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Sample records for soil mechanic laboratory

  1. Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics describes the laboratory testing to be conducted on soil samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study provides for measurements of index, mechanical, thermal, hydrologic, chemical, and mineral properties of soils from boring throughout the site. Samples will be taken from Playa Borings/Trenching, Transportation/Utilities Foundation Borings, Repository Surface Facilities Design Foundation Borings, and Exploratory Shaft Facilities Design Foundation Borings. Data from the laboratory tests will be used for soil strata characterization, design of foundations for surface structures, design of transportation facilities and utility structures, design of impoundments, design of shaft lining, design of the shaft freeze wall, shaft permitting, performance assessment calculations, and other program requirements. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Soil Fills Phoenix Laboratory Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows four of the eight cells in the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA, on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. TEGA's ovens, located underneath the cells, heat soil samples so the released gases can be analyzed.

    Left to right, the cells are numbered 7, 6, 5 and 4. Phoenix's Robotic Arm delivered soil most recently to cell 6 on the 137th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 13, 2008).

    Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera took this image at 3:03 p.m. local solar time on Sol 138 (Oct. 14, 2008).

    Phoenix landed on Mars' northern plains on May 25, 2008.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Soil mechanics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Bromwell, L. G.; Carrier, W. D., III; Costes, N. C.; Houston, W. N.; Scott, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 15 soil-mechanics experiment has offered greater opportunity for study of the mechanical properties of the lunar soil than previous missions, not only because of the extended lunar-surface stay time and enhanced mobility provided by the lunar roving vehicle (rover), but also because four new data sources were available for the first time. These sources were: (1) the self-recording penetrometer (SRP), (2) new, larger diameter, thin-walled core tubes, (3) the rover, and (4) the Apollo lunar-surface drill (ALSD). These data sources have provided the best bases for quantitative analyses thus far available in the Apollo Program.

  4. Soil mechanics: breaking ground.

    PubMed

    Einav, Itai

    2007-12-15

    In soil mechanics, student's models are classified as simple models that teach us unexplained elements of behaviour; an example is the Cam clay constitutive models of critical state soil mechanics (CSSM). 'Engineer's models' are models that elaborate the theory to fit more behavioural trends; this is usually done by adding fitting parameters to the student's models. Can currently unexplained behavioural trends of soil be explained without adding fitting parameters to CSSM models, by developing alternative student's models based on modern theories?Here I apply an alternative theory to CSSM, called 'breakage mechanics', and develop a simple student's model for sand. Its unique and distinctive feature is the use of an energy balance equation that connects grain size reduction to consumption of energy, which enables us to predict how grain size distribution (gsd) evolves-an unprecedented capability in constitutive modelling. With only four parameters, the model is physically clarifying what CSSM cannot for sand: the dependency of yielding and critical state on the initial gsd and void ratio. PMID:17855225

  5. Classical Mechanics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosing, Juliet W.

    2006-12-01

    At Pacific University we have included a lab with our upper division Classical Mechanics class. We do a combination of physical labs (air resistance, harmonic motion, amusement park physics), Maple labs (software), and projects. Presentation of some of the labs, results and challenges with this course will be included.

  6. Laboratory Experiment on Electrokinetic Remediation of Soil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsayed-Ali, Alya H.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetic remediation is a method of decontaminating soil containing heavy metals and polar organic contaminants by passing a direct current through the soil. An undergraduate chemistry laboratory is described to demonstrate electrokinetic remediation of soil contaminated with copper. A 30 cm electrokinetic cell with an applied voltage of 30…

  7. A Laboratory Exercise Relating Soil Energy Budgets to Soil Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Richard T.; Cerny-Koenig, Teresa; Kotuby-Amacher, Janice; Grossl, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Enrollment by students in degree programs other than traditional horticulture, agronomy, and soil science has increased in basic plant and soil science courses. In order to broaden the appeal of these courses to students from majors other than agriculture, we developed a hands-on laboratory exercise relating the basic concepts of a soil energy…

  8. Soil erosion-runoff relationships: insights from laboratory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Amrakh; Warrington, David; Levy, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the processes and mechanisms affecting runoff generation and subsequent soil erosion in semi-arid regions is essential for the development of improved soil and water conservation management practices. Using a drip type laboratory rain simulator, we studied runoff and soil erosion, and the relationships between them, in 60 semi-arid region soils varying in their intrinsic properties (e.g., texture, organic matter) under differing extrinsic conditions (e.g., rain properties, and conditions prevailing in the field soil). Both runoff and soil erosion were significantly affected by the intrinsic soil and rain properties, and soil conditions within agricultural fields or watersheds. The relationship between soil erosion and runoff was stronger when the rain kinetic energy was higher rather than lower, and could be expressed either as a linear or exponential function. Linear functions applied to certain limited cases associated with conditions that enhanced soil structure stability, (e.g., slow wetting, amending with soil stabilizers, minimum tillage in clay soils, and short duration exposure to rain). Exponential functions applied to most of the cases under conditions that tended to harm soil stability (e.g., fast wetting of soils, a wide range of antecedent soil water contents and rain kinetic energies, conventional tillage, following biosolid applications, irrigation with water of poor quality, consecutive rain simulations). The established relationships between runoff and soil erosion contributed to a better understanding of the mechanisms governing overland flow and soil loss, and could assist in (i) further development of soil erosion models and research techniques, and (ii) the design of more suitable management practices for soil and water conservation.

  9. SLOPE FAILURE MECHANISMS IN COHESIVE SOILS: INSIGHTS FROM THEORETICAL AND NUMERICAL ANALYSES OF FIELD AND LABORATORY-TRIGGERED EVENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, J.; Spickermann, A.; van Asch, T.

    2009-12-01

    A landslide can show a variety of failure modes which depends on the given conditions of the slope such as geometry, material characteristics and presence of discontinuities. Besides the gravity as main loading factor, it is assumed that slope failures are often caused by hydrological processes. The identification and modelling of failure modes and triggering mechanisms are essential requirements in landslide forecasting and in the design of reliable early warning systems. This work is an attempt to get a better understanding of the mode of failure and possible failure mechanisms taking place in cohesive slopes. Theoretical analysis has been carried out on the basis of (1) field observations of two failure events of the clay-rich Super-Sauze mudslide (Southeast France) and (2) small-scale landslides triggered in a flume using clay from Zoelen (Netherlands) and reworked black marls from Super-Sauze. To investigate the failure behaviour numerically a simple analytical model, named 2LM (Landslide Liquefaction Model) (van Asch et al. 2006; van Asch & Malet, in press) is used. The model assumes that liquefaction is related to previous development of slip surfaces, i.e. deformation of the landslide body (sliding blocks, slumps) during motion leading to the generation of excess pore water pressure and thus to fluidization. The model is based on the theory of limiting equilibrium dividing the area above an estimated slip surface into slices of constant width. Immediately after failure, the difference in movement for each slice is calculated assuming a viscous shear band and using the Coulomb-viscous model. The differential movements conduct to differential strains which are transferred to excess pore water pressures. The potential fluidization is then evaluated for each slice in relation to the displacements. Results from an application of this model on the two slump-type failures that occurred in the Super-Sauze mudslide are presented. Then the model is applied to the

  10. SOIL AND FILL LABORATORY SUPPORT - 1991

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of soil analysis laboratory work by the University of Florida in Support of the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). Analyses were performed on soil and fill samples collected during 1991 by the FRRP Research House program and the New House Evaluation P...

  11. Apollo 11 soil mechanics investigation.

    PubMed

    Costes, N C; Carrier, W D; Mitchell, J K; Scott, R F

    1970-01-30

    The fine-grained surface material at the Apollo 11 landing site is a brownish, medium-gray, slightly cohesive granular soil, with bulky grains in the silt-to-fine-sand range, having a specific gravity of 3.1 and exhibiting adhesive characteristics. Within the upper few centimeters, the lunar soil has an average density of about 1.6 grams per cubic centimeter and is similar in appearance and behavior to the soils studied at the Surveyor equatorial landing sites. Althouglh considerably different in composition and in range of particle shapes, it is similar in its mechanical behavior to terrestrial soils of the same grain size distribution.

  12. Wentworth Institute Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual. Laboratory Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avakian, Harry; And Others

    This publication is a laboratory study guide designed for mechanical engineering students. All of the experiments (with the exception of experiment No. 1) contained in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual have been included in this guide. Brief theoretical backgrounds, examples and their solutions, charts, graphs, illustrations, and…

  13. Lunar soil properties and soil mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Houston, W. N.; Hovland, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    The study to identify and define recognizable fabrics in lunar soil in order to determine the history of the lunar regolith in different locations is reported. The fabric of simulated lunar soil, and lunar soil samples are discussed along with the behavior of simulated lunar soil under dynamic and static loading. The planned research is also included.

  14. Radionuclide contaminated soil: Laboratory study and economic analysis of soil washing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, M.; Zhou, H.; Patel, B.; Bowerman, B.; Brower, J.

    1996-05-20

    The objective of the work discussed in this report is to determine if soil washing is a feasible method to remediate contaminated soils from the Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The contaminants are predominantly Cs-137 and Sr-90. The authors have assumed that the target activity for Cs-137 is 50 pCi/g and that remediation is required for soils having greater activities. Cs-137 is the limiting contaminant because it is present in much greater quantities than Sr-90. This work was done in three parts, in which they: estimated the volume of contaminated soil as a function of Cs-137 content, determined if simple removal of the fine grained fraction of the soil (the material that is less than 0.063 mm) would effectively reduce the activity of the remaining soil to levels below the 50 pCi/g target, assessed the effectiveness of chemical and mechanical (as well as combinations of the two) methods of soil decontamination. From this analysis the authors were then able to develop a cost estimate for soil washing and for a baseline against which soil washing was compared.

  15. Soil moisture: Some fundamentals. [agriculture - soil mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milstead, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    A brief tutorial on soil moisture, as it applies to agriculture, is presented. Information was taken from books and papers considered freshman college level material, and is an attempt to briefly present the basic concept of soil moisture and a minimal understanding of how water interacts with soil.

  16. Characterization and immobilization of cesium-137 in soil at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ningping; Mason, C.F.V.; Turney, W.R.J.R.

    1996-06-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is a major contaminant in soils of Technical Area 21 (TA-21) and is mainly associated with soil particles {<=}2.00 mm. Cesium-137 was not leached by synthetic groundwater or acid rainwater. Soil erosion is a primary mechanism of {sup 137}Cs transport in TA-21. The methodology that controls soil particle runoff can prevent the transport of {sup 137}Cs.

  17. A Mechanical Resonance Apparatus for Undergraduate Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Christopher C.

    1995-01-01

    Reports the use of a heavy duty hacksaw blade and a 1000 turn pick-up coil to form the basis of a mechanical oscillator for a laboratory exercise in mechanical resonance designed for either the elementary undergraduate course or in association with an upper level mechanics course. (LZ)

  18. Wentworth Institute Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avakian, Harry; And Others

    This publication is a Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual designed to be used by technical institute students in Mechanical Engineering Technology Programs. The experiments are introductory in nature and embrace the fields of applied thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, refrigeration, heat transfer and basic instrumentation. There are 20…

  19. Students Dig Deep in the Mystery Soil Lab: A Playful, Inquiry-Based Soil Laboratory Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiet, Rachel K.

    2014-01-01

    The Mystery Soil Lab, a playful, inquiry-based laboratory project, is designed to develop students' skills of inquiry, soil analysis, and synthesis of foundational concepts in soil science and soil ecology. Student groups are given the charge to explore and identify a "Mystery Soil" collected from a unique landscape within a 10-mile…

  20. An Historical Perspective on the Theory and Practice of Soil Mechanical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, W. P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Traces the history of soil mechanical analysis. Evaluates this history in order to place current concepts in perspective, from both a research and teaching viewpoint. Alternatives to traditional separation techniques for use in soils teaching laboratories are discussed. (TW)

  1. Mechanisms of Soil Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Rattan

    2015-04-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration in soil is one of the several strategies of reducing the net emission of CO2 into the atmosphere. Of the two components, soil organic C (SOC) and soil inorganic C (SIC), SOC is an important control of edaphic properties and processes. In addition to off-setting part of the anthropogenic emissions, enhancing SOC concentration to above the threshold level (~1.5-2.0%) in the root zone has numerous ancillary benefits including food and nutritional security, biodiversity, water quality, among others. Because of its critical importance in human wellbeing and nature conservancy, scientific processes must be sufficiently understood with regards to: i) the potential attainable, and actual sink capacity of SOC and SIC, ii) permanence of the C sequestered its turnover and mean residence time, iii) the amount of biomass C needed (Mg/ha/yr) to maintain and enhance SOC pool, and to create a positive C budget, iv) factors governing the depth distribution of SOC, v) physical, chemical and biological mechanisms affecting the rate of decomposition by biotic and abiotic processes, vi) role of soil aggregation in sequestration and protection of SOC and SIC pool, vii) the importance of root system and its exudates in transfer of biomass-C into the SOC pools, viii) significance of biogenic processes in formation of secondary carbonates, ix) the role of dissolved organic C (DOC) in sequestration of SOC and SIC, and x) importance of weathering of alumino-silicates (e.g., powered olivine) in SIC sequestration. Lack of understanding of these and other basic processes leads to misunderstanding, inconsistencies in interpretation of empirical data, and futile debates. Identification of site-specific management practices is also facilitated by understanding of the basic processes of sequestration of SOC and SIC. Sustainable intensification of agroecosystems -- producing more from less by enhancing the use efficiency and reducing losses of inputs, necessitates thorough

  2. Microbial Mechanisms Enhancing Soil C Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Zak, Donald

    2015-09-24

    Human activity has globally increased the amount of nitrogen (N) entering ecosystems, which could foster higher rates of C sequestration in the N-limited forests of the Northern Hemisphere. Presently, these ecosystems are a large global sink for atmospheric CO2, the magnitude of which could be influenced by the input of human-derived N from the atmosphere. Nevertheless, empirical studies and simulation models suggest that anthropogenic N deposition could have either an important or inconsequential effect on C storage in forests of the Northern Hemisphere, a set of observations that continues to fuel scientific discourse. Although a relatively simple set of physiological processes control the C balance of terrestrial ecosystems, we still fail to understand how these processes directly and indirectly respond to greater N availability in the environment. The uptake of anthropogenic N by N-limited forest trees and a subsequent enhancement of net primary productivity have been the primary mechanisms thought to increase ecosystem C storage in Northern Hemisphere forests. However, there are reasons to expect that anthropogenic N deposition could slow microbial activity in soil, decrease litter decay, and increase soil C storage. Fungi dominate the decay of plant detritus in forests and, under laboratory conditions, high inorganic N concentrations can repress the transcription of genes coding for enzymes which depolymerize lignin in plant detritus; this observation presents the possibility that anthropogenic N deposition could elicit a similar effect under field conditions. In our 18-yr-long field experiment, we have been able to document that simulated N deposition, at a rate expected in the near future, resulted in a significant decline in cellulolytic and lignolytic microbial activity, slowed plant litter decay, and increased soil C storage (+10%); this response is not portrayed in any biogeochemical model simulating the effect of atmospheric N deposition on ecosystem C

  3. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  4. Laboratory and greenhouse assessment of phytoremediation of petroleum contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, M.K.; Schwab, A.P.; Wang, X.

    1996-12-31

    Phytoremediation of soils contaminated with petroleum and associated priority pollutants was evaluated in greenhouse and laboratory experiments. Mineralization of several PAHs was measured in rhizosphere soil, non-rhizosphere soil, and sterile soil amended with simulated root exudates. The least amount of mineralization was observed in sterile soil, but there were no differences among all other soils. Mineralization of 14 C-benzo[a]pyrene was determined in chambers to determine the effects of tall fescue on dissipation of this compound. After 180 days, the soils with fescue had more than twice the mineralization than soils without plants. In the soils with plants, evolution of 14CO2 from the soil was five times greater than from the plant biomass. These experiments demonstrate that the presence of plants is a necessary part of the phytoremediation process. There appears to be no residual rhizosphere effect, and the simple exudation of organic compounds does not mimic fully the presence of roots.

  5. Graphs of Soil Mechanics Tests in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On STS-89, three Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) test cells were subjected to five cycles of compression and relief (left) and three were subjected to shorter displacement cycles that simulate motion during an earthquake (right). In the compression/relief tests, the sand particles rearranged themselves and slightly re-expanded the column during relief. In the short displacement tests, the specimen's resistance to compression decreases, even though the displacement remains the same. The specimens were cycled up to 100 times or until the resistive force was less than 1% that of the previous cycle. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  6. Apollo soil mechanics experiment S-200

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Houston, W. N.; Carrier, W. D., III; Costes, N. C.

    1974-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of the unconsolidated lunar surface material samples that were obtained during the Apollo missions were studied. Sources of data useful for deduction of soil information, and methods used to obtained the data are indicated. A model for lunar soil behavior is described which considers soil characteristics, density and porosity, strength, compressibility, and trafficability parameters. Lunar history and processes are considered, and a comparison is made of lunar and terrestrial soil behavior. The impact of the findings on future exploration and development of the moon are discussed, and publications resulting from lunar research by the soil mechanics team members are listed.

  7. Extension of laboratory-measured soil spectra to field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Weismiller, R. A.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Spectral responses of two glaciated soils, Chalmers silty clay loam and Fincastle silt loam, formed under prairie grass and forest vegetation, respectively, were measured in the laboratory under controlled moisture equilibria using an Exotech Model 20C spectroradiometer to obtain spectral data in the laboratory under artificial illumination. The same spectroradiometer was used outdoors under solar illumination to obtain spectral response from dry and moistened field plots with and without corn residue cover, representing the two different soils. Results indicate that laboratory-measured spectra of moist soil are directly proportional to the spectral response of that same field-measured moist bare soil over the 0.52 micrometer to 1.75 micrometer wavelength range. The magnitudes of difference in spectral response between identically treated Chalmers and Fincastle soils are greatest in the 0.6 micrometers to 0.8 micrometer transition region between the visible and near infrared, regardless of field condition or laboratory preparation studied.

  8. Simple Laboratory Experiment for Illustrating Soil Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattey, J. A.; Johnson, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experiment to illustrate the effect of food source and added nutrients (N) on microbial activity in the soil. Supplies include air-dried soil, dried plant material, sources of carbon and nitrogen, a trap such as KOH, colored water, and a 500-mL Erlenmeyer flask. Includes a diagram of an incubation chamber to demonstrate microbial…

  9. A mechanical resonance apparatus for undergraduate laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christopher C.

    1995-03-01

    A heavy duty hacksaw blade and a 1000 turn pick-up coil form the basis of a mechanical oscillator for a laboratory exercise in mechanical resonance designed for either the elementary course or in association with an upper level mechanics course. Damped harmonic motion, amplitude, and phase resonance curves, and the transient motion of the system can be studied. Since the resonant frequencies are in the 10 to 20 Hz range, a digital multimeter can be used to record accurate amplitude resonance curves with minimal tedium.

  10. Biochar: from laboratory mechanisms through the greenhouse to field trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, C. A.; Gao, X.; Dugan, B.; Silberg, J. J.; Zygourakis, K.; Alvarez, P. J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The biochar community is excellent at pointing to individual cases where biochar amendment has changed soil properties, with some studies showing significant improvements in crop yields, reduction in nutrient export, and remediation of pollutants. However, many studies exist which do not show improvements, and in some cases, studies clearly show detrimental outcomes. The next, crucial step in biochar science and engineering research will be to develop a process-based understanding of how biochar acts to improve soil properties. In particular, we need a better mechanistic understanding of how biochar sorbs and desorbs contaminants, how it interacts with soil water, and how it interacts with the soil microbial community. These mechanistic studies need to encompass processes that range from the nanometer to the kilometer scale. At the nanometer scale, we need a predictive model of how biochar will sorb and desorb hydrocarbons, nutrients, and toxic metals. At the micrometer scale we need models that explain biochar's effects on soil water, especially the plant-available fraction of soil water. The micrometer scale is also where mechanistic information is neeed about microbial processes. At the macroscale we need physical models to describe the landscape mobility of biochar, because biochar that washes away from fields can no longer provide crop benefits. To be most informative, biochar research should occur along a lab-greenhouse-field trial trajectory. Laboratory experiments should aim determine what mechanisms may act to control biochar-soil processes, and then greenhouse experiments can be used to test the significance of lab-derived mechanisms in short, highly replicated, controlled experiments. Once evidence of effect is determined from greenhouse experiments, field trials are merited. Field trials are the gold standard needed prior to full deployment, but results from field trials cannot be extrapolated to other field sites without the mechanistic backup provided

  11. Liquefaction mechanism for layered soils

    SciTech Connect

    Fiegel, G.L.; Kutter, B.L. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Results from four centrifuge model tests are presented. Three of the model tests involve layered soil deposits subject to base shaking; one model test involves a uniform soil deposit of sand subject to base shaking. The layered soil models consisted of fine sand overlain by a layer of relatively impermeable silica flour (silt). Pore-water pressures, accelerations, and settlements were measured during all four tests. Results from the model tests involving layered soils suggest that during liquefaction a water interlayer or very loose zone of soil may develop at the sand-silt interface due to the difference in permeabilities. In each layered model test, boils were observed on the surface of the silt layer. These boils were concentrated in the thinnest zones of the overlying silt layer and provided a vent for the excess pore-water pressure generated in the fine sand.

  12. Physical and mechanical properties of the lunar soil (a review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slyuta, E. N.

    2014-09-01

    We review the data on the physical and mechanical properties of the lunar soil that were acquired in the direct investigations on the lunar surface carried out in the manned and automatic missions and in the laboratory examination of the lunar samples returned to the Earth. In justice to the American manned program Apollo, we show that a large volume of the data on the properties of the lunar soil was also obtained in the Soviet automatic program Lunokhod and with the automatic space stations Luna-16, -20, and -24 that returned the lunar soil samples to the Earth. We consider all of the main physical and mechanical properties of the lunar soil, such as the granulometric composition, density and porosity, cohesion and adhesion, angle of internal friction, shear strength of loose soil, deformation characteristics (the deformation modulus and Poisson ratio), compressibility, and the bearing capacity, and show the change of some properties versus the depth. In most cases, the analytical dependence of the main parameters is presented, which is required in developing reliable engineering models of the lunar soil. The main physical and mechanical properties are listed in the summarizing table, and the currently available models and simulants of the lunar soil are reviewed.

  13. Laboratory rock mechanics testing manual. Public draft

    SciTech Connect

    Shuri, F S; Cooper, J D; Hamill, M L

    1981-10-01

    Standardized laboratory rock mechanics testing procedures have been prepared for use in the National Terminal Waste Storage Program. The procedures emphasize equipment performance specifications, documentation and reporting, and Quality Assurance acceptance criteria. Sufficient theoretical background is included to allow the user to perform the necessary data reduction. These procedures incorporate existing standards when possible, otherwise they represent the current state-of-the-art. Maximum flexibility in equipment design has been incorporated to allow use of this manual by existing groups and to encourage future improvements.

  14. KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF SOIL BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of kinetic studies to soil chemistry is useful to determine reaction mechanisms and fate of nutrients and environmental contaminants. How deeply one wishes to query the mechanism depends on the detail sought. Reactions that involve chemical species in more than on...

  15. Controlled Field and Laboratory Experiments to Investigate soil-root Interactions and Streambank Stability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollen, N. L.; Simon, A.

    2002-12-01

    Riparian vegetation has a number of mechanical and hydrologic effects on streambank stability, some of which are positive and some of which are negative. The mechanical reinforcement provided by root networks is one of the most important stabilizing factors, as roots are strong in tension but weak in compression and conversely soil is strong in compression but weak in tension. A soil that contains roots therefore has increased shear strength due to the production of a reinforced matrix, which is stronger than the soil or roots separately (Thorne, 1990). Quantification and understanding of the way the soil and roots interact individually and as a complete matrix is important if we are to predict the reinforcing effects of different types of riparian vegetation in streambank stabilizing schemes. Previous estimates of the contribution of root networks to soil strength have been attained either by using equations that sum root tensile and the soil shear strengths (eg. Wu et al., 1979), or by carrying out shear tests of root-permeated soils. However, neither of these methods alone allows a full investigation and understanding of the interactions that take place between the soil and the roots as a soil is sheared. These interactions are complex, and the simple addition of root tensile and soil shear strengths may therefore lead to overestimation of the increased strength provided to the soil by the roots, as the rate of mobilization of stress in the roots may not be the same as that of the soil (Waldron and Dakessian, 1981; Pollen et al., 2002). This paper describes a series of experiments that were carried out to test the material properties of roots, and soil samples from a streambank along Goodwin Creek, N. Mississippi. Results from field experiments carried out to measure root-tensile strengths, and stress-displacement characteristics of roots, were compared with laboratory shear tests of soil samples from Goodwin Creek. It was shown that the roots of different

  16. Influence of the Soil Genesis on Physical and Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Marschalko, Marian; Yilmaz, Işık; Fojtová, Lucie; Kubečka, Karel; Bouchal, Tomáš; Bednárik, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the influence of soil genesis on the physical-mechanical properties. The presented case study was conducted in the region of the Ostrava Basin where there is a varied genetic composition of the Quaternary geological structure on the underlying Neogeneous sediments which are sediments of analogous granulometry but different genesis. In this study, 7827 soil samples of an eolian, fluvial, glacial, and deluvial origin and their laboratory analyses results were used. The study identified different values in certain cases, mostly in coarser-grained foundation soils, such as sandy loam S4 (MS) and clayey sand F4 (CS). The soils of the fluvial origin manifest different values than other genetic types. Next, based on regression analyses, dependence was proved neither on the deposition depth (depth of samples) nor from the point of view of the individual foundation soil classes or the genetic types. The contribution of the paper is to point at the influence of genesis on the foundation soil properties so that engineering geologists and geotechnicians pay more attention to the genesis during engineering-geological and geotechnical investigations. PMID:23844398

  17. Influence of the soil genesis on physical and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Marschalko, Marian; Yilmaz, Işık; Fojtová, Lucie; Kubečka, Karel; Bouchal, Tomáš; Bednárik, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the influence of soil genesis on the physical-mechanical properties. The presented case study was conducted in the region of the Ostrava Basin where there is a varied genetic composition of the Quaternary geological structure on the underlying Neogeneous sediments which are sediments of analogous granulometry but different genesis. In this study, 7827 soil samples of an eolian, fluvial, glacial, and deluvial origin and their laboratory analyses results were used. The study identified different values in certain cases, mostly in coarser-grained foundation soils, such as sandy loam S4 (MS) and clayey sand F4 (CS). The soils of the fluvial origin manifest different values than other genetic types. Next, based on regression analyses, dependence was proved neither on the deposition depth (depth of samples) nor from the point of view of the individual foundation soil classes or the genetic types. The contribution of the paper is to point at the influence of genesis on the foundation soil properties so that engineering geologists and geotechnicians pay more attention to the genesis during engineering-geological and geotechnical investigations.

  18. Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Nicholaus M.; Southard, Randal J.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.

    2010-02-01

    Management of soils to reduce the amount of PM 10 emitted during agricultural tillage operations is important for attainment of air quality standards in California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV). The purpose of this study was to improve and expand upon earlier work of predicting tillage-generated dust emissions based on soil properties. We focus on gravimetric soil water content (GWC) and soil texture. A mechanical laboratory dust generator was used to test 23 soils collected for this study. Averaged results showed PM 10 concentrations (mg m -3) increased logarithmically as GWC decreased below soil water potentials of -1500 kPa. Soils with clay contents less than about 10% by weight began to emit PM 10 at GWCs 1.5-4 times their GWC at -1500 kPa. Soils with clay contents greater than about 10% began to emit PM 10 at GWC values closer to -1500 kPa. We found no correlation between maximum PM 10 concentrations, measured at low GWC values, and the %sand, %silt, or %clay in a soil. However, there was a significant correlation between the %silt to %clay ratio and PM 10 concentrations. This not only suggests the dependence of dust emission magnitudes on the supply of particles of PM 10 size, but also the importance of clay in stabilizing aggregates and maintaining higher amounts of capillary water at lower water potentials. Based on modeled results of pooled data, PM 10 concentrations increased linearly (slope = 564) for every unit increase in the %silt to %clay ratio. However, when soils were separated into groups based on clay content, the slopes for PM 10 concentrations vs. %silt to %clay ratio were texture dependent. The slope for soils with <10% clay (slope = 727) was 3.3 times greater than for soils with >20% clay (slope = 221). Improved PM 10 emission prediction based on soil properties should improve management decisions aimed at reducing tillage-generated PM 10.

  19. Examination of plants in lunar (germ free) soil in Plant Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Dr. Charles Walkenshaw, Manned Spacecraft Center botanist, examines sorghum and tobacco plants in lunar (germ free) soil in the Plant Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. The soil was brought back from the Moon by the Apollo 11 astronauts.

  20. A laboratory procedure for measuring and georeferencing soil colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques-Mateu, A.; Balaguer-Puig, M.; Moreno-Ramon, H.; Ibanez-Asensio, S.

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing and geospatial applications very often require ground truth data to assess outcomes from spatial analyses or environmental models. Those data sets, however, may be difficult to collect in proper format or may even be unavailable. In the particular case of soil colour the collection of reliable ground data can be cumbersome due to measuring methods, colour communication issues, and other practical factors which lead to a lack of standard procedure for soil colour measurement and georeferencing. In this paper we present a laboratory procedure that provides colour coordinates of georeferenced soil samples which become useful in later processing stages of soil mapping and classification from digital images. The procedure requires a laboratory setup consisting of a light booth and a trichromatic colorimeter, together with a computer program that performs colour measurement, storage, and colour space transformation tasks. Measurement tasks are automated by means of specific data logging routines which allow storing recorded colour data in a spatial format. A key feature of the system is the ability of transforming between physically-based colour spaces and the Munsell system which is still the standard in soil science. The working scheme pursues the automation of routine tasks whenever possible and the avoidance of input mistakes by means of a convenient layout of the user interface. The program can readily manage colour and coordinate data sets which eventually allow creating spatial data sets. All the tasks regarding data joining between colorimeter measurements and samples locations are executed by the software in the background, allowing users to concentrate on samples processing. As a result, we obtained a robust and fully functional computer-based procedure which has proven a very useful tool for sample classification or cataloging purposes as well as for integrating soil colour data with other remote sensed and spatial data sets.

  1. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume II. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the second volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the eight lessons included in this volume are cold metal work, soldering, agricultural safety programs, farm shops, farm structures, farm and ranch electrification, soil and water…

  2. Stress, deformation and micromorphological aspects of soil freezing under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetchick, Elizabeth

    In this thesis, frost heave is viewed as a process resulting from the interactions between thermodynamic conditions, soil environment controls such as texture, stress/deformation conditions and soil microstructure. A series of laboratory experiments was devised to investigate the links between these aspects. Because a limited number of studies exist on the development of internal stresses and strains in freezing soil, the work focussed on obtaining rheological data using conventional soil strain gauges and prototype stress transducers. A fine-grained unstructured silt was placed in a column (30 cm diameter by 100 cm length) and subjected to freezing and freeze-thaw cycles from the top down, lasting up to three months. Heat and water flows, as well as stresses and strains were monitored. The frozen soil was sectioned at the end of four of the experiments to examine the soil fabrics that had developed. From the experimental results, schematic stress and strain curves are proposed. For a single freeze cycle, compressive normal and tensile normal stresses were recorded simultaneously by the measuring devices within the freezing soil profile. Ice lens inception took place when the stress field changed, a condition which occurred either at the frost front level or at the base of the growing ice lens. Negative and positive strains reflected the different stress states that were sustained below and above the freezing front. Negative strains or soil consolidation took place as stresses increased before the passage of the frost line. Negligible soil strains were recorded as maximum soil consolidation was attained, before soil expansion. Distinct positive strain patterns indicating secondary and continuing heave, were recorded simultaneously throughout a thickness of soil, over a range of temperatures. Ice lens growth mostly took place as secondary frost heave, but continuing heave was measured, and the temperature conditions for both types of heave were determined. During

  3. Laboratory soil piping and internal erosion experiments: evaluation of a soil piping model for low-compacted soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil piping has been attributed as a potential mechanism of instability for embankments, hillslopes, dams, and streambanks. In fact, deterministic models have been proposed to predict soil piping and internal erosion. However, limited research has been conducted under controlled conditions to evalua...

