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Sample records for sodium-water reaction signals

  1. Theoretical Study of Sodium-Water Surface Reaction Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR).

  2. Microstructure and deformation mode of a stainless steel rupture disc exposed to sodium-water reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sudha, C.; Parameswaran, P. Kishore, S.; Murthy, C. Meikanda; Rajan, M.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Raghunathan, V.S.

    2008-08-15

    This paper deals with microstructural studies carried out on an austenitic stainless steel rupture disc which was exposed to sodium-water reaction. The rupture disc was part of a leak simulator put in a micro leak test section which was used to study the 'self wastage' of steam generator tubes. During micro leak testing, the rupture disc failed exhibiting a linear crack at a much lower pressure of 10 MPa rather than bursting open at the higher designed pressure of 15 MPa. The failed rupture disc revealed different microstructural features on the inner (steam exposed) and outer (sodium exposed) surfaces. Using microstructure as the signature, the temperature experienced by the rupture disc was predicted as {>=} 1273 K. Evidence for the exposure of the rupture disc to highly exothermic sodium-water reaction was obtained in the form of sodium rich debris, microcracks and deformation bands. Detailed transmission electron microscopy revealed the nature of deformation bands as deformation twins which is not a preferred failure mode for austenitic stainless steels.

  3. User`s input manual for quasi-steady sodium/water reaction analysis computer program SWAC-13E

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y W; Choi, U S; Nelson, S O

    1985-08-01

    SWAC-13E is a quasi-steady two-phase flow analysis code for liquid sodium and hydrogen mixtures in an LMFBR intermediate heat transport system and pressure relief system following large-leak sodium/water reactions in a steam generator. SWAC-13E complements the SWAAM-II and SWAAM-LT codes developed by ANL. SWAC-13E was received from Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan through an international agreement on the exchange of breeder reactor technology between the US Department of Energy and PNC. SWAC-13E was originally written for the Japanese computer system FACOM, and was converted to run on an IBM system at ANL. Input data needed for execution of the SWAC-13E code are described, following the understanding gained through execution of the code for several example problems. The coding changes involved in the conversion are also described. This report is intended to serve as the first document for use of the IBM version of SWAC-13E. Users are referred to various other documents for details of the code capabilities, theoretical basis, and other pertinent information needed in use of the code.

  4. Development of a multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in steam generators of sodium-cooled fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Uchibori, Akihiro; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-31

    A multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors was newly developed. The analysis system consists of the mechanistic numerical analysis codes, SERAPHIM, TACT, and RELAP5. The SERAPHIM code calculates the multicomponent multiphase flow and sodium-water chemical reaction caused by discharging of pressurized water vapor. Applicability of the SERAPHIM code was confirmed through the analyses of the experiment on water vapor discharging in liquid sodium. The TACT code was developed to calculate heat transfer from the reacting jet to the adjacent tube and to predict the tube failure occurrence. The numerical models integrated into the TACT code were verified through some related experiments. The RELAP5 code evaluates thermal hydraulic behavior of water inside the tube. The original heat transfer correlations were corrected for the tube rapidly heated by the reacting jet. The developed system enables evaluation of the wastage environment and the possibility of the failure propagation.

  5. Development of a multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in steam generators of sodium-cooled fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchibori, Akihiro; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    A multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors was newly developed. The analysis system consists of the mechanistic numerical analysis codes, SERAPHIM, TACT, and RELAP5. The SERAPHIM code calculates the multicomponent multiphase flow and sodium-water chemical reaction caused by discharging of pressurized water vapor. Applicability of the SERAPHIM code was confirmed through the analyses of the experiment on water vapor discharging in liquid sodium. The TACT code was developed to calculate heat transfer from the reacting jet to the adjacent tube and to predict the tube failure occurrence. The numerical models integrated into the TACT code were verified through some related experiments. The RELAP5 code evaluates thermal hydraulic behavior of water inside the tube. The original heat transfer correlations were corrected for the tube rapidly heated by the reacting jet. The developed system enables evaluation of the wastage environment and the possibility of the failure propagation.

  6. Analysis of large-leak test SWAT-3 Run-6 data by use of sodium-water-reaction analysis code SWAAM-I

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.W.; Lin, H.C.

    1982-02-01

    The Sodium Water Advanced Analysis Method computer code (SWAAM-I) is used to analyze the large-leak test data SWAT-3 Run-6. The SWAT-3 is the mockup of the secondary system of the Japanese breeder-reactor demonstration plant Monju. The steam-generator design for the Monju reactor was a helical-coil-tube type with a cover-gas space, and the SWAT-3 Run-6 Test vessel simulates this design of the steam generator. The objectives of this work are: (1) to examine the adequacy of the SWAAM-I code for the helical-coil-tube steam-generator system, (2) to understand and confirm the understanding of phenomena that have major design implications, and (3) to define needs for additional development of SWAAM-I code capabilities.

  7. Power plant II - Sodium-water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, M.

    The implementation of a sodium based heat exchange loop is presented as a means of reducing the required size of a solar thermal power plant heat exchanger. Sodium as a heat transfer fluid allows operations near 535 C with electromagnetic pumps. It is noted that sodium must be completely sealed in and surrounded with a neutral gas such as nitrogen or argon. The higher temperatures pave the way for a more efficient thermodynamic cycle, although the Themis receiver would necessarily need a faster loop in addition to more absorbent surfaces to adequately handle the sodium liquid. The steam lines would be helically wound in a chamber through which the sodium flows linearly downward. Storage is concluded to not be feasible under current technology due to the violent reactions possible between sodium and water or hitec salts. An auxiliary heat source would be required.

  8. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus.

  9. Signalling crosstalk in light stress and immune reactions in plants.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Andrea; Rahikainen, Moona; Konert, Grzegorz; Finazzi, Giovanni; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2014-04-19

    The evolutionary history of plants is tightly connected with the evolution of microbial pathogens and herbivores, which use photosynthetic end products as a source of life. In these interactions, plants, as the stationary party, have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense, signal and respond to the presence of external stress agents. Chloroplasts are metabolically versatile organelles that carry out fundamental functions in determining appropriate immune reactions in plants. Besides photosynthesis, chloroplasts host key steps in the biosynthesis of amino acids, stress hormones and secondary metabolites, which have a great impact on resistance against pathogens and insect herbivores. Changes in chloroplast redox signalling pathways and reactive oxygen species metabolism also mediate local and systemic signals, which modulate plant resistance to light stress and disease. Moreover, interplay among chloroplastic signalling networks and plasma membrane receptor kinases is emerging as a key mechanism that modulates stress responses in plants. This review highlights the central role of chloroplasts in the signalling crosstalk that essentially determines the outcome of plant-pathogen interactions in plants.

  10. Signalling crosstalk in light stress and immune reactions in plants

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Andrea; Rahikainen, Moona; Konert, Grzegorz; Finazzi, Giovanni; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary history of plants is tightly connected with the evolution of microbial pathogens and herbivores, which use photosynthetic end products as a source of life. In these interactions, plants, as the stationary party, have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense, signal and respond to the presence of external stress agents. Chloroplasts are metabolically versatile organelles that carry out fundamental functions in determining appropriate immune reactions in plants. Besides photosynthesis, chloroplasts host key steps in the biosynthesis of amino acids, stress hormones and secondary metabolites, which have a great impact on resistance against pathogens and insect herbivores. Changes in chloroplast redox signalling pathways and reactive oxygen species metabolism also mediate local and systemic signals, which modulate plant resistance to light stress and disease. Moreover, interplay among chloroplastic signalling networks and plasma membrane receptor kinases is emerging as a key mechanism that modulates stress responses in plants. This review highlights the central role of chloroplasts in the signalling crosstalk that essentially determines the outcome of plant–pathogen interactions in plants. PMID:24591720

  11. Hierarchical Feedback Modules and Reaction Hubs in Cell Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianfeng; Lan, Yueheng

    2015-01-01

    Despite much effort, identification of modular structures and study of their organizing and functional roles remain a formidable challenge in molecular systems biology, which, however, is essential in reaching a systematic understanding of large-scale cell regulation networks and hence gaining capacity of exerting effective interference to cell activity. Combining graph theoretic methods with available dynamics information, we successfully retrieved multiple feedback modules of three important signaling networks. These feedbacks are structurally arranged in a hierarchical way and dynamically produce layered temporal profiles of output signals. We found that global and local feedbacks act in very different ways and on distinct features of the information flow conveyed by signal transduction but work highly coordinately to implement specific biological functions. The redundancy embodied with multiple signal-relaying channels and feedback controls bestow great robustness and the reaction hubs seated at junctions of different paths announce their paramount importance through exquisite parameter management. The current investigation reveals intriguing general features of the organization of cell signaling networks and their relevance to biological function, which may find interesting applications in analysis, design and control of bio-networks. PMID:25951347

  12. Biophoton distress flares signal the onset of the hypersensitive reaction.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, John W

    2005-07-01

    Detection of biophoton emission, a natural bioluminescence, has emerged as a non-destructive method to mark the onset of the hypersensitive resistance reaction in Arabidopsis, bean and tomato. Rapid biophoton emission in Arabidopsis requires an intact R-gene signalling network and increased levels of cytosolic calcium and nitric oxide. The burst of biophotons precedes macroscopic symptoms by several hours and its timing is characteristic for specific gene-for-gene interactions. The ability to monitor biophoton emission from whole plants in real time should allow detailed dissection of plant defence responses.

  13. Bayesian parametric estimation of stop-signal reaction time distributions.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Dora; Dolan, Conor V; Logan, Gordon D; Brown, Scott D; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2013-11-01

    The cognitive concept of response inhibition can be measured with the stop-signal paradigm. In this paradigm, participants perform a 2-choice response time (RT) task where, on some of the trials, the primary task is interrupted by a stop signal that prompts participants to withhold their response. The dependent variable of interest is the latency of the unobservable stop response (stop-signal reaction time, or SSRT). Based on the horse race model (Logan & Cowan, 1984), several methods have been developed to estimate SSRTs. None of these approaches allow for the accurate estimation of the entire distribution of SSRTs. Here we introduce a Bayesian parametric approach that addresses this limitation. Our method is based on the assumptions of the horse race model and rests on the concept of censored distributions. We treat response inhibition as a censoring mechanism, where the distribution of RTs on the primary task (go RTs) is censored by the distribution of SSRTs. The method assumes that go RTs and SSRTs are ex-Gaussian distributed and uses Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling to obtain posterior distributions for the model parameters. The method can be applied to individual as well as hierarchical data structures. We present the results of a number of parameter recovery and robustness studies and apply our approach to published data from a stop-signal experiment.

  14. Dynamic signaling cascades: reversible covalent reaction-coupled molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yulong; You, Lei

    2015-11-11

    The research of systems chemistry exploring complex mixtures of interacting synthetic molecules has been burgeoning recently. Herein we demonstrate for the first time the coupling of molecular switches with a dynamic covalent reaction (DCR) and the modulation of created chemical cascades with a variety of inputs, thus closely mimicking a biological signaling system. A novel Michael type DCR of 10-methylacridinium perchlorate and monothiols exhibiting excellent regioselectivity and tunable affinity was discovered. A delicate balance between the unique reactivity of the reactant and the stability of the adduct leads to the generation of a strong acid in a thermodynamically controlled system. The dynamic cascade was next created via coupling of the DCR and a protonation-induced configurational switch (E/Z isomerization) through a proton relay. Detailed examination of the interdependence of the equilibrium enabled us to rationally optimize the cascade and also shed light on the possible intermediate of the switching process. Furthermore, relative independence of the coupled reactions was verified by the identification of stimuli that are able to facilitate one reaction but suppress the other. To further enhance systematic complexity, a second DCR of electrophilic aldehydes and thiols was employed for the reversible inhibition of the binary system, thus achieving the interplay of multiple equilibria. Finally, a fluorescence switch was turned on through coupling with the DCR, showcasing the versatility of our strategy. The results described herein should pave the way for the exploitation of multifunctional dynamic covalent cascades.

  15. Maternal Emotional Signals, Social Referencing, and Infants' Reactions to Strangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boccia, Maria; Campos, Joseph J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the significance of emotional communication and social referencing of the mother by her infant as determinants of the infant's affective reactions to other social figures in the environment. (PCB)

  16. Dependecy of the reaction time from the overlap of signal lights with different colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Karsten D.

    2005-02-01

    The rearward signal aspect consists of lights with different colors. With standard technics these signal lights are located at different places. With new technics it is possible to build signal lights with different colors together in one place. The signals overlap. In experiments at the University of Karlsruhe we studied the dependency between reaction time and overlap of signal lights. We can see, that the total overlap from a yellow turn signal and a red brake signal will increase the reaction time. The increase depends of the ratio between the luminance of the turn indicator signal and the luminance of the brake signal. With a ratio from one to one (best case with minimal increase) we found an increase of 300 milli seconds.

  17. Adverse reactions to oncologic drugs: spontaneous reporting and signal detection.

    PubMed

    Tuccori, Marco; Montagnani, Sabrina; Capogrosso-Sansone, Alice; Mantarro, Stefania; Antonioli, Luca; Fornai, Matteo; Blandizzi, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Oncology is one of the areas of medicine with the most active research being conducted on new drugs. New pharmacological entities frequently enter the clinical arena, and therefore, the safety profile of anticancer products deserves continuous monitoring. However, only very severe and (unusual) suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are usually reported, since cancer patients develop ADRs very frequently and some practical selectivity must be used. Notably, a recent study was able to identify 76 serious ADRs reported in updated drug labels of oncologic drugs and 50% of them (n = 38) were potentially fatal. Of these, 49 and 58%, respectively, were not described in initial drug labels. The aims of this article are to provide an overview about spontaneous reporting of ADRs of oncologic drugs and to discuss the available methods to analyze the safety of anticancer drugs using databases of spontaneous ADR reporting.

  18. Prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during reaction time performance

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Krystal L.; Alberico, Stephanie L.; Miller, Adam D.; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.

    2013-01-01

    Responses during a simple reaction time task are influenced by temporal expectation, or the ability to anticipate when a stimulus occurs in time. Here, we test the hypothesis that prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during simple reaction time task performance. We depleted dopamine projections to the medial prefrontal circuits by infusing 6-hydroxidopamine, a selective neurotoxin, into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of rats, and studied their performance on a simple reaction time task with two delays. VTA dopamine depletion did not change movements or learning of the reaction time task. However, VTA dopamine-depleted animals did not develop delay-dependent speeding of reaction times, suggesting that mesocortical dopamine signaling is required for temporal expectation. Next, we manipulated dopamine signaling within the medial prefrontal cortex using local pharmacology. We found that SCH23390, a D1-type dopamine receptor antagonist, specifically attenuated delay-dependent speeding, while sulpiride, a D2-type receptor antagonist, did not. These data suggest that prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during performance of a simple reaction time task. Our findings provide insight into temporal processing of the prefrontal cortex, and how dopamine signaling influences prefrontal circuits that guide goal-directed behavior. PMID:24120554

  19. Prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during reaction time performance.

    PubMed

    Parker, K L; Alberico, S L; Miller, A D; Narayanan, N S

    2013-01-01

    Responses during a simple reaction time task are influenced by temporal expectation, or the ability to anticipate when a stimulus occurs in time. Here, we test the hypothesis that prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during simple reaction time task performance. We depleted dopamine projections to the medial prefrontal circuits by infusing 6-hydroxidopamine, a selective neurotoxin, into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of rats, and studied their performance on a simple reaction time task with two delays. VTA dopamine depletion did not change movements or learning of the reaction time task. However, VTA dopamine-depleted animals did not develop delay-dependent speeding of reaction times, suggesting that mesocortical dopamine signaling is required for temporal expectation. Next, we manipulated dopamine signaling within the medial prefrontal cortex using local pharmacology. We found that SCH23390, a D1-type dopamine receptor antagonist, specifically attenuated delay-dependent speeding, while sulpiride, a D2-type receptor antagonist, did not. These data suggest that prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during performance of a simple reaction time task. Our findings provide insight into temporal processing of the prefrontal cortex, and how dopamine signaling influences prefrontal circuits that guide goal-directed behavior. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Amplified-response-spectrum analysis of sodium-water reaction pressure waves. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Knittle, D.E.

    1981-10-28

    This report deals with a frequency spectrum evaluation of the SWAAM I predicted double rupture disc assembly operation pressure wave generated in the LLTR Series II A-2 test. It also evaluates the same wave predicted by the TRANSWRAP II code and the pressure wave actually measured upstream of the rupture disc assembly by the test instrumentation in Test A-2. The SWAAM I and TRANSWRAP II codes currently use the same analytical model to characterize the rupture disc until the disc strikes the knife edges. Thereafter, the SWAAM I code relies on analytical techniques to characterize the phenomena, whereas the TRANSWRAP II code uses empirical parameters based on A-2 test data to represent the disc behavior. Any differences in the predicted dynamic pipe loads caused by double rupture disc assembly operation, using the forcing functions predicted by the codes can, therefore, be traced to this difference.

  1. Biophysical assay for tethered signaling reactions reveals tether-controlled activity for the phosphatase SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    Goyette, Jesse; Salas, Citlali Solis; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel A.; Allard, Jun; Dushek, Omer

    2017-01-01

    Tethered enzymatic reactions are ubiquitous in signaling networks but are poorly understood. A previously unreported mathematical analysis is established for tethered signaling reactions in surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Applying the method to the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a phosphorylated tether corresponding to an immune receptor cytoplasmic tail provides five biophysical/biochemical constants from a single SPR experiment: two binding rates, two catalytic rates, and a reach parameter. Tether binding increases the activity of SHP-1 by 900-fold through a binding-induced allosteric activation (20-fold) and a more significant increase in local substrate concentration (45-fold). The reach parameter indicates that this local substrate concentration is exquisitely sensitive to receptor clustering. We further show that truncation of the tether leads not only to a lower reach but also to lower binding and catalysis. This work establishes a new framework for studying tethered signaling processes and highlights the tether as a control parameter in clustered receptor signaling. PMID:28378014

  2. Biophysical assay for tethered signaling reactions reveals tether-controlled activity for the phosphatase SHP-1.

    PubMed

    Goyette, Jesse; Salas, Citlali Solis; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel A; Allard, Jun; Dushek, Omer

    2017-03-01

    Tethered enzymatic reactions are ubiquitous in signaling networks but are poorly understood. A previously unreported mathematical analysis is established for tethered signaling reactions in surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Applying the method to the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a phosphorylated tether corresponding to an immune receptor cytoplasmic tail provides five biophysical/biochemical constants from a single SPR experiment: two binding rates, two catalytic rates, and a reach parameter. Tether binding increases the activity of SHP-1 by 900-fold through a binding-induced allosteric activation (20-fold) and a more significant increase in local substrate concentration (45-fold). The reach parameter indicates that this local substrate concentration is exquisitely sensitive to receptor clustering. We further show that truncation of the tether leads not only to a lower reach but also to lower binding and catalysis. This work establishes a new framework for studying tethered signaling processes and highlights the tether as a control parameter in clustered receptor signaling.

  3. Dynamic modeling of biochemical reactions with application to signal transduction: principles and tools using Mathematica.

    PubMed

    Tóth, János; Rospars, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Modeling of biochemical phenomena is based on formal reaction kinetics. This requires the translation of the original reaction systems into sets of differential equations expressing the effects of the various reaction steps. The temporal behavior of the system is obtained by solving the differential equations. We present the main concepts on which the formal approach of these two problems is based and we show how the amount of work needed to treat them can be significantly reduced by using a mathematical program package (Mathematica). Symbolic and numerical calculations can be performed with the programs presented and graphic presentations of the behavior of the system be obtained. The basic ideas are illustrated with three examples taken from the area of signal transduction and ion signaling.

  4. Combing signals from spontaneous reports and electronic health records for detection of adverse drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Harpaz, Rave; Vilar, Santiago; DuMouchel, William; Salmasian, Hojjat; Haerian, Krystl; Shah, Nigam H; Chase, Herbert S; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Objective Data-mining algorithms that can produce accurate signals of potentially novel adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a central component of pharmacovigilance. We propose a signal-detection strategy that combines the adverse event reporting system (AERS) of the Food and Drug Administration and electronic health records (EHRs) by requiring signaling in both sources. We claim that this approach leads to improved accuracy of signal detection when the goal is to produce a highly selective ranked set of candidate ADRs. Materials and methods Our investigation was based on over 4 million AERS reports and information extracted from 1.2 million EHR narratives. Well-established methodologies were used to generate signals from each source. The study focused on ADRs related to three high-profile serious adverse reactions. A reference standard of over 600 established and plausible ADRs was created and used to evaluate the proposed approach against a comparator. Results The combined signaling system achieved a statistically significant large improvement over AERS (baseline) in the precision of top ranked signals. The average improvement ranged from 31% to almost threefold for different evaluation categories. Using this system, we identified a new association between the agent, rasburicase, and the adverse event, acute pancreatitis, which was supported by clinical review. Conclusions The results provide promising initial evidence that combining AERS with EHRs via the framework of replicated signaling can improve the accuracy of signal detection for certain operating scenarios. The use of additional EHR data is required to further evaluate the capacity and limits of this system and to extend the generalizability of these results. PMID:23118093

  5. Combing signals from spontaneous reports and electronic health records for detection of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Rave; Vilar, Santiago; Dumouchel, William; Salmasian, Hojjat; Haerian, Krystl; Shah, Nigam H; Chase, Herbert S; Friedman, Carol

    2013-05-01

    Data-mining algorithms that can produce accurate signals of potentially novel adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a central component of pharmacovigilance. We propose a signal-detection strategy that combines the adverse event reporting system (AERS) of the Food and Drug Administration and electronic health records (EHRs) by requiring signaling in both sources. We claim that this approach leads to improved accuracy of signal detection when the goal is to produce a highly selective ranked set of candidate ADRs. Our investigation was based on over 4 million AERS reports and information extracted from 1.2 million EHR narratives. Well-established methodologies were used to generate signals from each source. The study focused on ADRs related to three high-profile serious adverse reactions. A reference standard of over 600 established and plausible ADRs was created and used to evaluate the proposed approach against a comparator. The combined signaling system achieved a statistically significant large improvement over AERS (baseline) in the precision of top ranked signals. The average improvement ranged from 31% to almost threefold for different evaluation categories. Using this system, we identified a new association between the agent, rasburicase, and the adverse event, acute pancreatitis, which was supported by clinical review. The results provide promising initial evidence that combining AERS with EHRs via the framework of replicated signaling can improve the accuracy of signal detection for certain operating scenarios. The use of additional EHR data is required to further evaluate the capacity and limits of this system and to extend the generalizability of these results.

  6. Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography Coupled to Multiple Reaction Monitoring Enables Reproducible Quantification of Phospho-signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jacob J.; Yan, Ping; Zhao, Lei; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Moore, Heather D.; Lin, Chenwei; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L.; Stirewalt, Derek L.; Reding, Kerryn W.; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    A major goal in cell signaling research is the quantification of phosphorylation pharmacodynamics following perturbations. Traditional methods of studying cellular phospho-signaling measure one analyte at a time with poor standardization, rendering them inadequate for interrogating network biology and contributing to the irreproducibility of preclinical research. In this study, we test the feasibility of circumventing these issues by coupling immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC)-based enrichment of phosphopeptides with targeted, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to achieve precise, specific, standardized, multiplex quantification of phospho-signaling responses. A multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay targeting phospho-analytes responsive to DNA damage was configured, analytically characterized, and deployed to generate phospho-pharmacodynamic curves from primary and immortalized human cells experiencing genotoxic stress. The multiplexed assays demonstrated linear ranges of ≥3 orders of magnitude, median lower limit of quantification of 0.64 fmol on column, median intra-assay variability of 9.3%, median inter-assay variability of 12.7%, and median total CV of 16.0%. The multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay enabled robust quantification of 107 DNA damage-responsive phosphosites from human cells following DNA damage. The assays have been made publicly available as a resource to the community. The approach is generally applicable, enabling wide interrogation of signaling networks. PMID:26621847

  7. Factors Affecting the Timing of Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Imai, Shungo; Uehara, Keiko; Maruyama, Junya; Shimizu, Mikiko; Mochizuki, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting the timing of signal detection by comparing variations in reporting time of known and unknown ADRs after initial drug release in the USA. Data on adverse event reactions (AERs) submitted to U.S. FDA was used. Six ADRs associated with 6 drugs (rosuvastatin, aripiprazole, teriparatide, telithromycin, exenatide, varenicline) were investigated: Changes in the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component as indexes of signal detection were followed every 3 months after each drugs release, and the time for detection of signals was investigated. The time for the detection of signal to be detected after drug release in the USA was 2-10 months for known ADRs and 19-44 months for unknown ones. The median lag time for known and unknown ADRs was 99.0-122.5 days and 185.5-306.0 days, respectively. When the FDA released advisory information on rare but potentially serious health risks of an unknown ADR, the time lag to report from the onset of ADRs to the FDA was shorter. This study suggested that one factor affecting signal detection time is whether an ADR was known or unknown at release.

  8. Factors Affecting the Timing of Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Imai, Shungo; Uehara, Keiko; Maruyama, Junya; Shimizu, Mikiko; Mochizuki, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting the timing of signal detection by comparing variations in reporting time of known and unknown ADRs after initial drug release in the USA. Data on adverse event reactions (AERs) submitted to U.S. FDA was used. Six ADRs associated with 6 drugs (rosuvastatin, aripiprazole, teriparatide, telithromycin, exenatide, varenicline) were investigated: Changes in the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component as indexes of signal detection were followed every 3 months after each drugs release, and the time for detection of signals was investigated. The time for the detection of signal to be detected after drug release in the USA was 2–10 months for known ADRs and 19–44 months for unknown ones. The median lag time for known and unknown ADRs was 99.0–122.5 days and 185.5–306.0 days, respectively. When the FDA released advisory information on rare but potentially serious health risks of an unknown ADR, the time lag to report from the onset of ADRs to the FDA was shorter. This study suggested that one factor affecting signal detection time is whether an ADR was known or unknown at release. PMID:26641634

  9. A web-based quantitative signal detection system on adverse drug reaction in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chanjuan; Xia, Jielai; Deng, Jianxiong; Chen, Wenge; Wang, Suzhen; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Guanquan

    2009-07-01

    To establish a web-based quantitative signal detection system for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) based on spontaneous reporting to the Guangdong province drug-monitoring database in China. Using Microsoft Visual Basic and Active Server Pages programming languages and SQL Server 2000, a web-based system with three software modules was programmed to perform data preparation and association detection, and to generate reports. Information component (IC), the internationally recognized measure of disproportionality for quantitative signal detection, was integrated into the system, and its capacity for signal detection was tested with ADR reports collected from 1 January 2002 to 30 June 2007 in Guangdong. A total of 2,496 associations including known signals were mined from the test database. Signals (e.g., cefradine-induced hematuria) were found early by using the IC analysis. In addition, 291 drug-ADR associations were alerted for the first time in the second quarter of 2007. The system can be used for the detection of significant associations from the Guangdong drug-monitoring database and could be an extremely useful adjunct to the expert assessment of very large numbers of spontaneously reported ADRs for the first time in China.

  10. A Program of Yersinia enterocolitica Type III Secretion Reactions Is Activated by Specific Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vincent T.; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2001-01-01

    Successful establishment of Yersinia infections requires the type III machinery, a protein transporter that injects virulence factors (Yops) into macrophages. It is reported here that the Yersinia type III pathway responds to environmental signals by transporting proteins to distinct locations. Yersinia enterocolitica cells sense an increase in extracellular amino acids (glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, and asparagine) that results in the activation of the type III pathway. Another signal, provided by serum proteins such as albumin, triggers the secretion of YopD into the extracellular medium. The third signal, a decrease in calcium concentration, appears to be provided by host cells and causes Y. enterocolitica to transport YopE and presumably other virulence factors across the eukaryotic plasma membrane. Mutations in several genes encoding regulatory molecules (lcrG, lcrH, tyeA, yopD, yopN, yscM1, and yscM2) bypass the signal requirement of the type III pathway. Together these results suggest that yersiniae may have evolved distinct secretion reactions in response to environmental signals. PMID:11489848

  11. AFM Imaging of Hybridization Chain Reaction-Mediated Signal Transmission Between two DNA Origami Structures.

    PubMed

    Helmig, Sarah; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-09-03

    Signal transfer is central to the controlled exchange of information in biology and advanced technologies. Therefore, the development of reliable, long-ranging signal transfer systems for artificial nanoscale assemblies is of great scientific interest. We have designed such a system for signal transfer between two connected DNA nanostructures, using the hybridization chain reaction (HCR). Two sets of metastable DNA hairpins - of which one is immobilized in specific points along tracks on DNA origami structures - are polymerized to form a continuous DNA duplex, which is visible using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Upon addition of a designed initiator, the initiation signal is efficiently transferred >200 nm from a specific location on one origami structure to an end point on another origami structure. The system shows no significant loss of signal when crossing from one nanostructure to another, and therefore has the potential to be applied to larger multi-component DNA assemblies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Release the BEESTS: Bayesian Estimation of Ex-Gaussian STop-Signal reaction time distributions

    PubMed Central

    Matzke, Dora; Love, Jonathon; Wiecki, Thomas V.; Brown, Scott D.; Logan, Gordon D.; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2013-01-01

    The stop-signal paradigm is frequently used to study response inhibition. In this paradigm, participants perform a two-choice response time (RT) task where the primary task is occasionally interrupted by a stop-signal that prompts participants to withhold their response. The primary goal is to estimate the latency of the unobservable stop response (stop signal reaction time or SSRT). Recently, Matzke et al. (2013) have developed a Bayesian parametric approach (BPA) that allows for the estimation of the entire distribution of SSRTs. The BPA assumes that SSRTs are ex-Gaussian distributed and uses Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling to estimate the parameters of the SSRT distribution. Here we present an efficient and user-friendly software implementation of the BPA—BEESTS—that can be applied to individual as well as hierarchical stop-signal data. BEESTS comes with an easy-to-use graphical user interface and provides users with summary statistics of the posterior distribution of the parameters as well various diagnostic tools to assess the quality of the parameter estimates. The software is open source and runs on Windows and OS X operating systems. In sum, BEESTS allows experimental and clinical psychologists to estimate entire distributions of SSRTs and hence facilitates the more rigorous analysis of stop-signal data. PMID:24339819

  13. Hybridization chain reaction-based fluorescence immunoassay using DNA intercalating dye for signal readout.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yan; Nie, Ji; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhao, Ming-Zhe; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2014-07-07

    A novel format of fluorescence immunosorbent assay based on the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) using a DNA intercalating dye for signal readout was constructed for the sensitive detection of targets, both in competitive and sandwich modes. In this platform, the capture and recognition processes are based on immunoreactions and the signal amplification depends on the enzyme-free, isothermal HCR-induced labelling event. After a competitive or a sandwich immunoreaction, a biotinylated capture DNA was bound to a biotinylated signal antibody through avidin, and triggered the HCR by two specific hairpins into a nicked double helix. Gene Finder (GF), a fluorescent probe for double-strand DNA, was intercalated in situ into the amplified chain to produce the fluorescence signal. The limit of detection (LOD) for rabbit IgG in competitive mode by HCR/GF immunoassay was improved at least 100-fold compared with the traditional fluorescence immunoassay using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled-streptavidin or fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled second antibody as the signal readout. The proposed fluorescence immunoassay was also demonstrated by using α-fetoprotein as the model target in sandwich mode, and showed a wide linear range from 28 ng mL(-1) to 20 μg mL(-1) with a LOD of 6.0 ng mL(-1). This method also showed satisfactory analysis in spiked human serum, which suggested that it might have great potential for versatile applications in life science and point-of-care diagnostics.

  14. Application of quantitative signal detection in the Dutch spontaneous reporting system for adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    van Puijenbroek, Eugène; Diemont, Willem; van Grootheest, Kees

    2003-01-01

    The primary aim of spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) is the timely detection of unknown adverse drug reactions (ADRs), or signal detection. Generally this is carried out by a systematic manual review of every report sent to an SRS. Statistical analysis of the data sets of an SRS, or quantitative signal detection, can provide additional information concerning a possible relationship between a drug and an ADR. We describe the role of quantitative signal detection and the way it is applied at the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb. Results of the statistical analysis are implemented in the traditional case-by-case analysis. In addition, for data-mining purposes, a list of associations of ADRs and suspected drugs that are disproportionally present in the database is periodically generated. Finally, quantitative signal generation can be used to study more complex relationships, such as drug-drug interactions and syndromes. The results of quantitative signal detection should be considered as an additional source of information, complementary to the traditional analysis. Techniques for the detection of drug interactions and syndromes offer a new challenge for pharmacovigilance in the near future.

  15. Ultrasensitive Multiplexed Immunoassay for Tumor Biomarkers Based on DNA Hybridization Chain Reaction Amplifying Signal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinjin; Wang, Junchun; Zhao, Junqing; Guo, Zilin; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2016-03-23

    In this work, a novel electrochemical immunoassay protocol has been reported for simultaneous determination of multiple tumor biomarkers based on DNA hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) were selected as model biomarkers. The immunoassay protocol contained primary antibodies immobilized on gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), secondary antibodies conjugated with DNA concatemer from HCR of primer, auxiliary probe, and signal probe labeled with signal molecules (methyleneblue (MB) and ferrocene (Fc)). In the presence of target biomarkers, the sandwich immunocomplex was formed between the primary antibodies and secondary antibodies bioconjugates carrying numerous signal molecules. As a result, two well-resolved reduction peaks, one was at -0.35 V (corresponding to MB) and other was at 0.33 V (corresponding to Fc; both vs SCE), were obtained in differential pulse voltammetry, and peak currents changed were related to the level of biomarkers. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunoassay exhibited a wide linear response range (0.5 pg mL(-1) to 50 ng mL(-1)) and low detection limits (PSA, 0.17 pg mL(-1); AFP, 0.25 pg mL(-1)) (at S/N = 3). In addition, the immunoassay was evaluated by analyzing simulate human serum sample, and the recoveries obtained were within 99.4-107.6% for PSA and 97.9-108.2% for AFP, indicating the immnuoassay could be applied to the simultaneous detection of AFP and PSA in human serum samples.

  16. Nucleic acid templated reactions: consequences of probe reactivity and readout strategy for amplified signaling and sequence selectivity.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Tom N; Seitz, Oliver

    2009-07-06

    DNA- and RNA-templated chemical reactions can serve as a diagnostic means for the detection of nucleic acids. Reaction schemes that allow amplified detection are of high interest for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-free DNA and RNA diagnosis. These reactions typically draw upon the catalytic activity of the template, which is able to trigger the conversion of many signaling molecules per template molecule. However, the design of reactive probes that allow both sensitive and selective nucleic acid detection is a challenge and requires insight into three major parameters: a) reactivity of functional groups involved, b) affinity of probes for the template, and c) the readout system. In this study we used peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based probes to investigate in detail the signaling power and the selectivity of a transfer reaction derived from a native chemical ligation. We show that subtle variations of the thioesters involved had a tremendous impact on the sensitivity and selectivity of the reaction system. The results suggest that reactions at turnover conditions require low rates of non-templated reaction pathways to provide high target selectivity and sensitivity. On the other hand, very high rates of templated reactions should be avoided to allow mismatched probe-template complexes to dissociate prior to bond formation. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the DNA-catalyzed transfer reaction was studied and provided insight into crucial strand-exchange processes. Further improvements of selective signaling were achieved through a new readout based on pyrene-transfer reactions. This method reduces background signals and enables significant increases in the signaling rates compared with previous fluorescence-based methods.

  17. Leverage principle of retardation signal in titration of double protein via chip moving reaction boundary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liu-Xia; Cao, Yi-Ren; Xiao, Hua; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Shao-Rong; Meng, Qing-Hua; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2016-03-15

    In the present work we address a simple, rapid and quantitative analytical method for detection of different proteins present in biological samples. For this, we proposed the model of titration of double protein (TDP) and its relevant leverage theory relied on the retardation signal of chip moving reaction boundary electrophoresis (MRBE). The leverage principle showed that the product of the first protein content and its absolute retardation signal is equal to that of the second protein content and its absolute one. To manifest the model, we achieved theoretical self-evidence for the demonstration of the leverage principle at first. Then relevant experiments were conducted on the TDP-MRBE chip. The results revealed that (i) there was a leverage principle of retardation signal within the TDP of two pure proteins, and (ii) a lever also existed within these two complex protein samples, evidently demonstrating the validity of TDP model and leverage theory in MRBE chip. It was also showed that the proposed technique could provide a rapid and simple quantitative analysis of two protein samples in a mixture. Finally, we successfully applied the developed technique for the quantification of soymilk in adulterated infant formula. The TDP-MRBE opens up a new window for the detection of adulteration ratio of the poor food (milk) in blended high quality one. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mood induction effects on motor sequence learning and stop signal reaction time.

    PubMed

    Greeley, Brian; Seidler, Rachael D

    2017-01-01

    The neurobiological theory of positive affect proposes that positive mood states may benefit cognitive performance due to an increase of dopamine throughout the brain. However, the results of many positive affect studies are inconsistent; this may be due to individual differences. The relationship between dopamine and performance is not linear, but instead follows an inverted "U" shape. Given this, we hypothesized that individuals with high working memory capacity, a proxy measure for dopaminergic transmission, would not benefit from positive mood induction and in fact performance in dopamine-mediated tasks would decline. In contrast, we predicted that individuals with low working memory capacities would receive the most benefit after positive mood induction. Here, we explored the effect of positive affect on two dopamine-mediated tasks, an explicit serial reaction time sequence learning task and the stop signal task, predicting that an individual's performance is modulated not only by working memory capacity, but also on the type of mood. Improvements in explicit sequence learning from pre- to post-positive mood induction were associated with working memory capacity; performance declined in individuals with higher working memory capacities following positive mood induction, but improved in individuals with lower working memory capacities. This was not the case for negative or neutral mood induction. Moreover, there was no relationship between the change in stop signal reaction time with any of the mood inductions and individual differences in working memory capacity. These results provide partial support for the neurobiological theory of positive affect and highlight the importance of taking into account individual differences in working memory when examining the effects of positive mood induction.

  19. Human TLR1 Deficiency Is Associated with Impaired Mycobacterial Signaling and Protection from Leprosy Reversal Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Misch, Elizabeth A.; Macdonald, Murdo; Ranjit, Chaman; Sapkota, Bishwa R.; Wells, Richard D.; Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Kaplan, Gilla; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important regulators of the innate immune response to pathogens, including Mycobacterium leprae, which is recognized by TLR1/2 heterodimers. We previously identified a transmembrane domain polymorphism, TLR1_T1805G, that encodes an isoleucine to serine substitution and is associated with impaired signaling. We hypothesized that this TLR1 SNP regulates the innate immune response and susceptibility to leprosy. In HEK293 cells transfected with the 1805T or 1805G variant and stimulated with extracts of M. leprae, NF-κB activity was impaired in cells with the 1805G polymorphism. We next stimulated PBMCs from individuals with different genotypes for this SNP and found that 1805GG individuals had significantly reduced cytokine responses to both whole irradiated M. leprae and cell wall extracts. To investigate whether TLR1 variation is associated with clinical presentations of leprosy or leprosy immune reactions, we examined 933 Nepalese leprosy patients, including 238 with reversal reaction (RR), an immune reaction characterized by a Th1 T cell cytokine response. We found that the 1805G allele was associated with protection from RR with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.51 (95% CI 0.29–0.87, p = 0.01). Individuals with 1805 genotypes GG or TG also had a reduced risk of RR in comparison to genotype TT with an OR of 0.55 (95% CI 0.31–0.97, p = 0.04). To our knowledge, this is the first association of TLR1 with a Th1-mediated immune response. Our findings suggest that TLR1 deficiency influences adaptive immunity during leprosy infection to affect clinical manifestations such as nerve damage and disability. PMID:18461142

  20. Designing Driver Assistance Systems with Crossmodal Signals: Multisensory Integration Rules for Saccadic Reaction Times Apply

    PubMed Central

    Steenken, Rike; Weber, Lars; Colonius, Hans; Diederich, Adele

    2014-01-01

    Modern driver assistance systems make increasing use of auditory and tactile signals in order to reduce the driver's visual information load. This entails potential crossmodal interaction effects that need to be taken into account in designing an optimal system. Here we show that saccadic reaction times to visual targets (cockpit or outside mirror), presented in a driving simulator environment and accompanied by auditory or tactile accessories, follow some well-known spatiotemporal rules of multisensory integration, usually found under confined laboratory conditions. Auditory nontargets speed up reaction time by about 80 ms. The effect tends to be maximal when the nontarget is presented 50 ms before the target and when target and nontarget are spatially coincident. The effect of a tactile nontarget (vibrating steering wheel) was less pronounced and not spatially specific. It is shown that the average reaction times are well-described by the stochastic “time window of integration” model for multisensory integration developed by the authors. This two-stage model postulates that crossmodal interaction occurs only if the peripheral processes from the different sensory modalities terminate within a fixed temporal interval, and that the amount of crossmodal interaction manifests itself in an increase or decrease of second stage processing time. A qualitative test is consistent with the model prediction that the probability of interaction, but not the amount of crossmodal interaction, depends on target–nontarget onset asynchrony. A quantitative model fit yields estimates of individual participants' parameters, including the size of the time window. Some consequences for the design of driver assistance systems are discussed. PMID:24800823

  1. Designing driver assistance systems with crossmodal signals: multisensory integration rules for saccadic reaction times apply.

    PubMed

    Steenken, Rike; Weber, Lars; Colonius, Hans; Diederich, Adele

    2014-01-01

    Modern driver assistance systems make increasing use of auditory and tactile signals in order to reduce the driver's visual information load. This entails potential crossmodal interaction effects that need to be taken into account in designing an optimal system. Here we show that saccadic reaction times to visual targets (cockpit or outside mirror), presented in a driving simulator environment and accompanied by auditory or tactile accessories, follow some well-known spatiotemporal rules of multisensory integration, usually found under confined laboratory conditions. Auditory nontargets speed up reaction time by about 80 ms. The effect tends to be maximal when the nontarget is presented 50 ms before the target and when target and nontarget are spatially coincident. The effect of a tactile nontarget (vibrating steering wheel) was less pronounced and not spatially specific. It is shown that the average reaction times are well-described by the stochastic "time window of integration" model for multisensory integration developed by the authors. This two-stage model postulates that crossmodal interaction occurs only if the peripheral processes from the different sensory modalities terminate within a fixed temporal interval, and that the amount of crossmodal interaction manifests itself in an increase or decrease of second stage processing time. A qualitative test is consistent with the model prediction that the probability of interaction, but not the amount of crossmodal interaction, depends on target-nontarget onset asynchrony. A quantitative model fit yields estimates of individual participants' parameters, including the size of the time window. Some consequences for the design of driver assistance systems are discussed.

  2. New Signal Amplification Strategy Using Semicarbazide as Co-reaction Accelerator for Highly Sensitive Electrochemiluminescent Aptasensor Construction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meng-Nan; Zhuo, Ying; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Ya-Qin

    2015-11-17

    A highly sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) aptasensor was constructed using semicarbazide (Sem) as co-reaction accelerator to promote the ECL reaction rate of CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) and the co-reactant of peroxydisulfate (S2O8(2-)) for boosting signal amplification. The co-reaction accelerator is a species that when it is introduced into the ECL system containing luminophore and co-reactant, it can interact with co-reactant rather than luminophore to promote the ECL reaction rate of luminophore and co-reactant; thus the ECL signal is significantly amplified in comparison with that in which only luminophore and co-reactant are present. In this work, the ECL signal probes were first fabricated by alternately assembling the Sem and Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto the surfaces of hollow Au nanocages (AuNCs) via Au-N bond to obtain the multilayered nanomaterials of (AuNPs-Sem)n-AuNCs for immobilizing amino-terminated detection aptamer of thrombin (TBA2). Notably, the Sem with two -NH2 terminal groups could not only serve as cross-linking reagent to assemble AuNPs and AuNCs but also act as co-reaction accelerator to enhance the ECL reaction rate of CdTe QDs and S2O8(2-) for signal amplification. With the sandwich-type format, TBA2 signal probes could be trapped on the CdTe QD-based sensing interface in the presence of thrombin (TB) to achieve a considerably enhanced ECL signal in S2O8(2-) solution. As a result, the Sem in the TBA2 signal probes could accelerate the reduction of S2O8(2-) to produce the more oxidant mediators of SO4(•-), which further boosted the production of excited states of CdTe QDs to emit light. With the employment of the novel co-reaction accelerator Sem, the proposed ECL biosensor exhibited ultrahigh sensitivity to quantify the concentration of TB from 1 × 10(-7) to 1 nM with a detection limit of 0.03 fM, which demonstrated that the co-reaction accelerator could provide a simple, efficient, and low-cost approach for signal

  3. DNA photonic nanowires with tunable FRET signals on the basis of toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Wang, Xiaojing; Wei, Bing; Huang, Fujian; Yao, Dongbao; Liang, Haojun

    2017-03-02

    A DNA photonic nanowire with tunable FRET signals was fabricated on the basis of cascaded toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement reactions. Different DNA inputs were added to trigger the reaction network, and the corresponding FRET signals were obtained. Compared to the direct hybridization, this design is sensitive for 2 nM targets within 20 min and also causes color changes of the solution with blue-light excitation. It could also be applied in live cells to monitor MicroRNA with a simple modification which might become a low-cost method for further application in the future.

