synaptic transmission. Our studies reveal that NaV1.7 is a target for itch management and the antibody has therapeutic potential for suppressing pain and itch. Our antibody strategy may have broad applications for voltage-gated cation channels. PMID:24856969

  14. A monoclonal antibody that targets a NaV1.7 channel voltage sensor for pain and itch relief.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Park, Chul-Kyu; Chen, Gang; Han, Qingjian; Xie, Rou-Gang; Liu, Tong; Ji, Ru-Rong; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2014-06-05

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels control the upstroke of the action potentials in excitable cells. Multiple studies have shown distinct roles of NaV channel subtypes in human physiology and diseases, but subtype-specific therapeutics are lacking and the current efforts have been limited to small molecules. Here, we present a monoclonal antibody that targets the voltage-sensor paddle of NaV1.7, the subtype critical for pain sensation. This antibody not only inhibits NaV1.7 with high selectivity, but also effectively suppresses inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice. Interestingly, the antibody inhibits acute and chronic itch despite well-documented differences in pain and itch modulation. Using this antibody, we discovered that NaV1.7 plays a key role in spinal cord nociceptive and pruriceptive synaptic transmission. Our studies reveal that NaV1.7 is a target for itch management, and the antibody has therapeutic potential for suppressing pain and itch. Our antibody strategy may have broad applications for voltage-gated cation channels.

  15. Classification of Na channel receptors specific for various scorpion toxins.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, K P; Watt, D D; Lazdunski, M

    1983-04-01

    1. The specific binding to rat brain synaptosomes of a radiolabelled derivative of toxin II from the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus could be prevented by toxins III and IV, but not by toxin V or variants 1-3, from the venom of Centruroides sculpturatus. 2. The specific binding of a similar derivative of toxin II from Androctonus australis Hector was not affected by any of the toxins from Centruroides sculpturatus. 3. There is biochemical evidence for only two distinct classes of Na channel receptors specific for known scorpion toxins.

  16. Tissue kallikrein activation of the epithelial Na channel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankit B.; Chao, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial Na Channels (ENaC) are responsible for the apical entry of Na+ in a number of different epithelia including the renal connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct. Proteolytic cleavage of γ-ENaC by serine proteases, including trypsin, furin, elastase, and prostasin, has been shown to increase channel activity. Here, we investigate the ability of another serine protease, tissue kallikrein, to regulate ENaC. We show that excretion of tissue kallikrein, which is secreted into the lumen of the connecting tubule, is stimulated following 5 days of a high-K+ or low-Na+ diet in rats. Urinary proteins reconstituted in a low-Na buffer activated amiloride-sensitive currents (INa) in ENaC-expressing oocytes, suggesting an endogenous urinary protease can activate ENaC. We next tested whether tissue kallikrein can directly cleave and activate ENaC. When rat ENaC-expressing oocytes were exposed to purified tissue kallikrein from rat urine (RTK), ENaC currents increased threefold in both the presence and absence of a soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). RTK and trypsin both decreased the apparent molecular mass of cleaved cell-surface γ-ENaC, while immunodepleted RTK produced no shift in apparent molecular mass, demonstrating the specificity of the tissue kallikrein. A decreased effect of RTK on Xenopus ENaC, which has variations in the putative prostasin cleavage sites in γ-ENaC, suggests these sites are important in RTK activation of ENaC. Mutating the prostasin site in mouse γ-ENaC (γRKRK186QQQQ) abolished ENaC activation and cleavage by RTK while wild-type mouse ENaC was activated and cleaved similar to that of the rat. We conclude that tissue kallikrein can be a physiologically relevant regulator of ENaC activity. PMID:22622459

  17. Sodium channel subconductance levels measured with a new variance-mean analysis

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The currents through single Na+ channels were recorded from dissociated cells of the flexor digitorum brevis muscle of the mouse. At 15 degrees C the prolonged bursts of Na+ channel openings produced by application of the drug DPI 201-106 had brief sojourns to subconductance levels. The subconductance events were relatively rare and brief, but could be identified using a new technique that sorts amplitude estimates based on their variance. The resulting "levels histogram" had a resolution of the conductance levels during channel activity that was superior to that of standard amplitude histograms. Cooling the preparation to 0 degrees C prolonged the subconductance events, and permitted further quantitative analysis of their amplitudes, as well as clear observations of single-channel subconductance events from untreated Na+ channels. In all cases the results were similar: a subconductance level, with an amplitude of roughly 35% of the fully open conductance and similar reversal potential, was present in both drug-treated and normal Na+ channels. Drug-treated channels spent approximately 3-6% of their total open time in the subconductance state over a range of potentials that caused the open probability to vary between 0.1 and 0.9. The summed levels histograms from many channels had a distinctive form, with broader, asymmetrical open and substate distributions compared with those of the closed state. Individual subconductance events to levels other than the most common 35% were also observed. I conclude that subconductance events are a normal subset of the open state of Na+ channels, whether or not they are drug treated. The subconductance events may represent a conformational alteration of the channel that occurs when it conducts ions. PMID:2849627

  18. Cell-free expression of a functional pore-only sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Kovácsová, Gabriela; Gustavsson, Emil; Wang, Jiajun; Kreir, Mohamed; Peuker, Sebastian; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels participate in the propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. Eukaryotic Navs are pseudo homotetrameric polypeptides, comprising four repeats of six transmembrane segments (S1-S6). The first four segments form the voltage-sensing domain and S5 and S6 create the pore domain with the selectivity filter. Prokaryotic Navs resemble these characteristics, but are truly tetrameric. They can typically be efficiently synthesized in bacteria, but production in vitro with cell-free synthesis has not been demonstrated. Here we report the cell-free expression and purification of a prokaryotic tetrameric pore-only sodium channel. We produced milligram quantities of the functional channel protein as characterized by size-exclusion chromatography, infrared spectroscopy and electrophysiological recordings. Cell-free expression enables advanced site-directed labelling, post-translational modifications, and special solubilization schemes. This enables next-generation biophysical experiments to study the principle of sodium ion selectivity and transport in sodium channels.

  19. Inheritance of pyrethroid resistance and a sodium channel gene mutation in the cattle tick Boophilus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) producing a substitution (Phe'Ile), within the S6 transmembrane segment at domain III within the sodium channel gene sequence, has been associated with pyrethroid resistance in the cattle tick Boophilus microplus. The aim of the present study was to analyze the...

  20. Anticonvulsive action of (+/-)-kavain estimated from its properties on stimulated synaptosomes and Na+ channel receptor sites.

    PubMed

    Gleitz, J; Friese, J; Beile, A; Ameri, A; Peters, T

    1996-11-07

    Kava pyrones are constituents of the intoxicating pepper (Piper methysticum Forst), which has been shown to be anticonvulsive. The question of how the excitability of neurons is affected was investigated by determining the interaction of (+/-)-kavain with epitopes (site 1, site 2) of voltage-dependent Na+ channels and the action of (+/-)-kavain on 4-aminopyridine-stimulated synaptosomes as model of repetitive firing neurons. [3H]Saxitoxin and [3H]batrachotoxin were used for radioligand-binding assays performed with synaptosomal membranes. Gultamate released from 4-aminopyridine-stimulated cerebrocortical synaptosomes and the cytosolic concentrations of Na+ and Ca2+ ([Na+]i, [Ca+]i) were detected fluorometrically by using an enzyme-linked assay, sodium-binding benzofuranisophthalate (SBFI) and Fura-2, respectively. (+/-)-Kavain failed to compete with [3H]saxitoxin up to 400 mumol/l but dose-dependently suppressed binding of [3H]batrachotoxin with an IC50 value of 88 mumol/l (Ki = 72 mumol/l) although displacement of [3H]batrachotoxin was restricted to 33% of control at 400 mumol/l (+/-)-kavain. In stimulated synaptosomes, 5 mmol/l 4-aminopyridine provoked an increase in [Na+]i and [Ca2+]i by 9 mmol/l Na+ and 235 nmol/l Ca2+. Comparable to the reduction in [3H]batrachotoxin binding, 400 mumol/l (+/-)-kavain suppressed the increase in [Na+]i and [Ca2+]i to 38 and 29% of control, respectively. Consistent with the increase in [Na+]i and [Ca2+]i, 5 mmol/l 4-aminopyridine provoked glutamate release (rate: 38 pmol/s*mg protein) which was dose-dependently diminished to 60% of control by 400 mumol/l (+/-)-kavain. KCl depolarization (40 mmol/l) provoked an increase in [Ca2+]i and glutamate release almost identical to the responses elicited by 4-aminopyridine but 400 mumol/l (+/-)-kavain suppressed only the rate of glutamate release by 9% of control. The data suggest an interaction of (+/-)-kavain with voltage-dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels, thereby suppressing the 4

  1. Three Peptide Modulators of the Human Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel 1.7, an Important Analgesic Target, from the Venom of an Australian Tarantula.

    PubMed

    Chow, Chun Yuen; Cristofori-Armstrong, Ben; Undheim, Eivind A B; King, Glenn F; Rash, Lachlan D

    2015-06-30

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are responsible for propagating action potentials in excitable cells. NaV1.7 plays a crucial role in the human pain signalling pathway and it is an important therapeutic target for treatment of chronic pain. Numerous spider venom peptides have been shown to modulate the activity of NaV channels and these peptides represent a rich source of research tools and therapeutic lead molecules. The aim of this study was to determine the diversity of NaV1.7-active peptides in the venom of an Australian Phlogius sp. tarantula and to characterise their potency and subtype selectivity. We isolated three novel peptides, μ-TRTX-Phlo1a, -Phlo1b and -Phlo2a, that inhibit human NaV1.7 (hNaV1.7). Phlo1a and Phlo1b are 35-residue peptides that differ by one amino acid and belong in NaSpTx family 2. The partial sequence of Phlo2a revealed extensive similarity with ProTx-II from NaSpTx family 3. Phlo1a and Phlo1b inhibit hNaV1.7 with IC50 values of 459 and 360 nM, respectively, with only minor inhibitory activity on rat NaV1.2 and hNaV1.5. Although similarly potent at hNaV1.7 (IC50 333 nM), Phlo2a was less selective, as it also potently inhibited rNaV1.2 and hNaV1.5. All three peptides cause a depolarising shift in the voltage-dependence of hNaV1.7 activation.

  2. Voltage-gated sodium channels contribute to action potentials and spontaneous contractility in isolated human lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Telinius, Niklas; Majgaard, Jens; Kim, Sukhan; Katballe, Niels; Pahle, Einar; Nielsen, Jørn; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Donna Briggs

    2015-07-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) play a key role for initiating action potentials (AP) in excitable cells. VGSC in human lymphatic vessels have not been investigated. In the present study, we report the electrical activity and APs of small human lymphatic collecting vessels, as well as mRNA expression and function of VGSC in small and large human lymphatic vessels. The VGSC blocker TTX inhibited spontaneous contractions in six of 10 spontaneously active vessels, whereas ranolazine, which has a narrower VGSC blocking profile, had no influence on spontaneous activity. TTX did not affect noradrenaline-induced contractions. The VGSC opener veratridine induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner (0.1-30 μm) eliciting a stable tonic contraction and membrane depolarization to -18 ± 0.6 mV. Veratridine-induced depolarizations and contractions were reversed ∼80% by TTX, and were dependent on Ca(2+) influx via L-type calcium channels and the sodium-calcium exchanger in reverse mode. Molecular analysis determined NaV 1.3 to be the predominantly expressed VGSC isoform. Electrophysiology of mesenteric lymphatics determined the resting membrane potential to be -45 ± 1.7 mV. Spontaneous APs were preceded by a slow depolarization of 5.3 ± 0.6 mV after which a spike was elicited that almost completely repolarized before immediately depolarizing again to plateau. Vessels transiently hyperpolarized prior to returning to the resting membrane potential. TTX application blocked APs. We have shown that VGSC are necessary for initiating and maintaining APs and spontaneous contractions in human lymphatic vessels and our data suggest the main contribution from comes NaV 1.3. We have also shown that activation of these channels augments the contractile activity of the vessels.

  3. Immunocytochemical localization of amiloride-sensitive sodium channels in the lower intestine of the hen.

    PubMed

    Smith, P R; Bradford, A L; Dantzer, V; Benos, D J; Skadhauge, E

    1993-04-01

    We have used polyclonal antibodies generated against purified bovine renal amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels to localize amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels within the lower intestine (colon and coprodeum) of the hen. These antibodies cross-reacted with two polypeptides exhibiting M(r)'s of 235 and 150 kDa on immunoblots of detergent-solubilized apical membrane fractions from both the colon and coprodeum. The apparent molecular masses of theses polypeptides are in agreement with the M(r)'s of 2 of the subunits of the renal high amiloride-affinity Na+ channel, namely the alpha and the beta (= amiloride binding) subunits. The cellular distribution of Na+ channels was determined by immunoperoxidase and indirect immunofluorescence cytochemical techniques. The apical (luminal) membrane and cytoplasm of villar principal cells in both colon and coprodeum exhibited immunoreactivity, whereas goblet cells were negative. Both principal and goblet cells of the crypts were also negative. We conclude that the amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels are localized to the principal cells of the intestinal villi and that these cells are responsible for intestinal Na+ absorption.

  4. Benchmarking the stability of human detergent-solubilised voltage-gated sodium channels for structural studies using eel as a reference.