  4. Linkages of plant–soil feedbacks and underlying invasion mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Inderjit; Cahill, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial communities and processes have repeatedly been shown to impact plant community assembly and population growth. Soil-driven effects may be particularly pronounced with the introduction of plants to non-native ranges, as introduced plants are not typically accompanied by transference of local soil communities. Here we describe how the mechanisms by which soil community processes influence plant growth overlap with several known and well-described mechanisms of plant invasion. Critically, a given soil community process may either facilitate or limit invasion, depending upon local conditions and the specific mechanisms of soil processes involved. Additionally, as soil communities typically consist of species with short generation times, the net consequences of plant–soil feedbacks for invasion trajectories are likely to change over time, as ecological and evolutionary adjustments occur. Here we provide an overview of the ecological linkages of plant–soil feedbacks and underlying mechanisms of invasion. PMID:25784668

  5. Soil properties affecting toxicity of zinc to soil microbial properties in laboratory-spiked and field-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Erik; Buekers, Jurgen; Oliver, Ian; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2004-11-01

    The effects of soil properties and zinc (Zn) availability on the toxicity of Zn to soil microbial processes are poorly understood. Three soil microbial processes--potential nitrification rate (PNR), substrate (glucose)-induced respiration (SIR), and a maize residue respiration (MRR)--were measured in 15 European topsoils (pH 3.0-7.5; total Zn 7-191 mg/kg) that were freshly spiked with ZnCl2. The Zn toxicity thresholds of 20 to 50% effective concentrations (EC20s and EC50s) based on total concentrations of Zn in soil varied between 5- and 26-fold among soils, depending on the assay. The Zn toxicity thresholds based on Zn concentrations in soil solution varied at least 10-fold more than corresponding total metal thresholds. Soil pH had no significant effect on soil total Zn toxicity thresholds, whereas significant positive correlations were found between these thresholds and background Zn for the PNR and SIR test (r = 0.74 and 0.71, respectively; log-log correlations). No such trend was found for the MRR test. Soil solution-based thresholds showed highly significant negative correlations with soil pH for all assays that might be explained by competition of H+ for binding sites, as demonstrated for aquatic species. The microbial assays were also applied to soils collected under galvanized pylons (three sites) where concentrations of total Zn were up to 2,100 to 3,700 mg Zn/kg. Correlations between concentrations of total Zn and microbial responses were insignificant at all sites even though spiking reference samples to equivalent concentrations reduced microbial activities up to more than 10-fold. Differences in response between spiked and field soils are partly but not completely attributed to the large differences in concentrations of Zn in soil solution. We conclude that soil pH has no significant effect on Zn toxicity to soil microbial processes in laboratory-spiked soils, and we suggest that community tolerance takes place at both background and elevated Zn

  6. Laboratory and Field Investigations of Dynamic Effects in Soil Water Retention Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yung-Chia; Tseng, Yen-Huiang; Ye, Jiun-Yan

    2015-04-01

    The unsaturated soil is a multi-phase system and the embedded physical mechanisms and chemical reactions are very complicated. The characteristics of groundwater flow and mechanisms of mass transport are still ambiguous so far. In order to fully understand the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone, the soil water retention curve plays an important role in description of water flow. However, the measurements and calculations of soil water retention curve are usually obtained under the static condition or steady state (equilibrium), in which the dynamic effects (non-equilibrium) are not considered, and the obtained relationship between capillary pressure and saturation is skeptical. Therefore, the sandbox experiments and field tests will be conducted to discuss the dynamic effects in the soil water retention curve and hysteresis effect in this study. In the laboratory, the relations between capillary pressure, saturation, the rate of change of water content, and dynamic constant are evaluated through different setting of boundary conditions and different sizes of particles. In the field, the tests are conducted to describe the soil water retention curve through the rain simulator and artificial evaporation. Besides, the dynamic dewpoint potentiameter is used to analyze the hysteresis effect of soil samples, and its results are compared with the results obtained from sandbox and field experiments. Finally, through a series of experiments, the relationship between capillary pressure and saturation under the dynamic effects is established, and the associated theories and mechanisms are discussed. The works developed in this study can provide as reference tools for the hydrogeological investigation and contaminated site remediation in the future. Keywords: capillary pressure, saturation, soil water retention curve, hysteresis, sandbox experiment, field test

  7. Mechanism of boron tolerance in soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Iftikhar; Fujiwara, Toru

    2010-01-01

    Boron (B) is toxic to living cells at levels above a certain threshold. We isolated several B-tolerant bacterial strains from soil samples and studied them for possible mechanisms of B tolerance. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and comparative phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the isolates belong to the following 6 genera: Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, Lysinibacillus, Algoriphagus, Gracilibacillus, and Bacillus. These isolates exhibited B-tolerance levels of 80, 100, 150, 300, 450, and 450 mmol/L, respectively, whilst maintaining a significantly lower intracellular B concentration than in the medium. Statistical analysis showed a negative correlation between the protoplasmic B concentration and the degree of tolerance to a high external B concentration. The kinetic assays suggest that the high B efflux and (or) exclusion are the tolerance mechanisms against a high external B concentration in the isolated bacteria. PMID:20130690

  8. Laboratory investigation of visible shuttle glow mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, A.; Swenson, G. R.; Caledonia, G. E.; Holtzclaw, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments designed to uncover mechanistic information about the spectral and spatial characteristics of shuttle glow were conducted. The luminescence was created when a pulse of O atoms traveling at orbital velocities was directed toward NO molecules previously adsorbed to aluminum, nickel, and Z306 Chemglaz (a common baffle black) coated surfaces held at various temperatures. Spectral and spatial measurements were made using a CCD imaging spectrometer. Corroborative spectral information was recorded in separate measurements using a scanning monochromator and gated photomultiplier arrangement. The e-folding distance at several temperatures was calculated from images of the surface glow using the photometrics image processing capability of the imaging spectrometer. The e-folding distance was not altered as a function of incoming O beam velocity. The results are presented and the observations provide direct evidence that the visible shuttle glow results from recombination of oxygen atoms and surface bound NO.

  9. Spectral properties of agricultural crops and soils measured from space, aerial, field, and laboratory sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Vanderbilt, V. C.; Robinson, B. F.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1981-01-01

    Investigations of the multispectral reflectance characteristics of crops and soils as measured from laboratory, field, aerial, and satellite sensor systems are reviewed. The relationships of important biological and physical characteristics to the spectral properties of crops and soils are addressed.

  10. Laboratory scale of rainfall's pattern and threshold in volcanic soil slope failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartiko, R. D.; Sadisun, I. A.; Tohari, A.; Sumintadiredja, P.

    2016-05-01

    Relationship between rainfall pattern, threshold and landslide process have widely developed. However, real-time observation in real landslide event is time consuming and has high degree of uncertainty. Therefore more analysis is usually developed in regional data scale with correlation between regional rainfall dataset and landslide inventory mapping. In this study, another approach is developed with a physical laboratory scale model. This research developed correlation between simulated rainfall pattern with mechanism and process of landslide. Rainfall with specific intensity and duration are given in residual volcanic soil in laboratory scale. Rainfall threshold observed between laboratory and regional model is highly correlated. There also occurred clear relationships between intensity, duration, antecedent rainfall, with rainfall's initiation and morphology.

  11. Physico-chemo-mechanical coupling mechanisms in soil behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liangbo

    Many processes in geomechanics or geotechnical/geomechanical system engineering involve phenomena that are physical and/or chemical in nature, the understanding of which is crucial to modeling the mechanical responses of soils to various loads. Such physico-chemo-mechanical coupling mechanisms are prevalent in two different types of geomechanical processes studied in this dissertation: long-term soil/sediments compaction & desiccation cracking. Most commonly the underlying physical and chemical phenomena are explained, formulated and quantified at microscopic level. In addition to the necessity of capturing the coupling mechanisms, another common thread that emerges in formulating their respective mathematical model is the necessity of linking phenomena occurring at different scales with a theory to be formulated at a macroscopic continuum level. Part I of this dissertation is focused on the subject of long-term compaction behavior of soils and sediments. The interest in this subject arises from the need to evaluate reservoir compaction and land subsidence that may result from oil/gas extraction in petroleum engineering. First, a damage-enhanced reactive chemo-plasticity model is developed to simulate creep of saturated geomaterials, a long-term strain developed at constant stress. Both open and closed systems are studied. The deformation at a constant load in a closed system exhibits most of the characteristics of the classical creep. Primary, secondary and tertiary creep can be interpreted in terms of dominant mechanisms in each phase, emphasizing the role of the rates of dissolution and precipitation, variable reaction areas and chemical softening intensity. The rest of Part I is devoted to the study of soil aging, an effect of a localized mineral dissolution related creep strain and subsequent material stiffening. A three-scale mathematical model is developed to numerically simulate the scenarios proposed based on macroscopic experiments and geochemical

  12. Notes: Water Flow and Chemical Retardation in Soils: A Simple Effective Laboratory Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, R. S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory demonstration that illustrates principles of miscible displacement and chemical retardation in soils. Discusses how the experimental apparatus can be constructed from readily available materials. (TW)

  13. Effects of soil moisture on the temperature sensitivity of soil heterotrophic respiration: a laboratory incubation study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiping; Hui, Dafeng; Shen, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh) is an important ecological model parameter and may vary with temperature and moisture. While Q10 generally decreases with increasing temperature, the moisture effects on Q10 have been controversial. To address this, we conducted a 90-day laboratory incubation experiment using a subtropical forest soil with a full factorial combination of five moisture levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% water holding capacity--WHC) and five temperature levels (10, 17, 24, 31, and 38°C). Under each moisture treatment, Rh was measured several times for each temperature treatment to derive Q10 based on the exponential relationships between Rh and temperature. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial community structure and soil nutrients were also measured several times to detect their potential contributions to the moisture-induced Q10 variation. We found that Q10 was significantly lower at lower moisture levels (60%, 40% and 20% WHC) than at higher moisture level (80% WHC) during the early stage of the incubation, but became significantly higher at 20%WHC than at 60% WHC and not significantly different from the other three moisture levels during the late stage of incubation. In contrast, soil Rh had the highest value at 60% WHC and the lowest at 20% WHC throughout the whole incubation period. Variations of Q10 were significantly associated with MBC during the early stages of incubation, but with the fungi-to-bacteria ratio during the later stages, suggesting that changes in microbial biomass and community structure are related to the moisture-induced Q10 changes. This study implies that global warming's impacts on soil CO2 emission may depend upon soil moisture conditions. With the same temperature rise, wetter soils may emit more CO2 into the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration. PMID:24647610

  14. Effects of soil moisture on the temperature sensitivity of soil heterotrophic respiration: a laboratory incubation study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiping; Hui, Dafeng; Shen, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh) is an important ecological model parameter and may vary with temperature and moisture. While Q10 generally decreases with increasing temperature, the moisture effects on Q10 have been controversial. To address this, we conducted a 90-day laboratory incubation experiment using a subtropical forest soil with a full factorial combination of five moisture levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% water holding capacity--WHC) and five temperature levels (10, 17, 24, 31, and 38°C). Under each moisture treatment, Rh was measured several times for each temperature treatment to derive Q10 based on the exponential relationships between Rh and temperature. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial community structure and soil nutrients were also measured several times to detect their potential contributions to the moisture-induced Q10 variation. We found that Q10 was significantly lower at lower moisture levels (60%, 40% and 20% WHC) than at higher moisture level (80% WHC) during the early stage of the incubation, but became significantly higher at 20%WHC than at 60% WHC and not significantly different from the other three moisture levels during the late stage of incubation. In contrast, soil Rh had the highest value at 60% WHC and the lowest at 20% WHC throughout the whole incubation period. Variations of Q10 were significantly associated with MBC during the early stages of incubation, but with the fungi-to-bacteria ratio during the later stages, suggesting that changes in microbial biomass and community structure are related to the moisture-induced Q10 changes. This study implies that global warming's impacts on soil CO2 emission may depend upon soil moisture conditions. With the same temperature rise, wetter soils may emit more CO2 into the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration.

  15. Effects of Soil Moisture on the Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Heterotrophic Respiration: A Laboratory Incubation Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiping; Hui, Dafeng; Shen, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh) is an important ecological model parameter and may vary with temperature and moisture. While Q10 generally decreases with increasing temperature, the moisture effects on Q10 have been controversial. To address this, we conducted a 90-day laboratory incubation experiment using a subtropical forest soil with a full factorial combination of five moisture levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% water holding capacity - WHC) and five temperature levels (10, 17, 24, 31, and 38°C). Under each moisture treatment, Rh was measured several times for each temperature treatment to derive Q10 based on the exponential relationships between Rh and temperature. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial community structure and soil nutrients were also measured several times to detect their potential contributions to the moisture-induced Q10 variation. We found that Q10 was significantly lower at lower moisture levels (60%, 40% and 20% WHC) than at higher moisture level (80% WHC) during the early stage of the incubation, but became significantly higher at 20%WHC than at 60% WHC and not significantly different from the other three moisture levels during the late stage of incubation. In contrast, soil Rh had the highest value at 60% WHC and the lowest at 20% WHC throughout the whole incubation period. Variations of Q10 were significantly associated with MBC during the early stages of incubation, but with the fungi-to-bacteria ratio during the later stages, suggesting that changes in microbial biomass and community structure are related to the moisture-induced Q10 changes. This study implies that global warming’s impacts on soil CO2 emission may depend upon soil moisture conditions. With the same temperature rise, wetter soils may emit more CO2 into the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration. PMID:24647610

  16. Infrared measurements of pristine and disturbed soils 1. Spectral contrast differences between field and laboratory data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Lucey, P.G.; Horton, K.A.; Winter, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of emissivity spectra (8-13 ??m) of pristine soils in the field with laboratory reflectance spectra of the same soils showed that laboratory spectra tend to have less spectral contrast than field spectra (see following article). We investigated this the phenomenon by measuring emission spectra of both undisturbed (in situ) and disturbed soils (prepared as if for transport to the laboratory). The disturbed soils had much less spectral contrast than the undisturbed soils in the reststrahlen region near 9 ??m. While the increased porosity of a disturbed soil can decrease spectral contrast due to multiple scattering, we hypothesize that the effect is dominantly the result of a difference in grain-size distribution of the optically active layer (i.e., fine particle coatings). This concept was proposed by Salisbury et al. (1994) to explain their observations that soils washed free of small particles adhering the larger grains exhibited greater spectral contrast than unwashed soils. Our laboratory reflectance spectra of wet- and dry-sieved soils returned from field sites also show greater spectral contrast for wet-sieved (washed) soils. We therefore propose that undisturbed soils in the field can be characterized as 'clean' soils (washed free of fine particles at the surface due to rain and wind action) and that disturbed soils represent 'dirty' soils (contaminated with fine particle coatings). The effect of packing soils in the field and laboratory also increases spectral contrast but not to the magnitude of that observed for undisturbed and wet-sieved soils. Since it is a common practice to use laboratory spectra of field samples to interpret spectra obtained remotely, we suggest that the influence of fine particle coatings on disturbed soils, if unrecognized, could influence interpretations of remote sensing data.Comparison of emissivity spectra (8-13 ??m) of pristine soils in the field with laboratory reflectance spectra of the same soils showed that

  17. Laboratory Studies to Examine the Impact of Polyacrylamide (PAM) on Soil Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, E. A.; Young, M. H.; Yu, Z.

    2005-12-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) is a long-chain synthetic polymer made of the monomer acrylamide (AMD). PAM has numerous uses ranging from food processing to drilling to wastewater treatment. More recently it has been proposed as a canal sealant in the western US to improve water conservation. To support a larger field-based experimental program being implemented in Grand Junction, CO, soil column experiments are being conducted to evaluate the mechanisms of how, and to what extent, PAM reduces soil hydraulic conductivity. The goal of the experiments is to find the optimum concentration and application method of PAM that reduces hydraulic conductivity to the greatest extent. Column tests were conducted, in triplicate, using a constant head method in acrylic columns of 15 cm length and 6.4 cm diameter. An unbalanced multi-factorial design was used with experimental variables including soil type (medium silica sand, locally-derived sand, and locally-derived loam), PAM concentration (11, 22, 44, 88 kg/canal-ha), turbidity (0, 100, 350 NTU), and application method (hydrated PAM on dry soil and powdered PAM applied to water column above saturated soil). Non-crosslinked anionic PAM with a molecular weight of 12 to 24 Mg/mol was used for all experiments. Additional experiments were conducted in graduated cylinders to evaluate interactions between PAM, turbidity and water chemistry. Results of the laboratory tests will be presented and discussed in the context of water conservation in the western US.

  18. An Explanation for the Observed Spectral Contrast Reduction Between Field and Laboratory Infrared Measurements of Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Lucey, P. G.; Horton, K. A.; Williams, T.; Winter, E. M.; Stocker, A. D.

    1996-03-01

    Comparison of emission spectra (7-14 m) of pristine soils in the field with bidirectional reflectance spectra of soils obtained in the laboratory shows that laboratory spectra tend to have less contrast than field spectra. We investigated this phenomenon by measuring emission spectra of both pristine (in situ) and sampled soils (prepared as if for transport to the laboratory). The sampled soils had much less spectral contrast than the pristine soils in the reststrahlen region near 9 m. We hypothesize that this effect is due to a difference in grainsize distribution of the optically active layer (i.e., fine particle coatings). This concept was proposed by Salisbury et al. to explain their observations that soils washed free of small particles adhering to larger grains exhibited greater spectral contrast than unwashed soils. Unrecognized, this phenomenon could influence interpretations of remote sensing data since it is a common practice to use spectra of materials obtained in the laboratory to interpret spectra obtained remotely.

  19. Mechanisms of inorganic nitrous oxide production in soils during nitrification and their dependence on soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Jannis; Liu, Shurong; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important anthropogenic greenhouse gas and today's single most ozone depleting substance. Soils have been identified as the major source of N2O. Microbial nitrification and denitrification are considered the major N2O emission sources. However, N2O production in soils, especially during nitrification, is far from being completely understood. Several abiotic reactions involving the nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) have been identified leading to N2O emissions, but are being neglected in most current studies. However, it is known that NH2OH can be oxidized by several soil constituents to form N2O. For better mitigation strategies it is mandatory to understand the underlying processes of N2O production during nitrification and their controlling factors. We studied N2O emissions from different soils in laboratory incubation experiments. Soils covered a wide range of land use types from arable to grassland and forest. Soil incubations were conducted with and without the addition of NH2OH at conditions favorable for nitrification with non-sterile as well as with sterile samples. N2O and, additionally, CO2 evolution were analyzed using gas chromatography. To get insight into the dynamics of N2O formation, N2O production from NH2OH was quantified online using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used to analyze the isotopic signature of the produced N2O (i.e. δ15N, δ18O, and 15N site preference). We observed large differences in N2O emissions between different soils upon the addition of NH2OH. While a forest soil sample with pH < 3 showed hardly any reaction to the addition of NH2OH, a very high and immediate formation of N2O was observed in a cropland soil sample at neutral pH. N2O production after NH2OH addition was also observed in autoclaved samples, which confirmed an abiotic production mechanism. Further, isotopic signatures of N2O could be used to differentiate

  20. The impact of standard preparation practice on the runoff and soil erosion rates under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledi Darvishan, Abdulvahed; Homayounfar, Vafa; Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed

    2016-09-01

    The use of laboratory methods in soil erosion studies, rainfall simulation experiments, Gerlach troughs, and other measurements such as ring infiltrometer has been recently considered more and more because of many advantages in controlling rainfall properties and high accuracy of sampling and measurements. However, different stages of soil removal, transfer, preparation and placement in laboratory plots cause significant changes in soil structure and, subsequently, the results of runoff, sediment concentration and soil loss. Knowing the rate of changes in sediment concentration and soil loss variables with respect to the soil preparation for laboratory studies is therefore inevitable to generalize the laboratory results to field conditions. However, there has been little attention given to evaluate the effects of soil preparation on sediment variables. The present study was therefore conducted to compare sediment concentration and soil loss in natural and prepared soil. To achieve the study purposes, 18 field 1 × 1 m plots were adopted in an 18 % gradient slope with sandy-clay-loam soil in the Kojour watershed, northern Iran. A portable rainfall simulator was then used to simulate rainfall events using one or two nozzles of BEX: 3/8 S24W for various rainfall intensities with a constant height of 3 m above the soil surface. Three rainfall intensities of 40, 60 and 80 mm h-1 were simulated on both prepared and natural soil treatments with three replications. The sediment concentration and soil loss at five 3 min intervals after time to runoff were then measured. The results showed the significant increasing effects of soil preparation (p ≤ 0.01) on the average sediment concentration and soil loss. The increasing rates of runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss due to the study soil preparation method for laboratory soil erosion plots were 179, 183 and 1050 % (2.79, 2.83 and 11.50 times), respectively.

  1. Cooperative learning in a Soil Mechanics course at undergraduate level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho-Lopes, M.; Macedo, J.; Bonito, F.

    2011-05-01

    The implementation of the Bologna Process enforced a significant change on traditional learning models, which were focused mainly on the transmission of knowledge. The results obtained in a first attempt at implementation of a cooperative learning model in the Soil Mechanics I course of the Department of Civil Engineering of the University of Aveiro, Portugal, are presented and discussed. The students were confronted with situations recreating a professional atmosphere in Geotechnics. Mandatory project team assignments to be prepared in groups were implemented, where each student had to fulfil specific and rotational roles, namely, laboratory/informatics technician, analyst, reporter and coordinator. To assess the implemented model, several strategies were used: students' feedback; marks monitoring; questionnaires.

  2. Soil Penetration by Earthworms and Plant Roots--Mechanical Energetics of Bioturbation of Compacted Soils.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Siul; Or, Dani; Schymanski, Stanislaus J

    2015-01-01

    We quantify mechanical processes common to soil penetration by earthworms and growing plant roots, including the energetic requirements for soil plastic displacement. The basic mechanical model considers cavity expansion into a plastic wet soil involving wedging by root tips or earthworms via cone-like penetration followed by cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydroskeleton or root radial growth. The mechanical stresses and resulting soil strains determine the mechanical energy required for bioturbation under different soil hydro-mechanical conditions for a realistic range of root/earthworm geometries. Modeling results suggest that higher soil water content and reduced clay content reduce the strain energy required for soil penetration. The critical earthworm or root pressure increases with increased diameter of root or earthworm, however, results are insensitive to the cone apex (shape of the tip). The invested mechanical energy per unit length increase with increasing earthworm and plant root diameters, whereas mechanical energy per unit of displaced soil volume decreases with larger diameters. The study provides a quantitative framework for estimating energy requirements for soil penetration work done by earthworms and plant roots, and delineates intrinsic and external mechanical limits for bioturbation processes. Estimated energy requirements for earthworm biopore networks are linked to consumption of soil organic matter and suggest that earthworm populations are likely to consume a significant fraction of ecosystem net primary production to sustain their subterranean activities.

  3. Soil Penetration by Earthworms and Plant Roots--Mechanical Energetics of Bioturbation of Compacted Soils.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Siul; Or, Dani; Schymanski, Stanislaus J

    2015-01-01

    We quantify mechanical processes common to soil penetration by earthworms and growing plant roots, including the energetic requirements for soil plastic displacement. The basic mechanical model considers cavity expansion into a plastic wet soil involving wedging by root tips or earthworms via cone-like penetration followed by cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydroskeleton or root radial growth. The mechanical stresses and resulting soil strains determine the mechanical energy required for bioturbation under different soil hydro-mechanical conditions for a realistic range of root/earthworm geometries. Modeling results suggest that higher soil water content and reduced clay content reduce the strain energy required for soil penetration. The critical earthworm or root pressure increases with increased diameter of root or earthworm, however, results are insensitive to the cone apex (shape of the tip). The invested mechanical energy per unit length increase with increasing earthworm and plant root diameters, whereas mechanical energy per unit of displaced soil volume decreases with larger diameters. The study provides a quantitative framework for estimating energy requirements for soil penetration work done by earthworms and plant roots, and delineates intrinsic and external mechanical limits for bioturbation processes. Estimated energy requirements for earthworm biopore networks are linked to consumption of soil organic matter and suggest that earthworm populations are likely to consume a significant fraction of ecosystem net primary production to sustain their subterranean activities. PMID:26087130

  4. Soil Penetration by Earthworms and Plant Roots—Mechanical Energetics of Bioturbation of Compacted Soils

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We quantify mechanical processes common to soil penetration by earthworms and growing plant roots, including the energetic requirements for soil plastic displacement. The basic mechanical model considers cavity expansion into a plastic wet soil involving wedging by root tips or earthworms via cone-like penetration followed by cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydroskeleton or root radial growth. The mechanical stresses and resulting soil strains determine the mechanical energy required for bioturbation under different soil hydro-mechanical conditions for a realistic range of root/earthworm geometries. Modeling results suggest that higher soil water content and reduced clay content reduce the strain energy required for soil penetration. The critical earthworm or root pressure increases with increased diameter of root or earthworm, however, results are insensitive to the cone apex (shape of the tip). The invested mechanical energy per unit length increase with increasing earthworm and plant root diameters, whereas mechanical energy per unit of displaced soil volume decreases with larger diameters. The study provides a quantitative framework for estimating energy requirements for soil penetration work done by earthworms and plant roots, and delineates intrinsic and external mechanical limits for bioturbation processes. Estimated energy requirements for earthworm biopore networks are linked to consumption of soil organic matter and suggest that earthworm populations are likely to consume a significant fraction of ecosystem net primary production to sustain their subterranean activities. PMID:26087130

  5. The status of soil mapping for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.L.; Lee, R.D.; Jeppesen, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    This report discusses the production of a revised version of the general soil map of the 2304-km{sup 2} (890-mi{sup 2}) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site in southeastern Idaho and the production of a geographic information system (GIS) soil map and supporting database. The revised general soil map replaces an INEL soil map produced in 1978 and incorporates the most current information on INEL soils. The general soil map delineates large soil associations based on National Resources Conservation Services [formerly the Soil Conservation Service (SCS)] principles of soil mapping. The GIS map incorporates detailed information that could not be presented on the general soil map and is linked to a database that contains the soil map unit descriptions, surficial geology codes, and other pertinent information.

  6. The Behaviour of Laboratory Soil Electrical Resistivity Value under Basic Soil Properties Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Aziman, M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Rosli, S.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical resistivity method (ERM) was a popular indirect geophysical tools adopted in engineering, environmental and archaeological studies. In the past, results of the electrical resistivity value (ERV) were always subjected to a long discussion and debate among the related parties such as an engineers, geophysicists and geologists due to its lack of clarification and evidences in quantitative point of view. Most of the results produced in the past was always been justified using qualitative ways which difficult to be accept by certain parties. In order to reduce the knowledge gap between those parties, this study has performed a laboratory experiment of soil box resistivity test which supported by an additional basic geotechnical test as referred to particle size distribution test (d), moisture content test (w), density test (ρbulk) and Atterberg limit test (LL, PL and PI). The test was performed to establish a series of electrical resistivity value with different quantity of water content for Clayey SILT and Silty SAND soil. It was found that the ERV of Silty SAND (600 - 7300 Ωm) was higher than Clayey SILT (13 - 7700 Ωm) due to the different quantity of basic soil properties value obtained from the basic geotechnical test. This study was successfully demonstrated that the fluctuation of ERV has greatly influenced by the variations of the soil physical properties (d, w, ρbulk, LL, PL and PI). Hence, the confidence level of ERV interpretation will be increasingly meaningful since it able to be proved by others parameter generated by laboratory direct test.

  7. Laboratory assessment of factors affecting soil clogging of soil aquifer treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Pavelic, P; Dillon, P J; Mucha, M; Nakai, T; Barry, K E; Bestland, E

    2011-05-01

    In this study the effect of soil type, level of pre-treatment, ponding depth, temperature and sunlight on clogging of soil aquifer treatment (SAT) systems was evaluated over an eight week duration in constant temperature and glasshouse environments. Of the two soil types tested, the more permeable sand media clogged more than the loam, but still retained an order of magnitude higher absolute permeability. A 6- to 8-fold difference in hydraulic loading rates was observed between the four source water types tested (one potable water and three recycled waters), with improved water quality resulting in significantly higher infiltration. Infiltration rates for ponding depths of 30 cm and 50 cm were higher than 10 cm, although for 50 cm clogging rates were higher due to greater compaction of the clogging layer. Overall, physical clogging was more significant than other forms of clogging. Microbial clogging becomes increasingly important when the particulate concentrations in the source waters are reduced through pre-treatment and for finer textured soils due to the higher specific surface area of the media. Clogging by gas binding took place in the glasshouse but not in the lab, and mechanical clogging associated with particle rearrangement was evident in the sand media but not in the loam. These results offer insight into the soil, water quality and operating conditions needed to achieve viable SAT systems.

  8. Mechanics of wheel-soil interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houland, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    An approximate theory for wheel-soil interaction is presented which forms the basis for a practical solution to the problem. It is shown that two fundamental observations render the problem determinate: (1) The line of action of the resultant of radial stresses acting at the wheel soil interface approximately bisects the wheel-soil contact angle for all values of slip. (2) A shear stress surface can be hypothesized. The influence of soil inertia forces is also evaluated. A concept of equivalent cohesion is introduced which allows a convenient experimental comparison for both cohesive and frictional soils. This theory compares favorably with previous analyses and experimental data, and shows that soil inertia forces influencing the motion of a rolling wheel can be significant.

  9. Soil transference patterns on bras: Image processing and laboratory dragging experiments.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kathleen R; Fitzpatrick, Robert W; Bottrill, Ralph S; Berry, Ron; Kobus, Hilton

    2016-01-01

    soil moisture content that would not have been possible otherwise. Soil type (e.g. Anthropogenic, gravelly sandy loam soil or Natural, organic-rich soil), clay mineralogy (smectite) and soil moisture content were the greatest influencing factors in all the dragging soil transference tests (both naked eye and measured properties) to explain the eight categories of soil transference patterns recorded. This study was intended to develop a method for dragging soil transference laboratory experiments and create a baseline of preliminary soil type/property knowledge. Results confirm the need to better understand soil behaviour and properties of clothing fabrics by further testing of a wider range of soil types and clay mineral properties. PMID:26679633

  10. Soil transference patterns on bras: Image processing and laboratory dragging experiments.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kathleen R; Fitzpatrick, Robert W; Bottrill, Ralph S; Berry, Ron; Kobus, Hilton

    2016-01-01

    soil moisture content that would not have been possible otherwise. Soil type (e.g. Anthropogenic, gravelly sandy loam soil or Natural, organic-rich soil), clay mineralogy (smectite) and soil moisture content were the greatest influencing factors in all the dragging soil transference tests (both naked eye and measured properties) to explain the eight categories of soil transference patterns recorded. This study was intended to develop a method for dragging soil transference laboratory experiments and create a baseline of preliminary soil type/property knowledge. Results confirm the need to better understand soil behaviour and properties of clothing fabrics by further testing of a wider range of soil types and clay mineral properties.

  11. ASSESSING SOIL ARSENIC BIOAVAILABILITY IN THE LABORATORY MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variation among soils in the bioavailability of arsenic can be a critical determinant of the risk posed by exposure to these soils. Although in vitro techniques can provide vital data on aspects of bioavailability of metals and metalloids from soils, these results must be valida...

  12. Student Arc Welding Noise Exposures in Agricultural Mechanics Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Glen M.

    1989-01-01

    A study surveyed noise levels in an agricultural mechanics educational laboratory while students completed common arc welds. It found that the time a student spent in the welding booth posed no threat to hearing. Maximum noise measured was well below the 140 dB(A) impulse level set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. (JOW)

  13. Model analysis of mechanisms controlling pneumatic soil vapor extraction.

    PubMed

    Høier, C K; Sonnenborg, T O; Jensen, K H; Gudbjerg, J

    2009-01-26

    The efficiency of traditional soil venting or soil vapor extraction (SVE) highly depends on the architecture of the subsurface because imposed advective air flow tends to bypass low-permeable contaminated areas. Pneumatic SVE is a technique developed to enhance remediation efficiency of heterogeneous soils by enforcing large fluctuating pressure fronts through the contaminated area. Laboratory experiments have suggested that pneumatic SVE considerably improves the recovery rate from low-permeable units. We have analyzed the experimental results using a numerical code and quantified the physical processes controlling the functioning of the method. A sensitivity analysis for selected boundary conditions, initial conditions and parameters was carried out to examine how the method behaves under conditions different from the experimental set-up. The simulations show that at the laboratory level the pneumatic venting technology is superior to the traditional technique, and that the method is particularly efficient in cases where large permeability contrasts exist between soil units in the subsurface. PMID:19004522

  14. Mechanisms involved in soil conditioning by polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Wallace, G.A.; Cha, J.W.

    1986-05-01

    Three different soils (two sodic and calcareous and one very acid and serpentine-like) was mixed with polyanion and polycation polymers and with a polysaccharide in suspension and passed the flocculated particles through sieves of different size openings for measurement of components. Including (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in the suspension resulted in more complete flocculation with high pH soils and less with the acid soil. In contrast, with the polycation the (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ resulted in less flocculation for all three soils. Liming the acid soil to pH 7 increased flocculation for both the polyanion and the polycation. The polyanion resulted in more flocculation on calcareous than on acid soil, and the reverse occurred for the polycation. These results indicate that the salt effect was that of bringing clay particles closely enough together so that several of them could be bound with a common polyanion. The binding then would occur many times with polyanions for each aggregate of clay particles. Ion bridging is an important phenomenon in which polyvalent cations may be shared with polymer and clay in the flocculation-aggregation process. The addition of a polysaccharide with the polyanion gives additive to synergistic responses, indicating that there is cross-linking between the two polymers. The total effect resembles a brush heap that secures stability for the flocculated particles.

  15. Laboratory Velocity Measurements Used for Recovering Soil Distributions from Field Seismic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P A; Bertete-Aguirre, H

    1999-10-20

    Recent advances in field methods make it possible to obtain high quality compressional (P) and shear (S) velocity data for the shallow subsurface. Environmental and engineering problems require new methods for interpreting the velocity data in terms of sub-surface soil distribution. Recent advances in laboratory measurement techniques have provided high quality velocity data for soils at low pressures that can be used to improve interpretation of field data. We show how laboratory data can be used to infer lithology from field data. We use laboratory ultrasonic velocity measurements from artificial soils made by combining various amounts of sand and peat moss.

