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Sample records for sodium channel na

  1. EXPRESS: Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Renuka; Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  2. Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents

    PubMed Central

    Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  3. Lysine and the Na+/K+ Selectivity in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liu, Huihui; Xia, Mengdie; Gong, Haipeng

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are critical in the generation and transmission of neuronal signals in mammals. The crystal structures of several prokaryotic Nav channels determined in recent years inspire the mechanistic studies on their selection upon the permeable cations (especially between Na+ and K+ ions), a property that is proposed to be mainly determined by residues in the selectivity filter. However, the mechanism of cation selection in mammalian Nav channels lacks direct explanation at atomic level due to the difference in amino acid sequences between mammalian and prokaryotic Nav homologues, especially at the constriction site where the DEKA motif has been identified to determine the Na+/K+ selectivity in mammalian Nav channels but is completely absent in the prokaryotic counterparts. Among the DEKA residues, Lys is of the most importance since its mutation to Arg abolishes the Na+/K+ selectivity. In this work, we modeled the pore domain of mammalian Nav channels by mutating the four residues at the constriction site of a prokaryotic Nav channel (NavRh) to DEKA, and then mechanistically investigated the contribution of Lys in cation selection using molecular dynamics simulations. The DERA mutant was generated as a comparison to understand the loss of ion selectivity caused by the K-to-R mutation. Simulations and free energy calculations on the mutants indicate that Lys facilitates Na+/K+ selection by electrostatically repelling the cation to a highly Na+-selective location sandwiched by the carboxylate groups of Asp and Glu at the constriction site. In contrast, the electrostatic repulsion is substantially weakened when Lys is mutated to Arg, because of two intrinsic properties of the Arg side chain: the planar geometric design and the sparse charge distribution of the guanidine group. PMID:27584582

  4. Lysine and the Na+/K+ Selectivity in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mengdie

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are critical in the generation and transmission of neuronal signals in mammals. The crystal structures of several prokaryotic Nav channels determined in recent years inspire the mechanistic studies on their selection upon the permeable cations (especially between Na+ and K+ ions), a property that is proposed to be mainly determined by residues in the selectivity filter. However, the mechanism of cation selection in mammalian Nav channels lacks direct explanation at atomic level due to the difference in amino acid sequences between mammalian and prokaryotic Nav homologues, especially at the constriction site where the DEKA motif has been identified to determine the Na+/K+ selectivity in mammalian Nav channels but is completely absent in the prokaryotic counterparts. Among the DEKA residues, Lys is of the most importance since its mutation to Arg abolishes the Na+/K+ selectivity. In this work, we modeled the pore domain of mammalian Nav channels by mutating the four residues at the constriction site of a prokaryotic Nav channel (NavRh) to DEKA, and then mechanistically investigated the contribution of Lys in cation selection using molecular dynamics simulations. The DERA mutant was generated as a comparison to understand the loss of ion selectivity caused by the K-to-R mutation. Simulations and free energy calculations on the mutants indicate that Lys facilitates Na+/K+ selection by electrostatically repelling the cation to a highly Na+-selective location sandwiched by the carboxylate groups of Asp and Glu at the constriction site. In contrast, the electrostatic repulsion is substantially weakened when Lys is mutated to Arg, because of two intrinsic properties of the Arg side chain: the planar geometric design and the sparse charge distribution of the guanidine group. PMID:27584582

  5. Targeting voltage gated sodium channels NaV1.7, Na V1.8, and Na V1.9 for treatment of pathological cough.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Yukiko; Undem, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) lead to the rational hypothesis that drugs capable of selective blockade of NaV subtypes may be a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of unwanted cough. Among the nine NaV subtypes (NaV1.1-NaV1.9), the afferent nerves involved in initiating cough, in common with nociceptive neurons in the somatosensory system, express mainly NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9. Although knowledge about the effect of selectively blocking these channels on the cough reflex is limited, their biophysical properties indicate that each may contribute to the hypertussive and allotussive state that typifies subacute and chronic nonproductive cough.

  6. Voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) protein dissection creates a set of functional pore-only proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shaya, David; Kreir, Mohamed; Robbins, Rebecca A.; Wong, Stephanie; Hammon, Justus; Brüggemann, Andrea; Minor, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    Many voltage-gated ion channel (VGIC) superfamily members contain six-transmembrane segments in which the first four form a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) and the last two form the pore domain (PD). Studies of potassium channels from the VGIC superfamily together with identification of voltage-sensor only proteins have suggested that the VSD and the PD can fold independently. Whether such transmembrane modularity is common to other VGIC superfamily members has remained untested. Here we show, using protein dissection, that the Silicibacter pomeroyi voltage-gated sodium channel (NaVSp1) PD forms a stand-alone, ion selective pore (NaVSp1p) that is tetrameric, α-helical, and that forms functional, sodium-selective channels when reconstituted into lipid bilayers. Mutation of the NaVSp1p selectivity filter from LESWSM to LDDWSD, a change similar to that previously shown to alter ion selectivity of the bacterial sodium channel NaVBh1 (NaChBac), creates a calcium-selective pore-only channel, CaVSp1p. We further show that production of PDs can be generalized by making pore-only proteins from two other extremophile NaVs: one from the hydrocarbon degrader Alcanivorax borkumensis (NaVAb1p), and one from the arsenite oxidizer Alkalilimnicola ehrlichei (NaVAe1p). Together, our data establish a family of active pore-only ion channels that should be excellent model systems for study of the factors that govern both sodium and calcium selectivity and permeability. Further, our findings suggest that similar dissection approaches may be applicable to a wide range of VGICs and, thus, serve as a means to simplify and accelerate biophysical, structural, and drug development efforts. PMID:21746903

  7. Contribution of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels to action potential electrogenesis in DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Renganathan, M; Cummins, T R; Waxman, S G

    2001-08-01

    C-type dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons can generate tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium-dependent action potentials. However, multiple sodium channels are expressed in these neurons, and the molecular identity of the TTX-R sodium channels that contribute to action potential production in these neurons has not been established. In this study, we used current-clamp recordings to compare action potential electrogenesis in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) and (-/-) small DRG neurons maintained for 2-8 h in vitro to examine the role of sodium channel Na(v)1.8 (alpha-SNS) in action potential electrogenesis. Although there was no significant difference in resting membrane potential, input resistance, current threshold, or voltage threshold in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) and (-/-) DRG neurons, there were significant differences in action potential electrogenesis. Most Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons generate all-or-none action potentials, whereas most of Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons produce smaller graded responses. The peak of the response was significantly reduced in Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons [31.5 +/- 2.2 (SE) mV] compared with Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons (55.0 +/- 4.3 mV). The maximum rise slope was 84.7 +/- 11.2 mV/ms in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons, significantly faster than in Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons where it was 47.2 +/- 1.3 mV/ms. Calculations based on the action potential overshoot in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) and (-/-) neurons, following blockade of Ca(2+) currents, indicate that Na(v)1.8 contributes a substantial fraction (80-90%) of the inward membrane current that flows during the rising phase of the action potential. We found that fast TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels can produce all-or-none action potentials in some Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons but, presumably as a result of steady-state inactivation of these channels, electrogenesis in Na(v)1.8 (-/-) neurons is more sensitive to membrane depolarization than in Na(v)1.8 (+/+) neurons, and, in the absence of Na(v)1.8, is attenuated with even modest depolarization. These observations

  8. Axotomy does not up-regulate expression of sodium channel Na(v)1.8 in Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Black, J A; Dusart, I; Sotelo, C; Waxman, S G

    2002-05-30

    Aberrant expression of the sensory neuron specific (SNS) sodium channel Na(v)1.8 has been demonstrated in cerebellar Purkinje cells in experimental models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in human MS. The aberrant expression of Na(v)1.8, which is normally present in primary sensory neurons but not in the CNS, may perturb cerebellar function, but the mechanisms that trigger it are not understood. Because axotomy can provoke changes in Na(v)1.8 expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, we tested the hypothesis that axotomy can provoke an up-regulation of Na(v)1.8 expression in Purkinje cells, using a surgical model that transects axons of Purkinje cells in lobules IIIb-VII in the rat. In situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry did not reveal an up-regulation of Na(v)1.8 mRNA or protein in axotomized Purkinje cells. Hybridization and immunostaining signals for the sodium channel Na(v)1.6 were clearly present, demonstrating that sodium channel transcripts and protein were present in experimental cerebella. These results demonstrate that axotomy does not trigger the expression of Na(v)1.8 in Purkinje cells. PMID:12007840

  9. Sensory neuron proteins interact with the intracellular domains of sodium channel NaV1.8.

    PubMed

    Malik-Hall, Misbah; Poon, W-Y Louisa; Baker, Mark D; Wood, John N; Okuse, Kenji

    2003-02-20

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate and propagate action potentials in excitable cells. The tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) channel (Na(V)1.8/SNS) is expressed in damage-sensing neurons (nociceptors) and plays an important role in pain pathways. Expression of high levels of functional Na(V)1.8 in heterologous cells has proved problematic, even in the presence of known sodium channel accessory beta-subunits. This suggests that other regulatory proteins are required for normal levels of Na(V)1.8 expression. Here we report the use of a yeast two-hybrid system and a rat dorsal root ganglion cDNA library to identify 28 different clones encoding proteins which interact with intracellular domains of Na(V)1.8. Many clones are expressed at high levels in small diameter DRG neurons as judged by in situ hybridization. Interacting proteins include cytoplasmic elements and linker proteins (e.g. beta-actin and moesin), enzymes (e.g. inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase and TAO2 thousand and one protein kinase), channels and membrane-associated proteins (voltage-dependent anion channel VDAC3V and tetraspanin), as well as motor proteins (dynein intermediate and light chain) and transcripts encoding previously undescribed proteins. Immunoprecipitation (pull-down) assays confirm that some of the proteins interact with, and may hence regulate, Na(V)1.8 in vivo. PMID:12591166

  10. Down regulation of sodium channel Na(v)1.1 expression by veratridine and its reversal by a novel sodium channel blocker, RS100642, in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jitendra R; Yao, Changping; Moffett, John R; Berti, Rossana; Koenig, Michael; Tortella, Frank C

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of veratridine-induced neuronal toxicity on sodium channel gene (NaCh) expression in primary forebrain cultures enriched in neurons, and its reversal by a novel sodium channel blocker, RS100642. Using quantitative RT-PCR, our findings demonstrated the expression ratio of NaCh genes in normal fetal rat forebrain neurons to be Na(v)1.2 > Na(v)1.3 > Na(v)1.8 > Na(v)1.1 > Na(v)1.7 (rBII > rBIII > PN3 > rBI > PN1). Veratridine treatment of neuronal cells produced neurotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner (0.25-20 micro M). Neuronal injury caused by a dose of veratridine producing 80% cell death (2.5 micro M) significantly, and exclusively down-regulated the Na(v)1.1 gene. However, treatment of neurons with RS100642 (200 micro M) reversed the down-regulation of the Na(v)1.1 gene expression caused by veratridine. Our findings document for the first time quantitative and relative changes in the expression of various NaCh genes in neurons following injury produced by selective activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, and suggest that the Na(v)1.1 sodium channel gene may play a key role in the neuronal injury/recovery process.

  11. Inhibition of neuropathic pain by decreased expression of the tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel, NaV1.8.

    PubMed

    Lai, Josephine; Gold, Michael S; Kim, Chang Sook; Bian, Di; Ossipov, Michael H; Hunter, John C; Porreca, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating chronic syndrome that often arises from injuries to peripheral nerves. Such pain has been hypothesized to be the result of an aberrant expression and function of sodium channels at the site of injury. Here, we show that intrathecal administration of specific antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) to the peripheral tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant sodium channel, NaV1.8, resulted in a time-dependent uptake of the ODN by dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, a selective "knock-down" of the expression of NaV1.8, and a reduction in the slow-inactivating, TTX-resistant sodium current in the DRG cells. The ODN treatment also reversed neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve injury, without affecting non-noxious sensation or response to acute pain. These data provide direct evidence linking NaV1.8 to neuropathic pain. As NaV1.8 expression is restricted to sensory neurons, this channel offers a highly specific and effective molecular target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:11790477

  12. Sodium channel diversity in the vestibular ganglion: NaV1.5, NaV1.8, and tetrodotoxin-sensitive currents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ping; Wooltorton, Julian R A; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Yang, Fu-Chia; Lysakowski, Anna; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2016-05-01

    Firing patterns differ between subpopulations of vestibular primary afferent neurons. The role of sodium (NaV) channels in this diversity has not been investigated because NaV currents in rodent vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) were reported to be homogeneous, with the voltage dependence and tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitivity of most neuronal NaV channels. RT-PCR experiments, however, indicated expression of diverse NaV channel subunits in the vestibular ganglion, motivating a closer look. Whole cell recordings from acutely dissociated postnatal VGNs confirmed that nearly all neurons expressed NaV currents that are TTX-sensitive and have activation midpoints between -30 and -40 mV. In addition, however, many VGNs expressed one of two other NaV currents. Some VGNs had a small current with properties consistent with NaV1.5 channels: low TTX sensitivity, sensitivity to divalent cation block, and a relatively negative voltage range, and some VGNs showed NaV1.5-like immunoreactivity. Other VGNs had a current with the properties of NaV1.8 channels: high TTX resistance, slow time course, and a relatively depolarized voltage range. In two NaV1.8 reporter lines, subsets of VGNs were labeled. VGNs with NaV1.8-like TTX-resistant current also differed from other VGNs in the voltage dependence of their TTX-sensitive currents and in the voltage threshold for spiking and action potential shape. Regulated expression of NaV channels in primary afferent neurons is likely to selectively affect firing properties that contribute to the encoding of vestibular stimuli. PMID:26936982

  13. Physiological interactions between Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.8 sodium channels: a computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Sung; Waxman, Stephen G

    2011-12-01

    We have examined the question of how the level of expression of sodium channel Na(v)1.8 affects the function of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that also express Na(v)1.7 channels and, conversely, how the level of expression of sodium channel Na(v)1.7 affects the function of DRG neurons that also express Na(v)1.8, using computer simulations. Our results demonstrate several previously undescribed effects of expression of Na(v)1.7: 1) at potentials more negative than -50 mV, increasing Na(v)1.7 expression reduces current threshold. 2) Na(v)1.7 reduces, but does not eliminate, the dependence of action potential (AP) threshold on membrane potential. 3) In cells that express Na(v)1.8, the presence of Na(v)1.7 results in larger amplitude subthreshold oscillations and increases the frequency of repetitive firing. Our results also demonstrate multiple effects of expression of Na(v)1.8: 1) dependence of current threshold on membrane potential is eliminated or reversed by expression of Na(v)1.8 at ≥50% of normal values. 2) Expression of Na(v)1.8 alone, in the absence of Na(v)1.7, can support subthreshold oscillation. 3) Na(v)1.8 is required for generation of overshooting APs, and its expression results in a prolonged AP with an inflection of the falling phase. 4) Increasing levels of expression of Na(v)1.8 result in a reduction in the voltage threshold for AP generation. 5) Increasing levels of expression of Na(v)1.8 result in an attenuation of Na(v)1.7 current during activity evoked by sustained depolarization due, at least in part, to accumulation of fast inactivation by Na(v)1.7 following the first AP. These results indicate that changes in the level of expression of Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.8 may provide a regulatory mechanism that tunes the excitability of small DRG neurons. PMID:21940606

  14. A sodium channel knockin mutant (NaV1.4-R669H) mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Burns, Dennis K.; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F.; Struyk, Arie F.; Cannon, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is an ion channelopathy of skeletal muscle characterized by attacks of muscle weakness associated with low serum K+. HypoPP results from a transient failure of muscle fiber excitability. Mutations in the genes encoding a calcium channel (CaV1.1) and a sodium channel (NaV1.4) have been identified in HypoPP families. Mutations of NaV1.4 give rise to a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders, with gain-of-function defects causing myotonia or hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. To address the question of specificity for the allele encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant as a cause of HypoPP and to produce a model system in which to characterize functional defects of the mutant channel and susceptibility to paralysis, we generated knockin mice carrying the ortholog of the gene encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant (referred to herein as R669H mice). Homozygous R669H mice had a robust HypoPP phenotype, with transient loss of muscle excitability and weakness in low-K+ challenge, insensitivity to high-K+ challenge, dominant inheritance, and absence of myotonia. Recovery was sensitive to the Na+/K+-ATPase pump inhibitor ouabain. Affected fibers had an anomalous inward current at hyperpolarized potentials, consistent with the proposal that a leaky gating pore in R669H channels triggers attacks, whereas a reduction in the amplitude of action potentials implies additional loss-of-function changes for the mutant NaV1.4 channels. PMID:21881211

  15. Tracking S4 movement by gating pore currents in the bacterial sodium channel NaChBac.

    PubMed

    Gamal El-Din, Tamer M; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2014-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels mediate the initiation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. Transmembrane segment S4 of voltage-gated sodium channels resides in a gating pore where it senses the membrane potential and controls channel gating. Substitution of individual S4 arginine gating charges (R1-R3) with smaller amino acids allows ionic currents to flow through the mutant gating pore, and these gating pore currents are pathogenic in some skeletal muscle periodic paralysis syndromes. The voltage dependence of gating pore currents provides information about the transmembrane position of the gating charges as S4 moves in response to membrane potential. Here we studied gating pore current in mutants of the homotetrameric bacterial sodium channel NaChBac in which individual arginine gating charges were replaced by cysteine. Gating pore current was observed for each mutant channel, but with different voltage-dependent properties. Mutating the first (R1C) or second (R2C) arginine to cysteine resulted in gating pore current at hyperpolarized membrane potentials, where the channels are in resting states, but not at depolarized potentials, where the channels are activated. Conversely, the R3C gating pore is closed at hyperpolarized membrane potentials and opens with channel activation. Negative conditioning pulses revealed time-dependent deactivation of the R3C gating pore at the most hyperpolarized potentials. Our results show sequential voltage dependence of activation of gating pore current from R1 to R3 and support stepwise outward movement of the substituted cysteines through the narrow portion of the gating pore that is sealed by the arginine side chains in the wild-type channel. This pattern of voltage dependence of gating pore current is consistent with a sliding movement of the S4 helix through the gating pore. Through comparison with high-resolution models of the voltage sensor of bacterial sodium channels, these results shed light on the

  16. The role of Na(V)1.8 sodium channel in the maintenance of chronic inflammatory hypernociception.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Cristiane Flora; Sachs, Daniela; Cunha, Fernando de Queiroz; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Ferreira, Sérgio Henrique

    2005-09-30

    We previously described an animal model of persistent inflammatory sensitization of nociceptors. In this model the hypernociception persists for more than 30 days after the cessation of 2 weeks of daily intraplantar treatment with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). The tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.8 is considered a characteristic of primary afferent nociceptive C fibers and plays an important role in acute hypernociception. In the present study, the relevance of the Na(V)1.8 channel was investigated in this model of persistent mechanical hypernociception in rats. In the PGE(2)-induced persistent hypernociception, but not in the single injection-induced acute hypernociception, the mRNA expression (RT-PCR) of Na(V)1.8 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was up-regulated. A similar increase of Na(V)1.8 mRNA was observed when DbcAMP was used to induce persistent hypernociception. Four daily intrathecal administrations of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) antisense against Na(V)1.8 decreased the mRNA encoding Na(V)1.8 in DRG. The intrathecal administration of ODN antisense prevented the PGE(2)-induced acute hypernociception and significantly reduced ongoing PGE(2)-induced persistent hypernociception. A parallel restoration of the persistent hypernociception and up-regulation of Na(V)1.8 mRNA was observed after the cessation of ODN antisense treatment. These results suggest the participation of Na(V)1.8 channels in the development and maintenance of chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia, and confirm their involvement in the acute inflammatory hypernociception. PMID:16043287

  17. Activation of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel NaV1.9 in rat primary sensory neurons contributes to melittin-induced pain behavior.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao-Qing; Zhao, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Xue-Feng; Xie, Fang; Yang, Yan; Chen, Jun

    2013-03-01

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons play important roles in pathological pain. We recently reported that melittin, the major toxin of whole bee venom, induced action potential firings in DRG neurons even in the presence of a high concentration (500 nM) of TTX, indicating the contribution of TTX-R sodium channels. This hypothesis is fully investigated in the present study. After subcutaneous injection of melittin, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 significantly upregulate mRNA and protein expressions, and related sodium currents also increase. Double immunohistochemical results show that NaV1.8-positive neurons are mainly medium- and small-sized, whereas NaV1.9-positive ones are only small-sized. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS ODNs) targeting NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 are used to evaluate functional significance of the increased expressions of TTX-R sodium channels. Behavioral tests demonstrate that AS ODN targeting NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8, reverses melittin-induced heat hypersensitivity. Neither NaV1.8 AS ODN nor NaV1.9 AS ODN affects melittin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These results provide previously unknown evidence that upregulation of NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8, in small-sized DRG neurons contributes to melittin-induced heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, melittin-induced biological effect indicates a potential strategy to study properties of TTX-R sodium channels. PMID:23264124

  18. Sodium Channel Inhibiting Marine Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn, Lyndon E.

    Saxitoxin (STX), tetrodotoxin (TTX) and their many chemical relatives are part of our daily lives. From killing people who eat seafood containing these toxins, to being valuable research tools unveiling the invisible structures of their pharmacological receptor, their global impact is beyond measure. The pharmacological receptor for these toxins is the voltage-gated sodium channel which transports Na ions between the exterior to the interior of cells. The two structurally divergent families of STX and TTX analogues bind at the same location on these Na channels to stop the flow of ions. This can affect nerves, muscles and biological senses of most animals. It is through these and other toxins that we have developed much of our fundamental understanding of the Na channel and its part in generating action potentials in excitable cells.

  19. Sodium channel Na(v)1.7 is essential for lowering heat pain threshold after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Shields, Shannon D; Cheng, Xiaoyang; Uçeyler, Nurcan; Sommer, Claudia; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-08-01

    Marked hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical (pressure) stimuli develop after a burn injury, but the neural mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood. In this study, we establish a new mouse model of focal second-degree burn injury to investigate the molecular and cellular basis for burn injury-induced pain. This model features robust injury-induced behavioral effects and tissue-specific altered cytokine profile, but absence of glial activation in spinal dorsal horn. Three voltage-gated sodium channels, Na(v)1.7, Na(v)1.8, and Na(v)1.9, are preferentially expressed in peripheral somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and have been implicated in injury-induced neuronal hyperexcitability. Using knock-out mice, we provide evidence that Na(v)1.7 selectively contributes to burn-induced hypersensitivity to heat, but not mechanical, stimuli. After burn model injury, wild-type mice display increased sensitivity to heat stimuli, and a normally non-noxious warm stimulus induces activity-dependent Fos expression in spinal dorsal horn neurons. Strikingly, both effects are absent in Na(v)1.7 conditional knock-out (cKO) mice. Furthermore, burn injury increases density and shifts activation of tetrodotoxin-sensitive currents in a hyperpolarized direction, both pro-excitatory properties, in DRG neurons from wild-type but not Na(v)1.7 cKO mice. We propose that, in sensory neurons damaged by burn injury to the hindpaw, Na(v)1.7 currents contribute to the hyperexcitability of sensory neurons, their communication with postsynaptic spinal pain pathways, and behavioral thresholds to heat stimuli. Our results offer insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of modality-specific pain signaling, and suggest Na(v)1.7-blocking drugs may be effective in burn patients. PMID:22875917

  20. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanck, Dorothy A.; Fozzard, Harry A.

    Voltage-gated sodium channels subserve regenerative excitation throughout the nervous system, as well as in skeletal and cardiac muscle. This excitation results from a voltage-dependent mechanism that increases regeneratively and selectively the sodium conductance of the channel e-fold for a 4-7 mV depolarization of the membrane with time constants in the range of tens of microseconds. Entry of Na+ into the cell without a companion anion depolarizes the cell. This depolarization, called the action potential, is propagated at rates of 1-20 meters/sec. In nerve it subserves rapid transmission of information and, in muscle cells, coordinates the trigger for contraction. Sodium-dependent action potentials depolarize the membrane to inside positive values of about 30-40 mV (approaching the electrochemical potential for the transmembrane sodium gradient). Repolarization to the resting potential (usually between -60 and -90 mV) occurs because of inactivation (closure) of sodium channels, which is assisted in different tissues by variable amounts of activation of voltage-gated potassium channels. This sequence results in all-or-nothing action potentials in nerve and fast skeletal muscle of 1-2 ms duration, and in heart muscle of 100-300 ms duration. Recovery of regenerative excitation, i.e., recovery of the ability of sodium channels to open, occurs after restoration of the resting potential with time constants of a few to several hundreds of milliseconds, depending on the channel isoform, and this rate controls the minimum interval for repetitive action potentials (refractory period).

  1. Targeting Voltage Gated Sodium Channels NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9 for Treatment of Pathological Cough

    PubMed Central

    Muroi, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) lead to the rational hypothesis that drugs capable of selective blockade of NaV subtypes may be a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of unwanted cough. Among the nine NaV subtypes (NaV1.1–NaV1.9), the afferent nerves involved in initiating cough, in common with nociceptive neurons in the somatosensory system, express mainly NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9. Although knowledge about the effect of selectively blocking these channels on the cough reflex is limited, their biophysical properties indicate that each may contribute to the hypertussive and allotussive state that typifies subacute and chronic nonproductive cough. PMID:24272479

  2. Epigenetics of epithelial Na+ channel-dependent sodium uptake and blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenzheng

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) consists of α, β, γ subunits. Its expression and function are regulated by aldosterone at multiple levels including transcription. ENaC plays a key role in Na+ homeostasis and blood pressure. Mutations in ENaC subunit genes result in hypertension or hypotension, depending on the nature of the mutations. Transcription of αENaC is considered as the rate-limiting step in the formation of functional ENaC. As an aldosterone target gene, αENaC is activated upon aldosterone- mineralocorticoid receptor binding to the cis-elements in the αENaC promoter, which is packed into chromatin. However, how aldosterone alters chromatin structure to induce changes in transcription is poorly understood. Studies by others and us suggest that Dot1a-Af9 complex represses αENaC by directly binding and regulating targeted histone H3 K79 hypermethylation at the specific subregions of αENaC promoter. Aldosterone decreases Dot1a-Af9 formation by impairing expression of Dot1a and Af9 and by inducing Sgk1, which, in turn, phosphorylates Af9 at S435 to weaken Dot1a-Af9 interaction. MR attenuates Dot1a-Af9 effect by competing with Dot1a for binding Af9. Af17 relieves repression by interfering with Dot1a-Af9 interaction and promoting Dot1a nuclear export. Af17-/- mice exhibit defects in ENaC expression, renal Na+ retention, and blood pressure control. This review gives a brief summary of these novel findings. PMID:26167459

  3. Distinct interactions of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} ions with the selectivity filter of the bacterial sodium channel Na{sub V}Ab

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Song; Zangerl, Eva-Maria; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► Ca{sup 2+} translocates slowly in the filter, due to lack of “loose” knock-on mechanism. ► Identification of a high affinity binding site in Na{sub V}Ab selectivity filter. ► Changes of EEEE locus triggered by electrostatic interactions with Ca{sup 2+} ions. -- Abstract: Rapid and selective ion transport is essential for the generation and regulation of electrical signaling pathways in living organisms. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to investigate how the bacterial sodium channel Na{sub V}Ab (Arcobacter butzleri) differentiates between Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} ions. Multiple nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations revealed distinct binding patterns for these two cations in the selectivity filter and suggested a high affinity calcium binding site formed by backbone atoms of residues Leu-176 and Thr-175 (S{sub CEN}) in the sodium channel selectivity filter.

  4. Small interfering RNA-mediated selective knockdown of Na(V)1.8 tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel reverses mechanical allodynia in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, X-W; Goregoaker, S; Engler, H; Zhou, X; Mark, L; Crona, J; Terry, R; Hunter, J; Priestley, T

    2007-05-11

    The biophysical properties of a tetrodotoxin resistant (TTXr) sodium channel, Na(V)1.8, and its restricted expression to the peripheral sensory neurons suggest that blocking this channel might have therapeutic potential in various pain states and may offer improved tolerability compared with existing sodium channel blockers. However, the role of Na(V)1.8 in nociception cannot be tested using a traditional pharmacological approach with small molecules because currently available sodium channel blockers do not distinguish between sodium channel subtypes. We sought to determine whether small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) might be capable of achieving the desired selectivity. Using Northern blot analysis and membrane potential measurement, several siRNAs were identified that were capable of a highly-selective attenuation of Na(V)1.8 message as well as functional expression in clonal ND7/23 cells which were stably transfected with the rat Na(V)1.8 gene. Functional knockdown of the channel was confirmed using whole-cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology. One of the siRNA probes showing a robust knockdown of Na(V)1.8 current was evaluated for in vivo efficacy in reversing an established tactile allodynia in the rat chronic constriction nerve-injury (CCI) model. The siRNA, which was delivered to lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) via an indwelling epidural cannula, caused a significant reduction of Na(V)1.8 mRNA expression in lumbar 4 and 5 (L4-L5) DRG neurons and consequently reversed mechanical allodynia in CCI rats. We conclude that silencing of Na(V)1.8 channel using a siRNA approach is capable of producing pain relief in the CCI model and further support a role for Na(V)1.8 in pathological sensory dysfunction. PMID:17367951

  5. Divergent actions of the pyrethroid insecticides S-bioallethrin, tefluthrin, and deltamethrin on rat Na(v)1.6 sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianguo; Soderlund, David M

    2010-09-15

    We expressed rat Na(v)1.6 sodium channels in combination with the rat beta(1) and beta(2) auxiliary subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes and evaluated the effects of the pyrethroid insecticides S-bioallethrin, deltamethrin, and tefluthrin on expressed sodium currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. S-Bioallethrin, a type I structure, produced transient modification evident in the induction of rapidly decaying sodium tail currents, weak resting modification (5.7% modification at 100 microM), and no further enhancement of modification upon repetitive activation by high-frequency trains of depolarizing pulses. By contrast deltamethrin, a type II structure, produced sodium tail currents that were ~9-fold more persistent than those caused by S-bioallethrin, barely detectable resting modification (2.5% modification at 100 microM), and 3.7-fold enhancement of modification upon repetitive activation. Tefluthrin, a type I structure with high mammalian toxicity, exhibited properties intermediate between S-bioallethrin and deltamethrin: intermediate tail current decay kinetics, much greater resting modification (14.1% at 100 microM), and 2.8-fold enhancement of resting modification upon repetitive activation. Comparison of concentration-effect data showed that repetitive depolarization increased the potency of tefluthrin approximately 15-fold and that tefluthrin was approximately 10-fold more potent than deltamethrin as a use-dependent modifier of Na(v)1.6 sodium channels. Concentration-effect data from parallel experiments with the rat Na(v)1.2 sodium channel coexpressed with the rat beta(1) and beta(2) subunits in oocytes showed that the Na(v)1.6 isoform was at least 15-fold more sensitive to tefluthrin and deltamethrin than the Na(v)1.2 isoform. These results implicate sodium channels containing the Na(v)1.6 isoform as potential targets for the central neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids.

  6. Point mutations at the local anesthetic receptor site modulate the state-dependent block of rat Na v1.4 sodium channels by pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2007-05-01

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides (PTIs) selectively block sodium channels at membrane potentials that promote slow sodium channel inactivation and are proposed to interact with a site that overlaps the local anesthetic (LA) receptor site. Mutagenesis studies identified two amino acid residues in the S6 segment of homology domain IV (Phe-1579 and Tyr-1586 in the rat Na(v)1.4 sodium channel) as principal elements of the LA receptor. To test the hypothesis that PTIs bind to the LA receptor, we constructed mutated Na(v)1.4/F1579A and Na(v)1.4/Y1586A cDNAs, expressed native and mutated channels in Xenopus oocytes, and examined the effects of these mutations on channel block by three PTIs (indoxacarb, its bioactivation product DCJW, and RH3421) by two-electrode voltage clamp. DCJW and RH3421 had no effect on Na(v)1.4 channels held at -120mV but caused a slowly developing block upon depolarization to -30mV. Estimated IC(50) values following 15min of exposure were 1 and 4muM for DCJW and RH3421, respectively. Indoxacarb failed to block Na(v)1.4 channels under all experimental conditions. Sensitivity to block by DCJW and RH3421 at -30mV was significantly reduced in Na(v)1.4/F1579A channels, a finding that is consistent with the impact of this mutation on drug binding. In contrast to its effect on drug binding, the Y1586A mutation increased the sensitivity of Na(v)1.4 channels held at -30mV to all three compounds, conferring modest sensitivity to indoxacarb and increasing sensitivity to DCJW and RH3421 by 58- and 16-fold, respectively. These results provide direct evidence for the action of PTIs at the LA receptor.

  7. CAP-1A is a novel linker that binds clathrin and the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.8.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuanju; Cummins, Theodore R; Tyrrell, Lynda; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D

    2005-04-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.8 produces a tetrodotoxin-resistant current and plays a key role in nociception. Annexin II/p11 binds to Na(v)1.8 and facilitates insertion of the channel within the cell membrane. However, the mechanisms responsible for removal of specific channels from the cell membrane have not been studied. We have identified a novel protein, clathrin-associated protein-1A (CAP-1A), which contains distinct domains that bind Na(v)1.8 and clathrin. CAP-1A is abundantly expressed in DRG neurons and colocalizes with Na(v)1.8 and can form a multiprotein complex with Na(v)1.8 and clathrin. Coexpression of CAP-1A and Na(v)1.8 in DRG neurons reduces Na(v)1.8 current density by approximately 50% without affecting the endogenous or recombinant tetrodotoxin-sensitive currents. This effect of CAP-1A is blocked by bafilomycin A1 treatment of transfected DRG neurons. CAP-1A thus is the first example of an adapter protein that links clathrin and a sodium channel and may regulate Na(v)1.8 channel density at the cell surface. PMID:15797711

  8. Tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels Na(v)1.8/SNS and Na(v)1.9/NaN in afferent neurons innervating urinary bladder in control and spinal cord injured rats.

    PubMed

    Black, Joel A; Cummins, Theodore R; Yoshimura, Naoki; de Groat, William C; Waxman, Stephen G

    2003-02-14

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels Na(v)1.8/SNS and Na(v)1.9/NaN are preferentially expressed in small diameter dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. The urinary bladder is innervated by small afferent neurons from L6/S1 DRG, of which approximately 75% exhibit high-threshold action potentials that are mediated by TTX-R sodium channels. Following transection of the spinal cord at T8, the bladder becomes areflexic and then gradually hyper-reflexic, and there is an attenuation of the TTX-R sodium currents in bladder afferent neurons. In the present study, we demonstrate that Na(v)1.8 is expressed in both bladder and non-bladder afferent neurons, while Na(v)1.9 is expressed in non-bladder afferent neurons but is rarely observed in bladder afferent neurons. In spinal cord transected rats 28-32 days following transection, there is a decreased expression of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels in bladder afferents, but no change in the expression of Na(v)1.8 in non-bladder afferent neurons. Both bladder and non-bladder afferent neurons exhibit limited increases in Na(v)1.9 expression following spinal cord transection. These results demonstrate that the expression of TTX-R channels in bladder afferent neurons changes after spinal cord transection, and these changes may contribute to the increased excitability of these neurons following spinal cord injury. PMID:12560118

  9. Glial-derived neurotrophic factor upregulates expression of functional SNS and NaN sodium channels and their currents in axotomized dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Cummins, T R; Black, J A; Dib-Hajj, S D; Waxman, S G

    2000-12-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons produce multiple sodium currents, including several different TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) currents and TTX-resistant (TTX-R) currents, which are produced by distinct sodium channels. We previously demonstrated that, after sciatic nerve transection, the levels of SNS and NaN sodium channel alpha-subunit transcripts and protein in small (18-30 micrometer diameter) DRG neurons are reduced, as are the amplitudes and densities of the slowly inactivating and persistent TTX-R currents produced by these two channels. In this study, we asked whether glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which has been shown to prevent some axotomy-induced changes such as the loss of somatostatin expression in DRG neurons, can ameliorate the axotomy-induced downregulation of SNS and NaN TTX-R sodium channels. We show here that exposure to GDNF can significantly increase both slowly inactivating and persistent TTX-R sodium currents, which are paralleled by increases in SNS and NaN mRNA and protein levels, in axotomized DRG neurons in vitro. We also show that intrathecally administered GDNF increases the amplitudes of the slowly inactivating and persistent TTX-R currents, and SNS and NaN protein levels, in peripherally axotomized DRG neurons in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that GDNF upregulates the persistent TTX-R current in SNS-null mice, thus demonstrating that the upregulated persistent sodium current is not produced by SNS. Because TTX-R sodium channels have been shown to be important in nociception, the effects of GDNF on axotomized DRG neurons may have important implications for the regulation of nociceptive signaling by these cells. PMID:11102483

  10. Sodium channels and pain.

    PubMed

    Habib, Abdella M; Wood, John N; Cox, James J

    2015-01-01

    Human and mouse genetic studies have led to significant advances in our understanding of the role of voltage-gated sodium channels in pain pathways. In this chapter, we focus on Nav1.7, Nav1.8, Nav1.9 and Nav1.3 and describe the insights gained from the detailed analyses of global and conditional transgenic Nav knockout mice in terms of pain behaviour. The spectrum of human disorders caused by mutations in these channels is also outlined, concluding with a summary of recent progress in the development of selective Nav1.7 inhibitors for the treatment of pain. PMID:25846613

  11. Cell membrane expression of cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 is modulated by alpha-actinin-2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Ziane, Rahima; Huang, Hai; Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Beggs, Alan H; Levesque, Georges; Chahine, Mohamed

    2010-01-12

    Cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 plays a critical role in heart excitability and conduction. The molecular mechanism that underlies the expression of Na(v)1.5 at the cell membrane is poorly understood. Previous studies demonstrated that cytoskeleton proteins can be involved in the regulation of cell surface expression and localization of several ion channels. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify Na(v)1.5-associated proteins that may be involved in channel function and expression. We identified alpha-actinin-2 as an interacting partner of the cytoplasmic loop connecting domains III and IV of Na(v)1.5 (Na(v)1.5/LIII-IV). Co-immunoprecipitation and His(6) pull-down assays confirmed the physical association between Na(v)1.5 and alpha-actinin-2 and showed that the spectrin-like repeat domain is essential for binding of alpha-actinin-2 to Na(v)1.5. Patch-clamp studies revealed that the interaction with alpha-actinin-2 increases sodium channel density without changing their gating properties. Consistent with these findings, coexpression of alpha-actinin-2 and Na(v)1.5 in tsA201 cells led to an increase in the level of expression of Na(v)1.5 at the cell membrane as determined by cell surface biotinylation. Lastly, immunostaining experiments showed that alpha-actinin-2 was colocalized with Na(v)1.5 along the Z-lines and in the plasma membrane. Our data suggest that alpha-actinin-2, which is known to regulate the functional expression of the potassium channels, may play a role in anchoring Na(v)1.5 to the membrane by connecting the channel to the actin cytoskeleton network.

  12. Lidocaine promotes the trafficking and functional expression of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Ziane, Rahima; Chatelier, Aurélien; O'leary, Michael E; Chahine, Mohamed

    2007-07-01

    Nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) express a combination of rapidly gating TTX-sensitive and slowly gating TTX-resistant Na currents, and the channels that produce these currents have been cloned. The Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.8 channels encode for the rapidly inactivating TTX-sensitive and slowly inactivating TTX-resistant Na currents, respectively. Although the Na(v)1.7 channel expresses well in cultured mammalian cell lines, attempts to express the Na(v)1.8 channel using similar approaches has been met with limited success. The inability to heterologously express Na(v)1.8 has hampered detailed characterization of the biophysical properties and pharmacology of these channels. In this study, we investigated the determinants of Na(v)1.8 expression in tsA201 cells, a transformed variant of HEK293 cells, using a combination of biochemistry, immunochemistry, and electrophysiology. Our data indicate that the unusually low expression levels of Na(v)1.8 in tsA201 cells results from a trafficking defect that traps the channel protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. Incubating the cultured cells with the local anesthetic lidocaine dramatically enhanced the cell surface expression of functional Na(v)1.8 channels. The biophysical properties of the heterologously expressed Na(v)1.8 channel are similar but not identical to those of the TTX-resistant Na current of native DRG neurons, recorded under similar conditions. Our data indicate that the lidocaine acts as a molecular chaperone that promotes efficient trafficking and increased cell surface expression of Na(v)1.8 channels. PMID:17507497

  13. Lidocaine promotes the trafficking and functional expression of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Ziane, Rahima; Chatelier, Aurélien; O'leary, Michael E; Chahine, Mohamed

    2007-07-01

    Nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) express a combination of rapidly gating TTX-sensitive and slowly gating TTX-resistant Na currents, and the channels that produce these currents have been cloned. The Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.8 channels encode for the rapidly inactivating TTX-sensitive and slowly inactivating TTX-resistant Na currents, respectively. Although the Na(v)1.7 channel expresses well in cultured mammalian cell lines, attempts to express the Na(v)1.8 channel using similar approaches has been met with limited success. The inability to heterologously express Na(v)1.8 has hampered detailed characterization of the biophysical properties and pharmacology of these channels. In this study, we investigated the determinants of Na(v)1.8 expression in tsA201 cells, a transformed variant of HEK293 cells, using a combination of biochemistry, immunochemistry, and electrophysiology. Our data indicate that the unusually low expression levels of Na(v)1.8 in tsA201 cells results from a trafficking defect that traps the channel protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. Incubating the cultured cells with the local anesthetic lidocaine dramatically enhanced the cell surface expression of functional Na(v)1.8 channels. The biophysical properties of the heterologously expressed Na(v)1.8 channel are similar but not identical to those of the TTX-resistant Na current of native DRG neurons, recorded under similar conditions. Our data indicate that the lidocaine acts as a molecular chaperone that promotes efficient trafficking and increased cell surface expression of Na(v)1.8 channels.

  14. Structure-activity relationships for the action of 11 pyrethroid insecticides on rat Na v 1.8 sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Sung; Soderlund, David M

    2006-03-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-sensitive sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting nerve function. This paper describes the action of 11 structurally diverse commercial pyrethroid insecticides on the rat Na v 1.8 sodium channel isoform, the principal carrier of the tetrodotoxin-resistant, pyrethroid-sensitive sodium current of sensory neurons, expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. All 11 compounds produced characteristic sodium tail currents following a depolarizing pulse that ranged from rapidly-decaying monoexponential currents (allethrin, cismethrin and permethrin) to persistent biexponential currents (cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin). Tail currents for the remaining compounds (bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate and tefluthrin) were monoexponential and decayed with kinetics intermediate between these extremes. Reconstruction of currents carried solely by the pyrethroid-modified subpopulation of channels revealed two types of pyrethroid-modified currents. The first type, found with cismethrin, allethrin, permethrin and tefluthrin, activated relatively rapidly and inactivated partially during a 40-ms depolarization. The second type, found with cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin and fenvalerate, activated more slowly and did not detectably inactivate during a 40-ms depolarization. Only bifenthrin did not produce modified currents that fit clearly into either of these categories. In all cases, the rate of activation of modified channels was strongly correlated with the rate of tail current decay following repolarization. Modification of Na v 1.8 sodium channels by cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin was enhanced 2.3- to 3.4-fold by repetitive stimulation; this effect appeared to result from the accumulation of persistently open channels rather than preferential binding to open channel states. Fenpropathrin was the most effective compound against Na v 1

  15. Structure-activity relationships for the action of 11 pyrethroid insecticides on rat Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.-S.; Soderlund, David M. . E-mail: dms6@cornell.edu

    2006-03-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-sensitive sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting nerve function. This paper describes the action of 11 structurally diverse commercial pyrethroid insecticides on the rat Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channel isoform, the principal carrier of the tetrodotoxin-resistant, pyrethroid-sensitive sodium current of sensory neurons, expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. All 11 compounds produced characteristic sodium tail currents following a depolarizing pulse that ranged from rapidly-decaying monoexponential currents (allethrin, cismethrin and permethrin) to persistent biexponential currents (cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin). Tail currents for the remaining compounds (bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate and tefluthrin) were monoexponential and decayed with kinetics intermediate between these extremes. Reconstruction of currents carried solely by the pyrethroid-modified subpopulation of channels revealed two types of pyrethroid-modified currents. The first type, found with cismethrin, allethrin, permethrin and tefluthrin, activated relatively rapidly and inactivated partially during a 40-ms depolarization. The second type, found with cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin and fenvalerate, activated more slowly and did not detectably inactivate during a 40-ms depolarization. Only bifenthrin did not produce modified currents that fit clearly into either of these categories. In all cases, the rate of activation of modified channels was strongly correlated with the rate of tail current decay following repolarization. Modification of Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channels by cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin was enhanced 2.3- to 3.4-fold by repetitive stimulation; this effect appeared to result from the accumulation of persistently open channels rather than preferential binding to open channel states. Fenpropathrin was the most effective compound against

  16. A-887826 is a structurally novel, potent and voltage-dependent Na(v)1.8 sodium channel blocker that attenuates neuropathic tactile allodynia in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Shieh, Char-Chang; Chapman, Mark L; Matulenko, Mark A; Hakeem, Ahmed H; Atkinson, Robert N; Kort, Michael E; Marron, Brian E; Joshi, Shailen; Honore, Prisca; Faltynek, Connie R; Krafte, Douglas S; Jarvis, Michael F

    2010-09-01

    Activation of sodium channels is essential to action potential generation and propagation. Recent genetic and pharmacological evidence indicates that activation of Na(v)1.8 channels contributes to chronic pain. Herein, we describe the identification of a novel series of structurally related pyridine derivatives as potent Na(v)1.8 channel blockers. A-887826 exemplifies this series and potently (IC(50)=11nM) blocked recombinant human Na(v)1.8 channels. A-887826 was approximately 3 fold less potent to block Na(v)1.2, approximately 10 fold less potent to block tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium (TTX-S Na(+)) currents and was >30 fold less potent to block Na(V)1.5 channels. A-887826 potently blocked tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium (TTX-R Na(+)) currents (IC(50)=8nM) from small diameter rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in a voltage-dependent fashion. A-887826 effectively suppressed evoked action potential firing when DRG neurons were held at depolarized potentials and reversibly suppressed spontaneous firing in small diameter DRG neurons from complete Freund's adjuvant inflamed rats. Following oral administration, A-887826 significantly attenuated tactile allodynia in a rat neuropathic pain model. Further characterization of TTX-R current block in rat DRG neurons demonstrated that A-887826 (100nM) shifted the mid-point of voltage-dependent inactivation of TTX-R currents by approximately 4mV without affecting voltage-dependent activation and did not exhibit frequency-dependent inhibition. The present data demonstrate that A-887826 is a structurally novel and potent Na(v)1.8 blocker that inhibits rat DRG TTX-R currents in a voltage-, but not frequency-dependent fashion. The ability of this structurally novel Na(v)1.8 blocker to effectively reduce tactile allodynia in neuropathic rats further supports the role of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels in pathological pain states. PMID:20566409

  17. Physiology and Pathophysiology of Sodium Channel Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Ghovanloo, M-R; Aimar, K; Ghadiry-Tavi, R; Yu, A; Ruben, P C

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are present in different tissues within the human body, predominantly nerve, muscle, and heart. The sodium channel is composed of four similar domains, each containing six transmembrane segments. Each domain can be functionally organized into a voltage-sensing region and a pore region. The sodium channel may exist in resting, activated, fast inactivated, or slow inactivated states. Upon depolarization, when the channel opens, the fast inactivation gate is in its open state. Within the time frame of milliseconds, this gate closes and blocks the channel pore from conducting any more sodium ions. Repetitive or continuous stimulations of sodium channels result in a rate-dependent decrease of sodium current. This process may continue until the channel fully shuts down. This collapse is known as slow inactivation. This chapter reviews what is known to date regarding, sodium channel inactivation with a focus on various mutations within each NaV subtype and with clinical implications. PMID:27586293

  18. Phosphorylation of sodium channel Na(v)1.8 by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase increases current density in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, Andy; Choi, Jin-Sung; Tyrrell, Lynda; Black, Joel A; Rush, Anthony M; Waxman, Stephen G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D

    2008-03-19

    The sensory neuron-specific sodium channel Na(v)1.8 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase are potential therapeutic targets within nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in inflammatory, and possibly neuropathic, pain. Na(v)1.8 channels within nociceptive DRG neurons contribute most of the inward current underlying the depolarizing phase of action potentials. Nerve injury and inflammation of peripheral tissues cause p38 activation in DRG neurons, a process that may contribute to nociceptive neuron hyperexcitability, which is associated with pain. However, how substrates of activated p38 contribute to DRG neuron hyperexcitability is currently not well understood. We report here, for the first time, that Na(v)1.8 and p38 are colocalized in DRG neurons, that Na(v)1.8 within DRG neurons is a substrate for p38, and that direct phosphorylation of the Na(v)1.8 channel by p38 regulates its function in these neurons. We show that direct phosphorylation of Na(v)1.8 at two p38 phospho-acceptor serine residues on the L1 loop (S551 and S556) causes an increase in Na(v)1.8 current density that is not accompanied by changes in gating properties of the channel. Our study suggests a mechanism by which activated p38 contributes to inflammatory, and possibly neuropathic, pain through a p38-mediated increase of Na(v)1.8 current density. PMID:18354022

  19. Divergent actions of the pyrethroid insecticides S-bioallethrin, tefluthrin, and deltamethrin on rat Na{sub v}1.6 sodium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Jianguo; Soderlund, David M.

    2010-09-15

    We expressed rat Na{sub v}1.6 sodium channels in combination with the rat {beta}{sub 1} and {beta}{sub 2} auxiliary subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes and evaluated the effects of the pyrethroid insecticides S-bioallethrin, deltamethrin, and tefluthrin on expressed sodium currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. S-Bioallethrin, a type I structure, produced transient modification evident in the induction of rapidly decaying sodium tail currents, weak resting modification (5.7% modification at 100 {mu}M), and no further enhancement of modification upon repetitive activation by high-frequency trains of depolarizing pulses. By contrast deltamethrin, a type II structure, produced sodium tail currents that were {approx} 9-fold more persistent than those caused by S-bioallethrin, barely detectable resting modification (2.5% modification at 100 {mu}M), and 3.7-fold enhancement of modification upon repetitive activation. Tefluthrin, a type I structure with high mammalian toxicity, exhibited properties intermediate between S-bioallethrin and deltamethrin: intermediate tail current decay kinetics, much greater resting modification (14.1% at 100 {mu}M), and 2.8-fold enhancement of resting modification upon repetitive activation. Comparison of concentration-effect data showed that repetitive depolarization increased the potency of tefluthrin {approx} 15-fold and that tefluthrin was {approx} 10-fold more potent than deltamethrin as a use-dependent modifier of Na{sub v}1.6 sodium channels. Concentration-effect data from parallel experiments with the rat Na{sub v}1.2 sodium channel coexpressed with the rat {beta}{sub 1} and {beta}{sub 2} subunits in oocytes showed that the Na{sub v}1.6 isoform was at least 15-fold more sensitive to tefluthrin and deltamethrin than the Na{sub v}1.2 isoform. These results implicate sodium channels containing the Na{sub v}1.6 isoform as potential targets for the central neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids.

  20. Effects of intrathecally administerd NaV1. 8 antisense oligonucleotide on the expression of sodium channel mRNA in dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Yao, Shanglong; Song, Wenge; Wang, Yuelan; Liu, Dong; Zen, Lian

    2005-01-01

    Neuropathic pain has been hypothesized to be the result of aberrant expression and function of sodium channels at the site of injury. To investigate the effects of NaV1. 8 antisense oligonucleotide on the expression of sodium channel mRNA in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in chronic neuropathic pain. 24 Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-260 g were anesthetized with the intraperitoneal injection of 300 mg x kg(-1) choral hydrate. The CCI model was made by loose ligation of sciatic nerve trunk by 4-0 chromic gut. The mechanical and thermal pain threshold were measured before operation and 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 days after operation. A PE-10 catheter was implanted in subarachnoid space at lumbar region. On the 7th postoperative day the animals were randomly divided into 4 groups. The drugs were injected intrathecally twice a day for 5 consecutive days in group 2-4. The animals were decapitated 14 days after the surgery. The L4-L6 DRG of the operated side was removed and crushed, and total RNA was extracted with Trizol reagent. The contralateral side was used as control. The change of NaV1. 8 sodium channel transcripts was determined by RT-PCR. Pain threshold was significantly lowered after CCI as compared with that in control group and was elevated 3 days after antisense oligonucleotide injection. Sensory neuron specific TTX-R sodium channel NaV1. 8 transcript was down-regulated after antisense oligonucleotide injection at the dosage of 45 microg as compared with that in CCI group (P < 0.01), and it was even greater at the dosage of 90 microg. The intrathecally injected NaV1. 8 antisense oligonucleotide can reduce the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia partially by downregulating the SNS transcript expression. PMID:16696329

  1. Knockdown of sodium channel NaV1.6 blocks mechanical pain and abnormal bursting activity of afferent neurons in inflamed sensory ganglia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A; Ye, Ling; Mao, Ju-Xian; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2013-08-01

    Inflammatory processes in the sensory ganglia contribute to many forms of chronic pain. We previously showed that local inflammation of the lumbar sensory ganglia rapidly leads to prolonged mechanical pain behaviors and high levels of spontaneous bursting activity in myelinated cells. Abnormal spontaneous activity of sensory neurons occurs early in many preclinical pain models and initiates many other pathological changes, but its molecular basis is not well understood. The sodium channel isoform NaV1.6 can underlie repetitive firing and excitatory persistent and resurgent currents. We used in vivo knockdown of this channel via local injection of siRNA to examine its role in chronic pain after local inflammation of the rat lumbar sensory ganglia. In normal dorsal root ganglion (DRG), quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that cells capable of firing repetitively had significantly higher relative expression of NaV1.6. In inflamed DRG, spontaneously active bursting cells expressed high levels of NaV1.6 immunoreactivity. In vivo knockdown of NaV1.6 locally in the lumbar DRG at the time of DRG inflammation completely blocked development of pain behaviors and abnormal spontaneous activity, while having only minor effects on unmyelinated C cells. Current research on isoform-specific sodium channel blockers for chronic pain is largely focused on NaV1.8 because it is present primarily in unmyelinated C fiber nociceptors, or on NaV1.7 because lack of this channel causes congenital indifference to pain. However, the results suggest that NaV1.6 may be a useful therapeutic target for chronic pain and that some pain conditions may be mediated primarily by myelinated A fiber sensory neurons. PMID:23622763

  2. Knockdown of sodium channel NaV1.6 blocks mechanical pain and abnormal bursting activity of afferent neurons in inflamed sensory ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Ye, Ling; Mao, Ju-Xian; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory processes in the sensory ganglia contribute to many forms of chronic pain. We previously showed that local inflammation of the lumbar sensory ganglia rapidly leads to prolonged mechanical pain behaviors and high levels of spontaneous bursting activity in myelinated cells. Abnormal spontaneous activity of sensory neurons occurs early in many preclinical pain models, and initiates many other pathological changes, but its molecular basis is not well understood. The sodium channel isoform NaV1.6 can underlie repetitive firing and excitatory persistent and resurgent currents. We used in vivo knockdown of this channel via local injection of siRNA to examine its role in chronic pain following local inflammation of the rat lumbar sensory ganglia. In normal DRG, quantitative PCR showed that cells capable of firing repetitively had significantly higher relative expression of NaV1.6. In inflamed DRG, spontaneously active bursting cells expressed high levels of NaV1.6′ immunoreactivity. In vivo knockdown of NaV1.6 locally in the lumbar DRG at the time of DRG inflammation completely blocked development of pain behaviors and abnormal spontaneous activity, while having only minor effects on unmyelinated C-cells. Current research on isoform-specific sodium channel blockers for chronic pain is largely focused on NaV1.8, because it is present primarily in unmyelinated C fiber nociceptors, or on NaV1.7, because lack of this channel causes congenital indifference to pain. However, the results suggest that NaV1.6 may be a useful therapeutic target for chronic pain, and that some pain conditions may be primarily mediated by myelinated A-fiber sensory neurons. PMID:23622763

  3. Engineering potent and selective analogues of GpTx-1, a tarantula venom peptide antagonist of the Na(V)1.7 sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Zou, Anruo; Poppe, Leszek; Li, Hongyan; Andrews, Kristin L; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Favreau, Philippe; Stöcklin, Reto; Miranda, Les P

    2015-03-12

    NaV1.7 is a voltage-gated sodium ion channel implicated by human genetic evidence as a therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Screening fractionated venom from the tarantula Grammostola porteri led to the identification of a 34-residue peptide, termed GpTx-1, with potent activity on NaV1.7 (IC50 = 10 nM) and promising selectivity against key NaV subtypes (20× and 1000× over NaV1.4 and NaV1.5, respectively). NMR structural analysis of the chemically synthesized three disulfide peptide was consistent with an inhibitory cystine knot motif. Alanine scanning of GpTx-1 revealed that residues Trp(29), Lys(31), and Phe(34) near the C-terminus are critical for potent NaV1.7 antagonist activity. Substitution of Ala for Phe at position 5 conferred 300-fold selectivity against NaV1.4. A structure-guided campaign afforded additive improvements in potency and NaV subtype selectivity, culminating in the design of [Ala5,Phe6,Leu26,Arg28]GpTx-1 with a NaV1.7 IC50 value of 1.6 nM and >1000× selectivity against NaV1.4 and NaV1.5.

  4. Engineering potent and selective analogues of GpTx-1, a tarantula venom peptide antagonist of the Na(V)1.7 sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Zou, Anruo; Poppe, Leszek; Li, Hongyan; Andrews, Kristin L; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Favreau, Philippe; Stöcklin, Reto; Miranda, Les P

    2015-03-12

    NaV1.7 is a voltage-gated sodium ion channel implicated by human genetic evidence as a therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Screening fractionated venom from the tarantula Grammostola porteri led to the identification of a 34-residue peptide, termed GpTx-1, with potent activity on NaV1.7 (IC50 = 10 nM) and promising selectivity against key NaV subtypes (20× and 1000× over NaV1.4 and NaV1.5, respectively). NMR structural analysis of the chemically synthesized three disulfide peptide was consistent with an inhibitory cystine knot motif. Alanine scanning of GpTx-1 revealed that residues Trp(29), Lys(31), and Phe(34) near the C-terminus are critical for potent NaV1.7 antagonist activity. Substitution of Ala for Phe at position 5 conferred 300-fold selectivity against NaV1.4. A structure-guided campaign afforded additive improvements in potency and NaV subtype selectivity, culminating in the design of [Ala5,Phe6,Leu26,Arg28]GpTx-1 with a NaV1.7 IC50 value of 1.6 nM and >1000× selectivity against NaV1.4 and NaV1.5. PMID:25658507

  5. Gain-of-function mutations in sodium channel Na(v)1.9 in painful neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianying; Han, Chongyang; Estacion, Mark; Vasylyev, Dymtro; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Gerrits, Monique M; Tyrrell, Lynda; Lauria, Giuseppe; Faber, Catharina G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2014-06-01

    Sodium channel Nav1.9 is expressed in peripheral nociceptive neurons, as well as visceral afferents, and has been shown to act as a threshold channel. Painful peripheral neuropathy represents a significant public health challenge and may involve gain-of-function variants in sodium channels that are preferentially expressed in peripheral sensory neurons. Although gain-of-function variants of peripheral sodium channels Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 have recently been found in painful small fibre neuropathy, the aetiology of peripheral neuropathy in many cases remains unknown. We evaluated 459 patients who were referred for possible painful peripheral neuropathy, and confirmed the diagnosis of small fibre neuropathy in a cohort of 393 patients (369 patients with pure small fibre neuropathy, and small fibre neuropathy together with large fibre involvement in an additional 24 patients). From this cohort of 393 patients with peripheral neuropathy, we sequenced SCN11A in 345 patients without mutations in SCN9A and SCN10A, and found eight variants in 12 patients. Functional profiling by electrophysiological recordings showed that these Nav1.9 mutations confer gain-of-function attributes to the channel, depolarize resting membrane potential of dorsal root ganglion neurons, enhance spontaneous firing, and increase evoked firing of these neurons. Our data show, for the first time, missense mutations of Nav1.9 in individuals with painful peripheral neuropathy. These genetic and functional observations identify missense mutations of Nav1.9 as a cause of painful peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24776970

  6. Increased Epithelial Sodium Channel Activity Contributes to Hypertension Caused by Na+-HCO3- Cotransporter Electrogenic 2 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wen, Donghai; Yuan, Yang; Warner, Paige C; Wang, Bangchen; Cornelius, Ryan J; Wang-France, Jun; Li, Huaqing; Boettger, Thomas; Sansom, Steven C

    2015-07-01

    The gene SLC4A5 encodes the Na(+)-HCO3 (-) cotransporter electrogenic 2, which is located in the distal nephron. Genetically deleting Na(+)-HCO3 (-) cotransporter electrogenic 2 (knockout) causes Na(+)-retention and hypertension, a phenotype that is diminished with alkali loading. We performed experiments with acid-loaded mice and determined whether overactive epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC) or the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter causes the Na(+) retention and hypertension in knockout. In untreated mice, the mean arterial pressure was higher in knockout, compared with wild-type (WT); however, treatment with amiloride, a blocker of ENaC, abolished this difference. In contrast, hydrochlorothiazide, an inhibitor of Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter, decreased mean arterial pressure in WT, but not knockout. Western blots showed that quantity of plasmalemmal full-length ENaC-α was significantly higher in knockout than in WT. Amiloride treatment caused a 2-fold greater increase in Na(+) excretion in knockout, compared with WT. In knockout, but not WT, amiloride treatment decreased plasma [Na(+)] and urinary K(+) excretion, but increased hematocrit and plasma [K(+)] significantly. Micropuncture with microelectrodes showed that the [K(+)] was significantly higher and the transepithelial potential (Vte) was significantly lower in the late distal tubule of the knockout compared with WT. The reduced Vte in knockout was amiloride sensitive and therefore revealed an upregulation of electrogenic ENaC-mediated Na(+) reabsorption in this segment. These results show that, in the absence of Na(+)-HCO3 (-) cotransporter electrogenic 2 in the late distal tubule, acid-loaded mice exhibit disinhibition of ENaC-mediated Na(+) reabsorption, which results in Na(+) retention, K(+) wasting, and hypertension.

  7. Roles of Voltage-Gated Tetrodotoxin-Sensitive Sodium Channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Quanmin; Liu, Xinming; Liu, Shiguang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common chronic medical problem worldwide; one of its complications is painful peripheral neuropathy, which can substantially erode quality of life and increase the cost of management. Despite its clinical importance, the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is complex and incompletely understood. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) link many physiological processes to electrical activity by controlling action potentials in all types of excitable cells. Two isoforms of VGSCs, NaV1.3 and NaV1.7, which are encoded by the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 3 and 9 (Scn3A and Scn9A) genes, respectively, have been identified in both peripheral nociceptive neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and pancreatic islet cells. Recent advances in our understanding of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 lead to the rational doubt about the cause–effect relation between diabetes and painful neuropathy. In this review, we summarize the roles of NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in islet cells and DRG neurons, discuss the link between DM and painful neuropathy, and present a model, which may provide a starting point for further studies aimed at identifying the mechanisms underlying diabetes and painful neuropathy. PMID:27608006

  8. Roles of Voltage-Gated Tetrodotoxin-Sensitive Sodium Channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Quanmin; Liu, Xinming; Liu, Shiguang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common chronic medical problem worldwide; one of its complications is painful peripheral neuropathy, which can substantially erode quality of life and increase the cost of management. Despite its clinical importance, the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is complex and incompletely understood. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) link many physiological processes to electrical activity by controlling action potentials in all types of excitable cells. Two isoforms of VGSCs, NaV1.3 and NaV1.7, which are encoded by the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 3 and 9 (Scn3A and Scn9A) genes, respectively, have been identified in both peripheral nociceptive neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and pancreatic islet cells. Recent advances in our understanding of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 lead to the rational doubt about the cause-effect relation between diabetes and painful neuropathy. In this review, we summarize the roles of NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in islet cells and DRG neurons, discuss the link between DM and painful neuropathy, and present a model, which may provide a starting point for further studies aimed at identifying the mechanisms underlying diabetes and painful neuropathy. PMID:27608006

  9. Painful peripheral neuropathy and sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can lead to neuropathic pain in a subset of patients. Painful peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating disorder, reflected by a reduced quality of life. Therapeutic strategies are limited and often disappointing, as in most cases targeted treatment is not available. Elucidating pathogenetic factors for pain might provide a target for optimal treatment. Voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.7-NaV1.9 are expressed in the small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons and their axons. By a targeted gene approach, missense gain-of-function mutations of NaV1.7-NaV1.9 have been demonstrated in painful peripheral neuropathy. Functional analyses have shown that these mutations produce a spectrum of pro-excitatory changes in channel biophysics, with the shared outcome at the cellular level of dorsal root ganglion hyperexcitability. Reduced neurite outgrowth may be another consequence of sodium channel mutations, and possible therapeutic strategies include blockade of sodium channels or block of reverse operation of the sodium-calcium exchanger. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of painful peripheral neuropathy offers new targets that may provide a basis for more effective treatment.

  10. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Cannon, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na(+) current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle. PMID:27048647

  11. Permeation of Na+ through open and Zn(2+)-occupied conductance states of cardiac sodium channels modified by batrachotoxin: exploring ion-ion interactions in a multi-ion channel.

    PubMed Central

    Schild, L; Moczydlowski, E

    1994-01-01

    Mammalian heart sodium channels inserted into planar bilayers exhibit a distinctive subconductance state when single batrachotoxin-modified channels are exposed to external Zn2+. The current-voltage behavior of the open state and the Zn(2+)-induced substate was characterized in the presence of symmetrical Na+ ranging from 2 to 3000 mM. The unitary conductance of the open state follows a biphasic dependence on [Na+] that can be accounted for by a 3-barrier-2-site model of Na+ permeation that includes double occupancy and Na(+)-Na+ repulsion. The unitary conductance of the Zn2+ substate follows a monophasic dependence on [Na+] that can be explained by a similar 3-barrier-2-site model with low affinity for Na+ and single occupancy due to repulsive interaction with a Zn2+ ion bound near the external entrance to the pore. The apparent association rate of Zn2+ derived from dwell-time analysis of flickering events is strongly reduced as [Na+] is raised from 50 to 500 mM. The apparent dissociation rate of Zn2+ is also enhanced as [Na+] is increased. While not excluding surface charge effects, such behavior is consistent with two types of ion-ion interactions: 1) A competitive binding interaction between Zn2+ and Na+ due to mutual competition for high affinity sites in close proximity. 2) A noncompetitive, destabilizing interaction resulting from simultaneous occupancy by Zn2+ and Na+. The repulsive influence of Zn2+ on Na+ binding in the cardiac Na+ channel is similar to that which has been proposed to occur between Ca2+ and Na+ in structurally related calcium channels. Based on recent mutagenesis data, a schematic model of functionally important residues in the external cation binding sites of calcium channels and cardiac sodium channels is proposed. In this model, the Zn(2+)-induced subconductance state results from Zn2+ binding to a site in the external vestibule that is close to the entrance of the pore but does not occlude it. PMID:8011896

  12. Development of a μO-Conotoxin Analogue with Improved Lipid Membrane Interactions and Potency for the Analgesic Sodium Channel NaV1.8.