  4. A stop-signal task for sheep: introduction and validation of a direct measure for the stop-signal reaction time.

    PubMed

    Knolle, Franziska; McBride, Sebastian D; Stewart, James E; Goncalves, Rita P; Morton, A Jennifer

    2017-04-07

    Huntington's disease (HD) patients show reduced flexibility in inhibiting an already-started response. This can be quantified by the stop-signal task. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a sheep version of the stop-signal task that would be suitable for monitoring the progression of cognitive decline in a transgenic sheep model of HD. Using a semi-automated operant system, sheep were trained to perform in a two-choice discrimination task. In 22% of the trials, a stop-signal was presented. Upon the stop-signal presentation, the sheep had to inhibit their already-started response. The stopping behaviour was captured using an accelerometer mounted on the back of the sheep. This set-up provided a direct read-out of the individual stop-signal reaction time (SSRT). We also estimated the SSRT using the conventional approach of subtracting the stop-signal delay (i.e., time after which the stop-signal is presented) from the ranked reaction time during a trial without a stop-signal. We found that all sheep could inhibit an already-started response in 91% of the stop-trials. The directly measured SSRT (0.974 ± 0.04 s) was not significantly different from the estimated SSRT (0.938 ± 0.04 s). The sheep version of the stop-signal task adds to the repertoire of tests suitable for investigating both cognitive dysfunction and efficacy of therapeutic agents in sheep models of neurodegenerative disease such as HD, as well as neurological conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  5. A Nonenzymatic Hairpin DNA Cascade Reaction Provides High Signal Gain of mRNA Imaging inside Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cuichen; Cansiz, Sena; Zhang, Liqin; Teng, I-Ting; Qiu, Liping; Li, Juan; Liu, Yuan; Zhou, Cuisong; Hu, Rong; Zhang, Tao; Cui, Cheng; Cui, Liang; Tan, Weihong

    2015-04-22

    Enzyme-free signal amplification has enabled sensitive in vitro detection of biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. However, monitoring targets of interest in live cells via enzyme-free amplification is still challenging, especially for analytes with low concentrations. To the best of our knowledge, this paper reports the first attempt to perform mRNA imaging inside live cells, using a nonenzymatic hairpin DNA cascade reaction for high signal gain, termed a hairpin DNA cascade amplifier (HDCA). In conventional nucleic acid probes, such as linear hybridization probes, mRNA target signaling occurs in an equivalent reaction ratio (1:1), whereas, in HDCA, one mRNA target is able to yield multiple signal outputs (1:m), thus achieving the goal of signal amplification for low-expression mRNA targets. Moreover, the recycled mRNA target in the HDCA serves as a catalyst for the assembly of multiple DNA duplexes, generating the fluorescent signal of reduced MnSOD mRNA expression, thus indicating amplified intracellular imaging. This programmable cascade reaction presents a simple and modular amplification mechanism for intracellular biomarkers of interest, providing a significant boost to the search for clues leading to the accurate identification and effective treatment of cancers.

  6. Amygdala fMRI Signal as a Predictor of Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Philipp; Jacob, Mark J.; Müller, Dirk K.; Vetter, Nora C.; Smolka, Michael N.; Marxen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Reaction times (RTs) are a valuable measure for assessing cognitive processes. However, RTs are susceptible to confounds and therefore variable. Exposure to threat, for example, speeds up or slows down responses. Distinct task types to some extent account for differential effects of threat on RTs. But also do inter-individual differences like trait anxiety. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we investigated whether activation within the amygdala, a brain region closely linked to the processing of threat, may also function as a predictor of RTs, similar to trait anxiety scores. After threat conditioning by means of aversive electric shocks, 45 participants performed a choice RT task during alternating 30 s blocks in the presence of the threat conditioned stimulus [CS+] or of the safe control stimulus [CS-]. Trait anxiety was assessed with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and participants were median split into a high- and a low-anxiety subgroup. We tested three hypotheses: (1) RTs will be faster during the exposure to threat compared to the safe condition in individuals with high trait anxiety. (2) The amygdala fMRI signal will be higher in the threat condition compared to the safe condition. (3) Amygdala fMRI signal prior to a RT trial will be correlated with the corresponding RT. We found that, the high-anxious subgroup showed faster responses in the threat condition compared to the safe condition, while the low-anxious subgroup showed no significant difference in RTs in the threat condition compared to the safe condition. Though the fMRI analysis did not reveal an effect of condition on amygdala activity, we found a trial-by-trial correlation between blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal within the right amygdala prior to the CRT task and the subsequent RT. Taken together, the results of this study showed that exposure to threat modulates task performance. This modulation is influenced by personality trait. Additionally and most

  7. Photosynthetic light reactions--an adjustable hub in basic production and plant immunity signaling.

    PubMed

    Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Tikkanen, Mikko; Durian, Guido; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-08-01

    Photosynthetic efficiency is a key trait that influences the sustainable utilization of plants for energy and nutrition. By now, extensive research on photosynthetic processes has underscored important structural and functional relationships among photosynthetic thylakoid membrane protein complexes, and their roles in determining the productivity and stress resistance of plants. Photosystem II photoinhibition-repair cycle, for example, has arisen vital in protecting also Photosystem I against light-induced damage. Availability of highly sophisticated genetic, biochemical and biophysical tools has greatly expanded the catalog of components that carry out photoprotective functions in plants. On thylakoid membranes, these components encompass a network of overlapping systems that allow delicate regulation of linear and cyclic electron transfer pathways, balancing of excitation energy distribution between the two photosystems and dissipation of excess light energy in the antenna system as heat. An increasing number of reports indicate that the above mentioned mechanisms also mediate important functions in the regulation of biotic stress responses in plants. Particularly the handling of excitation energy in the light harvesting II antenna complexes appears central to plant immunity signaling. Comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms and regulatory cross-talk, however, still remain elusive. This review highlights the current understanding of components that regulate the function of photosynthetic light reactions and directly or indirectly also modulate disease resistance in higher plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Pyrethroid pediculicide resistance of head lice in Canada evaluated by serial invasive signal amplification reaction.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Danielle; Palma, Kathleen G; Kaul, Nalini; Hodgdon, Hilliary; Van Geest, Andrea; Previte, Dominic J; Abou-Elghar, Gamal Elsayed; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Clark, J Marshall

    2010-01-01

    Most people in the United States and Canada with pediculosis will be treated with neurotoxic pediculicides containing pyrethrins or pyrethroids. Their widespread use led to significant resistance reported from various countries. Although treatment failures are frequently observed in Canada, the resistance frequency to pyrethroid pediculicide of human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) has not been determined. To determine the knockdown resistance (kdr) allele frequency in human head louse populations in Canada. Patients infested with Pediculus humanus capitis, aged 4 to 65 years, residents of Ontario, Quebec, and British Columbia, were participants. Head lice were collected by combing and picking the enrolled subjects' hair. Lice were analyzed by serial invasive signal amplification reaction (SISAR) for genotyping the T917I mutation of lice indicating permethrin resistance. The permethrin-resistant kdr allele (R allele) frequency could then be evaluated in the head lice collected in Canada. Of the head louse populations analyzed, 133 of 137 (97.1%) had a resistant (R) allele frequency, whereas only 4 of 137 (2.9%) had a susceptible (S) allele frequency. The 97.1% resistant (R) allele frequency in head lice from Canada could explain the treatment failures encountered with pyrethrin and pyrethroid pediculicide treatments in Canadian populations infested with Pediculus humanus capitis as the latter will not be eliminated by those pediculicides.

  9. Impaired motor inhibition in adults who stutter - evidence from speech-free stop-signal reaction time tasks.

    PubMed

    Markett, Sebastian; Bleek, Benjamin; Reuter, Martin; Prüss, Holger; Richardt, Kirsten; Müller, Thilo; Yaruss, J Scott; Montag, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Idiopathic stuttering is a fluency disorder characterized by impairments during speech production. Deficits in the motor control circuits of the basal ganglia have been implicated in idiopathic stuttering but it is unclear how these impairments relate to the disorder. Previous work has indicated a possible deficiency in motor inhibition in children who stutter. To extend these findings to adults, we designed two experiments to probe executive motor control in people who stutter using manual reaction time tasks that do not rely on speech production. We used two versions of the stop-signal reaction time task, a measure for inhibitory motor control that has been shown to rely on the basal ganglia circuits. We show increased stop-signal reaction times in two independent samples of adults who stutter compared to age- and sex-matched control groups. Additional measures involved simple reaction time measurements and a task-switching task where no group difference was detected. Results indicate a deficiency in inhibitory motor control in people who stutter in a task that does not rely on overt speech production and cannot be explained by general deficits in executive control or speeded motor execution. This finding establishes the stop-signal reaction time as a possible target for future experimental and neuroimaging studies on fluency disorders and is a further step towards unraveling the contribution of motor control deficits to idiopathic stuttering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Direct visualization of the reaction transformation and signal amplification in a DNA molecular machine with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Rui; Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Shusheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, as a proof of concept, the signal amplification in an artificial DNA molecular machine was directly visualized via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The molecular machine brought about obvious morphology change in DNA nanostructures as well as signal amplifications. On one hand, through a triggered and autonomically repeated RCA, a DNA nano-complex featuring a “locked” circular DNA template (serving as raw feed) was converted into a long periodically repeated strand, i.e., the RCA products. On the other hand, this RCA was repeated in three controllable reaction phases, bring about progressive signal amplification. It was testified that the RCA products (presented as long thread-like fluorescent objects) can be easily distinguished from the inputted DNA probes (presented as fluorescent dots), thus the transformation in reaction can be visualized. Also, by quantitive counting of the aforementioned fluorescence objects, the progress of the reaction through the phases, along with time, and over the lysozyme concentration can be demonstrated through TIRFM visualization. Overall, it was demonstrated that TIRFM is an efficient approach to quantitatively visualize the biochemical processes at single-molecule level. PMID:24790951

  11. Modulation of lead-induced performance deficit in children by varying signal rate in a serial choice reaction task

    SciTech Connect

    Winneke, G.; Brockhaus, A.; Collet, W.; Kraemer, U. )

    1989-11-01

    Evidence is presented showing that serial choice reaction performance is disrupted at low blood lead levels (PbB), and that parametric variation of task characteristics modulates the degree of disruption. This evidence is based on two independent studies in 6- to 9-year-old children living in two lead smelter areas in the cities of Nordenham (N = 114) and Stolberg (N = 109) in West Germany. Average PbB was 8.2 micrograms/100 ml (4.4-23.8 micrograms/100 ml) in the Nordenham sample and 7.4 micrograms/100 ml (4.2-18.0 micrograms/100 ml) in the Stolberg sample. Serial choice reaction performance was assessed by means of the Vienna reaction device in which a random sequence of light and tone signals has to be answered by pressing appropriate response buttons. Correct (hits) and false responses (errors) were evaluated as performance measures, and signal rate was varied in order to achieve easy and difficult task conditions. Exposure-related performance deficit was more pronounced for errors than for hits, more clearcut for high than for low signal rates, and proved significant in both studies after correction for confounding using confounder models of different complexities. Some features of the observed deficit resemble clinical observations in children presenting with attention deficit disorder.

  12. Direct visualization of the reaction transformation and signal amplification in a DNA molecular machine with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Rui; Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Shusheng

    2013-10-01

    In this study, as a proof of concept, the signal amplification in an artificial DNA molecular machine was directly visualized via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The molecular machine brought about obvious morphology change in DNA nanostructures as well as signal amplifications. On one hand, through a triggered and autonomically repeated RCA, a DNA nano-complex featuring a “locked” circular DNA template (serving as raw feed) was converted into a long periodically repeated strand, i.e. the RCA products. Furthermore, this RCA was repeated in three controllable reaction phases, bring about progressive signal amplification. It was testified that the RCA products (presented as long thread-like fluorescent objects) can be easily distinguished from the inputted DNA probes (presented as fluorescent dots), thus the transformation in reaction can be visualized. Also, by quantitive counting of the aforementioned fluorescence objects, the progress of the reaction through the phases, along with time, and over the lysozyme concentration can be demonstrated through TIRFM visualization. Overall, it was demonstrated that TIRFM is an efficient approach to quantitively visualize the biochemical processes at single-molecule level.

  13. Spectroscopic approaches to resolving ambiguities of hyper-polarized NMR signals from different reaction cascades.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pernille Rose; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-02-07

    The influx of exogenous substrates into cellular reaction cascades on the seconds time scale is directly observable by NMR spectroscopy when using nuclear spin polarization enhancement. Conventional NMR assignment spectra for the identification of reaction intermediates are not applicable in these experiments due to the non-equilibrium nature of the nuclear spin polarization enhancement. We show that ambiguities in the intracellular identification of transient reaction intermediates can be resolved by experimental schemes using site-specific isotope labelling, optimised referencing and response to external perturbations.

  14. Mass Spectrometric-Based Selected Reaction Monitoring of Protein Phosphorylation during Symbiotic Signaling in the Model Legume, Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the major cereal crops corn, rice, and wheat, leguminous plants such as soybean and alfalfa can meet their nitrogen requirement via endosymbiotic associations with soil bacteria. The establishment of this symbiosis is a complex process playing out over several weeks and is facilitated by the exchange of chemical signals between these partners from different kingdoms. Several plant components that are involved in this signaling pathway have been identified, but there is still a great deal of uncertainty regarding the early events in symbiotic signaling, i.e., within the first minutes and hours after the rhizobial signals (Nod factors) are perceived at the plant plasma membrane. The presence of several protein kinases in this pathway suggests a mechanism of signal transduction via posttranslational modification of proteins in which phosphate is added to the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine amino acid side chains. To monitor the phosphorylation dynamics and complement our previous untargeted 'discovery' approach, we report here the results of experiments using a targeted mass spectrometric technique, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) that enables the quantification of phosphorylation targets with great sensitivity and precision. Using this approach, we confirm a rapid change in the level of phosphorylation in 4 phosphosites of at least 4 plant phosphoproteins that have not been previously characterized. This detailed analysis reveals aspects of the symbiotic signaling mechanism in legumes that, in the long term, will inform efforts to engineer this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in important non-legume crops such as rice, wheat and corn. PMID:27203723

  15. Widespread GLI expression but limited canonical hedgehog signaling restricted to the ductular reaction in human chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Tirnitz-Parker, Janina Elke Eleonore; Hamson, Elizabeth Jane; Warren, Alessandra; Maneck, Bharvi; Chen, Jinbiao; Patkunanathan, Bramilla; Boland, Jade; Cheng, Robert; Shackel, Nicholas Adam; Seth, Devanshi; Bowen, David Geoffrey; Martelotto, Luciano Gastón; Watkins, D. Neil; McCaughan, Geoffrey William

    2017-01-01

    Canonical Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in vertebrate cells occurs following Smoothened activation/translocation into the primary cilia (Pc), followed by a GLI transcriptional response. Nonetheless, GLI activation can occur independently of the canonical Hh pathway. Using a murine model of liver injury, we previously identified the importance of canonical Hh signaling within the Pc+ liver progenitor cell (LPC) population and noted that SMO-independent, GLI-mediated signals were important in multiple Pc-ve GLI2+ intrahepatic populations. This study extends these observations to human liver tissue, and analyses the effect of GLI inhibition on LPC viability/gene expression. Human donor and cirrhotic liver tissue specimens were evaluated for SHH, GLI2 and Pc expression using immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Changes to viability and gene expression in LPCs in vitro were assessed following GLI inhibition. Identification of Pc (as a marker of canonical Hh signaling) in human cirrhosis was predominantly confined to the ductular reaction and LPCs. In contrast, GLI2 was expressed in multiple cell populations including Pc-ve endothelium, hepatocytes, and leukocytes. HSCs/myofibroblasts (>99%) expressed GLI2, with only 1.92% displaying Pc. In vitro GLI signals maintained proliferation/viability within LPCs and GLI inhibition affected the expression of genes related to stemness, hepatocyte/biliary differentiation and Hh/Wnt signaling. At least two mechanisms of GLI signaling (Pc/SMO-dependent and Pc/SMO-independent) mediate chronic liver disease pathogenesis. This may have significant ramifications for the choice of Hh inhibitor (anti-SMO or anti-GLI) suitable for clinical trials. We also postulate GLI delivers a pro-survival signal to LPCs whilst maintaining stemness. PMID:28187190

  16. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  17. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    PubMed

    Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Park, Kyounghoon; Yang, Bo Ram; Lee, Joongyub; Jin, Xue Mei; Park, Byung Joo

    2016-09-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability.

  18. HIV Neutralization Assay Using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Derived Molecular Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) B. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Walter Reed Army Institute of Research;*Henry M . Jackson Foundation; and ’SRA Technologies...Reed Army Institute of Research; *Henrv M . * Jackson Foundation; and tSRA Technologies, Rockville, Maryland, U.S.A. Summary: Characterization of the...Syndromes. Vol. 5. No. 12. 1992 93 1 11 072 1226 M . L. ROBB ET AL. amplification product signal to the standard curve produced from tion of HIV- 1 infection

  19. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signalling is essential for germinal centre reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingshou; Li, Zhirong; Wang, Pengcheng; Huang, Qizhao; Xu, Lifan; He, Ran; Ye, Lilin; Bai, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine-threonine kinase that has been shown to be essential for the differentiation and function of various immune cells. Earlier in vitro studies showed that mTOR signalling regulates B-cell biology by supporting their activation and proliferation. However, how mTOR signalling temporally regulates in vivo germinal centre B (GCB) cell development and differentiation into short-lived plasma cells, long-lived plasma cells and memory cells is still not well understood. In this study, we used a combined conditional/inducible knock-out system to investigate the temporal regulation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in the GCB cell response to acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection by deleting Raptor, a main component of mTORC1, specifically in B cells in pre- and late GC phase. Early Raptor deficiency strongly inhibited GCB cell proliferation and differentiation and plasma cell differentiation. Nevertheless, late GC Raptor deficiency caused only decreases in the size of memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells through poor maintenance of GCB cells, but it did not change their differentiation. Collectively, our data revealed that mTORC1 signalling supports GCB cell responses at both early and late GC phases during viral infection but does not regulate GCB cell differentiation into memory B cells and plasma cells at the late GC stage. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Nitric oxide promotes nicotine-triggered ERK signaling via redox reactions in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Sakai, Ryosuke; Maeda, Chiharu; Takata, Tsuyoshi; Ihara, Hideshi; Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2011-10-30

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS), serves as a signaling molecule with diverse biological responses in the central nervous system (CNS). In the present study, we demonstrated that nNOS expression enhances the nicotine-triggered activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in nNOS-transfected PC12 (NPC12) cells. Treatment with nicotine increased the phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the NPC12 cells as compared with that in control PC12 cells. However, nicotine treatment failed to enhance ERK1/2 phosphorylation when NPC12 cells were pretreated with several selective inhibitors of NOS, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, protein kinase C, Src, epidermal growth factor receptor, and MEK. The nicotine-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in PC12 cells was observed by their pretreatment with a NO donor. Moreover, the enhancement of nicotine-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the NPC12 cells was regulated by intracellular glutathione levels, but not by the soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP-protein kinase G signaling. Meanwhile, depolarization stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in both PC12 and NPC12 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that nicotine modulates NO-dependent redox condition; the resulting calcium influx, would increase ERK1/2 phosphorylation in nNOS expressing cells. Blockade of NO pathway may be selective target to reduce ERK1/2 phosphorylation via attenuation of the nicotine responses in the CNS.

  1. Impaired microglia fractalkine signaling affects stress reaction and coping style in mice.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Zsuzsanna; Kuti, Dániel; Ferenczi, Szilamér; Gulyás, Krisztina; Polyák, Ágnes; Kovács, Krisztina J

    2017-09-15

    Microglia, resident immune cells of the CNS are sensitive to various perturbations of the environment, such as stress exposure, and may be involved in translating these changes to behavior. Among the pathways mediating stress-related neuronal cues to microglia, the fractalkine-fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) signaling plays a crucial role. Using mice, in which the CX3CR1 gene was deleted, we explored hormonal and behavioral responses to acute and chronic stress along with changes in hypothalamic microglia. CX3CR1(-/-) animals display active escape in forced swim- and tail suspension tests, exaggerated neuronal activation in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and increased corticosterone release in response to restraint. Analysis of Iba1 immunostaining of hypothalamic sections revealed stress-related reduction of microglia in CX3CR1(-/-) mice. Because microglia also contribute to energy balance regulation, we characterized metabolic phenotype of CX3CR1(-/-) mice. Comparison of respiratory exchange ratio did not show genotype effect on fuel preference, however, the energy expenditure was increased in CX3CR1(-/-) mice, which may be related to their active coping behavior. Microglia and fractalkine signaling has been repeatedly shown to be involved chronic stress-induced depressive state. CX3CR1(-/-) mice did not become anhedonic in the "two hit" chronic stress paradigm, confirming resistance of these animals to chronic stress-induced mood alterations. However, there was no difference in stress hormone levels, open field performance and hypothalamic microglia distribution between the genotypes. These results highlight differential involvement of microglia fractalkine signaling in controlling/integrating hormonal-, metabolic and behavioral responses to acute and chronic stress challenges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Standard-based comprehensive detection of adverse drug reaction signals from nursing statements and laboratory results in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suehyun; Choi, Jiyeob; Kim, Hun-Sung; Kim, Grace Juyun; Lee, Kye Hwa; Park, Chan Hee; Han, Jongsoo; Yoon, Dukyong; Park, Man Young; Park, Rae Woong; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Ju Han

    2017-07-01

    We propose 2 Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities-enabled pharmacovigilance algorithms, MetaLAB and MetaNurse, powered by a per-year meta-analysis technique and improved subject sampling strategy. This study developed 2 novel algorithms, MetaLAB for laboratory abnormalities and MetaNurse for standard nursing statements, as significantly improved versions of our previous electronic health record (EHR)-based pharmacovigilance method, called CLEAR. Adverse drug reaction (ADR) signals from 117 laboratory abnormalities and 1357 standard nursing statements for all precautionary drugs ( n   = 101) were comprehensively detected and validated against SIDER (Side Effect Resource) by MetaLAB and MetaNurse against 11 817 and 76 457 drug-ADR pairs, respectively. We demonstrate that MetaLAB (area under the curve, AUC = 0.61 ± 0.18) outperformed CLEAR (AUC = 0.55 ± 0.06) when we applied the same 470 drug-event pairs as the gold standard, as in our previous research. Receiver operating characteristic curves for 101 precautionary terms in the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Preferred Terms were obtained for MetaLAB and MetaNurse (0.69 ± 0.11; 0.62 ± 0.07), which complemented each other in terms of ADR signal coverage. Novel ADR signals discovered by MetaLAB and MetaNurse were successfully validated against spontaneous reports in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System database. The present study demonstrates the symbiosis of laboratory test results and nursing statements for ADR signal detection in terms of their system organ class coverage and performance profiles. Systematic discovery and evaluation of the wide spectrum of ADR signals using standard-based observational electronic health record data across many institutions will affect drug development and use, as well as postmarketing surveillance and regulation.

  3. [On the conjugate hand reaction. Note IV. Changing rates of conjugate hand reaction to the sound and light signals modality for surgical interventions in the subcortical brain structures in humans].

    PubMed

    Blinkov, S M; Nikandrov, M G

    2010-01-01

    The results of the study on conjugate reaction time (BP) of hands (time of simple reaction) in 16 patients--with Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy and spastic torticollis before and after surgery--are stated. The analysis of conjugate BP left arm and arm BP signals of sound and light modality with a warning signal to determine the morphological structures which depend on the friendly reaction was performed. Was found that part of the surveyed patients had no violations of conjugate BP, the other part had significant changes in the magnitude of the correlation coefficient, by which evaluated conjugate BP left and right hands. Violations of the correlation coefficient between BP left arm and right arm BP were observed or sound, or doth on the sound, and the light signal. Violations of the conjugate hand reaction were observed in the ventro-lateral talamotomii, subtalamotomii and pallidotomii.

  4. Hyperbranched Hybridization Chain Reaction for Triggered Signal Amplification and Concatenated Logic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Chen, Min; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Dong, Ying; Wang, Zonghua

    2015-07-06

    A hyper-branched hybridization chain reaction (HB-HCR) is presented herein, which consists of only six species that can metastably coexist until the introduction of an initiator DNA to trigger a cascade of hybridization events, leading to the self-sustained assembly of hyper-branched and nicked double-stranded DNA structures. The system can readily achieve ultrasensitive detection of target DNA. Moreover, the HB-HCR principle is successfully applied to construct three-input concatenated logic circuits with excellent specificity and extended to design a security-mimicking keypad lock system. Significantly, the HB-HCR-based keypad lock can alarm immediately if the "password" is incorrect. Overall, the proposed HB-HCR with high amplification efficiency is simple, homogeneous, fast, robust, and low-cost, and holds great promise in the development of biosensing, in the programmable assembly of DNA architectures, and in molecular logic operations. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The validity of sequence symmetry analysis (SSA) for adverse drug reaction signal detection.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Izyan A; Pratt, Nicole L; Wiese, Michael D; Kalisch, Lisa M; Roughead, Elizabeth E

    2013-05-01

    To determine the validity of sequence symmetry analysis (SSA) method to detect adverse drug reactions from an administrative claims database. Published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of 19 medicines were identified through search databases, product information (PI) or the US Food and Drug Administration Web site. All adverse events (AEs) in the RCTs and the PI for the medicines were extracted. AEs were considered 'gold standard positive events' if they were reported as being statistically significant events in adequately powered RCTs. The remaining AEs were considered 'gold standard negative events' if the event was not listed as an AE in the PI for that medicine or any other medicine in its class. Indicators of AEs were identified by consensus from two clinical researchers. SSA was run for each medicine-indicator pair using four different time windows: 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. A total of 120 randomised placebo controlled trials were reviewed for the 19 tested medicines. A total of 165 medicine-indicator pairs (44 positive and 121 negative events) were identified and tested by SSA. At the 12-month time window, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of SSA were 61% (95%CI 0.46-0.74), 93% (95%CI 0.87-0.96), 77% (95%CI 0.61-0.88) and 87% (95%CI 0.80-0.92), respectively. Using a 3-month time window, the SSA had a lower sensitivity (52%). The SSA technique was found to have moderate sensitivity and high specificity for detecting ADRs. These results suggest that SSA is a potential tool for detecting ADRs using administrative claims data that could complement existing pharmacosurveillance methods. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Luminol encapsulated liposome as a signal generator for the detection of specific antigen-antibody reactions and nucleotide hybridization.

    PubMed

    Rakthong, Pakavadee; Intaramat, Akarin; Ratanabanangkoon, Kavi

    2010-01-01

    Liposomes prepared with biotinylated phospholipids and luminol entrapped were shown to be of 187 nm in size, 59% of which were unilamellar and with 43% luminol trapping efficiency. Liposome prepared from biotinylated phospholipids with a longer hydrophilic PEG2000 spacer, but not with the shorter hydrophobic caproyl one, bound efficiently and specifically with immobilized streptavidin in a microplate assay. The interactions of dinitrophenol and tobramycin with their respective antibodies, and the hybridization of 20-mers oligonucleotides were studied using the liposome as a signal generator. These reactions were shown to be specific with limits of detection of 0.58 microM, 0.96 microM and 18 nM, respectively.

  7. Utilization of Microwave Spectroscopy to Identify and Probe Reaction Dynamics of Hsno, a Crucial Biological Signaling Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Matthew; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Stanton, John F.; Cummins, Christopher; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2016-06-01

    Thionitrous acid (HSNO), a potential key intermediate in biological signaling pathways, has been proposed to link NO and H2S biochemistries. Its existence and stability in vivo, however, remain controversial. By means of Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, we establish that HSNO is spontaneously formed in high concentration when NO and H2S gases are simply mixed at room temperature in the presence of metallic surfaces. Our measurements reveal that HSNO is formed with high efficiency by the reaction H2S and N2O3 to produce HSNO and HNO2, where N2O3 is a product of NO disproportionation. These studies also suggest that further reaction of HSNO with H2S may form HNO and HSSH. The length of the S--N bond has been derived to high precision from isotopic studies, and is found to be unusually long, 1.84 Å -- the longest S--N bond reported to date for an SNO compound. The present structural and reactivity investigations of this elusive molecule provide a firm fundation to better understand its physiological chemistry and propensity to undergo S--N bond homolysis in vivo.

  8. Cognitive MR spectroscopy of anterior cingulate cortex in ADHD: elevated choline signal correlates with slowed hit reaction times.

    PubMed

    Colla, Michael; Ende, Gabriele; Alm, Barbara; Deuschle, Michael; Heuser, Isabella; Kronenberg, Golo

    2008-06-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays a major role in modulating executive control of attention. Here, 15 medication-nai ve patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 10 carefully matched healthy controls were studied with 2D (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of the ACC [Brodmann areas 24b'-c' and 32']. Attentional skills were assessed using the identical pairs version of the continuous performance task (CPT-IP). Analysis of regional brain spectra revealed a significantly increased signal of choline-containing compounds (Ch) in the ACC of ADHD patients (p<0.05). Across and within groups, the Ch signal showed high correlations with slowed hit reaction times on the CPT-IP. No group differences in N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and creatine (tCr) were detectable. The combination of performance deficits and elevated Ch levels in the ACC supports the hypothesis that subtle structural abnormalities underlie the functional alterations in ACC activation previously observed in ADHD patients.

  9. Sensitive electrochemical immunoassay with signal enhancement based on nanogold-encapsulated poly(amidoamine) dendrimer-stimulated hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ai-Li

    2015-12-07

    A new electrochemical immunosensor with signal enhancement was designed for sensitive detection of disease-related protein (human carbohydrate antigen 19-9, CA 19-9 used in this case). The assay was carried out on a capture antibody-modified screen-printed carbon electrode with a sandwich-type mode by using detection antibody-functionalized nanogold-encapsulated poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (AuNP-PAAD). The AuNP-PAAD was first synthesized through the in situ reduction method and functionalized with the polyclonal rabbit anti-human CA 19-9 antibody. Upon target CA 19-9 introduction, a sandwiched immunocomplex could be formed between the capture antibody and detection antibody. Accompanying the AuNP-PAAD, the electrocatalytic activity of the carried gold nanoparticles toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) allowed the rapid quantification of the target analyte on the electrode. The amplified electrochemical signal mainly derived from AuNP-catalyzed HER in an acidic medium. Under optimal conditions, the immuno-HER assay displayed a wide dynamic concentration range from 0.01 to 300 U mL(-1) toward target CA 19-9 with a detection limit (LOD) of 6.3 mU mL(-1). The reproducibility, precision, specificity and stability of our strategy were acceptable. Additionally, the system was further validated by assaying 13 human serum specimens, giving well matched results obtained from the commercialized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method.

  10. Measuring Attention in Rodents: Comparison of a Modified Signal Detection Task and the 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Karly M.; Peak, James; Burne, Thomas H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric research has utilized cognitive testing in rodents to improve our understanding of cognitive deficits and for preclinical drug development. However, more sophisticated cognitive tasks have not been as widely exploited due to low throughput and the extensive training time required. We developed a modified signal detection task (SDT) based on the growing body of literature aimed at improving cognitive testing in rodents. This study directly compares performance on the modified SDT with a traditional test for measuring attention, the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5CSRTT). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on either the 5CSRTT or the SDT. Briefly, the 5CSRTT required rodents to pay attention to a spatial array of five apertures and respond with a nose poke when an aperture was illuminated. The SDT required the rat to attend to a light panel and respond either left or right to indicate the presence of a signal. In addition, modifications were made to the reward delivery, timing, control of body positioning, and the self-initiation of trials. It was found that less training time was required for the SDT, with both sessions to criteria and daily session duration significantly reduced. Rats performed with a high level of accuracy (>87%) on both tasks, however omissions were far more frequent on the 5CSRTT. The signal duration was reduced on both tasks as a manipulation of task difficulty relevant to attention and a similar pattern of decreasing accuracy was observed on both tasks. These results demonstrate some of the advantages of the SDT over the traditional 5CSRTT as being higher throughput with reduced training time, fewer omission responses and their body position was controlled at stimulus onset. In addition, rats performing the SDT had comparable high levels of accuracy. These results highlight the differences and similarities between the 5CSRTT and a modified SDT as tools for assessing attention in preclinical animal models. PMID

  11. A cytometric bead assay for sensitive DNA detection based on enzyme-free signal amplification of hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei; Liu, Hongmei; Yang, Wenxia; Fan, Yunlong; Yang, Lang; Wang, Yucong; Liu, Chenghui; Li, Zhengping

    2013-11-15

    A versatile flow cytometric bead assay (CBA) is developed for sensitive DNA detection by integrating the advantages of hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for enzyme-free signal amplification, flow cytometry for robust and rapid signal readout as well as magnetic beads (MBs) for facile separation. In this HCR-CBA, a biotinylated hairpin DNA (Bio-H1) is firstly immobilized on streptavidin-functionalized MBs. Upon the addition of target DNA, each target would hybridize with one Bio-H1 to open its hairpin structure and subsequently initiate a cascade of hybridization events between two species of fluorescent DNA hairpin probes (H1*/H2*) to form a nicked double helical DNA structure, resulting in amplified accumulation of numerous fluorophores on the MBs. Finally, the fluorescent MBs are directly analyzed by flow cytometry. This technique enables quantitative analysis of the HCR products anchored on the MBs as a function of target DNA concentration, and analysis of each sample can be completed within few minutes. Therefore, the HCR-CBA approach provides a practical DNA assay with greatly improved sensitivity. The detection limit of a model DNA target is 0.5 pM (3σ), which is about 3 orders of magnitude lower compared with traditional hybridization methods without HCR. Furthermore, the signal of complementary target can be clearly distinguished from that of single-base mismatched sequences, indicating the high specificity of the HCR-CBA. Moreover, this strategy is also successfully applied to the DNA analysis in complex biological samples, showing great potential in gene analysis and disease diagnosis in clinical samples.

  12. Determination of knockdown resistance allele frequencies in global human head louse populations using the serial invasive signal amplification reaction

    PubMed Central

    Hodgdon, Hilliary E.; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Previte, Domenic J.; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Aboelghar, Gamal E.; Lee, Si Hyeock; Clark, J. Marshall

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pediculosis is the most prevalent parasitic infestation of humans. Resistance to pyrethrin- and pyrethroid-based pediculicides is due to knockdown (kdr)-type point mutations in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel α-subunit gene. Early detection of resistance is crucial for the selection of effective management strategies. RESULTS Kdr allele frequencies of lice from 14 countries were determined using serial invasive signal amplification reaction. Lice collected from Uruguay, UK and Australia had kdr allele frequencies of 100% while lice from Ecuador, Papua New Guinea, South Korea and Thailand had kdr allele frequencies of 0%. The remaining 7 countries investigated, including seven US populations, two Argentina, Brazil, Denmark, Czech Republic, Egypt and Israel, displayed variable kdr allele frequencies, ranging from 11% to 97%. CONCLUSION The newly developed and validated SISAR method is suitable for accurate monitoring of kdr allele frequencies in head lice. Proactive management is needed where kdr-type resistance is not yet saturated. Based on sodium channel insensitivity and its occurrence in louse populations resistant to pyrethrin- and pyrethroid-based pediculicides, the T917I mutation appears a key marker for resistance. Results from the Egyptian population, however, indicate that phenotypic resistance of lice with single or double mutations (M815I and/or L920F) should also be determined. PMID:20564731

  13. Retardation signal for fluorescent determination of total protein content via rapid and sensitive chip moving reaction boundary electrophoretic titration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Houyu; Shi, Yongting; Yan, Jian; Dong, Jingyu; Li, Si; Xiao, Hua; Xie, Haiyang; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2014-03-18

    A novel concept and theory of moving reaction boundary (MRB) retardation signal (RMRB) was advanced for determination of total protein content via MRB electrophoretic titration (MRBET). The theoretical results revealed that the retardation extent of boundary displacment, viz., the RMRB value, was as a function of protein content. Thus, the RMRB value of a sample could be used to determine its total protein content according to the relevant calibration curve. To demonstrate the concept and theoretical results, a novel microdevice was designed for the relevant experiments of MRBET. The microdevice has 30 identical work cells, each of which is composed of five ultrashort single microchannels (5 mm). In the microdevice, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was used to denote MRB motion and RMRB value for the first time, the polyacrylamide gel (PAG) containing protein sample was photopolymerized in microchannels, and the MRB was created with acid or alkali and target protein sample. As compared to the classic Kjeldahl method and conventional MRBET performed in glass tube, the developed titration chip has the following merits: good sensitivity (0.3-0.4 μg/mL vs 150-200 μg/mL of protein concentration, 0.6-0.8 ng vs 30-2000 μg of absolute protein content), rapid analysis (20-60 s vs 15-200 min), and portable low-power (15 V vs 200 V).

  14. Contrasting Effect of Prepulse Signals on Performance of Toxoplasma-Infected and Toxoplasma-Free Subjects in an Acoustic Reaction Times Test

    PubMed Central

    Příplatová, Lenka; Šebánková, Blanka; Flegr, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Background About 30% of people on Earth have latent toxoplasmosis. Infected subjects do not express any clinical symptoms, however, they carry dormant stages of parasite Toxoplasma for the rest of their life. This form of toxoplasmosis is mostly considered harmless, however, recent studies showed its specific effects on physiology, behaviour and its associations with various diseases, including psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Individuals who suffer from schizophrenia have about 2.7 times higher prevalence of Toxoplasma-seropositivity than controls, which suggests that some traits characteristic of schizophrenic patients, including the sex difference in schizophrenia onset, decrease of grey matter density in specific brain areas and modification of prepulse inhibition of startle reaction could in fact be caused by toxoplasmosis for those patients who are Toxoplasma-seropositive. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured the effect of prepulse inhibition/facilitation of the startle reaction on reaction times. The students, 170 women and 66 men, were asked to react as quickly as possible to a startling acoustic signal by pressing a computer mouse button. Some of the startling signals were without the prepulse, some were 20 msec. preceded by a short (20 msec.) prepulse signal of lower intensity. Toxoplasma-seropositive subjects had longer reaction times than the controls. Acoustic prepulse shorted the reaction times in all subjects. This effect of prepulse on reaction times was stronger in male subjects and increased with the duration of infection, suggesting that it represented a cumulative effect of latent toxoplasmosis, rather than a fading out after effect of past acute toxoplasmosis. Conclusions Different sensitivity of Toxoplasma-seropositive and Toxoplasma-seronegative subjects on effect of prepulses on reaction times (the toxoplasmosis-prepulse interaction) suggested, but of course did not prove, that the alternations of prepulse inhibition of

  15. Propagation of kinetic uncertainties through a canonical topology of the TLR4 signaling network in different regions of biochemical reaction space

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Signal transduction networks represent the information processing systems that dictate which dynamical regimes of biochemical activity can be accessible to a cell under certain circumstances. One of the major concerns in molecular systems biology is centered on the elucidation of the robustness properties and information processing capabilities of signal transduction networks. Achieving this goal requires the establishment of causal relations between the design principle of biochemical reaction systems and their emergent dynamical behaviors. Methods In this study, efforts were focused in the construction of a relatively well informed, deterministic, non-linear dynamic model, accounting for reaction mechanisms grounded on standard mass action and Hill saturation kinetics, of the canonical reaction topology underlying Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated signaling events. This signaling mechanism has been shown to be deployed in macrophages during a relatively short time window in response to lypopolysaccharyde (LPS) stimulation, which leads to a rapidly mounted innate immune response. An extensive computational exploration of the biochemical reaction space inhabited by this signal transduction network was performed via local and global perturbation strategies. Importantly, a broad spectrum of biologically plausible dynamical regimes accessible to the network in widely scattered regions of parameter space was reconstructed computationally. Additionally, experimentally reported transcriptional readouts of target pro-inflammatory genes, which are actively modulated by the network in response to LPS stimulation, were also simulated. This was done with the main goal of carrying out an unbiased statistical assessment of the intrinsic robustness properties of this canonical reaction topology. Results Our simulation results provide convincing numerical evidence supporting the idea that a canonical reaction mechanism of the TLR4 signaling network is capable of

  16. Fucose, mannose, and β-N-acetylglucosamine glycopolymers initiate the mouse sperm acrosome reaction through convergent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linghui; Sampson, Nicole S

    2014-02-21

    The sperm acrosome reaction (AR), an essential exocytosis step in mammalian fertilization, is mediated by a species-specific interaction of sperm surface molecules with glycans on the egg. Previous studies indicate that a subset of terminal carbohydrates on the mouse egg zona pellucida (ZP) trigger the AR by cross-linking or aggregating receptors on the sperm membrane. However, the exact role of those carbohydrates in AR has not been identified and the mechanism underlying the AR still needs further investigation. To study this process, a series of glycopolymers was synthesized. The glycopolymers are composed of a multivalent scaffold (norbornene), a functional ligand (previously identified ZP terminal monosaccharides), and a linker connecting the ligand and the scaffold. The polymers were tested for their ability to initiate AR and through which signaling pathways AR induction occurred. Our data demonstrate that mannose, fucose, and β-N-acetylglucosamine 10-mers and 100-mers initiate AR in a dose-dependent manner, and the 100-mers are more potent on a per monomer basis than the 10-mers. Although nearly equipotent in inducing the AR at the optimal concentrations, their AR activation kinetics are not identical. Similar to mouse ZP3, all 100-mer-activated AR are sensitive to guanine-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins), tyrosine kinase, protein kinase A, protein kinase C, and Ca(2+)-related antagonists. Thus, the chemotypes of synthetic glycopolymers imitate the physiologic AR-activation agents and provide evidence that occupation of one of at least three different receptor binding sites is sufficient to initiate the AR.

  17. Herbivore-Triggered Electrophysiological Reactions: Candidates for Systemic Signals in Higher Plants and the Challenge of Their Identification1

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Matthias R.; Will, Torsten; Felle, Hubert H.; Furch, Alexandra C.U.

    2016-01-01

    In stressed plants, electrophysiological reactions (elRs) are presumed to contribute to long-distance intercellular communication between distant plant parts. Because of the focus on abiotic stress-induced elRs in recent decades, biotic stress-triggered elRs have been widely ignored. It is likely that the challenge to identify the particular elR types (action potential [AP], variation potential, and system potential [SP]) was responsible for this course of action. Thus, this survey focused on insect larva feeding (Spodoptera littoralis and Manduca sexta) that triggers distant APs, variation potentials, and SPs in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plant species (Hordeum vulgare, Vicia faba, and Nicotiana tabacum). APs were detected only after feeding on the stem/culm, whereas SPs were observed systemically following damage to both stem/culm and leaves. This was attributed to the unequal vascular innervation of the plant and a selective electrophysiological connectivity of the plant tissue. However, striking variations in voltage patterns were detected for each elR type. Further analyses (also in Brassica napus and Cucurbita maxima) employing complementary electrophysiological approaches in response to different stimuli revealed various reasons for these voltage pattern variations: an intrinsic plasticity of elRs, a plant-specific signature of elRs, a specific influence of the applied (a)biotic trigger, the impact of the technical approach, and/or the experimental setup. As a consequence, voltage pattern variations, which are not irregular but rather common, need to be included in electrophysiological signaling analysis. Due to their widespread occurrence, systemic propagation, and respective triggers, elRs should be considered as candidates for long-distance communication in higher plants. PMID:26872949

  18. Sensitive electrochemical detection of telomerase activity using spherical nucleic acids gold nanoparticles triggered mimic-hybridization chain reaction enzyme-free dual signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Li, Jing-Jing; Rui, Kai; Gai, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-03-03

    We report an electrochemical sensor for telomerase activity detection based on spherical nucleic acids gold nanoparticles (SNAs AuNPs) triggered mimic-hybridization chain reaction (mimic-HCR) enzyme-free dual signal amplification. In the detection strategy, SNAs AuNPs and two hairpin probes were employed. SNAs AuNPs as the primary amplification element, not only hybridized with the telomeric repeats on the electrode to amplify signal but also initiated the subsequent secondary amplification, mimic-hybridization chain reaction of two hairpin probes. If the cells' extracts were positive for telomerase activity, SNAs AuNPs could be captured on the electrode. The carried initiators could trigger an alternative hybridization reaction of two hairpin probes that yielded nicked double helices. The signal was further amplified enzyme-free by numerous hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride ([Ru(NH3)6](3+), RuHex) inserting into double-helix DNA long chain by electrostatic interaction, each of which could generate an electrochemical signal at appropriate potential. With this method, a detection limit of down to 2 HeLa cells and a dynamic range of 10-10,000 cells were achieved. Telomerase activities of different cell lines were also successfully evaluated.