    PubMed

    Slowik, Daria; Henderson, Richard

    2015-07-01

    With the ultimate goal of detailed structural analysis of mammalian and particularly human voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), we have investigated the relative stability of human and rat VGSCs and compared them with electric eel VGSC. We found that NaV1.3 from rat was the most stable after detergent solubilisation. The order of stability was rNaV1.3>hNaV1.2>hNaV1.1>hNaV1.6>hNaV1.3>hNaV1.4. However, a comparison with the VGSC from Electrophorus electricus, which is most similar to NaV1.4, shows that the eel VGSC is considerably more stable in detergent than the human VGSCs examined. We conclude that current methods of structural analysis, such as single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM), may be most usefully targeted to eel VGSC or rNaV1.3, but that structural analysis on the full spectrum of VGSCs, by methods that require greater stability such as crystallisation and X-ray crystallography, will require further stabilisation of the channel.

  5. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive α-subunits of voltage-gated sodium channels are relevant for inhibition of cardiac sodium currents by local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Stoetzer, C; Doll, T; Stueber, T; Herzog, C; Echtermeyer, F; Greulich, F; Rudat, C; Kispert, A; Wegner, F; Leffler, A

    2016-06-01

    The sodium channel α-subunit (Nav) Nav1.5 is regarded as the most prevalent cardiac sodium channel required for generation of action potentials in cardiomyocytes. Accordingly, Nav1.5 seems to be the main target molecule for local anesthetic (LA)-induced cardiotoxicity. However, recent reports demonstrated functional expression of several "neuronal" Nav's in cardiomyocytes being involved in cardiac contractility and rhythmogenesis. In this study, we examined the relevance of neuronal tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Nav's for inhibition of cardiac sodium channels by the cardiotoxic LAs ropivacaine and bupivacaine. Effects of LAs on recombinant Nav1.2, 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5 expressed in human embryonic kidney cell line 293 (HEK-293) cells, and on sodium currents in murine, cardiomyocytes were investigated by whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Expression analyses were performed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Cultured cardiomyocytes from neonatal mice express messenger RNA (mRNA) for Nav1.2, 1.3, 1.5, 1.8, and 1.9 and generate TTX-sensitive sodium currents. Tonic and use-dependent block of sodium currents in cardiomyocytes by ropivacaine and bupivacaine were enhanced by 200 nM TTX. Inhibition of recombinant Nav1.5 channels was similar to that of TTX-resistant currents in cardiomyocytes but stronger as compared to inhibition of total sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Recombinant Nav1.2, 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5 channels displayed significant differences in regard to use-dependent block by ropivacaine. Finally, bupivacaine blocked sodium currents in cardiomyocytes as well as recombinant Nav1.5 currents significantly stronger in comparison to ropivacaine. Our data demonstrate for the first time that cardiac TTX-sensitive sodium channels are relevant for inhibition of cardiac sodium currents by LAs.

  6. Transcainide causes two modes of open-channel block with different voltage sensitivities in batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, G W; French, R J

    1994-01-01

    Transcainide, a complex derivative of lidocaine, blocks the open state of BTX-activated sodium channels from bovine heart and rat skeletal muscle in two distinct ways. When applied to either side of the membrane, transcainide caused discrete blocking events a few hundred milliseconds in duration (slow block), and a concomitant reduction in apparent single-channel amplitude, presumably because of rapid block beyond the temporal resolution of our recordings (fast block). We quantitatively analyzed block from the cytoplasmic side. Both modes of block occurred via binding of the drug to the open channel, approximately followed 1:1 stoichiometry, and were similar for both channel subtypes. For slow block, the blocking rate increased, and the unblocking rate decreased with depolarization, yielding an overall enhancement of block at positive potentials, and suggesting a blocking site at an apparent electrical distance about 45% of the way from the cytoplasmic end of the channel (z delta approximately 0.45). In contrast, the fast blocking mode was only slightly enhanced by depolarization (z delta approximately 0.15). Phenomenologically, the bulky and complex transcainide molecule combines the almost voltage-insensitive blocking action of phenylhydrazine (Zamponi and French, 1994a (companion paper)) with a slow open-channel blocking action that shows a voltage dependence typical of simpler amines. Only the slower blocking mode was sensitive to the removal of external sodium ions, suggesting that the two types of block occur at distinct sites. Dose-response relations were also consistent with independent binding of transcainide to two separate sites on the channel. PMID:7811913

  7. Effect of chaotropic anions on the sodium transport by the Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Ayuyan, Artem G; Sokolov, Valerij S; Lenz, Alexander A; Apell, Hans-Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    The effect of choline iodide, bromide and chloride on the kinetics of the electrogenic sodium transport by the Na,K-ATPase was investigated in a model system of ATPase-containing membrane fragments adsorbed on the lipid bilayer membrane. The kinetic parameters of Na(+) transport were determined from short circuit currents after fast release of ATP from its caged precursor. The falling phase of the current transients could be fitted by a single exponential with the time constant, tau (2). Its temperature dependence allowed an estimation of the activation energy of the rate-limiting reaction step, the conformation transition E(1)/E(2). Choline iodide and bromide caused a decrease of the activation energy as well as the overall rate of the process expressed as the pre-exponential factor A of the Arrhenius equation. If choline iodide or bromide were present on the cytoplasmic and extracellular sides of the protein, the temperature dependent changes were more pronounced than when present on the cytoplasmic side only. These results can be explained by an effect of the anions on water structure on the extracellular surface of the protein, where a deep access channel connects the ion-binding sites with the solution. Chloride ions also caused a deceleration of the electrogenic transport, however, in contrast to iodide or bromide, they did not affect the activation energy, and were more effective when added on the cytoplasmic side. This effect can be explained by asymmetric screening of the negative surface charges which leads to a transmembrane electric potential that modifies the ion transfer.

  8. Axons provide the secretory machinery for trafficking of voltage-gated sodium channels in peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    González, Carolina; Cánovas, José; Fresno, Javiera; Couve, Eduardo; Court, Felipe A.; Couve, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of the axonal proteome is key to generate and maintain neural function. Fast and slow axoplasmic waves have been known for decades, but alternative mechanisms to control the abundance of axonal proteins based on local synthesis have also been identified. The presence of the endoplasmic reticulum has been documented in peripheral axons, but it is still unknown whether this localized organelle participates in the delivery of axonal membrane proteins. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for action potentials and are mostly concentrated in the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Despite their fundamental role, little is known about the intracellular trafficking mechanisms that govern their availability in mature axons. Here we describe the secretory machinery in axons and its contribution to plasma membrane delivery of sodium channels. The distribution of axonal secretory components was evaluated in axons of the sciatic nerve and in spinal nerve axons after in vivo electroporation. Intracellular protein trafficking was pharmacologically blocked in vivo and in vitro. Axonal voltage-gated sodium channel mRNA and local trafficking were examined by RT-PCR and a retention-release methodology. We demonstrate that mature axons contain components of the endoplasmic reticulum and other biosynthetic organelles. Axonal organelles and sodium channel localization are sensitive to local blockade of the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. More importantly, secretory organelles are capable of delivering sodium channels to the plasma membrane in isolated axons, demonstrating an intrinsic capacity of the axonal biosynthetic route in regulating the axonal proteome in mammalian axons. PMID:26839409

  9. Astrocytes within multiple sclerosis lesions upregulate sodium channel Nav1.5.

    PubMed

    Black, Joel A; Newcombe, Jia; Waxman, Stephen G

    2010-03-01

    Astrocytes are prominent participants in the response of the central nervous system to injury, including neuroinflammatory insults. Rodent astrocytes in vitro have been shown to express voltage-gated sodium channels in a dynamic manner, with a switch in expression of tetrodotoxin-sensitive to tetrodotoxin-resistant channels in reactive astrocytes. However, the expression of sodium channels in human astrocytes has not been studied, and it is not known whether there are changes in the expression of sodium channels in reactive astrocytes of the human central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate a focal and robust upregulation of sodium channel Nav1.5 in reactive astrocytes at the borders of, and within, active and chronic multiple sclerosis lesions. Nav1.5 was only detectable at very low levels in astrocytes within multiple sclerosis macroscopically normal-appearing white matter or in normal control brain. Nav1.1, Nav1.2, Nav1.3 and Nav1.6 showed little or no expression in astrocytes within normal control tissue and limited upregulation in active multiple sclerosis lesions. Nav1.5 was also expressed at high levels in astrocytes in tissue surrounding new and old cerebrovascular accidents and brain tumours. These results demonstrate the expression of Nav1.5 in human astrocytes and show that Nav1.5 expression is dynamic in these cells. Our observations suggest that the upregulated expression of Nav1.5 in astrocytes may provide a compensatory mechanism, which supports sodium/potassium pump-dependent ionic homoeostasis in areas of central nervous system injury.

  10. Differentiated pattern of sodium channel expression in dissociated Purkinje neurons maintained in long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Fry, Mark; Boegle, Aimee K; Maue, Robert A

    2007-05-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje neurons in vivo exhibit high frequency and multi-spike action potentials with transient (INaT), resurgent (INaR) and persistent (INaP) Na+ currents arising from voltage-gated Na+ channels, which play important roles in shaping the action potentials and electrical activity of these cells. However, little is known about Na+ channel expression in cultured Purkinje neurons despite the use of in vitro approaches to study these cells. Therefore, GFP-expressing Purkinje neurons isolated from transgenic mice were analysed after four weeks in culture, when, coincident with distinct axonal and dendritic morphologies, cultured Purkinje neurons exhibited dendrite-specific MAP2 expression characteristic of polarized neurons. In cell-attached patch clamp recordings, Na+ currents occurred at significantly higher frequencies and amplitudes in patches from the soma and axon than from dendrites, similar to the polarized distribution observed in vivo. INaT, INaR and INaP Na+ currents with properties similar to those observed in acutely isolated Purkinje neurons were detected in nucleated outside-out patches from cultured Purkinje cells. RT-PCR analysis detected Nav1.1, Nav1.2 and Nav1.6, but not Nav1.3, Nav1.4, Nav 1.5 or Nav1.8 Na+ channel alpha subunit gene expression in cultured Purkinje neurons, as observed in vivo. Together, the results indicate that key aspects of Na+ channel expression in mature Purkinje neurons in vivo occur in vitro.

  11. Voltage-dependent block by saxitoxin of sodium channels incorporated into planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    French, R J; Worley, J F; Krueger, B K

    1984-01-01

    We have previously studied single, voltage-dependent, saxitoxin-(STX) blockable sodium channels from rat brain in planar lipid bilayers, and found that channel block by STX was voltage-dependent. Here we describe the effect of voltage on the degree of block and on the kinetics of the blocking reaction. From their voltage dependence and kinetics, it was possible to distinguish single-channel current fluctuations due to blocking and unblocking of the channels by STX from those caused by intrinsic channel gating. The use of batrachotoxin (BTX) to inhibit sodium-channel inactivation allowed recordings of stationary fluctuations over extended periods of time. In a range of membrane potentials where the channels were open greater than 98% of the time, STX block was voltage-dependent, provided sufficient time was allowed to reach a steady state. Hyperpolarizing potentials favored block. Both association (blocking) and dissociation (unblocking) rate constants were voltage-dependent. The equilibrium dissociation constants computed from the association and dissociation rate constants for STX block were about the same as those determined from the steady-state fractional reduction in current. The steepness of the voltage dependence was consistent with the divalent toxin sensing 30-40% of the transmembrane potential. PMID:6324910

  12. Structural manipulation approaches towards enhanced sodium ionic conductivity in Na-rich antiperovskites

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Qingfei; Liu, Zhenpu; ...

    2015-06-10

    High-performance solid electrolytes are critical for realizing all-solid-state batteries with enhance safety and cycling efficiency. However, currently available candidates (sulfides and the NASICON-typ ceramics) still suffer from drawbacks such as inflammability, high-cost and unfavorable machinability Here we present the structural manipulation approaches to improve the sodium ionic conductivity in series of affordable Na-rich antiperovskites. Experimentally, the whole solid solutions of Na3OX (X ¼ Cl Br, I) are synthesized via a facile and timesaving route from the cheapest raw materials (Na, NaOH an NaX). The materials are nonflammable, suitable for thermoplastic processing due to low melting temperature (<300° C) without decomposing.more » Notably, owing to the flexibility of perovskite-type structure it's feasible to control the local structure features by means of size-mismatch substitution an unequivalent-doping for a favorable sodium ionic diffusion pathway. Enhancement of sodium ioni conductivity by 2 magnitudes is demonstrated by these chemical tuning methods. The optimized sodiu ionic conductivity in Na2.9Sr0.05OBr0.6I0.4 bulk samples reaches 1.9 10- 3 S/cm at 200° C and even highe at elevated temperature. Here, we believe further chemical tuning efforts on Na-rich antiperovskites wil promote their performance greatly for practical all-solid state battery applications.« less

  13. Structural manipulation approaches towards enhanced sodium ionic conductivity in Na-rich antiperovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Qingfei; Liu, Zhenpu; Zhou, Zhengyang; Li, Shuai; Zhu, Jinlong; Zou, Ruqiang; Wang, Yingxia; Lin, Jianhua; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-06-10

    High-performance solid electrolytes are critical for realizing all-solid-state batteries with enhance safety and cycling efficiency. However, currently available candidates (sulfides and the NASICON-typ ceramics) still suffer from drawbacks such as inflammability, high-cost and unfavorable machinability Here we present the structural manipulation approaches to improve the sodium ionic conductivity in series of affordable Na-rich antiperovskites. Experimentally, the whole solid solutions of Na3OX (X ¼ Cl Br, I) are synthesized via a facile and timesaving route from the cheapest raw materials (Na, NaOH an NaX). The materials are nonflammable, suitable for thermoplastic processing due to low melting temperature (<300° C) without decomposing. Notably, owing to the flexibility of perovskite-type structure it's feasible to control the local structure features by means of size-mismatch substitution an unequivalent-doping for a favorable sodium ionic diffusion pathway. Enhancement of sodium ioni conductivity by 2 magnitudes is demonstrated by these chemical tuning methods. The optimized sodiu ionic conductivity in Na2.9Sr0.05OBr0.6I0.4 bulk samples reaches 1.9 10- 3 S/cm at 200° C and even highe at elevated temperature. Here, we believe further chemical tuning efforts on Na-rich antiperovskites wil promote their performance greatly for practical all-solid state battery applications.