    PubMed

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Dekan, Zoltan; Inserra, Marco C; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Craik, David J; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F; Mobli, Mehdi; Schroeder, Christina I; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Vetter, Irina

    2016-05-27

    The μO-conotoxins MrVIA, MrVIB, and MfVIA inhibit the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8, a well described target for the treatment of pain; however, little is known about the residues or structural elements that define this activity. In this study, we determined the three-dimensional structure of MfVIA, examined its membrane binding properties, performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis, and identified residues important for its activity at human NaV1.8. A second round of mutations resulted in (E5K,E8K)MfVIA, a double mutant with greater positive surface charge and greater affinity for lipid membranes compared with MfVIA. This analogue had increased potency at NaV1.8 and was analgesic in the mouse formalin assay. PMID:27026701

  13. Carbamazepine interacts with a slow inactivation state of NaV1.8-like sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Carlos A; Cardenas, Carla G; de Armendi, Alberto J; Scroggs, Reese S

    2006-11-13

    Carbamazepine was tested on high-threshold TTX-resistant Na+ currents (TTX-R-currents), evoked from acutely isolated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. Under control conditions, the TTX-R-currents recorded from different DRG cells varied greatly regarding use-dependent inactivation (TTX-R-current UDI), measured as the percent decrease in current amplitude induced by changing the current activation rate from 0.1 Hz to 1.0 Hz. Also, when TTX-R-currents were evoked at 0.1 Hz from a holding potential (hp) of -60 mV, a larger fraction of TTX-R-channels resided tonically in a slow inactivation state in DRG cells with more TTX-R-current UDI versus those with less TTX-R-current UDI. The block of TTX-R-currents evoked from hp -60 mV by 100-microM carbamazepine and the EC50 for carbamazepine block was positively correlated with TTX-R-current UDI. The slope factors estimated for the concentration-response curves averaged 0.68, suggesting the presence of low and high affinity sites. Fitting the data with a two-site binding isotherm gave estimates of 30 microM and 760 microM for the EC50s of the high and low affinity sites, respectively. The fraction of the total fit attributed to the high affinity site was positively correlated with TTX-R-current UDI. Carbamazepine increased the fast and slow time constants for recovery from inactivation and the fraction of the fit attributed to the slow time constant. These data suggest that carbamazepine interacts with a slow inactivation state of TTX-R-channels. This particular mechanism might be exploited in future research aimed at developing pain medications that selectively block Na(V)1.8 channels or Na+ channels in general. PMID:16978779

  14. Insect sodium channels and insecticide resistance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the generation and propagation of action potentials (i.e., electrical impulses) in excitable cells. Although most of our knowledge about sodium channels is derived from decades of studies of mammalian isoforms, research on insect sodium channels is revealing both common and unique aspects of sodium channel biology. In particular, our understanding of the molecular dynamics and pharmacology of insect sodium channels has advanced greatly in recent years, thanks to successful functional expression of insect sodium channels in Xenopus oocytes and intensive efforts to elucidate the molecular basis of insect resistance to insecticides that target sodium channels. In this review, I discuss recent literature on insect sodium channels with emphases on the prominent role of alternative splicing and RNA editing in the generation of functionally diverse sodium channels in insects and the current understanding of the interactions between insect sodium channels and insecticides. PMID:17206406

  15. A subtle alternative splicing event of the Na(V)1.8 voltage-gated sodium channel is conserved in human, rat, and mouse.

    PubMed

    Schirmeyer, Jana; Szafranski, Karol; Leipold, Enrico; Mawrin, Christian; Platzer, Matthias; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2010-06-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel subtype Na(V)1.8 (SCN10A) is exclusively expressed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and plays a critical role in pain perception. We isolated mRNA from human, rat, and mouse DRGs and screened for alternatively spliced isoforms of the SCN10A mRNA using 454 sequencing. In all three species, we found an event of subtle alternative splicing at a NAGNAG tandem acceptor that results in isoforms including or lacking glutamine 1030 (Na(V)1.8+Q and Na(V)1.8-Q, respectively) within the cytoplasmic loop between domains II and III. The relative amount of Na(V)1.8-Q mRNA in adult DRG was measured with 14.1 +/- 0.1% in humans and 11.2 +/- 0.2% in rats. This is in contrast to an abundance of 64.3 +/- 0.3% in mouse DRG. Thus, the NAGNAG tandem acceptor in SCN10A is conserved among rodents and humans but its alternative usage apparently occurs with species-specific abundance. Analysis of human Na(V)1.8+Q and -Q isoforms in whole-cell patch-clamp experiments after heterologous expression in the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro-2A revealed no obvious impact of the splicing event on channel function. PMID:19953341

  16. Sustained inhibition of the NaV1.7 sodium channel by engineered dimers of the domain II binding peptide GpTx-1.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Biswas, Kaustav; Holder, J Ryan; Zou, Anruo; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Poppe, Leszek; Andrews, Kristin L; Lin, Fen-Fen; Meng, Shi-Yuan; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Miranda, Les P

    2015-11-01

    Many efforts are underway to develop selective inhibitors of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as new analgesics. Thus far, however, in vitro selectivity has proved difficult for small molecules, and peptides generally lack appropriate pharmacokinetic properties. We previously identified the NaV1.7 inhibitory peptide GpTx-1 from tarantula venom and optimized its potency and selectivity via structure-guided analoging. To further understand GpTx-1 binding to NaV1.7, we have mapped the binding site to transmembrane segments 1-4 of the second pseudosubunit internal repeat (commonly referred to as Site 4) using NaV1.5/NaV1.7 chimeric protein constructs. We also report that select GpTx-1 amino acid residues apparently not contacting NaV1.7 can be derivatized with a hydrophilic polymer without adversely affecting peptide potency. Homodimerization of GpTx-1 with a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker resulted in a compound with increased potency and a significantly reduced off-rate, demonstrating the ability to modulate the function and properties of GpTx-1 by linking to additional molecules. PMID:26112439

  17. Bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNa(V)s) from the soil, sea, and salt lakes enlighten molecular mechanisms of electrical signaling and pharmacology in the brain and heart.

    PubMed

    Payandeh, Jian; Minor, Daniel L

    2015-01-16

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) provide the initial electrical signal that drives action potential generation in many excitable cells of the brain, heart, and nervous system. For more than 60years, functional studies of Na(V)s have occupied a central place in physiological and biophysical investigation of the molecular basis of excitability. Recently, structural studies of members of a large family of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNa(V)s) prevalent in soil, marine, and salt lake environments that bear many of the core features of eukaryotic Na(V)s have reframed ideas for voltage-gated channel function, ion selectivity, and pharmacology. Here, we analyze the recent advances, unanswered questions, and potential of BacNa(V)s as templates for drug development efforts.

  18. Bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNaVs) from the soil, sea, and salt lakes enlighten molecular mechanisms of electrical signaling and pharmacology in the brain and heart

    PubMed Central

    Payandeh, Jian; Minor, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) provide the initial electrical signal that drives action potential generation in many excitable cells of the brain, heart, and nervous system. For more than 60 years, functional studies of NaVs have occupied a central place in physiological and biophysical investigation of the molecular basis of excitability. Recently, structural studies of members of a large family of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNaVs) prevalent in soil, marine, and salt lake environments that bear many of the core features of eukaryotic NaVs have reframed ideas for voltage-gated channel function, ion selectivity, and pharmacology. Here, we analyze the recent advances, unanswered questions, and potential of BacNaVs as templates for drug development efforts. PMID:25158094

  19. μ-Conotoxins that differentially block sodium channels NaV1.1 through 1.8 identify those responsible for action potentials in sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael J.; Yoshikami, Doju; Azam, Layla; Gajewiak, Joanna; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Zhang, Min-Min

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are important for action potentials. There are seven major isoforms of the pore-forming and gate-bearing α-subunit (NaV1) of VGSCs in mammalian neurons, and a given neuron can express more than one isoform. Five of the neuronal isoforms, NaV1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.6, and 1.7, are exquisitely sensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX), and a functional differentiation of these presents a serious challenge. Here, we examined a panel of 11 μ-conopeptides for their ability to block rodent NaV1.1 through 1.8 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Although none blocked NaV1.8, a TTX-resistant isoform, the resulting “activity matrix” revealed that the panel could readily discriminate between the members of all pair-wise combinations of the tested isoforms. To examine the identities of endogenous VGSCs, a subset of the panel was tested on A- and C-compound action potentials recorded from isolated preparations of rat sciatic nerve. The results show that the major subtypes in the corresponding A- and C-fibers were NaV1.6 and 1.7, respectively. Ruled out as major players in both fiber types were NaV1.1, 1.2, and 1.3. These results are consistent with immunohistochemical findings of others. To our awareness this is the first report describing a qualitative pharmacological survey of TTX-sensitive NaV1 isoforms responsible for propagating action potentials in peripheral nerve. The panel of μ-conopeptides should be useful in identifying the functional contributions of NaV1 isoforms in other preparations. PMID:21652775

  20. Dietary Na+ inhibits the open probability of the epithelial sodium channel in the kidney by enhancing apical P2Y2-receptor tone.

    PubMed

    Pochynyuk, Oleh; Rieg, Timo; Bugaj, Vladislav; Schroth, Jana; Fridman, Alla; Boss, Gerry R; Insel, Paul A; Stockand, James D; Vallon, Volker

    2010-06-01

    Apical release of ATP and UTP can activate P2Y(2) receptors in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN) and inhibit the open probability (P(o)) of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Little is known, however, about the regulation and physiological relevance of this system. Patch-clamp studies in freshly isolated ASDN provide evidence that increased dietary Na(+) intake in wild-type mice lowers ENaC P(o), consistent with a contribution to Na(+) homeostasis, and is associated with increased urinary concentrations of UTP and the ATP hydrolytic product, ADP. Genetic deletion of P2Y(2) receptors in mice (P2Y(2)(-/-); littermates to wild-type mice) or inhibition of apical P2Y-receptor activation in wild-type mice prevents dietary Na(+)-induced lowering of ENaC P(o). Although they lack suppression of ENaC P(o) by dietary NaCl, P2Y(2)(-/-) mice do not exhibit NaCl-sensitive blood pressure, perhaps as a consequence of compensatory down-regulation of aldosterone levels. Consistent with this hypothesis, clamping mineralocorticoid activity at high levels unmasks greater ENaC activity and NaCl sensitivity of blood pressure in P2Y(2)(-/-) mice. The studies indicate a key role of the apical ATP/UTP-P2Y(2)-receptor system in the inhibition of ENaC P(o) in the ASDN in response to an increase in Na(+) intake, thereby contributing to NaCl homeostasis and blood pressure regulation. PMID:20097874

  1. Lipid Regulation of Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    D'Avanzo, N

    2016-01-01

    The lipid landscapes of cellular membranes are complex and dynamic, are tissue dependent, and can change with the age and the development of a variety of diseases. Researchers are now gaining new appreciation for the regulation of ion channel proteins by the membrane lipids in which they are embedded. Thus, as membrane lipids change, for example, during the development of disease, it is likely that the ionic currents that conduct through the ion channels embedded in these membranes will also be altered. This chapter provides an overview of the complex regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic voltage-dependent sodium (Nav) channels by fatty acids, sterols, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cannabinoids. The impact of lipid regulation on channel gating kinetics, voltage-dependence, trafficking, toxin binding, and structure are explored for Nav channels that have been examined in heterologous expression systems, native tissue, and reconstituted into artificial membranes. Putative mechanisms for Nav regulation by lipids are also discussed. PMID:27586290

  2. Intracellular Na+ regulates epithelial Na+ channel maturation.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Elisa; Carattino, Marcelo D; Hughey, Rebecca P; Pilewski, Joseph M; Kleyman, Thomas R; Myerburg, Mike M

    2015-05-01

    Epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) function is regulated by the intracellular Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]i) through a process known as Na(+) feedback inhibition. Although this process is known to decrease the expression of proteolytically processed active channels on the cell surface, it is unknown how [Na(+)]i alters ENaC cleavage. We show here that [Na(+)]i regulates the posttranslational processing of ENaC subunits during channel biogenesis. At times when [Na(+)]i is low, ENaC subunits develop mature N-glycans and are processed by proteases. Conversely, glycan maturation and sensitivity to proteolysis are reduced when [Na(+)]i is relatively high. Surface channels with immature N-glycans were not processed by endogenous channel activating proteases, nor were they sensitive to cleavage by exogenous trypsin. Biotin chase experiments revealed that the immature surface channels were not converted into mature cleaved channels following a reduction in [Na(+)]i. The hypothesis that [Na(+)]i regulates ENaC maturation within the biosynthetic pathways is further supported by the finding that Brefeldin A prevented the accumulation of processed surface channels following a reduction in [Na(+)]i. Therefore, increased [Na(+)]i interferes with ENaC N-glycan maturation and prevents the channel from entering a state that allows proteolytic processing. PMID:25767115

  3. Coordinated role of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger in sustaining microglial activation during inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Muhammad M.; Sonsalla, Patricia K.; Richardson, Jason R.

    2013-12-01

    Persistent neuroinflammation and microglial activation play an integral role in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. We investigated the role of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) and Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchangers (NHE) in the activation of immortalized microglial cells (BV-2) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. LPS (10 and 100 ng/ml) caused a dose- and time-dependent accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na{sup +}){sub i}] in BV-2 cells. Pre-treatment of cells with the VGSC antagonist tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 μM) abolished short-term Na{sup +} influx, but was unable to prevent the accumulation of (Na{sup +}){sub i} observed at 6 and 24 h after LPS exposure. The NHE inhibitor cariporide (1 μM) significantly reduced accumulation of (Na{sup +}){sub i} 6 and 24 h after LPS exposure. Furthermore, LPS increased the mRNA expression and protein level of NHE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced after co-treatment with TTX and/or cariporide. LPS increased production of TNF-α, ROS, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and expression of gp91{sup phox}, an active subunit of NADPH oxidase, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX or TTX + cariporide. Collectively, these data demonstrate a closely-linked temporal relationship between VGSC and NHE-1 in regulating function in activated microglia, which may provide avenues for therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing neuroinflammation. - Highlights: • LPS causes immediate increase in sodium through VGSC and subsequently through the NHE-1. • Inhibition of VGSC reduces increases in NHE-1 and gp91{sup phox}. • Inhibition of VGSC and NHE-1 reduces NADPH oxidase-mediated Tnf-α, ROS, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. • NHE-1 and Na{sub v}1.6 may be viable targets for therapeutic interventions to reduce neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disease.

  4. Development and validation of a thallium flux-based functional assay for the sodium channel NaV1.7 and its utility for lead discovery and compound profiling.

    PubMed

    Du, Yu; Days, Emily; Romaine, Ian; Abney, Kris K; Kaufmann, Kristian; Sulikowski, Gary; Stauffer, Shaun; Lindsley, Craig W; Weaver, C David

    2015-06-17

    Ion channels are critical for life, and they are targets of numerous drugs. The sequencing of the human genome has revealed the existence of hundreds of different ion channel subunits capable of forming thousands of ion channels. In the face of this diversity, we only have a few selective small-molecule tools to aid in our understanding of the role specific ion channels in physiology which may in turn help illuminate their therapeutic potential. Although the advent of automated electrophysiology has increased the rate at which we can screen for and characterize ion channel modulators, the technique's high per-measurement cost and moderate throughput compared to other high-throughput screening approaches limit its utility for large-scale high-throughput screening. Therefore, lower cost, more rapid techniques are needed. While ion channel types capable of fluxing calcium are well-served by low cost, very high-throughput fluorescence-based assays, other channel types such as sodium channels remain underserved by present functional assay techniques. In order to address this shortcoming, we have developed a thallium flux-based assay for sodium channels using the NaV1.7 channel as a model target. We show that the assay is able to rapidly and cost-effectively identify NaV1.7 inhibitors thus providing a new method useful for the discovery and profiling of sodium channel modulators.

  5. Local knockdown of the NaV1.6 sodium channel reduces pain behaviors, sensory neuron excitability, and sympathetic sprouting in rat models of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, as in other pain models, abnormal spontaneous activity of myelinated sensory neurons occurs early and is essential for establishing pain behaviors and other pathologies. Sympathetic sprouting into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is observed after spinal nerve ligation, and sympathectomy reduces pain behavior. Sprouting and spontaneous activity may be mutually reinforcing: blocking neuronal activity reduces sympathetic sprouting, and sympathetic spouts functionally increase spontaneous activity in vitro. However, most studies in this field have used nonspecific methods to block spontaneous activity, methods that also block evoked and normal activity. In this study, we injected small inhibitory RNA directed against the NaV1.6 sodium channel isoform into the DRG before spinal nerve ligation. This isoform can mediate high frequency repetitive firing, like that seen in spontaneously active neurons. Local knockdown of NaV1.6 markedly reduced mechanical pain behaviors induced by spinal nerve ligation, reduced sympathetic sprouting into the ligated sensory ganglion, and blocked abnormal spontaneous activity and other measures of hyperexcitability in myelinated neurons in the ligated sensory ganglion. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that sympathetic sprouting preferentially targeted NaV1.6-positive neurons. Under these experimental conditions, NaV1.6 knockdown did not prevent or strongly alter single evoked action potentials, unlike previous less specific methods used to block spontaneous activity. NaV1.6 knockdown also reduced pain behaviors in another pain model, chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve, provided the model was modified so that the lesion site was relatively close to the siRNA-injected lumbar DRGs. The results highlight the relative importance of abnormal spontaneous activity in establishing both pain behaviors and sympathetic sprouting, and suggest that the NaV1.6 isoform may have value as a

  6. Comparative study of lacosamide and classical sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs on sodium channel slow inactivation.

    PubMed

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; Leclère, Nathalie; Vandenplas, Catherine; Foerch, Patrik; Wolff, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exert their therapeutic activity by modifying the inactivation properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v) ) channels. Lacosamide is unique among AEDs in that it selectively enhances the slow inactivation component. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of AEDs on Na(v) channel inactivation, a direct comparison of results cannot be made because of varying experimental conditions. In this study, the effects of different AEDs on Na(v) channel steady-state slow inactivation were investigated under identical experimental conditions using whole-cell patch-clamp in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. All drugs were tested at 100 μM, and results were compared with those from time-matched control groups. Lacosamide significantly shifted the voltage dependence of Na(v) current (I(Na) ) slow inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials (by -33 ± 7 mV), whereas the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels and the curve slope did not differ significantly. Neither SPM6953 (lacosamide inactive enantiomer), nor carbamazepine, nor zonisamide affected the voltage dependence of I(Na) slow inactivation, the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels, or the curve slope. Phenytoin significantly increased the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels (by 28% ± 9%) in a voltage-independent manner but did not affect the curve slope. Lamotrigine slightly increased the fraction of inactivated currents (by 15% ± 4%) and widened the range of the slow inactivation voltage dependence. Lamotrigine and rufinamide induced weak, but significant, shifts of I(Na) slow inactivation toward more depolarized potentials. The effects of lacosamide on Na(v) channel slow inactivation corroborate previous observations that lacosamide has a unique mode of action among AEDs that act on Na(v) channels. PMID:23239147

  7. Voltage gated sodium channels as drug discovery targets.

    PubMed

    Bagal, Sharan K; Marron, Brian E; Owen, Robert M; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are a family of transmembrane ion channel proteins. They function by forming a gated, water-filled pore to help establish and control cell membrane potential via control of the flow of ions between the intracellular and the extracellular environments. Blockade of NaVs has been successfully accomplished in the clinic to enable control of pathological firing patterns that occur in a diverse range of conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiac arrhythmias. First generation sodium channel modulator drugs, despite low inherent subtype selectivity, preferentially act on over-excited cells which reduces undesirable side effects in the clinic. However, the limited therapeutic indices observed with the first generation demanded a new generation of sodium channel inhibitors. The structure, function and the state of the art in sodium channel modulator drug discovery are discussed in this chapter.

  8. Voltage gated sodium channels as drug discovery targets

    PubMed Central

    Bagal, Sharan K; Marron, Brian E; Owen, Robert M; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are a family of transmembrane ion channel proteins. They function by forming a gated, water-filled pore to help establish and control cell membrane potential via control of the flow of ions between the intracellular and the extracellular environments. Blockade of NaVs has been successfully accomplished in the clinic to enable control of pathological firing patterns that occur in a diverse range of conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiac arrhythmias. First generation sodium channel modulator drugs, despite low inherent subtype selectivity, preferentially act on over-excited cells which reduces undesirable side effects in the clinic. However, the limited therapeutic indices observed with the first generation demanded a new generation of sodium channel inhibitors. The structure, function and the state of the art in sodium channel modulator drug discovery are discussed in this chapter. PMID:26646477

  9. Ion selectivity strategies of sodium channel selectivity filters.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Lim, Carmay

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Sodium ion channels selectively transport Na(+) cations across the cell membrane. These integral parts of the cell machinery are implicated in regulating the cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle contraction, nerve impulses, salt and water homeostasis, as well as pain and taste perception. Their malfunction often results in various channelopathies of the heart, brain, skeletal muscles, and lung; thus, sodium channels are key drug targets for various disorders including cardiac arrhythmias, heart attack, stroke, migraine, epilepsy, pain, cancer, and autoimmune disorders. The ability of sodium channels to discriminate the native Na(+) among other competing ions in the surrounding fluids is crucial for proper cellular functions. The selectivity filter (SF), the narrowest part of the channel's open pore, lined with amino acid residues that specifically interact with the permeating ion, plays a major role in determining Na(+) selectivity. Different sodium channels have different SFs, which vary in the symmetry, number, charge, arrangement, and chemical type of the metal-ligating groups and pore size: epithelial/degenerin/acid-sensing ion channels have generally trimeric SFs lined with three conserved neutral serines and/or backbone carbonyls; eukaryotic sodium channels have EKEE, EEKE, DKEA, and DEKA SFs with an invariant positively charged lysine from the second or third domain; and bacterial voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels exhibit symmetrical EEEE SFs, reminiscent of eukaryotic voltage-gated calcium channels. How do these different sodium channel SFs achieve high selectivity for Na(+) over its key rivals, K(+) and Ca(2+)? What factors govern the metal competition in these SFs and which of these factors are exploited to achieve Na(+) selectivity in the different sodium channel SFs? The free energies for replacing K(+) or Ca(2+) bound inside different model SFs with Na(+), evaluated by a combination of density functional theory and continuum dielectric

  10. Inactivation of the sodium channel. I. Sodium current experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bezanilla, F; Armstrong, CM

    1977-01-01

    Inactivation of sodium conductance has been studied in squid axons with voltage clamp techniques and with the enzyme pronase which selectively destroys inactivation. Comparison of the sodium current before and after pronase treatment shows a lag of several hundred microseconds in the onset of inactivation after depolarization. This lag can of several hundred microseconds in the onset of inactivation after polarization. This lag can also be demonstrated with double-pulse experiments. When the membrane potential is hyperpolarized to -140 mV before depolarization, both activation and inactivation are delayed. These findings suggest that inactivation occurs only after activation are delayed. These findings suggest that inactivation occurs only after activation; i.e. that the channels must open before they can inactivate. The time constant of inactivation measured with two pulses (τ(c)) is the same as the one measured from the decay of the sodium current during a single pulse (τ(h)). For large depolarizations, steady-state inactivation becomes more incomplete as voltage increases; but it is relatively complete and appears independent of voltage when determined with a two- pulse method. This result confirms the existence of a second open state for Na channels, as proposed by Chandler and Meves (1970. J. Physiol. [Lond.]. 211:653-678). The time constant of recovery from inactivation is voltage dependent and decreases as the membrane potential is made more negative. A model for Na channels is presented which has voltage-dependent transitions between the closed and open states, and a voltage-independent transition between the open and the inactivated state. In this model the voltage dependence of inactivation is a consequence of coupling to the activation process. PMID:591911

  11. Discovery and biological evaluation of potent, selective, orally bioavailable, pyrazine-based blockers of the Na(v)1.8 sodium channel with efficacy in a model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Scanio, Marc J C; Shi, Lei; Drizin, Irene; Gregg, Robert J; Atkinson, Robert N; Thomas, James B; Johnson, Matthew S; Chapman, Mark L; Liu, Dong; Krambis, Michael J; Liu, Yi; Shieh, Char-Chang; Zhang, Xufeng; Simler, Gricelda H; Joshi, Shailen; Honore, Prisca; Marsh, Kennan C; Knox, Alison; Werness, Stephen; Antonio, Brett; Krafte, Douglas S; Jarvis, Michael F; Faltynek, Connie R; Marron, Brian E; Kort, Michael E

    2010-11-15

    Na(v)1.8 (also known as PN3) is a tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTx-r) voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) that is highly expressed on small diameter sensory neurons. It has been implicated in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, and we envisioned that selective blockade of Na(v)1.8 would be analgesic, while reducing adverse events typically associated with non-selective VGSC blocking therapeutic agents. Herein, we describe the preparation and characterization of a series of 6-aryl-2-pyrazinecarboxamides, which are potent blockers of the human Na(v)1.8 channel and also block TTx-r sodium currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Selected derivatives display selectivity versus human Na(v)1.2. We further demonstrate that an example from this series is orally bioavailable and produces antinociceptive activity in vivo in a rodent model of neuropathic pain following oral administration. PMID:20965738

  12. Properties of wild-type and fluorescent protein-tagged mouse tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel (Na V 1.8) heterologously expressed in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Geoffrey G; Puhl, Henry L; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2008-04-01

    The tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Na(+) current arising from Na(V)1.8-containing channels participates in nociceptive pathways but is difficult to functionally express in traditional heterologous systems. Here, we show that injection of cDNA encoding mouse Na(V)1.8 into the nuclei of rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons results in TTX-resistant Na(+) currents with amplitudes equal to or exceeding the currents arising from natively expressing channels of mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The activation and inactivation properties of the heterologously expressed Na(V)1.8 Na(+) channels were similar but not identical to native TTX-resistant channels. Most notably, the half-activation potential of the heterologously expressed Na(V)1.8 channels was shifted about 10 mV toward more depolarized potentials. Fusion of fluorescent proteins to the N- or C-termini of Na(V)1.8 did not substantially affect functional expression in SCG neurons. Unexpectedly, fluorescence was not concentrated at the plasma membrane but found throughout the interior of the neuron in a granular pattern. A similar expression pattern was observed in nodose ganglion neurons expressing the tagged channels. In contrast, expression of tagged Na(V)1.8 in HeLa cells revealed a fluorescence pattern consistent with sequestration in the endoplasmic reticulum, thus providing a basis for poor functional expression in clonal cell lines. Our results establish SCG neurons as a favorable surrogate for the expression and study of molecularly defined Na(V)1.8-containing channels. The data also indicate that unidentified factors may be required for the efficient functional expression of Na(V)1.8 with a biophysical phenotype identical to that found in sensory neurons. PMID:18272876

  13. Epithelial sodium channel modulates platelet collagen activation.

    PubMed

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Ortega, Arturo

    2014-03-01

    Activated platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelial extracellular matrix and undergo a rapid cytoskeletal rearrangement resulting in shape change and release of their intracellular dense and alpha granule contents to avoid hemorrhage. A central step in this process is the elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration through its release from intracellular stores and on throughout its influx from the extracellular space. The Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a highly selective Na(+) channel involved in mechanosensation, nociception, fluid volume homeostasis, and control of arterial blood pressure. The present study describes the expression, distribution, and participation of ENaC in platelet migration and granule secretion using pharmacological inhibition with amiloride. Our biochemical and confocal analysis in suspended and adhered platelets suggests that ENaC is associated with Intermediate filaments (IF) and with Dystrophin-associated proteins (DAP) via α-syntrophin and β-dystroglycan. Migration assays, quantification of soluble P-selectin, and serotonin release suggest that ENaC is dispensable for migration and alpha and dense granule secretion, whereas Na(+) influx through this channel is fundamental for platelet collagen activation.

  14. Na+ channel function, regulation, structure, trafficking and sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Shaw, Robin M; Pitt, Geoffrey S; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Sack, Jon T; Abriel, Hugues; Aldrich, Richard W; Belardinelli, Luiz; Cannell, Mark B; Catterall, William A; Chazin, Walter J; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Deschenes, Isabelle; Grandi, Eleonora; Hund, Thomas J; Izu, Leighton T; Maier, Lars S; Maltsev, Victor A; Marionneau, Celine; Mohler, Peter J; Rajamani, Sridharan; Rasmusson, Randall L; Sobie, Eric A; Clancy, Colleen E; Bers, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second of a series of three reviews published in this issue resulting from the University of California Davis Cardiovascular Symposium 2014: Systems approach to understanding cardiac excitation–contraction coupling and arrhythmias: Na+ channel and Na+ transport. The goal of the symposium was to bring together experts in the field to discuss points of consensus and controversy on the topic of sodium in the heart. The present review focuses on Na+ channel function and regulation, Na+ channel structure and function, and Na+ channel trafficking, sequestration and complexing. PMID:25772290

  15. Propranolol Blocks Cardiac and Neuronal Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dao W.; Mistry, Akshitkumar M.; Kahlig, Kristopher M.; Kearney, Jennifer A.; Xiang, Jizhou; George, Alfred L.

    2010-01-01

    Propranolol is a widely used, non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist with proven efficacy in treating cardiovascular disorders and in the prevention of migraine headaches. At plasma concentrations exceeding those required for β-adrenergic receptor inhibition, propranolol also exhibits anti-arrhythmic (“membrane stabilizing”) effects that are not fully explained by β-blockade. Previous in vitro studies suggested that propranolol may have local anesthetic effects. We directly tested the effects of propranolol on heterologously expressed recombinant human cardiac (NaV1.5) and brain (NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3) sodium channels using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We found that block was not stereospecific as we observed approximately equal IC50 values for tonic and use-dependent block by R-(+) and S-(−) propranolol (tonic block: R: 21.4 μM vs S: 23.6 μM; use-dependent block: R: 2.7 μM vs S: 2.6 μM). Metoprolol and nadolol did not block NaV1.5 indicating that sodium channel block is not a class effect of β-blockers. The biophysical effects of R-(+)-propranolol on NaV1.5 and NaV1.1 resembled that of the prototypical local anesthetic lidocaine including the requirement for a critical phenylalanine residue (F1760 in NaV1.5) in the domain 4 S6 segment. Finally, we observed that brain sodium channels exhibited less sensitivity to R-(+)-propranolol than NaV1.5 channels. Our findings establish sodium channels as targets for propranolol and may help explain some beneficial effects of the drug in treating cardiac arrhythmias, and may explain certain adverse central nervous system effects. PMID:21833183

  16. Differential state-dependent modification of rat Na{sub v}1.6 sodium channels expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells by the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin

    SciTech Connect

    He, Bingjun; Soderlund, David M.

    2011-12-15

    We expressed rat Na{sub v}1.6 sodium channels in combination with the rat {beta}1 and {beta}2 auxiliary subunits in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and evaluated the effects of the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin on expressed sodium currents using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Both pyrethroids produced concentration-dependent, resting modification of Na{sub v}1.6 channels, prolonging the kinetics of channel inactivation and deactivation to produce persistent 'late' currents during depolarization and tail currents following repolarization. Both pyrethroids also produced concentration dependent hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage dependence of channel activation and steady-state inactivation. Maximal shifts in activation, determined from the voltage dependence of the pyrethroid-induced late and tail currents, were {approx} 25 mV for tefluthrin and {approx} 20 mV for deltamethrin. The highest attainable concentrations of these compounds also caused shifts of {approx} 5-10 mV in the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation. In addition to their effects on the voltage dependence of inactivation, both compounds caused concentration-dependent increases in the fraction of sodium current that was resistant to inactivation following strong depolarizing prepulses. We assessed the use-dependent effects of tefluthrin and deltamethrin on Na{sub v}1.6 channels by determining the effect of trains of 1 to 100 5-ms depolarizing prepulses at frequencies of 20 or 66.7 Hz on the extent of channel modification. Repetitive depolarization at either frequency increased modification by deltamethrin by {approx} 2.3-fold but had no effect on modification by tefluthrin. Tefluthrin and deltamethrin were equally potent as modifiers of Na{sub v}1.6 channels in HEK293 cells using the conditions producing maximal modification as the basis for comparison. These findings show that the actions of tefluthrin and deltamethrin of Na{sub v}1.6 channels in HEK293

  17. Bioinspired Artificial Sodium and Potassium Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Fuertes, Alberto; Amorín, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, all biological systems present a high level of compartmentalization in order to carry out a wide variety of functions in a very specific way. Hence, they need ways to be connected with the environment for communication, homeostasis equilibrium, nutrition, waste elimination, etc. The biological membranes carry out these functions; they consist of physical insulating barriers constituted mainly by phospholipids. These amphipathic molecules spontaneously aggregate in water to form bilayers in which the polar groups are exposed to the aqueous media while the non-polar chains self-organize by aggregating to each other to stay away from the aqueous media. The insulating properties of membranes are due to the formation of a hydrophobic bilayer covered at both sides by the hydrophilic phosphate groups. Thus, lipophilic molecules can permeate the membrane freely, while the small charged or very hydrophilic molecules require the assistance of other membrane components in order to overcome the energetic cost implied in crossing the non-polar region of the bilayer. Most of the large polar species (such as oligosaccharides, polypeptides or nucleic acids) cross into and out of the cell via endocytosis and exocytosis, respectively. Nature has created a series of systems (carriers and pores) in order to control the balance of small hydrophilic molecules and ions. The most important structures to achieve these goals are the ionophoric proteins that include the channel proteins, such as the sodium and potassium channels, and ionic transporters, including the sodium/potassium pumps or calcium/sodium exchangers among others. Inspired by these, scientists have created non-natural synthetic transporting structures to mimic the natural systems. The progress in the last years has been remarkable regarding the efficient transport of Na(+) and K(+) ions, despite the fact that the selectivity and the ON/OFF state of the non-natural systems remain a present and future challenge

  18. Bioinspired Artificial Sodium and Potassium Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Fuertes, Alberto; Amorín, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, all biological systems present a high level of compartmentalization in order to carry out a wide variety of functions in a very specific way. Hence, they need ways to be connected with the environment for communication, homeostasis equilibrium, nutrition, waste elimination, etc. The biological membranes carry out these functions; they consist of physical insulating barriers constituted mainly by phospholipids. These amphipathic molecules spontaneously aggregate in water to form bilayers in which the polar groups are exposed to the aqueous media while the non-polar chains self-organize by aggregating to each other to stay away from the aqueous media. The insulating properties of membranes are due to the formation of a hydrophobic bilayer covered at both sides by the hydrophilic phosphate groups. Thus, lipophilic molecules can permeate the membrane freely, while the small charged or very hydrophilic molecules require the assistance of other membrane components in order to overcome the energetic cost implied in crossing the non-polar region of the bilayer. Most of the large polar species (such as oligosaccharides, polypeptides or nucleic acids) cross into and out of the cell via endocytosis and exocytosis, respectively. Nature has created a series of systems (carriers and pores) in order to control the balance of small hydrophilic molecules and ions. The most important structures to achieve these goals are the ionophoric proteins that include the channel proteins, such as the sodium and potassium channels, and ionic transporters, including the sodium/potassium pumps or calcium/sodium exchangers among others. Inspired by these, scientists have created non-natural synthetic transporting structures to mimic the natural systems. The progress in the last years has been remarkable regarding the efficient transport of Na(+) and K(+) ions, despite the fact that the selectivity and the ON/OFF state of the non-natural systems remain a present and future challenge.

  19. The cellular localization of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, potassium channel, epithelial sodium channel γ and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase in human eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Xiang; Zeng, Shaopeng; Chen, Lu; Li, Xuexue; Lin, Changmin; Zhang, Mingjun; Shu, Shenyou; Xie, Sitian; He, Yunpu; Yang, Lvjun; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2014-10-01

    The secretory portions of human eccrine sweat glands secrete isotonic fluid into the lumen and then the primary fluid is rendered hypotonic during its passage to the skin surface. During the processes of sweat secretion and absorption, many enzymes and proteins play important roles. In the study, the cellular localizations of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), potassium channel (KC), epithelial sodium channel γ (γENaC) and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in human eccrine sweat glands and epidermis were detected using immunofluorescence labeling. The results revealed that in the secretory coils, the basolateral membranes showed evidence of CFTR, NHE1 and KC activities, the apical membranes showed the activities of KC and NHE1, and the nucleus showed γEaNC and V-ATPase activities; in the duct, the peripheral and luminal ductal cells showed evidence of CFTR, NHE1 and KC, the apical membranes showed the activities of CFTR and NHE1, and the nucleus showed γEaNC, V-ATPase and KC activities. The cellular localization of these proteins in eccrine sweat glands is helpful to better understand the mechanisms of sweat secretion and absorption. PMID:25081942

  20. Cardiac Na Channels: Structure to Function.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, K R; Clancy, C E

    2016-01-01

    Heart rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. Opening of the primary cardiac voltage-gated sodium (NaV1.5) channel initiates cellular depolarization and the propagation of an electrical action potential that promotes coordinated contraction of the heart. The regularity of these contractile waves is critically important since it drives the primary function of the heart: to act as a pump that delivers blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. Perturbations to NaV1.5 may alter the structure, and hence the function, of the ion channel and are associated downstream with a wide variety of cardiac conduction pathologies, such as arrhythmias. PMID:27586288

  1. Interaction of Tarantula Venom Peptide ProTx-II with Lipid Membranes Is a Prerequisite for Its Inhibition of Human Voltage-gated Sodium Channel NaV1.7.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Deplazes, Evelyne; Lawrence, Nicole; Cheneval, Olivier; Chaousis, Stephanie; Inserra, Marco; Thongyoo, Panumart; King, Glenn F; Mark, Alan E; Vetter, Irina; Craik, David J; Schroeder, Christina I

    2016-08-12

    ProTx-II is a disulfide-rich peptide toxin from tarantula venom able to inhibit the human voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 (hNaV1.7), a channel reported to be involved in nociception, and thus it might have potential as a pain therapeutic. ProTx-II acts by binding to the membrane-embedded voltage sensor domain of hNaV1.7, but the precise peptide channel-binding site and the importance of membrane binding on the inhibitory activity of ProTx-II remain unknown. In this study, we examined the structure and membrane-binding properties of ProTx-II and several analogues using NMR spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show a direct correlation between ProTx-II membrane binding affinity and its potency as an hNaV1.7 channel inhibitor. The data support a model whereby a hydrophobic patch on the ProTx-II surface anchors the molecule at the cell surface in a position that optimizes interaction of the peptide with the binding site on the voltage sensor domain. This is the first study to demonstrate that binding of ProTx-II to the lipid membrane is directly linked to its potency as an hNaV1.7 channel inhibitor. PMID:27311819

  2. Magnetic and electric fields across sodium and potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Marília A. G.; Cruz, Frederico A. O.; Silva, Dilson

    2015-12-01

    We determined the magnetic field around sodium and potassium ionic channels based on a physico-mathematical model that took into account charges in the surface bilayer. For the numerical simulation, we applied the finite element method. Results show that each channel produces its specific and individual response to the ion transport, according to its individual intrinsic properties. The existence of a number of active Na+-channels in a given membrane region seems not to interfere directly in the functioning of K+-channel located among them, and vice-versa.

  3. Specificity, affinity and efficacy of iota-conotoxin RXIA, an agonist of voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.2, 1.6 and 1.7

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Brian; Zhang, Min-Min; Buczek, Oga; Azam, Layla; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Norton, Raymond S; Olivera, Baldomero M; Yoshikami, Doju

    2009-01-01

    The excitotoxic conopeptide ι-RXIA induces repetitive action potentials in frog motor axons and seizures upon intracranial injection into mice. We recently discovered that ι-RXIA shifts the voltage-dependence of activation of voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.6 to a more hyperpolarized level. Here, we performed voltage-clamp experiments to examine its activity against rodent NaV1.1 through NaV1.7 co-expressed with the β1 subunit in Xenopus oocytes and NaV1.8 in dissociated mouse DRG neurons. The order of sensitivity to ι-RXIA was NaV1.6 > 1.2 > 1.7, and the remaining subtypes were insensitive. The time course of ι-RXIA-activity on NaV1.6 during exposure to different peptide concentrations were well fit by single-exponential curves that provided kobs. The plot of kobs versus [ι-RXIA] was linear, consistent with a bimolecular reaction with a Kd of ~3 μM, close to the steady-state EC50 of ~2 μM. ι-RXIA has an unusual residue, D-Phe, and the analog with an L-Phe instead, ι-RXIA[L-Phe44], had a two-fold lower affinity and two-fold faster off-rate than ι-RXIA on NaV1.6 and furthermore was inactive on NaV1.2. ι-RXIA induced repetitive action potentials in mouse sciatic nerve with conduction velocities of both A- and C-fibers, consistent with the presence of NaV1.6 at nodes of Ranvier as well as in unmyelinated axons. Sixteen peptides homologous to ι-RXIA have been identified from a single species of Conus, so these peptides represent a rich family of novel sodium channel-targeting ligands. PMID:18486102

  4. Epithelial Sodium and Chloride Channels and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the asthmatic pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/chlorine ion channel. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were the English articles from 1980 to 2015 from journal databases, primarily PubMed and Google Scholar. The terms used in the literature search were: (1) ENaCs; cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); asthma/asthmatic, (2) ENaC/sodium salt; CF; asthma/asthmatic, (3) CFTR/chlorine ion channels; asthma/asthmatic, (4) ENaC/sodium channel/scnn1a/scnn1b/scnn1g/scnn1d/amiloride-sensitive/amiloride-inhibtable sodium channels/sodium salt; asthma/asthmatic, lung/pulmonary/respiratory/tracheal/alveolar, and (5) CFTR; CF; asthma/asthmatic (ti). Study Selection: These studies included randomized controlled trials or studies covering asthma pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to ENaC/chlorine ion channels within the last 25 years (from 1990 to 2015). The data involving chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF obtained from individual studies were also reviewed by the authors. Results: Airway surface liquid dehydration can cause airway inflammation and obstruction. ENaC and CFTR are closely related to the airway mucociliary clearance. Ion transporters may play a critical role in pathogenesis of asthmatic exacerbations. Conclusions: Ion channels have been the center of many studies aiming to understand asthmatic pathophysiological mechanisms or to identify therapeutic targets for better control of the disease. PMID:26265620

  5. Co-Localization of Sodium Channel Na[v]1.6 and the Sodium--Calcium Exchanger at Sites of Axonal Injury in the Spinal Cord in EAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craner, Matthew J.; Hains, Bryan C.; Lo, Albert C.; Black, Joel A.; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2004-01-01

    Axonal degeneration contributes to the development of non-remitting neurological deficits and disability in multiple sclerosis, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie axonal loss in multiple sclerosis are not clearly understood. Studies of white matter axonal injury have demonstrated that voltage-gated sodium channels can provide a route for…

  6. Sodium Channels, Mitochondria, and Axonal Degeneration in Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Persson, Anna-Karin; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Estacion, Mark; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy results from damage to peripheral nerves and is often accompanied by pain in affected limbs. Treatment represents an unmet medical need and a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying axonal injury is needed. Longer nerve fibers tend to degenerate first (length-dependence), and patients carrying pathogenic mutations throughout life usually become symptomatic in mid- or late-life (time-dependence). The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels can contribute to axonal injury and sodium channel gain-of-function mutations have been linked to peripheral neuropathy. Recent studies have implicated sodium channel activity, mitochondrial compromise, and reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange in time- and length-dependent axonal injury. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying axonal injury in peripheral neuropathy may provide new therapeutic strategies for this painful and debilitating condition.

  7. Biophysical Adaptations of Prokaryotic Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Vien, T N; DeCaen, P G

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the adaptive features found in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These two families are distinct, having diverged early in evolutionary history but maintain a surprising degree of convergence in function. While prokaryotic NaVs are required for growth and motility, eukaryotic NaVs selectively conduct fast electrical currents for short- and long-range signaling across cell membranes in mammalian organs. Current interest in prokaryotic NaVs is stoked by their resolved high-resolution structures and functional features which are reminiscent of eukaryotic NaVs. In this chapter, comparisons between eukaryotic and prokaryotic NaVs are made to highlight the shared and unique aspects of ion selectivity, voltage sensitivity, and pharmacology. Examples of prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaV convergent evolution will be discussed within the context of their structural features. PMID:27586280

  8. Potassium Versus Sodium Selectivity in Monovalent Ion Channel Selectivity Filters.

    PubMed

    Lim, Carmay; Dudev, Todor

    2016-01-01

    Transport of Na(+) and K(+) ions across the cell membrane is carried out by specialized pore-forming ion channel proteins, which exert tight control on electrical signals in cells by regulating the inward/outward flow of the respective cation. As Na(+) and K(+) ions are both present in the body fluids, their respective ion channels should discriminate with high fidelity between the two competing metal ions, conducting the native cation while rejecting its monovalent contender (and other ions present in the cellular/extracellular milieu). Indeed, monovalent ion channels are characterized by remarkable metal selectivity. This striking ion selectivity of monovalent ion channels is astonishing in view of the close similarity between Na(+) and K(+): both are spherical alkali cations with the same charge, analogous chemical and physical properties, and similar ionic radii. The monovalent ion channel selectivity filters (SFs), which dictate the selectivity of the channel, differ in oligomericity, composition, overall charge, pore size, and solvent accessibility. This diversity of SFs raises the following intriguing questions: (1) What factors govern the metal competition in these SFs? (2) Which of these factors are exploited in achieving K(+) or Na(+) selectivity in the different types of monovalent channel SFs? These questions are addressed herein by summarizing results from recent studies. The results show that over billions of years of evolution, the SFs of potassium and sodium ion channels have adapted to the specific physicochemical properties of the cognate ion, using various strategies to enable them to efficiently select the native ion among its contenders.

  9. Molecular basis of ion permeability in a voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Claire E; Bagnéris, Claire; DeCaen, Paul G; Sula, Altin; Scaglione, Antonella; Clapham, David E; Wallace, B A

    2016-04-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for electrical signalling across cell membranes. They exhibit strong selectivities for sodium ions over other cations, enabling the finely tuned cascade of events associated with action potentials. This paper describes the ion permeability characteristics and the crystal structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel, showing for the first time the detailed locations of sodium ions in the selectivity filter of a sodium channel. Electrostatic calculations based on the structure are consistent with the relative cation permeability ratios (Na(+) ≈ Li(+) ≫ K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) measured for these channels. In an E178D selectivity filter mutant constructed to have altered ion selectivities, the sodium ion binding site nearest the extracellular side is missing. Unlike potassium ions in potassium channels, the sodium ions in these channels appear to be hydrated and are associated with side chains of the selectivity filter residues, rather than polypeptide backbones. PMID:26873592

  10. Discovery of potent furan piperazine sodium channel blockers for treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Drizin, Irene; Gregg, Robert J; Scanio, Marc J C; Shi, Lei; Gross, Michael F; Atkinson, Robert N; Thomas, James B; Johnson, Matthew S; Carroll, William A; Marron, Brian E; Chapman, Mark L; Liu, Dong; Krambis, Michael J; Shieh, Char-Chang; Zhang, XuFeng; Hernandez, Gricelda; Gauvin, Donna M; Mikusa, Joseph P; Zhu, Chang Z; Joshi, Shailen; Honore, Prisca; Marsh, Kennan C; Roeloffs, Rosemarie; Werness, Stephen; Krafte, Douglas S; Jarvis, Michael F; Faltynek, Connie R; Kort, Michael E

    2008-06-15

    The synthesis and pharmacological characterization of a novel furan-based class of voltage-gated sodium channel blockers is reported. Compounds were evaluated for their ability to block the tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel Na(v)1.8 (PN3) as well as the Na(v)1.2 and Na(v)1.5 subtypes. Benchmark compounds from this series possessed enhanced potency, oral bioavailability, and robust efficacy in a rodent model of neuropathic pain, together with improved CNS and cardiovascular safety profiles compared to the clinically used sodium channel blockers mexiletine and lamotrigine. PMID:18501613

  11. Mutant Sodium Channel for Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, Bakhos A; Christensen, Adam P; Pike, Lisa; Wurdinger, Thomas; Perry, Katherine F; Saydam, Okay; Jacobs, Andreas H; García-Añoveros, Jaime; Weissleder, Ralph; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Corey, David P; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2009-01-01

    Viral vectors have been used to deliver a wide range of therapeutic genes to tumors. In this study, a novel tumor therapy was achieved by the delivery of a mammalian brain sodium channel, ASIC2a, carrying a mutation that renders it constitutively open. This channel was delivered to tumor cells using a herpes simplex virus-1/Epstein–Barr virus (HSV/EBV) hybrid amplicon vector in which gene expression was controlled by a tetracycline regulatory system (tet-on) with silencer elements. Upon infection and doxycycline induction of mutant channel expression in tumor cells, the open channel led to amiloride-sensitive sodium influx as assessed by patch clamp recording and sodium imaging in culture. Within hours, tumor cells swelled and died. In addition to cells expressing the mutant channel, adjacent, noninfected cells connected by gap junctions also died. Intratumoral injection of HSV/EBV amplicon vector encoding the mutant sodium channel and systemic administration of doxycycline led to regression of subcutaneous tumors in nude mice as assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The advantage of this direct mode of tumor therapy is that all types of tumor cells become susceptible and death is rapid with no time for the tumor cells to become resistant. PMID:19259066

  12. Ionic Blockage of Sodium Channels in Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Woodhull, Ann M.

    1973-01-01

    Increasing the hydrogen ion concentration of the bathing medium reversibly depresses the sodium permeability of voltage-clamped frog nerves. The depression depends on membrane voltage: changing from pH 7 to pH 5 causes a 60% reduction in sodium permeability at +20 mV, but only a 20% reduction at +180 mV. This voltage-dependent block of sodium channels by hydrogen ions is explained by assuming that hydrogen ions enter the open sodium channel and bind there, preventing sodium ion passage. The voltage dependence arises because the binding site is assumed to lie far enough across the membrane for bound ions to be affected by part of the potential difference across the membrane. Equations are derived for the general case where the blocking ion enters the channel from either side of the membrane. For H+ ion blockage, a simpler model, in which H+ enters the channel only from the bathing medium, is found to be sufficient. The dissociation constant of H+ ions from the channel site, 3.9 x 10-6 M (pKa 5.4), is like that of a carboxylic acid. From the voltage dependence of the block, this acid site is about one-quarter of the way across the membrane potential from the outside. In addition to blocking as described by the model, hydrogen ions also shift the responses of sodium channel "gates" to voltage, probably by altering the surface potential of the nerve. Evidence for voltage-dependent blockage by calcium ions is also presented. PMID:4541078

  13. Relationship of axonal voltage-gated sodium channel 1.8 (NaV1.8) mRNA accumulation to sciatic nerve injury-induced painful neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Lin, Audrey; Mulpuri, Yatendra; Lee, Kyung; Spigelman, Igor; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2011-11-18

    Painful peripheral neuropathy is a significant clinical problem; however, its pathological mechanism and effective treatments remain elusive. Increased peripheral expression of tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel 1.8 (NaV1.8) has been shown to associate with chronic pain symptoms in humans and experimental animals. Sciatic nerve entrapment (SNE) injury was used to develop neuropathic pain symptoms in rats, resulting in increased NaV1.8 mRNA in the injured nerve but not in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). To study the role of NaV1.8 mRNA in the pathogenesis of SNE-induced painful neuropathy, NaV1.8 shRNA vector was delivered by subcutaneous injection of cationized gelatin/plasmid DNA polyplex into the rat hindpaw and its subsequent retrograde transport via sciatic nerve to DRG. This in vivo NaV1.8 shRNA treatment reversibly and repeatedly attenuated the SNE-induced pain symptoms, an effect that became apparent following a distinct lag period of 3-4 days and lasted for 4-6 days before returning to pretreatment levels. Surprisingly, apparent knockdown of NaV1.8 mRNA occurred only in the injured nerve, not in the DRG, during the pain alleviation period. Levels of heteronuclear NaV1.8 RNA were unaffected by SNE or shRNA treatments, suggesting that transcription of the Scn10a gene encoding NaV1.8 was unchanged. Based on these data, we postulate that increased axonal mRNA transport results in accumulation of functional NaV1.8 protein in the injured nerve and the development of painful neuropathy symptoms. Thus, targeted delivery of agents that interfere with axonal NaV1.8 mRNA may represent effective neuropathic pain treatments. PMID:21965668

  14. The pattern of expression of the voltage-gated sodium channels Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 does not change in uninjured primary sensory neurons in experimental neuropathic pain models.

    PubMed

    Decosterd, Isabelle; Ji, Ru-Rong; Abdi, Salahadin; Tate, Simon; Woolf, Clifford J

    2002-04-01

    A spared nerve injury of the sciatic nerve (SNI) or a segmental lesion of the L5 and L6 spinal nerves (SNL) lead to behavioral signs of neuropathic pain in the territory innervated by adjacent uninjured nerve fibers, while a chronic constriction injury (CCI) results in pain sensitivity in the affected area. While alterations in voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) have been shown to contribute to the generation of ectopic activity in the injured neurons, little is known about changes in VGSCs in the neighboring intact dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, even though these cells begin to fire spontaneously. We have now investigated changes in the expression of the TTX-resistant VGSCs, Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3) and Nav1.9 (SNS2/NaN) by immunohistochemistry in rat models of neuropathic pain both with an intermingling of intact and degenerated axons in the nerve stump (SNL and CCI) and with a co-mingling in the same DRG of neurons with injured and uninjured axons (sciatic axotomy and SNI). The expression of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 protein was abolished in all injured DRG neurons, in all models. In intact DRGs and in neighboring non-injured neurons, the expression and the distribution among the A- and C-fiber neuronal populations of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 was, however, unchanged. While it is unlikely, therefore, that a change in the expression of TTX-resistant VGSCs in non-injured neurons contributes to neuropathic pain, it is essential that molecular alterations in both injured and non-injured neurons in neuropathic pain models are investigated. PMID:11972999

  15. The peripheral pro-nociceptive state induced by repetitive inflammatory stimuli involves continuous activation of protein kinase A and protein kinase C epsilon and its Na(V)1.8 sodium channel functional regulation in the primary sensory neuron.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Cristiane Flora; Sachs, Daniela; Funez, Mani Indiana; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; de Queiroz Cunha, Fernando; Ferreira, Sérgio Henrique

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, the participation of the Na(V)1.8 sodium channel was investigated in the development of the peripheral pro-nociceptive state induced by daily intraplantar injections of PGE(2) in rats and its regulation in vivo by protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C epsilon (PKCvarepsilon) as well. In the prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-induced persistent hypernociception, the Na(V)1.8 mRNA in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was up-regulated. The local treatment with dipyrone abolished this persistent hypernociception but did not alter the Na(V)1.8 mRNA level in the DRG. Daily intrathecal administrations of antisense Na(V)1.8 decreased the Na(V)1.8 mRNA in the DRG and reduced ongoing persistent hypernociception. Once the persistent hypernociception had been abolished by dipyrone, but not by Na(V)1.8 antisense treatment, a small dose of PGE(2) restored the hypernociceptive plateau. These data show that, after a period of recurring inflammatory stimuli, an intense and prolonged nociceptive response is elicited by a minimum inflammatory stimulus and that this pro-nociceptive state depends on Na(V)1.8 mRNA up-regulation in the DRG. In addition, during the persistent hypernociceptive state, the PKA and PKCvarepsilon expression and activity in the DRG are up-regulated and the administration of the PKA and PKCvarepsilon inhibitors reduce the hypernociception as well as the Na(V)1.8 mRNA level. In the present study, we demonstrated that the functional regulation of the Na(V)1.8 mRNA by PKA and PKCvarepsilon in the primary sensory neuron is important for the development of the peripheral pro-nociceptive state induced by repetitive inflammatory stimuli and for the maintenance of the behavioral persistent hypernociception. PMID:19073148

  16. Mice lacking sodium channel beta1 subunits display defects in neuronal excitability, sodium channel expression, and nodal architecture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunling; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Xu, Xiaorong; Edwards, Chris A; Sorenson, Dorothy R; Chen, Yuan; McEwen, Dyke P; O'Malley, Heather A; Bharucha, Vandana; Meadows, Laurence S; Knudsen, Gabriel A; Vilaythong, Alex; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Saunders, Thomas L; Scheuer, Todd; Shrager, Peter; Catterall, William A; Isom, Lori L

    2004-04-21

    Sodium channel beta1 subunits modulate alpha subunit gating and cell surface expression and participate in cell adhesive interactions in vitro. beta1-/- mice appear ataxic and display spontaneous generalized seizures. In the optic nerve, the fastest components of the compound action potential are slowed and the number of mature nodes of Ranvier is reduced, but Na(v)1.6, contactin, caspr 1, and K(v)1 channels are all localized normally at nodes. At the ultrastructural level, the paranodal septate-like junctions immediately adjacent to the node are missing in a subset of axons, suggesting that beta1 may participate in axo-glial communication at the periphery of the nodal gap. Sodium currents in dissociated hippocampal neurons are normal, but Na(v)1.1 expression is reduced and Na(v)1.3 expression is increased in a subset of pyramidal neurons in the CA2/CA3 region, suggesting a basis for the epileptic phenotype. Our results show that beta1 subunits play important roles in the regulation of sodium channel density and localization, are involved in axo-glial communication at nodes of Ranvier, and are required for normal action potential conduction and control of excitability in vivo. PMID:15102918

  17. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; McArthur, Jeff; Ostroumov, Vitaly; French, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10–70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  18. DDT, pyrethrins, pyrethroids and insect sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Davies, T G E; Field, L M; Usherwood, P N R; Williamson, M S

    2007-03-01

    The long term use of many insecticides is continually threatened by the ability of insects to evolve resistance mechanisms that render the chemicals ineffective. Such resistance poses a serious threat to insect pest control both in the UK and worldwide. Resistance may result from either an increase in the ability of the insect to detoxify the insecticide or by changes in the target protein with which the insecticide interacts. DDT, the pyrethrins and the synthetic pyrethroids (the latter currently accounting for around 17% of the world insecticide market), act on the voltage-gated sodium channel proteins found in insect nerve cell membranes. The correct functioning of these channels is essential for normal transmission of nerve impulses and this process is disrupted by binding of the insecticides, leading to paralysis and eventual death. Some insect pest populations have evolved modifications of the sodium channel protein which prevent the binding of the insecticide and result in the insect developing resistance. Here we review some of the work (done at Rothamsted Research and elsewhere) that has led to the identification of specific residues on the sodium channel that may constitute the DDT and pyrethroid binding sites.

  19. Overview of the voltage-gated sodium channel family

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Frank H; Catterall, William A

    2003-01-01

    Selective permeation of sodium ions through voltage-dependent sodium channels is fundamental to the generation of action potentials in excitable cells such as neurons. These channels are large integral membrane proteins and are encoded by at least ten genes in mammals. The different sodium channels have remarkably similar functional properties, but small changes in sodium-channel function are biologically relevant, as underscored by mutations that cause several human diseases of hyperexcitability. PMID:12620097

  20. Understanding Sodium Channel Function and Modulation Using Atomistic Simulations of Bacterial Channel Structures.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, C; Allen, T W

    2016-01-01

    Sodium channels are chief proteins involved in electrical signaling in the nervous system, enabling critical functions like heartbeat and brain activity. New high-resolution X-ray structures for bacterial sodium channels have created an opportunity to see how these proteins operate at the molecular level. An important challenge to overcome is establishing relationships between the structures and functions of mammalian and bacterial channels. Bacterial sodium channels are known to exhibit the main structural features of their mammalian counterparts, as well as several key functional characteristics, including selective ion conduction, voltage-dependent gating, pore-based inactivation and modulation by local anesthetic, antiarrhythmic and antiepileptic drugs. Simulations have begun to shed light on each of these features in the past few years. Despite deviations in selectivity signatures for bacterial and mammalian channels, simulations have uncovered the nature of the multiion conduction mechanism associated with Na(+) binding to a high-field strength site established by charged glutamate side chains. Simulations demonstrated a surprising level of flexibility of the protein, showing that these side chains are active participants in the permeation process. They have also uncovered changes in protein structure, leading to asymmetrical collapses of the activation gate that have been proposed to correspond to inactivated structures. These observations offer the potential to examine the mechanisms of state-dependent drug activity, focusing on pore-blocking and pore-based slow inactivation in bacterial channels, without the complexities of inactivation on multiple timescales seen in eukaryotic channels. Simulations have provided molecular views of the interactions of drugs, consistent with sites predicted in mammalian channels, as well as a wealth of other sites as potential new drug targets. In this chapter, we survey the new insights into sodium channel function that

  1. Epithelial Sodium and Acid-Sensing Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellenberger, Stephan

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are non-voltage-gated Na+ channels that form their own subfamilies within the ENaC/degenerin ion channel family. ASICs are sensors of extracellular pH, and ENaC, whose main function is trans-epithelial Na+ transport, can sense extra- and intra-cellular Na+. In aldosterone-responsive epithelial cells of the kidney, ENaC plays a critical role in the control of sodium balance, blood volume and blood pressure. In airway epithelia, ENaC has a distinct role in controlling fluid reabsorption at the air-liquid interface, thereby determining the rate of mucociliary transport. In taste receptor cells of the tongue, ENaC is involved in salt taste sensation. ASICs have emerged as key sensors for extracellular protons in central and peripheral neurons. Although not all of their physiological and pathological functions are firmly established yet, there is good evidence for a role of ASICs in the brain in learning, expression of fear, and in neurodegeneration after ischaemic stroke. In sensory neurons, ASICs are involved in nociception and mechanosensation. ENaC and ASIC subunits share substantial sequence homology and the conservation of several functional domains. This chapter summarises our current understanding of the physiological functions and of the mechanisms of ion permeation, gating and regulation of ENaC and ASICs.

  2. Voltage-gated sodium channels and cancer: is excitability their primary role?

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Sébastien; Gillet, Ludovic; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Besson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are molecular characteristics of excitable cells. Their activation, triggered by membrane depolarization, generates transient sodium currents that initiate action potentials in neurons and muscle cells. Sodium currents were discovered by Hodgkin and Huxley using the voltage clamp technique and reported in their landmark series of papers in 1952. It was only in the 1980's that sodium channel proteins from excitable membranes were molecularly characterized by Catterall and his collaborators. Non-excitable cells can also express NaV channels in physiological conditions as well as in pathological conditions. These NaV channels can sustain biological roles that are not related to the generation of action potentials. Interestingly, it is likely that the abnormal expression of NaV in pathological tissues can reflect the re-expression of a fetal phenotype. This is especially true in epithelial cancer cells for which these channels have been identified and sodium currents recorded, while it was not the case for cells from the cognate normal tissues. In cancers, the functional activity of NaV appeared to be involved in regulating the proliferative, migrative, and invasive properties of cells. This review is aimed at addressing the non-excitable roles of NaV channels with a specific emphasis in the regulation of cancer cell biology. PMID:26283962

  3. Molecular Biology of Insect Sodium Channels and Pyrethroid Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Most of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors. PMID:24704279

  4. Stimulation of epithelial sodium channel activity by the sulfonylurea glibenclamide.

    PubMed

    Chrabi, A; Horisberger, J D

    1999-07-01

    The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) contributes to the regulation of the sodium balance and blood pressure because it mediates a rate-limiting step in sodium transport across the epithelium of the distal nephron. The activity of ENaC is regulated by hormones, such as aldosterone and vasopressin, and by other intracellular or extracellular factors, but the mechanisms of these regulations are not yet well understood. It has been proposed that ENaC may be regulated by an associated ATP-binding cassette protein such as the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator or the K channel-associated sulfonylurea receptor. Glibenclamide, a known inhibitor of sulfonylurea receptor and cystic fibrosis conductance regulator, induced a dose-dependent and reversible stimulation (of the order of 40-50%) of the amiloride-sensitive current in oocytes expressing Xenopus ENaC, with a K1/2 of 45 +/- 5 microM. A similar effect was observed in oocytes expressing human ENaC, but not rat ENaC. Measurements performed with various combinations of rat and Xenopus subunits indicated that several subunits are involved in this effect. Glibenclamide also increased the transepithelial Na transport by the A6 Xenopus kidney cell line. Single-channel current recordings showed a doubling of the number of the open channels when glibenclamide was applied locally to the extracellular surface of the cell membrane. These results support the hypothesis of the existence of an associated ATP-binding cassette-type regulatory protein associated with the epithelial sodium channel. PMID:10381797

  5. Sodium channel genes in pain-related disorders: phenotype-genotype associations and recommendations for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Stephen G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Gerrits, Monique M; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Lauria, Giuseppe; Cox, James J; Wood, John N; Woods, C Geoffrey; Drenth, Joost P H; Faber, Catharina G

    2014-11-01

    Human studies have firmly implicated voltage-gated sodium channels in human pain disorders, and targeted and massively parallel genomic sequencing is beginning to be used in clinical practice to determine which sodium channel variants are involved. Missense substitutions of SCN9A, the gene encoding sodium channel NaV1.7, SCN10A, the gene encoding sodium channel NaV1.8, and SCN11A, the gene encoding sodium channel NaV1.9, produce gain-of-function changes that contribute to pain in many human painful disorders. Genomic sequencing might help to establish a diagnosis, and in the future might support individualisation of therapeutic approaches. However, in many cases, and especially in sodium channelopathies, the results from genomic sequencing can only be appropriately interpreted in the context of an extensive functional assessment, or family segregation analysis of phenotype and genotype. PMID:25316021

  6. Base of the thumb domain modulates epithelial sodium channel gating.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shujie; Ghosh, D Dipon; Okumura, Sora; Carattino, Marcelo D; Kashlan, Ossama B; Sheng, Shaohu; Kleyman, Thomas R

    2011-04-29

    The activity of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is modulated by multiple external factors, including proteases, cations, anions and shear stress. The resolved crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1), a structurally related ion channel, and mutagenesis studies suggest that the large extracellular region is involved in recognizing external signals that regulate channel gating. The thumb domain in the extracellular region of ASIC1 has a cylinder-like structure with a loop at its base that is in proximity to the tract connecting the extracellular region to the transmembrane domains. This loop has been proposed to have a role in transmitting proton-induced conformational changes within the extracellular region to the gate. We examined whether loops at the base of the thumb domains within ENaC subunits have a similar role in transmitting conformational changes induced by external Na(+) and shear stress. Mutations at selected sites within this loop in each of the subunits altered channel responses to both external Na(+) and shear stress. The most robust changes were observed at the site adjacent to a conserved Tyr residue. In the context of channels that have a low open probability due to retention of an inhibitory tract, mutations in the loop activated channels in a subunit-specific manner. Our data suggest that this loop has a role in modulating channel gating in response to external stimuli, and are consistent with the hypothesis that external signals trigger movements within the extracellular regions of ENaC subunits that are transmitted to the channel gate. PMID:21367859

  7. Neuronal death and perinatal lethality in voltage-gated sodium channel alpha(II)-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Planells-Cases, R; Caprini, M; Zhang, J; Rockenstein, E M; Rivera, R R; Murre, C; Masliah, E; Montal, M

    2000-06-01

    Neural activity is crucial for cell survival and fine patterning of neuronal connectivity during neurodevelopment. To investigate the role in vivo of sodium channels (NaCh) in these processes, we generated knockout mice deficient in brain NaChalpha(II). NaChalpha(II)(-/-) mice were morphologically and organogenically indistinguishable from their NaChalpha(+/-) littermates. Notwithstanding, NaChalpha(II)(-/-) mice died perinatally with severe hypoxia and massive neuronal apoptosis, notably in the brainstem. Sodium channel currents recorded from cultured neurons of NaChalpha(II)(-/-) mice were sharply attenuated. Death appears to arise from severe hypoxia consequent to the brainstem deficiency of NaChalpha(II). NaChalpha(II) expression is, therefore, redundant for embryonic development but essential for postnatal survival.