  19. Signal-on fluorescence biosensor for microRNA-21 detection based on DNA strand displacement reaction and Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme cleavage.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huan-Shun; Li, Bing-Chen; Zhou, Yun-Lei; Wang, Hai-Yan; Wang, Ming-Hui; Ai, Shi-Yun

    2017-10-15

    MicroRNAs have been involved into many biological processes and are regarded as disease biomarkers. Simple, rapid, sensitive and selective method for microRNA detection is crucial for early diagnosis and therapy of diseases. In this work, sensitive fluorescence assay was developed for microRNA-21 detection based on DNA polymerase induced strand displacement amplification reaction, Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme catalysis reaction, and magnetic separation. In the presence of target microRNA-21, amounts of trigger DNA could be produced with DNA polymerase induced strand displacement amplification reaction, and the trigger DNA could be further hybridized with signal DNA, which was labeled with biotin and AMCA dye. After introduction of Mg(2+), trigger DNA could form DNAzyme to cleave signal DNA. After magnetic separation, the DNA fragment with AMCA dye could give fluorescence signal, which was related to microRNA-21 concentration. Based on the two efficient signal amplifications, the developed method showed high detection sensitivity with low detection limit of 0.27fM (3σ). In addition, this fluorescence strategy also possessed excellent detection specificity, and could be applied to analyze microRNA-21 expression level in serum of cancer patient. According to the obtained results, the developed fluorescence method might be a promising detection platform for microRNA-21 quantitative analysis in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Direct RNA detection without nucleic acid purification and PCR: Combining sandwich hybridization with signal amplification based on branched hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yao; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a convenient, robust and low-cost RNA detection system suitable for high-throughput applications. This system uses a highly specific sandwich hybridization to capture target RNA directly onto solid support, followed by on-site signal amplification via 2-dimensional, branched hybridizing chain polymerization through toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction. The assay uses SYBR Green to detect targets at concentrations as low as 1 pM, without involving nucleic acid purification or any enzymatic reaction, using ordinary oligonucleotides without modification or labeling. The system was demonstrated in the detection of malaria RNA in blood and GAPDH gene expression in cell lysate.

  1. A Reaction Time Advantage for Calculating Beliefs over Public Representations Signals Domain Specificity for "Theory of Mind"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Adam S.; German, Tamsin C.

    2010-01-01

    In a task where participants' overt task was to track the location of an object across a sequence of events, reaction times to unpredictable probes requiring an inference about a social agent's beliefs about the location of that object were obtained. Reaction times to false belief situations were faster than responses about the (false) contents of…

  2. A Reaction Time Advantage for Calculating Beliefs over Public Representations Signals Domain Specificity for "Theory of Mind"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Adam S.; German, Tamsin C.

    2010-01-01

    In a task where participants' overt task was to track the location of an object across a sequence of events, reaction times to unpredictable probes requiring an inference about a social agent's beliefs about the location of that object were obtained. Reaction times to false belief situations were faster than responses about the (false) contents of…

  3. [Change of character of directed motor reactions of female crickets Gryllus argentinus Sauss. to intraspecies signals under conditions of sensory pathology at different stages of adult ontogenesis].

    PubMed

    Zhemchuzhnikov, M K; Kniazev, A N

    2011-01-01

    The character of motor activity of female crickets Gryllus argentinus Sauss. was studied in norm and under conditions of inactivation of cercal organ at realization of reproductive and protective behavior at various steps of adult ontogenesis (at the 2nd, 7th, and 12th day). There are described and analyzed various forms of female motor reactions on a movable track-ball at presentation f models of male intraspecies call and aggressive signals. The reversible inactivation or cereal receptors was shown to lead to disturbance of mechanisms of realization of normal reproductive behavior in the end of prereproductive and in the beginning of reproductive periods of adult ontogenesis. This is manifested as a significant decrease of reactions of positive phonotaxis in response to presentation of model of the male call signal in individuals with experimental sensory pathology as compared with the control cricket group (norm). No significant differences in portions of typical directed motor reactions were established in norm and under conditions of sensory pathology at presentation of aggressive signal. Thus, we have managed to show that preservation of tympanal organ is the necessary, but not sufficient condition of realization of adequate acoustic reproductive behavior. Only by working together, the distant mechanoreceptor systems (the cereal and the tympanal ones) are able to provide adequate behavior. This confirmed to earlier put forward hypothesis about interaction of distant mechanoreceptor systems and about the existence of the single sensory complex necessary for realization of insect adequate behavior.

  4. Chip-based ingroove microplasma with orthogonal signal collection: new approach for carbon-containing species detection through open air reaction for performance enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanying; Li, Xuemei; Duan, Yixiang

    2014-01-01

    A novel microplasma generator based on ceramic chips has been developed and coupled with optical emission spectrometry through orthogonal detection. Stable microplasma was generated between two electrodes in the ingroove discharge chamber and the optical fiber was set in perpendicular to the gas outlet to collect emitted light. The emission signal of CN is surprisingly enhanced by reacting carbon-containing species with back-diffusion nitrogen from open air, and the enhanced CN signal is successfully applied to sensitively detect organic compounds for the first time. This article focuses to study the structural characteristic and the signal enhancement mechanism through back-diffusion reaction. Several organic compounds were detected directly with the limits of detection down to ppb level. Besides, the advantages of low energy consumption and the chip-based discharge chamber show great potential to be applied in portable devices. This development may lead to a new way for the sensitive detection of organic compounds. PMID:24763181

  5. Acquiring multiple signals along with the reaction time: improving recognition capability of a multidimensional colorimetric sensor array for sensitive protein detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiaoe; He, Liuying; Lu, Yuexiang; Gao, Xinxin; Wang, Feiyang; Jing, Wenjie; Liu, Yueying

    2017-07-10

    The development of sensitive and cheap sensor arrays for identification of proteins plays an important role in many bioanalytical and clinical investigations. Here, we introduce a multidimensional colorimetric sensor array for the detection of multiple proteins based on acquiring multiple signals along with the reaction time to enhance the discrimination ability. In a single experiment, the unique fingerprint for each protein against the sensor array is generated from a response absorbance signal at three reaction time points (at 10 min, 15 min, and 20 min). Our colorimetric sensing system is able to identify ten proteins not only in aqueous solution at 10 nM but also in human urine at the 50 nM level with an accuracy of 100%. Moreover, the identification of HSA in urine at the nanomolar level within a linear range of 0.05-1.0 μM is achieved. Our sensing array system is sufficiently sensitive for the discrimination of pure HSA, binary mixtures of HSA and Lys at a total concentration of 50 nM in urine. This study indicates that the application of the real-time resolved response signals enables the enhancement of the discrimination ability for protein recognition.

  6. 5-LOX Inhibitor Zileuton Reduces Inflammatory Reaction and Ischemic Brain Damage Through the Activation of PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xian-Kun; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Shi, Song-Sheng; Liang, Ri-Sheng; Wang, Chun-Hua; Chen, Chun-Mei; Yang, Wei-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies from our laboratories showed that an anti-inflammatory drug, 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton, attenuates ischemic brain damage via inhibiting inflammatory reaction. However, it was elusive whether zileuton attenuates inflammatory reaction and ischemic brain damage through the modulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. In the present study, we, for the first time, investigated whether PI3K/Akt pathway was involved in zileuton's anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties against brain damage following experimental ischemic stroke. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), then received treatment with zileuton or vehicle after the onset of ischemia. LY294002 was injected intracerebroventricularly to inhibit the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway selectively. Neurological deficit scores, cerebral infarct volume, morphological characteristic and cerebral water content were assessed 24 h after cerebral ischemia. The enzymatic activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured 24 h after cerebral ischemia. Expression of p-Akt, t-Akt and COX-2 in ischemic brain were determined by western blot. NF-κB p65 immuno-positive cells in ischemic brain were detected 24 h after cerebral ischemia. The content of TNF-α in blood was examined by ELISA. 5-LOX inhibitor zileuton significantly reduces neurological deficit scores, cerebral infarct volume, cerebral water content, ischemic neuronal injury and the enzymatic activity of MPO, all of which were abolished by LY294002 administration. Zileuton significantly up-regulates the expression of p-Akt, which was inhibited by LY294002 administration. Zileuton significantly down-regulates the over-expression of NF-κB p65 and COX-2, and attenuates the release of TNF-α, all of which were disminished by LY294002 administration. These results suggest that zileuton attenuates ischemic brain damage by inhibiting inflammatory reaction through the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling

  7. Amplification and modulation of fluorescent signals by using hybridization chain reactions for multiplexed sensing of biomolecules in a one-pot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Yamada, Kenji; Ohno, Yuko; Tanida, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Fluorescence readout of molecular information is a promising approach for biomolecular sensing. For detection of enormous biomolecules via uorescence, biomolecular information should be converted to codes that can be readout easily and simultaneously. For the purpose, we study a biomolecule uorescence color (B/F) encoders that modulate uorescence signals by control of uorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The B/F encoder converts biomolecular signals into uorescent color codes represented with uorescent wavelengths and intensity levels. The combination offers a great number of codes for representing the biomolecular information. In this study, we discuss multiplexed detection of target biomolecules using B/F encoders. Use of the B/F encoders would offer a multiplexed biomolecular sensing in a one-pot without micro-fabrication like DNA microarray. In the experiments, we prepared B/F encoders based on two kinds of hybridization chain reactions (HCR) that make long double-stranded DNA polymers to control positions of uorescence and quencher molecules. In the B/F encoders, target molecules trigger to start assembling the polymer structures. The uorescent molecules in the absence of the targets are near the quenchers and the output uorescence is suppressed by FRET. The polymerization process separates the uorescent and quencher dyes and the uorescent signal increase. The experimental results show that the B/F encoders based on HCRs have linear and independent response to each target, and temporal signals during the encoding reactions are usable for multiplexed readout. This result leads to the multiplexed sensing in a one-pot by uorescent ampli cation and multiple uorescent color-coding.

  8. Ultrasensitive and selective electrochemical biosensor for detection of mercury (II) ions by nicking endonuclease-assisted target recycling and hybridization chain reaction signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Hong, Minqiang; Wang, Mengyan; Wang, Jing; Xu, Xueqin; Lin, Zhenyu

    2017-02-22

    In this paper, a novel and signal-on electrochemical biosensor based on Hg(2+)- triggered nicking endonuclease-assisted target recycling and hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification tactics was developed for sensitive and selective detection of Hg(2+). The hairpin-shaped capture probe A (PA) contained a specific sequence which was recognized by nicking endonuclease (NEase). In the presence of Hg(2+), probe B (PB) hybridized with PA to form stand-up duplex DNA strands via the Hg(2+) mediated thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) structure, which automatically triggered NEase to selectively digest duplex region from the recognition sites, spontaneously dissociating PB and Hg(2+) and leaving the remnant initiators. The released PB and Hg(2+) could be reused to initiate the next cycle and more initiators were generated. The long nicked double helices were formed through HCR event, which was triggered by the initiators and two hairpin-shaped signal probes labeled with methylene blue, resulting in a significant signal increase. Under optimum conditions, the resultant biosensor showed the high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of Hg(2+) in a linear range from 10 pM to 50nM (R(2)=0.9990), and a detection limit as low as 1.6 pM (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor was successfully applied in the detection of Hg(2+) in environment water samples with satisfactory results.

  9. TLR4-HMGB1 signaling pathway affects the inflammatory reaction of autoimmune myositis by regulating MHC-I.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zemin; Zhang, Xiujuan; Peng, Anping; He, Min; Lei, Zhenhua; Wang, Yunxiu

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the effects of TLR4 on the expression of the HMGB1, MHC-I and downstream cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, and to investigate the biological role of the TLR4-HMGB1 signaling pathway in the development of the autoimmune myositis. We built mice models with experimental autoimmune myositis (EAM) and used the inverted screen experiment to measure their muscle endurance; we also examined inflammatory infiltration of muscle tissues after HE staining; and we assessed the expression of MHC-I using immunohistochemistry. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were extracted and flow cytometry was utilized to detect the effect of IFN-γ on the expression of MHC-I. Furthermore, PBMCs were treated with IFN-γ, anti-TLR4, anti-HMGB1 and anti-MHC-I. Real-time PCR and western blotting were employed to examine the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1 and MHC-I in different groups. The ELISA method was also utilized to detect the expression of the downstream cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. The expressions of TLR4, HMGB1 and MHC-I in muscle tissues from mice with EAM were significantly higher than those in the control group (all P<0.05). After IFN-γ treatment, the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MHC-I, TNF-α and IL-6 in PBMCs significantly increased (all P<0.05). The treatment of anti-TLR4, anti-HMGB1 and anti-MHC-I could significantly downregulate the expression of MHC-I (all P<0.05). In addition, anti-TLR4 and anti-HMGB1 significantly reduced the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 (all P<0.05). The TLR4-HMGB1 signaling pathway affects the process of autoimmune myositis inflammation by regulating the expression of MHC-I and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantification of β-Catenin Signaling Components in Colon Cancer Cell Lines, Tissue Sections, and Microdissected Tumor Cells using Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Gruidl, Mike; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth; Liu, Richard Z.; Eschrich, Steven; Lloyd, Mark; Nasir, Aejaz; Bui, Marilyn M.; Huang, Emina; Shibata, David; Yeatman, Timothy; Koomen, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Reaction monitoring mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful tool for targeted detection and quantification of proteins in clinical samples. Here, we report the use of gel electrophoresis for protein fractionation and liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM) screening for quantitative analysis of components from the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which contributes to colon tumor formation and progression. In silico tools are used to design LC-MRM screens for each target protein. Following successful peptide detection, stable isotope labeled peptides are synthesized and developed as internal standards. Then, the assays are implemented in colon cancer cell lines to achieve detection in minimal amounts of cells, compatible with direct translation to clinical specimens. Selected assays are compared with qualitative results from immunoblotting (Westerns) and translated to individual frozen colon tissue sections and laser capture microdissected tumor cells. This LC-MRM platform has been translated from in vitro models to clinical specimens, forming the basis for future experiments in patient assessment. PMID:20590165

  11. Enzyme-free and isothermal detection of microRNA based on click-chemical ligation-assisted hybridization coupled with hybridization chain reaction signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Motoi

    2015-05-01

    An enzyme-free and isothermal microRNA (miRNA) detection method has been developed based on click-chemical ligation-assisted hybridization coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) on magnetic beads (MBs). The click-chemical ligation between an azide-modified probe DNA and a dibenzocyclooctyne-modified probe DNA occurred through the hybridization of target miRNA (miR-141). HCR on MBs was performed by the addition of DNA hairpin monomers (H1 and H2). After magnetic separation and denaturation/rehybridization of HCR products ([H1/H2] n ), the resulting HCR products were analyzed by the fluorescence emitted from an intercalative dye, allowing amplification of the fluorescent signal. The proposed assay had a limit of detection of 0.55 fmol, which was 230-fold more sensitive than that of the HCR on the MBs coupled with a conventional sandwich hybridization assay (without click-chemical ligation) (limit of detection 127 fmol). Additionally, the proposed assay could discriminate between miR-141 and other miR-200 family members. In contrast to quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction techniques using enzymes and thermal cycling, this is an enzyme-free assay that can be conducted under isothermal conditions and can specifically detect miR-141 in fetal bovine serum.

  12. Comparative analysis of driver's brake perception-reaction time at signalized intersections with and without countdown timer using parametric duration models.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chuanyun; Zhang, Yaping; Bie, Yiming; Hu, Liwei

    2016-10-01

    Countdown timers display the time left on the current signal, which makes drivers be more ready to react to the phase change. However, previous related studies have rarely explored the effects of countdown timer on driver's brake perception-reaction time (BPRT) to yellow light. The goal of this study was therefore to characterize and model driver's BPRT to yellow signal at signalized intersections with and without countdown timer. BPRT data for "first-to-stop" vehicles after yellow onset within the transitional zone were collected through on-site observation at six signalized intersections in Harbin, China. Statistical analysis showed that the observed 15th, 50th, and 85th percentile BPRTs without countdown timer were 0.52, 0.84, and 1.26s, respectively. The observed 15th, 50th, and 85th percentile BPRTs with countdown timer were 0.32, 1.20, and 2.52s, respectively. Log-logistic distribution appeared to best fit the BPRT without countdown timer, while Weibull distribution seemed to best fit the BPRT with countdown timer. After that, a Log-logistic accelerated failure time (AFT) duration model was developed to model driver's BPRT without countdown timer, whereas a Weibull AFT duration model was established to model driver's BPRT with countdown timer. Three significant factors affecting the BPRT identified in both AFT models included yellow-onset distance from the stop line, yellow-onset approach speed, and deceleration rate. No matter whether the presence of countdown timer or not, BPRT increased as yellow-onset distance to the stop line or deceleration rate increased, but decreased as yellow-onset speed increased. The impairment of driver's BPRT due to countdown timer appeared to increase with yellow-onset distance to the stop line or deceleration rate, but decrease with yellow-onset speed. An increase in driver's BPRT because of countdown timer may induce risky driving behaviors (i.e., stop abruptly, or even violate traffic signal), revealing a weakness of

  13. SODIUM-WATER HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, W.R.; Koch, L.J.

    1962-04-17

    A heat exchanger comprising a tank for hot liquid and a plurality of concentric, double tubes for cool liquid extending vertically through the tank is described. These tubes are bonded throughout most of their length but have an unbonded portion at both ends. The inner tubes extend between headers located above and below the tanmk and the outer tubes are welded into tube sheets forming the top and bottom of the tank at locations in the unbonded portions of the tubes. (AEC)

  14. 2-Hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid attenuates mast cell-mediated allergic reaction in mice via modulation of the FcεRI signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon-Yong; Je, In-Gyu; Kim, Min Jong; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Choi, Young-Ae; Baek, Moon-Chang; Lee, Byungheon; Choi, Jin Kyeong; Park, Hae Ran; Shin, Tae-Yong; Lee, Soyoung; Yoon, Seung-Bin; Lee, Sang-Rae; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells are important effector cells in immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated allergic reactions such as asthma, atopic dermatitis and rhinitis. Vanillic acid, a natural product, has shown anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we investigated the anti-allergic inflammatory effects of ortho-vanillic acid (2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid, o-VA) that was a derivative of vanillic acid isolated from Amomum xanthioides. In mouse anaphylaxis models, oral administration of o-VA (2, 10, 50 mg/kg) dose-dependently attenuated ovalbumin-induced active systemic anaphylaxis and IgE-mediated cutaneous allergic reactions such as hypothermia, histamine release, IgE production and vasodilation; administration of o-VA also suppressed the mast cell degranulator compound 48/80-induced anaphylaxis. In cultured mast cell line RBL-2H3 and isolated rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro, pretreatment with o-VA (1–100 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited DNP-HSA-induced degranulation of mast cells by decreasing the intracellular free calcium level, and suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-4. Pretreatment of RBL-2H3 cells with o-VA suppressed DNP-HSA-induced phosphorylation of Lyn, Syk, Akt, and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB. In conclusion, o-VA suppresses the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory response by blocking the signaling pathways downstream of high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) on the surface of mast cells. PMID:27890918

  15. Effects of T-state and R-state stabilization on deoxyhemoglobin-nitrite reactions and stimulation of nitric oxide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Vitturi, Dario A.; Rodriguez, Cilina; Murphy, Serena; Dorman, Scott; Shiva, Sruti; Zhou, Yipin; Jia, Yiping; Palmer, Andre F.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent data suggest that transitions between the relaxed (R) and tense (T) state of hemoglobin control the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide (NO) by deoxyhemoglobin. This reaction may play a role in physiologic NO homeostasis and be a novel consideration for the development of the next generation of hemoglobin-based blood oxygen carriers (HBOCs, i.e. artificial blood substitutes). Herein we tested the effects of chemical stabilization of bovine hemoglobin in either the T- (THb) or R-state (RHb) on nitrite reduction kinetics, NO-gas formation and ability to stimulate NO-dependent signaling. These studies were performed over a range of fractional saturations that is expected to mimic biological conditions. The initial rate for nitrite-reduction decreased in the following order RHb > bHb > THb, consistent with the hypothesis that the rate constant for nitrite reduction is faster with R-state Hb and slower with T-state Hb. Moreover, RHb produced more NO-gas and inhibited mitochondrial respiration more potently than both bHb and THb. Interestingly, at low oxygen fractional saturations, THb produced more NO and stimulated nitrite-dependent vasodilation more potently than bHb despite both derivatives having similar initial rates for nitrite reduction and a more negative reduction potential in THb versus bHb. These data suggest that cross-linking of bovine hemoglobin in the T-state conformation leads to a more effective coupling of nitrite reduction to NO-formation. Our results support the model of allosteric regulation of nitrite reduction by deoxyhemoglobin and show that cross-linking hemoglobins in distinct quaternary states can generate products with increased NO yields from nitrite reduction that could be harnessed to promote NO-signaling in vivo. PMID:21277987

  16. A new paradigm and computational framework to estimate stop-signal reaction time distributions from the inhibition of complex motor sequences

    PubMed Central

    Teichert, Tobias; Ferrera, Vincent P.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory control is an important component of executive function that allows organisms to abort emerging behavioral plans or ongoing actions on the fly as new sensory information becomes available. Current models treat inhibitory control as a race between a Go- and a Stop process that may be mediated by partially distinct neural substrates, i.e., the direct and the hyper-direct pathway of the basal ganglia. The fact that finishing times of the Stop process (Stop-Signal Reaction Time, SSRT) cannot be observed directly has precluded a precise comparison of the functional properties that govern the initiation (GoRT) and inhibition (SSRT) of a motor response. To solve this problem, we modified an existing inhibitory paradigm and developed a non-parametric framework to measure the trial-by-trial variability of SSRT. A series of simulations verified that the non-parametric approach is on par with a parametric approach and yields accurate estimates of the entire SSRT distribution from as few as ~750 trials. Our results show that in identical settings, the distribution of SSRT is very similar to the distribution of GoRT albeit somewhat shorter, wider and significantly less right-skewed. The ability to measure the precise shapes of SSRT distributions opens new avenues for research into the functional properties of the hyper-direct pathway that is believed to mediate inhibitory control. PMID:26236226

  17. Effect of Compound Chuanxiong Capsule on Inflammatory Reaction and PI3K/Akt/NF-κB Signaling Pathway in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Qunfu; Liu, Weihong; Liu, Hongxu; Zhou, Mingxue

    2015-01-01

    Compound Chuanxiong Capsule (CCC), a Chinese herbal compound, can exhibit antiatherosclerotic effect; however, its mechanism is still unclear. This study is designed to study the mechanism of CCC on atherosclerosis in the ApoE-knockout (ApoE−/−) mice fed with a high-fat diet. After 6 weeks of high-fat feeding, 40 ApoE−/− mice were randomized (n = 10) and treated with lipitor, high-dose or low-dose CCC, or distilled water (ApoE−/− group) for 7 weeks. The blood lipids in serum and the plaque areas of the mice were measured and the mRNA expressions of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinases (PI3K), Akt, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) of the aortae were determined. The data showed that CCC can significantly decrease the levels of blood lipids, atherosclerosis index, and plaque areas and increase collagen proportion in plaques as compared with the untreated mice (p < 0.05, p < 0.01). In addition, CCC can significantly reduce the mRNA expressions of PI3K, Akt, NF-κB, IL-6, and TNF-α in the mice fed with a high-fat diet (p < 0.001). Thus, we concluded that CCC can inhibit inflammatory reaction in the ApoE−/− mice fed with a high-fat diet. This mechanism may be attributed to regulating PI3K/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26539229

  18. DNA-based hybridization chain reaction and biotin-streptavidin signal amplification for sensitive detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 through ELISA.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi; Han, Jiao-Jiao; Shan, Shan; Liu, Dao-Feng; Wu, Song-Song; Xiong, Yong-Hua; Lai, Wei-Hua

    2016-12-15

    This study reported on a novel sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the sensitive determination of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7) by using DNA-based hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and biotin-streptavidin signal amplification. The anti-E. coli O157:H7 polyclonal antibody (pAb) was immobilized in the ELISA wells. The anti-E. coli O157:H7 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and initiator strand (DNA1) were labeled on gold nanoparticle (AuNP) to form a mAb-AuNP-DNA1 complex. In the presence of the target E. coli O157:H7, the sandwiched immunocomplex, which is pAb-E. coli O157:H7-mAb-AuNP-DNA1, could be formed. Two types of biotinylated hairpin were subsequently added in the ELISA well. A nicked double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) that contained abundant biotins was formed after HCR. Detection was performed after adding horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin and substrate/chromogen solution. Under optimal conditions, E. coli O157:H7 could be detected in the range of 5×10(2) CFU/mL to 1×10(7) CFU/mL; the limit of detection was 1.08×10(2) CFU/mL in pure culture. The LOD of the novel ELISA was 185 times lower than that of traditional ELISA. The proposed method is considerably specific and can be applied in the detection of whole milk samples inoculated with E. coli O157:H7. The coefficient of variation of in pure culture and in whole milk was 0.99-5.88% and 0.76-5.38%, respectively. This method offers a promising application in the detection of low concentrations of food-borne pathogens.

  19. Lack of essential information in spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions in Catalonia-a restraint to the potentiality for signal detection.

    PubMed

    Plessis, Lorraine; Gómez, Ainhoa; García, Núria; Cereza, Gloria; Figueras, Albert

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the quality of the information contained in the adverse drug reactions (ADR) reports and to describe the magnitude and characteristics of the lacking information. All reports of serious ADR received by the Catalan Center of Pharmacovigilance in 2014 were analyzed using the VigiGrade and a more clinical and qualitative approach. Up to 824 reports describing serious ADR were included in the study; of them, 503 (61.0%) were sent by health care professionals (HPs) and the remaining 321 (39.0%) came from pharmaceutical companies (PhC). More than 80% of missing variables such as 'onset date' or 'time-to-onset' of the ADR were from PhCs reports. 'Onset of treatment date' was not filled in 28 (22.2%) of the reports including an 'additional monitoring' medicine, and 'end of treatment' date was not completed in 53 of those reports (42.1%). In summary, 39% of the reports involving a black triangle medicine sent by PhCs lacked some essential information such as the onset date of treatment. More than one third of the reports coming from manufacturers did not include information that is considered a limiting factor to evaluate any causal relationship, and can be an issue for the detection of safety signals. To take advantage of this huge amount of potentially important information that is almost useless at present, data mining tools and new algorithms should be developed and tested with the aim of finding formulas to deal with a huge amount of low quality data without losing it, nor generating a number of false associations.

  20. Distinct roles of electric and hydraulic signals on the reaction of leaf gas exchange upon re-irrigation in Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Grams, Thorsten E E; Koziolek, Christiane; Lautner, Silke; Matyssek, Rainer; Fromm, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that electric and hydraulic long-distance signals modify photosynthesis and stomatal aperture upon re-irrigation in intact drought-stressed plants was examined. Maize plants (Zea mays L.) were exposed to drought conditions by decreasing the soil water content to 40-50% of field capacity. The decrease in water content resulted in a decline in stomatal conductance to 50-60% of the level in well-watered plants. Re-irrigation of the plants initiated both hydraulic and electric signals, followed by a two-phase response of the net CO2 uptake rate and stomatal conductance of leaves. The transitional first phase (phase 1) is characterized by a rapid decrease in both levels. In the second phase (phase 2), both parameters gradually increase to levels above those of drought-stressed plants. Elimination of either the hydraulic signal by compensatory pressure application to the root system, or of the electric signal by cooling of the leaf blade gave evidence that the two signals (1) propagated independently from each other and (2) triggered the two-phase response in leaf gas exchange. The results provided evidence that the hydraulic signal initiated a hydropassive decrease in stomatal aperture and for the involvement of electric signals in the regulation of photosynthesis of drought-stressed plants.

  1. The value of time-to-onset in statistical signal detection of adverse drug reactions: a comparison with disproportionality analysis in spontaneous reports from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Joep H G; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P

    2016-12-01

    In pharmacovigilance, the commonly used disproportionality analysis (DPA) in statistical signal detection is known to have its limitations. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of the time to onset (TTO) of ADRs in addition to DPA. We performed a pilot study using individual case safety reports (ICSRs) for three drugs (Cervarix®, nitrofurantoin and simvastatin) from the Lareb spontaneous reporting database. TTO distributions for drug - ADR associations were compared to other ADRs for the same drug and to other drugs for the same ADR using two-sample Anderson-Darling testing. Statistically significant associations were considered true positive (TP) signals if the association was present in the official product information of the drug. Sensitivity and specificity for the TTO method were compared with the DPA method. As a measure of disproportionality, the reporting odds ratio (ROR) was used. In general, sensitivity was lower, and specificity was higher for the TTO method compared to DPA. The TTO method showed similar sensitivity for all three drugs, whereas specificity was lower for Cervarix®. Eight additional TP signals were found using the TTO method compared to DPA. Our study shows that statistical signal detection based on the TTO alone resulted in a limited number of additional signals compared to DPA. We therefore conclude that the TTO method is of limited value for full database statistical screening in our setting. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Processing of chimeric mammalian cytochrome b5 precursors in Escherichia coli: reaction specificity of signal peptidase and identification of an aminopeptidase in post-translocational processing.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, V; Karim, A; Kaderbhai, N; Jones, A; Evans, A; Kaderbhai, M A

    1993-01-01

    A chimeric precursor interlinked by an arginine residue between the full-length signal sequence of alkaline phosphatase and the eukaryotic cytoplasmic cytochrome b5 was constructed. Expression of the chimeric precursor protein in Escherichia coli resulted in efficient export of spectrally authentic cytochrome b5 into the periplasm [Karim, Harding, Evans, Kaderbhai and Kaderbhai (1993) Bio/Technology 11, 612-618]. On sequencing, the apparent absence of arginine at the N-terminus of the secreted cytochrome b5 implied that the chimera was either miscleaved by signal peptidase or further processed following signal excision by an uncharacterized peptidase. The influence of the N-terminal region of cytochrome b5 on the unusual processing of the chimeric precursor was investigated by engineering a number of variant forms in which the region between Arg+1 and the mature portion of cytochrome b5 was extended and varied. Observations of the in vivo processed patterns of these variant cytochrome b5 forms exported into the periplasm revealed that the absence of arginine was due to neither miscleavage of the translocated precursor by the signal peptidase nor the nature of the early region of cytochrome b5. In fact, the selective excision of the arginine residue occurred subsequent to signal sequence deletion by an aminopeptidase which was sensitive to the metal chelator o-phenanthroline. We show that this aminopeptidase also participates in the trimming of the N-terminal arginine residue of the bacterial alkaline phosphatase to generate the three isoenzymes in the periplasm. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8352742

  3. Do cytokinins function as two-way signals between plants and animals? Cytokinins may not only mediate defence reactions via secondary compounds, but may directly interfere with developmental signals in insects.

    PubMed

    Robischon, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    Cytokinins are plant hormones that have, among many other functions, senescence-modulatory effects in plant tissue. This is evident not only from biochemical data, but is vividly illustrated in the "green island" phenotype in plant leaves caused by cytokinins released for example by leaf mining insects or microbial pathogens. It is beyond doubt that, in addition to their roles in plants, cytokinins also provoke physiological and developmental effects in animals. It is hypothesized that the recently much discussed modification of plant metabolism by insects and associated microbes via cytokinin signals has a counterpart in direct cytokinin signalling that interferes with the animals' hormonal systems and impacts their population dynamics. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Are mussels able to distinguish underwater sounds? Assessment of the reactions of Mytilus galloprovincialis after exposure to lab-generated acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Vazzana, Mirella; Celi, Monica; Maricchiolo, Giulia; Genovese, Lucrezia; Corrias, Valentina; Quinci, Enza Maria; de Vincenzi, Giovanni; Maccarrone, Vincenzo; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Mazzola, Salvatore; Buscaino, Giuseppa; Filiciotto, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the effects of lab-generated acoustic signals on the behaviour and biochemistry of Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). The experiment was carried out in a tank equipped with a video-recording system using six groups of five mussels exposed to five acoustic treatments (each treatment was replicated three times) for 30min. The acoustic signals, with a maximum sound pressure level of 150dB rms re 1μPa, differed in frequency range as follows: low (0.1-5kHz), mid-low (5-10kHz), mid (10-20kHz), mid-high (20-40kHz) and high (40-60kHz). The exposure to sweeps did not produce any significant changes in the mussels' behaviour. Conversely, the specimens exposed to the low frequency band treatment showed significantly higher values of the following biochemical stress parameters measured in their plasma and tissues: glucose, total proteins, total haemocyte number (THC), heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) expression, and Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The responses observed in the mussels exposed to low frequency sweeps enable us to suppose a biological and ecological role for this sound, which contains the main frequencies produced by both shipping traffic and the acoustic emissions of fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. THE EFFECTS OF PAST SEXUAL ASSAULT PERPETRATION AND ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION ON MEN’S REACTIONS TO WOMEN’S MIXED SIGNALS

    PubMed Central

    ABBEY, ANTONIA; ZAWACKI, TINA; BUCK, PHILIP O.

    2015-01-01

    Theories about misperception of sexual intent, cognitive distortions among rapists, and alcohol’s effects on cognition describe processes that may contribute to acquaintance sexual assault. Drawing on these literatures, an experiment was conducted to examine hypotheses about the effects of past sexual assault perpetration and alcohol consumption on 153 college men’s reactions to a female confederate. As compared to nonperpetrators, self–acknowledged rapists and verbal coercers reported being more sexually attracted to the confederate. Trained coders were least certain that rapists noticed specific positive and negative cues that the confederate used and most certain that verbal coercers did. Intoxicated participants perceived themselves and their partner as acting more sexually than did sober or placebo participants. Suggestions are discussed for research and treatment programs with college sexual assault perpetrators. PMID:26500390

  6. Revealing isomerism in sodium-water clusters: Photoionization spectra of Na(H2O)n (n = 2-90)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierking, Christoph W.; Zurheide, Florian; Zeuch, Thomas; Med, Jakub; Parez, Stanislav; Slavíček, Petr

    2017-06-01

    Soft ionization of sodium tagged polar clusters is increasingly used as a powerful technique for sizing and characterization of small aerosols with possible application, e.g., in atmospheric chemistry or combustion science. Understanding the structure and photoionization of the sodium doped clusters is critical for such applications. In this work, we report on measurements of photoionization spectra for sodium doped water clusters containing 2-90 water molecules. While most of the previous studies focused on the ionization threshold of the Na(H2O)n clusters, we provide for the first time full photoionization spectra, including the high-energy region, which are used as reference for a comparison with theory. As reported in previous work, we have seen an initial drop of the appearance ionization energy with cluster size to values of about 3.2 eV for n <5 . In the size range from n = 5 to n = 15, broad ion yield curves emerge; for larger clusters, a constant range between signal appearance (˜2.8 eV) and signal saturation (˜4.1 eV) has been observed. The measurements are interpreted with ab initio calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for selected cluster sizes (n ≤ 15). The simulations revealed theory shortfalls when aiming at quantitative agreement but allowed us identifying structural motifs consistent with the observed ionization energy distributions. We found a decrease in the ionization energy with increasing coordination of the Na atom and increasing delocalization of the Na 3s electron cloud. The appearance ionization energy is determined by isomers with fully solvated sodium and a highly delocalized electron cloud, while both fully and incompletely solvated isomers with localized electron clouds can contribute to the high energy part of the photoionization spectrum. Simulations at elevated temperatures show an increased abundance of isomers with low ionization energies, an entropic effect enabling size selective infrared action

  7. Electroacupuncture modulated the inflammatory reaction in MCAO rats via inhibiting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway in microglia

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bingbing; Lu, Yan; Zhao, Haijun; Wang, Yuan; Li, Lin; Wang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway in microglia. Male Wistar rat of SPF grade (weighing 200±20 g) were randomly divided into (i): sham control group, which was subjected to sham operation (ii) vehicle group, which underwent the occlusion of middle cerebral artery; (iii-v): acupuncture groups, which were subjected to the occlusion of middle cerebral artery and treated with acupuncture on the Neiguan acupoint (P6), Quchi acupoint (LI11), and Diji acupoint (SP8), respectively. HE staining was performed to detect the necrotic rate of neurons. Mediators of inflammation were measured using ELISA. Immunofluorescence was performed to measure the expression of TLR4, HMGB1, TRAF6, IKKβ and NF-κB p65 in microglia. Severe decrease was noticed in the neurological score, necrotic rates of neuron, expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TLR4, HMGB1, TRAF6, IKKβ and NF-κB p65 in microglia. Compared with the vehicle group, significant decrease was revealed in the neurological score, necrotic rate, IL-1β, TLR4, TRAF6, IKKβ and NF-κB p65 in Neiguan group and Quchi group, respectively. In addition, remarkable decrease was observed in the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 in Quchi group. Compared with the Diji group, the necrotic rate of neurons in hippocampus region was significantly decreased in the Quchi group (P < 0.05). In Neiguan group, the expression of TLR4 and IKKβ was significantly attenuated (P < 0.05). The expression of TRAF6 was remarkably decreased in the Neiguan group and Quchi group, respectively. Electroacupuncture on Neiguan and Quchi could improve the neurological injury, attenuate the inflammation, and inhibit the activity of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway in microglia. PMID:26617842

  8. Electroacupuncture modulated the inflammatory reaction in MCAO rats via inhibiting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway in microglia.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingbing; Lu, Yan; Zhao, Haijun; Wang, Yuan; Li, Lin; Wang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway in microglia. Male Wistar rat of SPF grade (weighing 200 ± 20 g) were randomly divided into (i): sham control group, which was subjected to sham operation (ii) vehicle group, which underwent the occlusion of middle cerebral artery; (iii-v): acupuncture groups, which were subjected to the occlusion of middle cerebral artery and treated with acupuncture on the Neiguan acupoint (P6), Quchi acupoint (LI11), and Diji acupoint (SP8), respectively. HE staining was performed to detect the necrotic rate of neurons. Mediators of inflammation were measured using ELISA. Immunofluorescence was performed to measure the expression of TLR4, HMGB1, TRAF6, IKKβ and NF-κB p65 in microglia. Severe decrease was noticed in the neurological score, necrotic rates of neuron, expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TLR4, HMGB1, TRAF6, IKKβ and NF-κB p65 in microglia. Compared with the vehicle group, significant decrease was revealed in the neurological score, necrotic rate, IL-1β, TLR4, TRAF6, IKKβ and NF-κB p65 in Neiguan group and Quchi group, respectively. In addition, remarkable decrease was observed in the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 in Quchi group. Compared with the Diji group, the necrotic rate of neurons in hippocampus region was significantly decreased in the Quchi group (P < 0.05). In Neiguan group, the expression of TLR4 and IKKβ was significantly attenuated (P < 0.05). The expression of TRAF6 was remarkably decreased in the Neiguan group and Quchi group, respectively. Electroacupuncture on Neiguan and Quchi could improve the neurological injury, attenuate the inflammation, and inhibit the activity of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway in microglia.

  9. Analysis of radicals and radical reaction products in cell signalling and biomolecular damage: the long hard road to gold-standard measures.

    PubMed

    Winyard, Paul G; Spickett, Corinne M; Griffiths, Helen R

    2011-10-01

    The field of free radical biology and medicine continues to move at a tremendous pace, with a constant flow of ground-breaking discoveries. The following collection of papers in this issue of Biochemical Society Transactions highlights several key areas of topical interest, including the crucial role of validated measurements of radicals and reactive oxygen species in underpinning nearly all research in the field, the important advances being made as a result of the overlap of free radical research with the reinvigorated field of lipidomics (driven in part by innovations in MS-based analysis), the acceleration of new insights into the role of oxidative protein modifications (particularly to cysteine residues) in modulating cell signalling, and the effects of free radicals on the functions of mitochondria, extracellular matrix and the immune system. In the present article, we provide a brief overview of these research areas, but, throughout this discussion, it must be remembered that it is the availability of reliable analytical methodologies that will be a key factor in facilitating continuing developments in this exciting research area.

  10. Myrislignan attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation reaction in murine macrophage cells through inhibition of NF-κB signalling pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong; Zhu, Zheng-Guang; Yu, Peng-Jiu; Wang, Guang-Fa; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Li, Jing-Rong; Ai, Rui-Ting; Li, Zhong-Huang; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Zhang, Wei Xu Jia-Jie; Wu, Shu-Guang

    2012-09-01

    Myrislignan is a new kind of lignan isolated from Myristica fragrans Houtt. Its antiinflammatory effects have not yet been reported. In the present study, the antiinflammatory effects and the underlying mechanisms of myrislignan in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were investigated. Myrislignan significantly inhibited LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) in a dose-dependent manner. It inhibited mRNA expression and release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). This compound significantly inhibited mRNA and protein expressions of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) dose-dependently in LPS-stimulated macrophage cells. Further study showed that myrislignan decreased the cytoplasmic loss of inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) protein and the translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to the nucleus. Our results suggest that myrislignan may exert its antiinflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated macrophages cells by inhibiting the NF-κB signalling pathway activation.

  11. Microfluidic paper-based analytical device for photoelectrochemical immunoassay with multiplex signal amplification using multibranched hybridization chain reaction and PdAu enzyme mimetics.

    PubMed

    Lan, Feifei; Sun, Guoqiang; Liang, Linlin; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua

    2016-05-15

    Combining multibranched hybridization chain reaction (mHCR), the photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensor was fabricated with a microfluidic paper-based analytical devices using different sizes of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) sensitized flower-like 3D ZnO superstructures as photoactive materials. Firstly, 4-aminothiophenol (PATP) functioned ZnO was anchored on gold-paper working electrode. With the aid of PATP, large-sized CdTe-COOH QDs (QDs1) were conjugated onto the ZnO surface because of the formation of a strong bond (Zn-S) between the thiol of PATP molecule and the ZnO, and the remaining amino group formed an amide bond with carboxylic acid group capping CdTe. Then the small-sized CdTe-NH2 QDs (QDs2) were modified on the QDs1 by forming amide bond, which leaded to a very strong photocurrent response because of the formation of cosensitized structure. The designed mHCR produced long products with multiple branched arms, which could attached multiple PdAu nanoparticles and catalyze the oxidation of hydroquinone (HQ) using H2O2 as anoxidant. Double strands DNA with multiple branched arms (mdsDNA) was formed by mHCR. In the presence of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), PdAu-mdsDNA conjugates-labeled CEA antibody was captured. The concentrations of CEA were measured through the decrease in photocurrent intensity resulting from the increase in steric hindrance of the immunocomplex and the polymeric oxidation product of HQ. In addition, the oxidation product of HQ deposited on the as-obtained electrode, which could efficiently inhibit the photoinduced electron transfer. Under optimal conditions, the PEC immunosensor exhibited excellent analytical performance: the detection range of CEA was from 0.001 to 90 ng mL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.33 pg mL(-1). The as-obtained immunosensor exhibited excellent precision, prominent specificity, acceptable stability and reproducibility, and could be used for the detection of CEA in real samples. The proposed assay opens a

  12. Large-scale sodium-basalt concrete reaction test LSC-1

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, M.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Colburn, R.P.; Winkel, B.V.

    1981-06-01

    The energy and hydrogen released from sodium-concrete reactions must be considered the analysis of beyond-design basis accidents for breeder reactors. Consequently, a large-scale sodium-basalt concrete reaction test was completed in the Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF) at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). 454 kg of sodium at 593{sup 0}C was spilled onto 0.84 m{sup 2} of basalt concrete 0.61 m deep containing two layers of reinforcing steel bar. From the data obtained, it was possible to complete a mass and energy balance for this test. The hydrogen generation and generation rate as functions of time for the duration of the test were determined. The major contribution to the chemical energy was energy associated with the formation of hydrogen (sodium-water reactions).

  13. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  14. [Disorders in sodium-water balance].

    PubMed

    Petitclerc, Thierry

    2013-02-01

    Water balance control is aimed at normalizing cellular hydration, and sodium balance control at normalizing extracellular volume. Water balance control is based on the regulation of body fluid tonicity, while the control of sodium balance is based on the regulation of effective arterial volume. Disorders of water balance act on cellular hydration: primary disorders induce a proportional change in tonicity; secondary disorders are induced by a change in tonicity or effective arterial volume. Disorders of sodium balance act on extracellular volume: primary disorders of sodium balance induce a change in effective arterial volume; secondary disorders are induced by a change in effective arterial volume. Physical examination of the patient allows assessing the extracellular volume and the severity of the sodium balance disorder. Natremia - that generally reflects tonicity - allows to assess cellular hydration and to determine the type of water balance disorder. In the case of natremia disturbance, the assessment of both the tonicity and the extracellular volume allows the determination of the type of water and/or sodium balance disorder that is necessary for prescribing the adequate therapy.

  15. Gender differences in the association between stop-signal reaction times, body mass indices and/or spontaneous food intake in pre-school children: an early model of compromised inhibitory control and obesity.