  14. Activation of the Endogenous Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System or Aldosterone Administration Increases Urinary Exosomal Sodium Channel Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ying; Wang, Xiaojing; Rose, Kristie L.; MacDonald, W. Hayes; Zhang, Bing; Schey, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary exosomes secreted by multiple cell types in the kidney may participate in intercellular signaling and provide an enriched source of kidney-specific proteins for biomarker discovery. Factors that alter the exosomal protein content remain unknown. To determine whether endogenous and exogenous hormones modify urinary exosomal protein content, we analyzed samples from 14 mildly hypertensive patients in a crossover study during a high-sodium (HS, 160 mmol/d) diet and low-sodium (LS, 20 mmol/d) diet to activate the endogenous renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We further analyzed selected exosomal protein content in a separate cohort of healthy persons receiving intravenous aldosterone (0.7 μg/kg per hour for 10 hours) versus vehicle infusion. The LS diet increased plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration, whereas aldosterone infusion increased only aldosterone concentration. Protein analysis of paired urine exosome samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry–based multidimensional protein identification technology detected 2775 unique proteins, of which 316 exhibited significantly altered abundance during LS diet. Sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and α- and γ-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunits from the discovery set were verified using targeted multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry quantified with isotope-labeled peptide standards. Dietary sodium restriction or acute aldosterone infusion similarly increased urine exosomal γENaC[112–122] peptide concentrations nearly 20-fold, which correlated with plasma aldosterone concentration and urinary Na/K ratio. Urine exosomal NCC and αENaC concentrations were relatively unchanged during these interventions. We conclude that urinary exosome content is altered by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation. Urinary measurement of exosomal γENaC[112–122] concentration may provide a useful biomarker of ENaC activation in future clinical studies. PMID:26113616

  15. Activation of the Endogenous Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System or Aldosterone Administration Increases Urinary Exosomal Sodium Channel Excretion.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ying; Wang, Xiaojing; Rose, Kristie L; MacDonald, W Hayes; Zhang, Bing; Schey, Kevin L; Luther, James M

    2016-02-01

    Urinary exosomes secreted by multiple cell types in the kidney may participate in intercellular signaling and provide an enriched source of kidney-specific proteins for biomarker discovery. Factors that alter the exosomal protein content remain unknown. To determine whether endogenous and exogenous hormones modify urinary exosomal protein content, we analyzed samples from 14 mildly hypertensive patients in a crossover study during a high-sodium (HS, 160 mmol/d) diet and low-sodium (LS, 20 mmol/d) diet to activate the endogenous renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We further analyzed selected exosomal protein content in a separate cohort of healthy persons receiving intravenous aldosterone (0.7 μg/kg per hour for 10 hours) versus vehicle infusion. The LS diet increased plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration, whereas aldosterone infusion increased only aldosterone concentration. Protein analysis of paired urine exosome samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based multidimensional protein identification technology detected 2775 unique proteins, of which 316 exhibited significantly altered abundance during LS diet. Sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and α- and γ-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunits from the discovery set were verified using targeted multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry quantified with isotope-labeled peptide standards. Dietary sodium restriction or acute aldosterone infusion similarly increased urine exosomal γENaC[112-122] peptide concentrations nearly 20-fold, which correlated with plasma aldosterone concentration and urinary Na/K ratio. Urine exosomal NCC and αENaC concentrations were relatively unchanged during these interventions. We conclude that urinary exosome content is altered by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation. Urinary measurement of exosomal γENaC[112-122] concentration may provide a useful biomarker of ENaC activation in future clinical studies.

  16. Sodium titanate nanotube/graphite, an electric energy storage device using Na+-based organic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liping; Qi, Li; Wang, Hongyu

    2013-11-01

    Sodium titanate nanotube (Na-TNT) sample has been prepared by a hydrothermal method using TiO2 and NaOH as starting materials and then calcined at 400 °C in air. X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption-desorption tests have been employed to characterize its crystal and pore structure. The Na-TNT can be used as the negative electrode for electric energy storage devices using Na+-based organic electrolytes. The charge storage mechanism at the Na-TNT negative electrode has been investigated by electrochemical tests (galvanostatic charge-discharge, cyclic voltammetry, etc.), ex-situ XRD and HRTEM measurements. The electric energy storage devices of Na-TNT/graphite have been constructed and the influence of graphite/Na-TNT mass ratio on their performance has been studied.

  17. How do voltage-gated sodium channels enhance migration and invasiveness in cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Besson, Pierre; Driffort, Virginie; Bon, Émeline; Gradek, Frédéric; Chevalier, Stéphan; Roger, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are abnormally expressed in tumors, often as neonatal isoforms, while they are not expressed, or only at a low level, in the matching normal tissue. The level of their expression and their activity is related to the aggressiveness of the disease and to the formation of metastases. A vast knowledge on the regulation of their expression and functioning has been accumulated in normal excitable cells. This helped understand their regulation in cancer cells. However, how voltage-gated sodium channels impose a pro-metastatic behavior to cancer cells is much less documented. This aspect will be addressed in the review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  18. Venom Peptides From Cone Snails: Pharmacological Probes for Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Green, B R; Olivera, B M

    2016-01-01

    The venoms of cone snails provide a rich source of neuroactive peptides (conotoxins). Several venom peptide families have been identified that are either agonists (ι- and δ-conotoxins) or antagonists (μ- and μO-conotoxins) of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Members of these conotoxin classes have been integral in identifying and characterizing specific neurotoxin binding sites on the channel. Furthermore, given the specificity of some of these peptides for one sodium channel subtype over another, conotoxins have also proven useful in exploring differences between VGSC subtypes. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge of the structure and function based on the results of conotoxin interactions with VGSCs and correlates the peptides with the phylogeny of the Conus species from which they were derived.

  19. δ ENaC: a novel divergent amiloride-inhibitable sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Run-Zhen; Chen, Zai-Xing; Shetty, Sreerama; Idell, Steven; Matalon, Sadis

    2012-01-01

    The fourth subunit of the epithelial sodium channel, termed delta subunit (δ ENaC), was cloned in human and monkey. Increasing evidence shows that this unique subunit and its splice variants exhibit biophysical and pharmacological properties that are divergent from those of α ENaC channels. The widespread distribution of epithelial sodium channels in both epithelial and nonepithelial tissues implies a range of physiological functions. The altered expression of SCNN1D is associated with numerous pathological conditions. Genetic studies link SCNN1D deficiency with rare genetic diseases with developmental and functional disorders in the brain, heart, and respiratory systems. Here, we review the progress of research on δ ENaC in genomics, biophysics, proteomics, physiology, pharmacology, and clinical medicine. PMID:22983350

  20. Kinetic effects of quaternary lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels: a gating current study

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of antiarrhythmic drugs with ion channels is often described within the context of the modulated receptor hypothesis, which explains the action of drugs by proposing that the binding site has a variable affinity for drugs, depending upon whether the channel is closed, open, or inactivated. Lack of direct evidence for altered gating of cardiac Na channels allowed for the suggestion of an alternative model for drug interaction with cardiac channels, which postulated a fixed affinity receptor with access limited by the conformation of the channel (guarded receptor hypothesis). We report measurement of the gating currents of Na channels in canine cardiac Purkinje cells in the absence and presence of QX-222, a quaternary derivative of lidocaine, applied intracellularly, and benzocaine, a neutral local anesthetic. These data demonstrate that the cardiac Na channel behaves as a modulated rather than a guarded receptor in that drug-bound channels gate with altered kinetics. In addition, the results suggest a new interpretation of the modulated receptor hypothesis whereby drug occupancy reduces the overall voltage- dependence of gating, preventing full movement of the voltage sensor. PMID:8169596

  1. [Amiloride sensitive sodium channels (ENaC) and their regulation by proteases].

    PubMed

    Galizia, Luciano; Ojea, Alejandro; Kotsias, Basilio A

    2011-01-01

    ENaC is a channel that mediates entry of Na+ from the luminal fluid into the cells in many reabsorbing epithelia and it is also expressed in human placenta. ENaC is crucial in the control of electrolyte and extracellular volume homeostasis. ENaC is regulated by several hormones, including aldosterone and blocked by amiloride and its analogs. ENaC channels are composed by three homologous subunits, α, β and γ that form the pore where Na ions are transported. Two factors regulate the activity of ENaC channels: 1) the number of channels inserted in the membrane and 2) the open probability of the channels or time that the channel is open. The number of channels is the result of a balance between the synthesis and degradation of ENaC channels. The open probability depends on the proteolysis of specific segments in the α and γ subunits of ENaC by multiple proteases inside of the cell or in the extracellular space. Among the most studied proteases are furin, prostasin, elastase, plasmin and trypsin. There are endogenous substances that block the activity of these proteases such as aprotinin, bikunin and nexin-1 and the expression of both, proteases and their inhibitors are controlled by the rate of Na+ movement, aldosterone and TFG-β levels. In this work we present some examples of this regulation and the potential role that this process may play under normal and pathological conditions such as cystic fibrosis, kidney diseases and hypertension.

  2. Actions of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS) on transient sodium, persistent sodium, and voltage-gated calcium currents in neurons of the subfornical organ.

    PubMed

    Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously found gasotransmitter that has been implicated in a variety of beneficial physiological functions. This study was performed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying actions of H2S previously observed in subfornical organ (SFO), where H2S acts to regulate blood pressure through a depolarization of the membrane and an overall increase in the excitability of SFO neurons. We used whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in the voltage-clamp configuration to analyze the effect of 1 mM NaHS, an H2S donor, on voltage-gated potassium, sodium, and calcium currents. We observed no effect of NaHS on potassium currents; however, both voltage-gated sodium currents (persistent and transient) and the N-type calcium current had a depolarized activation curve and an enhanced peak-induced current in response to a series of voltage-step and ramp protocols run in the control and NaHS conditions. These effects were not responsible for the previously observed depolarization of the membrane potential, as depolarizing effects of H2S were still observed following block of these conductances with tetrodotoxin (5 μM) and ω-conotoxin-GVIA (100 nM). Our studies are the first to investigate the effect of H2S on a variety of voltage-gated conductances in a single brain area, and although they do not explain mechanisms underlying the depolarizing actions of H2S on SFO neurons, they provide evidence of potential mechanisms through which this gasotransmitter influences the excitability of neurons in this important brain area as a consequence of the modulation of multiple ion channels.

  3. Cloning and functional characterization of a putative sodium channel auxiliary subunit gene from the house fly (Musca domestica).

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Smith, T J; Ingles, P J; Soderlund, D M

    2000-06-01

    The functional expression of cloned Drosophila melanogaster and house fly (Musca domestica) voltage-sensitive sodium channels in Xenopus oocytes is enhanced, and the inactivation kinetics of the expressed channels are accelerated, by coexpression with the tipE protein, a putative sodium channel auxiliary subunit encoded by the tipE gene of D. melanogaster. These results predict the existence of a tipE ortholog in the house fly. Using a PCR-based homology probing approach, we isolated cDNA clones encoding an ortholog of tipE (designated Vssc beta) from adult house fly heads. Clones comprising 3444 bp of cDNA sequence contained a 1317 bp open-reading frame encoding a 438 amino acid protein. The predicted Vssc beta protein exhibited 72% amino acid sequence identity to the entire D. melanogaster tipE protein sequence and 97% identity within the two hydrophobic segments identified as probable transmembrane domains. Coexpression of Vssc beta with the house fly sodium channel alpha subunit (Vssc1) in oocytes enhanced the level of sodium current expression five-fold and accelerated the rate of sodium current inactivation 2.2-fold. Both of these effects were significantly larger in magnitude than the corresponding effects of the D. melanogaster tipE protein on the expression and kinetics of Vssc1 sodium channels. These results identify a second example of a putative sodium channel auxiliary subunit from an insect having functional but not structural homology to vertebrate sodium channel beta subunits.