  16. Soil resistivity over root area ratio, soil humidity, and bulk density: laboratory tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guastini, Enrico; Giambastiani, Yamuna; Preti, Federico

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge about root system distribution covers an important role in slope shallow stability stud-ies, as this factor grants an increase in soil geotechnical properties (soil cohesion and friction an-gle) and determines a different underground water circulation. Published studies (Amato et al., 2008 and 2011; Censini et al., 2014) about in situ application of ERT (Electrical Resistivity Tomo-graphy) analysis show how the root presence affects the measurable soil resistivity values, confirm-ing the suitability to investigate the application of such technique, aiming to estimate root density in soil with an indirect and non-invasive method. This study, laboratory-based and led on reconstructed samples in controlled condition, aim to find a correlation between the resistivity variations and the various factors that can affect them (humid-ity, bulk density, presence of foreign bodies, temperature). The tests involved a clay-loam soil (USDA classification) taken from Quaracchi (Florence, Italy), in an experimental fir-wood (Picea abies) owned by the Department of Agricultural, Food and For-estry System, Florence University, a previously chosen site for field ERT applications. The row ma-terial has been dried out in a lab stove, grounded and sieved at 2 mm, and then placed in a lexan box (30 x 20 x 20 cm) without compaction. Inside the sample have been inserted 3 series of 4 iron electrodes, insulated along the shaft and with the conductive end placed at three different depth: 2 cm from surface, in the middle of the sample and in contact with the bottom of the box; resistivity measures are conducted on the three levels using a Syscal R2 with electrodes connected in a dipole-dipole configuration. Root presence is simulated inserting bamboo spits (simple geometry, replicable "R.A.R.") in varying number from 0 to 16 in every area between two contiguous electrodes. The tests are repeated in time, monitoring the natural variations in humidity (evapotranspiration) and bulk

  17. Dynamics of soil water evaporation during soil drying: laboratory experiment and numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3. PMID:24489492

  18. Dynamics of soil water evaporation during soil drying: laboratory experiment and numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3.

  19. Patterns and possible mechanisms of soil CO2 uptake in sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Fa, Ke-Yu; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Wu, Bin; Qin, Shu-Gao; Liu, Zhen; She, Wei-Wei

    2016-02-15

    It has been reported that soils in drylands can absorb CO2, although the patterns and mechanisms of such a process remain under debate. To address this, we investigated the relationships between soil CO2 flux and meteorological factors and soil properties in Northwest China to reveal the reasons for "anomalous" soil CO2 flux in a desert ecosystem. Soil CO2 flux increased significantly and exponentially with surficial turbulence at the diel scale under dry conditions (P<0.05), whereas the relationship under wet conditions was insignificant. Furthermore, soil CO2 flux demonstrated remarkable negative correlation with soil air pressure (P<0.05) in both dry and wet conditions. Analysis considering Henry's Law indicated that soil water content was insufficient to dissolve the absorbed CO2 in dry conditions, but was sufficient in wet conditions. The concentration of soil HCO3(-) in the morning was higher than in the evening in dry conditions, but this pattern was reversed in wet conditions. These results imply that CO2 outgassing induced by turbulence, expansion of soil air, CO2 effusion from soil water, and carbonate precipitation during daytime can explain the abiotic diurnal CO2 release. Moreover, CO2 pumping from the atmosphere into the soil, caused mainly by carbonate dissolution, can account for nocturnal CO2 absorption in dry conditions. The abiotic soil CO2 flux pattern (CO2 absorption throughout the diel cycle) in wet conditions can be attributed to downward mass flow of soil CO2 and intensified soil air shrinkage, CO2 dissolving in soil water, and carbonate dissolution. These results provide a basis for determining the location of abiotic fixed carbon within soils in desert ecosystems. PMID:26674687

  20. Patterns and possible mechanisms of soil CO2 uptake in sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Fa, Ke-Yu; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Wu, Bin; Qin, Shu-Gao; Liu, Zhen; She, Wei-Wei

    2016-02-15

    It has been reported that soils in drylands can absorb CO2, although the patterns and mechanisms of such a process remain under debate. To address this, we investigated the relationships between soil CO2 flux and meteorological factors and soil properties in Northwest China to reveal the reasons for "anomalous" soil CO2 flux in a desert ecosystem. Soil CO2 flux increased significantly and exponentially with surficial turbulence at the diel scale under dry conditions (P<0.05), whereas the relationship under wet conditions was insignificant. Furthermore, soil CO2 flux demonstrated remarkable negative correlation with soil air pressure (P<0.05) in both dry and wet conditions. Analysis considering Henry's Law indicated that soil water content was insufficient to dissolve the absorbed CO2 in dry conditions, but was sufficient in wet conditions. The concentration of soil HCO3(-) in the morning was higher than in the evening in dry conditions, but this pattern was reversed in wet conditions. These results imply that CO2 outgassing induced by turbulence, expansion of soil air, CO2 effusion from soil water, and carbonate precipitation during daytime can explain the abiotic diurnal CO2 release. Moreover, CO2 pumping from the atmosphere into the soil, caused mainly by carbonate dissolution, can account for nocturnal CO2 absorption in dry conditions. The abiotic soil CO2 flux pattern (CO2 absorption throughout the diel cycle) in wet conditions can be attributed to downward mass flow of soil CO2 and intensified soil air shrinkage, CO2 dissolving in soil water, and carbonate dissolution. These results provide a basis for determining the location of abiotic fixed carbon within soils in desert ecosystems.

  1. Measuring soil erodibility using a laboratory "mini" JET

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Typically the erosion rate of cohesive soils is quantified using an excess shear stress equation, dependent on two major soil parameters: the critical shear stress and the erodibility coefficient. A submerged jet test (JET – Jet Erosion Test) is one method that has been developed for measuring the...

  2. Chemical Analysis of Soils: An Environmental Chemistry Laboratory for Undergraduate Science Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.; Avery, G. Brooks, Jr.; Manock, John J.; Skrabal, Stephen A.; Stehman, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise for undergraduate science students in which they evaluate soil samples for various parameters related to suitability for crop production and capability for retention of contaminants. (Contains 18 references.) (WRM)

  3. Soil mechanics on the Moon, Mars, and Mulberry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, W. D., III

    From a soil mechanics point of view, the Moon is a relatively simple place. Without any water, organics, or clay minerals, the geotechnical properties of the lunar soil are confined to a fairly limited range. Furthermore, the major soil-forming agent is meteorite impact, which breaks the big particles into little particles; and simultaneously, cements the little particles back together again with molten glass. After about a hundred million years of exposure to meteorite impact, the distribution of particle sizes in the soil achieves a sort of steady state. The majority of the returned lunar soil samples have been found to be well-graded silty-sand to sandy-silt (SM in the Unified Soil Classification System). Each of the particle size distributions plots within a relatively narrow band, which appears to be uniform over the entire lunar surface. This further restricts the range of physical properties of the lunar surface. In contrast, Martian soils should exhibit an extremely wide range of properties. We already know that there is a small amount of water in the soil, greater than in the Martian atmosphere. Furthermore, the soil is suspected to be smectitic clay. That makes two out of the three factors that greatly affect the properties of terrestrial soils.

  4. Soil mechanics on the Moon, Mars, and Mulberry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrier, W. D., III

    1988-01-01

    From a soil mechanics point of view, the Moon is a relatively simple place. Without any water, organics, or clay minerals, the geotechnical properties of the lunar soil are confined to a fairly limited range. Furthermore, the major soil-forming agent is meteorite impact, which breaks the big particles into little particles; and simultaneously, cements the little particles back together again with molten glass. After about a hundred million years of exposure to meteorite impact, the distribution of particle sizes in the soil achieves a sort of steady state. The majority of the returned lunar soil samples have been found to be well-graded silty-sand to sandy-silt (SM in the Unified Soil Classification System). Each of the particle size distributions plots within a relatively narrow band, which appears to be uniform over the entire lunar surface. This further restricts the range of physical properties of the lunar surface. In contrast, Martian soils should exhibit an extremely wide range of properties. We already know that there is a small amount of water in the soil, greater than in the Martian atmosphere. Furthermore, the soil is suspected to be smectitic clay. That makes two out of the three factors that greatly affect the properties of terrestrial soils.

  5. SOIL AND FILL LABORATORY SUPPORT - 1992 RADIOLOGICAL ANALYSES - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of soil analysis laboratory work by the University of Florida in support of the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). Analyses were performed on soil and fill samples collected during 1992 by the FRRP Research House Program and the New House Evaluation P...

  6. Factors Affecting Mineral Nitrogen Transformations by Soil Heating: A Laboratory Simulated Fire Study.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two forest soils from the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California were brought into the laboratory and subjected to simulated burning in a muffle furnace at several durations, oven temperatures, and water contents. Soils were analyzed for NO3-, NH4+, mineral N, total N, total C, and C:N responses to t...

  7. Fire vs. Metal: A Laboratory Study Demonstrating Microbial Responses to Soil Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromberger, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Incubation studies are traditionally used in soil microbiology laboratory classes to demonstrate microbial respiration and N mineralization-immobilization processes. Sometimes these exercises are done to calculate a N balance in N fertilizer-amended soils. However, examining microbial responses to environmental perturbations would appeal to soil…

  8. Field versus laboratory experiments to evaluate the fate of azoxystrobin in an amended vineyard soil.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Hernández, E; Marín-Benito, J M; Andrades, M S; Sánchez-Martín, M J; Rodríguez-Cruz, M S

    2015-11-01

    This study reports the effect that adding spent mushroom substrate (SMS) to a representative vineyard soil from La Rioja region (Spain) has on the behaviour of azoxystrobin in two different environmental scenarios. Field dissipation experiments were conducted on experimental plots amended at rates of 50 and 150 t ha(-1), and similar dissipation experiments were simultaneously conducted in the laboratory to identify differences under controlled conditions. Azoxystrobin dissipation followed biphasic kinetics in both scenarios, although the initial dissipation phase was much faster in the field than in the laboratory experiments, and the half-life (DT50) values obtained in the two experiments were 0.34-46.3 days and 89.2-148 days, respectively. Fungicide residues in the soil profile increased in the SMS amended soil and they were much higher in the top two layers (0-20 cm) than in deeper layers. The persistence of fungicide in the soil profile is consistent with changes in azoxystrobin adsorption by unamended and amended soils over time. Changes in the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of soils under different treatments assayed in the field and in the laboratory indicated that SMS and the fungicide had a stimulatory effect on soil DHA. The results reveal that the laboratory studies usually reported in the literature to explain the fate of pesticides in amended soils are insufficient to explain azoxystrobin behaviour under real conditions. Field studies are necessary to set up efficient applications of SMS and fungicide, with a view to preventing the possible risk of water contamination.

  9. Nitrification Is a Primary Driver of Nitrous Oxide Production in Laboratory Microcosms from Different Land-Use Soils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Hu, Hangwei; Suter, Helen; Hayden, Helen L; He, Jizheng; Mele, Pauline; Chen, Deli

    2016-01-01

    Most studies on soil N2O emissions have focused either on the quantifying of agricultural N2O fluxes or on the effect of environmental factors on N2O emissions. However, very limited information is available on how land-use will affect N2O production, and nitrifiers involved in N2O emissions in agricultural soil ecosystems. Therefore, this study aimed at evaluating the relative importance of nitrification and denitrification to N2O emissions from different land-use soils and identifying the potential underlying microbial mechanisms. A (15)N-tracing experiment was conducted under controlled laboratory conditions on four agricultural soils collected from different land-use. We measured N2O fluxes, nitrate ([Formula: see text]), and ammonium ([Formula: see text]) concentration and (15)N2O, (15)[Formula: see text], and (15)[Formula: see text] enrichment during the incubation. Quantitative PCR was used to quantify ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Our results showed that nitrification was the main contributor to N2O production in soils from sugarcane, dairy pasture and cereal cropping systems, while denitrification played a major role in N2O production in the vegetable soil under the experimental conditions. Nitrification contributed to 96.7% of the N2O emissions in sugarcane soil followed by 71.3% in the cereal cropping soil and 70.9% in the dairy pasture soil, while only around 20.0% of N2O was produced from nitrification in vegetable soil. The proportion of nitrified nitrogen as N2O (PN2O-value) varied across different soils, with the highest PN2O-value (0.26‰) found in the cereal cropping soil, which was around 10 times higher than that in other three systems. AOA were the abundant ammonia oxidizers, and were significantly correlated to N2O emitted from nitrification in the sugarcane soil, while AOB were significantly correlated with N2O emitted from nitrification in the cereal cropping soil. Our findings suggested that soil

  10. Nitrification Is a Primary Driver of Nitrous Oxide Production in Laboratory Microcosms from Different Land-Use Soils

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Hu, Hangwei; Suter, Helen; Hayden, Helen L.; He, Jizheng; Mele, Pauline; Chen, Deli

    2016-01-01

    Most studies on soil N2O emissions have focused either on the quantifying of agricultural N2O fluxes or on the effect of environmental factors on N2O emissions. However, very limited information is available on how land-use will affect N2O production, and nitrifiers involved in N2O emissions in agricultural soil ecosystems. Therefore, this study aimed at evaluating the relative importance of nitrification and denitrification to N2O emissions from different land-use soils and identifying the potential underlying microbial mechanisms. A 15N-tracing experiment was conducted under controlled laboratory conditions on four agricultural soils collected from different land-use. We measured N2O fluxes, nitrate (NO3-), and ammonium (NH4+) concentration and 15N2O, 15NO3-, and 15NH4+ enrichment during the incubation. Quantitative PCR was used to quantify ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Our results showed that nitrification was the main contributor to N2O production in soils from sugarcane, dairy pasture and cereal cropping systems, while denitrification played a major role in N2O production in the vegetable soil under the experimental conditions. Nitrification contributed to 96.7% of the N2O emissions in sugarcane soil followed by 71.3% in the cereal cropping soil and 70.9% in the dairy pasture soil, while only around 20.0% of N2O was produced from nitrification in vegetable soil. The proportion of nitrified nitrogen as N2O (PN2O-value) varied across different soils, with the highest PN2O-value (0.26‰) found in the cereal cropping soil, which was around 10 times higher than that in other three systems. AOA were the abundant ammonia oxidizers, and were significantly correlated to N2O emitted from nitrification in the sugarcane soil, while AOB were significantly correlated with N2O emitted from nitrification in the cereal cropping soil. Our findings suggested that soil type and land-use might have strongly affected the relative

  11. Nitrification Is a Primary Driver of Nitrous Oxide Production in Laboratory Microcosms from Different Land-Use Soils

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Hu, Hangwei; Suter, Helen; Hayden, Helen L.; He, Jizheng; Mele, Pauline; Chen, Deli

    2016-01-01

    Most studies on soil N2O emissions have focused either on the quantifying of agricultural N2O fluxes or on the effect of environmental factors on N2O emissions. However, very limited information is available on how land-use will affect N2O production, and nitrifiers involved in N2O emissions in agricultural soil ecosystems. Therefore, this study aimed at evaluating the relative importance of nitrification and denitrification to N2O emissions from different land-use soils and identifying the potential underlying microbial mechanisms. A 15N-tracing experiment was conducted under controlled laboratory conditions on four agricultural soils collected from different land-use. We measured N2O fluxes, nitrate (NO3-), and ammonium (NH4+) concentration and 15N2O, 15NO3-, and 15NH4+ enrichment during the incubation. Quantitative PCR was used to quantify ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Our results showed that nitrification was the main contributor to N2O production in soils from sugarcane, dairy pasture and cereal cropping systems, while denitrification played a major role in N2O production in the vegetable soil under the experimental conditions. Nitrification contributed to 96.7% of the N2O emissions in sugarcane soil followed by 71.3% in the cereal cropping soil and 70.9% in the dairy pasture soil, while only around 20.0% of N2O was produced from nitrification in vegetable soil. The proportion of nitrified nitrogen as N2O (PN2O-value) varied across different soils, with the highest PN2O-value (0.26‰) found in the cereal cropping soil, which was around 10 times higher than that in other three systems. AOA were the abundant ammonia oxidizers, and were significantly correlated to N2O emitted from nitrification in the sugarcane soil, while AOB were significantly correlated with N2O emitted from nitrification in the cereal cropping soil. Our findings suggested that soil type and land-use might have strongly affected the relative

  12. A laboratory based experimental study of mercury emission from contaminated soils in the River Idrijca catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocman, D.; Horvat, M.

    2009-11-01

    Results obtained by a laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS) focused on investigating the kinetics of the mercury emission flux (MEF) from contaminated soils of the Idrija Hg-mine region, Slovenia are presented. Representative soil samples with respect to total Hg concentrations (4-417 μg g-1) and land cover (forest, meadow and alluvial soil) alongside the River Idrijca were analysed to determine the variation in MEF versus distance from the source, regulating three major environmental parameters comprising soil temperature, soil moisture and solar radiation. MEFs ranged from less than 2 to 530 ng m-2 h-1, with the highest emissions from contaminated alluvial soils and soils near the mining district in the town of Idrija. A significant decrease of MEF was then observed with increasing distance from these sites. The results revealed a strong positive effect of all three parameters investigated on momentum MEF. The light-induced flux was shown to be independent of the soil temperature, while the soil aqueous phase seems to be responsible for recharging the pool of mercury in the soil available for both the light- and thermally-induced flux. The overall flux response to simulated environmental conditions depends greatly on the form of Hg in the soil. Higher activation energies are required for the overall process to occur in soils where insoluble cinnabar prevails compared to soils where more mobile Hg forms and forms available for transformation processes are dominant.

  13. A laboratory based experimental study of mercury emission from contaminated soils in the River Idrijca catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocman, D.; Horvat, M.

    2010-02-01

    Results obtained by a laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS) focused on investigating the kinetics of the mercury emission flux (MEF) from contaminated soils of the Idrija Hg-mine region, Slovenia are presented. Representative soil samples with respect to total Hg concentrations (4-417 μg g-1) and land cover (forest, meadow and alluvial soil) alongside the River Idrijca were analysed to determine the variation in MEF versus distance from the source, regulating three major environmental parameters comprising soil temperature, soil moisture and solar radiation. MEFs ranged from less than 2 to 530 ng m-2 h-1, with the highest emissions from contaminated alluvial soils and soils near the mining district in the town of Idrija. A significant decrease of MEF was then observed with increasing distance from these sites. The results revealed a strong positive effect of all three parameters investigated on momentum MEF. The light-induced flux was shown to be independent of the soil temperature, while the soil aqueous phase seems to be responsible for recharging the pool of mercury in the soil available for both the light- and thermally-induced flux. The overall flux response to simulated environmental conditions depends greatly on the form of Hg in the soil. Higher activation energies are required for the overall process to occur in soils where insoluble cinnabar prevails compared to soils where more mobile Hg forms and forms available for transformation processes are dominant.

  14. Glomalin related soil protein as indicator of fire severity: a laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Elena; Chrenková, Katarina; Arcenegui, Victoria; Jiménez-Pinilla, Patricia; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Mataix-Beneyto, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    Glomalin Related Soil Protein (GRSP), a glycoprotein produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Wright and Upadhyaya, 1996), was studied to determinate its effectiveness as an indicator of fire severity. Laboratory heating treatments were carried out at 180, 200, 250, 300, 400 and 500°C in soil samples from eight different sites of E Spain with different soil characteristics. Soil water repellency (SWR) and soil organic carbon (SOC) content were also studied to compare their sensitivity to temperature between certain parameters. Results showed that GRSP was affected even at low temperature, contrary to SOC, whose concentrations remained without changes at below 250°C. SWR did not appear in wettable soils after heating and disappeared in water repellent ones at temperatures over 200°C. GRSP behavior to temperature was different between soils. Redundancy Analyses divided sandy soils from the others. Silt, SOC, total content of aggregates (TCA) and initial GRSP concentrations were the significant properties explaining the response of GRSP to temperature. GRSP was more sensitive to temperature than SWR and SOC at low temperatures. Our results indicate that GRSP could be a useful indicator of fire severity. Key words: Arbuscular mycorrizhal fungi; Glomalin related soil protein; Soil water repellency; Soil aggregates. References: Wright, S.F, Upadhyaya, A., 1996. Extraction of an abundant and unusual protein from soil and comparison with hyphal protein of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Soil Sciences 161, 575-586

  15. Chemical Analysis of Soils: An Environmental Chemistry Laboratory for Undergraduate Science Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, Joan D.; Avery, G. Brooks, Jr.; Manock, John J.; Skrabal, Stephen A.; Stehman, Charles F.

    1999-12-01

    Successful management of conflicting uses of soils, which include food production as well as disposal of hazardous wastes, requires an understanding of soil characteristics that affect the mobility and fate of soil contaminants and nutrients. Soil chemistry, however, is often neglected in environmental chemistry courses. This laboratory exercise is designed to make this topic more accessible to instructors who teach environmental chemistry laboratories, as well as to their students. In this laboratory exercise, undergraduate science students evaluate soil samples for various parameters related to suitability for crop production and capability for retention of contaminants. The lab emphasizes the heterogeneous nature of soil and the difficulty of obtaining representative samples for analysis. One of the first steps in any chemical analysis is to obtain a representative analytical sample from a bulk sample, yet undergraduate students rarely do this in practice. In this lab, students attempt to obtain a representative analytical sample from a large soil sample. They compare their individual data with the mean and standard deviation compiled from the whole class. Soil water, calcium carbonate, organic matter, pH, and salinity are measured. Soil texture and octanol-water partitioning are demonstrated.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of frozen soil target materials with a fused interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Bronowski, David R.; Lee, Moo Yul

    2004-10-01

    To investigate the performance of artificial frozen soil materials with a fused interface, split tension (or 'Brazilian') tests and unconfined uniaxial compression tests were carried out in a low temperature environmental chamber. Intact and fused specimens were fabricated from four different soil mixtures (962: clay-rich soil with bentonite; DNA1: clay-poor soil; DNA2: clay-poor soil with vermiculite; and DNA3: clay-poor soil with perlite). Based on the 'Brazilian' test results and density measurements, the DNA3 mixture was selected to closely represent the mechanical properties of the Alaskan frozen soil. The healed-interface by the same soil layer sandwiched between two blocks of the same material yielded the highest 'Brazilian' tensile strength of the interface. Based on unconfined uniaxial compression tests, the frictional strength of the fused DNA3 specimens with the same soil appears to exceed the shear strength of the intact specimen.

  17. Mobility of spiromesifen in packed soil columns under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Mate, Ch Jamkhokai; Mukherjee, Irani; Das, Shaon Kumar

    2014-11-01

    On percolating water equivalent to 1,156 mm of rainfall, spiromesifen formulation did not leach out of 25-cm long columns, and 62.7 % of this was recovered in 5-10-cm soil depth. In columns treated with the analytical grade, 52.40 % of the recovered spiromesifen was confined to 0-5-cm soil depth, with 0.04 % in leachate fraction, suggesting high adsorption in soil. Results revealed that percolating 400 mL of water, residues of enol metabolite of spiromesifen was detected up to 20-25-cm soil layer, with 23.50 % residues of spiromesifen in this layer and 1.73 % in the leachate fraction indicating that metabolite is more mobile as compared to the parent compound. Results suggested a significant reduction in leaching losses of enol metabolite in amended soil columns with 5 % nano clay, farmyard manure (FYM), and vermicompost. No enol spiromesifen was recovered in the leachate in columns amended with nano clay, vermicompost, and FYM; however, 85.30, 70.5, and 65.40 %, respectively, was recovered from 0-5 cm-soil depth of column after percolating water equivalent to 1,156 mm of rainfall. Spiromesifen formulation is less mobile in sandy loam soil than analytical grade spiromesifen. The metabolite, enol spiromesifen, is relatively more mobile than the parent compound and may leach into groundwater. The study suggested that amendments were very effective in reducing the downward mobility of enol metabolite in soil column. Further, it resulted in greater retention of enol metabolite in the amendment application zone. PMID:25060860

  18. Soil examination for a forensic trace evidence laboratory-Part 3: A proposed protocol for the effective triage and management of soil examinations.

    PubMed

    Woods, Brenda; Lennard, Chris; Kirkbride, K Paul; Robertson, James

    2016-05-01

    In the past, forensic soil examination was a routine aspect of forensic trace evidence examinations. The apparent need for soil examinations then went through a period of decline and with it the capability of many forensic laboratories to carry out soil examinations. In more recent years, interest in soil examinations has been renewed due-at least in part-to soil examinations contributing to some high profile investigations. However, much of this renewed interest has been in organisations with a primary interest in soil and geology rather than forensic science. We argue the need to reinstate soil examinations as a trace evidence sub-discipline within forensic science laboratories and present a pathway to support this aim. An examination procedure is proposed that includes: (i) appropriate sample collection and storage by qualified crime scene examiners; (ii) exclusionary soil examinations by trace evidence scientists within a forensic science laboratory; (iii) inclusionary soil examinations by trace evidence scientists within a forensic science laboratory; and (iv) higher-level examination of soils by specialist soil scientists and palynologists. Soil examinations conducted by trace evidence scientists will be facilitated if the examinations are conducted using the instrumentation routinely used by these examiners. Hence, the proposed examination protocol incorporates instrumentation in routine use in a forensic trace evidence laboratory. Finally, we report on an Australian soil scene variability study and a blind trial that demonstrate the utility of the proposed protocol for the effective triage and management of soil samples by forensic laboratories. PMID:26968018

  19. Soil examination for a forensic trace evidence laboratory-Part 3: A proposed protocol for the effective triage and management of soil examinations.

    PubMed

    Woods, Brenda; Lennard, Chris; Kirkbride, K Paul; Robertson, James

    2016-05-01

    In the past, forensic soil examination was a routine aspect of forensic trace evidence examinations. The apparent need for soil examinations then went through a period of decline and with it the capability of many forensic laboratories to carry out soil examinations. In more recent years, interest in soil examinations has been renewed due-at least in part-to soil examinations contributing to some high profile investigations. However, much of this renewed interest has been in organisations with a primary interest in soil and geology rather than forensic science. We argue the need to reinstate soil examinations as a trace evidence sub-discipline within forensic science laboratories and present a pathway to support this aim. An examination procedure is proposed that includes: (i) appropriate sample collection and storage by qualified crime scene examiners; (ii) exclusionary soil examinations by trace evidence scientists within a forensic science laboratory; (iii) inclusionary soil examinations by trace evidence scientists within a forensic science laboratory; and (iv) higher-level examination of soils by specialist soil scientists and palynologists. Soil examinations conducted by trace evidence scientists will be facilitated if the examinations are conducted using the instrumentation routinely used by these examiners. Hence, the proposed examination protocol incorporates instrumentation in routine use in a forensic trace evidence laboratory. Finally, we report on an Australian soil scene variability study and a blind trial that demonstrate the utility of the proposed protocol for the effective triage and management of soil samples by forensic laboratories.

  20. Hydraulic and mechanical properties of soil aggregates under organic and conventional soil management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójciga, A.; Kuś, J.; Turski, M.; Lipiec, J.

    2009-04-01

    Variation in hydraulic and mechanical properties of soil aggregates is an important factor affecting water storage and infiltration because the large inter-aggregate pores are dewatered first and the transport of water and solutes is influenced by the properties of the individual aggregates and contacts between them. A high mechanical stability of soil aggregates is fundamental for the maintenance of proper tilth and provides stable traction for farm implements, but limit root growth inside aggregates. The aggregate properties are largely influenced by soil management practices. Our objective was to compare the effects of organic and conventional soil management on hydraulic and mechanical properties of soil aggregates. Experimental fields subjected to long-term organic (14 years) and conventional managements were located on loamy soil at the Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - National Research Institute in Pulawy, Poland. Soil samples were collected from two soil depths (0-10 cm and 10-20 cm). After air-drying, two size fractions of soil aggregates (15-20 and 30-35 mm) were manually selected and kept in the dried state in a dessicator in order to provide the same boundary conditions. Following properties of the aggregates were determined: porosity (%) using standard wax method, cumulative infiltration Q (mm3 s-1) and sorptivity S (mm s -1/2) of water and ethanol using a tube with a sponge inserted at the tip, wettability (by comparison of sorptivity of water and ethanol) using repellency index R, crushing strength q (MPa) using strength testing device (Zwick/Roell) and calculated by Dexter's formula. All properties were determined in 15 replicates for each treatment, aggregates size and depth. Organic management decreased porosity of soil aggregates and ethanol infiltration. All aggregates revealed rather limited wettability (high repellency index). In most cases the aggregate wettability was lower under conventional than organic soil management

  1. Stuffing Carbon Away: Mechanisms of Carbon Sequestration in Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, P J; Masiello, C A; Southon, J R; Trumbore, S E; Harden, J W; White, A F; Chadwick, O A; Torn, M S

    2003-01-24

    Soils offer the potential to sequester large quantities of carbon from the atmosphere for decades to millennia and so may ameliorate the anthropogenic influence of fossil fuel release. However changes in climate can drastically affect the soil's ability to store carbon through changes mineralogy on time scales of human interest. It is essential to understand the major controls on soil carbon dynamics before we attempt to manage sequestration to control atmospheric CO{sub 2} buildup. Models of the terrestrial carbon cycle often use clay content to parameterize soil carbon turnover. Evidence from volcanic soils suggests that soil mineralogy is a major control on a soil's ability to store carbon, because different types of minerals have widely varying abilities to physically and chemically isolate soil organic matter from decomposition, however volcanic soils represent only a small percentage of the earth's soils. The relationship between precipitation and soil carbon storage is also complex and poorly constrained. Significantly, precipitation changes predicted as a result of atmospheric CO{sub 2} doubling include increased rainfall throughout California. We utilized {sup 14}C, {delta}{sup 13}C, and the total organic carbon, iron, and aluminum contents to address the question of the importance of mineralogy and climate on carbon storage in soils formed on a globally representative parent material. The California coastal terraces, formed over the last 500 thousand years as a result of tectonic uplift and sea level change, provide a natural laboratory to examine the effect of mineralogy and climate on carbon storage. We have focused on two terraces sequences, one near Eureka and one near Santa Cruz. Within each set of terraces only soil mineral development varies; all other variables are constant (rainfall, plant systems, and soil parent material, and land management). Annual precipitation at Eureka is twice that at Santa Cruz, allowing us to examine its role in the

  2. Multiplicity of mechanisms govern efficacy of anaerobic soil disinfestation for soil-borne disease control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies demonstrated that carbon input type influenced control of various fungi, oomycetes and plant parasitic nematodes with anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD). Findings implicated multiple mechanisms may contribute to the overall level of disease control attained. In strawberry field trials, ASD ...

  3. Comparison of an unsaturated soil zone model (SESOIL) predictions with a laboratory leaching experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hetrick, D.M.; Travis, C.C.; Kinerson, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Model predictions of a modified version of the soil compartment model SESOIL are compared with laboratory measurements of pollutant transport in soil. A brief description of SESOIL is given and modifications that have been made to the model are summarized. Comparisons are performed using data from a laboratory soil column study involving six chemicals (dicamba, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, atrazine, diazinon, pentachlorophenol, and lindane). Overall, SESOIL model predictions are in good agreement with the empirical data. Limitation of the model are discussed. 15 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Soil examination for a forensic trace evidence laboratory--Part 1: Spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Woods, Brenda; Lennard, Chris; Kirkbride, K Paul; Robertson, James

    2014-12-01

    In the past, forensic soil examination was a routine aspect of trace evidence examination in forensic science. However, in Australia, the apparent need for soil examinations has diminished and with it the capability of forensic science laboratories to carry out soil examination has been eroded. In recent years, due to soil examinations contributing to some high profile investigations, interest in soil examinations has been renewed. Routine soil examinations conducted in a forensic science laboratory by trace evidence scientists can be facilitated if the examinations are conducted using the instrumentation routinely used by these examiners. Spectroscopic techniques such as visible microspectrophotometry (MSP) and Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are routinely used by trace evidence analysts for the colour and compositional analysis, respectively, of forensic items, including paints, fibres, inks and toners, tapes, adhesives and other miscellaneous examinations. This article presents an examination of the feasibility of using MSP and ATR-FTIR as a first step in the forensic comparison of soils with particular reference to Australian soil samples. This initial study demonstrates MSP and ATR-FTIR can effectively be used as a screening test for the discrimination of "forensic-sized" soil samples prior to submission for more detailed analyses by a soil expert. PMID:25205526

  5. Soil examination for a forensic trace evidence laboratory--Part 1: Spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Woods, Brenda; Lennard, Chris; Kirkbride, K Paul; Robertson, James

    2014-12-01

    In the past, forensic soil examination was a routine aspect of trace evidence examination in forensic science. However, in Australia, the apparent need for soil examinations has diminished and with it the capability of forensic science laboratories to carry out soil examination has been eroded. In recent years, due to soil examinations contributing to some high profile investigations, interest in soil examinations has been renewed. Routine soil examinations conducted in a forensic science laboratory by trace evidence scientists can be facilitated if the examinations are conducted using the instrumentation routinely used by these examiners. Spectroscopic techniques such as visible microspectrophotometry (MSP) and Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are routinely used by trace evidence analysts for the colour and compositional analysis, respectively, of forensic items, including paints, fibres, inks and toners, tapes, adhesives and other miscellaneous examinations. This article presents an examination of the feasibility of using MSP and ATR-FTIR as a first step in the forensic comparison of soils with particular reference to Australian soil samples. This initial study demonstrates MSP and ATR-FTIR can effectively be used as a screening test for the discrimination of "forensic-sized" soil samples prior to submission for more detailed analyses by a soil expert.