    PubMed

    Levitan, R D; Rivera, J; Silveira, P P; Steiner, M; Gaudreau, H; Hamilton, J; Kennedy, J L; Davis, C; Dube, L; Fellows, L; Wazana, A; Matthews, S; Meaney, M J

    2015-04-01

    Poor inhibitory control is associated with overeating and/or obesity in school-age children, adolescents and adults. The current study examined whether an objective and reliable marker of response inhibition, the stop-signal reaction time (SSRT), is associated with body mass index (BMI) z-scores and/or food intake during a snack test in pre-school children. The current sample consisted of 193 pre-school children taking part in a longitudinal study of early brain development (Maternal Adversity, Vulnerability and Neurodevelopment (the MAVAN project)). Linear mixed-effect models were used to examine whether the SSRT measured at age 48 months associated with BMI z-scores and/or dietary intake during a laboratory-based snack test. After controlling for significant covariates including maternal BMI, there was a significant gender by SSRT interaction effect in predicting 48-month BMI z-scores. Post-hoc analysis revealed an association between longer SSRTs (poor response inhibition) and higher BMIs in girls but not boys. Across both girls and boys, longer SSRTs were associated with greater intake of carbohydrates and sugars during the snack test. The association between SSRT scores and BMI z-scores in girls was not statistically mediated by carbohydrate or sugar intake. At 48 months of age, slower response inhibition on the Stop-Signal Task associates with higher BMI z-scores in girls, and with higher intake of carbohydrates and sugars during a snack test across both genders. Ongoing follow-up of these children will help clarify the implications of these associations for longer term macronutrient intake, eating-related pathology and/or pathological weight gain over time.

  16. Signal voter

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Roy L.

    1981-01-01

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals, each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  17. Signal voter

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, R.L.

    1981-04-28

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals , each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  18. Quantitation of signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Krauss, S; Brand, M D

    2000-12-01

    Conventional qualitative approaches to signal transduction provide powerful ways to explore the architecture and function of signaling pathways. However, at the level of the complete system, they do not fully depict the interactions between signaling and metabolic pathways and fail to give a manageable overview of the complexity that is often a feature of cellular signal transduction. Here, we introduce a quantitative experimental approach to signal transduction that helps to overcome these difficulties. We present a quantitative analysis of signal transduction during early mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes, with steady-state respiration rate as a convenient marker of metabolic stimulation. First, by inhibiting various key signaling pathways, we measure their relative importance in regulating respiration. About 80% of the input signal is conveyed via identifiable routes: 50% through pathways sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and MAP kinase and 30% through pathways sensitive to an inhibitor of calcineurin. Second, we quantify how each of these pathways differentially stimulates functional units of reactions that produce and consume a key intermediate in respiration: the mitochondrial membrane potential. Both the PKC and calcineurin routes stimulate consumption more strongly than production, whereas the unidentified signaling routes stimulate production more than consumption, leading to no change in membrane potential despite increased respiration rate. The approach allows a quantitative description of the relative importance of signal transduction pathways and the routes by which they activate a specific cellular process. It should be widely applicable.

  19. Electrical signaling and photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical irritation of trigger hairs and subsequent generation of action potentials have significant impact on photosynthesis and respiration in carnivorous Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula). Action potential-mediated inhibition of photosynthesis and stimulation of respiration is confined only to the trap and was not recorded in adjacent photosynthetic lamina. We showed that the main primary target of electrical signals on assimilation is in the dark enzymatic reaction of photosynthesis. Without doubt, the electrical signaling is costly, and the possible co-existence of such type of signals and photosynthesis in plant cell is discussed. PMID:21558815

  20. Quantifying Ubiquitin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ordureau, Alban; Münch, Christian; Harper, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin (UB)-driven signaling systems permeate biology, and are often integrated with other types of post-translational modifications (PTMs), most notably phosphorylation. Flux through such pathways is typically dictated by the fractional stoichiometry of distinct regulatory modifications and protein assemblies as well as the spatial organization of pathway components. Yet, we rarely understand the dynamics and stoichiometry of rate-limiting intermediates along a reaction trajectory. Here, we review how quantitative proteomic tools and enrichment strategies are being used to quantify UB-dependent signaling systems, and to integrate UB signaling with regulatory phosphorylation events. A key regulatory feature of ubiquitylation is that the identity of UB chain linkage types can control downstream processes. We also describe how proteomic and enzymological tools can be used to identify and quantify UB chain synthesis and linkage preferences. The emergence of sophisticated quantitative proteomic approaches will set a new standard for elucidating biochemical mechanisms of UB-driven signaling systems. PMID:26000850

  1. A DNA logic gate based on strand displacement reaction and rolling circle amplification, responding to multiple low-abundance DNA fragment input signals, and its application in detecting miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuqi; Song, Yanyan; Wu, Fan; Liu, Wenting; Fu, Boshi; Feng, Bingkun; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-04-25

    A conveniently amplified DNA AND logic gate platform was designed for the highly sensitive detection of low-abundance DNA fragment inputs based on strand displacement reaction and rolling circle amplification strategy. Compared with others, this system can detect miRNAs in biological samples. The success of this strategy demonstrates the potential of DNA logic gates in disease diagnosis.

  2. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  3. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles.

    PubMed

    Nałęcz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miękisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-07

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  4. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  5. Signal enhancement for gene detection based on a redox reaction of [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) mediated by ferrocene at the terminal of a peptide nucleic acid as a probe with hybridization-amenable conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hiroshi; Tao, Hiroaki

    2008-07-01

    Electrochemically enhanced DNA detection was demonstrated by utilizing the couple of a synthesized ferrocene-terminated peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with a cysteine anchor and a sacrificial electron donor [Fe(CN)(6)](4-). DNA detection sensors were prepared by modifying a gold electrode surface with a mixed monolayer of the probe PNA and 11-hydroxy-1-undecanethiol (11-HUT), protecting [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) from any unexpected redox reaction. Before hybridization, the terminal ferrocene moiety of the probe was subject to a redox reaction due to the flexible probe structure and, in the presence of [Fe(CN)(6)](4-), the observed current was amplified based on regeneration of the ferrocene moiety. Hybridization decreased the redox current of the ferrocene. This occurred because hybridization rigidified the probe structure: the ferrocene moiety was then removed from the electrode surface, and the redox reaction of [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) was again prevented. The change in the anodic current before and after hybridization was enhanced 1.75-fold by using the electron donor [Fe(CN)(6)](4-). Sequence-specific detection of the complementary target DNA was also demonstrated.

  6. Exploring Listeners' Real-Time Reactions to Regional Accents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Kevin; Clark, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Evaluative reactions to language stimuli are presumably dynamic events, constantly changing through time as the signal unfolds, yet the tools we usually use to capture these reactions provide us with only a snapshot of this process by recording reactions at a single point in time. This paper outlines and evaluates a new methodology which employs…

  7. Exploring Listeners' Real-Time Reactions to Regional Accents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Kevin; Clark, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Evaluative reactions to language stimuli are presumably dynamic events, constantly changing through time as the signal unfolds, yet the tools we usually use to capture these reactions provide us with only a snapshot of this process by recording reactions at a single point in time. This paper outlines and evaluates a new methodology which employs…

  8. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  9. Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Conditions Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... exposed to a foreign substance, some people suffer reactions identical to anaphylaxis, but no allergy (IgE antibody) ...

  10. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  11. Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Conditions Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... exposed to a foreign substance, some people suffer reactions identical to anaphylaxis, but no allergy (IgE antibody) ...

  12. Epidemiology of cutaneous drug-induced reactions.

    PubMed

    Naldi, L; Crotti, S

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous reactions represent in many surveillance systems, the most frequent adverse events attributable to drugs. The spectrum of clinical manifestations is wide and virtually encompasses any known dermatological disease. The introduction of biological agents and so-called targeted therapies has further enlarged the number of reaction patterns especially linked with cytokine release or in balance. The frequency and clinical patterns of cutaneous reactions are influenced by drug use, prevalence of specific conditions (e.g., HIV infection) and pharmacogenetic traits of a population, and they may vary greatly among the different populations around the world. Studies of reaction rates in cohorts of hospitalized patients revealed incidence rates ranging from, 1 out 1000 to 2 out 100 of all hospitalized patients. For drugs such as aminopenicillines and sulfamides the incidence of skin reactions is in the order of 3-5 cases out of 100 exposed people. Although the majority of cutaneous reactions are mild and self-limiting, there are reactions such as Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Surveillance systems routed on sound epidemiologic methodology, are needed to raise signals and to assess risks associated with specific reactions and drug exposures. Identification of risk factors for adverse reactions and appropriate genetic screening of groups at higher risk may improve the outcomes of skin reactions.

  13. Quantifying mixing using equilibrium reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, Philip M.; Posner, Jonathan D.

    2009-03-01

    A method of quantifying equilibrium reactions in a microchannel using a fluorometric reaction of Fluo-4 and Ca2+ ions is presented. Under the proper conditions, equilibrium reactions can be used to quantify fluid mixing without the challenges associated with constituent mixing measures such as limited imaging spatial resolution and viewing angle coupled with three-dimensional structure. Quantitative measurements of CaCl and calcium-indicating fluorescent dye Fluo-4 mixing are measured in Y-shaped microchannels. Reactant and product concentration distributions are modeled using Green's function solutions and a numerical solution to the advection-diffusion equation. Equilibrium reactions provide for an unambiguous, quantitative measure of mixing when the reactant concentrations are greater than 100 times their dissociation constant and the diffusivities are equal. At lower concentrations and for dissimilar diffusivities, the area averaged fluorescence signal reaches a maximum before the species have interdiffused, suggesting that reactant concentrations and diffusivities must be carefully selected to provide unambiguous, quantitative mixing measures. Fluorometric equilibrium reactions work over a wide range of pH and background concentrations such that they can be used for a wide variety of fluid mixing measures including industrial or microscale flows.

  14. A label-free and enzyme-free ultra-sensitive transcription factors biosensor using DNA-templated copper nanoparticles as fluorescent indicator and hairpin DNA cascade reaction as signal amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sha, Liang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Guangfeng

    2016-08-15

    Detection and quantification of specific protein with ultralow concentration play a crucial role in biotechnological applications and biomedical diagnostics. In this paper, a label-free and enzyme-free amplified fluorescent biosensor has been developed for transcription factors detection based on AT-rich double-stranded DNA-templated copper nanoparticles (ds DNA/Cu NPs) and hairpin DNA cascade reaction. This strategy was demonstrated by using nuclear factor-kappa B p50 (NF-κB p50) and specific recognition sequences as a model case. In this assay, a triplex consists of double-stranded DNA containing NF-κB p50 specifically binding sequences and a special design single-stranded DNA (Trigger) which is able to activate the hairpin DNA cascade amplifier (HDCA). In the presence of NF-κB p50, the triplex became unstable since the target bound to the recognition sequences with strong affinity. The selective binding event confirmed that the Trigger was successfully released from the triplex and initiated HDCA to yield the product which could effectively template the formation of fluorescent Cu NPs. The experimental results revealed that the advanced strategy was ultra-sensitive for detecting NF-κB p50 in the concentration range from 0.1 to 1000 pM with a detection limit of 0.096 pM. In addition, the relative standard deviation was 4.08% in 3 repetitive assays of 500 pM NF-κB p50, which indicated that the reproducibility of this strategy was acceptable. Besides desirable sensitivity, the developed biosensor also showed high selectivity, cost-effective, and simplified operations. In addition, the proposed biosensing platform is versatile. By conjugating with various specific recognition units, it could hold considerable potential to sensitive and selective detect various DNA-binding proteins and might find wide applications in biomedical fields. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Effects of Stop-Signal Probability in the Stop-Signal Paradigm: The N2/p3 Complex Further Validated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramautar, J.R.; Kok, A.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of frequency of occurrence of stop signals in the stop-signal paradigm. Presenting stop signals less frequently resulted in faster reaction times to the go stimulus and a lower probability of inhibition. Also, go stimuli elicited larger and somewhat earlier P3 responses when stop signals occurred…

  16. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  17. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  18. Skin reactions to sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Nixon, R L; Frowen, K E; Lewis, A E

    1997-06-01

    Sunscreen reactions are said not to be uncommon. A population referred to a patch testing clinic was evaluated for reactions to sunscreen by questionnaire initially and then, if relevant, by patch testing to sunscreen products and their components. Irritant reactions were more common than allergic contact dermatitis. Allergic reactions to sunscreens were less common than to non-sunscreen chemicals present in sunscreen products.

  19. [Reactions to food].

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, R; Eggesb M; Botten, G

    1995-12-10

    Adverse reactions to food occur in about 1-2% of the population, but are reported more frequently by patients. Most reactions to food are not caused by allergy. IgE-mediated food reactions are well known and of major clinical significance owing to their potentially dangerous, even life-threatening character. Adverse reactions to food can also be caused by immunological mechanisms other than IgE-mediated reactions such as, enzyme deficiencies, active pharmacological substances in food and psychological mechanisms. Double-blind provocation is the only way to diagnose a positive reaction to a food item with some certainty. Regretably no objective measures for food reactions exist.

  20. Combined online spectroscopic, calorimetric, and chemometric analysis: reaction enthalpy determinations in single and parallel reactions.

    PubMed

    Tjahjono, Martin; Widjaja, Effendi; Garland, Marc

    2009-06-02

    Calorimetry and signal processing: Vibrational spectroscopies, heat-flow microcalorimetry, and multivariate analysis are combined to decouple the reaction enthalpies of parallel reactions [picture: see text]. This methodology allows the evaluation of reaction enthalpy from complex systems without recourse to conventional kinetic modeling. Simultaneous in situ/online spectroscopy and heat-flow measurements as well as multivariate analyses are performed, apparently for the first time, to determine heats of reaction for single and parallel reactions. Two different vibrational spectroscopy techniques, namely Raman and FTIR spectroscopy, are used in conjunction with flow-through TAM III microcalorimetry. With respect to the spectroscopic analysis, the reaction spectra are first analyzed to determine the pure-component spectra and the corresponding concentrations without recourse to external calibration. With respect to the calorimetric analysis, a soft modeling approach is employed to determine the heats of reaction without recourse to any conventional kinetic models. This combined approach is implemented to determine the extents of reaction as well as the corresponding heats of reaction at 298.15 K and 0.1 MPa for a) the hydrolysis of acetic anhydride (single reaction) and b) the hydrolysis of methyl paraben and ethyl paraben in alkaline solution (both single and parallel reactions). In the latter case, the heat-flow contributions from the two simultaneous reactions are successfully decoupled. Taken together, these results demonstrate proof of concept for the present approach. The newly developed methodology appears to be quite general and particularly useful for investigating complex reaction systems. This is particularly true for multiple simultaneous reactions and reactions where the detailed kinetic expressions are not available, or cannot be easily determined. The use of extents of reaction is also very helpful where there is high variability in reaction rates

  1. Reaction-diffusion in the NEURON simulator

    PubMed Central

    McDougal, Robert A.; Hines, Michael L.; Lytton, William W.

    2013-01-01

    In order to support research on the role of cell biological principles (genomics, proteomics, signaling cascades and reaction dynamics) on the dynamics of neuronal response in health and disease, NEURON's Reaction-Diffusion (rxd) module in Python provides specification and simulation for these dynamics, coupled with the electrophysiological dynamics of the cell membrane. Arithmetic operations on species and parameters are overloaded, allowing arbitrary reaction formulas to be specified using Python syntax. These expressions are then transparently compiled into bytecode that uses NumPy for fast vectorized calculations. At each time step, rxd combines NEURON's integrators with SciPy's sparse linear algebra library. PMID:24298253

  2. Reaction-diffusion in the NEURON simulator.

    PubMed

    McDougal, Robert A; Hines, Michael L; Lytton, William W

    2013-01-01

    In order to support research on the role of cell biological principles (genomics, proteomics, signaling cascades and reaction dynamics) on the dynamics of neuronal response in health and disease, NEURON's Reaction-Diffusion (rxd) module in Python provides specification and simulation for these dynamics, coupled with the electrophysiological dynamics of the cell membrane. Arithmetic operations on species and parameters are overloaded, allowing arbitrary reaction formulas to be specified using Python syntax. These expressions are then transparently compiled into bytecode that uses NumPy for fast vectorized calculations. At each time step, rxd combines NEURON's integrators with SciPy's sparse linear algebra library.

  3. Signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, David M.

    The application of signal processing technology to conventional weapons systems can lower operator workloads and enhance kill probabilities, while automating wide-area surveillance, target search and classification, target tracking, and aimpoint selection. Immediate opportunities exist for automatic target cueing in underwater and over-the-horizon targeting, as well as for airborne multiple-target fire control. By embedding the transit/receive electronics into conformal aircraft sensor arrays, a 'smart' skin can be created. Electronically scanned phased arrays can be used to yield accurate azimuthal and elevation positions while nullifying EW threats. Attention is given to major development thrusts in algorithm design.

  4. Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    ORGANIZATION Univ of Minnesota (f*fto U. S. Army Research Office 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (Wiy Stat, and ZIP Code...Minneapolis, MN 55455 P. 0. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Sa. NAME Of FUNDING ISPONSORING Sb. OFFICE SYMBOL 9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT...PROJECT ITASK jWORK UNIT Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 EMNTO.I NO NO CESOIO 11. TITLE (Incudt Security Classifiratio") Signal Processing of, he auth

  5. Ubiquitin signaling in immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongbo; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has emerged as a crucial mechanism that regulates signal transduction in diverse biological processes, including different aspects of immune functions. Ubiquitination regulates pattern-recognition receptor signaling that mediates both innate immune responses and dendritic cell maturation required for initiation of adaptive immune responses. Ubiquitination also regulates the development, activation, and differentiation of T cells, thereby maintaining efficient adaptive immune responses to pathogens and immunological tolerance to self-tissues. Like phosphorylation, ubiquitination is a reversible reaction tightly controlled by the opposing actions of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases. Deregulated ubiquitination events are associated with immunological disorders, including autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27012466

  6. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  7. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  8. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  9. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R; Phelps, Michael E; Quake, Stephen R; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  10. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  11. Modeling Mechanochemical Reaction Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Adams, Heather; Miller, Brendan P; Furlong, Octavio J; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Navarra, Gabriele; Rossi, Antonella; Xu, Yufu; Kotvis, Peter V; Tysoe, Wilfred T

    2017-08-09

    The mechanochemical reaction between copper and dimethyl disulfide is studied under well-controlled conditions in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Reaction is initiated by fast S-S bond scission to form adsorbed methyl thiolate species, and the reaction kinetics are reproduced by two subsequent elementary mechanochemical reaction steps, namely a mechanochemical decomposition of methyl thiolate to deposit sulfur on the surface and evolve small, gas-phase hydrocarbons, and sliding-induced oxidation of the copper by sulfur that regenerates vacant reaction sites. The steady-state reaction kinetics are monitored in situ from the variation in the friction force as the reaction proceeds and modeled using the elementary-step reaction rate constants found for monolayer adsorbates. The analysis yields excellent agreement between the experiment and the kinetic model, as well as correctly predicting the total amount of subsurface sulfur in the film measured using Auger spectroscopy and the sulfur depth distribution measured by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  12. Electronically excited states of sodium-water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Claus Peter; Bobbert, Christiana; Shimosato, Taku; Daigoku, Kota; Miura, Nobuaki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2003-12-01

    The lowest electronically excited state of small Na(H2O)n clusters has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The excitation energy as determined by the depletion spectroscopy method drops from 16 950 cm-1 for the sodium atom down to 9670 cm-1 when only three water molecules are attached to the Na atom. For larger clusters the absorption band shifts back towards higher energies and reaches 10 880 cm-1 for n=12. The experimental data are compared to quantum-chemical calculations at the Møeller-Plesset second-order perturbation and multireference single and double excitation configuration interaction levels. We found that the observed size dependence of the transition energy is well reproduced by the interior structure where the sodium atom is surrounded by water molecules. The analysis of the radial charge distribution of the unpaired electron in these interior structures gives a new insight into the formation of the "solvated" electron.

  13. Oxygen sensing and signaling.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Joost T; Licausi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an indispensable substrate for many biochemical reactions in plants, including energy metabolism (respiration). Despite its importance, plants lack an active transport mechanism to distribute oxygen to all cells. Therefore, steep oxygen gradients occur within most plant tissues, which can be exacerbated by environmental perturbations that further reduce oxygen availability. Plants possess various responses to cope with spatial and temporal variations in oxygen availability, many of which involve metabolic adaptations to deal with energy crises induced by low oxygen. Responses are induced gradually when oxygen concentrations decrease and are rapidly reversed upon reoxygenation. A direct effect of the oxygen level can be observed in the stability, and thus activity, of various transcription factors that control the expression of hypoxia-induced genes. Additional signaling pathways are activated by the impact of oxygen deficiency on mitochondrial and chloroplast functioning. Here, we describe the molecular components of the oxygen-sensing pathway.

  14. Hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Fields, C L; Robinson, J W; Roy, T M; Ossorio, M A; Byrd, R P

    1998-05-01

    Adverse drug reactions can vary from a simple rash to anaphylactic shock. While certain medications including the penicillins are well known to cause such reactions, other drugs are not as commonly recognized. Azathioprine hypersensitivity reactions tend to be benign and self-limiting with cessation of drug ingestion. We report a patient who had a hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine, which manifested as distributive shock that mimicked sepsis. We also reviewed the English language literature for risk factors for a hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine and its possible mechanism.

  15. Receptor signaling clusters in the immune synapse

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, Michael L.; Groves, Jay T.

    2012-02-23

    Signaling processes between various immune cells involve large-scale spatial reorganization of receptors and signaling molecules within the cell-cell junction. These structures, now collectively referred to as immune synapses, interleave physical and mechanical processes with the cascades of chemical reactions that constitute signal transduction systems. Molecular level clustering, spatial exclusion, and long-range directed transport are all emerging as key regulatory mechanisms. The study of these processes is drawing researchers from physical sciences to join the effort and represents a rapidly growing branch of biophysical chemistry. Furthermore, recent advances in physical and quantitative analyses of signaling within the immune synapses are reviewed here.

  16. Urothelial Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The urothelium, which lines the inner surface of the renal pelvis, the ureters, and the urinary bladder, not only forms a high-resistance barrier to ion, solute and water flux, and pathogens, but also functions as an integral part of a sensory web which receives, amplifies, and transmits information about its external milieu. Urothelial cells have the ability to sense changes in their extracellular environment, and respond to chemical, mechanical and thermal stimuli by releasing various factors such as ATP, nitric oxide, and acetylcholine. They express a variety of receptors and ion channels, including P2X3 purinergic receptors, nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and TRP channels, which all have been implicated in urothelial-neuronal interactions, and involved in signals that via components in the underlying lamina propria, such as interstitial cells, can be amplified and conveyed to nerves, detrusor muscle cells, and ultimately the central nervous system. The specialized anatomy of the urothelium and underlying structures, and the possible communication mechanisms from urothelial cells to various cell types within the bladder wall are described. Changes in the urothelium/lamina propria (“mucosa”) produced by different bladder disorders are discussed, as well as the mucosa as a target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23589830

  17. [Adverse reactions to vaccines].

    PubMed

    Eseverri, J L; Ranea, S; Marin, A

    2003-01-01

    Adverse reactions to vaccines are highly varied, ranging from mild local reactions to fatal outcomes. In the last few years many adverse reactions have been attributed to vaccines, often without justification. In agreement with the World Health Organization, these reactions can be classified as follows, depending on the cause: vaccination-induced reactions (due to an effect of the vaccine itself or to an idiosyncrasy); reactions due to errors in storage, manipulation and/or administration; and coincidental reactions (no causal relationship with the vaccine). Hypersensitivity reactions fall into six categories, depending on the causative agent: reactions due to some component of the infectious agent or one of its products; reactions due to adjuvants: aluminium hydroxide; reactions due to stabilizers: gelatin; reactions due to preservatives: thiomersal; reactions due to antibiotics: neomycin; and reactions due to a biological culture medium: chicken embryo cells. Allergic children should not be excluded from the normal vaccine calendar. Immunologically, allergic individuals are more susceptible to infection and to microbial and viral diseases, which often play an aggravating role. Rubella, whooping cough, and influenza usually exacerbate respiratory allergies. Non-vaccination carries a marked risk of contracting serious diseases such as poliomyelitis, tetanus, and diphtheria, etc. In a not too distant future, the techniques of genetic recombination and monoclonal antibody production will allow the creation of vaccines from organisms that cannot be cultivated in the laboratory or that produce small quantities of antigen. These techniques will also lead to identification of the antigens with the greatest immunogenic power and, consequently, to extremely pure vaccines. The adverse reactions to vaccines referred to our service account for between 0.59 % and 1.27 % of first visits in the last three years. We recorded a total of 48 adverse reactions to vaccines. Of

  18. Connectionist and diffusion models of reaction time.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, R; Van Zandt, T; McKoon, G

    1999-04-01

    Two connectionist frameworks, GRAIN (J. L. McClelland, 1993) and brain-state-in-a-box (J. A. Anderson, 1991), and R. Ratcliff's (1978) diffusion model were evaluated using data from a signal detection task. Dependent variables included response probabilities, reaction times for correct and error responses, and shapes of reaction-time distributions. The diffusion model accounted for all aspects of the data, including error reaction times that had previously been a problem for all response-time models. The connectionist models accounted for many aspects of the data adequately, but each failed to a greater or lesser degree in important ways except for one model that was similar to the diffusion model. The findings advance the development of the diffusion model and show that the long tradition of reaction-time research and theory is a fertile domain for development and testing of connectionist assumptions about how decisions are generated over time.

  19. Enhanced release of primary signals may render intercellular signalling ineffective due to spatial aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kundrát, Pavel; Friedland, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Detailed mechanistic modelling has been performed of the intercellular signalling cascade between precancerous cells and their normal neighbours that leads to a selective removal of the precancerous cells by apoptosis. Two interconnected signalling pathways that were identified experimentally have been modelled, explicitly accounting for temporal and spatial effects. The model predicts highly non-linear behaviour of the signalling. Importantly, under certain conditions, enhanced release of primary signals by precancerous cells renders the signalling ineffective. This counter-intuitive behaviour arises due to spatial aspects of the underlying signalling scheme: Increased primary signalling by precancerous cells does, upon reaction with factors derived from normal cells, produce higher yields of apoptosis-triggering molecules. However, the apoptosis-triggering signals are formed farther from the precancerous cells, so that these are attacked less efficiently. Spatial effects thus may represent a novel analogue of negative feedback mechanisms. PMID:27645799

  20. Noncanonical reactions of flavoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-11-05

    Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a "molecular scaffold" in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  1. Reaction spreading on graphs.

    PubMed

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension d{s}, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension d{l}. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)∼t{d{l}}. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)e{αt} with α proportional to ln(k), where (k) is the average degree of the graph.

  2. Nuclear reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ``hot`` nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ``flow`` measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study {sup 40}Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs.

  3. Photoneutron Reactions in Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    Photoneutron reactions are discussed in the context of nucleosynthesis with emphasis on a unified understanding of (γ, n) and (n, γ) reactions for heavy nuclei through the γ-ray strength function and a revisit to explosive nucleosynthesis of 9Be through the reciprocity theorem. The role of photonuclear reactions in nucleosynthesis is supplemented by the photonuclear data project (IAEA-CRP F42032) and will be strengthened in the Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in the future.

  4. Immune reaction to propanidid.

    PubMed

    Christmas, D

    1984-05-01

    An adverse reaction to the intravenous anaesthetic agent propanidid is described in which the main features were hypotension, facial erythema, and abdominal pain. Changes in serum complement levels and differential white cell counts indicate that this was an immune reaction mediated by the classical complement pathway. The immune reaction apparently involved antibodies other than those of the IgE (reagin) class, and circumstantial evidence suggests that it was specific to propanidid rather than to the entire formulation or to Cremophor EL.

  5. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, E.W.; Simms, R.

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  6. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, Edward W.; Simms, Richard

    1981-01-01

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  7. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M Allen; Beeman, Barton V; Benett, William J; Hadley, Dean R; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L; Krulevitch, Peter A

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  8. Signal replication in a DNA nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Oscar; Houmadi, Said; Aimé, Jean-Pierre; Elezgaray, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Logic circuits based on DNA strand displacement reaction are the basic building blocks of future nanorobotic systems. The circuits tethered to DNA origami platforms present several advantages over solution-phase versions where couplings are always diffusion-limited. Here we consider a possible implementation of one of the basic operations needed in the design of these circuits, namely, signal replication. We show that with an appropriate preparation of the initial state, signal replication performs in a reproducible way. We also show the existence of side effects concomitant to the high effective concentrations in tethered circuits, such as slow leaky reactions and cross-activation.

  9. Modern reaction-based indicator systems†

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traditional analyte-specific synthetic receptors or sensors have been developed on the basis of supramolecular interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding, electrostatics, weak coordinative bonds). Unfortunately, this approach is often subject to limitations. As a result, increasing attention within the chemical sensor community is turning to the use of analyte-specific molecular indicators, wherein substrate-triggered reactions are used to signal the presence of a given analyte. This tutorial review highlights recent reaction-based indicator systems that have been used to detect selected anions, cations, reactive oxygen species, and neutral substrates. PMID:19587959

  10. Modern reaction-based indicator systems.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dong-Gyu; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2009-06-01

    Traditional analyte-specific synthetic receptors or sensors have been developed on the basis of supramolecular interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding, electrostatics, weak coordinative bonds). Unfortunately, this approach is often subject to limitations. As a result, increasing attention within the chemical sensor community is turning to the use of analyte-specific molecular indicators, wherein substrate-triggered reactions are used to signal the presence of a given analyte. This tutorial review highlights recent reaction-based indicator systems that have been used to detect selected anions, cations, reactive oxygen species, and neutral substrates.

  11. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  12. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  13. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  14. REUSABLE REACTION VESSEL

    DOEpatents

    Soine, T.S.

    1963-02-26

    This patent shows a reusable reaction vessel for such high temperature reactions as the reduction of actinide metal chlorides by calcium metal. The vessel consists of an outer metal shell, an inner container of refractory material such as sintered magnesia, and between these, a bed of loose refractory material impregnated with thermally conductive inorganic salts. (AEC)

  15. Chemical burn or reaction

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000059.htm Chemical burn or reaction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ...

  16. Oscillating Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes several oscillating chemical reactions which can be used in undergraduate chemistry laboratories. In one such reaction, ferroin oscillates from red (reducing solution) to blue (oxidizing solution) for about an hour at a frequency which can readily be shown to depend on such factors as the temperature, type of solvent, and concentration…

  17. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  18. Photoinduced Multicomponent Reactions.

    PubMed

    Garbarino, Silvia; Ravelli, Davide; Protti, Stefano; Basso, Andrea

    2016-12-12

    The combination of multicomponent approaches with light-driven processes opens up new scenarios in the area of synthetic organic chemistry, where the need for sustainable, atom- and energy-efficient reactions is increasingly urgent. Photoinduced multicomponent reactions are still in their infancy, but significant developments in this area are expected in the near future.

  19. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  20. Chemical Reaction Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role of chemical-equation problem solving in helping students predict reaction products. Methods for helping students learn this process must be taught to students and future teachers by using pedagogical skills within the content of chemistry. Emphasizes that solving chemical reactions should involve creative cognition where…

  1. Reactions to Attitudinal Deviancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, John M.; Allen, Vernon L.

    This paper presents a critical review of empirical and theoretical treatments of group reaction to attitudinal deviancy. Inspired by Festinger's (1950) ideas on resolution of attitudinal discrepancies in groups, Schachter (1951) conducted an experiment that has greatly influenced subsequent research and theory concerning reaction to attitudinal…

  2. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  3. Precompound Reactions: Basic Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2008-04-17

    Because of the non-zero nuclear equilibration time, the compound-nucleus scattering model fails when the incident energy exceeds 10 or 20 MeV, and precompound reactions become important. Basic ideas used in the quantum-statistical approaches to these reactions are described.

  4. Allergic reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wood, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    Anaphylactic reactions to vaccines are rare but do occur, and have been reported for nearly every vaccine. And while the reaction rate per each dose of vaccine is low, this is a common clinical question due in large part to the enormous numbers of vaccines administered. Reactions are most often due to vaccine constituents rather than the microbial components of the vaccine, but in many instances, the specific ingredient triggering the reaction cannot be definitively identified. Evaluation of patients with suspected vaccine reactions should begin by determining whether the symptoms and timing of the reaction were consistent with a true allergic reaction, followed by an assessment to determine whether the patient needs further doses of the vaccine in question, or similar vaccines, in the future. Skin and serologic testing to vaccines and vaccine constituents can then be performed to further assess the potential cause of the reaction and to develop a plan for future immunizations. Specific guidelines for the administration of influenza vaccines to egg allergic patients have been revised to allow virtually all patients to receive this vaccine in a straightforward manner. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Reactions and their management.

    PubMed

    Ganapati, R; Pai, V V

    2004-12-01

    The uneventful response to chemotherapy in leprosy is marked by clinically disturbing episodes encountered in 20-30% of patients and these phenomena are called "reactions". Generally they are classified as reversal reaction (type-1) and erythema nodosum leprosum (type-2). The cutaneous menifestations are: (1) Type-2 reactions in LL, BL types constituting erythema nodosum leprosum, erythema multiforme, erythema necroticans, subcutaneous nodules, lepromatous exacerbation. (2) Type-1 reactions in borderline and tuberculoid leprosy. The other manifestations include: Acute neuritis, lymphadenitis, arthritis, oedema of the hands and feet, ocular lesions, etc. Sequelae of reactions are: Paralytic deformities, non-paralytic deformities, extensive scarring and renal damage. A simple guideline to identify the risk-prone cases has been narrated. Prednisolone in standard dosage schedule as recommended by WHO is now being widely used in control programmes.

  6. Automatic NMR-Based Identification of Chemical Reaction Types in Mixtures of Co-Occurring Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Latino, Diogo A. R. S.; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the 1H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants) and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the 1H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps) produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF), the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure elucidation of the

  7. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    PubMed

    Latino, Diogo A R S; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1)H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants) and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1)H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps) produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF), the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure elucidation of

  8. Globin-based redox signaling

    PubMed Central

    De Henau, Sasha; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have become recognized as signaling cues that participate at all levels of cellular organization. Globins, with their redox-active heme iron and ubiquitous presence, seem ideally suited to participate in ROS metabolism. Here we comment on our recent findings that show the participation of a globin, GLB-12, in a redox signaling pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that GLB-12 produces superoxide, a type of ROS, after which this is converted to what appears to be a hydrogen peroxide gradient over the plasma membrane by the activity of intracellular and extracellular superoxide dismutases. In the first part, we discuss in more detail the different regulatory mechanisms that increase the effectiveness of this redox signal. In the second part, we comment on how specific structural and biochemical properties allow this globin to perform redox reactions. Interestingly, these properties are also observed in 2 other C. elegans globins that appear to be involved in redox biology. We therefore hypothesize that globins involved in redox signaling display similar structural and biochemical characteristics and propose that a subgroup of globins can be added to the group of proteins that play a vital role in redox signaling. PMID:27695650

  9. Globin-based redox signaling.

    PubMed

    De Henau, Sasha; Braeckman, Bart P

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have become recognized as signaling cues that participate at all levels of cellular organization. Globins, with their redox-active heme iron and ubiquitous presence, seem ideally suited to participate in ROS metabolism. Here we comment on our recent findings that show the participation of a globin, GLB-12, in a redox signaling pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that GLB-12 produces superoxide, a type of ROS, after which this is converted to what appears to be a hydrogen peroxide gradient over the plasma membrane by the activity of intracellular and extracellular superoxide dismutases. In the first part, we discuss in more detail the different regulatory mechanisms that increase the effectiveness of this redox signal. In the second part, we comment on how specific structural and biochemical properties allow this globin to perform redox reactions. Interestingly, these properties are also observed in 2 other C. elegans globins that appear to be involved in redox biology. We therefore hypothesize that globins involved in redox signaling display similar structural and biochemical characteristics and propose that a subgroup of globins can be added to the group of proteins that play a vital role in redox signaling.

  10. Using photo-initiated polymerization reactions to detect molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Kaastrup, K; Sikes, H D

    2016-02-07

    Widely used medical diagnostic devices and assays that sense the presence of a particular molecule in a bodily fluid often rely on either a nanoparticle label or an enzymatic reaction to generate a signal that is easily detectable. In many cases, it is desirable if the magnitude of the signal correlates with the concentration of the molecule of interest. Photo-initiated polymerization reactions are an alternative means of generating amplified signals that can be used to quantify biological molecules in complex fluids. In this case, the formation of a polymer, typically a cross-linked hydrogel, signifies the presence of the molecule of interest. This tutorial review explains how photo-initiated polymerization reactions have been used in a conditional manner to detect and quantify molecular recognition events. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of using photo-initiated reactions in comparison with other approaches and highlight exciting directions and opportunities in this area.

  11. Algorithm for reaction classification.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Hans; Eiblmaier, Josef; Grethe, Guenter; Löw, Peter; Matuszczyk, Heinz; Saller, Heinz

    2013-11-25

    Reaction classification has important applications, and many approaches to classification have been applied. Our own algorithm tests all maximum common substructures (MCS) between all reactant and product molecules in order to find an atom mapping containing the minimum chemical distance (MCD). Recent publications have concluded that new MCS algorithms need to be compared with existing methods in a reproducible environment, preferably on a generalized test set, yet the number of test sets available is small, and they are not truly representative of the range of reactions that occur in real reaction databases. We have designed a challenging test set of reactions and are making it publicly available and usable with InfoChem's software or other classification algorithms. We supply a representative set of example reactions, grouped into different levels of difficulty, from a large number of reaction databases that chemists actually encounter in practice, in order to demonstrate the basic requirements for a mapping algorithm to detect the reaction centers in a consistent way. We invite the scientific community to contribute to the future extension and improvement of this data set, to achieve the goal of a common standard.

  12. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  13. Modeling of surface reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models are used to elucidate properties of the monomer-monomer and monomer-dimer type chemical reactions on a two-dimensional surface. The authors use mean-field and lattice gas models, detailing similarities and differences due to correlations in the lattice gas model. The monomer-monomer, or AB surface reaction model, with no diffusion, is investigated for various reaction rates k. Study of the exact rate equations reveals that poisoning always occurs if the adsorption rates of the reactants are unequal. If the adsorption rates of the reactants are equal, simulations show slow poisoning, associated with clustering of reactants. This behavior is also shown for the two-dimensional voter model. The authors analyze precisely the slow poisoning kinetics by an analytic treatment for the AB reaction with infinitesimal reaction rate, and by direct comparison with the voter model. They extend the results to incorporate the effects of place-exchange diffusion, and they compare the AB reaction with infinitesimal reaction rate and no diffusion to the voter model with diffusion at rate 1/2. They also consider the relationship of the voter model to the monomer-dimer model, and investigate the latter model for small reaction rates. The monomer-dimer, or AB[sub 2] surface reaction model is also investigated. Specifically, they consider the ZGB-model for CO-oxidation, and in generalizations of this model which include adspecies diffusion. A theory of nucleation to describe properties of non-equilibrium first-order transitions, specifically the evolution between [open quote]reactive[close quote] steady states and trivial adsorbing states, is derived. The behavior of the [open quote]epidemic[close quote] survival probability, P[sub s], for a non-poisoned patch surrounded by a poisoned background is determined below the poisoning transition.

  14. Cycloaddition reactions of ICNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasinszki, Tibor; Krebsz, Melinda; Hajgató, Balázs

    2009-05-01

    The mechanism and selectivity of cycloaddition reactions of iodonitrile oxide, ICNO, have been studied with theoretical methods for the first time using MR-AQCC coupled-cluster and B3LYP DFT methods. Calculations have predicted that the favoured ICNO dimerisation process is a multi-step reaction to diiodofuroxan involving dinitrosoethylene-like intermediates. The ICNO cycloaddition with nitriles and ethynyl derivatives is a synchronous process favouring the formation of 1,2,4-oxadiazole and 1,2-oxazole derivatives, respectively. The cycloaddition reactions of ICNO have been studied experimentally by generating ICNO from AgCNO and iodine. Diiodofuroxan is obtained, however, even at the presence of nitriles.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1963-09-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described for breeding fissionable material, including a heat-exchange tank, a high- and a low-pressure chamber therein, heat- exchange tubes connecting these chambers, a solution of U/sup 233/ in heavy water in a reaction container within the tank, a slurry of thorium dioxide in heavy water in a second container surrounding the first container, an inlet conduit including a pump connecting the low pressure chamber to the reaction container, an outlet conduit connecting the high pressure chamber to the reaction container, and means of removing gaseous fission products released in both chambers. (AEC)

  16. Signal feature recognition based on lightwave neuromorphic signal processing.

    PubMed

    Fok, Mable P; Deming, Hannah; Nahmias, Mitchell; Rafidi, Nicole; Rosenbluth, David; Tait, Alexander; Tian, Yue; Prucnal, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    We developed a hybrid analog/digital lightwave neuromorphic processing device that effectively performs signal feature recognition. The approach, which mimics the neurons in a crayfish responsible for the escape response mechanism, provides a fast and accurate reaction to its inputs. The analog processing portion of the device uses the integration characteristic of an electro-absorption modulator, while the digital processing portion employ optical thresholding in a highly Ge-doped nonlinear loop mirror. The device can be configured to respond to different sets of input patterns by simply varying the weights and delays of the inputs. We experimentally demonstrated the use of the proposed lightwave neuromorphic signal processing device for recognizing specific input patterns.

  17. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle.

  18. Untoward penicillin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Guthe, T.; Idsöe, O.; Willcox, R. R.

    1958-01-01

    The literature on untoward reactions following the administration of penicillin is reviewed. These reactions, including a certain number of deaths which have been reported, are of particular interest to health administrations and to WHO in view of the large-scale programmes for controlling the treponematoses which are now under way—programmes affecting millions of people in many parts of the world. The most serious problems are anaphylactic sensitivity phenomena and superinfection or cross-infection with penicillin-resistant organisms, and the reactions involved range in intensity from the mildest to the fatal; the incidence of the latter is estimated at 0.1-0.3 per million injections. The authors point out that with increasing use of penicillin, more persons are likely to become sensitized and the number of reactions can therefore be expected to rise. The best prevention against such an increase is the restriction of the unnecessary use of penicillin. PMID:13596877

  19. Translated chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2014-05-01

    Many biochemical and industrial applications involve complicated networks of simultaneously occurring chemical reactions. Under the assumption of mass action kinetics, the dynamics of these chemical reaction networks are governed by systems of polynomial ordinary differential equations. The steady states of these mass action systems have been analyzed via a variety of techniques, including stoichiometric network analysis, deficiency theory, and algebraic techniques (e.g., Gröbner bases). In this paper, we present a novel method for characterizing the steady states of mass action systems. Our method explicitly links a network's capacity to permit a particular class of steady states, called toric steady states, to topological properties of a generalized network called a translated chemical reaction network. These networks share their reaction vectors with their source network but are permitted to have different complex stoichiometries and different network topologies. We apply the results to examples drawn from the biochemical literature.

  20. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  1. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  2. Reaction wheel assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The fabrication and testing of three reaction wheels with associated drive and system monitoring electronics and brushless dc spin motors are discussed; the wheels are intended for use in a teleoperator simulator. Test results are included as graphs.

  3. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  4. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  5. An Illuminating Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of carbide lights as an excellent mechanism for introducing or reviewing many basic chemistry concepts including elements and compounds, endothermic and exothermic reactions, physical and chemical changes, and balancing chemical equations. (JRH)

  6. Skin Reactions to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Talpash, Orest

    1976-01-01

    Although skin reactions to cold are seen surprisingly infrequently in Canada, it is important to manage them correctly when they do occur. Frostbite, cold urticarias, Raynaud's disease and phenomenon, and several miscellaneous changes are discussed. PMID:21308019

  7. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  8. An Illuminating Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of carbide lights as an excellent mechanism for introducing or reviewing many basic chemistry concepts including elements and compounds, endothermic and exothermic reactions, physical and chemical changes, and balancing chemical equations. (JRH)

  9. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  10. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  11. Information processing in multi-step signaling pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Ambhi; Hamidzadeh, Archer; Zhang, Jin; Levchenko, Andre

    Information processing in complex signaling networks is limited by a high degree of variability in the abundance and activity of biochemical reactions (biological noise) operating in living cells. In this context, it is particularly surprising that many signaling pathways found in eukaryotic cells are composed of long chains of biochemical reactions, which are expected to be subject to accumulating noise and delayed signal processing. Here, we challenge the notion that signaling pathways are insulated chains, and rather view them as parts of extensively branched networks, which can benefit from a low degree of interference between signaling components. We further establish conditions under which this pathway organization would limit noise accumulation, and provide evidence for this type of signal processing in an experimental model of a calcium-activated MAPK cascade. These results address the long-standing problem of diverse organization and structure of signaling networks in live cells.