  4. A melanosomal two-pore sodium channel regulates pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Escobar, Iliana E.; Oancea, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular organelles mediate complex cellular functions that often require ion transport across their membranes. Melanosomes are organelles responsible for the synthesis of the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanin synthesis result in pigmentation defects, visual deficits, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Although genes encoding putative melanosomal ion transporters have been identified as key regulators of melanin synthesis, melanosome ion transport and its contribution to pigmentation remain poorly understood. Here we identify two-pore channel 2 (TPC2) as the first reported melanosomal cation conductance by directly patch-clamping skin and eye melanosomes. TPC2 has been implicated in human pigmentation and melanoma, but the molecular mechanism mediating this function was entirely unknown. We demonstrate that the vesicular signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate PI(3,5)P2 modulates TPC2 activity to control melanosomal membrane potential, pH, and regulate pigmentation. PMID:27231233

  5. Mechanism of action of two insect toxins huwentoxin-III and ainantoxin-VI on voltage-gated sodium channels*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-lan; Yi, Su; Liang, Song-ping

    2010-01-01

    Selenocosmia huwena and Selenocosmia hainana are two tarantula species found in southern China. Their venoms contain abundant peptide toxins. Two new neurotoxic peptides, huwentoxin-III (HWTX-III) and hainantoxin-VI (HNTX-VI), were obtained from the venom using ion-exchange chromatography and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The mechanism of action of HWTX-III and HNTX-VI on insect neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) was studied via whole-cell patch clamp techniques. In a fashion similar to δ-atracotoxins, HNTX-VI can induce a slowdown of current inactivation of the VGSC and reduction in the peak of Na+ current in cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons. Meanwhile, 10 µmol/L HNTX-IV caused a positive shift of steady-state inactivation of sodium channel. HWTX-III inhibited VGSCs on DUM neurons (concentration of toxin at half-maximal inhibition (IC50)≈1.106 µmol/L) in a way much similar to tetrodotoxin (TTX). HWTX-III had no effect on the kinetics of activation and inactivation. The shift in the steady-state inactivation curve was distinct from other depressant spider toxins. The diverse effect and the mechanism of action of the two insect toxins illustrate the diverse biological activities of spider toxins and provide a fresh theoretical foundation to design and develop novel insecticides. PMID:20506577

  6. Carvacrol modulates voltage-gated sodium channels kinetics in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Joca, Humberto Cavalcante; Vieira, Daiana Cardoso Oliveira; Vasconcelos, Aliny Perreira; Araújo, Demetrius Antônio Machado; Cruz, Jader Santos

    2015-06-05

    Recent studies have shown that many of plant-derived compounds interact with specific ion channels and thereby modulate many sensing mechanisms, such as nociception. The monoterpenoid carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) has an anti-nociceptive effect related to a reduction in neuronal excitability and voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV) inhibition in peripheral neurons. However, the detailed mechanisms of carvacrol-induced inhibition of neuronal NaV remain elusive. This study explores the interaction between carvacrol and NaV in isolated dorsal root ganglia neurons. Carvacrol reduced the total voltage-gated Na(+) current and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) current component in a concentration-dependent manner. Carvacrol accelerates current inactivation and induced a negative-shift in voltage-dependence of steady-state fast inactivation in total and TTX-R Na(+) current. Furthermore, carvacrol slowed the recovery from inactivation. Carvacrol provoked a leftward shift in both the voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation and activation of the TTX-R Na(+) current component. In addition, carvacrol-induced inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) current was enhanced by an increase in stimulation frequency and when neurons were pre-conditioned with long depolarization pulse (5s at -50 mV). Taken all results together, we herein demonstrated that carvacrol affects NaV gating properties. The present findings would help to explain the mechanisms underlying the analgesic activity of carvacrol.

  7. Semi-volatiles at Mercury: Sodium (Na) and potassium (K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, A.

    1994-01-01

    Several lines of evidence now suggest that Mercury is a planet rich in moderately-volatile elements such as Na and K. Recent mid-infrared spectral observations of Mercury's equatorial and mid-latitude region near 120 degrees mercurian longitude indicate the presence of plagioclase feldspar. Spectra of Mercury's surface exhibit spectral activity similar to labradorite (plagioclase feldspar with NaAlSi3O8: 30-50 percent) and bytownite (NaAlSi3O8: 10-30 percent). These surface studies were stimulated by the relatively large abundance of Na and K observed in Mercury's atmosphere. An enhanced column of K is observed at the longitudes of Caloris Basin and of the antipodal terrain. Extreme heating at these 'hot' longitudes and severe fracturing suffered from the large impact event could lead to enhanced outgassing from surface or subsurface materials. Alternatively, sputtering from a surface enriched in K could be the source of the observed enhancement. Recent microwave measurements of Mercury also give indirect evidence of a mercurian regolith less FeO-rich than the Moon. An anomalously high index of refraction derived from the whole-disk integrated phase curve of Danjon may also be indicative of surface sulfides contributing to a regolith that is moderately volatile-rich. The recent exciting observations of radar-bright spots at high latitudes also indicate that a substance of high volume scattering, like ice, is present in shadowed regions. Other radar-bright spots have been seen at locations of Na enhancements on the atmosphere. All combined, these pieces of evidence point to a planet that is not severely depleted in volatiles or semi-volatiles.

  8. NapA Na(+)/H(+) Antiporter as a Sodium Extrusion System Supplementary to the Vacuolar Na(+)-ATPase in Enterococcus hirae.

    PubMed

    Kawano, M; Igarashi, K; Solioz, M; Kakinuma, Y

    1998-01-01

    Enterococcus hirae has two sodium extrusion systems: the NapA Na(+)/H(+) antiporter and the vacuolar Na(+)-ATPase. We found that a NapA mutant, WD4, which is deficient in Na(+)/H(+) antiporter activity, grew well in the pH range of 6 to 10 up to 200 mM sodium. This was due to active, potential-independent sodium extrusion by the Na(+)-ATPase, which was induced under these conditions. The NapA Na(+)/H(+) antiporter is thus not a prerequisite for growth of E. hirae in the presence of sodium, but plays a supplementary role in sodium extrusion at acidic pH.

  9. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Induces Intrinsic Alterations in Na Channel Gating in Layer II Medial Entorhinal Cortex Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hargus, Nicholas J.; Merrick, Ellen C.; Nigam, Aradhya; Kalmar, Christopher L.; Baheti, Aparna R.; Bertram, Edward H.; Patel, Manoj K.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy involving the limbic structures of the temporal lobe. Layer II neurons of the entorhinal cortex (EC) form the major excitatory input into the hippocampus via the perforant path and consist of non-stellate and stellate neurons. These neurons are spared and hyper-excitable in TLE. The basis for the hyper-excitability is likely multifactorial and may include alterations in intrinsic properties. In a rat model of TLE, medial EC (mEC) non-stellate and stellate neurons had significantly higher action potential (AP) firing frequencies than in control. The increase remained in the presence of synaptic blockers, suggesting intrinsic mechanisms. Since sodium (Na) channels play a critical role in AP generation and conduction we sought to determine if Na channel gating parameters and expression levels were altered in TLE. Na channel currents recorded from isolated mEC TLE neurons revealed increased Na channel conductances, depolarizing shifts in inactivation parameters and larger persistent (INaP) and resurgent (INaR) Na currents. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed increased staining of Nav1.6 within the axon initial segment and Nav1.2 within the cell bodies of mEC TLE neurons. These studies provide support for additional intrinsic alterations within mEC layer II neurons in TLE and implicate alterations in Na channel activity and expression, in part, for establishing the profound increase in intrinsic membrane excitability of mEC layer II neurons in TLE. These intrinsic changes, together with changes in the synaptic network, could support seizure activity in TLE. PMID:20946956

  10. Overexpression of NaV 1.6 channels is associated with the invasion capacity of human cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Plata, Everardo; Ortiz, Cindy S; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Medina-Martinez, Ingrid; Alfaro, Ana; Berumen, Jaime; Rivera, Manuel; Gomora, Juan C

    2012-05-01

    Functional activity of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) has been associated to the invasion and metastasis behaviors of prostate, breast and some other types of cancer. We previously reported the functional expression of VGSC in primary cultures and biopsies derived from cervical cancer (CaC). Here, we investigate the relative expression levels of VGSC subunits and its possible role in CaC. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that mRNA levels of Na(V) 1.6 α-subunit in CaC samples were ∼40-fold higher than in noncancerous cervical (NCC) biopsies. A Na(V) 1.7 α-subunit variant also showed increased mRNA levels in CaC (∼20-fold). All four Na(V) β subunits were also detected in CaC samples, being Na(V) β1 the most abundant. Proteins of Na(V) 1.6 and Na(V) 1.7 α-subunits were immunolocalized in both NCC and CaC biopsies and in CaC primary cultures as well; however, although in NCC sections proteins were mainly relegated to the plasma membrane, in CaC biopsies and primary cultures the respective signal was stronger and widely distributed in both cytoplasm and plasma membrane. Functional activity of Na(V) 1.6 channels in the plasma membrane of CaC cells was confirmed by whole-cell patch-clamp experiments using Cn2, a Na(V) 1.6-specific toxin, which blocked ∼30% of the total sodium current. Blocking of sodium channels VGSC with tetrodotoxin and Cn2 did not affect proliferation neither migration, but reduced by ∼20% the invasiveness of CaC primary culture cells in vitro assays. We conclude that Na(V) 1.6 is upregulated in CaC and could serve as a novel molecular marker for the metastatic behavior of this carcinoma.

  11. Assessment of sodium channel mutations in Makah Tribal members of the U.S. Pacific Northwest as a potential mechanism of resistance to paralytic shellfish poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nicolaus G.; Robertson, Alison; Grattan, Lynn M.; Pendleton, Steve; Roberts, Sparkle; Tracy, J. Kathleen; Trainer, Vera L.

    2015-01-01

    The Makah Tribe of Neah Bay, Washington, has historically relied on the subsistence harvest of coastal seafood, including shellfish, which remains an important cultural and ceremonial resource. Tribal legend describes visitors from other tribes that died from eating shellfish collected on Makah lands. These deaths were believed to be caused by paralytic shellfish poisoning, a human illness caused by ingestion of shellfish contaminated with saxitoxins, which are produced by toxin-producing marine dinoflagellates on which the shellfish feed. These paralytic shellfish toxins include saxitoxin, a potent Na+ channel antagonist that binds to the pore region of voltage gated Na+ channels. Amino acid mutations in the Na+ channel pore have been demonstrated to confer resistance to saxitoxin in softshell clam populations exposed to paralytic shellfish toxins present in their environment. Because of the notion of resistance to paralytic shellfish toxins, we aimed to determine if a resistance strategy was possible in humans with historical exposure to toxins in shellfish. We collected, extracted and purified DNA from buccal swabs of 83 volunteer Makah tribal members and sequenced the skeletal muscle Na+ channel (Nav1.4) at nine loci to characterize potential mutations in the relevant saxitoxin binding regions. No mutations of these specific regions were identified after comparison to a reference sequence. This study suggests that any resistance of Makah Tribal members to saxitoxin is not a function of Nav1.4 modification but may be due to mutations in neuronal or cardiac sodium channels or some other mechanism unrelated to sodium channel function. PMID:27616973

  12. Differential distribution of the sodium-activated potassium channels slick and slack in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Sandra; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    The sodium-activated potassium channels Slick (Slo2.1, KCNT2) and Slack (Slo2.2, KCNT1) are high-conductance potassium channels of the Slo family. In neurons, Slick and Slack channels are involved in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization, in the regulation of firing patterns, and in setting and stabilizing the resting membrane potential. The distribution and subcellular localization of Slick and Slack channels in the mouse brain have not yet been established in detail. The present study addresses this issue through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Both channels were widely distributed and exhibited distinct distribution patterns. However, in some brain regions, their expression overlapped. Intense Slick channel immunoreactivity was observed in processes, varicosities, and neuronal cell bodies of the olfactory bulb, granular zones of cortical regions, hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septal nuclei, certain hypothalamic and midbrain nuclei, and several regions of the brainstem. The Slack channel showed primarily a diffuse immunostaining pattern, and labeling of cell somata and processes was observed only occasionally. The highest Slack channel expression was detected in the olfactory bulb, lateral septal nuclei, basal ganglia, and distinct areas of the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellar cortex. In addition, comparing our data obtained from mouse brain with a previously published study on rat brain revealed some differences in the expression and distribution of Slick and Slack channels in these species. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2093-2116, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Structural requirements for voltage-dependent block of muscle sodium channels by phenol derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Haeseler, G; Piepenbrink, A; Bufler, J; Dengler, R; Aronson, J K; Piepenbrock, S; Leuwer, M

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the effects of four different phenol derivatives, with methyl and halogen substituents, on heterologously expressed human skeletal muscle sodium channels, in order to find structural determinants of blocking potency.All compounds blocked skeletal muscle sodium channels in a concentration-dependent manner. The methylated phenol 3-methylphenol and the halogenated phenol 4-chlorophenol blocked sodium currents on depolarization from −100 mV to 0 mV with IC50 values of 2161 and 666 μM respectively. Methylation of the halogenated compound further increased potency, reducing the IC50 to 268 μM in 2-methyl-4-chlorophenol and to 150 μM in 3,5-dimethyl-4-chlorophenol.Membrane depolarization before the test depolarization increased sodium channel blockade. When depolarizations were started from −70 mV or when a 2.5 s prepulse was introduced before the test pulse inducing slow inactivation, the IC50 was reduced more than 3 fold in all compounds. The values of KD for the fast-inactivated state derived from drug-induced shifts in steady-state availability curves were 14 μM for 3,5-dimethyl-4-chlorophenol, 19 μM for 2-methyl-4-chlorophenol, 26 μM for 4-chlorophenol and 115 μM for 3-methylphenol.All compounds accelerated the current decay during depolarization and slowed recovery from fast inactivation. No relevant frequency-dependent block after depolarizing pulses applied at 10, 50 and 100 Hz was detected for any of the compounds.All the phenol derivatives that we examined are effective blockers of skeletal muscle sodium channels, especially in conditions that are associated with membrane depolarization. Blocking potency is increased by halogenation and by methylation with increasing numbers of methyl groups. PMID:11309264

  14. Structural inferences for the native skeletal muscle sodium channel as derived from patterns of endogenous proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, S.; Yang, J.; Barchi, R. )

    1989-08-05

    The alpha subunit (Mr approximately 260,000) of the rat skeletal muscle sodium channel is sensitive to cleavage by endogenous proteases during the isolation of muscle surface membrane. Antisera against synthetic oligopeptides were used to map the resultant fragments in order to identify protease-sensitive regions of the channel's structure in its native membrane environment. Antibodies to the amino terminus labeled major fragments of Mr approximately 130,000 and 90,000 and lesser amounts of other peptides as small as Mr approximately 12,000. Antisera to epitopes within the carboxyl-terminal half of the primary sequence recognized two fragments of Mr approximately 110,000 and 78,000. Individual antisera also selectively labeled smaller polypeptides in the most extensively cleaved preparations. The immunoreactivity patterns of monoclonal antibodies previously raised against the purified channel were then surveyed. The binding sites for one group of monoclonals, including several that recognize subtype-specific epitopes in the channel structure, were localized within a 12-kDa fragment near the amino terminus. The distribution of carbohydrate along the primary structure of the channel was also assessed by quantitating {sup 125}I-wheat germ agglutinin and 125I-concanavalin A binding to the proteolytic peptides. Most of the carbohydrate detected by these lectins was located between 22 and 90 kDa from the amino terminus of the protein. No lectin binding was detected to fragments arising from carboxyl-terminal half of the protein. These results were analyzed in terms of current models of sodium channel tertiary structure. In its normal membrane environment, the skeletal muscle sodium channel appears sensitive to cleavage by endogenous proteases in regions predicted to link the four repeat domains on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane while the repeat domains themselves are resistant to proteolysis.