  8. Ubiquitylation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Laedermann, Cédric J; Decosterd, Isabelle; Abriel, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are regulated by different types of posttranslational modifications. The focus of this review is the regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) upon their ubiquitylation. The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) was the first ion channel shown to be regulated upon ubiquitylation. This modification results from the binding of ubiquitin ligase from the Nedd4 family to a protein-protein interaction domain, known as the PY motif, in the ENaC subunits. Many of the Navs have similar PY motifs, which have been demonstrated to be targets of Nedd4-dependent ubiquitylation, tagging them for internalization from the cell surface. The role of Nedd4-dependent regulation of the Nav membrane density in physiology and disease remains poorly understood. Two recent studies have provided evidence that Nedd4-2 is downregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in both rat and mouse models of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. Using two different mouse models, one with a specific knockout of Nedd4-2 in sensory neurons and another where Nedd4-2 was overexpressed with the use of viral vectors, it was demonstrated that the neuropathy-linked neuronal hyperexcitability was the result of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 overexpression due to Nedd4-2 downregulation. These studies provided the first in vivo evidence of the role of Nedd4-2-dependent regulation of Nav channels in a disease state. This ubiquitylation pathway may be involved in the development of symptoms and diseases linked to Nav-dependent hyperexcitability, such as pain, cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy, migraine, and myotonias. PMID:24737239

  9. Sodium channel molecular conformations and antiarrhythmic drug affinity.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Michael F; Fozzard, Harry A; Lipkind, Gregory M; Hanck, Dorothy A

    2010-01-01

    Class I cardiac antiarrhythmic drugs, for example, lidocaine, mexiletine, flecainide, quinidine, and procainamide, continue to play an important role in the therapy for cardiac arrhythmias because of the presence of use-dependent block. Lidocaine, as well as related drugs such as mepivacaine, bupivacaine, and cocaine, also belong to the class of medications referred to as local anesthetics. In this review, we will consider lidocaine as the prototypical antiarrhythmic drug because it continues to be widely used both as an antiarrhythmic drug (first used as an antiarrhythmic drug in 1950) as well as a local anesthetic agent. Both of these clinical uses depend upon block of sodium current (I(Na)), but it is the presence of use-dependent I(Na) block, that is, an increasing amount of block at faster heart rates, which enables a local anesthetic agent to be a useful antiarrhythmic drug. Although many early studies investigated the action of antiarrhythmic drugs on Na currents, the availability of site-directed mutant Na channels has enabled for major advances in understanding their mechanisms of action based upon molecular conformations of the Na channel. PMID:20685573

  10. Role of Sodium Channels in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, David I; Isom, Lori L; Petrou, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are fundamentally important for the generation and coordinated transmission of action potentials throughout the nervous system. It is, therefore, unsurprising that they have been shown to play a central role in the genesis and alleviation of epilepsy. Genetic studies on patients with epilepsy have identified more than 700 mutations among the genes that encode for VGSCs attesting to their role in pathogenesis. Further, many common antiepileptic drugs act on VGSCs to suppress seizure activity. Here, we present an account of the role of VGSCs in epilepsy, both through their pathogenic dysfunction and as targets for pharmacotherapy.

  11. Intrinsic gating mechanisms of epithelial sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Long; Fuller, Catherine M; Benos, Dale J

    2002-08-01

    The hypothesis that there is a highly conserved, positively charged region distal to the second transmembrane domain in alpha-ENaC (epithelial sodium channel) that acts as a putative receptor site for the negatively charged COOH-terminal beta- and gamma-ENaC tails was tested in mutagenesis experiments. After expression in Xenopus oocytes, alpha-ENaC constructs in which positively charged arginine residues were converted into negatively charged glutamic acids could not be inhibited by blocking peptides. These observations provide insight into the gating machinery of ENaC. PMID:12107075

  12. Expression of 5-HT3 receptors and TTX resistant sodium channels (NaV1.8) on muscle nerve fibers in pain-free humans and patients with chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that 5-HT3-antagonists reduce muscle pain, but there are no studies that have investigated the expression of 5-HT3-receptors in human muscles. Also, tetrodotoxin resistant voltage gated sodium-channels (NaV) are involved in peripheral sensitization and found in trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the rat masseter muscle. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of nerve fibers that express 5-HT3A-receptors alone and in combination with NaV1.8 sodium-channels in human muscles and to compare it between healthy pain-free men and women, the pain-free masseter and tibialis anterior muscles, and patients with myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and pain-free controls. Methods Three microbiopsies were obtained from the most bulky part of the tibialis and masseter muscles of seven and six healthy men and seven and six age-matched healthy women, respectively, while traditional open biopsies were obtained from the most painful spot of the masseter of five female patients and from a similar region of the masseter muscle of five healthy, age-matched women. The biopsies were processed by routine immunohistochemical methods. The biopsy sections were incubated with monoclonal antibodies against the specific axonal marker PGP 9.5, and polyclonal antibodies against the 5-HT3A-receptors and NaV1.8 sodium-channels. Results A similar percentage of nerve fibers in the healthy masseter (85.2%) and tibialis (88.7%) muscles expressed 5-HT3A-receptors. The expression of NaV1.8 by 5-HT3A positive nerve fibers associated with connective tissue was significantly higher than nerve fibers associated with myocytes (P < .001). In the patients, significantly more fibers per section were found with an average of 3.8 ± 3 fibers per section in the masseter muscle compared to 2.7 ± 0.2 in the healthy controls (P = .024). Further, the frequency of nerve fibers that co-expressed NaV1.8 and 5-HT3A receptors was significantly

  13. Differential sensitivity of rat voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms to pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2006-07-15

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides are potent inhibitors of insect and mammalian voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In mammals, there are nine sodium channel alpha subunit isoforms that have unique distributions and pharmacological properties, but no published data exist that compare the relative sensitivity of these different mammalian sodium channel isoforms to inhibition by pyrazoline-type insecticides. This study employed the Xenopus oocyte expression system to examine the relative sensitivity of rat Na(v)1.2a, Na(v)1.4, Na(v)1.5, and Na(v)1.8 sodium channel alpha subunit isoforms to the pyrazoline-type insecticides indoxacarb, DCJW, and RH 3421. Additionally, we assessed the effect of coexpression with the rat beta1 auxiliary subunit on the sensitivity of the Na(v)1.2a and Na(v)1.4 isoforms to these compounds. The relative sensitivity of the four sodium channel alpha subunits differed for each of the three compounds we examined. With DCJW, the order of sensitivity was Na(v)1.4 > Na(v)1.2a > Na(v)1.5 > Na(v)1.8. In contrast, the relative sensitivity of these isoforms to indoxacarb differed from that to DCJW: the Na(v)1.8 isoform was most sensitive, the Na(v)1.4 isoform was completely insensitive, and the sensitivities of the Na(v)1.5 and Na(v)1.2a isoforms were intermediate between these two extremes. Moreover, the pattern of sensitivity to RH 3421 among these four isoforms was different from that for either indoxacarb or DCJW: the Na(v)1.4 isoform was most sensitive to RH 3421, whereas the sensitivities of the remaining three isoforms were substantially less than that of the Na(v)1.4 isoform and were approximately equivalent. The only statistically significant effect of coexpression of either the Na(v)1.2a or Na(v)1.4 isoforms with the beta1 subunit was the modest reduction in the sensitivity of the Na(v)1.2a isoform to RH 3421. These results demonstrate that mammalian sodium channel isoforms differ in their sensitivities to pyrazoline-type insecticides.

  14. Differential sensitivity of rat voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms to pyrazoline-type insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, Kristopher S.; Soderlund, David M. . E-mail: dms6@cornell.edu

    2006-07-15

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides are potent inhibitors of insect and mammalian voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In mammals, there are nine sodium channel {alpha} subunit isoforms that have unique distributions and pharmacological properties, but no published data exist that compare the relative sensitivity of these different mammalian sodium channel isoforms to inhibition by pyrazoline-type insecticides. This study employed the Xenopus oocyte expression system to examine the relative sensitivity of rat Na{sub v}1.2a, Na{sub v}1.4, Na{sub v}1.5, and Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channel {alpha} subunit isoforms to the pyrazoline-type insecticides indoxacarb, DCJW, and RH 3421. Additionally, we assessed the effect of coexpression with the rat {beta}1 auxiliary subunit on the sensitivity of the Na{sub v}1.2a and Na{sub v}1.4 isoforms to these compounds. The relative sensitivity of the four sodium channel {alpha} subunits differed for each of the three compounds we examined. With DCJW, the order of sensitivity was Na{sub v}1.4 > Na{sub v}1.2a > Na{sub v}1.5 > Na{sub v}1.8. In contrast, the relative sensitivity of these isoforms to indoxacarb differed from that to DCJW: the Na{sub v}1.8 isoform was most sensitive, the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform was completely insensitive, and the sensitivities of the Na{sub v}1.5 and Na{sub v}1.2a isoforms were intermediate between these two extremes. Moreover, the pattern of sensitivity to RH 3421 among these four isoforms was different from that for either indoxacarb or DCJW: the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform was most sensitive to RH 3421, whereas the sensitivities of the remaining three isoforms were substantially less than that of the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform and were approximately equivalent. The only statistically significant effect of coexpression of either the Na{sub v}1.2a or Na{sub v}1.4 isoforms with the {beta}1 subunit was the modest reduction in the sensitivity of the Na{sub v}1.2a isoform to RH 3421. These results demonstrate that mammalian sodium

  15. Effects of the β1 auxiliary subunit on modification of Rat Na(v)1.6 sodium channels expressed in HEK293 cells by the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    He, Bingjun; Soderlund, David M

    2016-01-15

    We expressed rat Nav1.6 sodium channels with or without the rat β1 subunit in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and evaluated the effects of the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin on whole-cell sodium currents. In assays with the Nav1.6 α subunit alone, both pyrethroids prolonged channel inactivation and deactivation and shifted the voltage dependence of channel activation and steady-state inactivation toward hyperpolarization. Maximal shifts in activation were ~18 mV for tefluthrin and ~24 mV for deltamethrin. These compounds also caused hyperpolarizing shifts of ~10-14 mV in the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation and increased in the fraction of sodium current that was resistant to inactivation. The effects of pyrethroids on the voltage-dependent gating greatly increased the size of sodium window currents compared to unmodified channels; modified channels exhibited increased probability of spontaneous opening at membrane potentials more negative than the normal threshold for channel activation and incomplete channel inactivation. Coexpression of Nav1.6 with the β1 subunit had no effect on the kinetic behavior of pyrethroid-modified channels but had divergent effects on the voltage-dependent gating of tefluthrin- or deltamethrin-modified channels, increasing the size of tefluthrin-induced window currents but decreasing the size of corresponding deltamethrin-induced currents. Unexpectedly, the β1 subunit did not confer sensitivity to use-dependent channel modification by either tefluthrin or deltamethrin. We conclude from these results that functional reconstitution of channels in vitro requires careful attention to the subunit composition of channel complexes to ensure that channels in vitro are faithful functional and pharmacological models of channels in neurons.

  16. Neurological perspectives on voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Linley, John E.; Baker, Mark D.; Minett, Michael S.; Cregg, Roman; Werdehausen, Robert; Rugiero, François

    2012-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels has long been linked to disorders of neuronal excitability such as epilepsy and chronic pain. Recent genetic studies have now expanded the role of sodium channels in health and disease, to include autism, migraine, multiple sclerosis, cancer as well as muscle and immune system disorders. Transgenic mouse models have proved useful in understanding the physiological role of individual sodium channels, and there has been significant progress in the development of subtype selective inhibitors of sodium channels. This review will outline the functions and roles of specific sodium channels in electrical signalling and disease, focusing on neurological aspects. We also discuss recent advances in the development of selective sodium channel inhibitors. PMID:22961543

  17. The neuronal channel NALCN contributes resting sodium permeability and is required for normal respiratory rhythm.

    PubMed

    Lu, Boxun; Su, Yanhua; Das, Sudipto; Liu, Jin; Xia, Jingsheng; Ren, Dejian

    2007-04-20

    Sodium plays a key role in determining the basal excitability of the nervous systems through the resting "leak" Na(+) permeabilities, but the molecular identities of the TTX- and Cs(+)-resistant Na(+) leak conductance are totally unknown. Here we show that this conductance is formed by the protein NALCN, a substantially uncharacterized member of the sodium/calcium channel family. Unlike any of the other 20 family members, NALCN forms a voltage-independent, nonselective cation channel. NALCN mutant mice have a severely disrupted respiratory rhythm and die within 24 hours of birth. Brain stem-spinal cord recordings reveal reduced neuronal firing. The TTX- and Cs(+)-resistant background Na(+) leak current is absent in the mutant hippocampal neurons. The resting membrane potentials of the mutant neurons are relatively insensitive to changes in extracellular Na(+) concentration. Thus, NALCN, a nonselective cation channel, forms the background Na(+) leak conductance and controls neuronal excitability. PMID:17448995

  18. Phylogeny unites animal sodium leak channels with fungal calcium channels in an ancient, voltage-insensitive clade.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J; Hillis, David M; Zakon, Harold H

    2012-12-01

    Proteins in the superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels mediate behavior across the tree of life. These proteins regulate the movement of ions across cell membranes by opening and closing a central pore that controls ion flow. The best-known members of this superfamily are the voltage-gated potassium, calcium (Ca(v)), and sodium (Na(v)) channels, which underlie impulse conduction in nerve and muscle. Not all members of this family are opened by changes in voltage, however. NALCN (NA(+) leak channel nonselective) channels, which encode a voltage-insensitive "sodium leak" channel, have garnered a growing interest. This study examines the phylogenetic relationship among Na(v)/Ca(v) voltage-gated and voltage-insensitive channels in the eukaryotic group Opisthokonta, which includes animals, fungi, and their unicellular relatives. We show that NALCN channels diverged from voltage-gated channels before the divergence of fungi and animals and that the closest relatives of NALCN channels are fungal calcium channels, which they functionally resemble.

  19. Sodium channel slow inactivation interferes with open channel block

    PubMed Central

    Hampl, Martin; Eberhardt, Esther; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Lampert, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 are linked to inherited pain syndromes such as erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). PEPD mutations impair Nav1.7 fast inactivation and increase persistent currents. PEPD mutations also increase resurgent currents, which involve the voltage-dependent release of an open channel blocker. In contrast, IEM mutations, whenever tested, leave resurgent currents unchanged. Accordingly, the IEM deletion mutation L955 (ΔL955) fails to produce resurgent currents despite enhanced persistent currents, which have hitherto been considered a prerequisite for resurgent currents. Additionally, ΔL955 exhibits a prominent enhancement of slow inactivation (SI). We introduced mutations into Nav1.7 and Nav1.6 that either enhance or impair SI in order to investigate their effects on resurgent currents. Our results show that enhanced SI is accompanied by impaired resurgent currents, which suggests that SI may interfere with open-channel block. PMID:27174182

  20. THE ROLE OF SODIUM CHANNELS IN CHRONIC PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Simon R.; Luo, Songjiang; Henry, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Here we review recent research into the mechanisms of chronic pain that has focused on neuronal sodium channels, a target of classic analgesic agents. We first discuss evidence that specific sodium channel isoforms are essential for the detection and conduction of normal acutely painful stimuli from nociceptors. We then review findings that show changes in sodium channel expression and localization in chronic inflammation and nerve injury in animal and human tissues. We conclude by discussing the role that myelination plays in organizing and maintaining sodium channel clusters at nodes of Ranvier in normal development and how inflammatory processes or nerve injury alter the characteristics of such clusters. Based on these findings, we suggest that chronic pain may in part result from partial demyelination of axons during chronic injury, which creates aberrant sodium channel clusters that serve as sites of ectopic sensitivity or spontaneous activity. PMID:22806363

  1. [Role of the voltage-gated sodium channels in the metastatic capacity of cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Plata, Everardo

    2012-01-01

    The functional expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) in cancer cells is associated with an increase of metastatic potential. The activity of Na(v) channels modulates different cellular processes related to the development of the malignant phenotype, such as adhesion, galvanotaxis, motility and invasiveness. Among the great diversity of cancerous phenotypes, Na(v) channels expression is common in highly metastatic cells with their distribution following a primary tumor-specific pattern. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature, regarding to: the types of Na(v) channels expressed by different types of cancer cells, the cancer cellular processes in which they play important roles, and the molecular mechanisms by which these channels promote metastasis.

  2. Inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels by sumatriptan bioisosteres

    PubMed Central

    Carbonara, Roberta; Carocci, Alessia; Roussel, Julien; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Buonavoglia, Canio; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni; Camerino, Diana Conte; Desaphy, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are known to play a pivotal role in perception and transmission of pain sensations. Gain-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the peripheral neuronal sodium channels, hNav1.7–1.9, cause human painful diseases. Thus while treatment of chronic pain remains an unmet clinical need, sodium channel blockers are considered as promising druggable targets. In a previous study, we evaluated the analgesic activity of sumatriptan, an agonist of serotonin 5HT1B/D receptors, and some new chiral bioisosteres, using the hot plate test in the mouse. Interestingly, we observed that the analgesic effectiveness was not necessarily correlated to serotonin agonism. In this study, we evaluated whether sumatriptan and its congeners may inhibit heterologously expressed hNav1.7 sodium channels using the patch-clamp method. We show that sumatriptan blocks hNav1.7 channels only at very high, supratherapeutic concentrations. In contrast, its three analogs, namely 20b, (R)-31b, and (S)-22b, exert a dose and use-dependent sodium channel block. At 0.1 and 10 Hz stimulation frequencies, the most potent compound, (S)-22b, was 4.4 and 1.7 fold more potent than the well-known sodium channel blocker mexiletine. The compound induces a negative shift of voltage dependence of fast inactivation, suggesting higher affinity to the inactivated channel. Accordingly, we show that (S)-22b likely binds the conserved local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels. Combining these results with the previous ones, we hypothesize that use-dependent sodium channel blockade contributes to the analgesic activity of (R)-31b and (S)-22b. These later compounds represent promising lead compounds for the development of efficient analgesics, the mechanism of action of which may include a dual action on sodium channels and 5HT1D receptors. PMID:26257653

  3. Inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels by sumatriptan bioisosteres.

    PubMed

    Carbonara, Roberta; Carocci, Alessia; Roussel, Julien; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Buonavoglia, Canio; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni; Camerino, Diana Conte; Desaphy, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are known to play a pivotal role in perception and transmission of pain sensations. Gain-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the peripheral neuronal sodium channels, hNav1.7-1.9, cause human painful diseases. Thus while treatment of chronic pain remains an unmet clinical need, sodium channel blockers are considered as promising druggable targets. In a previous study, we evaluated the analgesic activity of sumatriptan, an agonist of serotonin 5HT1B/D receptors, and some new chiral bioisosteres, using the hot plate test in the mouse. Interestingly, we observed that the analgesic effectiveness was not necessarily correlated to serotonin agonism. In this study, we evaluated whether sumatriptan and its congeners may inhibit heterologously expressed hNav1.7 sodium channels using the patch-clamp method. We show that sumatriptan blocks hNav1.7 channels only at very high, supratherapeutic concentrations. In contrast, its three analogs, namely 20b, (R)-31b, and (S)-22b, exert a dose and use-dependent sodium channel block. At 0.1 and 10 Hz stimulation frequencies, the most potent compound, (S)-22b, was 4.4 and 1.7 fold more potent than the well-known sodium channel blocker mexiletine. The compound induces a negative shift of voltage dependence of fast inactivation, suggesting higher affinity to the inactivated channel. Accordingly, we show that (S)-22b likely binds the conserved local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels. Combining these results with the previous ones, we hypothesize that use-dependent sodium channel blockade contributes to the analgesic activity of (R)-31b and (S)-22b. These later compounds represent promising lead compounds for the development of efficient analgesics, the mechanism of action of which may include a dual action on sodium channels and 5HT1D receptors. PMID:26257653

  4. Functional expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary cultures of human cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Daniel; Delgadillo, Dulce Maria; Hernández-Gallegos, Elizabeth; Ramírez-Domínguez, Martha Eugenia; Hinojosa, Luz María; Ortiz, Cindy Sharon; Berumen, Jaime; Camacho, Javier; Gomora, Juan Carlos

    2007-02-01

    Cervical cancer (CaC) is the third most frequent cause of death from cancer among women in the world and the first in females of developing countries. Several ion channels are upregulated in cancer, actually potassium channels have been suggested as tumor markers and therapeutic targets for CaC. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) activity is involved in proliferation, motility, and invasion of prostate and breast cancer cells; however, the participation of this type of channels in CaC has not been explored. In the present study, we identified both at the molecular and electrophysiological level VGSC in primary cultures from human cervical carcinoma biopsies. With the whole cell patch clamp technique, we isolated and identified a voltage-gated Na(+) current as the main component of the inward current in all investigated cells. Sodium current was characterized by its kinetics, voltage dependence, sensitivity to tetrodotoxin (TTX) block and dependence to [Na(+)](o). By analyzing the expression of mRNAs encoding TTX-sensitive Na(+) channel alpha subunits with standard RT-PCR and specific primers, we detected Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.4, Na(v)1.6, and Na(v)1.7 transcripts in total RNA obtained from primary cultures and biopsies of CaC. Restriction enzyme analysis of PCR products was consistent with the molecular nature of the corresponding genes. Notably, only transcripts for Na(v)1.4 sodium channels were detected in biopsies from normal cervix. The results show for the first time the functional expression of VGSC in primary cultures from human CaC, and suggest that these channels might be considered as potential molecular markers for this type of cancer.

  5. Down-regulation of voltage-dependent sodium channels initiated by sodium influx in developing neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dargent, B.; Couraud, F. )

    1990-08-01

    To address the issue of whether regulatory feedback exists between the electrical activity of a neuron and ion-channel density, the authors investigated the effect of Na{sup +}-channel activators (scorpion {alpha} toxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) on the density of Na{sup +} channels in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. A partial but rapid (t{sub 1/2}, 15 min) disappearance of surface Na{sup +} channels was observed as measured by a decrease in the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)saxitoxin and {sup 125}I-labeled scorpion {beta} toxin and a decrease in specific {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake. Moreover, the increase in the number of Na{sup +} channels that normally occurs during neuronal maturation in vitro was inhibited by chronic channel activator treatment. The induced disappearance of Na{sup +} channels was abolished by tetrodotoxin, was found to be dependent on the external Na{sup +} concentration, and was prevented when either choline (a nonpermeant ion) or Li{sup +} (a permeant ion) was substituted for Na{sup +}. Amphotericin B, a Na{sup +} ionophore, and monensin were able to mimick the effect of Na{sup +}-channel activators, while a KCl depolarization failed to do this. This feedback regulation seems to be a neuronal property since Na{sup +}-channel density in cultured astrocytes was not affected by channel activator treatment or by amphotericin B. The present evidence suggests that an increase in intracellular Na{sup +} concentration, whether elicited by Na{sup +}-channel activators or mediated by a Na{sup +} ionophore, can induce a decrease in surface Na{sup +} channels and therefore is involved in down-regulation of Na{sup +}-channel density in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro.

  6. Down-regulation of voltage-dependent sodium channels initiated by sodium influx in developing neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Dargent, B; Couraud, F

    1990-01-01

    To address the issue of whether regulatory feedback exists between the electrical activity of a neuron and ion-channel density, we investigated the effect of Na(+)-channel activators (scorpion alpha toxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) on the density of Na+ channels in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. A partial but rapid (t1/2, 15 min) disappearance of surface Na+ channels was observed as measured by a decrease in the specific binding of [3H]saxitoxin and 125I-labeled scorpion beta toxin and a decrease in specific 22Na+ uptake. Moreover, the increase in the number of Na+ channels that normally occurs during neuronal maturation in vitro was inhibited by chronic channel activator treatment. The induced disappearance of Na+ channels was abolished by tetrodotoxin, was found to be dependent on the external Na+ concentration, and was prevented when either choline (a nonpermeant ion) or Li+ (a permeant ion) was substituted for Na+. Amphotericin B, a Na+ ionophore, and monensin were able to mimick the effect of Na(+)-channel activators, while a KCl depolarization failed to do this. This feedback regulation seems to be a neuronal property since Na(+)-channel density in cultured astrocytes was not affected by channel activator treatment or by amphotericin B. The present evidence suggests that an increase in intracellular Na+ concentration, whether elicited by Na(+)-channel activators or mediated by a Na+ ionophore, can induce a decrease in surface Na+ channels and therefore is involved in down-regulation of Na(+)-channel density in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. PMID:2165609

  7. Venus Flytrap HKT1-Type Channel Provides for Prey Sodium Uptake into Carnivorous Plant Without Conflicting with Electrical Excitability.

    PubMed

    Böhm, J; Scherzer, S; Shabala, S; Krol, E; Neher, E; Mueller, T D; Hedrich, R

    2016-03-01

    The animal diet of the carnivorous Venus flytrap, Dionaea muscipula, contains a sodium load that enters the capture organ via an HKT1-type sodium channel, expressed in special epithelia cells on the inner trap lobe surface. DmHKT1 expression and sodium uptake activity is induced upon prey contact. Here, we analyzed the HKT1 properties required for prey sodium osmolyte management of carnivorous Dionaea. Analyses were based on homology modeling, generation of model-derived point mutants, and their functional testing in Xenopus oocytes. We showed that the wild-type HKT1 and its Na(+)- and K(+)-permeable mutants function as ion channels rather than K(+) transporters driven by proton or sodium gradients. These structural and biophysical features of a high-capacity, Na(+)-selective ion channel enable Dionaea glands to manage prey-derived sodium loads without confounding the action potential-based information management of the flytrap.

  8. Venus Flytrap HKT1-Type Channel Provides for Prey Sodium Uptake into Carnivorous Plant Without Conflicting with Electrical Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, J.; Scherzer, S.; Shabala, S.; Krol, E.; Neher, E.; Mueller, T.D.; Hedrich, R.

    2016-01-01

    The animal diet of the carnivorous Venus flytrap, Dionaea muscipula, contains a sodium load that enters the capture organ via an HKT1-type sodium channel, expressed in special epithelia cells on the inner trap lobe surface. DmHKT1 expression and sodium uptake activity is induced upon prey contact. Here, we analyzed the HKT1 properties required for prey sodium osmolyte management of carnivorous Dionaea. Analyses were based on homology modeling, generation of model-derived point mutants, and their functional testing in Xenopus oocytes. We showed that the wild-type HKT1 and its Na+- and K+-permeable mutants function as ion channels rather than K+ transporters driven by proton or sodium gradients. These structural and biophysical features of a high-capacity, Na+-selective ion channel enable Dionaea glands to manage prey-derived sodium loads without confounding the action potential-based information management of the flytrap. PMID:26455461

  9. Venus Flytrap HKT1-Type Channel Provides for Prey Sodium Uptake into Carnivorous Plant Without Conflicting with Electrical Excitability.

    PubMed

    Böhm, J; Scherzer, S; Shabala, S; Krol, E; Neher, E; Mueller, T D; Hedrich, R

    2016-03-01

    The animal diet of the carnivorous Venus flytrap, Dionaea muscipula, contains a sodium load that enters the capture organ via an HKT1-type sodium channel, expressed in special epithelia cells on the inner trap lobe surface. DmHKT1 expression and sodium uptake activity is induced upon prey contact. Here, we analyzed the HKT1 properties required for prey sodium osmolyte management of carnivorous Dionaea. Analyses were based on homology modeling, generation of model-derived point mutants, and their functional testing in Xenopus oocytes. We showed that the wild-type HKT1 and its Na(+)- and K(+)-permeable mutants function as ion channels rather than K(+) transporters driven by proton or sodium gradients. These structural and biophysical features of a high-capacity, Na(+)-selective ion channel enable Dionaea glands to manage prey-derived sodium loads without confounding the action potential-based information management of the flytrap. PMID:26455461

  10. Single sodium channels from the squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Bezanilla, F

    1987-01-01

    Since the work of A. L. Hodgkin and A. F. Huxley (1952. J. Physiol. [Lond.].117:500-544) the squid giant axon has been considered the classical preparation for the study of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels. In this preparation much data have been gathered on macroscopic and gating currents but no single sodium channel data have been available. This paper reports patch clamp recording of single sodium channel events from the cut-open squid axon. It is shown that the single channel conductance in the absence of external divalent ions is approximately 14 pS, similar to sodium channels recorded from other preparations, and that their kinetic properties are consistent with previous results on gating and macroscopic currents obtained from the perfused squid axon preparation. PMID:2447971

  11. Sodium channels in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.M. ); Black, J.A.; Waxman, S.G. Veterans Affairs Medical Center, West Haven, CT ); Angelides, K.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Immunoblotting, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, and tritiated saxitoxin (({sup 3}H)STX) binding experiments were used to study sodium channel localization in Schwann cells. Polyclonal antibody 7493, which is directed against purifed sodium channels from rat brain, specifically recognized a 260-kDa protein corresponding to the {alpha} subunit of the sodium channel in immunoblots of crude glycoproteins from rat sciatic nerve. Electron microscopic localization of sodium channel immunoreactivity within adult rat sciatic nerves reveals heavy staining of the axon membrane at the node of Ranvier, in contrast to the internodal axon membrane, which does not stain. Schwann cells including perinodal processes also exhibit antibody 7493 immunoreactivity, localized within both the cytoplasm and the plasmalemma of the Schwann cell. To examine further the possibility that sodium channels are localized within Schwann cell cytoplasm, ({sup 3}H)STX binding was studied in cultured rabbit Schwann cells, both intact and after homogenization. Saturable binding of STX was singificantly higher in homogenized Schwann cells than in intact Schwann cells. Moreover, the equilibrium dissociation constant was higher for homogenized preparations (1.77 {plus minus} 0.37 nM) than for intact Schwann cells (1.06 {plus minus} 0.29 nM). These data suggest the presence of an intracellular pool of sodium channels or channel presursors in Schwann cells.

  12. Genomic organization of the human skeletal muscle sodium channel gene

    SciTech Connect

    George, A.L. Jr.; Iyer, G.S.; Kleinfield, R.; Kallen, R.G.; Barchi, R.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Voltage-dependent sodium channels are essential for normal membrane excitability and contractility in adult skeletal muscle. The gene encoding the principal sodium channel [alpha]-subunit isoform in human skeletal muscle (SCN4A) has recently been shown to harbor point mutations in certain hereditary forms of periodic paralysis. The authors have carried out an analysis of the detailed structure of this gene including delination of intron-exon boundaries by genomic DNA cloning and sequence analysis. The complete coding region of SCN4A is found in 32.5 kb of genomic DNA and consists of 24 exons (54 to >2.2 kb) and 23 introns (97 bp-4.85 kb). The exon organization of the gene shows no relationship to the predicted functional domains of the channel protein and splice junctions interrupt many of the transmembrane segments. The genomic organization of sodium channels may have been partially conserved during evolution as evidenced by the observation that 10 of the 24 splice junctions in SCN4A are positioned in homologous locations in a putative sodium channel gene in Drosophila (para). The information presented here should be extremely useful both for further identifying sodium channel mutations and for gaining a better understanding of sodium channel evolution. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Sodium channel selectivity and conduction: prokaryotes have devised their own molecular strategy.

    PubMed

    Finol-Urdaneta, Rocio K; Wang, Yibo; Al-Sabi, Ahmed; Zhao, Chunfeng; Noskov, Sergei Y; French, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Striking structural differences between voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels from prokaryotes (homotetramers) and eukaryotes (asymmetric, four-domain proteins) suggest the likelihood of different molecular mechanisms for common functions. For these two channel families, our data show similar selectivity sequences among alkali cations (relative permeability, Pion/PNa) and asymmetric, bi-ionic reversal potentials when the Na/K gradient is reversed. We performed coordinated experimental and computational studies, respectively, on the prokaryotic Nav channels NaChBac and NavAb. NaChBac shows an "anomalous," nonmonotonic mole-fraction dependence in the presence of certain sodium-potassium mixtures; to our knowledge, no comparable observation has been reported for eukaryotic Nav channels. NaChBac's preferential selectivity for sodium is reduced either by partial titration of its highly charged selectivity filter, when extracellular pH is lowered from 7.4 to 5.8, or by perturbation-likely steric-associated with a nominally electro-neutral substitution in the selectivity filter (E191D). Although no single molecular feature or energetic parameter appears to dominate, our atomistic simulations, based on the published NavAb crystal structure, revealed factors that may contribute to the normally observed selectivity for Na over K. These include: (a) a thermodynamic penalty to exchange one K(+) for one Na(+) in the wild-type (WT) channel, increasing the relative likelihood of Na(+) occupying the binding site; (b) a small tendency toward weaker ion binding to the selectivity filter in Na-K mixtures, consistent with the higher conductance observed with both sodium and potassium present; and (c) integrated 1-D potentials of mean force for sodium or potassium movement that show less separation for the less selective E/D mutant than for WT. Overall, tight binding of a single favored ion to the selectivity filter, together with crucial inter-ion interactions within the pore, suggests

  14. Potential Roles of Amiloride-Sensitive Sodium Channels in Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Siguang; Liu, Cui; Ma, Yana; Ji, Hong-Long; Li, Xiumin

    2016-01-01

    The ENaC/degenerin ion channel superfamily includes the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and acid sensitive ionic channel (ASIC). ENaC is a multimeric ion channel formed by heteromultimeric membrane glycoproteins, which participate in a multitude of biological processes by mediating the transport of sodium (Na(+)) across epithelial tissues such as the kidney, lungs, bladder, and gut. Aberrant ENaC functions contribute to several human disease states including pseudohypoaldosteronism, Liddle syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and salt-sensitive hypertension. Increasing evidence suggests that ion channels not only regulate ion homeostasis and electric signaling in excitable cells but also play important roles in cancer cell behaviors such as proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and migration. Indeed, ENaCs/ASICs had been reported to be associated with cancer characteristics. Given their cell surface localization and pharmacology, pharmacological strategies to target ENaC/ASIC family members may be promising cancer therapeutics. PMID:27403419

  15. Potential Roles of Amiloride-Sensitive Sodium Channels in Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Siguang; Liu, Cui; Ma, Yana; Ji, Hong-Long; Li, Xiumin

    2016-01-01

    The ENaC/degenerin ion channel superfamily includes the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and acid sensitive ionic channel (ASIC). ENaC is a multimeric ion channel formed by heteromultimeric membrane glycoproteins, which participate in a multitude of biological processes by mediating the transport of sodium (Na+) across epithelial tissues such as the kidney, lungs, bladder, and gut. Aberrant ENaC functions contribute to several human disease states including pseudohypoaldosteronism, Liddle syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and salt-sensitive hypertension. Increasing evidence suggests that ion channels not only regulate ion homeostasis and electric signaling in excitable cells but also play important roles in cancer cell behaviors such as proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and migration. Indeed, ENaCs/ASICs had been reported to be associated with cancer characteristics. Given their cell surface localization and pharmacology, pharmacological strategies to target ENaC/ASIC family members may be promising cancer therapeutics. PMID:27403419

  16. Expression of Nav1.8 sodium channels perturbs the firing patterns of cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Renganathan, M; Gelderblom, M; Black, J A; Waxman, S G

    2003-01-10

    The sensory neuron specific sodium channel Na(v)1.8/SNS exhibits depolarized voltage-dependence of inactivation, slow inactivation and rapid repriming, which differentiate it from other voltage-gated sodium channels. Na(v)1.8 is normally selectively expressed at high levels in sensory ganglion neurons, but not within the CNS. However, expression of Na(v)1.8 mRNA and protein are upregulated within cerebellar Purkinje cells in animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS), and in human MS. To examine the effect of expression of Na(v)1.8 on the activity pattern of Purkinje cells, we biolistically introduced Na(v)1.8 cDNA into these cells in vitro. We report here that Na(v)1.8 can be functionally expressed at physiological levels (similar to the levels in DRG neurons where Na(v)1.8 is normally expressed) within Purkinje cells, and that its expression alters the activity of these neurons in three ways: first, by increasing the amplitude and duration of action potentials; second, by decreasing the proportion of action potentials that are conglomerate and the number of spikes per conglomerate action potential; and third, by contributing to the production of sustained, pacemaker-like impulse trains in response to depolarization. These results provide support for the hypothesis that the expression of Na(v)1.8 channels within Purkinje cells, which occurs in MS, may perturb their function. PMID:12493611

  17. Evolutionarily conserved intracellular gate of voltage-dependent sodium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelstrom, Kevin; Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel P.; Holmgren, Miguel; Chanda, Baron

    2014-03-01

    Members of the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily (VGIC) regulate ion flux and generate electrical signals in excitable cells by opening and closing pore gates. The location of the gate in voltage-gated sodium channels, a founding member of this superfamily, remains unresolved. Here we explore the chemical modification rates of introduced cysteines along the S6 helix of domain IV in an inactivation-removed background. We find that state-dependent accessibility is demarcated by an S6 hydrophobic residue; substituted cysteines above this site are not modified by charged thiol reagents when the channel is closed. These accessibilities are consistent with those inferred from open- and closed-state structures of prokaryotic sodium channels. Our findings suggest that an intracellular gate composed of a ring of hydrophobic residues is not only responsible for regulating access to the pore of sodium channels, but is also a conserved feature within canonical members of the VGIC superfamily.

  18. A Stored Charge Model for the Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, Rosalie C.; Strieb, Jay D.

    1971-01-01

    A new model is proposed to account for the apparent conductance changes of the sodium, or early, channel in nerve fiber membranes. In this model it is assumed that the channels are gated at the interior side of the membrane and are resistively limited at the exterior side by sodium selective barriers of high resistance to ion flow. Under resting conditions the closed channels accumulate a store of sodium ions, dependent on the exterior sodium concentration. With the application of a depolarizing clamp the interior gates open allowing the stored ions to discharge into the interior low sodium concentration solution. In this model the initial rise in the early current results from the opening of more and more gates in response to the depolarizing clamp. The subsequent fall in the early current results from the “capacitative” discharge of the opened channels, limited by the high resistive barrier at the exterior end. Upon repolarization, the gates reclose and sodium ions reaccumulate in the channels from the high concentration external solution, but at a slow rate determined by the resistive barrier. Preliminary tests of this model, using a number of simplifying assumptions, show that it has the ability to account, at least semiquantitatively, for the major characteristics of the experimental clamp results. PMID:5113000

  19. Sodium channel Nav1.8: Emerging links to human disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Chongyang; Huang, Jianying; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-02-01

    The NaV1.8 sodium channel, encoded by gene SCN10A, was initially termed sensory neuron-specific (SNS) due to prominent expression in primary sensory neurons including dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Early studies on rodent NaV1.8 demonstrated depolarized voltage dependence of channel inactivation, a slow rate of inactivation, and rapid recovery from inactivation. As a result of these biophysical properties, NaV1.8 supports repetitive firing in response to sustained depolarization. This article reviews recent studies that reveal multiple links of NaV1.8 to human disease: (1) It has recently been shown that functional attributes that distinguish NaV1.8 from other sodium channel subtypes are exaggerated in human NaV1.8; its influence on neuronal activity is thus greater than previously thought. (2) Gain-of-function mutations of NaV1.8 that produce DRG neuron hyperexcitability have been found in 3% of patients with painful neuropathy, establishing a role in pathogenesis. (3) NaV1.8 is ectopically expressed within Purkinje neurons in multiple sclerosis (MS), where it perturbs electrical activity. Recent evidence indicates that variants of SCN10A predict the degree of cerebellar dysfunction in MS. (4) Emerging evidence has linked SCN10A variants to disorders of cardiac rhythm, via mechanisms that may include an effect on cardiac innervation. Involvement of NaV1.8 in neurologic disease may have therapeutic implications. NaV1.8-specific blocking agents, under development, ameliorate pain and attenuate MS-like deficits in animal models. Recent studies suggest that pharmacogenomics may permit the matching of specific channel blocking agents to particular patients. The new links of NaV1.8 in human disease raise new questions, but also suggest new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26747884

  20. Sodium channel Nav1.8: Emerging links to human disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Chongyang; Huang, Jianying; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-02-01

    The NaV1.8 sodium channel, encoded by gene SCN10A, was initially termed sensory neuron-specific (SNS) due to prominent expression in primary sensory neurons including dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Early studies on rodent NaV1.8 demonstrated depolarized voltage dependence of channel inactivation, a slow rate of inactivation, and rapid recovery from inactivation. As a result of these biophysical properties, NaV1.8 supports repetitive firing in response to sustained depolarization. This article reviews recent studies that reveal multiple links of NaV1.8 to human disease: (1) It has recently been shown that functional attributes that distinguish NaV1.8 from other sodium channel subtypes are exaggerated in human NaV1.8; its influence on neuronal activity is thus greater than previously thought. (2) Gain-of-function mutations of NaV1.8 that produce DRG neuron hyperexcitability have been found in 3% of patients with painful neuropathy, establishing a role in pathogenesis. (3) NaV1.8 is ectopically expressed within Purkinje neurons in multiple sclerosis (MS), where it perturbs electrical activity. Recent evidence indicates that variants of SCN10A predict the degree of cerebellar dysfunction in MS. (4) Emerging evidence has linked SCN10A variants to disorders of cardiac rhythm, via mechanisms that may include an effect on cardiac innervation. Involvement of NaV1.8 in neurologic disease may have therapeutic implications. NaV1.8-specific blocking agents, under development, ameliorate pain and attenuate MS-like deficits in animal models. Recent studies suggest that pharmacogenomics may permit the matching of specific channel blocking agents to particular patients. The new links of NaV1.8 in human disease raise new questions, but also suggest new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Fluorescently labelled Na+ channels are localized and immobilized to synapses of innervated muscle fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelides, Kimon J.

    1986-05-01

    Segregation of voltage-dependent sodium channels to the hillock of motoneurones and nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons is crucial for conduction of the nerve impulse1,2. Much less is known, however, about the distribution of voltage-dependent Na+ channels on muscle fibres. Recently, Beam et al.3 have shown that Na+ channels are concentrated near the neuromuscular junction. To determine the topography and mechanisms governing the distribution of voltage-dependent Na+ channels on muscle, microfluorimetry and fluorescence photobleach recovery (FPR) have now been used to measure the density and lateral mobility of fluorescently labelled Na+ channels on uninnervated and innervated muscle fibres. On uninnervated myotubes, Na+ channels are diffusely distributed and freely mobile, whereas after innervation the channels concentrate at neuronal contact sites. These channels are immobile and co-localize with acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). At extrajunctional regions the Na+ channel density is lower and the channels more mobile. The results suggest that the nerve induces Na+ channels to redistribute, immobilize and co-localize with AChRs at sites of neuronal contact.

  2. Sodium Channels in Pain and Cancer: New Therapeutic Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Luiz, Ana Paula; Wood, John N

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) underpin electrical activity in the nervous system through action potential propagation. First predicted by the modeling studies of Hodgkin and Huxley, they were subsequently identified at the molecular level by groups led by Catterall and Numa. VGSC dysfunction has long been linked to neuronal and cardiac disorders with some nonselective sodium channel blockers in current use in the clinic. The lack of selectivity means that side effect issues are a major impediment to the use of broad spectrum sodium channel blockers. Nine different sodium channels are known to exist, and selective blockers are now being developed. The potential utility of these drugs to target diseases ranging from migraine, multiple sclerosis, muscle, and immune system disorders, to cancer and pain is being explored. Four channels are potential targets for pain disorders. This conclusion comes from mouse knockout studies and human mutations that prove the involvement of Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in the development and maintenance of acute and chronic pain. In this chapter, we present a short overview of the possible role of Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in human pain and the emerging and unexpected role of sodium channels in cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26920012

  3. Sodium channel haploinsufficiency and structural change in ventricular arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jeevaratnam, K; Guzadhur, L; Goh, Y M; Grace, A A; Huang, C L-H

    2016-02-01

    Normal cardiac excitation involves orderly conduction of electrical activation and recovery dependent upon surface membrane, voltage-gated, sodium (Na(+) ) channel α-subunits (Nav 1.5). We summarize experimental studies of physiological and clinical consequences of loss-of-function Na(+) channel mutations. Of these conditions, Brugada syndrome (BrS) and progressive cardiac conduction defect (PCCD) are associated with sudden, often fatal, ventricular tachycardia (VT) or fibrillation. Mouse Scn5a(+/-) hearts replicate important clinical phenotypes modelling these human conditions. The arrhythmic phenotype is associated not only with the primary biophysical change but also with additional, anatomical abnormalities, in turn dependent upon age and sex, each themselves exerting arrhythmic effects. Available evidence suggests a unified binary scheme for the development of arrhythmia in both BrS and PCCD. Previous biophysical studies suggested that Nav 1.5 deficiency produces a background electrophysiological defect compromising conduction, thereby producing an arrhythmic substrate unmasked by flecainide or ajmaline challenge. More recent reports further suggest a progressive decline in conduction velocity and increase in its dispersion particularly in ageing male Nav 1.5 haploinsufficient compared to WT hearts. This appears to involve a selective appearance of slow conduction at the expense of rapidly conducting pathways with changes in their frequency distributions. These changes were related to increased cardiac fibrosis. It is thus the combination of the structural and biophysical changes both accentuating arrhythmic substrate that may produce arrhythmic tendency. This binary scheme explains the combined requirement for separate, biophysical and structural changes, particularly occurring in ageing Nav 1.5 haploinsufficient males in producing clinical arrhythmia. PMID:26284956

  4. Convergent Evolution of Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Sodium Channels in Predators and Prey.

    PubMed

    Toledo, G; Hanifin, C; Geffeney, S; Brodie, E D

    2016-01-01

    Convergent evolution of similar adaptive traits may arise from either common or disparate molecular and physiological mechanisms. The forces that determine the degree of underlying mechanistic similarities across convergent phenotypes are highly debated and poorly understood. Some garter snakes are able to consume newts that possess the channel blocking compound tetrodotoxin (TTX). Despite belonging to unrelated lineages, both the predators and prey have independently evolved remarkably similar physiological mechanisms of resistance to TTX that involve chemical and structural changes in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV). The evolution of TTX resistance in this predator-prey pair constitutes a natural experiment that allows us to explore the causes of molecular convergence. Here, we review broad patterns of convergence at the level of amino acid changes in NaV channels of animals that evolved TTX resistance and make comparisons to known TTX-resistant channels that did not evolve under the selective pressures imposed by TTX. We conclude that convergence likely stems from the interplay of the target specificity of TTX and functional constraints of NaV that are shared among taxa. These and other factors can limit channel evolution to favor a few functionally permissible paths of adaptation, which can explain the observed predictability of changes to channel structure. By studying the functional causes of convergence in NaV channels, we can further our understanding of the role of these important channel proteins at the center of the evolution of the nervous system. PMID:27586282

  5. Molecular dynamics of ion transport through the open conformation of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Ulmschneider, Martin B; Bagnéris, Claire; McCusker, Emily C; Decaen, Paul G; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E; Ulmschneider, Jakob P; Wallace, B A

    2013-04-16

    The crystal structure of the open conformation of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel pore from Magnetococcus sp. (NaVMs) has provided the basis for a molecular dynamics study defining the channel's full ion translocation pathway and conductance process, selectivity, electrophysiological characteristics, and ion-binding sites. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations permitted a complete time-course characterization of the protein in a membrane system, capturing the plethora of conductance events and revealing a complex mixture of single and multi-ion phenomena with decoupled rapid bidirectional water transport. The simulations suggest specific localization sites for the sodium ions, which correspond with experimentally determined electron density found in the selectivity filter of the crystal structure. These studies have also allowed us to identify the ion conductance mechanism and its relation to water movement for the NavMs channel pore and to make realistic predictions of its conductance properties. The calculated single-channel conductance and selectivity ratio correspond closely with the electrophysiology measurements of the NavMs channel expressed in HEK 293 cells. The ion translocation process seen in this voltage-gated sodium channel is clearly different from that exhibited by members of the closely related family of voltage-gated potassium channels and also differs considerably from existing proposals for the conductance process in sodium channels. These studies simulate sodium channel conductance based on an experimentally determined structure of a sodium channel pore that has a completely open transmembrane pathway and activation gate.

  6. Activation of Na+ channels in cell membrane by capacitive stimulation with silicon chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, Ingmar; Fromherz, Peter

    2005-11-01

    Sodium channels are the crucial electrical elements of neuronal excitation. As a step toward hybrid neuron-semiconductor devices, we studied the activation of recombinant NaV1.4 sodium channels in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells by stimulation from an electrolyte/oxide/silicon (EOS) capacitor. HfO2 was used as an insulator to attain a high capacitance. An effective activation was achieved by decaying voltage ramps at constant intracellular voltage at a depleted NaCl concentration in the bath to enhance the resistance of the cell-chip contact. We were also able to open sodium channels at a NaCl concentration close to physiological conditions. This experiment provides a basis for noninvasive capacitive stimulation of nerve cells with semiconductor chips.

  7. Regulation of epithelial sodium channels in urokinase plasminogen activator deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zaixing; Zhao, Runzhen; Zhao, Meimi; Liang, Xinrong; Bhattarai, Deepa; Dhiman, Rohan; Shetty, Sreerama; Idell, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) govern transepithelial salt and fluid homeostasis. ENaC contributes to polarization, apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transformation, etc. Fibrinolytic proteases play a crucial role in virtually all of these processes and are elaborated by the airway epithelium. We hypothesized that urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates ENaC function in airway epithelial cells and tested that possibility in primary murine tracheal epithelial cells (MTE). Both basal and cAMP-activated Na+ flow through ENaC were significantly reduced in monolayers of uPA-deficient cells. The reduction in ENaC activity was further confirmed in basolateral membrane-permeabilized cells. A decrease in the Na+-K+-ATPase activity in the basolateral membrane could contribute to the attenuation of ENaC function in intact monolayer cells. Dysfunctional fluid resolution was seen in uPA-disrupted cells. Administration of uPA and plasmin partially restores ENaC activity and fluid reabsorption by MTEs. ERK1/2, but not Akt, phosphorylation was observed in the cells and lungs of uPA-deficient mice. On the other hand, cleavage of γ ENaC is significantly depressed in the lungs of uPA knockout mice vs. those of wild-type controls. Expression of caspase 8, however, did not differ between wild-type and uPA−/− mice. In addition, uPA deficiency did not alter transepithelial resistance. Taken together, the mechanisms for the regulation of ENaC by uPA in MTEs include augmentation of Na+-K+-ATPase, proteolysis, and restriction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We demonstrate for the first time that ENaC may serve as a downstream signaling target by which uPA controls the biophysical profiles of airway fluid and epithelial function. PMID:25172911

  8. The Epithelial Sodium Channel and the Processes of Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) mediates passive sodium transport across the apical membranes of sodium absorbing epithelia, like the distal nephron, the intestine, and the lung airways. Additionally, the channel has been involved in the transduction of mechanical stimuli, such as hydrostatic pressure, membrane stretch, and shear stress from fluid flow. Thus, in vascular endothelium, it participates in the control of the vascular tone via its activity both as a sodium channel and as a shear stress transducer. Rather recently, ENaC has been shown to participate in the processes of wound healing, a role that may also involve its activities as sodium transporter and as mechanotransducer. Its presence as the sole channel mediating sodium transport in many tissues and the diversity of its functions probably underlie the complexity of its regulation. This brief review describes some aspects of ENaC regulation, comments on evidence about ENaC participation in wound healing, and suggests possible regulatory mechanisms involved in this participation. PMID:27493961

  9. The Epithelial Sodium Channel and the Processes of Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Chifflet, Silvia; Hernandez, Julio A

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) mediates passive sodium transport across the apical membranes of sodium absorbing epithelia, like the distal nephron, the intestine, and the lung airways. Additionally, the channel has been involved in the transduction of mechanical stimuli, such as hydrostatic pressure, membrane stretch, and shear stress from fluid flow. Thus, in vascular endothelium, it participates in the control of the vascular tone via its activity both as a sodium channel and as a shear stress transducer. Rather recently, ENaC has been shown to participate in the processes of wound healing, a role that may also involve its activities as sodium transporter and as mechanotransducer. Its presence as the sole channel mediating sodium transport in many tissues and the diversity of its functions probably underlie the complexity of its regulation. This brief review describes some aspects of ENaC regulation, comments on evidence about ENaC participation in wound healing, and suggests possible regulatory mechanisms involved in this participation. PMID:27493961

  10. Removal of sodium inactivation and block of sodium channels by chloramine-T in crayfish and squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J. M.; Tanguy, J.; Yeh, J. Z.

    1987-01-01

    Modification of sodium channels by chloramine-T was examined in voltage clamped internally perfused crayfish and squid giant axons using the double sucrose gap and axial wire technique, respectively. Freshly prepared chloramine-T solution exerted two major actions on sodium channels: (a) an irreversible removal of the fast Na inactivation, and (b) a reversible block of the Na current. Both effects were observed when chloramine-T was applied internally or externally (5-10 mM) to axons. The first effect was studied in crayfish axons. We found that the removal of the fast Na inactivation did not depend on the states of the channel since the channel could be modified by chloramine-T at holding potential (from -80 to -100 mV) or at depolarized potential of -30 mV. After removal of fast Na inactivation, the slow inactivation mechanism was still present, and more channels could undergo slow inactivation. This result indicates that in crayfish axons the transition through the fast inactivated state is not a prerequisite for the slow inactivation to occur. During chloramine-T treatment, a distinct blocking phase occurred, which recovered upon washing out the drug. This second effect of chloramine-T was studied in detail in squid axons. After 24 h, chloramine-T solution lost its ability to remove fast inactivation but retained its blocking action. After removal of the fast Na inactivation, both fresh and aged chloramine-T solutions blocked the Na currents with a similar potency and in a voltage-dependent manner, being more pronounced at lower depolarizing potentials. A similar voltage-dependent block was observed with aged chloramine-T solution in an axon with intact inactivation. In contrast to the action of the fresh solution, the aged chloramine-T solution was found to accelerate the decay of Na currents.These results suggest that chloramine-T solution contains at least two active molecular forms that act at different sites in the Na channel. PMID:2444276

  11. Slack, Slick, and Sodium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    The Slack and Slick genes encode potassium channels that are very widely expressed in the central nervous system. These channels are activated by elevations in intracellular sodium, such as those that occur during trains of one or more action potentials, or following activation of nonselective cationic neurotransmitter receptors such as AMPA receptors. This review covers the cellular and molecular properties of Slack and Slick channels and compares them with findings on the properties of sodium-activated potassium currents (termed KNa currents) in native neurons. Human mutations in Slack channels produce extremely severe defects in learning and development, suggesting that KNa channels play a central role in neuronal plasticity and intellectual function. PMID:24319675

  12. Conduction velocity is regulated by sodium channel inactivation in unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges.

    PubMed

    De Col, Roberto; Messlinger, Karl; Carr, Richard W

    2008-02-15

    Axonal conduction velocity varies according to the level of preceding impulse activity. In unmyelinated axons this typically results in a slowing of conduction velocity and a parallel increase in threshold. It is currently held that Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-dependent axonal hyperpolarization is responsible for this slowing but this has long been equivocal. We therefore examined conduction velocity changes during repetitive activation of single unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges. In direct contradiction to the currently accepted postulate, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blockade actually enhanced activity-induced conduction velocity slowing, while the degree of velocity slowing was curtailed in the presence of lidocaine (10-300 microm) and carbamazepine (30-500 microm) but not tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10-80 nm). This suggests that a change in the number of available sodium channels is the most prominent factor responsible for activity-induced changes in conduction velocity in unmyelinated axons. At moderate stimulus frequencies, axonal conduction velocity is determined by an interaction between residual sodium channel inactivation following each impulse and the retrieval of channels from inactivation by a concomitant Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-mediated hyperpolarization. Since the process is primarily dependent upon sodium channel availability, tracking conduction velocity provides a means of accessing relative changes in the excitability of nociceptive neurons.

  13. Functional Na+ Channels in Cell Adhesion probed by Transistor Recording

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtner, Markus; Fromherz, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Cell membranes in a tissue are in close contact to each other, embedded in the extracellular matrix. Standard electrophysiological methods are not able to characterize ion channels under these conditions. Here we consider the area of cell adhesion on a solid substrate as a model system. We used HEK 293 cells cultured on fibronectin and studied the activation of NaV1.4 sodium channels in the adherent membrane with field-effect transistors in a silicon substrate. Under voltage clamp, we compared the transistor response with the whole-cell current. We observed that the extracellular voltage in the cell-chip contact was proportional to the total membrane current. The relation was calibrated by alternating-current stimulation. We found that Na+ channels are present in the area of cell adhesion on fibronectin with a functionality and a density that is indistinguishable from the free membrane. The experiment provides a basis for studying selective accumulation and depletion of ion channels in cell adhesion and also for a development of cell-based biosensoric devices and neuroelectronic systems. PMID:16227504

  14. Simulation Studies of Ion Permeation and Selectivity in Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Ing, C; Pomès, R

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in electrically excitable cells. Molecular dynamics simulations have become a useful tool to study the molecular basis of ion transport in atomistic models of voltage-gated ion channels. The elucidation of several three-dimensional structures of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) in 2011 and 2012 opened the way to detailed computational investigations of this important class of membrane proteins. Here we review the numerous simulation studies of Na(+) permeation and selectivity in bacterial Nav channels published in the past 5years. These studies use a variety of simulation methodologies differing in force field parameters, molecular models, sampling algorithms, and simulation times. Although results disagree on the details of ion permeation mechanisms, they concur in the presence of two primary Na(+) binding sites in the selectivity filter and support a loosely coupled knock-on mechanism of Na(+) permeation. Comparative studies of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) permeation reveal sites within Nav channels that are Na(+) selective, yet a consensus model of selectivity has not been established. We discuss the agreement between simulation and experimental results and propose strategies that may be used to resolve discrepancies between simulation studies in order to improve future computational studies of permeation and selectivity in ion channels. PMID:27586286

  15. Voltage-gated sodium channel modulation by scorpion α-toxins

    PubMed Central

    Bosmans, Frank; Tytgat, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels are integral membrane proteins that function as a gateway for a selective permeation of sodium ions across biological membranes. In this way, they are crucial players for the generation of action potentials in excitable cells. Voltage-gated Na+ channels are encoded by at least nine genes in mammals. The different isoforms have remarkably similar functional properties, but small changes in function and pharmacology are biologically well-defined, as underscored by mutations that cause several diseases and by modulation of a myriad of compounds respectively. This review will stress on the modulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels by scorpion alpha-toxins. Nature has designed these two classes of molecules as if they were predestined to each other: an inevitable ‘encounter’ between a voltage-gated Na+ channel isoform and an alpha-toxin from scorpion venom indeed results in a dramatically changed Na+ current phenotype with clear-cut consequences on electrical excitability and sometimes life or death. This fascinating aspect justifies an overview on scorpion venoms, their alpha-toxins and the Na+ channel targets they are built for, as well as on the molecular determinants that govern the selectivity and affinity of this ‘inseparable duo’. PMID:17087986

  16. Block of sodium channels by internal mono- and divalent guanidinium analogues. Modulation by sodium ion concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Danko, M; Smith-Maxwell, C; McKinney, L; Begenisich, T

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the block of squid axon sodium channels by mono- and divalent guanidinium analogues. The action of these compounds on steady state sodium currents was independent of the presence or absence of the normal inactivation process. Block by both mono- and divalent analogues was voltage-dependent, but was a steeper function of potential for divalent molecules. The voltage-dependence could not, in general, be reproduced by a simple model based on Boltzmann's equation. Inhibition of steady state currents by guanidinium ions with 50 mM internal sodium was reasonably well described by a 1:1 drug/channel binding function. Increasing the internal sodium ion concentration increased both the degree and voltage-dependence of current inhibition. This is in sharp contrast to the decrease in inactivation caused by internal sodium. Changes in the external sodium concentration had very little effect on drug block. These results are consistent with a model of the sodium channel as a multi-ion pore. Only a small increase in block can be produced by increased internal sodium in a three-barrier two-site model, but a four-barrier three-site model can reproduce these experimental findings. The implications of these results for physical models of inactivation are discussed. PMID:2420382

  17. Filamin Interacts with Epithelial Sodium Channel and Inhibits Its Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Dai, Xiao-Qing; Li, Qiang; Tuli, Jagdeep; Liang, Gengqing; Li, Shayla S.; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in the kidneys is critical for Na+ balance, extracellular volume, and blood pressure. Altered ENaC function is associated with respiratory disorders, pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1, and Liddle syndrome. ENaC is known to interact with components of the cytoskeleton, but the functional roles remain largely unclear. Here, we examined the interaction between ENaC and filamins, important actin filament components. We first discovered by yeast two-hybrid screening that the C termini of ENaC α and β subunits bind filamin A, B, and C, and we then confirmed the binding by in vitro biochemical assays. We demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation that ENaC, either overexpressed in HEK, HeLa, and melanoma A7 cells or natively expressed in LLC-PK1 and IMCD cells, is in the same complex with native filamin. Furthermore, the biotinylation and co-immunoprecipitation combined assays showed the ENaC-filamin interaction on the cell surface. Using Xenopus oocyte expression and two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology, we found that co-expression of an ENaC-binding domain of filamin substantially reduces ENaC channel function. Western blot and immunohistochemistry experiments revealed that the filamin A C terminus (FLNAC) modestly reduces the expression of the ENaC α subunit in oocytes and A7 cells. After normalizing the current by plasma membrane expression, we found that FLNAC results in ∼50% reduction in the ENaC channel activity. The inhibitory effect of FLNAC was confirmed by lipid bilayer electrophysiology experiments using purified ENaC and FLNAC proteins, which showed that FLNAC substantially reduces ENaC single channel open probability. Taken together, our study demonstrated that filamin reduces ENaC channel function through direct interaction on the cell surface. PMID:23161538

  18. The voltage-gated sodium channel: a major target of marine neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Mattei, César; Legros, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are key components for nerve excitability. They initiate and propagate the action potential in excitable cells, throughout the central and peripheral nervous system, thus enabling a variety of physiological functions to be achieved. The rising phase of the action potential is driven by the opening of Nav channels which activate rapidly and carry Na(+) ions in the intracellular medium, and ends with the Na(+) current inactivation. The biophysical properties of these channels have been elucidated, through the use of pharmacological agents that disrupt the molecular mechanism of the channel functioning. Among them, marine toxins produced by venomous animals or microorganisms have been crucial to map the different allosteric binding sites of the channels, understand their mode of action and represent an emerging source of therapeutic agents to alleviate or cure Na(+) channels-linked human diseases. In this article, we review recent discoveries on the molecular and biophysical properties of the Na(+) channel as a target for marine neurotoxins, and present the ongoing developments of pharmacological agents as therapeutic tools.

  19. Lyotropic anions. Na channel gating and Ca electrode response

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The effects of external anions on gating of Na channels of frog skeletal muscle were studied under voltage clamp. Anions reversibly shift the voltage dependence of peak sodium permeability and of steady state sodium inactivation towards more negative potentials in the sequence: methanesulfonate less than or equal to Cl- less than or equal to acetate less than Br- less than or equal to NO-3 less than or equal to SO2-4 less than benzenesulfonate less than SCN- less than ClO-4; approximately the lyotropic sequence. Voltage shifts are graded with mole fraction in mixtures and are roughly additive to calcium shifts. The peak PNa is not greatly affected. Except for SO2-4, these anions did not change the Ca++ activity of the solutions as measured with the dye murexide. Shifts of gating can be explained as the electrostatic effect of anion adsorption to the Na channel or to nearby lipid. Such adsorption is expected to follow the lyotropic series. Anions also interfere significantly with the response of a Ca-sensitive membrane electrode following the same sequence of effectiveness as the shifts of gating. The lyotropic anions decrease the Ca++ sensitivity and cause anomalously negative responses of the Ca electrode because these anions are somewhat permeant in the hydrophobic detector membrane. PMID:6302198

  20. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, I.; Luchinsky, D. G.; Tindjong, R.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Eisenberg, R. S.

    2013-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations to study the ionic conduction and valence selectivity of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as functions of the fixed charge Qf at its selectivity filter. We are thus able to reconcile the discrete calcium conduction bands recently revealed in our BD simulations, M0 (Qf=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e), with a set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5e), L1 (1.5e), thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands vs Qf for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Qf leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium-selective, nonblocking channel) → M0 (nonselective channel) → L1 (sodium-selective channel with divalent block) → M1 (calcium-selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L0 band is putatively identified with the eukaryotic sodium channel The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced transformations between nonselective channels, sodium-selective channels, and calcium-selective channels, which we interpret as transitions between different rows of the identification table. By considering the potential energy changes during permeation, we show explicitly that the multi-ion conduction bands of calcium and sodium channels arise as the result of resonant barrierless conduction. The pattern of periodic conduction bands is explained on the basis of sequential neutralization taking account of self-energy, as Qf(z,i)=ze(1/2+i), where i is the order of the band and z is the valence of the ion. Our results confirm the crucial influence of electrostatic interactions on conduction and on the Ca2+/Na+ valence selectivity of calcium and sodium ion channels. The model and results could be also applicable to biomimetic nanopores with charged walls.

