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Sample records for soil management strategies

  1. Assessment of soil sealing management responses, strategies, and targets toward ecologically sustainable urban land use management.

    PubMed

    Artmann, Martina

    2014-05-01

    Soil sealing has negative impacts on ecosystem services since urban green and soil get lost. Although there is political commitment to stop further sealing, no reversal of this trend can be observed in Europe. This paper raises the questions (1) which strategies can be regarded as being efficient toward ecologically sustainable management of urban soil sealing and (2) who has competences and should take responsibility to steer soil sealing? The analyses are conducted in Germany. The assessment of strategies is carried out using indicators as part of a content analysis. Legal-planning, informal-planning, economic-fiscal, co-operative, and informational strategies are analyzed. Results show that there is a sufficient basis of strategies to secure urban ecosystem services by protecting urban green and reducing urban gray where microclimate regulation is a main target. However, soil sealing management lacks a spatial strategically overview as well as the consideration of services provided by fertile soils.

  2. Pasture Management Strategies for Sequestering Soil Carbon - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Franzluebbers, Alan J.

    2006-03-15

    management indicated that soil organic carbon and nitrogen storage were greater with than without endophyte only under high soil fertility. This extra carbon and nitrogen in soil due to the presence of the endophyte was further found to be located in intermediately sized soil aggregates, which are important for reducing water runoff and improving water quality. These results suggest that well-fertilized tall fescue pastures with a high percentage of plants infected with the endophyte have the potential to help offset the rising carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This research has also shown positive ecological implications of tall fescue-endophyte association.

  3. Soil environmental quality in greenhouse vegetable production systems in eastern China: Current status and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenyou; Zhang, Yanxia; Huang, Biao; Teng, Ying

    2017-03-01

    Greenhouse vegetable production (GVP) has become an important source of public vegetable consumption and farmers' income in China. However, various pollutants can be accumulated in GVP soils due to the high cropping index, large agricultural input, and closed environment. Ecological toxicity caused by excessive pollutants' accumulation can then lead to serious health risks. This paper was aimed to systematically review the current status of soil environmental quality, analyze their impact factors, and consequently to propose integrated management strategies for GVP systems. Results indicated a decrease in soil pH, soil salinization, and nutrients imbalance in GVP soils. Fungicides, remaining nutrients, antibiotics, heavy metals, and phthalate esters were main pollutants accumulating in GVP soils comparing to surrounding open field soils. Degradation of soil ecological function, accumulation of major pollutants in vegetables, deterioration of neighboring water bodies, and potential human health risks has occurred due to the changes of soil properties and accumulation of pollutants such as heavy metals and fungicides in soils. Four dominant factors were identified leading to the above-mentioned issues including heavy application of agricultural inputs, outmoded planting styles with poor environmental protection awareness, old-fashion regulations, unreasonable standards, and ineffective supervisory management. To guarantee a sustainable GVP development, several strategies were suggested to protect and improve soil environmental quality. Implementation of various strategies not only requires the concerted efforts among different stakeholders, but also the whole lifecycle assessment throughout the GVP processes as well as effective enforcement of policies, laws, and regulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microbial metabolic profiles in Australian soils with varying crop management strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldorri, Sind; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2015-04-01

    Cotton production belt in Australia is covering vast areas from subtropical to temperate and grassland. Soil types are mostly different variations of clay with mainly black, grey and red clay soil containing variable proportions of sand in it. Growers often grow cotton in rotation with other crops, such as wheat, beans and corn, and soil fertilization vary with a number of growers using organic amendments as a main or supplementary source of nutrients. We have collected soil samples from farms in different regions and with different crop management strategies and studied the metabolic signature of microbial communities using the Biolog Ecoplate system. The metabolic patterns, supplemented with molecular analysis of the community will further the understanding of the influence of crop and soil management on soil functions carried out by microbes.

  5. Management strategies to reduce environmental impact from soil fumigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil fumigation is an important agronomic practice for controlling soil-borne plant pests. However, all fumigant chemicals have relatively high vapor pressure values and are prone to emission losses to the ambient atmosphere. This poses significant safety and human health concerns for farmers and ...

  6. The expeditious survey of soils as a management strategy against degradation processes of agroecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado Siqueira, Glécio; Medeiros Bezerra, Joel

    2013-04-01

    The pressure for agricultural use in hilly areas regarded as marginal to the productive process, committed to carrying capacity of natural systems and exposes the available resources, especially soil and water with higher rates of degradation. This fact, coupled with the lack of planning of production activities, knowing the limitations and capabilities of environmental elements, as well as the use of inappropriate agricultural practices and intensive, quickened the processes that generate environmental imbalance. To circumvent these problems, it is necessary to find mechanisms that mitigate the conflicts generated between productive activities and the environment. One should then respect the specificities and restrictions local soil and their interactions with other components of the environment, trying to select and adapt agricultural practices and techniques best suited to local conditions and enabling the sustainable use of land. For this detailed information and appropriate scale, consistent with the need for rural communities become indispensable instrument to support the management of natural resource use. The expeditious survey of soil provides subsidies to use planning and land management and propose management strategies that ensure higher productivity of soils and maintenance of the environmental quality of the area in question, so as to eliminate or at least alleviate the problems of erosion soil. The joint use of land mapping and topographical and use and occupancy permits integrated management for the recovery of degraded areas, the use of soil conservation practices and indicating areas for reforestation, agriculture and pasture. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the use of GIS tools for improving the expeditious survey of soil. The present study was conducted using data from the municipality of Campo do Meio (Minas Gerais, Brazil). Were prepared soil maps, topography and land use and occupation. Later he was made a map of land use capability (FAO

  7. An integrated crop- and soil-based strategy for variable-rate nitrogen management in corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Darrin F.

    Nitrogen (N) management in cereal crops has been the subject of considerable research and debate for several decades. Historic N management practices have contributed to low nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). Low NUE can be caused by such things as poor synchronization between soil N supply and crop demand, uniform application rates of fertilizer N to spatially variable landscapes, and failure to account for temporally variable influences on soil N supply and crop N need. Active canopy reflectance sensors and management zones (MZ) have been studied separately as possible plant- and soil-based N management tools to increase NUE. Recently, some have suggested that the integration of these two approaches would provide a more robust N management strategy that could more effectively account for soil and plant effects on crop N need. For this reason, the goal of this research was to develop an N application strategy that would account for spatial variability in soil properties and use active canopy reflectance sensors to determine in-season, on-the-go N fertilizer rates, thereby increasing NUE and economic return for producers over current N management practices. To address this overall goal, a series of studies were conducted to better understand active canopy sensor use and explore the possibility of integrating spatial soil data with active canopy sensors. Sensor placement to assess crop N status was first examined. It was found that the greatest reduction in error over sensing each individual row for a hypothetical 24-row applicator was obtained with 2-3 sensors estimating an average chlorophyll index for the entire boom width. Next, use of active sensor-based soil organic matter (OM) estimation was compared to more conventional aerial image-based soil OM estimation. By adjusting regression intercept values for each field, OM could be predicted using either a single sensor or image data layer. The final study consisted of validation of the active sensor algorithm

  8. Soil pH management without lime, a strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cultivated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Shahid; Bakken, Lars; Reent Köster, Jan; Tore Mørkved, Pål; Simon, Nina; Dörsch, Peter

    2015-04-01

    For decades, agricultural scientists have searched for methods to reduce the climate forcing of food production by increasing carbon sequestration in the soil and reducing the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O). The outcome of this research is depressingly meagre and the two targets appear incompatible: efforts to increase carbon sequestration appear to enhance the emissions of N2O. Currently there is a need to find alternative management strategies which may effectively reduce both the CO2 and N2O footprints of food production. Soil pH is a master variable in soil productivity and plays an important role in controlling the chemical and biological activity in soil. Recent investigations of the physiology of denitrification have provided compelling evidence that the emission of N2O declines with increasing pH within the range 5-7. Thus, by managing the soil pH at a near neutral level appears to be a feasible way to reduce N2O emissions. Such pH management has been a target in conventional agriculture for a long time, since a near-neutral pH is optimal for a majority of cultivated plants. The traditional way to counteract acidification of agricultural soils is to apply lime, which inevitably leads to emission of CO2. An alternative way to increase the soil pH is the use of mafic rock powders, which have been shown to counteract soil acidification, albeit with a slower reaction than lime. Here we report a newly established field trail in Norway, in which we compare the effects of lime and different mafic mineral and rock powders (olivine, different types of plagioclase) on CO2 and N2O emissions under natural agricultural conditions. Soil pH is measured on a monthly basis from all treatment plots. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission measurements are carried out on a weekly basis using static chambers and an autonomous robot using fast box technique. Field results from the first winter (fallow) show immediate effect of lime on soil pH, and slower effects of the mafic rocks. The

  9. Cumulative and residual effects of potato cropping system management strategies on crop and soil health parameters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil and crop management practices can greatly affect parameters related to soil health, as well as crop productivity and disease development, and may provide options for more sustainable production. Different 3-yr potato cropping systems focused on specific management goals of soil conservation (SC...

  10. Managing to enhance soil health

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Healthy soils are critical for meeting current and future societal demands. Management strategies that protect the soil against erosion, build soil organic matter and promote nutrient cycling are ways to enhance soil health. Keeping soils covered and judicious use of agrochemicals are akin to us “hu...

  11. Water reuse for irrigated agriculture in Jordan: challenges of soil sustainability and the role of management strategies.

    PubMed

    Carr, G; Nortcliff, S; Potter, R B

    2010-11-28

    Reclaimed water provides an important contribution to the water balance in water-scarce Jordan, but the quality of this water presents both benefits and challenges. Careful management of reclaimed water is required to maximize the nutrient benefits while minimizing the salinity risks. This work uses a multi-disciplinary research approach to show that soil response to irrigation with reclaimed water is a function of the management strategies adopted on the farm by the water user. The adoption of management methods to maintain soil productivity can be seen to be a result of farmers' awareness to potentially plant-toxic ions in the irrigation water (70% of Jordan Valley farmers identified salinization as a hazard from irrigation with reclaimed water). However, the work also suggests that farmers' management capacity is affected by the institutional management of water. About a third (35%) of farmers in the Jordan Valley claimed that their ability to manage salinization was limited by water shortages. Organizational interviews revealed that institutional awareness of soil management challenges was quite high (34% of interviewees described salinization as a risk from water reuse), but strategies to address this challenge at the institutional level require greater development.

  12. Crop and irrigation management strategies for saline-sodic soils and waters aimed at environmentally sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Qadir, M; Oster, J D

    2004-05-05

    Irrigation has long played a key role in feeding the expanding world population and is expected to play a still greater role in the future. As supplies of good-quality irrigation water are expected to decrease in several regions due to increased municipal-industrial-agricultural competition, available freshwater supplies need to be used more efficiently. In addition, reliance on the use and reuse of saline and/or sodic drainage waters, generated by irrigated agriculture, seems inevitable for irrigation. The same applies to salt-affected soils, which occupy more than 20% of the irrigated lands, and warrant attention for efficient, inexpensive and environmentally acceptable management. Technologically and from a management perspective, a couple of strategies have shown the potential to improve crop production under irrigated agriculture while minimizing the adverse environmental impacts. The first strategy, vegetative bioremediation--a plant-assisted reclamation approach--relies on growing appropriate plant species that can tolerate ambient soil salinity and sodicity levels during reclamation of salt-affected soils. A variety of plant species of agricultural significance have been found to be effective in sustainable reclamation of calcareous and moderately sodic and saline-sodic soils. The second strategy fosters dedicating soils to crop production systems where saline and/or sodic waters predominate and their disposal options are limited. Production systems based on salt-tolerant plant species using drainage waters may be sustainable with the potential of transforming such waters from an environmental burden into an economic asset. Such a strategy would encourage the disposal of drainage waters within the irrigated regions where they are generated rather than exporting these waters to other regions via discharge into main irrigation canals, local streams, or rivers. Being economically and environmentally sustainable, these strategies could be the key to future

  13. EU strategies and policies on soil and waste management to offset greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Marmo, L

    2008-01-01

    Climate change has become an important political priority in the environmental field, and beyond. To revert the increase in the Earth's temperature, developed country parties to the Kyoto Protocol committed to limit their greenhouse gas emissions. The 15 Member States that made up the European Community in 1997 have a combined reduction target of 8% in CO2-equivalent emissions in the period 2008-2012 compared to 1990. The role of soil, both as a source and a sink for carbon, is particularly important. How can soil organic matter be maintained or increased? There is no single answer, and a broad range of options need to be explored. Among the different measures proposed, the promotion of organic input on arable land (crop residues, cover crops, farm yard manure, compost, sewage sludge) has been mentioned. The challenge is to ensure that organic wastes of good quality are used to increase soil organic matter in carbon depleted soils and that appropriate monitoring is established. On the waste management front, the European Commission intends to produce guidance for Member States on the management of biowaste that will take into account all related environmental issues, including soil aspects. As for monitoring, the European Commission has put forward legislation according to which Member States would have to identify the areas at risk of soil organic matter decline in their national territory. Such legislation should be regarded as a major step forward for Europe, as it would ensure a high level of soil protection across the Community. This development will have the potential to enable the kind of estimation, measurement or modelling of crop or grazing land management needed for accounting under Article 3.4 of the Kyoto Protocol.

  14. Managing soil nitrogen to restore annual grass-infested plant communities: Effective strategy or incomplete framework?

    Treesearch

    J. J. James; R. E. Drenovsky; T. A. Monaco; M. J. Rinella

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical work has established a positive relationship between resource availability and habitat invasibility. For nonnative invasive annual grasses, similar to other invasive species, invader success has been tied most often to increased nitrogen (N) availability. These observations have led to the logical assumption that managing soils for low N...

  15. U.S. Department of Energy/Environmental Management's Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, C.

    2007-07-01

    The vision for the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is to focus and place high visibility on program achievements and broad-based remediation challenges and uncertainties facing the Office of Environmental Management. These include, but are not limited to, the development of contract performance measures; monitoring and controlling the cleanup investments for remediating groundwater and soil; finding and implementing interim and permanent cleanup remedies for technetium-99, strontium-90, chromium, uranium, and trichloroethylene; the development and use of sophisticated groundwater and fate and transport models; presenting the best science and engineering principles and practices for remediating groundwater and soil to environmental regulators and other key stakeholders; and ensuring that all source terms of contamination are fully identified and all sites are appropriately characterized. (authors)

  16. Soil erosion measurements by means of experimental plots to determine best land management strategies in vineyards and olive orchards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Keesstra, Saskia; Jordan, Antonio; Brevik, Erik; Nova, Agata; Prosdocimi, Massimo; Azorín-Molina, César; Yazdanpanah, Najme; Mahmoodabadi, Majid; Pereira, Paulo; Burguet, María

    2016-04-01

    In order to design sustainable land management there is a need to have accurate information on the impact this land management strategies have on water and sediment dynamics. This is especially important when a proper management is designed to reduce the soil losses due to the complex interaction of mechanisms that interact within the soil erosion process. Soil erosion is an non-linear process, both spatially and temporally, and as a consequence of that only well-monitored and accurate measurements can give insights in the processes and how these processes can be influenced by management to reduce soil losses (Cerdà, 2007; Ligonja and Shrestha, 2015; Nanko et al., 2015; Seutloali and Beckedahl, 2015). This is necessary at different scales: pedon, slope, and watershed because the governing processes differ at different scale (Keesstra, 2007; Jordán and Martínez Zavala, 2008; Borrelli et al., 2015). Soil erosion plots can give information about the temporal and spatial variability of soil losses. We present here a strategy developed by the Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group from the University of Valencia to assess the soil erosion rates in Eastern Spain. In 2002 the Soil Erosion Experimental Station in El Teularet-Sierra de Enguera was installed, to assess soil losses in rainfed agriculture orchards, and 73 plots of 1, 2, 4, 16 and 48 m2 were installed. In 2005 6 plots of 300 m2 were installed in the nearby Montesa soil erosion station to assess soil losses in citrus orchards. In 2011 16 plots of 2 m2 where installed in Les Alcusses to determine soil losses in olive orchards, and in 2015 8 plots in Celler del Roure vineyard to assess the impact of land management in vineyards and 8 plots in the El Teularet to study the impact of straw mulch on soil erosion rates. All erosion stations are located in several kilometres distance from each other. This research which we developed since 2002 is complementary to previous research where we used rainfall

  17. Cumulative and residual effects of different potato cropping system management strategies on soilborne diseases and soil microbial communities over time

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four different potato cropping systems (CS), designed to address specific management goals of soil conservation (SC), soil improvement (SI), disease suppression (DS), and a status quo standard rotation control (SQ), were evaluated for their effects on soilborne diseases of potato and soil microbial ...

  18. Adoption of Soil Health Improvement Strategies by Australian Farmers: I. Attitudes, Management and Extension Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, J. McL.; Cattle, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: There is inconsistency in the design, understanding, implementation and monitoring of soil health programmes. Despite mounting scientific evidence for the credibility of certain soil health indicators, an increase in the reporting of programme benefits, and progress in communicating these benefits, many farmers remain hesitant to…

  19. Adoption of Soil Health Improvement Strategies by Australian Farmers: I. Attitudes, Management and Extension Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, J. McL.; Cattle, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: There is inconsistency in the design, understanding, implementation and monitoring of soil health programmes. Despite mounting scientific evidence for the credibility of certain soil health indicators, an increase in the reporting of programme benefits, and progress in communicating these benefits, many farmers remain hesitant to…

  20. Cumulative and residual effects of potato cropping system management strategies on soil physical, chemical, and biological properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In field trials established in 2004, different 3-yr potato cropping systems focused on specific management goals of soil conservation (SC), soil improvement (SI), and disease-suppression (DS) were evaluated and compared to a 2-yr standard rotation (SQ) and a non-rotation control (PP) for their effec...

  1. Cumulative and residual effects of potato cropping system management strategies on soilborne diseases and soil microbial communities over time

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In field trials established in 2004, different 3-yr potato cropping systems focused on specific management goals of soil conservation (SC), soil improvement (SI), and disease-suppression (DS) were evaluated and compared to a 2-yr standard rotation (SQ) and a non-rotation control (PP) for their effec...

  2. Impact of slurry management strategies on potential leaching of nutrients and pathogens in a sandy soil amended with cattle slurry.

    PubMed

    Fangueiro, D; Surgy, S; Napier, V; Menaia, J; Vasconcelos, E; Coutinho, J

    2014-12-15

    For farmers, management of cattle slurry (CS) is now a priority, in order to improve the fertilizer value of the slurry and simultaneously minimize its environmental impact. Several slurry pre-treatments and soil application methods to minimize ammonia emissions are now available to farmers, but the impact of such management strategies on groundwater is still unclear. A laboratory experiment was performed over 24 days in controlled conditions, with undisturbed soil columns (sandy soil) in PVC pipes (30 cm high and 5.7 cm in diameter). The treatments considered (4 replicates) were: a control with no amendment (CTR), injection of whole CS (WSI), and surface application of: whole CS (WSS), acidified (pH 5.5) whole CS (AWSS), the liquid fraction obtained by centrifugation of CS (LFS), and acidified (pH 5.5) liquid fraction (ALFS). An amount of CS equivalent to 240 kg N ha(-1) was applied in all treatments. The first leaching event was performed 72 h after application of the treatments and then leaching events were performed weekly to give a total of four irrigation events (IEs). All the leachates obtained were analyzed for mineral and organic nitrogen, electrical conductivity (EC), pH, total carbon, and phosphorus. Total coliforms and Escherichia coli were also quantified in the leachates obtained in the first IE. The results show that both acidification and separation had significant effects on the composition of the leachates: higher NO3(-) concentrations were observed for the LFS and ALFS relative to all the other treatments, throughout the experiment, and lower NO3(-) concentrations were observed for acidified relative to non-acidified treatments at IE2. Acidification of both the LF and WS led to higher NH4(+) concentrations as well as an increase of EC for treatment ALFS relative to the control, in the first IE, and lower pH values in the AWSS. Furthermore, the E. coli and total coliform concentrations in AWSS, LFS, and ALFS were significantly higher than in

  3. Phytostabilization—Management Strategy for Stabilizing Trace Elements in Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Vaverková, Magdalena D.; Baryła, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Contamination of soil by copper (Cu) has become a serious problem throughout the world, causing the reduction of agricultural yield and harmful effects on human health by entering the food chain. A glasshouse pot experiment was designed to evaluate the potential use of halloysite as an immobilizing agent in the aided phytostabilization of Cu-contaminated soil, using Festuca rubra L. The content of Cu in plants, i.e., total and extracted by 0.01 M CaCl2, was determined using the method of spectrophotometry. Cu content in the tested parts of F. rubra differed significantly when halloysite was applied to the soil, as well as with increasing concentrations of Cu. The addition of halloysite significantly increased plant biomass. Cu accumulated in the roots, thereby reducing its toxicity to the aerial parts of the plant. The obtained values of bioconcentration and translocation factors observed for halloysite treatment indicate the effectiveness of using F. rubra in phytostabilization techniques. PMID:28841169

  4. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen.

  5. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen. PMID:27532007

  6. Soil management: The key to soil quality and sustainable agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basch, Gottlieb; Barão, Lúcia; Soares, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    Today, after the International Year of Soils in 2015 and the proclamation by the International Union of Soil Sciences of the International Decade of Soils 2015-2020, much attention is paid to soil quality. Often used interchangeably, both terms, soil quality and soil health, refer to dynamic soil properties such as soil organic matter or pH, while soil quality also includes inherent soil properties such as texture or mineral composition. However, it is the dynamic or manageable properties that adequate soil management can influence and thus contribute to a well-functioning soil environment capable to deliver the soil-mediated provisioning, regulating and supporting ecosystem services and soil functions. This contribution intends to highlight the key principles of sustainable soil management and provide evidence that they are compliant with a productive, resource efficient and ecologically friendly agriculture. Paradoxically, and despite benefitting from good soil quality, agriculture itself when based on conventional, especially intensive tillage-based soil management practices contributes decisively to soil degradation and to several of the soil threats as identified by the Soil Thematic Strategy, being soil erosion and soil organic matter decline the most notorious ones. To mitigate soil degradation, the European Union's Common Agricultural Policy has introduced conservation measures, mainly through cross-compliance measures supposed to guarantee minimum soil cover, to limit soil erosion and to maintain the levels of soil organic matter. However, it remains unclear to what extent EU member states apply these 'Good Agricultural and Environmental Condition' (GAEC) measures to their utilized agricultural areas. Effective and cost-efficient soil management systems able to conserve or to restore favourable soil conditions, to minimize soil erosion and to invert soil organic matter and soil biodiversity decline and improve soil structure are those capable to mimic as

  7. Soil Management for Hardwood Production

    Treesearch

    W. M. Broadfoot; B. G. Blackmon; J. B. Baker

    1971-01-01

    Soil management is the key to successful hardwood management because soil properties are probably the most important determinants of forest productivity. Because of the lack of soil uniformity, however, many foresters have become frustrated with attempts to relate soil to satisfactory growth. Since soil scientists have been unable to predict site quality for trees in...

  8. Management strategies for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Le Marshall, Kim Francis; Littlejohn, Geoffrey Owen

    2011-01-01

    What are the effective, evidence-based strategies available for the management of fibromyalgia? There are a number of management strategies available with robust evidence to support their use in clinical practice. Fibromyalgia is a complex pain syndrome characterized by widespread, chronic muscular pain and tenderness, disordered sleep, emotional distress, cognitive disturbance, and fatigue. Its prevalence is estimated to be 3%-5% in the population and higher yet in patients with comorbid rheumatic diseases. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs). PubMed, Cochrane Library, manual search. Key messages for patients and clinicians are: There are many effective pharmacological management strategies available for fibromyalgia.A nonpharmacological, multicomponent approach utilizing education, aerobic exercise, psychological therapy, and other strategies is also effective for fibromyalgia.Despite the significant and, at times, disabling physical and psychological symptoms, fibromyalgia can be a manageable condition with a potentially good outcome.

  9. Fault Management Design Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  10. Fault Management Design Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  11. Managing soils for long-term productivity

    PubMed Central

    Syers, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Meeting the goal of long-term agricultural productivity requires that soil degradation be halted and reversed. Soil fertility decline is a key factor in soil degradation and is probably the major cause of declining crop yields. There is evidence that the contribution of declining soil fertility to soil degradation has been underestimated.
    Sensitivity to soil degradation is implicit in the assessment of the sustainability of land management practices, with wide recognition of the fact that soils vary in their ability to resist change and recover subsequent to stress. The concept of resilience in relation to sustainability requires further elaboration and evaluation.
    In the context of soil degradation, a decline in soil fertility is primarily interpreted as the depletion of organic matter and plant nutrients. Despite a higher turnover rate of organic matter in the tropics there is no intrinsic difference between the organic matter content of soils from tropical and temperate regions. The level of organic matter in a soil is closely related to the above and below ground inputs. In the absence of adequate organic material inputs and where cultivation is continuous, soil organic matter declines progressively. Maintaining the quantity and quality of soil organic matter should be a guiding principle in developing management practices.
    Soil microbial biomass serves as an important reservoir of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S), and regulates the cycling of organic matter and nutrients. Because of its high turnover rate, microbial biomass reacts quickly to changes in management and is a sensitive indicator for monitoring and predicting changes in soil organic matter. Modelling techniques have been reasonably successful in predicting changes in soil organic matter with different organic material inputs, but there is little information from the tropics.
    Nutrient depletion through harvested crop components and residue removal, and by leaching and soil

  12. Managing soil remediation problems.

    PubMed

    Okx, J P; Hordijk, L; Stein, A

    1996-12-01

    Soil remediation has only a short history but the problem addressed is a significant one. Cost estimates for the clean-up of contaminated sites in the European Union and the United States are in the order of magnitude of 1,400 billion ECU. Such an enormous operation deserves the best management it can get. Reliable cost estimations per contaminated site are an important prerequisite. This paper addresses the problems related to site-wise estimations.When solving soil remediation problems, we have to deal with a large number of scientific disciplines. Too often solutions are presented from the viewpoint of only one discipline. In order to benefit from the combined disciplinary knowledge and experience, we think that it is necessary to describe the interrelations between these disciplines. This can be realized by developing an adequate model of the desired process which enables to consider and evaluate the essential factors as interdependent components of the total system.The resulting model provides a binding paradigm to the contributing disciplines which will result in improved efficiency and effectivity of the decision and the cost estimation process. In the near future, we will release the "Biosparging and Bioventing Expert Support System", an expert support system for problem owners, consultants and authorities dealing with the design and operation of a biosparging and/or a bioventing system.

  13. Medical equipment management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binseng; Furst, Emanuel; Cohen, Ted; Keil, Ode R; Ridgway, Malcolm; Stiefel, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Clinical engineering professionals need to continually review and improve their management strategies in order to keep up with improvements in equipment technology, as well as with increasing expectations of health care organizations. In the last 20 years, management strategies have evolved from the initial obsession with electrical safety to flexible criteria that fit the individual institution's needs. Few hospitals, however, are taking full advantage of the paradigm shift offered by the evolution of joint Commission standards. The focus should be on risks caused by equipment failure, rather than on equipment with highest maintenance demands. Furthermore, it is not enough to consider risks posed by individual pieces of equipment to individual patients. It is critical to anticipate the impact of an equipment failure on larger groups of patients, especially when dealing with one of a kind, sophisticated pieces of equipment that are required to provide timely and accurate diagnoses for immediate therapeutic decisions or surgical interventions. A strategy for incorporating multiple criteria to formulate appropriate management strategies is provided in this article.

  14. Effect of long-term farming strategies on soil microbiota and soil health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommermann, Loreen; Babin, Doreen; Sandmann, Martin; Smalla, Kornelia; Schellenberg, Ingo; Grosch, Rita; Geistlinger, Joerg

    2017-04-01

    Increasing food and energy demands have resulted in considerable intensification of farming practices, which brought about severe consequences for agricultural soils, e.g. loss of fertility, erosion and enrichment of soil-borne plant diseases. In order to maintain soil quality and health for the future, the development of more extensive and sustainable farming strategies is urgently needed. The soil microbiome is regarded as a key player in soil ecosystem functions, particularly the natural ability of soils to suppress plant pathogens (suppressiveness). Recent studies showed that soil microbial communities are influenced by agricultural management. To further analyze the effects of farming strategies on soil suppressiveness and plant performance, agricultural soils from three long-term field trials in Thyrow, Bernburg (both in Germany) and Therwil (Switzerland) were sampled and subjected to molecular profiling of soil bacteria and fungi using marker genes and high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Significant effects on bacterial as well as fungal community composition, including plant pathogenic and beneficial taxa, were observed among variants of tillage and crop rotation. The least effect on both communities had fertilization, with no significance between variants. Subsequently, the same soils were subjected to growth chamber pot experiments with lettuce as a model (Lactuca sativa). After a growth period of six weeks significant differences in lettuce shoot and soil microbial biomass were observed among soil samples of the different long-term trials. Furthermore, the lettuce rhizosphere exhibited diverse bacterial community compositions as observed by DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). Using group-specific PCR-DGGE fingerprints, bacterial responders to fertilization, soil management and crop rotation were identified among different taxonomic groups. Currently, bacterial and fungal amplicon sequencing of rhizosphere and bulk soil from these pot

  15. Long-term effects of soil management on ecosystem services and soil loss estimation in olive grove top soils.

    PubMed

    Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Keesstra, Saskia; Cerdà, Artemi; Brevik, Eric C

    2016-11-15

    Soil management has important effects on soil properties, runoff, soil losses and soil quality. Traditional olive grove (OG) management is based on reduced tree density, canopy size shaped by pruning and weed control by ploughing. In addition, over the last several decades, herbicide use has been introduced into conventional OG management. These management strategies cause the soil surface to be almost bare and subsequently high erosion rates take place. To avoid these high erosion rates several soil management strategies can be applied. In this study, three strategies were assessed in OG with conventional tillage in three plots of 1ha each. Soil properties were measured and soil erosion rates were estimated by means of the RUSLE model. One plot was managed with no amendments (control), and the other two were treated with olive leaves mulch and oil mill pomace applied yearly from 2003 until 2013. The control plot experienced the greatest soil loss while the use of olive leaves as mulch and olive mill pomace as an amendment resulted in a soil loss reduction of 89.4% and 65.4% respectively (assuming a 5% slope). In addition, the chemical and physical soil properties were improved with the amendments. This combined effect will created a higher quality soil over the long term that it is more resilient to erosion and can provide better ecosystem services, as its functions are improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Soil health paradigms and implications for disease management.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Soil health has been defined as the capacity of soil to function as a vital living system to sustain biological productivity, maintain environmental quality, and promote plant, animal, and human health. Building and maintaining soil health are essential to agricultural sustainability and ecosystem function. Management practices that promote soil health, including the use of crop rotations, cover crops and green manures, organic amendments, and conservation tillage, also have generally positive effects on the management of soilborne diseases through a number of potential mechanisms, including increasing soil microbial biomass, activity, and diversity, resulting in greater biological suppression of pathogens and diseases. However, there also may be particular disease issues associated with some soil health management practices. In this review, research and progress made over the past twenty years regarding soil health, sustainability, and soil health management practices, with an emphasis on their implications for and effects on plant disease and disease management strategies, are summarized.

  17. Conservation agricultural management to sequester soil organic carbon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Storing carbon (C) in soil as organic matter is not only a viable strategy to sequester CO2 from the atmosphere, but is vital for improving the quality, fertility, and functioning of soil. This presentation describes relevant management approaches to avoid land degradation and foster soil organic C ...

  18. Effects of organic carbon sequestration strategies on soil enzymatic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, E.; Suciu, N.; Botteri, L.; Ferrari, T.; Coppolecchia, D.; Trevisan, M.; Piccolo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Greenhouse gases emissions can be counterbalanced with proper agronomical strategies aimed at sequestering carbon in soils. These strategies must be tested not only for their ability in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but also for their impact on soil quality: enzymatic activities are related to main soil ecological quality, and can be used as early and sensitive indicators of alteration events. Three different strategies for soil carbon sequestration were studied: minimum tillage, protection of biodegradable organic fraction by compost amendment and oxidative polimerization of soil organic matter catalyzed by biometic porfirins. All strategies were compared with a traditional agricultural management based on tillage and mineral fertilization. Experiments were carried out in three Italian soils from different pedo-climatic regions located respectively in Piacenza, Turin and Naples and cultivated with maize or wheat. Soil samples were taken for three consecutive years after harvest and analyzed for their content in phosphates, ß-glucosidase, urease and invertase. An alteration index based on these enzymatic activities levels was applied as well. The biomimetic porfirin application didn't cause changes in enzymatic activities compared to the control at any treatment or location. Enzymatic activities were generally higher in the minimum tillage and compost treatment, while differences between location and date of samplings were limited. Application of the soil alteration index based on enzymatic activities showed that soils treated with compost or subjected to minimum tillage generally have a higher biological quality. The work confirms the environmental sustainability of the carbon sequestering agronomical practices studied.

  19. Strategies in managing asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, A F

    1989-01-01

    The management of adult asthma involves a concerted effort to identify and remove or mollify inciting or triggering stimuli such as respiratory tract infections, gastric reflux, aspirin, beta-antagonists, and environmental agents; educate patients, using written treatment plans and pulmonary function monitoring; and properly use the antiasthmatic medications including beta-agonists, theophylline, anticholinergics, and corticosteroids, with an emphasis on aerosol delivery and the use of corticosteroids during exacerbations. This strategy is summarized with suggestions on therapy in emergency departments, during the transition from hospital to ambulatory care, before exercise, and during pregnancy. PMID:2660411

  20. Cultural strategies for managing weeds and soil moisture in cover crop based no-till soybean production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A four site-year study was conducted in North Carolina to evaluate the effects of soybean planting timing and row spacing on soil moisture, weed density, soybean lodging, and yield in a cover crop-based no-till organic soybean production system. Soybean planting timing included roll-kill/planting a...

  1. Concept, Components, and Strategies of Soil Health in Agroecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Magdoff, Fred

    2001-01-01

    The terms ''soil health'' or ''soil quality'' as applied to agroecosystems refer to the ability of soil to support and sustain crop growth while maintaining environmental quality. High-quality soils have the following characteristics: (i) a sufficient, but not excess, supply of nutrients; (ii) good structure (tilth); (iii) sufficient depth for rooting and drainage; (iv) good internal drainage; (v) low populations of plant disease and parasitic organisms; (vi) high populations of organisms that promote plant growth; (vii) low weed pressure; (viii) no chemicals that might harm the plant; (ix) resistance to being degraded; and (x) resilience following an episode of degradation. Management intended to improve soil health involves creatively combining a number of practices that enhance the soil's biological, chemical, and physical suitability for crop production. The most important general strategy is to add plentiful quantities of organic matter—including crop and cover crop residues, manures, and composts. Other important strategies include better crop rotations, reducing tillage and keeping the soil surface covered with living and dead residue, reducing compaction by decreasing heavy equipment traffic, and using best nutrient management practices. Practices that enhance soil quality frequently reduce plant pest pressures. PMID:19265876

  2. Human capital strategy: talent management.

    PubMed

    Nagra, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Large organizations, including the US Army Medical Department and the Army Nurse Corps, are people-based organizations. Consequently, effective and efficient management of the human capital within these organizations is a strategic goal for the leadership. Over time, the Department of Defense has used many different systems and strategies to manage people throughout their service life-cycle. The current system in use is called Human Capital Management. In the near future, the Army's human capital will be managed based on skills, knowledge, and behaviors through various measurement tools. This article elaborates the human capital management strategy within the Army Nurse Corps, which identifies, develops, and implements key talent management strategies under the umbrella of the Corps' human capital goals. The talent management strategy solutions are aligned under the Nurse Corps business strategy captured by the 2008 Army Nurse Corps Campaign Plan, and are implemented within the context of the culture and core values of the organization.

  3. Effects of soil management techniques on soil water erosion in apricot orchards.

    PubMed

    Keesstra, Saskia; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Brevik, Eric C; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Jordán, Antonio; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-05-01

    Soil erosion is extreme in Mediterranean orchards due to management impact, high rainfall intensities, steep slopes and erodible parent material. Vall d'Albaida is a traditional fruit production area which, due to the Mediterranean climate and marly soils, produces sweet fruits. However, these highly productive soils are left bare under the prevailing land management and marly soils are vulnerable to soil water erosion when left bare. In this paper we study the impact of different agricultural land management strategies on soil properties (bulk density, soil organic matter, soil moisture), soil water erosion and runoff, by means of simulated rainfall experiments and soil analyses. Three representative land managements (tillage/herbicide/covered with vegetation) were selected, where 20 paired plots (60 plots) were established to determine soil losses and runoff. The simulated rainfall was carried out at 55mmh(-1) in the summer of 2013 (<8% soil moisture) for one hour on 0.25m(2) circular plots. The results showed that vegetation cover, soil moisture and organic matter were significantly higher in covered plots than in tilled and herbicide treated plots. However, runoff coefficient, total runoff, sediment yield and soil erosion were significantly higher in herbicide treated plots compared to the others. Runoff sediment concentration was significantly higher in tilled plots. The lowest values were identified in covered plots. Overall, tillage, but especially herbicide treatment, decreased vegetation cover, soil moisture, soil organic matter, and increased bulk density, runoff coefficient, total runoff, sediment yield and soil erosion. Soil erosion was extremely high in herbicide plots with 0.91Mgha(-1)h(-1) of soil lost; in the tilled fields erosion rates were lower with 0.51Mgha(-1)h(-1). Covered soil showed an erosion rate of 0.02Mgha(-1)h(-1). These results showed that agricultural management influenced water and sediment dynamics and that tillage and herbicide

  4. Effect of Integrated Water-Nutrient Management Strategies on Soil Erosion Mediated Nutrient Loss and Crop Productivity in Cabo Verde Drylands.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Isaurinda; Ritsema, Coen; Geissen, Violette

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion, runoff and related nutrient losses are a big risk for soil fertility in Cabo Verde drylands. In 2012, field trials were conducted in two agro-ecological zones to evaluate the effects of selected techniques of soil-water management combined with organic amendments (T1: compost/manure + soil surfactant; T2: compost/animal or green manure + pigeon-pea hedges + soil surfactant; T3: compost/animal or green manure + mulch + pigeon-pea hedges) on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses in eroded soil and runoff and on crop yields. Three treatments and one control (traditional practice) were tested in field plots at three sites with a local maize variety and two types of beans. Runoff and eroded soil were collected after each erosive rain, quantified, and analysed for NO3-N and PO4-P concentrations. In all treatments runoff had higher concentrations of NO3-N (2.20-4.83 mg L-1) than of PO4-P (0.02-0.07 mg L-1), and the eroded soil had higher content of PO4-P (5.27-18.8 mg g-1) than of NO3-N (1.30-8.51 mg g-1). The control had significantly higher losses of both NO3-N (5.4, 4.4 and 19 kg ha-1) and PO4-P (0.2, 0.1 and 0.4 kg ha-1) than the other treatments. T3 reduced soil loss, runoff and nutrient losses to nearly a 100% while T1 and T2 reduced those losses from 43 to 88%. The losses of NO3-N and PO4-P were highly correlated with the amounts of runoff and eroded soil. Nutrient losses from the applied amendments were low (5.7% maximum), but the losses in the control could indicate long-term nutrient depletion in the soil (19 and 0.4 kg ha-1 of NO3-N and PO4-P, respectively). T1-T3 did not consistently increase crop yield or biomass in all three sites, but T1 increased both crop yield and biomass. We conclude that T3 (combining crop-residue mulch with organic amendment and runoff hedges) is the best treatment for steep slope areas but, the pigeon-pea hedges need to be managed for higher maize yield. T1 (combining organic amendment with soil surfactant) could be a

  5. Effect of Integrated Water-Nutrient Management Strategies on Soil Erosion Mediated Nutrient Loss and Crop Productivity in Cabo Verde Drylands

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Isaurinda; Ritsema, Coen; Geissen, Violette

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion, runoff and related nutrient losses are a big risk for soil fertility in Cabo Verde drylands. In 2012, field trials were conducted in two agro-ecological zones to evaluate the effects of selected techniques of soil-water management combined with organic amendments (T1: compost/manure + soil surfactant; T2: compost/animal or green manure + pigeon-pea hedges + soil surfactant; T3: compost/animal or green manure + mulch + pigeon-pea hedges) on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses in eroded soil and runoff and on crop yields. Three treatments and one control (traditional practice) were tested in field plots at three sites with a local maize variety and two types of beans. Runoff and eroded soil were collected after each erosive rain, quantified, and analysed for NO3-N and PO4-P concentrations. In all treatments runoff had higher concentrations of NO3-N (2.20-4.83 mg L-1) than of PO4-P (0.02-0.07 mg L-1), and the eroded soil had higher content of PO4-P (5.27-18.8 mg g-1) than of NO3-N (1.30-8.51 mg g-1). The control had significantly higher losses of both NO3-N (5.4, 4.4 and 19 kg ha-1) and PO4-P (0.2, 0.1 and 0.4 kg ha-1) than the other treatments. T3 reduced soil loss, runoff and nutrient losses to nearly a 100% while T1 and T2 reduced those losses from 43 to 88%. The losses of NO3-N and PO4-P were highly correlated with the amounts of runoff and eroded soil. Nutrient losses from the applied amendments were low (5.7% maximum), but the losses in the control could indicate long-term nutrient depletion in the soil (19 and 0.4 kg ha-1 of NO3-N and PO4-P, respectively). T1-T3 did not consistently increase crop yield or biomass in all three sites, but T1 increased both crop yield and biomass. We conclude that T3 (combining crop-residue mulch with organic amendment and runoff hedges) is the best treatment for steep slope areas but, the pigeon-pea hedges need to be managed for higher maize yield. T1 (combining organic amendment with soil surfactant) could be a

  6. Soil Management in Hardwood Plantations

    Treesearch

    B. G. Blackmon

    1978-01-01

    Several soil management techniques--fertilization, deep plowing, cover cropping, summer fallowing, Irrigation, and cultivation--can benefit hardwood plantations. The applicability of the treatments to plantations of cottonwood, sweetgum, sycamore, green ash, yellow-poplar, and oaks depends largely on site conditions.

  7. Anaerobic soil disinfestation and soil borne pest management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD; also referred to as Biological Soil Disinfestation (BSD)) is a pre-plant soil treatment method developed to control plant disease and manage yield decline in many crop production systems. The practice involves induction of anaerobic soil conditions by increasing m...

  8. Benchmark study on glyphosate-resistant cropping systems in the United States. Part 7: Effects of weed management strategy (grower practices versus academic recommendations) on the weed soil seedbank over 6 years.

    PubMed

    Gibson, David J; Young, Bryan G; Owen, Micheal D K; Gage, Karla L; Matthews, Joseph L; Jordan, David L; Shaw, David R; Weller, Stephen C; Wilson, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    Shifts in weed species composition and richness resulting from near-exclusive reliance on herbicides in glyphosate-resistant (GR) cropping systems has necessitated the implementation of alternative weed management tactics to reduce selection pressures of herbicides. We contrasted the response of the weed soil seedbank to effects of weed management strategy, comparing grower practices with academic recommendations for best management practices (BMPs) over 6 years and across five weed hardiness zones in the US Midwest at sites subject to GR cropping systems. Total weed population density and species richness varied according to cropping system, location and prior year's crop, but less so to weed management strategy. The seedbank population density for 11 of the 14 most frequent weed species was affected by weed management strategy either alone or in an interaction with hardiness zone or year, or both. In only 29% of comparisons was weed population density lower following academic recommendations, and this depended upon prior crop and cropping system. The population density of high-risk weed species was reduced by academic recommendations, but only in two of six years and under continuous GR maize. Overall, the weed population density was decreasing in field halves subject to the BMPs in the academic recommendations relative to grower practices. The soil seedbank is slow to respond to academic recommendations to mitigate glyphosate-resistant weeds, but represents a biological legacy that growers need to keep in mind even when management practices reduce emerged field weed population densities. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Implications of coservation management of surface soil organic carbon and the environment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil degradation through soil erosion and soil contamination is a visible sign that management strategies are out of ecological balance. On the other hand, sustainable soil management should be a goal to help achieve long-term development targets for a diversity of communities around the world. Co...

  10. Soil contamination in China: current status and mitigation strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang-Jie; Ma, Yibing; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Tang, Zhong; McGrath, Steve P

    2015-01-20

    China faces great challenges in protecting its soil from contamination caused by rapid industrialization and urbanization over the last three decades. Recent nationwide surveys show that 16% of the soil samples, 19% for the agricultural soils, are contaminated based on China’s soil environmental quality limits, mainly with heavy metals and metalloids. Comparisons with other regions of the world show that the current status of soil contamination, based on the total contaminant concentrations, is not worse in China. However, the concentrations of some heavy metals in Chinese soils appear to be increasing at much greater rates. Exceedance of the contaminant limits in food crops is widespread in some areas, especially southern China, due to elevated inputs of contaminants, acidic nature of the soil and crop species or cultivars prone to heavy metal accumulation. Minimizing the transfer of contaminants from soil to the food chain is a top priority. A number of options are proposed, including identification of the sources of contaminants to agricultural systems, minimization of contaminant inputs, reduction of heavy metal phytoavailability in soil with liming or other immobilizing materials, selection and breeding of low accumulating crop cultivars, adoption of appropriate water and fertilizer management, bioremediation, and change of land use to grow nonfood crops. Implementation of these strategies requires not only technological advances, but also social-economic evaluation and effective enforcement of environmental protection law.

  11. The rangeland management and soil health connection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil health is defined as the capacity of soil to function and provide ecosystem services to society. The importance of managing for the improvement and maintenance of soil health transcends political boundaries, generations, societies and languages. The challenge of communicating soil health conc...

  12. Knowledge management: an innovative risk management strategy.

    PubMed

    Zipperer, Lorri; Amori, Geri

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge management effectively lends itself to the enterprise risk process. The authors introduce the concept of knowledge management as a strategy to drive innovation and support risk management. They align this work with organizational efforts to improve patient safety and quality through the effective sharing of experience and lessons learned. The article closes with suggestions on how to develop a knowledge management initiative at an organization, who should be on the team, and how to sustain this effort and build the culture it requires to drive success.

  13. The office of strategy management.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2005-10-01

    There is a disconnect in most companies between strategy formulation and strategy execution. On average, 95% of a company's employees are unaware of, or do not understand, its strategy. If employees are unaware of the strategy, they surely cannot help the organization implement it effectively. It doesn't have to be like this. For the past 15 years, the authors have studied companies that achieved performance breakthroughs by adopting the Balanced Scorecard and its associated tools to help them better communicate strategy to their employees and to guide and monitor the execution of that strategy. Some companies, of course, have achieved better, longer-lasting improvements than others. The organizations that have managed to sustain their strategic focus have typically established a new corporate-level unit to oversee all activities related to strategy: an office of strategy management (OS M). The OSM, in effect, acts as the CEO's chief of staff. It coordinates an array of tasks: communicating corporate strategy; ensuring that enterprise-level plans are translated into the plans of the various units and departments; executing strategic initiatives to deliver on the grand design; aligning employees' plans for competency development with strategic objectives; and testing and adapting the strategy to stay abreast of the competition. The OSM does not do all the work, but it facilitates the processes so that strategy is executed in an integrated fashion across the enterprise. Although the companies that Kaplan and Norton studied use the Balanced Scorecard as the framework for their strategy management systems, the authors say the lessons of the OSM are applicable even to companies that do not use it.

  14. Management Strategies for Clopidogrel Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Craig J; Carris, Nicolas W; Ruf, Kathryn M

    2015-06-01

    Clopidogrel is a cornerstone of dual antiplatelet therapy. Hypersensitivity reactions potentially limit the use of this treatment and present a significant clinical challenge. The authors have developed recommendations for the management of clopidogrel hypersensitivity with consideration for the etiology, pathophysiology, and critical evaluation of potential management strategies. The clopidogrel hypersensitivity reaction is complex in mechanism and presents generally around day 5 of treatment. Generalized reactions are most common, but the reaction may also be localized or systemic. Screening patients for hypersensitivity is not always possible because the type IV delayed reaction is not detected reliably by conventional skin prick, intradermal challenge, or patch testing. Proposed strategies for management of clopidogrel hypersensitivity include treatment of the reaction with corticosteroids, clopidogrel desensitization, substituting an alternative P2Y12 inhibitor, or clopidogrel avoidance. The safety, efficacy, and cost of each potential strategy must be considered when managing a patient with clopidogrel hypersensitivity.

  15. Crisis management strategies.

    PubMed

    Koster, Maria C; Politis-Norton, Helen

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the different facets of crisis as experienced within the pharmaceutical industry but which are also prevalent throughout other industries. It highlights the importance of early identification and management of crises and issues, which in return are strongly intertwined with a fundamental positive internal corporate climate. A corporate philosophy should always embrace crisis management with the attitude of 'when' and not 'if'; therefore, a company should act today and not tomorrow once a crisis is on its doorstep. Preparation is of utmost importance and there are several items that can be addressed even before a crisis has arisen. Further, this paper also provides guidance on how to deal with the media, what to do and what not to do, and how to appoint the appropriate spokesperson. In this era of fast exchange of information, crisis, which previously may have stayed behind corporate doors, may not do so any longer. Image is very important and should therefore not be risked. Crisis and issue management should therefore be integrated in every company's philosophy and standard operating procedures.

  16. Simulation of Soil Water Content Variability in a Heavy Clay Soil under Contrasting Soil Managements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera, A.; Vanderlinden, K.; Martínez, G.; Espejo, A. J.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is a key variable for numerous physical, chemical and biological processes that take place at or near the soil surface. Understanding the spatial and temporal variability of SWC at the field scale is of prime importance for implementing efficient measurement strategies in applications. The aim of this study was to characterize the spatial and temporal variation of gravimetric SWC in a heavy clay soil, in a wheat-sunflower-legume rotation under conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) using a simple water balance model. An experimental field in SW Spain, where conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) management of a heavy clay soil are being compared since 1983, was sampled for gravimetric SWC on 38 occasions during 2008 and 2009. Topsoil clay content across the six plots was on average 55%, with a standard deviation of 2.7%. The soil profile was sampled at 54 locations, evenly distributed over the three CT and NT plots, at depths of 0-10, 25-35, and 55-65 cm. Topsoil water retention curves (SWRC) were determined in the laboratory on undisturbed soil samples from each of the 54 locations. A weather station recorded daily precipitation and evapotranspiration, as calculated by the Penman-Monteith FAO equation. The water balance was calculated using the Thornthwaite-Mather model with a daily time step. Three parameters, water holding capacity, and water evaporation corrector coefficients for each of the two years, were inversely estimated at the 54 SWC observation points and probability density functions were identified. Spatial variability of SWC was estimated using a Monte Carlo approach, and simulated and observed variability were compared. This Monte Carlo scheme, using a simple water balance model with only three parameters, was found to be useful for evaluating the influence of soil management on the variability of SWC in heavy clay soils.

  17. Managing incontinence: women's normalizing strategies.

    PubMed

    Skoner, M M; Haylor, M J

    1993-01-01

    Women's strategies for managing urinary incontinence were examined in a grounded-theory study. The women's basic social concern was dealing with incontinence in a manner that enabled them to feel normal. Feeling normal meant being able to do what they wanted to do and needed to do to have a normal life-style as they perceived it. This goal was accomplished by normalizing incontinence and its management. Normalization was achieved by directing its course through self-management, accounting for it in terms of personal history and life experiences, and delaying medical counsel. These strategies are described. The findings provide fresh insights about women's response to incontinence and their practice of self-managing its consequences.

  18. Moditored unsaturated soil transport processes as a support for large scale soil and water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanclooster, Marnik

    2010-05-01

    The current societal demand for sustainable soil and water management is very large. The drivers of global and climate change exert many pressures on the soil and water ecosystems, endangering appropriate ecosystem functioning. The unsaturated soil transport processes play a key role in soil-water system functioning as it controls the fluxes of water and nutrients from the soil to plants (the pedo-biosphere link), the infiltration flux of precipitated water to groundwater and the evaporative flux, and hence the feed back from the soil to the climate system. Yet, unsaturated soil transport processes are difficult to quantify since they are affected by huge variability of the governing properties at different space-time scales and the intrinsic non-linearity of the transport processes. The incompatibility of the scales between the scale at which processes reasonably can be characterized, the scale at which the theoretical process correctly can be described and the scale at which the soil and water system need to be managed, calls for further development of scaling procedures in unsaturated zone science. It also calls for a better integration of theoretical and modelling approaches to elucidate transport processes at the appropriate scales, compatible with the sustainable soil and water management objective. Moditoring science, i.e the interdisciplinary research domain where modelling and monitoring science are linked, is currently evolving significantly in the unsaturated zone hydrology area. In this presentation, a review of current moditoring strategies/techniques will be given and illustrated for solving large scale soil and water management problems. This will also allow identifying research needs in the interdisciplinary domain of modelling and monitoring and to improve the integration of unsaturated zone science in solving soil and water management issues. A focus will be given on examples of large scale soil and water management problems in Europe.

  19. Funding strategies for wilderness management

    Treesearch

    Carolyn Alkire

    2000-01-01

    Funding wilderness protection will continue to be a challenge for public land managers. With continuing competition for federal funds and balanced budget goals, other sources of funds may be necessary to supplement annual federal appropriations. This paper identifies and evaluates five potential funding strategies and provides examples of each that are currently in use...

  20. Soil-moisture sensors and irrigation management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This agricultural irrigation seminar will cover the major classes of soil-moisture sensors; their advantages and disadvantages; installing and reading soil-moisture sensors; and using their data for irrigation management. The soil water sensor classes include the resistance sensors (gypsum blocks, g...

  1. Ecological value of soil carbon management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management of soil carbon is critical to the climate change debate, as well as to the long-term productivity and ecosystem resilience of the biosphere. Soil organic carbon is a key ecosystem property that indicates inherent productivity of land, controls soil biological functioning and diversity, r...

  2. Management strategies for encouraging creativity.

    PubMed

    Preston, P

    1998-01-01

    Change, chaos, and uncertainty touch every part of every institution. The laboratory is not immune. Managers content to continue on their familiar path soon will find themselves bypassed. To meet today's challenges, directors of technical operations, laboratory directors, team leaders, and coordinators need plenty of creativity--from everyone on their staff. It is no longer just "nice" to improve group output and problem-solving skills while staying within a "shoestring" budget. It is absolutely necessary. In this article, we explore strategies laboratory managers can use to tap the creative potential and commitment of their people. These strategies work. Whether it involves using humor, creating "idea centers," or "deconstructing the bureaucracy," the goal is the same: to encourage clinical managers to think beyond their technical and managerial experience. The examples in this article may not suit the needs, situations, or tastes of all laboratory managers. They are "food for thought." The concepts and strategies these examples illustrate are every laboratory manager's keys to adapting successfully to future challenges.

  3. Evaluation of Land Use, Land Management and Soil Conservation Strategies to Reduce Non-Point Source Pollution Loads in the Three Gorges Region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehmel, Alexander; Schmalz, Britta; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-11-01

    The construction of the Three Gorges Dam in China and the subsequent impoundment of the Yangtze River have induced a major land use change in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region, which fosters increased inputs of sediment and nutrients from diffuse sources into the water bodies. Several government programs have been implemented to mitigate high sediment and nutrient loads to the reservoir. However, institutional weaknesses and a focus on economic development have so far widely counteracted the effectiveness of these programs. In this study, the eco-hydrological model soil and water assessment tool is used to assess the effects of changes in fertilizer amounts and the conditions of bench terraces in the Xiangxi catchment in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region on diffuse matter releases. With this, the study aims at identifying efficient management measures, which should have priority. The results show that a reduction of fertilizer amounts cannot reduce phosphorus loads considerably without inhibiting crop productivity. The condition of terraces in the catchment has a strong impact on soil erosion and phosphorus releases from agricultural areas. Hence, if economically feasible, programmes focusing on the construction and maintenance of terraces in the region should be implemented. Additionally, intercropping on corn fields as well as more efficient fertilization schemes for agricultural land were identified as potential instruments to reduce diffuse matter loads further. While the study was carried out in the Three Gorges Region, its findings may also beneficial for the reduction of water pollution in other mountainous areas with strong agricultural use.

  4. Evaluation of Land Use, Land Management and Soil Conservation Strategies to Reduce Non-Point Source Pollution Loads in the Three Gorges Region, China.