  12. [Occurrence of drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Pastorello, E; Qualizza, R M; Luraghi, M T; Ispano, M; Villa, A M; Ortolani, C; Zanussi, C

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the incidence of allergic reactions to drugs compared to other kinds of medical emergencies admitted to the main Hospital in Milan during a 6 months period. At the same time we drew a list of drugs most frequently involved in allergic reactions, and a list of the most frequent symptoms. Using special forms, the medical staff collected patients' data: age, history of atopy, identification of the drug causing the reaction, and any previous reactions. Among 11,407 cases of medical emergencies, we found 163 (1.43%) patients showing drug reactions: the mean age was 27.3; 58.90% were female; atopy was present in 16.56%. The drugs most frequently involved were: pyrazon group (22%); ASA (20.86%); penicillin and derivatives (9.20%); sulfa drugs (6.14%); group B vitamins (4.30%); tetanus toxoid (4.30%); hyposensitizing extracts (3.68%); propionic acid derivatives (2.46%); paracetamol (1.84%); indomethacin (1.23%); rifampicin (1.23%); erythromycin (1.23%); glafenine (1.23%); others (17.80%). Urticaria and/or angioedema were the most frequent symptoms (86.51%), then anaphylactic shock (9.81%) and asthma (3.68%) with regard to anaphylactic shock only 6.20% of the patients had had a previous reaction to the same drug. From these data we can see that the incidence of drug reactions is very low compared to other medical emergencies; penicillin evidenced fewer reactions than expected, while the pyrazon group and ASA confirmed the data from literature.

  13. Anaphylactoid reaction to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kelso, J M; Keating, M U; Squillace, D L; O'Connell, E J; Yunginger, J W; Sachs, M I

    1990-05-01

    We studied a 14-year-old boy who developed a pruritic rash and facial swelling after ingestion of beer or wine. A blinded challenge with purified ethanol was positive demonstrating ethanol itself to be the offending agent. An IgE-mediated reaction to ethanol or one of its metabolites as a hapten is possible, or the reaction may involve unusual metabolism of ethanol with accumulation of acetaldehyde and/or direct mast cell degranulation.

  14. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  15. Cyanohydrin reactions enhance glycolytic oscillations in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Nielsen, Astrid Gram; Tortzen, Christian; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous metabolic oscillations can be induced in yeast by addition of glucose and removal of extracellular acetaldehyde (ACAx). Compared to other means of ACAx removal, cyanide robustly induces oscillations, indicating additional cyanide reactions besides ACA to lactonitrile conversion. Here, (13)C NMR is used to confirm our previous hypothesis, that cyanide directly affects glycolytic fluxes through reaction with carbonyl-containing compounds. Intracellularly, at least 3 cyanohydrins were identified. Extracellularly, all signals could be identified and lactonitrile was found to account for ~66% of total cyanide removal. Simulations of our updated computational model show that intracellular cyanide reactions increase the amplitude of oscillations and that cyanide addition lowers [ACA] instantaneously. We conclude that cyanide provides the following means of inducing global oscillations: a) by reducing [ACAx] relative to oscillation amplitude, b) by targeting multiple intracellular carbonyl compounds during fermentation, and c) by acting as a phase resetting stimulus.

  16. Cell Simulation Package for Reactions and Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, Steve; Slepoy, Alex

    2005-04-01

    ChemCell is a simulation package designed for modeling signalling, regulatory, and metabolic pathways in biological cells. It reads input flies that describe the geomeby of the cell and positions of particles that represent proteins, protein complexes, and other bio-molecules. It also reads in lists of reactions and associated rates and other boundary condition information. ChemCell then models the reaction and diffusion of these particles within the cellular geometry as they interact overtime. It produces statistical information about the state of the cell, as well as snapshots of the reaction network. We anticipate ChemCell will be useful to researchers who wish to perform spatio-temporal modeling of cellular processes and who wish to develop new models or algorithms to add to the code. Thus ChemCell is also designed to be easy to modify and extend. The ChemCell package includes auxiliary codes for setting up problems and analyzing output.

  17. Mitochondrial metabolites: undercover signalling molecules

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are one of most characterized metabolic hubs of the cell. Here, crucial biochemical reactions occur and most of the cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is produced. In addition, mitochondria act as signalling platforms and communicate with the rest of the cell by modulating calcium fluxes, by producing free radicals, and by releasing bioactive proteins. It is emerging that mitochondrial metabolites can also act as second messengers and can elicit profound (epi)genetic changes. This review describes the many signalling functions of mitochondrial metabolites under normal and stress conditions, focusing on metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We provide a new framework for understanding the role of mitochondrial metabolism in cellular pathophysiology. PMID:28382199

  18. Sentra, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Maltsev, N.; Marland, E.; Yu, G. X.; Bhatnagar, S.; Lusk, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2002-01-01

    Sentra (http://www-wit.mcs.anl.gov/sentra) is a database of signal transduction proteins with the emphasis on microbial signal transduction. The database was updated to include classes of signal transduction systems modulated by either phosphorylation or methylation reactions such as PAS proteins and serine/threonine kinases, as well as the classical two-component histidine kinases and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Currently, Sentra contains signal transduction proteins from 43 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes as well as sequences from SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL. Signal transduction proteins are annotated with information describing conserved domains, paralogous and orthologous sequences, and conserved chromosomal gene clusters. The newly developed user interface supports flexible search capabilities and extensive visualization of the data.

  19. SENTRA, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, M.; Romine, M. F.; Maltsev, N.; Mathematics and Computer Science; PNNL

    2000-01-01

    SENTRA, available via URL http://wit.mcs.anl.gov/WIT2/Sentra/, is a database of proteins associated with microbial signal transduction. The database currently includes the classical two-component signal transduction pathway proteins and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, but will be expanded to also include other classes of signal transduction systems that are modulated by phosphorylation or methylation reactions. Although the majority of database entries are from prokaryotic systems, eukaroytic proteins with bacterial-like signal transduction domains are also included. Currently SENTRA contains signal transduction proteins in 34 complete and almost completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, as well as sequences from 243 organisms available in public databases (SWISS-PROT and EMBL). The analysis was carried out within the framework of the WIT2 system, which is designed and implemented to support genetic sequence analysis and comparative analysis of sequenced genomes.

  20. Gamma Reaction History Backgrounds at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, J. A.; Stoeffl, W. S.; Watts, P. W.; Carpenter, A. C.; Liebman, J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Grafil, E.

    2011-10-01

    The Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic at NIF detects gamma-rays, emitted directly from DT fusion reactions (DT γ) , through the use of four Gas Cherenkov detectors with adjustable gamma-ray energy thresholds. It is primarily used to determine bang time, burn width and total DT yield of the implosion. Background interference to the signal is insignificant when capsules are driven directly by the lasers, but can be significant during indirect-drive using a hohlraum, forming an approximately 20 ns plateau under the narrow ~200 ps FWHM fusion signal. This background is independent of fusion yield and most likely the result of laser-plasma interaction (LPI) induced hot electron bremsstrahlung radiation. These hard x-rays stream out target chamber ports and take multiple scatter paths to reach the GRH photomultiplier tubes (PMT), where they then bypass the Cherenkov conversion process and generate signal by direct interaction with the PMT microchannel plates. An examination of this background contribution to the GRH signal and possible mitigation strategies will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL-ABS-490832.

  1. Signal processing in eukaryotic chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segota, Igor; Rachakonda, Archana; Franck, Carl

    2013-03-01

    Unlike inanimate condensed matter, living cells depend upon the detection of chemical signals for their existence. First, we experimentally determined the chemotaxis response of eukaryotic Dictyostelium cells to static folic acid gradients and show that they can respond to gradients as shallow as 0.2% across the cell body. Second, using Shannon's information theory, we showed that the information cells receive about the gradient exceeds the theoretically predicted information at the receptor-ligand binding step, resulting in the violation of the data processing inequality. Finally, we analyzed how eukaryotic cells can affect the gradient signals by secreting enzymes that degrade the signal. We analyzed this effect with a focus on a well described Dictyostelium cAMP chemotaxis system where cAMP signals are affected by an extracellular cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) and its inhibitor (PDI). Using a reaction-diffusion model of this set of interactions in the extracellular space, we show that cells can effectively sense much steeper chemical gradients than naively expected (up to a factor of 12). We also found that the rough estimates of experimental PDE and PDI secretion rates are close to the optimal values for gradient sensing as predicted by our model.

  2. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  3. Signal processor for processing ultrasonic receiver signals

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1980-01-01

    A signal processor is provided which uses an analog integrating circuit in conjunction with a set of digital counters controlled by a precision clock for sampling timing to provide an improved presentation of an ultrasonic transmitter/receiver signal. The signal is sampled relative to the transmitter trigger signal timing at precise times, the selected number of samples are integrated and the integrated samples are transferred and held for recording on a strip chart recorder or converted to digital form for storage. By integrating multiple samples taken at precisely the same time with respect to the trigger for the ultrasonic transmitter, random noise, which is contained in the ultrasonic receiver signal, is reduced relative to the desired useful signal.

  4. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer–resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism. PMID:24068354

  5. Retroactive Signaling in Short Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sepulchre, Jacques-Alexandre; Merajver, Sofía D.; Ventura, Alejandra C.

    2012-01-01

    In biochemical signaling pathways without explicit feedback connections, the core signal transduction is usually described as a one-way communication, going from upstream to downstream in a feedforward chain or network of covalent modification cycles. In this paper we explore the possibility of a new type of signaling called retroactive signaling, offered by the recently demonstrated property of retroactivity in signaling cascades. The possibility of retroactive signaling is analysed in the simplest case of the stationary states of a bicyclic cascade of signaling cycles. In this case, we work out the conditions for which variables of the upstream cycle are affected by a change of the total amount of protein in the downstream cycle, or by a variation of the phosphatase deactivating the same protein. Particularly, we predict the characteristic ranges of the downstream protein, or of the downstream phosphatase, for which a retroactive effect can be observed on the upstream cycle variables. Next, we extend the possibility of retroactive signaling in short but nonlinear signaling pathways involving a few covalent modification cycles. PMID:22848403

  6. Sensitivity control through attenuation of signal transfer efficiency by negative regulation of cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Yu; Kakuda, Hiroaki; Fujita, Kazuhiro A; Uda, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Shinya

    2012-03-13

    Sensitivity is one of the hallmarks of biological and pharmacological responses. However, the principle of controlling sensitivity remains unclear. Here we theoretically analyse a simple biochemical reaction and find that the signal transfer efficiency of the transient peak amplitude attenuates depending on the strength of negative regulation. We experimentally find that many signalling pathways in various cell lines, including the Akt and ERK pathways, can be approximated by simple biochemical reactions and that the same property of the attenuation of signal transfer efficiency was observed for such pathways. Because of this property, a downstream molecule should show higher sensitivity to an activator and lower sensitivity to an inhibitor than an upstream molecule. Indeed, we experimentally verify that S6, which lies downstream of Akt, shows lower sensitivity to an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor than Akt. Thus, cells can control downstream sensitivity through the attenuation of signal transfer efficiency by changing the expression level of negative regulators.

  7. Improving the capacity of molecular communication using enzymatic reaction cycles.

    PubMed

    Awan, Hamdan; Chou, Chun Tung

    2017-09-18

    This paper considers the capacity of a diffusion-based molecular communication link assuming the receiver uses chemical reactions. The key contribution is we show that enzymatic reaction cycles, which is a class of chemical reactions commonly found in cells consisting of a forward and a backward enzymatic reaction, can improve the capacity of the communication link. The technical difficulty in analysing enzymatic reaction cycles is that their reaction rates are nonlinear. We deal with this by assuming that the amount of certain chemicals in the enzymatic reaction cycle is large. In order to simplify the problem further, we use singular perturbation to study a particular operating regime of the enzymatic reaction cycles. This allows us to derive a closed-form expression of the channel gain. This expression suggests that we can improve the channel gain by increasing the total amount of substrate in the enzymatic reaction cycle. By using numerical calculations, we show that the effect of the enzymatic reaction cycle is to increase the channel gain and to reduce the noise, which results in a better signal-to-noise ratio and in turn a higher communication capacity. Furthermore, we show that we can increase the capacity by increasing the total amount of substrate in the enzymatic reaction cycle.

  8. Reaction/Momentum Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    CTA Space Systems, Inc. has been licensed to sell commercially a reaction/momentum wheel originally developed for NASA's scientific satellites. NASA originally identified a need for the wheel in its Small Explorer program. The Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite required extremely low jitter and a reaction/momentum wheel with a torque greater than any comparably sized commercially available wheel to keep the instrument pointed at celestial objects to a high degree of precision. After development, a market assessment by Research Triangle Institute was completed, showing commercial potential for the flywheel technology. A license was granted to CTA in the fall of 1996. The company currently uses the technology in its complete spacecraft fabrication services and has built over 10 reaction/momentum wheels for commercial, scientific, and military customers.

  9. Hipersensitivity Reactions to Corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Berbegal, L; DeLeon, F J; Silvestre, J F

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used drugs in the clinical practice, especially by topic application in dermatology. These substances may act as allergens and produce immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Allergic contact dermatitis is the most frequent presentation of corticosteroid allergy and it should be studied by patch testing in specific units. The corticosteroids included in the Spanish standard battery are good markers but not ideal. Therefore, if those makers are positive, it is useful to apply a specific battery of corticosteroids and the drugs provided by patients. Immediate reactions are relatively rare but potentially severe, and it is important to confirm the sensitization profile and to guide the use of alternative corticosteroids, because they are often necessary in several diseases. In this article we review the main concepts regarding these two types of hypersensitivity reactions in corticosteroid allergy, as well as their approach in the clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  10. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  11. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  12. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  13. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    SciTech Connect

    House, P.A.

    1984-02-07

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  14. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    SciTech Connect

    House, P.A.

    1982-06-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an interrotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal application

  15. Multidimensional signal processing for ultrasonic signal classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Ramuhalli, P.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S.

    2001-04-01

    Neural network based signal classification systems are being used increasingly in the analysis of large volumes of data obtained in NDE applications. One example is in the interpretation on ultrasonic signals obtained from inspection of welds where signals can be due to porosity, slag, lack of fusion and cracks in the weld region. Standard techniques rely on differences in individual A-scans to classify the signals. This paper proposes an ultrasonic signal classification technique based on the information in a group of signals and examining the statistical characteristics of the signals. The method was 2-dimensional signal processing algorithms to analyze the information in B- and B'-scan images. In this paper, 2-dimensional transform based coefficients of the images are used as features and a multilayer perceptron is used to classify them. These results are then combined to get the final classification for the inspected region. Results of applying the technique to data obtained from the inspection of welds are presented.

  16. Fluorescent signaling of oxone by desulfurization of thioamide.

    PubMed

    Eor, Suyoung; Hwang, Jiyoung; Choi, Myung Gil; Chang, Suk-Kyu

    2011-02-04

    The chemosignaling of the oxidant Oxone by selective desulfurization of a thioamide was investigated. Pyrene-thioamide was efficiently converted to its amide analogue by reaction with Oxone, resulting in a pronounced fluorescent turn-on type signaling. Selective signaling of Oxone in aqueous solution was possible in the presence of representative alkali and alkaline earth metal ions, as well as common anions.

  17. ERK Signals: Scaffolding Scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    ERK1/2 MAP Kinases become activated in response to multiple intra- and extra-cellular stimuli through a signaling module composed of sequential tiers of cytoplasmic kinases. Scaffold proteins regulate ERK signals by connecting the different components of the module into a multi-enzymatic complex by which signal amplitude and duration are fine-tuned, and also provide signal fidelity by isolating this complex from external interferences. In addition, scaffold proteins play a central role as spatial regulators of ERKs signals. In this respect, depending on the subcellular localization from which the activating signals emanate, defined scaffolds specify which substrates are amenable to be phosphorylated. Recent evidence has unveiled direct interactions among different scaffold protein species. These scaffold-scaffold macro-complexes could constitute an additional level of regulation for ERK signals and may serve as nodes for the integration of incoming signals and the subsequent diversification of the outgoing signals with respect to substrate engagement. PMID:27303664

  18. Exocharmic Reactions up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    The exocharmic reactions that can be observed microscopically are discussed. The students can discover the optimal concentration of an acidic lead nitrate solution, so that a crystal of potassium iodide, nudged to the edge of a drop, results in glinting golden hexagons of lead iodide.

  19. Three Reaction Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coop, Richard H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    In reaction papers, Richard H. Coop, an educational psychologist, discusses six themes evident in papers on gifted education; B. J. Cox argues that systems theory is a valuable addition to education of identified and potentially gifted students; and Gary D. Fenstermacher argues for specification of educational entitlements of any learner before…

  20. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  1. Exocharmic Reactions up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    The exocharmic reactions that can be observed microscopically are discussed. The students can discover the optimal concentration of an acidic lead nitrate solution, so that a crystal of potassium iodide, nudged to the edge of a drop, results in glinting golden hexagons of lead iodide.

  2. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  3. A Superintendent's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, James H.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a superintendent's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author states that there is a problem with Marshall and Ward's article which begins with the title, particularly with the word "training." The author contends that there is a significant…

  4. The aromatic ene reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The ene reaction is a pericyclic process in which an alkene with an allylic hydrogen atom (the ene donor) reacts with a second unsaturated species (the enophile) to form a new product with a transposed π-bond. The aromatic ene reaction, in which the alkene component is embedded in an aromatic ring, has only been reported in a few (four) instances and has proceeded in low yield (≤6%). Here, we show efficient aromatic ene reactions in which a thermally generated aryne intermediate engages a pendant m-alkylarene substituent to produce a dearomatized isotoluene, itself another versatile but rare reactive intermediate. Our experiments were guided by computational studies that revealed structural features conducive to the aromatic ene process. We proceeded to identify a cascade comprising three reactions: (1) hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (for aryne generation), (2) intramolecular aromatic ene and (3) bimolecular Alder ene. The power of this cascade is evident from the structural complexity of the final products, the considerable scope, and the overall efficiency of these multistage, reagent- and by-product-free, single-pot transformations.

  5. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  6. Online Access: User Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawley, Carolyn

    1982-01-01

    Surveys reactions of students and faculty to the online circulation system at University of Guelph Library, Ontario. Findings concerning status of users, frequency of use, effectiveness of instructions on screen, convenience of terminal locations, type of information required by user, and general comments are noted. Four references are provided.…

  7. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  8. Introducing the Wittig Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstead, D. E. F.

    1979-01-01

    An experiment is described which provides a simple example of the application of the Wittig reaction to the synthesis of unsaturated compounds. The experiment was designed with British HNC chemistry students in mind, but it is also suitable as a project-type exercise for final year GCE A-level students. (Author/BB)

  9. Enantioselective Vinylogous Organocascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Hamish B; Dell'Amico, Luca; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Cascade reactions are powerful tools for rapidly assembling complex molecular architectures from readily available starting materials in a single synthetic operation. Their marriage with asymmetric organocatalysis has led to the development of novel techniques, which are now recognized as reliable strategies for the one-pot enantioselective synthesis of stereochemically dense molecules. In recent years, even more complex synthetic challenges have been addressed by applying the principle of vinylogy to the realm of organocascade catalysis. The key to the success of vinylogous organocascade reactions is the unique ability of the chiral organocatalyst to transfer reactivity to a distal position without losing control on the stereo-determining events. This approach has greatly expanded the synthetic horizons of the field by providing the possibility of forging multiple stereocenters in remote positions from the catalyst's point of action with high selectivity, while simultaneously constructing multiple new bonds. This article critically describes the developments achieved in the field of enantioselective vinylogous organocascade reactions, charting the ideas, the conceptual advances, and the milestone reactions that have been essential for reaching highly practical levels of synthetic efficiency.

  10. Confronting Combat Stress Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-22

    of the scalp, skull , or brain. 4 Combat stress reaction is categorized as a range of behaviors resulting from the stress of battle which decreases...3) experiencing rage aimed at discriminate and indiscriminate targets, (4) psychic numbing or emotional shutdown, (5) alienation from themselves and

  11. Lithium Cell Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    Page 1. INVESTIGATION OF CHEMICAL, ELECTROCHEMICAL AND PARASITIC REACTIONS IN LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLS ....... ................. 1 1.1 INTRODUCTION...OF LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLS. ................ 56 1.4.1 Carbon Limited Overdischarge...............56 1.4.1.1 Background... LITHIUM THIONYL - CHLORIDE CELLS. .. ............ ...... 101 1.5.1 Background. ....... ............ .... 101 1.5.2 Microphotography

  12. Bad Reaction to Cosmetics?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Bad Reaction to Cosmetics? Tell FDA Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... M.D., director of the agency’s Office of Cosmetics and Colors. “So, consumers are one of FDA’s ...

  13. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  14. QUICK REACTION STUDIES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The functional requirements of mission planning of space missions are documented. A discussion of the current applicable computer programs to some part of the mission planning process is included. In particular the Mission Analysis and Trajectory Simulation (MATS) system is described. The applicability of current programs to the demands of mission planning in a Quick Reaction

  15. The aromatic ene reaction

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The ene reaction is a pericyclic process in which an alkene having an allylic hydrogen atom (the ene donor) reacts with a second unsaturated species (the enophile) to form a new product with a transposed π-bond. The aromatic ene reaction, in which the alkene component is embedded in an aromatic ring, has only been reported in a few (four) instances and has proceeded in low yield (≤6%). Here we show efficient aromatic ene reactions in which a thermally generated aryne engages a pendant m-alkylarene substituent to produce a dearomatized isotoluene, itself another versatile but rare reactive intermediate. Our experiments were guided by computational studies that revealed structural features conducive to the aromatic ene process. We proceeded to identify a cascade comprising three reactions: (i) hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (for aryne generation), (ii) intramolecular aromatic ene, and (iii) bimolecular Alder ene. The power of this cascade is evident from the structural complexity of the final products, the considerable scope, and the overall efficiency of these multi-stage, reagent- and byproduct-free, single-pot transformations. PMID:24345944

  16. Azlactone Reaction Developments.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Pedro P; Carpanez, Arthur G; Amarante, Giovanni W

    2016-07-18

    Azlactones (also known as oxazolones) are heterocycles usually employed in the stereoselective synthesis of α,α-amino acids, heterocycles and natural products. The versatility of the azlactone scaffold arises from the numerous reactive sites, allowing its application in a diversity of transformations. This review aims to cover classical and recent applications of oxazolones, especially those involving stereoselective processes. After a short introduction on their structures and intrinsic reactivities, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) processes as well as reactions involving stereoselective formation of a new σ C-C bond, such as alkylation/allylation/arylation, aldol, ene, Michael and Mannich reactions will be exposed. Additionally, cycloadditions, Steglich rearrangement and sulfenylation reactions will also be discussed. Recent developments of the well-known Erlenmeyer azlactones will be described. For the most examples, the proposed mechanism, activation modes and/or key reaction intermediates will be exposed to rationalize both the final product and the observed stereochemistry. Finally, this review gives an overview of the synthetic utility of oxazolones. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  18. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  19. Formal modeling of a system of chemical reactions under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Krishnendu; Schlipf, John

    2014-10-01

    We describe a novel formalism representing a system of chemical reactions, with imprecise rates of reactions and concentrations of chemicals, and describe a model reduction method, pruning, based on the chemical properties. We present two algorithms, midpoint approximation and interval approximation, for construction of efficient model abstractions with uncertainty in data. We evaluate computational feasibility by posing queries in computation tree logic (CTL) on a prototype of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway.

  20. Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Skorpik, James R.; Dodson, Michael G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846.

  1. Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Skorpik, J.R.; Dodson, M.G.

    1999-05-25

    The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846. 8 figs.

  2. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  3. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  4. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  5. Adaptation of fast marching methods to intracellular signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikando, Aristide C.; Kinser, Jason M.

    2006-02-01

    Imaging of signaling phenomena within the intracellular domain is a well studied field. Signaling is the process by which all living cells communicate with their environment and with each other. In the case of signaling calcium waves, numerous computational models based on solving homogeneous reaction diffusion equations have been developed. Typically, the reaction diffusion approach consists of solving systems of partial differential equations at each update step. The traditional methods used to solve these reaction diffusion equations are very computationally expensive since they must employ small time steps in order to reduce the computational error. The presented research suggests the application of fast marching methods to imaging signaling calcium waves, more specifically fertilization calcium waves, in Xenopus laevis eggs. The fast marching approach provides fast and efficient means of tracking the evolution of monotonically advancing fronts. A model that employs biophysical properties of intracellular calcium signaling, and adapts fast marching methods to tracking the propagation of signaling calcium waves is presented. The developed model is used to reproduce simulation results obtained with reaction diffusion based model. Results obtained with our model agree with both the results obtained with reaction diffusion based models, and confocal microscopy observations during in vivo experiments. The adaptation of fast marching methods to intracellular protein or macromolecule trafficking is also briefly explored.

  6. Signaling in myxobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Dale

    2004-01-01

    Myxobacteria use soluble and cell-contact signals during their starvation-induced formation of fruiting bodies. These signals coordinate developmental gene expression with the cell movements that build fruiting bodies. Early in development, the quorum-sensing A-signal in Myxococcus xanthus helps to assess starvation and induce the first stage of aggregation. Later, the morphogenetic C-signal helps to pattern cell movement and shape the fruiting body. C-signal is a 17-kDa cell surface protein that signals by contact between the ends of two cells. The number of C-signal molecules per cell rises 100-fold from the beginning of fruiting body development to the end, when spores are formed. Traveling waves, streams, and sporulation have increasing thresholds for C-signal activity, and this progression ensures that spores form inside fruiting bodies.

  7. Signal sciences workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-05-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing.

  8. Staggered Costas signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Avraham; Levanon, Nadav

    1986-11-01

    A radar signal, based on coherent processing of a train of staggered Costas (1984) bursts is based on a minimum number of collocation of their individual ambiguity function sidelobe peaks. The resulting ambiguity function combines qualities of both 'thumbtack' and 'bed of nails' signals. Comparison with linear-FM, V-FM, and complementary phase coded signals is given, as well as comparison with hybrid signals consisting of both phase and frequency coding.

  9. Concordant Chemical Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shinar, Guy; Feinberg, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We describe a large class of chemical reaction networks, those endowed with a subtle structural property called concordance. We show that the class of concordant networks coincides precisely with the class of networks which, when taken with any weakly monotonic kinetics, invariably give rise to kinetic systems that are injective — a quality that, among other things, precludes the possibility of switch-like transitions between distinct positive steady states. We also provide persistence characteristics of concordant networks, instability implications of discordance, and consequences of stronger variants of concordance. Some of our results are in the spirit of recent ones by Banaji and Craciun, but here we do not require that every species suffer a degradation reaction. This is especially important in studying biochemical networks, for which it is rare to have all species degrade. PMID:22659063

  10. Hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Kathrin; Bircher, Andreas J

    2005-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics cause immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions, and may also affect internal organs and circulating blood cells. The underlying pathomechanisms are only partly understood. The extent of cross-reactivity among different quinolones depends on the type of clinical manifestation and its underlying mechanism. Despite recent advances, reliable diagnostic tests are still lacking. Recent studies have shown quinolone-specific IgE in vitro in more than 50% of patients with immediate-type reactions and a considerable cross-reactivity with related compounds. In maculopapular drug exanthems from ciprofloxacin, specific T-cell clones were identified, and cross-reactivity to related compounds was detected in approximately 50% of the clones. From re-exposure studies in patients with exanthems, cross-reactivity appears to be lower. Cellular tests such as lymphocyte transformation tests are currently not very useful. For prick and intradermal skin tests, widely divergent nonirritant test concentrations have been recommended. Desensitization may be possible in selected patients.

  11. Magnetically suspended reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, A. V.; Stocking, G. L.; Dendy, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic suspensions offer several advantages over conventional bearings, arising because of the contactless nature of the load support. In application to spacecraft reaction wheels, the advantages are low drag torque, wearfree, unlubricated, vacuum-compatible operation, and unlimited life. By the provision of redundancy in the control electronics, single-point failures are eliminated. The rational for selection of a passive radial, active axial, dc magnetic suspension is presented, and the relative merits of 3-loop and single-loop magnetic suspensions are discussed. The design of a .678 N-m-sec (.5 ft-lb-sec) reaction wheel using the single loop magnetic suspension was developed; the design compares favorably with current ball bearing wheels in terms of weight and power.

  12. Aluminum cluster reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leuchtner, R.E.; Harms, A.C.; Castleman, A.W. Jr. )

    1991-01-15

    Aluminum clusters, both anion and cation, are produced using laser vaporization and reacted under thermal conditions with oxygen in a flow tube reactor. An etching reaction is observed and bimolecular rate constants are reported for Al{sup +}{sub {ital n}}, {ital n}=1--33, and Al{sup {minus}}{sub {ital n}}, {ital n}=5--37. For certain clusters, namely Al{sup +}{sub 7}, Al{sup {minus}}{sub 13}, and Al{sup {minus}}{sub 23}, no apparent reactivity is observed (they are found to be produced from larger species). Interestingly, these correspond to predicted jellium shell closings with 20, 40, and 70 electrons, respectively. Besides these exceptions, and a small odd/even alternation in reaction rates, the overall reactivity is relatively insensitive to cluster size, and is found to range between about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} and 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 3}/s.

  13. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    PubMed Central

    David, T J

    1987-01-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either by the parents or the nursing staff after the administration of placebo or active substances. Twenty two patients returned to a normal diet without problems, but the parents of two children insisted on continuing the diet. While popular belief has it that additives may have harmful behavioural effects, objective verification is required to prevent overdiagnosis. PMID:3548601

  14. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  15. Electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1989-07-01

    During the tenure of this contract research was performed on a number of aspects of electron transfer reactions (solvent dynamics including vibrational effects, non-Debye solvent dynamics, early steps in bacterial photosynthesis) and of the use of artificial intelligence searching methods, the latter, in part, as a prelude to our current study of electron transfer reactions in structurally complicated systems such as proteins. Seven Technical Reports were issued during this period, and research on several topics was initiated: the study of the relation between charge transfer absorption and fluorescence spectra and the inverted region, a nonadiabatic/adiabatic coherent mechanism for electron transfers, and electron transfers between two immiscible-liquid phases and between a semiconductor and an electrolyte.

  16. Mathematical model of TGF-βsignalling: feedback coupling is consistent with signal switching.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Shabnam; Zhu, Hong-Jian; Wagner, John; Tan, Chin Wee; Manton, Jonathan H; Burgess, Antony W

    2017-04-13

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signalling regulates the development of embryos and tissue homeostasis in adults. In conjunction with other oncogenic changes, long-term perturbation of TGF-β signalling is associated with cancer metastasis. Although TGF-β signalling can be complex, many of the signalling components are well defined, so it is possible to develop mathematical models of TGF-β signalling using reduction and scaling methods. The parameterization of our TGF-β signalling model is consistent with experimental data. We developed our mathematical model for the TGF-β signalling pathway, i.e. the RF- model of TGF-β signalling, using the "rapid equilibrium assumption" to reduce the network of TGF-β signalling reactions based on the time scales of the individual reactions. By adding time-delayed positive feedback to the inherent time-delayed negative feedback for TGF-β signalling. We were able to simulate the sigmoidal, switch-like behaviour observed for the concentration dependence of long-term (> 3 hours) TGF-β stimulation. Computer simulations revealed the vital role of the coupling of the positive and negative feedback loops on the regulation of the TGF-β signalling system. The incorporation of time-delays for the negative feedback loop improved the accuracy, stability and robustness of the model. This model reproduces both the short-term and long-term switching responses for the intracellular signalling pathways at different TGF-β concentrations. We have tested the model against experimental data from MEF (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) WT, SV40-immortalized MEFs and Gp130 (F/F) MEFs. The predictions from the RF- model are consistent with the experimental data. Signalling feedback loops are required to model TGF-β signal transduction and its effects on normal and cancer cells. We focus on the effects of time-delayed feedback loops and their coupling to ligand stimulation in this system. The model was simplified and reduced to its key

  17. Tetrapyrrole Signaling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles make critical contributions to a number of important processes in diverse organisms. In plants, tetrapyrroles are essential for light signaling, the detoxification of reactive oxygen species, the assimilation of nitrate and sulfate, respiration, photosynthesis, and programed cell death. The misregulation of tetrapyrrole metabolism can produce toxic reactive oxygen species. Thus, it is not surprising that tetrapyrrole metabolism is strictly regulated and that tetrapyrrole metabolism affects signaling mechanisms that regulate gene expression. In plants and algae, tetrapyrroles are synthesized in plastids and were some of the first plastid signals demonstrated to regulate nuclear gene expression. In plants, the mechanism of tetrapyrrole-dependent plastid-to-nucleus signaling remains poorly understood. Additionally, some of experiments that tested ideas for possible signaling mechanisms appeared to produce conflicting data. In some instances, these conflicts are potentially explained by different experimental conditions. Although the biological function of tetrapyrrole signaling is poorly understood, there is compelling evidence that this signaling is significant. Specifically, this signaling appears to affect the accumulation of starch and may promote abiotic stress tolerance. Tetrapyrrole-dependent plastid-to-nucleus signaling interacts with a distinct plastid-to-nucleus signaling mechanism that depends on GENOMES UNCUOPLED1 (GUN1). GUN1 contributes to a variety of processes, such as chloroplast biogenesis, the circadian rhythm, abiotic stress tolerance, and development. Thus, the contribution of tetrapyrrole signaling to plant function is potentially broader than we currently appreciate. In this review, I discuss these aspects of tetrapyrrole signaling. PMID:27807442

  18. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, Darrell; Azevado, Stephen

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  19. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  20. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  1. Chemical Reactions in Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-04

    NH 3)n, n _> 4, clusters has been attributed to the (solvated) naphtholate anion.3a A single picosecond decay measurement has been reported which...vibrational energy in the cluster Sl state. The data are summarized in Table I. A model to explain these decay results can be constructed based on a proton...11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) Chemical Reactions in Clusters 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Elliot R. Bernstein 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED

  2. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-01

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  3. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-20

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  4. [Skin reactions to bradykinin].

    PubMed

    Rihoux, J P; Ramboer, I; Fadel, R

    1995-10-01

    A large series of experiments carried out in animals and humans suggest that histamine release is not involved in the leakage phenomenon induced by bradykinin (BK) challenge. These experiments comprise in vitro studies on skin and bronchial human mast cells and in vivo studies on guinea pig airways and human skin using mepyramine, chlorpheniramine and terfenadine as reference H1-anti-histamines. Nevertheless, it has been shown recently that the H1 antagonist cetirizine 10 mg p.o. markedly inhibits skin reactions induced by BK challenge (intradermal injection of 212 micrograms BK in 10 microL saline and prick test with a solution of 21.2 micrograms/microL). In a guinea pig model, this drug also inhibited the bronchospasm induced by increasing concentrations of BK given by iv route (0.25 to 2 micrograms/Kg) and aerosol (3 to 300 micrograms/Kg). This inhibition was similar to the one obtained with the specific BK antagonist HOE 140 (15 pM/Kg). New data in the literature suggest the existence of various pharmacological mediators possibly involved in the BK-induced reaction: neuromediators, nitric oxyde and PAF. They also suggest that this reaction presents itself as a well defined sequence of pharmacological events. Since we could show that there is no binding of cetirizine to a human recombinant B2 receptor in vitro, some hypotheses are raised in order to explain this unexpected inhibiting effect of cetirizine.

  5. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  6. Pulsed ion beam investigation of the kinetics of surface reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, C. C.; Eck, T. G.; Hoffman, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    Pulsed ion beam measurements of the kinetics of surface reactions are discussed for the case where the width of the ion pulse is comparable to the measured reaction time, but short compared to the time between successive pulses. Theoretical expressions are derived for the time dependence of the ion-induced signals for linear surface reactions. Results are presented for CO emission from surface carbon and CF emission from Teflon induced by oxygen ion bombardment. The strengths and limitations of this technique are described.

  7. Polyneutron Chain Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Fisher

    2000-11-12

    Although helium atoms do not form molecules, a sufficiently large number will bind into a stable liquid droplet. A comparable situation is expected for neutrons, with a sufficiently large number binding into a stable droplet of neutron matter. Such polyneutron droplets can be viewed as isotopes of an element with nuclear charge Z=0, tentatively denoted neutrium, symbol Nt. Because of the relatively weak binding of neutrons compared with that of a mix of neutrons and protons, the minimum number of neutrons required for stability of a droplet is fairly large. Early estimates of {approx}60 may be reduced to a dozen or so by the BCS pairing interaction. The Nt entries with N{>=}12 are new to the table of isotopes. Because all of them are beta-unstable, none is expected to persist as a free particle. Yet, some may occasionally be produced by means to be described below, and it is of interest to examine their decay chains and their interactions with charged nuclei to ascertain how their presence might be revealed. Although these reactions are interesting, they cannot be taken seriously without identifying a source for the initial Nt isotope that begins the chain. Here, we consider possible interactions between {sup 16}O and {sup A}Nt. Although there is no strong interaction between them, we can expect a very weak residual attraction that can form a loosely bound {sup 16}O {sup A}Nt nuclear molecule. This is not a compound nucleus in the usual sense because, considered as fluids, the {sup 16}O and {sup A}Nt droplets are immiscible. For a droplet with fewer than about 60 neutrons, beta decay of {sup A}Nt is prevented by the buildup of Coulomb energy associated with transforming {sup A}Nt into {sup A}H in close proximity to {sup 16}O. Thus, it is possible that {sup 16}O {sup A}Nt molecules can persist indefinitely and that a few of them may be present in ordinary water as supermassive oxygen nuclei. Because the binding of these molecules is weak, the {sup A}Nt component can

  8. Chemical computing with reaction-diffusion processes.

    PubMed

    Gorecki, J; Gizynski, K; Guzowski, J; Gorecka, J N; Garstecki, P; Gruenert, G; Dittrich, P

    2015-07-28

    Chemical reactions are responsible for information processing in living organisms. It is believed that the basic features of biological computing activity are reflected by a reaction-diffusion medium. We illustrate the ideas of chemical information processing considering the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction and its photosensitive variant. The computational universality of information processing is demonstrated. For different methods of information coding constructions of the simplest signal processing devices are described. The function performed by a particular device is determined by the geometrical structure of oscillatory (or of excitable) and non-excitable regions of the medium. In a living organism, the brain is created as a self-grown structure of interacting nonlinear elements and reaches its functionality as the result of learning. We discuss whether such a strategy can be adopted for generation of chemical information processing devices. Recent studies have shown that lipid-covered droplets containing solution of reagents of BZ reaction can be transported by a flowing oil. Therefore, structures of droplets can be spontaneously formed at specific non-equilibrium conditions, for example forced by flows in a microfluidic reactor. We describe how to introduce information to a droplet structure, track the information flow inside it and optimize medium evolution to achieve the maximum reliability. Applications of droplet structures for classification tasks are discussed. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Nucleic Acid Templated Reactions for Chemical Biology.

    PubMed

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Seitz, Oliver

    2017-06-21

    Nucleic acid directed bioorthogonal reactions offer the fascinating opportunity to unveil and redirect a plethora of intracellular mechanisms. Nano- to picomolar amounts of specific RNA molecules serve as templates and catalyze the selective formation of molecules that 1) exert biological effects, or 2) provide measurable signals for RNA detection. Turnover of reactants on the template is a valuable asset when concentrations of RNA templates are low. The idea is to use RNA-templated reactions to fully control the biodistribution of drugs and to push the detection limits of DNA or RNA analytes to extraordinary sensitivities. Herein we review recent and instructive examples of conditional synthesis or release of compounds for in cellulo protein interference and intracellular nucleic acid imaging. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  10. Satellite signaling at synapses

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor-Giles, Kate M.; Ganetzky, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Neural function requires effective communication between neurons and their targets at synapses. Thus, proper formation, growth and plasticity of synapses are critical to behavior. A retrograde (muscle to neuron) BMP signal is required to promote synaptic growth, homeostasis and stability at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions (NMJs).1-4 We recently demonstrated that this signal constitutes an instructive signal that sculpts synaptic growth in a graded manner and uncovered a presynaptic endocytic mechanism that modulates BMP signaling levels. In the absence of this regulation, excessive BMP signaling results in overgrown NMJs with a proliferation of ectopic boutons.5 PMID:20798607

  11. Site-selective covalent reactions on proteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    So, Wing Ho; Zhang, Yu; Kang, Wei; Wong, Clarence T T; Sun, Hongyan; Xia, Jiang

    2017-07-05

    To achieve precise control of the signaling events or to achieve unmistakable synthesis of biomolecules, nature has evolved organic reactions involving proteinogenic amino acids with unparalleled site selectivity. For example, dedicated enzymes accurately dictate the site of post-translational modifications in signaling proteins, and ribosomes precisely link the C-terminal carboxylic acid of one unprotected amino acid with the N-terminal amino group of the other amino acid through spatially confined proximity. For many years, chemists have been striving to achieve site selectivity on biomolecules by mimicking nature. Driven by the development of chemoselective protein conjugation reactions, enzymology and protein-protein interactions, the past decade has witnessed a boom in site-selective protein conjugation reactions. (In this review, a site-selective protein conjugation reaction is defined as an organic reaction that targets a single amino acid instead of a kind of amino acids in a protein or a proteome under physiological conditions, for example, a single cysteine residue among all of the cysteines.) In this review, we summarize the recent advancements of bioconjugation reactions that demonstrate this feature of precise site selectivity, focusing on the reactions of the proteinogenic amino acids (excluding those at non-coded or non-proteinogenic amino acids that are introduced to proteins through genetic manipulations). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A biocompatible, highly efficient click reaction and its applications.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Liang, Gaolin

    2014-02-14

    Herein, we review the development, optimization, applications and potential prospects of a novel click reaction based on the condensation reaction between 2-cyanobenzothiazole (CBT) and D-cysteine (D-Cys) in fireflies. This click condensation reaction has obvious advantages in biocompatibility, efficiency and stability in aqueous environments. Optimization of this click reaction has been carried out so that it can be controlled by pH change, reduction, or enzymatic cleavage to synthesize large molecules and self-assembled nanostructures, or enhance probe signals. Consequently, this CBT-based click reaction has been and could be successfully applied to a wide range of biomedical applications such as molecular imaging (e.g., optical imaging, nuclear imaging and magnetic resonance imaging), biomolecular detection, drug delivery and other potentialities.

  13. Cytokines: sources, receptors and signalling.

    PubMed

    Barrett, K E

    1996-03-01

    Cytokines are a family of protein mediators that are important in transducing information between various cell types. These messengers are synthesized by a broad spectrum of cells. Cellular sources of cytokines include those cell types considered to play pivotal roles in the immune system as well as in inflammatory responses, including lymphocytes, monocytes and mast cells. Emerging data indicate that non-immune cells, including epithelial cells and fibroblasts, may also be important sources of certain cytokines. Cytokines fulfill a number of roles during immune and inflammatory reactions, and may display overlapping or redundant functions. In part, this redundancy may arise from the fact that cytokine receptors are not all unique entities, but may be divided into families. Many cytokine receptors have a subunit structure, with common subunits shared between receptors, and serving as affinity modifiers/signal transducers. Cytokines exert their effects on target cells by activating intracellular signalling mechanisms. In addition to 'classical' signal transduction path-ways, new data indicate that cytokines may also exemplify molecules that utilize novel signalling mechanisms, including the Jak-STAT pathways of transcriptional regulation and pathways involving the novel lipid second messenger, ceramide. In conclusion, molecular techniques have enabled the identification of many new cytokines, and the elucidation of their binding sites and mechanisms of action. This information has provided new insights into this complex area. Moreover, an understanding of the molecular basis of cytokine action and the pathways that lead to their acute and chronic effects may, in turn, facilitate interventions to prevent or modify their actions in disease states.

  14. Chemical and radiation-chemical radical reactions in lignocellulose materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzina, Svetlana I.; Shilova, Irina A.; Mikhailov, Al'fa I.

    2011-09-01

    Chemical and radiation-chemical radical reactions in lignocellulose materials were explored by 3-cm and 2-mm ESR spectroscopy. Background (intrinsic) singlet signals at g=2.003 from wood pulp and lignin and those arising during reaction of lignocellulose materials with acids and chlorine were attributed to radicals with conjugated CC bonds. The 2-mm ESR signal with 3D anisotropy of g-factor from o-semiquinone radical ions formed in reaction of lignin with NaOH was recorded for the first time. The singlet signals derived from cellulose γ-irradiated at 77 K and marked out during post-thermal reactions were assigned to radicals with conjugated bonds. In wetted cellulose, a triplet signal with αβH≅2.7 mT and imposed quadruplet structure (0.5-0.7 mT) from three γ-protons was detected at 300 K and attributed to С 4-radicals. The triplet signals derived from С 2- and С 3-radicals in pyranose cycles of cellulose exhibited higher values of αβH (3.0-3.2 mT) and lower thermal stability (up to 250 K). In radiolyzed cotton pulp, detected were ESR signals derived from formyl radicals formed upon rupture of the С 5С 6 bond in pyranose cycles. Heating up irradiated samples under О 2 was accompanied by formation of peroxide radicals. Photoinduced recombination of trapped electrons with С 1-radicals was found to proceed as a chain reaction with a kinetic length of about 25 units. Photolysis ( λ≥360 nm) of radiolyzed cellulose enhanced the disclosure of pyranose cycles and, as a result, the evolution of CO 2 by a factor of 2-2.5.