  1. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, I; Luchinsky, D G; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2013-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations to study the ionic conduction and valence selectivity of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as functions of the fixed charge Q(f) at its selectivity filter. We are thus able to reconcile the discrete calcium conduction bands recently revealed in our BD simulations, M0 (Q(f)=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e), with a set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5e), L1 (1.5e), thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands vs Q(f) for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Q(f) leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium-selective, nonblocking channel) → M0 (nonselective channel) → L1 (sodium-selective channel with divalent block) → M1 (calcium-selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L0 band is putatively identified with the eukaryotic sodium channel The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced transformations between nonselective channels, sodium-selective channels, and calcium-selective channels, which we interpret as transitions between different rows of the identification table. By considering the potential energy changes during permeation, we show explicitly that the multi-ion conduction bands of calcium and sodium channels arise as the result of resonant barrierless conduction. The pattern of periodic conduction bands is explained on the basis of sequential neutralization taking account of self-energy, as Q(f)(z,i)=ze(1/2+i), where i is the order of the band and z is the valence of the ion. Our results confirm the crucial influence of electrostatic interactions on conduction and on the Ca(2+)/Na(+) valence selectivity of calcium and sodium ion channels. The model and results could be also applicable to biomimetic nanopores with charged walls. PMID:24329301

  2. Conotoxins That Could Provide Analgesia through Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Munasinghe, Nehan R.; Christie, MacDonald J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain creates a large socio-economic burden around the world. It is physically and mentally debilitating, and many sufferers are unresponsive to current therapeutics. Many drugs that provide pain relief have adverse side effects and addiction liabilities. Therefore, a great need has risen for alternative treatment strategies. One rich source of potential analgesic compounds that has emerged over the past few decades are conotoxins. These toxins are extremely diverse and display selective activity at ion channels. Voltage gated sodium (NaV) channels are one such group of ion channels that play a significant role in multiple pain pathways. This review will explore the literature around conotoxins that bind NaV channels and determine their analgesic potential. PMID:26690478

  3. Sodium channels in presynaptic nerve terminals. Regulation by neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Regulation of Na+ channels by neurotoxins has been studied in pinched- off nerve endings (synaptosomes) from rat brain. Activation of Na+ channels by the steroid batrachotoxin and by the alkaloid veratridine resulted in an increase in the rate of influx of 22Na into the synaptosomes. In the presence of 145 mM Na+, these agents also depolarized the synaptosomes, as indicated by increased fluorescence in the presence of a voltage-sensitive oxacarbocyanine dye [diO-C5(3)]. Polypeptide neurotoxins from the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus and from the sea anemone Anthopleura xanthogrammica potentiated the stimulatory effects of batrachotoxin and veratridine on the influx of 22Na into synaptosomes. Saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin blocked the stimulatory effects of batrachotoxin and veratridine, both in the presence and absence of the polypeptide toxins, but did not affect control 22Na influx or resting membrane potential. A three-state model for Na+ channel operation can account for the effects of these neurotoxins on Na+ channels as determined both by Na+ flux measurements in vitro and by electrophysiological experiments in intact nerve and muscle. PMID:6252277

  4. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Mechanistic Insights From Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Oakes, V; Furini, S; Domene, C

    2016-01-01

    The permeation of ions and other molecules across biological membranes is an inherent requirement of all cellular organisms. Ion channels, in particular, are responsible for the conduction of charged species, hence modulating the propagation of electrical signals. Despite the universal physiological implications of this property, the molecular functioning of ion channels remains ambiguous. The combination of atomistic structural data with computational methodologies, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, is now considered routine to investigate structure-function relationships in biological systems. A fuller understanding of conduction, selectivity, and gating, therefore, is steadily emerging due to the applicability of these techniques to ion channels. However, because their structure is known at atomic resolution, studies have consistently been biased toward K(+) channels, thus the molecular determinants of ionic selectivity, activation, and drug blockage in Na(+) channels are often overlooked. The recent increase of available crystallographic data has eminently encouraged the investigation of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels via computational methods. Here, we present an overview of simulation studies that have contributed to our understanding of key principles that underlie ionic conduction and selectivity in Na(+) channels, in comparison to the K(+) channel analogs. PMID:27586285

  5. Regulation of the epithelial Na(+) channel by intracellular Na(+).

    PubMed

    Awayda, M S

    1999-08-01

    The hypothesis that the intracellular Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)](i)) is a regulator of the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) was tested with the Xenopus oocyte expression system by utilizing a dual-electrode voltage clamp. [Na(+)](i) averaged 48.1 +/- 2.2 meq (n = 27) and was estimated from the amiloride-sensitive reversal potential. [Na(+)](i) was increased by direct injection of 27.6 nl of 0.25 or 0.5 M Na(2)SO(4). Within minutes of injection, [Na(+)](i) stabilized and remained elevated at 97.8 +/- 6.5 meq (n = 9) and 64. 9 +/- 4.4 (n = 5) meq 30 min after the initial injection of 0.5 and 0.25 M Na(2)SO(4), respectively. This increase of [Na(+)](i) caused a biphasic inhibition of ENaC currents. In oocytes injected with 0.5 M Na(2)SO(4) (n = 9), a rapid decrease of inward amiloride-sensitive slope conductance (g(Na)) to 0.681 +/- 0.030 of control within the first 3 min and a secondary, slower decrease to 0.304 +/- 0.043 of control at 30 min were observed. Similar but smaller inhibitions were also observed with the injection of 0.25 M Na(2)SO(4). Injection of isotonic K(2)SO(4) (70 mM) or isotonic K(2)SO(4) made hypertonic with sucrose (70 mM K(2)SO(4)-1.2 M sucrose) was without effect. Injection of a 0.5 M concentration of either K(2)SO(4), N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG) sulfate, or 0.75 M NMDG gluconate resulted in a much smaller initial inhibition (<14%) and little or no secondary decrease. Thus increases of [Na(+)](i) have multiple specific inhibitory effects on ENaC that can be temporally separated into a rapid phase that was complete within 2-3 min and a delayed slow phase that was observed between 5 and 30 min. PMID:10444397

  6. Inhibitory effect of the recombinant Phoneutria nigriventer Tx1 toxin on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Silva, Anita O; Peigneur, Steve; Diniz, Marcelo R V; Tytgat, Jan; Beirão, Paulo S L

    2012-12-01

    Phoneutria nigriventer toxin Tx1 (PnTx1, also referred to in the literature as Tx1) exerts inhibitory effect on neuronal (Na(V)1.2) sodium channels in a way dependent on the holding potential, and competes with μ-conotoxins but not with tetrodotoxin for their binding sites. In the present study we investigated the electrophysiological properties of the recombinant toxin (rPnTx1), which has the complete amino acid sequence of the natural toxin with 3 additional residues: AM on the N-terminal and G on the C-terminal. At the concentration of 1.5 μM, the recombinant toxin inhibits Na(+) currents of dorsal root ganglia neurons (38.4 ± 6.1% inhibition at -80 mV holding potential) and tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) currents (26.2 ± 4.9% at the same holding potential). At -50 mV holding potential the inhibition of the total current reached 71.3 ± 2.3% with 1.5 μM rPnTx1. The selectivity of rPnTx1 was investigated on ten different isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The order of potency for rPnTx1 was: rNa(V)1.2 > rNa(V)1.7 ≈ rNa(V)1.4 ≥ rNa(V)1.3 > mNa(V)1.6 ≥ hNa(V)1.8. No effect was seen on hNa(V)1.5 and on the arthropods isoforms (DmNa(V)1, BGNa(V)1.1a and VdNa(V)1). The IC(50) for Na(V)1.2 was 33.7 ± 2.9 nM with a maximum inhibition of 83.3 ± 1.9%. The toxin did not alter the voltage-dependence of channel gating and was effective on Na(V)1.2 channels devoid of inactivation. It was ineffective on neuronal calcium channels. We conclude that rPnTx1 has a promising selectivity, and that it may be a valuable model to achieve pharmacological activities of interest for the treatment of channelopathies and neuropathic pain. PMID:22968173

  7. The Permeability of the Sodium Channel to Metal Cations in Myelinated Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil

    1972-01-01

    The relative permeability of sodium channels to eight metal cations is studied in myelinated nerve fibers. Ionic currents under voltage-clamp conditions are measured in Na-free solutions containing the test ion. Measured reversal potentials and the Goldman equation are used to calculate the permeability sequence: Na+ ≈ Li+ > Tl+ > K+. The ratio PK/PNa is 1/12. The permeabilities to Rb+, Cs+, Ca++, and Mg++ are too small to measure. The permeability ratios agree with observations on the squid giant axon and show that the reversal potential ENa differs significantly from the Nernst potential for Na+ in normal axons. Opening and closing rates for sodium channels are relatively insensitive to the ionic composition of the bathing medium, implying that gating is a structural property of the channel rather than a result of the movement or accumulation of particular ions around the channel. A previously proposed pore model of the channel accommodates the permeant metal cations in a partly hydrated form. The observed sequence of permeabilities follows the order expected for binding to a high field strength anion in Eisenman's theory of ion exchange equilibria. PMID:5025743

  8. Chloride channels mediate sodium sulphide-induced relaxation in rat uteri

    PubMed Central

    Mijušković, Ana; Kokić, Aleksandra Nikolić; Dušić, Zorana Oreščanin; Slavić, Marija; Spasić, Mihajlo B; Blagojević, Duško

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hydrogen sulphide reduces uterine contractility and is of potential interest as a treatment for uterine disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of sodium sulphide (Na2S)-induced relaxation of rat uterus, investigate the importance of redox effects and ion channel-mediated mechanisms, and any interactions between these two mechanisms. Experimental Approach Organ bath studies were employed to assess the pharmacological effects of Na2S in uterine strips by exposing them to Na2S with or without Cl− channel blockers (DIDS, NFA, IAA-94, T16Ainh-A01, TA), raised KCl (15 and 75 mM), K+ channel inhibitors (glibenclamide, TEA, 4-AP), L-type Ca2+ channel activator (S-Bay K 8644), propranolol and methylene blue. The activities of antioxidant enzymes were measured in homogenates of treated uteri. The expression of bestrophin channel 1 (BEST-1) was determined by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Key Results Na2S caused concentration-dependent reversible relaxation of spontaneously active and calcium-treated uteri, affecting both amplitude and frequency of contractions. Uteri exposed to 75 mM KCl were less sensitive to Na2S compared with uteri in 15 mM KCl. Na2S-induced relaxations were abolished by DIDS, but unaffected by other modulators or by the absence of extracellular HCO3−, suggesting the involvement of chloride ion channels. Na2S in combination with different modulators provoked specific changes in the anti-oxidant profiles of uteri. The expression of BEST-1, both mRNA and protein, was demonstrated in rat uteri. Conclusions and Implications The relaxant effects of Na2S in rat uteri are mediated mainly via a DIDS-sensitive Cl−-pathway. Components of the relaxation are redox- and Ca2+-dependent. PMID:25857480

  9. Two tarantula venom peptides as potent and differential Na(V) channels blockers.

    PubMed

    Cherki, Ronit S; Kolb, Ela; Langut, Yael; Tsveyer, Lior; Bajayo, Nissim; Meir, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Voltage dependent sodium (Na(V)) channels are large membrane spanning proteins which lie in the basis of action potential generation and propagation in excitable cells and hence are essential mediators of neuronal signaling. Inhibition of Na(V) channel activity is one of the core mechanisms to treat conditions related to neuronal hyperexcitability, such as epilepsy in the clinic. Na(V) channel blockers are also extensively used to locally inhibit action potential generation and related pain perceptions in the form of local anesthetics. Here we describe the isolation, biochemical characterization, synthesis and in vitro characterization of two potent Na(V) channel blockers from the venom of the Paraphysa scrofa (Phrixotrichus auratus) tarantula spider. Both Voltage sensor toxin 3 (VSTx-3, κ-theraphotoxin-Gr4a) and GTx1-15 (Toxin Gtx1-15), were originally isolated from the venom of the related tarantula Grammostola rosea and described as K(V) and Ca(V) channel blockers, respectively. In our hands, GTx1-15 was shown to be a potent inhibitor of tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive channels (IC₅₀ 0.007 μM for hNa(V)1.7 and 0.12 μM for hNa(V)1.3 channels), with very little effect on TTX-resistant (Na(V)1.5 and NaV1.8) channels. VSTx-3 was demonstrated to be a potent, TTX-sensitive sodium channel blocker and especially, potent blocker of Na(V)1.8 channels (IC₅₀ 0.19 μM for hNa(V)1.3, 0.43 μM for hNa(V)1.7 and 0.77 μM for hNa(V)1.8 channels). Such potent inhibitors with differential selectivity among Na(V) channel isoforms may be used as tools to study the roles of the different channels in processes related to hyperexcitability and as lead compounds to treat pathological pain conditions. PMID:24211312

  10. Patterned electrical activity modulates sodium channel expression in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Klein, Joshua P; Tendi, Elisabetta A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Fields, R Douglas; Waxman, Stephen G

    2003-10-15

    Peripheral nerve injury induces changes in the level of gene expression for sodium channels Nav1.3, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 within dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which may contribute to the development of hyperexcitability, ectopic neuronal discharge, and neuropathic pain. The mechanism of this change in sodium channel expression is unclear. Decreased availability of neurotrophic factors following axotomy contributes to these changes in gene transcription, but the question of whether changes in intrinsic neuronal activity levels alone can trigger changes in the expression of these sodium channels has not been addressed. We examined the effect of electrical stimulation on the expression of Nav1.3, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 by using cultured embryonic mouse sensory neurons under conditions in which nerve growth factor (NGF) was not limiting. Expression of Nav1.3 was not significantly changed following stimulation. In contrast, we observed activity-dependent down-regulation of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA and protein levels after stimulation, as demonstrated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. These results show that a change in neuronal activity can alter the expression of sodium channel genes in a subtype-specific manner, via a mechanism independent of NGF withdrawal. PMID:14515348

  11. Phyla- and Subtype-Selectivity of CgNa, a Na+ Channel Toxin from the Venom of the Giant Caribbean Sea Anemone Condylactis Gigantea

    PubMed Central

    Billen, Bert; Debaveye, Sarah; Béress, Lászlo; Tytgat, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Because of their prominent role in electro-excitability, voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels have become the foremost important target of animal toxins. These toxins have developed the ability to discriminate between closely related NaV subtypes, making them powerful tools to study NaV channel function and structure. CgNa is a 47-amino acid residue type I toxin isolated from the venom of the Giant Caribbean Sea Anemone Condylactis gigantea. Previous studies showed that this toxin slows the fast inactivation of tetrodotoxin-sensitive NaV currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. To illuminate the underlying NaV subtype-selectivity pattern, we have assayed the effects of CgNa on a broad range of mammalian isoforms (NaV1.2–NaV1.8) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. This study demonstrates that CgNa selectively slows the fast inactivation of rNaV1.3/β1, mNaV1.6/β1 and, to a lesser extent, hNaV1.5/β1, while the other mammalian isoforms remain unaffected. Importantly, CgNa was also examined on the insect sodium channel DmNaV1/tipE, revealing a clear phyla-selectivity in the efficacious actions of the toxin. CgNa strongly inhibits the inactivation of the insect NaV channel, resulting in a dramatic increase in peak current amplitude and complete removal of fast and steady-state inactivation. Together with the previously determined solution structure, the subtype-selective effects revealed in this study make of CgNa an interesting pharmacological probe to investigate the functional role of specific NaV channel subtypes. Moreover, further structural studies could provide important information on the molecular mechanism of NaV channel inactivation. PMID:21833172

  12. A pharmacological analysis of high-affinity sodium transport in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.): a 24Na+/42K+ study

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Lasse M.; Britto, Dev T.; Li, Mingyuan; Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    2012-01-01

    Soil sodium, while toxic to most plants at high concentrations, can be beneficial at low concentrations, particularly when potassium is limiting. However, little is known about Na+ uptake in this ‘high-affinity’ range. New information is provided here with an insight into the transport characteristics, mechanism, and ecological significance of this phenomenon. High-affinity Na+ and K+ fluxes were investigated using the short-lived radiotracers 24Na and 42K, under an extensive range of measuring conditions (variations in external sodium, and in nutritional and pharmacological agents). This work was supported by electrophysiological, compartmental, and growth analyses. Na+ uptake was extremely sensitive to all treatments, displaying properties of high-affinity K+ transporters, K+ channels, animal Na+ channels, and non-selective cation channels. K+, NH4+NH4+, and Ca2+ suppressed Na+ transport biphasically, yielding IC50 values of 30, 10, and <5 μM, respectively. Reciprocal experiments showed that K+ influx is neither inhibited nor stimulated by Na+. Sodium efflux constituted 65% of influx, indicating a futile cycle. The thermodynamic feasibility of passive channel mediation is supported by compartmentation and electrophysiological data. Our study complements recent advances in the molecular biology of high-affinity Na+ transport by uncovering new physiological foundations for this transport phenomenon, while questioning its ecological relevance. PMID:22268152

  13. Sodium-dependent inhibition of the epithelial sodium channel by an arginyl-specific reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, H.; Yeger, O.; Asher, C.

    1988-04-25

    Effects of the arginyl- and lysyl-specific reagent phenylglyoxal (PGO) on the epithelial Na+ channel were evaluated by measuring the amiloride-blockable /sup 22/Na+ fluxes in membrane vesicles derived from the toad bladder epithelium. Incubating whole cells or isolated membranes with PGO readily and irreversibly blocked the channel-mediated tracer flux. Na+ ions present during the interaction of membranes with PGO could protect channels from inactivation by PGO. This effect required the presence of Na+ at the luminal side of the membrane and was characterized by an IC50 of 79 mM Na+. Amiloride, too, could desensitize channels to PGO, but its effect was significant only when whole cells were interacted with the protein-modifying reagent. The data are compatible with a model in which the conductive path of the channel contains a functional arginine, possibly forming a salt bridge with a carboxylic group, which is involved in Na+ translocation and amiloride binding. It was also shown that the augmentation of transport induced by incubating whole cells in Ca2+-free solution involves the activation or recruitment of channels that are not vulnerable to PGO prior to incubation.

  14. Two tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in human dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Dib-Hajj, S D; Tyrrell, L; Cummins, T R; Black, J A; Wood, P M; Waxman, S G

    1999-11-26

    Two tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) voltage-gated sodium channels, SNS and NaN, are preferentially expressed in small dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia neurons, most of which are nociceptive, of rat and mouse. We report here the sequence of NaN from human DRG, and demonstrate the presence of two TTX-R currents in human DRG neurons. One current has physiological properties similar to those reported for SNS, while the other displays hyperpolarized voltage-dependence and persistent kinetics; a similar TTX-R current was recently identified in DRG neurons of sns-null mouse. Thus SNS and NaN channels appear to produce different currents in human DRG neurons. PMID:10580103

  15. Na+ Channel β Subunits: Overachievers of the Ion Channel Family

    PubMed Central

    Brackenbury, William J.; Isom, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) in mammals contain a pore-forming α subunit and one or more β subunits. There are five mammalian β subunits in total: β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4, encoded by four genes: SCN1B–SCN4B. With the exception of the SCN1B splice variant, β1B, the β subunits are type I topology transmembrane proteins. In contrast, β1B lacks a transmembrane domain and is a secreted protein. A growing body of work shows that VGSC β subunits are multifunctional. While they do not form the ion channel pore, β subunits alter gating, voltage-dependence, and kinetics of VGSCα subunits and thus regulate cellular excitability in vivo. In addition to their roles in channel modulation, β subunits are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules and regulate cell adhesion and migration. β subunits are also substrates for sequential proteolytic cleavage by secretases. An example of the multifunctional nature of β subunits is β1, encoded by SCN1B, that plays a critical role in neuronal migration and pathfinding during brain development, and whose function is dependent on Na+ current and γ-secretase activity. Functional deletion of SCN1B results in Dravet Syndrome, a severe and intractable pediatric epileptic encephalopathy. β subunits are emerging as key players in a wide variety of physiopathologies, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and cancer. β subunits mediate multiple signaling pathways on different timescales, regulating electrical excitability, adhesion, migration, pathfinding, and transcription. Importantly, some β subunit functions may operate independently of α subunits. Thus, β subunits perform critical roles during development and disease. As such, they may prove useful in disease diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22007171

  16. Ionic selectivity and thermal adaptations within the voltage-gated sodium channel family of alkaliphilic Bacillus.

    PubMed

    DeCaen, Paul G; Takahashi, Yuka; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro; Clapham, David E

    2014-01-01

    Entry and extrusion of cations are essential processes in living cells. In alkaliphilic prokaryotes, high external pH activates voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), which allows Na(+) to enter and be used as substrate for cation/proton antiporters responsible for cytoplasmic pH homeostasis. Here, we describe a new member of the prokaryotic voltage-gated Na(+) channel family (NsvBa; Non-selective voltage-gated, Bacillus alcalophilus) that is nonselective among Na(+), Ca(2+) and K(+) ions. Mutations in NsvBa can convert the nonselective filter into one that discriminates for Na(+) or divalent cations. Gain-of-function experiments demonstrate the portability of ion selectivity with filter mutations to other Bacillus Nav channels. Increasing pH and temperature shifts their activation threshold towards their native resting membrane potential. Furthermore, we find drugs that target Bacillus Nav channels also block the growth of the bacteria. This work identifies some of the adaptations to achieve ion discrimination and gating in Bacillus Nav channels. PMID:25385530

  17. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Guo, Yu -Guo

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmosphere during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.

  18. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Guo, Yu -Guo

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmospheremore » during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.« less

  19. Spider-venom peptides that target voltage-gated sodium channels: pharmacological tools and potential therapeutic leads.

    PubMed

    Klint, Julie K; Senff, Sebastian; Rupasinghe, Darshani B; Er, Sing Yan; Herzig, Volker; Nicholson, Graham M; King, Glenn F

    2012-09-15

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels play a central role in the propagation of action potentials in excitable cells in both humans and insects. Many venomous animals have therefore evolved toxins that modulate the activity of Na(V) channels in order to subdue their prey and deter predators. Spider venoms in particular are rich in Na(V) channel modulators, with one-third of all known ion channel toxins from spider venoms acting on Na(V) channels. Here we review the landscape of spider-venom peptides that have so far been described to target vertebrate or invertebrate Na(V) channels. These peptides fall into 12 distinct families based on their primary structure and cysteine scaffold. Some of these peptides have become useful pharmacological tools, while others have potential as therapeutic leads because they target specific Na(V) channel subtypes that are considered to be important analgesic targets. Spider venoms are conservatively predicted to contain more than 10 million bioactive peptides and so far only 0.01% of this diversity been characterised. Thus, it is likely that future research will reveal additional structural classes of spider-venom peptides that target Na(V) channels.

  20. Sodium channel inactivation in the crayfish giant axon. Must channels open before inactivating

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.

    1981-09-01

    Experiments on sodium channel inactivation kinetics were performed on voltage-clamped crayfish giant axons. The primary goals was to investigate whether channels must open before activating. Voltage-clamp artifacts were minimized by the use of low-sodium solutions and full series resistance compensation, and the spatial uniformity of the currents was checked with a closely spaced pair of electrodes used to measure local current densities. For membrane potentials between -40 and +40 mV, sodium currents decay to zero with a single exponential time-course. The time constant for decay is a steep function of membrane potential. The time-course of inactivation measured with the double-pulse method is very similar to the decay of current at the same potential. Steady-state inactivation curves measured with different test pulses are identical. The time-course of doubling pulse inactivation shows a lag that roughly correlates with the opening of sodium channels, but it is not strictly necessary for channels to open before inactivating. Measurements of the potential dependence of the integral of sodium conductance are also inconsistent with the simplest cases of models in which channels must open before activating.

  1. Isochannels and blocking modes of voltage-dependent sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Moczydlowski, E; Uehara, A; Guo, X; Heiny, J

    1986-01-01

    Our results support the existence of three different Na-channel subtypes or isochannels. These isochannels can be readily distinguished as the predominant Na-channel types in mammalian brain, skeletal muscle, and cardiac muscle. The sensitivity to mu-conotoxin GIIIA and tetrodotoxin is sufficient to classify these channels. The skeletal muscle channel is very sensitive to both tetrodotoxin and mu-conotoxin, the brain channel is sensitive to tetrodotoxin but insensitive to mu-conotoxin, and the heart and denervated muscle channels are insensitive to both toxins. In addition to block at the external receptor site for guanidinium toxins, several other blocking modes can be generalized for batrachotoxin-activated Na channels. One mode is peculiar to certain hydrophobic molecules so far represented by our studies of benzocaine and procaine. These molecules induce discrete blocking events with dwell times that apparently increase with anesthetic concentration and a blocking frequency that increases with negative voltage. This mode is quite distinct from the fast internal block by charged organic molecules that increases with positive voltage. These results imply that it is not possible to ascribe the diverse effects of local anesthetics to a single site in the interior channel mouth, as previously proposed by Hille. Our observations thus support the conclusions of other workers who used mixtures of two local anesthetics to show that the dose-response behavior does not fit single-site behavior, but requires at least two distinct sites. Two additional blocking modes can be distinguished for the interactions of cations at the internal and external mouths of the channel. Organic molecules can apparently enter the electric field from the internal but not the external side of the channel. This result suggests a wide internal entry way to the field and an external constriction that prevents the entry of molecules with a single methyl group but permits entry of divalent

  2. An important role of a pyrethroid-sensing residue F1519 in the action of the N-alkylamide insecticide BTG 502 on the cockroach sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuzhe; Khambay, Bhupinder

    2011-01-01

    Deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, and BTG 502, an alkylamide insecticide, target voltage-gated sodium channels. Deltamethrin binds to a unique receptor site and causes prolonged opening of sodium channels by inhibiting deactivation and inactivation. Previous 22Na+ influx and receptor binding assays using mouse brain synaptoneurosomes showed that BTG 502 antagonized the binding and action of batrachotoxin (BTX), a site 2 sodium channel neurotoxin. However, the effect of BTG 502 has not been examined directly on sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In this study, we examined the effect of BTG 502 on wild-type and mutant cockroach sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Toxin competition experiments confirmed that BTG 502 antagonizes the action of BTX and possibly shares a common receptor site with BTX. However, unlike BTX which causes persistent activation of sodium channels, BTG 502 reduces the amplitude of peak sodium current. A previous study showed that BTG 502 was more toxic to pyrethroid-resistant house flies possessing a super-kdr (knockdown resistance) mechanism than to pyrethroid-susceptible house flies. However, we found that the cockroach sodium channels carrying the equivalent super-kdr mutations (M918T and L1014F) were not more sensitive to BTG 502 than the wild-type channel. Instead, a kdr mutation, F1519I, which reduces pyrethroid binding, abolished the action of BTG 502. These results provide evidence the actions of alkylamide and pyrethroid insecticides require a common sodium channel residue. PMID:21426938

  3. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Biophysics, Pharmacology, and Related Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Gollob, Michael H.; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit) that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (INa) and can also function as cell adhesion molecules. In vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named “channel partners” or “channel interacting proteins” (ChiPs) like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin), and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics). Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium “channelopathies”.  This review will outline the structure, function, and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field. PMID:22798951

  4. Role of Epithelium Sodium Channel in Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruo-Yu; Yang, Shu-Hua; Xu, Wei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review the recent developments in the mechanisms of epithelium sodium channels (ENaCs) induced bone formation and regulation. Data Sources: Studies written in English or Chinese were searched using Medline, PubMed and the index of Chinese-language literature with time restriction from 2005 to 2014. Keywords included ENaC, bone, bone formation, osteonecrosis, estrogen, and osteoporosis. Data from published articles about the structure of ENaC, mechanism of ENaC in bone formation in recent domestic and foreign literature were selected. Study Selection: Abstract and full text of all studies were required to obtain. Studies those were not accessible and those did not focus on the keywords were excluded. Results: ENaCs are tripolymer ion channels which are assembled from homologous α, β, and γ subunits. Crystal structure of ENaCs suggests that ENaC has a central ion-channel located in the central symmetry axis of the three subunits. ENaCs are protease sensitive channels whose iron-channel activity is regulated by the proteolytic reaction. Channel opening probability of ENaCs is regulated by proteinases, mechanical force, and shear stress. Several molecules are involved in regulation of ENaCs in bone formation, including nitride oxide synthases, voltage-sensitive calcium channels, and cyclooxygenase-2. Conclusion: The pathway of ENaC involved in shear stress has an effect on stimulating osteoblasts even bone formation by estrogen interference. PMID:26904995

  5. Studies of multimodal gating of the sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Keynes, Richard D

    2002-01-01

    Chandler and Meves found that in squid axons perfused with NaF a small flow of Na+ ions persisted in the inactivated state, and that the Na+ channel therefore has more than one open state. Studies by Correa and Bezanilla on single patches in squid axons showed that such steady currents arose from reopening of the channel at a relatively low frequency. Currents with comparable properties are generated in mammalian brain cells and elsewhere. The existence of a third mode of gating was established by Patlak and Ortiz when they showed that in frog muscle fibres there were occasionally quite large bursts of late openings. Again, similar behaviour has been observed in other types of muscle and in brain cells. It is suggested that the voltage gating of all ionic channels involves a screw-helical mechanism, operating in steps each transferring unit charge. For segment S4 in domain IV of Na+ channels, three charges have to be transferred to reach the initial open state, and a fourth for fast inactivation to take place. The single late openings in the inactivated steady state may be explained by the transfer of a fifth charge in IVS4, while the larger bursts of reopening involve a modulation of the mechanism of fast inactivation.

  6. The hitchhiker’s guide to the voltage-gated sodium channel galaxy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels contribute to the rising phase of action potentials and served as an early muse for biophysicists laying the foundation for our current understanding of electrical signaling. Given their central role in electrical excitability, it is not surprising that (a) inherited mutations in genes encoding for Nav channels and their accessory subunits have been linked to excitability disorders in brain, muscle, and heart; and (b) Nav channels are targeted by various drugs and naturally occurring toxins. Although the overall architecture and behavior of these channels are likely to be similar to the more well-studied voltage-gated potassium channels, eukaryotic Nav channels lack structural and functional symmetry, a notable difference that has implications for gating and selectivity. Activation of voltage-sensing modules of the first three domains in Nav channels is sufficient to open the channel pore, whereas movement of the domain IV voltage sensor is correlated with inactivation. Also, structure–function studies of eukaryotic Nav channels show that a set of amino acids in the selectivity filter, referred to as DEKA locus, is essential for Na+ selectivity. Structures of prokaryotic Nav channels have also shed new light on mechanisms of drug block. These structures exhibit lateral fenestrations that are large enough to allow drugs or lipophilic molecules to gain access into the inner vestibule, suggesting that this might be the passage for drug entry into a closed channel. In this Review, we will synthesize our current understanding of Nav channel gating mechanisms, ion selectivity and permeation, and modulation by therapeutics and toxins in light of the new structures of the prokaryotic Nav channels that, for the time being, serve as structural models of their eukaryotic counterparts. PMID:26712848

  7. Structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel pore reveals essential gating elements and an outer ion binding site common to eukaryotic channels

    PubMed Central

    Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Arrigoni, Cristina; Wong, Stephanie; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Loussouarn, Gildas; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are central elements of cellular excitation. Notwithstanding advances from recent bacterial NaV (BacNaV) structures, key questions about gating and ion selectivity remain. Here, we present a closed conformation of NaVAe1p, a pore-only BacNaV derived from NaVAe1, a BacNaV from the arsenite oxidizer Alkalilimnicola ehrlichei found in Mono Lake, California, that provides insight into both fundamental properties. The structure reveals a pore domain in which the pore-lining S6 helix connects to a helical cytoplasmic tail. Electrophysiological studies of full-length BacNaVs show that two elements defined by the NaVAe1p structure, an S6 activation gate position and the cytoplasmic tail ‘neck’, are central to BacNaV gating. The structure also reveals the selectivity filter ion entry site, termed the ‘outer ion’ site. Comparison with mammalian voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) selectivity filters, together with functional studies shows that this site forms a previously unknown determinant of CaV high affinity calcium binding. Our findings underscore commonalities between BacNaVs and eukaryotic voltage-gated channels and provide a framework for understanding gating and ion permeation in this superfamily. PMID:24120938

  8. Single-cell analysis of sodium channel expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cojen; O'Leary, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) express multiple voltage-gated sodium (Na) channels that substantially differ in gating kinetics and pharmacology. Small-diameter (<25 μm) neurons isolated from the rat DRG express a combination of fast tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) and slow TTX-resistant (TTX-R) Na currents while large-diameter neurons (>30 μm) predominately express fast TTX-S Na current. Na channel expression was further investigated using single-cell RT-PCR to measure the transcripts present in individually harvested DRG neurons. Consistent with cellular electrophysiology, the small neurons expressed transcripts encoding for both TTX-S (Nav1.1, Nav1.2, Nav1.6, and Nav1.7) and TTX-R (Nav1.8 and Nav1.9) Na channels. Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 were the predominant Na channels expressed in the small neurons. The large neurons highly expressed TTX-S isoforms (Nav1.1, Nav1.6, and Nav1.7) while TTX-R channels were present at comparatively low levels. A unique subpopulation of the large neurons was identified that expressed TTX-R Na current and high levels of Nav1.8 transcript. DRG neurons also displayed substantial differences in the expression of neurofilaments (NF200, peripherin) and Necl-1, a neuronal adhesion molecule involved in myelination. The preferential expression of NF200 and Necl-1 suggests that large-diameter neurons give rise to thick myelinated axons. Small-diameter neurons expressed peripherin, but reduced levels of NF200 and Necl-1, a pattern more consistent with thin unmyelinated axons. Single-cell analysis of Na channel transcripts indicates that TTX-S and TTX-R Na channels are differentially expressed in large myelinated (Nav1.1, Nav1.6, and Nav1.7) and small unmyelinated (Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9) sensory neurons. PMID:20816971

  9. Effects of blockers of Ca2+ channels and other ion channels on in vitro excystment of Paragonimus ohirai metacercariae induced by sodium cholate.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teruaki

    2004-11-01

    The inhibitory effects of various ion channel blockers were examined on in vitro excystment of Paragonimus ohirai metacercariae induced by a bile salt, sodium cholate. At a concentration of 10 microM, bepridil, a non-selective Ca(2+) channel blocker, completely inhibited in vitro excystment, whereas TEA, lidocaine, and R(+)-IAA-94, channel blockers against K(+), Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, respectively, benzamil, an Na(+)/H(+) and Na(+)/Ca(2+) ion exchanger blocker, and R(+)-DIOA, a [K(+), Cl(-)] cotransporter inhibitor, did not. Considering the previous result that Ca(2+) ionophores are also efficient inducing factors for in vitro excystment of P. ohirai metacercariae and the present result, bile salts appear to induce the excystment of P. ohirai metacercariae through evoking the Ca(2+) channels of target cells within the metacercarial juveniles. PMID:15449179

  10. Airway Defense Control Mediated via Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Kocmalova, M; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Banovcin, P; Sutovska, M

    2016-01-01

    Expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) takes place in the airways and the role of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 in the control of airway's defense reflexes has been confirmed. The activation of Nav channels is crucial for cough initiation and airway smooth muscle reactivity, but it is unknown whether these channels regulate ciliary beating. This study evaluated the involvement of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 channels in the airway defense mechanisms using their pharmacological blockers in healthy guinea pigs and in the experimental allergic asthma model. Asthma was modeled by ovalbumin sensitization over a period of 21 days. Blockade of Nav1.7 channels significantly decreased airway smooth muscle reactivity in vivo, the number of cough efforts, and the cilia beat frequency in healthy animals. In the allergic asthma model, blockade of Nav1.8 efficiently relieved symptoms of asthma, without adversely affecting cilia beat frequency. The study demonstrates that Nav1.8 channel antagonism has a potential to alleviate cough and bronchial hyperreactivity in asthma. PMID:27161110

  11. Rat epileptic seizures evoked by BmK {alpha}IV and its possible mechanisms involved in sodium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Zhifang; Bai Zhantao; Zhang Xuying; Liu Tong; Pang Xueyan; Ji Yonghua . E-mail: yhji@server.shcnc.ac.cn

    2007-05-01

    This study showed that rat unilateral intracerebroventricular injection of BmK {alpha}IV, a sodium channel modulator derived from scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, induced clusters of spikes, epileptic discharges and convulsion-related behavioral changes. BmK {alpha}IV potently promoted the release of endogenous glutamate from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. In vitro examination of the effect of BmK {alpha}IV on intrasynaptosomal free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and sodium concentration [Na{sup +}]{sub i} revealed that BmK {alpha}IV-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was associated with an increase in Ca{sup 2+} and Na{sup +} influx. Moreover, BmK {alpha}IV-mediated glutamate release and ion influx was completely blocked by tetrodotoxin, a blocker of sodium channel. Together, these results suggest that the induction of BmK {alpha}IV-evoked epileptic seizures may be involved in the modulation of BmK {alpha}IV on tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels located on the nerve terminal, which subsequently enhances the Ca{sup 2+} influx to cause an increase of glutamate release. These findings may provide some insight regarding the mechanism of neuronal action of BmK {alpha}IV in the central nervous system for understanding epileptogenesis involved in sodium channels.

  12. Sodium channel from rat brain. Reconstitution of voltage-dependent scorpion toxin binding in vesicles of defined lipid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D.J.; Talvenheimo, J.A.; Catterall, W.A.

    1985-09-25

    Purified sodium channels incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles mediate neurotoxin-activated SSNa influx but do not bind the alpha-scorpion toxin from Leiurus quinquestriatus (LqTx) with high affinity. Addition of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or phosphatidylserine to the reconstitution mixture restores high affinity LqTx binding with KD = 1.9 nM for PC/PE vesicles at -90 mV and 36 degrees C in sucrose-substituted medium. Other lipids tested were markedly less effective. The binding of LqTx in vesicles of PC/PE (65:35) is sensitive to both the membrane potential formed by sodium gradients across the reconstituted vesicle membrane and the cation concentration in the extravesicular medium. Binding of LqTx is reduced 3- to 4-fold upon depolarization to 0 mV from -50 to -60 mV in experiments in which (Na+)out/(Na+)in is varied by changing (Na+)in or (Na+)out at constant extravesicular ionic strength. It is concluded that the purified sodium channel contains the receptor site for LqTx in functional form and that restoration of high affinity, voltage-dependent binding of LqTx by the purified sodium channel requires an appropriate ratio of PC to PE and/or phosphatidylserine in the vesicle membrane.

  13. The epithelial sodium channel in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Maejima, Sho; Yoshie, Sumio; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Konno, Norifumi; Joss, Jean M P

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a Na(+)-selective, aldosterone-stimulated ion channel involved in sodium transport homeostasis. ENaC is rate-limiting for Na(+) absorption in the epithelia of osmoregulatory organs of tetrapods. Although the ENaC/degenerin gene family is proposed to be present in metazoans, no orthologues or paralogues for ENaC have been found in the genome databases of teleosts. We studied full-length cDNA cloning and tissue distributions of ENaCα, β and γ subunits in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, which is the closest living relative of tetrapods. Neoceratodus ENaC (nENaC) comprised three subunits: nENaCα, β and γ proteins. The nENaCα, β and γ subunits are closely related to amphibian ENaCα, β and γ subunits, respectively. Three ENaC subunit mRNAs were highly expressed in the gills, kidney and rectum. Amiloride-sensitive sodium current was recorded from Xenopus oocytes injected with the nENaCαβγ subunit complementary RNAs under a two-electrode voltage clamp. nENaCα immunoreactivity was observed in the apical cell membrane of the gills, kidney and rectum. Thus, nENaC may play a role in regulating sodium transport of the lungfish, which has a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This is interesting because there may have been an ENaC sodium absorption system controlled by aldosterone before the conquest of land by vertebrates.

  14. Physiological and genetic analysis of multiple sodium channel variants in a model of genetic absence epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, M K; McGarr, T C; Beyer, B J; Gazina, E; Kaplan, D I; Cordeiro, L; Thomas, E; Dib-Hajj, S D; Waxman, S G; Frankel, W N; Petrou, S

    2015-01-01

    In excitatory neurons, SCN2A (NaV1.2) and SCN8A (NaV1.6) sodium channels are enriched at the axon initial segment. NaV1.6 is implicated in several mouse models of absence epilepsy, including a missense mutation identified in a chemical mutagenesis screen (Scn8aV929F). Here, we confirmed the prior suggestion that Scn8aV929F exhibits a striking genetic background-dependent difference in phenotypic severity, observing that spike-wave discharge (SWD) incidence and severity are significantly diminished when Scn8aV929F is fully placed onto the C57BL/6J strain compared with C3H. Examination of sequence differences in NaV subunits between these two inbred strains suggested NaV1.2V752F as a potential source of this modifier effect. Recognising that the spatial co-localisation of the NaV channels at the axon initial segment (AIS) provides a plausible mechanism for functional interaction, we tested this idea by undertaking biophysical characterisation of the variant NaV channels and by computer modelling. NaV1.2V752F functional analysis revealed an overall gain-of-function and for NaV1.6V929F revealed an overall loss-of-function. A biophysically realistic computer model was used to test the idea that interaction between these variant channels at the AIS contributes to the strain background effect. Surprisingly this modelling showed that neuronal excitability is dominated by the properties of NaV1.2V752F due to “functional silencing” of NaV1.6V929F suggesting that these variants do not directly interact. Consequent genetic mapping of the major strain modifier to Chr 7, and not Chr 2 where Scn2a maps, supported this biophysical prediction. While a NaV1.6V929F loss of function clearly underlies absence seizures in this mouse model, the strain background effect is apparently not due to an otherwise tempting Scn2a variant, highlighting the value of combining physiology and genetics to inform and direct each other when interrogating genetic complex traits such as absence

  15. Regulation of epithelial sodium channels by cGMP/PKGII

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Hong-Guang; Chen, Lan; Han, Dong-Yun; Li, Jun; Song, Wei-Feng; Wei, Shi-Peng; Fang, Xiao-Hui; Gu, Xiu; Matalon, Sadis; Ji, Hong-Long

    2009-01-01

    Airway and alveolar fluid clearance is mainly governed by vectorial salt movement via apically located rate-limiting Na+ channels (ENaC) and basolateral Na+/K+-ATPases. ENaC is regulated by a spectrum of protein kinases, i.e. protein kinase A (PKA), C (PKC), and G (PKG). However, the molecular mechanisms for the regulation of ENaC by cGMP/PKG remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we studied the pharmacological responses of native epithelial Na+ channels in human Clara cells and human αβγδ ENaCs expressed in oocytes to cGMP. 8-pCPT-cGMP increased amiloride-sensitive short-circuit current (Isc) across H441 monolayers and heterologously expressed αβγδ ENaC activity in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, 8-pCPT-cGMP (a PKGII activator) but not 8-Br-cGMP (a PKGI activator) increased amiloride-sensitive whole cell currents in H441 cells in the presence of CFTRinh-172 and diltiazem. In all cases, the cGMP-activated Na+ channel activity was inhibited by Rp-8-pCPT-cGMP, a specific PKGII inhibitor. This was substantiated by the evidence that PKGII was the sole isoform expressed in H441 cells at the protein level. Importantly, intratracheal instillation of 8-pCPT-cGMP in BALB/c mice increased amiloride-sensitive alveolar fluid clearance by ∼30%, consistent with the in vitro results. We therefore conclude that PKGII is an activator of lung epithelial Na+ channels, which may expedite the resolution of oedematous fluid in alveolar sacs. PMID:19359370

  16. Single-channel, macroscopic, and gating currents from sodium channels in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, C A; Bezanilla, F

    1991-01-01

    Single-channel, macroscopic ionic, and macroscopic gating currents were recorded from the voltage-dependent sodium channel using patch-clamp techniques on the cut-open squid giant axon. To obtain a complete set of physiological measurements of sodium channel gating under identical conditions, and to facilitate comparison with previous work, comparison was made between currents recorded in the absence of extracellular divalent cations and in the presence of physiological concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ (10 mM) and Mg2+ (50 mM). The single-channel currents were well resolved when divalent cations were not included in the extracellular solution, but were decreased in amplitude in the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions. The instantaneous current-voltage relationship obtained from macroscopic tail current measurements similarly was depressed by divalents, and showed a negative slope-conductance region for inward current at negative potentials. Voltage dependent parameters of channel gating were shifted 9-13 mV towards depolarized potentials by external divalent cations, including the peak fraction of channels open versus voltage, the time constant of tail current decline, the prepulse inactivation versus voltage relationship, and the charge-voltage relationship for gating currents. The effects of divalent cations are consistent with open channel block by Ca2+ and Mg2+ together with divalent screening of membrane charges. PMID:1663795

  17. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. PMID:26185330

  18. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine.

  19. Rab11b regulates the trafficking and recycling of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Robert S.; Silvis, Mark R.; Gallo, Luciana I.; Liang, Xiubin; Apodaca, Gerard; Fizzell, Raymond A.; Johnson, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Expression of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) at the apical membrane of cortical collecting duct (CCD) principal cells is modulated by regulated trafficking mediated by vesicle insertion and retrieval. Small GTPases are known to facilitate vesicle trafficking, recycling, and membrane fusion events; however, little is known about the specific Rab family members that modify ENaC surface density. Using a mouse CCD cell line that endogenously expresses ENaC (mpkCCD), the channel was localized to both Rab11a- and Rab11b-positive endosomes by immunoisolation and confocal fluorescent microscopy. Expression of a dominant negative (DN) form of Rab11a or Rab11b significantly reduced the basal and cAMP-stimulated ENaC-dependent sodium (Na+) transport. The greatest reduction in Na+ transport was observed with the expression of DN-Rab11b. Furthermore, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of each Rab11 isoform demonstrated the requirement for Rab11b in ENaC surface expression. These data indicate that Rab11b, and to a lesser extent Rab11a, is involved in establishing the constitutive and cAMP-stimulated Na+ transport in mpkCCD cells. PMID:22129970

  20. A novel anticonvulsant modulates voltage-gated sodium channel inactivation and prevents kindling-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad N; Gavrilovici, Cezar; Shah, Syed U Ali; Shaheen, Farzana; Choudhary, Muhammad I; Rahman, Atta-ur; Fahnestock, Margaret; Simjee, Shabana U; Poulter, Michael O

    2013-09-01

    Here, we explore the mechanism of action of isoxylitone (ISOX), a molecule discovered in the plant Delphinium denudatum, which has been shown to have anticonvulsant properties. Patch-clamp electrophysiology assayed the activity of ISOX on voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in both cultured neurons and brain slices isolated from controls and rats with experimental epilepsy(kindling model). Quantitative transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) (QPCR) assessed brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in kindled rats, and kindled rats treated with ISOX. ISOX suppressed sodium current (I(Na)) showing an IC50 value of 185 nM in cultured neurons. ISOX significantly slowed the recovery from inactivation (ISOX τ = 18.7 ms; Control τ = 9.4 ms; p < 0.001). ISOX also enhanced the development of inactivation by shifting the Boltzmann curve to more hyperpolarized potentials by -11.2 mV (p < 0.05). In naive and electrically kindled cortical neurons, the IC50 for sodium current block was identical to that found in cultured neurons. ISOX prevented kindled stage 5 seizures and decreased the enhanced BDNF mRNA expression that is normally associated with kindling (p < 0.05). Overall, our data show that ISOX is a potent inhibitor of VGSCs that stabilizes steady-state inactivation while slowing recovery and enhancing inactivation development. Like many other sodium channel blocker anti-epileptic drugs, the suppression of BDNF mRNA expression that usually occurs with kindling is likely a secondary outcome that nevertheless would suppress epileptogenesis. These data show a new class of anti-seizure compound that inhibits sodium channel function and prevents the development of epileptic seizures.

  1. Unveiling the sodium intercalation properties in Na1.86□0.14Fe3(PO4)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essehli, R.; Ben Yahia, H.; Maher, K.; Sougrati, M. T.; Abouimrane, A.; Park, J.-B.; Sun, Y.-K.; Al-Maadeed, M. A.; Belharouak, I.

    2016-08-01

    The new compound Na1.86□0.14Fe3(PO4)3 was successfully synthesized via hydrothermal synthesis and its crystal structure was determined using powder X-ray diffraction data. Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 was also characterized by operando XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and galvanostatic cycling. Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 crystallizes with the alluaudite-type structure with the eight coordinated Na1 and Na2 sodium atoms located within the channels. The combination of the Rietveld- and Mössbauer-analyses confirms that the sodium vacancies in the Na1 site are linked to a partial oxidation of Fe2+ during synthesis. The electrochemical tests indicated that Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 is a 3 V sodium intercalating cathode. At the current densities of 5, 10, and 20 mA g-1, the material delivers the specific capacities of 109, 97, and 80 mA h g-1, respectively. After 100 charge and discharge cycles, Na1.86Fe3(PO4)3 exhibited good sodium removal and uptake behavior although no optimizations of particle size, morphology, and carbon coating were performed.

  2. Alkaloids from Veratrum taliense Exert Cardiovascular Toxic Effects via Cardiac Sodium Channel Subtype 1.5

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gan; Rong, Ming-Qiang; Li, Qiong; Liu, Ya-Ping; Long, Cheng-Bo; Meng, Ping; Yao, Hui-Ming; Lai, Ren; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Several species of the genus Veratrum that produce steroid alkaloids are commonly used to treat pain and hypertension in China and Europe. However, Veratrum alkaloids (VAs) induce serious cardiovascular toxicity. In China, Veratrum treatment often leads to many side effects and even causes the death of patients, but the pathophysiological mechanisms under these adverse effects are not clear. Here, two solanidine-type VAs (isorubijervine and rubijervine) isolated from Veratrum taliense exhibited strong cardiovascular toxicity. A pathophysiological study indicated that these VAs blocked sodium channels NaV1.3–1.5 and exhibited the strongest ability to inhibit NaV1.5, which is specifically expressed in cardiac tissue and plays an essential role in cardiac physiological function. This result reveals that VAs exert their cardiovascular toxicity via the NaV1.5 channel. The effects of VAs on NaV1.3 and NaV1.4 may be related to their analgesic effect and skeletal muscle toxicity, respectively. PMID:26729167

  3. Purification and subunit structure of the [3H]phenamil receptor associated with the renal apical Na+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Barbry, P; Chassande, O; Vigne, P; Frelin, C; Ellory, C; Cragoe, E J; Lazdunski, M

    1987-01-01

    Sodium crosses the apical membrane of tight epithelia through a sodium channel, which is inhibited by the diuretic amiloride and by analogs such as phenamil. Target size analysis indicated that the functional size of the [3H]phenamil binding sites associated with the epithelial Na+ channel from pig kidney is 92 +/- 10 kDa. The [3H]phenamil receptor was solubilized by using 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. The solubilized material displayed the same properties of interaction with amiloride and its derivatives as the membrane-bound receptor. A two-step purification of the epithelial Na+ channel was achieved by using QAE Sephadex chromatography and affinity chromatography on a Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin column. It results in an 1100-fold purification of the Na+ channel as compared to pig kidney microsomes with a yield of 15% +/- 5%. The maximal specific activity was 3.7 nmol/mg of protein. NaDodSO4/poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified Na+ channel under nonreducing conditions showed the presence of a single major polypeptide chain of apparent molecular mass 185 kDa. Under disulfide-reducing conditions, the purified epithelial Na+ channel migrated as a single band of apparent molecular mass 105 kDa. It is suggested that the epithelial Na+ channel from pig kidney has a total molecular mass of 185 kDa and consists of two nearly identical 90- to 105-kDa polypeptide chains crosslinked by disulfide bridges. Images PMID:2440032

  4. Sodium channels in membrane vesicles from cultured toad bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, C.; Moran, A.; Rossier, B.C.; Garty, H. Ben Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva Institut de Pharmacologie de l'Universite de Lausanne )

    1988-04-01

    Electrical potential-driven {sup 22}Na{sup +} fluxes were measured in membrane vesicles prepared from TBM-18(cl23) cells (a clone of the established cell line TB-M). Fifty to seventy percent of the tracer uptake in vesicles derived from cells that were cultivated on a porous support were blocked by the diuretic amiloride. The amiloride inhibition constant was <0.1 {mu}M, indicating that this flux is mediated by the apical Na{sup +}-specific channels. Vesicles prepared from cells that were not grown on a porous support exhibited much smaller amiloride-sensitive fluxes. Two Ca{sup 2+}-dependent processes that down-regulated the channel conductance and were previously identified in native epithelia were found in the cultured cells as well. Vesicles isolated from cells that were preincubated with 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M aldosterone for 16-20 h exhibited higher amiloride-sensitive conductance than vesicles derived from control, steroid-depleted cells. Thus membrane derived from TBM-18(cl23) cells can be used to characterize the epithelial Na{sup +} channel and its hormonal regulation.

  5. Primary erythromelalgia in a 12-year-old boy: positive response to sodium channel blockers despite negative SCN9A mutations.

    PubMed

    Jakob, A; Creutzfeldt, R; Staszewski, O; Winterpacht, A; Berner, R; Hufnagel, M

    2012-09-01

    Erythromelalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent pain attacks, swelling and redness in the distal extremities. The primary forms of the disorder are caused by mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels. Treatment is difficult and controlled therapeutic studies offer little to no guidance. We report on a 12-year-old boy and his first occurrence of primary erythromelalgia. Genetic findings for mutations in the SCN9A gene, which encodes for the α-subunit of sodium channel NaV1.7, were negative. Although initial treatment with sodium nitroprusside was ineffective, subsequent medication with lidocaine and mexiletine, in combination with gabapentin, was successful. Despite negative findings for mutations in the sodium channels, the use of sodium channel blockers should be considered in these patients. PMID:22170168

  6. Surface expression of sodium channels and transporters in rat kidney: effects of dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Frindt, Gustavo; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2009-11-01

    The abundance of Na transport proteins in the luminal membrane of the rat kidney was assessed using in situ biotinylation and immunoblotting. When animals were fed an Na-deficient diet for 1 wk, the amounts of epithelial Na channel (ENaC) beta-subunit (beta-ENaC) and gamma-subunit (gamma-ENaC) and Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) protein in the surface fraction increased relative to controls by 1.9-, 3.5-, and 1.5-fold, respectively. The amounts of the luminal Na/H exchanger (NHE3) and the luminal Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) did not change significantly. The increases in ENaC subunits were mimicked by administration of aldosterone for 1 wk, but the increase in NCC was not. When the animals were fed a high-Na (5% NaCl) diet for 1 wk, the surface expression of beta-ENaC increased by 50%, whereas that of the other membrane proteins did not change, relative to controls. The biochemical parameter most strongly affected by dietary Na was the abundance of the 65-kDa cleaved form of gamma-ENaC at the surface. This increased by 8.5-fold with Na depletion and decreased by 40% with Na loading. The overall 14-fold change reflected regulation of the total abundance of the subunit as well as the fraction of the subunit protein in the cleaved form. We conclude that cleavage of gamma-ENaC and its expression at the apical surface play a major role in the regulation of renal Na reabsorption.

  7. S1-S3 counter charges in the voltage sensor module of a mammalian sodium channel regulate fast inactivation.

    PubMed

    Groome, James R; Winston, Vern

    2013-05-01

    The movement of positively charged S4 segments through the electric field drives the voltage-dependent gating of ion channels. Studies of prokaryotic sodium channels provide a mechanistic view of activation facilitated by electrostatic interactions of negatively charged residues in S1 and S2 segments, with positive counterparts in the S4 segment. In mammalian sodium channels, S4 segments promote domain-specific functions that include activation and several forms of inactivation. We tested the idea that S1-S3 countercharges regulate eukaryotic sodium channel functions, including fast inactivation. Using structural data provided by bacterial channels, we constructed homology models of the S1-S4 voltage sensor module (VSM) for each domain of the mammalian skeletal muscle sodium channel hNaV1.4. These show that side chains of putative countercharges in hNaV1.4 are oriented toward the positive charge complement of S4. We used mutagenesis to define the roles of conserved residues in the extracellular negative charge cluster (ENC), hydrophobic charge region (HCR), and intracellular negative charge cluster (INC). Activation was inhibited with charge-reversing VSM mutations in domains I-III. Charge reversal of ENC residues in domains III (E1051R, D1069K) and IV (E1373K, N1389K) destabilized fast inactivation by decreasing its probability, slowing entry, and accelerating recovery. Several INC mutations increased inactivation from closed states and slowed recovery. Our results extend the functional characterization of VSM countercharges to fast inactivation, and support the premise that these residues play a critical role in domain-specific gating transitions for a mammalian sodium channel.

  8. Trimethyloxonium modification of batrachotoxin-activated Na channels alters functionally important protein residues.

    PubMed Central

    Cherbavaz, D B

    1995-01-01

    The extracellular side of single batrachotoxin-activated voltage-dependent Na channels isolated from rat skeletal muscle membranes incorporated into neutral planar lipid bilayers were treated in situ with the carboxyl methylating reagent, trimethyloxonium (TMO). These experiments were designed to determine whether TMO alters Na channel function by a general through-space electrostatic mechanism or by methylating specific carboxyl groups essential to channel function. TMO modification reduced single-channel conductance by decreasing the maximal turnover rate. Modification increased channel selectivity for sodium ions relative to potassium ions as measured under biionic conditions. TMO modification increased the mu-conotoxin (muCTX) off-rate by three orders of magnitude. Modification did not alter the muCTX on-rate at low ionic strength or Na channel voltage-dependent gating characteristics. These data demonstrate that TMO does not act via a general electrostatic mechanism. Instead, TMO targets protein residues specifically involved in ion conduction, ion selectivity, and muCTX binding. These data support the hypothesis that muCTX blocks open-channel current by physically obstructing the ion channel pore. PMID:7787022

  9. Neurotrophin-3 significantly reduces sodium channel expression linked to neuropathic pain states.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D; Stucky, Cheryl L; McComb, Geoffrey W; Verge, Valerie M K

    2008-10-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from chronic constriction injury (CCI) is critically linked to sensitization of peripheral nociceptors. Voltage gated sodium channels are major contributors to this state and their expression can be upregulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). We have previously demonstrated that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) acts antagonistically to NGF in modulation of aspects of CCI-induced changes in trkA-associated nociceptor phenotype and thermal hyperalgesia. Thus, we hypothesized that exposure of neurons to increased levels of NT-3 would reduce expression of Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 in DRG neurons subject to CCI. In adult male rats, Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 mRNAs are expressed at high levels in predominantly small to medium size neurons. One week following CCI, there is reduced incidence of neurons expressing detectable Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 mRNA, but without a significant decline in mean level of neuronal expression, and similar findings observed immunohistochemically. There is also increased accumulation/redistribution of channel protein in the nerve most apparent proximal to the first constriction site. Intrathecal infusion of NT-3 significantly attenuates neuronal expression of Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 mRNA contralateral and most notably, ipsilateral to CCI, with a similar impact on relative protein expression at the level of the neuron and constricted nerve. We also observe reduced expression of the common neurotrophin receptor p75 in response to CCI that is not reversed by NT-3 in small to medium sized neurons and may confer an enhanced ability of NT-3 to signal via trkA, as has been previously shown in other cell types. These findings are consistent with an analgesic role for NT-3. PMID:18601922

  10. A sodium channel mutation identified in Aedes aegypti selectively reduces cockroach sodium channel sensitivity to type I, but not type II pyrethroids.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaonong; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. Numerous point mutations in sodium channel genes have been identified in pyrethroid-resistant insect species, and many have been confirmed to reduce or abolish sensitivity of channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes to pyrethroids. Recently, several novel mutations were reported in sodium channel genes of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes mosquito populations. One of the mutations is a phenylalanine (F) to cysteine (C) change in segment 6 of domain III (IIIS6) of the Aedes mosquito sodium channel. Curiously, a previous study showed that alanine substitution of this F did not alter the action of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, on a cockroach sodium channel. In this study, we changed this F to C in a pyrethroid-sensitive cockroach sodium channel and examined mutant channel sensitivity to permethrin as well as five other type I or type II pyrethroids in Xenopus oocytes. Interestingly, the F to C mutation drastically reduced channel sensitivity to three type I pyrethroids, permethrin, NRDC 157 (a deltamethrin analogue lacking the α-cyano group) and bioresemthrin, but not to three type II pyrethroids, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and cyhalothrin. These results confirm the involvement of the F to C mutation in permethrin resistance, and raise the possibility that rotation of type I and type II pyrethroids might be considered in the control of insect pest populations where this particular mutation is present.

  11. Controlling epithelial sodium channels with light using photoswitchable amilorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönberger, Matthias; Althaus, Mike; Fronius, Martin; Clauss, Wolfgang; Trauner, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    Amiloride is a widely used diuretic that blocks epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs). These heterotrimeric transmembrane proteins, assembled from β, γ and α or δ subunits, effectively control water transport across epithelia and sodium influx into non-epithelial cells. The functional role of δβγENaC in various organs, including the human brain, is still poorly understood and no pharmacological tools are available for the functional differentiation between α- and δ-containing ENaCs. Here we report several photoswitchable versions of amiloride. One compound, termed PA1, enables the optical control of ENaC channels, in particular the δβγ isoform, by switching between blue and green light, or by turning on and off blue light. PA1 was used to modify functionally δβγENaC in amphibian and mammalian cells. We also show that PA1 can be used to differentiate between δβγENaC and αβγENaC in a model for the human lung epithelium.

  12. Regulation of Na v channels in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Mohamed; Ziane, Rahima; Vijayaragavan, Kausalia; Okamura, Yasushi

    2005-10-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels have an essential role in the biophysical properties of nociceptive neurons. Factors that regulate Na(+) channel function are of interest from both pathophysiological and therapeutic perspectives. Increasing evidence indicates that changes in expression or inappropriate modulation of these channels leads to electrical instability of the cell membrane and the inappropriate spontaneous activity that is observed following nerve injury, and that this might contribute to neuropathic pain. The role of Na(v) channels in nociception depends on modulation by factors such as auxiliary beta-subunits, cytoskeletal proteins and the phosphorylation state of neurons. In this review we describe the modulation of Na(v) channels on sensory neurons by auxiliary beta-subunits, protein kinases and cytoskeletal proteins.

  13. Negative-dominance phenomenon with genetic variants of the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5.

    PubMed

    Sottas, Valentin; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    During the past two decades, many pathological genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene encoding the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac (monomeric) sodium channel Na(v)1.5, have been described. Negative dominance is a classical genetic concept involving a "poison" mutant peptide that negatively interferes with the co-expressed wild-type protein, thus reducing its cellular function. This phenomenon has been described for genetic variants of multimeric K(+) channels, which mechanisms are well understood. Unexpectedly, several pathologic SCN5A variants that are linked to Brugada syndrome also demonstrate such a dominant-negative (DN) effect. The molecular determinants of these observations, however, are not yet elucidated. This review article summarizes recent findings that describe the mechanisms underlying the DN phenomenon of genetic variants of K(+), Ca(2+), Cl(-) and Na(+) channels, and in particular Brugada syndrome variants of Na(v)1.5. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  14. A Na(+) Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1). We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor.

  15. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-08-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10‑3 S cm‑1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor.

  16. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10−3 S cm−1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  17. A Na(+) Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1). We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  18. Cardiac Sodium Channel Mutations: Why so Many Phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Yang, K-C; Dudley, S C

    2016-01-01

    The cardiac Na(+) channel (Nav1.5) conducts a depolarizing inward Na(+) current that is responsible for the generation of the upstroke Phase 0 of the action potential. In heart tissue, changes in Na(+) currents can affect conduction velocity and impulse propagation. The cardiac Nav1.5 is also involved in determination of the action potential duration, since some channels may reopen during the plateau phase, generating a persistent or late inward current. Mutations of cardiac Nav1.5 can induce gain or loss of channel function because of an increased late current or a decrease of peak current, respectively. Gain-of-function mutations cause Long QT syndrome type 3 and possibly atrial fibrillation, while loss-of-function channel mutations are associated with a wider variety of phenotypes, such as Brugada syndrome, cardiac conduction disease, dilated cardiomyopathy, and sick sinus node syndrome. The penetrance and phenotypes resulting from Nav1.5 mutations also vary with age, gender, body temperature, circadian rhythm, and between regions of the heart. This phenotypic variability makes it difficult to correlate genotype-phenotype. We propose that mutations are only one contributor to the phenotype and additional modifications on Nav1.5 lead to the phenotypic variability. Possible modifiers include other genetic variations and alterations in the life cycle of Nav1.5 such as gene transcription, RNA processing, translation, posttranslational modifications, trafficking, complex assembly, and degradation. In this chapter, we summarize potential modifiers of cardiac Nav1.5 that could help explain the clinically observed phenotypic variability. Consideration of these modifiers could help improve genotype-phenotype correlations and lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27586294

  19. Associated proteins and renal epithelial Na+ channel function.

    PubMed

    Ismailov, I I; Berdiev, B K; Bradford, A L; Awayda, M S; Fuller, C M; Benos, D J

    1996-01-01

    The hypothesis that amiloride-sensitive Na+ channel complexes immunopurified from bovine renal papillary collecting tubules contain, as their core conduction component, an ENaC subunit, was tested by functional and immunological criteria. Disulfide bond reduction with dithiothreitol (DTT) of renal Na+ channels incorporated into planar lipid bilayers caused a reduction of single channel conductance from 40 pS to 13 pS, and uncoupled PKA regulation of this channel. The cation permeability sequence, as assessed from bi-ionic reversal potential measurements, and apparent amiloride equilibrium dissociation constant (K(amil)i) of the Na+ channels were unaltered by DTT treatment. Like ENaC, the DTT treated renal channel became mechanosensitive, and displayed a substantial decrease in K(amil)i following stretch (0.44 +/- 0.12 microM versus 6.9 +/- 1.0 microM). Moreover, stretch activation induced a loss in the channel's ability to discriminate between monovalent cations, and even allowed Ca2+ to permeate. Polyclonal antibodies generated against a fusion protein of alpha bENaC recognized a 70 kDa polypeptide component of the renal Na+ channel complex. These data suggest that ENaC is present in the immunopurified renal Na+ channel protein complex, and that PKA sensitivity is conferred by other associated proteins. PMID:8834119

  20. A pore segment in DEG/ENaC Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Snyder, P M; Olson, D R; Bucher, D B

    1999-10-01

    DEG/ENaC Na(+) channels have diverse functions, including Na(+) absorption, neurotransmission, and sensory transduction. The ability of these channels to discriminate between different ions is critical for their normal function. Several findings suggest that DEG/ENaC channels have a pore structure similar to K(+) channels. To test this hypothesis, we examined the accessibility of native and introduced cysteines in the putative P loop of ENaC. We identified residues that span a barrier that excludes amiloride as well as anionic and large methanethiosulfonate reagents from the pore. This segment contains a structural element ((S/G)CS) involved in selectivity of ENaC. The results are not consistent with predictions from the K(+) channel pore, suggesting that DEG/ENaC Na(+) channels have a novel pore structure. PMID:10497211

  1. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes. PMID:23283222

  2. tmc-1 encodes a sodium-sensitive channel required for salt chemosensation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Bang, Sangsu; Hwang, Sun Wook; Schafer, William R

    2013-02-01

    Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) genes encode a broadly conserved family of multipass integral membrane proteins in animals. Human TMC1 and TMC2 genes are linked to human deafness and required for hair-cell mechanotransduction; however, the molecular functions of these and other TMC proteins have not been determined. Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans tmc-1 gene encodes a sodium sensor that functions specifically in salt taste chemosensation. tmc-1 is expressed in the ASH polymodal avoidance neurons, where it is required for salt-evoked neuronal activity and behavioural avoidance of high concentrations of NaCl. However, tmc-1 has no effect on responses to other stimuli sensed by the ASH neurons including high osmolarity and chemical repellents, indicating a specific role in salt sensation. When expressed in mammalian cell culture, C. elegans TMC-1 generates a predominantly cationic conductance activated by high extracellular sodium but not by other cations or uncharged small molecules. Thus, TMC-1 is both necessary for salt sensation in vivo and sufficient to generate a sodium-sensitive channel in vitro, identifying it as a probable ionotropic sensory receptor. PMID:23364694

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide Prevents Advanced Glycation End-Products Induced Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiushi; Song, Binlin; Jiang, Shuai; Liang, Chen; Chen, Xiao; Shi, Jing; Li, Xinyuan; Sun, Yingying; Wu, Mingming; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Ma, He-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are complex and heterogeneous compounds implicated in diabetes. Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) at the distal nephron plays an important role in diabetic hypertension. Here, we report that H2S antagonizes AGEs-induced ENaC activation in A6 cells. ENaC open probability (PO) in A6 cells was significantly increased by exogenous AGEs and that this AGEs-induced ENaC activity was abolished by NaHS (a donor of H2S) and TEMPOL. Incubating A6 cells with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT) mimicked the effects of AGEs on ENaC activity, but did not induce any additive effect. We found that the expression levels of catalase were significantly reduced by AGEs and both AGEs and 3-AT facilitated ROS uptake in A6 cells, which were significantly inhibited by NaHS. The specific PTEN and PI3K inhibitors, BPV(pic) and LY294002, influence ENaC activity in AGEs-pretreated A6 cells. Moreover, after removal of AGEs from AGEs-pretreated A6 cells for 72 hours, ENaC PO remained at a high level, suggesting that an AGEs-related “metabolic memory” may be involved in sodium homeostasis. Our data, for the first time, show that H2S prevents AGEs-induced ENaC activation by targeting the ROS/PI3K/PTEN pathway. PMID:26078825

  4. 23Na NMR study of ionic mesophases in molten sodium carboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonekamp, J.; Eguchi, T.; Jonas, J.