  6. The relevance of in-situ and laboratory characterization of sandy soil hydraulic properties for soil water simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Meisam; Seuntjens, Piet; Shahidi, Reihaneh; Joris, Ingeborg; Boënne, Wesley; Al-Barri, Bashar; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Field water flow processes can be precisely delineated with proper sets of soil hydraulic properties derived from in situ and/or laboratory experiments. In this study we analyzed and compared soil hydraulic properties obtained by traditional laboratory experiments and inverse optimization tension infiltrometer data along the vertical direction within two typical Podzol profiles with sand texture in a potato field. The main goal was to identify proper sets of hydraulic parameters and to evaluate their relevance on hydrological model performance for irrigation management purposes. Tension disc infiltration experiments were carried out at four and five different depths for both profiles at consecutive negative pressure heads of 12, 6, 3 and 0.1 cm. At the same locations and depths undisturbed samples were taken to determine Mualem-van Genuchten (MVG) hydraulic parameters (θr, residual water content, θs, saturated water content, α and n, shape parameters and Kls, lab saturated hydraulic conductivity) in the laboratory. Results demonstrated horizontal differences and vertical variability of hydraulic properties. The tension disc infiltration data fitted well in inverse modeling using Hydrus 2D/3D in combination with final water content at the end of the experiment, θf. Four MVG parameters (θs, α, n and field saturated hydraulic conductivity Kfs) were estimated (θr set to zero), with estimated Kls and α values being relatively similar to values from Wooding's solution which used as initial value and estimated θs corresponded to (effective) field saturated water content, θf. The laboratory measurement of Kls yielded 2-30 times higher values than the field method Kfs from top to subsoil layers, while there was a significant correlation between both Ks values (r = 0.75). We found significant differences of MVG parameters θs, n and α values between laboratory and field measurements, but again a significant correlation was observed between laboratory and field MVG

  7. Load dissipation by corn residue on tilled soil in laboratory and field-wheeling conditions.

    PubMed

    Reichert, José M; Brandt, André A; Rodrigues, Miriam F; Reinert, Dalvan J; Braida, João A

    2016-06-01

    Crop residues may partially dissipate applied loads and reduce soil compaction. We evaluated the effect of corn residue on energy-applied dissipation during wheeling. The experiment consisted of a preliminary laboratory test and a confirmatory field test on a Paleaudalf soil. In the laboratory, an adapted Proctor test was performed with three energy levels, with and without corn residue. Field treatments consisted of three 5.1 Mg tractor wheeling intensities (0, 2, and 6), with and without 12 Mg ha(-1) corn residue on the soil surface. Corn residue on the soil surface reduced soil bulk density in the adapted Proctor test. By applying energy of 52.6 kN m m(-3) , soil dissipated 2.98% of applied energy, whereas with 175.4 kN m m(-3) a dissipation of 8.60% was obtained. This result confirms the hypothesis that surface mulch absorbs part of the compaction effort. Residue effects on soil compaction observed in the adapted Proctor test was not replicated under subsoiled soil field conditions, because of differences in applied pressure and soil conditions (structure, moisture and volume confinement). Nevertheless, this negative result does not mean that straw has no effect in the field. Such effects should be measured via stress transmission and compared to soil load-bearing capacity, rather than on bulk deformations. Wheeling by heavy tractor on subsoiled soil increased compaction, independently of surface residue. Two wheelings produced a significantly increase, but six wheelings did not further increase compaction. Reduced traffic intensity on recently tilled soil is necessary to minimize soil compaction, since traffic intensity show a greater effect than surface mulch on soil protection from excessive compaction. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26304050

  8. An improved method for field extraction and laboratory analysis of large, intact soil cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tindall, J.A.; Hemmen, K.; Dowd, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed for the extraction of large, undisturbed soil cores and for subsequent analysis of fluid movement within the cores. The major problems associated with these methods are expense, cumbersome field extraction, and inadequate simulation of unsaturated flow conditions. A field and laboratory procedure is presented that is economical, convenient, and simulates unsaturated and saturated flow without interface flow problems and can be used on a variety of soil types. In the field, a stainless steel core barrel is hydraulically pressed into the soil (30-cm diam. and 38 cm high), the barrel and core are extracted from the soil, and after the barrel is removed from the core, the core is then wrapped securely with flexible sheet metal and a stainless mesh screen is attached to the bottom of the core for support. In the laboratory the soil core is set atop a porous ceramic plate over which a soil-diatomaceous earth slurry has been poured to assure good contact between plate and core. A cardboard cylinder (mold) is fastened around the core and the empty space filled with paraffin wax. Soil cores were tested under saturated and unsaturated conditions using a hanging water column for potentials ???0. Breakthrough curves indicated that no interface flow occurred along the edge of the core. This procedure proved to be reliable for field extraction of large, intact soil cores and for laboratory analysis of solute transport.

  9. Recharge forest revisited: soils of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Grafton, J.

    1980-11-01

    Soil samples were collected from terrestrial systems 44 months after they had been subjected to 22 months of sewage spray application. Data on pH, % organic matter, exchangeable hydrogen, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, calcium, manganese, iron, aluminum, nitrate, and ammonia were generated for each soil horizon in three plots from two forest types. The three plots represent a control, treatment with primary sewage, and treatment with secondary sewage. There were no replicates. Differences in soil chemistry and/or structure between the three plots were assumed to be due to sewage application. Residual difference for a parameter, or changes remaining after 44 months, were considered significant if at least one Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) by horizon produced an F value corresponding to a p of .05. Analyses, data, and pH graphs are presented for future reference.

  10. Mapping soil surface macropores using infrared thermography: an exploratory laboratory study.

    PubMed

    de Lima, João L M P; Abrantes, João R C B; Silva, Valdemir P; de Lima, M Isabel P; Montenegro, Abelardo A A

    2014-01-01

    Macropores and water flow in soils and substrates are complex and are related to topics like preferential flow, nonequilibrium flow, and dual-continuum. Hence, the quantification of the number of macropores and the determination of their geometry are expected to provide a better understanding on the effects of pores on the soil's physical and hydraulic properties. This exploratory study aimed at evaluating the potential of using infrared thermography for mapping macroporosity at the soil surface and estimating the number and size of such macropores. The presented technique was applied to a small scale study (laboratory soil flume). PMID:25371915

  11. Laboratory-scale bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil of Kuwait with soil amendment materials.

    PubMed

    Cho, B H; Chino, H; Tsuji, H; Kunito, T; Nagaoka, K; Otsuka, S; Yamashita, K; Matsumoto, S; Oyaizu, H

    1997-10-01

    A huge amount of oil-contaminated soil remains unremediated in the Kuwait desert. The contaminated oil has the potentiality to cause pollution of underground water and to effect the health of people in the neighborhood. In this study, laboratory scale bioremediation experiments were carried out. Hyponex (Hyponex, Inc.) and bark manure were added as basic nutrients for microorganisms, and twelve kinds of materials (baked diatomite, microporous glass, coconut charcoal, an oil-decomposing bacterial mixture (Formula X from Oppenheimer, Inc.), and eight kinds of surfactants) were applied to accelerate the biodegradation of oil hydrocarbons. 15% to 33% of the contaminated oil was decomposed during 43 weeks' incubation. Among the materials tested, coconut charcoal enhanced the biodegradation. On the contrary, the addition of an oil-decomposing bacterial mixture impeded the biodegradation. The effects of the other materials were very slight. The toxicity of the biodegraded compounds was estimated by the Ames test and the tea pollen tube growth test. Both of the hydrophobic (dichloromethane extracts) and hydrophilic (methanol extracts) fractions showed a very slight toxicity in the Ames test. In the tea pollen tube growth test, the hydrophobic fraction was not toxic and enhanced the growth of pollen tubes.

  12. Laboratory-scale bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil of Kuwait with soil amendment materials.

    PubMed

    Cho, B H; Chino, H; Tsuji, H; Kunito, T; Nagaoka, K; Otsuka, S; Yamashita, K; Matsumoto, S; Oyaizu, H

    1997-10-01

    A huge amount of oil-contaminated soil remains unremediated in the Kuwait desert. The contaminated oil has the potentiality to cause pollution of underground water and to effect the health of people in the neighborhood. In this study, laboratory scale bioremediation experiments were carried out. Hyponex (Hyponex, Inc.) and bark manure were added as basic nutrients for microorganisms, and twelve kinds of materials (baked diatomite, microporous glass, coconut charcoal, an oil-decomposing bacterial mixture (Formula X from Oppenheimer, Inc.), and eight kinds of surfactants) were applied to accelerate the biodegradation of oil hydrocarbons. 15% to 33% of the contaminated oil was decomposed during 43 weeks' incubation. Among the materials tested, coconut charcoal enhanced the biodegradation. On the contrary, the addition of an oil-decomposing bacterial mixture impeded the biodegradation. The effects of the other materials were very slight. The toxicity of the biodegraded compounds was estimated by the Ames test and the tea pollen tube growth test. Both of the hydrophobic (dichloromethane extracts) and hydrophilic (methanol extracts) fractions showed a very slight toxicity in the Ames test. In the tea pollen tube growth test, the hydrophobic fraction was not toxic and enhanced the growth of pollen tubes. PMID:9314191

  13. Mechanics of aeolian processes: Soil erosion and dust production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrabadi, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aeolian (wind) processes occur as a result of atmosphere/land-surface system interactions. A thorough understanding of these processes and their physical/mechanical characterization on a global scale is essential to monitoring global change and, hence, is imperative to the fundamental goal of the Earth observing system (Eos) program. Soil erosion and dust production by wind are of consequence mainly in arid and semi arid regions which cover 36 percent of the Earth's land surface. Some recent models of dust production due to wind erosion of agricultural soils and the mechanics of wind erosion in deserts are reviewed and the difficulties of modeling the aeolian transport are discussed.

  14. Delineation of Hydrocarbon Contamination of Soils and Sediments With Environmental Magnetic Methods: Laboratory and Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijal, M. L.; Appel, E.; Porsch, K.; Kappler, A.; Blaha, U.; Petrovsky, E.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination of soils and sediments is a worldwide environmental problem. The present research focuses on the study of magnetic properties of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and sediments using environmental magnetic methods both on field sites as well as in laboratory batch experiments. The main objectives of this research are i) to determine a possible application of magnetic proxies for the delineation of organic contamination in soils and sediments and ii) to examine the role of bacteria in changing soil magnetic properties after hydrocarbon contamination. A former oil field and a former military site which are heavily contaminated with hydrocarbons were studied. Additionally, three different types of natural clean soils were investigated in laboratory experiments by simulating hydrocarbon contamination in sterile and microbial active setups. Magnetic properties, soil properties, iron bioavailability, iron redox state and hydrocarbon content of samples were measured. Additionally, magnetic susceptibility (MS) was monitored weekly in laboratory batch set-ups during several months. Results from the field sites showed that there is an increase of MS and a good correlation between MS and hydrocarbon content. A weekly monitored MS result from the laboratory study clearly indicated~~10% change (increase as well as decrease) of initial MS of respective soils only in microbial active set-ups with saturation after a few weeks of experimental period. This depicts that there is a change of MS caused by microbial iron mineral transformation in presence of hydrocarbon contamination in soils. The results from the field study demonstrate that magnetic proxies can be used to localize hydrocarbon contamination. However, more field sites with hydrocarbon contaminated soils and sediments need to be investigated by using environmental magnetic methods for better understanding the factors driving such changes in magnetic properties.

  15. Laboratory scale vitrification of low-level radioactive nitrate salts and soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, P.; Anderson, B.; Davis, D.

    1993-07-01

    INEL has radiologically contaminated nitrate salt and soil waste stored above and below ground in Pad A and the Acid Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Pad A contain uranium and transuranic contaminated potassium and sodium nitrate salts generated from dewatered waste solutions at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Acid Pit was used to dispose of liquids containing waste mineral acids, uranium, nitrate, chlorinated solvents, and some mercury. Ex situ vitrification is a high temperature destruction of nitrates and organics and immobilizes hazardous and radioactive metals. Laboratory scale melting of actual radionuclides containing INEL Pad A nitrate salts and Acid Pit soils was performed. The salt/soil/additive ratios were varied to determine the range of glass compositions (resulted from melting different wastes); maximize mass and volume reduction, durability, and immobilization of hazardous and radioactive metals; and minimize viscosity and offgas generation for wastes prevalent at INEL and other DOE sites. Some mixtures were spiked with additional hazardous and radioactive metals. Representative glasses were leach tested and showed none. Samples spiked with transuranic showed low nuclide leaching. Wasteforms were two to three times bulk densities of the salt and soil. Thermally co-processing soils and salts is an effective remediation method for destroying nitrate salts while stabilizing the radiological and hazardous metals they contain. The measured durability of these low-level waste glasses approached those of high-level waste glasses. Lab scale vitrification of actual INEL contaminated salts and soils was performed at General Atomics Laboratory as part of the INEL Waste Technology Development and Environmental Restoration within the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program.

  16. Factors controlling short-term soil microbial response after laboratory heating. Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Compán, Elizabeth; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio; Jordán, Antonio; Bárcenas-Moreno, Gema

    2015-04-01

    Soil microbial response after fire is controlled by numerous variables which conclude with a mosaic of results depending on organic carbon alterations or pH fire-induced changes. This fact has complicated the studies focused on post-fire microbial response, compiling high variability of opposite result in the bibliography. Soil laboratory heating cannot emulate a real wildfire effect on soil but lead us the possibility to control several variables and it is a valid tool to clarify the relative weight of different factors controlling microbial response after soil heating. In this preliminary study different heated treatments were applied to unaltered forest soil samples, obtaining 4 different heating treatments to simulate a range of fire intensities: unaltered-control (UH), and soil heated at 300, 450 and 500 °C. In order to isolate possible nutrient availability or pH heating-induced changes, different culture media were prepared using soil:water extract from each heating treatments and adding different supplements to obtain the total of 11 different culture media: unheated soil without supplements (UH-N-), unheated soil with nutrient supplement (UH-N+), soil heated at 300 °C without supplements (300-N-), soil heated at 300 °C with nutrient supplement (300-N+), soil heated at 300 °C with nutrient supplement and pH-buffered (300-N+pH); soil heated at 450 °C without supplements (450-N-), soil heated at 450 °C with nutrient supplement (450-N+), soil heated at 450 °C with nutrient supplement and pH-buffered (450-N+); soil heated at 500 °C without supplements (500-N-), soil heated at 500 °C with nutrient supplement (500-N+), soil heated at 500 °C with nutrient supplement and pH-buffered (500-N+). Each media was inoculated with different dilutions of a microbial suspension from the original unaltered soil, and the abundance of viable and cultivable microorganisms were measured by plate count method. In addition, the analysis of heating-induced soil organic

  17. Microbial transformations of azaarenes in creosite-contaminated soil and ground water: Laboratory and field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Updegraff, D.M.; Bennett, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Azaarenes or aromatic nitrogen heterocycles are a class of compounds found in wood-preservative wastes containing creosote. The fate and movement of these compounds in contaminated aquifers is not well understood. Water-quality studies in an aquifer contaminated with creosote near Pensacola, Florida, indicated that ground water was contaminated with several azaarenes and their oxygenated and alkylated derivatives, suggesting that these oxygenated compounds may be products of microbial transformation reactions. Accordingly, laboratory studies were designed to investigate the fate of these compounds. Under aerobic conditions, soil pseudomonads isolated from creosote-contaminated soil converted quinoline to 2(1H)quinoline that subsequently was degraded to unknown products. A methanogenic consortium isolated from an anaerobic sewage digestor, in presence of ground-water and creosote-contaminated soil, converted quinoline, isoquinoline, and 4-methylquinoline to their respective oxygenated analogs. In addition, N-, C-, and O-methylated analogs of oxygenated azaarenes were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in aerobic cultures. Under the experimental conditions, 2-methylquinoline was biorefractory. Presence of similar biotransformation products in anaerobic cultures and contaminated ground water from the Pensacola site provided further evidence that these compounds indeed were mivrobial transformation products. Stable isotope labeling studies indicated that the source of the oxygen atom for this hydroxylation reaction under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was water. A mechanism was proposed for this hydroxylation reaction. Whereas parent azaarenes are biodegradable in both anaerobic and aerobic zones, oxygenated and alkylated analogs are more biorefractory and, hence, persistent in anaerobic zones of contaminated aquifers.

  18. Weathering controls on mechanisms of carbon storage in grassland soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masiello, C.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Southon, J.; Torn, M.S.; Harden, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    On a sequence of soils developed under similar vegetation, temperature, and precipitation conditions, but with variations in mineralogical properties, we use organic carbon and 14C inventories to examine mineral protection of soil organic carbon. In these soils, 14C data indicate that the creation of slow-cycling carbon can be modeled as occurring through reaction of organic ligands with Al3+ and Fe3+ cations in the upper horizons, followed by sorption to amorphous inorganic Al compounds at depth. Only one of these processes, the chelation Al3+ and Fe3+ by organic ligands, is linked to large carbon stocks. Organic ligands stabilized by this process traverse the soil column as dissolved organic carbon (both from surface horizons and root exudates). At our moist grassland site, this chelation and transport process is very strongly correlated with the storage and long-term stabilization of soil organic carbon. Our 14C results show that the mechanisms of organic carbon transport and storage at this site follow a classic model previously believed to only be significant in a single soil order (Spodosols), and closely related to the presence of forests. The presence of this process in the grassland Alfisol, Inceptisol, and Mollisol soils of this chronosequence suggests that this process is a more significant control on organic carbon storage than previously thought. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Weathering controls on mechanisms of carbon storage in grassland soils

    SciTech Connect

    Masiello, C.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Southon, J.; Torn, M.S.; Harden, J.W.

    2004-09-01

    On a sequence of soils developed under similar vegetation, temperature, and precipitation conditions, but with variations in mineralogical properties, we use organic carbon and 14C inventories to examine mineral protection of soil organic carbon. In these soils, 14C data indicate that the creation of slow-cycling carbon can be modeled as occurring through reaction of organic ligands with Al3+ and Fe3+ cations in the upper horizons, followed by sorption to amorphous inorganic Al compounds at depth. Only one of these processes, the chelation of Al3+ and Fe3+ by organic ligands, is linked to large carbon stocks. Organic ligands stabilized by this process traverse the soil column as dissolved organic carbon (both from surface horizons and root exudates). At our moist grassland site, this chelation and transport process is very strongly correlated with the storage and long-term stabilization of soil organic carbon. Our 14C results show that the mechanisms of organic carbon transport and storage at this site follow a classic model previously believed to only be significant in a single soil order (Spodosols), and closely related to the presence of forests. The presence of this process in the grassland Alfisol, Inceptisol, and Mollisol soils of this chronosequence suggests that this process is a more significant control on organic carbon storage than previously thought.

  20. Influence of sea salts on drainage water and soil chemistry of two different soil types: soil leaching experiments under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Sariyildiz, Temel

    2004-07-01

    The effects of sea-salt on drainage water and soil chemistry was studied using two different soil types and setting up five soil-leaching experiments under controlled laboratory conditions. The objectives of the soil-leaching experiments were to provide information of the variability of soils and their drainage water chemistry following the input of different sea-salt solutions with different times which was similar to the precipitation input experienced during the storms in fields. Analyses were presented of major ions (Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-) and NH4+) and pH for drainage water. At the end of the experiment, CEC (cation exchange capacity), %BS (percent base saturation), exchangeable capacity of Na, Ca and Mg and pH were also analysed for soil horizon chemistry. The results showed an increase in concentration of most of the major ions in the drainage water, though some adsorption of Na, Ca and Mg had taken place; so the result being a significant decrease in soil water pH. The chemical characteristics of each soil horizons also showed significant changes with the sea-salt applications compared to initial chemical characteristics. However, comparison of data from the four different sea-salt applications under different soil type or land-use didn't indicate the additional role that different land management could play in drainage water or soil chemistry.

  1. Using Field Trips and Field-Based Laboratories to Teach Undergraduate Soil Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Steffan, Joshua; Hopkins, David

    2015-04-01

    Classroom activities can provide important background information allowing students to understand soils. However, soils are formed in nature; therefore, understanding their properties and spatial relationships in the field is a critical component for gaining a comprehensive and holistic understanding of soils. Field trips and field-based laboratories provide students with the field experiences and skills needed to gain this understanding. Field studies can 1) teach students the fundamentals of soil descriptions, 2) expose students to features (e.g., structure, redoximorphic features, clay accumulation, etc.) discussed in the classroom, and 3) allow students to verify for themselves concepts discussed in the more theoretical setting of the classroom. In each case, actually observing these aspects of soils in the field reinforces and improves upon classroom learning and comprehension. In addition, the United States Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service has identified a lack of fundamental field skills as a problem when they hire recent soil science graduates, thereby demonstrating the need for increased field experiences for the modern soil science student. In this presentation we will provide examples of field trips and field-based laboratories that we have designed for our undergraduate soil science classes, discuss the learning objectives, and provide several examples of comments our students have made in response to these field experiences.

  2. The use of electrical anisotropy measurements to monitor soil crack dynamics - laboratory evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahraei, Amirhossein; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Zimmermann, Egon; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Swelling and shrinking of soil cracks is a key factor determining water fluxes in many irrigated soils. Most previous studies have used time-intensive and destructive methods for crack characterization, such as depth and volume determination from simplified geometrical measurements or liquid latex filling. Because of their destructive and time-consuming nature, these methods have only provided instantaneous estimates of the geometry and/or volume of cracks. The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of anisotropy in electrical resistivity measured with a square electrode array to determine crack depth dynamics. In a first step, the performance of the method was analyzed using a laboratory experiment where an artificial soil crack was emulated using a plastic plate in a water bath. Since cracking depth was precisely known, this experiment allowed to develop a method to estimate soil crack depth from measurements of the electrical anisotropy. In a second step, electrical anisotropy was measured during soil crack development within a soil monolith consisting of a mix of sand and bentonite. The cracking depth estimated from electrical measurement compared well with reference ruler measurements. These laboratory measurements inspired confidence in the use of electrical anisotropy for soil crack investigations, and consequently the developed methods will be applied to investigate soil crack dynamics in the field in a next step.

  3. Inorganic nitrogen determined by laboratory and field extractions of two forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Miegroet, H.V.

    1995-03-01

    To assess the effect of a delay in soil processing on inorganic N levels in N-rich soils, field and laboratory extractions were compared at two forested sites with high N mineralization and nitrification potential. At eight sampling dates in 1989 and 1990, five mineral soil cores per site were taken between 0- and 10-cm depth and transported on ice to the laboratory for KCI extraction and NH{sub 4}-N and NO{sub 3}-N analysis. At three sampling dates in 1990, soil extractions were performed in the field immediately following sampling, and inorganic N concentrations were compared between extractions. Nitrate-N increased four- to sevenfold (net release of 2-7 mg NO{sub 3}-N/kg dry soil) due to the transport and relatively short delay (<24 h) in the processing of the soil samples, either coinciding with increased net N mineralization or due to transformation of NH{sub 4}-N into NO{sub 3}-N. This study indicates that if possible, soil samples should be extracted in the field, especially at N-rich sites. The concerns raised by this study may not necessarily apply to N-pour soils characterized by slow N transformation rates. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Investigations on the fate of sulfadiazine in manured soil: laboratory experiments and test plot studies.

    PubMed

    Kreuzig, Robert; Höltge, Sibylla

    2005-04-01

    The fate of 14C-labeled sulfadiazine (SDZ) in manured soil has been investigated in laboratory test systems. In the first approach, stability of 14C-SDZ in liquid bovine manure has been tested. Only 1% of the initially applied radiotracer was mineralized to 14C-carbon dioxide and 82% were transferred to nonextractable residues within a 102-d incubation period. Test slurries with defined aged residues were prepared and, supplementary to standard solutions, applied to silty-clay soil samples. These tests showed the high affinity of 14C-SDZ residues to the soil matrix. In the second approach, basic data on microbial, chemical, and photoinduced degradability in soil were gathered. The data indicated the formation of nonextractable residues as the predominant process in soil, which was accelerated by the test slurry application. In the third approach, laboratory lysimeter tests were conducted to investigate leaching and degradation as simultaneously occurring processes. The 14C-SDZ residues (64%) mainly were retained in the surface layer as nonextractable residues. Although a high mobility in soil was revealed by a soil/water distribution coefficient of 2 L kg(-1), percolate contamination amounted to only 3% of the initially applied 14C-SDZ. The tendencies of leaching and degradability in soil also were observed in test plot studies under field conditions.

  5. Soil and Crop management: Lessons from the laboratory biosphere 2002-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstone, S.; Nelson, M.; Alling, A.; Allen, J.

    During the years 2002 and 2003, three closed system experiments were carried out in the "Laboratory Biosphere" facility located in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The program involved experimentation with "Hoyt" Soy Beans, USU Apogee Wheat and TU-82-155 sweet potato using a 5.37 m2 soil planting bed which was 30 cm deep. The soil texture, 40% clay, 31% sand and 28% silt (a clay loam), was collected from an organic farm in New Mexico to avoid chemical residues. Soil management practices involved minimal tillage, mulching and returning crop residues to the soil after each experiment. Between experiment #2 and #3, the top 15 cm of the soil was amended using a mix of peat moss, green sand, humates and pumice to improve soil texture, lower soil pH and increase nutrient availability. Soil analyses for all three experiments are presented to show how the soils have changed with time and how the changes relate to crop selection and rotation, soil selection and management, water management and pest control. The experience and information gained from these experiments are being applied to the future design of the Mars On Earth facility.

  6. Carbon stabilization mechanisms in soils in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Boris; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    The volcanic ash soils of the Andes contain very large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) per unit area. Consequently, they constitute significant potential sources or sinks of the greenhouse gas CO2. Climate and/or land use change potentially have a strong effect on these large SOM stocks. To clarify the role of chemical and physical stabilisation mechanisms in volcanic ash soils in the montane tropics, we investigated carbon stocks and stabilization mechanisms in the top- and subsoil along an altitudinal transect in the Ecuadorian Andes. The transect encompassed a sequence of paleosols under forest and grassland (páramo), including a site where vegetation cover changed in the last century. We applied selective extraction techniques, performed X-ray diffraction analyses of the clay fraction and estimated pore size distributions at various depths in the top- and subsoil along the transect. In addition, from several soils the molecular composition of SOM was further characterized with depth in the current soil as well as the entire first and the top of the second paleosol using GC/MS analyses of extractable lipids and Pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses of bulk organic matter. Our results show that organic carbon stocks in the mineral soil under forest a páramo vegetation were roughly twice as large as global averages for volcanic ash soils, regardless of whether the first 30cm, 100cm or 200cm were considered. We found the carbon stabilization mechanisms involved to be: i) direct stabilization of SOM in organo-metallic (Al-OM) complexes; ii) indirect protection of SOM through low soil pH and toxic levels of Al; and iii) physical protection of SOM due to a very high microporosity of the soil (Tonneijck et al., 2010; Jansen et al. 2011). When examining the organic carbon at a molecular level, interestingly we found extensive degradation of lignin in the topsoil while extractable lipids were preferentially preserved in the subsoil (Nierop and Jansen, 2009). Both vegetation

  7. The mechanics and energetics of soil bioturbation by earthworms and plant roots - Impacts on soil structure generation and maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Dani; Ruiz, Siul; Schymanski, Stanlislaus

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure is the delicate arrangement of solids and voids that facilitate numerous hydrological and ecological soil functions ranging from water infiltration and retention to gaseous exchange and mechanical anchoring of plant roots. Many anthropogenic activities affect soil structure, e.g. via tillage and compaction, and by promotion or suppression of biological activity and soil carbon pools. Soil biological activity is critical to the generation and maintenance of favorable soil structure, primarily through bioturbation by earthworms and root proliferation. The study aims to quantify the mechanisms, rates, and energetics associated with soil bioturbation, using a new biomechanical model to estimate stresses required to penetrate and expand a cylindrical cavity in a soil under different hydration and mechanical conditions. The stresses and soil displacement involved are placed in their ecological context (typical sizes, population densities, burrowing rates and behavior) enabling estimation of mechanical energy requirements and impacts on soil organic carbon pool (in the case of earthworms). We consider steady state plastic cavity expansion to determine burrowing pressures of earthworms and plant roots, akin to models of cone penetration representing initial burrowing into soil volumes. Results show that with increasing water content the strain energy decreases and suggest trade-offs between cavity expansion pressures and energy investment for different root and earthworm geometries and soil hydration. The study provides a quantitative framework for estimating energy costs of bioturbation in terms of soil organic carbon or the mechanical costs of soil exploration by plant roots as well as mechanical and hydration limits to such activities.

  8. Effect of some amendments on leachate properties of a calcareous saline- sodic soil: A laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanpanah, Najme; Mahmoodabadi, Majid

    2010-05-01

    Soil salinity and sodicity are escalating problems worldwide, especially in Iran since 90 percent of the country is located in arid and semi-arid. Reclamation of sodic soils involves replacement of exchangeable Na by Ca. While some researches have been undertaken in the controllable laboratory conditions using soil column with emphasis on soil properties, the properties of effluent as a measure of soil reclamation remain unstudied. In addition, little attention has been paid to the temporal variability of effluent quality. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of different amendments consist of gypsum, manure, pistachio residue, and their combination for ameliorating a calcareous saline sodic soil. Temporal variability of effluent properties during reclamation period was studied, as well. A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of different amendments using soil columns. The amendment treatments were: control, manure, pistachio residue, gypsum powder (equivalent of gypsum requirement), manure+gypsum and pistachio residue+gypsum, which were applied once in the beginning of the experiment. The study was performed in 120 days period and totally four irrigation treatments were supplied to each column. After irrigations, the effluent samples were collected every day at the bottom of the soil columns and were analyzed. The results show that for all treatments, cations (e.g. Ca, Mg, Na and K) in the outflow decreased with time, exponentially. Manure treatment resulted in highest rate of Ca, Mg, Na leaching from soil solution, in spite of the control which had the lowest rate. In addition, pistachio residue had the most effect on K leaching. Manure treatment showed the most EC and SAR in the leachate, while gypsum application leads to the least rate of them. The findings of this research reveal different rates of cations leaching from soil profile, which is important in environmental issues. Keywords: Saline sodic soil, Reclamation

  9. Biomarkers as Indicators of Respiration During Laboratory Incubations of Alaskan Arctic Tundra Permafrost Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchings, J.; Schuur, E.; Bianchi, T. S.; Bracho, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    High latitude permafrost soils are estimated to store 1,330 - 1,580 Pg C, which account for ca. 40% of global soil C and nearly twice that of atmospheric C. Disproportionate heating of high latitude regions during climate warming potentially results in permafrost thaw and degradation of surficial and previously-frozen soil C. Understanding how newly-thawed soils respond to microbial degradation is essential to predicting C emissions from this region. Laboratory incubations have been a key tool in understanding potential respiration rates from high latitude soils. A recent study found that among the common soil measurements, C:N was the best predictor of C losses. Here, we analyzed Alaskan Arctic tundra soils from before and after a nearly 3-year laboratory incubation. Bulk geochemical values as well as the following biomarkers were measured: lignin, amino acids, n-alkanes, and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGT). We found that initial C:N did not predict C losses and no significant change in C:N between initial and final samples. The lignin acid to aldehyde (Ad:Al) degradation index showed the same results with a lack of C loss prediction and no significant change during the experiment. However, we did find that C:N and Ad:Al had a significant negative correlation suggesting behavior consistent with expectations. The failure to predict C losses was likely influenced by a number of factors, including the possibility that biomarkers were tracking a smaller fraction of slower cycling components of soil C. To better interpret these results, we also used a hydroxyproline-based amino acid degradation index and n-alkanes to estimate the contribution Sphagnum mosses to soil samples - known to have slower turnover times than vascular plants. Finally, we applied a GDGT soil temperature proxy to estimate the growing season soil temperatures before each incubation, as well as investigating the effects of incubation temperature on the index's temperature estimate.

  10. Effects of the veterinary pharmaceutical ivermectin on soil invertebrates in laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Römbke, J; Krogh, K A; Moser, T; Scheffczyk, A; Liebig, M

    2010-02-01

    As part of the risk assessment of veterinary pharmaceuticals, the potential impact of these chemicals on soil ecosystems has to be determined according to European law. However, almost no data from standardized laboratory tests are available. Therefore, in the EU FP6 ERAPharm, the effects of the widely used veterinary pharmaceutical ivermectin, an anthelminthic, were studied in chronic laboratory tests performed according to OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) guidelines. In detail, three soil invertebrate species--the earthworm Eisenia fetida, the springtail Folsomia candida, and the predatory mite Hypoaspis aculeifer--were tested. The nominal concentrations of ivermectin mixed into the test substrate artificial soil was verified using residue analysis, which indicated that the test substance is persistent for at least up to 28 days. As expected when considering the mode of action of this substance, survival and reproduction of collembolans were clearly affected [LC(50) = 8.4 mg/kg soil dry weight (dw); NOEC(repro) = 0.3 mg/kg soil (dw)]. Predatory mites reacted less sensitively [LC(50) > or = 31.6 mg/kg soil (dw); NOEC(repro) = 3.2 mg/kg soil (dw)]. Earthworm survival and reproduction were affected in the same order of magnitude as the predatory mites [LC(50) > or = 10 mg/kg soil (dw); NOEC(repro) = 2.5 mg/kg soil (dw)]. These results are in good agreement with the few data known from nonstandardized tests for the same or related soil invertebrate species. The results of these tests indicate that the effects of ivermectin on soil invertebrates--in particular, collembolans--cannot be excluded at field-relevant concentrations, as determined in a risk assessment according to VICH guidelines. More sophisticated higher-tier tests (e.g., in multispecies or semifield test systems) are recommended in order to assess the potential risk more accurately.

  11. Cooperative Learning in a Soil Mechanics Course at Undergraduate Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinho-Lopes, M.; Macedo, J.; Bonito, F.

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of the Bologna Process enforced a significant change on traditional learning models, which were focused mainly on the transmission of knowledge. The results obtained in a first attempt at implementation of a cooperative learning model in the Soil Mechanics I course of the Department of Civil Engineering of the University of…

  12. Ultrasonic and mechanical soil washing processes for the remediation of heavy-metal-contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seulgi; Lee, Wontae; Son, Younggyu

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonic/mechanical soil washing process was investigated and compared with ultrasonic process and mechanical process using a relatively large lab-scale sonoreactor. It was found that higher removal efficiencies were observed in the combined processes for 0.1 and 0.3 M HCl washing liquids. It was due to the combination effects of macroscale removal for the overall range of slurry by mechanical mixing and microscale removal for the limited zone of slurry by cavitational actions.