  15. Functional consequences of lidocaine binding to slow-inactivated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Na channels open upon depolarization but then enter inactivated states from which they cannot readily reopen. After brief depolarizations, native channels enter a fast-inactivated state from which recovery at hyperpolarized potentials is rapid (< 20 ms). Prolonged depolarization induces a slow-inactivated state that requires much longer periods for recovery (> 1 s). The slow-inactivated state therefore assumes particular importance in pathological conditions, such as ischemia, in which tissues are depolarized for prolonged periods. While use- dependent block of Na channels by local anesthetics has been explained on the basis of delayed recovery of fast-inactivated Na channels, the potential contribution of slow-inactivated channels has been ignored. The principal (alpha) subunits from skeletal muscle or brain Na channels display anomalous gating behavior when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, with a high percentage entering slow-inactivated states after brief depolarizations. This enhanced slow inactivation is eliminated by coexpressing the alpha subunit with the subsidiary beta 1 subunit. We compared the lidocaine sensitivity of alpha subunits expressed in the presence and absence of the beta 1 subunit to determine the relative contributions of fast-inactivated and slow-inactivated channel block. Coexpression of beta 1 inhibited the use-dependent accumulation of lidocaine block during repetitive (1-Hz) depolarizations from -100 to - 20 mV. Therefore, the time required for recovery from inactivated channel block was measured at -100 mV. Fast-inactivated (alpha + beta 1) channels were mostly unblocked within 1 s of repolarization; however, slow-inactivated (alpha alone) channels remained blocked for much longer repriming intervals (> 5 s). The affinity of the slow- inactivated state for lidocaine was estimated to be 15-25 microM, versus 24 microM for the fast-inactivated state. We conclude that slow- inactivated Na channels are blocked by lidocaine with an affinity

  16. Membrane Na+-pyrophosphatases can transport protons at low sodium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Luoto, Heidi H; Nordbo, Erika; Baykov, Alexander A; Lahti, Reijo; Malinen, Anssi M

    2013-12-06

    Membrane-bound Na(+)-pyrophosphatase (Na(+)-PPase), working in parallel with the corresponding ATP-energized pumps, catalyzes active Na(+) transport in bacteria and archaea. Each ~75-kDa subunit of homodimeric Na(+)-PPase forms an unusual funnel-like structure with a catalytic site in the cytoplasmic part and a hydrophilic gated channel in the membrane. Here, we show that at subphysiological Na(+) concentrations (<5 mM), the Na(+)-PPases of Chlorobium limicola, four other bacteria, and one archaeon additionally exhibit an H(+)-pumping activity in inverted membrane vesicles prepared from recombinant Escherichia coli strains. H(+) accumulation in vesicles was measured with fluorescent pH indicators. At pH 6.2-8.2, H(+) transport activity was high at 0.1 mM Na(+) but decreased progressively with increasing Na(+) concentrations until virtually disappearing at 5 mM Na(+). In contrast, (22)Na(+) transport activity changed little over a Na(+) concentration range of 0.05-10 mM. Conservative substitutions of gate Glu(242) and nearby Ser(243) and Asn(677) residues reduced the catalytic and transport functions of the enzyme but did not affect the Na(+) dependence of H(+) transport, whereas a Lys(681) substitution abolished H(+) (but not Na(+)) transport. All four substitutions markedly decreased PPase affinity for the activating Na(+) ion. These results are interpreted in terms of a model that assumes the presence of two Na(+)-binding sites in the channel: one associated with the gate and controlling all enzyme activities and the other located at a distance and controlling only H(+) transport activity. The inherent H(+) transport activity of Na(+)-PPase provides a rationale for its easy evolution toward specific H(+) transport.

  17. High temperature infrared spectrum of sodium iodide (NaI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Arthur G.

    2014-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of sodium iodide vapor between 200 and 275 cm-1 has been measured with a resolution of 0.006 cm-1 at a temperature of 1096 K. The Δv = 1 transitions from v = 1 ← 0 to v = 13 ← 12 have been measured. Dunham constants are given from an least-squares analysis of 1285 fairly well resolved transitions. The band center for the fundamental band is ν0 = 257.2837 ± 0.0002 cm-1. The relative intensities of the Δv = 1 transitions from different vibrational states are studied and it is shown that the intensity is roughly proportional to v″ + 1 as expected from the harmonic oscillator approximation. From measurements of the Herman-Wallis constant, α1,0 = -0.0054 ± 0.0008, it is estimated that the transition moment must be μ1,0 ≈ 0.135 ± 0.020 debye.

  18. Experimental visualization of the diffusion pathway of sodium ions in the Na3[Ti2P2O10F] anode for sodium-ion battery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhaohui; Wang, Yuesheng; Sun, Chunwen; Alonso, J. A.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Chen, Liquan

    2014-01-01

    Sodium-ion batteries have attracted considerable interest as an alternative to lithium-ion batteries for electric storage applications because of the low cost and natural abundance of sodium resources. The materials with an open framework are highly desired for Na-ion insertion/extraction. Here we report on the first visualization of the sodium-ion diffusion path in Na3[Ti2P2O10F] through high-temperature neutron powder diffraction experiments. The evolution of the Na-ion displacements of Na3[Ti2P2O10F] was investigated with high-temperature neutron diffraction (HTND) from room temperature to 600°C; difference Fourier maps were utilized to estimate the Na nuclear-density distribution. Temperature-driven Na displacements indicates that sodium-ion diffusion paths are established within the ab plane. As an anode for sodium-ion batteries, Na3[Ti2P2O10F] exhibits a reversible capacity of ~100 mAh g−1 with lower intercalation voltage. It also shows good cycling stability and rate capability, making it promising applications in sodium-ion batteries. PMID:25427677

  19. Experimental visualization of the diffusion pathway of sodium ions in the Na3[Ti2P2O10F] anode for sodium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhaohui; Wang, Yuesheng; Sun, Chunwen; Alonso, J A; Fernández-Díaz, M T; Chen, Liquan

    2014-11-27

    Sodium-ion batteries have attracted considerable interest as an alternative to lithium-ion batteries for electric storage applications because of the low cost and natural abundance of sodium resources. The materials with an open framework are highly desired for Na-ion insertion/extraction. Here we report on the first visualization of the sodium-ion diffusion path in Na3[Ti2P2O10F] through high-temperature neutron powder diffraction experiments. The evolution of the Na-ion displacements of Na3[Ti2P2O10F] was investigated with high-temperature neutron diffraction (HTND) from room temperature to 600°C; difference Fourier maps were utilized to estimate the Na nuclear-density distribution. Temperature-driven Na displacements indicates that sodium-ion diffusion paths are established within the ab plane. As an anode for sodium-ion batteries, Na3[Ti2P2O10F] exhibits a reversible capacity of ~100 mAh g(-1) with lower intercalation voltage. It also shows good cycling stability and rate capability, making it promising applications in sodium-ion batteries.

  20. Reconstitution of highly purified saxitoxin-sensitive Na+-channels into planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Hanke, W; Boheim, G; Barhanin, J; Pauron, D; Lazdunski, M

    1984-01-01

    Highly purified Na+-channels isolated from rat brain have been reconstituted into virtually solvent-free planar lipid bilayer membranes. Two different types of electrically excitable channels were detected in the absence of any neurotoxins. The activity of both channels was blocked by saxitoxin. The first channel type is highly selective for Na+ over K+ (approximately 10:1), it shows a bursting behavior, a conductance of 25 pS in Na+-Ringer and undergoes continuous opening and closing events for periods of minutes within a defined range of negative membranes voltages. The second channel type has a conductance of 150 pS and a lower selectivity for Na+ and K+ (2.2:1); only a few opening and closing events are observed with this channel after one voltage jump. The latter type of channel is also found with highly purified Na+-channel from Electrophorus electricus electroplax. A qualitative analysis of the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of the high conductance channel has been carried out. Channel properties are affected not only by saxitoxin but also by a scorpion (Centruroides suffusus suffusus) toxin and a sea anemone (Anemonia sulcata) toxin both known to be selective for the Na+-channel. The spontaneous transformation of the large conductance channel type into the small one has been considered; the two channel types may represent the expression of activity of different conformational states of the same protein. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6325173

  1. Reconstitution of highly purified saxitoxin-sensitive Na+-channels into planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hanke, W; Boheim, G; Barhanin, J; Pauron, D; Lazdunski, M

    1984-03-01

    Highly purified Na+-channels isolated from rat brain have been reconstituted into virtually solvent-free planar lipid bilayer membranes. Two different types of electrically excitable channels were detected in the absence of any neurotoxins. The activity of both channels was blocked by saxitoxin. The first channel type is highly selective for Na+ over K+ (approximately 10:1), it shows a bursting behavior, a conductance of 25 pS in Na+-Ringer and undergoes continuous opening and closing events for periods of minutes within a defined range of negative membranes voltages. The second channel type has a conductance of 150 pS and a lower selectivity for Na+ and K+ (2.2:1); only a few opening and closing events are observed with this channel after one voltage jump. The latter type of channel is also found with highly purified Na+-channel from Electrophorus electricus electroplax. A qualitative analysis of the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of the high conductance channel has been carried out. Channel properties are affected not only by saxitoxin but also by a scorpion (Centruroides suffusus suffusus) toxin and a sea anemone (Anemonia sulcata) toxin both known to be selective for the Na+-channel. The spontaneous transformation of the large conductance channel type into the small one has been considered; the two channel types may represent the expression of activity of different conformational states of the same protein.

  2. Channel waveguides in glass via silver-sodium field-assisted ion exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, K.; Pagano, S. J.; Viehmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    Multimode channel waveguides have been formed in sodium aluminosilicate glass by field-assisted diffusion of Ag(+) ions from vacuum-evaporated Ag films. The two-dimensional refractive index profiles of the waveguides were controlled by varying the diffusion time, the diffusion temperature, and the electric field strength. Estimates of the diffusion rate through a strip aperture were obtained, assuming the electric field was strong 120-240 V/mm. The maximum change in refractive index in the sodium aluminosilicate glasses was estimated near 65 percent of the change in soda-lime silicate glass. The physical properties of the glasses are given in a table.

  3. Regulation of cough and action potentials by voltage-gated Na channels.

    PubMed

    Carr, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    The classical role ascribed to voltage-gated Na channels is the conduction of action potentials. Some excitable tissues such as cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle predominantly express a single voltage-gated Na channels isoform. Of the nine voltage-gated Na channels, seven are expressed in neurons, of these Nav 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9 are expressed in sensory neurons including vagal sensory neurons that innervate the airways and initiate cough. Nav 1.7 and Nav 1.9 are of particular interest as they represent two extremes in the functional diversity of voltage-gated Na channels. Voltage-gated Na channel isoforms expressed in airway sensory neurons produce multiple distinct Na currents that underlie distinct aspects of sensory neuron function. The interaction between voltage-gated Na currents underlies the characteristic ability of airway sensory nerves to encode encounters with irritant stimuli into action potential discharge and evoke the cough reflex.

  4. Cloning and expression of the epithelial sodium channel and its role in osmoregulation of aquatic and estivating African lungfish Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Konno, Norifumi; Shibuya, Sachika; Nogami, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a sodium (Na(+))-selective aldosterone-stimulated ion channel involved in Na(+) transport homeostasis of tetrapods. We examined full-length cDNA sequences and tissue distributions of ENaCα, ENaCβ, and ENaCγ subunits in the African lungfish Protopterus annectens. Protopterus ENaC (pENaC) comprises 3 subunits: pENaCα, pENaCβ, and pENaCγ. pENaCα, pENaCβ, and pENaCγ subunits are closely related to α, β, and γ subunits of the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri ENaC (nENaC), respectively. Three ENaC subunit mRNAs were highly expressed in the gills and moderately expressed in the kidney and rectum of P. annectens. During estivation for 2-4weeks and 2-3months, plasma Na(+) concentration was relatively stable, but plasma urea concentration significantly increased in comparison with the control fish kept in a freshwater environment. Plasma aldosterone concentration and mRNA expression of the ENaCα subunit gradually and significantly decreased in the gills and kidney after 2months of estivation. Thus, aldosterone-dependent Na(+) absorption via ENaC probably exists in the epithelial cells of osmoregulatory organs of lungfish kept in fresh water, whereas plasma Na(+) concentration may be maintained by a mechanism independent of aldosterone-ENaC axis during estivation in lungfish.