    1980-10-01

    The 23Na NMR lineshapes are reported for the ionic mesophase and isotropic phase of the melts of sodium n-butyrate and sodium isovalerate. The powder pattern for the central transition typical for the second-order quadrupole effect observed in the mesophase melts is of particular interest. Some analogies to 23Na behavior in sodium β-alumina are pointed out.

  5. Sodium channel activation mechanisms. Insights from deuterium oxide substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Alicata, D.A.; Rayner, M.D.; Starkus, J.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Schauf and Bullock, using Myxicola giant axons, demonstrated that solvent substitution with deuterium oxide (D2O) significantly affects both sodium channel activation and inactivation kinetics without corresponding changes in gating current or tail current rates. They concluded that (a) no significant component of gating current derives from the final channel opening step, and (b) channels must deactivate (during tail currents) by a different pathway from that used in channel opening. By contrast, Oxford found in squid axons that when a depolarizing pulse is interrupted by a brief (approximately 100 microseconds) return to holding potential, subsequent reactivation (secondary activation) is very rapid and shows almost monoexponential kinetics. Increasing the interpulse interval resulted in secondary activation rate returning towards control, sigmoid (primary activation) kinetics. He concluded that channels open and close (deactivate) via the same pathway. We have repeated both sets of observations in crayfish axons, confirming the results obtained in both previous studies, despite the apparently contradictory conclusions reached by these authors. On the other hand, we find that secondary activation after a brief interpulse interval (50 microseconds) is insensitive to D2O, although reactivation after longer interpulse intervals (approximately 400 microseconds) returns towards a D2O sensitivity similar to that of primary activation. We conclude that D2O-sensitive primary activation and D2O-insensitive tail current deactivation involve separate pathways. However, D2O-insensitive secondary activation involves reversal of the D2O-insensitive deactivation step. These conclusions are consistent with parallel gate models, provided that one gating particle has a substantially reduced effective valence.

  6. Synthesis of sodium channels in the cell bodies of squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Brismar, T; Gilly, W F

    1987-01-01

    Giant axons in squid are formed by fusion of axons from many small cell bodies in the giant fiber lobe (GFL) of the stellate ganglion. Somata of GFL cells in vivo are inexcitable and do not have measurable sodium current (INa) when studied with microelectrode or patch-electrode voltage-clamp techniques. If GFL cells are separated from the giant axons and maintained in primary culture, axon-like INa can be recorded from the somata after several days. Incorporation of Na channels into GFL cell bodies requires protein synthesis, intracellular microtubule-based transport, and the lack of a morphologically defined axon to serve as a sink for channels synthesized in culture. PMID:3469679

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4-Induced Modulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhiwen; Jie, Pinghui; Tian, Yujing; Chen, Tingting; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to control the resting membrane potential and increase excitability in many types of cells. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play an important role in initiating action potentials in neurons. However, whether VGSCs can be modulated by the activation of TRPV4 in hippocampal pyramidal neurons remains unknown. In this study, we tested the effect of TRPV4 agonists (GSK1016790A and 4α-PDD) on voltage-gated sodium current (I Na) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and the protein levels of α/β-subunit of VGSCs in the hippocampus of mice subjected to intracerebroventricular (icv.) injection of GSK1016790A (GSK-injected mice). Herein, we report that I Na was inhibited by acute application of GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD. In the presence of TRPV4 agonists, the voltage-dependent inactivation curve shifted to the hyperpolarization, whereas the voltage-dependent activation curve remained unchanged. The TRPV4 agonist-induced inhibition of I Na was blocked by the TRPV4 antagonist or tetrodotoxin. Moreover, blocking protein kinase A (PKA) markedly attenuated the GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of I Na, whereas antagonism of protein kinase C or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase did not change GSK1016790A action. Finally, the protein levels of Nav1.1, Nav1.2, and Nav1.6 in the hippocampus increased in GSK-injected mice, whereas those of Nav1.3 and Navβ1 remained nearly unchanged. We conclude that I Na is inhibited by the acute activation of TRPV4 through PKA signaling pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, but protein expression of α-subunit of VGSCs is increased by sustained TRPV4 activation, which may compensate for the acute inhibition of I Na and provide a possibility for hyper-excitability upon sustained TRPV4 activation.

  8. Tetrodotoxin binding sites in human heart and human brain sodium channels. Final report, 28 June 1991-27 June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.M.; Hartmann, H.A.

    1994-07-28

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) are potent and lethal threats to exposed soldiers. The development of an antidote or site-specific antibodies for low affinity TTX/STX cardiac sodium channels and high affinity TTX/STX brain and peripheral nerve sodium channels requires a data base not only of the primary structure of the toxin receptor site(s) but also insight into the secondary structures of these site(s). Five goals or tasks were attempted and the first three were completed. Full-length human cardiac and brain sodium channel cDNAs have been cloned and expressed as functional proteins in Xenopus oocytes. Silent restriction sites have been introduced around the pore or P-region of the Na+ channel repeats. Site-directed mutagenesis has identified critical residues in the pore from the primary structure involved in sensitivity to TTX and STX and other pore properties. Chemical modification of cysteine mutants of these initial residues by methanethiosulfonate compounds produces an expanded data base of the secondary structure of the toxins` receptors. Specific peptides which mimic these receptors will be made to compete with the natural receptor for the toxins. We have successfully cloned the cDNAs for both human heart and brain sodium channels and expressed functional proteins. The initial chemical modification data suggests file receptor sites for TTX/STX are not interchangeable and are not the same site.

  9. Voltage-gated sodium channels and metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Brackenbury, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are macromolecular protein complexes containing a pore-forming α subunit and smaller non-pore-forming β subunits. VGSCs are expressed in metastatic cells from a number of cancers. In these cells, Na+ current carried by α subunits enhances migration, invasion and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, the β subunits mediate cellular adhesion and process extension. The prevailing hypothesis is that VGSCs are upregulated in cancer, in general favoring an invasive/metastatic phenotype, although the mechanisms are still not fully clear. Expression of the Nav1.5 α subunit associates with poor prognosis in clinical breast cancer specimens, suggesting that VGSCs may have utility as prognostic markers for cancer progression. Furthermore, repurposing existing VGSC-blocking therapeutic drugs may provide a new strategy to improve outcomes in patients suffering from metastatic disease, which is the major cause of cancer-related deaths, and for which there is currently no cure. PMID:22992466

  10. Cardiac sodium channel palmitoylation regulates channel availability and myocyte excitability with implications for arrhythmia generation

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zifan; Xiao, Yucheng; Meng, Jingwei; Hudmon, Andy; Cummins, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav1.5) play an essential role in regulating cardiac electric activity by initiating and propagating action potentials in the heart. Altered Nav1.5 function is associated with multiple cardiac diseases including long-QT3 and Brugada syndrome. Here, we show that Nav1.5 is subject to palmitoylation, a reversible post-translational lipid modification. Palmitoylation increases channel availability and late sodium current activity, leading to enhanced cardiac excitability and prolonged action potential duration. In contrast, blocking palmitoylation increases closed-state channel inactivation and reduces myocyte excitability. We identify four cysteines as possible Nav1.5 palmitoylation substrates. A mutation of one of these is associated with cardiac arrhythmia (C981F), induces a significant enhancement of channel closed-state inactivation and ablates sensitivity to depalmitoylation. Our data indicate that alterations in palmitoylation can substantially control Nav1.5 function and cardiac excitability and this form of post-translational modification is likely an important contributor to acquired and congenital arrhythmias. PMID:27337590

  11. Multiple sodium channels and their roles in electrogenesis within dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Anthony M; Cummins, Theodore R; Waxman, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion neurons express an array of sodium channel isoforms allowing precise control of excitability. An increasing body of literature indicates that regulation of firing behaviour in these cells is linked to their patterns of expression of specific sodium channel isoforms, which have been discovered to possess distinct biophysical characteristics. The pattern of expression of sodium channels differs in different subclasses of DRG neurons and is not fixed but, on the contrary, changes in response to a variety of disease insults. Moreover, modulation of channels by their environment has been found to play an important role in the response of these neurons to stimuli. In this review we illustrate how excitability can be finely tuned to provide contrasting firing templates in different subclasses of DRG neurons by selective deployment of various sodium channel isoforms, by plasticity of expression of these proteins, and by interactions of these sodium channel isoforms with each other and with other modulatory molecules. PMID:17158175

  12. Shellfish Toxins Targeting Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management. PMID:24287955

  13. The sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) associate.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Abinash C; Wynne, Brandi M; Yu, Ling; Tomilin, Viktor; Yue, Qiang; Zhou, Yiqun; Al-Khalili, Otor; Mallick, Rickta; Cai, Hui; Alli, Abdel A; Ko, Benjamin; Mattheyses, Alexa; Bao, Hui-Fang; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Theilig, Franziska; Eaton, Douglas C; Hoover, Robert S

    2016-10-01

    The thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) are two of the most important determinants of salt balance and thus systemic blood pressure. Abnormalities in either result in profound changes in blood pressure. There is one segment of the nephron where these two sodium transporters are coexpressed, the second part of the distal convoluted tubule. This is a key part of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron, the final regulator of salt handling in the kidney. Aldosterone is the key hormonal regulator for both of these proteins. Despite these shared regulators and coexpression in a key nephron segment, associations between these proteins have not been investigated. After confirming apical localization of these proteins, we demonstrated the presence of functional transport proteins and native association by blue native PAGE. Extensive coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated a consistent interaction of NCC with α- and γ-ENaC. Mammalian two-hybrid studies demonstrated direct binding of NCC to ENaC subunits. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and immunogold EM studies confirmed that these transport proteins are within appropriate proximity for direct binding. Additionally, we demonstrate that there are functional consequences of this interaction, with inhibition of NCC affecting the function of ENaC. This novel finding of an association between ENaC and NCC could alter our understanding of salt transport in the distal tubule.

  14. Brefeldin A inhibition of apical Na+ channels in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R S; Grillo, F G; Sariban-Sohraby, S

    1996-01-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA) is used to probe trafficking of proteins through the central vacuolar system (CVS) in a variety of cells. Transepithelial Na+ transport by high-resistance epithelia, such as A6 cultured cells, is inhibited by BFA. Apical Na+ channels, as well as basolateral pumps and K+ channels, are complex proteins that probably traverse the CVS for routing to the plasma membrane. BFA (5 micrograms/ml) decreases transepithelial Na+ current near zero and increases resistance reversibly after 4 h. Longer exposures are toxic. When tissues were treated for 20 h with 0.2 microgram/ml BFA, Na+ transport also was reversibly inhibited. Using noise analysis, we found that BFA drastically reduced apical Na+ channel density. The increase in single channel current was consistent with cell hyperpolarization. After apical permeabilization with nystatin, changes in transepithelial current reflect changes in basolateral membrane transport. Transport at this membrane was inhibited by ouabain and cycloheximide, but not by BFA. After BFA, aldosterone was ineffective, suggesting that an intact CVS is required for stimulation by this hormone. Thus BFA inhibition of Na+ transport is localized at the apical membrane. Implications for channel turnover as a mechanism for regulating the Na+ transport rate are discussed.

  15. Functional coupling between sodium-activated potassium channels and voltage-dependent persistent sodium currents in cricket Kenyon cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the functional coupling between Na+-activated potassium (KNa) channels and Na+ influx through voltage-dependent Na+ channels in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Single-channel activity of KNa channels was recorded with the cell-attached patch configuration. The open probability (Po) of KNa channels increased with increasing Na+ concentration in a bath solution, whereas it decreased by the substitution of Na+ with an equimolar concentration of Li+. The Po of KNa channels was also found to be reduced by bath application of a high concentration of TTX (1 μM) and riluzole (100 μM), which inhibits both fast (INaf) and persistent (INaP) Na+ currents, whereas it was unaffected by a low concentration of TTX (10 nM), which selectively blocks INaf. Bath application of Cd2+ at a low concentration (50 μM), as an inhibitor of INaP, also decreased the Po of KNa channels. Conversely, bath application of the inorganic Ca2+-channel blockers Co2+ and Ni2+ at high concentrations (500 μM) had little effect on the Po of KNa channels, although Cd2+ (500 μM) reduced the Po of KNa channels. Perforated whole cell clamp analysis further indicated the presence of sustained outward currents for which amplitude was dependent on the amount of Na+ influx. Taken together, these results indicate that KNa channels could be activated by Na+ influx passing through voltage-dependent persistent Na+ channels. The functional significance of this coupling mechanism was discussed in relation to the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells and its possible role in the formation of long-term memory. PMID:26269549

  16. Structural Basis for Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Sodium and Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Teresa M.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate action potentials in nerve, muscle, and other electrically excitable cells. Voltage-gated calcium channels are activated by depolarization during action potentials, and calcium influx through them is the key second messenger of electrical signaling, initiating secretion, contraction, neurotransmission, gene transcription, and many other intracellular processes. Drugs that block sodium channels are used in local anesthesia and the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar disorder, chronic pain, and cardiac arrhythmia. Drugs that block calcium channels are used in the treatment of epilepsy, chronic pain, and cardiovascular disorders, including hypertension, angina pectoris, and cardiac arrhythmia. The principal pore-forming subunits of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are structurally related and likely to have evolved from ancestral voltage-gated sodium channels that are widely expressed in prokaryotes. Determination of the structure of a bacterial ancestor of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels at high resolution now provides a three-dimensional view of the binding sites for drugs acting on sodium and calcium channels. In this minireview, we outline the different classes of sodium and calcium channel drugs, review studies that have identified amino acid residues that are required for their binding and therapeutic actions, and illustrate how the analogs of those key amino acid residues may form drug-binding sites in three-dimensional models derived from bacterial channels. PMID:25848093

  17. Investigation of sodium distribution in phosphate glasses using spin-echo {sup 23}Na NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.; Click, C.C.; Conzone, S.; Brow, R.K.; Boyle, T.J.; Zwanziger, J.W.

    2000-02-24

    The spatial arrangements of sodium cations for a series of sodium phosphate glasses, xNa{sub 2}O{sm{underscore}bullet}(100{minus}x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (x {le} 55), were investigated using {sup 23}Na spin-echo NMR spectroscopy. The spin-echo decay rate is a function of the Na-Na homonuclear dipolar coupling, and is related to the spatial proximity of neighboring Na nuclei. The spin-echo decay rate in these sodium phosphate glasses increases nonlinearly with higher sodium number density, and thus provides a measure of the Na-Na extended range order. The results of these {sup 23}Na NMR experiments are discussed within the context of several structural models, including a decimated crystal lattice model, cubic dilation lattice model, a hard sphere (HS) random distribution model, and a pairwise cluster hard sphere model. While the experimental {sup 23}Na spin-echo M{sub 2} are described adequately by both the decimated lattice and the random HS models, it is demonstrated that the slight nonlinear behavior of M{sub 2} as a function of sodium number density is more correctly described by the random distribution in the HS model. At low sodium number densities the experimental M{sub 2} is inconsistent with models incorporating Na-Na clustering. The ability to distinguish between Na-Na clusters and nonclustered distributions becomes more difficult at higher sodium concentrations.

  18. Investigation of Sodium Distribution in Phosphate Glasses Using Spin-Echo {sup 23}Na NMR

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM, TODD M.; BOYLE, TIMOTHY J.; BROW, RICHARD K.; CLICK, CAROL C.; CONZONE, SAM; McLAUGHLIN, JAY; ZWANZIGER, JOE

    1999-09-16

    The spatial arrangement of sodium cations for a series of sodium phosphate glasses, xNa{sub 2}O(100-x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (x<55), were investigated using {sup 23}Na spin-echo NMR spectroscopy. The spin-echo decay rate is a function of the Na-Na homonuclear dipolar coupling and is related to the spatial proximity of neighboring Na nuclei. The spin-echo decay rate in these sodium phosphate glasses increases non-linearly with higher sodium number density, and thus provides a measure of the Na-Na extended range order. The results of these {sup 23}Na NMR experiments are discussed within the context of several structural models, including a decimated crystal lattice model, cubic dilation lattice model, a hard sphere (HS) random distribution model and a pair-wise cluster hard sphere model. While the experimental {sup 23}Na spin-echo M{sub 2} are described adequately by both the decimated lattice and the random HS model, it is demonstrated that the slight non-linear behavior of M{sub 2} as a function of sodium number density is more correctly described by the random distribution in the HS model. At low sodium number densities the experimental M{sub 2} is inconsistent with models incorporating Na-Na clustering. The ability to distinguish between Na-Na clusters and non-clustered distributions becomes more difficult at higher sodium concentrations.

  19. Blood pressure and amiloride-sensitive sodium channels in vascular and renal cells.

    PubMed

    Warnock, David G; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Tarjus, Antoine; Sheng, Shaohu; Oberleithner, Hans; Kleyman, Thomas R; Jaisser, Frederic

    2014-03-01

    Sodium transport in the distal nephron is mediated by epithelial sodium channel activity. Proteolytic processing of external domains and inhibition with increased sodium concentrations are important regulatory features of epithelial sodium channel complexes expressed in the distal nephron. By contrast, sodium channels expressed in the vascular system are activated by increased external sodium concentrations, which results in changes in the mechanical properties and function of endothelial cells. Mechanosensitivity and shear stress affect both epithelial and vascular sodium channel activity. Guyton's hypothesis stated that blood pressure control is critically dependent on vascular tone and fluid handling by the kidney. The synergistic effects, and complementary regulation, of the epithelial and vascular systems are consistent with the Guytonian model of volume and blood pressure regulation, and probably reflect sequential evolution of the two systems. The integration of vascular tone, renal perfusion and regulation of renal sodium reabsorption is the central underpinning of the Guytonian model. In this Review, we focus on the expression and regulation of sodium channels, and we outline the emerging evidence that describes the central role of amiloride-sensitive sodium channels in the efferent (vascular) and afferent (epithelial) arms of this homeostatic system.

  20. Involvement of voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.8 in the regulation of the release and synthesis of substance P in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Tang, He-Bin; Shiba, Eri; Li, Yu-Sang; Morioka, Norimitsu; Zheng, Tai-Xing; Ogata, Nobukuni; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2008-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether Na(v)1.8 contributes to the release and/or synthesis of substance P (SP) in adult mice dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The SP released from cultured DRG neurons of Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice exposed to either capsaicin or KCl was significantly lower than that from wild-type (C57BL/6) mice based on a radioimmunoassay. The SP level of L6 DRG in Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice was also lower than that in wild-type mice. After chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, the level of SP decreased in the L6 ipsilateral DRG of wild-type but not Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice. The preprotachykinin-A (PPT-A) mRNAs in L4 - 6 DRGs of Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice also fell to half their normally abundant levels of expression. There were significant increases in Na(v)1.8 expression of the L6 contralateral DRG from wild-type mice and in the percentage of neurons expressing neurokinin-1 receptor in the cytosol of L6 DRGs from wild-type or Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice. These findings suggest that Na(v)1.8 is involved in the regulation of the release and synthesis of SP in the DRG neurons of wild-type mice. PMID:18845912

  1. Mechanisms of disease: sodium channels and neuroprotection in multiple sclerosis-current status.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Stephen G

    2008-03-01

    Sodium channels can provide a route for a persistent influx of sodium ions into neurons. Over the past decade, it has emerged that sustained sodium influx can, in turn, trigger calcium ion influx, which produces axonal injury in neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The development of sodium channel blockers as potential neuroprotectants in MS has proceeded rapidly, and two clinical trials are currently ongoing. The route from the laboratory to the clinic includes some complex turns, however, and a third trial was recently put on hold because of new data that suggested that sodium channel blockers might have multiple, complex actions. This article reviews the development of the concept of sodium channel blockers as neuroprotectants in MS, the path from laboratory to clinic, and the current status of research in this area.

  2. Serine protease activation of near-silent epithelial Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Ray A; Boucher, Richard C; Stutts, M Jackson

    2004-01-01

    The regulation of epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) function is critical for normal salt and water balance. This regulation is achieved through cell surface insertion/retrieval of channels, by changes in channel open probability (Po), or through a combination of these processes. Epithelium-derived serine proteases, including channel activating protease (CAP) and prostasin, regulate epithelial Na+ transport, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that extracellular serine proteases activate a near-silent ENaC population resident in the plasma membrane. Single-channel events were recorded in outside-out patches from fibroblasts (NIH/3T3) stably expressing rat alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subunits (rENaC), before and during exposure to trypsin, a serine protease homologous to CAP and prostasin. Under baseline conditions, near-silent patches were defined as having rENaC activity (NPo) < 0.03, where N is the number of channels. Within 1-5 min of 3 microg/ml bath trypsin superfusion, NPo increased approximately 66-fold (n = 7). In patches observed to contain a single functional channel, trypsin increased Po from 0.02 +/- 0.01 to 0.57 +/- 0.03 (n = 3, mean +/- SE), resulting from the combination of an increased channel open time and decreased channel closed time. Catalytic activity was required for activation of near-silent ENaC. Channel conductance and the Na+/Li+ current ratio with trypsin were similar to control values. Modulation of ENaC Po by endogenous epithelial serine proteases is a potentially important regulator of epithelial Na+ transport, distinct from the regulation achieved by hormone-induced plasma membrane insertion of channels. PMID:12967915

  3. Identification of PN1, a Predominant Voltage-Dependent Sodium Channel Expressed Principally in Peripheral Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Aral, Juan J.; Moss, Brenda L.; He, Zhi-Jun; Koszowski, Adam G.; Whisenand, Teri; Levinson, Simon R.; Wolf, John J.; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Halegoua, Simon; Mandel, Gail

    1997-02-01

    Membrane excitability in different tissues is due, in large part, to the selective expression of distinct genes encoding the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Although the predominant sodium channels in brain, skeletal muscle, and cardiac muscle have been identified, the major sodium channel types responsible for excitability within the peripheral nervous system have remained elusive. We now describe the deduced primary structure of a sodium channel, peripheral nerve type 1 (PN1), which is expressed at high levels throughout the peripheral nervous system and is targeted to nerve terminals of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Studies using cultured PC12 cells indicate that both expression and targeting of PN1 is induced by treatment of the cells with nerve growth factor. The preferential localization suggests that the PN1 sodium channel plays a specific role in nerve excitability.

  4. Multimodal action of single Na+ channels in myocardial mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Böhle, T; Benndorf, K

    1995-01-01

    Unitary Na+ currents of myocardial mouse cells were studied at room temperature in 10 cell-attached patches, each containing one and only one channel. Small-pore patch pipettes (resistance 10-97 M omega when filled with 200% Tyrode's solution) with exceptionally thick walls were used. Observed were both rapidly inactivating (6 patches) and slowly inactivating (3 patches) Na+ currents. In one patch, a slow transition from rather fast to slow inactivation was detected over a time of 0.5 h. A short and a long component of the open-channel life time were recorded at the beginning, but only a short one at the end of the experiment. Concomitantly, the first latency was slowed. Amplitude histograms showed that the electrochemical driving force across the pore of the channel did not change during this time. In three patches, a fast and repetitive switching between different modes of Na+ channel action could be clearly identified by plotting the long-time course of the averaged current per trace. The ensemble-averaged current formed in each mode was different in kinetics and amplitude. Each mode had a characteristic mean open-channel life time and distribution of first latency, but the predominant single-channel current amplitude was unaffected by mode switches. It is concluded that two types of changes in kinetics may happen in a single Na+ channel: fast and reversible switches between different modes, and a slow loss of inactivation.

  5. Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Activity Promotes Cysteine Cathepsin-dependent Invasiveness and Colony Growth of Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Ludovic; Roger, Sébastien; Besson, Pierre; Lecaille, Fabien; Gore, Jacques; Bougnoux, Philippe; Lalmanach, Gilles; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2009-03-27

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)) are functionally expressed in highly metastatic cancer cells derived from nonexcitable epithelial tissues (breast, prostate, lung, and cervix). MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells express functional sodium channel complexes, consisting of Na(V)1.5 and associated auxiliary beta-subunits, that are responsible for a sustained inward sodium current at the membrane potential. Although these channels do not regulate cellular multiplication or migration, their inhibition by the specific blocker tetrodotoxin impairs both the extracellular gelatinolytic activity (monitored with DQ-gelatin) and cell invasiveness leading to the attenuation of colony growth and cell spreading in three-dimensional Matrigel-composed matrices. MDA-MB-231 cells express functional cysteine cathepsins, which we found play a predominant role ( approximately 65%) in cancer invasiveness. Matrigel invasion is significantly decreased in the presence of specific inhibitors of cathepsins B and S (CA-074 and Z-FL-COCHO, respectively), and co-application of tetrodotoxin does not further reduce cell invasion. This suggests that cathepsins B and S are involved in invasiveness and that their proteolytic activity partly depends on Na(V) function. Inhibiting Na(V) has no consequence for cathepsins at the transcription, translation, and secretion levels. However, Na(V) activity leads to an intracellular alkalinization and a perimembrane acidification favorable for the extracellular activity of these acidic proteases. We propose that Na(v) enhance the invasiveness of cancer cells by favoring the pH-dependent activity of cysteine cathepsins. This general mechanism could lead to the identification of new targets allowing the therapeutic prevention of metastases. PMID:19176528

  6. Na(+) -Activated K(+) Channels in Rat Supraoptic Neurones.

    PubMed

    Bansal, V; Fisher, T E

    2016-06-01

    The magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) of the hypothalamus secrete the neurohormones vasopressin and oxytocin. The systemic release of these hormones depends on the rate and pattern of MNC firing and it is therefore important to identify the ion channels that contribute to the electrical behaviour of MNCs. In the present study, we report evidence for the presence of Na(+) -activated K(+) (KN a ) channels in rat MNCs. KN a channels mediate outwardly rectifying K(+) currents activated by the increases in intracellular Na(+) that occur during electrical activity. Although the molecular identity of native KN a channels is unclear, their biophysical properties are consistent with those of expressed Slick (slo 2.1) and Slack (slo 2.2) proteins. Using immunocytochemistry and Western blot experiments, we found that both Slick and Slack proteins are expressed in rat MNCs. Using whole cell voltage clamp techniques on acutely isolated rat MNCs, we found that inhibiting Na(+) influx by the addition of the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin or the replacement of Na(+) in the external solution with Li(+) caused a significant decrease in sustained outward currents. Furthermore, the evoked outward current density was significantly higher in rat MNCs using patch pipettes containing 60 mm Na(+) than it was when patch pipettes containing 0 mm Na(+) were used. Our data show that functional KN a channels are expressed in rat MNCs. These channels could contribute to the activity-dependent afterhyperpolarisations that have been identified in the MNCs and thereby play a role in the regulation of their electrical behaviour. PMID:27091544

  7. Na+ Inhibits the Epithelial Na+ Channel by Binding to a Site in an Extracellular Acidic Cleft*

    PubMed Central

    Kashlan, Ossama B.; Blobner, Brandon M.; Zuzek, Zachary; Tolino, Michael; Kleyman, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) has a key role in the regulation of extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. ENaC belongs to a family of ion channels that sense the external environment. These channels have large extracellular regions that are thought to interact with environmental cues, such as Na+, Cl−, protons, proteases, and shear stress, which modulate gating behavior. We sought to determine the molecular mechanism by which ENaC senses high external Na+ concentrations, resulting in an inhibition of channel activity. Both our structural model of an ENaC α subunit and the resolved structure of an acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC1) have conserved acidic pockets in the periphery of the extracellular region of the channel. We hypothesized that these acidic pockets host inhibitory allosteric Na+ binding sites. Through site-directed mutagenesis targeting the acidic pocket, we modified the inhibitory response to external Na+. Mutations at selected sites altered the cation inhibitory preference to favor Li+ or K+ rather than Na+. Channel activity was reduced in response to restraining movement within this region by cross-linking structures across the acidic pocket. Our results suggest that residues within the acidic pocket form an allosteric effector binding site for Na+. Our study supports the hypothesis that an acidic cleft is a key ligand binding locus for ENaC and perhaps other members of the ENaC/degenerin family. PMID:25389295

  8. Na+ inhibits the epithelial Na+ channel by binding to a site in an extracellular acidic cleft.

    PubMed

    Kashlan, Ossama B; Blobner, Brandon M; Zuzek, Zachary; Tolino, Michael; Kleyman, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) has a key role in the regulation of extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. ENaC belongs to a family of ion channels that sense the external environment. These channels have large extracellular regions that are thought to interact with environmental cues, such as Na(+), Cl(-), protons, proteases, and shear stress, which modulate gating behavior. We sought to determine the molecular mechanism by which ENaC senses high external Na(+) concentrations, resulting in an inhibition of channel activity. Both our structural model of an ENaC α subunit and the resolved structure of an acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC1) have conserved acidic pockets in the periphery of the extracellular region of the channel. We hypothesized that these acidic pockets host inhibitory allosteric Na(+) binding sites. Through site-directed mutagenesis targeting the acidic pocket, we modified the inhibitory response to external Na(+). Mutations at selected sites altered the cation inhibitory preference to favor Li(+) or K(+) rather than Na(+). Channel activity was reduced in response to restraining movement within this region by cross-linking structures across the acidic pocket. Our results suggest that residues within the acidic pocket form an allosteric effector binding site for Na(+). Our study supports the hypothesis that an acidic cleft is a key ligand binding locus for ENaC and perhaps other members of the ENaC/degenerin family. PMID:25389295

  9. Use dependence of tetrodotoxin block of sodium channels: a revival of the trapped-ion mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, F; Gheri, A; Pusch, M; Moran, O

    1996-01-01

    The use-dependent block of sodium channels by tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been studied in cRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes expressing the alpha-subunit of rat brain IIA channels. The kinetics of stimulus-induced extra block are consistent with an underlying relaxation process involving only three states. Cumulative extra block induced by repetitive stimulations increases with hyperpolarization, with TTX concentration, and with extracellular Ca2+ concentration. We have developed a theoretical model based on the suggestion by Salgado et al. that TTX blocks the extracellular mouth of the ion pore less tightly when the latter has its external side occupied by a cation, and that channel opening favors a tighter binding by allowing the escape of the trapped ion. The model provides an excellent fit of the data, which are consistent with Ca2+ being more efficient than Na+ in weakening TTX binding and with bound Ca2+ stabilizing the closed state of the channel, as suggested by Armstrong and Cota. Reports arguing against the trapped-ion mechanism are critically discussed. PMID:8874004

  10. Voltage-dependent blockade by bupivacaine of cardiac sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Ji, Hui; Liu, Zhirui; Ji, Yonghua; You, Xinmin; Ding, Gang; Cheng, Zhijun

    2014-08-01

    Bupivacaine ranks as the most potent and efficient drug among class I local anesthetics, but its high potential for toxic reactions severely limits its clinical use. Although bupivacaine-induced toxicity is mainly caused by substantial blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), how these hydrophobic molecules interact with the receptor sites to which they bind remains unclear. Nav1.5 is the dominant isoform of VGSCs expressed in cardiac myocytes, and its dysfunction may be the cause of bupivacaine-triggered arrhythmia. Here, we investigated the effect of bupivacaine on Nav1.5 within the clinical concentration range. The electrophysiological measurements on Nav1.5 expressed in Xenopus oocytes showed that bupivacaine induced a voltage- and concentration-dependent blockade on the peak of I Na and the half-maximal inhibitory dose was 4.51 μmol/L. Consistent with other local anesthetics, bupivacaine also induced a use-dependent blockade on Nav1.5 currents. The underlying mechanisms of this blockade may contribute to the fact that bupivacaine not only dose-dependently affected the gating kinetics of Nav1.5 but also accelerated the development of its open-state slow inactivation. These results extend our knowledge of the action of bupivacaine on cardiac sodium channels, and therefore contribute to the safer and more efficient clinical use of bupivacaine.

  11. State-dependent block of rat Nav1.4 sodium channels expressed in xenopus oocytes by pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher; Soderlund, David M

    2005-06-01

    Insecticidal pyrazolines inhibit voltage-sensitive sodium channels of both insect and mammalian neurons in a voltage-dependent manner. Studies on the effects of pyrazoline insecticides on mammalian sodium channels have been limited to experimentation on the tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channel populations of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. In this study, we examined the effects of the insecticidal pyrazolines indoxacarb, the N-decarbomethoxyllated metabolite of indoxacarb (DCJW), and RH 3421 on rat Na(v)1.4 sodium channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Both DCJW and RH 3421 were ineffective inhibitors of rat Na(v)1.4 sodium channels at a membrane potential of -120 mV, but depolarization to -60 mV or -30 mV during insecticide exposure resulted in substantial block. Inhibition by pyrazoline insecticides was nearly irreversible with washout, but repolarization of the membrane relieved block. DCJW and RH 3421 also caused hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage dependence of slow inactivation without affecting the voltage dependence of activation or fast inactivation. These results suggest that DCJW and RH 3421 interact specifically with the slow inactivated state of the sodium channel. Indoxacarb did not cause block at any potential, yet it interfered with the ability of DCJW, but not RH 3421, to inhibit sodium current. Phenytoin, an anticonvulsant, reduced the efficacy of both DCJW and RH 3421. These data imply that the binding site for pyrazoline insecticides overlaps with that for therapeutic sodium channel blockers.

  12. Sodium channels, the electrogenisome and the electrogenistat: lessons and questions from the clinic.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-06-01

    In the six decades that have followed the work of Hodgkin and Huxley, multiple generations of neuroscientists and biophysicists have built upon their pivotal contributions. It is now clear that, in mammals, nine genes encode nine distinct voltage-gated sodium channels with different amino acid sequences and different physiological and pharmacological properties. The different sodium channel isoforms produce a multiplicity of distinct sodium currents with different time-dependent characteristics and voltage dependencies, which interact with each other and with the currents produced by other channels (including calcium and potassium channels) to shape neuronal firing patterns. Expression of these sodium channel isoforms is highly dynamic, both in the normal nervous system, and in the injured nervous system. Recent research has shed light on the roles of sodium channels in human disease, a development that may open up new therapeutic strategies. This article examines the pain-signalling system as an example of a neuronal network where multiple sodium channel isoforms play complementary roles in electrogenesis and a strong link with human disease has been established. Recent research suggests that it may be possible to target specific sodium channel isoforms that drive hyperexcitability in pain-signalling neurons, thereby providing new therapeutic strategies for chronic pain, and providing an illustration of the impact of the Hodgkin-Huxley legacy in the clinical domain.

  13. Action of the pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin on rat brain IIa sodium channels expressed in xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Soderlund, D M

    1998-12-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to a unique site on voltage-dependent sodium channels and prolong sodium currents, leading to repetitive bursts of action potentials or use-dependent nerve block. To further characterize the site and mode of action of pyrethroids on sodium channels, we injected synthetic mRNA encoding the rat brain IIa sodium channel alpha subunit, either alone or in combination with synthetic mRNA encoding the rat sodium channel beta1 subunit, into oocytes of the frog Xenopus laevis and assessed the actions of the pyrethroid insecticide [1R,cis,alphaS]-cypermethrin on expressed sodium currents by two-electrode voltage clamp. In oocytes expressing only the rat brain IIa alpha subunit, cypermethrin produced a slowly-decaying sodium tail current following a depolarizing pulse. In parallel experiments using oocytes expressing the rat brain IIa alpha subunit in combination with the rat beta1 subunit, cypermethrin produced qualitatively similar tail currents following a depolarizing pulse and also induced a sustained component of the sodium current measured during a step depolarization of the oocyte membrane. The voltage dependence of activation and steady-state inactivation of the cypermethrin-dependent sustained current were identical to those of the peak transient sodium current measured in the absence of cypermethrin. Concentration-response curves obtained using normalized tail current amplitude as an index of the extent of sodium channel modification by cypermethrin revealed that coexpression of the rat brain IIa alpha subunit with the rat beta1 subunit increased the apparent affinity of the sodium channel binding site for cypermethrin by more than 20-fold. These results confirm that the pyrethroid binding site is intrinsic to the sodium channel alpha subunit and demonstrate that coexpression of the rat brain IIa alpha subunit with the rat beta1 subunit alters the apparent affinity of this site for pyrethroids.

  14. Sodium channel kinetic changes that produce Brugada syndrome or progressive cardiac conduction system disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhu-Shan; Tranquillo, Joseph; Neplioueva, Valentina; Bursac, Nenad; Grant, Augustus O

    2007-01-01

    Some mutations of the sodium channel gene Na(V1.5) are multifunctional, causing combinations of LQTS, Brugada syndrome and progressive cardiac conduction system disease (PCCD). The combination of Brugada syndrome and PCCD is uncommon, although they both result from a reduction in the sodium current. We hypothesize that slow conduction is sufficient to cause S-T segment elevation and undertook a combined experimental and theoretical study to determine whether conduction slowing alone can produce the Brugada phenotype. Deletion of lysine 1479 in one of two positively charged clusters in the III/IV inter-domain linker causes both syndromes. We have examined the functional effects of this mutation using heterologous expression of the wild-type and mutant sodium channel in HEK-293-EBNA cells. We show that DeltaK1479 shifts the potential of half-activation, V(1/2m), to more positive potentials (V(1/2m) = -36.8 +/- 0.8 and -24.5 +/- 1.3 mV for the wild-type and DeltaK1479 mutant respectively, n = 11, 10). The depolarizing shift increases the extent of depolarization required for activation. The potential of half-inactivation, V(1/2h), is also shifted to more positive potentials (V(1/2h) = -85 +/- 1.1 and -79.4 +/- 1.2 mV for wild-type and DeltaK1479 mutant respectively), increasing the fraction of channels available for activation. These shifts are quantitatively the same as a mutation that produces PCCD only, G514C. We incorporated experimentally derived parameters into a model of the cardiac action potential and its propagation in a one dimensional cable (simulating endo-, mid-myocardial and epicardial regions). The simulations show that action potential and ECG changes consistent with Brugada syndrome may result from conduction slowing alone; marked repolarization heterogeneity is not required. The findings also suggest how Brugada syndrome and PCCD which both result from loss of sodium channel function are sometimes present alone and at other times in combination

  15. Differential role of GDNF and NGF in the maintenance of two TTX-resistant sodium channels in adult DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Fjell, J; Cummins, T R; Dib-Hajj, S D; Fried, K; Black, J A; Waxman, S G

    1999-04-20

    Following sciatic nerve transection, the electrophysiological properties of small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are markedly altered, with attenuation of TTX-R sodium currents and the appearance of rapidly repriming TTX-S currents. The reduction in TTX-R currents has been attributed to a down-regulation of sodium channels SNS/PN3 and NaN. While infusion of exogenous NGF to the transected nerve restores SNS/PN3 transcripts to near-normal levels in small DRG neurons, TTX-R sodium currents are only partially rescued. Binding of the isolectin IB4 distinguishes two subpopulations of small DRG neurons: IB4+ neurons, which express receptors for the GDNF family of neurotrophins, and IB4- neurons that predominantly express TrkA. We show here that SNS/PN3 is expressed in approximately one-half of both IB4+ and IB4- DRG neurons, while NaN is preferentially expressed in IB4+ neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies demonstrate that TTX-R sodium currents in IB4+ neurons have a more hyperpolarized voltage-dependence of activation and inactivation than do IB4- neurons, suggesting different electrophysiological properties for SNS/PN3 and NaN. We confirm that NGF restores SNS/PN3 mRNA levels in DRG neurons in vitro and demonstrate that the trk antagonist K252a blocks this rescue. The down-regulation of NaN mRNA is, nevertheless, not rescued by NGF-treatment in either IB4+ or IB4- neurons and NGF-treatment in vitro does not significantly increase the peak amplitude of the TTX-R current in small DRG neurons. In contrast, GDNF-treatment causes a twofold increase in the peak amplitude of TTX-R sodium currents and restores both SNS/PN3 and NaN mRNA to near-normal levels in IB4+ neurons. These observations provide a mechanism for the partial restoration of TTX-R sodium currents by NGF in axotomized DRG neurons, and demonstrate that the neurotrophins NGF and GDNF differentially regulate sodium channels SNS/PN3 and NaN. PMID:10216225

  16. A double-tuned (1)H/(23)Na dual resonator system for tissue sodium concentration measurements in the rat brain via Na-MRI.

    PubMed

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Tabbert, Martin; Junge, Sven; Gallagher, Lindsay; Macrae, I Mhairi; Fagan, Andrew J

    2010-12-21

    A method for quantifying the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the rat brain from ²³Na-MR images was developed. TSC is known to change in a variety of common human diseases and holds considerable potential to contribute to their study; however, its accurate measurement in small laboratory animals has been hindered by the extremely low signal to noise ratio (SNR) in ²³Na images. To address this, the design, construction and characterization of a double-tuned ¹H/²³Na dual resonator system for ¹H-guided quantitative ²³Na-MRI are described. This system comprises an SNR-optimized surface detector coil for ²³Na image acquisition, and a volume resonator producing a highly homogeneous B₁ field (<5% inhomogeneity) for the Na channel across the rat head. The resonators incorporated channel-independent balanced matching and tuning capabilities with active decoupling circuitry at the ²³Na resonance frequency. A quantification accuracy of TSC of <10 mM was achieved in Na-images with 1.2 µl voxel resolution acquired in 10 min. The potential of the quantification technique was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment of a rat model of cerebral stroke, where the evolution of the TSC was successfully monitored for 8 h after the stroke was induced. PMID:21113090

  17. Effects of the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) on cellular ion homeostasis in rat brain subjected to complete ischemia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y; Dengler, K; Zacharias, E; Wilffert, B; Tegtmeier, F

    1994-08-01

    Anoxic depolarization (AD) and failure of the cellular ion homeostasis are suggested to play a key role in ischemia-induced neuronal death. Recent studies show that the blockade of Na+ influx significantly improved the neuronal outcome. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 10 microM tetrodotoxin (TTX) on ischemia-induced disturbances of ion homeostasis in the isolated perfused rat brain. TTX inhibited the spontaneous EEG activity, delayed the ischemia-induced tissue acidification, and significantly postponed the occurrence of AD by 65%. The [Ca2+]e elevation prior to AD was attenuated from 17.8% to 6% while the increase of the [Na+]e in this period was enhanced (from 2.9% to 7.3%). These findings implied that the ischemia-induced early cellular sodium load and the corresponding shrinkage of the extracellular space was counteracted by TTX. Our results suggest that the Na+ influx via voltage-dependent channels preceding complete breakdown of ion homeostasis is one major factor leading to cell depolarization. The massive Na+ influx coinciding with AD, however, may be mainly via non-selective cation channels or/and receptor-operated channels. Persistent Na+ influx deteriorates neuronal tissue integrity by favouring Ca2+ influx and edema formation. Blockade of ischemia-induced excessive Na+ influx is, therefore, a promising pharmacological approach for stroke treatment. PMID:7953733

  18. 980-nm infrared laser modulation of sodium channel kinetics in a neuron cell linearly mediated by photothermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinyu; Liu, Jia; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Changsen

    2014-10-01

    Photothermal effect (PE) plays a major role in the near-infrared laser interaction with biological tissue. But, quite few interactions can be quantitatively depicted. Here, a two-step model is proposed to describe a 980-nm infrared laser interaction with neuron cell in vitro. First, the laser-induced temperature rises in the cell surrounding area were measured by using an open pipette method and also calculated by solving the heat conduction equation. Second, we recorded the modifications on sodium (Na) channel current in neuron cells directly by using a patch clamp to synchronize the 980-nm laser irradiation and obtained how the electrophysiological function of neuron cells respond to the temperature rise. Then, the activation time constants, τm, were extracted by fitting the sodium currents with the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The infrared laser modulation effect on sodium currents kinetics was examined by taking a ratio between the time constants with and without the laser irradiations. The analysis revealed that the averaged ratio at a specific laser exposure could be well related to the temperature properties of the Na channel protein. These results proved that the modulation of sodium current kinetics of a neuron cell in vitro by 980-nm laser with different-irradiation levels was linearly mediated corresponding to the laser-induced PE.

  19. Determination of Na(2)O from sodium aluminate NaAlO(2).

    PubMed

    Näykki, T; Raimo, A; Paavo, P; Antero, K; Päivi, N

    2000-07-31

    The aim of the work was to find a suitable method and conditions for determining Na(2)O wt.% from NaAlO(2). Problems were encountered while titrating NaAlO(2) with hydrochloric acid. The problematic area was the pH range 4-10 where aluminum precipitates as hydroxides. The different species of the aluminate solution were determined using potentiometric and complexometric titrations. The equivalent point of the potentiometric titration was detected using Gran's plotting method. Precipitation of aluminum hydroxides did not interfere with titrations, because in potentiometric titrations the pH value was over 10 and in complexometric titrations the pH was 4. The results were accurate and determinations were easy to carry out. Sodium was also determined by DCP-AES.

  20. Pyrethroid modifications of the activation and inactivation kinetics of the sodium channels in squid giant axons.

    PubMed

    de Weille, J R; Brown, L D; Narahashi, T

    1990-03-26

    The kinetics of sodium channel activation and inactivation were analyzed in the squid giant axons internally treated with various pyrethroids. Pyrethroids increased the steady-state sodium current in squid giant axons by removing the inactivation. The steady-state sodium conductances in control and pyrethroid-treated axons showed the same voltage dependence, indicating that the removal of inactivation by pyrethroids did not lead to an alteration of gating charge transfer. The pyrethroid-modified sodium channels were activated with a biphasic time course involving the movement of at least two gating particles, and both components were voltage-dependent. The slower component was abolished by treatment with either pronase or N-bromoacetamide. The net elementary charges transported in the electric membrane field were reduced in the course of slow activation of the pyrethroid-induced sodium current. It appears that the 'immobilization' of gating charge is related to the slow activation rather than the inactivation of the sodium channel.

  1. Action of insecticidal N-alkylamides at site 2 of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ottea, J.A.; Payne, G.T.; Soderlund, D.M. )

    1990-08-01

    Nine synthetic N-alkylamides were examined as inhibitors of the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)batrachotoxinin A 20{alpha}-benzoate (({sup 3}H)BTX-B) to sodium channels and as activators of sodium uptake in mouse brain synaptoneurosomes. In the presence of scorpion (Leiurus quinquestriatus) venom, the six insecticidal analogues were active as both inhibitors of ({sup 3}H)BTX-B binding and stimulators of sodium uptake. These findings are consistent with an action of these compounds at the alkaloid activator recognition site (site 2) of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel. The three noninsecticidal N-alkylamides also inhibited ({sup 3}H)BTX-B binding but were ineffective as activators of sodium uptake. Concentration-response studies revealed that some of the insecticidal amides also enhanced sodium uptake through a second, high-affinity interaction that does not involve site 2, but this secondary effect does not appear to be correlated with insecticidal activity. The activities of N-alkylamides as sodium channel activators were influenced by the length of the alkenyl chain and the location of unsaturation within the molecule. These results further define the actions of N-alkylamides on sodium channels and illustrate the significance of the multiple binding domains of the sodium channel as target sites for insect control agents.

  2. Discovery of triazolopyridine GS-458967, a late sodium current inhibitor (Late INai) of the cardiac NaV 1.5 channel with improved efficacy and potency relative to ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Koltun, Dmitry O; Parkhill, Eric Q; Elzein, Elfatih; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Notte, Gregory T; Kalla, Rao; Jiang, Robert H; Li, Xiaofen; Perry, Thao D; Avila, Belem; Wang, Wei-Qun; Smith-Maxwell, Catherine; Dhalla, Arvinder K; Rajamani, Sridharan; Stafford, Brian; Tang, Jennifer; Mollova, Nevena; Belardinelli, Luiz; Zablocki, Jeff A

    2016-07-01

    We started with a medium throughput screen of heterocyclic compounds without basic amine groups to avoid hERG and β-blocker activity and identified [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine as an early lead. Optimization of substituents for Late INa current inhibition and lack of Peak INa inhibition led to the discovery of 4h (GS-458967) with improved anti-arrhythmic activity relative to ranolazine. Unfortunately, 4h demonstrated use dependent block across the sodium isoforms including the central and peripheral nervous system isoforms that is consistent with its low therapeutic index (approximately 5-fold in rat, 3-fold in dog). Compound 4h represents our initial foray into a 2nd generation Late INa inhibitor program and is an important proof-of-concept compound. We will provide additional reports on addressing the CNS challenge in a follow-up communication. PMID:27080178

  3. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Evolutionary History and Distinctive Sequence Features.

    PubMed

    Kasimova, M A; Granata, D; Carnevale, V

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are responsible for the rising phase of the action potential. Their role in electrical signal transmission is so relevant that their emergence is believed to be one of the crucial factors enabling development of nervous system. The presence of voltage-gated sodium-selective channels in bacteria (BacNav) has raised questions concerning the evolutionary history of the ones in animals. Here we review some of the milestones in the field of Nav phylogenetic analysis and discuss some of the most important sequence features that distinguish these channels from voltage-gated potassium channels and transient receptor potential channels. PMID:27586287

  4. Sodium Channel Inhibitors Reduce DMPK mRNA and Protein.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, Luke; O'Reilly, Sean; Hadwen, Jeremiah; Tasnim, Nafisa; MacKenzie, Alex; Farooq, Faraz

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an expanded trinucleotide (CTG)n tract in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. This results in the aggregation of an expanded mRNA forming toxic intranuclear foci which sequester splicing factors. We believe down-regulation of DMPK mRNA represents a potential, and as yet unexplored, DM1 therapeutic avenue. Consequently, a computational screen for agents which down-regulate DMPK mRNA was undertaken, unexpectedly identifying the sodium channel blockers mexiletine, prilocaine, procainamide, and sparteine as effective suppressors of DMPK mRNA. Analysis of DMPK mRNA in C2C12 myoblasts following treatment with these agents revealed a reduction in the mRNA levels. In vivo analysis of CD1 mice also showed DMPK mRNA and protein down-regulation. The role of DMPK mRNA suppression in the documented efficacy of this class of compounds in DM1 is worthy of further investigation. PMID:26011798

  5. The A-kinase anchoring protein 15 regulates feedback inhibition of the epithelial Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Bengrine, Abderrahmane; Li, Jinqing; Awayda, Mouhamed S

    2007-04-01

    Protein kinase A anchoring proteins or AKAPs regulate the activity of many ion channels. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a well-recognized target of AKAPs, with other kinases now emerging as additional targets. We examined the roles of epithelial-expressed AKAPs in regulating the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). Experiments used heterologous expression with AKAP15, AKAP-KL, and AKAP79 in Xenopus oocytes. Experiments were carried out under high and low Na+ conditions, as Na+ loading is known to affect the baseline activity of ENaC in a PKC-dependent mechanism. ENaC activity was unaffected by AKAP79 and AKAP-KL expression. However, oocytes coexpressing AKAP15 exhibited an 80% and 91% reduction in the amiloride-sensitive, whole-cell conductance in high and low Na+ conditions, respectively. The reduced channel activity was unaffected by PKA activation or inhibition, indicating a PKA-independent mechanism. Expression with a membrane-targeting domain, mutant form of AKAP15 (AKAP15m) prevented the decrease of ENaC activity, but only under low Na+ conditions. In high sodium conditions, coexpression with AKAP15m led to an increase of ENaC activity to levels similar to those observed under low Na+. These results indicate that membrane-associated AKAP15 reduces ENaC activity whereas the cytoplasmically associated one may participate in the channel's feedback inhibition by intracellular Na+, a process known to involve PKC. This hypothesis was further confirmed in coexpression experiments, which demonstrated functional and physical interaction between AKAP15 and PKCalpha. We propose that AKAP15 regulates ENaC via a novel PKA-independent pathway. PMID:17244820

  6. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue. PMID:27032955

  7. The Sodium-Activated Potassium Channel Slack Is Required for Optimal Cognitive Flexibility in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausch, Anne E.; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    "Kcnt1" encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual…

  8. Indirect activation of the epithelial Na+ channel by trypsin.

    PubMed

    Bengrine, Abderrahmane; Li, Jinqing; Hamm, L Lee; Awayda, Mouhamed S

    2007-09-14

    We tested the hypothesis that the serine protease trypsin can indirectly activate the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC). Experiments were carried out in Xenopus oocytes and examined the effects on the channel formed by all three human ENaC subunits and that formed by Xenopus epsilon and human beta and gamma subunits (epsilonbetagammaENaC). Low levels of trypsin (1-10 ng/ml) were without effects on the oocyte endogenous conductances and were specifically used to test the effects on ENaC. Addition of 1 ng/ml trypsin for 60 min stimulated the amiloride-sensitive human ENaC conductance (g(Na)) by approximately 6-fold. This effect on the g(Na) was [Na(+)]-independent, thereby ruling out an interaction with channel feedback inhibition by Na(+). The indirect nature of this activation was confirmed in cell-attached patch clamp experiments with trypsin added to the outside of the pipette. Trypsin was comparatively ineffective at activating epsilonbetagammaENaC, a channel that exhibited a high spontaneous open probability. These observations, in combination with surface binding experiments, indicated that trypsin indirectly activated membrane-resident channels. Activation by trypsin was also dependent on catalytic activity of this protease but was not accompanied by channel subunit proteolysis. Channel activation was dependent on downstream activation of G-proteins and was blocked by G-protein inhibition by injection of guanyl-5'-yl thiophosphate and by pre-stimulation of phospholipase C. These data indicate a receptor-mediated activation of ENaC by trypsin. This trypsin-activated receptor is distinct from that of protease-activated receptor-2, because the response to trypsin was unaffected by protease-activated receptor-2 overexpression or knockdown. PMID:17627947

  9. Parkinson's disease-like forelimb akinesia induced by BmK I, a sodium channel modulator.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongyan; Wang, Ziyi; Jin, Jiahui; Pei, Xiao; Zhao, Yuxiao; Wu, Hao; Lin, Weide; Tao, Jie; Ji, Yonghua

    2016-07-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and characterized by motor disabilities which are mostly linked with high levels of synchronous oscillations in the basal ganglia neurons. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a vital role in the abnormal electrical activity of neurons in the globus pallidus (GP) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in PD. BmK I, a α-like toxin purified from the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, has been identified a site-3-specific modulator of VGSCs. The present study shows that forelimb akinesia can be induced by the injection of BmK I into the globus pallidus (GP) in rats. In addition, BmK I cannot produce neuronal damage in vivo and in vitro at 24h after treatment, indicating that the forelimb akinesia does not result from neuronal damage. Electrophysiological studies further revealed that the inactivated Na(+) currents were showed to be more vulnerably modulated by BmK I than the activated Na(+) currents in human neuron-like SHSY5Y cells. Furthermore, the modulation of BmK I on inactivation was preferentially attributed to fast inactivation rather than slow inactivation. Therefore, the PD-like forelimb akinesia may result from the modulation of sodium channels in neuron by BmK I. These findings not only suggest that BmK I may be an effective and novel molecule for the study of pathogenesis in PD but also support the idea that VGSCs play a crucial role in the motor disabilities in PD. PMID:27108049

  10. Comparative neuroprotective effect of sodium channel blockers after experimental spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ates, Ozkan; Cayli, Suleyman R; Gurses, Ilal; Turkoz, Yusuf; Tarim, Ozcan; Cakir, Celal O; Kocak, Ayhan

    2007-07-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in loss of function below the lesion. Secondary injury following the primary impact includes a number of biochemical and cellular alterations leading to tissue necrosis and cell death. Influx of Na(+) ions into cells has been postulated to be a key early event in the pathogenesis of secondary traumatic and ischemic central nervous system injury. Previous studies have shown that some voltage-sensitive sodium channel blockers provide powerful neuroprotection. The purpose of the present study was to compare the neuroprotective effect of three sodium channel blockers-mexiletine, phenytoin and riluzole--after SCI. Ninety rats were randomly and blindly divided into five groups of 18 rats each: sham-operated group, trauma group (bolus injection of 1 mL physiological saline intraperiteonally [i.p.]), mexiletine treatment group (80 mg/kg, i.p.), phenytoin treatment group (200 mg/kg, i.p.) and riluzole treatment group (8 mg/kg, i.p.). Twenty-four hours after injury, the rats were killed for determination of spinal cord water content and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Motor function scores of six rats from each group were evaluated weekly for six weeks. Then the rats were killed for histopathological assessment. Although all the treatment groups revealed significantly lower MDA levels and spinal cord edema than the trauma group (p<0.05), the riluzole and mexiletine treatment groups were better than the phenytoin treatment group. In the chronic stage, riluzole and mexiletine treatment achieved better results for neurobehavioral and histopathological recovery than phenytoin treatment. In conclusion, all the tested Na(+) blockers had a neuroprotective effect after SCI; riluzole and mexiletine were superior to phenytoin. PMID:17532502

  11. Involvement of voltage-gated sodium channels blockade in the analgesic effects of orphenadrine.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jean-François; Dipalma, Antonella; De Bellis, Michela; Costanza, Teresa; Gaudioso, Christelle; Delmas, Patrick; George, Alfred L; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2009-04-01

    Orphenadrine is a drug acting on multiple targets, including muscarinic, histaminic, and NMDA receptors. It is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and in musculoskeletal disorders. It is also used as an analgesic, although its mechanism of action is still unknown. Both physiological and pharmacological results have demonstrated a critical role for voltage-gated sodium channels in many types of chronic pain syndromes. We tested the hypothesis that orphenadrine may block voltage-gated sodium channels. By using patch-clamp experiments, we evaluated the effects of the drug on whole-cell sodium currents in HEK293 cells expressing the skeletal muscle (Nav1.4), cardiac (Nav1.5) and neuronal (Nav1.1 and Nav1.7) subtypes of human sodium channels, as well as on whole-cell tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant sodium currents likely conducted by Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 channel subtypes in primary culture of rat DRG sensory neurons. The results indicate that orphenadrine inhibits sodium channels in a concentration-, voltage- and frequency-dependent manner. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we further show that orphenadrine binds to the same receptor as the local anesthetics. Orphenadrine affinities for resting and inactivated sodium channels were higher compared to those of known sodium channels blockers, such as mexiletine and flecainide. Low, clinically relevant orphenadrine concentration produces a significant block of Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 channels, which are critical for experiencing pain sensations, indicating a role for sodium channel blockade in the clinical efficacy of orphenadrine as analgesic compound. On the other hand, block of Nav1.1 and Nav1.5 may contribute to the proconvulsive and proarrhythmic adverse reactions, especially observed during overdose. PMID:19217209

  12. Colonic Hypersensitivity and Sensitization of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels in Primary Sensory Neurons in Rats with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ji; Song, Zhen-Yuan; Zhang, Hong-Hong; Qin, Xin; Hu, Shufen; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients with long-standing diabetes often demonstrate intestinal dysfunction and abdominal pain. However, the pathophysiology of abdominal pain in diabetic patients remains elusive. The purpose of study was to determine roles of voltage-gated sodium channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in colonic hypersensitivity of rats with diabetes. Methods Diabetic models were induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 65 mg/kg) in adult female rats, while the control rats received citrate buffer only. Behavioral responses to colorectal distention were used to determine colonic sensitivity in rats. Colon projection DRG neurons labeled with DiI were acutely dissociated for measuring excitability and sodium channel currents by whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Western blot analysis was employed to measure the expression of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 of colon DRGs. Results STZ injection produced a significantly lower distention threshold than control rats in responding to colorectal distention. STZ injection also depolarized the resting membrane potentials, hyperpolarized action potential threshold, decreased rheobase and increased frequency of action potentials evoked by 2 and 3 times rheobase and ramp current stimulation. Furthermore, STZ injection enhanced neuronal sodium current densities of DRG neurons innervating the colon. STZ injection also led to a significant upregulation of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 expression in colon DRGs compared with age and sex-matched control rats. Conclusions Our results suggest that enhanced neuronal excitability following STZ injection, which may be mediated by upregulation of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 expression in DRGs, may play an important role in colonic hypersensitivity in rats with diabetes. PMID:26459453

  13. Fast and slow activation kinetics of voltage-gated sodium channels in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Gilly, W F; Gillette, R; McFarlane, M

    1997-05-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp recordings of Na current (I(Na)) were made under identical experimental conditions from isolated neurons from cephalopod (Loligo, Octopus) and gastropod (Aplysia, Pleurobranchaea, Doriopsilla) species to compare properties of activation gating. Voltage dependence of peak Na conductance (gNa) is very similar in all cases, but activation kinetics in the gastropod neurons studied are markedly slower. Kinetic differences are very pronounced only over the voltage range spanned by the gNa-voltage relation. At positive and negative extremes of voltage, activation and deactivation kinetics of I(Na) are practically indistinguishable in all species studied. Voltage-dependent rate constants underlying activation of the slow type of Na channel found in gastropods thus appear to be much more voltage dependent than are the equivalent rates in the universally fast type of channel that predominates in cephalopods. Voltage dependence of inactivation kinetics shows a similar pattern and is representative of activation kinetics for the two types of Na channels. Neurons with fast Na channels can thus make much more rapid adjustments in the number of open Na channels at physiologically relevant voltages than would be possible with only slow Na channels. This capability appears to be an adaptation that is highly evolved in cephalopods, which are well known for their high-speed swimming behaviors. Similarities in slow and fast Na channel subtypes in molluscan and mammalian neurons are discussed. PMID:9163364

  14. CRMP2 protein SUMOylation modulates NaV1.7 channel trafficking.

    PubMed

    Dustrude, Erik T; Wilson, Sarah M; Ju, Weina; Xiao, Yucheng; Khanna, Rajesh

    2013-08-23

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) trafficking is incompletely understood. Post-translational modifications of NaVs and/or auxiliary subunits and protein-protein interactions have been posited as NaV-trafficking mechanisms. Here, we tested if modification of the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) by a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) could affect NaV trafficking; CRMP2 alters the extent of NaV slow inactivation conferred by the anti-epileptic (R)-lacosamide, implying NaV-CRMP2 functional coupling. Expression of a CRMP2 SUMOylation-incompetent mutant (CRMP2-K374A) in neuronal model catecholamine A differentiated (CAD) cells did not alter lacosamide-induced NaV slow inactivation compared with CAD cells expressing wild type CRMP2. Like wild type CRMP2, CRMP2-K374A expressed robustly in CAD cells. Neurite outgrowth, a canonical CRMP2 function, was moderately reduced by the mutation but was still significantly higher than enhanced GFP-transfected cortical neurons. Notably, huwentoxin-IV-sensitive NaV1.7 currents, which predominate in CAD cells, were significantly reduced in CAD cells expressing CRMP2-K374A. Increasing deSUMOylation with sentrin/SUMO-specific protease SENP1 or SENP2 in wild type CRMP2-expressing CAD cells decreased NaV1.7 currents. Consistent with a reduction in current density, biotinylation revealed a significant reduction in surface NaV1.7 levels in CAD cells expressing CRMP2-K374A; surface NaV1.7 expression was also decreased by SENP1 + SENP2 overexpression. Currents in HEK293 cells stably expressing NaV1.7 were reduced by CRMP2-K374A in a manner dependent on the E2-conjugating enzyme Ubc9. No decrement in current density was observed in HEK293 cells co-expressing CRMP2-K374A and NaV1.1 or NaV1.3. Diminution of sodium currents, largely NaV1.7, was recapitulated in sensory neurons expressing CRMP2-K374A. Our study elucidates a novel regulatory mechanism that utilizes CRMP2 SUMOylation to choreograph NaV1.7 trafficking.