    PubMed

    Strehmel, Alexander; Schmalz, Britta; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-11-01

    The construction of the Three Gorges Dam in China and the subsequent impoundment of the Yangtze River have induced a major land use change in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region, which fosters increased inputs of sediment and nutrients from diffuse sources into the water bodies. Several government programs have been implemented to mitigate high sediment and nutrient loads to the reservoir. However, institutional weaknesses and a focus on economic development have so far widely counteracted the effectiveness of these programs. In this study, the eco-hydrological model soil and water assessment tool is used to assess the effects of changes in fertilizer amounts and the conditions of bench terraces in the Xiangxi catchment in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region on diffuse matter releases. With this, the study aims at identifying efficient management measures, which should have priority. The results show that a reduction of fertilizer amounts cannot reduce phosphorus loads considerably without inhibiting crop productivity. The condition of terraces in the catchment has a strong impact on soil erosion and phosphorus releases from agricultural areas. Hence, if economically feasible, programmes focusing on the construction and maintenance of terraces in the region should be implemented. Additionally, intercropping on corn fields as well as more efficient fertilization schemes for agricultural land were identified as potential instruments to reduce diffuse matter loads further. While the study was carried out in the Three Gorges Region, its findings may also beneficial for the reduction of water pollution in other mountainous areas with strong agricultural use.

  5. Adaptive management for soil ecosystem services

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birge, Hannah E.; Bevans, Rebecca A.; Allen, Craig R.; Angeler, David G.; Baer, Sara G.; Wall, Diana H.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystem services provided by soil include regulation of the atmosphere and climate, primary (including agricultural) production, waste processing, decomposition, nutrient conservation, water purification, erosion control, medical resources, pest control, and disease mitigation. The simultaneous production of these multiple services arises from complex interactions among diverse aboveground and belowground communities across multiple scales. When a system is mismanaged, non-linear and persistent losses in ecosystem services can arise. Adaptive management is an approach to management designed to reduce uncertainty as management proceeds. By developing alternative hypotheses, testing these hypotheses and adjusting management in response to outcomes, managers can probe dynamic mechanistic relationships among aboveground and belowground soil system components. In doing so, soil ecosystem services can be preserved and critical ecological thresholds avoided. Here, we present an adaptive management framework designed to reduce uncertainty surrounding the soil system, even when soil ecosystem services production is not the explicit management objective, so that managers can reach their management goals without undermining soil multifunctionality or contributing to an irreversible loss of soil ecosystem services.

  6. Adaptive management for soil ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Birgé, Hannah E; Bevans, Rebecca A; Allen, Craig R; Angeler, David G; Baer, Sara G; Wall, Diana H

    2016-12-01

    Ecosystem services provided by soil include regulation of the atmosphere and climate, primary (including agricultural) production, waste processing, decomposition, nutrient conservation, water purification, erosion control, medical resources, pest control, and disease mitigation. The simultaneous production of these multiple services arises from complex interactions among diverse aboveground and belowground communities across multiple scales. When a system is mismanaged, non-linear and persistent losses in ecosystem services can arise. Adaptive management is an approach to management designed to reduce uncertainty as management proceeds. By developing alternative hypotheses, testing these hypotheses and adjusting management in response to outcomes, managers can probe dynamic mechanistic relationships among aboveground and belowground soil system components. In doing so, soil ecosystem services can be preserved and critical ecological thresholds avoided. Here, we present an adaptive management framework designed to reduce uncertainty surrounding the soil system, even when soil ecosystem services production is not the explicit management objective, so that managers can reach their management goals without undermining soil multifunctionality or contributing to an irreversible loss of soil ecosystem services. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Adoption of Soil Health Improvement Strategies by Australian Farmers: II. Impediments and Incentives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, J. McL.; Cattle, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Many farmers remain hesitant to implement structured management plans and strategies tailored to address soil health, irrespective of mounting scientific evidence for the credibility of certain soil health indicators, an increase in the reporting of program benefits and progress in communicating these benefits. Hence, the purpose of this…

  8. Adoption of Soil Health Improvement Strategies by Australian Farmers: II. Impediments and Incentives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, J. McL.; Cattle, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Many farmers remain hesitant to implement structured management plans and strategies tailored to address soil health, irrespective of mounting scientific evidence for the credibility of certain soil health indicators, an increase in the reporting of program benefits and progress in communicating these benefits. Hence, the purpose of this…

  9. Soil Quality Indexing Strategies for Evaluating Sugarcane Expansion in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cherubin, Maurício R.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Cerri, Carlos E. P.; Franco, André L. C.; Tormena, Cássio A.; Davies, Christian A.; Cerri, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    , physical and biological processes within the soil. Our SQ evaluations also suggest that current approaches for expanding Brazilian sugarcane production by converting degraded pasture land to cropland can be a sustainable strategy for meeting increasing biofuel demand. However, management practices that alleviate negative impacts on soil physical and biological indicators must be prioritized within sugarcane producing areas to prevent unintentional SQ degradation over time. PMID:26938642

  10. Soil Quality Indexing Strategies for Evaluating Sugarcane Expansion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cherubin, Maurício R; Karlen, Douglas L; Cerri, Carlos E P; Franco, André L C; Tormena, Cássio A; Davies, Christian A; Cerri, Carlos C

    2016-01-01

    , physical and biological processes within the soil. Our SQ evaluations also suggest that current approaches for expanding Brazilian sugarcane production by converting degraded pasture land to cropland can be a sustainable strategy for meeting increasing biofuel demand. However, management practices that alleviate negative impacts on soil physical and biological indicators must be prioritized within sugarcane producing areas to prevent unintentional SQ degradation over time.

  11. Soil indicators to assess the effectiveness of restoration strategies in dryland ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, E. A. C.; Branquinho, C.; Nunes, A.; Schwilch, G.; Stavi, I.; Valdecantos, A.; Zucca, C.

    2015-12-01

    Soil indicators may be used for assessing both land suitability for restoration and the effectiveness of restoration strategies in restoring ecosystem functioning and services. In this review paper, several soil indicators, which can be used to assess the effectiveness of restoration strategies in dryland ecosystems at different spatial and temporal scales, are discussed. The selected indicators represent the different viewpoints of pedology, ecology, hydrology, and land management. The recovery of soil capacity to provide ecosystem services is primarily obtained by increasing soil rooting depth and volume, and augmenting water accessibility for vegetation. Soil characteristics can be used either as indicators of suitability, that is, inherently slow-changing soil qualities, or as indicators for modifications, namely dynamic, thus "manageable" soil qualities. Soil organic matter forms, as well as biochemistry, micro- and meso-biology, are among the most utilized dynamic indicators. On broader territorial scales, the Landscape Function Analysis uses a functional approach, where the effectiveness of restoration strategies is assessed by combining the analysis of spatial pattern of vegetation with qualitative soil indicators. For more holistic and comprehensive projects, effective strategies to combat desertification should integrate soil indicators with biophysical and socio-economic evaluation and include participatory approaches. The integrated assessment protocol of Sustainable Land Management developed by the World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies network is thoroughly discussed. Two overall outcomes stem from the review: (i) the success of restoration projects relies on a proper understanding of their ecology, namely the relationships between soil, plants, hydrology, climate, and land management at different scales, which is particularly complex due to the heterogeneous pattern of ecosystems functioning in drylands, and (ii) the selection of

  12. Soil management practices under organic farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Adel; Chami Ziad, Al; Hamdy, Atef

    2015-04-01

    Organic farming methods combine scientific knowledge of ecology and modern technology with traditional farming practices based on naturally occurring biological processes. Soil building practices such as crop rotations, intercropping, symbiotic associations, cover crops, organic fertilizers and minimum tillage are central to organic practices. Those practices encourage soil formation and structure and creating more stable systems. In farm nutrient and energy cycling is increased and the retentive abilities of the soil for nutrients and water are enhanced. Such management techniques also play an important role in soil erosion control. The length of time that the soil is exposed to erosive forces is decreased, soil biodiversity is increased, and nutrient losses are reduced, helping to maintain and enhance soil productivity. Organic farming as systematized and certifiable approach for agriculture, there is no surprise that it faces some challenges among both farmers and public sector. This can be clearly demonstrated particularly in the absence of the essential conditions needed to implement successfully the soil management practices like green manure and composting to improve soil fertility including crop rotation, cover cropping and reduced tillage. Those issues beside others will be fully discussed highlighting their beneficial impact on the environmental soil characteristics. Keywords: soil fertility, organic matter, plant nutrition

  13. Managing human resources for successful strategy execution.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    Managers face difficult challenges when they implement organizational strategies to achieve important goals. Execution of strategy has become more dependent upon the effective management of human resources. This article suggests how people can be managed more effectively to facilitate the execution of strategies and improve organizational performance.

  14. Disease management strategies for wildlife.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, G

    2002-04-01

    Three basic forms of management strategies exist for wildlife disease, as follows: prevention of introduction of disease, control of existing disease or eradication. Management may be directed at the disease agent, host population, habitat or be focused on human activities. Disease agents may be dealt with in the environment through disinfection or in the host through treatment. Disinfection and pesticides used to destroy agents or vectors are limited to local situations, may have serious environmental effects and may result in acquired resistance. Difficulty in delivering treatment limits chemotherapy to local situations. Host populations may be managed by immunisation, by altering their distribution or density, or by extirpation. Immunisation is best suited for microparasitic exogenous infections with a low reproductive rate and in populations which have a low turnover. Mass immunisation with oral baits has been effective, but this strategy is limited to a few serious diseases. It is difficult to move wild animals and techniques to discourage animals from entering an area become ineffective rapidly. The setting up of fences is feasible only in local situations. Selective culling is limited to situations in which affected individuals are readily identifiable. General population reduction has had little success in disease control but reducing populations surrounding a focus or creating a barrier to disease movement have been successful. Population reduction is a temporary measure. Eradication of a wildlife population has not been attempted for disease management. Habitat modification may be used to reduce exposure to disease agents, or to alter host distribution or density. Management of diseases of wild animals usually requires a change in human activities. The most important method is by restricting translocation of wild animals to prevent movement of disease.

  15. Assessing different agricultural managements with the use of soil quality indices in a Mediteranean calcareous soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Arcenegui, Vicky; Cerdà, Artemi

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion is a major problem in the Mediterranean region due to the arid conditions and torrential rainfalls, which contribute to the degradation of agricultural land. New strategies must be developed to reduce soil losses and recover or maintain soil functionality in order to achieve a sustainable agriculture. An experiment was designed to evaluate the effect of different agricultural management on soil properties and soil quality. Ten different treatments (contact herbicide, systemic herbicide, ploughing, Oat mulch non-plough, Oats mulch plough, leguminous plant, straw rice mulch, chipped pruned branches, residual-herbicide and agro geo-textile, and three control plots including no tillage or control and long agricultural abandonment (shrub on marls and shrub on limestone) were established in 'El Teularet experimental station' located in the Sierra de Enguera (Valencia, Spain). The soil is a Typic Xerorthent developed over Cretaceous marls in an old agricultural terrace. The agricultural management can modify the soil equilibrium and affect its quality. In this work two soil quality indices (models) developed by Zornoza et al. (2007) are used to evaluate the effects of the different agricultural management along 4 years. The models were developed studying different soil properties in undisturbed forest soils in SE Spain, and the relationships between soil parameters were established using multiple linear regressions. Model 1, that explained 92% of the variance in soil organic carbon (SOC) showed that the SOC can be calculated by the linear combination of 6 physical, chemical and biochemical properties (acid phosphatase, water holding capacity (WHC), electrical conductivity (EC), available phosphorus (P), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and aggregate stability (AS). Model 2 explains 89% of the SOC variance, which can be calculated by means of 7 chemical and biochemical properties (urease, phosphatase, and ß-glucosidase activities, pH, EC, P and CEC). We use the

  16. Agroforestry management in vineyards: effects on soil microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagne, Virginie; Nowak, Virginie; Guilland, Charles; Gontier, Laure; Dufourcq, Thierry; Guenser, Josépha; Grimaldi, Juliette; Bourgade, Emilie; Ranjard, Lionel

    2017-04-01

    Some vineyard practices (tillage, chemical weeding or pest management) are generally known to impact the environment with particular negative effects on the diversity and the abundance of soil microorganisms, and cause water and soil pollutions. In an agro-ecological context, innovative cropping systems have been developed to improve ecosystem services. Among them, agroforestry offers strategies of sustainable land management practices. It consists in intercropping trees with annual/perennial/fodder crop on the same plot but it is weakly referenced with grapevine. The present study assesses the effects of intercropped and neighbouring trees on the soil of three agroforestry vineyards, in south-western France regions. More precisely soils of the different plots were sampled and the impact of the distance to the tree or to the neighbouring trees (forest) on soil microbial community has been considered. Indigenous soil microbial communities were characterized by a metagenomic approach that consisted in extracting the molecular microbial biomass, then in calculating the soil fungi/bacteria ratio - obtained by qPCR - and then in characterizing the soil microbial diversity - through Illumina sequencing of 16S and 18S regions. Our results showed a significant difference between the soil of agroforestry vineyards and the soil sampled in the neighbouring forest in terms of microbial abundance and diversity. However, only structure and composition of bacterial community seem to be influenced by the implanted trees in the vine plots. In addition, the comparison of microbial co-occurrence networks between vine and forest plots as well as inside vine plots according to distance to the tree allow revealing a more sensitive impact of agroforestry practices. Altogether, the results we obtained build up the first references for concerning the soil of agroforestry vineyards which will be interpreted in terms of soil quality, functioning and sustainability.

  17. Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma: Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Montanari, Francesca; Diefenbach, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is largely curable with first-line therapy, approximately one-third of patients will not have a complete response to frontline treatment or will subsequently relapse. Only 50 % of these patients will be effectively salvaged with conventional therapies. The prognosis is particularly poor for those patients with chemotherapy refractory disease, who are unable to obtain even transient disease control, and for patients who relapse following high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. In this review, we summarize the most recent updates on the management of patients with relapsed HL, the role of novel therapies such as brentuximab vedotin, and an overview of promising new agents currently under investigation. We also discuss the role of consolidation strategies such as high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, and reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and the need for new strategies in the elderly patient population. PMID:24942298

  18. Effect of soil type and soil management on soil physical, chemical and biological properties in commercial organic olive orchards in Southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Jose Alfonso; Auxiliadora Soriano, Maria; Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Navas, Juan Antonio; Landa, Blanca B.

    2014-05-01

    One of the objectives of organic agriculture is to maintain and improve soil quality, while simultaneously producing an adequate yield. A key element in organic olive production is soil management, which properly implemented can optimize the use of rainfall water enhancing infiltration rates and controlling competition for soil water by weeds. There are different soil management strategies: eg. weed mowing (M), green manure with surface tillage in spring (T), or combination with animal grazing among the trees (G). That variability in soil management combined with the large variability in soil types on which organic olive trees are grown in Southern Spain, difficult the evaluation of the impact of different soil management on soil properties, and yield as well as its interpretation in terms of improvement of soil quality. This communications presents the results and analysis of soil physical, chemical and biological properties on 58 soils in Southern Spain during 2005 and 2006, and analyzed and evaluated in different studies since them. Those 58 soils were sampled in 46 certified commercial organic olive orchards with four soil types as well as 12 undisturbed areas with natural vegetation near the olive orchards. The four soil types considered were Eutric Regosol (RGeu, n= 16), Eutric Cambisol (CMeu, n=16), Calcaric Regosol (RGca, n=13 soils sampled) and Calcic Cambisol (CMcc), and the soil management systems (SMS) include were 10 light tillage (LT), 16 sheep grazing (G), 10 tillage (T), 10 mechanical mowing (M), and 12 undisturbed areas covered by natural vegetation (NV-C and NV-S). Our results indicate that soil management had a significant effect on olive yield as well as on key soil properties. Among these soil properties are physical ones, such as infiltration rate or bulk density, chemical ones, especially organic carbon concentration, and biological ones such as soil microbial respiration and bacterial community composition. Superimpose to that soil

  19. Population communication management training strategy.

    PubMed

    Bayan Salas, E

    1985-01-01

    The discussion presents some thoughts on a general training strategy in information/education/communication (IEC) management which might meet the needs of 3rd world countries. Management by objectives (MBO) has emerged as the central doctrine in management theory and practice since its initial formulation in 1954. Yet, little evidence exists to date of its successful application in IEC activities. Population IEC activities, being staff activities in a nonprofit, public sector program, are in the "twilight zone" of MBO where hasty efforts to comply with the form if not the substance of this management technique can lead to lower levels of performance and achievement than before the goal setting system was implemented. Yet, clearly, IEC managers need the benefits that management by objectives can bring if done properly. It is essential that IEC managers and workers stop looking at IEC materials as end products in themselves but rather as inputs to be combined with other inputs in realizing the desired output of voluntary behavioral change on a mass level. To overcome tendencies toward provincialism, all IEC managers should initially spend time working in other areas of the population program. The experience of using IEC materials and approaches in face-to-face transactions with potential acceptors is a prerequisite to the successful formulation of such materials and approaches. Training programs for IEC managers and supervisors should emphasize development of consensual decision making skills. The success or failure of the program depends on the ability of its workers to resolve potential conflicts between an individual's priorities and national priorities in a noncoercive manner. The social dynamics approach that seeks a conscious, voluntary, nonmanipulated shift of shared attitudes, opinions, feelings, and actions is the approach underlying the most successful population programs. All IEC managers and supervisors should be systematically trained in norm shifting

  20. Combination strategies for pain management.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Clark-Vetri, Rachel; Tallarida, Ronald J; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2003-10-01

    At least two factors relating to pain management using oral analgesics suggest that combination strategies merit consideration: many pains arise from more than one physiological cause and current analgesics have adverse effect profiles that might be reduced by combination with another agent in smaller doses or with less frequent dosing. In addition to increased convenience, combinations sometimes also result in the unexpected benefit of synergy. But not all pains, clinical settings or combinations merit the extra expense or other potential negative features of fixed-ratio products. This review examines the multiple basic science, clinical and pharmacoeconomic issues relating to analgesic combinations and the methodologies available for assessing these issues.

  1. Management strategies of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giovanni D

    2012-11-21

    Barrett's esophagus is a condition resulting from chronic gastro-esophageal reflux disease with a documented risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Current strategies for improved survival in patients with Barrett's adenocarcinoma focus on detection of dysplasia. This can be obtained by screening programs in high-risk cohorts of patients and/or endoscopic biopsy surveillance of patients with known Barrett's esophagus (BE). Several therapies have been developed in attempts to reverse BE and reduce cancer risk. Aggressive medical management of acid reflux, lifestyle modifications, antireflux surgery, and endoscopic treatments have been recommended for many patients with BE. Whether these interventions are cost-effective or reduce mortality from esophageal cancer remains controversial. Current treatment requires combinations of endoscopic mucosal resection techniques to eliminate visible lesions followed by ablation of residual metaplastic tissue. Esophagectomy is currently indicated in multifocal high-grade neoplasia or mucosal Barrett's carcinoma which cannot be managed by endoscopic approach.

  2. Introduction to Soil Fumigant Management Plans

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Soil fumigant pesticide labels require users to prepare a site-specific fumigation management plan (FMP) before the application begins. EPA has developed templates that outline the elements required by the labels.

  3. Ecosystem services driven by soil biota - Relevance and management in land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthoff, Martin; Peres, Guenola; Zaller, Johann; Pullemann, Mirjam; Taylor, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    To understand how land use systems affect soil biodiversity and how soil biodiversity (i.e. the performance of functional groups) feeds back to soil functions and ecosystem services is essential to establish sustainable practices in future soil management. This poster aims to summaries the current knowledge and perspectives on soil biota as the driver of key processes in soil and ecosystem functioning. We will list key processes and the driving organisms, as well as indicate and valuate management practices refering to current European projects. In conclusion we will suggest implementation strategies and identify research needs.

  4. Soil mapping and processes models to support climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Pereira, Paulo; Brevik, Eric; Cerda, Artemi; Jordan, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    As agreed in Paris in December 2015, global average temperature is to be limited to "well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels" and efforts will be made to "limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels. Thus, reducing greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) in all sectors becomes critical and appropriate sustainable land management practices need to be taken (Pereira et al., 2017). Mitigation strategies focus on reducing the rate and magnitude of climate change by reducing its causes. Complementary to mitigation, adaptation strategies aim to minimise impacts and maximize the benefits of new opportunities. The adoption of both practices will require developing system models to integrate and extrapolate anticipated climate changes such as global climate models (GCMs) and regional climate models (RCMs). Furthermore, integrating climate models driven by socio-economic scenarios in soil process models has allowed the investigation of potential changes and threats in soil characteristics and functions in future climate scenarios. One of the options with largest potential for climate change mitigation is sequestering carbon in soils. Therefore, the development of new methods and the use of existing tools for soil carbon monitoring and accounting have therefore become critical in a global change context. For example, soil C maps can help identify potential areas where management practices that promote C sequestration will be productive and guide the formulation of policies for climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. Despite extensive efforts to compile soil information and map soil C, many uncertainties remain in the determination of soil C stocks, and the reliability of these estimates depends upon the quality and resolution of the spatial datasets used for its calculation. Thus, better estimates of soil C pools and dynamics are needed to advance understanding of the C balance and the potential of soils for climate change mitigation. Here

  5. Configuration Management Process Assessment Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Thad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a strategy for assessing the development and effectiveness of configuration management systems within Programs, Projects, and Design Activities performed by technical organizations and their supporting development contractors. Scope: Various entities CM Systems will be assessed dependent on Project Scope (DDT&E), Support Services and Acquisition Agreements. Approach: Model based structured against assessing organizations CM requirements including best practices maturity criteria. The model is tailored to the entity being assessed dependent on their CM system. The assessment approach provides objective feedback to Engineering and Project Management of the observed CM system maturity state versus the ideal state of the configuration management processes and outcomes(system). center dot Identifies strengths and risks versus audit gotcha's (findings/observations). center dot Used "recursively and iteratively" throughout program lifecycle at select points of need. (Typical assessments timing is Post PDR/Post CDR) center dot Ideal state criteria and maturity targets are reviewed with the assessed entity prior to an assessment (Tailoring) and is dependent on the assessed phase of the CM system. center dot Supports exit success criteria for Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews. center dot Gives a comprehensive CM system assessment which ultimately supports configuration verification activities.*

  6. Managing Soil Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management practices impact soil organisms by altering their environment and therefore favoring some species over others. Management only rarely results in the elimination of an entire functional group that then impacts an ecosystem service, as in the example of repeated tillage eliminating earthwo...

  7. New soil water sensors for irrigation management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effective irrigation management is key to obtaining the most crop production per unit of water applied and increasing production in the face of competing demands on water resources. Management methods have included calculating crop water needs based on weather station measurements, calculating soil ...

  8. Management strategies for idiopathic urethritis.

    PubMed

    Henderson, L; Farrelly, P; Dickson, A P; Goyal, A

    2016-02-01

    Williams and Mikhael (1971) described idiopathic urethritis (IU) as a self-limiting condition that affects boys aged 5-15 years, with symptoms of urethrorrhagia, dysuria and haematuria. However, a proportion of boys will remain symptomatic for several years, and may develop urethral stricture (Poch et al., 2007; Palagiri et al., 2003). There is no universally effective treatment for IU, although various strategies have been employed. To review the presentation and long-term outcomes of boys with IU, and present the efficacy of management strategies that have been utilised. A retrospective review was performed of all boys with IU. It was based on clinical and cystoscopic findings for presentation, medical history, management and clinical progress. Fifty-four boys were included, with a median age of 11 years (range 5-15 years) at presentation. The median duration of symptoms was 18 months (range 2-132 months). The median follow-up was 18.5 months (range 1-120 months). Seven (13.0%) boys had early urethral stricture at initial cystourethroscopy, and one (1.9%) developed stricture during follow-up. Thirty-six boys (66.7%) had previous circumcision and four (7.4%) had meatal stenosis. Eight (14.8%) had previous hypospadias repair. Whilst 50% of boys with IU do not require any specific treatment, those with severe/unremitting symptoms may benefit from a trial of urethral steroids or short-term urethral catheterisation. The mechanisms of benefit from these modalities are unclear and they require further evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Homosexuality in Turkey: strategies for managing heterosexism.

    PubMed

    Bakacak, Ayça Gelgeç; Oktem, Pinar

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the strategies used by young homosexuals to manage their sexual minority status in Turkey. In-depth interviews were conducted with 15 self-identified homosexual university students. The data on the strategies employed by homosexuals suggested a categorization of these strategies into four interrelated areas: strategies employed in the process of self-acceptance; strategies to manage sexual stigma and prejudice; strategies specific to the coming-out process; and the strategies used while openly expressing their sexual identities.

  10. STRATEGIES IN SOIL PROTECTION - MISSIONS AND VISIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of this paper is the progress to reach our present understandings of the needs and methods for "Soil protection." Soil is critical to human life, needed for production of foods safe for lifetime consumption. Soils must be protected for support of human societies. Until...

  11. STRATEGIES IN SOIL PROTECTION - MISSIONS AND VISIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of this paper is the progress to reach our present understandings of the needs and methods for "Soil protection." Soil is critical to human life, needed for production of foods safe for lifetime consumption. Soils must be protected for support of human societies. Until...

  12. Validation of Sensor-Directed Spatial Simulated Annealing Soil Sampling Strategy.

    PubMed

    Scudiero, Elia; Lesch, Scott M; Corwin, Dennis L

    2016-07-01

    Soil spatial variability has a profound influence on most agronomic and environmental processes at field and landscape scales, including site-specific management, vadose zone hydrology and transport, and soil quality. Mobile sensors are a practical means of mapping spatial variability because their measurements serve as a proxy for many soil properties, provided a sensor-soil calibration is conducted. A viable means of calibrating sensor measurements over soil properties is through linear regression modeling of sensor and target property data. In the present study, two sensor-directed, model-based, sampling scheme delineation methods were compared to validate recent applications of soil apparent electrical conductivity (EC)-directed spatial simulated annealing against the more established EC-directed response surface sampling design (RSSD) approach. A 6.8-ha study area near San Jacinto, CA, was surveyed for EC, and 30 soil sampling locations per sampling strategy were selected. Spatial simulated annealing and RSSD were compared for sensor calibration to a target soil property (i.e., salinity) and for evenness of spatial coverage of the study area, which is beneficial for mapping nontarget soil properties (i.e., those not correlated with EC). The results indicate that the linear modeling EC-salinity calibrations obtained from the two sampling schemes provided salinity maps characterized by similar errors. The maps of nontarget soil properties show similar errors across sampling strategies. The Spatial Simulated Annealing methodology is, therefore, validated, and its use in agronomic and environmental soil science applications is justified.

  13. Disease management strategies: managing care giving in managed care.

    PubMed

    Nesse, R E; Hagedorn, S D; Scheitel, S M; Nyman, M A; Broers, J K

    2000-01-01

    The rapid rate of change in health care delivery systems has challenged and troubled health care providers. Some new health care delivery systems primarily emphasize the economics of medical care and leave providers with a sense that their profession has strayed from its mission. In addition, there is an increasing demand by payers and the public for public accountability for the quality and expense of clinical services. One response to these changes in health care is the use of disease management strategies. There is a growing body of knowledge regarding disease management strategies and practice guidelines in the literature. This article discusses how a provider group can implement improvement in the clinical process successfully by applying techniques of disease management.

  14. Galveston Island, Texas, Sand Management Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    conducted a study to support a sand management strategy for the Galveston Park Board of Trustees of Galveston, TX. The long-term management strategy ...ER D C/ CH L TR -1 6- 13 Galveston Island, Texas, Sand Management Strategies Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry...online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. ERDC/CHL TR-16-13 July 2016 Galveston Island, Texas, Sand Management Strategies

  15. Indices for soil management decisions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Indices are needed for periodic assessments of soil resource condition at all scales – within a lawn, field, farm, watershed, county, state, nation, or the world. There are several types of indices including scorecards, simulation models, decision aides, and assessment frameworks. This chapter exami...

  16. STRATEGIES IN SOIL PROTECTION - MISSIONS AND VISIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of this paper is the progress to reach our present understandings of the needs and methods for "Soil protection." Sloil is critical to human life, needed for production of foods safe for lifetime consumption. Soils must be protected for support of human societies. Unti...

  17. STRATEGIES IN SOIL PROTECTION - MISSIONS AND VISIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of this paper is the progress to reach our present understandings of the needs and methods for "Soil protection." Sloil is critical to human life, needed for production of foods safe for lifetime consumption. Soils must be protected for support of human societies. Unti...

  18. State Strategies To Manage Budget Shortfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Conference of State Legislatures, Denver, CO.

    Some of the strategies that states have used to manage budget shortfalls are presented in this report. It provides information, evaluations, and case studies that policymakers can refer to when considering their options, and it emphasizes strategies to manage budget shortfalls, which tend to need a quick resolution. The report also examines some…

  19. Study of microarthopod communities to assess soil quality in different managed vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnarli, E.; Goggioli, D.; Tarchi, F.; Guidi, S.; Nannelli, R.; Vignozzi, N.; Valboa, G.; Lottero, M. R.; Corino, L.; Simoni, S.

    2015-01-01

    Land use influences the abundance and diversity of soil arthropods. The evaluation of the impact of different management strategies on soil quality is increasingly requested. The determination of communities' structures of edaphic fauna can represent an efficient tool. In this study, in some vineyards in Piedmont (Italy), the effects of two different management systems, organic and integrated pest management (IPM), on soil biota were evaluated. As microarthropods living in soil surface are an important component of soil ecosystem interacting with all the other system components, a multi disciplinary approach was adopted by characterizing also some soil physical and chemical characteristics (soil texture, soil pH, total organic carbon, total nitrogen, calcium carbonate). Soil samplings were carried out on Winter 2011 and Spring 2012. All specimens were counted and determined up to the order level. The biological quality of the soil was defined through the determination of ecological indices, such as QBS-ar, species richness and indices of Shannon-Weaver, Pielou, Margalef and Simpson. The mesofauna abundance was affected by both the type of management and the soil texture. The analysis of microarthropod communities by QBS-ar showed higher values in organic than in IPM managed vineyards; in particular, the values registered in organic vineyards were similar to those characteristic of preserved soils.

  20. Precision control of soil N cycling via soil functional zone management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Managing the soil nitrogen (N) cycle is a major component of agricultural sustainability. Soil functional zone management (SFZM), a novel framework of agroecosystem management, may improve soil N management compared with conventional and no-tillage approaches by focusing on the timing and location (...

  1. Soil moisture monitoring for crop management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Dale

    2015-07-01

    The 'Risk management through soil moisture monitoring' project has demonstrated the capability of current technology to remotely monitor and communicate real time soil moisture data. The project investigated whether capacitance probes would assist making informed pre- and in-crop decisions. Crop potential and cropping inputs are increasingly being subject to greater instability and uncertainty due to seasonal variability. In a targeted survey of those who received regular correspondence from the Department of Primary Industries it was found that i) 50% of the audience found the information generated relevant for them and less than 10% indicted with was not relevant; ii) 85% have improved their knowledge/ability to assess soil moisture compared to prior to the project, with the most used indicator of soil moisture still being rain fall records; and iii) 100% have indicated they will continue to use some form of the technology to monitor soil moisture levels in the future. It is hoped that continued access to this information will assist informed input decisions. This will minimise inputs in low decile years with a low soil moisture base and maximise yield potential in more favourable conditions based on soil moisture and positive seasonal forecasts

  2. The soil management assessment framework: A potential soil health assessment tool

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) was developed in the 1990s utilizing Systems Engineering and Ecology experiences with scoring functions to normalize disparate soil physical, chemical, and biological indicator data representing critical properties and processes associated with soil qu...

  3. Effects of inter row management intensity on soil physical properties in European vineyards.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; Strauss, Peter; Kumpan, Monika; Guzmán, Gema; Gómez, Jose A.; Stiper, Katrin; Popescou, Daniela; Guernion, Muriel; Nicolai, Annegret; Winter, Silvia; Zaller, Johann G.

    2017-04-01

    Successful viticulture is mainly depending on soil, climate and management capabilities of vine growers. These factors influence on the availability of water during the growing season which in turn impacts on wine quality and quantity. To protect soil from being eroded many winegrowers try to keep the inter row zones of the vineyards green for as much time as possible. Greening also helps to provide water-stress to the grapes for harvesting high quality wines. However, the management strategies concerning the intensity of inter row management are widely different across Europe. They differ within regions, between regions and between countries and are mainly based on personal experience of the winegrowers. To measure possible effects of inter row management in vineyards on soil physical parameters we selected vineyards with different inter row management intensities in Austria, Romania, France and Spain. In total more than 700 undisturbed core samples (from 3 to 8 cm depth) out of 50 individual vineyards were analysed for saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, soil water retention, aggregate stability, total organic carbon, soil texture and bulk density. The comparison between high intensity management with at least one soil disturbance per year, medium intensity with less frequent soil disturbance and low intensity management with no soil disturbance since at least 5 years indicates that investigated soil physical properties did not necessarily improve for the upper soil layer in every region. The results indicate that the influence of long term and high frequency mechanical stress imposed on soil by use of agricultural machinery in inter rows as well as different fertilization strategies may in some cases exhibit higher impacts on soil physical properties than the different tillage strategies.

  4. Cumulative effects of fuel management on the soils of eastern U.S

    Treesearch

    Mac A. Callaham; D. Andrew Scott; Joseph J. O’Brien; John A. Stanturf

    2012-01-01

    Fuel management treatments in the Eastern United States encompass diverse activities that have a range of potential impacts on the soils within watersheds of managed forests and grasslands. In industrial or production forests, the predominant fuel management strategies are intensive site preparation (bedding, roller chopping, and burning slash), use of herbicides, and...

  5. Soil health: The concept, its role, and strategies for monitoring

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil health is not a new concept as evidenced by writings by both Greek and Roman philosophers who were aware of the importance of soil health to agricultural prosperity. Most recently, the concept has been recognized as a tool to help evaluate the effects of various agricultural and land management...

  6. Site-specific management of soil pH and nutrients in blueberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Site-specific management of soil pH and fertilizers is one of the most promising strategies in precision agriculture and is potentially applicable to many horticultural crops, including blueberry. Unlike most fruit crops, blueberry is adapted to low soil pH conditions in the range of 4-5.5 and has ...

  7. Guiding soil conservation strategy in headwater mediterranean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Slimane, Abir; Raclot, Damien; Evrard, Olivier; Sanaa, Mustapha; Lefèvre, Irène; Le Bissonnais, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Reservoir siltation due to water erosion is an important environmental issue in Mediterranean countries where storage of clear surface water is crucial for their economic and agricultural development. In order to reduce water erosion, this study aimed to design a methodology for guiding the implementation of efficient conservation strategies by identifying the dominant sediment sources in Mediterranean context. To this end, a fingerprinting method was combined with long-term field monitoring of catchment sediment yield in five headwater catchments (0.1-10 km2) equipped with a small reservoir between 1990 and 1995. The five catchments were chosen to cover the large diversity of environmental conditions found along the Tunisian Ridge and in the Cape Bon region. The fingerprinting techniques based on measurements of cesium-137 and Total Organic Carbon within the catchments and in reservoir sediment deposits successfully identified the contribution of rill/interrill and gully/channel erosion to sediment yield at the outlet of five small headwater catchments during the last 15-20 years. Results showed the very large variability of erosion processes among the selected catchments, with rill/interrill erosion contributions to sediment accumulated in outlet reservoirs ranging from 20 to 80%. Overall, rill/interrill erosion was the dominant process controlling reservoir siltation in three catchments whereas gully/channel erosion dominated in the other two catchments. This demonstrates that the dominant erosion process in the Mediterranean regions highly depends on the local environmental context. The lowest rill/interrill erosion contribution (2.2 Mg ha-1 yr-1) in the five catchments remained significantly higher than the tolerable soil loss indicating the severe levels reached by soil erosion along the Tunisian Ridge and in the Cape Bon region. This study also showed that although the implementation of improved topsoil management measures greatly reduced rill

  8. Soil indicators to assess the effectiveness of restoration strategies in dryland ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Edoardo; Branquinho, Cristina; Nunes, Alice; Schwilch, Gudrun; Stavi, Ilan; Valdecantos, Alejandro; Zucca, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Soil indicators may be used for assessing both land suitability for restoration and the effectiveness of restoration strategies in restoring ecosystem functioning and services. In this review paper, several soil indicators, which can be used to assess the effectiveness of restoration strategies in dryland ecosystems at different spatial and temporal scales, are discussed. The selected indicators represent the different viewpoints of pedology, ecology, hydrology, and land management. The recovery of soil capacity to provide ecosystem services is primarily obtained by increasing soil rooting depth and volume, and augmenting water accessibility for vegetation. Soil characteristics can be used either as indicators of suitability, that is, inherently slow-changing soil qualities, or as indicators for modifications, namely dynamic, thus "manageable" soil qualities. Soil organic matter forms, as well as biochemistry, micro- and meso-biology, are among the most utilized dynamic indicators. On broader territorial scales, the Landscape Function Analysis uses a functional approach, where the effectiveness of restoration strategies is assessed by combining the analysis of spatial pattern of vegetation with qualitative soil indicators. For more holistic and comprehensive projects, effective strategies to combat desertification should integrate soil indicators with biophysical and socio-economic evaluation and include participatory approaches. The integrated assessment protocol of Sustainable Land Management developed by the World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies network is thoroughly discussed. Two overall outcomes stem from the review: i) the success of restoration projects relies on a proper understanding of their ecology, namely the relationships between soil, plants, hydrology, climate, and land management at different scales, which is particularly complex due to the heterogeneous pattern of ecosystems functioning in drylands, and ii) the selection of

  9. Leadership Strategies for Managing Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kormanski, Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the impact of conflict in small group development theory. Views conflict as a positive, normally occurring behavior and presents leadership strategies involving withdrawal, suppression, integration, compromise, and power. Examines situational contingencies and presents a rationale for strategy selection and intervention. (Author)

  10. Volcanic Ash Soils: Sustainable Soil Management Practices, With Examples of Harvest Effects and Root Disease Trends

    Treesearch

    Mike Curran; Pat Green; Doug Maynard

    2007-01-01

    Sustainability protocols recognize forest soil disturbance as an important issue at national and international levels. At regional levels continual monitoring and testing of standards, practices, and effects are necessary for successful implementation of sustainable soil management. Volcanic ash-cap soils are affected by soil disturbance and changes to soil properties...

  11. Disease management as a performance improvement strategy.

    PubMed

    McClatchey, S

    2001-11-01

    Disease management is a strategy of organizing care and services for a patient population across the continuum. It is characterized by a population database, interdisciplinary and interagency collaboration, and evidence-based clinical information. The effectiveness of a disease management program has been measured by a combination of clinical, financial, and quality of life outcomes. In early 1997, driven by a strategic planning process that established three Centers of Excellence (COE), we implemented disease management as the foundation for a new approach to performance improvement utilizing five key strategies. The five implementation strategies are outlined, in addition to a review of the key elements in outcome achievement.

  12. Strategies to improve reference databases for soil microbiomes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jinlyung; Yang, Fan; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Cardenas, Erick; Garoutte, Aaron; Williams, Ryan; Flater, Jared; Tiedje, James M.; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Gelder, Brian; Howe, Adina

    2016-12-09

    A database of curated genomes is needed to better assess soil microbial communities and their processes associated with differing land management and environmental impacts. Interpreting soil metagenomic datasets with existing sequence databases is challenging because these datasets are biased towards medical and biotechnology research and can result in misleading annotations. We have curated a database of 928 genomes of soil-associated organisms (888 bacteria, 34 archaea, and 6 fungi). Using this database as a representation of the current state of knowledge of soil microbes that are well-characterized, we evaluated its composition and compared it to broader microbial databases, specifically NCBI’s RefSeq, as well as 3,035 publicly available soil amplicon datasets. These comparisons identified phyla and functions that are enriched in soils as well as those that may be underrepresented in RefSoil. For example, RefSoil was observed to have increased representation of Firmicutes despite its low abundance in soil environments and also lacked representation of Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia, which are abundant in soils. Our comparison of RefSoil to soil amplicon datasets allowed us to identify targets that if cultured or sequenced would significantly increase the biodiversity represented within RefSoil. To demonstrate the opportunities to access these underrepresented targets, we employed single cell genomics in a pilot experiment to recover 14 genomes from the "most wanted" list, which improved RefSoil's representation of EMP sequences by 7% by abundance. This effort demonstrates the value of RefSoil in the guidance of future research efforts and the capability of single cell genomics as a practical means to fill the existing genomic data gaps.

  13. Strategies to improve reference databases for soil microbiomes

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, Jinlyung; Yang, Fan; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; ...

    2016-12-09

    A database of curated genomes is needed to better assess soil microbial communities and their processes associated with differing land management and environmental impacts. Interpreting soil metagenomic datasets with existing sequence databases is challenging because these datasets are biased towards medical and biotechnology research and can result in misleading annotations. We have curated a database of 928 genomes of soil-associated organisms (888 bacteria, 34 archaea, and 6 fungi). Using this database as a representation of the current state of knowledge of soil microbes that are well-characterized, we evaluated its composition and compared it to broader microbial databases, specifically NCBI’s RefSeq,more » as well as 3,035 publicly available soil amplicon datasets. These comparisons identified phyla and functions that are enriched in soils as well as those that may be underrepresented in RefSoil. For example, RefSoil was observed to have increased representation of Firmicutes despite its low abundance in soil environments and also lacked representation of Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia, which are abundant in soils. Our comparison of RefSoil to soil amplicon datasets allowed us to identify targets that if cultured or sequenced would significantly increase the biodiversity represented within RefSoil. To demonstrate the opportunities to access these underrepresented targets, we employed single cell genomics in a pilot experiment to recover 14 genomes from the "most wanted" list, which improved RefSoil's representation of EMP sequences by 7% by abundance. This effort demonstrates the value of RefSoil in the guidance of future research efforts and the capability of single cell genomics as a practical means to fill the existing genomic data gaps.« less

  14. Demand management and case management: a conservation strategy.

    PubMed

    Bryant, C D R Anna K

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the history and development of managed competition, and explores the possibilities of a new demand management strategy in the context of nurse case management to offer less costly, higher quality care for a greater number of patients. The article examines the history and principles of healthcare demand management, its implementation in the hospital and clinical practices of nurse case managers, and its impacts in reducing costs while maintaining care levels. The article develops and analyzes the conflicts and common ground between demand management and case management. First, demand-side strategies can be effective in reducing costs while maintaining quality of nursing care; second, nurse case managers should employ patient education, self-care, and staffing solutions to manage demand. Nurse case managers must apply demand management principles carefully. Their goal is not to restrict care, but to maintain the highest levels of care possible within the limits of their practice's resources and staffing. Two critical themes emerge: (1) demand management is a potential alternative to market-driven managed competition and (2) nursing case management can affect an effective form of demand management. However, the long-term implications of these nursing case management strategies on healthcare staffing need further exploration.

  15. Contemporary management strategies for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Robert P

    2009-06-01

    A roundtable meeting that comprised clinical, patient advocacy, and managed care experts discussed issues regarding the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia. The panel agreed that earlier diagnosis and treatment, additional education for the medical community, and appropriate management by health plans, including patient access to US Food and Drug Administration-approved fibromyalgia medications, are needed. In addition, physicians, payers, and patient advocates must work to improve clinical, economic, and quality-of-life outcomes for fibromyalgia patients. Finally, treatment and diagnostic guidelines must be updated as advances in disease management are made (including approvals of 3 new pharmacologic agents), and development of a therapeutic category for "fibromyalgia" on payer formularies is needed.

  16. Time management strategies for research productivity.

    PubMed

    Chase, Jo-Ana D; Topp, Robert; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy; Zerwic, Julie J; Benefield, Lazelle E; Anderson, Cindy M; Conn, Vicki S

    2013-02-01

    Researchers function in a complex environment and carry multiple role responsibilities. This environment is prone to various distractions that can derail productivity and decrease efficiency. Effective time management allows researchers to maintain focus on their work, contributing to research productivity. Thus, improving time management skills is essential to developing and sustaining a successful program of research. This article presents time management strategies addressing behaviors surrounding time assessment, planning, and monitoring. Herein, the Western Journal of Nursing Research editorial board recommends strategies to enhance time management, including setting realistic goals, prioritizing, and optimizing planning. Involving a team, problem-solving barriers, and early management of potential distractions can facilitate maintaining focus on a research program. Continually evaluating the effectiveness of time management strategies allows researchers to identify areas of improvement and recognize progress.

  17. Gingival overgrowth: Part 2: management strategies.

    PubMed

    Chesterman, J; Beaumont, J; Kellett, M; Durey, K

    2017-02-10

    The effective and predictable management of gingival overgrowth requires correct diagnosis and consideration of aetiological factors, as discussed in Part 1 (BDJ 2017; 222: 85-91). Initial management should involve cause-related therapy, which may resolve or reduce the lesion. If functional, aesthetic and maintenance complications persist following this phase; further treatment may be required in the form of surgery. This paper discusses management strategies, including management of aetiological factors and surgical techniques.

  18. What's your strategy for managing knowledge?

    PubMed

    Hansen, M T; Nohria, N; Tierney, T

    1999-01-01

    The rise of the computer and the increasing importance of intellectual assets have compelled executives to examine the knowledge underlying their businesses and how it is used. Because knowledge management as a conscious practice is so young, however, executives have lacked models to use as guides. To help fill that gap, the authors recently studied knowledge management practices at management consulting firms, health care providers, and computer manufacturers. They found two very different knowledge management strategies in place. In companies that sell relatively standardized products that fill common needs, knowledge is carefully codified and stored in databases, where it can be accessed and used--over and over again--by anyone in the organization. The authors call this the codification strategy. In companies that provide highly customized solutions to unique problems, knowledge is shared mainly through person-to-person contacts; the chief purpose of computers is to help people communicate. They call this the personalization strategy. A company's choice of knowledge management strategy is not arbitrary--it must be driven by the company's competitive strategy. Emphasizing the wrong approach or trying to pursue both can quickly undermine a business. The authors warn that knowledge management should not be isolated in a functional department like HR or IT. They emphasize that the benefits are greatest--to both the company and its customers--when a CEO and other general managers actively choose one of the approaches as a primary strategy.

  19. Speed Management Strategies; A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Saadati, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically identify the various methods of speed management and their effects. Methods: A systematic search was performed in Science Direct, Ovid Medline, Scopus, PubMed and ProQuest databases from April to June 2015. Hand searching and reference of selected articles were used to improve article identification. Articles published after 1990 which had reported on efficacy/effectiveness of speed management strategies were included. Data were extracted using pre-defined extraction table. Results: Of the 803 retrieved articles, 22 articles were included in this review. Most of the included articles (63%) had before-after design and were done in European countries. Speed cameras, engineering schemes, intelligent speed adaption (ISA), speed limits and zones, vehicle activated sign and integrated strategies were the most common strategies reported in the literature. Various strategies had different effects on mean speed of the vehicles ranging from 1.6 to 10 km/h. Moreover, 8-65% and 11-71% reduction was reported in person injured accidents and fatal accidents, respectively as a result of employing various strategies. Conclusion: Literature revealed positive effects of various speed management strategies. Using various strategies was mostly dependent on road characteristics, driver’s attitude about the strategy as well as economic and technological capabilities of the country. Political support is considered as a main determinant in selecting speed management strategies. PMID:27540546

  20. Determination of potential management zones from soil electrical conductivity, yield and crop data.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Shi, Zhou; Wu, Ci-fang; Li, Hong-yi; Li, Feng

    2008-01-01

    One approach to apply precision agriculture to optimize crop production and environmental quality is identifying management zones. In this paper, the variables of soil electrical conductivity (EC) data, cotton yield data and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data in an about 15 ha field in a coastal saline land were selected as data resources, and their spatial variabilities were firstly analyzed and spatial distribution maps constructed with geostatistics technique. Then fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm was used to define management zones, fuzzy performance index (FPI) and normalized classification entropy (NCE) were used to determine the optimal cluster numbers. Finally one-way variance analysis was performed on 224 georeferenced soil and yield sampling points to assess how well the defined management zones reflected the soil properties and productivity level. The results reveal that the optimal number of management zones for the present study area was 3 and the defined management zones provided a better description of soil properties and yield variation. Statistical analyses indicate significant differences between the chemical properties of soil samples and crop yield in each management zone, and management zone 3 presented the highest nutrient level and potential crop productivity, whereas management zone 1 the lowest. Based on these findings, we conclude that fuzzy c-means clustering approach can be used to delineate management zones by using the given three variables in the coastal saline soils, and the defined management zones form an objective basis for targeting soil samples for nutrient analysis and development of site-specific application strategies.

  1. Strategies for data management engagement.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Deborah H

    2013-01-01

    The research landscape is growing dramatically, and librarians are examining new roles, services, and types of collaborations to support data-intensive research. This column describes curricular enhancements at one School of Library and Information Science in the United States. Several key areas of data management in which health sciences librarians may wish to build or enhance their skills are outlined. Possible roles and opportunities for health sciences librarians to strategically engage in data management initiatives are also presented.

  2. Optimizing diabetes management: managed care strategies.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, E Albert

    2013-06-01

    Both the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and its associated costs have been rising over time and are projected to continue to escalate. Therefore, type 2 DM (T2DM) management costs represent a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system unless substantial, systemic changes are made. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are uniquely positioned to attempt to make the changes necessary to reduce the burdens associated with T2DM by developing policies that align with evidence-based DM management guidelines and other resources. For example, MCOs can encourage members to implement healthy lifestyle choices, which have been shown to reduce DM-associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, MCOs are exploring the strengths and weaknesses of several different benefit plan designs. Value-based insurance designs, sometimes referred to as value-based benefit designs, use both direct and indirect data to invest in incentives that change behaviors through health information technologies, communications, and services to improve health, productivity, quality, and financial trends. Provider incentive programs, sometimes referred to as "pay for performance," represent a payment/delivery paradigm that places emphasis on rewarding value instead of volume to align financial incentives and quality of care. Accountable care organizations emphasize an alignment between reimbursement and implementation of best practices through the use of disease management and/ or clinical pathways and health information technologies. Consumer-directed health plans, or high-deductible health plans, combine lower premiums with high annual deductibles to encourage members to seek better value for health expenditures. Studies conducted to date on these different designs have produced mixed results.

  3. 15 Strategies for Managing Attention Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Glenda; Thomas, Alice; Lawson, Candy

    2005-01-01

    In this document, 15 strategies are offered for enhancing attention and managing attention problems. This listing is by no means exhaustive, but rather is meant as a place to begin. The best resources for strategies are the creative, inventive minds of enlightened assessment professionals, teachers and parents, in partnership with the students…

  4. Winning Strategies for Classroom Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Carol

    This book offers advice on arranging classrooms, diagnosing student behavior, and responding to students' emotional needs, examining intellectual, emotional, and physical challenges students face and providing strategies which help teachers create communities of learners, design classrooms, diagnose student behavior, and respond to student needs.…

  5. A proposal for soil cover and management factor (C) for RUSLE in vineyards with different soil management across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, José Alfonso; Biddoccu, Marcella; Guzman, Gema; Bauer, Thomas; Strauss, Peter; Winter, Silvia; Zaller, Johann; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2017-04-01

    The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation RUSLE (Dabney et al., 2012) is commonly used to estimate rates of soil erosion caused by rainfall and its associated overland flow on cropland and many other disturbed and undisturbed lands. Several studies have been focused on the evaluation of erosion risk in vineyards across Europe, which has four countries, France, Italy, Spain and Portugal, among the world's top ten vine growers. Other European countries, such as Romania, Greece, Austria, Serbia and Hungary, also have significant surface devoted to vineyards (FAO, 2014). However, literature shows a wide variability among C factors from different sources (Auerswald and Schwab, 1999; Kouli et al., 2009; Novara et al., 2011; Pacheco et al., 2014; Rodrigo Comino et al., 2016) that complicates their interpretation and use outside the area where they were developed. Gómez et al. (2016) presented a simplified erosion prediction model based on RUSLE, ORUSCAL, to demonstrate the possibility to calibrate RUSLE for a broad range of management conditions in vineyards with limited datasets. This approach have already been pursued successfully in olives (Gómez et al. 2003, Vanwalleghem et al., 2011). This communication reports the results of an evaluation of the calibration strategies and model predictions of ORUSCAL using a long-term experiment dataset (Bidoccu et al., 2016) in a vineyard in Northern Italy, and its implementation to develop soil cover and management factors (C) in three different soil, climate and management conditions across Europe: Southern Spain, Northern Italy and Austria. The communication, furthermore, explores and discusses of the application of the ORUSCAL model to additional vineyards areas in France and Romania in the context of the Vinedivers project (www.vinedivers.eu). Keywords: vineyard, erosion, soil management, RUSLE, model. References Auerswald K., Schwab, S. 1999. Erosion risk (C factor) of different viticultural practices. Vitic. Enol. Sci.54

  6. Soil Contamination and Remediation Strategies. Current research and future challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruzzelli, G.

    2012-04-01

    Soil contamination: the heritage of industrial development Contamination is only a part of a whole set of soil degradation processes, but it is one of paramount importance since soil pollution greatly influences the quality of water, food and human health. Soil contamination has been identified as an important issue for action in the European strategy for soil protection, it has been estimated that 3.5 million of sites are potentially contaminated in Europe. Contaminated soils have been essentially discovered in industrial sites landfills and energy production plants, but accumulation of heavy metals and organic compounds can be found also in agricultural land . Remediation strategies. from incineration to bioremediation The assessment of soil contamination is followed by remedial action. The remediation of contaminated soils started using consolidates technologies (incineration inertization etc.) previously employed in waste treatment,. This has contributed to consider a contaminated soil as an hazardous waste. This rough approximation was unfortunately transferred in many legislations and on this basis soil knowledge have been used only marginally in the clean up procedures. For many years soil quality has been identified by a value of concentration of a contaminant and excavation and landfill disposal of soil has been largely used. In the last years the knowledge of remediation technology has rapidly grown, at present many treatment processes appear to be really feasible at field scale, and soil remediation is now based on risk assessment procedures. Innovative technologies, largely dependent on soil properties, such as in situ chemical oxidation, electroremediation, bioventing, soil vapor extraction etc. have been successfully applied. Hazardous organic compounds are commonly treated by biological technologies, biorememdiation and phytoremediation, being the last partially applied also for metals. Technologies selection is no longer exclusively based on

  7. Comparative evaluation of pooling strategy in soil metaproteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Keiblinger, Katharina Maria; Fuchs, Stephan; Wegner, Uwe; Hentschker, Christian; Becher, Dörthe; Riedel, Kathrin; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    Metaproteomics allow the simultaneous mapping of peptides of all known genomes and proteomes to disclose the identity of different organisms present in a sample; the simultaneous examination of microbial community structure and various protein functions is possible. However, metaproteomic studies of soils present a major challenge since (i) sample complexity hamper protein identification, and (ii) soil contains high microbial diversity but low protein amounts. The soil matrix is heterogeneous over diverse scales in space and time. Within the present study we test a pooling strategy for standardization of soil sample protein extraction. To this end we conducted a pooling experiment to evaluate the applicability and suitability for metaproteome analysis of the soil samples. Five individual replicate soil samples from small plots (1 m x 1 m size) on the larger plot scale (with the size of approximately 10 m x 10 m in a mature common beech stand) were analyzed and for pooling purposes a fraction of each individual sample was used to create a pooled soil sample prior to extraction. Extracted soil proteins were subject to protein separation on a 1D-SDS-PAGE, to remove interfering substances and reduce soil sample complexity. After trypsin digestion, the resulting peptide mixtures were analyzed on a LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. Comparison of peptide mass spectra to protein groups for individual and pooled soil samples resulted in similar abundances of microbial taxa and functions. Our results indicate that pooling is a time- and cost-efficient practice for proteomic analyses of soils if the research questions are focusing on the variability of most abundant taxa and functions. In general, we think it will be necessary to test soils from each site or experiment individually if pooling is not suitable. We conclude that, the application of pooling for extraction purposes should be considered for metaproteomics from field studies that do not focus on within

  8. Does management intensity in inter rows effect soil physical properties in Austrian and Romanian vineyards?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; Strauss, Peter; Stiper, Katrin; Klipa, Vladimir; Popescu, Daniela; Winter, Silvia; Zaller, Johann G.

    2016-04-01

    Successful viticulture is mainly influenced by soil and climate. The availability of water during the growing season highly influences wine quality and quantity. To protect soil from being eroded most of the winegrowers keep the inter row zones of the vineyards green. Greening also helps to provide water-stress to the grapes for harvesting high quality wines. However, these greening strategies concerning the intensity of inter row management differ from farm to farm and are mainly based on personal experience of the winegrowers. However to what extent different inter row management practices affect soil physical properties are not clearly understood yet. To measure possible effects of inter row management in vineyards on soil physical parameters we selected paired vineyards with different inter row management in Austria and Romania. In total more than 7000 soil analysis were conducted for saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, soil water retention, water stable aggregates, total organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, potassium, phosphorous, soil texture, bulk density and water infiltration. The comparison between high intensity management with at least one soil disturbance per year, medium intensity with one soil disturbance every second inter row per year and low intensity management with no soil disturbance since at least 5 years indicates that investigated soil physical properties did not improve for the upper soil layer (3-8cm). This is in contrast to general perceptions of improved soil physical properties due to low intensity of inter row management, i.e. permanent vegetated inter rows. This may be attributed to long term and high frequency mechanical stress by agricultural machinery in inter rows.