  5. Cholinergic regulation of epithelial sodium channels in rat alveolar type 2 epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yoshizumi; Helms, My N; Eaton, Amity F; Self, Julie; Ramosevac, Semra; Jain, Lucky; Bao, Hui-Fang; Eaton, Douglas C

    2013-03-15

    We and others have shown that epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC) in alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells are activated by β2 agonists, steroid hormones, elevated oxygen tension, and by dopamine. Although acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) have been previously described in the lung, there are few reports of whether cholinergic agonists alter sodium transport in the alveolar epithelium. Therefore, we investigated how cholinergic receptors regulate ENaC activity in primary cultures of rat AT2 cells using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings to assess ENaC activity. We found that the muscarinic agonists, carbachol (CCh) and oxotremorine, activated ENaC in a dose-dependent manner but that nicotine did not. CCh-induced activation of ENaC was blocked by atropine. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry suggested that muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors (mAChRs) but not nicotinic receptors were present in AT2 cells. Endogenous RhoA and GTP-RhoA increased in response to CCh and the increase was reduced by pretreatment with atropine. We showed that Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), abolished endogenous ENaC activity and inhibited the activation of ENaC by CCh. We also showed that ROCK signaling was necessary for ENaC stability in 2F3 cells, a model for AT2 cells. Our results showed that muscarinic agonists activated ENaC in rat AT2 cells through M2 and/or M3 mAChRs probably via a RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

  6. Restoration of Epithelial Sodium Channel Function by Synthetic Peptides in Pseudohypoaldosteronism Type 1B Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Willam, Anita; Aufy, Mohammed; Tzotzos, Susan; Evanzin, Heinrich; Chytracek, Sabine; Geppert, Sabrina; Fischer, Bernhard; Fischer, Hendrik; Pietschmann, Helmut; Czikora, Istvan; Lucas, Rudolf; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Shabbir, Waheed

    2017-01-01

    The synthetically produced cyclic peptides solnatide (a.k.a. TIP or AP301) and its congener AP318, whose molecular structures mimic the lectin-like domain of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF), have been shown to activate the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in various cell- and animal-based studies. Loss-of-ENaC-function leads to a rare, life-threatening, salt-wasting syndrome, pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1B (PHA1B), which presents with failure to thrive, dehydration, low blood pressure, anorexia and vomiting; hyperkalemia, hyponatremia and metabolic acidosis suggest hypoaldosteronism, but plasma aldosterone and renin activity are high. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the ENaC-activating effect of solnatide and AP318 could rescue loss-of-function phenotype of ENaC carrying mutations at conserved amino acid positions observed to cause PHA1B. The macroscopic Na+ current of all investigated mutants was decreased compared to wild type ENaC when measured in whole-cell patch clamp experiments, and a great variation in the membrane abundance of different mutant ENaCs was observed with Western blotting experiments. However, whatever mechanism leads to loss-of-function of the studied ENaC mutations, the synthetic peptides solnatide and AP318 could restore ENaC function up to or even higher than current levels of wild type ENaC. As therapy of PHA1B is only symptomatic so far, the peptides solnatide and AP318, which directly target ENaC, are promising candidates for the treatment of the channelopathy-caused disease PHA1B. PMID:28286482

  7. The activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is required at a posttranslational level for induction of voltage-dependent sodium channels by peptide growth factors in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and expression of voltage-dependent sodium (Na) channels is a crucial aspect of neuronal differentiation because of the central role these ion channels play in the generation of action potentials and the transfer of information in the nervous system. We have used rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell lines deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity to examine the role of PKA in the induction of Na channel expression by nerve growth factor (NGF) and basic FGF (bFGF). In the parental PC12 cell line both NGF and bFGF elicit an increase in the density of functional Na channels, as determined from whole-cell patch clamp recordings. This increase does not occur in two PC12 cell lines deficient in both isozymes of PKA (PKAI and PKAII), and is strongly reduced in a third line deficient in PKAII, but not PKAI. Despite the inability of the neurotrophic factors to induce functional Na channel expression in the PKA-deficient cells, Northern blot hybridization studies and saxitoxin binding assays of intact cells indicate that NGF and bFGF are still capable of eliciting increases in both Na channel mRNA and Na channel protein in the membrane. Thus, PKA activity appears to be necessary at a posttranslational step in the synthesis and expression of functional Na channels, and thereby plays an important role in determining neuronal excitability. PMID:1311713

  8. Modification of sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics by ether and halothane

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.; Shrager, P.; Goldstein, D.A.

    1981-03-01

    The effects of ether and halothane on the kinetics of sodium and potassium currents were investigated in the crayfish giant axon. Both general anesthetics produced a reversible, dose-dependent speeding up of sodium current inactivation at all membrane potentials, with no change in the rising phase of the currents. Double-pulse inactivation experiments with ether also showed faster inactivation, but the rate of recovery from inactivation at negative potentials was not affected. Ether shifted the midpoint of the steady-state fast inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction and made the curve steeper. The activation of potassium currents was faster with ether present, with no change in the voltage dependence of steady-state potassium currents. Ether and halothane are known to perturb the structure of lipid bilayer membranes; the alterations in sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics are consistent with the hypothesis that the rats of the gating processes of the channels can be affected by the state of the lipids surrounding the channels, but a direct effect of ether and halothane on the protein part of the channels cannot be ruled out.

  9. Protein kinase regulation of a cloned epithelial Na+ channel

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We examined the regulation of a cloned epithelial Na+ channel (alpha beta gamma-rENaC) by protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC). Experiments were performed in Xenopus oocytes and in planar lipid bilayers. At a holding potential of -100 mV, amiloride-sensitive current averaged -1,279 +/- 111 nA (n = 7) in alpha beta gamma-rENaC- expressing oocytes. Currents in water-injected oocytes were essentially unresponsive to 10 microM amiloride. A 1-h stimulation of PKC with 100 nM of PMA inhibited whole-cell currents in Xenopus oocytes to 17.1 +/- 1.8, and 22.1 +/- 2.6% of control (n = 7), at holding potentials of - 100 and +40 mV, respectively. Direct injection of purified PKC resulted in similar inhibition to that observed with PMA. Additionally, the inactive phorbol ester, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, 4-O-methyl, was without effect on alpha beta gamma-rENaC currents. Pretreatment with the microtubule inhibitor colchicine (100 microM) did not modify the inhibitory effect of PMA; however, pretreatment with 20 microM cytochalasin B decreased the inhibitory action of PMA to < 20% of that previously observed. In vitro-synthesized alpha beta gamma-rENaC formed an amiloride-sensitive Na(+)-selective channel when incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. Addition of PKC, diacyl-glycerol, and Mg-ATP to the side opposite that which amiloride blocked, decreased the channel's open probability (Po) from 0.44 +/- 0.06 to 0.13 +/- 0.03 (n = 9). To study the effects of PKA on alpha beta gamma-rENaC expressed in Xenopus oocytes, cAMP levels were elevated with 10 microM forskolin and 1 mM isobutyl-methyl-xanthine. This cAMP-elevating cocktail did not cause any stimulation of alpha beta gamma-rENaC currents in either the inward or outward directions. This lack of activation was also observed in oocytes preinhibited with PMA and in oocytes pretreated with cytochalasin B and PMA. Neither alpha-rENaC nor alpha beta gamma-rENaC incorporated into planar lipid bilayers could be

  10. Pyrethroids Differentially Alter Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels from the Honeybee Central Olfactory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kadala, Aklesso; Charreton, Mercedes; Jakob, Ingrid; Cens, Thierry; Rousset, Matthieu; Chahine, Mohamed; Le Conte, Yves; Charnet, Pierre; Collet, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of neurons from the honey bee olfactory system to pyrethroid insecticides was studied using the patch-clamp technique on central ‘antennal lobe neurons’ (ALNs) in cell culture. In these neurons, the voltage-dependent sodium currents are characterized by negative potential for activation, fast kinetics of activation and inactivation, and the presence of cumulative inactivation during train of depolarizations. Perfusion of pyrethroids on these ALN neurons submitted to repetitive stimulations induced (1) an acceleration of cumulative inactivation, and (2) a marked slowing of the tail current recorded upon repolarization. Cypermethrin and permethrin accelerated cumulative inactivation of the sodium current peak in a similar manner and tetramethrin was even more effective. The slow-down of channel deactivation was markedly dependent on the type of pyrethroid. With cypermethrin, a progressive increase of the tail current amplitude along with successive stimulations reveals a traditionally described use-dependent recruitment of modified sodium channels. However, an unexpected decrease in this tail current was revealed with tetramethrin. If one considers the calculated percentage of modified channels as an index of pyrethroids effects, ALNs are significantly more susceptible to tetramethrin than to permethrin or cypermethrin for a single depolarization, but this difference attenuates with repetitive activity. Further comparison with peripheral neurons from antennae suggest that these modifications are neuron type specific. Modeling the sodium channel as a multi-state channel with fast and slow inactivation allows to underline the effects of pyrethroids on a set of rate constants connecting open and inactivated conformations, and give some insights to their specificity. Altogether, our results revealed a differential sensitivity of central olfactory neurons to pyrethroids that emphasize the ability for these compounds to impair detection and processing

  11. Sodium ion transport mechanisms in antiperovskite electrolytes Na3OBr and Na4OI2: An in Situ neutron diffraction study

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Yonggang; Li, Shuai; ...

    2016-06-02

    Na-rich antiperovskites are recently developed solid electrolytes with enhanced sodium ionic conductivity and show promising functionality as a novel solid electrolyte in an all solid-stat battery. In this work, the sodium ionic transport pathways of the parent compound Na3OBr, as well as the modified layered antiperovskite Na4OI2, were studied and compared through temperature dependent neutron diffraction combined with the maximum entropy method. In the cubic Na3OBr antiperovskite, the nuclear density distribution maps at 500 K indicate that sodium ions ho within and among oxygen octahedra, and Br- ions are not involved in the tetragonal Na4OI2 antiperovskite, Na ions, which connectmore » octahedra in the ab plane, have the lowest activation energy barrier. In conclusion, the transport of sodium ions along the c axis is assisted by I- ions.« less

  12. Sodium Ion Transport Mechanisms in Antiperovskite Electrolytes Na3OBr and Na4OI2: An in Situ Neutron Diffraction Study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Yonggang; Li, Shuai; Howard, John W; Neuefeind, Jörg; Ren, Yang; Wang, Hui; Liang, Chengdu; Yang, Wenge; Zou, Ruqiang; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-06-20

    Na-rich antiperovskites are recently developed solid electrolytes with enhanced sodium ionic conductivity and show promising functionality as a novel solid electrolyte in an all solid-state battery. In this work, the sodium ionic transport pathways of the parent compound Na3OBr, as well as the modified layered antiperovskite Na4OI2, were studied and compared through temperature-dependent neutron diffraction combined with the maximum entropy method. In the cubic Na3OBr antiperovskite, the nuclear density distribution maps at 500 K indicate that sodium ions hop within and among oxygen octahedra, and Br(-) ions are not involved. In the tetragonal Na4OI2 antiperovskite, Na ions, which connect octahedra in the ab plane, have the lowest activation energy barrier. The transport of sodium ions along the c axis is assisted by I(-) ions.