  15. Calmodulin and Ca2+ control of voltage gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Yoder, Jesse B; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Amzel, L Mario

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the cytosolic portion of voltage activated sodium channels (CTNav) in complexes with calmodulin and other effectors in the presence and the absence of calcium provide information about the mechanisms by which these effectors regulate channel activity. The most studied of these complexes, those of Nav1.2 and Nav1.5, show details of the conformations and the specific contacts that are involved in channel regulation. Another voltage activated sodium channel, Nav1.4, shows significant calcium dependent inactivation, while its homolog Nav1.5 does not. The available structures shed light on the possible localization of the elements responsible for this effect. Mutations in the genes of these 3 Nav channels are associated with several disease conditions: Nav1.2, neurological conditions; Nav1.4, syndromes involving skeletal muscle; and Nav1.5, cardiac arrhythmias. Many of these disease-specific mutations are located at the interfaces involving CTNav and its effectors. PMID:26218606

  16. Kinetics of grayanotoxin evoked modification of sodium channels in squid giant axons.

    PubMed

    Yakehiro, M; Seyama, I; Narahashi, T

    1997-02-01

    Kinetics of modification of the sodium channel by alpha-dihydrograyanotoxin II (GTX) were studied with voltage-clamped squid giant axons. GTX modified the channel to generate sustained inward current, only when the membrane was kept depolarized to levels more positive than -80mV, in a voltage-dependent manner, increasing the depolarization. Repetitive depolarizing pulses suppressed rather than increased the degree of GTX-evoked modification. GTX-evoked modification proceeded with a dual exponential time course, regardless of the presence or absence of the inactivation gate, but the elimination by pronase of the inactivation gate accelerated GTX-evoked modification. GTX unbound from the sodium channel with a time constant of 30 s at -150 mV in a manner independent of the concentration. The effective concentration that produced a half-maximal sustained sodium current (EC50), which represents GTX-modified channel activity, was estimated to be about 10 microM with one-to-one stoichiometry. The activation/voltage relationship for the sustained sodium current was shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction by as much as 63-94 mV compared with that of peak sodium current. At a GTX concentration of 100 microM and at +20mV, 64% of the sodium channel population was modified. A kinetics model is proposed to account for the behavior of GTX -modified sodium channels.

  17. Neonatal maternal deprivation sensitizes voltage-gated sodium channel currents in colon-specific dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shufen; Xiao, Ying; Zhu, Liyan; Li, Lin; Hu, Chuang-Ying; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2013-02-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain in association with altered bowel movements. The underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain elusive. This study was designed to examine the role for sodium channels in a rat model of chronic visceral hyperalgesia induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD). Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores were performed on adult male rats. Colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were labeled with DiI and acutely dissociated for measuring excitability and sodium channel current under whole-cell patch-clamp configurations. The expression of Na(V)1.8 was analyzed by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR. NMD significantly increased AWR scores, which lasted for ~6 wk in an association with hyperexcitability of colon DRG neurons. TTX-resistant but not TTX-sensitive sodium current density was greatly enhanced in colon DRG neurons in NMD rats. Compared with controls, activation curves showed a leftward shift in NMD rats whereas inactivation curves did not differ significantly. NMD markedly accelerated the activation time of peak current amplitude without any changes in inactivation time. Furthermore, NMD remarkably enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels but not at mRNA levels in colon-related DRGs. The expression of Na(V)1.9 was not altered after NMD. These data suggest that NMD enhances TTX-resistant sodium activity of colon DRG neurons, which is most likely mediated by a leftward shift of activation curve and by enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels, thus identifying a specific molecular mechanism underlying chronic visceral pain and sensitization in patients with IBS. PMID:23139220

  18. Menthol pain relief through cumulative inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Hao, Jizhe; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Gabriac, Mélanie; Delmas, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Menthol is a natural compound of plant origin known to produce cool sensation via the activation of the TRPM8 channel. It is also frequently part of topical analgesic drugs available in a pharmacy, although its mechanism of action is still unknown. Compelling evidence indicates that voltage-gated Na(+) channels are critical for experiencing pain sensation. We tested the hypothesis that menthol may block voltage-gated Na(+) channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. By use of a patch clamp, we evaluated the effects of menthol application on tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 channel subtypes in DRG neurons, and on TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels in immortalized DRG neuron-derived F11 cells. The results indicate that menthol inhibits Na(+) channels in a concentration-, voltage-, and frequency-dependent manner. Menthol promoted fast and slow inactivation states, causing use-dependent depression of Na(+) channel activity. In current clamp recordings, menthol inhibited firing at high-frequency stimulation with minimal effects on normal neuronal activity. We found that low concentrations of menthol cause analgesia in mice, relieving pain produced by a Na(+) channel-targeting toxin. We conclude that menthol is a state-selective blocker of Nav1.8, Nav1.9, and TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels, indicating a role for Na(+) channel blockade in the efficacy of menthol as topical analgesic compound. PMID:22172548

  19. Menthol pain relief through cumulative inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Hao, Jizhe; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Gabriac, Mélanie; Delmas, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Menthol is a natural compound of plant origin known to produce cool sensation via the activation of the TRPM8 channel. It is also frequently part of topical analgesic drugs available in a pharmacy, although its mechanism of action is still unknown. Compelling evidence indicates that voltage-gated Na(+) channels are critical for experiencing pain sensation. We tested the hypothesis that menthol may block voltage-gated Na(+) channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. By use of a patch clamp, we evaluated the effects of menthol application on tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 channel subtypes in DRG neurons, and on TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels in immortalized DRG neuron-derived F11 cells. The results indicate that menthol inhibits Na(+) channels in a concentration-, voltage-, and frequency-dependent manner. Menthol promoted fast and slow inactivation states, causing use-dependent depression of Na(+) channel activity. In current clamp recordings, menthol inhibited firing at high-frequency stimulation with minimal effects on normal neuronal activity. We found that low concentrations of menthol cause analgesia in mice, relieving pain produced by a Na(+) channel-targeting toxin. We conclude that menthol is a state-selective blocker of Nav1.8, Nav1.9, and TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels, indicating a role for Na(+) channel blockade in the efficacy of menthol as topical analgesic compound.

  20. [Characterization of the epithelial sodium channel in human pre-eclampsia syncytiotrophoblast].

    PubMed

    del Monaco, Silvana; Assef, Yanina; Damiano, Alicia; Zotta, Elsa; Ibarra, Cristina; Kotsias, Basilio A

    2006-01-01

    The syncytiotrophoblast (SCT), a multinucleated epithelium forming the outer layer of chorionic villi, acts in human placenta as a transporting barrier regulating the transference of nutrients, solutes and water between maternal and fetal blood. Electrolyte homeostasis and extracellular fluid volume are maintained primarily by regulated Na+ transport. The present study was conducted to analyze the presence of the epithelial Na channel (ENaC) in placental tissue from normal and pre-eclamptic women and in BeWo cell, a model of a human SCT. Changes in the expression of these proteins during sodium transport across the placenta may be related to the pathogeny of pre-eclampsia. The role that ENaC and Na+ transport deregulation play on human placental tissues still remains unknown although in aldosterone-responsive epithelial cells (kidney, colon), abnormalities upregulating its activity lead to increased Na+ uptake and hypertension (i.e. Liddle's syndrome) whereas a diminished channel activity can result in the pseudohypoaldosteronisn syndrome with salt loss and hypotension. Our results show that ENaC is expressed in the apical membrane of normal syncytiotrophoblast. The amplified fragment of alpha-ENaC was cloned and sequenced having a 100% identity with the sequence of (alpha-ENaC obtained from GenBank (SCNN1A, accession number Z92981). We found that the transcription of the alpha-ENaC mRNA was not detectable in preeclamptic placentas and the protein was not observed with immunohistochemistry staining, probably indicating a low protein expression level. In BeWo cells ENac was found and its expression is regulated by aldosterone, vasopressin, progesterone and estradiol. With patch clamp techniques we studied the currents trough ENaO channels in Bewo cells. We observed currents that were blocked by 10 microM amiloride in cells incubated in 100 nM aldosterone for 12 hs. The amplitude of this current was 20-fold the basal current, a reversal potential of 3 mV and a

  1. Dosage Effects of a Drosophila Sodium Channel Gene on Behavior and Axonal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Stern, M.; Kreber, R.; Ganetzky, B.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of para mutations on behavior and axonal excitability in Drosophila suggested that para specifically affects sodium channels. This hypothesis was confirmed by molecular analysis of the para locus, which demonstrates that the encoded para product is a sodium channel polypeptide. Here we characterize the effects of altered para(+) dosage on behavior and axonal excitability, both in an otherwise wild-type background and in combination with two other mutations: nap(ts), which also affects sodium channels, and Sh(KS133), which specifically affects potassium channels. Whereas it was previously shown that decreased dosage of para(+) is unconditionally lethal in a .nap(ts) background, we find that increased dosage of para(+) suppresses nap(ts). Similarly, we find that para hypomorphs or decreased dosage of para(+) suppresses Sh(KS133), whereas increased dosage of para(+) enhances Sh(KS133). The electrophysiological basis for these effects is investigated. Other genes in Drosophila that have sequence homology to sodium channels do not show such dosage effects, which suggests that the para(+) product has a function distinct from that of other putative Drosophila sodium channel genes. We conclude that the number of sodium channels present in at least some Drosophila neurons can be affected by changes in para(+) gene dosage, and that the level of para(+) expression can strongly influence neuronal excitability. PMID:2155153

  2. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Liu, Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong, Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an alpha-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G(1111) and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G(1111) in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G(1111), a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G(1111) had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  3. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Liu Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an {alpha}-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G{sup 1111} and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G{sup 1111} in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G{sup 1111}, a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G{sup 1111} had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  4. Hapalindoles from the cyanobacterium fischerella: potential sodium channel modulators.

    PubMed

    Cagide, Eva; Becher, Paul G; Louzao, M Carmen; Espiña, Begoña; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Jüttner, Friedrich; Botana, Luis M

    2014-10-20

    Hapalindoles make up a large group of bioactive metabolites of the cyanobacterial order Stigonematales. 12-epi-Hapalindole E isonitrile, 12-epi-hapalindole C isonitrile, 12-epi-hapalindole J isonitrile, and hapalindole L from Fischerella are acutely toxic for insect larvae; however, the biochemical targets responsible for the biological activities of hapalindoles are not understood. We describe here the electron impact mass spectra of these four hapalindole congeners; their structures were confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In combination with the presented mass spectra of (15)N-labeled species and their retention times on a gas chromatography capillary column, a rapid and reliable determination should be possible in future research. The bioactivity of these hapalindoles was tested on mammalian cells focusing on their effects in the BE(2)-M17 excitable human neuroblastoma cell line. The fluorescent dye Alamar Blue was applied to monitor cytotoxicity, fura-2 to evaluate changes in the cytosolic calcium concentrations, and bis-oxonol to detect effects on membrane potential. Data showed that the hapalindoles did not affect cell viability of the neuroblastoma cells, even when they were incubated for 72 h. Neither depolarization nor initiation of calcium influx was observed in the cells upon hapalindole treatment. However, the data provide evidence that hapalindoles are sodium channel-modulating neurotoxins. They inhibited veratridine-induced depolarization in a manner similar to that of neosaxitoxin. Our data suggest hapalindoles should be added to the growing number of neurotoxic secondary metabolites, such as saxitoxins and anatoxins, already known in freshwater cyanobacteria. As stable congeners, hapalindoles may be a risk in freshwater ecosystems or agricultural water usage and should therefore be considered in water quality assessment.

  5. Hapalindoles from the cyanobacterium fischerella: potential sodium channel modulators.

    PubMed

    Cagide, Eva; Becher, Paul G; Louzao, M Carmen; Espiña, Begoña; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Jüttner, Friedrich; Botana, Luis M

    2014-10-20

    Hapalindoles make up a large group of bioactive metabolites of the cyanobacterial order Stigonematales. 12-epi-Hapalindole E isonitrile, 12-epi-hapalindole C isonitrile, 12-epi-hapalindole J isonitrile, and hapalindole L from Fischerella are acutely toxic for insect larvae; however, the biochemical targets responsible for the biological activities of hapalindoles are not understood. We describe here the electron impact mass spectra of these four hapalindole congeners; their structures were confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In combination with the presented mass spectra of (15)N-labeled species and their retention times on a gas chromatography capillary column, a rapid and reliable determination should be possible in future research. The bioactivity of these hapalindoles was tested on mammalian cells focusing on their effects in the BE(2)-M17 excitable human neuroblastoma cell line. The fluorescent dye Alamar Blue was applied to monitor cytotoxicity, fura-2 to evaluate changes in the cytosolic calcium concentrations, and bis-oxonol to detect effects on membrane potential. Data showed that the hapalindoles did not affect cell viability of the neuroblastoma cells, even when they were incubated for 72 h. Neither depolarization nor initiation of calcium influx was observed in the cells upon hapalindole treatment. However, the data provide evidence that hapalindoles are sodium channel-modulating neurotoxins. They inhibited veratridine-induced depolarization in a manner similar to that of neosaxitoxin. Our data suggest hapalindoles should be added to the growing number of neurotoxic secondary metabolites, such as saxitoxins and anatoxins, already known in freshwater cyanobacteria. As stable congeners, hapalindoles may be a risk in freshwater ecosystems or agricultural water usage and should therefore be considered in water quality assessment. PMID:25285689

  6. The conductance and density of sodium channels in the cut-open squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Bekkers, J M; Greeff, N G; Keynes, R D

    1986-01-01

    Non-stationary Na current fluctuations in small voltage-clamped patches of cut-open squid giant axon were analysed by an ensemble-average technique to yield the single Na channel conductance gamma Na and the Na channel density in the patch. gamma Na appeared to be voltage independent over the range -30 to +40 mV and had a mean value of 4.4 +/- 1.1 pS in 514 mM-Na/20 mM-Na at 5 kHz band width and temperature between 3.5 and 5.0 degrees C. gamma Na did not change significantly at band widths to 20 kHz. gamma Na in reduced Na solutions, 103 mM-Na/4 mM-Na, at 3.5-5.0 degrees C had a mean value of 1.2 +/- 0.3 pS. Internal solutions containing 50 mM-tetraethylammonium (TEA) depressed both gamma Na and the mean Na currents by roughly the same factor, compared with solutions without TEA. The reduced gamma Na had a mean value of 2.2 +/- 0.7 pS. The mean Na channel density in the standard 514 mM-Na/20 mM-Na solution was estimated to be 180 +/- 100 microM-2. The densities in the other solutions mentioned above were not significantly different from this value. PMID:2432246

  7. Trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid colitis alters Na 1.8 channel expression in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    King, D E; Macleod, R J; Vanner, S J

    2009-08-01

    Visceral inflammation evokes hyperexcitability in nociceptive dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and these changes are associated with increased voltage-gated sodium channel (Na(v)) 1.8 current density, but the molecular determinants of these changes are unclear. This study used Western blotting to measure changes in Na(v) 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9 protein expression during trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) colitis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to examine corresponding changes in mRNA. Colonic neurons were labelled with the retrograde tracer Fast Blue injected into the wall of the distal colon and quantitative PCR performed on laser-captured labelled colonic neurons from ganglia at T9-13 or unlabelled DRG neurons from the upper spinal cord. Immunohistochemistry and western blots were performed on whole DRG from the same sites. Fast Blue-labelled neurons demonstrated Na(v) 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9 immunoreactivity. On day 7 of colitis, which correlated with electrophysiological studies, there was a threefold increase in Na(v) 1.8 protein in ganglia from T9 to 13, but Na(v) 1.7 and 1.9 levels were unchanged. There was no corresponding change in the Na(v) 1.8 alpha-subunit mRNA levels. However, on days 2 and 4, Na(v) 1.8 mRNA was decreased 10-fold. Na(v) 1.8 protein and mRNA levels were unchanged in neurons isolated from ganglia in the upper spinal cord, where colonic neurons are not found. These findings suggest that the TNBS evoked increase in Na(v) 1.8 currents is associated with increased numbers of channels. The absence of corresponding changes in transcript suggests a translational or post-translational mechanism, but the 10-fold recovery of transcript preceding this time point also demonstrates a complex transcriptional regulation. PMID:19239624

  8. Epithelial Sodium Channels in Pulmonary Epithelial Progenitor and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Bi-Jie; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the epithelium of mammalian lungs is essential for restoring normal function following injury, and various cells and mechanisms contribute to this regeneration and repair. Club cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs), and alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATII) are dominant stem/progenitor cells for maintaining epithelial turnover and repair. Epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC), a critical pathway for transapical salt and fluid transport, are expressed in lung epithelial progenitors, including club and ATII cells. Since ENaC activity and expression are development- and differentiation-dependent, apically located ENaC activity has therefore been used as a functional biomarker of lung injury repair. ENaC activity may be involved in the migration and differentiation of local and circulating stem/progenitor cells with diverse functions, eventually benefiting stem cells spreading to re-epithelialize injured lungs. This review summarizes the potential roles of ENaC expressed in native progenitor and stem cells in the development and regeneration of the respiratory epithelium. PMID:27570489

  9. Epithelial Sodium Channels in Pulmonary Epithelial Progenitor and Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Bi-Jie; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the epithelium of mammalian lungs is essential for restoring normal function following injury, and various cells and mechanisms contribute to this regeneration and repair. Club cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs), and alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATII) are dominant stem/progenitor cells for maintaining epithelial turnover and repair. Epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC), a critical pathway for transapical salt and fluid transport, are expressed in lung epithelial progenitors, including club and ATII cells. Since ENaC activity and expression are development- and differentiation-dependent, apically located ENaC activity has therefore been used as a functional biomarker of lung injury repair. ENaC activity may be involved in the migration and differentiation of local and circulating stem/progenitor cells with diverse functions, eventually benefiting stem cells spreading to re-epithelialize injured lungs. This review summarizes the potential roles of ENaC expressed in native progenitor and stem cells in the development and regeneration of the respiratory epithelium. PMID:27570489

  10. Possible roles of exceptionally conserved residues around the selectivity filters of sodium and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis B; Zhorov, Boris S

    2011-01-28

    In the absence of x-ray structures of sodium and calcium channels their homology models are used to rationalize experimental data and design new experiments. A challenge is to model the outer-pore region that folds differently from potassium channels. Here we report a new model of the outer-pore region of the NaV1.4 channel, which suggests roles of highly conserved residues around the selectivity filter. The model takes from our previous study (Tikhonov, D. B., and Zhorov, B. S. (2005) Biophys. J. 88, 184-197) the general disposition of the P-helices, selectivity filter residues, and the outer carboxylates, but proposes new intra- and inter-domain contacts that support structural stability of the outer pore. Glycine residues downstream from the selectivity filter are proposed to participate in knob-into-hole contacts with the P-helices and S6s. These contacts explain the adapted tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes that feed on toxic prey through valine substitution of isoleucine in the P-helix of repeat IV. Polar residues five positions upstream from the selectivity filter residues form H-bonds with the ascending-limb backbones. Exceptionally conserved tryptophans are engaged in inter-repeat H-bonds to form a ring whose π-electrons would facilitate passage of ions from the outer carboxylates to the selectivity filter. The outer-pore model of CaV1.2 derived from the NaV1.4 model is also stabilized by the ring of exceptionally conservative tryptophans and H-bonds between the P-helices and ascending limbs. In this model, the exceptionally conserved aspartate downstream from the selectivity-filter glutamate in repeat II facilitates passage of calcium ions to the selectivity-filter ring through the tryptophan ring. Available experimental data are discussed in view of the models.

  11. Rufinamide Improves Functional and Behavioral Deficits via Blockade of Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Sodium Channels in Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kharatmal, Shivsharan B; Singh, Jitendra N; Sharma, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Rufinamide is a structurally novel, antiepileptic drug approved for the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Its mechanism of action involves inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) with possible membrane-stabilizing effects. VGSCs play a significant role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Therefore, we investigated the effects of rufinamide on tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium current (TTX-R I(Na)) in acutely dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons isolated from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by using whole-cell voltage-clamp configuration. In addition, the functional and behavioural nociceptive parameters were evaluated to assess its potential in diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic rats demonstrated the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia with reduced nerve perfusion and conduction velocity as compared to control. Rufinamide treatments (3 and 10 mg/kg) significantly improved these functional and nociceptive deficits. Diabetic rat DRG neurons exhibited increased TTX-R I(Na) density as compared to control. The voltage-dependent activation and steady-state inactivation curves for TTX-R I(Na) in DRG neurons from diabetic rats were shifted negatively as compared to control. Rufinamide treatments significantly blocked the TTX-R Na+ channel activity as evident from significant reduction in I(Na) density and hyperpolarizing shift in activation and inactivation curves as compared to diabetic control. This suggests that rufinamide acts on TTX-R Na+ channels, reduces channel activity and attenuates nerve functional and behavioral parameters in diabetic rats. Altogether, these results indicate therapeutic potential of rufinamide in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26036975

  12. Diversity and Convergence of Sodium Channel Mutations Involved in Resistance to Pyrethroids

    PubMed Central

    Rinkevich, Frank D.; Du, Yuzhe; Dong, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides target voltage-gated sodium channels, which are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system. The intensive use of pyrethroids in controlling arthropod pests and disease vectors has led to many instances of pyrethroid resistance around the globe. In the past two decades, studies have identified a large number of sodium channel mutations that are associated with resistance to pyrethroids. The purpose of this review is to summarize both common and unique sodium channel mutations that have been identified in arthropod pests of importance to agriculture or human health. Identification of these mutations provides valuable molecular markers for resistance monitoring in the field and helped the discovery of the elusive pyrethroid receptor site(s) on the sodium channel. PMID:24019556

  13. Control of the spatial distribution of sodium channels in giant fiber lobe neurons of the squid.

    PubMed

    Gilly, W F; Lucero, M T; Horrigan, F T

    1990-11-01

    Na+ channels are present at high density in squid giant axon but are absent from its somata in the giant fiber lobe (GFL) of the stellate ganglion. GFL cells dispersed in vitro maintain growing axons and develop a Na+ channel distribution similar to that in vivo. Tunicamycin, a glycosylation inhibitor, selectively disrupts the spatially appropriate, high level expression of Na+ channels in axonal membrane but has no effect on expression in cell bodies, which show low level, inappropriate expression in vitro. This effect does not appear to involve alteration in Na+ channel turnover or axon viability. K+ channel distribution is unaffected. Thus, glycosylation appears to be involved in controlling Na+ channel localization in squid neurons.

  14. The roles of sodium channels in nociception: implications for mechanisms of pain

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Theodore R; Sheets, Patrick L; Waxman, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the role of voltage-gated sodium channels in nociception may provide important insights into pain mechanisms. Voltage-gated sodium channels are critically important for electrogenesis and nerve impulse conduction, and a target for important clinically relevant analgesics such as lidocaine. Furthermore, within the last decade studies have shown that certain sodium channel isoforms are predominantly expressed in peripheral sensory neurons associated with pain sensation, and that the expression and functional properties of voltage-gated sodium channels in peripheral sensory neurons can be dynamically regulated following axonal injury or peripheral inflammation. These data suggest that specific voltage-gated sodium channels may play crucial roles in nociception. Experiments with transgenic mice lines have clearly implicated Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 in inflammatory, and possibly neuropathic, pain. However the most convincing and perhaps most exciting results regarding the role of voltage-gated sodium channels has come out recently from studies on human inherited disorders of nociception. Point mutations in Nav1.7 have been identified in patients with two distinct autosomal dominant severe chronic pain syndromes. Electrophysiological experiments indicate that these pain-associated mutations cause small yet significant changes in the gating properties of voltage-gated sodium channels that are likely to contribute substantially to the development of chronic pain. Equally exciting, a recent study has indicated that recessive mutations in Nav1.7 that eliminate functional current can result in an apparent complete, and possibly specific, indifference to pain in humans, suggesting that isoform specific blockers could be very effective in treating pain. In this review we will examine what is known about the roles of voltage-gated sodium channels in nociception. PMID:17766042

  15. Characteristics and pharmacological regulation of epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and epithelial Na+ transport.

    PubMed

    Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial Na(+) transport participates in control of various body functions and conditions: e.g., homeostasis of body fluid content influencing blood pressure, control of amounts of fluids covering the apical surface of alveolar epithelial cells at appropriate levels for normal gas exchange, and prevention of bacterial/viral infection. Epithelial Na(+) transport via the transcellular pathway is mediated by the entry step of Na(+) across the apical membrane via Epithelial Na(+) Channel (ENaC) located at the apical membrane, and the extrusion step of Na(+) across the basolateral membrane via the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase located at the basolateral membrane. The rate-limiting step of the epithelial Na(+) transport via the transcellular pathway is generally recognized to be the entry step of Na(+) across the apical membrane via ENaC. Thus, up-/down-regulation of ENaC essentially participates in regulatory systems of blood pressure and normal gas exchange. Amount of ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport is determined by the number of ENaCs located at the apical membrane, activity (open probability) of individual ENaC located at the apical membrane, single channel conductance of ENaC located at the apical membrane, and driving force for the Na(+) entry via ENaCs across the apical membrane. In the present review article, I discuss the characteristics of ENaC and how these factors are regulated.

  16. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 activation by dietary capsaicin promotes urinary sodium excretion by inhibiting epithelial sodium channel α subunit-mediated sodium reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wang, Fei; Wei, Xing; Liang, Yi; Cui, Yuanting; Gao, Feng; Zhong, Jian; Pu, Yunfei; Zhao, Yu; Yan, Zhencheng; Arendshorst, William J; Nilius, Bernd; Chen, Jing; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2014-08-01

    High salt (HS) intake contributes to the development of hypertension. Epithelial sodium channels play crucial roles in regulating renal sodium reabsorption and blood pressure. The renal transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel can be activated by its agonist capsaicin. However, it is unknown whether dietary factors can act on urinary sodium excretion and renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) function. Here, we report that TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin increased urinary sodium excretion through reducing sodium reabsorption in wild-type (WT) mice on a HS diet but not in TRPV1(-/-) mice. The effect of capsaicin on urinary sodium excretion was involved in inhibiting αENaC and its related with-no-lysine kinase 1/serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase 1 pathway in renal cortical collecting ducts of WT mice. Dietary capsaicin further reduced the increased αENaC activity in WT mice attributed to the HS diet. In contrast, this capsaicin effect was absent in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Immunoprecipitation study indicated αENaC specifically coexpressed and functionally interact with TRPV1 in renal cortical collecting ducts of WT mice. Additionally, ENaC activity and expression were suppressed by capsaicin-mediated TRPV1 activation in cultured M1-cortical collecting duct cells. Long-term dietary capsaicin prevented the development of high blood pressure in WT mice on a HS diet. It concludes that TRPV1 activation in the cortical collecting ducts by capsaicin increases urinary sodium excretion and avoids HS diet-induced hypertension through antagonizing αENaC-mediated urinary sodium reabsorption. Dietary capsaicin may represent a promising lifestyle intervention in populations exposed to a high dietary salt intake.

  17. A novel SCN9A mutation responsible for primary erythromelalgia and is resistant to the treatment of sodium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Tzu; Huang, Po-Yuan; Yen, Chen-Tung; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Primary erythromelalgia (PE) is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder characterized by severe burning pain and erythema in the extremities upon heat stimuli or exercise. Mutations in human SCN9A gene, encoding the α-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(v)1.7, were found to be responsible for PE. Three missense mutations of SCN9A gene have recently been identified in Taiwanese patients including a familial (I136V) and two sporadic mutations (I848T, V1316A). V1316A is a novel mutation and has not been characterized yet. Topologically, I136V is located in DI/S1 segment and both I848T and V1316A are located in S4-S5 linker region of DII and DIII domains, respectively. To characterize the elelctrophysiological manifestations, the channel conductance with whole-cell patch clamp was recorded on the over-expressed Chinese hamster overy cells. As compared with wild type, the mutant channels showed a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage dependent activation and a depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation. The recovery time from channel inactivation is faster in the mutant than in the wild type channels. Since warmth can trigger and exacerbate symptoms, we then examine the influence of tempearture on the sodium channel conduction. At 35°C, I136V and V1316A mutant channels exhibit a further hyperpolarizing shift at activation as compared with wild type channel, even though wild type channel also produced a significant hyperpolarizing shift compared to that of 25°C. High temperature caused a significant depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation in all three mutant channels. These findings may confer to the hyperexcitability of sensory neurons, especially at high temperature. In order to identifying an effective treatment, we tested the IC₅₀ values of selective sodium channel blockers, lidocaine and mexiletine. The IC₅₀ for mexiletine is lower for I848T mutant channel as compared to that of the wild type and other two

  18. NaV1.8 channels are expressed in large, as well as small, diameter sensory afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie Y; Baxter, James C; Howard, Jason R; Elmslie, Keith S

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) express a subset of voltage dependent sodium channels (NaV) including NaV1.1, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9. Previous work supported preferential localization of NaV1.8 channels to small-medium diameter, nociceptive afferent neurons. However, we recently published evidence that NaV1.8 was the dominant NaV channel expressed in the somas of small, medium and large diameter muscle afferent neurons, which is consistent with other reports. Here, we extend those results to show that NaV1.8 expression is not correlated with afferent neuron diameter. Using immunocytochemistry, we found NaV1.8 expression in ~50% of sensory afferent neurons with diameters ranging from 20 to 70 µm. In addition, electrophysiological analysis shows that the kinetic and inactivation properties of NaV1.8 current are invariant with neuron size. These data add further support to the idea that NaV1.8 contributes to the electrical excitability of both nociceptive and non-nociceptive sensory neurons. PMID:23064159

  19. Insight toward epithelial Na+ channel mechanism revealed by the acid-sensing ion channel 1 structure.

    PubMed

    Stockand, James D; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Booth, Rachell E; Silverthorn, Dee U

    2008-09-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) protein family includes a diverse group of ion channels, including nonvoltage-gated Na(+) channels of epithelia and neurons, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1). In mammalian epithelia, ENaC helps regulate Na(+) and associated water transport, making it a critical determinant of systemic blood pressure and pulmonary mucosal fluidity. In the nervous system, ENaC/DEG proteins are related to sensory transduction. While the importance and physiological function of these ion channels are established, less is known about their structure. One hallmark of the ENaC/DEG channel family is that each channel subunit has only two transmembrane domains connected by an exceedingly large extracellular loop. This subunit structure was recently confirmed when Jasti and colleagues determined the crystal structure of chicken ASIC1, a neuronal acid-sensing ENaC/DEG channel. By mapping ENaC to the structural coordinates of cASIC1, as we do here, we hope to provide insight toward ENaC structure. ENaC, like ASIC1, appears to be a trimeric channel containing 1alpha, 1beta, and 1gamma subunit. Heterotrimeric ENaC and monomeric ENaC subunits within the trimer possibly contain many of the major secondary, tertiary, and quaternary features identified in cASIC1 with a few subtle but critical differences. These differences are expected to have profound effects on channel behavior. In particular, they may contribute to ENaC insensitivity to acid and to its constitutive activity in the absence of time- and ligand-dependent inactivation. Experiments resulting from this comparison of cASIC1 and ENaC may help clarify unresolved issues related to ENaC architecture, and may help identify secondary structures and residues critical to ENaC function.

  20. Kinetic analysis of the denaturation process by alcohols of sodium channels in squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Kukita, F; Mitaku, S

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of several aliphatic alcohols on sodium currents were examined in the intracellularly perfused squid giant axon when the same concentration of alcohol was applied on both sides of the membrane. 2. An irreversible suppression of sodium currents, accompanied by anaesthesia at high alcohol concentration, was examined in detail using four aliphatic alcohols, that is, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol and 1-pentanol. 3. This irreversible effect seemed to be attributable to the sequential denaturation of sodium channels, because the kinetics, the current-voltage relation and the sodium channel activation-voltage curve did not change after the sodium current decreased. 4. The time course of the remaining sodium conductance was measured as a function of the sum of the alcohol application time by repeating the process of applying and completely washing out alcohol. The remaining sodium conductance decayed as a function of time in a single exponential manner. This decay time constant depended strongly on the concentration of alcohol and could be assumed to be the denaturation time constant of the sodium channel. 5. The denaturation time constant decreased as the alcohol concentration increased. This time constant is proportional to the Nth power of the alcohol concentration. The N values are 4.3, 4.5, 5.8 and 7.6 for ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively. This implies that alcohol molecules bind to a restricted number of specific sites in the sodium channel protein to cause the denaturation. 6. The concentration of alcohol which caused the same amount of denaturation is related to the exponential function of the carbon number of the alcohol. Considering the partition coefficient of alcohol between lipid and aqueous solution, the concentration of alcohol in the membrane which denatured half of the sodium channels in 2 h can be calculated to be 0.5 M for all alcohols. PMID:8246196

  1. Molecular basis of the remarkable species selectivity of an insecticidal sodium channel toxin from the African spider Augacephalus ezendami

    PubMed Central

    Herzig, Volker; Ikonomopoulou, Maria; Smith, Jennifer J.; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Gilchrist, John; Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Rezende, Fernanda Oliveira; Moreira, Luciano Andrade; Nicholson, Graham M.; Bosmans, Frank; King, Glenn F.

    2016-01-01

    The inexorable decline in the armament of registered chemical insecticides has stimulated research into environmentally-friendly alternatives. Insecticidal spider-venom peptides are promising candidates for bioinsecticide development but it is challenging to find peptides that are specific for targeted pests. In the present study, we isolated an insecticidal peptide (Ae1a) from venom of the African spider Augacephalus ezendami (family Theraphosidae). Injection of Ae1a into sheep blowflies (Lucilia cuprina) induced rapid but reversible paralysis. In striking contrast, Ae1a was lethal to closely related fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) but induced no adverse effects in the recalcitrant lepidopteran pest Helicoverpa armigera. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that Ae1a potently inhibits the voltage-gated sodium channel BgNaV1 from the German cockroach Blattella germanica by shifting the threshold for channel activation to more depolarized potentials. In contrast, Ae1a failed to significantly affect sodium currents in dorsal unpaired median neurons from the American cockroach Periplaneta americana. We show that Ae1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor and that sensitivity to the toxin is conferred by natural sequence variations in the S1–S2 loop of domain II. The phyletic specificity of Ae1a provides crucial information for development of sodium channel insecticides that target key insect pests without harming beneficial species. PMID:27383378

  2. Molecular basis of the remarkable species selectivity of an insecticidal sodium channel toxin from the African spider Augacephalus ezendami.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Volker; Ikonomopoulou, Maria; Smith, Jennifer J; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Gilchrist, John; Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Rezende, Fernanda Oliveira; Moreira, Luciano Andrade; Nicholson, Graham M; Bosmans, Frank; King, Glenn F

    2016-01-01

    The inexorable decline in the armament of registered chemical insecticides has stimulated research into environmentally-friendly alternatives. Insecticidal spider-venom peptides are promising candidates for bioinsecticide development but it is challenging to find peptides that are specific for targeted pests. In the present study, we isolated an insecticidal peptide (Ae1a) from venom of the African spider Augacephalus ezendami (family Theraphosidae). Injection of Ae1a into sheep blowflies (Lucilia cuprina) induced rapid but reversible paralysis. In striking contrast, Ae1a was lethal to closely related fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) but induced no adverse effects in the recalcitrant lepidopteran pest Helicoverpa armigera. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that Ae1a potently inhibits the voltage-gated sodium channel BgNaV1 from the German cockroach Blattella germanica by shifting the threshold for channel activation to more depolarized potentials. In contrast, Ae1a failed to significantly affect sodium currents in dorsal unpaired median neurons from the American cockroach Periplaneta americana. We show that Ae1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor and that sensitivity to the toxin is conferred by natural sequence variations in the S1-S2 loop of domain II. The phyletic specificity of Ae1a provides crucial information for development of sodium channel insecticides that target key insect pests without harming beneficial species. PMID:27383378

  3. Assessment of sodium channel mutations in Makah Tribal members of the U.S. Pacific Northwest as a potential mechanism of resistance to paralytic shellfish poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nicolaus G.; Robertson, Alison; Grattan, Lynn M.; Pendleton, Steve; Roberts, Sparkle; Tracy, J. Kathleen; Trainer, Vera L.

    2015-01-01

    The Makah Tribe of Neah Bay, Washington, has historically relied on the subsistence harvest of coastal seafood, including shellfish, which remains an important cultural and ceremonial resource. Tribal legend describes visitors from other tribes that died from eating shellfish collected on Makah lands. These deaths were believed to be caused by paralytic shellfish poisoning, a human illness caused by ingestion of shellfish contaminated with saxitoxins, which are produced by toxin-producing marine dinoflagellates on which the shellfish feed. These paralytic shellfish toxins include saxitoxin, a potent Na+ channel antagonist that binds to the pore region of voltage gated Na+ channels. Amino acid mutations in the Na+ channel pore have been demonstrated to confer resistance to saxitoxin in softshell clam populations exposed to paralytic shellfish toxins present in their environment. Because of the notion of resistance to paralytic shellfish toxins, we aimed to determine if a resistance strategy was possible in humans with historical exposure to toxins in shellfish. We collected, extracted and purified DNA from buccal swabs of 83 volunteer Makah tribal members and sequenced the skeletal muscle Na+ channel (Nav1.4) at nine loci to characterize potential mutations in the relevant saxitoxin binding regions. No mutations of these specific regions were identified after comparison to a reference sequence. This study suggests that any resistance of Makah Tribal members to saxitoxin is not a function of Nav1.4 modification but may be due to mutations in neuronal or cardiac sodium channels or some other mechanism unrelated to sodium channel function.

  4. Nerve compression activates selective nociceptive pathways and upregulates peripheral sodium channel expression in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Frieboes, Laura Rummler; Palispis, Winnie Anne; Gupta, Ranjan

    2010-06-01

    Chronic nerve compression (CNC) injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, are common musculoskeletal conditions that affect patients with debilitating loss of sensory function and pain. Although early detection and treatment are important, our understanding of pain-related molecular mechanisms remains largely unclear. Here we investigate these mechanisms using an animal model for CNC injury. To confirm that CNC injury induces pain, we assessed expression of c-fos, a gene that is rapidly expressed in spinal sensory afferents in response to painful peripheral stimuli, and TNF-alpha and IL-6, two proinflammatory cytokines that are crucial to development of inflammatory-mediated pain. Results show c-fos upregulation 1-2 weeks postinjury in the absence of TNF-alpha or IL-6 expression, indicating increased neural sensitivity without an inflammatory response. This is consistent with previous studies that showed no morphologic evidence of inflammation in the CNC model. Surprisingly, we also found de novo expression of Na(V)1.8, a sodium channel linked to the development of neuropathic pain, in endoneurial Schwann cells following injury. Until now, Na(V)1.8 expression was thought to be restricted to sensory neurons. CNC injury appears to be a unique model of noninflammatory neuropathic pain. Further investigation of the underlying molecular basis could yield promising targets for early diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Block of two subtypes of sodium channels in cockroach neurons by indoxacarb insecticides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xilong; Ikeda, Tomoko; Salgado, Vincent L; Yeh, Jay Z; Narahashi, Toshio

    2005-06-01

    Indoxacarb, a novel insecticide, and its decarbomethoxyllated metabolite, DCJW, are known to block voltage-gated Na(+) channels in insects and mammals, but the mechanism of block is not yet well understood. The present study was undertaken to characterize the action of indoxacarb and DCJW on cockroach Na(+) channels. Na(+) currents were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique from neurons acutely dissociated from thoracic ganglia of the American cockroach Periplaneta americana L. Two types of tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) currents were observed, with different voltage dependencies of channel inactivation. Type-I Na(+) currents were inactivated at more negative potentials than type-II Na(+) currents. As a result, these two types of Na(+) channels responded to indoxacarb compounds differentially. At a holding potential of -100 mV, type-I Na(+) currents were inhibited reversibly by 1 microM indoxacarb and irreversibly by 1 microM DCJW in a voltage-dependent manner, whereas type-II Na(+) currents were not affected by either of the compound. However, type-II Na(+) currents were inhibited by indoxacarb or DCJW at more depolarizing membrane potentials, ranging from -60 to -40 mV. The slow inactivation curves of type-I and type-II Na(+) channels were significantly shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction by indoxacarb and DCJW, suggesting that these compounds have high affinities for the inactivated state of the Na(+) channels. It was concluded that the differential blocking actions of indoxacarb insecticides on type-I and type-II Na(+) currents resulted from their different voltage dependence of Na(+) channel inactivation. The irreversible nature of DCJW block may be partially responsible for its potent action in insects.

  6. Sodium channel Nav1.6 accumulates at the site of infraorbital nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Michael A; Freking, Angelique R; Johnson, Lonnie R; Levinson, S Rock

    2007-01-01

    Background Sodium channel (NaCh) expressions change following nerve and inflammatory lesions and this change may contribute to the activation of pain pathways. In a previous study we found a dramatic increase in the size and density of NaCh accumulations, and a remodeling of NaChs at intact and altered myelinated sites at a location just proximal to a combined partial axotomy and chromic suture lesion of the rat infraorbital nerve (ION) with the use of an antibody that identifies all NaCh isoforms. Here we evaluate the contribution of the major nodal NaCh isoform, Nav1.6, to this remodeling of NaChs following the same lesion. Sections of the ION from normal and ION lesioned subjects were double-stained with antibodies against Nav1.6 and caspr (contactin-associated protein; a paranodal protein to identify nodes of Ranvier) and then z-series of optically sectioned images were captured with a confocal microscope. ImageJ (NIH) software was used to quantify the average size and density of Nav1.6 accumulations, while additional single fiber analyses measured the axial length of the nodal gap, and the immunofluorescence intensity of Nav1.6 in nodes and of caspr in the paranodal region. Results The findings showed a significant increase in the average size and density of Nav1.6 accumulations in lesioned IONs when compared to normal IONs. The results of the single fiber analyses in caspr-identified typical nodes showed an increased axial length of the nodal gap, an increased immunofluorescence intensity of nodal Nav1.6 and a decreased immunofluorescence intensity of paranodal caspr in lesioned IONs when compared to normal IONs. In the lesioned IONs, Nav1.6 accumulations were also seen in association with altered caspr-relationships, such as heminodes. Conclusion The results of the present study identify Nav1.6 as one isoform involved in the augmentation and remodeling of NaChs at nodal sites following a combined partial axotomy and chromic suture ION lesion. The

  7. Dysregulation of voltage-gated sodium channels by ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2 in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Laedermann, Cédric J; Cachemaille, Matthieu; Kirschmann, Guylène; Pertin, Marie; Gosselin, Romain-Daniel; Chang, Isabelle; Albesa, Maxime; Towne, Chris; Schneider, Bernard L; Kellenberger, Stephan; Abriel, Hugues; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2013-07-01

    Peripheral neuropathic pain is a disabling condition resulting from nerve injury. It is characterized by the dysregulation of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. The mechanisms underlying the altered expression of Na(v)s remain unknown. This study investigated the role of the E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, which is known to ubiquitylate Navs, in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain in mice. The spared nerve injury (SNI) model of traumatic nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain was used, and an Na(v)1.7-specific inhibitor, ProTxII, allowed the isolation of Na(v)1.7-mediated currents. SNI decreased NEDD4-2 expression in DRG cells and increased the amplitude of Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.8 currents. The redistribution of Na(v)1.7 channels toward peripheral axons was also observed. Similar changes were observed in the nociceptive DRG neurons of Nedd4L knockout mice (SNS-Nedd4L(-/-)). SNS-Nedd4L(-/-) mice exhibited thermal hypersensitivity and an enhanced second pain phase after formalin injection. Restoration of NEDD4-2 expression in DRG neurons using recombinant adenoassociated virus (rAAV2/6) not only reduced Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.8 current amplitudes, but also alleviated SNI-induced mechanical allodynia. These findings demonstrate that NEDD4-2 is a potent posttranslational regulator of Na(v)s and that downregulation of NEDD4-2 leads to the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons and contributes to the genesis of pathological pain. PMID:23778145

  8. SODIUM CHANNELS (NAV1.2/B1) EXPRESSED IN XENOPUS OOCYTES DEMONSTRATE SENSITIVITY TO PYRETHROIDS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSCs) are hypothesized to be a primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. However, multiple isoforms of VSSCs exist and the sensitivity of different isoforms to pyrethroids has not been well characterized. The Nav1.2/1 channel predominates in a...

  9. Cytogenetic and molecular localization of tipE: A gene affecting sodium channels in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, G.; Deak, P.; Hall, L.M.

    1995-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels play a key role in nerve cells where they are responsible for the increase in sodium permeability during the rising phase of action potentials. In Drosophila melanogaster a subset of temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations affect sodium channel function. One such mutation is temperature-induced paralysis locus E (tipE), which has been shown by electrophysiology and ligand binding studies to reduce sodium channel numbers. Three new {gamma}-ray-induced tipE alleles associated with either visible deletions in 64AB or a translocation breakpoint within 64B2 provide landmarks for positional cloning of tipE. Beginning with the flanking cloned gene Ras2, a 140-kb walk across the translocation breakpoint was completed. Germline transformation using a 42-kb cosmid clone and successively smaller subclones localized the tipE gene within a 7.4-kb genomic DNA segment. Although this chromosome region is rich in transcripts, only three overlapping mRNAs (5.4, 4.4, and 1.7 kb) lie completely within the smallest rescuing construct. The small sizes of the rescuing construct and transcripts suggests that tipE does not encode a standard sodium channel {alpha}-subunit with four homologous repeats. Sequencing these transcripts will elucidate the role of the tipE gene product in sodium channel functional regulation. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Cloning and expression of a FMRFamide-gated Na+ channel from Helisoma trivolvis and comparison with the native neuronal channel

    PubMed Central

    Jeziorski, Michael C; Green, Kevin A; Sommerville, John; Cottrell, Glen A

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned a cDNA encoding a Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2 (FMRFamide)-gated Na+ channel from nervous tissue of the pond snail Helisoma trivolvis (HtFaNaC) and expressed the channel in Xenopus oocytes. The deduced amino acid sequence of the protein expressed by HtFaNaC is 65 % identical to that of the FMRFamide-gated channel cloned from Helix aspersa (HaFaNaC). HtFaNaC expressed in oocytes was less sensitive to FMRFamide (EC50 = 70 μM) than HaFaNaC (EC50 = 2 μM). The two had a similar selectivity for Na+. The amplitude of the FMRFamide response of HtFaNaC was increased by reducing the extracellular concentration of divalent cations. The conductance of the two channels was similar, but the mean open time of unitary events was shorter for expressed HtFaNaC compared to expressed HaFaNaC. Each channel was susceptible to peptide block by high agonist concentrations. In marked contrast to HaFaNaC and other amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels, amiloride, and the related drugs benzamil and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA), enhanced the FMRFamide response in oocytes expressing HtFaNaC cRNA. The potentiating effects of EIPA and benzamil were greater than those of amiloride. Unitary current analysis showed that with such drugs, there was channel blockade as well as an increased probability of channel opening. The similar permeability of the oocyte-expressed HtFaNaC and the Helisoma neuronal channel, and the susceptibility of both to agonist blockade and blockade by divalent cations, suggest that the channels are the same. However, neuronal channels were less susceptible to enhancement by amiloride analogues and in some patches were more sensitive to FMRFamide than expressed HtFaNaC. PMID:10878095

  11. Discovery of Diphenyl Amine Based Sodium Channel Blockers, Effective Against hNav1.2

    PubMed Central

    Hudgens, Debjani P.; Taylor, Catherine; Batts, Timothy W.; Patel, Manoj K.; Brown, Milton L.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new therapies for chronic pain is an area of unmet medical need. Central to pathways of chronic pain is the upregulation of voltage gated sodium channels. The use of tricyclic antidepressants, which also have sodium channel activity, in chronic pain therapy prompted us to develop novel compounds from this scaffold. Herein, we show that the tricyclic moiety is not needed for effective inhibition of the [3H]-BTX binding site and sodium currents of hNav1.2. Our lead compound (6), containing a diphenyl amine motif demonstrated a 53.2% inhibitory block of Nav1.2 current at 10 μM, which is greater than 50% increase in current block in comparison to the amitriptyline standard. Altogether our study establishes that the tricyclic motif is unnecessary for hNav1.2 activity and modification of the amine portion is detrimental to sodium channel block. PMID:17035036

  12. On the Natural and Unnatural History of the Voltage-Gated Na(+) Channel.

    PubMed

    Moczydlowski, E G

    2016-01-01

    This review glances at the voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) channel (NaV) from the skewed perspective of natural history and the history of ideas. Beginning with the earliest natural philosophers, the objective of biological science and physiology was to understand the basis of life and discover its intimate secrets. The idea that the living state of matter differs from inanimate matter by an incorporeal spirit or mystical force was central to vitalism, a doctrine based on ancient beliefs that persisted until the last century. Experimental electrophysiology played a major role in the abandonment of vitalism by elucidating physiochemical mechanisms that explained the electrical excitability of muscle and nerve. Indeed, as a principal biomolecule underlying membrane excitability, the NaV channel may be considered as the physical analog or surrogate for the vital spirit once presumed to animate higher forms of life. NaV also epitomizes the "other secret of life" and functions as a quantal transistor element of biological intelligence. Subplots of this incredible but true story run the gamut from electric fish to electromagnetism, invention of the battery, venomous animals, neurotoxins, channelopathies, arrhythmia, anesthesia, astrobiology, etc.

  13. On the Natural and Unnatural History of the Voltage-Gated Na(+) Channel.

    PubMed

    Moczydlowski, E G

    2016-01-01

    This review glances at the voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) channel (NaV) from the skewed perspective of natural history and the history of ideas. Beginning with the earliest natural philosophers, the objective of biological science and physiology was to understand the basis of life and discover its intimate secrets. The idea that the living state of matter differs from inanimate matter by an incorporeal spirit or mystical force was central to vitalism, a doctrine based on ancient beliefs that persisted until the last century. Experimental electrophysiology played a major role in the abandonment of vitalism by elucidating physiochemical mechanisms that explained the electrical excitability of muscle and nerve. Indeed, as a principal biomolecule underlying membrane excitability, the NaV channel may be considered as the physical analog or surrogate for the vital spirit once presumed to animate higher forms of life. NaV also epitomizes the "other secret of life" and functions as a quantal transistor element of biological intelligence. Subplots of this incredible but true story run the gamut from electric fish to electromagnetism, invention of the battery, venomous animals, neurotoxins, channelopathies, arrhythmia, anesthesia, astrobiology, etc. PMID:27586279

  14. Blood Pressure and Amiloride-Sensitive Sodium Channels in Vascular and Renal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G.; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Tarjus, Antoine; Sheng, Shaohu; Oberleithner, Hans; Kleyman, Thomas R.; Jaisser, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    This review is focused on the expression and regulation of amiloride-sensitive sodium channels in the epithelial cells of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ENaC) and amiloride-sensitive sodium channel activity in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Guyton’s hypothesis stated that blood pressure control is critically dependent on vascular tone and fluid handling by the kidney. With the study of Mendelian forms of hypertension and their corresponding transgenic mouse models, the main components of the aldosterone- and angiotensin-dependent sodium transporters have been identified over the past 20 years. Proteolytic processing of the ENaC external domain, and inhibition by increased sodium concentrations are important features of the ENaC complexes expressed in the distal nephron. In contrast, amiloride-sensitive sodium channels expressed in the vascular system are activated by increased external sodium concentrations, resulting in changes in the mechanical properties and function of endothelial cells. Mechano-sensitivity and shear stress affect both epithelial and vascular sodium channel activity. The synergistic effects and complementary regulation of the epithelial and vascular systems are consistent with the Guytonian model of volume and blood pressure regulation, and may reflect sequential evolution of the two systems. The integration of vascular tone, renal perfusion and regulation of renal sodium reabsorption is the central underpinning of the Guytonian model. We summarize the recent evidence in this review that describes the central role of amiloride-sensitive sodium channels in the efferent (e.g., vascular) and afferent (e.g., epithelial) arms of this homeostatic system. PMID:24419567

  15. Functional Interaction between the Scaffold Protein Kidins220/ARMS and Neuronal Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Cesca, Fabrizia; Satapathy, Annyesha; Ferrea, Enrico; Nieus, Thierry; Benfenati, Fabio; Scholz-Starke, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Kidins220 (kinase D-interacting substrate of 220 kDa)/ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning (ARMS) acts as a signaling platform at the plasma membrane and is implicated in a multitude of neuronal functions, including the control of neuronal activity. Here, we used the Kidins220−/− mouse model to study the effects of Kidins220 ablation on neuronal excitability. Multielectrode array recordings showed reduced evoked spiking activity in Kidins220−/− hippocampal networks, which was compatible with the increased excitability of GABAergic neurons determined by current-clamp recordings. Spike waveform analysis further indicated an increased sodium conductance in this neuronal subpopulation. Kidins220 association with brain voltage-gated sodium channels was shown by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and Na+ current recordings in transfected HEK293 cells, which revealed dramatic alterations of kinetics and voltage dependence. Finally, an in silico interneuronal model incorporating the Kidins220-induced Na+ current alterations reproduced the firing phenotype observed in Kidins220−/− neurons. These results identify Kidins220 as a novel modulator of Nav channel activity, broadening our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating network excitability. PMID:26037926

  16. The role of sodium channels in the mechanism of action of antidepressants and mood stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel; Chenu, Franck; Hascoët, Martine

    2009-11-01

    Antidepressant drugs modify in different ways the activity of neurons, by increasing monoamines levels and by modulating ion channels. Sodium channels are molecular targets for antiepileptic drugs, which can also be mood stabilizers (i.e. lamotrigine, topiramate, phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproic acid). After a short overview on the sodium channels and the interaction with antidepressants and mood stabilizers, a comparison of the activity of both antidepressants and mood stabilizers with the addition of veratrine (sodium channel opener) on the forced swimming test (FST) in mice was presented. By comparing the antidepressant-like effect of the antidepressants (paroxetine, imipramine and desipramine) with the one of anticonvulsants (lamotrigine, phenytoin and topiramate) on the FST, it seems that the mechanism of action of anticonvulsants and antidepressants are different, because veratrine limits the activity of anticonvulsants but not of antidepressants. The anticonvulsants topiramate and phenytoin reduce the immobility time in the FST in a range of time similar to those induced by antidepressants, suggesting that the FST could be sensitive to both drugs. The magnitude of antidepressant-like effect of the lamotrigine (acting through an increase in monoaminergic neurotransmission and a blockade of sodium channels) in the FST is greater than what is obtained after administration of the other drugs, suggesting that this dual activity could be used as an augmentation strategy. Authors conclude that the development of new drugs acting on sodium channels could potentially be of interest as antidepressants, but also as augmentation strategies for classical antidepressants.

  17. Open-channel block by internally applied amines inhibits activation gate closure in batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, G W; French, R J

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the action of several pore-blocking amines on voltage-dependent activation gating of batrachotoxin(BTX)-activated sodium channels, from bovine heart and rat skeletal muscle, incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. Although structurally simpler, the compounds studied show general structural features and channel-inhibiting actions that resemble those of lidocaine. When applied to the cytoplasmic end of the channel, these compounds cause a rapid, voltage-dependent, open-channel block seen as a reduction in apparent single-channel amplitude (companion paper). Internal application of phenylpropanolamine, phenylethylamine, phenylmethylamine, and diethylamine, as well as causing open-channel block, reduces the probability of channel closure, producing a shift of the steady-state activation curve toward more hyperpolarizing potentials. These gating effects were observed for both cardiac and skeletal muscle channels and were not evoked by addition of equimolar N-Methyl-D-Glucamine, suggesting a specific interaction of the blockers with the channel rather than a surface charge effect. Kinetic analysis of phenylpropanolamine action on skeletal muscle channels indicated that phenylpropanolamine reduced the closed probability via two separate mechanisms. First, mean closed durations were slightly abbreviated in its presence. Second, and more important, the frequency of the gating closures was reduced. This action was correlated with the degree, and the voltage dependence, of open-channel block, suggesting that the activation gate cannot close while the pore is occluded by the blocker. Such a mechanism might underlie the previously reported immobilization of gating charge associated with local anesthetic block of unmodified sodium channels. PMID:7811914

  18. Increased renal epithelial na channel expression and activity correlate with elevation of blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Haloui, Mounsif; Tremblay, Johanne; Seda, Ondrej; Koltsova, Svetlana V; Maksimov, Georgy V; Orlov, Sergei N; Hamet, Pavel

    2013-10-01

    Elevation of blood pressure with age is one of the hallmarks of hypertension in both males and females. This study examined transcriptomic profiles in the kidney of 12-, 40-, and 80-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats and 4 recombinant inbred strains in search for functional genetic elements supporting temporal dynamics of blood pressure elevation. We found that both in males and females of spontaneously hypertensive rats and hypertensive recombinant inbred strains age-dependent blood pressure increment was accompanied by 50% heightened expression of epithelial sodium channel β- and γ-subunits. Epithelial sodium channel subunit expression correlated positively with blood pressure but correlated negatively with renin expression. Increased epithelial sodium channel activity was observed in cultured epithelial cells isolated from the kidney medulla of 80-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats but not in age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto. This difference remained evident after 24-hour treatment with aldosterone. 22Na uptake in the perfused kidney medulla was increased whereas the urinary Na/K ratio was decreased in old spontaneously hypertensive rats compared with normotensive controls. The difference was eliminated by the administration of epithelial sodium channel inhibitor benzamil. Observations in recombinant inbred strains representing various mixtures of parental hypertensive and normotensive genomes suggest that Scnn1g and Scnn1b genes themselves are not implicated in heightened expression and that the increased expression is neither secondary nor required for a partial elevation of blood pressure in contrast to spontaneously hypertensive rats. We suggest that spontaneously hypertensive rats display an intact negative feed-back between renin-angiotensin-system and epithelial Na channel activity whose upregulated expression is supported by a yet unknown mechanism.

  19. In vivo stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase enhanced tubuloglomerular feedback but reduced tubular sodium transport during high dietary NaCl intake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dan Yang; Gao, Huanhuan; Boini, Krishna M; Osswald, Hartmut; Nürnberg, Bernd; Lang, Florian

    2010-06-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is expressed in the apical membrane of cortical thick ascending limb, distal, and collecting tubules as well as macula densa cells of the kidneys. AMPK is an active modulator of epithelial Na(+) channels, Na(+)-2Cl(-)-K(+) cotransporter, and the ATP-dependent potassium channel. The present experiments explored whether AMPK participates in the regulation of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and renal tubular sodium handling. To this end, renal clearance and micropuncture experiments were performed in anesthetized rats. Under normal NaCl diet, neither TGF response nor renal fluid and sodium excretion were altered by pharmacological activation of AMPK in vivo. However, under high NaCl diet, the TGF response was significantly enhanced after intravenous or intratubular application of the AMPK activator AICAR. Moreover, AICAR application significantly increased fractional delivery of fluid and sodium to the end of the proximal tubule. High dietary NaCl intake increased the renal transcript levels encoding the AMPK-alpha1 subunit, while it decreased the expression of AMPK-beta1 and AMPK-gamma2 subunits. Immunoblots revealed that high dietary NaCl intake reduced renal expression of activated AMPK by about three times compared to normal NaCl diet whereas additional AICAR application increased AMPK activity. Our results suggest that AMPK regulates tubuloglomerular balance as well as tubular transport upon change of renal work load.

  20. Mutant bacterial sodium channels as models for local anesthetic block of eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, Natalie E; Corry, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Voltage gated sodium channels are the target of a range of local anesthetic, anti-epileptic and anti-arrhythmic compounds. But, gaining a molecular level understanding of their mode of action is difficult as we only have atomic resolution structures of bacterial sodium channels not their eukaryotic counterparts. In this study we used molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate that the binding sites of both the local anesthetic benzocaine and the anti-epileptic phenytoin to the bacterial sodium channel NavAb can be altered significantly by the introduction of point mutations. Free energy techniques were applied to show that increased aromaticity in the pore of the channel, used to emulate the aromatic residues observed in eukaryotic Nav1.2, led to changes in the location of binding and dissociation constants of each drug relative to wild type NavAb. Further, binding locations and dissociation constants obtained for both benzocaine (660 μM) and phenytoin (1 μM) in the mutant channels were within the range expected from experimental values obtained from drug binding to eukaryotic sodium channels, indicating that these mutant NavAb may be a better model for drug binding to eukaryotic channels than the wild type.

  1. Regulation of persistent Na current by interactions between β subunits of voltage-gated Na channels

    PubMed Central

    Aman, Teresa K.; Grieco-Calub, Tina M.; Chen, Chunling; Rusconi, Raffaella; Slat, Emily A.; Isom, Lori L.; Raman, Indira M.

    2009-01-01

    The β subunits of voltage-gated Na channels (Scnxb) regulate the gating of pore-forming α subunits, as well as their trafficking and localization. In heterologous expression systems, β1, β2, and β3 subunits influence inactivation and persistent current in different ways. To test how the β4 protein regulates Na channel gating, we transfected β4 into HEK cells stably expressing NaV1.1. Unlike a free peptide with a sequence from the β4 cytoplasmic domain, the full-length β4 protein did not block open channels. Instead, β4 expression favored open states by shifting activation curves negative, decreasing the slope of the inactivation curve, and increasing the percentage of non-inactivating current. Consequently, persistent current tripled in amplitude. Expression of β1 or chimeric subunits including the β1 extracellular domain, however, favored inactivation. Co-expressing NaV1.1 and β4 with β1 produced tiny persistent currents, indicating that β1 overcomes the effects of β4 in heterotrimeric channels. In contrast, β1C121W, which contains an extracellular epilepsy-associated mutation, did not counteract the destabilization of inactivation by β4, and also required unusually large depolarizations for channel opening. In cultured hippocampal neurons transfected with β4, persistent current was slightly but significantly increased. Moreover, in β4-expressing neurons from Scn1b and Scn1b/Scn2b null mice, entry into inactivated states was slowed. These data suggest that β1 and β4 have antagonistic roles, the former favoring inactivation and the latter favoring activation. Because increased Na channel availability may facilitate action potential firing, these results suggest a mechanism for seizure susceptibility of both mice and humans with disrupted β1 subunits. PMID:19228957

  2. Slc26A9 - anion exchanger, channel and Na+ transporter

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Min-Hwang; Plata, Consuelo; Zandi-Nejad, Kambiz; Sinđić, Aleksandra; Sussman, Caroline R.; Mercado, Adriana; Broumand, Vadjista; Raghuram, Viswanathan; Mount, David B.; Romero, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    The SLC26 gene family encodes anion transporters with diverse functional attributes: (a) anion exchanger, (b) anion sensor and (c) anion conductance (likely channel). We have cloned and studied Slc26a9, a paralog expressed mostly in lung and stomach. Immunohistochemistry shows that Slc26a9 is present at apical and intracellular membranes of lung and stomach epithelia. Using expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes and ion-sensitive microelectrodes, we discovered that Slc26a9 has a novel function not found in any other Slc26 proteins – cation coupling. Intracellular pH and voltage measurements show that Slc26a9 is a nCl--HCO3- exchanger, suggesting roles in gastric HCl secretion or pulmonary HCO3- secretion; Na+ electrodes and uptakes reveal that Slc26a9 has a cation-dependence. Single channel measurements indicate that Slc26a9 displays discrete open and close states. These experiments show that Slc26a9 has three discrete physiological modes: nCl--HCO3- exchanger, Cl- channel, and Na+-anion cotransporter. Thus, the Slc26a9 transporter-channel is uniquely suited for dynamic and tissue-specific physiology or regulation in epithelial tissues. PMID:19365592

  3. Putative resolution of the EEEE selectivity paradox in L-type Ca2+ and bacterial Na+ biological ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, I. Kh; Luchinsky, D. G.; Gibby, W. A. T.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Eisenberg, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    The highly selective permeation of ions through biological ion channels can be described and explained in terms of fluctuational dynamics under the influence of powerful electrostatic forces. Hence valence selectivity, e.g. between Ca2+ and Na+ in calcium and sodium channels, can be described in terms of ionic Coulomb blockade, which gives rise to distinct conduction bands and stop-bands as the fixed negative charge Q f at the selectivity filter of the channel is varied. This picture accounts successfully for a wide range of conduction phenomena in a diversity of ion channels. A disturbing anomaly, however, is that what appears to be the same electrostatic charge and structure (the so-called EEEE motif) seems to select Na+ conduction in bacterial channels but Ca2+ conduction in mammalian channels. As a possible resolution of this paradox it is hypothesised that an additional charged protein residue on the permeation path of the mammalian channel increases |{{Q}f}| by e, thereby altering the selectivity from Na+ to Ca2+. Experiments are proposed that will enable the hypothesis to be tested.

  4. Dependence of nodal sodium channel clustering on paranodal axoglial contact in the developing CNS.

    PubMed

    Rasband, M N; Peles, E; Trimmer, J S; Levinson, S R; Lux, S E; Shrager, P

    1999-09-01

    Na(+) channel clustering at nodes of Ranvier in the developing rat optic nerve was analyzed to determine mechanisms of localization, including the possible requirement for glial contact in vivo. Immunofluorescence labeling for myelin-associated glycoprotein and for the protein Caspr, a component of axoglial junctions, indicated that oligodendrocytes were present, and paranodal structures formed, as early as postnatal day 7 (P7). However, the first Na(+) channel clusters were not seen until P9. Most of these were broad, and all were excluded from paranodal regions of axoglial contact. The number of detected Na(+) channel clusters increased rapidly from P12 to P22. During this same period, conduction velocity increased sharply, and Na(+) channel clusters became much more focal. To test further whether oligodendrocyte contact directly influences Na(+) channel distributions, nodes of Ranvier in the hypomyelinating mouse Shiverer were examined. This mutant has oligodendrocyte-ensheathed axons but lacks compact myelin and normal axoglial junctions. During development Na(+) channel clusters in Shiverer mice were reduced in numbers and were in aberrant locations. The subcellular location of Caspr was disrupted, and nerve conduction properties remained immature. These results indicate that in vivo, Na(+) channel clustering at nodes depends not only on the presence of oligodendrocytes but also on specific axoglial contact at paranodal junctions. In rats, ankyrin-3/G, a cytoskeletal protein implicated in Na(+) channel clustering, was detected before Na(+) channel immunoreactivity but extended into paranodes in non-nodal distributions. In Shiverer, ankyrin-3/G labeling was abnormal, suggesting that its localization also depends on axoglial contact. PMID:10460258

  5. Phenolic acids isolated from the fungus Schizophyllum commune exert analgesic activity by inhibiting voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hui-Min; Wang, Gan; Liu, Ya-Ping; Rong, Ming-Qiang; Shen, Chuan-Bin; Yan, Xiu-Wen; Luo, Xiao-Dong; Lai, Ren

    2016-09-01

    The present study was designed to search for compounds with analgesic activity from the Schizophyllum commune (SC), which is widely consumed as edible and medicinal mushroom world. Thin layer chromatography (TLC), tosilica gel column chromatography, sephadex LH 20, and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) were used to isolate and purify compounds from SC. Structural analysis of the isolated compounds was based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The effects of these compounds on voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels were evaluated using patch clamp. The analgesic activity of these compounds was tested in two types of mouse pain models induced by noxious chemicals. Five phenolic acids identified from SC extracts in the present study included vanillic acid, m-hydroxybenzoic acid, o-hydroxybenzeneacetic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-methybenzoic acid, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid. They inhibited the activity of both tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-r) and tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-s) NaV channels. All the compounds showed low selectivity on NaV channel subtypes. After intraperitoneal injection, three compounds of these compounds exerted analgesic activity in mice. In conclusion, phenolic acids identified in SC demonstrated analgesic activity, facilitating the mechanistic studies of SC in the treatment of neurasthenia. PMID:27667511

  6. Seizure suppression through manipulating splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao

    2015-01-01

    Seizure can result from increased voltage-gated persistent sodium current expression. Although many clinically-approved antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated persistent sodium current, none exclusively repress this current without also adversely affecting the transient voltage-gated sodium current. Achieving a more selective block has significant potential for the treatment of epilepsy. Recent studies show that voltage-gated persistent sodium current amplitude is regulated by alternative splicing offering the possibility of a novel route for seizure control. In this study we identify 291 splicing regulators that, on knockdown, alter splicing of the Drosophila voltage-gated sodium channel to favour inclusion of exon K, rather than the mutually exclusive exon L. This change is associated with both a significant reduction in voltage-gated persistent sodium current, without change to transient voltage-gated sodium current, and to rescue of seizure in this model insect. RNA interference mediated knock-down, in two different seizure mutants, shows that 95 of these regulators are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration. Moreover, most suppress seizure activity in both mutants, indicative that they are part of well conserved pathways and likely, therefore, to be optimal candidates to take forward to mammalian studies. We provide proof-of-principle for such studies by showing that inhibition of a selection of regulators, using small molecule inhibitors, is similarly effective to reduce seizure. Splicing of the Drosophila sodium channel shows many similarities to its mammalian counterparts, including altering the amplitude of voltage-gated persistent sodium current. Our study provides the impetus to investigate whether manipulation of splicing of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels may be exploitable to provide effective seizure control. PMID:25681415

  7. Seizure suppression through manipulating splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao; Baines, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Seizure can result from increased voltage-gated persistent sodium current expression. Although many clinically-approved antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated persistent sodium current, none exclusively repress this current without also adversely affecting the transient voltage-gated sodium current. Achieving a more selective block has significant potential for the treatment of epilepsy. Recent studies show that voltage-gated persistent sodium current amplitude is regulated by alternative splicing offering the possibility of a novel route for seizure control. In this study we identify 291 splicing regulators that, on knockdown, alter splicing of the Drosophila voltage-gated sodium channel to favour inclusion of exon K, rather than the mutually exclusive exon L. This change is associated with both a significant reduction in voltage-gated persistent sodium current, without change to transient voltage-gated sodium current, and to rescue of seizure in this model insect. RNA interference mediated knock-down, in two different seizure mutants, shows that 95 of these regulators are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration. Moreover, most suppress seizure activity in both mutants, indicative that they are part of well conserved pathways and likely, therefore, to be optimal candidates to take forward to mammalian studies. We provide proof-of-principle for such studies by showing that inhibition of a selection of regulators, using small molecule inhibitors, is similarly effective to reduce seizure. Splicing of the Drosophila sodium channel shows many similarities to its mammalian counterparts, including altering the amplitude of voltage-gated persistent sodium current. Our study provides the impetus to investigate whether manipulation of splicing of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels may be exploitable to provide effective seizure control.