  9. Long term management practices influenced soil aggregation and carbon dynamics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil aggregation protects soil organic C (SOC) against rapid decomposition, improves soil quality, and reduces soil erosion potential. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effects of long-term (21 yrs.) management practices on SOC, water stable aggregate (WSA), and aggregate-associated ...

  10. Internationalisation Strategies for Management Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, W. Stewart; Martin, Graeme

    1998-01-01

    A literature review and case study of a British business school examined these areas: (1) competing rationales for internationalizing management education; (2) transfer of best practice from the west; and (3) problems that parent and host countries face in joint ventures. (SK)

  11. Selecting habitat management strategies on refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Richard L.; King, Wayne J.; Cornely, John E.

    1998-01-01

    This report is a joint effort of the Biological Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to provide National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) managers guidance on the selection and evaluation of habitat management strategies to meet stated objectives. The FWS recently completed a handbook on writing refuge management goals and objectives (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1996a). the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires that National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) lands be managed according to approved Comprehensive Conservation Plans to guide management decisions and devise strategies for achieving refuge unit purposes and meeting the NWRS mission. It is expected that over the next several years most refuges will develop new or revised refuge goals and objectives for directing their habitat management strategies. This paper outlines the steps we recommend in selecting and evaluating habitat management strategies to meet specific refuge habitat objectives. We selected two examples to illustrate the process. Although each refuge is unique and will require specific information and solutions, these two examples can be used as guidance when selecting and evaluating habitat management strategies for other refuge resources: Example 1. Management of floodplain woods habitat for forest interior birds. The biological recourse of concern is the quality and quantity of floodplain woods habitat for eastern forest interior birds in the Cypress Creek NWR (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1996b). Example 2. Management of habitat for biodiversity: Historical landscape proportions. The biological resource of concern is the change in diversity associated with man-induced changes in the distribution and abundance of habitat types at the Minnesota Valley NWR (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1996c).

  12. Precision agriculture and soil and water management in cranberry production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent research on soil and water management of cranberry farms is presented in a special issue in Canadian Journal of Soil Science. The special issue (“Precision Agriculture and Soil Water Management in Cranberry Production”) consists of ten articles that include field, laboratory, and modeling stu...

  13. Heat Management Strategy Trade Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Steve Priebe; Dirk Gombert; Ted Bauer

    2009-09-01

    This Heat Management Trade Study was performed in 2008-2009 to expand on prior studies in continued efforts to analyze and evaluate options for cost-effectively managing SNF reprocessing wastes. The primary objective was to develop a simplified cost/benefit evaluation for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing that combines the characteristics of the waste generated through reprocessing with the impacts of the waste on heating the repository. Under consideration were age of the SNF prior to reprocessing, plutonium and minor actinide (MA) separation from the spent fuel for recycle, fuel value of the recycled Pu and MA, age of the remaining spent fuel waste prior to emplacement in the repository, length of time that active ventilation is employed in the repository, and elemental concentration and heat limits for acceptable glass waste form durability. A secondary objective was to identify and qualitatively analyze remaining issues such as (a) impacts of aging SNF prior to reprocessing on the fuel value of the recovered fissile materials, and (b) impact of reprocessing on the dose risk as developed in the Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Results of this study can be used to evaluate different options for managing decay heat in waste streams from spent nuclear fuel.

  14. Integrating removal actions and remedial actions: Soil and debris management at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    Goidell, L.C.; Hagen, T.D.; Strimbu, M.J.; Dupuis-Nouille, E.M.; Taylor, A.C.; Weese, T.E.; Yerace, P.J.

    1996-02-01

    Since 1991, excess soil and debris generated at the Fernald Environmental management Project (FEMP) have been managed in accordance with the principles contained in a programmatic Removal Action (RvA) Work Plan (WP). This plan provides a sitewide management concept and implementation strategy for improved storage and management of excess soil and debris over the period required to design and construct improved storage facilities. These management principles, however, are no longer consistent with the directions in approved and draft Records of Decision (RODs) and anticipated in draft RODs other decision documents. A new approach has been taken to foster improved management techniques for soil and debris that can be readily incorporated into remedial design/remedial action plans. Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This paper describes the methods that were applied to address the issues associated with keeping the components of the new work plan field implementable and flexible; this is especially important as remedial design is either in its initial stages or has not been started and final remediation options could not be precluded.

  15. Effects of soil type and farm management on soil ecological functional genes and microbial activities

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, Jennifer; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne; Kang, S.; Zhou, Jizhong; Reganold, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between soil microbial diversity and soil function are the subject of much debate. Process-level analyses have shown that microbial function varies with soil type and responds to soil management. However, such measurements cannot determine the role of community structure and diversity in soil function. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of gene frequency and diversity, measured by microarray analysis, on soil processes. The study was conducted in an agro-ecosystem characterized by contrasting management practices and soil types. Eight pairs of adjacent commercial organic and conventional strawberry fields were matched for soil type, strawberry variety, and all other environmental conditions. Soil physical, chemical and biological analyses were conducted including functional gene microarrays (FGA). Soil physical and chemical characteristics were primarily determined by soil textural type (coarse vs fine-textured), but biological and FGA measures were more influenced by management (organic vs conventional). Organically managed soils consistently showed greater functional activity as well as FGA signal intensity (SI) and diversity. Overall FGA SI and diversity were correlated to total soil microbial biomass. Functional gene group SI and/or diversity were correlated to related soil chemical and biological measures such as microbial biomass, cellulose, dehydrogenase, ammonium and sulfur. Management was the dominant determinant of soil biology as measured by microbial gene frequency and diversity, which paralleled measured microbial processes.

  16. Effects of soil type and farm management on soil ecological functional genes and microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Jennifer R; Schadt, Christopher W; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne; Kang, Sanghoon; Zhou, Jizhong; Reganold, John P

    2010-09-01

    Relationships between soil microbial diversity and soil function are the subject of much debate. Process-level analyses have shown that microbial function varies with soil type and responds to soil management. However, such measurements cannot determine the role of community structure and diversity in soil function. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of gene frequency and diversity, measured by microarray analysis, on soil processes. The study was conducted in an agro-ecosystem characterized by contrasting management practices and soil types. Eight pairs of adjacent commercial organic and conventional strawberry fields were matched for soil type, strawberry variety, and all other environmental conditions. Soil physical, chemical and biological analyses were conducted including functional gene microarrays (FGA). Soil physical and chemical characteristics were primarily determined by soil textural type (coarse vs fine-textured), but biological and FGA measures were more influenced by management (organic vs conventional). Organically managed soils consistently showed greater functional activity as well as FGA signal intensity (SI) and diversity. Overall FGA SI and diversity were correlated to total soil microbial biomass. Functional gene group SI and/or diversity were correlated to related soil chemical and biological measures such as microbial biomass, cellulose, dehydrogenase, ammonium and sulfur. Management was the dominant determinant of soil biology as measured by microbial gene frequency and diversity, which paralleled measured microbial processes.

  17. Soil Carbon Storage in Christmas Tree Farms: Maximizing Ecosystem Management and Sustainability for Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. K.; Shaw, R.; Langley, A.

    2008-12-01

    Management of agroecosystems for the purpose of manipulating soil carbon stocks could be a viable approach for countering rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, while maximizing sustainability of the agroforestry industry. We investigated the carbon storage potential of Christmas tree farms in the southern Appalachian mountains as a potential model for the impacts of land management on soil carbon. We quantified soil carbon stocks across a gradient of cultivation duration and herbicide management. We compared soil carbon in farms to that in adjacent pastures and native forests that represent a control group to account for variability in other soil-forming factors. We partitioned tree farm soil carbon into fractions delineated by stability, an important determinant of long-term sequestration potential. Soil carbon stocks in the intermediate pool are significantly greater in the tree farms under cultivation for longer periods of time than in the younger tree farms. This pool can be quite large, yet has the ability to repond to biological environmental changes on the centennial time scale. Pasture soil carbon was significantly greater than both forest and tree farm soil carbon, which were not different from each other. These data can help inform land management and soil carbon sequestration strategies.

  18. Effects of management, soil attributes and region on soil microbial communities in vineyards (Napa, California, USA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil microorganisms play an important role in soil health. However, little is known about the relationship between soil microbial community composition and diversity and commercially significant aspects of soil health. The purpose of this study is to: (1) assess the impact of management practices on...

  19. Planning your UST management strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, T.S.; Bacon, P.A. )

    1993-09-01

    For the past six years, federal regulations have required underground storage tank (UST) owners to manage their tank facilities more carefully and accountably than ever before. As mandated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), all 50 states have implemented programs to monitor existing USTs, regulate new tank installations and levy fines for leaking tanks. The liability stipulation may be most important. This provision makes the investment in monitoring and safety equipment worthwhile for the tank owner. Equally important, it serves as a deterrent for careless practices and provides financial recourse for the cleanup of leaks or spills. While each state has the option of expanding on the federal government's UST management guidelines, all states had to adopt at least those basics. The minimum standards require that owners protect new USTs from corrosion, leaks and overfills, install leak detection devices and acquire liability insurance. The federal regulations also exempt certain tanks from compliance. These include tanks that hold less than 1,100 gallons, flow-through or process tanks and tanks that hold heating oil used for on-premises heating. Some state, however, have set more stringent regulations disallowing some of these exemptions. Either way, gasoline dealerships are by far the largest group of UST owners affected by the regulations. The rules also affect regulated substances such as heating oil, aviation fuels, and chemical solvents.

  20. Effect of management and soil moisture regimes on wetland soils total carbon and nitrogen in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiri, Hellen; Kreye, Christine; Becker, Mathias

    2013-04-01

    Wetland soils play an important role as storage compartments for water, carbon and nutrients. These soils implies various conditions, depending on the water regimes that affect several important microbial and physical-chemical processes which in turn influence the transformation of organic and inorganic components of nitrogen, carbon, soil acidity and other nutrients. Particularly, soil carbon and nitrogen play an important role in determining the productivity of a soil whereas management practices could determine the rate and magnitude of nutrient turnover. A study was carried out in a floodplain wetland planted with rice in North-west Tanzania- East Africa to determine the effects of different management practices and soil water regimes on paddy soil organic carbon and nitrogen. Four management treatments were compared: (i) control (non weeded plots); (ii) weeded plots; (iii) N fertilized plots, and (iv) non-cropped (non weeded plots). Two soil moisture regimes included soil under field capacity (rainfed conditions) and continuous water logging compared side-by-side. Soil were sampled at the start and end of the rice cropping seasons from the two fields differentiated by moisture regimes during the wet season 2012. The soils differed in the total organic carbon and nitrogen between the treatments. Soil management including weeding and fertilization is seen to affect soil carbon and nitrogen regardless of the soil moisture conditions. Particularly, the padddy soils were higher in the total organic carbon under continuous water logged field. These findings are preliminary and a more complete understanding of the relationships between management and soil moisture on the temporal changes of soil properties is required before making informed decisions on future wetland soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Keywords: Management, nitrogen, paddy soil, total carbon, Tanzania,

  1. A soil-specific agro-ecological strategy for sustainable production in Argentina farm fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Martin; Barbera, Agustin; Castro-Franco, Mauricio; Hansson, Alejandro; Domenech, Marisa

    2017-04-01

    The continuous increment of frequencies and doses of pesticides, glyphosate and fertilizers, the deterioration of the structure, biotic balance and fertility of soils and the ground water pollution are characteristics of the current Argentinian agricultural model. In this context, agro-ecological innovations are needed to develop a real sustainable agriculture, enhancing the food supply. Precision agriculture technologies can strengthen the expansion of agro-ecological farming in experimental farm fields. The aim of this study was to propose a soil-specific agro-ecological strategy for sustainable production at field scale focused on the use of soil sensors and digital soil mapping techniques. This strategy has been developed in 15 hectares transition agro-ecological farm field, located at Barrow Experimental Station (Lat:-38.322844, Lon:-60.25572) Argentina. The strategy included five steps: (i) to measure apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and elevation within agro-ecological farm field; (ii) to apply a clustering method using MULTISPATI-PCA algorithm to delimitate three soil-specific zones (Z1, Z2 and Z3); (iii) to determine three soil sampling points by zone, using conditioned Latin hypercube method, in addition to elevation and ECa as auxiliary information; (iv) to collect soil samples at 2-10 cm depth in each point and to determine in laboratory: total organic carbon content (TOC), cation-exchange capacity (CEC), pH and phosphorus availability (P-Bray). In addition, soil bulk density (SBD) was measured at 0-20 cm depth. Finally, (v) according to each soil-specific zone, a management strategy was recommended. Important differences in soil properties among zones could suggest that the strategy developed was able to apply an agro ecological soil-specific practice management. pH and P-Bray were significantly (p<0.05) higher in Z1 than in Z2 and Z3. TOC did not show significant difference among zones, but it was higher in Z2. CEC was significantly (p<0

  2. Nonpharmacologic strategies for managing hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Randy; Aukerman, Glen

    2006-06-01

    The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure recommends lifestyle modification for all patients with hypertension or prehypertension. Modifications include reducing dietary sodium to less than 2.4 g per day; increasing exercise to at least 30 minutes per day, four days per week; limiting alcohol consumption to two drinks or less per day for men and one drink or less per day for women; following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension eating plan (high in fruits, vegetables, potassium, calcium, and magnesium; low in fat and salt); and achieving a weight loss goal of 10 lb (4.5 kg) or more. Alternative treatments such as vitamin C, coenzyme Q10, magnesium, and omega-3 fatty acids have been suggested for managing hypertension, but evidence for their effectiveness is lacking.

  3. Management strategies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Kristen M; Ditre, Chérie M

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What are the most effective treatment(s) for mild, moderate, severe, and hormonally driven acne? Results: Mild acne responds favorably to topical treatments such as benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and a low-dose retinoid. Moderate acne responds well to combination therapy comprising-topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, and/or retinoids, as well as oral antibiotics in refractory cases and oral contraceptive pills for female acne patients. Severe nodulocystic acne vulgaris responds best to oral isotretinoin therapy. In female patients with moderate to severe acne, facial hair, loss of scalp hair and irregular periods, polycystic ovarian syndrome should be considered and appropriate treatment with hormonal modulation given. Adjunctive procedures can also be considered for all acne patients. Implementation: Pitfalls to avoid when treating acne: treatment of acne in women of child-bearing age; familiarization of all acne treatments in order to individualize management for patients; indications for specialist referral. PMID:21691566

  4. Momentum management strategy during Space Station buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Lynda; Malchow, Harvey; Hattis, Philip

    1988-01-01

    The use of momentum storage devices to control effectors for Space Station attitude control throughout the buildup sequence is discussed. Particular attention is given to the problem of providing satisfactory management of momentum storage effectors throughout buildup while experiencing variable torque loading. Continuous and discrete control strategies are compared and the effects of alternative control moment gyro strategies on peak momentum storage requirements and on commanded maneuver characteristics are described.

  5. Soil type-depending effect of paddy management: composition and distribution of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, Livia; Kölbl, Angelika; Lehndorff, Eva; Houtermans, Miriam; Schad, Peter; Zhang, Gang-Lin; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    Paddy soil management is assumed to promote soil organic matter accumulation and specifically lignin caused by the resistance of the aromatic lignin structure against biodegradation under anaerobic conditions during inundation of paddy fields. The present study investigates the effect of paddy soil management on soil organic matter composition compared to agricultural soils which are not used for rice production (non-paddy soils). A variety of major soil types, were chosen in Indonesia (Java), including Alisol, Andosol and Vertisol sites (humid tropical climate of Java, Indonesia) and in China Alisol sites (humid subtropical climate, Nanjing). This soils are typically used for rice cultivation and represent a large range of soil properties to be expected in Asian paddy fields. All topsoils were analysed for their soil organic matter composition by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and lignin-derived phenols by CuO oxidation method. The soil organic matter composition, revealed by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, was similar for the above named different parent soil types (non-paddy soils) and was also not affected by the specific paddy soil management. The contribution of lignin-related carbon groups to total SOM was similar in the investigated paddy and non-paddy soils. A significant proportion of the total aromatic carbon in some paddy and non-paddy soils was attributed to the application of charcoal as a common management practise. The extraction of lignin-derived phenols revealed low VSC (vanillyl, syringyl, cinnamyl) values for all investigated soils, being typical for agricultural soils. An inherent accumulation of lignin-derived phenols due to paddy management was not found. Lignin-derived phenols seem to be soil type-dependent, shown by different VSC concentrations between the parent soil types. The specific paddy management only affects the lignin-derived phenols in Andosol-derived paddy soils which are characterized by

  6. Strategies for soil-based precision agriculture in cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Haly L.; Morgan, Cristine L. S.; Stanislav, Scott; Rouze, Gregory; Shi, Yeyin; Thomasson, J. Alex; Valasek, John; Olsenholler, Jeff

    2016-05-01

    The goal of precision agriculture is to increase crop yield while maximizing the use efficiency of farm resources. In this application, UAV-based systems are presenting agricultural researchers with an opportunity to study crop response to environmental and management factors in real-time without disturbing the crop. The spatial variability soil properties, which drive crop yield and quality, cannot be changed and thus keen agronomic choices with soil variability in mind have the potential to increase profits. Additionally, measuring crop stress over time and in response to management and environmental conditions may enable agronomists and plant breeders to make more informed decisions about variety selection than the traditional end-of-season yield and quality measurements. In a previous study, seed-cotton yield was measured over 4 years and compared with soil variability as mapped by a proximal soil sensor. It was found that soil properties had a significant effect on seed-cotton yield and the effect was not consistent across years due to different precipitation conditions. However, when seed-cotton yield was compared to the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), as measured using a multispectral camera from a UAV, predictions improved. Further improvement was seen when soil-only pixels were removed from the analysis. On-going studies are using UAV-based data to uncover the thresholds for stress and yield potential. Long-term goals of this research include detecting stress before yield is reduced and selecting better adapted varieties.

  7. Initial management strategies for follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiushi; Ayer, Turgay; Nastoupil, Loretta J; Seward, Miray; Zhang, Hongzheng; Sinha, Rajni; Flowers, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Follicular lymphoma (FL) can vary markedly in its initial presentation, and no single standard approach for its initial management has been adopted. Available options for the initial management of FL include watchful waiting, radiation, single-agent rituximab and combination of rituximab and chemotherapy with strategies segregated for patients who have low and high tumor burden disease based on established criteria. However, marked debate occurs regarding the role of watchful waiting in the modern era for low tumor burden, asymptomatic patients, the optimal timing of rituximab, the selection of chemotherapy regimen to partner with rituximab in high tumor burden patients, and strategies for the management of relapsed disease. We provide an evidence-based discussion on these and other issues regarding the management of FL, and propose a mathematical modeling approach for addressing some of these questions. PMID:23476737

  8. Workforce management strategies in a disaster scenario.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelic, Andjelka; Turk, Adam L.

    2008-08-01

    A model of the repair operations of the voice telecommunications network is used to study labor management strategies under a disaster scenario where the workforce is overwhelmed. The model incorporates overtime and fatigue functions and optimizes the deployment of the workforce based on the cost of the recovery and the time it takes to recover. The analysis shows that the current practices employed in workforce management in a disaster scenario are not optimal and more strategic deployment of that workforce is beneficial.

  9. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iden, Ronald

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to explore the multigenerational strategies used by 3 managers from a Franklin County, Ohio manufacturing facility with a population size of 6 participants. The conceptual framework for this study was built upon generational theory and cohort group theory. The data were collected through face-to-face semistructured interviews, company documents, and a reflexive journal. Member checking was completed to strengthen the credibility and trustworthiness of the interpretation of participants' responses. A modified van Kaam method enabled separation of themes following the coding of data. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) required multigenerational managerial skills, (b) generational cohort differences, (c) most effective multigenerational management strategies, and (d) least effective multigenerational management strategies. Findings from this study may contribute to social change through better understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of the primary generations in the workforce, and, in turn, improve community relationships.

  10. Group-Oriented Behavior Management Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer J.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of group oriented behavior management strategies to modify classroom behavior problems is suggested. Advantages, disadvantages, and implementation guidelines for the group response cost system, the good behavior game, the group timeout ribbon, hero method, peer-mediated extinction, and peer confrontation. (DB)

  11. Management Strategies for Promoting Teacher Collective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Eric C. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to validate a theoretical model for developing teacher collective learning by using a quasi-experimental design, and explores the management strategies that would provide a school administrator practical steps to effectively promote collective learning in the school organization. Twenty aided secondary schools in Hong Kong were…

  12. Classroom Management Strategies for Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdivia, Joe S.

    2007-01-01

    Classroom management strategies designed to improve problem behavior directly affect student achievement. Researchers have demonstrated positive behavior supports (PBS) can reduce problem behavior. However, researchers have also found evidence that PBS may not always be successful and further studies are needed to improve the use of PBS as a…

  13. Practical management strategies for diaper dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, S; Bergman, J N; Au, S

    2006-09-01

    Common diaper dermatitis is an irritant contact diaper dermatitis (IDD) created by the combined influence of moisture, warmth, urine, feces, friction, and secondary infection. It is difficult to completely eradicate these predisposing factors in a diapered child. Thus, IDD presents an ongoing therapeutic challenge for parents, family physicians, pediatricians, and dermatologists. This article will focus on practical management strategies for IDD.

  14. Seeking sustainability: Israel's evolving water management strategy.

    PubMed

    Tal, Alon

    2006-08-25

    The water management policies adopted to address Israel's chronic scarcity have not been without environmental consequences. Yet, through a trial-and-error process, a combined strategy of water transport, rainwater harvesting, and wastewater reuse and desalination, along with a variety of water conservation measures, have put the country on a more sustainable path for the future.

  15. Strategies to manage antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsiang-Kuang; Perfect, John R

    2011-02-01

    Invasive fungal infections continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. From more than half a million deaths from cryptococcosis in sub-Saharan Africa to an unchanging death rate from invasive candidiasis, despite three antifungal classes of drugs, insights into better strategies to reduce therapeutic failures or resistance are needed. This review examines the issues around antifungal drug resistance from both a basic description of the failures and how they are detected to the variety of issues that need to be addressed to help prevent failures for successful management. The reader will gain an understanding of the clinical complexities in this patient population for management of invasive fungal infections. Throughout the review, principles of management are given along with some specific clinical examples to illustrate the issues and frame the knowledge base. From this discussion it is hoped that the clinician can use the insights provided to manage individual patients and find links to the evidence-based material that support its conclusions. Also, this review specifically identifies the limitations of present management and directs clinicians to gather additional information and provide even better treatment strategies. Invasive fungal infections are life-threatening complications of serious underlying diseases. Their management can be complicated by both direct and clinical drug resistance and by understanding these possibilities and correcting them; most patients can be successfully managed with present antifungal drugs if the underlying diseases can be controlled.

  16. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Soil management system for water conservation and mitigation of global change effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, A.; Florentino, A.; Lorenzo, V.

    2012-04-01

    One of the main constraints in rained agriculture is the water availability for plant growth which depends largely on the ability of the soil to allow water flow, infiltration and its storage. In Venezuela, the interaction between aggressive climatic conditions, highly susceptible soils and inadequate management systems have caused soil degradation which together with global change threatened the food production sustainability. To address this problem, we need to implement conservationist management strategies that improve infiltration rate, permeability and water holding capacity in soil and reduce water loss by protecting the soil surface. In order to study the impact of different management systems on soil water balance in a Fluventic Haplustept, the effects of 11 years of tillage and crops rotation management were evaluated in a long term field experiment located in Turén (Portuguesa state). The evaluated tillage systems were no tillage (NT) and conventional tillage (CT) and crop rotation treatments were maize (Zea mays)-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and maize-bean (Vigna unguiculata). Treatments were established in plots arranged in a randomized block design with three replicates. The gravimetric moisture content was determined in the upper 20 cm of soil, at eight different sampling dates. Results showed increased in time of the water availability with the use of tillage and corn-cotton rotation and, better protection of the soil against raindrop impact with crop residues. Water retention capacity also increased and improved structural condition on soil surface such as infiltration, storage and water flow distribution in the rooting zone. We conclude that these strategies of land use and management would contribute to mitigate the climate change effects on food production in this region of Venezuela. Key words: Soil quality; rained agriculture; plant water availability

  18. Managing the Chronically Overworked Team: Twenty Strategies.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Overwork, at first glance, seems like a problem that affects only the employee. But for medical practices and those who manage them, the problem is far greater than that. Chronically overworked employees may not be meeting their goals. They may be making more mistakes and letting things slip through the cracks. Ultimately, patients may have less-than-ideal experiences in a practice where the employees are stretched thin. And turnover may skyrocket in practices where employees are chronically overworked. This article offers practice managers 20 practical and affordable strategies they can use to manage a chronically overworked medical practice team. It suggests an effective technique they can use to tell their bosses that their employees are overworked. This article also suggests the costs to the practice of a chronically overworked staff, including a hidden cost many people overlook. It provides four coping strategies practice managers can teach to their overworked employees. It summarizes research exploring how overwork affects employees' sleep and eating habits, and additional research linking long hours of overwork to diminished productivity. Finally, this article provides five strategies practice managers can use to make their overworked employees feel valued.

  19. Soils

    Treesearch

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome: contemporary nutrition management strategies.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Gerard E; Shepherd, Sue J; Chander Roland, Bani; Ireton-Jones, Carol; Matarese, Laura E

    2014-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a complex disorder whose pathophysiology involves alterations in the enteric microbiota, visceral hypersensitivity, gut immune/barrier function, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation, neurotransmitters, stress response, psychological factors, and more. The importance of diet in the management of irritable bowel syndrome has taken center stage in recent times as the literature validates the relationship of certain foods with the provocation of symptoms. Likewise, a number of elimination dietary programs have been successful in alleviating irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. Knowledge of the dietary management strategies for irritable bowel syndrome will help guide nutritionists and healthcare practitioners to deliver optimal outcomes. This tutorial reviews the nutrition management strategies for irritable bowel syndrome.

  1. Soil physical conditions as livestock treading effect in tropical Agroecosystem of dryland and strategies to mitigate desertification risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florentino, A.; Torres, D.; Ospina, A.; Contreras, J.; Palma, Z.; Silvera, J.

    2012-04-01

    higher quality level than bare soils. Some predictive regression equation had a high R2 value and was a useful tool for to evaluate the risk of extreme climatic changes and to mitigate their detrimental effects. We conclude that the global climatic change (CCG) will have a negative effect on these agroecosystems functions, mainly in soil and water conservation, carbon sequestration, and productivity. Natural recovery of soil physical properties from treading damage of pastoral soils will be possible in the future with the implementation of soil management strategies, mainly through re-vegetation and recuperation of the BSC. Key word: Soil structure; aggregate stability; soil sealing index; hydraulic conductivity of surface sealing.

  2. Developing Nematode Management Zones Using Soil EC Data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Much research work is ongoing that is investigating methods and tools for delineating cotton root knot nematode [M. incognita] management zones via soil texture. Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) can be a surrogate measurement for determining soil texture as clay content is a dominant phy...

  3. Soil management challenges in response to climatic change

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agriculture has tremendous potential to help solve global food, feed, fiber, and bioenergy challenges and respond to changing climatic conditions provided we do not compromise our soil, water and air resources. This presentation will examine soil management, defined by the Soil Science Society of Am...

  4. Soil Management Plan For The Potable Water System Upgrades Project

    SciTech Connect

    Field, S. M.

    2007-04-01

    This plan describes and applies to the handling and management of soils excavated in support of the Y-12 Potable Water Systems Upgrades (PWSU) Project. The plan is specific to the PWSU Project and is intended as a working document that provides guidance consistent with the 'Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex' (Y/SUB/92-28B99923C-Y05) and the 'Record of Decision for Phase II Interim Remedial Actions for Contaminated Soils and Scrapyard in Upper East Fork Popular Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2229&D2). The purpose of this plan is to prevent and/or limit the spread of contamination when moving soil within the Y-12 complex. The major feature of the soil management plan is the decision tree. The intent of the decision tree is to provide step-by-step guidance for the handling and management of soil from excavation of soil through final disposition. The decision tree provides a framework of decisions and actions to facilitate Y-12 or subcontractor decisions on the reuse of excavated soil on site and whether excavated soil can be reused on site or managed as waste. Soil characterization results from soil sampling in support of the project are also presented.

  5. Beyond PARR - PMEL's Integrated Data Management Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, E. F.; O'Brien, K.; Manke, A. B.; Schweitzer, R.; Smith, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) hosts a wide range of scientific projects that span a number of scientific and environmental research disciplines. Each of these 14 research projects have their own data streams that are as diverse as the research. With its requirements for public access to federally funded research results and data, the 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology memo on Public Access to Research Results (PARR) changed the data management landscape for Federal agencies. In 2015, with support from the PMEL Director, Dr. Christopher Sabine, PMEL's Science Data Integration Group (SDIG) initiated a multi-year effort to formulate and implement an integrated data-management strategy for PMEL research efforts. Instead of using external requirements, such as PARR, to define our approach, we focussed on strategies to provide PMEL science projects with a unified framework for data submission, interoperable data access, data storage, and easier data archival to National Data Centers. This improves data access to PMEL scientists, their collaborators, and the public, and also provides a unified lab framework that allows our projects to meet their data management objectives, as well as those required by the PARR. We are implementing this solution in stages that allows us to test technology and architecture choices before comitting to a large scale implementation. SDIG developers have completed the first year of development where our approach is to reuse and leverage existing frameworks and standards. This presentation will describe our data management strategy, explain our phased implementation approach, the software and framework choices, and how these elements help us meet the objectives of this strategy. We will share the lessons learned in dealing with diverse and complex datasets in this first year of implementation and how these outcomes will shape our decisions for this ongoing effort. The data management capabilities now

  6. Management of soil systems for the disposal of industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, J C

    1981-01-01

    Research continues to provide improved information about the toxicity of materials, their transport in soil, and the kinetics of detoxification that is most useful in evaluating alternative approaches for safely managing industrial wastes. The placement of industrial wastes into soil systems is a satisfactory management approach if the material is nontoxic, if the soil has the capability of detoxifying the material, or if the soil prevents the material from entering the biosphere. Examples from the literature of successful applications of industrial wastes to soil are discussed.

  7. Case study of microarthropod communities to assess soil quality in different managed vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnarli, E.; Goggioli, D.; Tarchi, F.; Guidi, S.; Nannelli, R.; Vignozzi, N.; Valboa, G.; Lottero, M. R.; Corino, L.; Simoni, S.

    2015-07-01

    Land use influences the abundance and diversity of soil arthropods. The evaluation of the impact of different management strategies on soil quality is increasingly sought, and the determination of community structures of edaphic fauna can represent an efficient tool. In the area of Langhe (Piedmont, Italy), eight vineyards characterized for physical and chemical properties (soil texture, soil pH, total organic carbon, total nitrogen, calcium carbonate) were selected. We evaluated the effect of two types of crop management, organic and integrated pest management (IPM), on abundance and biodiversity of microarthropods living at the soil surface. Soil sampling was carried out in winter 2011 and spring 2012. All specimens were counted and determined up to the order level. The biodiversity analysis was performed using ecological indexes (taxa richness, dominance, Shannon-Wiener, Buzas and Gibson's evenness, Margalef, equitability, Berger-Parker), and the biological soil quality was assessed with the BSQ-ar index. The mesofauna abundance was affected by both the type of management and sampling time. On the whole, a higher abundance was in organic vineyards (N = 1981) than in IPM ones (N = 1062). The analysis performed by ecological indexes showed quite a high level of biodiversity in this environment, particularly in May 2012. Furthermore, the BSQ-ar values registered were similar to those obtained in preserved soils.

  8. Soil Functional Zone Management: A Vehicle for Enhancing Production and Soil Ecosystem Services in Row-Crop Agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alwyn; Kane, Daniel A; Ewing, Patrick M; Atwood, Lesley W; Jilling, Andrea; Li, Meng; Lou, Yi; Davis, Adam S; Grandy, A Stuart; Huerd, Sheri C; Hunter, Mitchell C; Koide, Roger T; Mortensen, David A; Smith, Richard G; Snapp, Sieglinde S; Spokas, Kurt A; Yannarell, Anthony C; Jordan, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing global demand for food, bioenergy feedstocks and a wide variety of bio-based products. In response, agriculture has advanced production, but is increasingly depleting soil regulating and supporting ecosystem services. New production systems have emerged, such as no-tillage, that can enhance soil services but may limit yields. Moving forward, agricultural systems must reduce trade-offs between production and soil services. Soil functional zone management (SFZM) is a novel strategy for developing sustainable production systems that attempts to integrate the benefits of conventional, intensive agriculture, and no-tillage. SFZM creates distinct functional zones within crop row and inter-row spaces. By incorporating decimeter-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity, SFZM attempts to foster greater soil biodiversity and integrate complementary soil processes at the sub-field level. Such integration maximizes soil services by creating zones of 'active turnover', optimized for crop growth and yield (provisioning services); and adjacent zones of 'soil building', that promote soil structure development, carbon storage, and moisture regulation (regulating and supporting services). These zones allow SFZM to secure existing agricultural productivity while avoiding or minimizing trade-offs with soil ecosystem services. Moreover, the specific properties of SFZM may enable sustainable increases in provisioning services via temporal intensification (expanding the portion of the year during which harvestable crops are grown). We present a conceptual model of 'virtuous cycles', illustrating how increases in crop yields within SFZM systems could create self-reinforcing feedback processes with desirable effects, including mitigation of trade-offs between yield maximization and soil ecosystem services. Through the creation of functionally distinct but interacting zones, SFZM may provide a vehicle for optimizing the delivery of multiple goods and services in

  9. Soil Functional Zone Management: A Vehicle for Enhancing Production and Soil Ecosystem Services in Row-Crop Agroecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Alwyn; Kane, Daniel A.; Ewing, Patrick M.; Atwood, Lesley W.; Jilling, Andrea; Li, Meng; Lou, Yi; Davis, Adam S.; Grandy, A. Stuart; Huerd, Sheri C.; Hunter, Mitchell C.; Koide, Roger T.; Mortensen, David A.; Smith, Richard G.; Snapp, Sieglinde S.; Spokas, Kurt A.; Yannarell, Anthony C.; Jordan, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing global demand for food, bioenergy feedstocks and a wide variety of bio-based products. In response, agriculture has advanced production, but is increasingly depleting soil regulating and supporting ecosystem services. New production systems have emerged, such as no-tillage, that can enhance soil services but may limit yields. Moving forward, agricultural systems must reduce trade-offs between production and soil services. Soil functional zone management (SFZM) is a novel strategy for developing sustainable production systems that attempts to integrate the benefits of conventional, intensive agriculture, and no-tillage. SFZM creates distinct functional zones within crop row and inter-row spaces. By incorporating decimeter-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity, SFZM attempts to foster greater soil biodiversity and integrate complementary soil processes at the sub-field level. Such integration maximizes soil services by creating zones of ‘active turnover’, optimized for crop growth and yield (provisioning services); and adjacent zones of ‘soil building’, that promote soil structure development, carbon storage, and moisture regulation (regulating and supporting services). These zones allow SFZM to secure existing agricultural productivity while avoiding or minimizing trade-offs with soil ecosystem services. Moreover, the specific properties of SFZM may enable sustainable increases in provisioning services via temporal intensification (expanding the portion of the year during which harvestable crops are grown). We present a conceptual model of ‘virtuous cycles’, illustrating how increases in crop yields within SFZM systems could create self-reinforcing feedback processes with desirable effects, including mitigation of trade-offs between yield maximization and soil ecosystem services. Through the creation of functionally distinct but interacting zones, SFZM may provide a vehicle for optimizing the delivery of multiple goods and services

  10. Urban gray vs. urban green vs. soil protection — Development of a systemic solution to soil sealing management on the example of Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Artmann, Martina

    2016-07-15

    Managing urban soil sealing is a difficult venture due to its spatial heterogeneity and embedding in a socio-ecological system. A systemic solution is needed to tackle its spatial, ecological and social sub-systems. This study develops a guideline for urban actors to find a systemic solution to soil sealing management based on two case studies in Germany: Munich and Leipzig. Legal-planning, informal-planning, economic-fiscal, co-operative and informational responses were evaluated by indicators to proof which strategy considers the spatial complexity of urban soil sealing (systemic spatial efficiency) and, while considering spatial complexity, to assess what the key management areas for action are to reduce the ecological impacts by urban soil sealing (ecological impact efficiency) and to support an efficient implementation by urban actors (social implementation efficiency). Results suggest framing the systemic solution to soil sealing management through a cross-scale, legal-planning development strategy embedded in higher European policies. Within the socio-ecological system, the key management area for action should focus on the protection of green infrastructure being of high value for actors from the European to local scales. Further efforts are necessary to establish a systemic monitoring concept to optimize socio-ecological benefits and avoid trade-offs such as between urban infill development and urban green protection. This place-based study can be regarded as a stepping stone on how to develop systemic strategies by considering different spatial sub-targets and socio-ecological systems. - Highlights: • Urban soil sealing management is spatially complex. • The legal-planning strategy supports a systemic sealing management. • Urban green infrastructure protection should be in the management focus. • Soil protection requires policies from higher levels of government. • A systemic urban soil sealing monitoring concept is needed.

  11. How to engage undergraduate students in Soil Science: some strategies to enhance their motivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Acosta, Jose A.; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Faz, Angel

    2017-04-01

    Teaching soil science can be a challenge in those degrees where students are not familiar with the soil system and do not understand the importance of soil science for their future career. This is the case of students of Biology, Agronomy or Environmental Science, who normally consider soil as a mere substrate for vegetation development, with no interest about how soil determines productivity and quality of terrestrial ecosystems. Thus, students lack of initial motivation to study Soil Science, and just attend lectures and practical lessons as mandatory procedure to get the degree. To engage undergraduate students from Biology, Agronomy and Environmental Sciences in Soil Science, we developed a strategy to enhance their motivation by means of making them participants of the selection of the soils and analyses used for their training. By means of dichotomous keys, students, grouped in pairs, first select the main purpose of their study from different options (land productivity, soil biodiversity, soil fertility, effectiveness of restoration, effect of land use, effect of management, etc). Once objective is decided, we give them some information about sampling strategies, so that they select how soil sampling is going to be performed, and the number of samples to be taken. In terms of the initial objective, they also decide from a given list the properties they should measure. In a practical basis, from the list of selected properties to be measured, professors decide the ones they can really develop in terms of timing, resources and space demand. After that, they are aware about the fact that they have an experimental design developed by them to achieve the goal they meant. Under this perspective, their motivation is enhanced since students are the ones deciding what to study in terms of their personal and professional interests, so that learning is more effective. The negative aspect of this strategy is that it involves many hours of tutorials for the professor

  12. Soil carbon sequestration and forest management: challenges and opportunities

    Treesearch

    Coeli M. Hoover

    2003-01-01

    The subject of the effects of forest management activities on soil carbon is a difficult one to address, but ongoing discussions of carbon sequestration as an emissions offset and the emergence of carbon-credit-trading systems necessitate that we broaden and deepen our understanding of the response of forest-soil carbon pools to forest management. There have been...

  13. Remote Sensing of Soils for Environmental Assessment and Management.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeGloria, Stephen D.; Irons, James R.; West, Larry T.

    2014-01-01

    The next generation of imaging systems integrated with complex analytical methods will revolutionize the way we inventory and manage soil resources across a wide range of scientific disciplines and application domains. This special issue highlights those systems and methods for the direct benefit of environmental professionals and students who employ imaging and geospatial information for improved understanding, management, and monitoring of soil resources.

  14. Managing soil nitrate with cover crops and buffer strips in Sicilian vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, A.; Gristina, L.; Guaitoli, F.; Santoro, A.; Cerdà, A.

    2013-08-01

    When soil nitrate levels are low, plants suffer nitrogen (N) deficiency but when the levels are excessive, soil nitrates can pollute surface and subsurface waters. Strategies to reduce the nitrate pollution are necessary to reach a sustainable use of resources such as soil, water and plant. Buffer strips and cover crops can contribute to the management of soil nitrates, but little is known of their effectiveness in semiarid vineyards plantations. The research was carried out in the south coast of Sicily (Italy) to evaluate nitrate trends in a vineyard managed both conventionally and using two different cover crops (Triticum durum and Vicia sativa cover crop). A 10 m-wide buffer strip was seeded with Lolium perenne at the bottom of the vineyard. Soil nitrate was measured monthly and nitrate movement was monitored by application of a 15N tracer to a narrow strip between the bottom of vineyard and the buffer and non-buffer strips. Lolium perenne biomass yield in the buffer strips and its isotopic nitrogen content were monitored. Vicia sativa cover crop management contributed with an excess of nitrogen, and the soil management determined the nitrogen content at the buffer areas. A 6 m buffer strip reduced the nitrate by 42% with and by 46% with a 9 m buffer strip. Thanks to catch crops, farmers can manage the N content and its distribution into the soil over the year, can reduced fertilizer wastage and reduce N pollution of surface and groundwater.

  15. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Ji, Lei; Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) and clipping (2.06 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) than under grazing (1.65 μmol.m-(2).s(-1)) over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content) and biotic (ANPP and BNPP) factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China.

  16. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17μmol.m−2.s−1) and clipping (2.06μmol.m−2.s−1) than under grazing (1.65μmol.m−2.s−1) over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content) and biotic (ANPP and BNPP) factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China. PMID:26808376

  17. Surface features of soil particles of three types of soils under different land use strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveeva, Nataliy; Kotelnikova, Anna; Rogova, Olga; Proskurnin, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    surface area and PZC. The results suggested considerable differences between sorption features of both soils and fractions under different land use strategies.

  18. Legacy effects of grassland management on soil carbon to depth.

    PubMed

    Ward, Susan E; Smart, Simon M; Quirk, Helen; Tallowin, Jerry R B; Mortimer, Simon R; Shiel, Robert S; Wilby, Andrew; Bardgett, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    The importance of managing land to optimize carbon sequestration for climate change mitigation is widely recognized, with grasslands being identified as having the potential to sequester additional carbon. However, most soil carbon inventories only consider surface soils, and most large-scale surveys group ecosystems into broad habitats without considering management intensity. Consequently, little is known about the quantity of deep soil carbon and its sensitivity to management. From a nationwide survey of grassland soils to 1 m depth, we show that carbon in grassland soils is vulnerable to management and that these management effects can be detected to considerable depth down the soil profile, albeit at decreasing significance with depth. Carbon concentrations in soil decreased as management intensity increased, but greatest soil carbon stocks (accounting for bulk density differences), were at intermediate levels of management. Our study also highlights the considerable amounts of carbon in subsurface soil below 30 cm, which is missed by standard carbon inventories. We estimate grassland soil carbon in Great Britain to be 2097 Tg C to a depth of 1 m, with ~60% of this carbon being below 30 cm. Total stocks of soil carbon (t ha(-1) ) to 1 m depth were 10.7% greater at intermediate relative to intensive management, which equates to 10.1 t ha(-1) in surface soils (0-30 cm), and 13.7 t ha(-1) in soils from 30 to 100 cm depth. Our findings highlight the existence of substantial carbon stocks at depth in grassland soils that are sensitive to management. This is of high relevance globally, given the extent of land cover and large stocks of carbon held in temperate managed grasslands. Our findings have implications for the future management of grasslands for carbon storage and climate mitigation, and for global carbon models which do not currently account for changes in soil carbon to depth with management. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The survival strategy of the soil microbial biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Philip; Kemmitt, Sarah; Dungait, Jennifer; Xu, Jianming

    2014-05-01

    The soil microbial biomass (biomass) is defined as the sum of the masses of all soil microorganisms > 5000 µm3 (e.g. fungi, bacteria, protozoa, yeasts, actinomycetes and algae). Typically comprising about 1 to 3 % of total soil organic matter (SOM), the biomass might be though to live in a highly substrate-rich environment. However, the SOM is, normally, only exceedingly slowly available to the biomass. However the biomass can survive for months or even years on this meagre energy source. Not surprisingly, therefore, the biomass exhibits many features typical of a dormant or resting population. These include a very low rate of basal and specific respiration, a slow rate of cell division (about once every six months on average) and slow turnover rate. These are clearly adaptations to existing in an environment where substrate availability is very low. Yet, paradoxically, the biomass, in soils worldwide, has an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration (around 10 to 12 µmol ATP g-1 biomass C), and an Adenylate Energy Charge (AEC = [(ATP) + (0.5 ADP)]/[(ATP)+(ADP) + (AMP)]) which are typical of microorganisms growing exponentially in a chemostat. This sets us several questions. Firstly, under the condition of extremely limited substrate availability in soil, why does the biomass not mainly exist as spores, becoming active, by increasing both its ATP concentration and AEC, when substrate (plant and animal residues) becomes available? We surmise that a spore strategy may put organisms at a competitive disadvantage, compared to others which are prepared to invest energy, maintaining high ATP and ATP, to take advantage of a 'food event' as soon as it becomes available. Secondly, since SOM is available (although only very slowly) to the biomass, why have some groups not evolved the ability to mineralize it faster, obtain more energy, and so gain a competitive advantage? We believe that the reason why organisms do not use this strategy is, simply, that they cannot. Our

  20. Environmental management strategy: four forces analysis.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Martin W; Von Windheim, Jesko

    2015-01-01

    We develop an analytical approach for more systematically analyzing environmental management problems in order to develop strategic plans. This approach can be deployed by agencies, non-profit organizations, corporations, or other organizations and institutions tasked with improving environmental quality. The analysis relies on assessing the underlying natural processes followed by articulation of the relevant societal forces causing environmental change: (1) science and technology, (2) governance, (3) markets and the economy, and (4) public behavior. The four forces analysis is then used to strategize which types of actions might be most effective at influencing environmental quality. Such strategy has been under-used and under-valued in environmental management outside of the corporate sector, and we suggest that this four forces analysis is a useful analytic to begin developing such strategy.

  1. Environmental Management Strategy: Four Forces Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Martin W.; Von Windheim, Jesko

    2015-01-01

    We develop an analytical approach for more systematically analyzing environmental management problems in order to develop strategic plans. This approach can be deployed by agencies, non-profit organizations, corporations, or other organizations and institutions tasked with improving environmental quality. The analysis relies on assessing the underlying natural processes followed by articulation of the relevant societal forces causing environmental change: (1) science and technology, (2) governance, (3) markets and the economy, and (4) public behavior. The four forces analysis is then used to strategize which types of actions might be most effective at influencing environmental quality. Such strategy has been under-used and under-valued in environmental management outside of the corporate sector, and we suggest that this four forces analysis is a useful analytic to begin developing such strategy.

  2. Heat management strategies for MSW landfills.

    PubMed

    Yeşiller, Nazli; Hanson, James L; Kopp, Kevin B; Yee, Emma H

    2016-10-01

    Heat is a primary byproduct of landfilling of municipal solid waste. Long-term elevated temperatures have been reported for MSW landfills under different operational conditions and climatic regions around the world. A conceptual framework is presented for management of the heat generated in MSW landfills. Three main strategies are outlined: extraction, regulation, and supplementation. Heat extraction allows for beneficial use of the excess landfill heat as an alternative energy source. Two approaches are provided for the extraction strategy: extracting all of the excess heat above baseline equilibrium conditions in a landfill and extracting only a part of the excess heat above equilibrium conditions to obtain target optimum waste temperatures for maximum gas generation. Heat regulation allows for controlling the waste temperatures to achieve uniform distribution at target levels at a landfill facility. Two approaches are provided for the regulation strategy: redistributing the excess heat across a landfill to obtain uniform target optimum waste temperatures for maximum gas generation and redistributing the excess heat across a landfill to obtain specific target temperatures. Heat supplementation allows for controlling heat generation using external thermal energy sources to achieve target waste temperatures. Two approaches are provided for the supplementation strategy: adding heat to the waste mass using an external energy source to increase waste temperatures and cooling the waste mass using an external energy source to decrease waste temperatures. For all strategies, available landfill heat energy is determined based on the difference between the waste temperatures and the target temperatures. Example analyses using data from landfill facilities with relatively low and high heat generation indicated thermal energy in the range of -48.4 to 72.4MJ/m(3) available for heat management. Further modeling and experimental analyses are needed to verify the effectiveness

  3. Management strategies for promoting successful breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Bear, K; Tigges, B B

    1993-06-01

    Clinicians can promote a successful breastfeeding experience by providing support, anticipatory guidance and practical information. This article presents the components of early follow-up and guidelines for assessment. Management strategies for common problems are discussed, such as nipple soreness, cracked nipples, plugged ducts and mastitis, insufficient infant weight gain, perceived inadequacy of milk supply, breast-milk jaundice, sexual adjustment and failure at breastfeeding. Breastfeeding guidelines for employed mothers and adoptive mothers are indicated.

  4. Strategies for Management of Synchronous Colorectal Metastases.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Jason A; Merchant, Nipun B

    2014-06-01

    The management of synchronous presentation of colorectal cancer and liver metastases has long been a topic of debate and discussion for surgeons due to the unique dilemma of balancing operative timing along with treatment strategy. Operative strategies for resection include staged resection with colon first approach, "reverse" staged resection with liver metastases resected first, and one-stage, or simultaneous, resection of both the primary tumor and liver metastases approach. These operative strategies can be further augmented with perioperative chemotherapy and other novel approaches that may improve resectability and patient survival. The decision on operative timing and approach, however, remains largely dependent on the surgeon's determination of disease resectability, patient fitness, and the need for neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  5. Using soil quality indicators for monitoring sustainable forest management

    Treesearch

    James A. Burger; Garland Gray; D. Andrew Scott

    2010-01-01

    Most private and public forest land owners and managers are compelled to manage their forests sustainably, which means management that is economically viable,environmentally sound, and socially acceptable. To meet this mandate, the USDA Forest Service protects the productivity of our nation’s forest soils by monitoring and evaluating management activities to ensure...

  6. Determination of potential management zones from soil electrical conductivity, yield and crop data*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Shi, Zhou; Wu, Ci-fang; Li, Hong-yi; Li, Feng

    2008-01-01

    One approach to apply precision agriculture to optimize crop production and environmental quality is identifying management zones. In this paper, the variables of soil electrical conductivity (EC) data, cotton yield data and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data in an about 15 ha field in a coastal saline land were selected as data resources, and their spatial variabilities were firstly analyzed and spatial distribution maps constructed with geostatistics technique. Then fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm was used to define management zones, fuzzy performance index (FPI) and normalized classification entropy (NCE) were used to determine the optimal cluster numbers. Finally one-way variance analysis was performed on 224 georeferenced soil and yield sampling points to assess how well the defined management zones reflected the soil properties and productivity level. The results reveal that the optimal number of management zones for the present study area was 3 and the defined management zones provided a better description of soil properties and yield variation. Statistical analyses indicate significant differences between the chemical properties of soil samples and crop yield in each management zone, and management zone 3 presented the highest nutrient level and potential crop productivity, whereas management zone 1 the lowest. Based on these findings, we conclude that fuzzy c-means clustering approach can be used to delineate management zones by using the given three variables in the coastal saline soils, and the defined management zones form an objective basis for targeting soil samples for nutrient analysis and development of site-specific application strategies. PMID:18196615

  7. Bermudagrass management in the Southern Piedmont U.S. IV. Soil surface nitrogen pools.

    PubMed

    Franzluebbers, A J; Stuedemann, J A

    2001-09-24

    The fate of nitrogen (N) applied in forage-based agricultural systems is important for understanding the long-term production and environmental impacts of a particular management strategy. We evaluated the factorial combination of three types of N fertilization (inorganic, crimson clover [Trifolium incarnatum L.] cover crop plus inorganic, and chicken [Gallus gallus] broiler litter pressure and four types of harvest strategy (unharvested forage, low and high cattle [Bos Taurus] grazing pressure, and monthly haying in summer) on surface residue and soil N pools during the first 5 years of 'Coastal' bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon [L.] Pers.) management. The type of N fertilization used resulted in small changes in soil N pools, except at a depth of 0 to 2 cm, where total soil N was sequestered at a rate 0.2 g x kg(-1) x year(-1) greater with inorganic fertilization than with other fertilization strategies. We could account for more of the applied N under grazed systems (76-82%) than under ungrazed systems (35-71%). As a percentage of applied N, 32 and 48% were sequestered as total soil N at a depth of 0 to 6 cm when averaged across fertilization strategies under low and high grazing pressures, respectively, which was equivalent to 6.8 and 10.3 g x m(-2) x year(-1). Sequestration rates of total soil N under the unharvested-forage and haying strategies were negligible. Most of the increase in total soil N was at a depth of 0 to 2 cm and was due to changes in the particulate organic N (PON) pool. The greater cycling of applied N into the soil organic N pool with grazed compared with ungrazed systems suggests an increase in the long-term fertility of soil.

  8. Fluid management strategies in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M

    2012-04-01

    In patients with chronic heart failure, fluid retention (or hypervolemia) is often the stimulus for acute decompensated heart failure that requires hospitalization. The pathophysiology of fluid retention is complex and involves both hemodynamic and clinical congestion. Signs and symptoms of both hemodynamic and clinical congestion should be assessed serially during hospitalization. Core heart failure drug and cardiac device therapies should be provided, and ultrafiltration may be warranted. Critical care, intermediate care, and telemetry nurses have roles in both assessment and management of patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure and fluid retention. Nurse administrators and managers have heightened their attention to fluid retention because the Medicare performance measure known as the risk-standardized 30-day all-cause readmission rate after heart failure hospitalization can be attenuated by fluid management strategies initiated by nurses during a patient's hospitalization.

  9. Opt-in medical management strategies.

    PubMed

    Fetterolf, Donald; Olson, Marty

    2008-02-01

    Historically, health plans and disease management companies have employed "opt-out" strategies for evaluating medical management outcomes across larger populations, targeting the entire population of eligible individuals and allowing those not interested to opt out. Recent observations that the predominant effort of these programs is on high-risk patients has lead some managers to suggest that the focus be on only those individuals with an anticipated higher effectiveness and lower cost to the payers of such services. They believe such "opt-in" models, in which only higher risk participants are targeted and enrolled, will deliver higher value. The use of common opt-in models, however, is not only methodologically unsound, but experience in the field suggests there may be less overall effect as well. Calculation methods for developing impact remain extremely sensitive to methodology

  10. Tools to support maintenance strategies under soft soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J. W. M.; van Meerten, J. J.; Woning, M. P.; Eijbersen, M. J.; Huber, M.

    2015-11-01

    Costs for maintenance of infrastructure in municipalities with soft soil underground conditions, are estimated to be almost 40 % higher than in others. As a result, these municipalities meet financial problems that cause overdue maintenance. In some cases municipalities are even afraid to be unable to offer a minimum service level in future. In common, traditional practice, roads and sewerage systems have been constructed in trenches that consist of sandy material that replaces the upper meters of the soft soil. Under influence of its weight, this causes accelerated settlements of the construction. A number of alternative constructions have been developed, e.g. using light-weight materials to limit settlement velocity. In order to limit future maintenance costs, improvement of maintenance strategies is desired. Tools have been and will be developed to support municipalities in improving their maintenance strategies and save money by doing that. A model (BALANS) that weighs the attractiveness of alternative solutions under different soil, environmental and economic circumstances, will be presented.

  11. The effects of soil management on subsoil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Andrew; Coleman, Kevin; Jenkinson, David; Powlson, David; Poulton, Paul; Whitmore, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Soil management has a clear effect on the organic matter (OM) content of soils in agricultural systems. For instance, grassland soils tend to have a greater OM content than arable soils due to the difference in the management of the surface vegetation between the two systems. Our knowledge of this is largely restricted to the topsoil however, as this is the part of the profile that is most obviously influenced by the inputs and losses of OM. How agricultural management at the surface affects OM contents in the subsoil is rarely considered, let alone understood. We present the state of our current knowledge of the effect of soil management on subsoil OM based on measurements made on soils from some of the established field experiments at Rothamsted Research, UK. We have examined subsoil OM data collected by us and other scientists at Rothamsted representing different timescales: long-term (Broadbalk wilderness and arable, Geescroft wilderness, and Park Grass: 130 years), medium-term (Highfield ley-arable: 40-60 years), and short-term (Highfield and Geescroft reversion: 2 years). Samples to depths of up to 96 cm in the profile were collected from the field experiments periodically between 1870 and 2009 and analysed for C and N. Both C and N increased in soils converted from arable to long-term woodland and grassland throughout the profile. The C:N ratio also increased in comparison to long-term arable soils which suggested either the preferential accumulation of C or the preferential decomposition of N at depth in grassland and woodland soils, or the converse at depth in the arable soils. Small increases in C and N in both long-term grassland and arable soils were also apparent. In the medium-term, differences in the pattern of soil C and N with depth were found, with homogenisation in the cultivated layer in arable and fallow soils and a more gradual decrease with depth in the grassland soil. In general, differences between soils subjected to different management

  12. Potentials for Soil Enzyme as Indicators of Ecological Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senwo, Z. N.; Manu, A.; Coleman, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Activity measurements of selected soil enzymes (cellulase, glucosidase, amidohydrolase, phosphatase, arylsulfatase) involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur cycling in the biosphere, hold potential as early and sensitive indicators of soil ecological stress and restoration, These measurements are advantageous because the procedures are simple, rapid, and reproducible over time. Enzyme activities are sensitive to short-term changes in soil and kind-use management. Enzyme activities have also been observed to be closely related to soil organic matter proposed as an index of soil quality.