  13. Modification of cardiac sodium channels by carboxyl reagents. Trimethyloxonium and water-soluble carbodiimide

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    In TTX-sensitive nerve and skeletal muscle Na+ channels, selective modification of external carboxyl groups with trimethyloxonium (TMO) or water-soluble carbodiimide (WSC) prevents voltage-dependent Ca2+ block, reduces unitary conductance, and decreases guanidinium toxin affinity. In the case of TMO, it has been suggested that all three effects result from modification of a single carboxyl group, which causes a positive shift in the channel's surface potential. We studied the effect of these reagents on Ca2+ block of adult rabbit ventricular Na+ channels in cell-attached patches. In unmodified channels, unitary conductance (gamma Na) was 18.6 +/- 0.9 pS with 280 mM Na+ and 2 mM Ca2+ in the pipette and was reduced to 5.2 +/- 0.8 pS by 10 mM Ca2+. In contrast to TTX-sensitive Na+ channels, Ca2+ block of cardiac Na+ channels was not prevented by TMO; after TMO pretreatment, gamma Na was 6.1 +/- 1.0 pS in 10 mM Ca2+. Nevertheless, TMO altered cardiac Na+ channel properties. In 2 mM Ca2+, TMO-treated patches exhibited up to three discrete gamma Na levels: 15.3 +/- 1.7, 11.3 +/- 1.5, and 9.8 +/- 1.8 pS. Patch-to-patch variation in which levels were present and the absence of transitions between levels suggests that at least two sites were modified by TMO. An abbreviation of mean open time (MOT) accompanied each decrease in gamma Na. The effects on channel gating of elevating external Ca2+ differed from those of TMO pretreatment. Increasing pipette Ca2+ from 2 to 10 mM prolonged the MOT at potentials positive to approximately -35 mV by decreasing the open to inactivated (O-->I) transition rate constant. On the other hand, even in 10 mM Ca2+ TMO accelerated the O-->I transition rate constant without a change in its voltage dependence. Ensemble averages after TMO showed a shortening of the time to peak current and an acceleration of the rate of current decay. Channel modification with WSC resulted in analogous effects to those of TMO in failing to show relief from block by

  14. Influence of sodium halides (NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI) on the photocatalytic performance of hydrothermally synthesized hematite photoanodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsinghai; Huang, Mao-Chia; Hsieh, Yi-Kong; Chang, Wen-Sheng; Lin, Jing-Chie; Lee, Chih-Hao; Wang, Chu-Fang

    2013-08-28

    It has been suggested that a high concentration of Fe(3+) in solution, a low pH, and noncomplexing ions of high ionic strength are all essential for developing a high-quality hematite array. Our curiosity was piqued regarding the role of the electrolyte ions in the hydrothermal synthesis of hematite photoanodes. In this study, we prepared hematite photoanodes hydrothermally from precursor solutions of 0.1 M FeCl3 at pH 1.55 with a background electrolyte of 1.0 M sodium halide (NaF, NaCl, NaBr, or NaI). We compared the structures and properties of the as-obtained hematite photoanodes with those of the material prepared in 1.0 M NaNO3, the most widely adopted electrolyte in previous studies. Among our studied systems, we found that the hematite photoanode prepared in NaCl solution was the only one possessing properties similar to those of the sample obtained from the NaNO3 solution-most importantly in terms of photoelectrochemical performance (ca. 0.2 mA/cm(2) with +0.4 V vs SCE). The hematites obtained from the NaF, NaBr, and NaI solutions exhibited much lower (by approximately 2 orders of magnitude) photocurrent densities under the same conditions, possibly because of their relatively less ordered crystallinity and the absence of rodlike morphologies. Because the synthetic protocol was identical in each case, we believe that these two distinct features reflect the environments in which these hematite photoanodes were formed. Consistent with the latest studies reported in the literature of the X-ray photoelectron spectra of fast-frozen hematite colloids in aqueous solutions, it appears that the degree of surface ion loading at the electrolyte-hematite interface (Stern layer) is critical during the development of hematite photoanodes. We suspect that a lower ion surface loading benefits the hematite developing relatively higher-order and a rodlike texture, thereby improving the photoelectrochemical activity.

  15. CNS sites activated by renal pelvic epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) in response to hypertonic saline in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Vanessa S; Terrill, Christopher; Hopewood, Ian; Loewy, Arthur D; Knuepfer, Mark M

    2017-05-01

    In some patients, renal nerve denervation has been reported to be an effective treatment for essential hypertension. Considerable evidence suggests that afferent renal nerves (ARN) and sodium balance play important roles in the development and maintenance of high blood pressure. ARN are sensitive to sodium concentrations in the renal pelvis. To better understand the role of ARN, we infused isotonic or hypertonic NaCl (308 or 500mOsm) into the left renal pelvis of conscious rats for two 2hours while recording arterial pressure and heart rate. Subsequently, brain tissue was analyzed for immunohistochemical detection of the protein Fos, a marker for neuronal activation. Fos-immunoreactive neurons were identified in numerous sites in the forebrain and brainstem. These areas included the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the lateral parabrachial nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON). The most effective stimulus was 500mOsm NaCl. Activation of these sites was attenuated or prevented by administration of benzamil (1μM) or amiloride (10μM) into the renal pelvis concomitantly with hypertonic saline. In anesthetized rats, infusion of hypertonic saline but not isotonic saline into the renal pelvis elevated ARN activity and this increase was attenuated by simultaneous infusion of benzamil or amiloride. We propose that renal pelvic epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) play a role in activation of ARN and, via central visceral afferent circuits, this system modulates fluid volume and peripheral blood pressure. These pathways may contribute to the development of hypertension.

  16. Skeletal muscle disuse induces fibre type-dependent enhancement of Na(+) channel expression.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, J F; Pierno, S; Léoty, C; George, A L; De Luca, A; Camerino, D C

    2001-06-01

    Slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fibres have specific contractile properties to respond to specific needs. Since sodium current density is higher in fast-twitch than in slow-twitch fibres, sodium channels contribute to the phenotypic feature of myofibres. Phenotype determination is not irreversible: after periods of rat hindlimb unloading (HU), a model of hypogravity, a slow-to-fast transition occurs together with atrophy in the antigravity slow-twitch soleus muscle. Using cell-attached patch-clamp and northern blot analyses, we looked at sodium channel expression in soleus muscles after 1-3 weeks of HU in rats. We found that sodium channels in fast-twitch flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibres, soleus muscle fibres and 1- to 3-week HU soleus muscle fibres showed no difference in unitary conductance, open probability and voltage-dependencies of activation, fast inactivation and slow inactivation. However, muscle disuse increased sodium current density in soleus muscle fibres 2-fold, 2.5-fold and 3-fold after 1, 2 and 3 weeks of HU, respectively. The concentration of mRNA for the skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha subunit increased 2-fold after 1 week of HU but returned to the control level after 3 weeks of HU. In contrast, the concentration of mRNA for the ubiquitous sodium channel beta(1) subunit was unchanged after 1 week and had increased by 30% after 3 weeks of HU. The tetrodotoxin sensitivity of sodium currents in 3-week HU soleus muscles and the lack of mRNA signal for the juvenile skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha subunit excluded denervation in our experiments. The observed increase in sodium current density may reduce the resistance to fatigue of antigravity muscle fibres, an effect that may contribute to muscle impairment in humans after space flight or after long immobilization.

  17. Kinetic Analysis of Membrane Potential Dye Response to NaV1.7 Channel Activation Identifies Antagonists with Pharmacological Selectivity against NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Finley, Michael; Cassaday, Jason; Kreamer, Tony; Li, Xinnian; Solly, Kelli; O'Donnell, Greg; Clements, Michelle; Converso, Antonella; Cook, Sean; Daley, Chris; Kraus, Richard; Lai, Ming-Tain; Layton, Mark; Lemaire, Wei; Staas, Donnette; Wang, Jixin

    2016-06-01

    The NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel is a highly valued target for the treatment of neuropathic pain due to its expression in pain-sensing neurons and human genetic mutations in the gene encoding NaV1.7, resulting in either loss-of-function (e.g., congenital analgesia) or gain-of-function (e.g., paroxysmal extreme pain disorder) pain phenotypes. We exploited existing technologies in a novel manner to identify selective antagonists of NaV1.7. A full-deck high-throughput screen was developed for both NaV1.7 and cardiac NaV1.5 channels using a cell-based membrane potential dye FLIPR assay. In assay development, known local anesthetic site inhibitors produced a decrease in maximal response; however, a subset of compounds exhibited a concentration-dependent delay in the onset of the response with little change in the peak of the response at any concentration. Therefore, two methods of analysis were employed for the screen: one to measure peak response and another to measure area under the curve, which would capture the delay-to-onset phenotype. Although a number of compounds were identified by a selective reduction in peak response in NaV1.7 relative to 1.5, the AUC measurement and a subsequent refinement of this measurement were able to differentiate compounds with NaV1.7 pharmacological selectivity over NaV1.5 as confirmed in electrophysiology.

  18. Structure of the sodium channel pore revealed by serial cysteine mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, M T; Chiamvimonvat, N; Marban, E; Tomaselli, G F

    1996-01-01

    The pores of voltage-gated cation channels are formed by four intramembrane segments that impart selectivity and conductance. Remarkably little is known about the higher order structure of these critical pore-lining or P segments. Serial cysteine mutagenesis reveals a pattern of side-chain accessibility that contradicts currently favored structural models based on alpha-helices or beta-strands. Like the active sites of many enzymes of known structure, the sodium channel pore consists of irregular loop regions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8552626

  19. Voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels mediate Sema3A retrograde signaling that regulates dendritic development.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Naoya; Aoki, Reina; Chen, Sandy; Jitsuki-Takahashi, Aoi; Ohura, Shunsuke; Kamiya, Haruyuki; Goshima, Yoshio

    2016-01-15

    Growing axons rely on local signaling at the growth cone for guidance cues. Semaphorin3A (Sema3A), a secreted repulsive axon guidance molecule, regulates synapse maturation and dendritic branching. We previously showed that local Sema3A signaling in the growth cones elicits retrograde retrograde signaling via PlexinA4 (PlexA4), one component of the Sema3A receptor, thereby regulating dendritic localization of AMPA receptor GluA2 and proper dendritic development. In present study, we found that nimodipine (voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker) and tetrodotoxin (TTX; voltage-gated Na(+) channel blocker) suppress Sema3A-induced dendritic localization of GluA2 and dendritic branch formation in cultured hippocampal neurons. The local application of nimodipine or TTX to distal axons suppresses retrograde transport of Venus-Sema3A that has been exogenously applied to the distal axons. Sema3A facilitates axonal transport of PlexA4, which is also suppressed in neurons treated with either TTX or nimodipine. These data suggest that voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels mediate Sema3A retrograde signaling that regulates dendritic GluA2 localization and branch formation.

  20. Desmosomes and the sodium channel complex: implications for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy and Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cerrone, Marina; Delmar, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in proteins of the desmosome are associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC; also referred to as "ARVC" or "ARVD"). Life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias often occur in the concealed phase of the disease before the onset of structural changes. Among the various potential mechanisms for arrhythmogenesis in AC, in this article, we concentrate on the relation between desmosomes and sodium channel function. We review evidence indicating that (1) loss of desmosomal integrity (including mutations or loss of expression of plakophilin-2; PKP2) leads to reduced sodium current (INa), (2) the PKP2-INa relation could be partly consequent to the fact that PKP2 facilitates proper trafficking of proteins to the intercalated disc, and (3) PKP2 mutations can be present in patients diagnosed with Brugada syndrome (BrS), thus supporting the previously proposed notion that AC and BrS are not two completely separate entities, but "bookends" in a continuum of variable sodium current deficiency and structural disease.

  1. Dysregulation of renal aquaporins and epithelial sodium channel in lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jakob; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Christensen, Birgitte Mønster; Frøkiaer, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren

    2008-05-01

    Lithium is used commonly to treat bipolar mood disorders. In addition to its primary therapeutic effects in the central nervous system lithium has a number of side effects in the kidney. The side effects include nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with polyuria, mild sodium wasting, and changes in acid/base balance. These functional changes are associated with marked structural changes in collecting duct cell composition and morphology, likely contributing to the functional changes. Over the past few years, investigations of lithium-induced renal changes have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the disturbances in water, sodium, and acid/base metabolism. This includes dysregulation of renal aquaporins, epithelial sodium channel, and acid/base transporters. This review focuses on these issues with the aim to present this in context with clinically relevant features.

  2. SCN9A mutations define primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder of voltage gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Drenth, Joost P H; te Morsche, Rene H M; Guillet, Gerard; Taieb, Alain; Kirby, R Lee; Jansen, Jan B M J

    2005-06-01

    Primary erythermalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of red, warm and painful hands, and/or feet. We previously localized the gene for primary erythermalgia to a 7.94 cM region on chromosome 2q. Recently, Yang et al identified two missense mutations of the sodium channel alpha subunit SCN9A in patients with erythermalgia. The presence of voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory neurons is thought to play a crucial role in several chronic painful neuropathies. We examined four different families and two sporadic cases and detected missense sequence variants in SCN9A to be present in primary erythermalgia patients. A total of five of six mutations were located in highly conserved regions. One family with autosomal dominantly inherited erythermalgia was double heterozygous for two separate SCN9A mutations. These data establish primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder and offers hope for treatment of this incapacitating painful disorder.

  3. Molecular Characterization of Neurally Expressing Genes in the Para Sodium Channel Gene Cluster of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hong, C. S.; Ganetzky, B.

    1996-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms regulating expression of para, which encodes the major class of sodium channels in the Drosophila nervous system, we have tried to locate upstream cis-acting regulatory elements by mapping the transcriptional start site and analyzing the region immediately upstream of para in region 14D of the polytene chromosomes. From these studies, we have discovered that the region contains a cluster of neurally expressing genes. Here we report the molecular characterization of the genomic organization of the 14D region and the genes within this region, which are: calnexin (Cnx), actin related protein 14D (Arp14D), calcineurin A 14D (CnnA14D), and chromosome associated protein (Cap). The tight clustering of these genes, their neuronal expression patterns, and their potential functions related to expression, modulation, or regulation of sodium channels raise the possibility that these genes represent a functionally related group sharing some coordinate regulatory mechanism. PMID:8849894

  4. Photoaffinity labeling of alpha- and beta- scorpion toxin receptors associated with rat brain sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Darbon, H; Jover, E; Couraud, F; Rochat, H

    1983-09-15

    Azido nitrophenylaminoacetyl [125I]iodo derivative of toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus, a beta-toxin, and azido nitrophenylaminoacetyl [125I]iodo derivative of toxin V from Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus, an alpha-toxin, have been covalently linked after binding to their receptor sites that are related to the voltage sensitive sodium channel present in rat brain synaptosomes. Both derivatives labeled two polypeptides of 253000 +/- 20000 and 35000 +/- 2000 mol. wt. Labeling was blocked for each derivative by a large excess of the corresponding native toxin but no cross inhibition was obtained. These results suggest that both alpha - and beta - scorpion toxin receptors are located on or near the same two membrane polypeptides which may be part of the voltage dependent sodium channel.