  13. Laboratory degradation studies of bentazone, dichlorprop, MCPA, and propiconazole in Norwegian soils.

    PubMed

    Thorstensen, C W; Lode, O

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory degradation studies were performed in Norwegian soils using two commercial formulations (Tilt and Triagran-P) containing either propiconazole alone or a combination of bentazone, dichlorprop, and MCPA. These soils included a fine sandy loam from Hole and a loam from Kroer, both of which are representative of Norwegian agricultural soils. The third soil was a highly decomposed organic material from the Froland forest. A fourth soil from the Skuterud watershed was used only for propiconazole degradation. After 84 d, less than 0.1% of the initial MCPA concentration remained in all three selected soils. For dichlorprop, the same results were found for the fine sandy loam and the organic-rich soil, but in the loam, 26% of the initial concentration remained. After 84 d, less than 0.1% of the initial concentration of bentazone remained in the organic-rich soil, but in the loam and the fine sandy loam 52 and 69% remained, respectively. Propiconazole was shown to be different from the other pesticides by its persistence. Amounts of initial concentration remaining varied from 40, 70, and 82% in the reference soils after 84 d for the organic-rich soil, fine sandy loam, and loam, respectively. The organic-rich soil showed the highest capacity to decompose all four pesticides. The results from the agricultural soils and the Skuterud watershed showed that the persistence of propiconazole was high. Pesticide degradation was approximated to first-order kinetics. Slow rates of degradation, where more than 50% of the pesticide remained in the soil after the 84-d duration of the experiment, did not fit well with first-order kinetics.

  14. Summary of proposed approach for deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1996-11-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory, carried out under an Interagency Agreement (IAG) with the United States Department of Energy (DOE), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). The objective of this paper is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL.

  15. Resistance to antiplatelet drugs: molecular mechanisms and laboratory detection.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, M

    2007-07-01

    The definition 'resistance to antiplatelet drugs' should be limited to situations in which failure of the drug to hit its pharmacological target has been documented by specific laboratory tests. Aspirin resistance, as determined by specific tests (e.g. serum thromboxane B(2)), appears to be rare (1-2%) and, in most instances, is caused by poor compliance. In contrast to aspirin, studies that used specific tests to measure the pharmacological effect of thienopyridines [e.g. vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP)] showed a wide variability of responses to these drugs, with significant proportions of subjects (15-30%) who are very poor responders. Inter-individual differences in the extent of metabolism of thienopyridines to their active metabolites is the most plausible mechanism for the observed inter-individual variability in platelet inhibition. The demonstration that some patients may be 'resistant' or 'poor responders' to the pharmacological effect of antiplatelet drugs, has prompted the need of laboratory monitoring of antiplatelet therapy. However, many published studies have been performed using unspecific tests of platelet function, which identify patients on antiplatelet treatment with high residual platelet reactivity, which is not necessarily because of resistance to antiplatelet drugs. Despite this drawback, identification of patients with high residual platelet reactivity may be useful to predict their risk of atherothrombotic events. However, many studies still need to be carried out to identify the ideal laboratory test and to answer basic questions on its clinical utility and cost-effectiveness, before monitoring antiplatelet therapy can be recommended in the clinical practise. Until then, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy should be considered for investigational purposes only. PMID:17635731

  16. Agricultural Mechanics Laboratory Management Professional Development Needs of Wyoming Secondary Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, Billy R.; Saucier, P. Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Accidents happen; however, the likelihood of accidents occurring in the agricultural mechanics laboratory is greatly reduced when agricultural mechanics laboratory facilities are managed by secondary agriculture teachers who are competent and knowledgeable. This study investigated the agricultural mechanics laboratory management in-service needs…

  17. Modification of sandy soil hydrophysical environment through bagasse additive under laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Halim, A. A.; Kumlung, Arunsiri

    2015-01-01

    Until now sandy soils can be considered as one roup having common hydrophysical problems. Therefore, a laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of bagasse as an amendment to improve hydrophysical properties of sandy soil, through the determination of bulk density, aggregatesize distribution, total porosity, hydraulic conductivity, pore-space structure and water retention. To fulfil this objective, sandy soils were amended with bagasse at the rate of 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4% on the dry weight basis. The study results demonstrated that the addition of bagasse to sandy soils in between 3 to 4% on the dry weight basis led to a significant decrease in bulk density, hydraulic conductivity, and rapid-drainable pores, and increase in the total porosity, water-holding pores, fine capillary pores, water retained at field capacity, wilting point, and soil available water as compared with the control treatment

  18. Predicting hydrocarbon removal from thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction systems. 1. Laboratory studies.

    PubMed

    Poppendieck, D G; Loehr, R C; Webster, M T

    1999-10-01

    Conventional soil vapor extraction (SVE) systems have a limited effectiveness at removing semi-volatile chemicals from soil. Raising chemical vapor pressures by heating soil in-situ can decrease remediation time and help remove semi-volatile chemicals that otherwise would not be removed by conventional SVE. The increased compound removal rate that results from use of thermally enhanced SVE was investigated in laboratory studies. Increased soil temperatures (50-150 degrees C) increased both the rate of removal of the compounds studied and the range of compounds that were removed in column studies. The column studies indicated that if soil temperatures are raised enough to elevate the vapor pressure of a compound above 70 Pa, SVE will remove most of the compound from the soil. Thermally enhanced column study hydrocarbon removal rate constants were shown to have a definable relationship with vapor pressure. The relative removal rate constants also demonstrated an Arrhenius relationship with temperature. Laboratory studies can be used to develop these relationships and the results can be extrapolated within certain temperature ranges and compound types for a given soil.

  19. Continuous measurements of H2 and CO deposition onto soil: a laboratory soil chamber experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Eiler, J.; Smith, N. V.; Thrift-Viveros, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen uptake in soil is the largest single component of the global budget of atmospheric H2, and is the most important parameter for predicting changes in atmospheric concentration with future changing sources (anthropogenic and otherwise). The rate of hydrogen uptake rate by soil is highly uncertain [1]. As a component of the global budget, it is simply estimated as the difference among estimates for other recognized sources and sinks, assuming the atmosphere is presently in steady state. Previous field chamber experiments [2] show that H2 deposition velocity varies complexly with soil moisture level, and possibly with soil organic content and temperature. We present here results of controlled soil chamber experiments on 3 different soil blocks (each ~20 x ~20 x ~21 cm) with a controlled range of moisture contents. All three soils are arid to semi arid, fine grained, and have organic contents of 10-15%. A positive air pressure (slightly higher than atmospheric pressure) and constant temperature and relative humidity was maintained inside the 10.7 liter, leak-tight plexiglass chamber, and a stream of synthetic air with known H2 concentration was continuously bled into the chamber through a needle valve and mass flow meter. H2, CO and CO2 concentrations were continuously analyzed in the stream of gas exiting the chamber, using a TA 3000 automated Hg-HgO reduced gas analyzer and a LI-820 CO2 gas analyzer. Our experimental protocol involved waiting until concentrations of analyte gases in the exiting gas stream reached a steady state, and documenting how that steady state varied with various soil properties and the rate at which gases were delivered to the chamber. The rate constants for H2 and CO consumption in the chamber were measured at several soil moisture contents. The calculated deposition velocities of H2 and CO into the soil are positively correlated with steady-state concentrations, with slopes and curvatures that vary with soil type and moisture level

  20. Formation of Soil Water Repellency by Laboratory Burning and Its Effect on Soil Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sujung; Im, Sangjun

    2010-05-01

    Fire-induced soil water repellency can vary with burning conditions, and may lead to significant changes in soil hydraulic properties. However, isolation of the effects of soil water repellency from other factors is difficult, particularly under field conditions. This study was conducted to (i) investigate the effects of burning using different plant leaf materials and (ii) of different burning conditions on the formation of soil water repellency, and (iii) isolate the effects of the resulting soil water repellency on soil evaporation from other factors. Burning treatments were performed on the surface of homogeneous fully wettable sand soil contained in a steel frame (60 x 60 cm; 40 cm depth). As controls a sample without a heat treatment, and a heated sample without fuel, were also used. Ignition and heat treatments were carried out with a gas torch. For comparing the effects of different burning conditions, fuel types included oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora), pine needle litter (litter on a coniferous forest floor, P. densiflora + P. rigida), and broad-leaf litter (Quercus mongolica + Q. aliena + Prunus serrulata var. spontanea + other species); fuel loads were 200 g, 300 g, and 500 g; and heating duration was 40 s, 90 s and 180 s. The heating duration was adjusted to control the temperature, based on previous experiments. The temperature was measured continuously at 3-second intervals and logged with two thermometers. After burning, undisturbed soil columns were sampled for subsequent experiments. Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) test was performed at every 1 mm depth of the soil columns to measure the severity of soil water repellency and its vertical extent. Soil water repellency was detected following all treatments. As the duration of heating increased, the thickness of the water repellent layer increased, whilst the severity of soil water repellency decreased. As regards fuel amount, the most severe soil water repellency was

  1. Effects of snow accumulation on soil temperature and change of salinity in frozen soil from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Sato, E.; Ishii, M.; Nemoto, M.; Mochizuki, S.

    2008-12-01

    In order to clarify the effect of snow depth on the ground temperature, snowfalls were occurred on soil samples using an artificial snowfall machine in the laboratory and variations of soil temperatures up to 30cm were measured during snowfall. The snow types used here were dendrites (type A) and sphere (type B). The snow depths on the soil surface were 10cm and 30cm for each snow type, so four deferent experimental results were obtained. At each experiment, two samples with deferent initial volumetric water content were prepared, about 10% and 20%. The initial soil temperature was set to 5°C and temperature in the laboratory was kept at -10°C. Soil temperatures were measured at the depths of 0cm, 10cm, 20cm and 30cm during the snowfall, and continuous measurements were conducted for ten hours after the stop of snowfall. From the experiments, it is confirmed that the soil temperature strongly depended on the depths of snow on the surface, density and water content. The soil sample using the type A with the depth of 30cm snow accumulation had the highest temperature at the surface, followed by the type A with 10cm snow, type B with 30cm snow and type B with 10cm snow. It was also pointed that temperature of the high water content samples showed the high temperature decrease compared with the low water one due to the high heat capacity except for the sample using type A with 10cm snow. Numerical calculation will be needed to explain these results. In addition, another experiment will be carried out to clarify the change of salinity during soil freezing with snow accumulation. The method to measure the salinity of soil is to measure the electrical conductivity of soil and volumetric water content at the same depth. The temperature condition in the cooling bath is ranged between -10 and 5°C and changed in 24 hours. Firstly, the temperature profiles will be measured to detect the frozen front, then measurements will start and discuss the results.

  2. Laboratory studies on formation of bound residues and degradation of propiconazole in soils.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Seon; Shim, Jae Han; Suh, Yong Tack

    2003-03-01

    Laboratory studies on the formation of bound residues and on the degradation of the triazole fungicide propiconazole were conducted in two different soils. Soils treated with 14C-propiconazole were incubated at 22 degrees C and extracted exhaustively with a solvent at each sampling date until no further propiconazole was extracted. The solvent-extractable residues were used to measure propiconazole remaining in the soil, and the extracted soils were used to investigate bound residues of propiconazole. Mineralization of propiconazole was investigated by measuring [14C]carbon dioxide evolved from the soil samples. Formation of bound residues of propiconazole was higher in silty clay loam soil than in sandy loam soil, giving approximately 38 and 23% of the applied 14C, respectively. In contrast, the rates of degradation and mineralization of propiconazole were lower in silty clay loam soil than in sandy loam soil. Decreased extractability of the 14C residues with incubation time was observed with increased formation of bound residues. When the propiconazole remaining in the solvent-extractable residues was quantitatively measured by high-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis, the half-life value in sandy loam soil was about 315 days, while the half-life in silty clay loam soil exceeded the duration of the 1 year experimental period. Increased formation of bound residues was observed as propiconazole degraded with incubation time, suggesting that degradation products are involved in the formation of bound residues. Our study suggests that the formation of bound residues of propiconazole contributes to the persistence of this fungicide in soil.

  3. Drivers of soil organic matter vulnerability to climate change. Part I: Laboratory incubations of Swiss forest soils and radiocarbon analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Domínguez, Beatriz; Studer, Mirjam S.; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Haghipour, Negar; McIntyre, Cameron; Wacker, Lukas; Zimmermann, Stephan; Walthert, Lorenz; Hagedorn, Frank; Abiven, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Given the key role of soil organic carbon (SOC) on climate and greenhouse gas regulation, there is an increasing need to incorporate the carbon (C) feedback between SOC and the atmosphere into earth system models. The evaluation of these models points towards uncertainties on the response of CO2-C fluxes, derived from the decomposition of SOC, to the influence of controls/drivers. SOC vulnerability refers to the likelihood of losing previously stabilized soil organic matter, by the effect of environmental factors. The objective of this study is to produce a SOC vulnerability ranking of soils and to provide new insights into the influence of environmental and soil properties controls. Research on SOC vulnerability tends to focus on climatic controls and neglect the effect of other factors, such as soil geochemistry and mineralogy, on C stabilization/de-stabilization processes. In this work, we hypothesized that climate (mean annual temperature and soil moisture status proxy at the research sites in the period 1981-2010), soil (pH and % clay) and terrain (slope gradient and orientation) characteristics are the main controls of the CO2-C fluxes from SOC. Following a statistics-based approach, we selected 54 forest sites across Switzerland, which cover a broad spectrum of values for the hypothesized controls. Then, we selected the study sites so that the controls are orthogonal to each other; thus, their effect was not confounded. At each site, we collected three non-overlapping topsoil (i.e. 20 cm) composites within 40 x 40 m2 plots. In the laboratory, we sieved fresh soils at 2 mm and run a 2-weeks pre-incubation, before beginning a 6-months aerobic soil incubation under controlled conditions of moisture and temperature. Periodically, we collected NaOH (1M) traps containing the CO2-C derived from microbial heterotrophic respiration. We calculated the cumulative CO2-C respired and the one-pool SOC decomposition rates from the 54 forest sites, and linked these data to

  4. Laboratory and Airborne BRDF Analysis of Vegetation Leaves and Soil Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Butler, James J.; King, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory-based Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) analysis of vegetation leaves, soil, and leaf litter samples is presented. The leaf litter and soil samples, numbered 1 and 2, were obtained from a site located in the savanna biome of South Africa (Skukuza: 25.0degS, 31.5degE). A third soil sample, number 3, was obtained from Etosha Pan, Namibia (19.20degS, 15.93degE, alt. 1100 m). In addition, BRDF of local fresh and dry leaves from tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) and acacia tree (Acacia greggii) were studied. It is shown how the BRDF depends on the incident and scatter angles, sample size (i.e. crushed versus whole leaf,) soil samples fraction size, sample status (i.e. fresh versus dry leaves), vegetation species (poplar versus acacia), and vegetation s biochemical composition. As a demonstration of the application of the results of this study, airborne BRDF measurements acquired with NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) over the same general site where the soil and leaf litter samples were obtained are compared to the laboratory results. Good agreement between laboratory and airborne measured BRDF is reported.

  5. Biodegradation of plastics in soil and effects on nitrification activity. A laboratory approach

    PubMed Central

    Bettas Ardisson, Giulia; Tosin, Maurizio; Barbale, Marco; Degli-Innocenti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The progressive application of new biodegradable plastics in agriculture calls for improved testing approaches to assure their environmental safety. Full biodegradation (≥90%) prevents accumulation in soil, which is the first tier of testing. The application of specific ecotoxicity tests is the second tier of testing needed to show safety for the soil ecosystem. Soil microbial nitrification is widely used as a bioindicator for evaluating the impact of chemicals on soil but it is not applied for evaluating the impact of biodegradable plastics. In this work the International Standard test for biodegradation of plastics in soil (ISO 17556, 2012) was applied both to measure biodegradation and to prepare soil samples needed for a subsequent nitrification test based on another International Standard (ISO 14238, 2012). The plastic mulch film tested in this work showed full biodegradability and no inhibition of the nitrification potential of the soil in comparison with the controls. The laboratory approach suggested in this Technology Report enables (i) to follow the course of biodegradation, (ii) a strict control of variables and environmental conditions, (iii) the application of very high concentrations of test material (to maximize the possible effects). This testing approach could be taken into consideration in improved testing schemes aimed at defining the biodegradability of plastics in soil. PMID:25566223

  6. Biodegradation of plastics in soil and effects on nitrification activity. A laboratory approach.

    PubMed

    Bettas Ardisson, Giulia; Tosin, Maurizio; Barbale, Marco; Degli-Innocenti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The progressive application of new biodegradable plastics in agriculture calls for improved testing approaches to assure their environmental safety. Full biodegradation (≥90%) prevents accumulation in soil, which is the first tier of testing. The application of specific ecotoxicity tests is the second tier of testing needed to show safety for the soil ecosystem. Soil microbial nitrification is widely used as a bioindicator for evaluating the impact of chemicals on soil but it is not applied for evaluating the impact of biodegradable plastics. In this work the International Standard test for biodegradation of plastics in soil (ISO 17556, 2012) was applied both to measure biodegradation and to prepare soil samples needed for a subsequent nitrification test based on another International Standard (ISO 14238, 2012). The plastic mulch film tested in this work showed full biodegradability and no inhibition of the nitrification potential of the soil in comparison with the controls. The laboratory approach suggested in this Technology Report enables (i) to follow the course of biodegradation, (ii) a strict control of variables and environmental conditions, (iii) the application of very high concentrations of test material (to maximize the possible effects). This testing approach could be taken into consideration in improved testing schemes aimed at defining the biodegradability of plastics in soil. PMID:25566223

  7. Biodegradation of plastics in soil and effects on nitrification activity. A laboratory approach.

    PubMed

    Bettas Ardisson, Giulia; Tosin, Maurizio; Barbale, Marco; Degli-Innocenti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The progressive application of new biodegradable plastics in agriculture calls for improved testing approaches to assure their environmental safety. Full biodegradation (≥90%) prevents accumulation in soil, which is the first tier of testing. The application of specific ecotoxicity tests is the second tier of testing needed to show safety for the soil ecosystem. Soil microbial nitrification is widely used as a bioindicator for evaluating the impact of chemicals on soil but it is not applied for evaluating the impact of biodegradable plastics. In this work the International Standard test for biodegradation of plastics in soil (ISO 17556, 2012) was applied both to measure biodegradation and to prepare soil samples needed for a subsequent nitrification test based on another International Standard (ISO 14238, 2012). The plastic mulch film tested in this work showed full biodegradability and no inhibition of the nitrification potential of the soil in comparison with the controls. The laboratory approach suggested in this Technology Report enables (i) to follow the course of biodegradation, (ii) a strict control of variables and environmental conditions, (iii) the application of very high concentrations of test material (to maximize the possible effects). This testing approach could be taken into consideration in improved testing schemes aimed at defining the biodegradability of plastics in soil.

  8. Pore-water pressures associated with clogging of soil pipes: Numerical analysis of laboratory experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clogging of soil pipes due to excessive internal erosion has been hypothesized to cause extreme erosion events such as landslides, debris flows, and gullies, but confirmation of this phenomenon has been lacking. Laboratory and field measurements have failed to measure pore water pressures within pip...

  9. Laboratory and field testing for utilization of an excavated soil as landfill liner material.

    PubMed

    Bozbey, Ilknur; Guler, Erol

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using a silty soil excavated in highway construction as landfill liner material. The tests were conducted both at laboratory and in situ scales, and the soil was tested in pure and lime treated forms. Different levels of compaction energy were used. For the field study, a test pad was constructed and in situ hydraulic conductivity experiments were conducted by sealed double ring infiltrometers (SDRI). Laboratory testing revealed that while lime treatment improved the shear strength, it resulted in higher hydraulic conductivity values compared to pure soil. It was observed that leachate permeation did not change the hydraulic conductivity of the pure and lime treated samples. Laboratory hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 10(-9) m/s and met the 1.0E-08 m/s criterion in the Turkish regulations, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value allowed in most developed countries. SDRI testing, which lasted for 6 mo, indicated that lime treatment increased the hydraulic conductivity of pure soil significantly in the field scale tests. In situ hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 1E-08 and 1E-07 m/s, and exceeded the allowable value in the Turkish regulations. Undisturbed samples collected from the test pad were not representative of field hydraulic conductivities. Contrary to laboratory findings, higher compaction efforts did not result in lower hydraulic conductivities in field scales. The study verified the importance of in situ hydraulic conductivity testing in compacted liners. PMID:16376067

  10. Laboratory and field testing for utilization of an excavated soil as landfill liner material.

    PubMed

    Bozbey, Ilknur; Guler, Erol

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using a silty soil excavated in highway construction as landfill liner material. The tests were conducted both at laboratory and in situ scales, and the soil was tested in pure and lime treated forms. Different levels of compaction energy were used. For the field study, a test pad was constructed and in situ hydraulic conductivity experiments were conducted by sealed double ring infiltrometers (SDRI). Laboratory testing revealed that while lime treatment improved the shear strength, it resulted in higher hydraulic conductivity values compared to pure soil. It was observed that leachate permeation did not change the hydraulic conductivity of the pure and lime treated samples. Laboratory hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 10(-9) m/s and met the 1.0E-08 m/s criterion in the Turkish regulations, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value allowed in most developed countries. SDRI testing, which lasted for 6 mo, indicated that lime treatment increased the hydraulic conductivity of pure soil significantly in the field scale tests. In situ hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 1E-08 and 1E-07 m/s, and exceeded the allowable value in the Turkish regulations. Undisturbed samples collected from the test pad were not representative of field hydraulic conductivities. Contrary to laboratory findings, higher compaction efforts did not result in lower hydraulic conductivities in field scales. The study verified the importance of in situ hydraulic conductivity testing in compacted liners.

  11. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: LABORATORY FEASIBILITY TESTING OF PROTOTYPE SOIL WASHING CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This draft document reports on laboratory testing of several washing solutions to decontaminate soils contaminated vith dioxins. The following extractants were evaluated; surfactant mixtures of 0.5% to 3% Adsee 799 and 0.5* to 3% Hyonic NP90 in distilled water, Freon TF with ...

  12. Mechanisms Controlling the Plant Diversity Effect on Soil Microbial Community Composition and Soil Microbial Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado Vázquez, P. G.; Lange, M.; Griffiths, R.; Malik, A.; Ravenek, J.; Strecker, T.; Eisenhauer, N.; Gleixner, G.

    2015-12-01

    Soil microorganisms are the main drivers of soil organic matter cycling. Organic matter input by living plants is the major energy and matter source for soil microorganisms, higher organic matter inputs are found in highly diverse plant communities. It is therefore relevant to understand how plant diversity alters the soil microbial community and soil organic matter. In a general sense, microbial biomass and microbial diversity increase with increasing plant diversity, however the mechanisms driving these interactions are not fully explored. Working with soils from a long-term biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment), we investigated how changes in the soil microbial dynamics related to plant diversity were explained by biotic and abiotic factors. Microbial biomass quantification and differentiation of bacterial and fungal groups was done by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis; terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to determine the bacterial diversity. Gram negative (G-) bacteria predominated in high plant diversity; Gram positive (G+) bacteria were more abundant in low plant diversity and saprotrophic fungi were independent from plant diversity. The separation between G- and G+ bacteria in relation to plant diversity was governed by a difference in carbon-input related factors (e.g. root biomass and soil moisture) between plant diversity levels. Moreover, the bacterial diversity increased with plant diversity and the evenness of the PLFA markers decreased. Our results showed that higher plant diversity favors carbon-input related factors and this in turn favors the development of microbial communities specialized in utilizing new carbon inputs (i.e. G- bacteria), which are contributing to the export of new C from plants to soils.

  13. Mechanisms for 1,3-Dichloropropene Dissipation in Biochar-Amended Soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuxia; Gao, Suduan; Wang, Dong; Spokas, Kurt; Cao, Aocheng; Yan, Dongdong

    2016-03-30

    Biochar, which is organic material heated under a limited supply of oxygen, has the potential to reduce fumigant emissions when incorporated in the soil, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of biochar properties, amendment rate, soil microbe, moisture, temperature, and soil type on the fate of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) isomers in laboratory incubation experiments by assessing the 1,3-D degradation rate and adsorption capacity. 1,3-D dissipation rates were significantly reduced due to strong adsorption by biochar, which was also strongly affected by biochar type. Following a 1% biochar amendment, the half-lives of 1,3-D in soil were increased 2.5-35 times. The half-lives of 1,3-D in soil were strongly affected by soil moisture, temperature, and amendment rate. The effects of sterilization on 1,3-D degradation were much smaller in biochar-amended soils than in nonsterilized soils, which suggests the importance of abiotic pathways with biochar's presence. Dissipation of 1,3-D in biochar was divided into adsorption (49-93%) and chemical degradation pathways. Biochar properties, such as specific surface area (SSA), pH, water content, carbon content, and feedstock, all appeared to affect 1,3-D dissipation with potentially complex interactions. The biochar (air-dry) water content was highly correlated with 1,3-D adsorption capacity and thus can serve as an important predictor for fumigant mitigation use. The fate of the adsorbed fumigant onto biochar requires further examination on potential long-term environmental impacts before guidelines for biochar as a field practice to control fumigant emissions can be formulated. PMID:26954066

  14. Soil examination for a forensic trace evidence laboratory - Part 2: Elemental analysis.

    PubMed

    Woods, Brenda; Paul Kirkbride, K; Lennard, Chris; Robertson, James

    2014-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) are compared in terms of their discrimination power when applied to Australian soil specimens. SEM/EDX and XRF are frequently used in forensic laboratories for the elemental analysis of paint and glass, and for miscellaneous examinations. LIBS is an emerging technique for forensic applications, with a number of researchers promoting its use for the elemental profiling of glass fragments. In this study, 29 soil specimens were analysed, with 12 specimens coming from the Canberra area and the remaining 17 specimens from other sites around Australia. As very good discrimination results were obtained for each of the analytical methods, any of these elemental analysis techniques, available in a trace evidence laboratory, could be used as part of a wider examination protocol to differentiate soil specimens.

  15. Soil mechanical properties at the Apollo 14 site.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Bromwell, L. G.; Carrier, W. D., III; Costes, N. C.; Scott, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 14 lunar landing provided a greater amount of information on the mechanical properties of the lunar soil than previous missions. Measurements on core-tube samples and the results of transporter track analyses indicate that the average density of the soil in the Fra Mauro region is in the range from 1.45 to 1.60 g/cu cm. The soil strength appears to be higher in the vicinity of the site of the Apollo 14 lunar surface experiments package, and trench data suggest that strength increases with depth. Lower-bound estimates of soil cohesion give values of 0.03 to 0.10 kN/sq m, which are lower than values of 0.35 to 0.70 kN/sq m estimated for soils encountered in previous missions. The in situ modulus of elasticity, deduced from the measured seismic-wave velocity, is compatible with that to be expected for a terrestrial silty fine sand in the lunar gravitational field.

  16. Laboratory Investigations into Micromechanical Mechanisms Controlling Earthquake Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Glaser, S. D.; Kiwan, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    Improving our understanding of factors controlling spontaneous shear rupture nucleation on a frictional fault would help better define the important physical processes contributing to earthquake rupture and faulting. Our current laboratory investigations quantify the local stress states on a laboratory fault, which control the transition of sliding from stable (quasi-static) to unstable (dynamic), commonly referred to as earthquake nucleation. A fault is experimentally modeled using two Poly(methyl methacrylate) samples in a direct shear configuration. During nucleation, we observed sudden, elastodynamic stress changes using an array of 16 acoustic emission (AE) sensors. Measurements of absolute displacement from these sensors allowed us to characterize general source mechanics using moment tensor inversion. This technique is widely used in seismology and we observe double-couple (DC) focal mechanisms; a source commonly used to characterize in situ earthquakes. During nucleation, we sometimes observe swarms of smaller, ';foreshock' earthquakes (Mw ~ -7), localized in time and space, prior to the incipient mainshock (Mw ~ -3.25). In general, the local perturbations in the stress field induced by the stress drop (Δσ) from a single foreshock was insufficient to cause the subsequent foreshock at the spatial distances recorded experimentally. This implied that the underlying process driving the foreshock sequence (and eventual mainshock) was aseismic slip over the nucleation zone recorded using non-contact sensors. Spatio-temporal distributions of the foreshocks and the near-fault aseismic motions were shown to be directly related to: i) the rate at which the average bulk stress accumulates across the fault (dτf /dt) and ii) the heterogeneity of normal stress caused by the irregular distribution of asperities, respectively. (A) Locations of the foreshocks (FS1-FS9) determined using p-wave travel times from multiple AE sensors. The locations were superimposed on

  17. Integrating Novel Field, Laboratory and Modelling Techniques to Upscale Estimates of Soil Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, John; Parsons, Anthony; Cooper, James; Long, Edward; Hargrave, Graham; Kitchener, Ben; Hewett, Caspar; Onda, Yuichi; Furukawa, Tomomi; Obana, Eiichiro; Hayashi, Hirofumi; Noguchi, Takehiro

    2013-04-01

    Erosion is a particle-based phenomenon, yet most of current understanding and modelling of this process is based on bulk measurements rather than the movement of individual particles. Difficulties with measuring particle motions in dynamically changing conditions are being overcome with the application of two new technologies - particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and radio frequency identification (RFID). It is thus possible to evaluate the entrainment, transport and deposition of individual particles and these data can be used to parameterize and to test particle-based modelling of the particle-based process. Both PIV and RFID tagging have been used in laboratory experiments to evaluate the detachment process by raindrops on bare surfaces and in shallow flows using rainfall simulation. The results suggest that the processes are more complex than hitherto thought with multiple detachment and transfer mechanisms. Because both mechanisms affect travel distance, they affect the ways in which estimates of soil erosion can be scaled from plot to hillslope and catchment scales. To evaluate movements at larger scales, we have also used RFID-tagged particles in field settings to look at sediment transfers following the Fukushima accident in Japan, 2011. A marker-in-cell model (MAHLERAN-MiC) has been developed to enable the laboratory results to be upscaled and tested in a field setting. Markers (representing sediment particles), containing sediment-property information, are initially distributed on a cellular grid. A cellular model is used to set up the boundary conditions and determine the hydrology and hydraulics on the hillslope. The markers are then moved through the grid according to these properties. This technique combines the advantages of Eulerian and Lagrangian methods while avoiding the shortcomings of each (computational efficiency vs. accuracy). The model simulates all the processes of detachment and transport; raindrop detachment and transport, interrill

  18. Competitive Sorption between Oxalate and Phosphate in Soil: An Environmental Chemistry Laboratory Using Ion Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kang; Pierzynski, Gary

    2003-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to introduce students to an important chemical phenomenon, anion sorption and desorption in the soil. In this lab exercise, competitive sorption between oxalate and phosphate was evaluated on aluminum oxide and a soil from a temperate region. Testings were done at two pH levels using a batch equilibrium technique. Ion chromatography was used for simultaneous measurement of oxalate and phosphate in water samples collected from the experiment. The results from this experiment clearly illustrated that oxalate exudation by the roots of certain plants may help them obtain phosphorus in phosphorus-deficient soils. Students gained hands-on experience in ion chromatography and knowledge about important chemical factors affecting the behavior of anions in the soil environment and their potential effects on plants. This lab exercise would be appropriate for use in undergraduate or master-degree courses in chemistry, environmental chemistry, and instrumental analysis.

  19. [A laboratory and field study on the disposal of domestic waste water based on soil permeation].

    PubMed

    Yamaura, G

    1989-02-01

    The present study was conducted to get information necessary for the disposal of domestic waste water by soil permeation. The clarifying ability of soil was examined by conducting laboratory experiments using soil columns and making inquiries about practical disposal facilities based on soil permeation using trenches. In the column experiment, soil columns were prepared by packing polyvinyl chloride pipes with volcanic-ash loam, river sand, or an equivolume mixture of both, and secondary effluent of domestic waste water was poured into each soil column at a daily rate of 100 l/m2. In this experiment, loam and sand loam, both containing fine silt and clay, gave BOD removals of over 95% when the influent BOD load per 1 m3 of soil was less than 10 g/d and gave the coliform group removals of 100% when the influent coliform group load per 1 m3 soil was less than 10(9)/d. Loam and sand loam gave T-P removals of over 90%. The P adsorption capacity of soil was limited to less than 12% of the absorption coefficient of phosphoric acid. All the soils gave low T-N removals, mostly less than 50%. The trench disposal gave high removals of 90-97% for BOD, 90-97% for T-P, and 94-99% for the coliform group but low removals of 11-49% for T-N, showing a trend similar to that of the column disposal. Thus, we can roughly estimate the effectiveness of actual soil permeation disposal from the results of the column experiments. In the waste water permeation region, the extent of waste water permeation exceeded 700 cm horizontally from the trench, but the waste water load within 100 cm laterally from the trench occupied 60.3% of the total. The concentrations of T-C and T-N at almost all observation spots in the permeation region were lower than in the control region, and were not caused to accumulate in soil by waste water loading. In contrast, T-P was accumulated concentratively in the depth range from 50-100 cm right below the trench. The conditions for effective disposal of domestic

  20. Mechanisms Controlling CO2 Pulses upon Rewetting Dry Soils: Effects of Vegetation on Soil C Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homyak, P. M.; Blankinship, J. C.; Schimel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Since 1958 it has been recognized that rewetting a dry soil produces a large pulse of respiration. However, the mechanisms controlling these pulses continue to be debated, with both physiological and physical mechanisms postulated. Recent studies suggest that a pool of water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) increases as surface soils dry, concomitant with the increase in microbial biomass and the size of the rewetting CO2 pulse, but that these patterns are weakened in soils below the rooting zone. Because physically protected soil C is made available by the rewetting event itself, it is unlikely that the WEOC was generated by physical processes. Thus, we asked: i) Does the microbial decomposition of 'fresh' plant detritus during the dry season generate a pool of bioavailable WEOC, and ii) does its rapid metabolism upon rewetting control the magnitude of CO2 pulses? To answer these questions we manipulated plant inputs by thinning during the growing season, and measured CO2 emissions and WEOC concentrations for two years at a seasonally-dry California grassland. We also estimated a rapidly bioavailable WEOC (BWEOC) pool by measuring headspace CO2 after 3 hours of adding water. Opposite to our predictions, WEOC and BWEOC were most abundant in soils without plants. However, during the second year of treatment, soils with plants had higher BWEOC. Soil CO2 emissions were greater during the dry season with plants than without plants during both years, as well as upon rewetting, especially during the second year of treatment when the BWEOC accumulated during the summer drought. Apparently, WEOC was not generated by the decomposition of 'fresh' plant C, but rather, by C in various stages of decomposition. Because CO2 emissions during the dry season were higher with plants than without plants, interactions between plants and microbes appear to control the production of a BWEOC pool that influences the magnitude of CO2 pulses upon rewetting.