  13. Diabetes benefit management: evolving strategies for payers.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, Albert L

    2011-11-01

    Over the next quarter century, the burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is expected to at least double. Currently, 1 in every 10 healthcare dollars is spent on diabetes management; by 2050, it has been projected that the annual costs of managing T2DM will rise to $336 billion. Without substantial, systemic changes, T2DM management costs will lead to a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system. However, the appropriate management of diabetes can reduce associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, adequate glycemic control can improve patient outcomes and significantly reduce diabetes-related complications. This article provides an overview of key concepts associated with a value-based insurance design (VBID) approach to T2DM coverage. By promoting the use of services or treatments that provide high benefits relative to cost, and by alternatively discouraging patients from utilizing services whose benefits do not justify their cost, VBID improves the quality of healthcare while simultaneously reining in spending. VBID initiatives tend to focus on chronic disease management and generally target prescription drug use. However, some programs have expanded their scope by incorporating services traditionally offered by wellness and disease management programs. The concept of VBID is growing, and it is increasingly being implemented by a diverse and growing number of public and private entities, including pharmacy benefit managers, health plans, and employers. This article provides key background on VBID strategies, with a focus on T2DM management. It also provides a road map for health plans seeking to implement VBID as part of their programs.

  14. Soils and nutrition management for black walnuts

    Treesearch

    Felix, Jr. Ponder

    2004-01-01

    Although walnut may survive when planted in unsuitable soils, most likely growth will be slow and the trees will be of poor quality. Sufficient time should be spent locating quality sites for this valuable and high-site demanding species. Undoubtedly, only ideal soil conditions will allow for adequate root expansion and for soil levels of nutrients and water to be...

  15. Change of soil carbon fluxes in European beech forest under different climate and management scenarios: an example from Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanović, Dejan; Orlović, Saša; Matović, Bratislav; Suckow, Felicitas; Lasch-Born, Petra; Galić, Zoran; Reyer, Christopher; Gutsch, Martin; Pekeč, Saša

    2013-04-01

    Soil texture and structure, rainfall, temperature conditions and forest management determine the rate of soil carbon sequestration in forest ecosystems. European beech is one of most important and most abundant tree species in Europe. Forest management strategy influences aboveground biomass as well as belowground biomass and soil organic and inorganic carbon. This study explores how different management strategies (i.e. thinning from above intensities with 10%, 20% and 30% removal of trees every ten years) under three different time periods 1971-2000, 2011-2040 and 2051-2080 of the IPCC SRES A2 climate change scenario, influence total soil carbon stock in a beech stand in eastern Serbia. For the simulations, the process-based tree growth model 4C was used. At the beginning of the simulations, the total soil carbon stock was about 85 tC/ha. The most intensive management strategy appears to provide highest carbon fluxes into the soil and the highest total carbon stock values (between 160 and 180 tC/ha) at the end of the simulation periods. All management strategies under the climate of the period 2051-2080 showed the lowest values (about 160 tC/ha). We analyse the interrelationships between management caused changes in litter fluxes and climate (mainly temperature) caused losses of carbon from soil by respiration. In some cases different thinning intensities showed similar fluxes for the same time periods, whereas both climate scenario periods showed quite similar influence for the same management scenarios. The influence of different management strategies on the final total soil carbon stock will be shown.

  16. Soil ecology and agricultural technology; An integrated approach towards improved soil management for sustainable farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulleman, Mirjam; Pérès, Guénola; Crittenden, Stephen; Heddadj, Djilali; Sukkel, Wijnand

    2014-05-01

    Intensive arable food production systems are in need of smart solutions that combine ecological knowledge and farm technology to maximize yields while protecting natural resources. The huge diversity of soil organisms and their interactions is of crucial importance for soil functions and ecosystem services, such as organic matter incorporation and break down, nutrient mineralization, soil structure formation, water regulation and disease and pest control. Soil management decisions that take into account the soil biodiversity and associated functions are thus essential to (i) maintain soil productivity in the long term, (ii) reduce the dependency on external inputs and non-renewables such as fossil fuels, and (iii) make agroecosystems more resilient against biotic and abiotic stresses. Organic farming systems and reduced tillage systems are two approaches that aim to increase soil biodiversity and general soil quality, through improved management of organic matter but differ in their emphasis on the use of chemical inputs for crop protection or soil disturbance, respectively. In North-western Europe experience with and knowledge of reduced tillage systems is still scarce, both in conventional and organic farming. Our study targeted both conventional and organic farming and aimed at 1) documenting reduced tillage practices within different agroecological contexts in NW Europe; 2) evaluating the effects of reduced tillage systems on soil biodiversity and soil ecosystem services; 3) increase understanding of agroecological factors that determine trade-offs between different ecosystem services. Earthworm species and nematode taxa were selected as indicator organisms to be studied for their known response to soil management and effects on soil functions. Additionally, soil organic matter, physical soil parameters and processes, and crop yields have been measured across multiple sites. Data have been collected over several cropping seasons in long term field experiments

  17. Optimal management of familial hypercholesterolemia: treatment and management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Nemati, Mohammad Hassan; Astaneh, Behrooz

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is an autosomally dominant disorder caused by various mutations in low-density lipoprotein receptor genes. This will lead to elevated levels of total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which may in turn lead to premature coronary atherosclerosis and cardiac-related death. The symptoms are more severe in the homozygous type of the disease. Different options for the treatment of affected patients are now available. Diet therapy, pharmacologic therapy, lipid apheresis, and liver transplantation are among the various treatments. We clinically review the treatment and management strategies for the disease in order to shed light on the optimal management of familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:21191428

  18. Sustainable Soil Management: Its perception and the need for policy intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basch, Gottlieb; Kassam, Amir; González-Sánchez, Emilio

    2017-04-01

    As stated in the strategic objectives of the Global Soil Partnership "healthy soils and sustainable soil management are the precondition for human well-being and economic welfare and therefore play the key role for sustainable development". Although the functional properties of a healthy soil are well understood, in practice it is easily overlooked what is necessary to achieve and sustain healthy agricultural soils. This contribution intends: to discuss the concept of sustainable soil management in agricultural production with regard to soil health, and to highlight its importance in the achievement of both Sustainable Development Goals and the 4 per mille objectives, as well as for the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). In Europe, soil and the need for its conservation and stewardship gained visibility at the beginning of this century during the discussions related to the Soil Thematic Strategy. This higher level of awareness concerning the status of Europe's soils led to the introduction of soil conservation standards into the cross-compliance mechanism within the 1st Pillar of CAP. These standards were applied through the definition of Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAECs) which are compulsory for all farmers receiving direct payments, and in the last CAP reform in 2014, through the introduction of additional Greening Measures in Pilar 1. Despite these measures and the claim of some writers that they already contributed to significantly reducing soil erosion, the EC Joint Research Centre still reports water erosion in Europe amounting to almost one billion tonnes annually. Regarding soil conservation, soil carbon stocks or the provision of additional ecosystem services, measures called for in GAEC 4 (Minimum soil cover), in GAEC 5 (Minimum land management reflecting site specific conditions to limit soil erosion), and in GAEC 6 (Maintenance of soil organic matter level through appropriate practices, …), give the impression that a lot is being

  19. Hydraulic and mechanical properties of soil aggregates under organic and conventional soil management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójciga, A.; Kuś, J.; Turski, M.; Lipiec, J.

    2009-04-01

    Variation in hydraulic and mechanical properties of soil aggregates is an important factor affecting water storage and infiltration because the large inter-aggregate pores are dewatered first and the transport of water and solutes is influenced by the properties of the individual aggregates and contacts between them. A high mechanical stability of soil aggregates is fundamental for the maintenance of proper tilth and provides stable traction for farm implements, but limit root growth inside aggregates. The aggregate properties are largely influenced by soil management practices. Our objective was to compare the effects of organic and conventional soil management on hydraulic and mechanical properties of soil aggregates. Experimental fields subjected to long-term organic (14 years) and conventional managements were located on loamy soil at the Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - National Research Institute in Pulawy, Poland. Soil samples were collected from two soil depths (0-10 cm and 10-20 cm). After air-drying, two size fractions of soil aggregates (15-20 and 30-35 mm) were manually selected and kept in the dried state in a dessicator in order to provide the same boundary conditions. Following properties of the aggregates were determined: porosity (%) using standard wax method, cumulative infiltration Q (mm3 s-1) and sorptivity S (mm s -1/2) of water and ethanol using a tube with a sponge inserted at the tip, wettability (by comparison of sorptivity of water and ethanol) using repellency index R, crushing strength q (MPa) using strength testing device (Zwick/Roell) and calculated by Dexter's formula. All properties were determined in 15 replicates for each treatment, aggregates size and depth. Organic management decreased porosity of soil aggregates and ethanol infiltration. All aggregates revealed rather limited wettability (high repellency index). In most cases the aggregate wettability was lower under conventional than organic soil management

  20. Reducing the dimensionality of soil microinvertebrate community datasets using Indicator Species Analysis: Implications for ecosystem monitoring and soil management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil microinvertebrates are closely associated with soil decomposition and nutrient cycles and may be particularly responsive indicators for soil management practices. However, identification of appropriate bioindicator species for many systems has been severely limited by a lack of information on ...

  1. Slope stability effects of fuel management strategies – inferences from Monte Carlo simulations

    Treesearch

    R. M. Rice; R. R. Ziemer; S. C. Hankin

    1982-01-01

    A simple Monte Carlo simulation evaluated the effect of several fire management strategies on soil slip erosion and wildfires. The current condition was compared to (1) a very intensive fuelbreak system without prescribed fires, and (2) prescribed fire at four time intervals with (a) current fuelbreaks and (b) intensive fuel-breaks. The intensive fuelbreak system...

  2. Healthy sand : a farmers initiative on soil protection and ecosystem service management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Annemieke; Verzandvoort, Simone; Kuikman, Peter; Stuka, Jason; Morari, Francesco; Rienks, Willem; Stokkers, Jan; Hesselink, Bertus; Lever, Henk

    2015-04-01

    In a small region in the Netherlands a group of dairy farmers (cooperated in a foundation HOE Duurzaam) cooperates with the drinking water company and together aim for a more healthy soil. They farm a sandy soil, which is in most of the parcels low in organic matter. The local farmers perceive loss of soil fertility and blame loss of soil organic matter for that. All farmers expect that increasing the soil organic matter content will retain more nitrates in the soil, leading to a reduction in nitrate leaching and a higher nutrient availability for the crops, forage and grass and probably low urgency for grassland renewal. The drinking water company in the area also has high expectations that a higher SOM content does relate to higher quality of the (drinking) water and lower costs to clean and filter the water to meet drinking water quality requirements. Most farmers in the area face suboptimal moisture conditions and thrive for increasing the soil organic matter content and improving the soil structure as key factors to relieve, soil moisture problems both in dry (drought) and wet (flooding) periods. A better water holding capacity of the soil provides benefits for the regional water board as this reduces leaching and run-off. The case study, which is part of the Recare-project, at first glance deals with soil management and technology to improve soil quality. However, the casus in fact deals with social innovation. The real challenge to this group of neighbours, farmers within a small region, and to science is how to combine knowledge and experience on soil management for increasing the content of soil organic matter and how to recognize the ecosystem services that are provided by the adapted and more 'healthy' soils. And also how to formalize relations between costs and benefits of measures taken in the field and how these could be financially rewarded from an agreed and acceptable financial awarding scheme based on payments for securing soil carbon stocks and

  3. Effects of Applied Land Use Strategies on Farmland Soils in the Southwestern Siberian Kulunda-Steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwald, Lars-Christian; Illiger, Patrick; Stephan, Eckart; Frühauf, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    The Kulunda steppe in southwestern Siberia is one of the most intensely used agricultural regions in the world. The study area of the KULUNDA project is the Kulunda steppe, which is a part of the conversion region created during the so called "virgin land campaign" in the soviet era. Nowadays it is characterized by widespread soil degradation. Despite the fact that agriculture is the basis of existence, land use practice is maladjusted to the local conditions. The widespread soil degradation and accordingly the decreased soil humus content have negative effects on crop yields in this region. With respect to climate change, the current study analyses the cause effect relationship between land use practice and soil properties. In particular, different methods of soil cultivation will be tested and for each of the cases the soil humus content, soil water, soil solute balance will be measured and compared. In addition, the possibilities of soil carbon sequestration capacity will be analyzed. Furthermore, the study aims to achieve properly adapted sustainable cropping systems to stabilize the yields and to increase the productivity of plant production per spatial unit in this high vulnerable dry farming region. In 2012 the long term field trials started at three test farms in different steppe biomes, containing different soil types from chernozems to kastanozems. Each of them is characterized by a negative water balance. Successfully running cropping models, such as crop rotation, tilling intensity, plant protection and nutrition strategies from south Canadian steppe regions were adapted to regional agronomic needs. The traditional Russian cultivation system will be compared with two modern systems, including no-tillage methods on specially randomized test plots. Additionally, these plots are equipped with soil moisture monitoring systems to analyze the soil water content in different depths under the different cropping methods. The expected results will not only deepen

  4. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  5. TASKILLAN II - Pilot strategies for workload management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, Leon D.; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1990-01-01

    This study focused on the strategies used by pilots in managing their workload level, and their subsequent task performance. Sixteen licensed pilots flew 42 missions on a helicopter simulation, and were evaluated on their performance of the overall mission, as well as individual tasks. Pilots were divided in four groups, defined by the presence or absence of scheduling control over tasks and the availability of intelligence concerning the type and stage of difficulties imposed during the flight. Results suggest that intelligence supported strategies that yielded significant higher performance levels, while scheduling control seemed to have no impact on performance. Both difficulty type and the stage of difficulty impacted performance significantly, with strongest effects for time stresss and difficulties imposed late in the flight.

  6. Soil mapping in past and recent agricultural management sustainability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holec, Juraj; Burian, Libor; Horáčková, Šárka; Druga, Michal; Čekovská, Lucia; Súľovský, Marek; Minár, Jozef; Smetanová, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Human impact on soils via accelerated processes of soil degradation has created heterogeneous soilscapes in the Chernozem regions in South-West Carpathians Foreland. Loess hilly lands, such as Trnavska Tabula Table, are characterized by colourful mosaic of 'bright patches' represented by eroded Chernozems or Regosols, and dark non-eroded or accumulated soils. Detailed soil mapping of soil spatial patterns with regard to topography and land use structures is inevitable for assessing sustainability of past land management triggering conditions in which current sustainable management must operate, and description of current conditions. To tackle this challenge, the study analyses extensive datasets of more than 800 field drillings, and develops topography based prediction models to analyse regional sediment budget since the onset of agriculture. Current and reconstructed soilscapes are compared with historical and recent land use patterns and effects of different land uses and landscape designs on soil and erosion processes are evaluated.The project is supported by APVV-15-0054.

  7. Soil Moisture, Salinity, and Nitrate Control for Soil and Groundwater Protection in Support of Wireless Sensor Networks and Optimal Irrigation Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Harmon, T. C.

    2007-12-01

    Over-irrigation with reclaimed water may cause crop yield reduction and groundwater quality degradation. Continuous and automatic monitoring strategies are desirable as a means of guiding management schemes to avoid these problems. In this work, an optimal irrigation management scheme known as Receding Horizon Control (RHC) is proposed to balance water reuse and soil/groundwater quality. In this scheme, a wireless networked sensor array is deployed to provide on-line feedback to the simulators on which the management algorithm depends. A simulation model including a one- (vertical) dimensional form of the Richards equation coupled to energy and solute transport equations is automatically updated with real-time soil moisture, temperature, nitrate, and salinity sensor data on a regular basis. A genetic algorithm-based control scheme determines the optimal irrigation rate using current observations which continuously maximizes the reclaimed water usage while maintaining salinity and nitrate in soils at a certain level. Results from simulated soil moisture/nitrate control where maximum soil moisture/nitrate level throughout the soil depth is maintained are presented. On-site soil moisture control in Palmdale, CA, where reclaimed water is irrigated with center-pivot irrigation system at an agricultural site, is also demonstrated. An on-going field experiment in Merced, CA where automatic irrigation system is set up to control salinity level in soils is presented as well. The results demonstrate that coupling in situ observations with RHC process control algorithm is a viable strategy for achieving water reuse and agricultural objectives while minimizing negative impacts on environmental quality.

  8. It's magic: a unique practice management strategy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Steven

    2003-11-15

    For thousands of years prior to the advent of modern dentistry, magic has been used to entertain, impress, and motivate individuals. Today's dental professionals are using the concept of The Magic of a Healthy Smile through their use of modern clinical techniques and as a means for practice marketing, patient education, and the reduction of patient stress and fear. This article describes how dentists/magicians have incorporated magic into their practices and the benefits of this useful patient management strategy. A script of the "Happy Tooth Magic Show" and resources for dentists to create their own dental magic show are provided.

  9. Novel strategies for managing pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loc, Welley S; Smith, Jill P; Matters, Gail; Kester, Mark; Adair, James H

    2014-01-01

    With the incidence reports of pancreatic cancer increasing every year, research over the last several decades has been focused on the means to achieve early diagnosis in patients that are at a high risk of developing the malignancy. This review covers current strategies for managing pancreatic cancer and further discusses efforts in understanding the role of early onset symptoms leading to tumor progression. Recent investigations in this discussion include type 3c diabetes, selected biomarkers and pathways related to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions, drug resistance, and advances in nanomedicine which may provide significant solutions for improving early detection and treatments in future medicine. PMID:25356034

  10. Soil Management Effects on Gas Fluxes from an Organic Soil Agricultural System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennewein, S. P.; Bhadha, J. H.; Lang, T. A.; Singh, M.; Daroub, S. H.; McCray, M.

    2015-12-01

    The role of soil management on gas flux isn't well understood for Histosols of the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) of southern Florida. The region is responsible for roughly half of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) production in the USA along with supplying winter vegetable crops to the eastern USA. Future productivity in the EAA is jeopardized by soil subsidence resulting from oxidation of organic matter. Establishing the role of tillage, water-table depth, nitrogen fertilizer, and soil depth on gas flux will help determine how effective various managements are on conserving soil. Ongoing lysimeter and field studies examined effects of management practices (water-table, tillage, and nitrogen fertilizer), and soil depth on, gas emission and microbial biomass. The trials were set in Belle Glade, FL, on Lauderhill muck (Lithic Haplosaprists). Results to be presented include soil microbial biomass and soil gas (CO2, CH4, and N2O) flux. This study provides insight into management effectiveness and agriculture sustainability on shallow muck soils of the EAA and will help farmers mitigate problems associated with soil subsidence and seasonally high water-tables.

  11. Strategies for pain management: a review.

    PubMed

    Sollami, Alfonso; Marino, Leonardo; Fontechiari, Simona; Fornari, Marta; Tirelli, Pierangela; Zenunaj, Elisabetta

    2015-09-09

    PROBLEM/BACKGROUND: Pain management is a major worldwide health problem. It manifests itself in a variety of forms involving in turn a multiplicity of responses and therapeutic strategies. Following from this, the training of health personnel must deal with this situation and must not only offer technical assistance, but must also deal with the psychological and social aspects of the problem. In recent years various guidelines and protocols have become popular for pain management. The aim of this paper is to present a literature review of the major international databases. Type of research: Systematic review. To identify relevant studies in the literature on pain management and identify the guidelines recognized by the scientific community. A literature search was conducted using the keywords "pain management" and "nurse" published since 2000 in English and Italian in the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Med Line. Excluding items which did not meet the inclusion criteria, 49 articles were included in the review. Despite a growing availability of evidence-based guidelines, drugs for pain control and the enactment of legislation to promote the use of opioid analgesics in pain therapy, a substantial proportion of the European population continues to have pain. Estimates of the prevalence of pain symptoms in the literature show that between 40% and 63% of hospitalized patients reported pain, peaking at 82.3% in cancer patients in advanced stages of the disease or terminally ill (in hospital or at home). Several studies published in recent years have agreed on a definition of some key points in the management of pain. Studies agree that pain should be recognized as the 5th vital sign, hence the need for validated scales whether single or multi-dimensional, quantitative or qualitative. The approach to the management of pain must be multi-professional, and the use of pharmacology must be in accordance with the WHO three-step approach. Several studies have demonstrated

  12. Invasive mycoses: strategies for effective management.

    PubMed

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2012-01-01

    Effective management of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) depends on early individualized therapy that optimizes efficacy and safety. Considering the negative consequences of IFI, for some high-risk patients the potential benefits of prophylactic therapy may outweigh the risks. When using a prophylactic, empiric, or preemptive therapeutic approach, clinicians must take into account the local epidemiology, spectrum of activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, and safety profile of different antifungal agents, together with unique host-related factors that may affect antifungal efficacy or safety. Therapeutic drug monitoring is increasingly recognized as important or necessary when employing lipophilic triazoles (itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole) or flucytosine. Because early diagnostics remain limited for uncommon, yet emerging opportunistic molds (e.g., Mucorales), and treatment delay is associated with increased mortality, early effective management often depends on a high index of suspicion, taking into account predisposing factors, host cues favoring mucormycosis, and local epidemiology. Antifungal options for mucormycosis are limited, and optimal management depends on a multimodal approach that includes early diagnosis/clinical suspicion, correction of underlying predisposing factors, radical debridement of affected tissues, and extended antifungal therapy. This article discusses strategies for the effective management of invasive mycoses, with a particular focus on antifungal hepatotoxicity.

  13. Management Strategies for CLN2 Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ruth E; Adams, Heather R; Blohm, Martin; Cohen-Pfeffer, Jessica L; de Los Reyes, Emily; Denecke, Jonas; Drago, Kristen; Fairhurst, Charlie; Frazier, Margie; Guelbert, Norberto; Kiss, Szilárd; Kofler, Annamaria; Lawson, John A; Lehwald, Lenora; Leung, Mary-Anne; Mikhaylova, Svetlana; Mink, Jonathan W; Nickel, Miriam; Shediac, Renée; Sims, Katherine; Specchio, Nicola; Topcu, Meral; von Löbbecke, Ina; West, Andrea; Zernikow, Boris; Schulz, Angela

    2017-04-01

    CLN2 disease (neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2) is a rare, autosomal recessive, pediatric-onset, rapidly progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1) enzyme deficiency, and is characterized by language delay, seizures, rapid cognitive and motor decline, blindness, and early death. No management guidelines exist and there is a paucity of published disease-specific evidence to inform clinical practice, which currently draws upon experience from the field of childhood neurodisability. Twenty-four disease experts were surveyed on CLN2 disease management and a subset met to discuss current practice. Management goals and strategies are consistent among experts globally and are guided by the principles of pediatric palliative care. Goals and interventions evolve as the disease progresses, with a shift in focus from maintenance of function early in the disease to maintenance of quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach is critical for optimal patient care. This work represents an initial step toward the development of consensus-based management guidelines for CLN2 disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating anaerobic soil disinfestation and other biological soil management methods for open-field tomato production in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) and other biological soil management practices employing carbon-rich and/or biologically-active ingredients help contribute to overall soil suppressiveness in crop disease management. However, their roles in soil fertility tended to be overshadowed by disease cont...

  15. Distinct soil bacterial communities revealed under a diversely managed agroecosystem

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Land-use change and management are normally enacted to manipulate environments to improve conditions that relate to production, remediation, and accommodation. However, soil microbial community complexity after manipulations is still difficult to quantify. In this study, replicate soil samples we...

  16. An adaptive management process for forest soil conservation.

    Treesearch

    Michael P. Curran; Douglas G. Maynard; Ronald L. Heninger; Thomas A. Terry; Steven W. Howes; Douglas M. Stone; Thomas Niemann; Richard E. Miller; Robert F. Powers

    2005-01-01

    Soil disturbance guidelines should be based on comparable disturbance categories adapted to specific local soil conditions, validated by monitoring and research. Guidelines, standards, and practices should be continually improved based on an adaptive management process, which is presented in this paper. Core components of this process include: reliable monitoring...

  17. Book review: Principals of soil conservation and management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conservation and sustainable management of soil are essential features of humankind’s reverence for Nature. As well they should be, given the essential ecosystem services that soil imparts to our world, such as producing food, moderating climate, storing and cycling water and nutrients, purifying w...

  18. Managing soil nitrate with cover crops and buffer strips in Sicilian vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, A.; Gristina, L.; Guaitoli, F.; Santoro, A.; Cerdà, A.

    2013-04-01

    When soil nitrate levels are inadequate, plants suffer nitrogen deficiency but when the levels are excessive, nitrates (NO3-N) can pollute surface and subsurface waters. Strategies to reduce the nitrate pollution are necessary to reach a sustainable use of resources such as soil, water and plant. Buffer strips and cover crops can contribute to the management of soil nitrates, but little is known of their effectiveness in semiarid vineyards plantations. The experimental site, a 10 m wide and 80 m long area at the bottom of a vineyard was selected in Sicily. The soil between vine rows and upslope of the buffer strip (seeded with Lolium perenne) and non-buffer strips (control) was managed conventionally and with one of two cover crops (Triticum durum and Vicia sativa cover crop). Soil nitrate was measured monthly and nitrate movement was monitored by application of a 15N tracer to a narrow strip between the bottom of vineyard and the buffer and non-buffer strips. L. perenne biomass yield in the buffer strips and its isotopic nitrogen content were monitored. V. sativa cover crop management contribute with an excess of nitrogen, and the soil management determined the nitrogen content at the buffer areas. A 6 m buffer strip reduce the nitrate by 42% with and by 46% with a 9 m buffer strip.

  19. Tradeoffs of 20 Years of Management on the Sequestration, Stratification, and Stabilization of Soil Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiartas, Jessica

    2017-04-01

    Amidst concerns over rising atmospheric levels of CO2, climate uncertainty, and increased demands for agricultural intensification, there is strong impetus to better characterize the global carbon and nitrogen cycles and identify management opportunities for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural soils are often lower in fertility and soil carbon relative to pre-cultivation levels. Thus, soil carbon sequestration in agricultural lands has been widely touted as a promising avenue to offset greenhouse gas emissions, while providing additional benefits, including improved soil fertility, increased water holding capacity, and reduced erosion. However, there is still uncertainty regarding carbon saturation potentials and the tradeoffs of different management practices. The Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility provides a unique opportunity to assess the long-term impact of various crop rotations, nutrient management systems, and irrigation strategies on carbon sequestration across the entire soil profile up to 2 meters deep. Traditionally, soil carbon research has been limited to the surface soil, neglecting mechanisms that contribute to the vertical redistribution of soil organic matter (SOM). While variation in SOC increases drastically at depth, our results suggest that we are missing major pieces of the puzzle by utilizing shallow sampling depths. Recognizing the persistence of soil organic matter as an ecosystem property, our research characterizes not only changes in the amount of soil carbon and nitrogen, but also changes in the surface chemistry of the soil organic matter (using infrared spectroscopy), as well as relevant physical properties including texture and mineralogy. Over the 20 years, significant gains of 18.3 Mg/ha SOC were achieved in organically managed systems, which received the highest inputs of water and carbon, while the lowest input systems, which are both unfertilized and rain-fed, significantly lost SOC, on the order of 7

  20. Barrett's Esophagus: Emerging Knowledge and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Atul; Stairs, Douglas B.; Mani, Haresh; McGarrity, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased exponentially in the last 3 decades. Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor of EAC. Patients with BE have a greater than 40 folds higher risk of EAC compared with the general population. Recent years have witnessed a revolution in the clinical and molecular research related to BE. However, several aspects of this condition remain controversial. Data regarding the true prevalence of BE have varied widely. Recent studies have suggested a lower incidence of EAC in nondysplastic BE (NDBE) than previously reported. There is paucity of prospective data showing a survival benefit of screening or surveillance for BE. Furthermore, the ever-increasing emphasis on healthcare cost containment has called for reexamination of the screening and surveillance strategies for BE. There is a need for identification of reliable clinical predictors or molecular biomarkers to risk-stratify patients who might benefit the most from screening or surveillance for BE. Finally, new therapies have emerged for the management of dysplastic BE. In this paper, we highlight the key areas of controversy and uncertainty surrounding BE. The paper discusses, in detail, the current literature about the molecular pathogenesis, biomarkers, histopathological diagnosis, and management strategies for BE. PMID:22701199

  1. Development of Strategies for Sustainable Irrigation Water Management in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyliger, Anatoly; Ermolaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    During 1960 - 1990 years irrigated areas in Russia have increased rapidly, helping to boost agricultural output. Although the impressive achievements of irrigation in this period its large experience indicates problems and failures of irrigation water management. In addition to large water use and low irrigation water efficiency, environmental concerns (excessive water depletion, water quality reduction, water logging, soil degradation) are usually considered like the most significant problem of the irrigation sector. Despite of considerable shrinking of irrigated areas in Russia and decreasing of water withdrawal for irrigation purposes during two last decades a degradation of environment as well as degradation of soil and water resources in irrigated areas was prolonged and will probably continue if current irrigation practices are maintained. Nowadays, in different regions of Russia there are societal demand to restore agricultural irrigation in Russia as answer to challenges from climate pattern changes and degradation of land & water resources. In the respect of these demands there is a need to develop strategies for sustainability of agricultural irrigation in Russia that should be based on three main societal objectives: costeffective use of water in irrigated agriculture at farm level, and satisfactory preserving the natural environment. Therefore sustainable irrigation water management is not only an objective at farm level but also an overall goal at the local and regional as well. A way to achieve sustainability in irrigation water management is to solve the local conflicts arising from the interactions between water use at irrigation areas and surrounding environment. Thus should be based on the development of irrigation framework program including on the irrigation water management issues, policies & decisions making at federal and regional levels should be based on the indicators of environment & irrigation water efficiency monitoring promoting the

  2. An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

    2012-07-01

    Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in

  3. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Kuwatsch, Sandra; Bohn, Marco; Josten, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instead of waiting for challenges to confront hospital management, doctors and managers should act in advance to optimize and sustain value-based health. This work highlights the importance of scenario planning in hospitals, proposes an elaborated definition of the stakeholders of a hospital and defines the influence factors to which hospitals are exposed to. Methodology: Based on literature analysis as well as on personal interviews with stakeholders we propose an elaborated definition of stakeholders and designed a questionnaire that integrated the following influence factors, which have relevant impact on hospital management: political/legal, economic, social, technological and environmental forces. These influence factors are examined to develop the so-called critical uncertainties. Thorough identification of uncertainties was based on a “Stakeholder Feedback”. Results: Two key uncertainties were identified and considered in this study: the development of workload for the medical staff the profit oriented performance of the medical staff. According to the developed scenarios, complementary education of the medical staff as well as of non-medical top executives and managers of hospitals was the recommended core strategy. Complementary scenario-specific strategic options should be considered whenever needed to optimize dealing with a specific future development of the health care environment. Conclusion: Strategic planning in hospitals is essential to ensure sustainable success. It considers multiple situations and integrates internal and external insights and perspectives in addition to identifying weak signals and “blind spots”. This flows into a sound planning for multiple strategic options. It is a state of the art tool that allows dealing with the increasing challenges facing hospital management. PMID:26504735

  4. Revaluating US Land Ownership and Management in Order to Effectively Combat Soil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drohan, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Land privatization has resulted throughout history in: a variety of governance types; wealth imbalances; fluctuating degrees of food production; industrialization; and the privatization of intellectual ideas/property. USA government strategies to combat soil degradation have in large been reactive and driven by land privatization and the entrepreneurial nature of the US economy, especially agriculture. This has led to boom and bust cycles of agriculture and soil resilience. Further straining the capability to combat soil degradation are weaknesses in land management legislation due to separation of federal and state law and unfunded mandates. Last, the sheer size of the United States may be its greatest weakness in effectively developing a coherent national soil degradation policy. The recent failure of the European Soil Directive emphasizes the continual struggle between land privatization, food production, and the generation of wealth. We suggest several new strategies to combat USA soil degradation based on existing and new land management schemes, which have the potential to more effectively buffer the unpredictable future of increasing population and climate change.

  5. Soil management and conservation: Irrigation: Methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Irrigation applies water to soil to improve crop production. The three main methods of irrigation are surface, sprinkler and micro. Surface irrigation is used on 85% of the irrigated land in the world. It generally requires lower capital investment because the soil conveys water within the field, ra...

  6. Site-specific cotton management: Soil measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    oil variability within fields has a large effect on crop growth and yield, often due to variations in soil texture and water holding capacity. This is particularly true in the alluvial soils of the Mississippi Delta, where profile sand contents can range from 20% to 90% within a field. Variable-rate...

  7. Integrating soil ecological knowledge into restoration management

    Treesearch

    M.A. Callaham

    2008-01-01

    The variability in the type of ecosystem degradation andthe specificity of restoration goals can challenge restorationists’ability to generalize about approaches that leadto restoration success. The discipline of soil ecology, whichemphasizes both soil organisms and ecosystem processes,

  8. Integrating soil ecological knowledge into restoration management

    Treesearch

    Liam Heneghan; Susan P. Miller; Sara Baer; Mac A. Callaham; James Montgomery; Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman; Charles C. Rhoades; Sarah Richardson

    2008-01-01

    The variability in the type of ecosystem degradation and the specificity of restoration goals can challenge restorationists' ability to generalize about approaches that lead to restoration success. The discipline of soil ecology, which emphasizes both soil organisms and ecosystem processes, has generated a body of knowledge that can be generally useful in...

  9. Proceedings of the California Forest Soils Council Conference on Forest Soils Biology and Forest Management

    Treesearch

    Robert F. Powers; Donald L. Hauxwell; Gary M. Nakamura

    2000-01-01

    Biotic properties of forest soil are the linkages connecting forest vegetation with an inert rooting medium to create a dynamic, functioning ecosystem. But despite the significance of these properties, managers have little awareness of the biotic world beneath their feet. Much of our working knowledge of soil biology seems anchored in myth and misunderstanding. To...

  10. Soil management and carbon calculation methods influence changes in soil carbon estimation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Throughout the years, many studies have evaluated changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) mass on a fixed-depth (FD) basis without considering changes in soil mass caused by changing in bulk density. In two study sites, we investigated the effect of different management practices on SOC changes calcul...

  11. Grassland management impacts on soil carbon stocks: a new synthesis.

    PubMed

    Conant, Richard T; Cerri, Carlos E P; Osborne, Brooke B; Paustian, Keith

    2017-03-01

    Grassland ecosystems cover a large portion of Earths' surface and contain substantial amounts of soil organic carbon. Previous work has established that these soil carbon stocks are sensitive to management and land use changes: grazing, species composition, and mineral nutrient availability can lead to losses or gains of soil carbon. Because of the large annual carbon fluxes into and out of grassland systems, there has been growing interest in how changes in management might shift the net balance of these flows, stemming losses from degrading grasslands or managing systems to increase soil carbon stocks (i.e., carbon sequestration). A synthesis published in 2001 assembled data from hundreds of studies to document soil carbon responses to changes in management. Here we present a new synthesis that has integrated data from the hundreds of studies published after our previous work. These new data largely confirm our earlier conclusions: improved grazing management, fertilization, sowing legumes and improved grass species, irrigation, and conversion from cultivation all tend to lead to increased soil C, at rates ranging from 0.105 to more than 1 Mg C·ha(-1) ·yr(-1) . The new data include assessment of three new management practices: fire, silvopastoralism, and reclamation, although these studies are limited in number. The main area in which the new data are contrary to our previous synthesis is in conversion from native vegetation to grassland, where we find that across the studies the average rate of soil carbon stock change is low and not significant. The data in this synthesis confirm that improving grassland management practices and conversion from cropland to grassland improve soil carbon stocks.

  12. Soil Organic Matter and Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, T. L.; Mitkowski, N. A.; Abawi, G. S.

    2002-01-01

    Organic matter and its replenishment has become a major component of soil health management programs. Many of the soil's physical, chemical, and biological properties are a function of organic matter content and quality. Adding organic matter to soil influences diverse and important biological activities. The diversity and number of free-living and plant-parasitic nematodes are altered by rotational crops, cover crops, green manures, and other sources of organic matter. Soil management programs should include the use of the proper organic materials to improve soil chemical, physical, and biological parameters and to suppress plant-parasitic nematodes and soilborne pathogens. It is critical to monitor the effects of organic matter additions on activities of major and minor plant-parasitic nematodes in the production system. This paper presents a general review of information in the literature on the effects of crop rotation, cover crops, and green manures on nematodes and their damage to economic crops. PMID:19265946

  13. Influence of management history and landscape variables on soil organic carbon and soil redistribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venteris, E.R.; McCarty, G.W.; Ritchie, J.C.; Gish, T.

    2004-01-01

    Controlled studies to investigate the interaction between crop growth, soil properties, hydrology, and management practices are common in agronomy. These sites (much as with real world farmland) often have complex management histories and topographic variability that must be considered. In 1993 an interdisiplinary study was started for a 20-ha site in Beltsville, MD. Soil cores (271) were collected in 1999 in a 30-m grid (with 5-m nesting) and analyzed as part of the site characterization. Soil organic carbon (SOC) and 137Cesium (137Cs) were measured. Analysis of aerial photography from 1992 and of farm management records revealed that part of the site had been maintained as a swine pasture and the other portion as cropped land. Soil properties, particularly soil redistribution and SOC, show large differences in mean values between the two areas. Mass C is 0.8 kg m -2 greater in the pasture area than in the cropped portion. The pasture area is primarily a deposition site, whereas the crop area is dominated by erosion. Management influence is suggested, but topographic variability confounds interpretation. Soil organic carbon is spatially structured, with a regionalized variable of 120 m. 137Cs activity lacks spatial structure, suggesting disturbance of the profile by animal activity and past structures such as swine shelters and roads. Neither SOC nor 137Cs were strongly correlated to terrain parameters, crop yields, or a seasonal soil moisture index predicted from crop yields. SOC and 137Cs were weakly correlated (r2 ???0.2, F-test P-value 0.001), suggesting that soil transport controls, in part, SOC distribution. The study illustrates the importance of past site history when interpreting the landscape distribution of soil properties, especially those strongly influenced by human activity. Confounding variables, complex soil hydrology, and incomplete documentation of land use history make definitive interpretations of the processes behind the spatial distributions

  14. Health plans' strategies for managing outpatient specialty pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Mullins, C Daniel; Lavallee, Danielle Chauncey; Pradel, Françoise G; DeVries, Andrea R; Caputo, Nadine

    2006-01-01

    Balancing increased spending for specialty pharmaceuticals while providing affordable and equitable coverage for consumers is a key issue for public and private payers. Health plans rely on an array of strategies, including both medical management and those used for more traditional pharmaceuticals. To explore specific management strategies for outpatient specialty pharmaceuticals, a survey was administered to thirty-eight Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans, focused on identifying core strategies. Prior authorization was the most commonly used strategy, implemented by 83.3 percent of respondents. Other frequently implemented management strategies included claims review (82.8 percent), formulary management (76.7 percent), and utilization review (70 percent).

  15. Relationship-Driven Classroom Management: Strategies That Promote Student Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitto, John M.

    This book combines information about resiliency, classroom management, and discipline into a user-friendly discussion suitable for all teachers. The material covers both preventive strategies and reactive strategies. The chapters of part 1, "Reinventive Strategies," are: (1) "Relationship-Driven Classroom Management and Resilience"; (2)…

  16. Relationship-Driven Classroom Management: Strategies That Promote Student Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitto, John M.

    This book combines information about resiliency, classroom management, and discipline into a user-friendly discussion suitable for all teachers. The material covers both preventive strategies and reactive strategies. The chapters of part 1, "Reinventive Strategies," are: (1) "Relationship-Driven Classroom Management and Resilience"; (2)…

  17. Effectiveness of alternative management strategies in meeting conservation objectives

    Treesearch

    Richards S. Holthausen; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    2007-01-01

    This chapter evaluates how well various management strategies meet a variety of conservation objectives, summarizes their effectiveness in meeting objectives for rare or little-known (RLK) species, and proposes ways to combine strategies to meet overall conservation objectives. We address two broad categories of management strategies. Species approaches result in...

  18. Soil management and green water in sloping rainfed vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Marqués Pérez, María; Ruíz-Colmenero, Marta; García-Díaz, Andrés; Bienes Allas, Ramón

    2017-04-01

    Improved crop production in areas with restricted water availability is of particular interest. Farmers need to maximize the water use efficiency when the possibilities of further extension of irrigation are limited and water is becoming scarce and expensive. Water in rainfed crops depends on rainfall depth and soil characteristics such as texture and structure, water holding capacity, previous moisture, infiltration, soil surface conditions, steepness and slope length. Land management practices can be used to maximise water availability. In previous studies the unwillingness of farmers to change their practices towards more sustainable use was mainly due to the worry about water competition. This work is aimed at understanding the influence of management practices in the water partitioning of this land use. This study was conducted in a sloping vineyard in the centre of Spain. A rain gauge recorded rainfall depth and intensity in the area. Three different soil management practices were considered: 1) traditional tillage, 2) permanent cover and 3) mowed cover of cereals, both sown in the strips between vines. Two moisture sensors were buried at 10 and 35 cm depths. Three replicates per management practice were performed. It is expected that the lack of tillage increase the potential for litter to protect the soil surface against raindrop impact and to contribute to increasing soil organic carbon, and the corresponding increase in infiltration and water holding capacity. The analysis of two years of daily records of rainfall, runoff and soil moisture are intended to establish any influence of management practices on the partitioning of water. Particularly, the so-called "green water" was estimated, i.e. the fraction of rainfall that infiltrates into the soil and will be further available to plants. Soil characteristics such as texture, structure, moisture, infiltration were established. In addition simulated rainfalls carried out in summer and winter over bounded

  19. Technical assistance development soil management policy in Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruyt, Eva; Helsen, Stefan; Hambach, Patrick; Cuyvers, Lars

    2014-05-01

    As from the first of July 2013, Croatia became a EU member country and therefore has to comply with all the EU-rules (the "acquis") as defined in the European Council in Copenhagen in 1993. One of the aspects of this acquis is the protection and conservation of the soil and groundwater and the remediation of contaminated sites that cause human and environmental risks. On behalf of the Department of Environment, Nature and Energy of the Flemish government together with the Public Waste Agency of Flanders(OVAM), ECOREM was assigned to carry out this study. The scope of this study therefore focuses on the aspect of soil management that can be divided into two main policies, beïng the policy for the prevention of soil contamination from new activities(1) and the policy for the management and remediation of historical soil contamination from local sources like industrial sites(2). To form a soil management policy, Croatia must start from the legal obligations enforced by the European Union. One of the European Directives regulating the monitoring and protection of soil and groundwater is the new Industrial Emission Directive ('IED' - 2010/78/EU) from the 24th of November 2010. Whereas the framework of the Directive is larger than contamination of soil , the focus of this study was limited to soil contamination only. In order to comply with the existing EU policy contributing to soil protection, the regulations in the IED, the Croatian government needs to adapt existing legislations or apply new regulations regarding soil monitoring for the industrial activities. Also other EU Directives enforce actions contributing to soil protection. Therefore, a questionnaire with different sorts of questions was sent to the different stakeholders (environmental institutes, agencies, ministries,…). The results were interpreted and allowed Ecorem, being the environmental consultant, to evaluate the gaps in the environmental and soil management policy. This study gives advice on how

  20. Global change pressures on soils from land use and management.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pete; House, Joanna I; Bustamante, Mercedes; Sobocká, Jaroslava; Harper, Richard; Pan, Genxing; West, Paul C; Clark, Joanna M; Adhya, Tapan; Rumpel, Cornelia; Paustian, Keith; Kuikman, Peter; Cotrufo, M Francesca; Elliott, Jane A; McDowell, Richard; Griffiths, Robert I; Asakawa, Susumu; Bondeau, Alberte; Jain, Atul K; Meersmans, Jeroen; Pugh, Thomas A M

    2016-03-01

    Soils are subject to varying degrees of direct or indirect human disturbance, constituting a major global change driver. Factoring out natural from direct and indirect human influence is not always straightforward, but some human activities have clear impacts. These include land-use change, land management and land degradation (erosion, compaction, sealing and salinization). The intensity of land use also exerts a great impact on soils, and soils are also subject to indirect impacts arising from human activity, such as acid deposition (sulphur and nitrogen) and heavy metal pollution. In this critical review, we report the state-of-the-art understanding of these global change pressures on soils, identify knowledge gaps and research challenges and highlight actions and policies to minimize adverse environmental impacts arising from these global change drivers. Soils are central to considerations of what constitutes sustainable intensification. Therefore, ensuring that vulnerable and high environmental value soils are considered when protecting important habitats and ecosystems, will help to reduce the pressure on land from global change drivers. To ensure that soils are protected as part of wider environmental efforts, a global soil resilience programme should be considered, to monitor, recover or sustain soil fertility and function, and to enhance the ecosystem services provided by soils. Soils cannot, and should not, be considered in isolation of the ecosystems that they underpin and vice versa. The role of soils in supporting ecosystems and natural capital needs greater recognition. The lasting legacy of the International Year of Soils in 2015 should be to put soils at the centre of policy supporting environmental protection and sustainable development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Extreme soil erosion rates in citrus slope plantations and control strategies. A literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Ángel González Peñaloza, Félix; Pereira, Paulo; Reyes Ruiz Gallardo, José; García Orenes, Fuensanta; Burguet, María

    2013-04-01

    Soil Erosion is a natural process that shapes the Earth. Due to the impact of agriculture, soil erosion rates increase, landforms show gullies and rills, and soils are depleted. In the Mediterranean, wheat, olive and vineyards were the main agriculture products, but new plantations are being found in sloping terrain due to the drip-irrigation. This new strategy results in the removal of the traditional terraces in order to make suitable for mechanization the agriculture plantation. Citrus is a clear example of the impact of the new chemical agriculture with a high investment in herbicides, pesticides, mechanisation, land levelling and drip computer controlled irrigation systems. The new plantation of citrus orchards is found in the Mediterranean, but also in California, Florida, China and Brazil. Chile, Argentina, and South Africa are other producers that are moving to an industrial production of citrus. This paper shows how the citrus plantations are found as one of the most aggressive plantation due to the increase in soil erosion, and how we can apply successful control strategies. The research into the high erosion rates of citrus orchard built on the slopes are mainly found in China (Wu et al., 1997; Xu et al., 2010; Wang et al., 2011; Wu et al., 2011; Liu et al., 2011; Lü et al., 2011; Xu et al., 2012) and in the Mediterranean (Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2008; 2009; Cerdà et al., 2009a; 2009b; Cerdà et al., 2011; 2012) Most of the research done devoted to the measurements of the soil losses but also some research is done related to the soil properties (Lu et al., 1997; Lü et al., 2012; Xu et al., 2012) and the impact of cover crops to reduce the soil losses (Lavigne et al., 2012; Le Bellec et al., 2012) and the use of residues such as dried citrus peel in order to reduce the soil losses. There are 116 million tonnes of citrus produced yearly, and this affects a large surface of the best land. The citrus orchards are moving from flood irrigated to drip

  2. Glucosinolates in collard greens grown under three soil management practices.

    PubMed

    Antonious, George F

    2015-01-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs, β-D-thioglucoside-N-hydroxysulfates) are polar compounds present in varying amounts in members of the Brassicaceae family. They suppress soil-borne pests due to the biofumigant properties of the highly toxic isothiocyanates present in Brassica vegetables. The objectives of this investigation were to: (1) assess variation in GSLs concentrations among collard plants grown under three soil management practices: sewage sludge (SS) mixed with native soil, chicken manure (CM) mixed with native soil, and no-mulch (NM) native soil, (2) quantify GSLs concentrations in collard roots, leaves, and stems at harvest for potential use of their crude extracts in plant protection, and (3) assess myrosinase activity in soil amended with CM and SS mixed with native soil. Separation of GSLs was accomplished by adsorption on a DEAE-Sephadex ion exchange resin using disposable pipette tips filled with DEAE, a weak base, with a net positive charge when ionized and exchange anions such as GSLs (hydrophilic plant secondary metabolites). Quantification of total GSLs was based on inactivation of collard endogenous myrosinase and liberation of the glucose moiety from the GSLs molecule by addition of standardized myrosinase and colorimetric determination of the liberated glucose moiety. Across all treatments, SS and CM increased soil organic matter content from 2.2% in native soil to 4.2 and 6.5%, respectively. GSLs concentrations were significantly greater in collard leaves (30.9 µmoles g(-1) fresh weight) compared to roots and stems (7.8 and 1.2 µmoles g(-1) fresh weight), respectively. Leaves of collard grown in soil amended with SS contained the greatest concentrations of GSLs compared to leaves of plants grown in CM and NM treatments. Accordingly, leaves of collard plants grown in soil amended with SS could play a significant role in sustainable agriculture as alternative tools for soil-borne disease management in conventional and organic agriculture.

  3. Biological and biochemical soil quality indicators for agricultural management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, Giulia

    2017-04-01

    Soil quality is defined as the capacity of a soil to perform multiple functions. Agricultural soils can, in principle, sustain a wide range of functions. However, negative pressure exerted by natural and anthropogenic soil threats such as soil erosion, soil organic matter losses and soil compaction have the potential to permanently damage soil quality. Soil chemical, physical and biological parameters can be used as indicators of soil quality. The specific objective of this study is to assess the suitability of novel soil parameters as soil quality indicators. We focus on biological/biochemical parameters, due to the unique role of soil biota in soil functions and to their high sensitivity to disturbances. The novel indicators are assessed in ten European long-term field experiments (LTEs) with different agricultural land use (arable and permanent crops), management regimes and pedo-climatic characteristics. The contrasts in agricultural management are represented by conventional/reduced tillage, organic/mineral fertilization and organic matter addition/no organic matter addition. We measured two different pools of labile organic carbon (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and permanganate oxidizable carbon (POXC)), and determined DOC quality through its fractionation in hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds. In addition, total nematode abundance has been assessed with qPCR. These parameters will be related to soil functions which have been measured with a minimum data set of indicators for soil quality (including TOC, macronutrients, and soil respiration). As a preliminary analysis, the Sensitivity Index (SI) for a given LTE was calculated for DOC and POXC according to Bolinder et al., 1999 as the ratio of the soil attribute under modified practices (e.g. reduced tillage) compared to the conventional practices (e.g. conventional tillage). The overall effect of the sustainable management on the indicators has been derived by calculating an average SI for those LTEs

  4. National launch strategy vehicle data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, David

    1990-01-01

    The national launch strategy vehicle data management system (NLS/VDMS) was developed as part of the 1990 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. The system was developed under the guidance of the Engineering Systems Branch of the Information Systems Office, and is intended for use within the Program Development Branch PD34. The NLS/VDMS is an on-line database system that permits the tracking of various launch vehicle configurations within the program development office. The system is designed to permit the definition of new launch vehicles, as well as the ability to display and edit existing launch vehicles. Vehicles can be grouped in logical architectures within the system. Reports generated from this package include vehicle data sheets, architecture data sheets, and vehicle flight rate reports. The topics covered include: (1) system overview; (2) initial system development; (3) supercard hypermedia authoring system; (4) the ORACLE database; and (5) system evaluation.

  5. Preparing Future Leaders: Project Management Strategies for Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Roger; Gutowski, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    This article makes a case for teaching project management strategies in service-learning courses. The authors describe three specific documents students can create to help them manage a service-learning project and then present strategies that can help students manage their project teams. Such skills, the authors argue, provide the tools students…

  6. Preparing Future Leaders: Project Management Strategies for Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Roger; Gutowski, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    This article makes a case for teaching project management strategies in service-learning courses. The authors describe three specific documents students can create to help them manage a service-learning project and then present strategies that can help students manage their project teams. Such skills, the authors argue, provide the tools students…

  7. Preservice Teachers' Knowledge and Perceptions of Effective Behavior Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nields, Allison N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student teachers' perceptions and knowledge of behavior management strategies. A questionnaire that included questions about broad behavior management techniques, behavioral learning theory, and behavior management strategies related to behavioral learning theory was given to sixty-one student teacher candidates at a large…

  8. Preservice Teachers' Knowledge and Perceptions of Effective Behavior Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nields, Allison N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student teachers' perceptions and knowledge of behavior management strategies. A questionnaire that included questions about broad behavior management techniques, behavioral learning theory, and behavior management strategies related to behavioral learning theory was given to sixty-one student teacher candidates at a large…

  9. Healthcare management strategies: interdisciplinary team factors.

    PubMed

    Andreatta, Pamela; Marzano, David

    2012-12-01

    Interdisciplinary team factors are significant contributors to clinical performance and associated patient outcomes. Quality of care and patient safety initiatives identify human factors associated with team performance as a prime improvement area for clinical patient care. The majority of references to interdisciplinary teams in obstetrics and gynecology in the literature recommends the use of multidisciplinary approaches when managing complex medical cases. The reviewed literature suggests that interdisciplinary team development is important for achieving optimally efficient and effective performance; however, few reports provide specific recommendations for how to optimally achieve these objectives in the process of providing interdisciplinary care to patients. The absence of these recommendations presents a significant challenge for those tasked with improving team performance in the workplace. The prescribed team development programs cited in the review are principally built around communication strategies and simulation-based training mechanisms. Few reports provide descriptions of optimal team-based competencies in the various contexts of obstetric and gynecology teams. However, team-based evaluation strategies and empirical data documenting the transfer of team training to applied clinical care are increasing in number and quality. Our findings suggest that research toward determining team factors that promote optimal performance in applied clinical practice requires definition of specific competencies for the variable teams serving obstetrics and gynecology.

  10. Economic and Societal Benefits of Soil Carbon Management (Chapter 1).

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many papers and books on soil carbon management have addressed specific ecosystems such as agricultural lands, rangelands, forestlands, etc. This paper introduces a book within which each chapter begins by addressing a particular concern and potential options to manage it, along with their real and...

  11. Strategies for Management of Colorectal Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Abrão, Mauricio Simões; Borrelli, Giuliano Moysés; Clarizia, Roberto; Kho, Rosanne Marie; Ceccaroni, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis has clearly three distinct clinical presentations and deep endometriosis, especially compromising the rectosigmoid is probably the most concerning one for both patients and surgeons. Currently, with the available tools, it is mandatory to have a precise diagnostic of this type of disease prior to indication of treatment. Strategies to manage this form of endometriosis will take into account several involved aspects, such as age of the patient, reproductive desire or infertility, clinical symptoms, as well as the extension and localization of the disease. Treatment could vary from more conservative to more radical depending on those aspects. As we pointed out in this article, the key to manage colorectal endometriosis is to start with a good diagnosis. Knowing exactly what is the extension and localization of the disease and knowing the patient's wishes as well as the clinical complaints, surgeons are able to define the best option for each patient. Critical points should always be discussed; for example, patients chosen to have clinical treatment should be aware of important issues regarding the follow-up, while patients undergoing surgery must be advised about all surgical possibilities and related complications.

  12. How agricultural management shapes soil microbial communities: patterns emerging from genetic and genomic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Amanda; Grandy, A. Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Agriculture is a predominant land use and thus a large influence on global carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) balances, climate, and human health. If we are to produce food, fiber, and fuel sustainably we must maximize agricultural yield while minimizing negative environmental consequences, goals towards which we have made great strides through agronomic advances. However, most agronomic strategies have been designed with a view of soil as a black box, largely ignoring the way management is mediated by soil biota. Because soil microbes play a central role in many of the processes that deliver nutrients to crops and support their health and productivity, agricultural management strategies targeted to exploit or support microbial activity should deliver additional benefits. To do this we must determine how microbial community structure and function are shaped by agricultural practices, but until recently our characterizations of soil microbial communities in agricultural soils have been largely limited to broad taxonomic classes due to methodological constraints. With advances in high-throughput genetic and genomic sequencing techniques, better taxonomic resolution now enables us to determine how agricultural management affects specific microbes and, in turn, nutrient cycling outcomes. Here we unite findings from published research that includes genetic or genomic data about microbial community structure (e.g. 454, Illumina, clone libraries, qPCR) in soils under agricultural management regimes that differ in type and extent of tillage, cropping selections and rotations, inclusion of cover crops, organic amendments, and/or synthetic fertilizer application. We delineate patterns linking agricultural management to microbial diversity, biomass, C- and N-content, and abundance of microbial taxa; furthermore, where available, we compare patterns in microbial communities to patterns in soil extracellular enzyme activities, catabolic profiles, inorganic nitrogen pools, and nitrogen

  13. Soil Management Units delimitation based on soil survey and multivariate techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Franco, Mauricio; Costa, Jose Luis; Aparicio, Viriginia; Domenech, Marisa; Cicore, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a methodology for delimitating soil management unit (DSMU) at farm scale using soil survey (SCALE 1:50.000), ancillary soil information, MULTISPAT-PCA and Euclidean distance analysis. DSMU was applied in 6 fields of 3 agricultural zones from Argentina. This study was carried out in three steps: (i) Zone delimitation by soil type using multivariate spatial classification of ancillary information (MULTISPATI-PCA) and fuzzy K-means (FKM); (ii) validation of zone delimited by soil type and (iii) determination of spatial relation among soil properties analyzed and those detailed in soil survey. Principal components (CPs) obtained from MULTISPATI-PCA showed higher spatial autocorrelation than those obtained from conventional analysis. In addition, MULTISPATI-PCA allowed identifying variables which had maximum spatial autocorrelation and that most contribute to global spatial variation. The number of zones by field was determined using summary index from FKM. The lowest summary index was selected by field. We delimited 3 zones by soil type in fields' zones 1 and 2, whereas in the other cases we delimited 2 zones. DSMU was capable to differentiate efficiently zones by soil type. Clay content, ECextr, CIC and pH were properties more related to zone delimitation. Our results suggest that in zone 1 exist a spatial relation between zones delimited by soil type and Balcarce-Mar del Plata soil series. In zone 2 showed spatial correspondence among zones delimited and Canals and El Albion soil series. In zone 3, we could not find relation among zones delimited by field and soil survey information. In conclusion, DMSU proved to be an accurate methodology in 2 of 3 agricultural zones in Argentina. The soil degradative effect on fields of zone 3, may affect the application of DSMU.