  15. Acoustic Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William M.; Candy, James V.

    Signal processing refers to the acquisition, storage, display, and generation of signals - also to the extraction of information from signals and the re-encoding of information. As such, signal processing in some form is an essential element in the practice of all aspects of acoustics. Signal processing algorithms enable acousticians to separate signals from noise, to perform automatic speech recognition, or to compress information for more efficient storage or transmission. Signal processing concepts are the building blocks used to construct models of speech and hearing. Now, in the 21st century, all signal processing is effectively digital signal processing. Widespread access to high-speed processing, massive memory, and inexpensive software make signal processing procedures of enormous sophistication and power available to anyone who wants to use them. Because advanced signal processing is now accessible to everybody, there is a need for primers that introduce basic mathematical concepts that underlie the digital algorithms. The present handbook chapter is intended to serve such a purpose.

  16. Neuronal signaling through endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cosker, Katharina E; Segal, Rosalind A

    2014-02-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease.

  17. Neuronal Signaling through Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cosker, Katharina E.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease. PMID:24492712

  18. Well sealing via thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, William Edward; Dunn, Sandra Dalvit

    2016-11-15

    A platform is formed in a well below a target plug zone by lowering a thermite reaction charge into the well and igniting it, whereby the products of the reaction are allowed to cool and expand to form a platform or support in the well. A main thermite reaction charge is placed above the platform and ignited to form a main sealing plug for the well. In some embodiments an upper plug is formed by igniting an upper thermite reaction charge above the main thermite reaction charge. The upper plug confines the products of ignition of the main thermite reaction charge.

  19. Synthesising periodic triggering signals with genetic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Liang; Chen, Po-Kuei

    2014-02-01

    The potential of the clock lies in its role of triggering logic reaction for sequential biological circuits. This research introduces an idea of designing a genetic clock generator by Fourier series based on the genetic oscillators. The authors generalise the design idea using a combination of fundamental sinusoidal signals. Since biochemical reaction of the biological system is extremely slow, however, transition between minimal and maximal levels is instantaneous for an ideal clock signal; it is thus not directly realisable in biological systems. That means it would be hard to directly synthesize a square wave generator for use as a genetic clock. They apply Fourier series to represent a square wave as a finite summation of sinusoidal waves generated by some genetic oscillators with different harmonic oscillating frequencies, in which the amplitude alternates at a constant frequency between the fixed minimal and maximal levels with the same duration of time.

  20. [Pheromones: an underestimated communication signal in humans].

    PubMed

    Frey, J

    2003-01-01

    The pheromones are molecules, mainly aliphatic acids, with or without perceptible odor, recognized by specific receptors, the stimulation of which induces neuroendocrine reactions and affects the individual behavior. Olfactory receptors are underexpressed in human, 70 % of genes have become nonfunctional pseudogenes. But the remaining function was tested and is able to induce emotional reactions corresponding to a non-verbal signal of social interactions. In the present study, we review the actual knowledge on the olfactory receptors. They belong to the G-protein-coupled-receptors. Their signal is transduced to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Some HLA-based olfactory cues are shown with reference to recent experiments. The pathophysiological hypotheses are considered with respect to studies in anorexia nervosa and Alzheimer' disease.

  1. Reaction Extrema: Extent of Reaction in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandezande, Jonathon E.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago de Donder introduced the term "extent of reaction", ?. We build on that work by defining the concept of reagent extrema for an arbitrary chemical reaction, aA + bB [reversible reaction] yY + zZ. The central equation is ?^[subscript i] = -n[subscript i,0]/?[subscript i]. The symbol ?^[subscript i] represents the…

  2. Reaction Extrema: Extent of Reaction in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandezande, Jonathon E.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago de Donder introduced the term "extent of reaction", ?. We build on that work by defining the concept of reagent extrema for an arbitrary chemical reaction, aA + bB [reversible reaction] yY + zZ. The central equation is ?^[subscript i] = -n[subscript i,0]/?[subscript i]. The symbol ?^[subscript i] represents the…

  3. Procedures for Decomposing a Redox Reaction into Half-Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishtik, Ilie; Berka, Ladislav H.

    2005-01-01

    A simple algorithm for a complete enumeration of the possible ways a redox reaction (RR) might be uniquely decomposed into half-reactions (HRs) using the response reactions (RERs) formalism is presented. A complete enumeration of the possible ways a RR may be decomposed into HRs is equivalent to a complete enumeration of stoichiometrically…

  4. Insect bite reactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Mann, Baldeep Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK) disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr) as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some serious adverse effects

  5. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-08

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters.

  6. Reactions of Negative Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-17

    AUTHOR(S)* Viggiano , Albert A., Paulson, John F. C 6 UPE E T R O A IOE 18ate SUBo EC TERMS enti t e "Swrme f Ionsar and Efyb l to n in Gases, FIELD...Reactions of Negative Ions Albert A. Viggiano * and John F. Paulson Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts 017310 *Air Force Geophysics...an important process in controlling the electron density in a variety of natural plasmas , such as the earth’s ionosphere and interstellar space, and

  7. Hydrogen forming reaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Marianowski, L.G.; Fleming, D.K.

    1989-03-07

    A hydrogen forming process is described, comprising: conducting in a hydrogen production zone a chemical reaction forming mixed gases comprising molecular hydrogen; contacting one side of a hydrogen ion porous and molecular gas nonporous metallic foil with the mixed gases in the hydrogen production zone; dissociating the molecular hydrogen to ionic hydrogen on the one side of the metallic foil; passing the ionic hydrogen through the metallic foil to its other side; and withdrawing hydrogen from the other side of the metallic foil, thereby removing hydrogen from the hydrogen production zone.

  8. Gravitational Radiation Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.

    We give a short personally-biased review on the recent progress in our understanding of gravitational radiation reaction acting on a point particle orbiting a black hole. The main motivation of this study is to obtain sufficiently precise gravitational waveforms from inspiraling binary compact stars with a large mass ratio. For this purpose, various new concepts and techniques have been developed to compute the orbital evolution taking into account the gravitational self-force. Combining these ideas with a few supplementary new ideas, we try to outline a path to our goal here.

  9. The polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Welch, Hazel M

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has had a significant impact on all aspects of the molecular biosciences, from cancer research to forensic science. The sensitivity and specificity inherent in the technique allow minute quantities of genetic material to be detected while the unique properties of thermostable DNA polymerase ensure that abundant copies are reliably reproduced to levels that can be visualized and/or used for further applications. This chapter describes applications of PCR and PCR-RT to investigate primary cancer and metastatic disease at both the DNA and mRNA expression levels.

  10. Timescale analysis of rule-based biochemical reaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.; Finley, Stacey D.

    2012-01-01

    The flow of information within a cell is governed by a series of protein-protein interactions that can be described as a reaction network. Mathematical models of biochemical reaction networks can be constructed by repetitively applying specific rules that define how reactants interact and what new species are formed upon reaction. To aid in understanding the underlying biochemistry, timescale analysis is one method developed to prune the size of the reaction network. In this work, we extend the methods associated with timescale analysis to reaction rules instead of the species contained within the network. To illustrate this approach, we applied timescale analysis to a simple receptor-ligand binding model and a rule-based model of Interleukin-12 (IL-12) signaling in näive CD4+ T cells. The IL-12 signaling pathway includes multiple protein-protein interactions that collectively transmit information; however, the level of mechanistic detail sufficient to capture the observed dynamics has not been justified based upon the available data. The analysis correctly predicted that reactions associated with JAK2 and TYK2 binding to their corresponding receptor exist at a pseudo-equilibrium. In contrast, reactions associated with ligand binding and receptor turnover regulate cellular response to IL-12. An empirical Bayesian approach was used to estimate the uncertainty in the timescales. This approach complements existing rank- and flux-based methods that can be used to interrogate complex reaction networks. Ultimately, timescale analysis of rule-based models is a computational tool that can be used to reveal the biochemical steps that regulate signaling dynamics. PMID:21954150

  11. A biocatalytic cascade with several output signals--towards biosensors with different levels of confidence.

    PubMed

    Guz, Nataliia; Halámek, Jan; Rusling, James F; Katz, Evgeny

    2014-05-01

    The biocatalytic cascade based on enzyme-catalyzed reactions activated by several biomolecular input signals and producing output signal after each reaction step was developed as an example of a logically reversible information processing system. The model system was designed to mimic the operation of concatenated AND logic gates with optically readable output signals generated at each step of the logic operation. Implications include concurrent bioanalyses and data interpretation for medical diagnostics.

  12. Telephone multiline signaling using common signal pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodloe, R. R.; Toole, P. C.; Belt, J. L.; Leininger, D. B. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An operator can rapidly and automatically produce coded electrical signals by manipulating mechanical thumb wheel switches so as to instruct a service center to connect any number of telephone lines to the console thus enabling the operator to listen and/or talk over several lines simultaneously. The system includes an on-site console having several mechanically operated thumb wheel switches to which the desired lines to be connected can be dialed in. Electrical coded signals are fed to a number of banks of line AND gates representing units, tens and hundreds, a group of channel gates, and a command gate. These signals are gated out in a controlled manner to an encoder which generates tones that are transmitted over a single line to a communication service center.

  13. Demonstration of the Fenton Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Roher, Alex E.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the Fenton reaction, which is carried out using the Fenton reagent that is used for groundwater and soil remediation. The Fenton reaction can be implicated in DNA damage, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and ageing in general.

  14. Hydrazine decomposition and other reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Warren E. (Inventor); La France, Donald S. (Inventor); Voge, Hervey H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to the catalytic decomposition of hydrazine, catalysts useful for this decomposition and other reactions, and to reactions in hydrogen atmospheres generally using carbon-containing catalysts.

  15. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  16. Demonstration of the Fenton Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Roher, Alex E.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the Fenton reaction, which is carried out using the Fenton reagent that is used for groundwater and soil remediation. The Fenton reaction can be implicated in DNA damage, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and ageing in general.

  17. Stochastic resonance in thermally activated reactions: Application to biological ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Vodyanoy, Igor

    1998-09-01

    At the molecular level many thermally activated reactions can be viewed as Poisson trains of events whose instantaneous rates are defined by the reaction activation barrier height and an effective collision frequency. When the barrier height depends on an external parameter, variation in this parameter induces variation in the event rate. Extending our previous work, we offer a detailed theoretical analysis of signal transduction properties of these reactions considering the external parameter as an input signal and the train of resulting events as an output signal. The addition of noise to the system input facilitates signal transduction in two ways. First, for a linear relationship between the barrier height and the external parameter the output signal power grows exponentially with the mean square fluctuation of the noise. Second, for noise of a sufficiently high bandwidth, its addition increases output signal quality measured as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The output SNR reaches a maximum at optimal noise intensity defined by the reaction sensitivity to the external parameter, reaction initial rate, and the noise bandwidth. We apply this theory to ion channels of excitable biological membranes. Based on classical results of Hodgkin and Huxley we show that open/closed transitions of voltage-gated ion channels can be treated as thermally activated reactions whose activation barriers change linearly with applied transmembrane voltage. As an experimental example we discuss our recent results obtained with polypeptide alamethicin incorporated into planar lipid bilayers.

  18. Stochastic resonance in thermally activated reactions: Application to biological ion channels.

    PubMed

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Vodyanoy, Igor

    1998-09-01

    At the molecular level many thermally activated reactions can be viewed as Poisson trains of events whose instantaneous rates are defined by the reaction activation barrier height and an effective collision frequency. When the barrier height depends on an external parameter, variation in this parameter induces variation in the event rate. Extending our previous work, we offer a detailed theoretical analysis of signal transduction properties of these reactions considering the external parameter as an input signal and the train of resulting events as an output signal. The addition of noise to the system input facilitates signal transduction in two ways. First, for a linear relationship between the barrier height and the external parameter the output signal power grows exponentially with the mean square fluctuation of the noise. Second, for noise of a sufficiently high bandwidth, its addition increases output signal quality measured as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The output SNR reaches a maximum at optimal noise intensity defined by the reaction sensitivity to the external parameter, reaction initial rate, and the noise bandwidth. We apply this theory to ion channels of excitable biological membranes. Based on classical results of Hodgkin and Huxley we show that open/closed transitions of voltage-gated ion channels can be treated as thermally activated reactions whose activation barriers change linearly with applied transmembrane voltage. As an experimental example we discuss our recent results obtained with polypeptide alamethicin incorporated into planar lipid bilayers.(c) 1998 American Institute of Physics.

  19. The Hyperon {Lambda}(1405) in p+p reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siebenson, Johannes

    2011-10-21

    We present an analysis of the hyperon {Lambda}(1405) for p+p reactions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy. The data were taken with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES). A {Lambda}(1405) signal could be reconstructed in both charged decay channels ({Lambda}(1405){yields}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}).

  20. [Hypersensitivity reactions to insulin].

    PubMed

    Becerril-Ángeles, Martín; Moctezuma-Trejo, Cristina; Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to insulin are infrequent, yet of clinical importance. The mechanisms of hypersensitivity involved can be of three types: I, III and IV. To describe the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity to insulin, its clinical features and diagnostic and therapeutic approach, that help identify the cases of allergy to insulin and begin a treatment, or if necessary, to refer patients to a specialists or appropriate medical attention. An electronic search of papers related to insulin hypersensitivity was performed in PubMed and the articles selected were those considered the most relevant for this review. Thirty eight papers about pathophysiology, mechanisms of injury and the different types of insulin involved in hypersensitivity reactions were included. Likewise, information for the diagnosis of insulin hypersensitivity and some options of treatment for first contact physicians or the referral of patients to specialists in endocrinology and allergy were included. Insulin hypersensitivity has a low prevalence and diverse clinical manifestations. The different types of insulin suitable allow the majority of cases of hypersensitivity to continue the treatment in a efficient and flexible manner.

  1. Drug dangers and reactions.

    PubMed

    WEILERSTEIN, R W

    1961-01-01

    The protection of the consumer against dangerous, adulterated, and misbranded drugs provided by the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act has failed in some instances. A general program of reporting adverse drug reactions has been initiated on a pilot basis. Arrangements are being made to extend this program into larger hospitals. Better and more complete reporting of adverse drug reactions together with tightening of the Food and Drug law regarding new drugs will improve this situation. Recently the president of the National Academy of Sciences appointed a committee at the request of the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare to review the policies and procedures used by the Food and Drug Administration in reaching decisions and to present recommendations. This committee has completed its work and has made specific recommendations that would give the Food and Drug Administration authority to require proof of efficacy as well as safety of all new drugs, and would provide it with sufficient resources to meet the responsibilities assigned to it.

  2. DRUG DANGERS AND REACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Weilerstein, Ralph W.

    1961-01-01

    The protection of the consumer against dangerous, adulterated, and misbranded drugs provided by the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act has failed in some instances. A general program of reporting adverse drug reactions has been initiated on a pilot basis. Arrangements are being made to extend this program into larger hospitals. Better and more complete reporting of adverse drug reactions together with tightening of the Food and Drug law regarding new drugs will improve this situation. Recently the president of the National Academy of Sciences appointed a committee at the request of the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare to review the policies and procedures used by the Food and Drug Administration in reaching decisions and to present recommendations. This committee has completed its work and has made specific recommendations that would give the Food and Drug Administration authority to require proof of efficacy as well as safety of all new drugs, and would provide it with sufficient resources to meet the responsibilities assigned to it. PMID:13783849

  3. Reactions of intermetallic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, R.W.; Castleman, A.W. Jr. )

    1990-02-01

    Reaction of bismuth--alkali clusters with closed-shell HX acids provides insight into the structures, formation, and stabilities of these intermetallic species. HC1 and HI are observed to quantitatively strip Bi{sub {ital x}}Na{sub {ital y}} and Bi{sub {ital x}}K{sub {ital y}}, respectively, of their alkali component, leaving bare bismuth clusters as the only bismuth-containing species detected. Product bismuth clusters exhibit the same distribution observed when pure bismuth is evaporated in the source. Though evaporated simultaneously from the same crucible, this suggests alkali atoms condense onto existing bismuth clusters and have negligible effect on their formation and consequent distribution. The indistinguishibility of reacted and pure bismuth cluster distributions further argues against the simple replacement of alkali atoms with hydrogen in these reactions. This is considered further evidence that the alkali atoms are external to the stable bismuth Zintl anionic structures. Reactivities of Bi{sub {ital x}}Na{sub {ital y}} clusters with HC1 are estimated to lie between 3{times}10{sup {minus}13} for Bi{sub 4}Na, to greater than 4{times}10{sup {minus}11} for clusters possessing large numbers of alkali atoms. Bare bismuth clusters are observed in separate experiments to react significantly more slowly with rates of 1--9{times}10{sup {minus}14} and exhibit little variation of reactivity with size. The bismuth clusters may thus be considered a relatively inert substrate upon which the alkali overlayer reacts.

  4. [Abnormal grief reaction].

    PubMed

    Meyer, J E

    1977-01-01

    Pathological grief reactions following the death of a child are reported on the basis of five case studies. In contrast to acute grief reactions these pathological syndromes are of long standing. One parent had not truly accepted the death of the child. The denial of reality is sometimes a defence against aggression towards the deceased, because of his having left one behind. The mourning process comes to no end but remains in its initial phase. At the same time the life of the mourner stands still, as in the house and the family everything is left unchanged. Family interactions alter, particularly between the parents. For the genesis of these grief syndromes the following is of relevance: The death occurs at a time, when another child cannot replace the one who died. Mature independence had not been reached by either parent or child. Death destroyed expectations that this child would succeed in that which the parent had been unable to achieve. The parent had not seen the child after death--a gap in the continuity of experiencing which made acceptance of the irreversibility of the loss even more difficult.

  5. Metallic induction reaction engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Douglas; Mongeau, Peter P.; Kolm, Henry H.

    1985-11-01

    Metal rings placed close to a pulsed field coil have been accelerated at 200 million gee to 5 km/s in a 2 cm length by Bandoletov in the USSR Bandoletov, 1977. We have studied the basic phenomena and ultimate limitations of the pulsed induction process both theoretically and experimentally to determine its usefulness as a reaction engine. It is possible in principle to accelerate metal rings at high efficiency, and impart sufficient energy to ensure melting and evaporation, so that the reaction mass is ultimately ejected in the form of plasma. In practice the process is limited by electrical, mechanical and thermal failure of the induction coil. Over a hundred shots were fired including several in which 12 gram rings were accelerated to over 700 m/s at efficiencies above 30 percent. This is equivalent to the performance of a high power rifle with a one inch long barrel. An unexpected result of these studies is the discovery that to achieve maximum velocity, the mutual inductance gradient between induction coil and projectile ring in the firing position must be reduced to minimize the initial acceleration. This reduces the back voltage and increases the interaction time, resulting in maximum energy transfer.

  6. Lowering energy barriers in surface reactions through concerted reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sakong, Sung; Mosch, Christian; Lozano, Ariel; Busnengo, H Fabio; Gross, Axel

    2012-10-22

    Any technologically important chemical reaction typically involves a number of different elementary reaction steps consisting of bond-breaking and bond-making processes. Usually, one assumes that such complex chemical reactions occur in a step-wise fashion where one single bond is made or broken at a time. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory we show that the barriers of rate-limiting steps for technologically relevant surface reactions are significantly reduced if concerted reaction mechanisms are taken into account.

  7. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    An iodine clock reaction that gives a colorless to black result similar to that of the familiar Landolt iodate-bisulfite clock reaction is described. The vitamin C clock reaction uses chemicals that are readily available on the retail market: vitamin C, tincture of iodine, 3% hydrogen peroxide, and laundry starch. Orange juice may be used as the vitamin C source to give an orange to black reaction.

  8. Nitric oxide signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Allan D

    2005-01-01

    Plants have four nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes. NOS1 appears mitochondrial, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) chloroplastic. Distinct peroxisomal and apoplastic NOS enzymes are predicted. Nitrite-dependent NO synthesis is catalyzed by cytoplasmic nitrate reductase or a root plasma membrane enzyme, or occurs nonenzymatically. Nitric oxide undergoes both catalyzed and uncatalyzed oxidation. However, there is no evidence of reaction with superoxide, and S-nitrosylation reactions are unlikely except during hypoxia. The only proven direct targets of NO in plants are metalloenzymes and one metal complex. Nitric oxide inhibits apoplastic catalases/ascorbate peroxidases in some species but may stimulate these enzymes in others. Plants also have the NO response pathway involving cGMP, cADPR, and release of calcium from internal stores. Other known targets include chloroplast and mitochondrial electron transport. Nitric oxide suppresses Fenton chemistry by interacting with ferryl ion, preventing generation of hydroxyl radicals. Functions of NO in plant development, response to biotic and abiotic stressors, iron homeostasis, and regulation of respiration and photosynthesis may all be ascribed to interaction with one of these targets. Nitric oxide function in drought/abscisic acid (ABA)-induction of stomatal closure requires nitrate reductase and NOS1. Nitric oxide synthasel likely functions to produce sufficient NO to inhibit photosynthetic electron transport, allowing nitrite accumulation. Nitric oxide is produced during the hypersensitive response outside cells undergoing programmed cell death immediately prior to loss of plasma membrane integrity. A plasma membrane lipid-derived signal likely activates apoplastic NOS. Nitric oxide diffuses within the apoplast and signals neighboring cells via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent induction of salicylic acid biosynthesis. Response to wounding appears to involve the same NOS and direct targets.

  9. Wnt signaling in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, T; Rindtorff, N; Boutros, M

    2017-01-01

    Wnt signaling is one of the key cascades regulating development and stemness, and has also been tightly associated with cancer. The role of Wnt signaling in carcinogenesis has most prominently been described for colorectal cancer, but aberrant Wnt signaling is observed in many more cancer entities. Here, we review current insights into novel components of Wnt pathways and describe their impact on cancer development. Furthermore, we highlight expanding functions of Wnt signaling for both solid and liquid tumors. We also describe current findings how Wnt signaling affects maintenance of cancer stem cells, metastasis and immune control. Finally, we provide an overview of current strategies to antagonize Wnt signaling in cancer and challenges that are associated with such approaches. PMID:27617575

  10. [Growth hormone signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Zych, Sławomir; Szatkowska, Iwona; Czerniawska-Piatkowska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The substantial improvement in the studies on a very complicated mechanism-- growth hormone signaling in a cell, has been noted in last decade. GH-induced signaling is characterized by activation of several pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the signal transducer and activator of transcription and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3) pathways. This review shows a current model of the growth hormone receptor dimerization, rotation of subunits and JAK2 kinase activation as the initial steps in the cascade of events. In the next stages of the signaling process, the GH-(GHR)2-(JAK2)2 complex may activate signaling molecules such as Stat, IRS-1 and IRS-2, and particularly all cascade proteins that activate MAP kinase. These pathways regulate basal cellular functions including target gene transcription, enzymatic activity and metabolite transport. Therefore growth hormone is considered as a major regulator of postnatal growth and metabolism, probably for mammary gland growth and development too.

  11. Optical signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses several optical configurations used for signal processing. Electronic-to-optical transducers are outlined, noting fixed window transducers and moving window acousto-optic transducers. Folded spectrum techniques are considered, with reference to wideband RF signal analysis, fetal electroencephalogram analysis, engine vibration analysis, signal buried in noise, and spatial filtering. Various methods for radar signal processing are described, such as phased-array antennas, the optical processing of phased-array data, pulsed Doppler and FM radar systems, a multichannel one-dimensional optical correlator, correlations with long coded waveforms, and Doppler signal processing. Means for noncoherent optical signal processing are noted, including an optical correlator for speech recognition and a noncoherent optical correlator.

  12. Enzymatic reactions on immobilised substrates.

    PubMed

    Gray, Christopher J; Weissenborn, Martin J; Eyers, Claire E; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2013-08-07

    This review gives an overview of enzymatic reactions that have been conducted on substrates attached to solid surfaces. Such biochemical reactions have become more important with the drive to miniaturisation and automation in chemistry, biology and medicine. Technical aspects such as choice of solid surface and analytical methods are discussed and examples of enzyme reactions that have been successful on these surfaces are provided.

  13. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an iodine clock reaction that produces an effect similar to the Landolt clock reaction. This reaction uses supermarket chemicals and avoids iodate, bisulfite, and mercury compounds. Ascorbic acid and tincture of iodine are the main reactants with alternate procedures provided for vitamin C tablets and orange juice. (DDR)

  14. Corona reaction method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lowther, F.E.

    1981-08-11

    Corona induced chemical reactions are conducted in a corona discharge zone in which narrow high voltage pulses are applied along with a relatively low voltage bias potential. It is found that for many corona discharge reactions, such as the conversion of oxygen to ozone, the present method increases the electrical efficiency of the reaction.

  15. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  16. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an iodine clock reaction that produces an effect similar to the Landolt clock reaction. This reaction uses supermarket chemicals and avoids iodate, bisulfite, and mercury compounds. Ascorbic acid and tincture of iodine are the main reactants with alternate procedures provided for vitamin C tablets and orange juice. (DDR)

  17. More on Chemical Reaction Balancing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinehart, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    A previous article stated that only the matrix method was powerful enough to balance a particular chemical equation. Shows how this equation can be balanced without using the matrix method. The approach taken involves writing partial mathematical reactions and redox half-reactions, and combining them to yield the final balanced reaction. (JN)

  18. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  19. Reaction Decoder Tool (RDT): extracting features from chemical reactions

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Torrance, Gilliean; Baldacci, Lorenzo; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Fenninger, Franz; Gopal, Nimish; Choudhary, Saket; May, John W.; Holliday, Gemma L.; Steinbeck, Christoph; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Extracting chemical features like Atom–Atom Mapping (AAM), Bond Changes (BCs) and Reaction Centres from biochemical reactions helps us understand the chemical composition of enzymatic reactions. Reaction Decoder is a robust command line tool, which performs this task with high accuracy. It supports standard chemical input/output exchange formats i.e. RXN/SMILES, computes AAM, highlights BCs and creates images of the mapped reaction. This aids in the analysis of metabolic pathways and the ability to perform comparative studies of chemical reactions based on these features. Availability and implementation: This software is implemented in Java, supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, and freely available at https://github.com/asad/ReactionDecoder Contact: asad@ebi.ac.uk or s9asad@gmail.com PMID:27153692

  20. Reaction Decoder Tool (RDT): extracting features from chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Torrance, Gilliean; Baldacci, Lorenzo; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Fenninger, Franz; Gopal, Nimish; Choudhary, Saket; May, John W; Holliday, Gemma L; Steinbeck, Christoph; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-07-01

    Extracting chemical features like Atom-Atom Mapping (AAM), Bond Changes (BCs) and Reaction Centres from biochemical reactions helps us understand the chemical composition of enzymatic reactions. Reaction Decoder is a robust command line tool, which performs this task with high accuracy. It supports standard chemical input/output exchange formats i.e. RXN/SMILES, computes AAM, highlights BCs and creates images of the mapped reaction. This aids in the analysis of metabolic pathways and the ability to perform comparative studies of chemical reactions based on these features. This software is implemented in Java, supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, and freely available at https://github.com/asad/ReactionDecoder : asad@ebi.ac.uk or s9asad@gmail.com. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Optical Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-28

    compatible with the laser cation in the on-line inspection of products such as source. Thus, if the laser wavelength is z850 nm, hypodermic needles ...content for cw signals, short pulse signals, and evolving pulse signals - - the most difficult ones to analyze. We performed an extensive analysis on a...agreer.nt with the theory , and support our claims concerning the high performance level of our acousto-optir. architecture. We recognized the opportunity to

  2. Signaling Mechanisms for Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chun-Lin; Iijima, Miho

    2011-01-01

    Cells recognize external chemical gradients and translate these environmental cues into amplified intracellular signaling that results in elongated cell shape, actin polymerization toward the leading edge, and movement along the gradient. Mechanisms underlying chemotaxis are conserved evolutionarily from Dictyostelium amoeba to mammalian neutrophils. Recent studies have uncovered several parallel intracellular signaling pathways that crosstalk in chemotaxing cells. Here, we review these signaling mechanisms in Dictyostelium discoideum. PMID:21585354

  3. Danger signals in stroke.

    PubMed

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Sobey, Christopher G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Magnus, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Danger molecules are the first signals released from dying tissue after stroke. These danger signals bind to receptors on immune cells that will result in their activation and the release of inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators, resulting in amplification of the immune response and subsequent enlargement of the damaged brain volume. The release of danger signals is a central event that leads to a multitude of signals and cascades in the affected and neighbouring tissue, therefore providing a potential target for therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Slit-Robo signaling.

    PubMed

    Blockus, Heike; Chédotal, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Slits are secreted proteins that bind to Roundabout (Robo) receptors. Slit-Robo signaling is best known for mediating axon repulsion in the developing nervous system. However, in recent years the functional repertoire of Slits and Robo has expanded tremendously and Slit-Robo signaling has been linked to roles in neurogenesis, angiogenesis and cancer progression among other processes. Likewise, our mechanistic understanding of Slit-Robo signaling has progressed enormously. Here, we summarize new insights into Slit-Robo evolutionary and system-dependent diversity, receptor-ligand interactions, signaling crosstalk and receptor activation.

  5. Fluorogenic Templated Reaction Cascades for RNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Velema, Willem A; Kool, Eric T

    2017-03-27

    Nucleic acids detection is essential to the study of biological processes and to diagnosis of pathological states. Although PCR is highly effective in vitro, methods that can function without prior sample preparation, thermal cycling, or enzymes are of interest due to their simplicity. Most current non-PCR detection methods rely on linear signal amplification, which hinders the detection of small amounts of genetic material. To address this limitation, we tested a new strategy for attaining higher-order signal amplification, in which a target sequence templates a chemical ligation and the product of this reaction is in turn detected with a second templated reaction. The method is nonenzymatic, isothermal and fluorogenic, allowing the direct detection of nucleic acids in complex matrices. Using this approach, as little as 500 attomoles (10 pM) could be detected with single nucleotide resolution. In a test of selectivity, single nucleotide substitutions and deletions could successfully be detected, including a deletion that is associated with tetracycline resistance in Helicobacter pylori. Compatibility with biological matrices was demonstrated by the direct detection of rRNA in bacterial lysate. Imaging and detection of target sequences on a solid support further illustrates the potential of the new approach for high-throughput analysis.

  6. Spatial aspects in the SMAD signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Claus, J; Friedmann, E; Klingmüller, U; Rannacher, R; Szekeres, T

    2013-11-01

    Among other approaches, differential equations are used for a deterministic quantitative description of time-dependent biological processes. For intracellular systems, such as signaling pathways, most existing models are based on ordinary differential equations. These models describe temporal processes, while they neglect spatial aspects. We present a model for the SMAD signaling pathway, which gives a temporal and spatial description on the basis of reaction diffusion equations to answer the question whether cell geometry plays a role in signaling. In this article we simulate the ordinary differential equations as well as partial differential equations of parabolic type with suile numerical methods, the latter on different cell geometries. In addition to manual construction of idealized cells, we also construct meshes from microscopy images of real cells. The main focus of the paper is to compare the results of the model without and with spatial aspects to answer the addressed question. The results show that diffusion in the model can lead to significant intracellular gradients of signaling molecules and changes the level of response to the signal transduced by the signaling pathway. In particular, the extent of these observations depends on the geometry of the cell.

  7. Polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Arnhelm, N. ); Levenson, C.H. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) an in-vitro method of amplifying DNA sequences. Beginning with DNA of any origin- bacterial, viral, plant, or animal- PCR can increase the amount of a DNA sequence hundreds of millions to billions of times. The procedure can amplify a targeted sequence even when it makes up less than one part in a million of the total initial sample. PCR is an enzymatic process that is carried out in discrete cycles of amplification, each of which can double the amount of target DNA in the sample. Thus, n cycles can produce 2{sup n} times as much target as was present to begin with. This paper discusses how PCR has had an impact on molecular biology, human genetics, infectious and genetic disease diagnosis, forensic science, and evolutionary biology.

  8. [Bullous drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Hertl-Yazdi, M S; Hertl, M

    2005-01-01

    Bullous drug exanthems are clinically characteristic, usually severe cutaneous and mucosal drug hypersensitivity reactions. Commonly, they appear 5-14 days after onset of drug treatment. Therapy of choice is to avoid the culprit drug and systemic administration of glucocorticoids. A key element in the immune pathogenesis of bullous drug exanthems is presumably the activation of cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes which recognize drug metabolites as nominal antigens. These compounds form spontaneously (e.g. penicillins) or are metabolized by cytochrome P450-dependent enzymes (sulfonamides). The diagnosis of bullous drug exanthems is primarily based on skin tests and in vitro-techniques. Among the skin tests, prick as well as patch tests are important. Patch tests can be also applied at the former skin lesion in fixed drug eruption. In vitro techniques include analysis of drug-specific IgE (only available for anti-penicillin, anti-sulfamethoxazole) and cellular tests with the patients' lymphocytes (lymphocyte transformation test-LTT).

  9. Mixtures and Mineral Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.

    The monograph Mixtures and Mineral Reactions contains a large amount of information of value to mineralogists, petrologists, and geochemists. The first four chapters are a succinct account of the thermodynamic description of crystalline solutions. In these early chapters a comparison is made between different mathematical treatments of activitycomposition models, there is a discussion of the unmixing by exsolution of a single solution into two phases, and methods of computing phase equilibria in assemblages of different minerals are given. If the reader is perplexed by the discussion of standard states (cf. Figure 1.3), not to worry. That is a normal condition for anyone forced to choose between equivalent reference frames yet knowing, somewhere down the line, that the choice will ultimately make one's computational life more or less difficult.

  10. Leukotriene signaling in atherosclerosis and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Bäck, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The inflammatory process of atherosclerosis is associated with several pathophysiological reactions within the vascular wall. The arachidonic acid released by phospholipase A2 serves as substrate for the production of a group of lipid mediators known as the leukotrienes, which induce pro-inflammatory signaling through activation of specific BLT and CysLT receptors. Discussion Leukotriene signaling has been implicated in early lipid retention and foam cell accumulation, as well as in the development of intimal hyperplasia and advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, the association of leukotrienes with degradation of extracellular matrix has suggested a role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Finally, studies of either myocardial or cerebral ischemia and reperfusion indicate that leukotriene signaling in addition may be involved in the development of ischemic injury. Conclusion Both leukotriene synthesis inhibitors and leukotriene receptor antagonists have been suggested to induce beneficial effects at different stages of the atherosclerosis process. PMID:18949546

  11. Plasmonic smart dust for probing local chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Tittl, Andreas; Yin, Xinghui; Giessen, Harald; Tian, Xiang-Dong; Tian, Zhong-Qun; Kremers, Christian; Chigrin, Dmitry N; Liu, Na

    2013-04-10

    Locally probing chemical reactions or catalytic processes on surfaces under realistic reaction conditions has remained one of the main challenges in materials science and heterogeneous catalysis. Where conventional surface interrogation techniques usually require high-vacuum conditions or ensemble average measurements, plasmonic nanoparticles excel in extreme light focusing and can produce highly confined electromagnetic fields in subwavelength volumes without the need for complex near-field microscopes. Here, we demonstrate an all-optical probing technique based on plasmonic smart dust for monitoring local chemical reactions in real time. The silica shell-isolated gold nanoparticles that form the smart dust can work as strong light concentrators and optically report subtle environmental changes at their pinning sites on the probed surface during reaction processes. As a model system, we investigate the hydrogen dissociation and subsequent uptake trajectory in palladium with both "dust-on-film" and "film-on-dust" platforms. Using time-resolved single particle measurements, we demonstrate that our technique can in situ encode chemical reaction information as optical signals for a variety of surface morphologies. The presented technique offers a unique scheme for real-time, label-free, and high-resolution probing of local reaction kinetics in a plethora of important chemical reactions on surfaces, paving the way toward the development of inexpensive and high-output reaction sensors for real-world applications.

  12. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  13. Subdiffusion-reaction processes with A→B reactions versus subdiffusion-reaction processes with A+B→B reactions.

    PubMed

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Katarzyna D

    2014-09-01

    We consider the subdiffusion-reaction process with reactions of a type A+B→B (in which particles A are assumed to be mobile, whereas B are assumed to be static) in comparison to the subdiffusion-reaction process with A→B reactions which was studied by Sokolov, Schmidt, and Sagués [Phys. Rev. E 73, 031102 (2006)]. In both processes a rule that reactions can only occur between particles which continue to exist is taken into account. Although in both processes a probability of the vanishing of particle A due to a reaction is independent of both time and space variables (assuming that in the system with the A+B→B reactions, particles B are distributed homogeneously), we show that subdiffusion-reaction equations describing these processes as well as their Green's functions are qualitatively different. The reason for this difference is as follows. In the case of the former reaction, particles A and B have to meet with some probability before the reaction occurs in contradiction with the case of the latter reaction. For the subdiffusion process with the A+B→B reactions we consider three models which differ in some details concerning a description of the reactions. We base the method considered in this paper on a random walk model in a system with both discrete time and discrete space variables. Then the system with discrete variables is transformed into a system with both continuous time and continuous space variables. Such a method seems to be convenient in analyzing subdiffusion-reaction processes with partially absorbing or partially reflecting walls. The reason is that within this method we can determine Green's functions without a necessity of solving a fractional differential subdiffusion-reaction equation with boundary conditions at the walls. As an example, we use the model to find the Green's functions for a subdiffusive reaction system (with the reactions mentioned above), which is bounded by a partially absorbing wall. This example shows how the model

  14. Traveling wave to a reaction-hyperbolic system for axonal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Feimin; Li, Xing; Zhang, Yinglong

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we study a class of nonlinear reaction-hyperbolic systems modeling the neuronal signal transfer in neuroscience. This reaction-hyperbolic system can be regarded as n × n (n ≥ 2) hyperbolic system with relaxation. We first prove the existence of traveling wave by Gershgorin circle theorem and mathematically describe the neuronal signal transport. Then for a special case n = 2, we show the traveling wave is nonlinearly stable, and obtain the convergence rate simultaneously by a weighted estimate.

  15. Signaling Function of Heme Oxygenase Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Many reports have underscored the importance of the heme degradation pathway that is regulated by heme oxygenase (HO). This reaction releases bile pigments and carbon monoxide (CO), which are important antioxidant and signaling molecules. Thus, the reaction of HO-1 would have significant cytoprotective effects. Nevertheless, the importance of this protein goes beyond its enzymatic action. New evidence outlines significant effects of inactive forms of the HO-1 protein. Recent Advances: In fact, the role of the HO protein in cellular signaling, including transcription factor activation, binding to proteins, phosphorylation, and modulation of protein function, among others, has started being elucidated. The mechanism by which the inducible form of HO-1, in particular, can migrate to various cellular compartments to mediate important signaling or how and why it binds to key transcription factors and other proteins that are important in DNA repair is also described in several physiologic systems. Critical Issues: The signaling functions of HO-1 may have particular relevance in clinical circumstances, including cancer, as redistribution of HO-1 into the nuclear compartment is observed with cancer progression and metastasis. In addition, along with oxidative stress, the pleiotropic functions of HO-1 modulate antioxidant defense. In organ transplantation, HO and its byproducts suppress rejection at multiple levels and in sepsis-induced pulmonary dysfunction, inhaled CO or modulation of HO activity can change the course of the disease in animals. Future Directions: It is hoped that a more detailed understanding of the various signaling functions of HO will guide therapeutic approaches for complex diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1743–1753. PMID:24180238

  16. Signaling by Gasotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Asif K.; Gadalla, Moataz M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide is well established as a major signaling molecule. Evidence is accumulating that carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide also are physiologic mediators in the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems. This Review focuses on mechanisms whereby they signal by binding to metal centers in metalloproteins, such as in guanylyl cyclase, or modifying sulfhydryl groups in protein targets. PMID:19401594

  17. MBA Quality Signals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Randall S.

    1998-01-01

    A study identified quality signals for master's programs in business administration (MBAs). Traditional scholarly oriented academic signals are apparently not valued as such by external customer groups. MBA academic quality appears to be a multidimensional construct, with subdimensions of real-worldness; placement; student satisfaction; and…

  18. Geophysical Signal Recognition,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    quite helpful in the magnetosphere. Detecting a particular in earthquake prediction . However pattern recog- micropulsation event can provide a diagnosis...bio- In su..a.iry, application of pattern recognition to medical signals, progress in geophysical signal earthquake prediction is in its infancy

  19. MBA Quality Signals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Randall S.

    1998-01-01

    A study identified quality signals for master's programs in business administration (MBAs). Traditional scholarly oriented academic signals are apparently not valued as such by external customer groups. MBA academic quality appears to be a multidimensional construct, with subdimensions of real-worldness; placement; student satisfaction; and…

  20. Only signaling modules that discriminate sharply between stimulatory and nonstimulatory inputs require basal signaling for fast cellular responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artomov, Mykyta; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2010-09-01

    In many types of cells, binding of molecules to their receptors enables cascades of intracellular chemical reactions to take place (signaling). However, a low level of signaling also occurs in most unstimulated cells. Such basal signaling in resting cells can have many functions, one of which is that it is thought to be required for fast cellular responses to external stimuli. A mechanistic understanding of why this is true and which features of cellular signaling networks make basal signaling necessary for fast responses is unknown. We address this issue by obtaining the time required for activation of common types of cell signaling modules with and without basal signaling. Our results show that the absence of basal signaling does not have any dramatic effects on the response time for signaling modules that exhibit a graded response to increasing stimulus levels. In sharp contrast, signaling modules that exhibit sharp dose-response curves which discriminate sensitively between stimuli to which the cell needs to respond and low-grade inputs (or stochastic noise) require basal signaling for fast cellular responses. In such cases, we find that an optimal level of basal signaling balances the requirements for fast cellular responses while minimizing spurious activation without appropriate stimulation.

  1. Adaptive signal processor

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, H.V.

    1980-07-01

    An experimental, general purpose adaptive signal processor system has been developed, utilizing a quantized (clipped) version of the Widrow-Hoff least-mean-square adaptive algorithm developed by Moschner. The system accommodates 64 adaptive weight channels with 8-bit resolution for each weight. Internal weight update arithmetic is performed with 16-bit resolution, and the system error signal is measured with 12-bit resolution. An adapt cycle of adjusting all 64 weight channels is accomplished in 8 ..mu..sec. Hardware of the signal processor utilizes primarily Schottky-TTL type integrated circuits. A prototype system with 24 weight channels has been constructed and tested. This report presents details of the system design and describes basic experiments performed with the prototype signal processor. Finally some system configurations and applications for this adaptive signal processor are discussed.

  2. Near-Perfect Adaptation in the E. coli Chemotaxis Signal Transduction Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Setayeshgar, Sima

    2007-03-01

    Biochemical reaction networks constitute the computing language of the cell, from converting external stimuli into appropriate intracellular signals to regulating gene expression. Precise adaptation is an important property of many signaling networks, allowing compensation for continued stimulation without saturation. Furthermore, a common feature of intracellular reaction networks is the ability to operate in a noisy environment where concentrations of key components, such as signaling molecules and enzymes controlling reaction rates are typically small and therefore fluctuations in their numbers are significant. In the context of the well- characterized E. coli chemotaxis signal transduction network, we present a new computational scheme that explores surfaces in the space of total protein concentrations and reaction rates on which (near-)perfect adaptation holds. The resulting dependencies between parameters provide conditions for (near-)perfect adaptation as well as ranges of numerical values for parameters not reliably known from experiments. We generalize the applicability of this scheme to other signaling networks.

  3. Signalling network construction for modelling plant defence response.

    PubMed

    Miljkovic, Dragana; Stare, Tjaša; Mozetič, Igor; Podpečan, Vid; Petek, Marko; Witek, Kamil; Dermastia, Marina; Lavrač, Nada; Gruden, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Plant defence signalling response against various pathogens, including viruses, is a complex phenomenon. In resistant interaction a plant cell perceives the pathogen signal, transduces it within the cell and performs a reprogramming of the cell metabolism leading to the pathogen replication arrest. This work focuses on signalling pathways crucial for the plant defence response, i.e., the salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene signal transduction pathways, in the Arabidopsis thaliana model plant. The initial signalling network topology was constructed manually by defining the representation formalism, encoding the information from public databases and literature, and composing a pathway diagram. The manually constructed network structure consists of 175 components and 387 reactions. In order to complement the network topology with possibly missing relations, a new approach to automated information extraction from biological literature was developed. This approach, named Bio3graph, allows for automated extraction of biological relations from the literature, resulting in a set of (component1, reaction, component2) triplets and composing a graph structure which can be visualised, compared to the manually constructed topology and examined by the experts. Using a plant defence response vocabulary of components and reaction types, Bio3graph was applied to a set of 9,586 relevant full text articles, resulting in 137 newly detected reactions between the components. Finally, the manually constructed topology and the new reactions were merged to form a network structure consisting of 175 components and 524 reactions. The resulting pathway diagram of plant defence signalling represents a valuable source for further computational modelling and interpretation of omics data. The developed Bio3graph approach, implemented as an executable language processing and graph visualisation workflow, is publically available at http://ropot.ijs.si/bio3graph/and can be utilised for

  4. Jasmonate signalling: a copycat of auxin signalling?

    PubMed

    Pérez, A Cuéllar; Goossens, A

    2013-12-01

    Plant hormones regulate almost all aspects of plant growth and development. The past decade has provided breakthrough discoveries in phytohormone sensing and signal transduction, and highlighted the striking mechanistic similarities between the auxin and jasmonate (JA) signalling pathways. Perception of auxin and JA involves the formation of co-receptor complexes in which hormone-specific E3-ubiquitin ligases of the SKP1-Cullin-F-box protein (SCF) type interact with specific repressor proteins. Across the plant kingdom, the Aux/IAA and the JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins correspond to the auxin- and JA-specific repressors, respectively. In the absence of the hormones, these repressors form a complex with transcription factors (TFs) specific for both pathways. They also recruit several proteins, among which the general co-repressor TOPLESS, and thereby prevent the TFs from activating gene expression. The hormone-mediated interaction between the SCF and the repressors targets the latter for 26S proteasome-mediated degradation, which, in turn, releases the TFs to allow modulating hormone-dependent gene expression. In this review, we describe the similarities and differences in the auxin and JA signalling cascades with respect to the protein families and the protein domains involved in the formation of the pathway-specific complexes.