  5. Antinociceptive Effects of AGAP, a Recombinant Neurotoxic Polypeptide: Possible Involvement of the Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Sodium Channels in Small Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Li; Liu, Xi-Fang; Li, Gui-Xia; Ban, Meng-qi; Chen, Jian-Zhao; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Jing-Hai; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Antitumor-analgesic peptide (AGAP) is a novel recombinant polypeptide. The primary study showed that AGAP 1.0 mg/kg exhibited strong analgesic and antitumor effects. The tail vein administration of AGAP potently reduced pain behaviors in mice induced by intraplantar injection of formalin or intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid, without affecting basal pain perception. To further assess the mechanisms of AGAP, the effects of AGAP on sodium channels were assessed using the whole-cell patch clamp recordings in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. The results showed that AGAP (3–1000 nM) inhibited the sodium currents in small-diameter DRG neurons in a dose-dependent manner. 1000 nM AGAP could inhibit the current density-voltage relationship curve of sodium channels in a voltage-dependent manner and negatively shift the activation curves. 1000 nM AGAP could reduce the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium currents by 42.8% in small-diameter DRG neurons. Further analysis revealed that AGAP potently inhibited NaV1.8 currents by 59.4%, and negatively shifted the activation and inactivation kinetics. 1000 nM AGAP also reduced the NaV1.9 currents by 33.7%, but had no significant effect on activation and inactivation kinetics. Thus, our results demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of AGAP inhibited TTX-R sodium channel in rat small-diameter DRG neurons. It is concluded that these new results may better explain, at least in part, the analgesic properties of this polypeptide. PMID:28066245

  6. Cell surface expression of the epithelial Na channel and a mutant causing Liddle syndrome: a quantitative approach.

    PubMed

    Firsov, D; Schild, L; Gautschi, I; Mérillat, A M; Schneeberger, E; Rossier, B C

    1996-12-24

    The epithelial amiloride-sensitive sodium channel (ENaC) controls transepithelial Na+ movement in Na(+)-transporting epithelia and is associated with Liddle syndrome, an autosomal dominant form of salt-sensitive hypertension. Detailed analysis of ENaC channel properties and the functional consequences of mutations causing Liddle syndrome has been, so far, limited by lack of a method allowing specific and quantitative detection of cell-surface-expressed ENaC. We have developed a quantitative assay based on the binding of 125I-labeled M2 anti-FLAG monoclonal antibody (M2Ab*) directed against a FLAG reporter epitope introduced in the extracellular loop of each of the alpha, beta, and gamma ENaC subunits. Insertion of the FLAG epitope into ENaC sequences did not change its functional and pharmacological properties. The binding specificity and affinity (Kd = 3 nM) allowed us to correlate in individual Xenopus oocytes the macroscopic amiloride-sensitive sodium current (INa) with the number of ENaC wild-type and mutant subunits expressed at the cell surface. These experiments demonstrate that: (i) only heteromultimeric channels made of alpha, beta, and gamma ENaC subunits are maximally and efficiently expressed at the cell surface; (ii) the overall ENaC open probability is one order of magnitude lower than previously observed in single-channel recordings; (iii) the mutation causing Liddle syndrome (beta R564stop) enhances channel activity by two mechanisms, i.e., by increasing ENaC cell surface expression and by changing channel open probability. This quantitative approach provides new insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying one form of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  7. Expression of sodium channel α subunits 1.1, 1.2 and 1.6 in rat hippocampus after kainic acid-induced epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xin; Werkman, Taco R; Gorter, Jan A; Wadman, Wytse J; van Vliet, Erwin A

    2013-09-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels control neuronal excitability and are the primary target for the majority of anti-epileptic drugs. This study investigates the (sub)cellular expression patterns of three important brain-associated Na(+) channel α subunits: NaV1.1, NaV1.2 and NaV1.6 during epileptogenesis (induced by kainic acid) using time points that cover the period from induction to the chronic phase of epilepsy. NaV1.1 immunoreactivity was persistently reduced at 1 day, 3 weeks and 2 months after SE in CA1 and CA3. About 50% of the NaV1.1-positive interneurons was lost at one day after SE in all regions investigated. In the hilus a similar reduction in NeuN-positive neurons was found, while in the CA1 and CA3 region the loss in NeuN-positive neurons only reached 15% in the chronic phase of epilepsy. This implies a stronger shift in the balance between excitation and inhibition toward excitation in the CA1 and CA3 region than in the hilus. NaV1.2 immunoreactivity in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus was lower than control at 1 day after SE. It increased at 3 weeks and 2 months after SE in the inner molecular layer and overlapped with sprouted mossy fibers. NaV1.6 immunoreactivity in the dendritic region of CA1 and CA3 was persistently reduced at all time-points during epileptogenesis. Some astrocytes expressed NaV1.1 and NaV1.6 at 3 weeks after SE. Expression data alone are not sufficient to explain changes in network stability, or infer causality in epileptogenesis. These results demonstrate that hippocampal sub-regional expression of NaV1.1, NaV1.2 and NaV1.6 Na(+) channel α subunits is altered during epileptogenesis in a time and location specific way. This implies that understanding epileptogenesis has to take into account several distinct and type-specific changes in sodium channel expression.

  8. Effect of Gamma Radiation on Sodium Channels in Different Conformations in Neuroblastoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    rads). selectively sulphonic acid : Tris. 2-amino-2-hydroxymethylprepane-l.3- reduce sodium currents in isolated frog sciatic dial. nerves under...similar ful in demonstrating structural and functional spectrum of radiosensitivity. A large body of bio- properties of biological membrane macromole...channel function 12-41. One might expect that quences than does disruption of nucleic acids , ionizing radiation, comprising a higher energy spectrum than

  9. Reactive species modify NaV1.8 channels and affect action potentials in murine dorsal root ganglia neurons

    PubMed Central

    Schink, Martin; Leipolcf, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons are important relay stations between the periphery and the central nervous system and are essential for somatosensory signaling. Reactive species are produced in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and are known to alter electric signaling. Here we studied the influence of reactive species on the electrical properties of DRG neurons from mice with the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Even mild stress induced by either low concentrations of chloramine-T (10 µM) or low-intensity blue-light irradiation profoundly diminished action potential frequency but prolonged single action potentials in wild-type neurons. The impact on evoked action potentials was much smaller in neurons deficient of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8 (NaV1.8−/−), the channel most important for the action potential upstroke in DRG neurons. Low concentrations of chloramine-T caused a significant reduction of NaV1.8 peak current and at higher concentrations progressively slowed down inactivation. Blue light had a smaller effect on amplitude but slowed down NaV1.8 channel inactivation. The observed effects were less apparent for TTX-sensitive NaV channels. NaV1.8 is an important reactive-species-sensitive component in the electrical signaling of DRG neurons, potentially giving rise to loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenomena depending on the type of reactive species and their effective concentration and time of exposure. PMID:26383867

  10. Sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) tablets as an alternative to sodium hypochlorite for the routine treatment of drinking water at the household level.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Thomas; Edmondson, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Household water treatment using sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) has been recognized as a cost-effective means of reducing the heavy burden of diarrhea and other waterborne diseases, especially among populations without access to improved water supplies. Sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), which is widely used in emergencies, is an alternative source of chlorine that may present certain advantages over NaOCl for household-based interventions in development settings. We summarize the basic chemistry and possible benefits of NaDCC, and review the available literature concerning its safety and regulatory treatment and microbiological effectiveness. We review the evidence concerning NaDCC in field studies, including microbiological performance and health outcomes. Finally, we examine studies and data to compare NaDCC with NaOCl in terms of compliance, acceptability, affordability and sustainability, and suggest areas for further research.

  11. Site of anticonvulsant action on sodium channels: autoradiographic and electrophysiological studies in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.F.; Baraban, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    The anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine interact allosterically with the batrachotoxin binding site of sodium channels. In the present study, we demonstrate an autoradiographic technique to localize the batrachotoxin binding site on sodium channels in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxinin-A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B). Binding of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B to brain sections is dependent on potentiating allosteric interactions with scorpion venom and is displaced by BTX-B (Kd approximately 200 nM), aconitine, veratridine, and phenytoin with the same rank order of potencies as described in brain synaptosomes. The maximum number of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites in forebrain sections also agrees with biochemical determinations. Autoradiographic localizations indicate that (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites are not restricted to cell bodies and axons but are present in synaptic zones throughout the brain. For example, a particularly dense concentration of these sites in the substantia nigra is associated with afferent terminals of the striatonigral projection. By contrast, myelinated structures possess much lower densities of binding sites. In addition, we present electrophysiological evidence that synaptic transmission, as opposed to axonal conduction, is preferentially sensitive to the action of aconitine and veratridine. Finally, the synaptic block produced by these sodium channel activators is inhibited by phenytoin and carbamazepine at therapeutic anticonvulsant concentrations.

  12. Sodium channel gene expression associated with pyrethroid resistant house flies and German cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Wang, Haichuan; Zhang, Lee; Liu, Nannan

    2006-09-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channels of the insect nervous system are the primary target of DDT and pyrethroid insecticides. The loss of target site sensitivity to insecticides resulting from a substitution of leucine to phenylalanine, termed the L-to-F kdr mutation, in the sodium channel of the insect nervous system is known to be important in insecticide resistance. Yet, little is known about the molecular basis underlying the genotype and kdr-mediated resistance phenotype relationship. Here we report a systematic study of resistance-associated kdr allelic expression within and among resistant and susceptible house fly and German cockroach populations. We compared genomic DNA and RNA sequences within the same individuals from different insect strains, finding no correlation for the kdr allele at the genomic DNA level with levels of susceptibility or resistance to insecticide. However, there was a strong correlation between kdr allele expression and the levels of insecticide resistance. This correlation is probably regulated through RNA variation and RNA editing. These results suggest a role for posttranscriptional regulation in the connection of the sodium channel genotype and its mutation-mediated resistance phenotype.

  13. Role of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor α in control of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-mediated sodium reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Tengis S; Levchenko, Vladislav; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2014-10-10

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron where it performs sodium reabsorption from the lumen. We have recently shown that ENaC activity contributes to the development of salt-induced hypertension as a result of deficiency of EGF level. Previous studies revealed that Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor α (RhoGDIα) is involved in the control of salt-sensitive hypertension and renal injury via Rac1, which is one of the small GTPases activating ENaC. Here we investigated the intracellular mechanism mediating the involvement of the RhoGDIα/Rac1 axis in the control of ENaC and the effect of EGF on ENaC in this pathway. We demonstrated that RhoGDIα is highly expressed in the cortical collecting ducts of mice and rats, and its expression is down-regulated in Dahl salt-sensitive rats fed a high salt diet. Knockdown of RhoGDIα in cultured cortical collecting duct principal cells increased ENaC subunits expression and ENaC-mediated sodium reabsorption. Furthermore, RhoGDIα deficiency causes enhanced response to EGF treatment. Patch clamp analysis reveals that RhoGDIα significantly decreases ENaC current density and prevents its up-regulation by RhoA and Rac1. Inhibition of Rho kinase with Y27632 had no effects on ENaC response to EGF either in control or RhoGDIα knocked down cells. However, EGF treatment increased levels of active Rac1, which was further enhanced in RhoGDIα-deficient cells. We conclude that changes in the RhoGDIα-dependent pathway have a permissive role in the Rac1-mediated enhancement of ENaC activity observed in salt-induced hypertension.

  14. Multi-site Phosphorylation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel α Subunits from Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Berendt, Frank J.; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of ion channels underlies cellular plasticity in mammalian neurons. Voltage-gated sodium or Nav channels underlie action potential initiation and propagation, dendritic excitability, and many other aspects of neuronal excitability. Various protein kinases have been suggested to phosphorylate the primary α subunit of Nav channels, affecting diverse aspects of channel function. Previous studies of Nav α subunit phosphorylation have led to the identification of a small set of phosphorylation sites important in meditating aspects of Nav channel function. Here we use nanoflow liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC MS/MS) on Nav α subunits affinity-purified from rat brain with two distinct monoclonal antibodies to identify 15 phosphorylation sites on Nav1.2, 12 of which have not been previously reported. We also found 3 novel phosphorylation sites on Nav1.1. In general, commonly used phosphorylation site prediction algorithms did not accurately predict these novel in vivo phosphorylation sites. Our results demonstrate that specific Nav α subunits isolated from rat brain are highly phosphorylated, and suggest extensive modulation of Nav channel activity in mammalian brain. Identification of phosphorylation sites using monoclonal antibody-based immunopurification and mass spectrometry is an effective approach to define the phosphorylation status of Nav channels and important membrane proteins in mammalian brain. PMID:20131913

  15. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of voltage-sensitive sodium channels in primary cultures of rat brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rossie, S.; Catterall, W.A.

    1986-03-05

    The ..cap alpha.. subunit of the voltage-sensitive Na channel from rat brain is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase in purified preparations and in synaptosomes. The authors have begun to study cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of Na channels in intact cells. Rat brain cells collected at embryonic day 15 and maintained in culture for approximately 21 days were subjected to treatments designed to increase intracellular cAMP. Cells were solubilized and Na channels were isolated by immunoprecipitation, then rephosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and /sup 32/P-ATP, to allow incorporation of /sup 32/P into available cAMP-dependent phosphorylation sites of Na channels. The amount of /sup 32/P incorporated into channel is inversely proportional to the extent of endogenous phosphorylation. Treatment of cells with forskolin inhibited rephosphorylation of Na channels, indicating that enhanced endogenous phosphorylation of channels had occurred. The effect of forskolin on cell surface Na channels occurred rapidly, was sustained over 30 min., and was half-maximal at 6..mu..M. 8-Br-cAMP, (EC/sub 50/-5mM) and isobutylmethylxanthine (EC/sub 50/-60..mu..M) also caused inhibition of /sup 32/P incorporation into