  14. Innovative Soil Management Practices (SMP) Assessment in Europe and China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barão, Lúcia

    2017-04-01

    The growing world population poses a major challenge to global agricultural food and feed production through the pressure to increase agricultural outputs either by increasing the land area dedicated to agriculture or by productivity increases. Whether in developed or developing regions, agricultural intensification based on conventional approaches has resulted in severe environmental impacts and innovative soil management practices are needed to halter ongoing soil degradation and promote sustainable land management capable to produce more from less. The iSQAPER project - Interactive Soil Quality Assessment in Europe and China for Agricultural Productivity and Environmental Resilience - aims to develop a Soil Quality app (SQAPP) linking soil and agricultural management practices to soil quality indicators. This easy friendly tool will provide a direct and convenient way to advise farmers and other suitable actors in this area, regarding the best management practices to be adopted in very specific and local conditions. In this particular study from iSQAPER, we aimed to identify the most promising innovative soil management practices (SMP) currently used and its geographical distribution along different pedo-climatic regions in Europe (Boreal, Atlantic, Mediterranean Temperate, Mediterranean Semi-Arid, Southern Sub-Continental and Northern Sub-Continental) and China (Middle Temperate, Warm temperate and Central Asia Tropical). So far we have identified 155 farms where innovative SMP's are used, distributed along 4 study site regions located in China (Qiyang, Suining, Zhifanggou and Gongzhuling) and 10 study site regions located in Europe (The Netherlands, France, Portugal, Spain, Greece, Slovenia, Hungary, Romania, Poland and Estonia) and covering the major pedo-climatic regions. From this identification we concluded that the most used innovative SMP's in the study site regions in Europe are Manuring & Composting (14%), Min-till (14%), Crop rotation (12

  15. Management matters: Testing a mitigation strategy of nitrous oxide emissions on managed grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Kathrin; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Eugster, Werner; Koller, Patrick; Käslin, Florian; Merbold, Lutz

    2017-04-01

    The magnitude of greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange between managed grasslands and the atmosphere depends besides climate predominantly on management practices. While natural or extensively managed grasslands are known to function as GHG sinks, intensively managed grasslands are characterized by substantial nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions diminishing their sink function. One potential N2O mitigation strategy is to reduce the required amount of nitrogen (N) fertilizer input by using biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) via legumes. However, the effect of legumes on nitrous oxide emissions is still not fully understood. In this study we quantify net GHG fluxes from two differently managed grassland parcels (mitigation, control) and relate our results to productivity (yields). In addition, we aim at revealing the influence of various driver variables on N2O exchange. Our experimental setup consisted of an eddy covariance tower that measured the net exchange of the three major anthropogenic GHGs, nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Both grassland parcels can be covered with this tower due to two prevailing wind directions. GHG flux measurements were accompanied by measurements of commonly known driver variables such as water filled pore space, soil temperature, soil oxygen concentrations and mineral N to disentangle the soil meteorological influence of N2O fluxes from human drivers. Following organic fertilizer application, we measured elevated N2O emissions (>1 nmol m-2 s-1) at the control parcel and unchanged N2O emissions at the treatment parcel. Net annual fluxes were 54% and 50% lower at the experimental parcel in 2015 and 2016, respectively. Annual yields did not significantly differ between parcels, but were slightly lower at the experimental parcel compared to the control parcel. Significantly lower nitrous oxide fluxes under experimental management indicate that nitrous oxide emissions can be effectively reduced at very low costs with a clover

  16. Improving Recall Using Database Management Systems: A Learning Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of microcomputer database management systems to facilitate the instructional uses of learning strategies relating to information processing skills, especially recall. Two learning strategies, cross-classification matrixing and node acquisition and integration, are highlighted. (Author/LRW)

  17. Education on sustainable soil management for the masses? The Soil4Life MOOC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroulis, Jerry; Demie, Moore; Riksen, Michel; Ritsema, Coen

    2017-04-01

    Although soil is one of our most important natural resources and the foundation for all life on Earth it remains one of the most neglected of our resources. We, in soil science know this, but what do we do to reach more people more quickly? MOOCs, 'Massive Open Online Courses', are a vehicle for offering learning to virtually unlimited audiences at little cost to the student. Could MOOCs be the format for introducing more people worldwide to the importance of soil and sustainable soil management? MOOCs have their limitations and critics. However, depending on your goals, expectations and resources, they are a means for getting information to a much broader population than is possible through conventional educational formats. Wageningen University (WU) agreed and approved the development of a MOOC on sustainable soil management entitled Soil4Life. This presentation reviews the format and results of Soil4Life, concluding with some observations and reflections about this approach to soil science education. The Soil4Life MOOC introduces the role of soil in life on earth, soil degradation, and socio-economic issues related to generating action for long-term sustainability of the many soil-related ecosystem services. The objectives of Soil4Life are to raise awareness about the many important aspects of soil and sustainable soil management, and to allow the educational materials we produced to be available for use by others. The process of creating the Soil4Life MOOC involved 18 academic staff across all WU soil-related groups plus a vital team of education and technical staff. This number of people posed various challenges. However, with clear guidelines, lots of encouragement and technical support, Soil4Life was started in late 2015 and launched on the edx platform in May 2016. Just over 5000 students from 161 countries enrolled in the first offer of the Soil4Life MOOC - a modest number for MOOCs, but not bad for soil science. The targeted audience was initially high

  18. A holistic strategy for adaptive land management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adaptive management is widely applied to natural resources management. Adaptive management can be generally defined as an iterative decision-making process that incorporates formulation of management objectives, actions designed to address these objectives, monitoring of results, and repeated adapta...

  19. Affects of different tillage managements on soil physical quality in a clayey soil.

    PubMed

    Sağlam, Mustafa; Selvi, Kemal Çağatay; Dengiz, Orhan; Gürsoy, Fatma Esra

    2015-01-01

    This study, conducted in 2011, researches the effects of different tillage practices on the physical soil quality of clayey soil. This soil quality index (SQI) assessment was made by studying the changes in physical soil functions such as suitability for root development, facilitation for water entry, movement and storage, and resistance against surface degradation based on tillage management. When compared with the control parcel, statistically significant decreases were seen in the SQI with different tillage practices (p < 0.05). Among the tillage practices, the highest SQI was seen with the plow + rotary tiller + direct seeding machine, while the lowest SQI was seen with the direct drilling practice. On the other hand, the statistically insignificant effects of tillage practices on the soil quality of the study area were considered to be a result of either the study period or the joint effect of soil texture and climatic features. Thus, long-term tillage practices were recommended in order to get healthier information about soil quality by considering soil and climatic conditions. In addition, for heavy clayey soils, reduced tillage practices, which included plowing, were thought to develop physical soil qualities of root development and water movement.

  20. Management practices to improve soil quality and productivity of eroded soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The topsoil in the central Great Plains Region (CGPR) has lost its quality and productivity through wind and water erosion induced by tillage and poor soil management. Organic amendment such as manure is one of the management practices that can restore the quality and the productivity of degraded/er...

  1. Nematode Communities in Organically and Conventionally Managed Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Neher, Deborah A.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of nematode community indices requires a reference to a relatively undisturbed community. Maturity and trophic diversity index values were compared for five pairs of certified organically and conventionally managed soils in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Available nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium) was estimated at various lag periods relative to times of sampling for nematode communities to determine the strength of correlative relationship between nematode communities and nitrogen availability. Soils were sampled six times yearly in 1993 and 1994 to determine the best time of year to sample. Maturity values for plant parasites were greater in organically than conventionally managed soils, and differences between management systems were greater in fall than spring months. However, other maturity and diversity indices did not differ between the two management practices. Differences in crop species grown in the two systems accounted for most differences observed in the community of plant-parasitic nematodes. Indices of free-living nematodes were correlated negatively with concentrations of ammonium, whereas indices of plant-parasitic nematodes were correlated positively with concentrations of nitrate. Due to the similarity of index values between the two systems, organically managed soils are not suitable reference sites for monitoring and assessing the biological aspects of soil quality for annually harvested crops. PMID:19270884

  2. SUSTAINABLE MSW MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under increasing pressure to minimize potential environmental burdens and costs for municipal solid waste (MSW) management, state and local governments often must modify programs and adopt more efficient integrated MSW management strategies that reflect dynamic shifts in MSW mana...

  3. Modelling the effect of agricultural management practices on soil organic carbon stocks: does soil erosion matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeu, Elisabet; Van Wesemael, Bas; Van Oost, Kristof

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decades, an increasing number of studies have been conducted to assess the effect of soil management practices on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks. At regional scales, biogeochemical models such as CENTURY or Roth-C have been commonly applied. These models simulate SOC dynamics at the profile level (point basis) over long temporal scales but do not consider the continuous lateral transfer of sediment that takes place along geomorphic toposequences. As a consequence, the impact of soil redistribution on carbon fluxes is very seldom taken into account when evaluating changes in SOC stocks due to agricultural management practices on the short and long-term. To address this gap, we assessed the role of soil erosion by water and tillage on SOC stocks under different agricultural management practices in the Walloon region of Belgium. The SPEROS-C model was run for a 100-year period combining three typical crop rotations (using winter wheat, winter barley, sugar beet and maize) with three tillage scenarios (conventional tillage, reduced tillage and reduced tillage in combination with additional crop residues). The results showed that including soil erosion by water in the simulations led to a general decrease in SOC stocks relative to a baseline scenario (where no erosion took place). The SOC lost from these arable soils was mainly exported to adjacent sites and to the river system by lateral fluxes, with magnitudes differing between crop rotations and in all cases lower under conservation tillage practices than under conventional tillage. Although tillage erosion plays an important role in carbon redistribution within fields, lateral fluxes induced by water erosion led to a higher spatial and in-depth heterogeneity of SOC stocks with potential effects on the soil water holding capacity and crop yields. This indicates that studies assessing the effect of agricultural management practices on SOC stocks and other soil properties over the landscape should

  4. Alterations of hydraulic soil properties influenced by land-use changes and agricultural management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weninger, Thomas; Kreiselmeier, Janis; Chandrasekhar, Parvathy; Jülich, Stefan; Schwärzel, Kai; Schwen, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Estimation and modeling of soil water movement and the hydrologic balance of soils requires sound knowledge about hydraulic soil properties (HSP). The soil water characteristics, the hydraulic conductivity function and the pore size distribution (PSD) are commonly used instruments for the mathematical representation of HSP. Recent research highlighted the temporal variability of these functions caused by meteorological or land-use influences. State of the art modeling software for the continuous simulation of soil water movement uses a stationary approach for the HSP which means that their time dependent alterations and the subsequent effects on soil water balance is not considered. Mathematical approaches to describe the evolution of PSD are nevertheless known, but there is a lack of sound data basis for parameter estimation. Based on extensive field and laboratory measurements at 5 locations along a climatic gradient across Austria and Germany, this study will quantify short-term changes in HSP, detect driving forces and introduce a method to predict the effects of soil and land management actions on the soil water balance. Amongst several soil properties, field-saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities will be determined using a hood infiltration experiments in the field as well as by evaporation and dewpoint potentiometer method in the lab. All measurements will be carried out multiple times over a span of 2 years which will allow a detailed monitoring of changes in HSP. Experimental sites where we expect significant inter-seasonal changes will be equipped with sensors for soil moisture and matric potential. The choice of experimental field sites follows the intention to involve especially the effects of tillage operations, different cultivation strategies, microclimatically effective structures and land-use changes. The international project enables the coverage of a broad range of soil types as well as climate conditions and hence will have broad

  5. Soil water and transpirable soil water fraction variability within vineyards of the Penedès DO (NE Spain) affected by management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concepción Ramos, Maria

    2015-04-01

    This work investigated the variability in soil water recorded within the vineyard plots related to soil properties and management practices and its influence on the transpirable sol water fraction. The study was carried out in vineyards in the Penedès Designation of Origin, planted with Chardonnay, with different disturbance degree and with compost treated and untreated areas within the plots. The response in years with different rainfall distributions, included years with extreme situations were evaluated. The main soil types are Typic Xerorthent and Calcixerollic Xerorthent and soil is bare most of the time. Soil water content was measured at different depths using TDR probes. The transpirable soil water fraction was estimated as the ratio between available soil water (ASW) at a given date and the total transpirable soil water (TTSW). TTSW was estimated as the soil water reserve held between an upper and lower limit (respectively, the soil water content near field capacity and soil water content at the end of a dry summer) and integrated over the estimated effective rooting depth. Both minimum and maximum soil water values varied within the plot at all depths. On the surface the minimum values ranged between 4.45 to about 10%, while on deeper layers it ranged between 7.8 and 17.8%. Regarding the maximum value varied between 17.45 and 24.8%. The transpirable soil water fraction for a given year varied significantly within the plot, with differences greater than 20% between the treated and untreated areas. The results were more exacerbated in the driest years an in those with more irregular distribution. Water available has a significant effect on yield. The results indicate the need of using different strategies for water management within the plots.

  6. Evaluating anaerobic soil disinfestation and other biological soil management methods for open-field tomato production in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD), amending the soil with composted poultry litter (CPL) and molasses (M), has been shown to be a potential alternative to chemical soil fumigation for tomato production, however, optimization of ASD and the use of other biologically-based soil management practices ...

  7. Vegetation management with fire modifies peatland soil thermal regime.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lee E; Palmer, Sheila M; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Holden, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Vegetation removal with fire can alter the thermal regime of the land surface, leading to significant changes in biogeochemistry (e.g. carbon cycling) and soil hydrology. In the UK, large expanses of carbon-rich upland environments are managed to encourage increased abundance of red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica) by rotational burning of shrub vegetation. To date, though, there has not been any consideration of whether prescribed vegetation burning on peatlands modifies the thermal regime of the soil mass in the years after fire. In this study thermal regime was monitored across 12 burned peatland soil plots over an 18-month period, with the aim of (i) quantifying thermal dynamics between burned plots of different ages (from <2 to 15 + years post burning), and (ii) developing statistical models to determine the magnitude of thermal change caused by vegetation management. Compared to plots burned 15 + years previously, plots recently burned (<2-4 years) showed higher mean, maximum and range of soil temperatures, and lower minima. Statistical models (generalised least square regression) were developed to predict daily mean and maximum soil temperature in plots burned 15 + years prior to the study. These models were then applied to predict temperatures of plots burned 2, 4 and 7 years previously, with significant deviations from predicted temperatures illustrating the magnitude of burn management effects. Temperatures measured in soil plots burned <2 years previously showed significant statistical disturbances from model predictions, reaching +6.2 °C for daily mean temperatures and +19.6 °C for daily maxima. Soil temperatures in plots burnt 7 years previously were most similar to plots burned 15 + years ago indicating the potential for soil temperatures to recover as vegetation regrows. Our findings that prescribed peatland vegetation burning alters soil thermal regime should provide an impetus for further research to understand the consequences of thermal regime

  8. Forest Management Effects on Surface Soil Carbon and Nitrogen

    Treesearch

    Jennifer D. Knoepp; Wayne T. Swank

    1997-01-01

    Changes in surface soil C and N can result from forest management practices and may provide an index of impacts on long-term site productivity. Soil C and N were measured over time for five water- sheds in the southern Appalachians: two aggrading hardwood forests, one south- and one north-facing, undisturbed since the 1920s;a white pine (PinussfrobusL.) plantation...

  9. Managing compost stability and amendment to soil to enhance soil heating during soil solarization.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Christopher W; Guo, Hongyun; Claypool, Joshua T; Marshall, Megan N; Perano, Kristen M; Stapleton, James J; Vandergheynst, Jean S

    2013-05-01

    Soil solarization is a method of soil heating used to eradicate plant pathogens and weeds that involves passive solar heating of moist soil mulched (covered) with clear plastic tarp. Various types of organic matter may be incorporated into soil prior to solarization to increase biocidal activity of the treatment process. Microbial activity associated with the decomposition of soil organic matter may increase temperatures during solarization, potentially enhancing solarization efficacy. However, the level of organic matter decomposition (stability) necessary for increasing soil temperature is not well characterized, nor is it known if various amendments render the soil phytotoxic to crops following solarization. Laboratory studies and a field trial were performed to determine heat generation in soil amended with compost during solarization. Respiration was measured in amended soil samples prior to and following solarization as a function of soil depth. Additionally, phytotoxicity was estimated through measurement of germination and early growth of lettuce seedlings in greenhouse assays. Amendment of soil with 10%(g/g) compost containing 16.9 mg CO2/gdry weight organic carbon resulted in soil temperatures that were 2-4 °C higher than soil alone. Approximately 85% of total organic carbon within the amended soil was exhausted during 22 days of solarization. There was no significant difference in residual respiration with soil depth down to 17.4 cm. Although freshly amended soil proved highly inhibitory to lettuce seed germination and seedling growth, phytotoxicity was not detected in solarized amended soil after 22 days of field solarization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluating the demand for carbon sequestration in olive grove soils as a strategy toward mitigating climate change.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Entrena, Macario; Barreiro-Hurlé, Jesús; Gómez-Limón, José A; Espinosa-Goded, María; Castro-Rodríguez, Juan

    2012-12-15

    In this paper we present an estimate of the economic value of carbon sequestration in olive grove soils derived from the implementation of different agricultural management systems. Carbon sequestration is considered jointly with other environmental co-benefits, such as enhanced erosion prevention and increased biodiversity. The estimates have been obtained using choice experiments and show that there is a significant demand from society for these environmental services. From a policy perspective, an agri-environmental scheme that delivers the highest level of each environmental service would be valued by society at 121 Euros per hectare. If we focus on carbon sequestration, each ton of CO(2) would be valued at 17 Euros. These results show that there is scope to include agricultural soil carbon sequestration in climate change mitigation strategies and to provide guidance for setting payments for agri-environmental schemes promoting soil management changes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Implementing bedside handover: strategies for change management.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Anne; Chaboyer, Wendy; Wallis, Marianne; Fetherston, Cathy

    2010-09-01

    To identify factors influencing change in two hospitals that moved from taped and verbal nursing handover to bedside handover. Bedside handover is based on patient-centred care, where patients participate in communicating relevant and timely information for care planning. Patient input reduces care fragmentation, miscommunication-related adverse events, readmissions, duplication of services and enhances satisfaction and continuity of care. Analysing change management was a component of a study aimed at developing a standard operating protocol for bedside handover communication. The research was undertaken in two regional acute care hospitals in two different states of Australia. Data collection included 532 semi-structured observations in six wards in the two hospitals and 34 in-depth interviews conducted with a purposive sample of nursing staff involved in the handovers. Observation and interview data were analysed separately then combined to generate thematic analysis of factors influencing the change process in the transition to bedside handover. Themes included embedding the change as part of the big picture, the need to link the project to standardisation initiatives, providing reassurance on safety and quality, smoothing out logistical difficulties and learning to listen. We conclude that change is more likely to be successful when it is part of a broader initiative such as a quality improvement strategy. Nurses are generally supportive of quality improvement initiatives, particularly those aimed at standardising care. For successful implementation, change managers should be mindful of clinicians' attitudes, motivation and concerns and their need for reassurance when changing their practice. This is particularly important when change is dramatic, as in moving from verbal handover, conducted in the safety of the nursing office, to bedside handover where there is greater transparency and accountability for the accuracy and appropriateness of communication

  12. Evolutionary space station fluids management strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Results are summarized for an 11-month study to define fluid storage and handling strategies and requirements for various specific mission case studies and their associated design impacts on the Space Station. There are a variety of fluid users which require a variety of fluids and use rates. Also, the cryogenic propellants required for NASA's STV, Planetary, and Code Z missions are enormous. The storage methods must accommodate fluids ranging from a high pressure gas or supercritical state fluid to a sub-cooled liquid (and superfluid helium). These requirements begin in the year 1994, reach a maximum of nearly 1800 metric tons in the year 2004, and trail off to the year 2018, as currently planned. It is conceivable that the cryogenic propellant needs for the STV and/or Lunar mission models will be met by LTCSF LH2/LO2 tanksets attached to the SS truss structure. Concepts and corresponding transfer and delivery operations have been presented for STV propellant provisioning from the SS. A growth orbit maneuvering vehicle (OMV) and associated servicing capability will be required to move tanksets from delivery launch vehicles to the SS or co-orbiting platforms. Also, appropriate changes to the software used for OMV operation are necessary to allow for the combined operation of the growth OMV. To support fluid management activities at the Space Station for the experimental payloads and propellant provisioning, there must be truss structure space allocated for fluid carriers and propellant tanksets, and substantial beam strengthening may be required. The Station must have two Mobile Remote Manipulator Systems (MRMS) and the growth OMV propellant handling operations for the STV at the SS. Propellant needs for the Planetary Initiatives and Code Z mission models will most likely be provided by co-orbiting propellant platform(s). Space Station impacts for Code Z mission fluid management activities will be minimal.

  13. Soil fertility management on natural pastures in Eastern Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi; Jolokhava, Tamar; Kenchiashvili, Naira; Tarkhnishvili, Maia

    2015-04-01

    The development of livestock production in Georgia is mainly based on productivity of natural common pasturelands as it is the cheapest way to keep animals. Therefore it is crucial to manage those pastures in order to supply domestic animals with adequate amount of green grass during whole grazing season. The problems associated with poor grassland management is especially evident under limited rainfall conditions. Usually farmers do not consider suitability of existing stocking rates with pasture productivity leading to overutilization of pastureland causing reduction of palatable plant species and total grass cover stimulating soil erosion processes, which deflates soil nutrients and soil organic matter. Intensification of negative processes may result in loss of soil fertility and poor grass regrowth capacities. Current study aims to evaluate existing grazing system on a selected plots from common pasturelands in Eastern Georgia and to develop a proper soil fertility management plan accepted in organic agriculture taking into account local soil-climatic conditions, pasture vegetation stand and its richness with palatable plant species.

  14. Wildfire mitigation strategies affect soil enzyme activity and soil organic carbon in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests

    Treesearch

    R.E.J. Boerner; T.A. Waldrop; V.B. Shelburne

    2006-01-01

    We quantified the effects of three wildfire hazard reduction treatments (prescribed fire, thinning from below, and the combination of fire and thinning), and passive management (control) on mineral soil organic C, and enzyme activity in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forests on the Piedmont of South Carolina. Soil organic C was reduced by thinning,...

  15. Long-term Effects of Grazing Management and Buffer Strips on Soil Erosion from Pastures.

    PubMed

    Pilon, C; Moore, P A; Pote, D H; Pennington, J H; Martin, J W; Brauer, D K; Raper, R L; Dabney, S M; Lee, J

    2017-03-01

    High grazing pressure can lead to soil erosion in pastures, causing increased sediment delivery to waterways. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the impact of grazing management and buffer strips on soil erosion by assessing soil physical properties, hydrology, and sediment loads from pastures fertilized with broiler litter. Field studies were conducted for 12 yr on 15 small watersheds. Five management strategies were evaluated: hayed (H), continuously grazed (CG), rotationally grazed (R), rotationally grazed with a buffer strip (RB), and rotationally grazed with a fenced riparian buffer (RBR). Broiler litter was applied every year at a rate of 5.6 Mg ha. Bulk density and penetration resistance were highest for CG watersheds. Runoff volumes, sediment concentrations, and loads were lowest for the H and RBR treatments and highest for CG. Average runoff amounts were 48, 84, 77, 60, and 81 mm yr for the H, R, RB, RBR, and CG treatments, respectively. Annual average sediment loads were 25, 30, 58, 71, and 110 kg ha for H, RBR, R, RB, and CG, respectively. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, Version 2 was reasonably effective at predicting soil loss for the R, RB, and RBR treatments, but it greatly overpredicted soil loss from the CG and H treatments. Converting a pasture to a hay field or using rotational grazing in conjunction with a fenced riparian buffer appear to be effective options for reducing soil erosion and runoff to waterways from pasture soils. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. Soil nutrient concentration and distribution at riverbanks undergoing different land management practices: Implications for riverbank management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X. H.; Chang, S.; Yuan, L. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Riverbanks are important boundaries for the nutrient cycling between lands and freshwaters. This research aimed to explore effects of different land management methods on the soil nutrient concentration and distribution at riverbanks. Soils from the reed-covered riverbanks of middle Yangtze River were studied, including the soils respectively undergoing systematic agriculture (gathering young tender shoots, reaping reed straws, and burning residual straws), fires and no disturbances. Results showed that the agricultural activities sharply decreased the contents of soil organic matter (SOM), N, P and K in subsurface soils but less decreased the surface SOM, N and K contents, whereas phosphorus were evidently decreased at both surface and subsurface layers. In contrast, the single application of fires caused a marked increase of SOM, N, P and K contents in both surface and subsurface soils but had little impacts on soil nutrient distributions. Soils under all the three conditions showed a relative increase of soil nutrients at riverbank foot. This comparative study indicated that the different or even contrary effects of riverbank management practices on soil nutrient statuses should be carefully taken into account when assessing the ecological effects of management practices.

  17. Surfactant seed coating - a strategy to improve turfgrass establishment on water repellent soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Turfgrass managers can experience poor seeding success when trying to establish golf course greens and sports fields on water repellent soils. Nonionic soil surfactant formulations based on ethylene oxide-propylene oxide (EO/PO) block copolymers are commonly used to treat water repellent soils. Rece...

  18. Distinct Soil Bacterial Communities Revealed under a Diversely Managed Agroecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Shange, Raymon S.; Ankumah, Ramble O.; Ibekwe, Abasiofiok M.; Zabawa, Robert; Dowd, Scot E.

    2012-01-01

    Land-use change and management practices are normally enacted to manipulate environments to improve conditions that relate to production, remediation, and accommodation. However, their effect on the soil microbial community and their subsequent influence on soil function is still difficult to quantify. Recent applications of molecular techniques to soil biology, especially the use of 16S rRNA, are helping to bridge this gap. In this study, the influence of three land-use systems within a demonstration farm were evaluated with a view to further understand how these practices may impact observed soil bacterial communities. Replicate soil samples collected from the three land-use systems (grazed pine forest, cultivated crop, and grazed pasture) on a single soil type. High throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was used to generate sequence datasets. The different land use systems showed distinction in the structure of their bacterial communities with respect to the differences detected in cluster analysis as well as diversity indices. Specific taxa, particularly Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and classes of Proteobacteria, showed significant shifts across the land-use strata. Families belonging to these taxa broke with notions of copio- and oligotrphy at the class level, as many of the less abundant groups of families of Actinobacteria showed a propensity for soil environments with reduced carbon/nutrient availability. Orders Actinomycetales and Solirubrobacterales showed their highest abundance in the heavily disturbed cultivated system despite the lowest soil organic carbon (SOC) values across the site. Selected soil properties ([SOC], total nitrogen [TN], soil texture, phosphodiesterase [PD], alkaline phosphatase [APA], acid phosphatase [ACP] activity, and pH) also differed significantly across land-use regimes, with SOM, PD, and pH showing variation consistent with shifts in community structure and composition. These results suggest that use of pyrosequencing

  19. Distinct soil bacterial communities revealed under a diversely managed agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Shange, Raymon S; Ankumah, Ramble O; Ibekwe, Abasiofiok M; Zabawa, Robert; Dowd, Scot E

    2012-01-01

    Land-use change and management practices are normally enacted to manipulate environments to improve conditions that relate to production, remediation, and accommodation. However, their effect on the soil microbial community and their subsequent influence on soil function is still difficult to quantify. Recent applications of molecular techniques to soil biology, especially the use of 16S rRNA, are helping to bridge this gap. In this study, the influence of three land-use systems within a demonstration farm were evaluated with a view to further understand how these practices may impact observed soil bacterial communities. Replicate soil samples collected from the three land-use systems (grazed pine forest, cultivated crop, and grazed pasture) on a single soil type. High throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was used to generate sequence datasets. The different land use systems showed distinction in the structure of their bacterial communities with respect to the differences detected in cluster analysis as well as diversity indices. Specific taxa, particularly Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and classes of Proteobacteria, showed significant shifts across the land-use strata. Families belonging to these taxa broke with notions of copio- and oligotrphy at the class level, as many of the less abundant groups of families of Actinobacteria showed a propensity for soil environments with reduced carbon/nutrient availability. Orders Actinomycetales and Solirubrobacterales showed their highest abundance in the heavily disturbed cultivated system despite the lowest soil organic carbon (SOC) values across the site. Selected soil properties ([SOC], total nitrogen [TN], soil texture, phosphodiesterase [PD], alkaline phosphatase [APA], acid phosphatase [ACP] activity, and pH) also differed significantly across land-use regimes, with SOM, PD, and pH showing variation consistent with shifts in community structure and composition. These results suggest that use of pyrosequencing

  20. DETERMINANTS OF NETWORK OUTCOMES: THE IMPACT OF MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    YSA, TAMYKO; SIERRA, VICENTA; ESTEVE, MARC

    2014-01-01

    The literature on network management is extensive. However, it generally explores network structures, neglecting the impact of management strategies. In this article we assess the effect of management strategies on network outcomes, providing empirical evidence from 119 urban revitalization networks. We go beyond current work by testing a path model for the determinants of network outcomes and considering the interactions between the constructs: management strategies, trust, complexity, and facilitative leadership. Our results suggest that management strategies have a strong effect on network outcomes and that they enhance the level of trust. We also found that facilitative leadership has a positive impact on network management as well as on trust in the network. Our findings also show that complexity has a negative impact on trust. A key finding of our research is that managers may wield more influence on network dynamics than previously theorized. PMID:25520529

  1. Soil organic carbon fractionation for improving agricultural soil quality diagnosis in different management practices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigalet, Sylvain; Chartin, Caroline; Kruger, Inken; Carnol, Monique; Van Oost, Kristof; van Wesemael, Bas

    2016-04-01

    Preserving ecosystem functions of soil organic matter (SOM) in soils is a key challenge. The need for an efficient diagnosis of SOM state in agricultural soils is a priority in order to facilitate the detection of changes in soil quality as a result of changes in management practices. The nature of SOM is complex and cannot readily be monitored due to the heterogeneity of its components. Assessment of the SOM level dynamics, typically characterized as the bulk soil organic carbon (SOC), can be refined by taking into account carbon pools with different turnover rates and stability. Fractionating bulk SOC in meaningful soil organic fractions helps to better diagnose SOC status. By separating carbon associated with clay and fine silt particles (stable carbon with slow turnover rate) and carbon non-associated with this fraction (labile and intermediate carbon with higher turnover rates), effects of management can be detected more efficiently at different spatial and temporal scales. Until now, most work on SOC fractionation has focused on small spatial scales along management or time gradients. The present case study focuses on SOC fractionation applied in order to refine the interpretation of organic matter turnover and SOC sequestration for regional units in Wallonia with comparable climate, management and, to a certain extent, soil conditions. In each unit, random samples from specific land uses are analyzed in order to assess the Normal Operative Ranges (NOR) of SOC fraction contents for each unit and land use combination. Thus, SOC levels of the different fractions of a specific field in a given unit can be compared to its corresponding NOR. It will help to better diagnose agricultural soil quality in terms of organic carbon compared to a bulk SOC diagnosis.

  2. Bermudagrass management in the southern Piedmont, USA: IX. Trace elements in soil with broiler litter application.

    PubMed

    Franzluebbers, A J; Wilkinson, S R; Stuedemann, J A

    2004-01-01

    An understanding of the long-term cycling of trace elements in soil with broiler litter fertilization under various forage utilization strategies is needed to develop sustainable agricultural production systems. We evaluated differences in Cu, Mn, Zn, and six other trace elements in response to 5 yr of bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] management varying in fertilization and harvest strategies on a Typic Kanhapludult in Georgia. Chicken (Gallus gallus) broiler litter was a significant source of trace elements that led to 3.4 +/- 0.5 times higher Cu, 2.0 +/- 0.3 times higher Mn, and 2.1 +/- 0.2 times higher Zn in the surface 3 cm of soil than when forage was fertilized inorganically. There were variable effects of broiler litter fertilization on other trace elements, depending upon element, depth of sampling, and forage utilization strategy. Concentrations of all trace elements in soil were below levels considered toxic to plants. Soil at a depth of 0 to 3 cm under grazed paddocks had 33 +/- 5% greater Cd, 18 +/- 1% greater Cr, 53 +/- 24% greater Cu, and 24 +/- 7% greater Zn compared with unharvested and hayed management. Trace elements in soil were unaffected whether forage was unharvested or removed as hay. These results suggest that broiler litter is a significant source of several trace elements and that ruminant processing of forage and subsequent deposition of excreta on the paddock allow these trace elements to accumulate more at the soil surface where they might interact with the high concentration of organic matter.

  3. Strategies for sustainable management of renewable resources during environmental change.

    PubMed

    Lindkvist, Emilie; Ekeberg, Örjan; Norberg, Jon

    2017-03-15

    As a consequence of global environmental change, management strategies that can deal with unexpected change in resource dynamics are becoming increasingly important. In this paper we undertake a novel approach to studying resource growth problems using a computational form of adaptive management to find optimal strategies for prevalent natural resource management dilemmas. We scrutinize adaptive management, or learning-by-doing, to better understand how to simultaneously manage and learn about a system when its dynamics are unknown. We study important trade-offs in decision-making with respect to choosing optimal actions (harvest efforts) for sustainable management during change. This is operationalized through an artificially intelligent model where we analyze how different trends and fluctuations in growth rates of a renewable resource affect the performance of different management strategies. Our results show that the optimal strategy for managing resources with declining growth is capable of managing resources with fluctuating or increasing growth at a negligible cost, creating in a management strategy that is both efficient and robust towards future unknown changes. To obtain this strategy, adaptive management should strive for: high learning rates to new knowledge, high valuation of future outcomes and modest exploration around what is perceived as the optimal action. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Integrated soil-crop system management for food security.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin-Ping; Cui, Zhen-Ling; Vitousek, Peter M; Cassman, Kenneth G; Matson, Pamela A; Bai, Jin-Shun; Meng, Qing-Feng; Hou, Peng; Yue, Shan-Chao; Römheld, Volker; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2011-04-19

    China and other rapidly developing economies face the dual challenge of substantially increasing yields of cereal grains while at the same time reducing the very substantial environmental impacts of intensive agriculture. We used a model-driven integrated soil-crop system management approach to develop a maize production system that achieved mean maize yields of 13.0 t ha(-1) on 66 on-farm experimental plots--nearly twice the yield of current farmers' practices--with no increase in N fertilizer use. Such integrated soil-crop system management systems represent a priority for agricultural research and implementation, especially in rapidly growing economies.

  5. Citrus orchards management and soil water repellency in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, A.; González Peñaloza, F. A.; Jordán, A.; Zavala, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    Water repellent soils are found around the world, although originally was found on fire affected soil (DeBano, 1981). However, for decades, water repellency was found to be a rare soil property. One of the pioneer research that shown that water repellency was a common soil property is the Wander (1949) publication in Science. Wander researched the water repellency on citrus groves, and since then, no information is available about the water repellency on citrus plantations. The Mediterranean soils are prone to water repellency due to the summer dry conditions (Cerdà and Doerr, 2007). And Land Use and Land Management are key factors (Harper et al., 2000; Urbanek et al., 2007) to understand the water repellency behaviour of agriculture soils. Valencia region (Eastern Spain) is the largest exporter in the world and citrus plantations located in the alluvial plains and fluvial terraces are moving to alluvial fans and slopes where the surface wash is very active (Cerdà et al., 2009). This research aims to show the water repellency on citrus orchards located on the sloping terrain (< 15 % angle slope). Measurement were conducted in four experimental plots located in the Canyoles River watershed to assess the soil water repellency in citrus orchards under different managements: annual addition of plant residues and manure with no tilling and no fertilizer (MNT), annual addition of plant residues with no tillage (NT), application of conventional herbicides and no tilling (HNT) and conventional tillage in June (CT). The period for each type of management ranged from 2 and 27 (MNT), 1 and 25 (NT), 2 and 27 (HNT) and 3 and 29 years (CT). At each plot, a ten points were selected every 10 cm along inter-rows and water drop penetration time test (WDTP; DeBano, 1981) was performed. The results show that the MNT treatment induced slight water repellency in citrus-cropped soils compared to other treatments. Small but significant soil water repellency was observed under NT and HNT

  6. Soil water and vegetation management for cleanup of selenium contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    Over the past year scientists have initiatived a new effort aimed at developing a soil water and vegetation management plan for Kesterson Reservoir. The plan is intended to result in a gradual depletion of the inventory of soluble selenium at the Reservoir through a combination agriculturally oriented practices that enhance dissipation of selenium from near surface soils. Agriculturally oriented processes that will contribute to depletion include microbial volatilization from the soils, direct volatilization by living plants, decomposition and volatilization of selenium-bearing vegetation, harvest and removal of seleniferous vegetation, and leaching. The benefits of using this integrated approach are that (1) no single mechanism needs to be relied upon to detoxify the soils, (2) a stable plant community can be established during this period so that impacts to wildlife can be more easily evaluated and controlled, (3) cleanup and management of the site can be carried out in a cost-effective manner. The management plan is also intended to facilitate control over wildlife exposure to selenium contaminated biota by creating a well managed environment. The majority of research associated with this new effort is being carried out at a 200 m by 50 m test plot in Pond 7. A two-line irrigation system , providing local groundwater as an irrigation supply, has been installed. Through an intensive program of soil water sampling, soil gas sampling, vegetation sampling, groundwater monitoring, and soil moisture monitoring, the mass balance for selenium under irrigated conditions is being evaluated. These studies, in conjunction with supplementary laboratory experiments will provide the information needed to develop an optimal management plan for the site. 23 refs., 38 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Crop rotations with annual and perennial forages under no-till soil management: soil attributes, soybean mineral nutrition, and yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Extensive use of sustainable and intensive agricultural systems would result in profitable farms producing greater yields while maintaining or enhancing natural resources. Development of sustainable crop and soil management systems depends on understanding complex relationships between soil managem...

  8. Integrating scattered trees into grazing landscapes to manage soil sustainably

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Phoebe; Wilson, Brian; Lockwood, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Acting as keystone structures, scattered paddock trees play an important ecosystem service in the Australian grazing environment through influencing their immediate environment both above- and below-ground. Since these trees are rapidly being lost from the landscape, there is a need to understand their functions more fully in order to manage the landscape in a sustainable manner. This study aims to quantify how single trees influence the soil resource with depth, and to investigate the spatial extent of this influence. Once these aspects have been quantified, the optimum distribution required to remediate depleted soil conditions can then be estimated. Three isolated trees were comprehensively examined for their influence on soil chemistry to a depth of 75cm and to a radial distance of more than 3.5 canopy radii. Soil moisture, total C, N and S, extractable P, pH (1:5 CaCl2 & H2O) and EC were examined. The trees modification on soil condition was strongly dependent on the soil property examined, although typically values were higher under the tree at the surface and diminished with distance both horizontally and vertically. We conclude that single trees significantly improve soil condition and that a distance of 2.5 canopy radii is sufficient to explain the spatial influence of scattered trees. Further work is now underway to elucidate the processes that influence soils around these trees. This work will link pasture productivity and pasture quality with soil attributes in order to fully quantify the ecosystem services these trees provide in order to sustainably manage this environment, both above- and below-ground.

  9. Recreational user attitudes towards management strategies of Allegany State Park

    Treesearch

    Michael Nisengard; Miklos Gratzer

    1998-01-01

    This project examines attitudes towards management strategies of four Allegany State Park recreational user groups: cabin users, recreational vehicle users, tent users, and day users. It investigates recreational user group attitude differences, and attitude change over a ten year time period, in regard to the following park management strategy categories: park...

  10. Development of a Consumable Inventory Management Strategy for the Supply Management Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    efficiently balances readiness with supply chain system-wide costs. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 107 14. SUBJECT TERMS Supply Chain Management , Inventory...management strategy for the SMU by incorporating operations management, business modeling, simulation, supply chain management , and logistics...management, supply chain management , and logistics engineering concepts. Next, the project group used the information gathered from these sources to

  11. Optimal pumping strategies for managing shallow, poorquality groundwater, western San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, P.; Wagner, B.; Belitz, K.

    1995-01-01

    Continued agricultural productivity in the western San Joaquin Valley, California, is threatened by the presence of shallow, poor-quality groundwater that can cause soil salinization. We evaluate the management alternative of using groundwater pumping to control the altitude of the water table and provide irrigation water requirements. A transient, three-dimensional, groundwater flow model was linked with nonlinear optimization to simulate management alternatives for the groundwater flow system. Optimal pumping strategies have been determined that substantially reduce the area subject to a shallow water table and bare-soil evaporation (that is, areas with a water table within 2.1 m of land surface) and the rate of drainflow to on-farm drainage systems. Optimal pumping strategies are constrained by the existing distribution of wells between the semiconfined and confined zones of the aquifer, by the distribution of sediment types (and associated hydraulic conductivities) in the western valley, and by the historical distribution of pumping throughout the western valley.

  12. Soil conservation service landscape resource management

    Treesearch

    Sally Schauman; Carolyn Adams

    1979-01-01

    SCS Landscape Resource Management (LRM) is the application of landscape architecture to SCS conservation activities. LRM includes but is not limited to visual resource management. LRM can be summarized in three principles: (1) SCS landscape architecture considers the landscape as a composite of ecological, social and visual resources; (2) SCS landscapes exist in the...

  13. Grassland Management and Conversion into Grassland: Effects on Soil Carbon

    DOE Data Explorer

    Conant, Richard T.; Paustian, Keith; Elliott, Edward T.

    2003-01-01

    Grasslands are heavily relied upon for food and forage production. A key component for sustaining production in grassland ecosystems is the maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM), which can be strongly influenced by management. Many management techniques intended to increase forage production may potentially increase SOM, thus sequestering atmospheric carbon (C). Further, conversion from either cultivation or native vegetation into grassland could also sequester atmospheric carbon. We reviewed studies examining the influence of improved grassland management practices and conversion into grasslands on soil C worldwide to assess the potential for C sequestration. Results from 115 studies containing over 300 data points were analyzed. Management improvements included fertilization (39%), improved grazing management (24%), conversion from cultivation (15%) and native vegetation (15%), sowing of legumes (4%) and grasses (2%), earthworm introduction (1%), and irrigation (1%). Soil C content and concentration increased with improved management in 74% of the studies, and mean soil C increased with all types of improvement. Carbon sequestration rates were highest during the first 40 y after treatments began and tended to be greatest in the top 10 cm of soil. Impacts were greater in woodland and grassland biomes than in forest, desert, rain forest, or shrubland biomes. Conversion from cultivation, the introduction of earthworms, and irrigation resulted in the largest increases. Rates of C sequestration by type of improvement ranged from 0.11 to 3.04 Mg C · ha–1 y–1, with a mean of 0.54 Mg C · ha –1 · y–1, and were highly influenced by biome type and climate. We conclude that grasslands can act as a significant carbon sink with the implementation of improved management.

  14. Microbial dynamics and arsenic speciation in rice paddy soil under two water management practices

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arsenic (As) undergoes several microbial transformations, including oxidation/reduction, methylation/demethylation, and volatilization in soil, which impact As bioavailability. Different water management systems for rice cultivation alter soil-redox conditions and As biogeochemistry. Soil microbial ...

  15. Proposed chemical mechanismsManagement practices impacts soil nutrients and bacterial populations in backgrounding beef feedlot

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Intensive beef backgrounding often accumulate manure born soil nutrients, microbes, and pharmaceuticals at different site locations. Unless properly managed, such waste materials can pollute surrounding soil and water sources. Soil sampling from these sites helps determining waste material levels bu...

  16. Modeling as a tool for management of saline soils and irrigation waters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Optimal management of saline soils and irrigation waters requires consideration of many interrelated factors including, climate, water applications and timing, water flow, plant water uptake, soil chemical reactions, plant response to salinity and solution composition, soil hydraulic properties and ...

  17. Examination of soil and cotton root-associated fungal and bacterial populations under conservation tillage management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Conservation tillage is common management practice utilized in the hopes of reducing soil erosion and increasing soil carbon. Additional evidence indicates that conservation tillage may lead to habitat improvement for soil microorganisms. Potential beneficial changes in rhizosphere bacte...

  18. Bermudagrass management in the Southern Piedmont USA: VI. Soil-profile inorganic nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Franzluebbers, Alan J; Stuedemann, John A

    2003-01-01

    Fate of applied N in forage-based agricultural systems is important to long-term production and environmental impacts. We evaluated the factorial combination of N fertilization targeted to supply 20 g N m 2 yr(-1) and harvest strategies on soil-profile inorganic N during the first 5 yr of 'Coastal' bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] management. Harvest strategy had much larger effects than fertilization strategy, most notably that soil-profile inorganic N was lower when hayed than under other systems. In the upper rooting zone (0- to 0.3-m depth), soil inorganic N (initially at 3.1 g m(-2)) remained unchanged during the 5 yr under unharvested and low and high grazing pressures (0.00 +/- 0.08 g m(-2) yr(-1)), but declined with haying (-0.25 g m(-2) yr(-1)). In the lower rooting zone (0.3- to 0.9-m depth), soil inorganic N (initially at 2.9 g m(-2)) accumulated with unharvested and low and high grazing pressure (0.64 +/- 0.20 g m(-2) yr(-1)), but remained unchanged with haying (-0.06 g m(-2) yr(-1)). Below the rooting zone (0.9- to 1.5-m depth), soil inorganic N (initially at 5.8 g m(-2)) increased with unharvested and high grazing pressure (0.34 +/- 0.03 g m(-2) yr(-1)), was unchanged with low grazing pressure (-0.10 g m(-2) yr(-1)), and declined with haying (-0.50 g m(-2) yr(-1)). Applied N appears to have been efficiently utilized by forage with subsequent sequestration into soil organic matter and little movement of inorganic N below the rooting zone (< 2% of applied N), irrespective of inorganic or organic fertilization strategy designed to supply sufficient N for high animal production from grazing.

  19. Soil consumption: An innovative system for better planning and managing soil in urban planning context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Angelo; Bonfante, Antonello; Langella, Giuliano; Minieri, Luciana; De Michele, Carlo; D'Antonio, Amedeo; Manna, Piero; Terribile, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Soil is a key natural resource and most crucial ecosystem services and the most important environmental benefits to humankind and the environment depend by its properties. However, soil is a delicate resource. Urbanization is the most impactful use of soils because it can cancel all its ecosystem functions and ends forever its life cycle since soil is removed completely and/or sealed with a cement/bitumen layer. The absence of an adequate soil culture led common urban planning to do not consider the reality of soil as living multifunctional system. In such framework, this work - performed under the project LIFE + SOILCONSWEB - aims to illustrate a different approach for soil management in spatial planning using a Spatial Decision Support System operating through the web (w-SDSS) to evaluate soil consumption. The system - already operating in an area of Southern Italy (Telese valley, 20,000 ha) - allows - in real time - to provide answers such as (i) the use of land (type and size) on different dates, (ii) mapping and statistics on the sprawl at the municipality scale, (iii) detailed mapping of land fragmentation (and statistical fragmentation) on different dates, (iv) quantification of loss of ecosystem services after potential new urbanization.

  20. Strategy Maps in University Management: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Shuangmiao; Zhong, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the conceptual use of the strategy map approach and the strategy map which it produces have been adapted from the business sector and introduced as tools for achieving more effective strategic planning and management in higher education institutions (HEIs). This study discusses the development of strategy maps as transformational…

  1. Strategy Maps in University Management: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Shuangmiao; Zhong, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the conceptual use of the strategy map approach and the strategy map which it produces have been adapted from the business sector and introduced as tools for achieving more effective strategic planning and management in higher education institutions (HEIs). This study discusses the development of strategy maps as transformational…

  2. Best management practices: Managing cropping systems for soil protection and bioenergy production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Interest in renewable alternatives to fossil fuels has increased. Crop residue such as corn stover or wheat straw can be used for bioenergy including a substitution for natural gas or coal. Harvesting crop residue needs to be managed to protect the soil and future soil productivity. The amount of bi...

  3. Influence of different floor management strategies of the vineyard on the natural yeast population associated with grape berries.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Arroyo, Teresa; Serrano, Ana; Valero, Eva

    2011-07-15

    Some oenological practices, such as the massive utilisation of commercial yeast and the consequent colonisation of wineries, can contribute to reducing the native yeast biodiversity. In this context, the vineyard could be a reservoir of autochthonous yeasts of oenological interest. Thus, the evaluation of the influence of different agricultural parameters on the biodiversity of yeast population in the vineyard is necessary. This work shows the results of the influence of some floor management strategies of the vineyard in the natural yeast population associated with the grape-berries. With this objective, a three year sampling plan was designed in the Shiraz vineyards of the Madrid region using three floor management strategies: bare soil by tillage, bare soil maintained with herbicides and soil maintained with cover crop. The results of this study have shown that bare soil by tillage could be a sustainable alternative for managing the soil, due to the reduced use of agrochemicals and the resulting high yeasts biodiversity. Nevertheless, the presence of herbicides in the vineyard has a minor impact on the diversity of grape associated yeast communities, and this could have increased the yeast populations. Hence, from the fermentative yeasts' (like Saccharomyces) point of view, in hot and arid environments where soils may be affected by the tillage management, the best option could be the maintenance of the bare soil with the use of herbicides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis on Fungal Diversity in Rhizosphere Soil of Continuous Cropping Potato Subjected to Different Furrow-Ridge Mulching Managements.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shuhao; Yeboah, Stephen; Xu, Xuexue; Liu, Yuhui; Yu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge about fungi diversity following different planting patterns could improve our understanding of soil processes and thus help us to develop sustainable management strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of different furrow-ridge mulching techniques on fungal diversity in rhizosphere soil under continuous cropping system. The investigated treatments were: flat plot without mulch (CK); flat plot with mulch (T1); on-ridge planting with full mulch (T2); on-furrow planting with full mulch (T3); on-ridge planting with half mulch (T4); and on-furrow planting with half mulch (T5). NGS (Illumina) methods and ITS1 sequences were used in monitoring fungi diversity of the potato rhizosphere soil. The fungi diversity in the rhizosphere soil was ranked in the order T5 > T2 > T4 > T1 > CK at the early growth stage and T2 > T3 > T1 > T4 > CK at the late growth stage of potato. The fungal communities found in the rhizosphere soil were Ascomycota, Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and other unidentified fungal communities. Among the fungal community in the rhizosphere soil, Ascomycota was found to be dominant fungi population, with the highest percentage (89%) in the T5 soil whereas the T2 soils had the lowest percentage (67%). The Fusarium abundance in fully-mulched treated soils was higher than in half-mulched treated soil. The dominant genus in the T4 soil was Mortierella, whereas lower populations (1-2%) of Scutellinia, Cryphonectria, Acremonium, and Alternaria were found in that treatment. Among the eumycetes, the dominant fungal class in all treated soils was the Sordariomycetes, which ranged from 57 to 85% in T2 and T5 soils, respectively. The Fusarium percentages in half-mulched treated soils (T4 and T5) were 55 and 28% lower than that of complete mulched treated soils (T2 and T3), respectively. The cluster analysis results showed that, CK, T4, and T5 treated soils and T1, T2, and T3 treated soils had similarities in microbial

  5. Analysis on Fungal Diversity in Rhizosphere Soil of Continuous Cropping Potato Subjected to Different Furrow-Ridge Mulching Managements

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shuhao; Yeboah, Stephen; Xu, Xuexue; Liu, Yuhui; Yu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge about fungi diversity following different planting patterns could improve our understanding of soil processes and thus help us to develop sustainable management strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of different furrow-ridge mulching techniques on fungal diversity in rhizosphere soil under continuous cropping system. The investigated treatments were: flat plot without mulch (CK); flat plot with mulch (T1); on-ridge planting with full mulch (T2); on-furrow planting with full mulch (T3); on-ridge planting with half mulch (T4); and on-furrow planting with half mulch (T5). NGS (Illumina) methods and ITS1 sequences were used in monitoring fungi diversity of the potato rhizosphere soil. The fungi diversity in the rhizosphere soil was ranked in the order T5 > T2 > T4 > T1 > CK at the early growth stage and T2 > T3 > T1 > T4 > CK at the late growth stage of potato. The fungal communities found in the rhizosphere soil were Ascomycota, Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and other unidentified fungal communities. Among the fungal community in the rhizosphere soil, Ascomycota was found to be dominant fungi population, with the highest percentage (89%) in the T5 soil whereas the T2 soils had the lowest percentage (67%). The Fusarium abundance in fully-mulched treated soils was higher than in half-mulched treated soil. The dominant genus in the T4 soil was Mortierella, whereas lower populations (1–2%) of Scutellinia, Cryphonectria, Acremonium, and Alternaria were found in that treatment. Among the eumycetes, the dominant fungal class in all treated soils was the Sordariomycetes, which ranged from 57 to 85% in T2 and T5 soils, respectively. The Fusarium percentages in half-mulched treated soils (T4 and T5) were 55 and 28% lower than that of complete mulched treated soils (T2 and T3), respectively. The cluster analysis results showed that, CK, T4, and T5 treated soils and T1, T2, and T3 treated soils had similarities in microbial

  6. Temporal and soil management effects on soil infiltration and water content in a hillslope vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddoccu, Marcella; Ferraris, Stefano; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2015-04-01

    The maintenance of bare soil in the vineyard's inter-rows with tillage, as well as other mechanized operations which increase the vehicle traffic, expose the soil to degradation, favoring overland flow and further threats as compaction, reduction of soil water holding capacity and water infiltration. Water infiltration is strongly controlled by field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, which depends primarily on soil texture and structure, and it is characterized by high spatial and temporal variability. Beyond the currently adopted soil management, some major causes in variability of infiltration rates are the history of cultivation and the structure of the first centimeters of the vineyard's soil. A study was carried out in two experimental vineyard plots included in the 'Tenuta Cannona Experimental Vine and Wine Centre of Regione Piemonte', located in NW Italy. The study was addressed to evaluate the temporal variations of the field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, in relation to the soil management adopted in the inter-rows of a hillslope vineyard. The investigation was carried out in a vineyard comparing the adoption of two different soil managements in the inter-rows: 1) conventional tillage and 2) controlled grass cover. Several series of double-ring of infiltration tests were carried out during a 2-years period of observation, using the simplified falling head technique (SFH). In order to take into account the effect of tractor traffic, the tests were done both inside the the track, the portion of soil affected by the transit of tractor wheels or tracks, and outside the track. Before the execution of each test, bulk density and initial soil water content close to the investigated area were determined. Relations among infiltration behavior and these parameters were analyzed. Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) at different sampling dates showed high variability, especially in the vineyard with cultivated soil. Indeed, highest infiltration rates were

  7. Total Quality Management Implementation Strategy: Directorate of Quality Assurance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    Directorate of Quality Assurance Total Quality Management Implementation Strategy 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) 8...that job. DTIC 7: t-I ECTE I SEP29 1989 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES TOM ( Total Quality Management ), Quality Assurance, Continuous Process...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 29d- 102 DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY DIRECTORATE OF QUALITY ASSURANCE 0 TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY 0 89 9

  8. Impact of soil types and management practices on soil microbiological properties - a case study in salt affected area of Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, Ravi Kumar; Makádi, Marianna; Michéli, Erika; Weldmichael, Tsedekech G.; Szegi, Tamás

    2017-04-01

    The impact of different land use systems on soil microbiological properties in salt affected soils were investigated in the Nádudvar region of Hajdu-Bihar County, Hungary. The study area is characterized by associations of Solonetz and Chernozem soils. Soils were collected from both arable (cultivated) and pasture (non-cultivated) land from the upper 15 cm, in May, 2016. Besides soil physical and chemical properties (SOM, pH, CaCO3, EC, E4/E6, available macro, meso and micro nutrients and moisture content), soil microbiological properties were also investigated, phosphatase and dehydrogenase activities of the samples were measured, as well as soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and soil microbiological respiration. The results were statistically compared on the different soil types and land uses. It was concluded that land management has greater impact on soil microbiology than inherent properties or soil types.