  5. Extent of reaction in open systems with multiple heterogeneous reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The familiar batch concept of extent of reaction is reexamined for systems of reactions occurring in open systems. Because species concentrations change as a result of transport processes as well as reactions in open systems, the extent of reaction has been less useful in practice in these applications. It is shown that by defining the extent of the equivalent batch reaction and a second contribution to the extent of reaction due to the transport processes, it is possible to treat the description of the dynamics of flow through porous media accompanied by many chemical reactions in a uniform, concise manner. This approach tends to isolate the reaction terms among themselves and away from the model partial differential equations, thereby enabling treatment of large problems involving both equilibrium and kinetically controlled reactions. Implications on the number of coupled partial differential equations necessary to be solved and on numerical algorithms for solving such problems are discussed. Examples provided illustrate the theory applied to solute transport in groundwater flow.

  6. Class III peroxidases in plant defence reactions.

    PubMed

    Almagro, L; Gómez Ros, L V; Belchi-Navarro, S; Bru, R; Ros Barceló, A; Pedreño, M A

    2009-01-01

    When plants are attacked by pathogens, they defend themselves with an arsenal of defence mechanisms, both passive and active. The active defence responses, which require de novo protein synthesis, are regulated through a complex and interconnected network of signalling pathways that mainly involve three molecules, salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene (ET), and which results in the synthesis of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Microbe or elicitor-induced signal transduction pathways lead to (i) the reinforcement of cell walls and lignification, (ii) the production of antimicrobial metabolites (phytoalexins), and (iii) the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Among the proteins induced during the host plant defence, class III plant peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7; hydrogen donor: H(2)O(2) oxidoreductase, Prxs) are well known. They belong to a large multigene family, and participate in a broad range of physiological processes, such as lignin and suberin formation, cross-linking of cell wall components, and synthesis of phytoalexins, or participate in the metabolism of ROS and RNS, both switching on the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed host cell death at the infection site associated with limited pathogen development. The present review focuses on these plant defence reactions in which Prxs are directly or indirectly involved, and ends with the signalling pathways, which regulate Prx gene expression during plant defence. How they are integrated within the complex network of defence responses of any host plant cell will be the cornerstone of future research.

  7. Reaction-contingency based bipartite Boolean modelling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intracellular signalling systems are highly complex, rendering mathematical modelling of large signalling networks infeasible or impractical. Boolean modelling provides one feasible approach to whole-network modelling, but at the cost of dequantification and decontextualisation of activation. That is, these models cannot distinguish between different downstream roles played by the same component activated in different contexts. Results Here, we address this with a bipartite Boolean modelling approach. Briefly, we use a state oriented approach with separate update rules based on reactions and contingencies. This approach retains contextual activation information and distinguishes distinct signals passing through a single component. Furthermore, we integrate this approach in the rxncon framework to support automatic model generation and iterative model definition and validation. We benchmark this method with the previously mapped MAP kinase network in yeast, showing that minor adjustments suffice to produce a functional network description. Conclusions Taken together, we (i) present a bipartite Boolean modelling approach that retains contextual activation information, (ii) provide software support for automatic model generation, visualisation and simulation, and (iii) demonstrate its use for iterative model generation and validation. PMID:23835289

  8. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  9. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  10. NIF Gamma Reaction History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; McEvoy, A. M.; Hoffman, N. M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Evans, S.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Lee, A.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Miller, E. K.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.

    2010-11-01

    The primary objective of the NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics is to provide bang time and burn width information based upon measurement of fusion gamma-rays. This is accomplished with energy-thresholded Gas Cherenkov detectors that convert MeV gamma-rays into UV/visible photons for high-bandwidth optical detection. In addition, the GRH detectors can perform γ-ray spectroscopy to explore other nuclear processes from which additional significant implosion parameters may be inferred (e.g., plastic ablator areal density). Implementation is occurring in 2 phases: 1) four PMT-based channels mounted to the outside of the NIF target chamber at ˜6 m from TCC (GRH-6m) for the 3e13-3e16 DT neutron yield range expected during the early ignition-tuning campaigns; and 2) several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at ˜15 m from TCC (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the wall into well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs for the 1e16-1e20 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign. This suite of diagnostics will allow exploration of interesting γ-ray physics well beyond the ignition campaign. Recent data from OMEGA and NIF will be shown.

  11. Ethylene signaling and regulation in plant growth and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifei; Cui, Xiankui; Sun, Yue; Dong, Chun-Hai

    2013-07-01

    Gaseous phytohormone ethylene affects many aspects of plant growth and development. The ethylene signaling pathway starts when ethylene binds to its receptors. Since the cloning of the first ethylene receptor ETR1 from Arabidopsis, a large number of studies have steadily improved our understanding of the receptors and downstream components in ethylene signal transduction pathway. This article reviews the regulation of ethylene receptors, signal transduction, and the posttranscriptional modulation of downstream components. Functional roles and importance of the ethylene signaling components in plant growth and stress responses are also discussed. Cross-reactions of ethylene with auxin and other phytohormones in plant organ growth will be analyzed. The studies of ethylene signaling in plant growth, development, and stress responses in the past decade greatly advanced our knowledge of how plants respond to endogenous signals and environmental factors.

  12. Cellular signaling: aspects for tumor diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Bernhard; Brischwein, Martin; Lob, Volker; Ressler, Johann; Wiest, Joachim

    2007-02-01

    Cells are organic microsystems with functional compartments interconnected by complex signal chains. Intracellular signaling routes and signal reception from the extracellular environment are characterized by redundancy, i.e., parallel pathways exist. If a cell is exposed to an external "signal input", the signal processing elements within the cell provide a response that will be a pattern of reactions manifest as a metabolic, morphologic or electric "signal output". Cell-chip hybrid structures are miniaturized analytical systems with the capability to monitor such cell responses in real time and under continuous control of the environmental conditions. A system analysis approach gives an idea of how the biological component of these hybrid structures works. This is exemplified by the putative role of the microenvironmental pH as a parameter of the utmost importance for the malignant "mode" of tumor cells, which can be monitored and modeled on such hybrid structures.

  13. Deblurring Signal Network Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kamps, Dominic; Dehmelt, Leif

    2017-09-15

    To orchestrate the function and development of multicellular organisms, cells integrate intra- and extracellular information. This information is processed via signal networks in space and time, steering dynamic changes in cellular structure and function. Defects in those signal networks can lead to developmental disorders or cancer. However, experimental analysis of signal networks is challenging as their state changes dynamically and differs between individual cells. Thus, causal relationships between network components are blurred if lysates from large cell populations are analyzed. To directly study causal relationships, perturbations that target specific components have to be combined with measurements of cellular responses within individual cells. However, using standard single-cell techniques, the number of signal activities that can be monitored simultaneously is limited. Furthermore, diffusion of signal network components limits the spatial precision of perturbations, which blurs the analysis of spatiotemporal processing in signal networks. Hybrid strategies based on optogenetics, surface patterning, chemical tools, and protein design can overcome those limitations and thereby sharpen our view into the dynamic spatiotemporal state of signal networks and enable unique insights into the mechanisms that control cellular function in space and time.

  14. The mechanism of signal transduction by two-component systems.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Rubio, Vicente; Marina, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Two-component systems, composed of a homodimeric histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), are major signal transduction devices in bacteria. Typically the signal triggers HK autophosphorylation at one His residue, followed by phosphoryl transfer from the phospho-His to an Asp residue in the RR. Signal extinction frequently involves phospho-RR dephosphorylation by a phosphatase activity of the HK. Our understanding of these reactions and of the determinants of partner specificity among HK-RR couples has been greatly increased by recent crystal structures and biochemical experiments on HK-RR complexes. Cis-autophosphorylation (one subunit phosphorylates itself) occurs in some HKs while trans-autophosphorylation takes place in others. We review and integrate this new information, discuss the mechanism of the three reactions and propose a model for transmembrane signaling by these systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Formaldehyde reactions in dark clouds.

    PubMed

    Sen, A D; Anicich, V G; Federman, S R

    1992-05-20

    The low-pressure reactions of formaldehyde (H2CO) with D+, D2+, D3+, and He+ have been studied by the ion cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potential loss processes for formaldehyde in cores of dark interstellar clouds. The deuterated reactants, which are easier to study experimentally, represent direct analogs for protons. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels have been measured. Charge transfer is observed to be the dominant reaction of H2CO with D+, D2+, and He+ ions. Only the D3+ reaction exhibits a proton transfer channel. All reactions proceed at rate coefficients near the collision limit. Proton-deuteron exchange reactions were found to be inefficient processes in the formaldehyde system.

  16. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  17. Formaldehyde reactions in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Federman, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    The low-pressure reactions of formaldehyde (H2CO) with D(+), D2(+), D3(+), and He(+) are studied by the ion-cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potential loss processes for formaldehyde in cores of dark interstellar clouds. The deuterated reactants represent direct analogs for protons. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels have been measured. Charge transfer is observed to be the dominant reaction of H2CO with D(+), D2(+), and He(+) ions. Only the D3(+) reaction exhibits a proton-transfer channel. All reactions proceed at rate coefficients near the collision limit. Proton-deuteron exchange reactions are found to be inefficient processes in the formaldehyde system.

  18. Fractional reaction-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Wojcik, Mariusz; Tachiya, M.

    2003-07-01

    A fractional reaction-diffusion equation is derived from a continuous time random walk model when the transport is dispersive. The exit from the encounter distance, which is described by the algebraic waiting time distribution of jump motion, interferes with the reaction at the encounter distance. Therefore, the reaction term has a memory effect. The derived equation is applied to the geminate recombination problem. The recombination is shown to depend on the intrinsic reaction rate, in contrast with the results of Sung et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 2338 (2002)], which were obtained from the fractional reaction-diffusion equation where the diffusion term has a memory effect but the reaction term does not. The reactivity dependence of the recombination probability is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  19. Reaction of iodine atoms with submicrometer squalane and squalene droplets: mechanistic insights into heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M; Wilson, Kevin R; Leone, Stephen R

    2014-11-13

    The gas-phase reaction of iodine atoms with hydrocarbon molecules is energetically unfavorable, and there is no direct evidence for iodinated product formation by either H abstraction or I addition reactions at ambient temperature. Here we consider the possible heterogeneous reaction of I atoms with submicrometer droplets composed of a saturated alkane, squalane (Sq), and an unsaturated alkene, squalene (Sqe). The investigations are performed in an atmospheric pressure photochemical flow tube reactor in conjunction with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer and a scanning mobility particle sizer. Squalane, a branched alkane, is unreactive toward I atoms within the signal-to-noise, and an upper limit of the effective reactive uptake coefficient is estimated to be γI(Sq) ≤ 8.58 × 10(–7). In contrast, the reaction of I atoms with unsaturated submicrometer squalene droplets results in observable iodinated squalene products. The effective reactive uptake coefficient of I atom with squalene particles is determined to be γI(Sqe) = (1.20 ± 0.52) × 10(–4) at an average I concentration of 1.5 × 10(14) molecules·cm(–3).

  20. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  1. Aestivation: signaling and hypometabolism.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B; Storey, Janet M

    2012-05-01

    Aestivation is a survival strategy used by many vertebrates and invertebrates to endure arid environmental conditions. Key features of aestivation include strong metabolic rate suppression, strategies to retain body water, conservation of energy and body fuel reserves, altered nitrogen metabolism, and mechanisms to preserve and stabilize organs, cells and macromolecules over many weeks or months of dormancy. Cell signaling is crucial to achieving both a hypometabolic state and reorganizing multiple metabolic pathways to optimize long-term viability during aestivation. This commentary examines the current knowledge about cell signaling pathways that participate in regulating aestivation, including signaling cascades mediated by the AMP-activated kinase, Akt, ERK, and FoxO1.

  2. Stochastic Modeling Of Biochemical Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    chemical reactions. Often for these reactions, the dynamics of the first M-order statistical moments of the species populations do not form a closed...results a stochastic model for gene expression is investigated. We show that in gene expression mechanisms , in which a protein inhibits its own...chemical reactions [7, 8, 4, 9, 10]. Since one is often interested in only the first and second order statistical moments for the number of molecules of

  3. Redox Reactions of Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Failure to maintain myoglobin (Mb) in the reduced state causes the formation of metMb, ferryl Mb species, and cross-linked Mb. Dissociation of ferriprotoporphyrin IX from the globin and release of iron atoms can also occur as oxidized Mb accumulates. These modifications may contribute to various oxidative pathologies in muscle and muscle foods. Recent Advances: The mechanism of ferryl Mb-mediated oxidative damage to nearby structures has been partially elucidated. Dissociation of ferriprotoporphyrin IX from metMb occurs more readily at acidic pH values. The dissociated ferriprotoporphyrin IX (also called hemin) readily decomposes preformed lipid hydroperoxides to reactive oxygen species. Heme oxygenase as well as lipophilic free radicals can degrade the protoporphyrin IX moiety, which results in the formation of free iron. Critical Issues: The multiple pathways by which Mb can incur toxicity create difficulties in determining the major cause of oxidative damage in a particular system. Peroxides and low pH activate each of the oxidative Mb forms, ferriprotoporphyrin IX, and released iron. Determining the relative concentration of these species is technically difficult, but essential to a complete understanding of oxidative pathology in muscle tissue. Future Directions: Improved methods to assess the different pathways of Mb toxicity are needed. Although significant advances have been made in the understanding of Mb interactions with other biomolecules, further investigation is needed to understand the physical and chemical nature of these interactions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2342–2351. PMID:22900975

  4. Kinematically complete chemical reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippel, S.; Stei, M.; Otto, R.; Hlavenka, P.; Mikosch, J.; Eichhorn, C.; Lourderaj, U.; Zhang, J. X.; Hase, W. L.; Weidemüller, M.; Wester, R.

    2009-11-01

    Kinematically complete studies of molecular reactions offer an unprecedented level of insight into the dynamics and the different mechanisms by which chemical reactions occur. We have developed a scheme to study ion-molecule reactions by velocity map imaging at very low collision energies. Results for the elementary nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction Cl- + CH3I → ClCH3 + I- are presented and compared to high-level direct dynamics trajectory calculations. Furthermore, an improved design of the crossed-beam imaging spectrometer with full three-dimensional measurement capabilities is discussed and characterization measurements using photoionization of NH3 and photodissociation of CH3I are presented.

  5. Pathophysiology of hemolytic transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Robertson D

    2005-07-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR) are systemic reactions provoked by immunologic red blood cell (RBC) incompatibility. Clinical and experimental observations of such reactions indicate that they proceed through phases of humoral immune reaction, activation of phagocytes, productions of cytokine mediators, and wide-ranging cellular responses. HTR have many features in common with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Knowledge of the pathophysiologic mechanisms in HTR suggest that newer biological agents that target complement intermediates or proinflammatory cytokines may be effective agents in the treatment of severe HTRs.

  6. Racemization in Prins Cyclization Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jasti, Ramesh

    2008-01-01

    Isotopic labeling experiments were performed in order to elucidate a new mechanism for racemization in Prins cyclization reactions. The loss in optical activity for these reactions was shown to occur by 2-oxonia-Cope rearrangements by way of a (Z)-oxocarbenium ion intermediate. Reaction conditions such as solvent, temperature, and the nucleophile employed played a critical role in whether an erosion in enantiomeric excess was observed. Additionally, certain structural features of Prins cyclization precursors were also shown to be important for preserving optical purity in these reactions. PMID:17031979

  7. [Situational reactions in suicidologic practice].

    PubMed

    Ambrumova, A G; Vrono, E M

    1985-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the description of suicidal manifestations in mentally normal adolescents among typical behavioural disorders characteristic of situational reactions of this age. Three types of suicido-dangerous situational responses of adolescents were specified with regard to their age and auto-and heteaggressiveness ratio: reaction of deprivation, explosive reaction and reaction of auto-elimination. Suicidogenic conflicts were analyzed and spheres of age-specific suicidal conflicts were defined. It is advisable that outpatient management of mentally normal adolescents with a history of a suicidal attempt be conducted in a special room of presentive suicidological service.

  8. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing.

    PubMed

    Lacasta, A M; Ramírez-Piscina, L; Sancho, J M; Lindenberg, K

    2013-04-14

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, and obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate ∼t(-1/2) to very close to the perfect mixing rate, ∼t(-1).

  9. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasta, A. M.; Ramírez-Piscina, L.; Sancho, J. M.; Lindenberg, K.

    2013-04-01

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, and obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate ˜t-1/2 to very close to the perfect mixing rate, ˜t-1.

  10. Neutron detectors for fusion reaction-rate measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Landen, O.L.; Murphy, T.J.; Jaanimagi, P.A.

    1994-02-10

    Fusion reactions in an inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) target filled with deuterium or a deuterium/tritium fuel release nearly monoenergetic neutrons. Because most the neutrons leave the compressed target without collision, they preserve reaction-rate information as they travel radially outward from their point of origin. Three fast, neutron detector techniques, each capable of measuring the fusion reaction-rate of ICF targets, have been demonstrated. The most advanced detector is based on the fast rise-time of a commercial plastic scintillator material (BC-422) which acts as a neutron-to-light converter. Signals, which are recorded with a fast optical streak camera, have a resolution of 25 ps. Good signals can be recorded for targets producing only 5 x 10{sup 7} DT neutrons. Two other detectors use knock-on collisions between neutrons and protons in a thin polyethylene (CH{sub 2}) converter. In one, the converter is placed in front of the photocathode of an x-ray streak camera. Recoil protons pass through the photocathode and knock out electrons which are accelerated and deflected to produce a signal. Resolutions < 25 ps are possible. In the other, the converter is placed in front of a microchannel plate (MCP) with a gated microstrip. Recoil protons eject electrons from the gold layer forming the microstrip. If a gate pulse is present, the signal is amplified. Present gate times are about 80 ps.

  11. Dynamic Reaction Figures: An Integrative Vehicle for Understanding Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A highly flexible learning tool, referred to as a dynamic reaction figure, is described. Application of these figures can (i) yield the correct chemical equation by simply following a set of menu driven directions; (ii) present the underlying "mechanism" in chemical reactions; and (iii) help to solve quantitative problems in a number of different…

  12. Topologically invariant reaction coordinates for simulating multistate chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Mones, Letif; Csányi, Gábor

    2012-12-27

    Evaluating free energy profiles of chemical reactions in complex environments such as solvents and enzymes requires extensive sampling, which is usually performed by potential of mean force (PMF) techniques. The reliability of the sampling depends not only on the applied PMF method but also the reaction coordinate space within the dynamics is biased. In contrast to simple geometrical collective variables that depend only on the positions of the atomic coordinates of the reactants, the E(gap) reaction coordinate (the energy difference obtained by evaluating a suitable force field using reactant and product state topologies) has the unique property that it is able to take environmental effects into account leading to better convergence, a more faithful description of the transition state ensemble and therefore more accurate free energy profiles. However, E(gap) requires predefined topologies and is therefore inapplicable for multistate reactions, in which the barrier between the chemically equivalent topologies is comparable to the reaction activation barrier, because undesired "side reactions" occur. In this article, we introduce a new energy-based collective variable by generalizing the E(gap) reaction coordinate such that it becomes invariant to equivalent topologies and show that it yields more well behaved free energy profiles than simpler geometrical reaction coordinates.

  13. Dynamic Reaction Figures: An Integrative Vehicle for Understanding Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A highly flexible learning tool, referred to as a dynamic reaction figure, is described. Application of these figures can (i) yield the correct chemical equation by simply following a set of menu driven directions; (ii) present the underlying "mechanism" in chemical reactions; and (iii) help to solve quantitative problems in a number of different…

  14. Characterization of tradeoffs in biomolecular signaling.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shaunak

    2013-12-01

    Systems-level tradeoffs are fundamental in engineering, and recent work has highlighted an analogous role for them in biology. However, the extent of validity of these tradeoffs, especially for biomolecular systems, is generally unclear. Here, we address this issue for signaling tradeoffs that can constrain, for a fixed concentration of the signaling protein, a simultaneous enhancement of the gain and range of an amplifier or of the gain and threshold of a switch. We find that these gain-related tradeoffs persist in mathematical models of biomolecular reaction mechanisms that are at the core of large classes of signaling systems. Further, we find that these tradeoffs are also prevalent in the parametric functional forms commonly used to describe input-output curves in experimental analyses. Finally, we find that these tradeoffs can persist even in the presence of transcriptional feedback mechanisms that can change the concentration of the signaling protein. These results present a systematic characterization of these tradeoffs in biomolecular signaling systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. GNSS Ocean Reflected Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean reflected signals from the GNSS satellites (received at low-Earth orbiting satellites, airplanes and fixed mountain locations) describe the ocean surface mean height, waves, roughness, spectral reflectivity and emissivity. The estimated accuracy of the average surface height is of the order of 10 cm for smooth conditions. Thus global observations could be an important new contribution to long-term variations of the ocean mean height as well as the monitoring of ocean mesoscale eddies, which result in sea-height changes much larger than the accuracy of the GNSS technique for reflected signals. The ocean reflected signals can be divided into two set of measurements, 1) high elevation measurements (equal to low incidence angles) and 2) low elevation grazing angle measurements. For the first type the ocean reflection cross-section has a limited extent. The reflected signal is coherent with smaller errors due to ocean waves, sampling rate and the internal processing method of the receiver. For low elevations, the signal reveals the incoherent scatter process at the reflection zone. To quantify the potential of the GNSS signals for determining spectral reflectivity at low elevations, we present ocean reflection GPS measurements from the Haleakala Summit on Maui, Hawaii, revealing the spectral characteristics of both the direct satellite signal and the ocean reflected signal for low elevation angles. The characteristics of the reflected signal depend on the scattering properties of the sea surface and the footprint of the reflection zone. While the footprint size and shape in turn depends on the signal incidence angle, the ocean mean tilt, and the relative velocities of transmitter and receiver to the reflection point. Thus the scattering properties of the sea surface are related to the sea surface roughness. We present the spectral properties of the signals as received by a high precision GPS instrument, simultaneously in both phase-locked mode and open-loop raw

  16. Peptide signaling in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Hayakawa, Eisuke

    2012-01-01

    Peptides play a number of crucial roles as signaling molecules in metazoans. In order to elaborate a more complete picture of the roles played by peptides in a single organism, we launched the "Hydra Peptide Project". For this project, we used Hydra magnipapillata, a species belonging to Cnidaria, one of the most basal metazoan phyla, and using a peptidomic approach, we systematically identified a number of peptide signaling molecules, their encoding genes and their functions. In this article, we report the peptides isolated from Hydra and other cnidarians, as well as their synthesis, processing and release from the cells to the target. Possible peptide signaling pathways are overviewed and finally we discuss the evolution of the peptide signaling system.

  17. Signal processing in SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, D. K.; Linscott, I. R.; Oliver, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is believed that the Galaxy might contain ten billion potential life sites. In view of the physical inaccessibility of extraterrestrial life on account of the vast distances involved, a logical first step in a search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) appears to be an attempt to detect signals already being radiated. The characteristics of the signals to be expected are discussed together with the search strategy of a NASA program. It is pointed out that all presently planned searches will use existing radio-astronomy antennas. If no extraterrestrial intelligence signals are discovered, society will have to decide whether SETI justifies a dedicated facility of much greater collecting area. Attention is given to a multichannel spectrum analyzer, CW signal detection, pulse detection, the pattern detector, and details of SETI system operation.

  18. Nucleotide signalling during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Idzko, Marco; Ferrari, Davide; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions are associated with the extracellular release of nucleotides, particularly ATP. In the extracellular compartment, ATP predominantly functions as a signalling molecule through the activation of purinergic P2 receptors. Metabotropic P2Y receptors are G-protein-coupled, whereas ionotropic P2X receptors are ATP-gated ion channels. Here we discuss how signalling events through P2 receptors alter the outcomes of inflammatory or infectious diseases. Recent studies implicate a role for P2X/P2Ysignalling in mounting appropriate inflammatory responses critical for host defence against invading pathogens or tumours. Conversely, P2X/P2Y signalling can promote chronic inflammation during ischaemia and reperfusion injury, inflammatory bowel disease or acute and chronic diseases of the lungs. Although nucleotide signalling has been used clinically in patients before, research indicates an expanding field of opportunities for specifically targeting individual P2 receptors for the treatment of inflammatory or infectious diseases. PMID:24828189

  19. Audio signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    System provides automatic volume control for an audio amplifier or a voice communication system without introducing noise surges during pauses in the input, and without losing the initial signal when the input resumes.

  20. Signals from the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Jeffrey M.

    1991-01-01

    Introduces the basics of radio astronomy and describes how to assemble several simple systems for receiving radio signals from the cosmos. Includes schematics, parts lists, working drawings, and contact information for radio astronomy suppliers. (11 references) (Author/JJK)

  1. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  2. Signals from the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Jeffrey M.

    1991-01-01

    Introduces the basics of radio astronomy and describes how to assemble several simple systems for receiving radio signals from the cosmos. Includes schematics, parts lists, working drawings, and contact information for radio astronomy suppliers. (11 references) (Author/JJK)

  3. Signal processing in SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, D. K.; Linscott, I. R.; Oliver, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is believed that the Galaxy might contain ten billion potential life sites. In view of the physical inaccessibility of extraterrestrial life on account of the vast distances involved, a logical first step in a search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) appears to be an attempt to detect signals already being radiated. The characteristics of the signals to be expected are discussed together with the search strategy of a NASA program. It is pointed out that all presently planned searches will use existing radio-astronomy antennas. If no extraterrestrial intelligence signals are discovered, society will have to decide whether SETI justifies a dedicated facility of much greater collecting area. Attention is given to a multichannel spectrum analyzer, CW signal detection, pulse detection, the pattern detector, and details of SETI system operation.

  4. Optical Signal Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-31

    8217 \\..\\ We let k be the ratio of the time base of the reference\\ \\ . signal to that of the received signal. PAU~ ~; II .~** We could analyze this case for an...decreases. The central to the approximation usually stated in optics texts. lobe of the pattern just covers the region II :s I when k We claimed...Reference Waveforms for Heterodyne Spectrum Analyzers K We previously developed the use of a distributed local oscillator, generated by a reference wavefront

  5. Dissecting DR3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Pobezinskaya, Yelena L; Liu, Zhenggang; Choksi, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Receptor signaling can be evaluated in multiple ways, including analysis of phosphorylation of downstream molecules and analysis of proteins that are recruited to the receptor upon ligand binding. Majority of studies on the mechanism of DR3 signaling were performed using overexpression systems that can often lead to artifacts. In this chapter we describe how to analyze DR3 downstream events with most attention being paid to endogenous immunoprecipitation.

  6. Wnt signaling and osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Manolagas, Stavros C.

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in understanding basic bone biology and the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of osteoporosis, over the last 20 years, have dramatically altered the management of this disease. The purpose of this mini-review is to highlight the seminal role of Wnt signaling in bone homeostasis and disease and the emergence of novel osteoporosis therapies by targeting Wnt signaling with drugs. PMID:24815296

  7. Signal-light nomogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, J. I.; Edgerton, C. F.; Duntley, S. Q.

    1975-01-01

    A nomogram is presented for predicting the sighting range for white, steady-burning signal lights. The theoretical and experimental bases are explained and instructions are provided for its use for a variety of practical problems concerning the visibility of signal lights. The nomogram is appropriate for slant path as well as horizontal sightings, and the gain of range achieved by utilizing binoculars can be predicted by use of it.

  8. Digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, A. V.; Baggeroer, A. B.; Lim, J. S.; Musicus, B. R.; Mook, D. R.; Duckworth, G. L.; Bordley, T. E.; Curtis, S. R.; Deadrick, D. S.; Dove, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    Signal and image processing research projects are described. Topics include: (1) modeling underwater acoustic propagation; (2) image restoration; (3) signal reconstruction; (4) speech enhancement; (5) pitch detection; (6) spectral analysis; (7) speech synthesis; (8) speech enhancement; (9) autoregressive spectral estimation; (10) knowledge based array processing; (11) speech analysis; (12) estimating the degree of coronary stenosis with image processing; (13) automatic target detection; and (14) video conferencing.

  9. A model study of sequential enzyme reactions and electrostatic channeling.

    PubMed

    Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; Metzger, Vincent T; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-03-14

    We study models of two sequential enzyme-catalyzed reactions as a basic functional building block for coupled biochemical networks. We investigate the influence of enzyme distributions and long-range molecular interactions on reaction kinetics, which have been exploited in biological systems to maximize metabolic efficiency and signaling effects. Specifically, we examine how the maximal rate of product generation in a series of sequential reactions is dependent on the enzyme distribution and the electrostatic composition of its participant enzymes and substrates. We find that close proximity between enzymes does not guarantee optimal reaction rates, as the benefit of decreasing enzyme separation is countered by the volume excluded by adjacent enzymes. We further quantify the extent to which the electrostatic potential increases the efficiency of transferring substrate between enzymes, which supports the existence of electrostatic channeling in nature. Here, a major finding is that the role of attractive electrostatic interactions in confining intermediate substrates in the vicinity of the enzymes can contribute more to net reactive throughput than the directional properties of the electrostatic fields. These findings shed light on the interplay of long-range interactions and enzyme distributions in coupled enzyme-catalyzed reactions, and their influence on signaling in biological systems.

  10. A model study of sequential enzyme reactions and electrostatic channeling

    PubMed Central

    Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; Metzger, Vincent T.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We study models of two sequential enzyme-catalyzed reactions as a basic functional building block for coupled biochemical networks. We investigate the influence of enzyme distributions and long-range molecular interactions on reaction kinetics, which have been exploited in biological systems to maximize metabolic efficiency and signaling effects. Specifically, we examine how the maximal rate of product generation in a series of sequential reactions is dependent on the enzyme distribution and the electrostatic composition of its participant enzymes and substrates. We find that close proximity between enzymes does not guarantee optimal reaction rates, as the benefit of decreasing enzyme separation is countered by the volume excluded by adjacent enzymes. We further quantify the extent to which the electrostatic potential increases the efficiency of transferring substrate between enzymes, which supports the existence of electrostatic channeling in nature. Here, a major finding is that the role of attractive electrostatic interactions in confining intermediate substrates in the vicinity of the enzymes can contribute more to net reactive throughput than the directional properties of the electrostatic fields. These findings shed light on the interplay of long-range interactions and enzyme distributions in coupled enzyme-catalyzed reactions, and their influence on signaling in biological systems. PMID:24628210

  11. Redox signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Our aim is to deliver an authoritative and challenging perspective of current concepts in plant redox signaling, focusing particularly on the complex interface between the redox and hormone-signaling pathways that allow precise control of plant growth and defense in response to metabolic triggers and environmental constraints and cues. Plants produce significant amounts of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of photosynthetic electron transport and metabolism. Such pathways contribute to the compartment-specific redox-regulated signaling systems in plant cells that convey information to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. Like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, the apoplast-cell wall compartment makes a significant contribution to the redox signaling network, but unlike these organelles, the apoplast has a low antioxidant-buffering capacity. The respective roles of ROS, low-molecular antioxidants, redox-active proteins, and antioxidant enzymes are considered in relation to the functions of plant hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, in the composite control of plant growth and defense. Regulation of redox gradients between key compartments in plant cells such as those across the plasma membrane facilitates flexible and multiple faceted opportunities for redox signaling that spans the intracellular and extracellular environments. In conclusion, plants are recognized as masters of the art of redox regulation that use oxidants and antioxidants as flexible integrators of signals from metabolism and the environment.

  12. Cytokinin signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ildoo; Sheen, Jen; Müller, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Despite long-standing observations on diverse cytokinin actions, the discovery path to cytokinin signaling mechanisms was tortuous. Unyielding to conventional genetic screens, experimental innovations were paramount in unraveling the core cytokinin signaling circuitry, which employs a large repertoire of genes with overlapping and specific functions. The canonical two-component transcription circuitry involves His kinases that perceive cytokinin and initiate signaling, as well as His-to-Asp phosphorelay proteins that transfer phosphoryl groups to response regulators, transcriptional activators, or repressors. Recent advances have revealed the complex physiological functions of cytokinins, including interactions with auxin and other signal transduction pathways. This review begins by outlining the historical path to cytokinin discovery and then elucidates the diverse cytokinin functions and key signaling components. Highlights focus on the integration of cytokinin signaling components into regulatory networks in specific contexts, ranging from molecular, cellular, and developmental regulations in the embryo, root apical meristem, shoot apical meristem, stem and root vasculature, and nodule organogenesis to organismal responses underlying immunity, stress tolerance, and senescence.

  13. Sucrose signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Jorge A.; Pontis, Horacio G.; Martínez-Noël, Giselle M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The role of sucrose as a signaling molecule in plants was originally proposed several decades ago. However, recognition of sucrose as a true signal has been largely debated and only recently this role has been fully accepted. The best-studied cases of sucrose signaling involve metabolic processes, such as the induction of fructan or anthocyanin synthesis, but a large volume of scattered information suggests that sucrose signals may control a vast array of developmental processes along the whole life cycle of the plant. Also, wide gaps exist in our current understanding of the intracellular steps that mediate sucrose action. Sucrose concentration in plant tissues tends to be directly related to light intensity, and inversely related to temperature, and accordingly, exogenous sucrose supply often mimics the effect of high light and cold. However, many exceptions to this rule seem to occur due to interactions with other signaling pathways. In conclusion, the sucrose role as a signal molecule in plants is starting to be unveiled and much research is still needed to have a complete map of its significance in plant function. PMID:23333971

  14. Signal Generalization and Discrimination in Meter-Monitoring Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-03-01

    appropriate to S. The experimental situation was thus reminiscent of the Donders b -reaction, a so-called disjunctive reaction in classical studies of reaction...expected, too, in the signal detection setting. i6’Project b -23, "Effects of perceptual response complexity on perform- ance in a visual monitoring task...9-0--o. o ~ 4h 3.0- 00Ř U 010-2 0-30- Fis 1. Bar gp b for izividual subject@ oe o ing resmponme to critical sIg,.l &lo vitb responses dis8oriinating

  15. Amplification of electromagnetic signals by ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Galvanovskis, J; Sandblom, J

    1997-01-01

    Cells may respond to the exposure of low-frequency electromagnetic fields with changes in cell division, ion influx, chemical reaction rates, etc. The chain of events leading to such responses is difficult to study, mainly because of extremely small energies associated with low-frequency fields, usually much smaller than the thermal noise level. However, the presence of stochastic systems (for instance, ion channels) provides a basis for signal amplification, and could therefore, despite the low signal-to-noise ratio of the primary response, lead to the transmission of weak signals along the signaling pathways of cells. We have explored this possibility for an ion channel model, and we present a theory, based on the formalism of stochastically driven processes, that relates the time averages of the ion channel currents to the amplitude and frequency of the applied signal. It is concluded from this theory that the signal-to-noise ratio increases with the number of channels, the magnitude of the rate constants, and the frequency response of the intracellular sensing system (for instance, a calcium oscillator). The amplification properties of the stochastic system are further deduced from numerical simulations carried out on the model, which consists of multiple identical two-state channels, and the behavior for different parameters is examined. Numerical estimates of the parameters show that under optimum conditions, even very weak low-frequency electromagnetic signals (<100 Hz and down to 100 microT) may be detected in a cellular system with a large number of ion channels. PMID:9414219

  16. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis.

  17. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis. PMID:25941081

  18. Participants' Reactions to Computerized Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Kim C.; Johnson, Marilyn F.

    This study investigated participants' reactions to computerized testing and assessed the practicability of this testing method in the classroom. A sample of 315 secondary-level students took a computerized and a printed version of a standardized aptitude test battery and a survey assessing their reactions to the computerized testing. Overall…

  19. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  20. Pharmacogenetics of hypersensitivity drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Simone; Becquemont, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and represent a major burden on the healthcare system. Some of those reactions are immunologically mediated (hypersensitivity reactions) and can be clinically subdivided into two categories: immediate reactions (IgE-related) and delayed reactions (T-cell-mediated). Delayed hypersensitivity reactions include both systemic syndromes and organ-specific toxicities and can be triggered by a wide range of chemically diverse drugs. Recent studies have demonstrated a strong genetic association between human leukocyte antigen alleles and susceptibility to delayed drug hypersensitivity. Most notable examples include human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*57:01 allele and abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome or HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-B*58:01 alleles related to severe cutaneous reactions induced by carbamazepine and allopurinol, respectively. This review aims to explore our current understanding in the field of pharmacogenomics of HLA-associated drug hypersensitivities and its translation into clinical practice for predicting adverse drug reactions. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Statistical Factors in Complexation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1985-01-01

    Four cases which illustrate statistical factors in complexation reactions (where two of the reactants are monodentate ligands) are presented. Included are tables showing statistical factors for the reactions of: (1) square-planar complexes; (2) tetrahedral complexes; and (3) octahedral complexes. (JN)

  2. "Greening up" the Suzuki Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktoudianakis, Evangelos; Chan, Elton; Edward, Amanda R.; Jarosz, Isabel; Lee, Vicki; Mui, Leo; Thatipamala, Sonya S.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rapid, green synthesis of a biaryl compound (4-phenylphenol) via a Pd(0)-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reaction in water. Mild reaction conditions and operational simplicity makes this experiment especially amenable to both mid- and upper-level undergraduates. The methodology exposes students to purely aqueous…

  3. "Greening up" the Suzuki Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktoudianakis, Evangelos; Chan, Elton; Edward, Amanda R.; Jarosz, Isabel; Lee, Vicki; Mui, Leo; Thatipamala, Sonya S.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rapid, green synthesis of a biaryl compound (4-phenylphenol) via a Pd(0)-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reaction in water. Mild reaction conditions and operational simplicity makes this experiment especially amenable to both mid- and upper-level undergraduates. The methodology exposes students to purely aqueous…

  4. Isosinglet approximation for nonelastic reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Group theoretic relations are derived between different combinations of projectile and secondary particles which appear to have a broad range of application in spacecraft shielding or radiation damage studies. These relations are used to reduce the experimental effort required to obtain nuclear reaction data for transport calculations. Implications for theoretical modeling are also noted, especially for heavy-heavy reactions.

  5. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  6. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  7. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  8. PHENOTHIAZINE ATARAXICS—Extrapyramidal Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Harvey D.; Malcolm, Mary

    1960-01-01

    Thirty-nine cases of extrapyramidal reactions caused by seven chemically different phenothiazine medications are presented. Historical, pharmacological, diagnostic, and therapeutic factors are considered. It is important that the physician prescribing phenothiazines be well aware of the reactions which may occur so that therapy may be discontinued at the first untoward signs. PMID:13806816

  9. Kinetics and dynamics in the G protein-coupled receptor signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Romero, Guillermo; Feinstein, Timothy N; Wehbi, Vanessa L

    2013-01-01

    We describe optical and microscopy methods based on Förster resonance energy transfer, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and imaging cross-correlation spectroscopy that permit to determine kinetic and dynamic properties of key reactions involved G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling from the initial ligand binding step to the generation of the second messenger, cAMP. Well suited to determine rate-limiting reactions taking place along a GPCR signaling cascade in live cells, these techniques have also uncovered new concepts in GPCR signaling as well as many interesting mechanistic subtleties by which GPCRs transmit neurotransmitter and hormone signals into cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-05

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  11. Fundamental reaction pathways during coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Gatsis, J.G. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the fundamental reaction pathways in coal petroleum residuum coprocessing. Once the reaction pathways are defined, further efforts can be directed at improving those aspects of the chemistry of coprocessing that are responsible for the desired results such as high oil yields, low dihydrogen consumption, and mild reaction conditions. We decided to carry out this investigation by looking at four basic aspects of coprocessing: (1) the effect of fossil fuel materials on promoting reactions essential to coprocessing such as hydrogen atom transfer, carbon-carbon bond scission, and hydrodemethylation; (2) the effect of varied mild conditions on the coprocessing reactions; (3) determination of dihydrogen uptake and utilization under severe conditions as a function of the coal or petroleum residuum employed; and (4) the effect of varied dihydrogen pressure, temperature, and residence time on the uptake and utilization of dihydrogen and on the distribution of the coprocessed products. Accomplishments are described.

  12. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  13. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  14. [Anaphylactic reaction following hair bleaching].

    PubMed

    Babilas, P; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2005-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate is a potent bleach and oxidizing agent that is commonly present in hair bleaches. Because bleaching is so commonly performed, hairdressers often develop allergic contact dermatitis to ammonium persulphate. In addition to this delayed reaction, asthma and rhinitis may develop as immediate reactions in those exposed to the fumes. Severe anaphylactic reactions are rare. We report a 24-year-old woman who acquired dermatitis following contact with bleaching substances while working as a hairdresser. After changing her profession, the dermatitis disappeared. Following the private use of a hairdressing bleach containing ammonium persulphate, she suffered a severe anaphylactic reaction with unconsciousness. The patient also developed an anaphylactic reaction three hours following patch testing with the hairdresser battery. The rub test with ammonium persulphate (2.5%) in a 1:100 solution was positive.

  15. Reaction time facilitation for horizontally moving auditory-visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Neil R; Wuerger, Sophie M; Meyer, Georg F

    2010-12-16

    For moving targets, bimodal facilitation of reaction time has been observed for motion in the depth plane (C. Cappe, G. Thut, B. Romei, & M. M. Murray, 2009), but it is unclear whether analogous RT facilitation is observed for auditory-visual motion stimuli in the horizontal plane, as perception of horizontal motion relies on very different cues. Here we found that bimodal motion cues resulted in significant RT facilitation at threshold level, which could not be explained using an independent decisions model (race model). Bimodal facilitation was observed at suprathreshold levels when the RTs for suprathreshold unimodal stimuli were roughly equated, and significant RT gains were observed for direction-discrimination tasks with abrupt-onset motion stimuli and with motion preceded by a stationary phase. We found no speeded responses for bimodal signals when a motion signal in one modality was paired with a spatially co-localized stationary signal in the other modality, but faster response times could be explained by statistical facilitation when the motion signals traveled in opposite directions. These results strongly suggest that integration of motion cues led to the speeded bimodal responses. Finally, our results highlight the importance of matching the unimodal reaction times to obtain response facilitation for bimodal motion signals in the linear plane.

  16. Reaction rates for reaction-diffusion kinetics on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2017-02-01

    The reaction-diffusion master equation is a stochastic model often utilized in the study of biochemical reaction networks in living cells. It is applied when the spatial distribution of molecules is important to the dynamics of the system. A viable approach to resolve the complex geometry of cells accurately is to discretize space with an unstructured mesh. Diffusion is modeled as discrete jumps between nodes on the mesh, and the diffusion jump rates can be obtained through a discretization of the diffusion equation on the mesh. Reactions can occur when molecules occupy the same voxel. In this paper, we develop a method for computing accurate reaction rates between molecules occupying the same voxel in an unstructured mesh. For large voxels, these rates are known to be well approximated by the reaction rates derived by Collins and Kimball, but as the mesh is refined, no analytical expression for the rates exists. We reduce the problem of computing accurate reaction rates to a pure preprocessing step, depending only on the mesh and not on the model parameters, and we devise an efficient numerical scheme to estimate them to high accuracy. We show in several numerical examples that as we refine the mesh, the results obtained with the reaction-diffusion master equation approach those of a more fine-grained Smoluchowski particle-tracking model.