  8. Effects of Cd2+ on the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) investigated by experimental and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Mernea, Maria; Ulăreanu, Roxana; Călborean, Octavian; Chira, Sergiu; Popescu, Octavian; Mihailescu, Dan F; Cucu, Dana

    2016-07-01

    The function of the epithelial Na+ channel from the apical membrane of many Na+ transporting epithelia is modulated by various chemical compounds from the extracellular space, such as heavy metals, protons or chloride ions. We have studied the effect of extracellular Cd2+ on the function of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) in heterologously expressed Xenopus laevis oocytes and Na+-transporting epithelia. We assayed channel function as the amiloride-sensitive sodium current (I(Na)). Cd2+ rapidly and voltage-independently inhibited INa in oocytes expressing αβγ Xenopus ENaC (xENaC). The extracellular Cd2+ inhibited Na+ transport and showed no influence on ENaC trafficking, as revealed by concomitant measurements of the transepithelial current, conductance and capacitance in Na+-transporting epithelia. Instead, amiloride inhibition was noticeably diminished in the presence of Cd2+ on the apical membrane. Using molecular modeling approaches, we describe the amiloride binding sites in rat and xENaC structures, and we present four putative binding sites for Cd2+. These results indicate that ENaC functions as a sensor for external Cd2+. PMID:27045669

  9. Cardiac Na currents and the inactivating, reopening, and waiting properties of single cardiac Na channels

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na currents were examined in single dissociated ventricular myocytes from neonatal rats. Single channel and whole cell currents were measured using the patch-clamp method. The channel density was calculated as 2/micron 2, which agreed with our usual finding of four channels per membrane patch. At 20 degrees C, the single channel conductance was 20 pS. The open time distributions were fit by a single-exponential function with a mean open time of approximately 1.0 ms at membrane potentials from -60 to -40 mV. Averaged single channel and whole cell currents were similar when scaled and showed both fast and slow rates of inactivation. The inactivation and activation gating shifted quickly to hyperpolarized potentials for channels in cell-attached as well as excised patches, whereas a much slower shift occurred in whole cells. Slowly inactivating currents were present in both whole cell and single channel current measurements at potentials as positive as -40 mV. In whole cell measurements, the potential range could be extended, and slow inactivation was present at potentials as positive as -10 mV. The curves relating steady state activation and inactivation to membrane potential had very little overlap, and slow inactivation occurred at potentials that were positive to the overlap. Slow inactivation is in this way distinguishable from the overlap or window current, and the slowly inactivating current may contribute to the plateau of the rat cardiac action potential. On rare occasions, a second set of Na channels having a smaller unit conductance and briefer duration was observed. However, a separate set of threshold channels, as described by Gilly and Armstrong (1984. Nature [Lond.]. 309:448), was not found. For the commonly observed Na channels, the number of openings in some samples far exceeded the number of channels per patch and the latencies to first opening or waiting times were not sufficiently dispersed to account for the slowly

  10. Estragole blocks neuronal excitability by direct inhibition of Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Alves, K.S.; Ferreira-da-Silva, F.W.; Peixoto-Neves, D.; Viana-Cardoso, K.V.; Moreira-Júnior, L.; Oquendo, M.B.; Oliveira-Abreu, K.; Albuquerque, A.A.C.; Coelho-de-Souza, A.N.; Leal-Cardoso, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Estragole is a volatile terpenoid, which occurs naturally as a constituent of the essential oils of many plants. It has several pharmacological and biological activities. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of action of estragole on neuronal excitability. Intact and dissociated dorsal root ganglion neurons of rats were used to record action potential and Na+ currents with intracellular and patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Estragole blocked the generation of action potentials in cells with or without inflexions on their descendant (repolarization) phase (Ninf and N0 neurons, respectively) in a concentration-dependent manner. The resting potentials and input resistances of Ninf and N0 cells were not altered by estragole (2, 4, and 6 mM). Estragole also inhibited total Na+ current and tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 3.2 and 3.6 mM, respectively). Kinetic analysis of Na+ current in the presence of 4 mM estragole showed a statistically significant reduction of fast and slow inactivation time constants, indicating an acceleration of the inactivation process. These data demonstrate that estragole blocks neuronal excitability by direct inhibition of Na+ channel conductance activation. This action of estragole is likely to be relevant to the understanding of the mechanisms of several pharmacological effects of this substance. PMID:24345915

  11. Identification of a cluster of residues in transmembrane segment 6 of domain III of the cockroach sodium channel essential for the action of pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuzhe; Lee, Jung-Eun; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhang, Tianxiang; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2009-04-15

    A phenylalanine residue (Phe1519) in the sixth transmembrane segment of domain III (IIIS6) of the cockroach BgNa(v) sodium channel is required for the binding and action of pyrethroids. However, whether or not other residues in IIIS6 participate in the action of pyrethroids remains to be determined. In the present study, we conducted a systematic analysis of 20 residues in IIIS6 of the BgNa(v) channel using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. Our results show that alanine substitutions of four residues, Ile1514, Gly1516, Phe1518 and Asn1522, altered sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroid insecticides. Whereas the G1516A, F1518A and N1522A substitutions diminished sodium channel sensitivity to all seven pyrethroids examined, including four type I (lacking the alpha-cyano group at the phenoxybenzyl alcohol) and three type II (containing the alpha-cyano group) pyrethroids, the I1514A substitution enhanced sodium channel sensitivity to four type I and type II pyrethroids that contain the phenoxybenzyl alcohol only. We also show that alanine/lysine substitutions of Leu1521 and Ser1517 affected the action of BTX (batrachotoxin), but not pyrethroids. In the Kv1.2-based homology model of the open sodium channel, side chains of Ile1514, Phe1518 and Asn1522 are exposed towards helix IIS5 and linker IIS4-IIS5, which contain previously identified pyrethroid-interacting residues, whereas Ser1517 and Leu1521 face the inner pore where the BTX receptor is located. Thus the present study provides further evidence for structural models in which pyrethroids bind to the lipid-exposed interface formed by helices IIIS6, IIS5 and linker helix IIS4-IIS5, whereas BTX binds to the pore-exposed side of the IIIS6 helix.

  12. Sodium and calcium binding to Panulirus interruptus hemocyanin as studied by 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Norne, J E; Gustavsson, H; Forsén, S; Chiancone, E; Kuiper, H A; Antonini, E

    1979-08-01

    Addition of Panulirus hemocyanin to NaCl solutions produces marked changes in the 23Na relaxation parameters; they show that sodium ions interact with binding sites on the protein and exchange rapidly with the bulk. The observed non-lorentzian lineshapes and the non-exponential decay of the transverse magnetization indicate that non-extreme narrowing conditions apply and give information on the dynamics of the interaction. Panulirus hemocyanin has at least two classes of Na+ binding sites; the binding constant of the more strongly bound sodium ions is in the order of 1 X 10(2) M-1. Competition between Na+ and Ca2+ for protein binding sites is demonstrated by the effect of Ca2+ on the 23Na relaxation parameters. However, only the more strongly bound Na+ are displaced by Ca2+. The number of Ca2+ needed to displace these sodium ions is 3--5 per oxygen binding site. The 23Na relaxation parameters are influenced also by the state of oxygenation of the protein, indicating a linkage between Na+ and oxygen binding. The simplest interpretation of the data is that sodium ions bind more strongly to oxyhemocyanin in agreement with oxygen equilibrium experiments. PMID:488113

  13. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels by Conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ.

    PubMed

    Green, Brad R; Gajewiak, Joanna; Chhabra, Sandeep; Skalicky, Jack J; Zhang, Min-Min; Rivier, Jean E; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Olivera, Baldomero M; Yoshikami, Doju; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-03-25

    Cone snail toxins are well known blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels, a property that is of broad interest in biology and therapeutically in treating neuropathic pain and neurological disorders. Although most conotoxin channel blockers function by direct binding to a channel and disrupting its normal ion movement, conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ channel blocking is unique, using both favorable binding interactions with the channel and a direct tether via an intermolecular disulfide bond. Disulfide exchange is possible because conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ contains anS-cysteinylated Cys-24 residue that is capable of exchanging with a free cysteine thiol on the channel surface. Here, we present the solution structure of an analog of μO§-GVIIJ (GVIIJ[C24S]) and the results of structure-activity studies with synthetic μO§-GVIIJ variants. GVIIJ[C24S] adopts an inhibitor cystine knot structure, with two antiparallel β-strands stabilized by three disulfide bridges. The loop region linking the β-strands (loop 4) presents residue 24 in a configuration where it could bind to the proposed free cysteine of the channel (Cys-910, rat NaV1.2 numbering; at site 8). The structure-activity study shows that three residues (Lys-12, Arg-14, and Tyr-16) located in loop 2 and spatially close to residue 24 were also important for functional activity. We propose that the interaction of μO§-GVIIJ with the channel depends on not only disulfide tethering via Cys-24 to a free cysteine at site 8 on the channel but also the participation of key residues of μO§-GVIIJ on a distinct surface of the peptide. PMID:26817840

  14. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels by Conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ.

    PubMed

    Green, Brad R; Gajewiak, Joanna; Chhabra, Sandeep; Skalicky, Jack J; Zhang, Min-Min; Rivier, Jean E; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Olivera, Baldomero M; Yoshikami, Doju; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-03-25

    Cone snail toxins are well known blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels, a property that is of broad interest in biology and therapeutically in treating neuropathic pain and neurological disorders. Although most conotoxin channel blockers function by direct binding to a channel and disrupting its normal ion movement, conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ channel blocking is unique, using both favorable binding interactions with the channel and a direct tether via an intermolecular disulfide bond. Disulfide exchange is possible because conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ contains anS-cysteinylated Cys-24 residue that is capable of exchanging with a free cysteine thiol on the channel surface. Here, we present the solution structure of an analog of μO§-GVIIJ (GVIIJ[C24S]) and the results of structure-activity studies with synthetic μO§-GVIIJ variants. GVIIJ[C24S] adopts an inhibitor cystine knot structure, with two antiparallel β-strands stabilized by three disulfide bridges. The loop region linking the β-strands (loop 4) presents residue 24 in a configuration where it could bind to the proposed free cysteine of the channel (Cys-910, rat NaV1.2 numbering; at site 8). The structure-activity study shows that three residues (Lys-12, Arg-14, and Tyr-16) located in loop 2 and spatially close to residue 24 were also important for functional activity. We propose that the interaction of μO§-GVIIJ with the channel depends on not only disulfide tethering via Cys-24 to a free cysteine at site 8 on the channel but also the participation of key residues of μO§-GVIIJ on a distinct surface of the peptide.

  15. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Yuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells.

  16. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei-Wan; Li, Xin-Yuan; Liu, Hui-Bin; Wang, Zi-Rui; Hu, Qing-Qing; Li, Yu-Xia; Song, Bin-Lin; Lou, Jie; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Ma, He-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (P O ). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and P O . Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells. PMID:27635187

  17. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Yuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells. PMID:27635187

  18. Exon 11 skipping of SCN10A coding for voltage-gated sodium channels in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Schirmeyer, Jana; Szafranski, Karol; Leipold, Enrico; Mawrin, Christian; Platzer, Matthias; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2014-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.8 (encoded by SCN10A) is predominantly expressed in dorsal root ganglia(DRG) and plays a critical role in pain perception. We analyzed SCN10A transcripts isolated from human DRGs using deep sequencing and found a novel splice variant lacking exon 11, which codes for 98 amino acids of the domain I/II linker. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed an abundance of this variant of up to 5–10% in human, while no such variants were detected in mouse or rat. Since no obvious functional differences between channels with and without the exon-11 sequence were detected, it is suggested that SCN10A exon 11 skipping in humans is a tolerated event. PMID:24763188

  19. Hydroxylated analogs of mexiletine as tools for structural-requirements investigation of the sodium channel blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Cavalluzzi, Maria M; Di Mola, Antonia; Lentini, Giovanni; Lovece, Angelo; Dipalma, Antonella; Costanza, Teresa; Desaphy, Jean-François; Conte Camerino, Diana; Franchini, Carlo

    2010-06-01

    [2-(2-Aminopropoxy)-1,3-phenylene]dimethanol 1 and 4-(2-aminopropoxy)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-5-methylphenol 2, two dihydroxylated analogs of mexiletine - a well known class IB anti-arrhythmic drug - were synthesized and used as pharmacological tools to investigate the blocking-activity requirements of human skeletal muscle, voltage-gated sodium channel. The very low blocking activity shown by newly synthesized compounds corroborates the hypothesis that the presence of a phenolic group in the para-position to the aromatic moiety and/or benzylic hydroxyl groups on the aromatic moiety of local anesthetic-like drugs impairs either the transport to or the interaction with the binding site in the pore of Na(+) channels. PMID:20509146

  20. Current view on regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels by calcium and auxiliary proteins.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Geoffrey S; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-09-01

    In cardiac and skeletal myocytes, and in most neurons, the opening of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV channels) triggers action potentials, a process that is regulated via the interactions of the channels' intercellular C-termini with auxiliary proteins and/or Ca(2+) . The molecular and structural details for how Ca(2+) and/or auxiliary proteins modulate NaV channel function, however, have eluded a concise mechanistic explanation and details have been shrouded for the last decade behind controversy about whether Ca(2+) acts directly upon the NaV channel or through interacting proteins, such as the Ca(2+) binding protein calmodulin (CaM). Here, we review recent advances in defining the structure of NaV intracellular C-termini and associated proteins such as CaM or fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) to reveal new insights into how Ca(2+) affects NaV function, and how altered Ca(2+) -dependent or FHF-mediated regulation of NaV channels is perturbed in various disease states through mutations that disrupt CaM or FHF interaction. PMID:27262167

  1. [Genetic and molecular basis for sodium channel-mediated Brugada syndrome].

    PubMed

    Barajas-Martínez, Héctor; Hu, Dan; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is a genetic disease that is characterized by abnormal electrocardiogram findings and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. This syndrome is linked to mutations in the SCN5A gene in approximately 20% of Brugada syndrome probands. SCN5A encodes the α subunit of the cardiac sodium channel. Studies conducted over the past decade have identified 11 other Brugada syndrome susceptibility genes besides to SCN5A, pointing to genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome. Transmission of the disease shows an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. This brief review focuses on a reported case of sodium channel-mediated Brugada syndrome, guiding the reader through the process of identification of the genetic variants responsible for the clinically-diagnosed syndrome, mutagenesis to clone SCN5A with and without the 2 variants identified and transfection of the 2 variants into TSA201 cells to determine the functional consequence of these genetic variants on sodium channel expression and function.

  2. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Song Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Dong Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  3. Static and dynamic polarizabilities of Na{sup -} within a variationally stable coupled-channel hyperspherical method

    SciTech Connect

    Masili, Mauro; Groote, J.J. de

    2004-11-01

    Using a model potential representation combined with a variationally stable method, we present a precise calculation of the electric dipole polarizabilities of the sodium negative ion (Na{sup -}). The effective two-electron eigensolutions for Na{sup -} are obtained from a hyperspherical coupled-channel calculation. This approach allows efficient error control and insight into the system's properties through one-dimensional potential curves. Our result of 1018.3 a.u. for the static dipole polarizability is in agreement with previous calculations and supports our results for the dynamic polarizability, which has scarcely been investigated hitherto.

  4. Potential contribution of epithelial Na+ channel to net secretion of aqueous humor.

    PubMed

    Civan, M M; Peterson-Yantorno, K; Sánchez-Torres, J; Coca-Prados, M

    1997-12-01

    The aqueous humor of the eye is secreted by the bilayered ciliary epithelium, consisting of the pigmented (PE) cell layer facing the stroma and the nonpigmented (NPE) cell layer facing the aqueous humor. Cells within each layer and between the two layers are linked by gap junctions, forming a ciliary epithelial syncytium. Unidirectional secretion from the stroma to the aqueous proceeds both through the cells (the transcellular pathway) and between the cells (the paracellular pathway). Net formation of aqueous humor must, however, be the algebraic sum of unidirectional secretion and unidirectional reabsorption from the aqueous humor back into the stoma. The mechanisms potentially underlying reabsorption of aqueous humor by the NPE cells have recently been addressed by studying the regulatory response (RVI) of anisosmotically shrunken NPE cells. The results indicated that epithelial Na+ channels with a high affinity to amiloride likely contribute to reabsorption of solute from the aqueous humor. We have substantiated this possibility by using Northern analysis to identify in human ciliary body RNA a 3.7-kb transcript corresponding to the alpha-subunit of the amiloride-sensitive, alpha beta gamma-ENaC epithelial sodium channel. We have also found that the Na(+)-channel inhibitor benzamil inhibits the RVI without affecting the cell volume of isotonic cell suspensions. This observation supports the hypothesis that the low conductance, highly selective epithelial Na+ channel is activated by shrinkage and contributes to unidirectional reabsorption as aqueous humor. Examples are provided of how the integrative regulation of aqueous humor formation can involve conjugate actions on both unidirectional secretion and reabsorption. PMID:9392872

  5. Activation of the epithelial Na+ channel in the collecting duct by vasopressin contributes to water reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, Vladislav; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Stockand, James D

    2009-11-01

    We used patch-clamp electrophysiology on isolated, split-open murine collecting ducts (CD) to test the hypothesis that regulation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity is a physiologically important effect of vasopressin. Surprisingly, this has not been tested directly before. We ask whether vasopressin affects ENaC activity distinguishing between acute and chronic effects, as well as, parsing the cellular signaling pathway and molecular mechanism of regulation. In addition, we quantified possible synergistic regulation of ENaC by vasopressin and aldosterone associating this with a requirement for distal nephron Na+ reabsorption during water conservation vs. maintenance of Na+ balance. We find that vasopressin significantly increases ENaC activity within 2-3 min by increasing open probability (P(o)). This activation was dependent on adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA. Water restriction (18-24 h) and pretreatment of isolated CD with vasopressin (approximately 30 min) resulted in a similar increase in P(o). In addition, this also increased the number (N) of active ENaC in the apical membrane. Similar to P(o), increases in N were sensitive to inhibitors of AC. Stressing animals with water and salt restriction separately and jointly revealed an important effect of vasopressin: conservation of water and Na+ each independently increased ENaC activity and jointly had a synergistic effect on channel activity. These results demonstrate a quantitatively important action of vasopressin on ENaC suggesting that distal nephron Na+ reabsorption mediated by this channel contributes to maintenance of water reabsorption. In addition, our results support that the combined actions of vasopressin and aldosterone are required to achieve maximally activated ENaC. PMID:19692483

  6. Activation of the epithelial Na+ channel in the collecting duct by vasopressin contributes to water reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, Vladislav; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Stockand, James D

    2009-11-01

    We used patch-clamp electrophysiology on isolated, split-open murine collecting ducts (CD) to test the hypothesis that regulation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity is a physiologically important effect of vasopressin. Surprisingly, this has not been tested directly before. We ask whether vasopressin affects ENaC activity distinguishing between acute and chronic effects, as well as, parsing the cellular signaling pathway and molecular mechanism of regulation. In addition, we quantified possible synergistic regulation of ENaC by vasopressin and aldosterone associating this with a requirement for distal nephron Na+ reabsorption during water conservation vs. maintenance of Na+ balance. We find that vasopressin significantly increases ENaC activity within 2-3 min by increasing open probability (P(o)). This activation was dependent on adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA. Water restriction (18-24 h) and pretreatment of isolated CD with vasopressin (approximately 30 min) resulted in a similar increase in P(o). In addition, this also increased the number (N) of active ENaC in the apical membrane. Similar to P(o), increases in N were sensitive to inhibitors of AC. Stressing animals with water and salt restriction separately and jointly revealed an important effect of vasopressin: conservation of water and Na+ each independently increased ENaC activity and jointly had a synergistic effect on channel activity. These results demonstrate a quantitatively important action of vasopressin on ENaC suggesting that distal nephron Na+ reabsorption mediated by this channel contributes to maintenance of water reabsorption. In addition, our results support that the combined actions of vasopressin and aldosterone are required to achieve maximally activated ENaC.

  7. Nanomolar Bifenthrin Alters Synchronous Ca2+ Oscillations and Cortical Neuron Development Independent of Sodium Channel Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Cui, Yanjun; Nguyen, Hai M.; Jenkins, David Paul; Wulff, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Bifenthrin, a relatively stable type I pyrethroid that causes tremors and impairs motor activity in rodents, is broadly used. We investigated whether nanomolar bifenthrin alters synchronous Ca2+ oscillations (SCOs) necessary for activity-dependent dendritic development. Primary mouse cortical neurons were cultured 8 or 9 days in vitro (DIV), loaded with the Ca2+ indicator Fluo-4, and imaged using a Fluorescence Imaging Plate Reader Tetra. Acute exposure to bifenthrin rapidly increased the frequency of SCOs by 2.7-fold (EC50 = 58 nM) and decreased SCO amplitude by 36%. Changes in SCO properties were independent of modifications in voltage-gated sodium channels since 100 nM bifenthrin had no effect on the whole-cell Na+ current, nor did it influence neuronal resting membrane potential. The L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine failed to ameliorate bifenthrin-triggered SCO activity. By contrast, the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)5 antagonist MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine] normalized bifenthrin-triggered increase in SCO frequency without altering baseline SCO activity, indicating that bifenthrin amplifies mGluR5 signaling independent of Na+ channel modification. Competitive [AP-5; (−)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and noncompetitive (dizocilpine, or MK-801 [(5S,10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate]) N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists partially decreased both basal and bifenthrin-triggered SCO frequency increase. Bifenthrin-modified SCO rapidly enhanced the phosphorylation of cAMP response element–binding protein (CREB). Subacute (48 hours) exposure to bifenthrin commencing 2 DIV–enhanced neurite outgrowth and persistently increased SCO frequency and reduced SCO amplitude. Bifenthrin-stimulated neurite outgrowth and CREB phosphorylation were dependent on mGluR5 activity since MPEP normalized both responses. Collectively these data identify a new mechanism by which bifenthrin potently alters Ca2

  8. Ligand action on sodium, potassium, and calcium channels: role of permeant ions.

    PubMed

    Zhorov, Boris S; Tikhonov, Denis B

    2013-03-01

    Ion channels are targets for many naturally occurring toxins and small-molecule drugs. Despite great progress in the X-ray crystallography of ion channels, we still do not have a complete understanding of the atomistic mechanisms of channel modulation by ligands. In particular, the importance of the simultaneous interaction of permeant ions with the ligand and the channel protein has not been the focus of much attention. Considering these interactions often allows one to rationalize the highly diverse experimental data within the framework of relatively simple structural models. This has been illustrated in earlier studies on the action of local anesthetics, sodium channel activators, as well as blockers of potassium and calcium channels. Here, we discuss the available data with a view to understanding the use-, voltage-, and current carrying cation-dependence of the ligand action, paradoxes in structure--activity relationships, and effects of mutations in these ion channels.

  9. Synthesis, solution structure, and phylum selectivity of a spider delta-toxin that slows inactivation of specific voltage-gated sodium channel subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Nahoko; Little, Michelle J; Nishio, Hideki; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Tytgat, Jan; Nicholson, Graham M; Corzo, Gerardo

    2009-09-01

    Magi 4, now renamed delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a, is a 43-residue neurotoxic peptide from the venom of the hexathelid Japanese funnel-web spider (Macrothele gigas) with homology to delta-hexatoxins from Australian funnel-web spiders. It binds with high affinity to receptor site 3 on insect voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels but, unlike delta-hexatoxins, does not compete for the related site 3 in rat brain despite being previously shown to be lethal by intracranial injection. To elucidate differences in Na(V) channel selectivity, we have undertaken the first characterization of a peptide toxin on a broad range of mammalian and insect Na(V) channel subtypes showing that delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a selectively slows channel inactivation of mammalian Na(V)1.1, Na(V)1.3, and Na(V)1.6 but more importantly shows higher affinity for insect Na(V)1 (para) channels. Consequently, delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a induces tonic repetitive firing of nerve impulses in insect neurons accompanied by plateau potentials. In addition, we have chemically synthesized and folded delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a, ascertained the bonding pattern of the four disulfides, and determined its three-dimensional solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Despite modest sequence homology, we show that key residues important for the activity of scorpion alpha-toxins and delta-hexatoxins are distributed in a topologically similar manner in delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a. However, subtle differences in the toxin surfaces are important for the novel selectivity of delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a for certain mammalian and insect Na(V) channel subtypes. As such, delta-hexatoxin-Mg1a provides us with a specific tool with which to study channel structure and function and determinants for phylum- and tissue-specific activity.

  10. Synthesis, Solution Structure, and Phylum Selectivity of a Spider δ-Toxin That Slows Inactivation of Specific Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Subtypes*

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Nahoko; Little, Michelle J.; Nishio, Hideki; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Tytgat, Jan; Nicholson, Graham M.; Corzo, Gerardo

    2009-01-01

    Magi 4, now renamed δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a, is a 43-residue neurotoxic peptide from the venom of the hexathelid Japanese funnel-web spider (Macrothele gigas) with homology to δ-hexatoxins from Australian funnel-web spiders. It binds with high affinity to receptor site 3 on insect voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels but, unlike δ-hexatoxins, does not compete for the related site 3 in rat brain despite being previously shown to be lethal by intracranial injection. To elucidate differences in NaV channel selectivity, we have undertaken the first characterization of a peptide toxin on a broad range of mammalian and insect NaV channel subtypes showing that δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a selectively slows channel inactivation of mammalian NaV1.1, NaV1.3, and NaV1.6 but more importantly shows higher affinity for insect NaV1 (para) channels. Consequently, δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a induces tonic repetitive firing of nerve impulses in insect neurons accompanied by plateau potentials. In addition, we have chemically synthesized and folded δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a, ascertained the bonding pattern of the four disulfides, and determined its three-dimensional solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Despite modest sequence homology, we show that key residues important for the activity of scorpion α-toxins and δ-hexatoxins are distributed in a topologically similar manner in δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a. However, subtle differences in the toxin surfaces are important for the novel selectivity of δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a for certain mammalian and insect NaV channel subtypes. As such, δ-hexatoxin-Mg1a provides us with a specific tool with which to study channel structure and function and determinants for phylum- and tissue-specific activity. PMID:19592486

  11. Conservation of Ca2+/Calmodulin Regulation across Na and Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Yang, Philemon S.; Niu, Jacqueline; Yang, Wanjun; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, David T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+channels comprise distinct ion-channel superfamilies, yet the carboxy tails of these channels exhibit high homology hinting at a long-shared and purposeful module. For different Ca2+ channels, carboxyl-tail inter actions with calmodulin do elaborate robust and similar forms of Ca2+ regulation. However, Na channels have only shown subtler Ca2+modulation that differs among reports, challenging attempts at unified understanding. Here, by rapid Ca2+photoreleaseon to Na channels, we reset this view of Na channel regulation. For cardiac muscle channels (NaV1.5), reported effects from which most mechanistic proposals derive, we observe no Ca2+modulation. Conversely, for skeletal-muscle channels (NaV1.4), we uncover fast Ca2+ regulation eerily similar to that of Ca2+ channels. Channel opathic myotonia mutations halve NaV1.4 Ca2+ regulation, and transplanting the NaV1.4 carboxy tail onto Ca2+ channels recapitulates Ca2+ regulation. Thus we argue for the persistence and physiological relevance of an ancient Ca2+ regulatory module across Na and Ca2+ channels. PMID:24949975

  12. Magnetic properties of ternary sodium oxides Na LnO 2 ( Ln=rare earths)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuta; Wakeshima, Makoto; Hinatsu, Yukio

    2003-11-01

    Magnetic properties of ternary sodium oxides Na LnO 2 ( Ln=rare earths) are investigated. Their crystal structures are grouped into three types of structures, which are α-LiFeO 2, β-LiFeO 2, and α-NaFeO 2, depending on the size of rare earths. Their magnetic susceptibilities and specific heats have been measured from 1.8 to 300 K. Among them, NaGdO 2, NaDyO 2, and NaHoO 2 show antiferromagnetic transitions at 2.4, 2.2, and 2.4 K, respectively, and NaNdO 2 transforms to the ferromagnetic state below 2.4 K. NaSmO 2, NaErO 2, and NaYbO 2 exhibit a magnetic anomaly below 1.8 K.

  13. Comparative effects of sodium channel blockers in short term rat whole embryo culture

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Mats F; Sköld, Anna-Carin; Ericson, Ann-Christin; Annas, Anita; Villar, Rodrigo Palma; Cebers, Gvido; Hellmold, Heike; Gustafson, Anne-Lee; Webster, William S

    2013-10-15

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect on the rat embryonic heart of two experimental drugs (AZA and AZB) which are known to block the sodium channel Nav1.5, the hERG potassium channel and the L-type calcium channel. The sodium channel blockers bupivacaine, lidocaine, and the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine were used as reference substances. The experimental model was the gestational day (GD) 13 rat embryo cultured in vitro. In this model the embryonic heart activity can be directly observed, recorded and analyzed using computer assisted image analysis as it responds to the addition of test drugs. The effect on the heart was studied for a range of concentrations and for a duration up to 3 h. The results showed that AZA and AZB caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia of the embryonic heart and at high concentrations heart block. These effects were reversible on washout. In terms of potency to cause bradycardia the compounds were ranked AZB > bupivacaine > AZA > lidocaine > nifedipine. Comparison with results from previous studies with more specific ion channel blockers suggests that the primary effect of AZA and AZB was sodium channel blockage. The study shows that the short-term rat whole embryo culture (WEC) is a suitable system to detect substances hazardous to the embryonic heart. - Highlights: • Study of the effect of sodium channel blocking drugs on embryonic heart function • We used a modified method rat whole embryo culture with image analysis. • The drugs tested caused a concentration dependent bradycardia and heart block. • The effect of drugs acting on multiple ion channels is difficult to predict. • This method may be used to detect cardiotoxicity in prenatal development.

  14. Comparative effects of sodium channel blockers in short term rat whole embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Mats F; Sköld, Anna-Carin; Ericson, Ann-Christin; Annas, Anita; Villar, Rodrigo Palma; Cebers, Gvido; Hellmold, Heike; Gustafson, Anne-Lee; Webster, William S

    2013-10-15

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect on the rat embryonic heart of two experimental drugs (AZA and AZB) which are known to block the sodium channel Nav1.5, the hERG potassium channel and the l-type calcium channel. The sodium channel blockers bupivacaine, lidocaine, and the l-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine were used as reference substances. The experimental model was the gestational day (GD) 13 rat embryo cultured in vitro. In this model the embryonic heart activity can be directly observed, recorded and analyzed using computer assisted image analysis as it responds to the addition of test drugs. The effect on the heart was studied for a range of concentrations and for a duration up to 3h. The results showed that AZA and AZB caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia of the embryonic heart and at high concentrations heart block. These effects were reversible on washout. In terms of potency to cause bradycardia the compounds were ranked AZB>bupivacaine>AZA>lidocaine>nifedipine. Comparison with results from previous studies with more specific ion channel blockers suggests that the primary effect of AZA and AZB was sodium channel blockage. The study shows that the short-term rat whole embryo culture (WEC) is a suitable system to detect substances hazardous to the embryonic heart.

  15. Novel role of Rac1/WAVE signaling mechanism in regulation of the epithelial Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Karpushev, Alexey V; Levchenko, Vladislav; Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Pavlov, Tengis S; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) is an essential channel responsible for Na(+) reabsorption in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron. Consequently, ENaC is a major effector impacting systemic blood volume and pressure. We have shown recently that Rac1 increases ENaC activity, whereas Cdc42 fails to change channel activity. Here we tested whether Rac1 signaling plays a physiological role in modulating ENaC in native tissue and polarized epithelial cells. We found that Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 markedly decreased ENaC activity in freshly isolated collecting ducts. Knockdown of Rac1 in native principal cells decreased ENaC-mediated sodium reabsorption and the number of channels at the apical plasma membrane. Members of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family play a central role in the control of the actin cytoskeleton. N-WASP functions downstream of Cdc42, whereas WAVEs are effectors of Rac1 activity. N-WASP and all 3 isoforms of WAVE significantly increased ENaC activity when coexpressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. However, wiskostatin, an inhibitor of N-WASP, had no effect on ENaC activity. Immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of WAVE1 and WAVE2 and absence of N-WASP and WAVE3 in mpkCCD(c14) and M-1 principal cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis also revealed localization of WAVE1 and WAVE2 but not N-WASP in the cortical collecting duct of Sprague-Dawley rat kidneys. Moreover, patch clamp analysis revealed that Rac1 and WAVE1/2 are parts of the same signaling pathway with respect to activation of ENaC. Thus, our findings suggest that Rac1 is essential for ENaC activity and regulates the channel via WAVE proteins.

  16. Sodium channel γENaC mediates IL-17 synergized high salt induced inflammatory stress in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Amara, Suneetha; Ivy, Michael T; Myles, Elbert L; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup

    2016-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is known to play a critical role in the development of cancer. Recent evidence suggests that high salt in the tissue microenvironment induces chronic inflammatory milieu. In this report, using three breast cancer-related cell lines, we determined the molecular basis of the potential synergistic inflammatory effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) with interleukin-17 (IL-17). Combined treatment of high NaCl (0.15M) with sub-effective IL-17 (0.1 nM) induced enhanced growth in breast cancer cells along with activation of reactive nitrogen and oxygen (RNS/ROS) species known to promote cancer. Similar effect was not observed with equi-molar mannitol. This enhanced of ROS/RNS activity correlates with upregulation of γENaC an inflammatory sodium channel. The similar culture conditions have also induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNFα etc. Taken together, these data suggest that high NaCl in the cellular microenvironment induces a γENaC mediated chronic inflammatory response with a potential pro-carcinogenic effect.

  17. Sodium channel slow inactivation as a therapeutic target for myotonia congenita

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Kevin R; Norman, Jennifer; Mitchell, Jacob R; Pinter, Martin J; Rich, Mark M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with myotonia congenita have muscle hyperexcitability due to loss-of-function mutations in the chloride channel in skeletal muscle, which causes spontaneous firing of muscle action potentials (myotonia), producing muscle stiffness. In patients, muscle stiffness lessens with exercise, a change known as the warm-up phenomenon. Our goal was to identify the mechanism underlying warm up and to use this information to guide development of novel therapy. Methods To determine the mechanism underlying warm-up, we used a recently discovered drug to eliminate muscle contraction, thus allowing prolonged intracellular recording from individual muscle fibers during induction of warm-up in a mouse model of myotonia congenita. Results Changes in action potentials suggested slow inactivation of sodium channels as an important contributor to warm-up. These data suggested enhancing slow inactivation of sodium channels might offer effective therapy for myotonia. Lacosamide and ranolazine enhance slow inactivation of sodium channels and are FDA-approved for other uses in patients. We compared the efficacy of both drugs to mexiletine, a sodium channel blocker currently used to treat myotonia. In vitro studies suggested both lacosamide and ranolazine were superior to mexiletine. However, in vivo studies in a mouse model of myotonia congenita suggested side effects could limit the efficacy of lacosamide. Ranolazine produced fewer side effects and was as effective as mexiletine at a dose that produced none of mexiletine’s hypoexcitability side effects. Interpretation We conclude ranolazine has excellent therapeutic potential for treatment of patients with myotonia congenita. PMID:25515836

  18. Exploring conformational states of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb via molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cristiano; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L; Treptow, Werner

    2012-12-26

    The X-ray structure of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb has been reported in a conformation with a closed conduction pore. Comparison between this structure and the activated-open and resting-closed structures of the voltage-gated Kv1.2 potassium channel suggests that the voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) of the reported structure are not fully activated. Using the aforementioned structures of Kv1.2 as templates, molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify analogous functional conformations of NavAb. Specifically, starting from the NavAb crystal structure, conformations of the membrane-bound channel are sampled along likely pathways for activation of the VSD and opening of the pore domain. Gating charge computations suggest that a structural rearrangement comparable to that occurring between activated-open and resting-closed states is required to explain experimental values of the gating charge, thereby confirming that the reported VSD structure is likely an intermediate along the channel activation pathway. Our observation that the X-ray structure exhibits a low pore domain-opening propensity further supports this notion. The present molecular dynamics study also identifies conformations of NavAb that are seemingly related to the resting-closed and activated-open states. Our findings are consistent with recent structural and functional studies of the orthologous channels NavRh, NaChBac, and NavMs and offer possible structures for the functionally relevant conformations of NavAb.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates the epithelial sodium channel through a phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, He-Ping

    2011-09-16

    Recent studies indicate that oxidative stress mediates salt-sensitive hypertension. To test the hypothesis that the renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a target of oxidative stress, patch clamp techniques were used to determine whether ENaC in A6 distal nephron cells is regulated by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). In the cell-attached configuration, H(2)O(2) significantly increased ENaC open probability (P(o)) and single-channel current amplitude but not the unit conductance. High concentrations of exogenous H(2)O(2) are required to elevate intracellular H(2)O(2), probably because catalase, the enzyme that promotes the decomposition of H(2)O(2) to H(2)O and O(2), is highly expressed in A6 cells. The effect of H(2)O(2) on ENaC P(o) was enhanced by 3-aminotriazole, a catalase inhibitor, and abolished by overexpression of catalase, indicating that intracellular H(2)O(2) levels are critical to produce the effect. However, H(2)O(2) did not directly activate ENaC in inside-out patches. The effects of H(2)O(2) on ENaC P(o) and amiloride-sensitive Na(+) current were abolished by inhibition of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Confocal microscopy data showed that H(2)O(2) elevated phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P(3)) in the apical membrane by stimulating PI3K. Because ENaC is stimulated by PI(3,4,5)P(3), these data suggest that H(2)O(2) stimulates ENaC via PI3K-mediated increases in apical PI(3,4,5)P(3). PMID:21795700

  20. Sodium Sulfur Battery Cell Experiment (NaSBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, J. Christopher

    1997-01-01

    The Ford Motor Company published papers describing new types of secondary battery comprised of: solid, sodium ion conducting electrolyte; liquid metal electrode; redox electrode; operating temperature between 300 and 400 deg. C; specific energy of 150 Wh/kg; and a nominal voltage of 2.0 V.

  1. Local anesthetic and antiepileptic drug access and binding to a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; French, Robert J; French, Christopher; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Allen, Toby W

    2014-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are important targets in the treatment of a range of pathologies. Bacterial channels, for which crystal structures have been solved, exhibit modulation by local anesthetic and anti-epileptic agents, allowing molecular-level investigations into sodium channel-drug interactions. These structures reveal no basis for the "hinged lid"-based fast inactivation, seen in eukaryotic Nav channels. Thus, they enable examination of potential mechanisms of use- or state-dependent drug action based on activation gating, or slower pore-based inactivation processes. Multimicrosecond simulations of NavAb reveal high-affinity binding of benzocaine to F203 that is a surrogate for FS6, conserved in helix S6 of Domain IV of mammalian sodium channels, as well as low-affinity sites suggested to stabilize different states of the channel. Phenytoin exhibits a different binding distribution owing to preferential interactions at the membrane and water-protein interfaces. Two drug-access pathways into the pore are observed: via lateral fenestrations connecting to the membrane lipid phase, as well as via an aqueous pathway through the intracellular activation gate, despite being closed. These observations provide insight into drug modulation that will guide further developments of Nav inhibitors. PMID:25136136

  2. In Liddle Syndrome, Epithelial Sodium Channel Is Hyperactive Mainly in the Early Part of the Aldosterone-Sensitive Distal Nephron.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, Viatcheslav; Krueger, Bettina; Bertog, Marko; Dahlmann, Anke; Palmisano, Ralf; Korbmacher, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is rate limiting for Na(+) absorption in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron comprising the late distal convoluted tubule (DCT2), the connecting tubule (CNT), and the entire collecting duct. Liddle syndrome (pseudohyperaldosteronism), a severe form of salt-sensitive hypertension, is caused by gain-of-function mutations of ENaC, but the precise tubular site of increased ENaC function is unknown. In the cortical collecting duct (CCD), ENaC is known to be regulated by aldosterone. In contrast, we recently reported aldosterone-independent ENaC regulation in the early part of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron. Here, we investigated ENaC function in the transition zone of DCT2/CNT or CNT/CCD microdissected from mice homozygous for Liddle syndrome mutation or from wild-type control mice. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were used to measure amiloride-sensitive ENaC currents in nephron fragments from mice maintained on different sodium diets to vary plasma aldosterone levels. Our data indicate that in mice with Liddle syndrome, the primary site of increased Na(+) reabsorption is the DCT2/CNT. In addition, increased aldosterone responsiveness of ENaC in CNT/CCD may contribute to salt-sensitive hypertension in Liddle syndrome. Single channel properties of ENaC were similar in Liddle syndrome mutation and wild-type mice, but ENaC expression at the apical membrane was increased in Liddle syndrome mutation when compared with wild-type mice, in particular, in animals maintained on a high salt diet. Our findings highlight the importance of ENaC function and regulation in the early part of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron for the maintenance of sodium balance and blood pressure control.

  3. In Liddle Syndrome, Epithelial Sodium Channel Is Hyperactive Mainly in the Early Part of the Aldosterone-Sensitive Distal Nephron.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, Viatcheslav; Krueger, Bettina; Bertog, Marko; Dahlmann, Anke; Palmisano, Ralf; Korbmacher, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is rate limiting for Na(+) absorption in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron comprising the late distal convoluted tubule (DCT2), the connecting tubule (CNT), and the entire collecting duct. Liddle syndrome (pseudohyperaldosteronism), a severe form of salt-sensitive hypertension, is caused by gain-of-function mutations of ENaC, but the precise tubular site of increased ENaC function is unknown. In the cortical collecting duct (CCD), ENaC is known to be regulated by aldosterone. In contrast, we recently reported aldosterone-independent ENaC regulation in the early part of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron. Here, we investigated ENaC function in the transition zone of DCT2/CNT or CNT/CCD microdissected from mice homozygous for Liddle syndrome mutation or from wild-type control mice. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were used to measure amiloride-sensitive ENaC currents in nephron fragments from mice maintained on different sodium diets to vary plasma aldosterone levels. Our data indicate that in mice with Liddle syndrome, the primary site of increased Na(+) reabsorption is the DCT2/CNT. In addition, increased aldosterone responsiveness of ENaC in CNT/CCD may contribute to salt-sensitive hypertension in Liddle syndrome. Single channel properties of ENaC were similar in Liddle syndrome mutation and wild-type mice, but ENaC expression at the apical membrane was increased in Liddle syndrome mutation when compared with wild-type mice, in particular, in animals maintained on a high salt diet. Our findings highlight the importance of ENaC function and regulation in the early part of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron for the maintenance of sodium balance and blood pressure control. PMID:27170740

  4. Adaptive evolution of voltage-gated sodium channels: The first 800 million years

    PubMed Central

    Zakon, Harold H.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+-permeable (Nav) channels form the basis for electrical excitability in animals. Nav channels evolved from Ca2+ channels and were present in the common ancestor of choanoflagellates and animals, although this channel was likely permeable to both Na+ and Ca2+. Thus, like many other neuronal channels and receptors, Nav channels predated neurons. Invertebrates possess two Nav channels (Nav1 and Nav2), whereas vertebrate Nav channels are of the Nav1 family. Approximately 500 Mya in early chordates Nav channels evolved a motif that allowed them to cluster at axon initial segments, 50 million years later with the evolution of myelin, Nav channels “capitalized” on this property and clustered at nodes of Ranvier. The enhancement of conduction velocity along with the evolution of jaws likely made early gnathostomes fierce predators and the dominant vertebrates in the ocean. Later in vertebrate evolution, the Nav channel gene family expanded in parallel in tetrapods and teleosts (∼9 to 10 genes in amniotes, 8 in teleosts). This expansion occurred during or after the late Devonian extinction, when teleosts and tetrapods each diversified in their respective habitats, and coincided with an increase in the number of telencephalic nuclei in both groups. The expansion of Nav channels may have allowed for more sophisticated neural computation and tailoring of Nav channel kinetics with potassium channel kinetics to enhance energy savings. Nav channels show adaptive sequence evolution for increasing diversity in communication signals (electric fish), in protection against lethal Nav channel toxins (snakes, newts, pufferfish, insects), and in specialized habitats (naked mole rats). PMID:22723361

  5. Three Peptide Modulators of the Human Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel 1.7, an Important Analgesic Target, from the Venom of an Australian Tarantula.

    PubMed

    Chow, Chun Yuen; Cristofori-Armstrong, Ben; Undheim, Eivind A B; King, Glenn F; Rash, Lachlan D

    2015-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are responsible for propagating action potentials in excitable cells. NaV1.7 plays a crucial role in the human pain signalling pathway and it is an important therapeutic target for treatment of chronic pain. Numerous spider venom peptides have been shown to modulate the activity of NaV channels and these peptides represent a rich source of research tools and therapeutic lead molecules. The aim of this study was to determine the diversity of NaV1.7-active peptides in the venom of an Australian Phlogius sp. tarantula and to characterise their potency and subtype selectivity. We isolated three novel peptides, μ-TRTX-Phlo1a, -Phlo1b and -Phlo2a, that inhibit human NaV1.7 (hNaV1.7). Phlo1a and Phlo1b are 35-residue peptides that differ by one amino acid and belong in NaSpTx family 2. The partial sequence of Phlo2a revealed extensive similarity with ProTx-II from NaSpTx family 3. Phlo1a and Phlo1b inhibit hNaV1.7 with IC50 values of 459 and 360 nM, respectively, with only minor inhibitory activity on rat NaV1.2 and hNaV1.5. Although similarly potent at hNaV1.7 (IC50 333 nM), Phlo2a was less selective, as it also potently inhibited rNaV1.2 and hNaV1.5. All three peptides cause a depolarising shift in the voltage-dependence of hNaV1.7 activation. PMID:26134258

  6. ERp29 regulates epithelial sodium channel functional expression by promoting channel cleavage.

    PubMed

    Grumbach, Yael; Bikard, Yann; Suaud, Laurence; Chanoux, Rebecca A; Rubenstein, Ronald C

    2014-10-15

    The epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) plays a key role in the regulation of blood pressure and airway surface liquid volume. ERp29 is a 29-kDa thioredoxin-homologous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein that has only a single cysteine instead of the usual thioredoxin CXXC motif. Our group previously demonstrated that ERp29 promotes biogenesis of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). On the basis of similarities of CFTR and ENaC trafficking, we hypothesized that ERp29 would also regulate ENaC biogenesis and functional expression. In epithelial cells, overexpression of wild-type (wt) ERp29 increased ENaC functional expression [amiloride-sensitive short-circuit current (Isc)] in Ussing chamber experiments, as well as the abundance of the cleaved form of γ-ENaC in whole cell lysates. In contrast, siRNA-mediated depletion of ERp29 or overexpression of a mutant ERp29 lacking its single cysteine (C157S ERp29) decreased ENaC functional expression. Cells in which wt ERp29 was overexpressed had a smaller fractional increase in amiloride-sensitive Isc when trypsin was applied to the apical surface to activate uncleaved ENaC, while cells in which C157S ERp29 was overexpressed or ERp29 was depleted had a significantly greater fractional increase in amiloride-sensitive Isc in response to trypsin. Interestingly, these observations were not associated with altered expression of β-ENaC at the apical surface. Instead, ERp29 appeared to promote the interaction of β-ENaC with the Sec24D cargo recognition component of the coat complex II ER exit machinery. Together, these data support the hypothesis that ERp29 directs ENaC toward the Golgi, where it undergoes cleavage during its biogenesis and trafficking to the apical membrane. PMID:24944201

  7. Cell-free expression of a functional pore-only sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Kovácsová, Gabriela; Gustavsson, Emil; Wang, Jiajun; Kreir, Mohamed; Peuker, Sebastian; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels participate in the propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. Eukaryotic Navs are pseudo homotetrameric polypeptides, comprising four repeats of six transmembrane segments (S1–S6). The first four segments form the voltage-sensing domain and S5 and S6 create the pore domain with the selectivity filter. Prokaryotic Navs resemble these characteristics, but are truly tetrameric. They can typically be efficiently synthesized in bacteria, but production in vitro with cell-free synthesis has not been demonstrated. Here we report the cell-free expression and purification of a prokaryotic tetrameric pore-only sodium channel. We produced milligram quantities of the functional channel protein as characterized by size-exclusion chromatography, infrared spectroscopy and electrophysiological recordings. Cell-free expression enables advanced site-directed labelling, post-translational modifications, and special solubilization schemes. This enables next-generation biophysical experiments to study the principle of sodium ion selectivity and transport in sodium channels. PMID:25770647

  8. The Permeability of the Sodium Channel to Organic Cations in Myelinated Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil

    1971-01-01

    The relative permeability of sodium channels to 21 organic cations was studied in myelinated nerve fibers. Ionic currents under voltage-clamp conditions were measured in sodium-free solutions containing the test cation. The measured reversal potential and the Goldman equation were used to calculate relative permeabilities. The permeability sequence was: sodium ≈ hydroxylamine > hydrazine > ammonium ≈ formamidine ≈ guanidine ≈ hydroxyguanidine > aminoguanididine >> methylamine. The cations of the following compounds were not measurably permeant: N-methylhydroxylamine, methylhydrazine, methylamine, methylguanidine, acetamidine, dimethylamine, tetramethylammonium, tetraethylammonium, ethanolamine, choline, tris(hydroxymethyl)amino methane, imidazole, biguanide, and triaminoguanidine. Thus methyl and methylene groups render cations impermeant. The results can be explained on geometrical grounds by assuming that the sodium channel is an oxygen-lined pore about 3 A by 5 A in cross-section. One pair of oxygens is assumed to be an ionized carboxylic acid. Methyl and amino groups are wider than the 3 A width of the channel. Nevertheless, cations containing amino groups can slide through the channel by making hydrogen bonds to the oxygens. However, methyl groups, being unable to form hydrogen bonds, are too wide to pass through. PMID:5315827

  9. Characterization of the binding of the Ptychodiscus brevis neurotoxin T17 to sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The lipid-soluble polyether neurotoxins isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Ptychodiscus brevis (formerly Gymnodinium breve) have been determined to bind to a unique receptor site associated with the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in rat brain synaptosomes. Reduction of the C/sub 42/ aldehyde function of T34 to the alcohol function of T17 using NaB/sup 3/H/sub 4/ yielded /sup 3/H-T17 with a specific activity of 15 Ci;/mmol. Using this specific probe, binding to sodium channels was measured at 4/sup 0/CC, 22/sup 0/C, and 37/sup 0/C. Rosenthal analysis of the binding data yielded a K/sub d/ of 2.9 nM and B/sub max/ of 6.8 pmoles /sup 3/H-T17 per mg of synaptosomal protein at 4/sup 0/C. Both K/sub d/ and B/sub max/ were found to be temperature dependent. Depolarization of the synaptosomes by osmotic lysis resulted in the loss of 34% of the available receptor sites, with no decrease in binding affinity. Unlabeled T17, T34, and synthetic T17 (reduced T34) were equipotent in their ability to displace /sup 3/H-T17 from its specific receptor site. Competition experiments using natural toxin probes specific for sites I-IV on the voltage-sensitive sodium channel demonstrate that /sup 3/H-T17 does not bind to any of the previously-described neurotoxin receptor sites. A fifth site is proposed.

  10. Benchmarking the stability of human detergent-solubilised voltage-gated sodium channels for structural studies using eel as a reference.

    PubMed

    Slowik, Daria; Henderson, Richard

    2015-07-01

    With the ultimate goal of detailed structural analysis of mammalian and particularly human voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), we have investigated the relative stability of human and rat VGSCs and compared them with electric eel VGSC. We found that NaV1.3 from rat was the most stable after detergent solubilisation. The order of stability was rNaV1.3>hNaV1.2>hNaV1.1>hNaV1.6>hNaV1.3>hNaV1.4. However, a comparison with the VGSC from Electrophorus electricus, which is most similar to NaV1.4, shows that the eel VGSC is considerably more stable in detergent than the human VGSCs examined. We conclude that current methods of structural analysis, such as single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM), may be most usefully targeted to eel VGSC or rNaV1.3, but that structural analysis on the full spectrum of VGSCs, by methods that require greater stability such as crystallisation and X-ray crystallography, will require further stabilisation of the channel.

  11. Contactin regulates the current density and axonal expression of tetrodotoxin-resistant but not tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels in DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Rush, Anthony M; Craner, Matthew J; Kageyama, Takashi; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G; Ranscht, Barbara

    2005-07-01

    Contactin, a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored predominantly neuronal cell surface glycoprotein, associates with sodium channels Nav1.2, Nav1.3 and Nav1.9, and enhances the density of these channels on the plasma membrane in mammalian expression systems. However, a detailed functional analysis of these interactions and of untested putative interactions with other sodium channel isoforms in mammalian neuronal cells has not been carried out. We examined the expression and function of sodium channels in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from contactin-deficient (CNTN-/-) mice, compared to CNTN+/+ litter mates. Nav1.9 is preferentially expressed in isolectin B4 (IB4)-positive neurons and thus we used this marker to subdivide small-diameter DRG neurons. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recording, we observed a greater than two-fold reduction of tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 current densities in IB4+ DRG neurons cultured from CNTN-/- vs. CNTN+/+ mice. Current densities for TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels were unaffected. Contactin's effect was selective for IB4+ neurons as current densities for both TTX-R and TTX-S channels were not significantly different in IB4- DRG neurons from the two genotypes. Consistent with these results, we have demonstrated a reduction in Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 immunostaining on peripherin-positive unmyelinated axons in sciatic nerves from CNTN-/- mice but detected no changes in the expression for the two major TTX-S channels Nav1.6 and Nav1.7. These data provide evidence of a role for contactin in selectively regulating the cell surface expression and current densities of TTX-R but not TTX-S Na+ channel isoforms in nociceptive DRG neurons; this regulation could modulate the membrane properties and excitability of these neurons. PMID:16029194

  12. High sodium ion conductivity of glass-ceramic electrolytes with cubic Na3PS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Akitoshi; Noi, Kousuke; Tanibata, Naoto; Nagao, Motohiro; Tatsumisago, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Sulfide solid electrolytes with cubic Na3PS4 phase has relatively high sodium ion conductivity of over 10-4 S cm-1 at room temperature, and all-solid-state sodium batteries Na-Sn/TiS2 with the electrolyte operated as a secondary battery at room temperature. To improve battery performance, conductivity enhancement of sulfide electrolytes is important. In this study, we have succeeded in enhancing conductivity by optimizing preparation conditions of Na3PS4 glass-ceramic electrolytes. By use of crystalline Na2S with high purity of 99.1%, cubic Na3PS4 crystals were directly precipitated by ball milling process at the composition of 75Na2S·25P2S5 (mol%). The glass-ceramic electrolyte prepared by milling for 1.5 h and consecutive heat treatment at 270 °C for 1 h showed the highest conductivity of 4.6 × 10-4 S cm-1, which is twice as high as the conductivity of the cubic Na3PS4 glass-ceramic prepared in a previous report. All-solid-state Na-Sn/NaCrO2 cells with the newly prepared electrolyte exhibited charge-discharge cycles at room temperature and kept about 60 mAh per gram of NaCrO2 for 15 cycles.

  13. Sodium-channel defects in benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures.

    PubMed

    Heron, Sarah E; Crossland, Kathryn M; Andermann, Eva; Phillips, Hilary A; Hall, Allison J; Bleasel, Andrew; Shevell, Michael; Mercho, Suha; Seni, Marie-Helene; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Mulley, John C; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2002-09-14

    Ion-channel gene defects are associated with a range of paroxysmal disorders, including several monogenic epilepsy syndromes. Two autosomal dominant disorders present in the first year of life: benign familial neonatal seizures, which is associated with potassium-channel gene defects; and benign familial infantile seizures, for which no genes have been identified. Here, we describe a clinically intermediate variant, benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures, with mutations in the sodium-channel subunit gene SCN2A. This clinico-molecular correlation defines a new benign familial epilepsy syndrome beginning in early infancy, an age at which seizure disorders frequently have a sombre prognosis.

  14. Use-Dependent Block of Human Cardiac Sodium Channels by GS967.

    PubMed

    Potet, Franck; Vanoye, Carlos G; George, Alfred L

    2016-07-01

    GS-458967, 6-(4-(Trifluoromethoxy)phenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine (GS967) is a recently described, novel, sodium channel inhibitor exhibiting potent antiarrhythmic effects in various in vitro and in vivo models. The antiarrhythmic mechanism has been attributed to preferential suppression of late sodium current. However, there has been no reported systematic investigation of the effects of this compound on isolated sodium channels. Here, we examined the effects of GS967 on peak (INaP) and late (INaL) sodium current recorded from cells that heterologously expressed human cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel, the principle cardiac sodium channel. As previously described, we observed that GS967 exerted tonic block of INaL (63%) to a significantly greater extent than INaP (19%). However, GS967 also caused a reduction of INaP in a frequency-dependent manner, consistent with use-dependent block (UDB). GS967 evoked more potent UDB of INaP (IC50 = 0.07 µM) than ranolazine (16 µM) and lidocaine (17 µM). Use-dependent block was best explained by a significant slowing of recovery from fast and slow inactivation with a significant enhancement of slow inactivation in the presence of GS967. Furthermore, GS967 was found to exert these same effects on a prototypical long QT syndrome mutation (delKPQ). An engineered mutation at an interaction site for local anesthetic agents (F1760A) partially attenuated the effect of GS967 on UDB, but had no effect on tonic INaL block. We conclude that GS967 is a preferential inhibitor of INaL, but it also exerts previously unreported strong effects on slow inactivation and recovery from inactivation, resulting in substantial UDB that is not entirely dependent on a known interaction site for local anesthetic agents. PMID:27136942

  15. Axons provide the secretory machinery for trafficking of voltage-gated sodium channels in peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    González, Carolina; Cánovas, José; Fresno, Javiera; Couve, Eduardo; Court, Felipe A; Couve, Andrés

    2016-02-16

    The regulation of the axonal proteome is key to generate and maintain neural function. Fast and slow axoplasmic waves have been known for decades, but alternative mechanisms to control the abundance of axonal proteins based on local synthesis have also been identified. The presence of the endoplasmic reticulum has been documented in peripheral axons, but it is still unknown whether this localized organelle participates in the delivery of axonal membrane proteins. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for action potentials and are mostly concentrated in the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Despite their fundamental role, little is known about the intracellular trafficking mechanisms that govern their availability in mature axons. Here we describe the secretory machinery in axons and its contribution to plasma membrane delivery of sodium channels. The distribution of axonal secretory components was evaluated in axons of the sciatic nerve and in spinal nerve axons after in vivo electroporation. Intracellular protein trafficking was pharmacologically blocked in vivo and in vitro. Axonal voltage-gated sodium channel mRNA and local trafficking were examined by RT-PCR and a retention-release methodology. We demonstrate that mature axons contain components of the endoplasmic reticulum and other biosynthetic organelles. Axonal organelles and sodium channel localization are sensitive to local blockade of the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. More importantly, secretory organelles are capable of delivering sodium channels to the plasma membrane in isolated axons, demonstrating an intrinsic capacity of the axonal biosynthetic route in regulating the axonal proteome in mammalian axons. PMID:26839409

  16. Axons provide the secretory machinery for trafficking of voltage-gated sodium channels in peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    González, Carolina; Cánovas, José; Fresno, Javiera; Couve, Eduardo; Court, Felipe A.; Couve, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of the axonal proteome is key to generate and maintain neural function. Fast and slow axoplasmic waves have been known for decades, but alternative mechanisms to control the abundance of axonal proteins based on local synthesis have also been identified. The presence of the endoplasmic reticulum has been documented in peripheral axons, but it is still unknown whether this localized organelle participates in the delivery of axonal membrane proteins. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for action potentials and are mostly concentrated in the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Despite their fundamental role, little is known about the intracellular trafficking mechanisms that govern their availability in mature axons. Here we describe the secretory machinery in axons and its contribution to plasma membrane delivery of sodium channels. The distribution of axonal secretory components was evaluated in axons of the sciatic nerve and in spinal nerve axons after in vivo electroporation. Intracellular protein trafficking was pharmacologically blocked in vivo and in vitro. Axonal voltage-gated sodium channel mRNA and local trafficking were examined by RT-PCR and a retention-release methodology. We demonstrate that mature axons contain components of the endoplasmic reticulum and other biosynthetic organelles. Axonal organelles and sodium channel localization are sensitive to local blockade of the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. More importantly, secretory organelles are capable of delivering sodium channels to the plasma membrane in isolated axons, demonstrating an intrinsic capacity of the axonal biosynthetic route in regulating the axonal proteome in mammalian axons. PMID:26839409

  17. Local anesthetic anchoring to cardiac sodium channels. Implications into tissue-selective drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Li, R A; Tsushima, R G; Himmeldirk, K; Dime, D S; Backx, P H

    1999-07-01

    Local anesthetics inhibit Na+ channels in a variety of tissues, leading to potentially serious side effects when used clinically. We have created a series of novel local anesthetics by connecting benzocaine (BZ) to the sulfhydryl-reactive group methanethiosulfonate (MTS) via variable-length polyethylether linkers (L) (MTS-LX-BZ [X represents 0, 3, 6, or 9]). The application of MTS-LX-BZ agents modified native rat cardiac as well as heterologously expressed human heart (hH1) and rat skeletal muscle (rSkM1) Na+ channels in a manner resembling that of free BZ. Like BZ, the effects of MTS-LX-BZ on rSkM1 channels were completely reversible. In contrast, MTS-LX-BZ modification of heart and mutant rSkM1 channels, containing a pore cysteine at the equivalent location as cardiac Na+ channels (ie, Y401C), persisted after drug washout unless treated with DTT, which suggests anchoring to the pore via a disulfide bond. Anchored MTS-LX-BZ competitively reduced the affinity of cardiac Na+ channels for lidocaine but had minimal effects on mutant channels with disrupted local anesthetic modification properties. These results establish that anchored MTS-LX-BZ compounds interact with the local anesthetic binding site (LABS). Variation in the linker length altered the potency of channel modification by the anchored drugs, thus providing information on the spatial relationship between the anchoring site and the LABS. Our observations demonstrate that local anesthetics can be anchored to the extracellular pore cysteine in cardiac Na+ channels and dynamically interact with the intracellular LABS. These results suggest that nonselective agents, such as local anesthetics, might be made more selective by linking these agents to target-specific anchors.

  18. [A girl with hereditary myotonia due to an exceptional sodium channel mutation].

    PubMed

    van den Bergen, J C; Verbruggen, K T; Ginjaar, H B; Kerstjens-Frederikse, W S

    2006-11-11

    A 22-month-old girl had cramps and stiffness of her muscles. After medical history, physical examination and an EMG, a short differential diagnosis based on the symptoms of myotonia was made. Initially, the symptoms were incorrectly assumed to be due to Becker's myotonia, an autosomal recessive condition caused by a mutation in the chloride channel. Molecular analysis did not show a defect in the chloride channel, but instead a defect in the sodium channel of the muscle fibre. Since defects in the sodium channel are responsible for several myotonic diseases, further analysis was necessary. Based on knowledge of the structure and mechanism of the sodium channel and study of literature on cases involving the identical mutation, the diagnosis 'potassium-aggravated myotonia' (PAM) was made. Re-evaluation of the patient showed that her symptoms fitted the diagnosis 'myotonia permanens', the severest form of PAM. She was treated with mexiletine. In myotonia several features can give direction to the diagnosis, including sensitivity to temperature and exercise, and family history. However, it is often necessary to use molecular analysis to be able to diagnose the disease correctly, make a prognosis and predict the risk of recurrence as well as to formulate a treatment plan. PMID:17137100

  19. Structural model of the open-closed-inactivated cycle of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Bagnéris, Claire; Naylor, Claire E; McCusker, Emily C; Wallace, B A

    2015-01-01

    In excitable cells, the initiation of the action potential results from the opening of voltage-gated sodium channels. These channels undergo a series of conformational changes between open, closed, and inactivated states. Many models have been proposed for the structural transitions that result in these different functional states. Here, we compare the crystal structures of prokaryotic sodium channels captured in the different conformational forms and use them as the basis for examining molecular models for the activation, slow inactivation, and recovery processes. We compare structural similarities and differences in the pore domains, specifically in the transmembrane helices, the constrictions within the pore cavity, the activation gate at the cytoplasmic end of the last transmembrane helix, the C-terminal domain, and the selectivity filter. We discuss the observed differences in the context of previous models for opening, closing, and inactivation, and present a new structure-based model for the functional transitions. Our proposed prokaryotic channel activation mechanism is then compared with the activation transition in eukaryotic sodium channels.