  9. Agricultural management explains historic changes in regional soil carbon stocks.

    PubMed

    van Wesemael, Bas; Paustian, Keith; Meersmans, Jeroen; Goidts, Esther; Barancikova, Gabriela; Easter, Mark

    2010-08-17

    Agriculture is considered to be among the economic sectors having the greatest greenhouse gas mitigation potential, largely via soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. However, it remains a challenge to accurately quantify SOC stock changes at regional to national scales. SOC stock changes resulting from SOC inventory systems are only available for a few countries and the trends vary widely between studies. Process-based models can provide insight in the drivers of SOC changes, but accurate input data are currently not available at these spatial scales. Here we use measurements from a soil inventory dating from the 1960s and resampled in 2006 covering the major soil types and agricultural regions in Belgium together with region-specific land use and management data and a process-based model. The largest decreases in SOC stocks occurred in poorly drained grassland soils (clays and floodplain soils), consistent with drainage improvements since 1960. Large increases in SOC in well drained grassland soils appear to be a legacy effect of widespread conversion of cropland to grassland before 1960. SOC in cropland increased only in sandy lowland soils, driven by increasing manure additions. Modeled land use and management impacts accounted for more than 70% of the variation in observed SOC changes, and no bias could be demonstrated. There was no significant effect of climate trends since 1960 on observed SOC changes. SOC monitoring networks are being established in many countries. Our results demonstrate that detailed and long-term land management data are crucial to explain the observed SOC changes for such networks.

  10. Agricultural management explains historic changes in regional soil carbon stocks

    PubMed Central

    van Wesemael, Bas; Paustian, Keith; Meersmans, Jeroen; Goidts, Esther; Barancikova, Gabriela; Easter, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Agriculture is considered to be among the economic sectors having the greatest greenhouse gas mitigation potential, largely via soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. However, it remains a challenge to accurately quantify SOC stock changes at regional to national scales. SOC stock changes resulting from SOC inventory systems are only available for a few countries and the trends vary widely between studies. Process-based models can provide insight in the drivers of SOC changes, but accurate input data are currently not available at these spatial scales. Here we use measurements from a soil inventory dating from the 1960s and resampled in 2006 covering the major soil types and agricultural regions in Belgium together with region-specific land use and management data and a process-based model. The largest decreases in SOC stocks occurred in poorly drained grassland soils (clays and floodplain soils), consistent with drainage improvements since 1960. Large increases in SOC in well drained grassland soils appear to be a legacy effect of widespread conversion of cropland to grassland before 1960. SOC in cropland increased only in sandy lowland soils, driven by increasing manure additions. Modeled land use and management impacts accounted for more than 70% of the variation in observed SOC changes, and no bias could be demonstrated. There was no significant effect of climate trends since 1960 on observed SOC changes. SOC monitoring networks are being established in many countries. Our results demonstrate that detailed and long-term land management data are crucial to explain the observed SOC changes for such networks. PMID:20679194

  11. Economic and Societal Benefits of Soil Carbon Management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the United States, soil has fueled the availability of abundant and safe food supplies, thus underpinning economic growth and development. In the future more vigilance will be needed in managing and renewing this precious resource by replacing the nutrients and life-sustaining matter that is rem...

  12. Proceedings - Management and productivity of western-montane forest soils

    Treesearch

    Alan E. Harvey; Leon F. Neuenschwander

    1991-01-01

    Includes 35 papers and six poster synopses presenting state-of-the-art knowledge on the nature and problems of integrating soils information and expertise into management of inland western forest resources. Papers emphasize regional information, but include data from world literature and previously unpublished material from regional experts.

  13. Soil quality indicator responses to row crop, grazed pasture, and agroforestry buffer management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Incorporation of trees and establishment of grass buffers within agroecosystems are management practices shown to enhance soil quality. Soil enzyme activities and water stable aggregates (WSA) have been identified as sensitive soil quality indicators to evaluate early responses to soil management. ...

  14. Soil quality index comparisons using Fort Cobb Oklahoma watershed-scale land management data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Soil Conditioning Index (SCI) and Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) are two different but complementary methods for evaluating soil management effects on soil quality. Although both tools have been widely used, little is known regarding how they compare to one another and if they produ...

  15. Developing management strategies for riparian areas.

    Treesearch

    D.E. Hibbs; S. Chan

    2001-01-01

    This talk outlines four principles that are critical to successful management of a riparian area. First, given problems both with defining historic conditions and with returning to them, attaining management goals based on restoration of ecological processes and functions will be far more successful. Second, the management goals for any stream reach must be placed in a...

  16. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iden, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to…

  17. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iden, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to…

  18. A national cohesive wildland fire management strategy

    Treesearch

    Forest Service U.S. Department of Agriculture; Office of Wildland Fire Coordination. Department of the Interior

    2011-01-01

    Addressing wildfire is not simply a fire management, fire operations, or wildland-urban interface problem - it is a larger, more complex land management and societal issue. The vision for the next century is to: Safely and effectively extinguish fire, when needed; use fire where allowable; manage our natural resources; and as a Nation, live with wildland fire. Three...

  19. Anaerobic N mineralization in paddy soils in relation to inundation management, physicochemical soil fractions, mineralogy and soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleutel, Steven; Kader, Mohammed Abdul; Ara Begum, Shamim; De Neve, Stefaan

    2013-04-01

    Anaerobic N mineralization measured from (saturated) repacked soil cores from 25 paddy fields in Bangladesh and was previously found to negatively related to soil N content on a relative basis. This suggests that other factors like soil organic matter (SOM) quality or abiotic factors instead control the anaerobic N mineralization process. We therefore assessed different physical and chemical fractions of SOM, management factors and various soil properties as predictors for the net anaerobic N mineralization. 1° First, we assessed routinely analyzed soil parameters (soil N and soil organic carbon, texture, pH, oxalate- and pyrophosphate-extractable Fe, Al, and Mn, fixed-NH4 content). We found no significant influences of neither soil mineralogy nor the annual length of inundation on soil N mineralization. The anaerobic N mineralization correlated positively with Na-pyrophosphate-extractable Fe and negatively with pH (both at P<0.01). At this stage it is, however, not known if these relations between net evolution of NH4 and pH and Fe content are causal or indirect. 2° Second, the 25 samples collected from farmers' fields were physically fractionated into particulate OM and silt and clay associated OM. The silt and clay sized OM was further chemically fractionated by oxidation with 6%NaOCl to isolate an oxidation-resistant OM fraction, followed by extraction of mineral bound OM with 10%HF thereby isolating the HF-resistant OM. None of the physicochemical SOM fractions were found useful predictors anaerobic N mineralization. The linkage between these chemical soil N fractions and N supplying processes actually occurring in the soil thus appears to be weak. Regardless, we hypothesize that variation in strength of N-mineral and N-OM linkages is likely to explain variation in bio-availability of organic N and proneness to mineralization. Yet, in order to separate kinetically different soil N fractions we then postulated that an alternative approach would be required

  20. Open Source for Knowledge and Learning Management: Strategies beyond Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytras, Miltiadis, Ed.; Naeve, Ambjorn, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    In the last years, knowledge and learning management have made a significant impact on the IT research community. "Open Source for Knowledge and Learning Management: Strategies Beyond Tools" presents learning and knowledge management from a point of view where the basic tools and applications are provided by open source technologies.…

  1. Survival strategies in the era of managed care.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, M L; Spirakes, A S

    1996-02-01

    The era of managed care has forced an unprecedented restructuring of the health care environment. As hospitals downsize in response, materiel managers should consider adopting strategies that may help ensure their survival, including innovative approaches to supply management and the development of individual responses that will best position them to succeed in this new reality.

  2. Current Models and Innovative Strategies in Management Education in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhong-Ming

    1999-01-01

    Current models of management education in China include national training, on-the-job technical training, and the national master's of business administration supervisory committee. Effective strategies being used include teamwork, process skills, action learning, cross-cultural management learning, and competency-based management development. (SK)

  3. Effects of new forest management strategies on squirrel populations.

    Treesearch

    Andrew B. Carey

    2000-01-01

    Two strategies for managing forests for multiple values have achieved prominence in debates in the Pacific Northwest: (1) legacy retention with passive management and long rotations, and (2) intensive management for timber with commercial thinnings and long rotations. Northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus), Townsend's chipmunks (

  4. Open Source for Knowledge and Learning Management: Strategies beyond Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytras, Miltiadis, Ed.; Naeve, Ambjorn, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    In the last years, knowledge and learning management have made a significant impact on the IT research community. "Open Source for Knowledge and Learning Management: Strategies Beyond Tools" presents learning and knowledge management from a point of view where the basic tools and applications are provided by open source technologies.…

  5. Management effects on soil quality in organic vegetable systems in western Washington

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management practices in organic vegetable cropping systems and their contributions toward sustainable farming practices can differ greatly. Soil quality monitoring may help organic farmers evaluate and choose best management practices. This study 1) assessed the sensitivity of soil biological prop...

  6. A holistic strategy for adaptive land management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Duniway, Michael C.; Pyke, David A.; Bestelmeyer, Brandon T.; Wills, Skye A.; Brown, Joel R.; Karl, Jason W.; Havstad, Kris M.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive management is widely applied to natural resources management (Holling 1973; Walters and Holling 1990). Adaptive management can be generally defined as an iterative decision-making process that incorporates formulation of management objectives, actions designed to address these objectives, monitoring of results, and repeated adaptation of management until desired results are achieved (Brown and MacLeod 1996; Savory and Butterfield 1999). However, adaptive management is often criticized because very few projects ever complete more than one cycle, resulting in little adaptation and little knowledge gain (Lee 1999; Walters 2007). One significant criticism is that adaptive management is often used as a justification for undertaking actions with uncertain outcomes or as a surrogate for the development of specific, measurable indicators and monitoring programs (Lee 1999; Ruhl 2007).

  7. Clinicians' strategies for managing their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations.

    PubMed

    Luff, Donna; Martin, Elliott B; Mills, Kelsey; Mazzola, Natalia M; Bell, Sigall K; Meyer, Elaine C

    2016-09-01

    To examine strategies employed by clinicians from different disciplines to manage their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations. Self-report questionnaires were collected prior to simulation-based Program to Enhance Relational and Communication Skills (PERCS) workshops for professionals representing a range of experience and specialties at a tertiary pediatric hospital. In response to an open-ended prompt, clinicians qualitatively described their own strategies for managing their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations. 126 respondents reported emotion management strategies. Respondents included physicians (42%), nurses (29%), medical interpreters (16%), psychosocial professionals (9%), and other (4%). Respondents identified 1-4 strategies. Five strategy categories were identified: Self-Care (51%), Preparatory and Relational Skills, (29%), Empathic Presence (28%), Team Approach (26%), and Professional Identity (20%). Across disciplines and experience levels, clinicians have developed strategies to manage their emotions when holding difficult healthcare conversations. These strategies support clinicians before, during and after difficult conversations. Understanding what strategies clinicians already employ to manage their emotions when holding difficult conversations has implications for educational planning and implementation. This study has potential to inform the development of education to support clinicians' awareness of their emotions and to enhance the range and effectiveness of emotion management during difficult healthcare conversations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of land management on soil structure and soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodesova, Radka; Jirku, Veronika; Nikodem, Antonin; Muhlhanselova, Marcela; Zigova, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Study is focused on a comparison of a soil structure and soil hydraulic properties within soil profiles of a same soil type under different land management. Study was performed in Haplic Luvisol in Hnevceves the Czech Republic. Two soil profiles, which were in close distance from each other, were chosen: 1. under the conventional tillage, 2. under the permanent (30 years) grass cover. Soil sampling and field experiments were carried out immediately after the harvest of winter barley in 2008. The micromorphological images were used to evaluate the soil structure of all Ap, Bt1, Bt2 and C diagnostic horizons. The hydraulic properties of the diagnostic horizons were studied in the laboratory using multistep outflow experiments performed on the undisturbed 100-cm3 soil samples. A tension disc infiltrometer (with a disc radius of 10 cm) and minidisc tension infiltrometers (with a disc radius of 2.2 cm) were used to measure cumulative water infiltration under unsaturated conditions created using a pressure head of -2 cm. Measurements were performed at a depths of 5, 45, 75 and 110 cm, which corresponded to the Ap, Bt1, Bt2 and C horizons of studied Haplic Luvisol at both locations. The Guelph permeameter was used to measure cumulative water flux under surface ponding conditions. The depth of the drilled well was 10, 50, 80 and 115 cm, the well radius was 3 cm, and the well ponding depth was 5 cm. Both tests were used to evaluate hydraulic conductivity (K for h=-2cm, and Ks) values. Results showed, that while properties in the Bt2 and C horizons of both soil profiles were relatively similar, properties in the Ap and Bt1 horizons were different. The fraction of gravitational pores (which may cause preferential flow) in the Ap and Bt1 horizons of the soil profile under the convectional tillage was large than those in the Ap and Bt1 horizons of the soil profile under the permanent grass. This influenced for instance the Ks values measured using the Guelph permeametr. The Ks

  9. Tillage, crop residue, and nutrient management effects on soil organic carbon sequestration in rice-based cropping systems: a review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sequestration of soil organic carbon (SOC) is one of the major agricultural strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, enhance food security, and improve agricultural sustainability. This paper synthesizes the much-needed state-of-knowledge on the effects of management practices, such as tilla...

  10. Evidence-Based Classroom Behaviour Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsonson, Barry S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews a range of evidence-based strategies for application by teachers to reduce disruptive and challenging behaviours in their classrooms. These include a number of antecedent strategies intended to help minimise the emergence of problematic behaviours and a range of those which provide positive consequences for appropriate student…

  11. Seeing about soilmanagement lessons from a simple model for renewable resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenegger, Klaus; Schappacher, Wilhelm

    2014-02-01

    Employing an effective cellular automata model, we investigate and analyze the build-up and erosion of soil. Depending on the strategy employed for handling agricultural production, in many cases we find a critical dependence on the prescribed production target, with a sharp transition between stable production and complete breakdown of the system. Strategies which are particularly well-suited for mimicking real-world management approaches can produce almost cyclic behavior, which can also either lead to sustainable production or to breakdown. While designed to describe the dynamics of soil evolution, this model is quite general and may also be useful as a model for other renewable resources and may even be employed in other disciplines like psychology.

  12. Ecological and functional adaptations to water management in a semiarid agroecosystem: a soil metaproteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Starke, Robert; Bastida, Felipe; Abadía, Joaquín; García, Carlos; Nicolás, Emilio; Jehmlich, Nico

    2017-08-31

    Climate change models point to a decrease in water availability in semiarid areas that would compromise the maintenance of sustainable agriculture. Here, we used a grapefruit agroecosystem model to evaluate the responses of the active soil microbial community - as a microbial subset directly involved in soil functionality- undergoing strategies to cope with the low water availability in south-east Spain. For this purpose, we tested the impacts of: (i) water quality: transfer-water from a river (TW) or reclaimed-water from a wastewater-treatment plant (RW); and (ii) water quantity: continuous optimal amount of water or reduced irrigation (RDI) in the temporal frame when the crop is less sensitive; and their interactions. Metaproteomics revealed that the phylogenetic diversity of the active community and its functional diversity were lowered in soils with RW. RDI lowered soil respiration and functional diversity while the phylogenetic diversity remained constant. The reestablishment of full irrigation after RDI led to a recovery of soil respiration that was accompanied by an enhanced abundance of resilient bacterial populations. Bacterial populations displayed molecular mechanisms against water stress that have been conserved evolutionarily in plants. Protein-based studies shed light on ecological and functional mechanisms that govern the adaptive responses of soil microbial communities to climate-change friendly water management.

  13. Environmental factors and health information technology management strategy.

    PubMed

    Menachemi, Nir; Shin, Dong Yeong; Ford, Eric W; Yu, Feliciano

    2011-01-01

    : Previous studies have provided theoretical and empirical evidence that environmental forces influence hospital strategy. : Rooted in resource dependence theory and the information uncertainty perspective, this study examined the relationship between environmental market characteristics and hospitals' selection of a health information technology (HIT) management strategy. : A cross-sectional design is used to analyze secondary data from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey, the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society Analytics Database, and the Area Resource File. Univariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses are used. : Overall, 3,221 hospitals were studied, of which 60.9% pursed a single-vendor HIT management strategy, 28.9% pursued a best-of-suite strategy, and 10.2% used a best-of-breed strategy. Multivariate analyses controlling for hospital characteristics found that measures of environmental factors representing munificence, dynamism, and/or complexity were systematically associated with various hospital HIT management strategy use. Specifically, the number of generalist physicians per capita was positively associated with the single-vendor strategy (B = -5.64, p = .10). Hospitals in urban markets were more likely to pursue the best-of-suite strategy (B = 0.622, p < .001). Dynamism, measured as the number of managed care contracts for a given hospital, was negatively associated with the single-vendor strategy (B = 0.004, p = .049). Lastly, complexity, measured as market competition, was positively associated with the best-of-breed strategy (B = 0.623, p = .042). : By and large, environmental factors are associated with hospital HIT management strategies in mostly theoretically supported ways. Hospital leaders and policy makers interested in influencing the adoption of hospital HIT should consider how market conditions influence HIT management decisions as part of programs to promote meaningful use.

  14. SOIL NITROGEN MANAGEMENT AND INVASION RESISTANCE

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Invasion by annual grasses, such as medusahead (Taeniatherum. caput-medusae (L.) Nevski), into the Great Basin sagebrush steppe is a major concern of ecologists and resource managers. Maintaining or improving ecosystem health depends on our ability to protect or re-establish functioning, desired pl...

  15. Impact of set-aside management on soil mesofauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Silvia; d'Errico, Giada; Mazza, Giuseppe; Mocali, Stefano; Bazzoffi, Paolo; Roversi, Pio Federico

    2014-05-01

    To contrast the biodiversity decline, the current Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) 2014-2020 responds to urgent environmental challenges and provides some new greening attempts as pastures, rotations, orchard grasses, ecological set-aside and organic farming. This study, supported by the Italian National Project MONACO (MIPAAF), aims to provide preliminary indications about the ecological impact of set-aside on soil biodiversity. Soil invertebrates, mainly nematodes and microarthropods, are excellent candidates to study the human activity impacts on the environment. Indeed, invertebrates are abundant, relatively easy to sample, and they can quickly respond to soil disturbance. Nematode assemblages offer several advantages for assessing the quality of terrestrial ecosystems because of their permeable cuticle through which they are in direct contact with solvents in the soil capillary water. Moreover, nematodes have high diversity and represent a trophically heterogeneous group. The Maturity Index (MI), based on the nematode fauna, represents a gauge of the conditions of the soil ecosystem. Edaphic microarthropods play an important role in the soil system in organic matter degradation and nutrient cycling. They show morphological characters that reveal adaptation to soil environments, such as reduction or loss of pigmentation and visual apparatus, streamlined body form with appendages reduction, reduction or loss of flying, jumping or running adaptations, thinner cuticle for reduced water-retention capacity. The "Qualità Biologica del Suolo" (QBS) index, namely "Biological Quality of Soil", is based on the types of edaphic microarthropods to assess soil biological quality. Three different set-aside managements were compared with a conventional annual crop in three Italian sites (Caorle, VE; Fagna, FI; Metaponto, MT). After five years the biological quality of soils using MI and QBS was evaluated. Regarding nematodes, the family richness and the biological quality

  16. Soil health: an emergent set of soil properties that result from synergy among agricultural management practices

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The responses of a selected soil microbial property to a single agricultural management practice are often inconsistent among field studies, possibly reflecting the site-specific nature of field studies. An equally compelling explanation is that in complex systems where outcomes are the result of n...

  17. Strategies to address management challenges in larger intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Matlakala, M C; Bezuidenhout, M C; Botha, A D H

    2015-10-01

    To illustrate the need for and suggest strategies that will enhance sustainable management of a large intensive care unit (ICU). The challenges faced by intensive care nursing in South Africa are well documented. However, there appear to be no strategies available to assist nurses to manage large ICUs or for ICU managers to deal with problems as they arise. Data sources to illustrate the need for strategies were challenges described by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. A purposive sample of managers was included in individual interviews during compilation of evidence regarding the challenges experienced in the management of large ICUs. The challenges were presented at the Critical Care Society of Southern Africa Congress held on 28 August to 2 September 2012 in Sun City North-West province, South Africa. Five strategies are suggested for the challenges identified: divide the units into sections; develop a highly skilled and effective nursing workforce to ensure delivery of quality nursing care; create a culture to retain an effective ICU nursing team; manage assets; and determine the needs of ICU nurses. ICUs need measures to drive the desired strategies into actions to continuously improve the management of the unit. Future research should be aimed at investigating the effectiveness of the strategies identified. This research highlights issues relating to large ICUs and the strategies will assist ICU managers to deal with problems related to large unit sizes, shortage of trained ICU nurses, use of agency nurses, shortage of equipment and supplies and stressors in the ICU. The article will make a contribution to the body of nursing literature on management of ICUs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A soil quality and metabolic activity assessment after fifty-seven years of agricultural management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil quality assessment is a proactive process for understanding the long-term effects of soil and crop management practices within agricultural watersheds. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of management on the soil quality in fields with 57 yrs of known management history. The f...

  19. Impact of 57 years of management on the soil quality of a Vertisol in Central Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil quality assessment is a proactive process for understanding the long-term effects of soil and crop management practices within agricultural watersheds. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of management on the soil quality in fields where the management history is known for clos...

  20. Modelling the impact of agricultural management on soil carbon stocks at the regional scale: the role of lateral fluxes.

    PubMed

    Nadeu, Elisabet; Gobin, Anne; Fiener, Peter; van Wesemael, Bas; van Oost, Kristof

    2015-08-01

    Agricultural management has received increased attention over the last decades due to its central role in carbon (C) sequestration and greenhouse gas mitigation. Yet, regardless of the large body of literature on the effects of soil erosion by tillage and water on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks in agricultural landscapes, the significance of soil redistribution for the overall C budget and the C sequestration potential of land management options remains poorly quantified. In this study, we explore the role of lateral SOC fluxes in regional scale modelling of SOC stocks under three different agricultural management practices in central Belgium: conventional tillage (CT), reduced tillage (RT) and reduced tillage with additional carbon input (RT+i). We assessed each management scenario twice: using a conventional approach that did not account for lateral fluxes and an alternative approach that included soil erosion-induced lateral SOC fluxes. The results show that accounting for lateral fluxes increased C sequestration rates by 2.7, 2.5 and 1.5 g C m(-2)  yr(-1) for CT, RT and RT+i, respectively, relative to the conventional approach. Soil redistribution also led to a reduction of SOC concentration in the plough layer and increased the spatial variability of SOC stocks, suggesting that C sequestration studies relying on changes in the plough layer may underestimate the soil's C sequestration potential due to the effects of soil erosion. Additionally, lateral C export from cropland was in the same of order of magnitude as C sequestration; hence, the fate of C exported from cropland into other land uses is crucial to determine the ultimate impact of management and erosion on the landscape C balance. Consequently, soil management strategies targeting C sequestration will be most effective when accompanied by measures that reduce soil erosion given that erosion loss can balance potential C uptake, particularly in sloping areas. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. High resolution digital soil mapping as a future instrument for developing sustainable landuse strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gries, Philipp; Funke, Lisa-Marie; Baumann, Frank; Schmidt, Karsten; Behrens, Thorsten; Scholten, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Climate change, increase in population and intensification of land use pose a great challenge for sustainable handling of soils. Intelligent landuse systems are able to minimize and/or avoid soil erosion and loss of soil fertility. A successful application of such systems requires area-wide soil information with high resolution. Containing three consecutive steps, the project INE-2-H („innovative sustainable landuse") at the University of Tuebingen is about creating high-resolution soil information using Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) techniques to develop sustainable landuse strategies. Input data includes soil data from fieldwork (texture and carbon content), the official digital soil and geological map (1:50.000) as well as a wide selection of local, complex and combined terrain parameters. First, soil maps have been created using the DSM approach and Random Forest (RF). Due to high resolution (10x10 m pixels), those maps show a more detailed spatial variability of soil information compared to the official maps used. Root mean square errors (RMSE) of the modelled maps vary from 2.11 % to 6.87 % and the coefficients of determination (R²) go from 0.42 to 0.68. Second, soil erosion potentials have been estimated according to the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). Long-term average annual soil loss ranges from 0.56 to 24.23 [t/ha/a]. Third, combining high-resolution erosion potentials with expert-knowledge of local farmers will result in a landuse system adapted to local conditions. This system will include sustainable strategies reducing soil erosion and conserving soil fertility.

  2. Strategies used for managing symptoms by women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Kengen Traska, Theresa; Rutledge, Dana N; Mouttapa, Michele; Weiss, Jie; Aquino, Jordan

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this study was to describe how persons with fibromyalgia manage their lives given the multiple symptoms they experience, in particular how they use non-pharmacologic strategies, or how they incorporate these strategies along with pharmacologic agents. Persons with fibromyalgia, a widespread chronic pain condition, often suffer from considerable fatigue, sleep disturbances and morning stiffness. Medical management does not lead to a cure, and sufferers must self-manage to maintain a good quality of life. This qualitative descriptive study used group interview methodology. Data were obtained from eight women with fibromyalgia. Women's mean age was 61 (range 54-81). Participants were invited to participate in a 90- minute group interview focused on symptom management. In the interview, open-ended questions allowed them to speak freely about managing multiple fibromyalgia symptoms. Content analysis by the first and second authors led to the identification of themes, which were validated by the co-authors who attended the interviews. Participants reported many strategies to cope with fibromyalgia symptoms and manage their lives. Main strategies included: 'pacing/planning', 'distraction techniques', 'coping with touch sensitivity', 'putting on the mask' and 'medications'. In addition, 'social support' from others with fibromyalgia and from family members was reported to be very important. Study findings demonstrate that women with fibromyalgia can develop strategies that enable them to cope with a life encumbered with chronic pain and fatigue. Moreover, this study confirmed effective fibromyalgia management strategies reported in other studies. Further research is needed on risks/benefits of these and other self-management strategies used by women with fibromyalgia. Our findings suggest that nurses should discuss the self-management strategies found with persons who have fibromyalgia in the context of individual patient experiences. © 2011 Blackwell

  3. Osteoarthritis 2: pain management and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Swift, Amelia

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful, progressive joint disorder. This article discusses pharmacological management of OA, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids, and non-pharmacological management, including weight reduction, acupuncture and joint replacement surgery. The third part, to be published online, will cover the physical, psychological and social impact of OA.

  4. 10 Budget-Savvy Content Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Facing an overall budget reduction of 10 percent, most colleges or universities would postpone investing in a Web content management system. However, for California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB), a large budget cut made Web content management even more important. CSUMB found an innovative way to purchase and implement a new Content…

  5. Teaching Self-Management Strategies to Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, K. Richard; And Others

    This book presents a behavioral program to teach adolescents basic self-management skills; two chapters provide the theoretical basis for the program and four chapters supply sample lesson plans. The first chapter is an introduction to behavioral self-management. It proposes a behavior change model with four major components: assessment,…

  6. 10 Budget-Savvy Content Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Facing an overall budget reduction of 10 percent, most colleges or universities would postpone investing in a Web content management system. However, for California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB), a large budget cut made Web content management even more important. CSUMB found an innovative way to purchase and implement a new Content…

  7. Comparison of EDTA-enhanced phytoextraction and phytostabilisation strategies with Lolium perenne on a heavy metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Thomas; Gustot, Quentin; Couder, Eléonore; Houben, David; Iserentant, Anne; Lutts, Stanley

    2011-11-01

    Phytoremediation is a promising and cost-effective strategy to manage heavy metal polluted sites. In this experiment, we compared simultaneously phytoextraction and phytostabilisation techniques on a Cd and Zn contaminated soil, through monitoring of plant accumulation and leaching. Lolium perenne plants were cultivated for 2 months under controlled environmental conditions in a 27.6 dm(3)-pot experiment allowing the collect of leachates. The heavy metal phytoextraction was promoted by adding Na-EDTA (0.5 g kg(-1) of soil) in watering solution. Phytostabilisation was assessed by mixing soil with steel shots (1%) before L. perenne sowing. Presence of plants exacerbated heavy metal leaching, by improving soil hydraulic conductivity. Use of EDTA for phytoextraction led to higher concentration of heavy metal in shoots. However, this higher heavy metal extraction was insufficient to satisfactory reduce the heavy metal content in soil, and led to important heavy metal leaching induced by EDTA. On the other hand, addition of steel shots efficiently decreased both Cd and Zn mobility, according to 0.01 M CaCl(2) extraction, and leaching. However, improvement of growth conditions by steel shots led to higher heavy metal mass in shoot tissues. Therefore, soil heavy metal mobility and plant metal uptake are not systematically positively correlated.

  8. Strategies and algorithms for management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Thomas; Gerig, Hans J; Henderson, John J

    2005-12-01

    Management of the difficult airway is the most important patient safety issue in the practice of anaesthesia. Many national societies have developed algorithms and guidelines for management of the difficult airway. The key issues of this chapter are definition of terms, the advantages and disadvantages of the use of guidelines, and a comparison of different algorithms and guidelines for management of the most important clinical airway scenarios. Although there is no strong evidence of benefit for any specific strategy or algorithm for management of the difficult airway, there is strong agreement that a pre-planned strategy may lead to improved outcome.

  9. Using scenario analysis to determine managed care strategy.

    PubMed

    Krentz, S E; Gish, R S

    2000-09-01

    In today's volatile healthcare environment, traditional planning tools are inadequate to guide financial managers of provider organizations in developing managed care strategies. These tools often disregard the uncertainty surrounding market forces such as employee benefit structure, the future of Medicare managed care, and the impact of consumer behavior. Scenario analysis overcomes this limitation by acknowledging the uncertain healthcare environment and articulating a set of plausible alternative futures, thus supplying financial executives with the perspective to craft strategies that can improve the market position of their organizations. By being alert for trigger points that might signal the rise of a specific scenario, financial managers can increase their preparedness for changes in market forces.

  10. Effectiveness of soil conservation strategies on erosion in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmansour, Moncef; Mabit, Lionel; Moussadek, Rachid; Yassin, Mohamed; Nouira, Asmae; Zouagui, Anis; Mrabet, Rachid; Iaaich, Hamza; Hajib, Said

    2016-04-01

    - In Morocco, reducing soil erosion and land degradation is a national priority for improving soil quality and protecting downstream water quality and quantity. The combined use of Cs-137 and Be-7 techniques permit to estimate long and short term erosion and deposition magnitudes under different agro-environment and climatic conditions and then to evaluate the effectiveness of soil conservation practices. Case studies using Cs-137 and Be-7 were carried out in three Moroccan agricultural sites: Marchouch, Harchane and Oued Mellah located in Rabat, Tétouan and Chaouia-Ouardigha regions, respectively. In these sites, fallout Cs-137 measurements allowed a retrospective assessment of long term (50-60 years) soil redistribution rates while fallout Be-7 (half-life of 53 days) was used to document short term soil erosion associated with rainfall events for different tillage systems and land uses. Long term soil erosion rates of the three regions evaluated by the Cs-137 method, ranged from 8 to 58 t/ha/yr. Mostly located in the upslope part of the fields, the eroding zones represented more than 70% of the total area. For the experimental sites in Rabat and Tétouan, the results obtained using Be-7 indicated that soil loss has been reduced significantly under no-till as compared to conventional tillage. Indeed, soil erosion rates were lowered by 50% for the Marchouch site and by 40% for the Harchane site. Concerning the Oued Mellah watershed, the results highlighted that high density Atriplex plantations have reduced soil loss by approximately 60 to 80%, while for the site under fruit plantations and cereals, soil erosion has been decreased by 58%.

  11. Managed bioremediation of soil contaminated with crude oil - soil chemistry and microbial ecology three years later

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, K.; Levetin, E.; Wells, H. |

    1997-12-31

    Analysis of samples taken from three experimental soil lysimeters demonstrated marked long-term effects of managed bioremediation on soil chemistry and on bacterial and fungal communities 3 yr after the application of crude oil or crude oil and fertilizer. The lysimeters were originally used to evaluate the short-term effectiveness of managed (application of fertilizer and water, one lysimeter) vs unmanaged bioremediation (one lysimeter) of Michigan Silurian crude oil compared to one uncontaminated control lysimeter. Three years following the original experiment, five 2-ft-long soil cores were extracted from each lysimeter, each divided into three sections, and the like sections mixed together to form composited soil samples. All subsequent chemical and microbiological analyses were performed on these nine composited samples. Substantial variation was found among the lysimeters for certain soil chemical characteristics (% moisture, pH, total Kjeldahl nitrogen [TKN], ammonia nitrogen [NH{sub 4}-N], phosphate phosphorous [PO{sub 4}-P], and sulfate [SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}]). 3 refs., 6 figs.

  12. The effects of different soil cover management practices on plant biodiversity and soil properties in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzaric, Suzana; Aly, Adel; Ladisa, Gaetano; Calabrese, Generosa

    2014-05-01

    The effects of different soil cover management practices on plant biodiversity and soil properties in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards Madzaric S., Aly A., Ladisa G. and Calabrese G. The loss of natural plant cover due to the inappropriate soil cover management is often a decisive factor for soil degradation in Mediterranean area. This accompanied with typical climate, characterized by cool, wet winters and hot and dry summers leads to soil erosion and loss of productivity. Due to simplification of agricultural practice and to the attempt to decrease cost of production, keeping soil bare is a widespread agricultural practice in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards (AOOs). The consequences of this are degradation of soil quality and reduction of plant biodiversity. In last year's some alternative practices are proposed in order to protect soil and biodiversity. One of these practices is the "grassing" i.e. covering the soil by selected autochthonous plant species. Objectives of our study are: (1) to evaluate impact of different soil cover management practices on soil properties and plant biodiversity in AOOs and (2) to define a minimum indicators' set (Minimum Data Set - MDS) to evaluate the effectiveness of different agricultural practices in environmental performance of AOOs. A comparison was carried on considering two management systems (conventional vs. organic) and three agricultural practices: conventional with bare soil (CON), organic with soil covered by selected autochthonous species (MIX) and organic left to the native vegetation (NAT). In general a clear positive influence of organic management system was recognized. Some soil quality indicators (physical, chemical and biological) showed responsiveness in describing the effects of management system and agricultural practices on soil properties. The both approaches with vegetation cover on the soil surface (either sowing of mixture or soil left to the natural plant cover) performed better than

  13. Delineating site-specific irrigation management units for managing soil salinity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop yield varies within fields due to nonuniformity of a number of factors including climate, pests, disease, management, topography, and soil. Conventional farming manages a field uniformly; as a result, conventional farming tends to wastes resources and money, and tends to detrimentally impact t...

  14. Spatial strategies for managing visitor impacts in National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leung, Y.-F.; Marion, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Resource and social impacts caused by recreationists and tourists have become a management concern in national parks and equivalent protected areas. The need to contain visitor impacts within acceptable limits has prompted park and protected area managers to implement a wide variety of strategies and actions, many of which are spatial in nature. This paper classifies and illustrates the basic spatial strategies for managing visitor impacts in parks and protected areas. A typology of four spatial strategies was proposed based on the recreation and park management literature. Spatial segregation is a common strategy for shielding sensitive resources from visitor impacts or for separating potentially conflicting types of use. Two forms of spatial segregation are zoning and closure. A spatial containment strategy is intended to minimize the aggregate extent of visitor impacts by confining use to limited designated or established Iocations. In contrast, a spatial dispersal strategy seeks to spread visitor use, reducing the frequency of use to levels that avoid or minimize permanent resource impacts or visitor crowding and conflict. Finally, a spatial configuration strategy minimizes impacting visitor behavior though the judicious spatial arrangement of facilities. These four spatial strategics can be implemented separately or in combination at varying spatial scales within a single park. A survey of national park managers provides an empirical example of the diversity of implemented spatial strategies in managing visitor impacts. Spatial segregation is frequently applied in the form of camping restrictions or closures to protect sensitive natural or cultural resources and to separate incompatible visitor activities. Spatial containment is the most widely applied strategy for minimizing the areal extent of resource impacts. Spatial dispersal is commonly applied to reduce visitor crowding or conflicts in popular destination areas but is less frequently applied or

  15. HMO strategies for managing workers' compensation claims.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, P A

    1996-03-01

    Health maintenance organizations (HMOs) have become very active in managing workers' compensation medical expense benefits. A survey of 316 HMOs shows that this activity takes the form of various network models and a range of services--such as utilization review and case management--that may not be linked to a provider network. Of the HMOs surveyed, 78 reported that, by using managed care services and provider discounts, they were able to save from 20 percent to 30 percent on occupational health claim costs.

  16. Adaptive Management as an Effective Strategy: Interdisciplinary Perceptions for Natural Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiss, Lindsay M.; Hessenauer, Jan-Michael; Nathan, Lucas R.; O'Connor, Kelly M.; Liberati, Marjorie R.; Kloster, Danielle P.; Barclay, Janet R.; Vokoun, Jason C.; Morzillo, Anita T.

    2017-02-01

    Adaptive management is a well-established approach to managing natural resources, but there is little evidence demonstrating effectiveness of adaptive management over traditional management techniques. Peer-reviewed literature attempts to draw conclusions about adaptive management effectiveness using social perceptions, but those studies are largely restricted to employees of US federal organizations. To gain a more comprehensive insight into perceived adaptive management effectiveness, this study aimed to broaden the suite of disciplines, professional affiliations, and geographic backgrounds represented by both practitioners and scholars. A questionnaire contained a series of questions concerning factors that lead to or inhibit effective management, followed by another set of questions focused on adaptive management. Using a continuum representing strategies of both adaptive management and traditional management, respondents selected those strategies that they perceived as being effective. Overall, characteristics (i.e., strategies, stakeholders, and barriers) identified by respondents as contributing to effective management closely aligned with adaptive management. Responses were correlated to the type of adaptive management experience rather than an individual's discipline, occupational, or regional affiliation. In particular, perceptions of characteristics contributing to adaptive management effectiveness varied between respondents who identified as adaptive management scholars (i.e., no implementation experience) and adaptive management practitioners. Together, these results supported two concepts that make adaptive management effective: practitioners emphasized adaptive management's value as a long-term approach and scholars noted the importance of stakeholder involvement. Even so, more communication between practitioners and scholars regarding adaptive management effectiveness could promote interdisciplinary learning and problem solving for improved

  17. Adaptive Management as an Effective Strategy: Interdisciplinary Perceptions for Natural Resources Management.

    PubMed

    Dreiss, Lindsay M; Hessenauer, Jan-Michael; Nathan, Lucas R; O'Connor, Kelly M; Liberati, Marjorie R; Kloster, Danielle P; Barclay, Janet R; Vokoun, Jason C; Morzillo, Anita T

    2017-02-01

    Adaptive management is a well-established approach to managing natural resources, but there is little evidence demonstrating effectiveness of adaptive management over traditional management techniques. Peer-reviewed literature attempts to draw conclusions about adaptive management effectiveness using social perceptions, but those studies are largely restricted to employees of US federal organizations. To gain a more comprehensive insight into perceived adaptive management effectiveness, this study aimed to broaden the suite of disciplines, professional affiliations, and geographic backgrounds represented by both practitioners and scholars. A questionnaire contained a series of questions concerning factors that lead to or inhibit effective management, followed by another set of questions focused on adaptive management. Using a continuum representing strategies of both adaptive management and traditional management, respondents selected those strategies that they perceived as being effective. Overall, characteristics (i.e., strategies, stakeholders, and barriers) identified by respondents as contributing to effective management closely aligned with adaptive management. Responses were correlated to the type of adaptive management experience rather than an individual's discipline, occupational, or regional affiliation. In particular, perceptions of characteristics contributing to adaptive management effectiveness varied between respondents who identified as adaptive management scholars (i.e., no implementation experience) and adaptive management practitioners. Together, these results supported two concepts that make adaptive management effective: practitioners emphasized adaptive management's value as a long-term approach and scholars noted the importance of stakeholder involvement. Even so, more communication between practitioners and scholars regarding adaptive management effectiveness could promote interdisciplinary learning and problem solving for improved

  18. Agricultural drainage water management: Potential impact and implementation strategies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The unique soil and climate of the Upper Mississippi River Basin (and the Lake Erie Basin) area provide the resources for bountiful agricultural production. Agricultural drainage (both surface and subsurface drainage) is essential for achieving economically viable crop production and management. Dra...

  19. Emphysematous pyelonephritis with calculus: Management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Tanmaya; Reddy, Sreedhar; Thomas, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) with calculus is well recognized but with very few reports on its treatment. Our aim is to elucidate our experience in its successful management. Materials and Methods: Over four years, we diagnosed seven cases (eight renal units) of EPN, out of which two patients (three renal units) had EPN with urinary calculi. After the initial conservative management of EPN, the stones were tackled appropriately. Results: EPN was initially managed effectively with antibiotics and supportive care. Once the patient was stable, the stones were cleared in a step-wise fashion. The associated postoperative complications were also tackled efficiently with preservation of renal function. Conclusion: In EPN with stones, nephrectomy is not the sole option available and they can be effectively managed with open / endoscopic measures. PMID:19718324

  20. Fibromyalgia: management strategies for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Arnold, L M; Gebke, K B; Choy, E H S

    2016-02-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic disorder defined by widespread pain, often accompanied by fatigue and sleep disturbance, affects up to one in 20 patients in primary care. Although most patients with FM are managed in primary care, diagnosis and treatment continue to present a challenge, and patients are often referred to specialists. Furthermore, the lack of a clear patient pathway often results in patients being passed from specialist to specialist, exhaustive investigations, prescription of multiple drugs to treat different symptoms, delays in diagnosis, increased disability and increased healthcare resource utilisation. We will discuss the current and evolving understanding of FM, and recommend improvements in the management and treatment of FM, highlighting the role of the primary care physician, and the place of the medical home in FM management. We reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of FM by searching PubMed and references from relevant articles, and selected articles on the basis of quality, relevance to the illness and importance in illustrating current management pathways and the potential for future improvements. The implementation of a framework for chronic pain management in primary care would limit unnecessary, time-consuming, and costly tests, reduce diagnostic delay and improve patient outcomes. The patient-centred medical home (PCMH), a management framework that has been successfully implemented in other chronic diseases, might improve the care of patients with FM in primary care, by bringing together a team of professionals with a range of skills and training. Although there remain several barriers to overcome, implementation of a PCMH would allow patients with FM, like those with other chronic conditions, to be successfully managed in the primary care setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Land use and management in PR China: problems and strategies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Y

    1990-10-01

    The conflict between population and land in China results from high population density, declining availability of arable land, decrease in cropland, overgrazing, inability to afford imported grain, and expansion of land use for urbanization. Unwise decisions have been made. These decisions have resulted in land degradation, soil erosion, deforestation, degradation of grasslands, waste of land for freight storage or waste disposal due to low grain prices, and nonagricultural constructions on croplands. Ineffective land management problems are identified as: 1) the lack of an economic means of guiding land use and land is not valued; the lack of any mechanism to ensure economic land use including public lands which are not accounted for with rent; 2) the lack of integration of departments into the decision making structure and too many departments making decisions about the same land; 3) the lack of choice in land use which results in higher government departments being unaware of local conditions, and the lack of appropriate investment which results in short-term exploitation; and 4) surveys are inadequate for decision making. The strategies suggested for improvement in land use management include low resources expenditure in production and appropriate goods consumption. The goal is to sustain subsistence with gradual improvement through development. Land resources must be conserved and the environment protected. The solutions to depend on food imports or reduce the nutritional level deny the equally plausible solution to generate a higher level of input. The profit motive and scientific agricultural practices could accomplish this end. Reclamation for cropland is possible for 8 million hectares of wasteland in wide areas in Sanjiang Plain and 3.4 million hectares in small pockets in Eastern Monsoon China. Traditional agriculture must be transformed and an optimum scale of land operation established. Land tenure reform is necessary. Regional conditions must prevail

  2. [Nutrient management strategy of paddy rice-upland crop rotation system].

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming-Sheng; Jiang, Rong-Feng; Zhang, Fu-Suo; Lü, Shi-Hua; Liu, Xue-Jun

    2008-02-01

    Paddy rice-upland crop rotation system is a major cropping system in China, and practiced widely along the Yangtze River basin. A unique feature of this system is the annual conversion of soil from aerobic to anaerobic and then back to aerobic condition, which can result in the changes of soil physical, chemical, and biological prosperities among seasons, making a special agroecosystem. The major challenges faced by this system include declining or stagnating productivity, increasing shortage of irrigation water, improper management of nutrients, low efficiency of resource utilization, and environmental pollution. Based on an overview of the characteristics and problems of paddy rice-upland crop rotation system, this paper put forward a strategy of practicing integrated nutrient management to solve the contradictions between nutrient input, crop production and environmental risk. The key points of this strategy included nutrient management from the whole rotation system perspective, integrated use of nutrients from various sources (chemical fertilizers, organic fertilizers, and nutrients from the environment), synchronization of nutrient supply and crop nutrient demand, application of different management technologies based on the characteristics of different nutrient resources, and integration of nutrient management with other cropping system technologies like water saving and high-yielding cultivation, etc.

  3. Knowledge Management and the Competitive Strategy of the Firm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halawi, Leila A.; McCarthy, Richard V.; Aronson, Jay E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Knowledge management (KM) has emerged as a strategy to improve organizational competitiveness. Our purpose is to identify the relationship between KM and the firm's competitive advantage. Design/methodology/approach: We review the existing literature on KM and strategy formulation. We utilize the resource-based view approach as a lens for…

  4. Knowledge Management and the Competitive Strategy of the Firm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halawi, Leila A.; McCarthy, Richard V.; Aronson, Jay E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Knowledge management (KM) has emerged as a strategy to improve organizational competitiveness. Our purpose is to identify the relationship between KM and the firm's competitive advantage. Design/methodology/approach: We review the existing literature on KM and strategy formulation. We utilize the resource-based view approach as a lens for…

  5. Analysis of Human Resources Management Strategy in China Electronic Commerce Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Fang

    The paper discussed electronic-commerce's influence on enterprise human resources management, proposed and proved the human resources management strategy which electronic commerce enterprise should adopt from recruitment strategy to training strategy, keeping talent strategy and other ways.

  6. Effect of land management on soil properties in flood irrigated citrus orchards in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugán-Coronado, A.; García-Orenes, F.; Cerdà, A.

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural land management greatly affects soil properties. Microbial soil communities are the most sensitive and rapid indicators of perturbations in land use and soil enzyme activities are sensitive biological indicators of the effects of soil management practices. Citrus orchards frequently have degraded soils and this paper evaluates how land management in citrus orchards can improve soil quality. A field experiment was performed in an orchard of orange trees (Citrus Sinensis) in the Alcoleja Experimental Station (Eastern Spain) with clay-loam agricultural soils to assess the long-term effects of herbicides with inorganic fertilizers (H), intensive ploughing and inorganic fertilizers (P) and organic farming (O) on the soil microbial properties, and to study the relationship between them. Nine soil samples were taken from each agricultural management plot. In all the samples the basal soil respiration, soil microbial biomass carbon, water holding capacity, electrical conductivity, soil organic matter, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, available potassium, aggregate stability, cation exchange capacity, pH, texture, macronutrients (Na, Ca and Mg), micronutrients (Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu), calcium carbonate equivalent, calcium carbonate content of limestone and enzimatic activities (urease, dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase and acid phosphatase) were determined. The results showed a substantial level of differentiation in the microbial properties, which were highly associated with soil organic matter content. The management practices including herbicides and intensive ploughing had similar results on microbial soil properties. O management contributed to an increase in the soil biology quality, aggregate stability and organic matter content.

  7. A strategy for the survey of urban garden soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, C.; Chenot, E. D.; Cortet, J.; Douay, F.; Dumat, C.; Pernin, C.; Pourrut, B.

    2012-04-01

    In France and all over the world, there is no systematic data available on the quality (fertility and contamination) of garden soils. Nevertheless, there is a growing need for a typology and for a method dedicated to national and international garden soil survey. This inventory is much needed in the context of environmental risk assessment, to predict the potential impact on human health of the direct contact with garden soils and of the consumption of vegetables from gardens. The state of the art on the international knowledge on garden soils, gardening practices and food production, shows that gardens remain poorly known and very complex ecological, economical and social systems. Their global quality is the result of a wide number of factors including environment, history, specific characteristics of the gardens, gardeners and their practices, plant and/or animal productions and socio-economic context. The aim is then to better know the determinism of the agronomic, environmental and sanitary properties of gardens as a function of gardening practices and their impact on the quality of soils and plants. We propose a definition of "garden" and more generally of all the field "garden". The system "garden" is represented by attributes (soil and plant characteristics) and factors with various impacts (e.g. environment > soil parent material > former land uses > age and sex of gardener > gardening practices > socio-professional group > type and proportion of productions > climate > age of the garden > size of the garden > education, information > cultural origin > functions of the garden > regulations). A typology of gardens including 7 selected factors and associated categories and a method for describing, sampling and characterizing a population of gardens representative (for a country) are proposed. Based on the statistical analysis on regional databases, we have determined and proposed an optimum size for the collected population of garden soils. The discussion of

  8. Strategies for initial management of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajeev; Guptha, Soneil

    2010-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) is a major public health problem in India and its prevalence is rapidly increasing among urban and rural populations. Reducing systolic and diastolic BP can decrease cardiovascular risk and this can be achieved by non-pharmacological (lifestyle measures) as well as pharmacological means. Lifestyle changes should be the initial approach to hypertension management and include dietary interventions (reducing salt, increasing potassium, alcohol avoidance, and multifactorial diet control), weight reduction, tobacco cessation, physical exercise, and stress management. A number of pharmaceutical agents, well evidenced by large randomized clinical trials, are available for initial treatment of high BP. These include older molecules such as thiazide diuretics and beta-blocking agents and newer molecules, dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers (CCB), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). In view of the recent clinical trials data, some international guidelines suggest that CCB, ACE inhibitors or ARB and not beta-blockers or diuretics should be the initial therapy in hypertension management. Comprehensive hypertension management focuses on reducing overall cardiovascular risk by lifestyle measures, BP lowering and lipid management and should be the preferred initial treatment approach. PMID:21150005

  9. LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE SUPPLIES OF BIOENERGY FEEDSTOCK AND ENHANCED SOIL QUALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth, Jr.

    2012-09-01

    Agriculture can simultaneously address global food, feed, fiber, and energy challenges provided our soil, water, and air resources are not compromised in doing so. As we embark on the 19th Triennial Conference of the International Soil and Tillage Research Organization (ISTRO), I am pleased to proclaim that our members are well poised to lead these endeavors because of our comprehensive understanding of soil, water, agricultural and bio-systems engineering processes. The concept of landscape management, as an approach for integrating multiple bioenergy feedstock sources, including biomass residuals, into current crop production systems, is used as the focal point to show how these ever-increasing global challenges can be met in a sustainable manner. Starting with the 2005 Billion Ton Study (BTS) goals, research and technology transfer activities leading to the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Revised Billion Ton Study (BT2) and development of a residue management tool to guide sustainable crop residue harvest will be reviewed. Multi-location USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Renewable Energy Assessment Project (REAP) team research and on-going partnerships between public and private sector groups will be shared to show the development of landscape management strategies that can simultaneously address the multiple factors that must be balanced to meet the global challenges. Effective landscape management strategies recognize the importance of nature’s diversity and strive to emulate those conditions to sustain multiple critical ecosystem services. To illustrate those services, the soil quality impact of harvesting crop residues are presented to show how careful, comprehensive monitoring of soil, water and air resources must be an integral part of sustainable bioenergy feedstock production systems. Preliminary analyses suggest that to sustain soil resources within the U.S. Corn Belt, corn (Zea mays L.) stover should not be harvested if average grain

  10. Validation of sensor-directed spatial simulated annealing soil sampling strategy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil spatial variability has a profound influence on most agronomical and environmental processes at field- and landscape-scales, including: site-specific management, vadose zone hydrology and transport, and soil quality, to mention a few. Mobile sensors are a practical means of mapping spatial vari...

  11. Meralgia paresthetica: diagnosis and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Harney, Donal; Patijn, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica (MP), coined from the Greek words meros (thigh and algos), meaning pain, is a neurological disorder characterized by a localized area of paresthesia and numbness on the anterolateral aspect of the thigh. The incidence of MP is more common than often reported in the literature. The etiology of MP includes mechanical factors such as obesity, pregnancy, and other conditions associated with increased intrabdominal pressure, surgery of the spine, and pelvic osteotomy. A coherent history and pertinent physical examination is essential in making the diagnosis; however, red flags such as tumor and lumbar disk herniations must be recognized and appropriately treated. While the diagnosis of MP is essentially a clinical diagnosis, sensory nerve conduction velocity studies are a useful adjunctive diagnostic tool. The management of MP includes treating the underlying cause (if any) and conservative management. Surgery should only be adopted when all nonoperative therapies have failed to manage the condition in an effective manner.

  12. Management Strategies for Mycosis Fungoides in India

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhury, Tanumay

    2017-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The approach to diagnosis and further follow-up is outlined. Evidence for interventions is based classically on a Tumor Node Metastasis Blood TNMB “stage-based” approach. The treatment options in India are limited. The options as per risk stratification and prognostic index are discussed. Early stages and low-risk patients can be managed with expectant policy or skin-directed therapies including topical steroids and phototherapy; intermediate-risk patients can be opted for interferons or retinoids or low dose methotrexate along with radiotherapy including total skin electron beam therapy while high-risk patients are managed most often with single agent or multiagent palliative chemotherapy. Patients who are intermediate- or high-risk need management by a multispecialty team at tertiary care centers. PMID:28400632

  13. Municipal solid waste management strategies in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turan, N Gamze; Coruh, Semra; Akdemir, Andaç; Ergun, Osman Nuri

    2009-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a major environmental problem in Turkey, as in many developing countries. Problems associated with municipal solid waste are difficult to address, but efforts towards more efficient collection and transportation and environmentally acceptable waste disposal continue in Turkey. Although strict regulations on the management of solid waste are in place, primitive disposal methods such as open dumping and discharge into surface water have been used in various parts of Turkey. This study presents a brief history of the legislative trends in Turkey for MSW management. The study also presents the MSW responsibility and management structure together with the present situation of generation, composition, recycling, and treatment. The results show that approximately 25 million ton of MSW are generated annually in Turkey. About 77% of the population receives MSW services. In spite of efforts to change open dumping areas into sanitary landfills and to build modern recycling and composting facilities, Turkey still has over 2000 open dumps.

  14. An instrument design and sample strategy for measuring soil respiration in the coastal temperate rain forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nay, S. M.; D'Amore, D. V.

    2009-12-01

    The coastal temperate rainforest (CTR) along the northwest coast of North America is a large and complex mosaic of forests and wetlands located on an undulating terrain ranging from sea level to thousands of meters in elevation. This biome stores a dynamic portion of the total carbon stock of North America. The fate of the terrestrial carbon stock is of concern due to the potential for mobilization and export of this store to both the atmosphere as carbon respiration flux and ocean as dissolved organic and inorganic carbon flux. Soil respiration is the largest export vector in the system and must be accurately measured to gain any comprehensive understanding of how carbon moves though this system. Suitable monitoring tools capable of measuring carbon fluxes at small spatial scales are essential for our understanding of carbon dynamics at larger spatial scales within this complex assemblage of ecosystems. We have adapted instrumentation and developed a sampling strategy for optimizing replication of soil respiration measurements to quantify differences among spatially complex landscape units of the CTR. We start with the design of the instrument to ease the technological, ergonomic and financial barriers that technicians encounter in monitoring the efflux of CO2 from the soil. Our sampling strategy optimizes the physical efforts of the field work and manages for the high variation of flux measurements encountered in this difficult environment of rough terrain, dense vegetation and wet climate. Our soil respirometer incorporates an infra-red gas analyzer (LiCor Inc. LI-820) and an 8300 cm3 soil respiration chamber; the device is durable, lightweight, easy to operate and can be built for under $5000 per unit. The modest unit price allows for a multiple unit fleet to be deployed and operated in an intensive field monitoring campaign. We use a large 346 cm2 collar to accommodate as much micro spatial variation as feasible and to facilitate repeated measures for tracking

  15. Classroom Management Strategies and Behavioral Interventions to Support Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpatrick, Robin Sue Holzworth

    2010-01-01

    This mixed method project study identified the need for effective classroom management strategies to dissuade student noncompliant behavior and to ensure academic success for all students. Enhancing classroom management practices is vital to improved student achievement and teacher self-efficacy. Within a constructivist framework, it is critical…

  16. A Strategy for Optimizing Item-Pool Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Adelaide; van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Item-pool management requires a balancing act between the input of new items into the pool and the output of tests assembled from it. A strategy for optimizing item-pool management is presented that is based on the idea of a periodic update of an optimal blueprint for the item pool to tune item production to test assembly. A simulation study with…

  17. Strategies for job creation through national forest management

    Treesearch

    Susan Charnley

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which national forest managers may contribute to community well-being by designing projects that accomplish forest management in ways that not only meet their ecological goals, but also create economic opportunities for nearby communities. The chapter summarizes a number of strategies for enhancing the economic benefits to communities...