  17. Calcium signaling and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Kass, G E; Orrenius, S

    1999-01-01

    The divalent calcium cation Ca(2+) is used as a major signaling molecule during cell signal transduction to regulate energy output, cellular metabolism, and phenotype. The basis to the signaling role of Ca(2+) is an intricate network of cellular channels and transporters that allow a low resting concentration of Ca(2+) in the cytosol of the cell ([Ca(2+)]i) but that are also coupled to major dynamic and rapidly exchanging stores. This enables extracellular signals from hormones and growth factors to be transduced as [Ca(2+)]i spikes that are amplitude and frequency encoded. There is considerable evidence that a number of toxic environmental chemicals target these Ca(2+) signaling processes, alter them, and induce cell death by apoptosis. Two major pathways for apoptosis will be considered. The first one involves Ca(2+)-mediated expression of ligands that bind to and activate death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1). In the second pathway, Ca(2+) has a direct toxic effect and its primary targets include the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mitochondria may respond to an apoptotic Ca(2+) signal by the selective release of cytochrome c or through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and opening of an inner mitochondrial membrane pore. Toxic agents such as the environmental pollutant tributyltin or the natural plant product thapsigargin, which deplete the ER Ca(2+) stores, will induce as a direct result of this effect the opening of plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels and an ER stress response. In contrast, under some conditions, Ca(2+) signals may be cytoprotective and antagonize the apoptotic machinery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10229704

  18. Temperature-dependent signal transmission in chloroplast accumulation response.

    PubMed

    Higa, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hayasaki, Yoshio; Kodama, Yutaka; Wada, Masamitsu

    2017-07-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement, well-characterized light-induced response found in various plant species from alga to higher plants, is an important phenomenon for plants to increase photosynthesis efficiency and avoid photodamage. The signal for chloroplast accumulation movement connecting the blue light receptor, phototropin, and chloroplasts remains to be identified, although the photoreceptors and the mechanism of movement via chloroplast actin filaments have now been revealed in land plants. The characteristics of the signal have been found; the speed of signal transfer is about 1 µm min(-1) and that the signal for the accumulation response has a longer life and is transferred a longer distance than that of the avoidance response. Here, to collect the clues of the unknown signal substances, we studied the effect of temperature on the speed of signal transmission using the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and found the possibility that the mechanism of signal transfer was not dependent on the simple diffusion of a substance; thus, some chemical reaction must also be involved. We also found new insights of signaling substances, such that microtubules are not involved in the signal transmission, and that the signal could even be transmitted through the narrow space between chloroplasts and the plasma membrane.

  19. Photosynthetic reaction center of green sulfur bacteria studied by EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, W.; Rutherford, A.W. ); Fieler, U. )

    1990-04-24

    Membrane preparations of two species of the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium have been studied be EPR. Three signals were detected which were attributed to iron-sulfur centers acting as electron acceptors in the photosynthetic reaction center. (1) A signal from a center designated F{sub B}, was photoinduced at 4K. (2) A similar signal, F{sub A}, was photoinduced in addition to the F{sub B} signal upon a short period of illumination at 200 K. (3) Further illumination at 200 K resulted in the appearance of a broad feature at g=1.78. This is attributed to the g{sub x} component of an iron-sulfur center designated F{sub X}. The designations of these signals as F{sub B}, F{sub A}, and F{sub X} are based on their spectroscopic similarities to signals in photosystem I (PS I). The orientation dependence of these EPR signals in ordered Chlorobium membrane multilayers is remarkably similar to that of their PS I homologues. A magnetic interaction between the reduced forms of F{sub B} and F{sub A} occurs, which is also very similar to that seen in PS I. The triplet state of P{sub 840}, the primary electron donor, could be photoinduced at 4 K in samples which had been preincubated with sodium dithionite and methyl viologen and then preilluminated at 200 K. The preillumination reduces the iron-sulfur centers while the preincubation is thought to result in the inactivation of an earlier electron acceptor. Orientation studies of the triplet signal in ordered multilayers indicate that the bacteriochlorophylls which act as the primary electron donor in Chlorobium are arranged with a structural geometry almost identical with that of the special pair in purple bacteria. The Chlorobium reaction center appears to be similar in some respects to both PS I and to the purple bacterial reaction center. This is discussed with regard to the evolution of the different types of reaction centers from a common ancestor.

  20. Effective reaction parameters for mixing controlled reactions in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Dentz, Marco; Carrera, Jesus; Kitanidis, Peter

    2008-02-01

    Sound understanding of mixing-controlled reactions in heterogeneous media is needed for the realistic modeling of contaminant transport in aquifers and is a precondition for the evaluation of natural attenuation processes, the design of nuclear waste disposal, and the engineered remediation of contaminated sites. In this work, we study the bimolecular dissolution-precipitation equilibrium reaction, adapted after De Simoni et al. (2005). Because of advective and dispersive transport of the reacting species, the system is globally in nonequilibrium because the effective reaction rate is limited by the finite rate of transport and thus is affected by the heterogeneity of the formation. We study the macroscopic formulation of such a reactive transport system in terms of mixing-controlled reaction parameters which integrate the impact of spatial heterogeneity. The apparent chemical saturation is found to be a function of the concentration variance and is generally greater than its local-scale equivalent. This explains why water samples taken from pumping wells are normally nonequilibrium with respect to minerals existing in the aquifer, even when local equilibrium is to be expected. The reaction rate is given by the product of a reaction factor, associated with the local equilibrium constant and concentration variance, and a mixing factor, which is the product of the microdispersion coefficient and the square gradient of the mean and perturbation concentration fields. The mixing factor dominates the description of the reaction rate in the upscaled macroscopic models. The reaction rate predicted by macroscopic models is controlled by two competing effects: The large heterogeneity-induced macrodispersion coefficient leads to an increase of reaction rate, while a more smoothed concentration gradient may lead to a decrease of the reaction rate. Macroscopic models may only give a good approximation at large time and away from the plume center of mass because of the balanced

  1. Reactive oxygen species generation and signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Baishnab Charan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of molecular oxygen into the atmosphere was accompanied by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as side products of many biochemical reactions. ROS are permanently generated in plastids, peroxisomes, mitochiondria, the cytosol and the apoplast. Imbalance between ROS generation and safe detoxification generates oxidative stress and the accumulating ROS are harmful for the plants. On the other hand, specific ROS function as signaling molecules and activate signal transduction processes in response to various stresses. Here, we summarize the generation of ROS in the different cellular compartments and the signaling processes which are induced by ROS. PMID:23072988

  2. Electrical signaling and photosynthesis: can they co-exist together?

    PubMed

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Mancuso, Stefano

    2011-06-01

    Mechanical irritation of trigger hairs and subsequent generation of action potentials have significant impact on photosynthesis and respiration in carnivorous Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula). Action potential-mediated inhibition of photosynthesis and stimulation of respiration is confined only to the trap and was not recorded in adjacent photosynthetic lamina. We showed that the main primary target of electrical signals on assimilation is in the dark enzymatic reaction of photosynthesis. Without doubt, the electrical signaling is costly, and the possible co-existence of such type of signals and photosynthesis in plant cell is discussed.

  3. Purinergic signalling and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Novak, Ivana

    2013-09-01

    The pancreas is an organ with a central role in nutrient breakdown, nutrient sensing and release of hormones regulating whole body nutrient homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the balance is broken-cells can be starving in the midst of plenty. There are indications that the incidence of diabetes type 1 and 2, and possibly pancreatogenic diabetes, is rising globally. Events leading to insulin secretion and action are complex, but there is emerging evidence that intracellular nucleotides and nucleotides are not only important as intracellular energy molecules but also as extracellular signalling molecules in purinergic signalling cascades. This signalling takes place at the level of the pancreas, where the close apposition of various cells-endocrine, exocrine, stromal and immune cells-contributes to the integrated function. Following an introduction to diabetes, the pancreas and purinergic signalling, we will focus on the role of purinergic signalling and its changes associated with diabetes in the pancreas and selected tissues/organ systems affected by hyperglycaemia and other stress molecules of diabetes. Since this is the first review of this kind, a comprehensive historical angle is taken, and common and divergent roles of receptors for nucleotides and nucleosides in different organ systems will be given. This integrated picture will aid our understanding of the challenges of the potential and currently used drugs targeted to specific organ/cells or disorders associated with diabetes.

  4. Photoreverse Reaction Dynamics of Octopus Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Keiichi; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Terazima, Masahide

    2007-01-01

    Photoreverse reactions of octopus rhodopsin (Rh) from acid-metarhodopsin (Acid-Meta), which is the final product of the photoreaction of Rh, to Rh were studied by the time-resolved transient absorption and transient grating methods. The time course of the absorption signal showed a rapid change within 500 ns followed by one phase with a time constant of ∼470 μs, whereas the transient grating signal indicates three phases with time constants of <500 ns, ∼490 μs, and 2.6 ms. The faster two phases indicate the conformational change in the vicinity of the chromophore, and the slowest one represents conformational change far from the chromophore. The absorption spectrum of the first intermediate created just after the laser excitation (<500 ns) is already very similar to the final product, Rh. This behavior is quite different from that of the forward reaction from Rh to Acid-Meta, in which several intermediates with different absorption spectra are involved within 50 ns–500 μs. This result indicates that the conformation around the chromophore is easily adjusted from all-trans to 11-cis forms compared with that from 11-cis to all-trans forms. Furthermore, it was found that the protein energy is quickly relaxed after the excitation. One of the significantly different properties between Rh and Acid-Meta is the diffusion coefficient (D). D is reduced by about half the transformation from Rh to Acid-Meta. This large reduction was interpreted in terms of the helix opening of the Rh structure. PMID:17325000

  5. Leukocyte Agglomeration Reaction in Diagnosis of Allergy Reactions from Antibiotics,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    tested in a clinic on 80 patients with serious allergic anamnesis . The results of the studies indicate that the leukocyte agglomeration reaction is a highly sensitive immunological indicator of hypersensitivity to antibiotics.

  6. Interface Reactions and Synthetic Reaction of Composite Systems

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon Sik; Kim, Jeong Min

    2010-01-01

    Interface reactions in composite systems often determine their overall properties, since product phases usually formed at interfaces during composite fabrication processing make up a large portion of the composites. Since most composite materials represent a ternary or higher order materials system, many studies have focused on analyses of diffusion phenomena and kinetics in multicomponent systems. However, the understanding of the kinetic behavior increases the complexity, since the kinetics of each component during interdiffusion reactions need to be defined for interpreting composite behaviors. From this standpoint, it is important to clarify the interface reactions for producing compatible interfaces with desired product phases. A thermodynamic evaluation such as a chemical potential of involving components can provide an understanding of the diffusion reactions, which govern diffusion pathways and product phase formation. A strategic approach for designing compatible interfaces is discussed in terms of chemical potential diagrams and interface morphology, with some material examples.

  7. Hypersensitivity reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Shahid; Bahna, Sami L

    2009-06-01

    To provide an updated concise review on food additives adverse reactions, diagnosis, and management. Despite the common use of food additives, their adverse reactions seem to be very rare in the general population (0.01-0.23%) but higher in atopic individuals (2-7%). Probably because of the difficulty in diagnosis, most of the available information is based on case reports or small series. Reported reactions are mostly mild and may affect the skin, the gastrointestinal tract, or the airways, and rarely anaphylaxis. Food additives should be suspected as the culprit in patients who report a history of reactions to a number of unrelated foods or to a certain food when commercially prepared but not when prepared at home. The major problem in dealing with reactions to additives is the identification of the offending agent(s). Apart from a careful history taking, allergy skin testing or in-vitro testing are rarely useful. Trials of elimination and reintroduction may be more helpful. If the anticipated reaction is severe, a well designed challenge testing should be carried out. Once the offending additive(s) is confirmed, treatment is avoidance. Because accidental exposure often happens, patients with a history of severe reactions should have self-injectable epinephrine and wear MedicAlert (Turlock, California, USA) identification.

  8. Surrogate Nuclear Reactions using STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Church, J A; Ahle, L; Cooper, J R; Hoffman, R D; Moody, K; Punyon, J; Schiller, A; Algin, E; Plettner, C; Ai, H; Beausang, C W; Casten, R F; Hughes, R; Ricard-McCutchan, E; Meyer, D; Ressler, J J; Caggiano, J A; Zamfir, N V; Amro, H; Heinz, A; Fallon, P; McMahan, M A; Macchiavelli, A O; Phair, L W

    2004-10-26

    The results from two surrogate reaction experiments using the STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) spectrometer are presented. The surrogate method involves measuring the particle and/or {gamma}-ray decay probabilities of excited nuclei populated via a direct reaction. These probabilities can then be used to deduce neutron-induced reaction cross sections that lead to the same compound nuclei. In the first experiment STARS coupled to the GAMMASPHERE {gamma}-ray spectrometer successfully reproduce surrogate (n,{gamma}), (n,n'{gamma}) and (n,2n{gamma}) cross sections on {sup 155,156}Gd using Gd {sup 3}He-induced reactions. In the second series of experiments an energetic deuteron beam from the ESTU tandem at the Wright Nuclear Structure Lab at Yale University was used to obtain the ratio of fission probabilities for {sup 238}U/ {sup 236}U and {sup 237}U/ {sup 239}U populated using the {sup 236,238}U(d,d'f) and {sup 236,238}U(d,pf) reactions. Results from these experiments are presented and the implications for the surrogate reaction technique are discussed.

  9. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Holst, Gregory L.; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L.; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously—each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  10. Separation of Climate Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Fodor, I

    2002-11-13

    Understanding changes in global climate is a challenging scientific problem. Simulated and observed data include signals from many sources, and untangling their respective effects is difficult. In order to make meaningful comparisons between different models, and to understand human effects on global climate, we need to isolate the effects of different sources. Recent eruptions of the El Chichon and Mt. Pinatubo volcanoes coincided with large El Nino and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, which complicates the separation of their contributions on global temperatures. Current approaches for separating volcano and ENSO signals in global mean data involve parametric models and iterative techniques [3]. We investigate alternative methods based on principal component analysis (PCA) [2] and independent component analysis (ICA) [1]. Our goal is to determine if such techniques can automatically identify the signals corresponding to the different sources, without relying on parametric models.

  11. Integrin signaling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Finney, Alexandra C; Stokes, Karen Y; Pattillo, Christopher B; Orr, A Wayne

    2017-06-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic lipid-driven inflammatory disease affecting large arteries, represents the primary cause of cardiovascular disease in the world. The local remodeling of the vessel intima during atherosclerosis involves the modulation of vascular cell phenotype, alteration of cell migration and proliferation, and propagation of local extracellular matrix remodeling. All of these responses represent targets of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors. As such, alterations in integrin signaling affect multiple aspects of atherosclerosis, from the earliest induction of inflammation to the development of advanced fibrotic plaques. Integrin signaling has been shown to regulate endothelial phenotype, facilitate leukocyte homing, affect leukocyte function, and drive smooth muscle fibroproliferative remodeling. In addition, integrin signaling in platelets contributes to the thrombotic complications that typically drive the clinical manifestation of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we examine the current literature on integrin regulation of atherosclerotic plaque development and the suitability of integrins as potential therapeutic targets to limit cardiovascular disease and its complications.

  12. Telemetry Ranging: Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the details of the signal processing used in a telemetry ranging system in which timing information is extracted from the downlink telemetry signal in order to compute spacecraft range. A previous article describes telemetry ranging concepts and architecture, which are a slight variation of a scheme published earlier. As in that earlier work, the telemetry ranging concept eliminates the need for a dedicated downlink ranging signal to communicate the necessary timing information. The present article describes the operation and performance of the major receiver functions on the spacecraft and the ground --- many of which are standard tracking loops already in use in JPL's flight and ground radios --- and how they can be used to provide the relevant information for making a range measurement. It also describes the implementation of these functions in software, and performance of an end-to-end software simulation of the telemetry ranging system.

  13. Updating dopamine reward signals

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has advanced our knowledge of phasic dopamine reward prediction error signals. The error signal is bidirectional, reflects well the higher order prediction error described by temporal difference learning models, is compatible with model-free and model-based reinforcement learning, reports the subjective rather than physical reward value during temporal discounting and reflects subjective stimulus perception rather than physical stimulus aspects. Dopamine activations are primarily driven by reward, and to some extent risk, whereas punishment and salience have only limited activating effects when appropriate controls are respected. The signal is homogeneous in terms of time course but heterogeneous in many other aspects. It is essential for synaptic plasticity and a range of behavioural learning situations. PMID:23267662

  14. Plant TOR signaling components

    PubMed Central

    John, Florian; Roffler, Stefan; Wicker, Thomas; Ringli, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Cell growth is a process that needs to be tightly regulated. Cells must be able to sense environmental factors like nutrient abundance, the energy level or stress signals and coordinate growth accordingly. The Target Of Rapamycin (TOR) pathway is a major controller of growth-related processes in all eukaryotes. If environmental conditions are favorable, the TOR pathway promotes cell and organ growth and restrains catabolic processes like autophagy. Rapamycin is a specific inhibitor of the TOR kinase and acts as a potent inhibitor of TOR signaling. As a consequence, interfering with TOR signaling has a strong impact on plant development. This review summarizes the progress in the understanding of the biological significance and the functional analysis of the TOR pathway in plants. PMID:22057328

  15. Endocytosis, Signaling, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; von Zastrow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic network comprises a vast and intricate system of membrane-delimited cell entry and cargo sorting routes running between biochemically and functionally distinct intracellular compartments. The endocytic network caters to the organization and redistribution of diverse subcellular components, and mediates appropriate shuttling and processing of materials acquired from neighboring cells or the extracellular milieu. Such trafficking logistics, despite their importance, represent only one facet of endocytic function. The endocytic network also plays a key role in organizing, mediating, and regulating cellular signal transduction events. Conversely, cellular signaling processes tightly control the endocytic pathway at different steps. The present article provides a perspective on the intimate relationships that exist between particular endocytic and cellular signaling processes in mammalian cells, within the context of understanding the impact of this nexus on integrated physiology. PMID:25085911

  16. Low ionospheric reactions on tropical depressions prior hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nina, Aleksandra; Radovanović, Milan; Milovanović, Boško; Kovačević, Andjelka; Bajčetić, Jovan; Popović, Luka Č.

    2017-10-01

    We study the reactions of the low ionosphere during tropical depressions (TDs) which have been detected before the hurricane appearances in the Atlantic Ocean. We explore 41 TD events using very low frequency (VLF) radio signals emitted by NAA transmitter located in the USA and recorded by VLF receiver located in Belgrade (Serbia). We found VLF signal deviations (caused ionospheric turbulence) in the case of 36 out of 41 TD events (88%). Additionally, we explore 27 TDs which have not been developed in hurricanes and found similar low ionospheric reactions. However, in the sample of 41 TDs which are followed by hurricanes the typical low ionosphere perturbations seem to be more frequent than other TDs.

  17. GEANT4 simulations of Cherenkov reaction history diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Caldwell, S. E.; Evans, S. C.; Sedilleo, T. J.; McEvoy, A.; Miller, E. K.; Stoeffl, W.; Ali, Z.

    2010-10-15

    This paper compares the results from a GEANT4 simulation of the gas Cherenkov detector 1 (GCD1) with previous simulations and experimental data from the Omega laser facility. The GCD1 collects gammas emitted during a deuterium-tritium capsule implosion and converts them, through several processes, to Cherenkov light. Photon signals are recorded using subnanosecond photomultiplier tubes, producing burn reaction histories. The GEANT4 GCD1 simulation is first benchmarked against ACCEPT, an integrated tiger series code, with good agreement. The simulation is subsequently compared with data from the Omega laser facility, where experiments have been performed to measure the effects of Hohlraum materials on reaction history signals, in preparation for experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  18. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  19. Standard Gibbs Energy of Metabolic Reactions: I. Hexokinase Reaction.

    PubMed

    Meurer, Florian; Bobrownik, Maria; Sadowski, Gabriele; Held, Christoph

    2016-10-11

    The standard Gibbs energy of reaction enables calculation of the driving force of a (bio)chemical reaction. Gibbs energies of reaction are required in thermodynamic approaches to determine fluxes as well as single reaction conversions of metabolic bioreactions. The hexokinase reaction (phosphorylation of glucose) is the entrance step of glycolysis, and thus its standard Gibbs energy of reaction (Δ(R)g°) is of great impact. Δ(R)g° is accessible from equilibrium measurements, and the very small concentrations of the reacting agents cause usually high error bars in data reduction steps. Even worse, works from literature do not account for the nonideal behavior of the reacting agents (activity coefficients were assumed to be unity); thus published Δ(R)g° values are not standard data. Consistent treatment of activity coefficients of reacting agents is crucial for the accurate determination of standard Gibbs energy from equilibrium measurements. In this work, equilibrium molalities of hexokinase reaction were measured with an enzyme kit. These results were combined with reacting agents' activity coefficients obtained with the thermodynamic model ePC-SAFT. Pure-component parameters for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) were fitted to experimental osmotic coefficients (water + Na2ATP, water + NaADP). Δ(R)g° of the hexokinase reaction at 298.15 K and pH 7 was found to be -17.83 ± 0.52 kJ·mol(-1). This value was compared with experimental literature data; very good agreement between the different Δ(R)g° values was obtained by accounting for pH, pMg, and the activity coefficients of the reacting agents.

  20. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  1. TOR signalling in plants.

    PubMed

    Rexin, Daniel; Meyer, Christian; Robaglia, Christophe; Veit, Bruce

    2015-08-15

    Although the eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signalling pathway has emerged as a key player for integrating nutrient-, energy- and stress-related cues with growth and metabolic outputs, relatively little is known of how this ancient regulatory mechanism has been adapted in higher plants. Drawing comparisons with the substantial knowledge base around TOR kinase signalling in fungal and animal systems, functional aspects of this pathway in plants are reviewed. Both conserved and divergent elements are discussed in relation to unique aspects associated with an autotrophic mode of nutrition and adaptive strategies for multicellular development exhibited by plants. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  2. Noninvasive vital signal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenan; Chee, Jonny; Chua, Kok Poo; Chen, ZhouDe

    2010-05-01

    Vital signals of patients, such as heart rate, temperature and movement are crucial to monitor patients in hospital. Current heart rate measurement is obtained by using Electrocardiograph, which normally applies electrodes to the patient's body. As electrodes are extremely uncomfortable to ware and hinder patient's movement, a non-invasive vital signal-monitoring device will be a better solution. Similar to Electrocardiograph, the device detects the voltage difference across the heart by using concept of capacitance, which can be obtained by two conductive fiber sewing on the bed sheet. Simultaneous temperature reading can also be detected by using surface mounted temperature sensor. This paper will mainly focus on the heart rate monitoring.

  3. Physiological Signal Conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedericks, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing a Physiological Signal Conditioner (PSC) for monitoring of astronauts in the ISS Human Research Facility. The PSC is battery powered and worn by the crew. The Engineering Development Unit (PSC EDU) and the form-and-fit PSC Tooling Model will be displayed along with associated graphics and text explanations. Results of a recent advanced PSC-2 feasibility study will be presented. The presentation will stimulate discussion of the functional capabilities of a wireless, crew worn Physiological Signal Conditioner. Application of advanced technology to meet the conflicting demands of size, power, and functional capability will be of interest.

  4. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Hallberg, Carl; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center have designed a signal conditioning amplifier which automatically matches itself to almost any kind of transducer. The product, called Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), uses state-of-the-art technologies to deliver high accuracy measurements. USCA's features which can be either programmable or automated include: voltage, current, or pulsed excitation, unlimited resolution gain, digital filtering and both analog and digital output. USCA will be used at Kennedy Space Center's launch pads for environmental measurements such as vibrations, strains, temperatures and overpressures. USCA is presently being commercialized through a co-funded agreement between NASA, the State of Florida, and Loral Test and Information Systems, Inc.

  5. Multichannel signal enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    A mixed adaptive filter is formulated for the signal processing problem where desired a priori signal information is not available. The formulation generates a least squares problem which enables the filter output to be calculated directly from an input data matrix. In one embodiment, a folded processor array enables bidirectional data flow to solve the recursive problem by back substitution without global communications. In another embodiment, a balanced processor array solves the recursive problem by forward elimination through the array. In a particular application to magnetoencephalography, the mixed adaptive filter enables an evoked response to an auditory stimulus to be identified from only a single trial.

  6. Array signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Haykin, S.; Justice, J.H.; Owsley, N.L.; Yen, J.L.; Kak, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    This is the first book to be devoted completely to array signal processing, a subject that has become increasingly important in recent years. The book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1, which is introductory, reviews some basic concepts in wave propagation. The remaining five chapters deal with the theory and applications of array signal processing in (a) exploration seismology, (b) passive sonar, (c) radar, (d) radio astronomy, and (e) tomographic imaging. The various chapters of the book are self-contained. The book is written by a team of five active researchers, who are specialists in the individual fields covered by the pertinent chapters.

  7. Freeze Enhanced Halate Halide Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, J. T.; Weaver, K.; Broderick, A.

    2014-12-01

    Relatively little is known about halate ion species (XO3-; X = I, Br, Cl) in atmospheric condensed phases. It was initial thought that iodate was a terminal stable species upon iodide oxidation. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that reactions involving iodate can lead to reactive iodine, and this chemistry is accelerated under acidic conditions. The environmental concentrations and chemistry of bromate and chlorate are largely unexplored in environmental ices. We present results from a series of aqueous phase halate ion reactions with halides under acidic conditions, showing that the kinetics are strongly enhanced upon freezing. The products of these reactions are reactive halogens, which have important implications to marine boundary layer chemistry.

  8. Magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocking, G.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly (MSRWA) is the product of a development effort funded by the Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) at Wright Patterson AFB. The specific objective of the project was to establish the manufacturing processes for samarium cobalt magnets and demonstrate their use in a space application. The development was successful on both counts. The application portion of the program, which involves the magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly, is emphasized. The requirements for the reaction wheel were based on the bias wheel requirements of the DSP satellite. The tasks included the design, fabrication, and test of the unit to the DSP program qualification requirements.

  9. Adverse reactions to tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R L; Lowe, R S; Lanier, B Q

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective review of 740 charts of patients with a history of adverse reaction to tetanus toxoid immunization was undertaken. The most common reactions, by history, were local edema and tenderness (33%), fever (15%), and anaphylactoid response (33%). Three patients who had a vesicular eruption at the immunization site were found to have delayed hypersensitivity to mercury. Thirty percent of the patients had received tetanus toxoid within one year and 55% within five years of evaluation. Reactive responses to immediate skin tests were exceedingly rare (less than 1%). None of the challenge patients suffered an adverse reaction.

  10. [Arthropod bite reactions and pyodermias].

    PubMed

    Hengge, U R

    2008-08-01

    Tourists in the tropics often develop reactions to bites or stings of mosquitoes, fleas, mites, ants, bedbugs, beetles, larva, millipedes, spiders and scorpions. In addition, they may have fresh or salt water exposure to sponges, corals, jellyfish and sea urchins with resultant injury and inflammation. Bacterial skin infections (pyodermias) can follow bites or stings as well as mechanical trauma. The most common bacteria involved in skin infections are staphylococci and streptococci. For tourists, bacterial infections are often complicating a pruritic bite reaction and scratching. It is important to know the cause of the bite reaction and pyoderma in order to take appropriate therapeutic measures.

  11. Hypersensitivity reactions to biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Vultaggio, Alessandra; Castells, Mariana C

    2014-08-01

    Biologic agents (BAs) are important therapeutic tools; their use has rapidly expanded and they are used in oncology, immunology, and inflammatory diseases. Their use may be limited, however, by adverse drug reactions. This article reviews the current literature on clinical presentation and pathogenic mechanisms of both acute and delayed reactions. In addition, procedures for management of BA-induced reactions, including preventive and diagnostic work-up, are provided. Lastly, this article summarizes the current knowledge of desensitization to several widely used monoclonal antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  13. Coarctate cyclization reactions: a primer.

    PubMed

    Young, Brian S; Herges, Rainer; Haley, Michael M

    2012-10-04

    The cleavage of five-membered heterocycles possessing an exocyclic carbene or nitrene to form conjugated ene-ene-yne systems has been documented for over 40 years; however, the reverse reaction, using a conjugated "ene-ene-yne" precursor to form a heterocycle is a relatively new approach. Over the past decade, the Haley and Herges groups have studied computationally and experimentally the cyclization of the "hetero-ene-ene-yne" motif via an unusual class of concerted reactions known as coarctate reactions. This feature article details our synthetic and mechanistic work involving triazene-arene-alkynes and structurally-related systems to generate heterocycles using coarctate chemistry.

  14. Bioluminescent Reaction by Immobilized Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryuta; Takahama, Eriko; Iinuma, Masataka; Ikeda, Takeshi; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    We have investigated an effect of immobilization of luciferase molecules at the optical fiber end on a bioluminescent reaction. The time dependence of measured count rates of emitted photons has been analyzed by fitting with numerical solution of differential equations including the effect of the product-inhibitor and the deactivation of the luciferase. Through the analysis, we have successfully extracted kinetic constants such as, reaction rate, number of active luciferase molecules, etc. Ratio of active molecules to total luciferase molecules in immobilization was one order of magnitude lower than that in solution. The reaction rate of the bioluminescent process was also different from the one of free luciferase in solution.

  15. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    PubMed

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Stepwise Signal Extraction via Marginal Likelihood

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chao; Kao, Chu-Lan Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the estimation of stepwise signal. To determine the number and locations of change-points of the stepwise signal, we formulate a maximum marginal likelihood estimator, which can be computed with a quadratic cost using dynamic programming. We carry out extensive investigation on the choice of the prior distribution and study the asymptotic properties of the maximum marginal likelihood estimator. We propose to treat each possible set of change-points equally and adopt an empirical Bayes approach to specify the prior distribution of segment parameters. Detailed simulation study is performed to compare the effectiveness of this method with other existing methods. We demonstrate our method on single-molecule enzyme reaction data and on DNA array CGH data. Our study shows that this method is applicable to a wide range of models and offers appealing results in practice. PMID:27212739

  17. Improving bioorthogonal protein ubiquitylation by click reaction.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Daniel; Schneider, Tatjana; Rösner, Daniel; Scheffner, Martin; Marx, Andreas

    2013-06-15

    Posttranslational modification of proteins with ubiquitin (ubiquitylation) regulates numerous cellular processes. Besides functioning as a signal for proteasomal degradation, ubiquitylation has also non-proteolytic functions by altering the biochemical properties of the modified protein. To investigate the effect(s) of ubiquitylation on the properties of a protein, sufficient amounts of homogenously and well-defined ubiquitylated proteins are required. Here, we report on the elaboration of a method for the generation of high amounts of site-specifically mono-ubiquitylated proteins. Firstly, a one-step affinity purification scheme was developed for ubiquitin containing the unnatural amino acid azidohomoalanine at the C-terminal position. This ubiquitin was conjugated in a click reaction to recombinant DNA polymerase β, equipped with an alkyne function at a distinct position. Secondly, addition of defined amounts of SDS to the reaction significantly improved product formation. With these two technical improvements, we have developed a straight forward procedure for the efficient generation of site-specifically ubiquitylated proteins that can be used to study the effect(s) of ubiquitylation on the activities/properties of a protein.

  18. Toward Direct Reaction-in-Flight Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmy, Jerry; Bredeweg, Todd; Fowler, Malcolm; Gooden, Matthew; Hayes, Anna; Rusev, Gencho; Caggiano, Joseph; Hatarik, Robert; Henry, Eugene; Tonchev, Anton; Yeaman, Charles; Bhike, Megha; Krishichayan, Krishi; Tornow, Werner

    2016-03-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) neutrons having energies greater than the equilibrium 14.1 MeV value can be produced via Reaction-in-Flight (RIF) interactions between plasma atoms and upscattered D or T ions. The yield and spectrum of these RIF produced neutrons carry information on the plasma properties as well as information on the stopping power of ions under plasma conditions. At NIF the yield of these RIF neutrons is predicted to be 4-7 orders of magnitude below the peak 14 MeV neutron yield. The current generation of neutron time of flight (nTOF) instrumentation has so far been incapable of detecting these low-yield neutrons primarily due to high photon backgrounds. To date, information on RIF neutrons has been obtained in integral activation experiments using reactions with high energy thresholds such as 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm and 209Bi(n,4n) 206Bi. Initial experiments to selectively suppress photon backgrounds have been performed at TUNL using pulsed monoenergetic neutron beams of 14.9, 18.5, 24.2, and 28.5 MeV impinging on a Bibenzyl scintillator. By placing 5 cm of Pb before the scintillator we were able to selectively suppress the photons from the flash occurring at the production target and enhance the n/_signal by ~6 times.

  19. PSFC: a Pathway Signal Flow Calculator App for Cytoscape

    PubMed Central

    Nersisyan, Lilit; Johnson, Graham; Riel-Mehan, Megan; Pico, Alexander; Arakelyan, Arsen

    2017-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways are sequences of biochemical reactions that propagate an input signal, such as a hormone binding to a cell-surface receptor, into the cell to trigger a reactive process. Assessment of pathway activities is crucial for determining which pathways play roles in disease versus normal conditions. To date various pathway flow/perturbation assessment tools are available, however they are constrained to specific algorithms and specific data types. There are no accepted standards for evaluation of pathway activities or simulation of flow propagation events in pathways, and the results of different software are difficult to compare. Here we present Pathway Signal Flow Calculator (PSFC), a Cytoscape app for calculation of a pathway signal flow based on the pathway topology and node input data. The app provides a rich framework for customization of different signal flow algorithms to allow users to apply various approaches within a single computational framework. PMID:26834984

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  4. System and process for pulsed multiple reaction monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail E

    2013-05-17

    A new pulsed multiple reaction monitoring process and system are disclosed that uses a pulsed ion injection mode for use in conjunction with triple-quadrupole instruments. The pulsed injection mode approach reduces background ion noise at the detector, increases amplitude of the ion signal, and includes a unity duty cycle that provides a significant sensitivity increase for reliable quantitation of proteins/peptides present at attomole levels in highly complex biological mixtures.

  5. Thermal maps of gases in heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    Jarenwattananon, Nanette N; Glöggler, Stefan; Otto, Trenton; Melkonian, Arek; Morris, William; Burt, Scott R; Yaghi, Omar M; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2013-10-24

    More than 85 per cent of all chemical industry products are made using catalysts, the overwhelming majority of which are heterogeneous catalysts that function at the gas-solid interface. Consequently, much effort is invested in optimizing the design of catalytic reactors, usually by modelling the coupling between heat transfer, fluid dynamics and surface reaction kinetics. The complexity involved requires a calibration of model approximations against experimental observations, with temperature maps being particularly valuable because temperature control is often essential for optimal operation and because temperature gradients contain information about the energetics of a reaction. However, it is challenging to probe the behaviour of a gas inside a reactor without disturbing its flow, particularly when trying also to map the physical parameters and gradients that dictate heat and mass flow and catalytic efficiency. Although optical techniques and sensors have been used for that purpose, the former perform poorly in opaque media and the latter perturb the flow. NMR thermometry can measure temperature non-invasively, but traditional approaches applied to gases produce signals that depend only weakly on temperature are rapidly attenuated by diffusion or require contrast agents that may interfere with reactions. Here we present a new NMR thermometry technique that circumvents these problems by exploiting the inverse relationship between NMR linewidths and temperature caused by motional averaging in a weak magnetic field gradient. We demonstrate the concept by non-invasively mapping gas temperatures during the hydrogenation of propylene in reactors packed with metal nanoparticles and metal-organic framework catalysts, with measurement errors of less than four per cent of the absolute temperature. These results establish our technique as a non-invasive tool for locating hot and cold spots in catalyst-packed gas-solid reactors, with unprecedented capabilities for testing

  6. Thermal maps of gases in heterogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarenwattananon, Nanette N.; Glöggler, Stefan; Otto, Trenton; Melkonian, Arek; Morris, William; Burt, Scott R.; Yaghi, Omar M.; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2013-10-01

    More than 85 per cent of all chemical industry products are made using catalysts, the overwhelming majority of which are heterogeneous catalysts that function at the gas-solid interface. Consequently, much effort is invested in optimizing the design of catalytic reactors, usually by modelling the coupling between heat transfer, fluid dynamics and surface reaction kinetics. The complexity involved requires a calibration of model approximations against experimental observations, with temperature maps being particularly valuable because temperature control is often essential for optimal operation and because temperature gradients contain information about the energetics of a reaction. However, it is challenging to probe the behaviour of a gas inside a reactor without disturbing its flow, particularly when trying also to map the physical parameters and gradients that dictate heat and mass flow and catalytic efficiency. Although optical techniques and sensors have been used for that purpose, the former perform poorly in opaque media and the latter perturb the flow. NMR thermometry can measure temperature non-invasively, but traditional approaches applied to gases produce signals that depend only weakly on temperature are rapidly attenuated by diffusion or require contrast agents that may interfere with reactions. Here we present a new NMR thermometry technique that circumvents these problems by exploiting the inverse relationship between NMR linewidths and temperature caused by motional averaging in a weak magnetic field gradient. We demonstrate the concept by non-invasively mapping gas temperatures during the hydrogenation of propylene in reactors packed with metal nanoparticles and metal-organic framework catalysts, with measurement errors of less than four per cent of the absolute temperature. These results establish our technique as a non-invasive tool for locating hot and cold spots in catalyst-packed gas-solid reactors, with unprecedented capabilities for testing

  7. Invasive Intraneural Interfaces: Foreign Body Reaction Issues.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Fiorenza; Ranieri, Federico; Vadalà, Gianluca; Zollo, Loredana; Di Pino, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Intraneural interfaces are stimulation/registration devices designed to couple the peripheral nervous system (PNS) with the environment. Over the last years, their use has increased in a wide range of applications, such as the control of a new generation of neural-interfaced prostheses. At present, the success of this technology is limited by an electrical impedance increase, due to an inflammatory response called foreign body reaction (FBR), which leads to the formation of a fibrotic tissue around the interface, eventually causing an inefficient transduction of the electrical signal. Based on recent developments in biomaterials and inflammatory/fibrotic pathologies, we explore and select the biological solutions that might be adopted in the neural interfaces FBR context: modifications of the interface surface, such as organic and synthetic coatings; the use of specific drugs or molecular biology tools to target the microenvironment around the interface; the development of bio-engineered-scaffold to reduce immune response and promote interface-tissue integration. By linking what we believe are the major crucial steps of the FBR process with related solutions, we point out the main issues that future research has to focus on: biocompatibility without losing signal conduction properties, good reproducible in vitro/in vivo models, drugs exhaustion and undesired side effects. The underlined pros and cons of proposed solutions show clearly the importance of a better understanding of all the molecular and cellular pathways involved and the need of a multi-target action based on a bio-engineered combination approach.

  8. Reaction-zone expansions and mechanism of the O{sub 2}, Ag/yttria-stabilized zirconia electrode reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, R.; Kloidt, T.; Kleitz, M.

    1997-02-01

    Experimental data obtained by impedance spectroscopy with silver droplet electrodes of different radii have been reanalyzed in the medium-frequency range under the assumption of rate-limiting oxygen diffusion through a thin slab of the electrode material. The model, which is based on literature data and has no adjustable parameters, gives a good fit. This demonstrates that in the medium-frequency range, oxygen diffusion through the electrode material is evenly distributed over the whole electrode interface. On the other hand, under dc conditions it is concentrated along the electrode triple-phase perimeter. Therefore, the distribution of the transfer current over the interface varies with the applied signal frequency. It follows that the electrode resistance and capacitance determined from the impedance diagram are related to an electrode reaction occurring over a reaction zone variable with the signal frequency.

  9. Generation and processing of peripheral temperature signals in mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierau, Fr.-K.; Wurster, R. D.; Neya, T.; Yamasato, T.; Ulrich, J.

    1980-09-01

    Temperature transduction in peripheral cold receptors and processing of peripheral temperature signals in the spinal cord were studied in cats and rats. The temperature dependence of the generator potential is attributed to different temperature coefficients of an electrogenic Na-efflux and the passive Na-influx. Cold receptor activity and particularly its bursting pattern is considerably modulated by the local Ca-concentration, but the effect of elevated Ca-concentration is abolished by the ATPase blocker ouabain. — The peripheral temperature signals from the scrotal skin of rats are transformed in dorsal horn neurones (DHN) into temperature reactions, which occur only above (warm reaction) or below (cold reaction) a certain temperature threshold and are limited to an operational range of 1 4°C. Convergency of different temperature inputs were observed in one and the same DHN. Supraspinal control of temperature reactive DHN appears to be complex but predominantly excitatory.

  10. NetSlim: high-confidence curated signaling maps

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Rajesh; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Thomas, Joji Kurian; Sharma, Jyoti; Tian, Maozhen; Palapetta, Shyam Mohan; Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Sekhar, Nirujogi Raja; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Goel, Renu; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Telikicherla, Deepthi; Bhattacharjee, Mitali; Pinto, Sneha M.; Syed, Nazia; Srikanth, Manda Srinivas; Sathe, Gajanan J.; Ahmad, Sartaj; Chavan, Sandip N.; Sameer Kumar, Ghantasala S.; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Prasad, T. S. K.; Harsha, H. C.; Rahiman, B Abdul; Ohara, Osamu; Bader, Gary D.; Sujatha Mohan, S.; Schiemann, William P.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2011-01-01

    We previously developed NetPath as a resource for comprehensive manually curated signal transduction pathways. The pathways in NetPath contain a large number of molecules and reactions which can sometimes be difficult to visualize or interpret given their complexity. To overcome this potential limitation, we have developed a set of more stringent curation and inclusion criteria for pathway reactions to generate high-confidence signaling maps. NetSlim is a new resource that contains this ‘core’ subset of reactions for each pathway for easy visualization and manipulation. The pathways in NetSlim are freely available at http://www.netpath.org/netslim. Database URL: www.netpath.org/netslim PMID:21959865

  11. Conditions for extinction events in chemical reaction networks with discrete state spaces.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D; Anderson, David F; Craciun, Gheorghe; Brijder, Robert

    2017-09-26

    We study chemical reaction networks with discrete state spaces and present sufficient conditions on the structure of the network that guarantee the system exhibits an extinction event. The conditions we derive involve creating a modified chemical reaction network called a domination-expanded reaction network and then checking properties of this network. Unlike previous results, our analysis allows algorithmic implementation via systems of equalities and inequalities and suggests sequences of reactions which may lead to extinction events. We apply the results to several networks including an EnvZ-OmpR signaling pathway in Escherichia coli.

  12. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  13. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Vasudevan, Biju; Pragasam, Vijendran

    2013-01-01

    Severe cutaneous drug reactions are one of the commonest medical challenges presenting to an emergency room in any hospital. The manifestations range from maculopapular rash to severe systemic symptoms like renal failure and cardiovascular compromise. Toxic epidermal necrolysis, erythroderma, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis and drug induced vasculitis are the common cutaneous drug reactions which can have severe morbidity and even mortality. Careful history taking of the lag period after drug intake and associated symptoms, along with detailed examination of the skin, mucosa and various systems, help in early diagnosis of these reactions. Early stoppage of the incriminating drug, specific therapy including corticosteroids, cyclosporine and intravenous immunoglobulin depending on the case along with supportive therapy and local measures help in salvaging most patients. An overview of these important cutaneous drug reactions along with their management is being reviewed in this article. PMID:24600147

  14. Sarcoid type reaction: medical hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Tchernev, G; Chokoeva, A A; Patterson, J W; Wollina, U; Lotti, T

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoid-type reactions could not always be clearly distinct from the independent disease sarcoidosis. Particular attention should be paid to paraneoplastic type of sarcoid reaction which until recent literature was characterized as 1) sarcoidosis associated with tumor disease or 2) sarcoidosis classified and presented as paraneoplastic disease. The analogy between sarcoidosis and paraneoplastic type of sarcoid reaction are the pure epithelioid cell granulomas. The role of molecular mimicry in paraneoplastic type of reaction is probably significant but not yet fully proven and understood. Future studies on this issue should be directed to identify the genetic defects (regarding the inflammasome and those recently established at EOS and Blau Syndrome) as well as screening programs for early detection of cancers, with a view to optimization of the subsequent therapy.

  15. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-01-05

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  16. Solar-thermal reaction processing

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Alan W; Dahl, Jaimee K; Lewandowski, Allan A; Bingham, Carl; Raska Buechler, Karen J; Grothe, Willy

    2014-03-18

    In an embodiment, a method of conducting a high temperature chemical reaction that produces hydrogen or synthesis gas is described. The high temperature chemical reaction is conducted in a reactor having at least two reactor shells, including an inner shell and an outer shell. Heat absorbing particles are included in a gas stream flowing in the inner shell. The reactor is heated at least in part by a source of concentrated sunlight. The inner shell is heated by the concentrated sunlight. The inner shell re-radiates from the inner wall and heats the heat absorbing particles in the gas stream flowing through the inner shell, and heat transfers from the heat absorbing particles to the first gas stream, thereby heating the reactants in the gas stream to a sufficiently high temperature so that the first gas stream undergoes the desired reaction(s), thereby producing hydrogen or synthesis gas in the gas stream.

  17. Alternative view of enzyme reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, M J; Storch, D M

    1985-01-01

    Since adsorption of the substrate in the active site of an enzyme can occur only if all solvent is squeezed out from between them, any reaction between them takes place in the absence of any intervening solvent--i.e., as it would in the gas phase. Recent work has shown that ionic reactions in the gas phase often differ greatly from analogous processes in solution. Therefore, current interpretations of enzyme reactions in terms of solution chemistry are misguided. The large rates and specificity of enzyme reactions may be due simply to elimination of the solvent. The cleavage of peptides by chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase A can be interpreted satisfactorily in this way. PMID:3857576

  18. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  19. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  20. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.