  1. Internal Gravity Waves: Generation and Breaking Mechanisms by Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    la Forgia, Giovanni; Adduce, Claudia; Falcini, Federico

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves (IGWs), occurring within estuaries and the coastal oceans, are manifest as large amplitude undulations of the pycnocline. IGWs propagating horizontally in a two layer stratified fluid are studied. The breaking of an IGW of depression shoaling upon a uniformly sloping boundary is investigated experimentally. Breaking dynamics beneath the shoaling waves causes both mixing and wave-induced near-bottom vortices suspending and redistributing the bed material. Laboratory experiments are conducted in a Perspex tank through the standard lock-release method, following the technique described in Sutherland et al. (2013). Each experiment is analysed and the instantaneous pycnocline position is measured, in order to obtain both geometric and kinematic features of the IGW: amplitude, wavelength and celerity. IGWs main features depend on the geometrical parameters that define the initial experimental setting: the density difference between the layers, the total depth, the layers depth ratio, the aspect ratio, and the displacement between the pycnoclines. Relations between IGWs geometric and kinematic features and the initial setting parameters are analysed. The approach of the IGWs toward a uniform slope is investigated in the present experiments. Depending on wave and slope characteristics, different breaking and mixing processes are observed. Sediments are sprinkled on the slope to visualize boundary layer separation in order to analyze the suspension e redistribution mechanisms due to the wave breaking.

  2. Parallel solid mechanics codes at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, M.

    1994-08-01

    Computational physicists at Sandia National Laboratories have moved their production codes to distributed memory parallel computers. The codes include the multi-material CTH Eulerian code, structural mechanics code. This presentation discusses our experiences moving the codes to parallel computers and experiences running the codes. Moving large production codes onto parallel computers require developing parallel algorithms, parallel data bases and parallel support tools. We rewrote the Eulerian CTH code for parallel computers. We were able to move both ALEGRA and PRONTO to parallel computers with only a modest number of modifications. We restructured the restart and graphics data bases to make them parallel and minimize the I/O to the parallel computer. We developed mesh decomposition tools to divide a rectangular or arbitrary connectivity mesh into sub-meshes. The sub-meshes map to processors and minimize the communication between processors. We developed new visualization tools to process the very large, parallel data bases. This presentation also discusses our experiences running these codes on Sandia`s 1840 compute node Intel Paragon, 1024 processor nCUBE and networked workstations. The parallel version of CTH uses the Paragon and nCUBE for production calculations. The ALEGRA and PRONTO codes are moving off networked workstations onto the Paragon and nCUBE massively parallel computers.

  3. Event triggered data acquisition in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, R.D.

    1993-03-01

    Increasing complexity of experiments coupled with limitations of the previously used computers required improvements in both hardware and software in the Rock Mechanics Laboratories. Increasing numbers of input channels and the need for better graphics could no longer be supplied by DATAVG, an existing software package for data acquisition and display written by D. J. Holcomb in 1983. After researching the market and trying several alternatives, no commercial program was found which met our needs. The previous version of DATAVG had the basic features needed but was tied to obsolete hardware. Memory limitations on the previously used PDP-11 made it impractical to upgrade the software further. With the advances in IBM compatible computers it is now desirable to use them as data recording platforms. With this information in mind, it was decided to write a new version of DATAVG which would take advantage of newer hardware. The new version had to support multiple graphic display windows and increased channel counts. It also had to be easier to use.

  4. A comparison of soil moisture characteristics predicted by the Arya-Paris model with laboratory-measured data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, L. M.; Richter, J. C.; Davidson, S. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Soil moisture characteristics predicted by the Arya-Paris model were compared with the laboratory measured data for 181 New Jersey soil horizons. For a number of soil horizons, the predicted and the measured moisture characteristic curves are almost coincident; for a large number of other horizons, despite some disparity, their shapes are strikingly similar. Uncertainties in the model input and laboratory measurement of the moisture characteristic are indicated, and recommendations for additional experimentation and testing are made.

  5. Characterisation of soil emissions of nitric oxide at field and laboratory scale using high resolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laville, P.; Flura, D.; Gabrielle, B.; Loubet, B.; Fanucci, O.; Rolland, M.-N.; Cellier, P.

    Agricultural soils may account for 10% of anthropogenic emissions of NO, a precursor of tropospheric ozone with potential impacts on air quality and global warming. However, the estimation of this biogenic source strength and its relationships to crop management is still challenging because of the spatial and temporal variability of the NO fluxes. Here, we present a combination of new laboratory- and field-scale methods to characterise NO emissions and single out the effects of environmental drivers. First, NO fluxes were continuously monitored over the growing season of a maize-cropped field located near Paris (France), using 6 automatic chambers. Mineral fertilizer nitrogen was applied from May to October 2005. An additional field experiment was carried out in October to test the effects of N fertilizer form on the NO emissions. The automatic chambers were designed to measure simultaneously the NO and N 2O gases. Laboratory measurements were carried out in parallel using soil cores sampled at same site to test the response of NO fluxes to varying soil N-NH 4 and water contents, and temperatures. The effects of soil core thickness were also analysed. The highest NO fluxes occurred during the first 5 weeks following fertilizer application. The cumulative loss of NO-N over the growing season was estimated at 1.5 kg N ha -1, i.e. 1.1% of the N fertilizer dose (140 kg N ha -1). All rainfall events induced NO peak fluxes, whose magnitude decreased over time in relation to the decline of soil inorganic N. In October, NO emissions were enhanced with ammonium forms of fertilizer N. Conversely, the application of nitrate-based fertilizers did not significantly increase NO emissions compared to an unfertilized control. The results of the subsequent laboratory experiments were in accordance with the field observations in magnitude and time variations. NO emissions were maximum with a water soil content of 15% (w w -1), and with a NH 4-N content of 180 mg NH 4-N kg soil -1

  6. Variable rainfall intensity during soil erosion experiments at the laboratory rainfall simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laburda, Tomas; Schwarzova, Pavla; Krasa, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Experimental research of soil erosion at the laboratory rainfall simulator at the CTU in Prague continued with 11th soil set Trebesice III in 2014/2015. Standard simulations with constant rainfall intensity were complemented by additional simulations with variable rainfall intensity with two different patterns. The main objective was to determine the feasibility of these experiments and the effect on erosion characteristics compared to those with constant rainfall intensity. This measurement consist of 60 minute simulations (change in intensity in 20. and 40. minute of simulation) with increasing rainfall intensity with pattern of 20-40-60 mm/hr ("inc") and decreasing intensity with pattern of 60-40-20 mm/hr ("dec") which have been compared with experiments with constant rainfall intensity of 40 mm/hr ("c40"). All experiments thus reaching the same total precipitation during entire simulation. This comparison was done on soil sample with dimensions of 4x0,9x0,15 meters and slope adjusted at 4° and 8°. Final evaluation consists of comparison of development and cumulative values of surface runoff and soil loss. In case of steady soil conditions (in this case, the experiments on the slope 4°) results show there is no significant difference in surface runoff in term of cumulative values and development (in the middle period of simulations with rainfall intensity of 40 mm/hr, i.e. 20-40. minute of every experiment) between "c40", "inc" and "dec". On the other hand, results of soil loss from the same experiments differ according to rainfall intensity pattern in both development and cumulative values. While "inc" experiment has slightly lower (up to 10 %) soil loss than "c40", development of soil loss (in the middle period of simulations with 40 mm/hr) of "dec" experiment is almost two times lower compare to "c40". Experiments with longitudinal soil surface of 8° differ in soil moisture that affects results more than variable rainfall intensity pattern. Experimental

  7. The Boulby Geoscience Project Underground Research Laboratory: Initial Results of a Rock Mechanics Laboratory Testing Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, M. J.; Petley, D. N.; Rosser, N.; Lim, M.; Sapsford, M.; Barlow, J.; Norman, E.; Williams, A.; Pybus, D.

    2009-12-01

    The Boulby Mine, which is situated on the northeast coast of England, is a major source of potash, primarily for use as a fertiliser, with a secondary product of rock salt (halite), used in highway deicing. The deposits are part of the Zechstein formation and are found at depths of between c.1100 and 1135 m below sea level. The evaporite sequence also contains a range of further lithologies, including anhydrite, dolomite and a mixed evaporate deposit. From a scientific perspective the dry, uncontaminated nature of the deposits, the range of lithologies present and the high stress conditions at the mine provide a unique opportunity to observe rock deformation in situ in varying geological and stress environments. To this end the Boulby Geoscience Project was established to examine the feasibility of developing an underground research laboratory at the mine. Information regarding the mechanical properties of the strata at the Boulby Mine is required to develop our understanding of the strength and deformation behaviour of the rock over differing timescales in response to variations in the magnitude and duration of applied stresses. As such data are currently limited, we have developed a laboratory testing programme that examines the behaviour of the deposits during the application of differential compressive stresses. We present the initial results of this testing programme here. Experiments have been carried out using a high pressure Virtual Infinite Strain (VIS) triaxial apparatus (250 kN maximum axial load; 64 MPa maximum cell pressure) manufactured by GDS Instruments. Conventional compression tests under uniaxial and triaxial conditions have been undertaken to determine the effects of axial stress application rate, axial strain rate and confining pressure on behaviour and failure mechanisms. The experimental programme also includes advanced testing into time-dependent creep behaviour under constant deviatoric stress; the effects of variations in temperature and

  8. Mechanical and Acoustic Signature of Slow Earthquakes on Laboratory Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Marco Maria; Marone, Chris; Tinti, Elisa; Scognamiglio, Laura; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Collettini, Cristiano

    2015-04-01

    Recent seismic and geodetic observations show that fault slip occurs via a spectrum of behaviors that range from seismic (fast dynamic) to aseismic (creep). Indeed faults can slip via a variety of quasi-dynamic processes such as Slow-Slip, Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFE), and Tremor. These transient modes of slip represent slow, but self-propagating acceleration of slip along fault zones. These phenomena have been observed worldwide in a variety of active tectonic environments, however the physics of quasi-dynamic rupture and the underlying fault zone processes are still poorly understood. Rate- and State- frictional constitutive equations predict that fast dynamic slip will occur when the stiffness of the loading system (k) is less than a critical stiffness (kc) characterizing the fault gouge. In order to investigate quasi-dynamic transients, we performed laboratory experiments on simulated fault gouge (silica powders) in the double direct shear configuration with a compliant central block allowing boundary conditions where k≈kc. In addition, PZTs were used to measure acoustical properties of the gouge layers during shear. We document an evolution of the fault mechanical properties as the σn is increased. For σn < 10 MPa we observe a steady state frictional type of shear. When σn ≥ 15 MPa we observe emergent slow-slip events from steady state shear with accumulated shear displacement of about 10 mm. The typical values of stress drop (Δτ) vary between 0.2 and 0.8 MPa, and have typical duration from 0.5 up to 3 seconds giving the characteristics of slow stick-slip. As σn is varied we observe different characteristics of slow slip. For σn = 15MPa a repetitive double period oscillation is observed with slow slip growing until a maximum stress drop and then self attenuating. When σn is increased to 20 and 25 MPa slow slip are characterized by larger Δτ with constant τmax and τmin, however still showing a co-seismic duration of ~2 seconds. Our results

  9. Development of an integrated soils laboratory for modeling and detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folks, William R.; North, Ryan E.; Wakeley, Lillian D.; Jackson, Samuel S.; Kelley, Julie R.; Castellane, Ray M.; McKenna, Jason R.

    2010-04-01

    The Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory at the US Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) has developed a near-surface properties laboratory to provide complete characterization of soil. Data from this laboratory is being incorporated into a comprehensive database, to enhance military force projection and protection by providing physical properties for modelers and designers of imaging and detection systems. The database will allow cross-referencing of mineralogical, electromagnetic, thermal, and optical properties to predict surface and subsurface conditions. We present an example data set from recent collection efforts including FTIR in the Near-IR, MWIR, and LWIR bands, magnetic susceptibility (500 Hz to 8 GHz), and soil conductivity and complex permittivity (10 μHz to 8 GHz) measurements. X-ray data is presented along with a discussion of site geology, sample collection and preparation methods, and mineralogy. This type of data-collection effort provides useful constraint information of soil properties for use in modeling and target detection. By establishing real ranges for critical soil properties, we are able to improve algorithms to define anomalies that can indicate the presence of land mines, unexploded ordnance (UXOs), improvised explosive devices (IEDs), tunnels, and other visually obscured threats.

  10. Summary report: Assessment of deep injection well associated surface soils at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pole, S.B.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes sampling activities and analytical results of the chemical and radiological content of surface soils from storm water retention basins and drainage ditches associated with eight deep injection wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The results of the sampling effort were intended to support permitting of the injection wells by the State of Idaho Department of Water Resources. In August 1992, the surface soils associated with eight storm water retention basins and ditches were sampled. All samples were collected and analyzed in accordance with a written sampling and analysis plan. The samples were analyzed by an off-Site contract laboratory, and the results were compared to local and regional soil analytical data to determine the presence of contaminants. The results indicated that the surface soils from the storm water retention basins and ditches did not have concentrations of metals or radionuclides greater than the range of concentrations found in local and regional soils. Volatile organic compounds were below detection limits.

  11. Nucleophilic substitution as a mechanism of atrazine sequestration in soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junhe; Shao, Juan; Kong, Deyang

    2015-03-01

    Formation of nonextractable residue was widely observed as a sink of atrazine (ATZ) in soil. However, the mechanisms by which ATZ binds to soil organic matter remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that neucleophilic substitution could serve an important pathway causing ATZ sequestration. The carbon bonded to the chlorine in ATZ molecule is partially positively charged due to the strong electronegativity of chlorine and is susceptible to the attack of nucleophiles such as aniline. Since aromatic amines are relatively rare in natural soils, amino acids/peptides were hypothesized to act as the main nucleophiles in real environment. However, substantially ATZ transformation was only observed in the presence of those species containing thiol functionality. Thus, we speculated that it was the thiol group in amino acids/peptides acting as the nucleophile. Nitrogen in amino acids was in fact not an active nucleophile toward ATZ. In addition to the sulfur-containing amino acids, other thiol compounds, and sulfide were also proved to be reactive to ATZ. Thus, the sequestration potential of ATZ probably correlates to the availability of thiol compounds in soil.

  12. Modeling Soil Organic Carbon at Regional Scale by Combining Multi-Spectral Images with Laboratory Spectra.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi; Xiong, Xiong; Adhikari, Kabindra; Knadel, Maria; Grunwald, Sabine; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    2015-01-01

    There is a great challenge in combining soil proximal spectra and remote sensing spectra to improve the accuracy of soil organic carbon (SOC) models. This is primarily because mixing of spectral data from different sources and technologies to improve soil models is still in its infancy. The first objective of this study was to integrate information of SOC derived from visible near-infrared reflectance (Vis-NIR) spectra in the laboratory with remote sensing (RS) images to improve predictions of topsoil SOC in the Skjern river catchment, Denmark. The second objective was to improve SOC prediction results by separately modeling uplands and wetlands. A total of 328 topsoil samples were collected and analyzed for SOC. Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT5), Landsat Data Continuity Mission (Landsat 8) images, laboratory Vis-NIR and other ancillary environmental data including terrain parameters and soil maps were compiled to predict topsoil SOC using Cubist regression and Bayesian kriging. The results showed that the model developed from RS data, ancillary environmental data and laboratory spectral data yielded a lower root mean square error (RMSE) (2.8%) and higher R2 (0.59) than the model developed from only RS data and ancillary environmental data (RMSE: 3.6%, R2: 0.46). Plant-available water (PAW) was the most important predictor for all the models because of its close relationship with soil organic matter content. Moreover, vegetation indices, such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), were very important predictors in SOC spatial models. Furthermore, the 'upland model' was able to more accurately predict SOC compared with the 'upland & wetland model'. However, the separately calibrated 'upland and wetland model' did not improve the prediction accuracy for wetland sites, since it was not possible to adequately discriminate the vegetation in the RS summer images. We conclude that laboratory Vis

  13. Modeling Soil Organic Carbon at Regional Scale by Combining Multi-Spectral Images with Laboratory Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi; Xiong, Xiong; Adhikari, Kabindra; Knadel, Maria; Grunwald, Sabine; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    2015-01-01

    There is a great challenge in combining soil proximal spectra and remote sensing spectra to improve the accuracy of soil organic carbon (SOC) models. This is primarily because mixing of spectral data from different sources and technologies to improve soil models is still in its infancy. The first objective of this study was to integrate information of SOC derived from visible near-infrared reflectance (Vis-NIR) spectra in the laboratory with remote sensing (RS) images to improve predictions of topsoil SOC in the Skjern river catchment, Denmark. The second objective was to improve SOC prediction results by separately modeling uplands and wetlands. A total of 328 topsoil samples were collected and analyzed for SOC. Satellite Pour l’Observation de la Terre (SPOT5), Landsat Data Continuity Mission (Landsat 8) images, laboratory Vis-NIR and other ancillary environmental data including terrain parameters and soil maps were compiled to predict topsoil SOC using Cubist regression and Bayesian kriging. The results showed that the model developed from RS data, ancillary environmental data and laboratory spectral data yielded a lower root mean square error (RMSE) (2.8%) and higher R2 (0.59) than the model developed from only RS data and ancillary environmental data (RMSE: 3.6%, R2: 0.46). Plant-available water (PAW) was the most important predictor for all the models because of its close relationship with soil organic matter content. Moreover, vegetation indices, such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), were very important predictors in SOC spatial models. Furthermore, the ‘upland model’ was able to more accurately predict SOC compared with the ‘upland & wetland model’. However, the separately calibrated ‘upland and wetland model’ did not improve the prediction accuracy for wetland sites, since it was not possible to adequately discriminate the vegetation in the RS summer images. We conclude that laboratory

  14. Nitrogen mineralization rates of the acidic, xeric soils of the New Jersey Pinelands: laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Poovarodom, S.; Tate, R.L. III

    1988-05-01

    In a series of laboratory incubation studies, the authors evaluated the effects of temperature, moisture, and nitrogen amendment on nitrogen mineralization rates in the acidic Lakehurst and Atsion sands of the New Jersey Pinelands. The average potentially mineralizable nitrogen (N/sub 0/) values for the Lakehurst and Atsion sands were 87 and 94 ..mu..g/g, respectively. Mineralization constants (k) were 0.0501 and 0.0756/wk at 25 and 35/degrees/C, respectively, for the Lakehurst sand and were 0.0327 and 0.0452/wk for the Atsion sand. Maximum mineralization occurred at 35/degrees/C for both soils with Q/sub 10/ values ranging from 1.8 to 2.1. Optimal soil moisture tensions for nitrogen mineralization were between /minus/0.01 and /minus/0.03 MPa. A soil moisture tension of /minus/0.01 MPa reduced nitrogen mineralization with the Lakehurst sand, but not with the Atsion sand. Amendment of the soil with ammonium sulfate increased mineralization with the Atsion sand, but had no effect on the Lakehurst soil. Conversely, ammonium chloride amendment increased the nitrogen mineralization rates in the Lakehurst, but not the Atsion sand. Urea amendment inhibited nitrogen mineralization with both soils. No nitrate accumulation was observed in any of the nitrogen-amended samples.

  15. Dissipation kinetics of tetraconazole in three types of soil and water under laboratory condition.

    PubMed

    Alam, Samsul; Sengupta, Dwaipayan; Kole, Ramen Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Anjan

    2013-12-01

    Laboratory experiment was conducted to understand the persistence behavior of tetraconazole in three soils of West Bengal (alluvial, red lateritic, and coastal saline) and also in water maintained at three different pH (4.0, 7.0, and 9.2) conditions. Processed soil samples (100 g) were spiked at two treatment doses: 2.5 μg/g (T₁) and 5.0 μg/g (T₂). Double distilled buffered water (200 ml) was spiked at two treatment doses: 1.0 μg/ml (T₁) and 2.00 μg/ml (T₂). The tetraconazole dissipation followed first-order reaction kinetics and the residual half-life (T₁/₂) values in soil were found to be in the range of 66.9-77.2 days for T₁ and 73.4-86.0 days for T₂. The persistence increased in the order red lateritic > new alluvial > coastal saline. Interestingly, the red lateritic soil exhibited the lowest pH (5.56) and organic carbon (0.52%) content as compared to other two soils. However, the dissipation of tetraconazole in case of water was not pH dependant. The T₁/₂ values in water were in the range of 94 to 125 days. The study indicated the persistent nature of tetraconazole in soil and water.

  16. Soil stabilization using oil shale solid wastes: Laboratory evaluation of engineering properties

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Oil shale solid wastes were evaluated for possible use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study was conducted and consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern shale can be used for soil stabilization if limestone is added during combustion. Without limestone, eastern oil shale waste exhibits little or no cementation. The testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented. 11 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Characterization of stony soils' hydraulic conductivity using laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Eléonore; Pichault, Mathieu; Pansak, Wanwisa; Degré, Aurore; Garré, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Determining soil hydraulic properties is of major concern in various fields of study. Although stony soils are widespread across the globe, most studies deal with gravel-free soils, so that the literature describing the impact of stones on the hydraulic conductivity of a soil is still rather scarce. Most frequently, models characterizing the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils assume that the only effect of rock fragments is to reduce the volume available for water flow, and therefore they predict a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with an increasing stoniness. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of rock fragments on the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This was done by means of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations involving different amounts and types of coarse fragments. We compared our results with values predicted by the aforementioned predictive models. Our study suggests that it might be ill-founded to consider that stones only reduce the volume available for water flow. We pointed out several factors of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils that are not considered by these models. On the one hand, the shape and the size of inclusions may substantially affect the hydraulic conductivity. On the other hand, laboratory experiments show that an increasing stone content can counteract and even overcome the effect of a reduced volume in some cases: we observed an increase in saturated hydraulic conductivity with volume of inclusions. These differences are mainly important near to saturation. However, comparison of results from predictive models and our experiments in unsaturated conditions shows that models and data agree on a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with stone content, even though the experimental conditions did not allow testing for stone contents higher than 20 %.

  18. Effect of fines on mechanical properties of soil-tire chip mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tatlisoz, N.; Benson, C.H.; Edil, T.B.

    1997-12-31

    Large quantities of waste tires can be beneficially used by incorporating them into structural fill employed in earthwork projects such as highway embankments and backfills for retaining structures. These applications require knowledge of the bulk mechanical properties of tire chips and soil-tire chip mixtures. The objective of the study described in this paper was to evaluate the mechanical properties and behavior of waste tire chips and their mixtures with fine- and coarse-grained soils. Large-scale laboratory testing equipment was used to conduct the study. Tests were conducted to evaluate shear strength, deformability, and compressibility. Mixtures made with typical backfill soils such as clean sand, sandy silt, and clay were tested. Results of the tests show that tire chips and soil-tire chip mixtures behave like soils, but are more compressible and also require more deformation to mobilize their ultimate shear strength. Incorporation of tire chips in the backfill results in a reduction in unit weight and, for mixtures containing sand or sandy silt, an increase in shear strength. In contrast, clay-tire chip mixtures have the same or lower shear strength as clay alone. Strength envelopes for sand-tire chip mixtures can be non-linear, and have virtually no cohesion intercept. Mixtures containing sandy silt behave similar to mixtures made with sand, except the shear strength envelope for the sandy silt-tire chip mixture is linear and has a cohesion intercept. Sand-tire chip and sandy silt-tire chip mixtures exhibit similar long-term compression behavior.

  19. Comparison of in situ and laboratory gamma spectroscopy of natural radionuclides in desert soil.

    PubMed

    Benke, R R; Kearfott, K J

    1997-08-01

    In situ and laboratory gamma spectroscopy were used to characterize natural background levels of radiation in the soil at eight sites around the Yucca Mountain Range. The purpose of this practical field analysis was to determine if published empirical in situ calibration factors would yield accurate quantitative specific activities (Bq kg(-1)) in a desert environment. Corrections were made to the in situ calibration factors to account for the on-axis response of a detector with a thin beryllium end window. The in situ gamma spectroscopy results were compared to laboratory gamma spectroscopy of soil samples gathered from each site. Five natural radionuclides were considered: 40K, 214Pb, 214Bi, 208Tl, and 228Ac. The in situ determined specific activities were consistently within +/-15% of the laboratory soil sample results. A quantitative discussion of the factors contributing to the uncertainty in the in situ and laboratory results is included. Analysis on the specific activity data using statistical hypothesis tests determined that three nuclides, 214Pb, 214Bi, and 228Ac showed a weak site dependence while the other two nuclides, 40K and 208Tl, did not exhibit a site dependence. Differing radiation background levels from site to site along with in situ and laboratory uncertainties in excess of 10% are two factors that account for the weak site dependence. Despite the good correlation between data, it was recommended that the in situ detector be calibrated by a detector-specific Monte Carlo code which would accurately model more complex geometries and source distributions. PMID:9228170

  20. Laboratory analysis of soil hydraulic properties of G-5 soil samples

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The Hydrologic Testing Laboratory at DBS&A has completed laboratory tests on TA-54 samples from well G5 as specified by Daniel James and summarized in Table 1. Tables 2 through 8 give the results of the specified analyses. Raw laboratory data and graphical plots of data (where appropriate) are contained in Appendices A through G. Appendix H lists the methods used in these analyses. A detailed description of each method is available upon request. Several sample-specific observations are important for data interpretation. Sample G-5 @ 21.5 was a short core and showed indications of preferential flow. Sample G-5 @ 92.5 developed a visually apparent crack during drying which correlates with the higher air permeabilities observed at lower water contents. Several samples yielded negative estimates of extrapolated intrinsic permeability while measured apparent permeabilities were reasonable. For consistency, however, only intrinsic values are presented. While our defined task is to provide data for interpretation, the following comments are offered as a context for some of the common parameter extraction issues. Further details and a more comprehensive summary of TA-54 data can be found in Unsaturated hydraulic characteristics of the Bandelier tuff at TA-54 dated November 17, 1994.

  1. Inter-laboratory variation in the chemical analysis of acidic forest soil reference samples from eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Donald S.; Bailiey, Scott W; Briggs, Russell D; Curry, Johanna; Fernandez, Ivan J.; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Goodale, Christine L.; Hazlett, Paul W.; Heine, Paul R; Johnson, Chris E.; Larson, John T; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Kolka, Randy K; Ouimet, Rock; Pare, D; Richter, Daniel D.; Shirmer, Charles D; Warby, Richard A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term forest soil monitoring and research often requires a comparison of laboratory data generated at different times and in different laboratories. Quantifying the uncertainty associated with these analyses is necessary to assess temporal changes in soil properties. Forest soil chemical properties, and methods to measure these properties, often differ from agronomic and horticultural soils. Soil proficiency programs do not generally include forest soil samples that are highly acidic, high in extractable Al, low in extractable Ca and often high in carbon. To determine the uncertainty associated with specific analytical methods for forest soils, we collected and distributed samples from two soil horizons (Oa and Bs) to 15 laboratories in the eastern United States and Canada. Soil properties measured included total organic carbon and nitrogen, pH and exchangeable cations. Overall, results were consistent despite some differences in methodology. We calculated the median absolute deviation (MAD) for each measurement and considered the acceptable range to be the median 6 2.5 3 MAD. Variability among laboratories was usually as low as the typical variability within a laboratory. A few areas of concern include a lack of consistency in the measurement and expression of results on a dry weight basis, relatively high variability in the C/N ratio in the Bs horizon, challenges associated with determining exchangeable cations at concentrations near the lower reporting range of some laboratories and the operationally defined nature of aluminum extractability. Recommendations include a continuation of reference forest soil exchange programs to quantify the uncertainty associated with these analyses in conjunction with ongoing efforts to review and standardize laboratory methods.

  2. Comparison of linuron degradation in the presence of pesticide mixtures in soil under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Swarcewicz, Maria; Gregorczyk, Andrzej; Sobczak, Justyna

    2013-10-01

    It is widely recognised that complex interactions occur between chemicals in mixtures. In many agricultural situations, the use of tank mixes and complex spray programs is a common practice. Insecticides, fungicides and a herbicide being applied in potato protection were used in this research. Interactions between linuron and insecticides, such as thiamethoxam or clothianidin, and fungicides, such as mancozeb or chlorothalonil, were examined in soil. The degradation rate of linuron in soil during laboratory incubation in six treatments was studied. Mixtures of linuron with mancozeb in sandy loam and clay loam soils had a significant effect on the persistence of this herbicide. For example, for the same herbicide, t 1/2 values for linuron were from 37 days in sandy loam to 44 days in clay loam. These values changed (64-67 days) when thiamethoxam and mancozeb were in soil. When mancozeb was added only, the half-life values were from 59 to 62 days, respectively. Other mixtures with chlorothalonil, thiamethoxam and clothianidin did not have any effect. In order to compare linuron degradation rates in soils, a single first-order model and expanded statistical analysis were used. PMID:23525775

  3. Evaluation of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) behaviour in agricultural soil through laboratory continuous studies.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Rodríguez, B; Zafra-Gómez, A; Reis, M S; Duarte, B P M; Verge, C; de Ferrer, J A; Pérez-Pascual, M; Vílchez, J L

    2015-07-01

    The behaviour of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) in agricultural soil is investigated in the laboratory using continuous-flow soil column studies in order to simultaneously analyze the three main underlying phenomena (adsorption/desorption, degradation and transport). The continuous-flow soil column experiments generated the breakthrough curves for each LAS homologue, C10, C11, C12 and C13, and by adding them up, for total LAS, from which the relevant retention, degradation and transport parameters could be estimated, after proposing adequate models. Several transport equations were considered, including the degradation of the sorbate in solution and its retention by soil, under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions between the sorbent and the sorbate. In general, the results obtained for the estimates of those parameters that were common to the various models studied (such as the isotherm slope, first order degradation rate coefficient and the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient) were rather consistent, meaning that mass transfer limitations are not playing a major role in the experiments. These three parameters increase with the length of the LAS homologue chain. The study will provide the underlying conceptual framework and fundamental parameters to understand, simulate and predict the environmental behaviour of LAS compounds in agricultural soils. PMID:25765258

  4. Evaluation of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) behaviour in agricultural soil through laboratory continuous studies.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Rodríguez, B; Zafra-Gómez, A; Reis, M S; Duarte, B P M; Verge, C; de Ferrer, J A; Pérez-Pascual, M; Vílchez, J L

    2015-07-01

    The behaviour of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) in agricultural soil is investigated in the laboratory using continuous-flow soil column studies in order to simultaneously analyze the three main underlying phenomena (adsorption/desorption, degradation and transport). The continuous-flow soil column experiments generated the breakthrough curves for each LAS homologue, C10, C11, C12 and C13, and by adding them up, for total LAS, from which the relevant retention, degradation and transport parameters could be estimated, after proposing adequate models. Several transport equations were considered, including the degradation of the sorbate in solution and its retention by soil, under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions between the sorbent and the sorbate. In general, the results obtained for the estimates of those parameters that were common to the various models studied (such as the isotherm slope, first order degradation rate coefficient and the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient) were rather consistent, meaning that mass transfer limitations are not playing a major role in the experiments. These three parameters increase with the length of the LAS homologue chain. The study will provide the underlying conceptual framework and fundamental parameters to understand, simulate and predict the environmental behaviour of LAS compounds in agricultural soils.

  5. Passive soil venting at the Chemical Waste Landfill Site at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, J.M.; Reavis, B.; Cheng, W.C.

    1995-05-01

    Passive Soil Vapor Extraction was tested at the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) site at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNLIW). Data collected included ambient pressures, differential pressures between soil gas and ambient air, gas flow rates into and out of the soil and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vented soil gas. From the differential pressure and flow rate data, estimates of permeability were arrived at and compared with estimates from other studies. Flow, differential pressure, and ambient pressure data were collected for nearly 30 days. VOC data were collected for two six-hour periods during this time. Total VOC emissions were calculated and found to be under the limit set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Although a complete process evaluation is not possible with the data gathered, some of the necessary information for designing a passive venting process was determined and the important parameters for designing the process were indicated. More study is required to evaluate long-term VOC removal using passive venting and to establish total remediation costs when passive venting is used as a polishing process following active soil vapor extraction.