  18. A Strategy for Optimizing Item-Pool Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Adelaide; van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Item-pool management requires a balancing act between the input of new items into the pool and the output of tests assembled from it. A strategy for optimizing item-pool management is presented that is based on the idea of a periodic update of an optimal blueprint for the item pool to tune item production to test assembly. A simulation study with…

  19. Classroom Management Strategies and Behavioral Interventions to Support Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpatrick, Robin Sue Holzworth

    2010-01-01

    This mixed method project study identified the need for effective classroom management strategies to dissuade student noncompliant behavior and to ensure academic success for all students. Enhancing classroom management practices is vital to improved student achievement and teacher self-efficacy. Within a constructivist framework, it is critical…

  20. A Policy Change Strategy for Head Lice Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, Kathleen; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to formulate an effective change strategy for head lice management in a group of five separate school districts within one county. Despite a desire to use evidence to support their practice, school nurses often encounter educational system barriers that prevent independent management of health conditions. The use of…

  1. Socioeconomic evaluation of broad-scale land management strategies.

    Treesearch

    Lisa K. Crone; Richard W. Haynes

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the socioeconomic effects of alternative management strategies for Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands in the interior Columbia basin. From a broad-scale perspective, there is little impact or variation between alternatives in terms of changes in total economic activity or social conditions in the region. However, adopting a finer...

  2. Delegation: Win-Win Strategies for Managing Early Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Jacqueline

    1999-01-01

    This issue of the Australian Early Childhood Association Research in Practice Series provides staff management strategies for directors and others involved with the management of early childhood settings and suggests ways to effectively delegate authority and tasks in order to reduce administrative pressures and workload. The booklet presents…

  3. An ecosystem management strategy for Sierran mixed-conifer forests

    Treesearch

    Malcolm North; Peter Stine; Kevin O' Hara; William Zielinski; Scott Stephens

    2009-01-01

    Current Sierra Nevada forest management is often focused on strategically reducing fuels without an explicit strategy for ecological restoration across the landscape matrix. Summarizing recent scientific literature, we suggest managers produce different stand structures and densities across the landscape using topographic variables (i.e., slope shape, aspect, and slope...

  4. Primary care referral management: a marketing strategy for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bender, A D; Geoghegan, S S; Lundquist, S H; Cantone, J M; Krasnick, C J

    1990-06-01

    With increasing competition among hospitals, primary care referral development and management programs offer an opportunity for hospitals to increase their admissions. Such programs require careful development, the commitment of the hospital staff to the strategy, an integration of hospital activities, and an understanding of medical practice management.

  5. A Policy Change Strategy for Head Lice Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, Kathleen; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to formulate an effective change strategy for head lice management in a group of five separate school districts within one county. Despite a desire to use evidence to support their practice, school nurses often encounter educational system barriers that prevent independent management of health conditions. The use of…

  6. Modeling the cumulative watershed effects of forest management strategies

    Treesearch

    R. R. Ziemer; J. Lewis; R. M. Rice; T. E. Lisle

    1991-01-01

    Abstract - There is increasing concern over the possibility of adverse cumulative watershed effects from intensive forest management. It is impractical to address many aspects of the problem experimentally because to do so would require studying large watersheds for 100 yr or more. One such aspect is the long-term effect of forest management strategies on erosion and...

  7. Ecological principles underpinning invasive plant management tools and strategies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The broad focus of ecologically-based invasive plant management is to identify and repair the ecological processes facilitating plant invasion. To be useful, however, EBIPM requires that our application of management tools and strategies be based on ecological principles that determine the rate and ...

  8. Multigeneration employees: strategies for effective management.

    PubMed

    Kupperschmidt, B R

    2000-09-01

    Today's health care workforce comprises Traditional, Baby Boomer, and Generation X employees. Effective managers must understand the times and generational characteristics of these employees and they must assure that employees understand and respect one another's differences. They must foster open discussion of how generational differences influence attitudes toward work and organizations. They must provide opportunities for multigeneration employees to contribute their best concurrent with meeting organizational goals. Employees must be offered a conditional security based upon value-added results and collaboration. Managers must use leadership practices that encourage the hearts of dispirited employees.

  9. Strategies for managing impressions of racial identity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Laura Morgan; Cha, Sandra E; Kim, Sung Soo

    2014-10-01

    This article deepens understanding of the workplace experiences of racial minorities by investigating racial identity-based impression management (RIM) by Asian American journalists. Racial centrality, directly or indirectly, predicted the use of 4 RIM strategies (avoidance, enhancement, affiliation, and racial humor). Professional centrality also predicted strategy use, which was related to life satisfaction and perceived career success. By shedding light on proactive strategies that individuals use to influence colleagues' impressions of their racial identity, we contribute to research on diversity in organizations, impression management, and racial identity.

  10. Increasing Efficiency of Water Use in Agriculture through Management of Soil Water Repellency to Optimize Soil and Water Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Demie; Kostka, Stan; McMillan, Mica; Gadd, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Water's ability to infiltrate and disperse in soils, and soil's ability to receive, transport, retain, filter and release water are important factors in the efficient use of water in agriculture. Deteriorating soil conditions, including development of soil water repellency, negatively impact hydrological processes and, consequently, the efficiency of rainfall and irrigation. Soil water repellency is increasingly being identified in diverse soils and cropping systems. Recently research has been conducted on the use of novel soil surfactants (co-formulations of alkyl polyglycoside and block copolymer surfactants) to avoid or overcome soil water repellency and enhance water distribution in soils. Results indicate that this is an effective and affordable approach to maintaining or restoring soil and water productivity in irrigated cropping systems. Results from studies conducted in Australia and the United States to determine how this technology modifies soil hydrological behavior and crop yields will be presented. A range of soils and various crops, including potatoes, corn, apples and grapes, were included. Several rates were compared to controls for effect on soil moisture levels, soil water distribution, and crop yield. An economic analysis was also conducted in some trials. Treatments improved rootzone water status, significantly increased crop yield and quality, and in some cases allowed significant reductions in water requirements. Where assessed, a positive economic return was generated. This technology holds promise as a strategy for increasing efficiency of water use in agriculture.

  11. Alertness Management Strategies for Operational Contexts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    or reproductive disorders. In addition, there is evidence from some studies that night work is associated with increased accide’nts. In fact, Folkard...behaviorally based strategies for avoiding insomnia in many situations, but in some cases, hypnotic medications or so- called "sleeping pills" may be necessary...preferable to being sleep deprived. Choosing the best hypnotic for each situation requires consideration of a variety of factors. From a strictly

  12. Population health management: a "start small" strategy.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Kathleen D

    2013-01-01

    Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI) is piloting population health management for a test population that comprises CHI employees and their families. CHI is using a medical home model to coordinate care. The system anticipates a reduction in its employee healthcare costs of 10 to 14 percent.

  13. Financial Planning and Management--New Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, William J.

    1979-01-01

    The goal of the future financial manager should be to educate college personnel to the level necessary to make balanced decisions. The challenge is to maintain the current operable systems and develop new approaches to maximize scarce resources through effective communication. (RC)

  14. Radiation Proctitis: Current Strategies in Management

    PubMed Central

    Do, Nhue L.; Nagle, Deborah; Poylin, Vitaliy Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation proctitis is a known complication following radiation therapy for pelvic malignancy. The majority of cases are treated nonsurgically, and an understanding of the available modalities is crucial in the management of these patients. In this paper, we focus on the current treatments of radiation proctitis. PMID:22144997

  15. Classroom Strategies: Classroom Management Systems. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speiss, Madeleine F.; And Others

    Classroom management is defined as procedures for arranging the classroom environment so that children learn what the teacher wants to teach them in the healthiest and most effective way possible. The Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory presents a discussion of these procedures as they relate to social controls and components of…

  16. Evaluation and experimentation with duck management strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Johnson, F.A.

    1989-01-01

    Our knowledge of the effects of hunting regulations on duck populations has been based largely on retrospective studies of historical data. We have reached the limits of what can be learned in this way. Future knowledge gains will likely come about only through experimentation and adaptive management.

  17. Evaluating Executive Strategies (Management Strategies and Teaching-Learning Strategies) of Graduate Curriculum: Case Study in Isfahan University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahmanpour, Muhammad; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Hatami, Mostafa; Mirzaee, Hamzeh

    2017-01-01

    The present study seeks to evaluate executive strategies in graduate Curriculum of Isfahan University from the point of view of management and teaching-learning strategies. This study is an applied survey. The population comprised BA students and faculty members of the University of Isfahan. In order to do so, 141 professors and 278 students were…

  18. Climate change alters ecological strategies of soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sarah E; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2014-02-01

    The timing and magnitude of rainfall events are expected to change in future decades, resulting in longer drought periods and larger rainfall events. Although microbial community composition and function are both sensitive to changes in rainfall, it is unclear whether this is because taxa adopt strategies that maximise fitness under new regimes. We assessed whether bacteria exhibited phylogenetically conserved ecological strategies in response to drying-rewetting, and whether these strategies were altered by historical exposure to experimentally intensified rainfall patterns. By clustering relative abundance patterns, we identified three discrete ecological strategies and found that tolerance to drying-rewetting increased with exposure to intensified rainfall patterns. Changes in strategy were primarily due to changes in community composition, but also to strategy shifts within taxa. These moisture regime-selected ecological strategies may be predictable from disturbance history, and are likely to be linked to traits that influence the functional potential of microbial communities.

  19. Change in MSW characteristics under recent management strategies in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Min; Liu, Chien-Chung; Hung, Chao-Yang; Hu, Allen; Chen, Shiao-Shing

    2008-12-01

    Reduction and recycling initiatives such as producer responsibility and pay-as-you-throw are being implemented in Taiwan. This paper presents a study assessing the impact of recently implemented municipal solid waste (MSW) reduction and recycling management strategies on the characteristics of waste feedstock for incineration in Taiwan. Through the periodic sampling of two typical MSW incineration plants, proximate and ultimate analyses were conducted according to standard methods to explore the influence of MSW reduction and recycling management strategies on incineration feed waste characteristics. It was observed that the annual amount of MSW generated in 2005 decreased by about 10% compared to 2003 and that the characteristics of MSW have changed significantly due to recent management strategies. The heating value of the MSW generated in Taiwan increased yearly by about 5% after program implementation. A comparison of the monthly variations in chemical concentrations indicated that the chlorine content in MSW has changed. This change results from usage reduction of PVC plastic due to the recycling fund management (RFM) program, and the food waste as well as salt content reduction due to the total recycling for kitchen garbage program. This achievement will improve the reduction of dioxin emissions from MSW incineration. In summary, management strategies must be conducted in tandem with the global trend to achieve a zero-waste-discharge country. When implementing these strategies and planning for future MSW management systems, it is important to consider the changes that may occur in the composition and characteristics of MSW over time.

  20. Soil management with respect to nitrogen mobilization and nutrient supply of grapevines on loess soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehofer, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The effects of different methods of soil management on the nutrient supply and the vine quality of organically grown `Grüner Veltliner` grapevines (Guyot double) were investigated in the winegrowing region Wagram of Lower Austria (municipality: Großriedenthal). Under permanent green cover the mineral nitrogen content in the soil was significantly lower than under green cover only in each second row. Regarding the nitrogen demand of the vine the best results of the mineral nitrogen content in soil were found by loosening up the soil by the end of April and breaking it open two weeks later. Permanent green cover inhibited shoot length development and the total acidity of the must was lower. The content of yeast assimilable nitrogen and the yield were reduced, but must density as well as potassium and ash contents of the wine were slightly higher. There were no differences in the vinification of the grapes of different origins. Significant differences in the sensory evaluation could not be related to different methods of soil cultivation.

  1. Mistakes to avoid when planning managed care strategies.

    PubMed

    Scheur, B S

    1997-06-01

    Hospital executives, steeped in hospital business traditions, sometimes fall victim to those traditions when planning their managed care strategies. They may fail to sufficiently evaluate their hospitals' market position or set appropriate priorities for their various business strategies. They may not recruit individuals with managed care expertise, develop effective marketing plans, or construct realistic physician networks. Some hospital executives may be ill-equipped to deal with cultural clashes and reluctant to share control of their managed care organizations with physicians. Or, they may not always understand the true nature of the arrangement they have entered into, the information and technology needs of the arrangement, and their own strategic advantages. Today's hospital executives must plan their managed care strategies carefully and execute them intelligently to ensure success.

  2. Savannah River Site Mixed Waste Management Facility Southwest Plume Tritium Phytoremediation Evaluating Irrigation Management Strategies Over 25 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Riah, Susan; Rebel, Karin

    2004-02-27

    To minimize movement of tritium into surface waters at the Mixed Waste Management Facility at the Savannah River Site, tritium contaminated seepage water is being retained in a constructed pond and used to irrigate forest acreage that lies above the pond and over the contaminated groundwater. Twenty five-year potential evapotranspiration and average precipitation are 1443 mm/year and 1127 mm/year, respectively, for the region in which the site is located. Management of the application of tritium contaminated irrigation water needs to be evaluated in the context of the large amount of rainfall relative to evapotranspiration, the strong seasonality in evapotranspiration, and intraannual and inter-annual variability in precipitation. A dynamic simulation model of water and tritium fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum was developed to assess the efficiency (tritium transpired/tritium applied) of several irrigation management strategies.

  3. Effect of land management on soil microbial properties in agricultural terraces of Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; Cerdà, Artemi; Garcia-Orenes, Fuensanta

    2014-05-01

    Soil quality is important for the sustainable development of terrestrial ecosystems. Agricultural land management is one of most important anthropogenic activities that greatly alters soil characteristics, including physical, chemical, and microbiological properties. The unsuitable land management can lead to a soil fertility loss and to a reduction in the abundance and diversity of soil microorganisms. However, ecological practices and some organic amendments can promote the activities of soil microbial communities, and increase its biodiversity. The microbial soil communities are the most sensitive and rapid indicators of perturbations in land use and soil enzyme activities are sensitive biological indicators of the effects of soil management practices. In this study, a field experiment was performed at clay-loam agricultural soil with an orchard of orange trees in Alcoleja (eastern Spain) to assess the long-term effects of inorganic fertilizers (F), intensive ploughing (P) and sustainable agriculture (S) on the soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic), enzyme activities (Urease, ß-glucosidase and phosphatase), basal soil repiration (BSR) and the relationship between them, and soil fertility in agro-ecosystems of Spain. Nine soil samples were taken from each agricultural management plot. In all the samples were determined the basal soil respiration, soil microbial biomass carbon, water holding capacity, electrical conductivity, soil organic carbon, nitrogen, available phosphorus, aggregate stability, cation exchange capacity, phosphorous, pH, texture, carbonates, active limestone and as enzimatic activities: Urease, ß-glucosidase and phosphatase. The results showed a substantial level of differentiation in the microbial properties, in terms of management practices, which was highly associated with soil organic matter content. The most marked variation in the different parameters studied appears to be related to sustainable agriculture terrace. The management

  4. Soil respiration at dominant patch types within a managed northern Wisconsin landscape

    Treesearch

    Eugenie S. Euskirchen; Jiquan Chen; Eric J. Gustafson; Siyan Ma

    2003-01-01

    Soil respiration (SR), a substantial component of the forest carbon budget, has been studied extensively at the ecosystem, regional, continental, and global scales, but little progress has been made toward understanding SR over managed forest landscapes. Soil respiration is often influenced by soil temperature (Ts), soil moisture (Ms...

  5. Soil Respiration at Dominant Patch Types within a Managed Northern Wisconsin Landscape

    Treesearch

    Eug& #233; nie Euskirchen; Jiquan Chen; Eric J. Gustafson; Siyan Ma; Siyan Ma

    2003-01-01

    Soil respiration (SR), a substantial component of the forest carbon budget, has been studied extensively at the ecosystem, regional, continental, and global scales, but little progress has been made toward understanding SR over managed forest landscapes. Soil respiration is often influenced by soil temperature (Ts), soil moisture (Ms...

  6. Manipulations of soil microbiota for C sequestration and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions in managed systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil microbes dominate processes that regulate soil trace gas emissions and soil C and N dynamics. Intensive management in agroecosystems provides unique opportunities to assess the effectiveness of microbial manipulations to enhance soil C retention and reduce trace gas emissions. While reduced til...

  7. Management-dependent soil property variability of Southeastern U.S. Coastal Plain plinthic kandiudults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines a management or use-dependent property as a type of dynamic soil property which changes on a human time-scale due to anthropogenic disturbances (indicative of soil change). Interest in soil change and C sequestration has led to increased emphasis ...

  8. Ecosystem services driven by the diversity of soil biota - understanding and management in agriculture - The Biodiversa SoilMan-Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthoff, Martin; Pérès, Guénola; Taylor, Astrid; Schrader, Stefan; Landa, Blanca; Nicolai, Annegret; Sandor, Mignon; Öptik, Maarja; Gema, Guzmán; Bergmann, Holger; Cluzeau, Daniel; Banse, Martin; Bengtsson, Jan; Guernion, Muriel; Zaller, Johann; Roslin, Tomas; Scheu, Stefan; Gómez Calero, José Alfonso

    2017-04-01

    Soil biota diversity is ensuring primary production in terrestrial ecosystems and agricultural productivity. Water and nutrient cycling, soil formation and aggregation, decomposition and carbon sequestration as well as control of pest organisms are important functions in soil that are driven by biota and biota interactions. In agricultural systems these functions support and regulate ecosystem services directed to agricultural production and agricultural sustainability. A main goal of future cropping systems will be to maintain or raise agricultural productivity while keeping production sustainable in spite of increasing food demands and ongoing soil degradation caused by inappropriate soil management practices. Farm based tools that farmers use to engineer soils for plant production depend as soil management factors on decisions by farmers, which are triggered by regional traditions, knowledge and also by agriculture policies as a governance impact. However, biological impacts on soil fertility and soil health are often neglected or overseen when planning and shaping soil management in annual cropping systems or perennial systems like vineyards. In order to get progress in conservation farming and in agricultural sustainability not only knowledge creation is in need, but also a clash of perspectives has to be overcome within the societies (generals public, farmers associations, NGOs) The talk will present the conception of the recently startet SoilMan-project and summaries selected results from current and recent European research projects.

  9. Temperature response of soil carbon decomposition depends strongly on forest management practice and soil layer on the eastern Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kaijun; He, Ruoyang; Yang, Wanqin; Li, Zhijie; Zhuang, Liyan; Wu, Fuzhong; Tan, Bo; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Tu, Lihua; Xu, Zhenfeng

    2017-07-06

    How forest management practice impacts the temperature response of soil carbon decomposition remains unclear in Tibetan boreal forests. Here, an experiment was conducted to compare soil carbon decomposition of two layers (organic and mineral) in three Tibetan forests (natural forest, NF; secondary forest, SF; spruce plantation, PF). Soils were incubated at two temperatures (10 °C and 20 °C) for 219 days. Increased temperature often stimulated carbon decomposition rates of organic layer but did not affect them in the mineral soils. Soil carbon decomposition rates in the organic layer followed a pattern of NF > SF > PF over the incubation period. Regardless of forest type, soil carbon decomposition rates and temperature coefficient (Q 10) were higher in the organic layers compared to mineral soils. Moreover, forest type conversion increased Q 10 values in each soil layer. Taken together, our results suggest that forest management practice has much stronger impacts on biochemical properties in the organic layers relative to mineral soils. Moreover, the temperature responses of soil carbon decomposition depend largely on forest management practice and soil layer in this specific area.

  10. Epilepsy during pregnancy: focus on management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Borgelt, Laura M; Hart, Felecia M; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L

    2016-01-01

    In the US, more than one million women with epilepsy are of childbearing age and have over 20,000 babies each year. Patients with epilepsy who become pregnant are at risk of complications, including changes in seizure frequency, maternal morbidity and mortality, and congenital anomalies due to antiepileptic drug exposure. Appropriate management of epilepsy during pregnancy may involve frequent monitoring of antiepileptic drug serum concentrations, potential preconception switching of antiepileptic medications, making dose adjustments, minimizing peak drug concentration with more frequent dosing, and avoiding potentially teratogenic medications. Ideally, preconception planning will be done to minimize risks to both the mother and fetus during pregnancy. It is important to recognize benefits and risks of current and emerging therapies, especially with revised pregnancy labeling in prescription drug product information. This review will outline risks for epilepsy during pregnancy, review various recommendations from leading organizations, and provide an evidence-based approach for managing patients with epilepsy before, during, and after pregnancy. PMID:27703396

  11. Soil Bioremediation Strategies Based on the Use of Fungal Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, Christian; Boukcim, Hassan; Jolivalt, Claude

    The pollution of soil due to chemical compounds is an important problem worldwide. For that reason, the development of bioremediation processes remains an important challenge. In that context, filamentous fungi and their enzymatic systems appear to be potent tools to decrease the levels of contaminants in soils, by contaminant degradation or stabilisation. The structures and modes of action of selected fungal enzymes, namely peroxidases and laccases, have been extensively studied and are now well-known. Nevertheless, some improvement of their catalytic characteristics can be attempted through genetic engineering, in order to develop specific properties. In addition, some research is still needed to overcome several of their limitations for their efficient use in soils.

  12. Electronic mail communication--management strategies.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Patricia B

    2003-12-01

    Electronic communication has come a long way in the past 30 years. It will no doubt continue to improve and remain the primary communication vehicle for businesses. Occupational health nurses, like other business professionals, must use email to their advantage to improve their practice. However, electronic mail communication must be managed in the same manner as records and documents produced in any form or media.

  13. Glomalin and soil aggregation under six management systems in the Northern Great Plains, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The soil environment is linked to aboveground management including plant species composition, grazing intensity, lev-els of soil disturbance, residue management, and the length of time of a living plant is growing. Soil samples were col-lected under rangeland [native grass, rotational grazing (NGRG)...

  14. Long-term effects of grazing management and buffer strips on soil erosion from pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High grazing pressure can lead to soil erosion in pastures by compacting soil and increasing runoff and sediment delivery to waterways. Limited information exists on the effects of grazing management and best management practices (BMPs), such as buffer strips, on soil erosion from pastures. The obje...

  15. Local soil classification and crop suitability: Implications for the historical land use and soil management in Monti di Trapani (Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Vila, Margarita; Corselli, Rocco; Bonet, María Teresa; Lopapa, Giuseppe; Pillitteri, Valentina; Fereres, Elias

    2017-04-01

    In the past, the lack of technologies (e.g. synthetic fertilizers) to overcome biophysical limitations has played a central role in land use planning. Thus, landscape management and agronomic practices are reactions to local knowledge and perceptions on natural resources, particularly soil. In the framework of the European research project MEMOLA (FP7), the role of local farmers knowledge and perceptions on soil for the historical land use through the spatial distribution of crops and the various management practices have been assessed in three different areas of Monti di Trapani region (Sicily). The identification of the soil classification systems of farmers and the criteria on which it is based, linked to the evaluation of the farmers' ability to identify and map the different soil types, was a key step. Nevertheless, beyond the comparison of the ethnopedological classification approach versus standard soil classification systems, the study also aims at understanding local soil management and land use decisions. The applied methodology was based on an interdisciplinary approach, combining soil science methods and participatory appraisal tools, particularly: i) semi-structured interviews; ii) soil sampling and analysis; iii) discussion groups; and iv) a workshop with local edafologists and agronomists. A rich local glossary of terms associated with the soil conditions and an own soil classification system have been identified in the region. Also, a detailed soil map, including process of soil degradation and soil capability, has been generated. This traditional soil knowledge has conditioned the management and the spatial distribution of the crops, and therefore the configuration of the landscape, until the 1990s. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the European Union project MEMOLA (Grant agreement no: 613265).

  16. Decreasing Toxic Metal Bioavailability with Novel Soil Amendment Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    e.g. Fe- oxide content, organic matter content, pH) were found to be highly correlated with decreased metal bioaccessibility, and statistical...constituents that could reduce mobile Cr(VI) to the less toxic Cr(III) species, and oxidize highly mobile As(III) to the less mobile As(V) species. These...found to promote the enhanced bioavailability of these metals. For example, when the soil Fe- oxide content for a particular DoD soil fell below 0.5% on

  17. Influence of sustainable management on aggregate stability and soil organic matter on agricultural soil of southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugan-Coronado, Alicia; Arcenegui, Victoria; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Gomez-Lucas, Ignacio; Garcia-Orenes, Fuensanta

    2016-04-01

    Intensive agriculture has increased crop yields but also posed severe environmental problems. Unsustainable land management such as excessive tillage can lead to a loss of soil fertility and a drastic reduction in the aggregate stability and soil organic matter content. However sustainable agriculture can keep good crop yields with minimal impact on ecological factors conserving the soil quality and its ecosystem services. Sustainable agriculture management promotes the maintenance of soil organic matter levels providing plant nutrients through the microbial decomposition of organic materials. Also this management has a positive effect on soil structure with the improvement of stability of aggregates. The resistance of soil aggregates to the slaking and dispersive effects of water (aggregate stability) is important for maintaining the structure in arable soils. Our purpose was to investigate and compare the effects of sustainable agricultural practices versus intensive agriculture on aggregate stability and soil organic matter. Three agricultural areas are being monitored in the southern of Spain, two of them with citrus orchards (AL) and (FE) and one with grapevine(PA). In all of them two agricultural treatments are being developed, organic with no-tillage management(O) and inorganic fertilization with herbicide application and intensive tillage (I). The sustainable agricultural management (manure, no tillage and vegetation cover) contributed to the improve of soil conditions, increasing organic matter and aggregate stability. Meanwhile, herbicide treatment and intensive tillage with inorganic fertilization managements resulted in the decreasing of aggregate stability and low levels of soil organic carbon. Soil organic matter content is generally low in all unsustainable treatments plots and tends to decline in aggregate stability and soil physical condition. In both treatments the crop yield are comparable.

  18. Influences of Farming Management on Quality and Quantity of Soil Organic Matter in Volcanic Ash Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Tanaka, H.; Matsumura, S.; Shimizu, T.; Zhang, M.

    2013-12-01

    Storage of soil organic matter (SOM) in terrestrial ecosystem plays a significant role in reducing carbon flux to the atmosphere and thus prevents the earth from global warming. In agricultural field, farming management, such as manure application and/or reduced tillage, are known to be effective methods to stimulate SOM storage. Volcanic ash soil, categorized into Andosols, is a major type of upland soil in Japan, and the soil contains relatively high concentration of SOM, meaning that volcanic ash soil can play an important role in carbon storage in Japan. To investigate the influences of farming management on quality and quantity of SOM, an empirical study was carried out in an upland soil field derived from volcanic ash. Surface soil samples were taken every three months from the field and fractionated physically and chemically. As for the physical fractionation, 53 μm sieving was performed. SOM in the samples were sorted into particulate organic matter (POM) denoting organic matter with particle size greater than 53 μm and less than 2 mm, and mineral-associated organic matter (MOM) denoting less than 53 μm. In addition, both POM and MOM were further fractionated chemically by extraction with pyrophosphate buffer solutions at three different pH levels. The fractionated organic matter as well as unfractionated SOM were analyzed and quantified for organic carbon, nitrogen content. This study induced the following results and findings. The manure and/or reduced tillage treatments can significantly increase the particulate organic carbon (POC) and all chemically fractionated POC contents. Especially, POC extracted with the buffer solution at pH4 (POCpH4) and the differences between POC and POC extracted with the buffer solution at pH10 (POC-POCpH10) have strong correlations with SOC, and manure application can effectively increase POC-POCpH10 fraction. The results indicate that these fractionated organic carbons would contribute storage of organic matter in

  19. MY SIRR: Minimalist agro-hYdrological model for Sustainable IRRigation management-Soil moisture and crop dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, Raffaele; Manfreda, Salvatore; Celano, Giuseppe

    The paper introduces a minimalist water-driven crop model for sustainable irrigation management using an eco-hydrological approach. Such model, called MY SIRR, uses a relatively small number of parameters and attempts to balance simplicity, accuracy, and robustness. MY SIRR is a quantitative tool to assess water requirements and agricultural production across different climates, soil types, crops, and irrigation strategies. The MY SIRR source code is published under copyleft license. The FOSS approach could lower the financial barriers of smallholders, especially in developing countries, in the utilization of tools for better decision-making on the strategies for short- and long-term water resource management.

  20. Nurses' strategies for managing pain in the postoperative setting.

    PubMed

    Manias, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Botti, Mari

    2005-03-01

    Acute pain is a significant problem in the postoperative setting. Patients report a lack of information about pain-control measures and ineffective pain control. Nurses continue to rely on pharmacologic measures and tend to under-administer analgesics. The purpose of this study was to determine the strategies nurses used to manage patients' pain in the postoperative setting. It also sought to examine the effect of context, including organization of care, nurses' prioritization of work activities, and pressures during a working shift, on their pain-management strategies. An observational design was used in two surgical units of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Six fixed observation times were identified as key periods for pain activities, each comprising a 2-hour duration. An observation period was examined at least 12 times, resulting in the completion of 74 observations and the identification of 316 pain cases. Fifty-two nurses were observed during their normal day's work with postoperative patients. Six themes were identified: managing pain effectively; prioritizing pain experiences for pain management; missing pain cues for pain management; regulators and enforcers of pain management; preventing pain; and reactive management of pain. The findings highlighted the critical nature of communication between clinicians and patients and among clinicians. It also demonstrated the influence of time on management strategies and the relative importance that nurses place on nonpharmacologic measures in actual practice. This research, which portrays what happens in actual clinical practice, has facilitated the identification of new data that were not evident from other research studies.

  1. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Kuwatsch, Sandra; Bohn, Marco; Josten, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Hintergrund: Das Krankenhausmanagement ist stets Herausforderungen ausgesetzt. Anstatt auf die Herausforderungen zu warten, sollten Ärzte und Manager im Voraus handeln, um ein optimiertes und nachhaltig wertorientiertes Gesundheitswesen zu sichern. Diese Arbeit unterstreicht die Bedeutung der Szenarienplanung in Krankenhäusern, schlägt eine ausgearbeitete Definition der Stakeholder eines Krankenhauses vor und definiert die Einflussfaktoren, denen Krankenhäuser ausgesetzt sind.Methodik: Basierend auf einer Literaturanalyse sowie auf persönlichen Interviews mit Stakeholdern eines Krankenhauses schlagen wir eine ausgearbeitete Definition von Stakeholdern vor und erarbeiteten einen Fragebogen. Dieser Fragebogen berücksichtigt folgende Einflussfaktoren, die entsprechende Auswirkungen auf das Krankenhaus-Management haben: politische/rechtliche, wirtschaftliche, soziale, technologische und Umweltkräfte.Diese Einflussfaktoren werden untersucht, um die so genannten kritischen Unsicherheiten zu entwickeln. Die gründliche Identifizierung von Unsicherheiten basierte auf „Stakeholder Feedback“.Ergebnisse: Zwei Haupt-Unsicherheiten wurden identifiziert und in dieser Studie berücksichtigt:die Entwicklung der Arbeitsbelastung für das medizinische Personaldie gewinnorientierte Leistung des medizinischen Personals.Entsprechend der entwickelten Szenarien konnten wir folgende Kernstrategie empfehlen: komplementäre Ausbildung sowohl des medizinischen Personals als auch der nicht-medizinischen Top-Führungskräfte und Manager von Krankenhäusern. Ergänzende szenariospezifische strategische Optionen sollen, falls erforderlich, in Betracht gezogen werden, um eine bestimmte zukünftige Entwicklung des medizinischen Umfeldes zu optimieren.Schlussfolgerung: Strategische Planung in Krankenhäusern ist wichtig, um nachhaltigen Erfolg zu gewährleisten. Diese Planung soll mehrere Situationen berücksichtigen und integriert interne und externe Ein- und Ausblicke. Darüber hinaus

  2. [Behavioral and cognitive strategies in stress management].

    PubMed

    Légeron, P

    1993-03-01

    Stress is a specific response of the individual to all nonspecific demands. However, this process of adaptation is very complex and varies considerably from person to person. The stress response or "stress reactivity" is triggered by various stressors, ranging from live events to daily hassles and including chronic stressors. These stressors need to be identified. The stress response is not univocal: it has physiological, cognitive and behavioral components. Most of the time, physiological, cognitive and behavioral responses are maladaptive and harmful for the individual. Stress management is directed at teaching individuals specific skills to modify parts of these responses in order to reduce stress. Relaxation therapies are the cornerstone of any stress management program. They mostly include autogenic training and progressive relaxation training, sometimes biofeedback. The relaxation response is a learned response. There are a variety of different methods of inducing this response. They share the common goal of countering the physiological aspects of the stress reaction. All the relaxation techniques involve long and exacting training. But proper training leads to a gradual reduction in time and effort required to relax. When properly pursued, these techniques produce a state of relaxation quickly and on demand. Cognitive approaches to stress management derive from the constatation that the individual's interpretation of events or situations which have been labeled stressful, the individual's anticipation of the consequences of the stressor and the individual's view of his or her ability to cope with the stressor or the stress reaction are fundamental in the stress process. There are a variety of cognitive theories and techniques, ranging from Beck's cognitive therapy to Ellis' Rational-Emotive Therapy. Initial phases of these therapies are directed at teaching the individual to recognize, record, analyse and modify maladaptive cognitions. The second phase is

  3. Gap filling strategies and error in estimating annual soil respiration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil respiration (Rsoil) is one of the largest CO2 fluxes in the global carbon (C) cycle. Estimation of annual Rsoil requires extrapolation of survey measurements or gap-filling of automated records to produce a complete time series. While many gap-filling methodologies have been employed, there is ...

  4. Suggested strategies to attract reviewers for soil & tillage research submissions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A recent letter to the editor in Soil and Tillage Research (STILL) entitled "Opportunity and Obligation" prompted a request for follow-up suggestions on how to solve a critical problem associated with securing reviewers for journal submissions. Ten broad suggestions for helping solve the problem of ...

  5. Substance-related environmental monitoring strategies regarding soil, groundwater and surface water - an overview.

    PubMed

    Kördel, Werner; Garelick, Hemda; Gawlik, Bernd M; Kandile, Nadia G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Rüdel, Heinz

    2013-05-01

    Substance-related monitoring is an essential tool within environmental risk assessment processes. The soundness of policy decisions including risk management measures is often directly related to the reliability of the environmental monitoring programs. In addition, monitoring programs are required for identifying new and less-investigated pollutants of concern in different environmental media. Scientifically sound and feasible monitoring concepts strongly depend on the aim of the study. The proper definition of questions to be answered is thus of pivotal importance. Decisions on sample handling, storage and the analysis of the samples are important steps for the elaboration of problem-oriented monitoring strategies. The same applies to the selection of the sampling sites as being representative for scenarios to be investigated. These steps may become critical to handle for larger international monitoring programs and thus trigger the quality of their results. This study based on the work of an IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) task group addresses different kinds and approaches of substance-related monitoring of different compartments of soil, groundwater and surface water, and discusses their advantages and limitations. Further important aspects are the monitoring across policies and the monitoring data management using information systems.

  6. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robert D; Scyphers, Steven B; Grabowski, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state's management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that may

  7. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert D.; Scyphers, Steven B.; Grabowski, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders’ perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state’s management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders’ support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that

  8. Soil Organic Carbon assessment on two different forest management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Minguillón, Alex; Sauras Yera, Teresa; Vallejo Calzada, Ramón

    2017-04-01

    Soil Organic Carbon assessment on two different forest management. A.F. Minguillón1, T. Sauras1, V.R: Vallejo1. 1 Departamento de Biología Evolutiva, Ecología y Ciencias Ambientales, Universidad de Barcelona, Avenida Diagonal 643, 03080 Barcelona, Spain. Soils from arid and semiarid zones are characterized by a low organic matter content from scarce plant biomass and it has been proposed that these soils have a big capacity to carbon sequestration. According to IPCC ARS WG2 (2014) report and WG3 draft, increase carbon storage in terrestrial ecosystems has been identified such a potential tool for mitigation and adaptation to climate change. In ecological restoration context improve carbon sequestration is considered a management option with multiple benefits (win-win-win). Our work aims to analyze how the recently developed restoration techniques contributed to increases in terrestial ecosystem carbon storage. Two restoration techniques carried out in the last years have been evaluated. The study was carried out in 6 localities in Valencian Community (E Spain) and organic horizons of two different restoration techniques were evaluated; slash brush and thinning Aleppo pine stands. For each technique, carbon stock and its physical and chemical stability has been analysed. Preliminary results point out restoration zones acts as carbon sink due to (1) the relevant necromass input produced by slash brush increases C stock on the topsoil ;(2) Thinning increase carbon accumulation in vegetation.

  9. Active microbial soil communities in different agricultural managements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, S.; Pastorelli, R.

    2009-04-01

    We studied the composition of active eubacterial microflora by RNA extraction from soil (bulk and rhizosphere) under different environmental impact managements, in a hilly basin in Gallura (Sardinia). We contrasted grassy vineyard, in which the soil had been in continuous contact with plant roots for a long period of time, with traditional tilled vineyard. Moreover, we examined permanent grassland, in which plants had been present for some years, with temporary grassland, in which varying plants had been present only during the respective growing seasons. Molecular analysis of total population was carried out by electrophoretic separation by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) of amplified cDNA fragments obtained from 16S rRNA. In vineyards UPGMA (Unweighted Pair Group Mathematical Average) analysis made up separate clusters depending on soil management. In spring both clusters showed similarity over 70%, while in autumn the similarity increased, 84% and 90% for grassy and conventional tilled vineyard respectively. Permanent and temporary grassland joined in a single cluster in spring, while in autumn a partial separation was evidenced. The grassy vineyard, permanent and temporary grassland showed higher richness and diversity Shannon-Weiner index values than vineyard with conventional tillage although no significant. In conclusion the expected effect of the rhizosphere was visible: the grass cover influenced positively the diversity of active microbial population.

  10. Impact of Ca-amendments and soil management in physical properties linked to soil-water relationship in degraded Ultisols from South-Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariscal-Sancho, I.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, P.; León, P.; Gómez-Paccard, C.; Benito, M.; Espejo, R.

    2012-04-01

    Cañamerós raña formation in western Spain was cleared for cropping in 1940´s. Its highly weathered acidic soils (Ultisols) were deeply affected by tillage. The soil organic matter (SOM) content and specially the particulate organic matter (POM), a labile fraction, were drastically reduced, and most of their chemical and physical soil properties related to its quality were negatively affected. The extraction of Ca through the harvest and the release of Al retained in organic-Al complexes resulted in a lower Ca/Al ratio which increased the Al toxicity. These effects led to a drastic yield reduction and the abandon of many degraded fields after 20-70 years of unsustainable managements. On these degraded soils we studied the effect of different soil management strategies (no-till with wild pasture (WP) and no-till with an improved pasture (IP)), and amendment applications (sugar foam waste (SF), and SF + Phosphogypsum (PH) versus control (C)). One of the objectives of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of these practices to recover soil quality parameters, especially those related to soil-water relationship. A Split-plot experiment was established in a degraded field. We evaluated the changes in superficial infiltration, bulk density, and content of water-stable aggregates per 100 g of soil before the Ca-amendment applications and pasture establishments, and after 4.5 years. We also measured the changes in SOM and POM contents which are closely related with the previous parameters. The Ca applications reduced Al toxicity, improved the pasture yield and increased organic matter inputs to soil. The results showed a significant increase of POM in all treatment compared with the POM content at the beginning of this experiment. However the "SOM minus POM" which could be classified as recalcitrant organic matter did not show significant increments. The increase of POM had a positive effect on the content of water-stable aggregates per 100 g of soil and the water

  11. Complexity Science Applications to Dynamic Trajectory Management: Research Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawhill, Bruce; Herriot, James; Holmes, Bruce J.; Alexandrov, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The promise of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is strongly tied to the concept of trajectory-based operations in the national airspace system. Existing efforts to develop trajectory management concepts are largely focused on individual trajectories, optimized independently, then de-conflicted among each other, and individually re-optimized, as possible. The benefits in capacity, fuel, and time are valuable, though perhaps could be greater through alternative strategies. The concept of agent-based trajectories offers a strategy for automation of simultaneous multiple trajectory management. The anticipated result of the strategy would be dynamic management of multiple trajectories with interacting and interdependent outcomes that satisfy multiple, conflicting constraints. These constraints would include the business case for operators, the capacity case for the Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP), and the environmental case for noise and emissions. The benefits in capacity, fuel, and time might be improved over those possible under individual trajectory management approaches. The proposed approach relies on computational agent-based modeling (ABM), combinatorial mathematics, as well as application of "traffic physics" concepts to the challenge, and modeling and simulation capabilities. The proposed strategy could support transforming air traffic control from managing individual aircraft behaviors to managing systemic behavior of air traffic in the NAS. A system built on the approach could provide the ability to know when regions of airspace approach being "full," that is, having non-viable local solution space for optimizing trajectories in advance.

  12. Ecology of Fungus Gnats (Bradysia spp.) in Greenhouse Production Systems Associated with Disease-Interactions and Alternative Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Cloyd, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    Fungus gnats (Bradysia spp.) are major insect pests of greenhouse-grown horticultural crops mainly due to the direct feeding damage caused by the larvae, and the ability of larvae to transmit certain soil-borne plant pathogens. Currently, insecticides and biological control agents are being used successively to deal with fungus gnat populations in greenhouse production systems. However, these strategies may only be effective as long as greenhouse producers also implement alternative management strategies such as cultural, physical, and sanitation. This includes elimination of algae, and plant and growing medium debris; placing physical barriers onto the growing medium surface; and using materials that repel fungus gnat adults. This article describes the disease-interactions associated with fungus gnats and foliar and soil-borne diseases, and the alternative management strategies that should be considered by greenhouse producers in order to alleviate problems with fungus gnats in greenhouse production systems. PMID:26463188

  13. Ecology of Fungus Gnats (Bradysia spp.) in Greenhouse Production Systems Associated with Disease-Interactions and Alternative Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Raymond A

    2015-04-09

    Fungus gnats (Bradysia spp.) are major insect pests of greenhouse-grown horticultural crops mainly due to the direct feeding damage caused by the larvae, and the ability of larvae to transmit certain soil-borne plant pathogens. Currently, insecticides and biological control agents are being used successively to deal with fungus gnat populations in greenhouse production systems. However, these strategies may only be effective as long as greenhouse producers also implement alternative management strategies such as cultural, physical, and sanitation. This includes elimination of algae, and plant and growing medium debris; placing physical barriers onto the growing medium surface; and using materials that repel fungus gnat adults. This article describes the disease-interactions associated with fungus gnats and foliar and soil-borne diseases, and the alternative management strategies that should be considered by greenhouse producers in order to alleviate problems with fungus gnats in greenhouse production systems.

  14. Soil property estimation and design for agroecosystem management using hierarchical geospatial functional data models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sustainable agriculture requires a site-specific approach to address crop management problems and environmental degradation processes that are spatially and temporally variable. These issues lead to production losses (water stress, low fertility, pest problems), soil degradation (erosion, soil organ...

  15. Applying disease management strategies to Medicare.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, C P; Bhalotra, S; Trisolini, M; Wallack, S S; Rasgon, S; Yeoh, H

    1999-01-01

    Medicare coverage begins for many when they have already developed one or more chronic diseases, and it often pays for the latest and costliest phases. Population-based disease modeling, patient screening, and monitoring would be appropriate interventions for chronic renal disease. Patients who have not yet advanced to end-stage renal disease would benefit from management of diabetes and hypertension, avoidance of nephrotoxic substances, and better preparation for dialysis. Administrative support could take the form of clinical guidelines, physician-led multidisciplinary teams, integrated delivery systems, provider and patient education, and new information technologies. Medicare reflects the long-term public perspective, and thus should further this new direction by supporting education, reimbursing for prevention efforts and allied health services, encouraging efficiency, and monitoring cost and quality outcomes.

  16. New Management Strategies for Ectopia Lentis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Melissa A; Origlieri, Catherine A; Dinallo, Anthony M; Forbes, Brian J; Wagner, Rudolph S; Guo, Suqin

    2015-01-01

    Ectopia lentis refers to displacement of the crystalline lens in the setting of various systemic and metabolic disorders. A literature review was conducted to investigate the management of non-traumatic ectopia lentis in the pediatric population, particularly focusing on surgical intervention. Both limbal and pars plana approaches for lensectomy are well established in the literature. Surgical options for intraocular lens implantation in pediatric eyes with ectopia lentis include anterior chamber intraocular lenses and iris-fixated or scleral-fixated posterior chamber intraocular lenses. Recently, the use of capsular tension rings has also been described with promising results. Visual rehabilitation and treatment of amblyopia are essential for patients within the amblyogenic age group following surgical intervention.

  17. Targeting sediment management strategies using sediment quantification and fingerprinting methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Fenton, Owen; Jordan, Phil; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2016-04-01

    Cost-effective sediment management is required to reduce excessive delivery of fine sediment due to intensive land uses such as agriculture, resulting in the degradation of aquatic ecosystems. Prioritising measures to mitigate dominant sediment sources is, however, challenging, as sediment loss risk is spatially and temporally variable between and within catchments. Fluctuations in sediment supply from potential sources result from variations in land uses resulting in increased erodibility where ground cover is low (e.g., cultivated, poached and compacted soils), and physical catchment characteristics controlling hydrological connectivity and transport pathways (surface and/or sub-surface). Sediment fingerprinting is an evidence-based management tool to identify sources of in-stream sediments at the catchment scale. Potential sediment sources are related to a river sediment sample, comprising a mixture of source sediments, using natural physico-chemical characteristics (or 'tracers'), and contributions are statistically un-mixed. Suspended sediment data were collected over two years at the outlet of three intensive agricultural catchments (approximately 10 km2) in Ireland. Dominant catchment characteristics were grassland on poorly-drained soils, arable on well-drained soils and arable on moderately-drained soils. High-resolution (10-min) calibrated turbidity-based suspended sediment and discharge data were combined to quantify yield. In-stream sediment samples (for fingerprinting analysis) were collected at six to twelve week intervals, using time-integrated sediment samplers. Potential sources, including stream channel banks, ditches, arable and grassland field topsoils, damaged road verges and tracks were sampled, oven-dried (<40oC) and sieved (125 microns). Soil and sediment samples were analysed for mineral magnetics, geochemistry and radionuclide tracers, particle size distribution and soil organic carbon. Tracer data were corrected to account for particle

  18. Blepharitis: current strategies for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Jackson, W Bruce

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this article is to present a consensus on the appropriate identification and management of patients with blepharitis based on expert clinical recommendations for 4 representative case studies and evidence from well-designed clinical trials. The case study recommendations were developed at a consensus panel meeting of Canadian ophthalmologists and a guest ophthalmologist from the U.K., with additional input from family doctors and an infectious disease/medical microbiologist, which took place in Toronto in June 2006. A MEDLINE search was also conducted of English language articles describing randomized controlled clinical trials that involved patients with blepharitis. Blepharitis involving predominantly the skin and lashes tends to be staphylococcal and (or) seborrheic in nature, whereas involvement of the meibomian glands may be either seborrheic, obstructive, or a combination (mixed). The pathophysiology of blepharitis is a complex interaction of various factors, including abnormal lid-margin secretions, microbial organisms, and abnormalities of the tear film. Blepharitis can present with a range of signs and symptoms, and is associated with various dermatological conditions, namely, seborrheic dermatitis, rosacea, and eczema. The mainstay of treatment is an eyelid hygiene regimen, which needs to be continued long term. Topical antibiotics are used to reduce the bacterial load. Topical corticosteroid preparations may be helpful in patients with marked inflammation. Blepharitis can present with a range of signs and symptoms, and its management can be complicated by a number of factors. Expert clinical recommendations and a review of the evidence on treatment supports the practice of careful lid hygiene, possibly combined with the use of topical antibiotics, with or without topical steroids. Systemic antibiotics may be appropriate in some patients.

  19. Prunus persica crop management as step toward AMF diversity conservation for the sustainable soil management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alguacil, M. M.; Torrecillas, E.; Lozano, Z.; Garcia-Orenes, F.; Roldan, A.

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in roots of Prunus persica under two fertilization treatments (CF: consisted of application of chicken manure (1400 kg.ha-1), urea (140 kg.ha-1), complex fertilizer 12-12-17/2 (280 kg.ha-1), and potassium sulfate (40 kg.ha-1) and IF: consisted of application of urea (140 kg.ha-1), complex fertilizer 12-12-17/2 (400 kg.ha-1) and potassium sulfate (70 kg.ha-1)) combined with integrated pest management (IM) or chemical pest management (CM), in a tropical agroecosystem in the north of Venezuela. Our goal was to ascertain how different fertilizers/pest management can modify the AMF diversity colonizing P. persica roots as an important step towards sustainable soil use and therefore protection of biodiversity. The AM fungal small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Twenty-one different phylotypes were identified, which were grouped in five families: Glomeraceae, Paraglomeraceae, Acaulosporaceae, Gigasporaceae and Archaeosporaceae. Sixteen of these sequence groups belonged to the genus Glomus, two to Paraglomus, one to Acaulospora, one to Scutellospora and one to Archaeospora. A different distribution of the AMF phylotypes as consequence of the difference between treatments was observed. Thus, the AMF communities of tree roots in the (IF+CM) treatment had the lowest diversity (H'=1.78) with the lowest total number of AMF sequence types (9). The trees from both (CF+IM) and (IF+IM) treatments had similar AMF diversity (H'?2.00); while the treatment (CF+CM) yielded the highest number of different AMF sequence types (17) and showed the highest diversity index (H'=2.69). In conclusion, the crop management including combination of organic and inorganic fertilization and chemical pest control appears to be the most suitable strategy with respect to reactivate the AMF diversity in the roots of this crop and thus, the agricultural and environmental

  20. Roles of managers in academic health centers: strategies for the managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kristina L

    2002-03-01

    This article addresses survival strategies of academic health centers (AHCs) in responding to market pressures and government reforms. Using six case studies of AHCs, the study links strategic changes in structure and management to managerial role performance. Utilizing Mintzberg's classification of work roles, the roles of liaison, monitor, entrepreneur, and resource allocator were found to be used by top-level managers as they implement strategies to enhance the viability of their AHCs. Based on these new roles, the study recommends improving management practices through education and training as well as changing organizational culture to support management decision making and foster the continued growth of managers and their AHCs.

  1. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.

    1993-09-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

  2. [Changes in soil organic carbon and soil microbial functional diversity of Carya cathayensis plantations under intensive managements].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Sen; Qian, Jin-Fang; Tong, Zhi-Peng; Huang, Jian-Qin; Zhao, Ke-Li

    2014-09-01

    The change characteristics of soil organic carbon and microbial function diversity in Chinese hickory Carya cathayensis stands with different intensive-management durations (5, 10, 15 and 20 years) were studied. The results showed that soil total organic carbon (TOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) decreased significantly, while the stability of soil C pool increased significantly after the conversion from evergreen and deciduous broadleaf forest to intensively-managed forest (IMF). TOC, MBC and WSOC in the hickory forest soil decreased by 28.4%, 34.1% and 53.3% with 5-year intensive management, and by 38.6%, 48.9% and 64.1% with 20-year intensive management, respectively. The proportions of carboxyl C, phenolic C and aromatic C in the hickory forest soil all increased significantly, and the aromaticity of soil organic C increased by 23.0%. Soil microbial functional diversity decreased greatly af- ter intensive management of Chinese hickory forest. Significant differences in average well color development (AWCD) were found between the 0- and 5-year treatments and the 10-, 15- and 20- year treatments. The microbial diversity indexes (H) and evenness indexes (E) in the 0- and 5-year treatments were much greater than in the 10- and 20-year treatments. Correlation analysis showed that there were significant correlations among soil TOC, WSOC, MBC, AWCD, H and E.

  3. Microbially supported phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils: strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    Phieler, René; Voit, Annekatrin; Kothe, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination of soil as a result of, for example, mining operations, evokes worldwide concern. The use of selected metal-accumulating plants to clean up heavy metal contaminated sites represents a sustainable and inexpensive method for remediation approaches and, at the same time, avoids destruction of soil function. Within this scenario, phytoremediation is the use of plants (directly or indirectly) to reduce the risks of contaminants in soil to the environment and human health. Microbially assisted bioremediation strategies, such as phytoextraction or phytostabilization, may increase the beneficial aspects and can be viewed as potentially useful methods for application in remediation of low and heterogeneously contaminated soil. The plant-microbe interactions in phytoremediation strategies include mutually beneficial symbiotic associations such as mycorrhiza, plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), or endophytic bacteria that are discussed with respect to their impact on phytoremediation approaches.

  4. Clinical nutrition management position: responsibilities and skill development strategies.

    PubMed

    Witte, S S; Messersmith, A M

    1995-10-01

    To determine the duties of clinical nutrition managers, the factors associated with the performance of the duties, the job specifications for the position, and the skill development strategies used by clinical nutrition managers. Clinical nutrition managers from 700 randomly selected, acute-care hospitals in the United States (with 300 or more beds) received a survey questionnaire. Respondents were asked to indicate performance or nonperformance, perceived importance, and methods used to develop skills for 54 duties related to clinical nutrition management. We requested additional information about position requirements, position characteristics, and demographic information. An 82% response rate with 67% usable responses (n = 472) was achieved. Frequencies for performance and nonperformance, mean importance, and frequencies for methods of skill development were determined for each duty. chi 2 Analysis with P < .10 was used to determine if an association existed between performance of a duty and time allotted to the position, number of personnel supervised, and type of personnel supervised. This study validated 46 of the duties as responsibilities of practicing clinical nutrition manager. Three duties not validated were related to financial management. The duty performed least often was conducting research/investigative studies. The number and type of personnel supervised was found to influence performance of duties, but time allotted to position was not an influence. The major strategies used for skill development were continuing education, networking, work experience in clinical dietetics, work experience in management dietetics, and their present job. These results can be used by clinical nutrition managers to assess the characteristics of their current position and develop a plan for enhancing their scope of responsibility. The identification of duties actually performed by clinical nutrition managers can also be used to develop standards of practice with

  5. Effects of crop management, soil type, and climate on N2O emissions from Austrian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Sigmund, Elisabeth; Kasper, Martina; Kitzler, Barbara; Haas, Edwin; Wandl, Michael; Strauss, Peter; Poetzelsberger, Elisabeth; Dersch, Georg; Winiwarter, Wilfried; Amon, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Within the project FarmClim ("Farming for a better climate") we assessed recent N2O emissions from two selected regions in Austria. Our aim was to deepen the understanding of Austrian N2O fluxes regarding region specific properties. Currently, N2O emissions are estimated with the IPCC default emission factor which only considers the amount of N-input as an influencing factor for N2O emissions. We evaluated the IPCC default emission factor for its validity under spatially distinct environmental conditions. For this two regions for modeling with LandscapeDNDC have been identified in this project. The benefit of using LandscapeDNDC is the detailed illustration of microbial processes in the soil. Required input data to run the model included daily climate data, vegetation properties, soil characteristics and land management. The analysis of present agricultural practices was basis for assessing the hot spots and hot moments of nitrogen emissions on a regional scale. During our work with LandscapeDNDC we were able to adapt specific model algorithms to Austrian agricultural conditions. The model revealed a strong dependency of N2O emissions on soil type. We could estimate how strongly soil texture affects N2O emissions. Based on detailed soil maps with high spatial resolution we calculated region specific contribution to N2O emissions. Accordingly we differentiated regions with deviating gas fluxes compared to the predictions by the IPCC inventory methodology. Taking region specific management practices into account (tillage, irrigation, residuals) calculation of crop rotation (fallow, catch crop, winter wheat, barley, winter barley, sugar beet, corn, potato, onion and rapeseed) resulted in N2O emissions differing by a factor of 30 depending on preceding crop and climate. A maximum of 2% of N fertilizer input was emitted as N2O. Residual N in the soil was a major factor stimulating N2O emissions. Interannual variability was affected by varying N-deposition even in case

  6. Sustainability: orthopaedic surgery wait time management strategies.

    PubMed

    Amar, Claudia; Pomey, Marie-Pascale; SanMartin, Claudia; De Coster, Carolyn; Noseworthy, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine Canadian organizational and systemic factors that made it possible to keep wait times within federally established limits for at least 18 months. The research design is a multiple cases study. The paper selected three cases: Case 1 - staff were able to maintain compliance with requirements for more than 18 months; Case 2 - staff were able to meet requirements for 18 months, but unable to sustain this level; Case 3 - staff were never able to meet the requirements. For each case the authors interviewed persons involved in the strategies and collected documents. The paper analysed systemic and organizational-level factors; including governance and leadership, culture, resources, methods and tools. Findings indicate that the hospital that was able to maintain compliance with the wait time requirements had specific characteristics: an exclusive mandate to do only hip and knee replacement surgery; motivated staff who were not distracted by other concerns; and a strong team spirit. The authors' research highlights an important gradient between three cases regarding the factors that sustain waiting times. The paper show that the hospital factory model seems attractive in a super-specialized surgery context. However, patients are selected for simple surgeries, without complications, and so this cannot be considered a unique model.