  20. Activation of the Endogenous Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System or Aldosterone Administration Increases Urinary Exosomal Sodium Channel Excretion.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ying; Wang, Xiaojing; Rose, Kristie L; MacDonald, W Hayes; Zhang, Bing; Schey, Kevin L; Luther, James M

    2016-02-01

    Urinary exosomes secreted by multiple cell types in the kidney may participate in intercellular signaling and provide an enriched source of kidney-specific proteins for biomarker discovery. Factors that alter the exosomal protein content remain unknown. To determine whether endogenous and exogenous hormones modify urinary exosomal protein content, we analyzed samples from 14 mildly hypertensive patients in a crossover study during a high-sodium (HS, 160 mmol/d) diet and low-sodium (LS, 20 mmol/d) diet to activate the endogenous renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We further analyzed selected exosomal protein content in a separate cohort of healthy persons receiving intravenous aldosterone (0.7 μg/kg per hour for 10 hours) versus vehicle infusion. The LS diet increased plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration, whereas aldosterone infusion increased only aldosterone concentration. Protein analysis of paired urine exosome samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based multidimensional protein identification technology detected 2775 unique proteins, of which 316 exhibited significantly altered abundance during LS diet. Sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and α- and γ-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunits from the discovery set were verified using targeted multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry quantified with isotope-labeled peptide standards. Dietary sodium restriction or acute aldosterone infusion similarly increased urine exosomal γENaC[112-122] peptide concentrations nearly 20-fold, which correlated with plasma aldosterone concentration and urinary Na/K ratio. Urine exosomal NCC and αENaC concentrations were relatively unchanged during these interventions. We conclude that urinary exosome content is altered by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation. Urinary measurement of exosomal γENaC[112-122] concentration may provide a useful biomarker of ENaC activation in future clinical studies.

  1. Absence of a salt (NaCl) preference or appetite in sodium-replete or depleted kittens.

    PubMed

    Yu, S; Rogers, Q R; Morris, J G

    1997-08-01

    Many omnivores and herbivores exhibit an appetite for sodium or salt (NaCl) solutions, but a similar sodium appetite has not been demonstrated in carnivores. The choice for or against sodium-adequate diets of sodium-replete and depleted kittens (confirmed by an elevated plasma aldosterone concentration) was examined using a two-bowl choice test. Both bowls contained purified diets, one bowl with one of various levels of sodium (as NaCl) and the other bowl a sodium-deficient diet (0.1 g Na/Kg). Neither sodium-replete nor depleted kittens showed a choice of the diet containing 2 g Na/kg over the deficient diet. Both groups of kittens showed significant aversion to a diet containing 10 g Na/kg diet, with no change in total food intake. Kittens previously exposed to a diet containing 10 g Na/kg diet appeared to have a learned aversion to sodium in subsequent choice tests. We conclude that kittens do not possess an innate sodium appetite and that a sodium appetite is not induced in sodium-depleted kittens.

  2. Computational Structural Pharmacology and Toxicology of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are targets for many toxins and medically important drugs. Despite decades of intensive studies in industry and academia, atomic mechanisms of action are still not completely understood. The major cause is a lack of high-resolution structures of eukaryotic channels and their complexes with ligands. In these circumstances a useful approach is homology modeling that employs as templates X-ray structures of potassium channels and prokaryotic sodium channels. On one hand, due to inherent limitations of this approach, results should be treated with caution. In particular, models should be tested against relevant experimental data. On the other hand, docking of drugs and toxins in homology models provides a unique possibility to integrate diverse experimental data provided by mutational analysis, electrophysiology, and studies of structure-activity relations. Here we describe how homology modeling advanced our understanding of mechanisms of several classes of ligands. These include tetrodotoxins and mu-conotoxins that block the outer pore, local anesthetics that block of the inner pore, batrachotoxin that binds in the inner pore but, paradoxically, activates the channel, pyrethroid insecticides that activate the channel by binding at lipid-exposed repeat interfaces, and scorpion alpha and beta-toxins, which bind between the pore and voltage-sensing domains and modify the channel gating. We emphasize importance of experimental data for elaborating the models. PMID:27586283

  3. Effects of detergent on the binding of solubilized sodium channels to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin: structural implications.

    PubMed

    Weiner, J S; Rudy, B

    1988-10-20

    The binding of the solubilized voltage-dependent sodium channel from rat brain to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is detergent-dependent. When solubilized in sodium cholate, only 11% of total recovered channels bound to a WGA-Sepharose column. When solubilized in Triton X-100 or CHAPS, however, 80% and 60% could bind, respectively. The effect of cholate on sodium channel binding is relatively specific: the major rat brain glycoproteins which bind to immobilized WGA are roughly the same in either Triton or cholate, as analyzed by SDS gel electrophoresis. The structural implications for the channel are discussed.

  4. Venom Peptides From Cone Snails: Pharmacological Probes for Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Green, B R; Olivera, B M

    2016-01-01

    The venoms of cone snails provide a rich source of neuroactive peptides (conotoxins). Several venom peptide families have been identified that are either agonists (ι- and δ-conotoxins) or antagonists (μ- and μO-conotoxins) of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Members of these conotoxin classes have been integral in identifying and characterizing specific neurotoxin binding sites on the channel. Furthermore, given the specificity of some of these peptides for one sodium channel subtype over another, conotoxins have also proven useful in exploring differences between VGSC subtypes. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge of the structure and function based on the results of conotoxin interactions with VGSCs and correlates the peptides with the phylogeny of the Conus species from which they were derived. PMID:27586281

  5. δ ENaC: a novel divergent amiloride-inhibitable sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Run-Zhen; Chen, Zai-Xing; Shetty, Sreerama; Idell, Steven; Matalon, Sadis

    2012-01-01

    The fourth subunit of the epithelial sodium channel, termed delta subunit (δ ENaC), was cloned in human and monkey. Increasing evidence shows that this unique subunit and its splice variants exhibit biophysical and pharmacological properties that are divergent from those of α ENaC channels. The widespread distribution of epithelial sodium channels in both epithelial and nonepithelial tissues implies a range of physiological functions. The altered expression of SCNN1D is associated with numerous pathological conditions. Genetic studies link SCNN1D deficiency with rare genetic diseases with developmental and functional disorders in the brain, heart, and respiratory systems. Here, we review the progress of research on δ ENaC in genomics, biophysics, proteomics, physiology, pharmacology, and clinical medicine. PMID:22983350

  6. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Induces Intrinsic Alterations in Na Channel Gating in Layer II Medial Entorhinal Cortex Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hargus, Nicholas J.; Merrick, Ellen C.; Nigam, Aradhya; Kalmar, Christopher L.; Baheti, Aparna R.; Bertram, Edward H.; Patel, Manoj K.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy involving the limbic structures of the temporal lobe. Layer II neurons of the entorhinal cortex (EC) form the major excitatory input into the hippocampus via the perforant path and consist of non-stellate and stellate neurons. These neurons are spared and hyper-excitable in TLE. The basis for the hyper-excitability is likely multifactorial and may include alterations in intrinsic properties. In a rat model of TLE, medial EC (mEC) non-stellate and stellate neurons had significantly higher action potential (AP) firing frequencies than in control. The increase remained in the presence of synaptic blockers, suggesting intrinsic mechanisms. Since sodium (Na) channels play a critical role in AP generation and conduction we sought to determine if Na channel gating parameters and expression levels were altered in TLE. Na channel currents recorded from isolated mEC TLE neurons revealed increased Na channel conductances, depolarizing shifts in inactivation parameters and larger persistent (INaP) and resurgent (INaR) Na currents. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed increased staining of Nav1.6 within the axon initial segment and Nav1.2 within the cell bodies of mEC TLE neurons. These studies provide support for additional intrinsic alterations within mEC layer II neurons in TLE and implicate alterations in Na channel activity and expression, in part, for establishing the profound increase in intrinsic membrane excitability of mEC layer II neurons in TLE. These intrinsic changes, together with changes in the synaptic network, could support seizure activity in TLE. PMID:20946956

  7. Overexpression of NaV 1.6 channels is associated with the invasion capacity of human cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Plata, Everardo; Ortiz, Cindy S; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Medina-Martinez, Ingrid; Alfaro, Ana; Berumen, Jaime; Rivera, Manuel; Gomora, Juan C

    2012-05-01

    Functional activity of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) has been associated to the invasion and metastasis behaviors of prostate, breast and some other types of cancer. We previously reported the functional expression of VGSC in primary cultures and biopsies derived from cervical cancer (CaC). Here, we investigate the relative expression levels of VGSC subunits and its possible role in CaC. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that mRNA levels of Na(V) 1.6 α-subunit in CaC samples were ∼40-fold higher than in noncancerous cervical (NCC) biopsies. A Na(V) 1.7 α-subunit variant also showed increased mRNA levels in CaC (∼20-fold). All four Na(V) β subunits were also detected in CaC samples, being Na(V) β1 the most abundant. Proteins of Na(V) 1.6 and Na(V) 1.7 α-subunits were immunolocalized in both NCC and CaC biopsies and in CaC primary cultures as well; however, although in NCC sections proteins were mainly relegated to the plasma membrane, in CaC biopsies and primary cultures the respective signal was stronger and widely distributed in both cytoplasm and plasma membrane. Functional activity of Na(V) 1.6 channels in the plasma membrane of CaC cells was confirmed by whole-cell patch-clamp experiments using Cn2, a Na(V) 1.6-specific toxin, which blocked ∼30% of the total sodium current. Blocking of sodium channels VGSC with tetrodotoxin and Cn2 did not affect proliferation neither migration, but reduced by ∼20% the invasiveness of CaC primary culture cells in vitro assays. We conclude that Na(V) 1.6 is upregulated in CaC and could serve as a novel molecular marker for the metastatic behavior of this carcinoma.

  8. Carvacrol modulates voltage-gated sodium channels kinetics in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Joca, Humberto Cavalcante; Vieira, Daiana Cardoso Oliveira; Vasconcelos, Aliny Perreira; Araújo, Demetrius Antônio Machado; Cruz, Jader Santos

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that many of plant-derived compounds interact with specific ion channels and thereby modulate many sensing mechanisms, such as nociception. The monoterpenoid carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) has an anti-nociceptive effect related to a reduction in neuronal excitability and voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV) inhibition in peripheral neurons. However, the detailed mechanisms of carvacrol-induced inhibition of neuronal NaV remain elusive. This study explores the interaction between carvacrol and NaV in isolated dorsal root ganglia neurons. Carvacrol reduced the total voltage-gated Na(+) current and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) current component in a concentration-dependent manner. Carvacrol accelerates current inactivation and induced a negative-shift in voltage-dependence of steady-state fast inactivation in total and TTX-R Na(+) current. Furthermore, carvacrol slowed the recovery from inactivation. Carvacrol provoked a leftward shift in both the voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation and activation of the TTX-R Na(+) current component. In addition, carvacrol-induced inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) current was enhanced by an increase in stimulation frequency and when neurons were pre-conditioned with long depolarization pulse (5s at -50 mV). Taken all results together, we herein demonstrated that carvacrol affects NaV gating properties. The present findings would help to explain the mechanisms underlying the analgesic activity of carvacrol. PMID:25794844

  9. Carvacrol modulates voltage-gated sodium channels kinetics in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Joca, Humberto Cavalcante; Vieira, Daiana Cardoso Oliveira; Vasconcelos, Aliny Perreira; Araújo, Demetrius Antônio Machado; Cruz, Jader Santos

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that many of plant-derived compounds interact with specific ion channels and thereby modulate many sensing mechanisms, such as nociception. The monoterpenoid carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) has an anti-nociceptive effect related to a reduction in neuronal excitability and voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV) inhibition in peripheral neurons. However, the detailed mechanisms of carvacrol-induced inhibition of neuronal NaV remain elusive. This study explores the interaction between carvacrol and NaV in isolated dorsal root ganglia neurons. Carvacrol reduced the total voltage-gated Na(+) current and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) current component in a concentration-dependent manner. Carvacrol accelerates current inactivation and induced a negative-shift in voltage-dependence of steady-state fast inactivation in total and TTX-R Na(+) current. Furthermore, carvacrol slowed the recovery from inactivation. Carvacrol provoked a leftward shift in both the voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation and activation of the TTX-R Na(+) current component. In addition, carvacrol-induced inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) current was enhanced by an increase in stimulation frequency and when neurons were pre-conditioned with long depolarization pulse (5s at -50 mV). Taken all results together, we herein demonstrated that carvacrol affects NaV gating properties. The present findings would help to explain the mechanisms underlying the analgesic activity of carvacrol.

  10. Changes in expression of two tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels and their currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons after sciatic nerve injury but not rhizotomy.

    PubMed

    Sleeper, A A; Cummins, T R; Dib-Hajj, S D; Hormuzdiar, W; Tyrrell, L; Waxman, S G; Black, J A

    2000-10-01

    Two TTX-resistant sodium channels, SNS and NaN, are preferentially expressed in c-type dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and have been shown recently to have distinct electrophysiological signatures, SNS producing a slowly inactivating and NaN producing a persistent sodium current with a relatively hyperpolarized voltage-dependence. An attenuation of SNS and NaN transcripts has been demonstrated in small DRG neurons after transection of the sciatic nerve. However, it is not known whether changes in the currents associated with SNS and NaN or in the expression of SNS and NaN channel protein occur after axotomy of the peripheral projections of DRG neurons or whether similar changes occur after transection of the central (dorsal root) projections of DRG neurons. Peripheral and central projections of L4/5 DRG neurons in adult rats were axotomized by transection of the sciatic nerve and the L4 and L5 dorsal roots, respectively. DRG neurons were examined using immunocytochemical and patch-clamp methods 9-12 d after sciatic nerve or dorsal root lesion. Levels of SNS and NaN protein in the two types of injuries were paralleled by their respective TTX-resistant currents. There was a significant decrease in SNS and NaN signal intensity in small DRG neurons after peripheral, but not central, axotomy compared with control neurons. Likewise, there was a significant reduction in slowly inactivating and persistent TTX-resistant currents in these neurons after peripheral, but not central, axotomy compared with control neurons. These results indicate that peripheral, but not central, axotomy results in a reduction in expression of functional SNS and NaN channels in c-type DRG neurons and suggest a basis for the altered electrical properties that are observed after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:11007885

  11. A melanosomal two-pore sodium channel regulates pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Escobar, Iliana E.; Oancea, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular organelles mediate complex cellular functions that often require ion transport across their membranes. Melanosomes are organelles responsible for the synthesis of the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanin synthesis result in pigmentation defects, visual deficits, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Although genes encoding putative melanosomal ion transporters have been identified as key regulators of melanin synthesis, melanosome ion transport and its contribution to pigmentation remain poorly understood. Here we identify two-pore channel 2 (TPC2) as the first reported melanosomal cation conductance by directly patch-clamping skin and eye melanosomes. TPC2 has been implicated in human pigmentation and melanoma, but the molecular mechanism mediating this function was entirely unknown. We demonstrate that the vesicular signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate PI(3,5)P2 modulates TPC2 activity to control melanosomal membrane potential, pH, and regulate pigmentation. PMID:27231233

  12. Molecular bases for the asynchronous activation of sodium and potassium channels required for nerve impulse generation.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Jérôme J; Campos, Fabiana V; Frezza, Ludivine; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2013-08-21

    Most action potentials are produced by the sequential activation of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and potassium (Kv) channels. This is mainly achieved by the rapid conformational rearrangement of voltage-sensor (VS) modules in Nav channels, with activation kinetics up to 6-fold faster than Shaker-type Kv channels. Here, using mutagenesis and gating current measurements, we show that a 3-fold acceleration of the VS kinetics in Nav versus Shaker Kv channels is produced by the hydrophilicity of two "speed-control" residues located in the S2 and S4 segments in Nav domains I-III. An additional 2-fold acceleration of the Nav VS kinetics is provided by the coexpression of the β1 subunit, ubiquitously found in mammal tissues. This study uncovers the molecular bases responsible for the differential activation of Nav versus Kv channels, a fundamental prerequisite for the genesis of action potentials.

  13. Actions of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS) on transient sodium, persistent sodium, and voltage-gated calcium currents in neurons of the subfornical organ

    PubMed Central

    Kuksis, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously found gasotransmitter that has been implicated in a variety of beneficial physiological functions. This study was performed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying actions of H2S previously observed in subfornical organ (SFO), where H2S acts to regulate blood pressure through a depolarization of the membrane and an overall increase in the excitability of SFO neurons. We used whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in the voltage-clamp configuration to analyze the effect of 1 mM NaHS, an H2S donor, on voltage-gated potassium, sodium, and calcium currents. We observed no effect of NaHS on potassium currents; however, both voltage-gated sodium currents (persistent and transient) and the N-type calcium current had a depolarized activation curve and an enhanced peak-induced current in response to a series of voltage-step and ramp protocols run in the control and NaHS conditions. These effects were not responsible for the previously observed depolarization of the membrane potential, as depolarizing effects of H2S were still observed following block of these conductances with tetrodotoxin (5 μM) and ω-conotoxin-GVIA (100 nM). Our studies are the first to investigate the effect of H2S on a variety of voltage-gated conductances in a single brain area, and although they do not explain mechanisms underlying the depolarizing actions of H2S on SFO neurons, they provide evidence of potential mechanisms through which this gasotransmitter influences the excitability of neurons in this important brain area as a consequence of the modulation of multiple ion channels. PMID:26180118

  14. Mechanism of action of two insect toxins huwentoxin-III and hainantoxin-VI on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-lan; Yi, Su; Liang, Song-ping

    2010-06-01

    Selenocosmia huwena and Selenocosmia hainana are two tarantula species found in southern China. Their venoms contain abundant peptide toxins. Two new neurotoxic peptides, huwentoxin-III (HWTX-III) and hainantoxin-VI (HNTX-VI), were obtained from the venom using ion-exchange chromatography and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The mechanism of action of HWTX-III and HNTX-VI on insect neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) was studied via whole-cell patch clamp techniques. In a fashion similar to delta-atracotoxins, HNTX-VI can induce a slowdown of current inactivation of the VGSC and reduction in the peak of Na+ current in cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons. Meanwhile, 10 micromol/L HNTX-IV caused a positive shift of steady-state inactivation of sodium channel. HWTX-III inhibited VGSCs on DUM neurons (concentration of toxin at half-maximal inhibition (IC(50)) approximately 1.106 micromol/L) in a way much similar to tetrodotoxin (TTX). HWTX-III had no effect on the kinetics of activation and inactivation. The shift in the steady-state inactivation curve was distinct from other depressant spider toxins. The diverse effect and the mechanism of action of the two insect toxins illustrate the diverse biological activities of spider toxins and provide a fresh theoretical foundation to design and develop novel insecticides. PMID:20506577

  15. A sodium channel gating model based on single channel, macroscopic ionic, and gating currents in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, C A; Bezanilla, F

    1991-01-01

    Sodium channel gating behavior was modeled with Markovian models fitted to currents from the cut-open squid giant axon in the absence of divalent cations. Optimum models were selected with maximum likelihood criteria using single-channel data, then models were refined and extended by simultaneous fitting of macroscopic ionic currents, ON and OFF gating currents, and single-channel first latency densities over a wide voltage range. Best models have five closed states before channel opening, with inactivation from at least one closed state as well as the open state. Forward activation rate constants increase with depolarization, and deactivation rate constants increase with hyperpolarization. Rates of inactivation from the open or closed states are generally slower than activation or deactivation rates and show little or no voltage dependence. Channels tend to reopen several times before inactivating. Macroscopic rates of activation and inactivation result from a combination of closed, open and inactivated state transitions. At negative potentials the time to first opening dominates the macroscopic current due to slow activation rates compared with deactivation rates: channels tend to reopen rarely, and often inactivate from closed states before they reopen. At more positive potentials, the time to first opening and burst duration together produce the macroscopic current. PMID:1663796

  16. Semi-volatiles at Mercury: Sodium (Na) and potassium (K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, A.

    1994-01-01

    Several lines of evidence now suggest that Mercury is a planet rich in moderately-volatile elements such as Na and K. Recent mid-infrared spectral observations of Mercury's equatorial and mid-latitude region near 120 degrees mercurian longitude indicate the presence of plagioclase feldspar. Spectra of Mercury's surface exhibit spectral activity similar to labradorite (plagioclase feldspar with NaAlSi3O8: 30-50 percent) and bytownite (NaAlSi3O8: 10-30 percent). These surface studies were stimulated by the relatively large abundance of Na and K observed in Mercury's atmosphere. An enhanced column of K is observed at the longitudes of Caloris Basin and of the antipodal terrain. Extreme heating at these 'hot' longitudes and severe fracturing suffered from the large impact event could lead to enhanced outgassing from surface or subsurface materials. Alternatively, sputtering from a surface enriched in K could be the source of the observed enhancement. Recent microwave measurements of Mercury also give indirect evidence of a mercurian regolith less FeO-rich than the Moon. An anomalously high index of refraction derived from the whole-disk integrated phase curve of Danjon may also be indicative of surface sulfides contributing to a regolith that is moderately volatile-rich. The recent exciting observations of radar-bright spots at high latitudes also indicate that a substance of high volume scattering, like ice, is present in shadowed regions. Other radar-bright spots have been seen at locations of Na enhancements on the atmosphere. All combined, these pieces of evidence point to a planet that is not severely depleted in volatiles or semi-volatiles.

  17. Assessment of sodium channel mutations in Makah Tribal members of the U.S. Pacific Northwest as a potential mechanism of resistance to paralytic shellfish poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nicolaus G.; Robertson, Alison; Grattan, Lynn M.; Pendleton, Steve; Roberts, Sparkle; Tracy, J. Kathleen; Trainer, Vera L.

    2015-01-01

    The Makah Tribe of Neah Bay, Washington, has historically relied on the subsistence harvest of coastal seafood, including shellfish, which remains an important cultural and ceremonial resource. Tribal legend describes visitors from other tribes that died from eating shellfish collected on Makah lands. These deaths were believed to be caused by paralytic shellfish poisoning, a human illness caused by ingestion of shellfish contaminated with saxitoxins, which are produced by toxin-producing marine dinoflagellates on which the shellfish feed. These paralytic shellfish toxins include saxitoxin, a potent Na+ channel antagonist that binds to the pore region of voltage gated Na+ channels. Amino acid mutations in the Na+ channel pore have been demonstrated to confer resistance to saxitoxin in softshell clam populations exposed to paralytic shellfish toxins present in their environment. Because of the notion of resistance to paralytic shellfish toxins, we aimed to determine if a resistance strategy was possible in humans with historical exposure to toxins in shellfish. We collected, extracted and purified DNA from buccal swabs of 83 volunteer Makah tribal members and sequenced the skeletal muscle Na+ channel (Nav1.4) at nine loci to characterize potential mutations in the relevant saxitoxin binding regions. No mutations of these specific regions were identified after comparison to a reference sequence. This study suggests that any resistance of Makah Tribal members to saxitoxin is not a function of Nav1.4 modification but may be due to mutations in neuronal or cardiac sodium channels or some other mechanism unrelated to sodium channel function. PMID:27616973

  18. Sodium arsenite affects Na+ transport in the isolated skin of the toad Pleurodema thaul.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Rivera, Cecilia; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic, applied as sodium arsenite (As(III)) to either inner or outer surfaces of the isolated toad skin, dose-dependently decreased the short-circuit current (Isc), potential difference (PD) and sodium conductance (G(Na)) in the concentration range 1-1000 microM, with effects often lasting over 3 h. Maximal inhibitory effect was over 90% with an IC(50) of about 34 microM. Applied during amiloride block, As(III) did not change this effect. However, an increase in electric parameters was noted during the initial 30 min in 22 experiments, indicating a possible translocation of cytosolic protein kinase C (PKC) to the membrane within 15 min, thus stimulating sodium transport; this is followed by a progressive inhibition of kinase activity. Comparative effects of amiloride (8 microM), As(III) (100 microM, outer surface) and noradrenaline (NA, 10 microM, inner surface) showed a significant increase in the stimulatory effect of NA on the electric parameters, which could be the result of arsenite clustering of cell surface receptors and activation of ensuing cellular signal transduction pathways. Ouabain 5 microM, followed by As(III) 100 microM, also stimulated the skin response to NA (10 microM), although the duration of the two phases of the response was markedly shortened. The exact mechanism is still in doubt: however, As(III) increases cerebral metabolites of NA and ouabain can increase NA efflux from tissue slices. The amiloride test, performed with As(III) in the outer surface, confirmed significant decrease in all the parameters: the driving force (E(Na)), sodium conductance (G(Na)), and importantly, shunt conductance (G(sh)), due to the known fact that arsenic inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication. PMID:17055342

  19. Functional reconstitution of the voltage-regulated sodium channel purified from electroplax of Electrophorus electricus

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The voltage-regulated NA channel is responsible for the depolarization of the excitable cell membrane during the normal action potential. This research has focused on the functional properties of the Na channel, purified from detergent extracts of electroplax membranes of the electric eel, and reconstituted into vesicles of defined phospholipid. These properties were assessed by measuring neurotoxin-modulated ion flux into the reconstituted membrane vesicles and by recording the single-channel currents of the purified channel by the patch-clamp method. The binding of tritiated tetrodotoxin (TTX) was employed as a marker for the purification of the channel. Two high-resolution fractionation steps, based on molecular charge and protein size, were used to obtain a preparation that is 80% homogeneous for a large peptide of 270,000 daltons. Radiotracer /sup 22/Na/sup +/ influx into the vesicles was stimulated by veratridine and by batrachotoxin (BTX) at concentrations of 100 ..mu..M and 5 ..mu..M, respectively. The stimulation by BTX was greater than that by veratridine, and can be as much as 16-fold over control influx levels. The stimulated influx is blocked by TTX with a K/sub i/ of 35 nM, and by local anesthetics in the normal pharmacological range. Large multilamellar vesicles prepared with a freeze-thaw step are suitable for single-channel recording techniques. When excised patches of the reconstituted membranes were voltage-clamped in the absence of activating neurotoxins, voltage-dependent single-channel currents were recorded. These displayed properties similar to those from native membranes of nerve and muscle. These results indicate that the protein purified on the basis of TTX binding is a functional Na channel possessing these functional domains: the ion-selective channel, the voltage sensors controlling activation and inactivation, and the sites of action of TTX, alkaloid neurotoxins, and local anesthetics.

  20. Cloning and expression of the epithelial sodium channel and its role in osmoregulation of aquatic and estivating African lungfish Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Konno, Norifumi; Shibuya, Sachika; Nogami, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a sodium (Na(+))-selective aldosterone-stimulated ion channel involved in Na(+) transport homeostasis of tetrapods. We examined full-length cDNA sequences and tissue distributions of ENaCα, ENaCβ, and ENaCγ subunits in the African lungfish Protopterus annectens. Protopterus ENaC (pENaC) comprises 3 subunits: pENaCα, pENaCβ, and pENaCγ. pENaCα, pENaCβ, and pENaCγ subunits are closely related to α, β, and γ subunits of the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri ENaC (nENaC), respectively. Three ENaC subunit mRNAs were highly expressed in the gills and moderately expressed in the kidney and rectum of P. annectens. During estivation for 2-4weeks and 2-3months, plasma Na(+) concentration was relatively stable, but plasma urea concentration significantly increased in comparison with the control fish kept in a freshwater environment. Plasma aldosterone concentration and mRNA expression of the ENaCα subunit gradually and significantly decreased in the gills and kidney after 2months of estivation. Thus, aldosterone-dependent Na(+) absorption via ENaC probably exists in the epithelial cells of osmoregulatory organs of lungfish kept in fresh water, whereas plasma Na(+) concentration may be maintained by a mechanism independent of aldosterone-ENaC axis during estivation in lungfish.

  1. Cloning and expression of the epithelial sodium channel and its role in osmoregulation of aquatic and estivating African lungfish Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Konno, Norifumi; Shibuya, Sachika; Nogami, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a sodium (Na(+))-selective aldosterone-stimulated ion channel involved in Na(+) transport homeostasis of tetrapods. We examined full-length cDNA sequences and tissue distributions of ENaCα, ENaCβ, and ENaCγ subunits in the African lungfish Protopterus annectens. Protopterus ENaC (pENaC) comprises 3 subunits: pENaCα, pENaCβ, and pENaCγ. pENaCα, pENaCβ, and pENaCγ subunits are closely related to α, β, and γ subunits of the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri ENaC (nENaC), respectively. Three ENaC subunit mRNAs were highly expressed in the gills and moderately expressed in the kidney and rectum of P. annectens. During estivation for 2-4weeks and 2-3months, plasma Na(+) concentration was relatively stable, but plasma urea concentration significantly increased in comparison with the control fish kept in a freshwater environment. Plasma aldosterone concentration and mRNA expression of the ENaCα subunit gradually and significantly decreased in the gills and kidney after 2months of estivation. Thus, aldosterone-dependent Na(+) absorption via ENaC probably exists in the epithelial cells of osmoregulatory organs of lungfish kept in fresh water, whereas plasma Na(+) concentration may be maintained by a mechanism independent of aldosterone-ENaC axis during estivation in lungfish. PMID:25541184

  2. Membrane Na+-pyrophosphatases can transport protons at low sodium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Luoto, Heidi H; Nordbo, Erika; Baykov, Alexander A; Lahti, Reijo; Malinen, Anssi M

    2013-12-01

    Membrane-bound Na(+)-pyrophosphatase (Na(+)-PPase), working in parallel with the corresponding ATP-energized pumps, catalyzes active Na(+) transport in bacteria and archaea. Each ~75-kDa subunit of homodimeric Na(+)-PPase forms an unusual funnel-like structure with a catalytic site in the cytoplasmic part and a hydrophilic gated channel in the membrane. Here, we show that at subphysiological Na(+) concentrations (<5 mM), the Na(+)-PPases of Chlorobium limicola, four other bacteria, and one archaeon additionally exhibit an H(+)-pumping activity in inverted membrane vesicles prepared from recombinant Escherichia coli strains. H(+) accumulation in vesicles was measured with fluorescent pH indicators. At pH 6.2-8.2, H(+) transport activity was high at 0.1 mM Na(+) but decreased progressively with increasing Na(+) concentrations until virtually disappearing at 5 mM Na(+). In contrast, (22)Na(+) transport activity changed little over a Na(+) concentration range of 0.05-10 mM. Conservative substitutions of gate Glu(242) and nearby Ser(243) and Asn(677) residues reduced the catalytic and transport functions of the enzyme but did not affect the Na(+) dependence of H(+) transport, whereas a Lys(681) substitution abolished H(+) (but not Na(+)) transport. All four substitutions markedly decreased PPase affinity for the activating Na(+) ion. These results are interpreted in terms of a model that assumes the presence of two Na(+)-binding sites in the channel: one associated with the gate and controlling all enzyme activities and the other located at a distance and controlling only H(+) transport activity. The inherent H(+) transport activity of Na(+)-PPase provides a rationale for its easy evolution toward specific H(+) transport.

  3. Channel waveguides in glass via silver-sodium field-assisted ion exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, K.; Pagano, S. J.; Viehmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    Multimode channel waveguides have been formed in sodium aluminosilicate glass by field-assisted diffusion of Ag(+) ions from vacuum-evaporated Ag films. The two-dimensional refractive index profiles of the waveguides were controlled by varying the diffusion time, the diffusion temperature, and the electric field strength. Estimates of the diffusion rate through a strip aperture were obtained, assuming the electric field was strong 120-240 V/mm. The maximum change in refractive index in the sodium aluminosilicate glasses was estimated near 65 percent of the change in soda-lime silicate glass. The physical properties of the glasses are given in a table.

  4. Synthesis and in vitro sodium channel blocking activity evaluation of novel homochiral mexiletine analogs.

    PubMed

    Carocci, Alessia; Catalano, Alessia; Bruno, Claudio; Lentini, Giovanni; Franchini, Carlo; De Bellis, Michela; De Luca, Annamaria; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2010-03-01

    New chiral mexiletine analogs were synthesized in their optically active forms and evaluated in vitro as use-dependent blockers of skeletal muscle sodium channels. Tests carried out on sodium currents of single muscle fibers of Rana esculenta demonstrated that all of them exerted a higher use-dependent block than mexiletine. The most potent analog, (S)-3-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)-1-phenylpropan-1-amine (S)-(5), was six-fold more potent than (R)-Mex in producing a tonic block. As observed with mexiletine, the newly synthesized compounds exhibit modest enantioselective behavior, that is more evident in 3-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)butan-1-amine (3). PMID:19544349

  5. Modification of sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics by ether and halothane

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.; Shrager, P.; Goldstein, D.A.

    1981-03-01

    The effects of ether and halothane on the kinetics of sodium and potassium currents were investigated in the crayfish giant axon. Both general anesthetics produced a reversible, dose-dependent speeding up of sodium current inactivation at all membrane potentials, with no change in the rising phase of the currents. Double-pulse inactivation experiments with ether also showed faster inactivation, but the rate of recovery from inactivation at negative potentials was not affected. Ether shifted the midpoint of the steady-state fast inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction and made the curve steeper. The activation of potassium currents was faster with ether present, with no change in the voltage dependence of steady-state potassium currents. Ether and halothane are known to perturb the structure of lipid bilayer membranes; the alterations in sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics are consistent with the hypothesis that the rats of the gating processes of the channels can be affected by the state of the lipids surrounding the channels, but a direct effect of ether and halothane on the protein part of the channels cannot be ruled out.

  6. Repurposing of sodium channel antagonists as potential new anti-myotonic drugs.

    PubMed

    Matthews, E; Hanna, M G

    2014-11-01

    Myotonia is often a painful and disabling symptom which can interfere with daily motor function resulting in significant morbidity. Since myotonic disorders are rare it has generally proved difficult to obtain class I level evidence for anti-myotonic drug efficacy by performing randomized placebo controlled trials. Current treatment guidance is therefore largely based on anecdotal reports and physician experience. Despite the genetic channel heterogeneity of the myotonic disorders the sodium channel antagonists have become the main focus of pharmacological interest. Mexiletine is currently regarded as the first choice sodium channel blocker based on a recent placebo controlled randomized trial. However, some patients do not respond to mexiletine or have significant side effects limiting its use. There is a clinical need to develop additional antimyotonic agents. The study of Desaphy et al. is therefore important and provides in vitro evidence that a number of existing drugs with sodium channel blocking capability could potentially be repurposed as anti-myotonic drugs. Translation of these potentially important in vitro findings into clinical practice requires carefully designed randomized controlled trials. Here we discuss Desaphy's findings in the wider context of attempts to develop additional therapies for patients with clinically significant myotonia. PMID:25218042

  7. Experimental visualization of the diffusion pathway of sodium ions in the Na3[Ti2P2O10F] anode for sodium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhaohui; Wang, Yuesheng; Sun, Chunwen; Alonso, J A; Fernández-Díaz, M T; Chen, Liquan

    2014-11-27

    Sodium-ion batteries have attracted considerable interest as an alternative to lithium-ion batteries for electric storage applications because of the low cost and natural abundance of sodium resources. The materials with an open framework are highly desired for Na-ion insertion/extraction. Here we report on the first visualization of the sodium-ion diffusion path in Na3[Ti2P2O10F] through high-temperature neutron powder diffraction experiments. The evolution of the Na-ion displacements of Na3[Ti2P2O10F] was investigated with high-temperature neutron diffraction (HTND) from room temperature to 600°C; difference Fourier maps were utilized to estimate the Na nuclear-density distribution. Temperature-driven Na displacements indicates that sodium-ion diffusion paths are established within the ab plane. As an anode for sodium-ion batteries, Na3[Ti2P2O10F] exhibits a reversible capacity of ~100 mAh g(-1) with lower intercalation voltage. It also shows good cycling stability and rate capability, making it promising applications in sodium-ion batteries.

  8. Experimental visualization of the diffusion pathway of sodium ions in the Na3[Ti2P2O10F] anode for sodium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhaohui; Wang, Yuesheng; Sun, Chunwen; Alonso, J. A.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Chen, Liquan

    2014-11-01

    Sodium-ion batteries have attracted considerable interest as an alternative to lithium-ion batteries for electric storage applications because of the low cost and natural abundance of sodium resources. The materials with an open framework are highly desired for Na-ion insertion/extraction. Here we report on the first visualization of the sodium-ion diffusion path in Na3[Ti2P2O10F] through high-temperature neutron powder diffraction experiments. The evolution of the Na-ion displacements of Na3[Ti2P2O10F] was investigated with high-temperature neutron diffraction (HTND) from room temperature to 600°C difference Fourier maps were utilized to estimate the Na nuclear-density distribution. Temperature-driven Na displacements indicates that sodium-ion diffusion paths are established within the ab plane. As an anode for sodium-ion batteries, Na3[Ti2P2O10F] exhibits a reversible capacity of ~100 mAh g-1 with lower intercalation voltage. It also shows good cycling stability and rate capability, making it promising applications in sodium-ion batteries.

  9. Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Activity Promotes Cysteine Cathepsin-dependent Invasiveness and Colony Growth of Human Cancer Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Ludovic; Roger, Sébastien; Besson, Pierre; Lecaille, Fabien; Gore, Jacques; Bougnoux, Philippe; Lalmanach, Gilles; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are functionally expressed in highly metastatic cancer cells derived from nonexcitable epithelial tissues (breast, prostate, lung, and cervix). MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells express functional sodium channel complexes, consisting of NaV1.5 and associated auxiliary β-subunits, that are responsible for a sustained inward sodium current at the membrane potential. Although these channels do not regulate cellular multiplication or migration, their inhibition by the specific blocker tetrodotoxin impairs both the extracellular gelatinolytic activity (monitored with DQ-gelatin) and cell invasiveness leading to the attenuation of colony growth and cell spreading in three-dimensional Matrigel®-composed matrices. MDA-MB-231 cells express functional cysteine cathepsins, which we found play a predominant role (∼65%) in cancer invasiveness. Matrigel® invasion is significantly decreased in the presence of specific inhibitors of cathepsins B and S (CA-074 and Z-FL-COCHO, respectively), and co-application of tetrodotoxin does not further reduce cell invasion. This suggests that cathepsins B and S are involved in invasiveness and that their proteolytic activity partly depends on NaV function. Inhibiting NaV has no consequence for cathepsins at the transcription, translation, and secretion levels. However, NaV activity leads to an intracellular alkalinization and a perimembrane acidification favorable for the extracellular activity of these acidic proteases. We propose that Nav enhance the invasiveness of cancer cells by favoring the pH-dependent activity of cysteine cathepsins. This general mechanism could lead to the identification of new targets allowing the therapeutic prevention of metastases. PMID:19176528

  10. Pyrethroids Differentially Alter Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels from the Honeybee Central Olfactory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kadala, Aklesso; Charreton, Mercedes; Jakob, Ingrid; Cens, Thierry; Rousset, Matthieu; Chahine, Mohamed; Le Conte, Yves; Charnet, Pierre; Collet, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of neurons from the honey bee olfactory system to pyrethroid insecticides was studied using the patch-clamp technique on central ‘antennal lobe neurons’ (ALNs) in cell culture. In these neurons, the voltage-dependent sodium currents are characterized by negative potential for activation, fast kinetics of activation and inactivation, and the presence of cumulative inactivation during train of depolarizations. Perfusion of pyrethroids on these ALN neurons submitted to repetitive stimulations induced (1) an acceleration of cumulative inactivation, and (2) a marked slowing of the tail current recorded upon repolarization. Cypermethrin and permethrin accelerated cumulative inactivation of the sodium current peak in a similar manner and tetramethrin was even more effective. The slow-down of channel deactivation was markedly dependent on the type of pyrethroid. With cypermethrin, a progressive increase of the tail current amplitude along with successive stimulations reveals a traditionally described use-dependent recruitment of modified sodium channels. However, an unexpected decrease in this tail current was revealed with tetramethrin. If one considers the calculated percentage of modified channels as an index of pyrethroids effects, ALNs are significantly more susceptible to tetramethrin than to permethrin or cypermethrin for a single depolarization, but this difference attenuates with repetitive activity. Further comparison with peripheral neurons from antennae suggest that these modifications are neuron type specific. Modeling the sodium channel as a multi-state channel with fast and slow inactivation allows to underline the effects of pyrethroids on a set of rate constants connecting open and inactivated conformations, and give some insights to their specificity. Altogether, our results revealed a differential sensitivity of central olfactory neurons to pyrethroids that emphasize the ability for these compounds to impair detection and processing

  11. High temperature infrared spectrum of sodium iodide (NaI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Arthur G.

    2014-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of sodium iodide vapor between 200 and 275 cm-1 has been measured with a resolution of 0.006 cm-1 at a temperature of 1096 K. The Δv = 1 transitions from v = 1 ← 0 to v = 13 ← 12 have been measured. Dunham constants are given from an least-squares analysis of 1285 fairly well resolved transitions. The band center for the fundamental band is ν0 = 257.2837 ± 0.0002 cm-1. The relative intensities of the Δv = 1 transitions from different vibrational states are studied and it is shown that the intensity is roughly proportional to v″ + 1 as expected from the harmonic oscillator approximation. From measurements of the Herman-Wallis constant, α1,0 = -0.0054 ± 0.0008, it is estimated that the transition moment must be μ1,0 ≈ 0.135 ± 0.020 debye.

  12. Sodium Ion Transport Mechanisms in Antiperovskite Electrolytes Na3OBr and Na4OI2: An in Situ Neutron Diffraction Study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Yonggang; Li, Shuai; Howard, John W; Neuefeind, Jörg; Ren, Yang; Wang, Hui; Liang, Chengdu; Yang, Wenge; Zou, Ruqiang; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-06-20

    Na-rich antiperovskites are recently developed solid electrolytes with enhanced sodium ionic conductivity and show promising functionality as a novel solid electrolyte in an all solid-state battery. In this work, the sodium ionic transport pathways of the parent compound Na3OBr, as well as the modified layered antiperovskite Na4OI2, were studied and compared through temperature-dependent neutron diffraction combined with the maximum entropy method. In the cubic Na3OBr antiperovskite, the nuclear density distribution maps at 500 K indicate that sodium ions hop within and among oxygen octahedra, and Br(-) ions are not involved. In the tetragonal Na4OI2 antiperovskite, Na ions, which connect octahedra in the ab plane, have the lowest activation energy barrier. The transport of sodium ions along the c axis is assisted by I(-) ions. PMID:27251879

  13. Purinergic mechanisms of lateral parabrachial nucleus facilitate sodium depletion-induced NaCl intake.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Miguel F; Barbosa, Silas P; De Andrade, Carina A F; Menani, José V; De Paula, Patrícia M

    2011-02-01

    Purinergic receptors are present in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN), a pontine structure involved in the control of sodium intake. In the present study, we investigated the effects of α,β-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate (α,β-methylene ATP, selective P2X purinergic agonist) alone or combined with pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS, P2X purinergic antagonist) or suramin (non-selective P2 purinergic antagonist) injected into the LPBN on sodium depletion-induced 1.8% NaCl intake. Male Holtzman rats with stainless steel cannulas implanted into the LPBN were used. Sodium depletion was induced by treating rats with the diuretic furosemide (20mg/kg of body weight) followed by 24h of sodium-deficient diet. Bilateral injections of α,β-methylene ATP (2.0 and 4.0nmol/0.2μl) into the LPBN increased sodium depletion-induced 1.8% NaCl intake (25.3±0.8 and 26.5±0.9ml/120min, respectively, vs. saline: 15.2±1.3ml/120min). PPADS (4nmol/0.2μl) alone into the LPBN did not change 1.8% NaCl intake, however, pretreatment with PPADS into the LPBN abolished the effects of α,β-methylene ATP on 1.8% NaCl intake (16.9±0.9ml/120min). Suramin (2.0nmol/0.2μl) alone into the LPBN reduced sodium depletion-induced 1.8% NaCl intake (5.7±1.9ml/120min, vs. saline: 15.5±1.1ml/120min), without changing 2% sucrose intake or 24h water deprivation-induced water intake. The combination of suramin and α,β-methylene ATP into the LPBN produced no change of 1.8% NaCl intake (15.2±1.2ml/120min). The results suggest that purinergic P2 receptor activation in the LPBN facilitates NaCl intake, probably by restraining LPBN mechanisms that inhibit sodium intake.

  14. Reactive species modify NaV1.8 channels and affect action potentials in murine dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Schink, Martin; Leipold, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are important relay stations between the periphery and the central nervous system and are essential for somatosensory signaling. Reactive species are produced in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and are known to alter electric signaling. Here we studied the influence of reactive species on the electrical properties of DRG neurons from mice with the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Even mild stress induced by either low concentrations of chloramine-T (10 μM) or low-intensity blue light irradiation profoundly diminished action potential frequency but prolonged single action potentials in wild-type neurons. The impact on evoked action potentials was much smaller in neurons deficient of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8 (NaV1.8(-/-)), the channel most important for the action potential upstroke in DRG neurons. Low concentrations of chloramine-T caused a significant reduction of NaV1.8 peak current and, at higher concentrations, progressively slowed down inactivation. Blue light had a smaller effect on amplitude but slowed down NaV1.8 channel inactivation. The observed effects were less apparent for TTX-sensitive NaV channels. NaV1.8 is an important reactive-species-sensitive component in the electrical signaling of DRG neurons, potentially giving rise to loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenomena depending on the type of reactive species and their effective concentration and time of exposure. PMID:26383867

  15. Reactive species modify NaV1.8 channels and affect action potentials in murine dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Schink, Martin; Leipold, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are important relay stations between the periphery and the central nervous system and are essential for somatosensory signaling. Reactive species are produced in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and are known to alter electric signaling. Here we studied the influence of reactive species on the electrical properties of DRG neurons from mice with the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Even mild stress induced by either low concentrations of chloramine-T (10 μM) or low-intensity blue light irradiation profoundly diminished action potential frequency but prolonged single action potentials in wild-type neurons. The impact on evoked action potentials was much smaller in neurons deficient of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8 (NaV1.8(-/-)), the channel most important for the action potential upstroke in DRG neurons. Low concentrations of chloramine-T caused a significant reduction of NaV1.8 peak current and, at higher concentrations, progressively slowed down inactivation. Blue light had a smaller effect on amplitude but slowed down NaV1.8 channel inactivation. The observed effects were less apparent for TTX-sensitive NaV channels. NaV1.8 is an important reactive-species-sensitive component in the electrical signaling of DRG neurons, potentially giving rise to loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenomena depending on the type of reactive species and their effective concentration and time of exposure.

  16. The rates of interaction of local anesthetics with sodium channels in nerve.

    PubMed

    Courtney, K R; Kendig, J J; Cohen, E N

    1978-11-01

    Voltage clamp experiments were carried out on Rana catesbiana nodes of Ranvier in order to test predictions regarding the relationship between local anesthetic lipid solubility and the rate of development of and recovery from frequency-dependent increments of sodium channel block. Contrary to expectations, the drugs of greater lipid solubility than lidocaine showed slower rates of development of frequency-dependent block and, in addition, induced longer rather than shorter memories for recent frequency-depent increments in channel block. Relaxation time constants for bupivacaine (50 micrometer), etidocaine (15 micrometer) and tetracaine (0.7 micrometer) measured 50, 8 and 8 sec, respectively, compared to shorter time constant of 2 sec for lidocaine (250 micrometer). Rate constants were calculated for binding to channels in both open and closed states. Open channels displayed a 130- to 6000-fold greater affinity for the local anesthetics than did closed channels, verifying an important feature of the "modulated receptor" hypothesis. In addition, binding to closed channels was enhanced by holding the membrane at more depolarizing potentials, which favored the development of inactive channel states. The exceptionally large binding constants of lidocaine for interactions with both closed and open channels cannot be attributed to its lipid solubility characteristics alone. PMID:712641

  17. Fast and slow blockade of sodium channels by flecainide in rabbit cardiac Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed

    Konzen, G; Reichardt, B; Hauswirth, O

    1990-06-01

    The electrophysiological effects of flecainide were tested using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique and Vmax-measurements in isolated rabbit cardiac Purkinje fibres. Flecainide predominantly unfolds its sodium-channel blocking action during the upstroke phase of the cardiac action potential, because its Vmax-depressant effects are independent of the duration of the depolarizing interval. Very long lasting depolarizations caused a second, very slow blocking activity. Starting from a steady-state block, recovery from block was tested and yielded a time constant of 7.3 s for a membrane potential of -105 mV. The strong blockade of sodium-channels combined with a delayed recovery behaviour of the drug-associated channels gives reasons for the observation of a marked use-dependent block. This block increased when the cycle length was shortened or the holding potential was less negative. Additional application of lidocaine in several concentrations did not significantly increase or attenuate the phasic block caused by flecainide alone. Under special conditions we investigated flecainide's depression and shift of the Vmax/Vm-relation and we observed that the concentration dependence of both parameters could be described by simple 1:1 binding reaction. The effects of flecainide are largely reversible often greater than or equal to 15 min. Flecainide could be characterized as an open channel blocker with a very slow inactivated channel blocking activity. For the qualitative description of the sodium-channel block by flecainide we used the "modulated-receptor hypothesis", whereas for reconstructions of the use-dependent action we applied the "guarded-receptor hypothesis", which enables computations of phasic block with the knowledge of only one forward and one reverse rate constant.

  18. The early and late effects of digoxin treatment on the sodium transport, sodium content and Na+K+- ATPase or erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cumberbatch, M; Zareian, K; Davidson, C; Morgan, D B; Swaminathan, R

    1981-06-01

    1 Erythrocyte sodium content, sodium transport (ouabain sensitive sodium flux Eos, and ouabain sensitive efflux rate constant ERCos) sodium, potassium activated ouabain sensitive adenosine triphosphatase (Na+K+ATPase) and plasma digoxin were measured in patients during acute digitalisation and in patients who were on long-term digoxin treatment. 2 In the six patients who were studied during digitalisation, the ERCos and Na+K+ATPase activity decreased and erythrocyte sodium content increased during days 2-4 treatment, but there was no change in Eos. 3 In 39 patients on long term digoxin therapy (2-119 months) the erythrocyte sodium content was normal, but the erythrocyte Na+K+ATPase activity was higher than the control group. When the results from these 39 patients were divided according to the duration of treatment it was found that the erythrocyte sodium content was higher in patients treated for 2-4 months than in patients treated for longer periods and the erythrocyte Na+K+ATPase activity increased with duration of treatment. In eight patients (duration of treatment greater than 29 months) in whom ERCos and Eos were measured, ERCos and Eos were higher than the control group. 4 The results suggest that the effects of digoxin on erythrocytes which occur during acute digoxin treatment do not persist in the long term. 5 The possible explanation for the higher ERCos, Eos and Na+K+ATPase activity in patients treated with digoxin for more than 2 months is discussed. PMID:6268133

  19. Studies examining the relationship between the chemical structure of protoxin II and its activity on voltage gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae H; Carlin, Kevin P; Wu, Gang; Ilyin, Victor I; Musza, Laszlo L; Blake, Paul R; Kyle, Donald J

    2014-08-14

    The aqueous solution structure of protoxin II (ProTx II) indicated that the toxin comprises a well-defined inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) backbone region and a flexible C-terminal tail region, similar to previously described NaSpTx III tarantula toxins. In the present study we sought to explore the structure-activity relationship of the two regions of the ProTx II molecule. As a first step, chimeric toxins of ProTx II and PaTx I were synthesized and their biological activities on Nav1.7 and Nav1.2 channels were investigated. Other tail region modifications to this chimera explored the effects of tail length and tertiary structure on sodium channel activity. In addition, the activity of various C-terminal modifications of the native ProTx II was assayed and resulted in the identification of protoxin II-NHCH3, a molecule with greater potency against Nav1.7 channels (IC50=42 pM) than the original ProTx II. PMID:25026046

  20. An external sodium ion binding site controls allosteric gating in TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Jara-Oseguera, Andres; Bae, Chanhyung; Swartz, Kenton J

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 channels in sensory neurons are integrators of painful stimuli and heat, yet how they integrate diverse stimuli and sense temperature remains elusive. Here, we show that external sodium ions stabilize the TRPV1 channel in a closed state, such that removing the external ion leads to channel activation. In studying the underlying mechanism, we find that the temperature sensors in TRPV1 activate in two steps to favor opening, and that the binding of sodium to an extracellular site exerts allosteric control over temperature-sensor activation and opening of the pore. The binding of a tarantula toxin to the external pore also exerts control over temperature-sensor activation, whereas binding of vanilloids influences temperature-sensitivity by largely affecting the open/closed equilibrium. Our results reveal a fundamental role of the external pore in the allosteric control of TRPV1 channel gating and provide essential constraints for understanding how these channels can be tuned by diverse stimuli. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13356.001 PMID:26882503

  1. An external sodium ion binding site controls allosteric gating in TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Jara-Oseguera, Andres; Bae, Chanhyung; Swartz, Kenton J

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 channels in sensory neurons are integrators of painful stimuli and heat, yet how they integrate diverse stimuli and sense temperature remains elusive. Here, we show that external sodium ions stabilize the TRPV1 channel in a closed state, such that removing the external ion leads to channel activation. In studying the underlying mechanism, we find that the temperature sensors in TRPV1 activate in two steps to favor opening, and that the binding of sodium to an extracellular site exerts allosteric control over temperature-sensor activation and opening of the pore. The binding of a tarantula toxin to the external pore also exerts control over temperature-sensor activation, whereas binding of vanilloids influences temperature-sensitivity by largely affecting the open/closed equilibrium. Our results reveal a fundamental role of the external pore in the allosteric control of TRPV1 channel gating and provide essential constraints for understanding how these channels can be tuned by diverse stimuli. PMID:26882503

  2. Molecular characterization of neurally expressing genes in the para sodium channel gene cluster of Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Chang-Sook; Ganetzky, B.

    1996-03-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms regulating expression of para, which encodes the major class of sodium channels in the Drosophila nervous system, we have tried to locate upstream cis-acting regulatory elements by mapping the transcriptional start site and analyzing the region immediately upstream of para in region 14D of the polytene chromosomes. From these studies, we have discovered that the region contains a cluster of neurally expressing genes. Here we report the molecular characterization of the genomic organization of the 14D region and the genes within this region, which are: calnexin (Cnx), actin related protein 14D (Arp14D), calcineurin A 14D (CnnA14D), and chromosome associated protein (Cap). The tight clustering of these genes, their neuronal expression patterns, and their potential functions related to expression, modulation, or regulation of sodium channels raise the possibility that these genes represent a functionally related group sharing some coordinate regulatory mechanism. 76 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Molecular Characterization of Neurally Expressing Genes in the Para Sodium Channel Gene Cluster of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hong, C. S.; Ganetzky, B.

    1996-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms regulating expression of para, which encodes the major class of sodium channels in the Drosophila nervous system, we have tried to locate upstream cis-acting regulatory elements by mapping the transcriptional start site and analyzing the region immediately upstream of para in region 14D of the polytene chromosomes. From these studies, we have discovered that the region contains a cluster of neurally expressing genes. Here we report the molecular characterization of the genomic organization of the 14D region and the genes within this region, which are: calnexin (Cnx), actin related protein 14D (Arp14D), calcineurin A 14D (CnnA14D), and chromosome associated protein (Cap). The tight clustering of these genes, their neuronal expression patterns, and their potential functions related to expression, modulation, or regulation of sodium channels raise the possibility that these genes represent a functionally related group sharing some coordinate regulatory mechanism. PMID:8849894

  4. Molecular basis for class Ib anti-arrhythmic inhibition of cardiac sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Pless, Stephan A; Galpin, Jason D; Frankel, Adam; Ahern, Christopher A

    2011-06-14

    Cardiac sodium channels are established therapeutic targets for the management of inherited and acquired arrhythmias by class I anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs). These drugs share a common target receptor bearing two highly conserved aromatic side chains, and are subdivided by the Vaughan-Williams classification system into classes Ia-c based on their distinct effects on the electrocardiogram. How can these drugs elicit distinct effects on the cardiac action potential by binding to a common receptor? Here we use fluorinated phenylalanine derivatives to test whether the electronegative surface potential of aromatic side chains contributes to inhibition by six class I AADs. Surprisingly, we find that class Ib AADs bind via a strong electrostatic cation-pi interaction, whereas class Ia and Ic AADs rely significantly less on this interaction. Our data shed new light on drug-target interactions underlying the inhibition of cardiac sodium channels by clinically relevant drugs and provide information for the directed design of AADs.

  5. Aldosterone-dependent and -independent regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in mouse distal nephron.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, Viatcheslav; Dahlmann, Anke; Krueger, Bettina; Bertog, Marko; Loffing, Johannes; Korbmacher, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    Aldosterone is thought to be the main hormone to stimulate the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN) comprising the late distal convoluted tubule (DCT2), the connecting tubule (CNT) and the entire collecting duct (CD). There is immunohistochemical evidence for an axial gradient of ENaC expression along the ASDN with highest expression in the DCT2 and CNT. However, most of our knowledge about renal ENaC function stems from studies in the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Here we investigated ENaC function in the transition zone of DCT2/CNT or CNT/CCD microdissected from mice maintained on different sodium diets to vary plasma aldosterone levels. Single-channel recordings demonstrated amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels in DCT2/CNT with biophysical properties typical for ENaC previously described in CNT/CCD. In animals maintained on a standard salt diet, the average ENaC-mediated whole cell current (ΔI(ami)) was higher in DCT2/CNT than in CNT/CCD. A low salt diet increased ΔI(ami) in CNT/CCD but had little effect on ΔI(ami) in DCT2/CNT. To investigate whether aldosterone is necessary for ENaC activity in the DCT2/CNT, we used aldosterone synthase knockout (AS(-/-)) mice that lack aldosterone. In CNT/CCD of AS(-/-) mice, ΔI(ami) was lower than that in wild-type (WT) animals and was not stimulated by a low salt diet. In contrast, in DCT2/CNT of AS(-/-) mice, ΔI(ami) was similar to that in DCT2/CNT of WT animals both on a standard and on a low salt diet. We conclude that ENaC function in the DCT2/CNT is largely independent of aldosterone which is in contrast to its known aldosterone sensitivity in CNT/CCD.

  6. Sodium manganese oxide thin films as cathodes for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Baggetto, Loic; Carroll, Kyler J; Unocic, Raymond R; Bridges, Craig A; Meng, Ying Shirley; Veith, Gabriel M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of sodium manganese oxide cathode thin films for rechargeable Na-ion batteries. Layered oxide compounds of nominal compositions Na0.6MnO2 and Na1.0MnO2 have been prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering and post-annealing at high temperatures under various conditions. The Na0.6MnO2 thin films possess either a hexagonal or orthorhombic structure while the Na1.0MnO2 films crystallize in a monoclinic structure, as shown by X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. The potential profiles of the film cathodes are characterized by features similar to those measured for the powders and exhibit reversible storage capacities in the range of 50-60 Ah cm-2 m-1, which correspond to about 120-140 mAh g-1, and are maintained over 80 cycles.

  7. Primary structure, chromosomal localization, and functional expression of a voltage-gated sodium channel from human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, C M; Ware, D H; Lee, S C; Patten, C D; Ferrer-Montiel, A V; Schinder, A F; McPherson, J D; Wagner-McPherson, C B; Wasmuth, J J; Evans, G A

    1992-01-01

    A cDNA library derived from human cerebral cortex was screened for the presence of sodium channel alpha subunit-specific clones. Ligation of three overlapping clones generated a full-length cDNA clone, HBA, that provided the complete nucleotide sequence coding for a protein of 2005 amino acids. The predicted structure suggests four homologous repeats and exhibits greatest homology and structural similarity to the rat brain sodium channel II. A second cDNA clone, HBB, that encodes a different subtype of sodium channel was isolated. Hybridization of DNA fragments from the 3' untranslated region of HBA and PCR with primers derived from HBB with human-hamster somatic cell hybrids localized these clones to human chromosome 2. In situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes mapped the structural genes for both HBA and HBB sodium channels to chromosome 2q23-24.3. The sodium channel HBA gene product was expressed by transfection in CHO cells. Expressed HBA currents were voltage-dependent, sodium-selective, and tetrodotoxin-sensitive and, thus, exhibit the biophysical and pharmacological properties characteristic of sodium channels. Images PMID:1325650

  8. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels as Therapeutic Targets for Treatment of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kharatmal, Shivsharan B; Singh, Jitendra N; Sharma, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is one of most common complication of diabetes, usually affecting 50% of diabetic patients and remains important cause of morbidity, mortality and deterioration of quality of life. PDN is well characterised by chronic hyperglycemia, alterations in expression and kinetics of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and neuro-inflammation which together may result into sensorimotor deficits in peripheral nervous system. Peripheral nociceptive neurons express variety of sodium channel isoforms particularly Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9, each play a key role in physiology of nociception by undergoing respective dynamic changes in expression and voltage-dependent gating properties. Thus, they are critical determinants of sensory neuronal excitability and associated neuropathic pain signal. Recent preclinical and clinical trial research has shed light on VGSCs as most compelling target in the treatment of PDN, a development that may open up new therapeutic approaches involving subtype selective sodium channel blockers to boost clinical efficacy, cost effectiveness, better tolerability and targeted treatment. In this review, we have summarized structure and functions of VGSCs and their involvement in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain along with the current status of pharmacological interventions targeted at VGSCs in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26202189

  9. Toxin-Resistant Sodium Channels: Parallel Adaptive Evolution across a Complete Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Hillis, David M.; Lu, Ying; Kyle, John W.; Fozzard, Harry A.; Zakon, Harold H.

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 75% of vertebrate proteins belong to protein families encoded by multiple evolutionarily related genes, a pattern that emerged as a result of gene and genome duplications over the course of vertebrate evolution. In families of genes with similar or related functions, adaptation to a strong selective agent should involve multiple adaptive changes across the entire gene family. However, we know of no evolutionary studies that have explicitly addressed this point. Here, we show how 4 taxonomically diverse species of pufferfishes (Tetraodontidae) each evolved resistance to the guanidinium toxins tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) via parallel amino acid replacements across all 8 sodium channels present in teleost fish genomes. This resulted in diverse suites of coexisting sodium channel types that all confer varying degrees of toxin resistance, yet show remarkable convergence among genes and phylogenetically diverse species. Using site-directed mutagenesis and expression of a vertebrate sodium channel, we also demonstrate that resistance to TTX/STX is enhanced up to 15-fold by single, frequently observed replacements at 2 sites that have not previously been implicated in toxin binding but show similar or identical replacements in pufferfishes and in distantly related vertebrate and nonvertebrate animals. This study presents an example of natural selection acting upon a complete gene family, repeatedly arriving at a diverse but limited number of adaptive changes within the same genome. To be maximally informative, we suggest that future studies of molecular adaptation should consider all functionally similar paralogs of the affected gene family. PMID:18258611

  10. Site of anticonvulsant action on sodium channels: autoradiographic and electrophysiological studies in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.F.; Baraban, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    The anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine interact allosterically with the batrachotoxin binding site of sodium channels. In the present study, we demonstrate an autoradiographic technique to localize the batrachotoxin binding site on sodium channels in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxinin-A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B). Binding of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B to brain sections is dependent on potentiating allosteric interactions with scorpion venom and is displaced by BTX-B (Kd approximately 200 nM), aconitine, veratridine, and phenytoin with the same rank order of potencies as described in brain synaptosomes. The maximum number of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites in forebrain sections also agrees with biochemical determinations. Autoradiographic localizations indicate that (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites are not restricted to cell bodies and axons but are present in synaptic zones throughout the brain. For example, a particularly dense concentration of these sites in the substantia nigra is associated with afferent terminals of the striatonigral projection. By contrast, myelinated structures possess much lower densities of binding sites. In addition, we present electrophysiological evidence that synaptic transmission, as opposed to axonal conduction, is preferentially sensitive to the action of aconitine and veratridine. Finally, the synaptic block produced by these sodium channel activators is inhibited by phenytoin and carbamazepine at therapeutic anticonvulsant concentrations.

  11. Possible involvement of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in cough reflex.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junzo; Nakanishi, Yuki; Ishikawa, Yoko; Hayashi, Shun-Suke; Asato, Megumi; Ohsawa, Masahiro

    2011-02-10

    We examined the involvement of tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant sodium channels in the peripheral mechanisms of the cough reflex in mice. We also examined the possibility of using ambroxol as an effective antitussive agent, and found that it produced antitussive effects through the inhibition of TTX-resistant sodium channels. The inhalation of fenvalerate, at concentrations of 0.3, 1 and 3μg/ml, for 5min produced coughs in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with tetrodotoxin, at a dose of 1μg/kg, s.c., slightly but significantly reduced the number of fenvalerate (3μg/ml)-induced coughs. However, the number of fenvalerate-induced coughs in tetorodotoxin-treated mice was still significantly greater than those in vehicle (0.4% DMSO) alone inhaled mice. On the other hand, pretreatment with tetrodotoxin, at a dose of 1μg/kg, s.c., almost completely reduced the number of citric acid (0.25M)-induced coughs to the level in vehicle (saline) alone inhaled mice. Pretreatment with ambroxol, at doses of 10, 30, 100 and 300mg/kg, p.o., dose-dependently and significantly reduced the number of fenvalerate (3μg/ml)-induced coughs. The present findings indicate that TTX-resistant sodium channels may play an important role in the enhancement of C-fiber-mediated cough pathways. Furthermore, ambroxol may prove to be a useful cough suppressant. PMID:21130084

  12. Sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) tablets as an alternative to sodium hypochlorite for the routine treatment of drinking water at the household level.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Thomas; Edmondson, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Household water treatment using sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) has been recognized as a cost-effective means of reducing the heavy burden of diarrhea and other waterborne diseases, especially among populations without access to improved water supplies. Sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), which is widely used in emergencies, is an alternative source of chlorine that may present certain advantages over NaOCl for household-based interventions in development settings. We summarize the basic chemistry and possible benefits of NaDCC, and review the available literature concerning its safety and regulatory treatment and microbiological effectiveness. We review the evidence concerning NaDCC in field studies, including microbiological performance and health outcomes. Finally, we examine studies and data to compare NaDCC with NaOCl in terms of compliance, acceptability, affordability and sustainability, and suggest areas for further research. PMID:16387550

  13. Modeling of DFT quality neural network potential for s