  6. Colloid facilitated transport of humic substances in soil: laboratory experiment and modeling calculation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Marina; Moiseenko, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    An understanding of ability to predict the fate and transport of colloids in soil systems are of great importance in many environmental and industrial applications. Especially, in the case study sizes and zeta potentials of lignin and humus components (as a parameter reflecting the mobility and tread of organic substances). The objects of investigation were water extracts of gleepodzolic soil of European territory of Russia and Western Siberia, as well as humus substances extracted from this soil. In this study, evaluation of size, molecular weight distribution and zeta potential were used to predict the mobility of the organic component fractions of the soil. Fractionation was performed using multistage filtration plant (100 Da) and measuring physic-chemical parameters measured with the Malvern Zetasizer Nano ZSP. Significant differences in the distribution of organic matter on the molecular weight, charge (sign) of the zeta potential and the size of the sample of European Russia in comparison with samples of Western Siberia have been found. Also, laboratory studies have demonstrated of any differences in physicochemical parameters as infrared spectra, ultraviolet spectra, complexing ability of samples of the same soil type but different areas of Russia. The results can be used in the prediction of the migration ability of fractions humus substances and their stability at change physic-chemical conditions (the coefficient of mobility of the organic components by calculated in MathCad). This work was supported by the grant № 14-17-00460 RSF from 07.11.2014

  7. Transport of contaminants from energy-process-waste leachates through subsurface soils and soil components: laboratory experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wangen, L.E.; Stallings, E.A.; Walker, R.D.

    1982-08-01

    The subsurface transport and attenuation of inorganic contaminants common to a variety of energy process waste leachates are being studied using laboratory column methods. Anionic species currently being emphasized are As, B, Mo, and Se. Transport of the cations Cd and Ni is also being studied. The solid adsorbents consist of three soil mineral components (silica sand, kaolinite, and goethite), and four subsurface soils (a dunal sand, an oxidic sandy clay loam, an acidic clay loam, and an alkaline clay loam). Breakthrough patterns of these species from packed soil columns are followed by monitoring eluent concentrations vs time under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. This report describes the experimental methods being used, the results of preliminary batch adsorption studies, and the results of column experiments completed through calendar year 1981. Using column influent concentrations of about 10 mg/l, adsorption (mmoles/100 g) has been determined from the eluent volume corresponding to 50% breakthrough. On silica sand, kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, these are 2.0 x 10/sup -4/, 0.020, 0.013, and 0.31 for cadmium, 4.4 x 10/sup -4/, 0.039, 0.020, and 0.98 for nickel. On kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, adsorption values (mmoles/100 g) are As (0.24, 0.019, and 20.5), B (0.041, 0.0019, and 1.77), Mo (0.048, 0.0010, and 5.93), and Se (0.029, 0.00048, and 1.30). Arsenic is the most highly adsorbed contaminant species and goethite has the largest adsorption capacity of the adsorbents.

  8. Estimation of soil air permeability components at a laboratory-scale pilot.

    PubMed

    Boudouch, Otmane; Esrael, Daoud; Kacem, Mariem; Benadda, Belkacem

    2012-01-01

    Soil air permeability is a key parameter in the design of soil vapour extraction. The purpose of this study is to verify the applicability of different analytical solutions, developed to determine soil characteristics in field conditions, to estimate soil air permeability in a small-scale pilot, since field testing may be expensive. A laboratory tridirectional pilot and a unidirectional column were designed in order to achieve the objectives of this work. Use of a steady-state unconfined analytical solution was found to be an appropriate method to determine soil air permeability components for the pilot conditions. Using pressure data collected under open, steady-state conditions, the average values of radial and vertical permeability were found to be, respectively, 9.97 x 10(-7) and 8.74 x 10(-7) cm2. The use of semi-confined analytical solutions may not be suitable to estimate soil parameters since a significant difference was observed between simulated and observed vacuums. Air permeability was underestimated when transient solutions were used, in comparison with methods based on steady-state solutions. The air radial and vertical permeability was found to be, respectively, 7.06 x 10(-7) and 4.93 x 10(-7) cm2, in the open scenario, and 2.30 x 10(-7) and 1.51 x 10(-7) cm2 in the semi-confined scenario. However, a good estimate of soil porosity was achieved using the two transient methods. The average values were predicted to be 0.482, in the open scenario, and 0.451 in the semi-confined scenario, which was in good agreement with the real value.

  9. A field and laboratory method for monitoring the concentration and isotopic composition of soil CO2.

    PubMed

    Breecker, Dan; Sharp, Zachary D

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of nmol size gas samples can be determined accurately and precisely using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We have developed a technique that exploits this capability in order to measure delta13C and delta18O values and, simultaneously, the concentration of CO2 in sub-mL volume soil air samples. A sampling strategy designed for monitoring CO2 profiles at particular locations of interest is also described. This combined field and laboratory technique provides several advantages over those previously reported: (1) the small sample size required allows soil air to be sampled at a high spatial resolution, (2) the field setup minimizes sampling times and does not require powered equipment, (3) the analytical method avoids the introduction of air (including O2) into the mass spectrometer thereby extending filament life, and (4) pCO2, delta13C and delta18O are determined simultaneously. The reproducibility of measurements of CO2 in synthetic tank air using this technique is: +/-0.08 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.10 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-0.7% (pCO2) at 5550 ppm. The reproducibility for CO2 in soil air is estimated as: +/-0.06 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.06 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-1.6% (pCO2). Monitoring soil CO2 using this technique is applicable to studies concerning soil respiration and ecosystem gas exchange, the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 (e.g. free air carbon dioxide enrichment) on soil processes, soil water budgets including partitioning evaporation from transpiration, pedogenesis and weathering, diffuse solid-earth degassing, and the calibration of speleothem and pedogenic carbonate delta13C values as paleoenvironmental proxies.

  10. On Unsaturated Soil Mechanics - Personal Views on Current Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, G. N.; Pietruszczak, S.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the authors' personal views on current research being conducted by various research groups around the world in the broad area of mechanics of unsaturated geomaterials in general and soils in particular. The topic is of interest to a wide spectrum of scientists and engineers working in diverse areas such as geology and geophysics, powder technology, agricultural, petroleum, chemical, geotechnical, civil, environmental and nuclear engineering. Even if we restrict ourselves to civil, geotechnical and environmental engineering, it is noted that a plethora of hypotheses as well as a number of empirical and semi-empirical relations have been introduced for describing the mechanics of unsaturated porous media. However, many of these proposed advances as well as methods of testing may lack sound theoretical basis.

  11. Investigation of the Critical State in Soil Mechanics Using DEM

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, Andres A.; Garcia-Rojo, Ramon; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2009-06-18

    The existence and uniqueness of the so-called critical state in soil mechanics is validated in our DEM simulations of irregular polygonal particles. For different particle shape characteristics, the critical state is independent of the initial stress and density conditions. We retain low stress levels, since we do not take into account the crushing of particles. In biaxial test simulations isotropic particles evolve toward a limiting state in which the system reaches a critical void ratio and deforms with constant volume, deviatoric stress, fabric anisotropy, and mechanical coordination number. The last one has been found to be the first variable to attain a critical value making possible for the rest of micro-and-macro-mechanical variables the convergence to the critical state. In periodic shear cell tests, for large shear deformations samples with anisotropic particles reach at the macro-mechanical level the same critical value for both shear force and void ratio. At the micro-mechanical level the components of the stress tensor, the fabric tensor and the inertia tensor of the particles also reach the same stationary state. By varying the aspect ratio of the particles we stated the strong influence of particle shape anisotropy on the parameters that the granular packing attained at the critical state.

  12. Mechanical properties of lunar regolith and lunar soil simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    Through the Surveyor 3 and 7, and Apollo 11-17 missions a knowledge of the mechanical properties of Lunar regolith were gained. These properties, including material cohesion, friction, in-situ density, grain-size distribution and shape, and porosity, were determined by indirect means of trenching, penetration, and vane shear testing. Several of these properties were shown to be significantly different from those of terrestrial soils, such as an interlocking cohesion and tensile strength formed in the absence of moisture and particle cementation. To characterize the strength and deformation properties of Lunar regolith experiments have been conducted on a lunar soil simulant at various initial densities, fabric arrangements, and composition. These experiments included conventional triaxial compression and extension, direct tension, and combined tension-shear. Experiments have been conducted at low levels of effective confining stress. External conditions such as membrane induced confining stresses, end platten friction and material self weight have been shown to have a dramatic effect on the strength properties at low levels of confining stress. The solution has been to treat these external conditions and the specimen as a full-fledged boundary value problem rather than the idealized elemental cube of mechanics. Centrifuge modeling allows for the study of Lunar soil-structure interaction problems. In recent years centrifuge modeling has become an important tool for modeling processes that are dominated by gravity and for verifying analysis procedures and studying deformation and failure modes. Centrifuge modeling is well established for terrestrial enginering and applies equally as well to Lunar engineering. A brief review of the experiments is presented in graphic and outline form.

  13. Event triggered data acquisition in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory upgrades and revisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, R.D.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes updates and revisions to the data acquisition computer program DATAVG which has served as the basic data collection system for the Sandia National Laboratories Geomechanics Department, Rock Mechanics Laboratory since late 1992. DATAVG was first described in Event Triggered Data Acquisition in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory, [Hardy, 1993]. DATAVG has been modified to incorporate numerous user-requested enhancements and a few bug fixes. In this paper these changes to DATAVG are described.

  14. Determining phosphorus release rates to runoff from selected Alberta soils using laboratory rainfall simulation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Charles R; Amrani, Mohamed; Akbar, Muhammad A; Heaney, Danial J; Vanderwel, Douwe S

    2006-01-01

    Phosphorus losses from agricultural land can cause accelerated eutrophication of surface water bodies. This study evaluated the use of soil test phosphorus (STP) levels to predict dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations in runoff water from agricultural soils using laboratory rainfall simulation. The objectives of this study were to determine (i) to what extent STP concentrations can be used as a basis to predict P losses from Alberta soils and (ii) how extended rainfall simulation run times affected DIP losses. Soil samples collected from a total of 38 field sites, widely scattered throughout the southern half of Alberta, were subjected to rainfall simulation in the laboratory. The STP concentrations were determined using Miller-Axley, Norwest, Kelowna, Modified Kelowna Mehlich-III, and distilled water extraction methods. Each rainfall simulation event lasted for at least 90 min. Runoff samples were collected in time series for the duration of each simulation, during two distinct runoff intervals: (i) for the first 30 min of continuous runoff (T30) and (ii) for 40 min during runoff equilibrium (Teq). For all the STP extractants and both runoff intervals, the relationship with DIP-flow-weighted mean concentration (FWMC) was linear and highly significant with r2 values ranging from 0.74 to 0.96. However, the slopes of the resulting regression lines were, on average, 1.85 times greater for the T30 runoff interval over those computed for the Teq interval. Thus experimental methodology greatly influenced regression parameters, suggesting that more work was needed to verify these relationships under natural conditions. In addition, with many of the r2 values greater than 0.90 there would be little, if any, benefit derived by including soil properties in regression analysis.

  15. Composite model to reproduce the mechanical behaviour of methane hydrate bearing soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Fuente, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydrate bearing sediments (MHBS) are naturally-occurring materials containing different components in the pores that may suffer phase changes under relative small temperature and pressure variations for conditions typically prevailing a few hundreds of meters below sea level. Their modelling needs to account for heat and mass balance equations of the different components, and several strategies already exist to combine them (e.g., Rutqvist & Moridis, 2009; Sánchez et al. 2014). These equations have to be completed by restrictions and constitutive laws reproducing the phenomenology of heat and fluid flows, phase change conditions and mechanical response. While the formulation of the non-mechanical laws generally includes explicitly the mass fraction of methane in each phase, which allows for a natural update of parameters during phase changes, mechanical laws are, in most cases, stated for the whole solid skeleton (Uchida et al., 2012; Soga et al. 2006). In this paper, a mechanical model is proposed to cope with the response of MHBS. It is based on a composite approach that allows defining the thermo-hydro-mechanical response of mineral skeleton and solid hydrates independently. The global stress-strain-temperature response of the solid phase (grains + hydrate) is then obtained by combining both responses according to energy principle following the work by Pinyol et al. (2007). In this way, dissociation of MH can be assessed on the basis of the stress state and temperature prevailing locally within the hydrate component. Besides, its structuring effect is naturally accounted for by the model according to patterns of MH inclusions within soil pores. This paper describes the fundamental hypothesis behind the model and its formulation. Its performance is assessed by comparison with laboratory data presented in the literature. An analysis of MHBS response to several stress-temperature paths representing potential field cases is finally presented. References

  16. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: LOW TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF CERCLA SOILS AND DEBRIS USING THE IT LABORATORY SCALE THERMAL DESORPTION FURNACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study report on laboratory experiments on low temperature treatment of soils using thermal desorption. The purpose of the study was to determine if thermal desorption could remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants from a synthetically prepared soil spiked with pre...

  17. Characterization of stony soils' hydraulic conductivity using laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichault, M.; Beckers, E.; Degré, A.; Garré, S.

    2015-10-01

    Determining soil hydraulic properties is of major concern in various fields of study. Though stony soils are widespread across the globe, most studies deal with gravel-free soils so that the literature describing the impact of stones on soil's hydraulic conductivity is still rather scarce. Most frequently, models characterizing the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils assume that the only effect of rock fragments is to reduce the volume available for water flow and therefore they predict a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with an increasing stoniness. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of rock fragments on the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This was done by means of laboratory and numerical experiments involving different amounts and types of coarse fragments. We compared our results with values predicted by the aforementioned models. Our study suggests that considering that stones only reduce the volume available for water flow might be ill-founded. We pointed out several drivers of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils, not considered by these models. On the one hand, the shape and the size of inclusions may substantially affect the hydraulic conductivity. On the other hand, the presence of rock fragments can counteract and even overcome the effect of a reduced volume in some cases. We attribute this to the creation of voids at the fine earth-stone interface. Nevertheless, these differences are mainly important near to saturation. However, we come up with a more nuanced view regarding the validity of the models under unsaturated conditions. Indeed, under unsaturated conditions, the models seem to represent the hydraulic behaviour of stones reasonably well.

  18. Improved chemometric methodologies for the assessment of soil carbon sequestration mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-González, Marco A.; Almendros, Gonzalo; Álvarez, Ana M.; González-Vila, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    The factors involved soil C sequestration, which is reflected in the highly variable content of organic matter in the soils, are not yet well defined. Therefore, their identification is crucial for understanding Earth's biogeochemical cycle and global change. The main objective of this work is to contribute to a better qualitative and quantitative assessment of the mechanisms of organic C sequestration in the soil, using omic approaches not requiring the detailed knowledge of the structure of the material under study. With this purpose, we have carried out a series of chemometric approaches on a set of widely differing soils (35 representative ecosystems). In an exploratory phase, we used multivariate statistical models (e.g., multidimensional scaling, discriminant analysis with automatic backward variable selection…) to analyze arrays of more than 200 independent soil variables (physicochemical, spectroscopic, pyrolytic...) in order to select those factors (descriptors or proxies) that explain most of the total system variance (content and stability of the different C forms). These models showed that the factors determining the stabilization of organic material are greatly dependent on the soil type. In some cases, the molecular structure of organic matter seemed strongly correlated with their resilience, while in other soil types the organo-mineral interactions played a significant bearing on the accumulation of selectively preserved C forms. In any case, it was clear that the factors driving the resilience of organic matter are manifold and not exclusive. Consequently, in a second stage, prediction models of the soil C content and their biodegradability (laboratory incubation experiments) were carried out by massive data processing by partial least squares (PLS) regression of data from Py-GC-MS and Py-MS. In some models, PLS was applied to a matrix of 150 independent variables corresponding to major pyrolysis compounds (peak areas) from the 35 samples of whole

  19. History of Sandia National Laboratories` auxiliary closure mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Weydert, J.C.; Ponder, G.M.

    1993-12-01

    An essential component of a horizontal, underground nuclear test setup at the Nevada Test Site is the auxiliary closure system. The massive gates that slam shut immediately after a device has been detonated allow the prompt radiation to pass, but block debris and hot gases from continuing down the tunnel. Thus, the gates protect experiments located in the horizontal line-of-sight steel pipe. Sandia National Laboratories has been the major designer and developer of these closure systems. This report records the history of SNL`s participation in and contributions to the technology of auxiliary closure systems used in horizontal tunnel tests in the underground test program.

  20. ISRU Soil Mechanics Vacuum Facility: Soil Bin Preparation and Simulant Strength Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Wilkinson, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Testing in relevant environments is key to exploration mission hardware development. This is true on both the component level (in early development) and system level (in late development stages). During ISRU missions the hardware will interface with the soil (digging, roving, etc) in a vacuum environment. A relevant test environment will therefore involve a vacuum chamber with a controlled, conditioned simulant bed. However, in earth-based granular media, such as lunar soil simulant, gases trapped within the material pore structures and water adsorbed to all particle surfaces will release when exposed to vacuum. Early vacuum testing has shown that this gas release can occur violently, which loosens and weakens the simulant, altering the consolidation state. The Vacuum Facility #13, a mid-size chamber (3.66m tall, 1.5m inner diameter) at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been modified to create a soil mechanics test facility. A 0.64m deep by 0.914m square metric ton bed of lunar simulant was placed under vacuum using a variety of pumping techniques. Both GRC-3 and LHT-3M simulant types have been used. An electric cone penetrometer was used to measure simulant strength properties at vacuum including: cohesion, friction angle, bulk density and shear modulus. Simulant disruptions, caused by off gassing, affected the strength properties, but could be mitigated by reducing pump rate. No disruptions were observed at pressures below 2.5Torr, regardless of the pump rate. However, slow off gassing of the soil lead to long test times, a full week, to reach 10-5Torr. This work highlights the need for robotic machine-simulant hardware and operations in vacuum to expeditiously perform (sub-)systems tests.

  1. Different response of nitrifiers and denitrifiers to re-wetting shape the NO release from soils in laboratory incubation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Thomas; Wu, Dianming; Song, Guozheng; Pommerenke, Bianca; Braker, Gesche

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory incubation studies incubating soils at a wide range of soil moistures, soil temperatures and mixing ratios of NO in the headspace and inorganic nutrient contents (NH4+,NO3-, NO2-) showed that release rates of NO follow an exponential function with increasing soil temperature and an optimum function for soil moisture. This approach assumes that environmental factors play the dominant role in shaping an ecosystem and thereby microbial communities and control the NO release from soil. We determined the NO release rate for a dryland farming soil under flooding irrigation in Xinjiang, China, a mid-latitude agricultural soil (Mainz, Germany), and a rice paddy (Ambai, India) upon wetting and subsequent drying out of soils. Only the release rate for the mid-latitude agricultural soil followed an optimum function for soil moisture. Release rates for the dryland farming soil and rice paddy, however, followed a two maxima function with distinct maxima at higher and lower soil moisture. Acknowledgement of two distinct maxima is critical for more accurately assessing regional biogenic NO emissions of soils under field conditions. To analyse the response of nitrifiers and denitrifiers involved in NO turnover in more detail we linked molecular analysis of functional gene expression (nirK and nirS, bacterial and archaeal amoA) and microbial community composition to NO release rates. We could show that the maximal transcriptional activity of denitrifiers and ammonia oxidizers differs with soil moisture and that higher transcriptional activity of nirS-type denitrifiers at higher soil moisture and of archaeal ammonia oxidizers at lower soil moisture may explain the two maxima for NO release.

  2. Evaluation of historical beryllium abundance in soils, airborne particulates and facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Mark; Bibby, Richard K; Eppich, Gary R; Lee, Steven; Lindvall, Rachel E; Wilson, Kent; Esser, Bradley K

    2012-10-15

    Beryllium has been historically machined, handled and stored in facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) since the 1950s. Additionally, outdoor testing of beryllium-containing components has been performed at LLNL's Site 300 facility. Beryllium levels in local soils and atmospheric particulates have been measured over three decades and are comparable to those found elsewhere in the natural environment. While localized areas of beryllium contamination have been identified, laboratory operations do not appear to have increased the concentration of beryllium in local air or water. Variation in airborne beryllium correlates to local weather patterns, PM10 levels, normal sources (such as resuspension of soil and emissions from coal power stations) but not to LLNL activities. Regional and national atmospheric beryllium levels have decreased since the implementation of the EPA's 1990 Clean-Air-Act. Multi-element analysis of local soil and air samples allowed for the determination of comparative ratios for beryllium with over 50 other metals to distinguish between natural beryllium and process-induced contamination. Ten comparative elemental markers (Al, Cs, Eu, Gd, La, Nd, Pr, Sm, Th and Tl) that were selected to ensure background variations in other metals did not collectively interfere with the determination of beryllium sources in work-place samples at LLNL. Multi-element analysis and comparative evaluation are recommended for all workplace and environmental samples suspected of beryllium contamination. The multi-element analyses of soils and surface dusts were helpful in differentiating between beryllium of environmental origin and beryllium from laboratory operations. Some surfaces can act as "sinks" for particulate matter, including carpet, which retains entrained insoluble material even after liquid based cleaning. At LLNL, most facility carpets had beryllium concentrations at or below the upper tolerance limit determined by sampling facilities

  3. Evaluation of historical beryllium abundance in soils, airborne particulates and facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Mark; Bibby, Richard K; Eppich, Gary R; Lee, Steven; Lindvall, Rachel E; Wilson, Kent; Esser, Bradley K

    2012-10-15

    Beryllium has been historically machined, handled and stored in facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) since the 1950s. Additionally, outdoor testing of beryllium-containing components has been performed at LLNL's Site 300 facility. Beryllium levels in local soils and atmospheric particulates have been measured over three decades and are comparable to those found elsewhere in the natural environment. While localized areas of beryllium contamination have been identified, laboratory operations do not appear to have increased the concentration of beryllium in local air or water. Variation in airborne beryllium correlates to local weather patterns, PM10 levels, normal sources (such as resuspension of soil and emissions from coal power stations) but not to LLNL activities. Regional and national atmospheric beryllium levels have decreased since the implementation of the EPA's 1990 Clean-Air-Act. Multi-element analysis of local soil and air samples allowed for the determination of comparative ratios for beryllium with over 50 other metals to distinguish between natural beryllium and process-induced contamination. Ten comparative elemental markers (Al, Cs, Eu, Gd, La, Nd, Pr, Sm, Th and Tl) that were selected to ensure background variations in other metals did not collectively interfere with the determination of beryllium sources in work-place samples at LLNL. Multi-element analysis and comparative evaluation are recommended for all workplace and environmental samples suspected of beryllium contamination. The multi-element analyses of soils and surface dusts were helpful in differentiating between beryllium of environmental origin and beryllium from laboratory operations. Some surfaces can act as "sinks" for particulate matter, including carpet, which retains entrained insoluble material even after liquid based cleaning. At LLNL, most facility carpets had beryllium concentrations at or below the upper tolerance limit determined by sampling facilities

  4. View of container of green-colored lunar soil in Lunar Receiving Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A close-up view of a container full of green-colored lunar soil in the Non-Sterile Nitrogen Processing Line (NNPL) in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL) at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). This sample, broken down into six separate samples after this photo was made, was made up of comprehensive fines from near Spur Crater on the Apennine front. The numbers assigned to the sample include numbers 15300 through 15305. Astronauts David R. Scott and James B. Irwin took the sample during the second extravehicular activity (EVA), at a Ground Elapsed Time (GET) of 146:05 to 146:06.

  5. Laboratory studies of potential mechanisms of renoxification of tropospheric nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Figueroa, A M; Sumner, A L; Finlayson-Pitts, B J

    2003-02-01

    Laboratory studies of the heterogeneous reactions between HNO3 in thin water films on silica surfaces and gaseous NO, CO, CH4, and SO2, proposed as potential "renoxification" mechanisms in the atmosphere, are reported. Transmission FTIR was used to monitor reactants and products on the silica surface and in the gas phase as a function of time. No reaction of CO, CH4, or SO2 was observed; upper limits to the reaction probabilities (gamma(rxn)) are < or = 10(-10) for CO and SO2 and < or = 10(-12) for CH4. However, the reaction of HNO3 with NO does occur with a lower limit for the reaction probability of gammaNO > or = (6 +/- 2) x 10(-9) (2s). The experimental evidence shows that the chemistry is insensitive to whether the substrate is pure silica or borosilicate glass. Nitric acid in its molecular form, and not the nitrate anion form, was shown to be the reactive species, and NH4NO3 was shown not to react with NO. The HNO3-NO reaction could be a significant means of renoxification of nitric acid on the surfaces of buildings and soils in the boundary layer of polluted urban atmospheres. This chemistry may help to resolve some discrepancies between model-predicted ozone and field observations in polluted urban atmospheres.

  6. Laboratory measurements of electrical resistivity versus water content on small soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robain, H.; Camerlynck, C.; Bellier, G.; Tabbagh, A.

    2003-04-01

    The assessment of soil water content variations more and more leans on geophysical methods that are non invasive and that allow a high spatial sampling. Among the different methods, DC electrical imaging is moving forward. DC Electrical resistivity shows indeed strong seasonal variations that principally depend on soil water content variations. Nevertheless, the widely used Archie's empirical law [1], that links resistivity with voids saturation and water conductivity is not well suited to soil materials with high clay content. Furthermore, the shrinking and swelling properties of soil materials have to be considered. Hence, it is relevant to develop new laboratory experiments in order to establish a relation between electrical resistivity and water content taking into account the rheological and granulometrical specificities of soil materials. The experimental device developed in IRD laboratory allows to monitor simultaneously (i) the water content, (ii) the electrical resistivity and (iii) the volume of a small cylindrical soil core (100cm3) put in a temperature controlled incubator (30°C). It provides both the shrinkage curve of the soil core (voids volume versus water content) and the electrical resistivity versus water content curve The modelisation of the shrinkage curve gives for each moisture state the water respectively contained in macro and micro voids [2], and then allows to propose a generalized Archie's like law as following : 1/Rs = 1/Fma.Rma + 1/Fmi.Rmi and Fi = Ai/(Vi^Mi.Si^Ni) with Rs : the soil resistivity. Fma and Fmi : the so called "formation factor" for macro and micro voids, respectively. Rma and Rmi : the resistivity of the water contained in macro and micro voids, respectively. Vi : the volume of macro and micro voids, respectively. Si : the saturation of macro and micro voids, respectively. Ai, Mi and Ni : adjustment coefficients. The variations of Rmi are calculated, assuming that Rma is a constant. Indeed, the rise of ionic

  7. Computer simulation and laboratory work in the teaching of mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, L.; DeAmbrosis, A.; Mascheretti, P.; Massara, C. I.

    1987-03-01

    By analysing the measures of student success in learning the fundamentals of physics in conjunction with the research reported in the literature one can conclude that it is difficult or undergraduates as well as high-school students to gain a reasonable understanding of elementary mechanics. Considerable effort has been devoted to identifying those factors which might prevent mechanics being successfully learnt and also to developing instructional methods which could improve its teaching (Champagne et al. 1984, Hewson 1985, McDermott 1983, Saltiel and Malgrange 1980, Whitaker 1983, White 1983). Starting from these research results and drawing from their own experience (Borghi et al. 1984, 1985), they arrived at the following conclusions. A strategy based on experimental activity, performed by the students themselves, together with a proper use of computer simulations, could well improve the learning of mechanics and enhance the interest in, and understanding of, topics which are difficult to treat in a traditional way. The authors describe the strategy they have designed to help high school students to learn mechanics and report how they have applied this strategy to their particular topic of projectile motion.

  8. Intrinsic degradation of volatile fatty acids in laboratory-compacted clayey soil.

    PubMed

    Hrapovic, L; Rowe, R K

    2002-10-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) represent the major organic constituent of landfill leachate and provide the greatest potential for leachate induced organic contamination of groundwater (e.g. as represented by an increase in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand). Long-term diffusion tests were performed for laboratory-compacted clayey soil plugs exposed to continuous supply of synthetic leachate containing VFAs. Significant microbial activity developed upon exposure of the soil's indigenous microorganisms to these degradable contaminants. The growth of heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (HAB, which include facultative anaerobes), sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria carrying out fermentation and mineralization of the VFAs became evident after 30-50 days of testing. The maximum microbial counts of (2-8) x 10(8) and (0.1-1) x 10(8) cfu/g for HAB and SRB were localized in the soil layer at the interface with the source of organic and inorganic nutrients. Regardless of this rapid growth in microbial population, the VFA consumption was small and measurable only after a lag of 140-180 days. It is considered that this lag of otherwise readily degradable organic compounds (such as VFAs) persisted due to a combination of the effects of a high initial concentration of these acids (2.4 g/l as dissolved organic carbon, DOC) applied to carbon starved soil microorganisms and the small pore size of the compacted clay. Once the significant amounts of gas were generated from fermentation, conditions developed for improved mass transport and exchange of the nutrients and bacteria and the outcome of the intrinsic degradation was more apparent. The breakdown of VFAs that followed after the lag was localized near the top of the soil and was characterized by a short half-life of 0.75-5 days for DOC (total VFAs as dissolved organic carbon).

  9. Heap leach studies on the removal of uranium from soil. Report of laboratory-scale test results

    SciTech Connect

    Turney, W.R.J.R.; York, D.A.; Mason, C.F.V.; Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Dander, D.C.; Longmire, P.A.; Morris, D.E.; Strait, R.K.; Brewer, J.S.

    1994-05-01

    This report details the initial results of laboratory-scale testing of heap leach that is being developed as a method for removing uranium from uranium-contaminated soil. The soil used was obtained from the site of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) near the village of Fernald in Ohio. The testing is being conducted on a laboratory scale, but it is intended that this methodology will eventually be enlarged to field scale where, millions of cubic meters of uranium-contaminated soil can be remediated. The laboratory scale experiments show that, using carbonate/bicarbonate solutions, uranium can be effectively removed from the soil from initial values of around 600 ppM down to 100 ppM or less. The goal of this research is to selectively remove uranium from the contaminated soil, without causing serious changes in the characteristics of the soil. It is also hoped that the new technologies developed for soil remediation at FEMP will be transferred to other sites that also have uranium-contaminated soil.

  10. Weakening mechanism and energy budget of laboratory earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelegue, Francois; Brantut, Nicolas; Marty, Samson; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of earthquake ruptures in subduction zone are expected to be partially governed by the dehydration of minerals during shear heating. In this study, we conducted and compared results coming from stick-slip experiments on Westerly granite, serpentinized peridotite, and serpentinite. Experiments were conducted under triaxial loading (σ1>σ2=σ3) at confining pressures (σ3) of 50 and 100 MPa. The angle between the fault plane and the maximum stress (σ1) was imposed to be equal to 30°. Usual a dual gain system, a high frequency acoustic monitoring array recorded particles acceleration during macroscopic stick-slip events and premonitory background microseismicity. In addition, we used an amplified strain gage located at 3 mm to fault plane to record the dynamic stress change during laboratory earthquakes. In all rocks, we show that increasing the stress acting on the fault leads to an increase of the seismic slip, which in turns leads to a decrease in the dynamic friction coefficient. However, for a same initial stress, displacements are larger in serpentinized peridotite and in serpentinite than in Westerly granite. While the partial melting of the fault surface is observed in each rock tested, the dynamic friction drop is larger in peridotite and serpentinite. This larger friction drop is explained by the dehydration of antigorite, which leaves a partially amorphised material and leads to the production of a low viscosity melt. Finally, using theroretical assumptions, we show that the radiation efficiency of laboratory earthquakes is larger in peridotite and serpentinite than in granite. This calculation is supported by larger elastic wave radiation, and by microstructural analysis.

  11. Fate of Methane and Ethanol-Blended Fuels in Soil: Laboratory and Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. M.; de Sieyes, N. R.; Peng, J.; Schmidt, R.; Buelow, M. C.; Felice, M.

    2015-12-01

    Our research site is within the UC Davis Putah Creek Riparian Reserve in Davis, CA; climate is semi-arid and soils are sandy loams and silts. We are conducting three types of controlled release experiments in the field: 1) Gas mixture, a continuous release of methane, sometimes with other gases included, with the composition and release rate changing over time to allow examination of various hypotheses, 2) E10 (gasoline with 10% ethanol): a continuous release of E10 NAPL at rate equal to documented low rate releases from underground storage tanks (USTs) that are difficult or impossible to detect with current practical approaches (<0.04 gallons per day); 3) E85: release at same rate as the E10 release. In the field experiments, gas or NAPL is released from a stainless steel drive point with 0.5 cm slotted section at 1 m bgs; we monitor temperature, pressure, moisture content, and soil gas composition in the soil, and efflux of carbon dioxide, methane, oxygen, water vapor, and other species to/ from soil to atmosphere. Periodic coring allows examination of the microbial community composition with depth. Laboratory microcosm and column tests assisted in planning the E10 and E85 field experiments above, evaluated the effect of moisture content on methane oxidation, and allowed testing and refinement of the monitoring approaches in the field We found that up to 40% of the methane released can be accounted for by efflux from soil to the atmosphere. The percentage in the efflux depends on the rate of release, and, based on literature and our microcosms with methane-spiked PCRR soils, we hypothesize that the very low moisture content of the soils in this drought year limits in situ methane oxidation. Efflux of carbon dioxide accounted for up to 20% of the E10 release rate under our lab column conditions, which we believe were oxygen-limited compared to the field conditions. We also detected low molecular weight hydrocarbons in the column efflux, though the concentrations

  12. Mechanical Properties and Organic Carbon of Soil Aggregates in the Northern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Canqui, H.; Lal, Rattan; Owens, L. B.; Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.

    2005-09-30

    The macroscale behavior of the soil depends on the mechanical properties of individual aggregates. The structural dynamics of the whole soil is defined by the architectural organization and attributes of ever-changing aggregates as the basic units of soil structure development. Aggregates influence root growth and seedling emergence (DeFreitas et al., 1996), soil moisture retention (SMR) and airflow (Watts and Dexter, 1997), and SOC sequestration and dynamics (Denef et al., 2004). Mechanical properties of aggregates are indicative of response of the soil system to tillage, compaction, and plant growth. The properties of aggregates may differ from those of the whole soil due to the dynamics of aggregate formation (Horn, 1990; Zhang, 1994). Understanding of mechanical properties of aggregates is cru- condicial to explain the macroscale functions of soil for plant growth (DeFreitas et al., 1996).