  7. The maintenance of soil fertility in Amazonian managed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luizão, Flávio J.; Fearnside, Philip M.; Cerri, Carlos E. P.; Lehmann, Johannes

    Most of Brazilian Amazonia faces important limitations for conventional agriculture and pastures due to a generally poor chemical fertility as well as the region's environmental conditions, especially high temperature and moisture. Without proper management, degradation of the soil and resulting unsustainability of agricultural and ranching production occur within a few years, leading to land abandonment. Use of perennial crops, especially those based on native tree species, would be instrumental in order to achieve best management such as that which assure recycling processes similar to those in the primary forest. Recommended alternative land uses are those producing high soil organic matter, recycling of nutrients, substantial agricultural production, and economic viability. These include agroforestry systems, enrichment of second growth with valuable native timber or fruit species, accelerated fallow regrowth via enrichment plantings, sequential agroforestry with slash-and-mulch, and diversified forest plantations. Improvement of agricultural soils can be based on lessons learned from the study of processes involved in the formation and maintenance of the rich "dark earths" (terra preta), which owe their high carbon content and fertility in part to high content of charcoal. Adding powdered charcoal combined with selected nutrients can increase soil carbon in modern agriculture. Considering that limitations to expansion of intensified land uses in Amazonia are serious, regional development should emphasize the natural forest, which can maintain itself without external inputs of nutrients. Instead of creating conditions to further expand deforestation, these forests may be used as they stand to provide a variety of valuable environmental services that could offer a sustainable basis for development of Amazonia.

  8. Soil management practice in Croatian vineyard affect CO2 fluxes and soil degradation in trafficking zones. First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogunovic, Igor; Bilandzija, Darija; Andabaka, Zeljko; Stupic, Domagoj; Cacic, Marija; Brezinscak, Luka; Maletic, Edi; Pereira, Paulo; Kisic, Ivica

    2017-04-01

    Vineyards represent one of the most degradation prone types of intensively managed land on Earth. Steep slopes encourage grape producers to adopt environmental friendly soil management like mulching or continuous no-tillage. In this context, producers have concerns about efficient fertilisation practices and water competitions between vine and grasses in continuous no-tillage inter rows. Vineyards in semi-humid areas like Continental Croatia mostly not suffer from water deficit during growth. Nevertheless, lack of research of different soil management practices open dilemma about soil compaction concerns in intensively trafficked soils in vineyard of semi-humid areas. Soil compaction, determined by bulk density (BD), soil water content (SWC) and CO2 fluxes from trafficked inter row positions were recorded in 2016 in an experiment in which four different soil management systems were compared in a vineyard raised on a silty clay loam soil, near Zagreb, Croatia: No-tillage (NT) system, continuous tillage (CT) and yearly inversed grass covered (INV-GC) and tillage managed (INV-T) inter rows are subjected to intensive traffic. Grape yield and must quality of grape variety Chardonnay was also monitored. Tractor traffic increased the soil BD at 0-10 and 10-20 cm, but especially at the 0-10 cm depth. CT treatment record lowest compaction at 0-10 cm because of tillage. Soil water content showed better conservation possibilities of INV-GC in drier period. In wet period SWC possibilities are similar between treatments. The results of soil compaction under different management indicate that vineyard soil differently response to traffic intensity and impact on microfauna activity and CO2 emissions. INV-GC and NT managed soils record lower CO2 fluxes from vineyard soil compared to CT and INV-T treatments. Management treatments did not statistically influenced on grape yields. Several years of investigation is needed to confirm the overall impact of different management

  9. Caries Management Strategies for Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, R.M.; Innes, N.P.T.; Machiulskiene, V.; Evans, D.J.P.; Splieth, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Minimal invasive approaches to managing caries, such as partial caries removal techniques, are showing increasing evidence of improved outcomes over the conventional complete caries removal. There is also increasing interest in techniques where no caries is removed. We present the 1-yr results of clinical efficacy for 3 caries management options for occlusoproximal cavitated lesions in primary molars: conventional restorations (CR; complete caries removal and compomer restoration), Hall technique (HT; no caries removal, sealing in with stainless steel crowns), and nonrestorative caries treatment (NRCT; no caries removal, opening up the cavity, teaching brushing and fluoride application). In sum, 169 children (3-8 yr old; mean, 5.56 ± 1.45 yr) were enrolled in this secondary care–based, 3-arm, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial. Treatments were carried out by specialist pediatric dentists or postgraduate trainees. One lesion per child received CR, HT, or NRCT. Outcome measures were clinical failure rates, grouped as minor failure (restoration loss/need for replacement, reversible pulpitis, caries progression, etc.) and major failure (irreversible pulpitis, abscess, etc.). There were 148 children (87.6%) with a minimum follow-up of 11 mo (mean, 12.23 ± 0.98 mo). Twenty teeth were recorded as having at least 1 minor failure: NRCT, n = 8 (5%); CR, n = 11 (7%); HT, n = 1 (1%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Only the comparison between NRCT and CR showed no significant difference (p = .79, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.80). Nine (6%) experienced at least 1 major failure: NRCT, n = 4 (2%); CR, n = 5 (3%); HT, n = 0 (0%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Individual comparison of NRCT and CR showed no statistically significant difference in major failures (p = .75, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.76). Success and failure rates were not significantly affected by pediatric dentists’ level of experience (p = .13, 95% CI = 0.12 to 0.14). The HT was significantly more successful

  10. Novel Strategies for the Removal of Toxic Metals from Soils and Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundhill, D. Max

    2004-02-01

    This article surveys the toxicities of mercury, cadmium, lead, copper, cadmium, and the actinides. Strategies for the removal of these metals include surfactants, aqueous biphasic systems, and liquid membranes. For soils, both in situ stabilization and detection are discussed. For extraction from soils, electrokinetic extraction, phytoremediation, and bioremediation methods are critically evaluated. This article provides an educator with the resources to set up a series of lectures on inorganic aspects of environmental chemistry.

  11. [Research advances in soil organic carbon and its fractions under different management patterns].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Yu, Wantai; Li, Jiandong; Jiang, Zishao

    2006-11-01

    Soil organic carbon can reflect soil quality and soil health, and is one of the hotspots in related researches at home and abroad. This paper reviewed the research results on the fractionation of soil organic carbon, with the focus on the dynamics of soil organic carbon and its fractions in their decomposition, accumulation, content, storage, and allocation proportion under different land use type and management pattern. Some related issues and further research directions were discussed.

  12. Soil and plant responses from land application of saline-sodic waters: Implications of management

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, G.F.; King, L.A.; Ganjegunte, G.K.

    2008-09-15

    Land application of co-produced waters from coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wells is one management option used in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana. Unfortunately the co-produced CBNG waters may be saline and/or sodic. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of irrigation with CBNG waters on soils and plants in the PRB. Soil properties and vegetation responses resulting from 1 to 4 yr of saline sodic water (electrical conductivity (EC) 1.6-4.8 dS m{sup -1} sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), 17-57 mmol L- applications were studied during 2003 and 2004 field seasons on sites (Ustic Torriorthent Haplocambid, Haplargid and Paleargid) representing native range grasslands seeded grass hayfields and alfalfa hayfields. Parameters measured from each irrigated site were compared directly with representative non-irrigated sites. Soil chemical and physical parameters including pH, EC, SAR, exchangeable sodium percent, texture, bulk density, infiltration and Darcy flux rates, were measured at various depth intervals to 120 cm. Mulitple-year applications of saline sodic water produced consistent trends of increased soil EC AND SAR values to depths of 30 cm reduced surface infiltration rates and lowered Darcy flux rates to 120 cm. Significant differences (p {le} 0.05) were determined between irrigated and non-irrigated areas for EC, SAR infiltration rates and Darcy flux (p {le} 0.10) at most sites. Saline sodic CBNG water applications significantly increased native perennial grass biomass production and cover on irrigated as compared with non-irrigated sites; however overall species evenness decreased. Biological effects were variable and complex reflecting site-specific conditions and water and soil management strategies.

  13. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    TW, CRAWFORD

    2008-07-17

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  14. [Global brain metastases management strategy: a multidisciplinary-based approach].

    PubMed

    Métellus, P; Tallet, A; Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Carpentier, A; Spano, J-P; Azria, D; Noël, G; Barlési, F; Taillibert, S; Le Rhun, É

    2015-02-01

    Brain metastases management has evolved over the last fifteen years and may use varying strategies, including more or less aggressive treatments, sometimes combined, leading to an improvement in patient's survival and quality of life. The therapeutic decision is subject to a multidisciplinary analysis, taking into account established prognostic factors including patient's general condition, extracerebral disease status and clinical and radiological presentation of lesions. In this article, we propose a management strategy based on the state of current knowledge and available therapeutic resources. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  15. Optimal management strategies for placenta accreta.

    PubMed

    Eller, A G; Porter, T F; Soisson, P; Silver, R M

    2009-04-01

    To determine which interventions for managing placenta accreta were associated with reduced maternal morbidity. Retrospective cohort study. Two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Utah. All identified cases of placenta accreta from 1996 to 2008. Cases of placenta accreta were identified using standard ICD-9 codes for placenta accreta, placenta praevia, and caesarean hysterectomy. Medical records were then abstracted for maternal medical history, hospital course, and maternal and neonatal outcomes. Maternal and neonatal complications were compared according to antenatal suspicion of accreta, indications for delivery, preoperative preparation, attempts at placental removal before hysterectomy, and hypogastric artery ligation. Early morbidity (prolonged maternal intensive care unit admission, large volume of blood transfusion, coagulopathy, ureteral injury, or early re-operation) and late morbidity (intra-abdominal infection, hospital re-admission, or need for delayed re-operation). Results Seventy-six cases of placenta accreta were identified. When accreta was suspected, scheduled caesarean hysterectomy without attempting placental removal was associated with a significantly reduced rate of early morbidity compared with cases in which placental removal was attempted (67 versus 36%, P=0.038). Women with preoperative bilateral ureteric stents had a lower incidence of early morbidity compared with women without stents (18 versus 55%, P=0.018). Hypogastric artery ligation did not reduce maternal morbidity. Scheduled caesarean hysterectomy with preoperative ureteric stent placement and avoiding attempted placental removal are associated with reduced maternal morbidity in women with suspected placenta accreta.

  16. Future strategies in the management of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Schwitter, Jürg

    2006-09-01

    New diagnostic techniques have now become available that will enable us to obtain information on coronary artery disease (CAD), which was not previously possible. This is urgently needed, since changes in CAD management are highly desirable considering that up to 60% of patients die due to an insufficient diagnostic strategy (reactive strategy). In this article, the pathophysiology of CAD and the evidence of current concepts on coronary atherosclerosis are critically reviewed. Consequently, a shift from a 'reactive strategy' of CAD management to an active strategy is proposed in order to detect and treat patients before acute myocardial infarcts occur. Reliability, repeatability, cost-effectiveness and comfort are important features of an optimal test for this active strategy. This perspective gives an overview of current and future tests with respect to these features. The novel tomographic techniques are particularly promising with respect to standardization and reproducibility, which will set the basis for the determination of test performance and, consequently, cost-effectiveness. Assessment of cost-effectiveness is increasingly important, since prevalence of CAD is high and will most likely increase, while resources will remain restricted in most countries. Considering these economic restrictions, this article also proposes new mathematical tools using data from prospective trials and large international registries as an objective means to select the best tests for CAD diagnosis and management, and to identify those patient subsets which benefit most from an active strategy.

  17. Impact of Conflict Management Strategies on the Generation Mechanism of Miners' Unsafe Behavior Tendency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ji-Zu; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Yao-Long; Wang, Tian-Ri

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the relationship between the generation mechanism of miners' unsafe behavior tendency and conflict management strategies, including cooperative conflict management strategy, competitive conflict management strategy and avoidant conflict management strategy. Miners from 3 collieries in Shanxi province completed a…

  18. Feed the crop not the soil: rethinking phosphorus management in the food chain.

    PubMed

    Withers, Paul J A; Sylvester-Bradley, Roger; Jones, Davey L; Healey, John R; Talboys, Peter J

    2014-06-17

    Society relies heavily on inorganic phosphorus (P) compounds throughout its food chain. This dependency is not only very inefficient and increasingly costly but is depleting finite global reserves of rock phosphate. It has also left a legacy of P accumulation in soils, sediments and wastes that is leaking into our surface waters and contributing to widespread eutrophication. We argue for a new, more precise but more challenging paradigm in P fertilizer management that seeks to develop more sustainable food chains that maintain P availability to crops and livestock but with reduced amounts of imported mineral P and improved soil function. This new strategy requires greater public awareness of the environmental consequences of dietary choice, better understanding of soil-plant-animal P dynamics, increased recovery of both used P and unutilized legacy soil P, and new innovative technologies to improve fertilizer P recovery. In combination, they are expected to deliver significant economic, environmental, and resource-protection gains, and contribute to future global P stewardship.

  19. Model predictive control power management strategies for HEVs: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanjun; Wang, Hong; Khajepour, Amir; He, Hongwen; Ji, Jie

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of power management strategy (PMS) utilized in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) with an emphasis on model predictive control (MPC) based strategies for the first time. Research on MPC-based power management systems for HEVs has intensified recently due to its many inherent merits. The categories of the existing PMSs are identified from the latest literature, and a brief study of each type is conducted. Then, the MPC approach is introduced and its advantages are discussed. Based on the acquisition method of driver behavior used for state prediction and the dynamic model used, the MPC is classified and elaborated. Factors that affect the performance of the MPC are put forward, including prediction accuracy, design parameters, and solvers. Finally, several important issues in the application of MPC-based power management strategies and latest developing trends are discussed. This paper not only provides a comprehensive analysis of MPC-based power management strategies for HEVs but also puts forward the future and emphasis of future study, which will promote the development of energy management controller with high performance and low cost for HEVs.

  20. Current strategies for endoscopic management of acute cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Tan, Damien

    2017-04-01

    At the pancreatobiliary session of Endoscopic Forum Japan (EFJ) 2016, current strategies for the endoscopic management of acute cholangitis were discussed. The topics consisted of two major parts, namely endoscopic management of acute cholangitis caused by common bile duct stones (CBDS) and biliary stent occlusion. Endoscopists from nine Japanese high-volume centers along with two overseas centers participated in the questionnaires and discussion. Strategies for management of cholangitis due to CBDS were agreed upon, and the clinical guideline of acute cholangitis (Tokyo guidelines 2013) was accepted. The best timing for drainage in Grade 2 (moderate) cholangitis urgent or early (<24 h) was inconclusive, and more data is required on this issue. Another controversy was the feasibility of one step stone extraction in the patient with cholangitis vs stone removal after the cholangitis had resolved. There were various opinions with regards to the management of acute cholangitis due to stent occlusion, and the strategies differed according to the stricture location (distal or hilar) and stent type initially placed (Covered or uncovered metal stent). Strategies for management of cholangitis caused by CBD stones are well established according to the TG13. More evidence is required before further recommendations can be made with regards to cholangitis due to stent occlusion. We aim to clarify this in the near future with questionnaires and consensus from experts. © 2017 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  1. [Effects of land use and management on soil quality of Heerqin sandy land].

    PubMed

    Su, Yongzhong; Zhao, Halin

    2003-10-01

    The changes of soil physical, chemical and biological properties under different land use and management lasted for 14 years were investigated on the Heerqin sandy land. The results showed that among various land use systems marked differences exhibited in soil quality indicators, including soil particle composition, porosity distribution, bulk density, water-holding capacity, organic matter and nutrient contents, pH, and enzyme activities. Most of these soil quality indicators were the highest in the orchard intercropped with crops and perennial grass (agroforestry systems), intermediate in the well-management irrigated farmland, and the lowest in the less-management dry farmland. Compared to the primary grassland soil, although some soil properties, including porosity distribution, water-holding capacity, phosphorus content, and enzyme activities, were improved in the well-management systems, soil organic matter and nitrogen contents were significantly lower. It suggested that a long-term input of organic matter was needed for the restoration and reestablishment of soil carbon and nitrogen pools in the seriously degraded ecosystem. Inappropriate land use and management could rapidly worsen soil quality, and hence, from a perspective of soil resource conservation, a preferable way for preventing soil degradation and achieving sustainable land use should be to give up the cultivation of degraded dry farmlands, and to adopt more effective and appropriate soil management and cultivation practices.

  2. Distribution of tetraether lipids in agricultural soils - differentiation between paddy and upland management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Niggemann, C.; Utami, S. R.; Marxen, A.; Mangelsdorf, K.; Bauersachs, T.; Schwark, L.

    2015-10-01

    Insufficient knowledge of the composition and variation of isoprenoid and branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in agricultural soils exists, despite of the potential effect of different management types (e.g. soil/water and redox conditions, cultivated plants) on GDGT distribution. Here, we determined the influence of different soil management types on the GDGT composition in paddy (flooded) and adjacent upland (non-flooded) soils, and if available also forest, bushland and marsh soils. To compare the local effects on GDGT distribution patterns, we collected comparable soil samples in various locations from tropical (Indonesia, Vietnam and Philippines) and subtropical (China and Italy) sites. We found that differences in the distribution of isoprenoid GDGTs (iGDGTs) as well as of branched GDGTs (brGDGTs) are predominantly controlled by management type and only secondarily by climatic exposition. In general upland soil had higher crenarchaeol contents than paddy soil, which on the contrary was more enriched in GDGT-0. The GDGT-0 / crenarchaeol ratio was 3-27 times higher in paddy soil and indicates the enhanced presence of methanogenic archaea, which were additionally linked to the number of rice cultivation cycles per year (higher number of cycles was coupled with an increase in the ratio). The TEX86 values were 1.3 times higher in upland, bushland and forest soils than in paddy soils. In all soils brGDGT predominated over iGDGTs, with the relative abundance of brGDGTs increasing from subtropical to tropical soils. Higher BIT values in paddy soils compared to upland soils together with higher BIT values in soil from subtropical climates indicate effects on the amounts of brGDGT through differences in management as well as climatic zones. In acidic soil CBT values correlated well with soil pH. In neutral to alkaline soils, however, no apparent correlation but an offset between paddy and upland managed soils was detected, which may suggest that soil

  3. Soil and geography are more important determinants of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal communities than management practices in Swiss agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Jansa, Jan; Erb, Angela; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Smilauer, Petr; Egli, Simon

    2014-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are ubiquitous soil fungi, forming mutualistic symbiosis with a majority of terrestrial plant species. They are abundant in nearly all soils, less diverse than soil prokaryotes and other intensively studied soil organisms and thus are promising candidates for universal indicators of land management legacies and soil quality degradation. However, insufficient data on how the composition of indigenous AMF varies along soil and landscape gradients have hampered the definition of baselines and effect thresholds to date. Here, indigenous AMF communities in 154 agricultural soils collected across Switzerland were profiled by quantitative real-time PCR with taxon-specific markers for six widespread AMF species. To identify the key determinants of AMF community composition, the profiles were related to soil properties, land management and site geography. Our results indicate a number of well-supported dependencies between abundances of certain AMF taxa and soil properties such as pH, soil fertility and texture, and a surprising lack of effect of available soil phosphorus on the AMF community profiles. Site geography, especially the altitude and large geographical distance, strongly affected AMF communities. Unexpected was the apparent lack of a strong land management effect on the AMF communities as compared to the other predictors, which could be due to the rarity of highly intensive and unsustainable land management in Swiss agriculture. In spite of the extensive coverage of large geographical and soil gradients, we did not identify any taxon suitable as an indicator of land use among the six taxa we studied. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Management Strategies for Skull Base Inverted Papilloma.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Jessica W; Khichi, Sunny S; Cho, Do-Yeon; Riley, Kristen O; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-07-01

    Inverted papilloma attached to the ventral skull base presents a surgical dilemma because surgical removal of the bony pedicle is critical to decrease risk of recurrence. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic management of skull base inverted papilloma. Case series with planned data collection. Tertiary medical center. Patients with skull base inverted papilloma. Over 7 years, 49 patients with skull base inverted papilloma were referred for surgical resection. Demographics, operative technique, pathology, complications, recurrence, and postoperative follow-up were evaluated. Average age at presentation was 57 years. Twenty-six patients (53%) had prior attempts at resection elsewhere, and 5 had squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) arising in an inverted papilloma. Six patients (12%) suffered major complications, including skull base osteomyelitis in 2 previously irradiated patients, cerebrospinal fluid leak with pneumocephalus (n = 1), meningitis (n = 1), invasive fungal sinusitis (n = 1), and cerebrovascular accident (n = 1). The mean disease-free interval was 29 months (range, 10-78 months). One patient with SCCA recurred in the nasopharynx (overall 2% recurrence rate). He is disease-free 3 years following endoscopic nasopharyngectomy. Three patients with SCCA had endoscopic resection of the skull base, while 1 subject with inverted papilloma pedicled on the superior orbital roof had an osteoplastic flap in conjunction with a Draf III procedure. All others received endoscopic resection. Removal of the bony pedicle resulted in excellent local control of skull base inverted papillomas. Our experience demonstrates that disease eradication with limited morbidity is attainable with this approach. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  5. Strategies to improve outcomes from operative childhood management of DDH.

    PubMed

    Wedge, John H; Kelley, Simon P

    2012-07-01

    The operative management of DDH is technically challenging. To achieve excellent results, surgeons need to select the most appropriate operative treatment, minimize the risk of complications, and be aggressive in the management of serious complications, such as redislocation and AVN, when they occur. We have described specific steps and strategies to assist in each of these key steps. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of management strategies for reducing nitrogen loadings to four US estuaries.

    PubMed

    Whitall, D; Castro, M; Driscoll, C

    2004-10-15

    In this study we used the Watershed Assessment Tool for Evaluating Reduction Strategies for Nitrogen (WATERSN) model to evaluate a variety of management strategies for reducing nitrogen (N) loads to four US east coast estuaries: Casco Bay, Long Island Sound, Chesapeake Bay and Pamlico Sound. These management strategies encompass reductions in atmospheric emissions and deposition of N from sources including, fossil fuel burning utility emissions and mobile NO(x) emissions, N treatment in wastewater and controls on agricultural N inputs. We find that in primarily urban watersheds biological removal of N in wastewater treatment produces the greatest reduction in N loading (32-57% reductions), while in less urban watersheds, reductions in agricultural loading are more effective (5-56% reductions) in decreasing N loads to coastal ecosystems. Because anthropogenic N inputs are derived from a variety of sources, we also examined an integrated scenario targeting all major N sources; this resulted in 35-58% reductions in N loading. Nitrogen pollution originates from multiple sources and is transported through several media (air, soil, water); a major challenge of the development of N management strategies will be the control of multiple sources to effectively reduce N loads to estuaries.

  7. Management Effects on Soil Respiration in North Carolina Coastal Plain Loblolly Pine Plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, M.; McNulty, S.; Noormets, A.; Treasure, E.

    2012-12-01

    Loblolly pine is the most widely planted tree for plantation management in the southern US. In the southern coastal plain, where much of the original longleaf pine and bottomland hardwood forests have been converted to loblolly pine plantations, inland areas are commonly characterized by deep organic soils that can store up to 80 kg C m-2. Intensive management activities on these sites disturb the forest floor and soil and their impact on soil respiration rates and long term soil storage capabilities is unclear. We measured soil respiration rates in three loblolly pine plantations being managed with a combination of ditching, bedding, clearcutting, thinning and fertilization. Sites and management regimes represented a wide range of real world conditions found in managed southern US forestry plantations. Soil efflux rates along with soil temperature and moisture were measured throughout the year at four to six plots on each site and best fit relationships were developed. Annual soil respiration rates where modeled using 30-minute soil temperature and moisture measurements recorded at a centralized meteorological station on each site. Soil efflux rates were highly correlated with soil temperature and moisture, but interaction between the two effects was uncommon. Soil temperature was the primary driver of soil respiration rates, but rates were suppressed under high soil moisture content. Modeled annual soil efflux rates were higher the first two years following clearcut harvest and thinning operations, but lower two years following fertilization. Rates were lower in the gaps, where entire tree rows were removed, compared to thinned areas, especially on the unfertilized site. Results indicate that soil respiration rates can be strongly impacted by forest management practices; however, the period of increased soil CO2 efflux due to site disturbance may last only a few years.

  8. Characterization of soil spatial variability for site-specific management using soil electrical conductivity and other remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Jisu

    Field-scale characterization of soil spatial variability using remote sensing technology has potential for achieving the successful implementation of site-specific management (SSM). The objectives of this study were to: (i) examine the spatial relationships between apparent soil electrical conductivity (EC a) and soil chemical and physical properties to determine if EC a could be useful to characterize soil properties related to crop productivity in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont of North Carolina; (ii) evaluate the effects of in-situ soil moisture variation on ECa mapping as a basis for characterization of soil spatial variability and as a data layer in cluster analysis as a means of delineating sampling zones; (iii) evaluate clustering approaches using different variable sets for management zone delineation to characterize spatial variability in soil nutrient levels and crop yields. Studies were conducted in two fields in the Piedmont and three fields in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Spatial measurements of ECa via electromagnetic induction (EMI) were compared with soil chemical parameters (extractable P, K, and micronutrients; pH, cation exchange capacity [CEC], humic matter or soil organic matter; and physical parameters (percentage sand, silt, and clay; and plant-available water [PAW] content; bulk density; cone index; saturated hydraulic conductivity [Ksat] in one of the coastal plain fields) using correlation analysis across fields. We also collected ECa measurements in one coastal plain field on four days with significantly different naturally occurring soil moisture conditions measured in five increments to 0.75 m using profiling time-domain reflectometry probes to evaluate the temporal variability of ECa associated with changes in in-situ soil moisture content. Nonhierarchical k-means cluster analysis using sensor-based field attributes including vertical ECa, near-infrared (NIR) radiance of bare-soil from an aerial color infrared (CIR) image

  9. Integrated Management Strategies Increase Cottonseed, Oil and Protein Production: The Key Role of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongkun; Zhang, Xinyue; Chen, Binglin; Meng, Yali; Wang, Youhua; Zhao, Wenqing; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2017-01-01

    Cottonseed, oil, and protein, as the by-products of cotton production, have the potential to provide commodities to meet the increasing demand of renewable bio-fuels and ruminant feed. An increase in crop yield per unit area requires high-yielding cultivar management with an economic nitrogen (N) rate, an optimal N application schedule, high-yielding plant populations and strong seedlings. Whether the integration of these agronomic practices into a coherent management system can increase the productivity of cotton fiber, embryo oil and protein requires experimental elucidation. In this 2-year study, conventional management practices (CM) were used as a control, and two integrated management strategies (IMS1 and IMS2) were considered at two soil fertility levels (high soil fertility and low soil fertility) to analyze the metabolic and biochemical traits of cotton embryos. The results illustrate that the cottonseed, oil, and protein yields for IMS1 and IMS2 were significantly higher than those under CM at both soil fertility levels and the fiber yield increased as well. The IMS regulated the maternal photo thermal environment by delaying the flowering date, resulting in increases in the seed weight. In developing cotton embryos, the IMS increased the embryo weight accumulation rate and biomass partitioning into oil and protein, which were associated with high activities of H+-ATPase, H+-PPase, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and cell wall invertase (C-INV) and low activities of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and vacuole invertase (V-INV). Increased hexoses (D-fructose, D-glucose) content contributed to the oil and protein contents. These results suggest that increased sucrose/H+ symport, sucrose hydrolysis, hexoses synthesis, and cumulative photo-thermal product (PTP), especially in the early stage of embryo growth, play a dominant role in the high productivity of cotton oil and protein. PMID:28194156

  10. Near infrared spectroscopy to estimate the temperature reached on burned soils: strategies to develop robust models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, César; Pedrosa, Elisabete T.; Pérez-Bejarano, Andrea; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2014-05-01

    The temperature reached on soils is an important parameter needed to describe the wildfire effects. However, the methods for measure the temperature reached on burned soils have been poorly developed. Recently, the use of the near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been pointed as a valuable tool for this purpose. The NIR spectrum of a soil sample contains information of the organic matter (quantity and quality), clay (quantity and quality), minerals (such as carbonates and iron oxides) and water contents. Some of these components are modified by the heat, and each temperature causes a group of changes, leaving a typical fingerprint on the NIR spectrum. This technique needs the use of a model (or calibration) where the changes in the NIR spectra are related with the temperature reached. For the development of the model, several aliquots are heated at known temperatures, and used as standards in the calibration set. This model offers the possibility to make estimations of the temperature reached on a burned sample from its NIR spectrum. However, the estimation of the temperature reached using NIR spectroscopy is due to changes in several components, and cannot be attributed to changes in a unique soil component. Thus, we can estimate the temperature reached by the interaction between temperature and the thermo-sensible soil components. In addition, we cannot expect the uniform distribution of these components, even at small scale. Consequently, the proportion of these soil components can vary spatially across the site. This variation will be present in the samples used to construct the model and also in the samples affected by the wildfire. Therefore, the strategies followed to develop robust models should be focused to manage this expected variation. In this work we compared the prediction accuracy of models constructed with different approaches. These approaches were designed to provide insights about how to distribute the efforts needed for the development of robust

  11. Role of Emotional Intelligence in Conflict Management Strategies of Nurses.

    PubMed

    Başoğul, Ceyda; Özgür, Gönül

    2016-09-01

    This study analyzes the emotional intelligence levels and conflict management strategies of nurses and the association between them. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted with 277 nurses in a stratified random sample from a university hospital in Turkey. The data were collected from nurses who gave their informed consent to participate using a personal information form, the Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory-II and Bar-On's Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-I). Data were assessed by descriptive statistics, t tests, and Pearson correlation analyses, using SPSS software. The levels of the nurses' strategies were as follows: avoiding (M = 2.98), dominating (M = 2.76), and obliging (M = 2.71) were medium; compromising (M = 1.99) and integration (M = 1.96) were low. The levels of the emotional intelligence of nurses (mean = 2.75) were medium on a 5-point scale. Integration (r = .168), obliging (r = .25), dominating (r = .18), and compromising (r = .33), which are conflict management strategies, were positively correlated with scores of emotional intelligence, and avoiding (r = -.25) was negatively correlated with scores of emotional intelligence (p < .05). The study determined that nurses' emotional intelligence affects conflict management strategies. To use effective strategies in conflict management, nurses must develop emotional intelligence. Training programs on conflict management and emotional intelligence are needed to improve effective conflict management in healthcare facilities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Soil management effect on soil quality indicators in vineyards of the Appellation of Origin "Montilla-Moriles" in southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Gema; Cabezas, José Manuel; Bauer, Thomas; Strauss, Peter; Winter, Silvia; Zaller, Johann; Gómez, José Alfonso

    2017-04-01

    The effect soil management on several indicators frequently used in the assessment of soil quality it is not always reflected unambiguously when measured at the field although it is normally assumed that this relation is straightforward. Within the European project VineDivers (www.vinedivers.eu), sixteen commercial vineyards belonging to the Appellation of Origin "Montilla-Moriles" (Córdoba) and covering a wide range of textural classes were selected. These farms were classified 'a priori' under two soil management categories: temporal cover crop and bare soil during the whole year. In each of the vineyards one representative inter-row was selected in order to characterise different physical, chemical and biological parameters to evaluate some aspects related to soil quality. Results indicate that the studied indicators respond clearly to soil textural class and vegetation cover biomass. However, there was no clear difference in above-ground biomass of the two management categories (Guzmán et al., 2016). These results suggest that the interpretation and extrapolation of the indicators evaluated should incorporate complementary information to characterise small variations of soil management intensity among vineyards that are apparently managed under the same management category. The communication presents this analysis based on the number and type of soil disturbance events of all vineyards. The high variability found among vineyards under the same management highlights the relevance of measuring these soil parameters used as quality indicators, instead of extrapolating from other vineyards or agricultural systems, and interpreting them according to baseline levels. References: Guzmán G., Cabezas J.M., Gómez J.A. 2016. Evaluación preliminar del efecto del manejo del suelo en indicadores que determinan su calidad en viñedos de la Denominación de Origen Montilla Moriles. II Jornadas de Viticultura SECH. Madrid.

  13. Influence of management practices on C stabilization pathways in agricultural volcanic ash soils (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Zulimar; María Álvarez, Ana; Carral, Pilar; de Figueiredo, Tomas; Almendros, Gonzalo

    2014-05-01

    Although C stabilization mechanisms in agricultural soils are still controversial [1], a series of overlapped pathways has been suggested [2] such as: i) insolubilization of low molecular weight precursors of soil organic matter (SOM) with reactive minerals through physical and chemical bonding, ii) selective accumulation of biosynthetic substances which are recalcitrant because of its inherent chemical composition, and iii) preservation and furter diagenetic transformation of particulate SOM entrapped within resistant microaggregates, where diffusion of soil enzymes is largely hampered. In some environments where carbohydrate and N compounds are not readily biodegraded, e.g., with water saturated micropores, an ill-known C stabilization pathway may involve the formation of Maillard's reaction products [3]. In all cases, these pathways converge in the formation of recalcitrant macromolecular substances, sharing several properties with the humic acid (HA) fraction [4]. In template forests, the selective preservation and further microbial reworking of plant biomass has been identified as a prevailing mechanism in the accumulation of recalcitrant SOM forms [5]. However, in volcanic ash soils with intense organomineral interactions, condensation reactions of low molecular weight precursors with short-range minerals may be the main mechanism [6]. In order to shed some light about the effect of agricultural management on soil C stabilization processes on volcanic ash soils, the chemical composition of HA and some structural proxies of SOM informing on its origin and potential resistance to biodegradation, were examined in 30 soils from Canary Islands (Spain) by visible, infrared (IR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, elementary analysis and pyrolytic techniques. The results of multivariate treatments, suggested at least three simultaneous C stabilization biogeochemical trends: i) diagenetic alteration of plant biomacromolecules in soils receiving

  14. Impact of postfire management on soil respiration and C concentration in a managed hemiboreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Kajar; Seglinš, Katrin; Parro, Kristi; Metslaid, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Fire is the main natural disturbance in boreal forests and it is expected that its frequency will increase as a result of climate change. Fire is the primary process which organizes the physical and biological attributes of the boreal biome and influences energy flows and biogeochemical cycles, particularly the carbon (C) cycle. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of forest fire and time since forest fire on soil respiration and soil C concentrations in scenarios where the area was managed or was not managed after fire disturbance. This study was carried out in two permanent research areas in northwestern Estonia (hemiboreal forest zone) that were damaged by fire: Vihterpalu (59o13' N 23o49' E) and Nõva (59o10' N 23o45' E). Fire occurred in Vihterpalu in year 1992 (550 ha burned), when the forest was 52 years old, and in Nõva in year 2008 (800 ha burned), when the forest was 70 years old. Before the fire disturbance both sites were covered with planted or sown Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests originally regenerated after heavy fires in 1940 (Nõva) and 1951 (Vihterpalu). In all areas we are dealing with stand replacing fires where all (or almost all) of the stand was destroyed by fire. In both study areas three different types of sample areas were set up: 1) control areas (CO), that are unburned and no management activities carried out; 2) burned and cleared (BC) with salvage logging, areas in which all dead and live trees were harvested from the plot after fire; 3) burned and uncleared areas (BU), areas without management in which both dead and live trees were left on the plots after fire disturbance. On every area three measuring transects (40 m long) were established where soil respiration (g CO2 m-2h-1) was measured on five collars, and five soil samples (0.5 m long and 0.05 m in diameter) were taken to estimate soil C (kg m-2) content. In our study, highest soil respiration values were recorded in control (CO) areas, which are not

  15. A survey of managed care strategies for pregnant smokers.

    PubMed

    Barker, D C; Robinson, L A; Rosenthal, A C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the content and comprehensiveness of pregnancy specific smoking cessation strategies within managed care organisations (MCOs) responding affirmatively to the national 1997-98 Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care (ATMC) survey. This cross sectional follow up study consisted of a fax survey sent to medical directors and a 37 question telephone survey of program overseers about the smoking cessation strategy. 147 MCOs identifying a pregnancy specific smoking cessation strategy on the 1997-98 ATMC survey served as the initial sample; 88 MCOs of 128 eligible plans completed both components, with a response rate of 69%. Pregnancy specific smoking cessation strategies varied. 40% of respondents used the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines for clinical smoking cessation to design their strategy. Strategies included self help materials, quit classes, telephone support and brief counselling by providers, linkages to quality improvement efforts, and use of patient databases for outreach. Only 42% offered a postpartum relapse prevention element. Lack of patient interest, competing clinic priorities, and the lack of a smoker identification system were the most problematic barriers to implementing strategies, common to at least a quarter of respondents. A majority ranked best practice manuals and web site linkages as the most useful form of technical assistance, followed by peer-to-peer counselling, regional workshops, newsletters, on-site assistance, and national conferences. The survey provides the first profile of prenatal tobacco treatment strategies in managed care. While design limitations prevent generalisation of these results to all MCOs, such information can help guide technical assistance to plans interested in reducing smoking among pregnant women.

  16. Phytoremediation strategies for soils contaminated with heavy metals: Modifications and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Imran, Muhammad; Shaheen, Muhammad Rashid; Ishaque, Wajid; Kamran, Muhammad Asif; Matloob, Amar; Rehim, Abdur; Hussain, Saddam

    2017-03-01

    Presence of heavy metals in agricultural soils is of major environmental concern and a great threat to life on the earth. A number of human health risks are associated with heavy metals regarding their entry into food chain. Various physical, chemical and biological techniques are being used to remove heavy metals and metalloids from soils. Among them, phytoremediation is a good strategy to harvest heavy metals from soils and have been proven as an effective and economical technique. In present review, we discussed various sources and harmful effects of some important heavy metals and metalloids, traditional phytoremediation strategies, mechanisms involved in phytoremediation of these metals, limitations and some recent advances in phytoremediation approaches. Since traditional phytoremediation approach poses some limitations regarding their applications at large scale, so there is a dire need to modify this strategy using modern chemical, biological and genetic engineering tools. In view of above, the present manuscript brings both traditional and advanced phytoremediation techniques together in order to compare, understand and apply these strategies effectively to exclude heavy metals from soil keeping in view the economics and effectiveness of phytoremediation strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stakeholder perceptions of soil managements in the Canyoles watershed. A Bayesian Belief Network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguet Marimón, Maria; Quinn, Claire; Stringer, Lindsay; Cerdà, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    not fight against these problems as, on the one hand, they do not realize that non-sustainable soil erosion rates reduce soil fertility, and, on the other hand, there are several cultural issues that guide them towards bare soil as they find this as a tidy way to keep their properties. However, more research needs to be done on the BBN approach in order to be able to have a holistic approach regarding the vision of the farmers concerning the use of the different soil conservation strategies. Acknowledgements. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 603498 (RECARE project). References Cain, J. 2001. Planning improvements in natural resources management: Guidelines for using Bayesian networks to support the planning and management of development programmes in the water sector and beyond. Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, UK. Marques, M. J., R. Bienes, J. Cuadrado, M. Ruiz-Colmenero, C. Barbero-Sierra, and A. Velasco. 2015. Analysing Perceptions Attitudes and Responses of Winegrowers about Sustainable Land Management in Central Spain. Land Degradation and Development 26 (5): 458-467. doi:10.1002/ldr.2355. Tengberg, A., F. Radstake, K. Zhang, and B. Dunn. 2016. Scaling Up of Sustainable Land Management in the Western People's Republic of China: Evaluation of a 10-Year Partnership. Land Degradation and Development 27 (2): 134-144. doi:10.1002/ldr.2270. Teshome, A., J. de Graaff, C. Ritsema, and M. Kassie. 2016. Farmers' Perceptions about the Influence of Land Quality, Land Fragmentation and Tenure Systems on Sustainable Land Management in the North Western Ethiopian Highlands. Land Degradation and Development 27 (4): 884-898. doi:10.1002/ldr.2298.

  18. How Managers' everyday decisions create or destroy your company's strategy.

    PubMed

    Bower, Joseph L; Gilbert, Clark G

    2007-02-01

    Senior executives have long been frustrated by the disconnection between the plans and strategies they devise and the actual behavior of the managers throughout the company. This article approaches the problem from the ground up, recognizing that every time a manager allocates resources, that decision moves the company either into or out of alignment with its announced strategy. A well-known story--Intel's exit from the memory business--illustrates this point. When discussing what businesses Intel should be in, Andy Grove asked Gordon Moore what they would do if Intel were a company that they had just acquired. When Moore answered, "Get out of memory," they decided to do just that. It turned out, though, that Intel's revenues from memory were by this time only 4% of total sales. Intel's lower-level managers had already exited the business. What Intel hadn't done was to shut down the flow of research funding into memory (which was still eating up one-third of all research expenditures); nor had the company announced its exit to the outside world. Because divisional and operating managers-as well as customers and capital markets-have such a powerful impact on the realized strategy of the firm, senior management might consider focusing less on the company's formal strategy and more on the processes by which the company allocates resources. Top managers must know the track record of the people who are making resource allocation proposals; recognize the strategic issues at stake; reach down to operational managers to work across division lines; frame resource questions to reflect the corporate perspective, especially when large sums of money are involved and conditions are highly uncertain; and create a new context that allows top executives to circumvent the regular resource allocation process when necessary.

  19. Trait-based characterisation of soil exploitation strategies of banana, weeds and cover plant species.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Florence; Damour, Gaëlle; Dorel, Marc; Moreau, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    Cover plants can be introduced in cropping systems to provide agroecosystem services, including weed control via competition for resources. There is currently no consensus on how to identify the best cover plant species, while trait-based approaches are promising for screening plant species due to their agroecosystem service provision potential. This study was carried out to characterize soil exploitation strategies of cover plant species in banana agroecosystems using a trait-based approach, and in turn identify cover plant species with a high weed control potential via competition for soil resources in banana cropping systems. A field experiment was conducted on 17 cover plant species, two weed species and two banana cultivars grown individually. Four functional traits were measured. Two of them (i.e., the size of the zone explored by roots and the root impact density) were used to characterize root system soil exploration patterns. Two other traits (i.e., specific root length and root diameter) were used to characterize resource acquisition within the soil zone explored by the roots. All studied traits exhibited marked variations among species. The findings suggested a trade-off between the abilities of species to develop a limited number of large diameter roots exploring a large soil zone versus many thin roots exploring a smaller soil zone. Three soil-resource exploitation strategies were identified among species: (i) with large diameter roots that explore a large soil zone; (ii) with small diameter roots and a high specific length that explore a smaller soil zone; and (iii) with a high total root-impact density and an intermediate specific root length that explore the uppermost soil layers. Interestingly, in our panel of species, no correlations with regard to belowground and aboveground strategies were noted: species with an acquisitive belowground strategy could display an acquisitive or a conservative aboveground strategy. The findings of this study

  20. Trait-based characterisation of soil exploitation strategies of banana, weeds and cover plant species

    PubMed Central

    Tardy, Florence; Damour, Gaëlle; Dorel, Marc; Moreau, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    Cover plants can be introduced in cropping systems to provide agroecosystem services, including weed control via competition for resources. There is currently no consensus on how to identify the best cover plant species, while trait-based approaches are promising for screening plant species due to their agroecosystem service provision potential. This study was carried out to characterize soil exploitation strategies of cover plant species in banana agroecosystems using a trait-based approach, and in turn identify cover plant species with a high weed control potential via competition for soil resources in banana cropping systems. A field experiment was conducted on 17 cover plant species, two weed species and two banana cultivars grown individually. Four functional traits were measured. Two of them (i.e., the size of the zone explored by roots and the root impact density) were used to characterize root system soil exploration patterns. Two other traits (i.e., specific root length and root diameter) were used to characterize resource acquisition within the soil zone explored by the roots. All studied traits exhibited marked variations among species. The findings suggested a trade-off between the abilities of species to develop a limited number of large diameter roots exploring a large soil zone versus many thin roots exploring a smaller soil zone. Three soil-resource exploitation strategies were identified among species: (i) with large diameter roots that explore a large soil zone; (ii) with small diameter roots and a high specific length that explore a smaller soil zone; and (iii) with a high total root-impact density and an intermediate specific root length that explore the uppermost soil layers. Interestingly, in our panel of species, no correlations with regard to belowground and aboveground strategies were noted: species with an acquisitive belowground strategy could display an acquisitive or a conservative aboveground strategy. The findings of this study

  1. Long-term citrus organic farming strategy results in soil organic matter recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Agata; Pereira, Paulo; Barone, Ettore; Giménez Morera, Antonio; Keesstra, Saskia; Gristina, Luciano; Jordán, Antonio; Parras-Alcantara, Luis; Cerdà, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT Soils play a key role in the Earth System (Keesstra et al., 2012; Brevick et al., 2015). Soils are a key resource for the human societies (Mol and Keesstra, 2012) and they are relevant to achieve the sustainability such as the United Nations Goals highlight (Keesstra et al., 2016). Agriculture soils, especially those under conventional tillage, are prone to organic matter mineralization, soil erosion, compaction and increase of greenhouse gases emission (Novara et al., 2011; Bruun et al., 2015; de Moraes et al., 2015; Choudhury et al., 2016; del Mar et al., 2016). The adoption of organic farming and sustainable management practices may provide a sustainable crop productivity, and in the meanwhile mitigate the negative impact of agriculture on ecosystem services benefits (Laudicina et al., 2015; Parras-Alcantara et al., 2015; 2016). The aim of this study was to examine, under field conditions, the long-term changes of soil organic matter under organic farming management in citrus orchards in Mediterranean environment and evaluate the ecosystem service on C sequestration in terms of economic benefits. The research was carried out at the Alcoleja Experimental Station located in the Cànyoles river watershed in the Eastern Spain on 45year old citrus plantation. Soil Organic Matter (SOM) content was monitored for 20 years at 6 different soil depth. The profitability of citrus plantation was estimated under conventional and organic management. Results showed that SOM in the 0-30 cm soil depth was the double after 20 years of organic farming management, ranging from 0.8 g kg-1 in 1995 to 1.5 g kg-1 in 2006. The highest SOM increase was in the top soil layer (368% of SOM increase in comparison to the initial SOM content) and decreased with soil depth. The effect of organic farming was relevant after 5 years since land management change, indicating that in Mediterranean environment the duration of long term studies should be higher than five years and proper policy

  2. Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-02

    This Soil Management Plan applies to all activities conducted under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that involve soil disturbance and potential management of waste soil. The plan was prepared under the direction of the Y-12 Environmental Compliance Department of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Soil disturbances related to maintenance activities, utility and building construction projects, or demolition projects fall within the purview of the plan. This Soil Management Plan represents an integrated, visually oriented, planning and information resource tool for decision making involving excavation or disturbance of soil at Y-12. This Soil Management Plan addresses three primary elements. (1) Regulatory and programmatic requirements for management of soil based on the location of a soil disturbance project and/or the regulatory classification of any contaminants that may be present (Chap. 2). Five general regulatory or programmatic classifications of soil are recognized to be potentially present at Y-12; soil may fall under one or more these classifications: (a) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) pursuant to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facilities Agreement; (b) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); (c) RCRA 3004(u) solid waste managements units pursuant to the RCRA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 permit for the ORR; (d) Toxic Substances and Control Act-regulated soil containing polychlorinated biphenyls; and (e) Radiologically contaminated soil regulated under the Atomic Energy Act review process. (2) Information for project planners on current and future planned remedial actions (RAs), as prescribed by CERCLA decision documents (including the scope of the actions and remedial goals), land use controls implemented to support or maintain RAs, RCRA post-closure regulatory requirements for

  3. Setting priorities for waste management strategies in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Paul H; Fellner, Johann

    2007-06-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the waste management systems, that are presently applied in affluent countries are appropriate solutions for waste management in less developed regions. For this purpose, three cities (Vienna, Damascus and Dhaka) which differ greatly in their gross domestic product and waste management were compared. The criteria for evaluation were economic parameters, and indicators as to whether the goals of waste management (protection of human health and the environment, the conservation of resources) were reached. Based on case studies, it was found that for regions spending 1-10 Euro capita(-1) year(-1) for waste management, the 'waste hierarchy' of prevention, recycling and disposal is not an appropriate strategy. In such regions, the improvement of disposal systems (complete collection, upgrading to sanitary landfilling) is the most cost-effective method to reach the objectives of solid waste management. Concepts that are widely applied in developed countries such as incineration and mechanical waste treatment are not suitable methods to reach waste management goals in countries where people cannot spend more than 10 Euro per person for the collection, treatment and disposal of their waste. It is recommended that each region first determines its economic capacity for waste management and then designs its waste management system according to this capacity and the goals of waste management.

  4. Grassland birds: An overview of threats and recommended management strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vickery, P.D.; Herkert, J.R.; Knopf, F.L.; Ruth, J.; Keller, C.E.; Bonney, Rick; Pashley, David N.; Cooper, Robert; Niles, Larry

    2000-01-01

    Grassland ecosystems are dependent on periodic disturbance for habitat maintenance. Historically, grazing by native herbivores and prairie fires were the agents principally responsible for maintaining grassland areas. However, elimination of native herbivores, wide-spread fire suppression, and conversion for agriculture have greatly altered grasslands in the United States and Canada. Because of these landscape changes, many grassland birds are increasingly dependent on land managers for habitat creation, maintenance, and health. Grazing, prescribed burning, and mowing/haying are the most frequently used, and versatile, grassland management techniques. Grassland birds prefer a wide range of grass heights and densities, with some species preferring short sparse vegetation, and others preferring taller, more dense vegetation. Due to differences in species habitat preferences and regional differences in soils and floristics, the responses of individual grassland species to specific grassland management practices can be variable and often are regionally dependent. As a result, management of grassland areas is best directed toward the creation of a mosaic of grassland habitat types. This habitat mosaic is probably best maintained through some type of rotational management system in which sections of large grassland areas receive management on a regular schedule. Such a rotational system would provide a variety of habitat types in every year, would ensure the availability of suitable habitat for birds at either end of the grassland management spectrum, and also would provide habitat for birds whose preferences lie between these extremes.

  5. [Effect of ground mulch managements on soil bacterial community structure and diversity in the non-irrigated apple orchard in Weibei Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuexing; Wen, Xiaoxia; Sun, Yulin; Zhang, Junli; Lin, Xiaoli; Liao, Yuncheng

    2015-07-04

    We studied the changes in soil bacterial communities induced by ground mulch managements at different apple growth periods. We adopted the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) with PCR-amplified 16S rRNA fragments to determine soil bacterial community structure and diversity. Soil bacterial community structure with different ground mulch managements were significantly different. Both the mulch management strategies and apple growth periods affected the predominant groups and their abundance in soil bacterial communities. Grass mulch and cornstalk mulch treatments had higher bacterial diversity and richness than the control at young fruit period and fruit expanding period, whereas film mulch treatment had no significant difference compared with the control. During mature period, bacterial diversity in the control reached its maximum, which may be ascribed to the rapid growth and reproduction of the r-selection bacteria. The clustering and detrended correspondence analysis revealed that differences in soil bacterial communities were closely correlated to apple growth periods and ground mulch managements. Soil samples from the grass mulch and cornstalk mulch treatments clustered together while those mulched with plastic film treatment were similar to the control. The most abundant phylum in soil bacterial community was Proteobacteria followed by Bacteroidetes. Some other phyla were also detected, such as Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi. Mulching with plant (Grass/Cornstalk) had great effects on soil bacterial community structure and enhanced the diversity while film mulch management had no significant effects.

  6. Management Strategies for Transition to Sustainable Agricultural Irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlfeld, D.; Mulligan, K.; Brown, C. M.; Yang, Y. E.

    2011-12-01

    In many agricultural regions of the world, aquifer overdrafting for agricultural irrigation continues. Management strategies are investigated that transition from this unsustainable use of water to a future, diminished use of irrigation. Complications arising from climate change and volatile energy prices are considered. A command and control strategy is modeled using combined simulation and optimization techniques. This strategy is compared with market based mechanisms such as cap and trade and Pigouvian pricing that are modeled using agent based methods. The formulations are designed to model the effects of different management strategies including those that seek to avoid rapid changes in basin-wide water utilization (considered a surrogate for agricultural production) over this time period. Formulations also include limits on total reduction in aquifer storage and controls on streamflow in the basin. The management formulations used in this study are developed for planning horizons of 50 to 100 years and use the Republican River Basin in the High Plains Aquifer as a case study. Historical and climate-adjusted recharge patterns are considered. Spatial and temporal variation in total irrigated acreage and the aquifer storage change determined by the solutions of the management formulations are analyzed and presented.

  7. University Students' Views of Obesity and Weight Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okonkwo, Ononuju; While, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the knowledge and views of university students regarding obesity and weight management strategies. Design: Online questionnaire-based survey of undergraduate and postgraduate university students in a large London university with a diverse student population. Method: The survey was administered online and circulated…

  8. Strategies for Talent Management: Greater Philadelphia Companies in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Human capital is one of the critical issues that impacts the Greater Philadelphia region's ability to grow and prosper. The CEO Council for Growth (CEO Council) is committed to ensuring a steady and talented supply of quality workers for this region. "Strategies for Talent Management: Greater Philadelphia Companies in Action" provides…

  9. Evolution in clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Nathan C; Galland, Joel; Borsato, Emerson P

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present an overview of the clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare in support of our electronic medical record systems. Intermountain first initiated efforts in developing a centralized enterprise knowledge repository in 2001. Applications developed, areas of emphasis served, and key areas of focus are presented. We also detail historical and current areas of emphasis, in response to business needs.

  10. Board and Senior Management Alignment on School Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarros, James C.; Sarros, Anne M.; Cooper, Brian K.; Santora, Joseph C.; Baker, Robin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the degree to which senior executive members of a school's decision-making team (senior management team and board of directors) are aligned on fundamental principles of school strategy. Our study is based on a conceptual framework of strategic leadership as it applies in an Australian independent school context. We also examine…

  11. Role Management Strategies of Beginning Teachers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Pik Lin; Tang, Sylvia Yee Fan

    2005-01-01

    Beginning teachers encounter new challenges as the role system in contemporary society has become more and more demanding. By means of the life history method, role management strategies of four Hong Kong beginning teachers employed to cope with role demands and intra-role conflicts were located in their biographical, workplace and wider…

  12. Coping Strategies for Managing Acculturative Stress among Asian International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ra, Young-An; Trusty, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the effects of specific coping strategies on managing acculturative stress and acculturation of Asian international students, based on a sample of 220 Asian international students in the U.S. The data were analyzed with hierarchical multiple regression using Baron and Kenny's (1986) mediation procedure. The results supported…

  13. Managing Work and Family: Do Control Strategies Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Versey, H. Shellae

    2015-01-01

    How can we effectively manage competing obligations from work and family without becoming overwhelmed? This question inspires the current study by examining control strategies that may facilitate better work-life balance, with a specific focus on the role of lowered aspirations and positive reappraisals, attitudes that underlie adaptive coping…

  14. Sources of Faculty Stress and Strategies for Its Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Paul; Clagett, Craig

    Views on sources of stress on college faculty and strategies for its management were obtained at small-group sessions in the 1980 faculty orientation at Prince George's Community College, Maryland. Sixteen faculty groups generated 218 responses expressing sources of job stress, a complete listing of which is appended. The responses were aggregated…

  15. The creative process in biomedical visualization: strategies and management.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P A

    1990-01-01

    The phases of the creative process (identification, preparation, incubation, insight, and elaboration/verification) are related to strategies for management of biomedical illustration projects. The idea that creativity is a mystery--and is unpredictable and uncontrollable--is not accepted. This article presents a practical way to encourage creative thinking in the biomedical visualization studio.

  16. Board and Senior Management Alignment on School Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarros, James C.; Sarros, Anne M.; Cooper, Brian K.; Santora, Joseph C.; Baker, Robin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the degree to which senior executive members of a school's decision-making team (senior management team and board of directors) are aligned on fundamental principles of school strategy. Our study is based on a conceptual framework of strategic leadership as it applies in an Australian independent school context. We also examine…

  17. Designs, Management Tactics, and Strategies in Asynchronous Learning Discussions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tu, Chih-Hsiung; Corry, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Discusses effective designs, management tactics, and strategies to produce ideal asynchronous network discussions that allow contemplation and encourage the development of critical thinking. A model of an online collaborative learning community is applied to implement the designs. A sample of online collaborative moderation guidelines is…

  18. University Students' Views of Obesity and Weight Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okonkwo, Ononuju; While, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the knowledge and views of university students regarding obesity and weight management strategies. Design: Online questionnaire-based survey of undergraduate and postgraduate university students in a large London university with a diverse student population. Method: The survey was administered online and circulated…

  19. Strategic Enrollment Management: Core Strategies and Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontrager, Bob

    2004-01-01

    This second of a two-part series builds on the core