  13. X-231B technology demonstration for in situ treatment of contaminated soil: Laboratory evaluation of in situ vapor stripping

    SciTech Connect

    West, O.R.; Siegrist, R.L.; Jennings, H.L.; Lucero, A.J.; Greene, D.W.; Schmunk, S.W.

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the study described in this report was to determine the efficiency of vapor stripping coupled with soil mixing for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from clay soils such as those that underlie the PORTS X-231B Solid Waste Management Unit. This was accomplished by conducting experiments wherein contaminated soil cores were treated in the laboratory using a system that simulated a field-scale vapor stripping/soil mixing treatment process. Treatment efficiencies obtained using several sets of process conditions, such as air temperature and flow rate, were determined through subsampling of the soil cores to establish pre- and posttreatment levels of VOCs in the soil. Two series of experiments were conducted under this study. In the first series, laboratory treatment was performed on intact soil cores that were taken from contaminated zones within the PORTS X-231B Unit using sampler liners that could be adapted as reaction lysimeters. Since soil core disturbance was minimized using this approach, the treatability experiments were conducted on soil that was fairly close to in situ conditions in terms of both soil structure and contaminant levels. The second series of experiments were performed on cores that were packed using X-231B soil and spiked with known amounts of trichloroethylene (TCE). This approach was taken for the second series because the VOC levels in the intact cores were found to be much lower than field values. In addition, the packed cores were smaller than the intact soil cores, with treatment volumes that were about a fifth of the treatment volumes in the intact soil cores. The smaller packed cores were not only easier to handle but were also more reliably characterized due to smaller treatment volumes from which samples were taken.

  14. Mechanisms Controlling Carbon Turnover from Diverse Microbial Groups in Temperate and Tropical Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throckmorton, H.; Dane, L.; Bird, J. A.; Firestone, M. K.; Horwath, W. R.

    2010-12-01

    Microorganisms represent an important intermediate along the pathway of plant litter decomposition to the formation of soil organic matter (SOM); yet little is known of the fate and stability of microbial C in soils and the importance of microbial biochemistry as a factor influencing SOM dynamics. This research investigates mechanisms controlling microbial C stabilization in a temperate forest in the Sierra Nevada of California (CA) and a tropical forest in Puerto Rico (PR). Biochemically diverse microbial groups (fungi, actinomycetes, bacteria gram (+), and bacteria gram (-)) were isolated from both sites, grown in the laboratory with C13 media, killed, and nonliving residues were added back to soils as a reciprocal transplant of microbial groups. The native microbial community in CA is dominated by fungi and in PR is dominated by bacteria, which provides an opportunity to asses the metabolic response of distinct microbial communities to the diverse microbial additions. CA and PR soils were sampled five times over a 3 and 2 year period, respectively. In CA there was no significant difference in the mean residence time (MRT) of diverse C13 microbial treatments; whereas in PR there were significant differences, whereby temperate fungi, temperate Gram (+) bacteria, and tropical actinomycetes exhibited a significantly longer MRT as compared with tropical fungi and temperate Gram (-). These results suggest that a bacterial dominated microbial community discriminates more amongst diverse substrates than a fungal-dominated community. MRT for labeled-C in CA was 5.21 ± 1.11 years, and in PR was 2.22 ± 0.45. Despite substantial differences in MRT between sites, physical fractionation of soils into light (LF), aggregated-occluded (OF), and mineral-associated (MF) fractions provided evidence that accelerated decomposition in PR (presumably due to climate) operated primarily on labeled-C unassociated with the mineral matrix (LF); labeled-C occluded within aggregates (OF) or

  15. Predictions of soil organic carbon using laboratory-based hyperspectral data in the northern Tianshan mountains, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongfei; Li, Jianlong

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a study dealing with soil organic carbon (SOC) estimation of soil through the combination of soil spectroscopy and multivariate stepwise linear regression. Soil samples were collected in the three sub-regions, dominated by brown calcic soil, in the northern Tianshan Mountains, China. Spectral measurements for all soil samples were performed in a controlled laboratory environment by a portable ASD FieldSpec FR spectrometer (350-2,500 nm). Twelve types of transformations were applied to the soil reflectance to remove the noise and to linearize the correlation between reflectance and SOC content. Based on the spectral reflectance and its derivatives, hyperspectral models can be built using correlation analysis and multivariable statistical methods. The results show that the main response range of soil organic carbon is between 400 and 750 nm. Correlation analysis indicated that SOC has stronger correlation with the second derivative than with the original reflectance and other transformations data. The two models developed with laboratory spectra gave good predictions of SOC, with root mean square error (RMSE) <5.0. The use of the full visible near-infrared spectral range gave better SOC predictions than using visible separately. The multivariate stepwise linear regression of second derivate model (model A) is optimal for estimating SOC content, with a determination coefficient of 0.894 and RMSE of 0.322. The results of this research study indicated that, for the grassland regions, combining soil spectroscopy and mathematical statistical methods does favor accurate prediction of SOC.

  16. Earthquake mechanism and predictability shown by a laboratory fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.

    1994-01-01

    Slip events generated in a laboratory fault model consisting of a circulinear chain of eight spring-connected blocks of approximately equal weight elastically driven to slide on a frictional surface are studied. It is found that most of the input strain energy is released by a relatively few large events, which are approximately time predictable. A large event tends to roughen stress distribution along the fault, whereas the subsequent smaller events tend to smooth the stress distribution and prepare a condition of simultaneous criticality for the occurrence of the next large event. The frequency-size distribution resembles the Gutenberg-Richter relation for earthquakes, except for a falloff for the largest events due to the finite energy-storage capacity of the fault system. Slip distributions, in different events are commonly dissimilar. Stress drop, slip velocity, and rupture velocity all tend to increase with event size. Rupture-initiation locations are usually not close to the maximum-slip locations. ?? 1994 Birkha??user Verlag.

  17. Chemical Fume Hoods in Higher Education Science Laboratories: Electrical, Mechanical and Human Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, John M.

    This paper is predicated on the realization that a chemical hood is only one element of laboratory safety which encompasses a variety of other elements starting with the architectural design and layout of laboratories; through the installation, operation and maintenance of integrated electrical and mechanical systems; to the safety-mindedness of…

  18. Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments with CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Barr, Jamie L.; Shaw, Joseph A.

    2013-10-01

    We modified our multi-channel, steady-state flow-through (SSFT), soil-CO2 flux monitoring system to include an array of inexpensive pyroelectric non-dispersive infrared detectors for full-range (0-100%) coverage of CO2 concentrations without dilution, and a larger-diameter vent tube. We then conducted field testing of this system from late July through mid-September 2010 at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) project site located in Bozeman, MT, and subsequently, laboratory testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA using a flux bucket filled with dry sand. In the field, an array of twenty-five SSFT and three non-steady-state (NSS) flux chambers was installed in a 10x4 m area, the long boundary of which was directly above a shallow (2-m depth) horizontal injection well located 0.5 m below the water table. Two additional chambers (one SSFT and one NSS) were installed 10 m from the well for background measurements. Volumetric soil moisture sensors were installed at each SSFT chamber to measure mean levels in the top 0.15 m of soil. A total flux of 52 kg CO2 d-1 was injected into the well for 27 d and the efflux from the soil was monitored by the chambers before, during, and for 27 d after the injection. Overall, the results were consistent with those from previous years, showing a radial efflux pattern centered on a known “hot spot”, rapid responses to changes in injection rate and wind power, evidence for movement of the CO2 plume during the injection, and nominal flux levels from the SSFT chambers that were up to 6-fold higher than those measured by adjacent NSS chambers. Soil moisture levels varied during the experiment from moderate to near saturation with the highest levels occurring consistently at the hot spot. The effects of wind on measured flux were complex and decreased as soil moisture content increased. In the laboratory, flux bucket testing with the SSFT chamber showed large measured-flux enhancement

  19. Biodegradation of petroleum sludge and petroleum polluted soil by a bacterial consortium: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Gojgic-Cvijovic, G D; Milic, J S; Solevic, T M; Beskoski, V P; Ilic, M V; Djokic, L S; Narancic, T M; Vrvic, M M

    2012-02-01

    This article presents a study of the efficiency and degradation pattern of samples of petroleum sludge and polluted sandy soil from an oil refinery. A bacterial consortium, consisting of strains from the genera Pseudomonas, Achromobacter, Bacillus and Micromonospora, was isolated from a petroleum sludge sample and characterized. The addition of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients and a chemical surfactant to both the samples and bioaugmentation to the soil sample were applied under laboratory conditions. The extent of biodegradation was monitored by the gravimetric method and analysis of the residual oil by gas chromatography. Over a 12-week experiment, the achieved degree of TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbon) degradation amounted to 82-88% in the petroleum sludge and 86-91% in the polluted soil. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was utilized to determine the biodegradability and degradation rates of n-alkanes, isoprenoids, steranes, diasteranes and terpanes. Complete degradation of the n-alkanes and isoprenoids fractions occurred in both the samples. In addition, the intensities of the peaks corresponding to tricyclic terpenes and homohopanes were decreased, while significant changes were also observed in the distribution of diasteranes and steranes.

  20. Capillary rise quantification by field injection of artificial deuterium and laboratory soil characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünberger, O.; Michelot, J. L.; Bouchaou, L.; Macaigne, P.; Hsissou, Y.; Hammecker, C.

    2010-10-01

    In arid contexts, water rises from the saturated level of a shallow aquifer to the drying soil surface where evaporation takes place. This process plays important roles in terms of plant survival, salt balance and aquifer budget. A new field quantification method of this capillary rise flow is proposed using micro-injections (6 μL) of deuterium-enriched solution (δ value of 63 000‰ vs. V-SMOW) into unsatured soil at 1 m depth. Evaluation of peak displacement from a profile sampling 35 days later, delivered estimates that were compared with outputs of numerical simulation based on laboratory hydrodynamic measurements. A rate of 3.7 cm y-1 was observed in a Moroccan site where the aquifer level was 2.44 m deep. This value was higher, than other estimates based on natural diffusion with the same depth of aquifer, but lower than the estimates established using integration of van Genutchen closed-form functions for soil hydraulic conductivity and retention curve.

  1. Capillary rise quantifications based on in-situ artificial deuterium peak displacement and laboratory soil characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünberger, O.; Michelot, J. L.; Bouchaou, L.; Macaigne, P.; Hsissou, Y.; Hammecker, C.

    2011-05-01

    In arid environments, water rises from the saturated level of a shallow aquifer to the drying soil surface where evaporation occurs. This process plays important roles in terms of plant survival, salt balance and aquifer budget. A new field quantification method of this capillary rise flow is proposed using micro-injections (6 μL) of a deuterium-enriched solution (δ value of 63 000‰ vs. V-SMOW) into unsaturated soil at a 1 m depth. Evaluation of peak displacement from profile sampling 35 days later delivered an estimate that was compared with outputs of numerical simulation based on laboratory hydrodynamic measurements assuming a steady state regime. A rate of 3.7 cm y-1 was estimated at a Moroccan site, where the aquifer water depth was 2.44 m. This value was higher than that computed from the relationship between evaporation rates and water level depth based on natural isotopic profile estimates, but it was lower than every estimate established using integration of the van Genuchten closed-form functions for soil hydraulic conductivity and retention curve.

  2. Cancer risks from soil emissions of volatile organic compounds at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dibley, V. R., LLNL

    1998-02-01

    The emission isolation flux chamber (EIFC) methodology was applied to Superfund investigations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 to determine if on-site workers were exposed to VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface and what, if any, health risks could be attributed to the inhalation of the VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface. During July and August of 1996, twenty, eighteen, and twenty six VOC soil vapor flux samples were collected in the Building 830, 832, and 854 areas, respectively using EIFCS. The VOC concentrations in the vapor samples were used to calculate soil flux rates which were used as input into an air dispersion model to calculate ambient air exposure-point concentrations. The exposure-point concentrations were compared to EPA Region IX Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs). Buildings 830 and 832 exposure-point concentrations were less then the PRGs therefore no cancer risks were calculated. The cancer risks for Building 854 ranged from 1.6 x 10{sup -7} to 2.1 x 10{sup -6}. The resultant inhalation cancer risks were all within the acceptable range, implying that on-site workers were not exposed to VOC vapors volatilizing from the subsurface soil that could have significant cancer risks. Therefore remediation in these areas would not be necessary.

  3. Mechanisms of soil carbon storage in experimental grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbeiss, S.; Temperton, V. M.; Gleixner, G.

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the fate of root and litter derived carbon into soil organic matter and dissolved organic matter in soil profiles, in order to explain unexpected positive effects of plant diversity on carbon storage. A time series of soil and soil solution samples was investigated at the field site of The Jena Experiment. In addition to the main biodiversity experiment with C3 plants, a C4 species (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) naturally labeled with 13C was grown on an extra plot. Changes in organic carbon concentration in soil and soil solution were combined with stable isotope measurements to follow the fate of plant carbon into the soil and soil solution. A split plot design with plant litter removal versus double litter input simulated differences in biomass input. After 2 years, the no litter and double litter treatment, respectively, showed an increase of 381 g C m-2 and 263 g C m-2 to 20 cm depth, while 71 g C m-2 and 393 g C m-2 were lost between 20 and 30 cm depth. The isotopic label in the top 5 cm indicated that 11 and 15% of soil organic carbon were derived from plant material on the no litter and the double litter treatment, respectively. Without litter, this equals the total amount of carbon newly stored in soil, whereas with double litter this corresponds to twice the amount of stored carbon. Our results indicate that litter input resulted in lower carbon storage and larger carbon losses and consequently accelerated turnover of soil organic carbon. Isotopic evidence showed that inherited soil organic carbon was replaced by fresh plant carbon near the soil surface. Our results suggest that primarily carbon released from soil organic matter, not newly introduced plant organic matter, was transported in the soil solution and contributed to the observed carbon storage in deeper horizons.

  4. Soil Penetration Rates by Earthworms and Plant Roots- Mechanical and Energetic Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Siul; Schymanski, Stan; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the implications of different soil burrowing rates by earthworms and growing plant roots using mechanical models that consider soil rheological properties. We estimate the energetic requirements for soil elasto-viscoplastic displacement at different rates for similar burrows and water contents. In the core of the mechanical model is a transient cavity expansion into viscoplastic wet soil that mimic an earthworm or root tip cone-like penetration and subsequent cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydrostatic skeleton or root radial growth. Soil matrix viscoplatic considerations enable separation of the respective energetic requirements for earthworms penetrating at 2 μm/s relative to plant roots growing at 0.2 μm/s . Typical mechanical and viscous parameters are obtained inversely for soils under different fixed water contents utilizing custom miniaturized cone penetrometers at different fixed penetration rates (1 to 1000 μm/s). Experimental results determine critical water contents where soil exhibits pronounced viscoplatic behavior (close to saturation), bellow which the soil strength limits earthworms activity and fracture propagation by expanding plant roots becomes the favorable mechanical mode. The soil mechanical parameters in conjunction with earthworm and plant root physiological pressure limitations (200 kPa and 2000 kPa respectively) enable delineation of the role of soil saturation in regulating biotic penetration rates for different soil types under different moisture contents. Furthermore, this study provides a quantitative framework for estimating rates of energy expenditure for soil penetration, which allowed us to determine maximum earthworm population densities considering soil mechanical properties and the energy stored in soil organic matter.

  5. Development of an ultrasonic process for detoxifying groundwater and soil: Laboratory research

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.M.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is conducting laboratory research to study the effectiveness of a new technique in which ultrasonic energy is used to convert chlorinated organic compounds into nonhazardous end products. Destruction efficiencies of greater than 99% were achieved for the organic compounds in aqueous solution. Key process parameters, such as solution pH values, steady-state temperatures under operating conditions, ultrasonic-power intensities, and oxidant concentrations, were investigated. In addition, a detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for the destruction of the organic compounds under an ultrasonic filed was developed and incorporated into a computational model. The agreement between the model and experimental results is generally good.

  6. Hyperspectral laboratory and airborne measurements as tools for local mapping of swelling soils in Orléans area (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, Gilles; Dufrechou, Gregory; Hohmann, Audrey

    2013-04-01

    Swelling soils contain clay minerals that change volume with water content and cause extensive and expensive damage on infrastructures. Based on spatial distribution of infrastructure damages and existing geological maps, the Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières (BRGM, the French Geological Survey) published in 2010 a 1:50 000 swelling hazard map of France. This map indexes the territory to low, intermediate, or high swell susceptibility, but does not display smallest and isolated clays lithologies. At local scale, identification of clay minerals and characterization of swell potential of soils using conventional soil analysis (DRX, chemical, and geotechnical analysis) are slow, expensive, and does not permit integrated measurements. Shortwave infrared (SWIR: 1100-2500 nm) spectral domains are characterized by significant spectral absorption bands that provide an underused tool for estimate the swell potential of soils. Reflectance spectroscopy, using an ASD Fieldspec Pro spectrometer, permits a rapid and less expensive measurement of soil reflectance spectra in the field and laboratory. In order to produce high precision map of expansive soils, the BRGM aims to optimize laboratory reflectance spectroscopy for mapping swelling soils. Geotechnical use of laboratory reflectance spectroscopy for local characterization of swell potential of soils could be assessable from an economical point of view. A new high resolution airborne hyperspectral survey (covering ca. 280 km², 380 channels ranging from 400 to 2500 nm) located at the W of Orléans (Loiret, France) will also be combined with field and laboratory measurements to detect and map swelling soils.

  7. Laboratory measurements of nitric oxide release from forest soil with a thick organic layer under different understory types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargsten, A.; Falge, E.; Pritsch, K.; Huwe, B.; Meixner, F. X.

    2010-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in the photochemistry of the troposphere. NO from soil contributes up to 40% to the global budget of atmospheric NO. Soil NO emissions are primarily caused by biological activity (nitrification and denitrification), that occurs in the uppermost centimeter of the soil, a soil region often characterized by high contents of organic material. Most studies of NO emission potentials to date have investigated mineral soil layers. In our study we sampled soil organic matter under different understories (moss, grass, spruce and blueberries) in a humid mountainous Norway spruce forest plantation in the Fichtelgebirge (Germany). We performed laboratory incubation and flushing experiments using a customized chamber technique to determine the response of net potential NO flux to physical and chemical soil conditions (water content and temperature, bulk density, particle density, pH, C/N ratio, organic C, soil ammonium, soil nitrate). Net potential NO fluxes (in terms of mass of N) from soil samples taken under different understories ranged from 1.7-9.8 ng m-2 s-1 (soil sampled under grass and moss cover), 55.4-59.3 ng m-2 s-1 (soil sampled under spruce cover), and 43.7-114.6 ng m-2 s-1 (soil sampled under blueberry cover) at optimum water content and a soil temperature of 10 °C. The water content for optimum net potential NO flux ranged between 0.76 and 0.8 gravimetric soil moisture for moss covered soils, between 1.0 and 1.1 for grass covered soils, 1.1 and 1.2 for spruce covered soils, and 1.3 and 1.9 for blueberry covered soils. Effects of soil physical and chemical characteristics on net potential NO flux were statistically significant (0.01 probability level) only for NH4+. Therefore, as an alternative explanation for the differences in soil biogenic NO emission we consider more biological factors like understory vegetation type, amount of roots, and degree of mycorrhization; they have the potential to explain the observed

  8. Mechanical Design of Hybrid Densitometer for Laboratory Applications

    SciTech Connect

    G. Walton; P. J. Polk; S. -T. Hsue

    1999-01-01

    The hybrid K-edge densitometry (KED) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) densitometer is a unique nondestructive assay (NDA) technique to determine the concentrations of nuclear material (SNM) in solutions. The technique is ideally suited to assay the dissolver solutions as well as the uranium and plutonium product solutions from reprocessing It is an important instrument for safeguarding reprocessing; it is also a useful tool in analytical laboratories because of its capability of analyzing mixed solutions of SNM without chemical separation. Figure 1 shows the hardware of an hybrid system developed at Los Alamos. The hybrid densitometer employs a combination of two complimentary techniques: absorption KED and XRF. The KED technique measures the transmission of a tightly collimated photon beam through the sample; it is therefore quite insensitive to the radiation emitted by the sample material. Fission product level of {approximately}1 Ci/mL can be tolerated. The technique is insensitive to matrix variation. XRF measures the fluorescent x-rays from the same sample and can be used to determine the ratios of SNM. The technique can be applied to thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium concentration determination. The technique can also be applied to mixed solutions found in nuclear fuel cycle without separation: thorium-uranium, uranium-plutoniun neptunium-plutonium-americium. The design of the hybrid densitometer is shown schematically in Figs. 1 and 2; Fig. 1 shows the top view; Fig. 2 shows the side view. The heart of the design is the changer. The sample changer can accommodate a sample tray, which holds up to six samples. The samples can be a 2-cm path length cell, 4-cm path length cell, or a mixture of both sizes. The sample tray is controlled by a "Compumotor" which in turn is controlled by a computer. The absolute position of the sample cell can be reproduced to a standard deviation of 0.02 mm. The sample changer is housed inside square stainless steel

  9. Quantification of Soil Physical Properties by Using X-Ray Computerized Tomography (CT) and Standard Laboratory (STD) Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Ambert Sanchez

    2003-12-12

    The implementation of x-ray computerized tomography (CT) on agricultural soils has been used in this research to quantify soil physical properties to be compared with standard laboratory (STD) methods. The overall research objective was to more accurately quantify soil physical properties for long-term management systems. Two field studies were conducted at Iowa State University's Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm near Nashua, IA using two different soil management strategies. The first field study was conducted in 1999 using continuous corn crop rotation for soil under chisel plow with no-till treatments. The second study was conducted in 2001 and on soybean crop rotation for the same soil but under chisel plow and no-till practices with wheel track and no-wheel track compaction treatments induced by a tractor-manure wagon. In addition, saturated hydraulic (K{sub s}) conductivity and the convection-dispersion (CDE) model were also applied using long-term soil management systems only during 2001. The results obtained for the 1999 field study revealed no significant differences between treatments and laboratory methods, but significant differences were found at deeper depths of the soil column for tillage treatments. The results for standard laboratory procedure versus CT method showed significant differences at deeper depths for the chisel plow treatment and at the second lower depth for no-till treatment for both laboratory methods. The macroporosity distribution experiment showed significant differences at the two lower depths between tillage practices. Bulk density and percent porosity had significant differences at the two lower depths of the soil column. The results obtained for the 2001 field study showed no significant differences between tillage practices and compaction practices for both laboratory methods, but significant differences between tillage practices with wheel track and no-wheel compaction treatments were found along the soil profile for

  10. Mathematical prediction of imidacloprid persistence in two Croatian soils with different texture, organic matter content and acidity under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Broznić, Dalibor; Milin, Čedomila

    2013-01-01

    In the present laboratory study, persistence of imidacloprid (IMI) as a function of initial insecticide concentration and soil properties in two Croatian soils (Krk sandy clay and Istria clay soils) was studied and described mathematically. Upon fitting the obtained experimental data for the higher concentration level (5 mg/kg) to mathematical models, statistical parameters (R (2), scaled root mean squared error and χ (2) error) indicated that the single first-order kinetics model provided the best prediction of IMI degradation in the Krk sandy clay soil, while in the Istria clay soil biphasic degradation was observed. At the lower concentration level (0.5 mg/kg), the biphasic models Gustafson and Holden models as well as the first-order double exponential model fitted the best experimental data in both soils. The disappearance time (DT50) values estimated by the single first-order double exponential model (from 50 to 132 days) proved that IMI can be categorized as a moderately persistent pesticide. In the Krk sandy clay soil, resulting DT50 values tended to increase with an increase of initial IMI concentration, while in the Istria clay soil, IMI persistence did not depend on the concentration. Organic matter of both experimental soils provided an accelerating effect on the degradation rate. The logistic model demonstrated that the effect of microbial activity was not the most important parameter for the biodegradation of IMI in the Istria clay soil, where IMI degradation could be dominated by chemical processes, such as chemical hydrolysis. The results pointed that mathematical modeling could be considered as the most convenient tool for predicting IMI persistence and contributes to the establishment of adequate monitoring of IMI residues in contaminated soil. Furthermore, IMI usage should be strictly controlled, especially in soils with low organic matter content where the risk of soil and groundwater contamination is much higher due to its longer

  11. Hydro-mechanical constitutive model for unsaturated compacted bentonite-sand mixture (BSM): Laboratory tests, parameter calibrations, modifications, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyanto, D. G.; Man, A. G.; Blatz, J. A.; Dixon, D. A.

    A bentonite-sand mixture (BSM) is one of the clay-based sealing components proposed for use in a Canadian deep geological repository (DGR) for used nuclear fuel. Numerical modelling to assess the overall design of the proposed DGR requires characterisation of the hydraulic-mechanical (H-M) of each of the components of the sealing system, including the BSM. The BSM currently under consideration is a 50/50 mixture (by dry mass) of bentonite and well-graded silica sand, compacted to a dry density of at least 1.67 Mg/m 3. This paper presents the H-M constitutive model parameters, calibrated for BSM specimens under saturated and unsaturated conditions, based on various laboratory tests. A set of parameters for an elastoplastic model for unsaturated soil, Basic Barcelona Model (BBM), have been determined to simulate the mechanical behaviour of the BSM specimen. A set of parameters for van Genuchten’s Soil-Water Characteristic Curve (SWCC) and Kozeny’s hydraulic permeability model have been determined to simulate the hydraulic behaviour of the BSM specimen. Using a finite element computer code, CODE_BRIGHT, these sets of parameters have been used to simulate H-M processes in BSM specimens during water infiltration under constant volume (CV) and constant mean stress (CMS) boundary conditions. The key features of the selected constitutive models that are different from the laboratory tests of the BSM specimen have been summarised. The functions to improve the capability of the selected constitutive models to match the laboratory test results of the BSM specimen have been proposed.

  12. [Effects and mechanisms of plant roots on slope reinforcement and soil erosion resistance: a research review].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan-Mei; Xia, Han-Ping; Li, Zhi-An; Cai, Xi-An

    2007-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in resisting the shallow landslip and topsoil erosion of slopes by raising soil shear strength. Among the models in interpreting the mechanisms of slope reinforcement by plant roots, Wu-Waldron model is a widely accepted one. In this model, the reinforced soil strength by plant roots is positively proportional to average root tensile strength and root area ratio, the two most important factors in evaluating slope reinforcement effect of plant roots. It was found that soil erosion resistance increased with the number of plant roots, though no consistent quantitative functional relationship was observed between them. The increase of soil erosion resistance by plant roots was mainly through the actions of fiber roots less than 1 mm in diameter, while fiber roots enhanced the soil stability to resist water dispersion via increasing the number and diameter of soil water-stable aggregates. Fine roots could also improve soil permeability effectively to decrease runoff and weaken soil erosion.

  13. An Analysis of Agricultural Mechanics Safety Practices in Agricultural Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Michael K.

    North Dakota secondary agricultural mechanics instructors were surveyed regarding instructional methods and materials, safety practices, and equipment used in the agricultural mechanics laboratory. Usable responses were received from 69 of 89 instructors via self-administered mailed questionnaires. Findings were consistent with results of similar…

  14. The influence of artificial macropores on water and solute transport in laboratory soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttle, J. M.; Leigh, D. G.

    1997-04-01

    The role of macropores in infiltration through a sandy loam was studied using laboratory columns pretreated with water possessing a δ 18O signature of -8.7% and 15 mg l -1 Cl -. A simulated snowmelt pulse of δ 18O-depleted water containing 1100 mg l -1 Cl - was added to a control column and two columns containing a single vertical macropore, one continuous and the other discontinuous. Macropores were formed in situ by disintegration of a biodegradable foam thread inserted during column packing. Macropores were 2 mm in diameter, which has been suggested to be the threshold for significant macropore flow given the soil's mean textural pore diameter of 0.41 mm. Meltwater was flushed from the columns by adding two pore volumes of isotopically enriched water containing 15 mg l -1 Cl - at a rate of 17.2 mm day -1. Tensiometers, time domain reflectometry probes and suction samplers were used to monitor matric potential, soil water content and soil water chemistry at 0.1 m intervals down the columns. Column effluent was sampled daily for δ 18O and Cl -. Mobile soil water contents ( θm) and dispersivities (ɛ) were estimated by fitting a one-dimensional analytical solution of the convection-dispersion equation to Cl - breakthrough curves (BTCs). θm increased with depth in all columns, whereas only the discontinuous macropore column showed an increase in ɛ with flow length. Cl - and δ 18O breakthrough occurred earlier at all depths in the macropore columns relative to the control, resulting in larger ɛ values for macroporous soil. ɛ for a given flow length tended to be greatest in the discontinuous macropore column, reflecting the role of internal catchment processes. Macropore presence was associated with decreased θm during infiltration and bimodal BTCs in column effluent. The threshold ratio of macropore-to-micropore diameters at which macropores exert a detectable influence on water transport must be less than that examined here.

  15. Soil-skin adherence from carpet: use of a mechanical chamber to control contact parameters.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alesia C; Bursac, Zoran; Biddle, Deborah; Coleman, Sheire; Johnson, Wayne

    2008-10-01

    A computer-controlled mechanical chamber was used to control the contact between carpet samples laden with soil, and human cadaver skin and cotton sheet samples for the measurement of mass soil transfer. Mass soil transfers were converted to adherence factors (mg/cm2) for use in models that estimate dermal exposure to contaminants found in soil media. The contact parameters of pressure (10 to 50 kPa) and time (10 to 50 sec) were varied for 369 experiments of mass soil transfer, where two soil types (play sand and lawn soil) and two soil sizes (< 139.7 microm and > or = 139.7 < 381) were used. Chamber probes were used to record temperature and humidity. Log transformation of the sand/soil transfers was performed to normalize the distribution. Estimated adjusted means for experimental conditions were exponentiated in order to express them in the original units. Mean soil mass transfer to cadaver skin (0.74 mg/cm2) was higher than to cotton sheets (0.21 mg/cm2). Higher pressure (p < 0.0001), and larger particle size (p < 0.0001) were also all associated with larger amounts of soil transfer. The original model was simplified into two by adherence material type (i.e., cadaver skin and cotton sheets) in order to investigate the differential effects of pressure, time, soil size, and soil type on transfer. This research can be used to improve estimates of dermal exposure to contaminants found in home carpets.

  16. Extraction of petroleum hydrocarbons from soil by mechanical shaking

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, A.P.; Su, J.; Wetzel, S.; Pekarek, S.; Banks, M.K.

    1999-06-01

    A shaking extraction method for petroleum hydrocarbons in soil was developed and compared to Soxhlet extraction. Soxhlet extraction is an EPA-approved method for volatile and semivolatile organic contaminants from solid materials, but it has many disadvantages including long extraction periods and potential loss of volatile compounds. When field-moist soils are used, variability in subsamples is higher, and the extraction of hydrocarbons with a nonpolar solvent may be less efficient. A shaking method was designed to fill the need for simpler and more efficient extraction of petroleum hydrocarbons from soil. A systematic study of extraction conditions was performed for various soil types, soil weights, solvents, extraction times, and extraction cycles. The results were compared to those for Soxhlet extraction. Shaking 1 g of soil with a sequence of three 10-mL aliquots of dichloromethane or acetone was found to be equivalent to Soxhlet extraction for total petroleum hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Shaking with acetone was more consistent than all other methods for the extraction of specific compounds from aged, contaminated soil. The shaking method appears to be applicable to a wide range of soil types and petroleum contaminants but should be compared to Soxhlet extraction for new conditions.

  17. Unsmooth cuticles of soil animals and theoretical analysis of their hydrophobicity and anti-soil-adhesion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xian

    2006-03-15

    Soil adhesion is a natural phenomenon, and it is harmful to terrain machines and tillage equipment that have soil as their work medium, such as automobiles, tractors, earth-moving machines, spades, hoes, and plows. Soil adhesion increases motion resistance and energy consumption, quickens damage to the soil-engaging components, and lowers work quality. The biomimetic research has provided a promising method to solve the soil adhesion problem. In this work, the cuticles of typical soil animals were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their wettability and mechanism of antiadhesion were analyzed in theory. The results of experimental observation have shown that the cuticles of soil animals have different unsmooth appearances, such as pimple-shaped, pit-like, and undee structures. But for the cross sections of the unsmooth cuticles, their common character is undee. Theoretical analysis has indicated that the larger the ratio of the amplitude of the wave to the period of the wave, the stronger the hydrophobicity, the more easily the composite interface between the liquid and the unsmooth cuticles forms, and the function of reducing soil adhesion of the unsmooth cuticles will be better. PMID:16298383

  18. Site study plan for routine laboratory rock mechanics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Site Study Plan for Routine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes routine laboratory testing to be conducted on rock samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study plan describes the early laboratory testing. Additional testing may be required and the type and scope of testing will be dependent upon the results of the early testing. This study provides for measurements of index, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical properties with tests which are standardized and used widely in geotechnical investigations. Another Site Study Plan for Nonroutine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes laboratory testing of samples from the site to determine mechanical, thermomechanical, and thermal properties by less widely used methods, many of which have been developed specifically for characterization of the site. Data from laboratory tests will be used for characterization of rock strata, design of shafts and underground facilities, and modeling of repository behavior in support of resolution of both preclosure and postclosure issues. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Nitrogen mineralization, immobilization, and nitrification following urea fertilization of a forest soil under field and laboratory conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Edwards, N.T.; Todd, D.E.

    1980-05-01

    Following a 200-kg urea-N/ha fertilization in a loblolly pine stand (Pinus taeda), soil mineral N levels (almost entirely NH/sub 4//sup +/) declined from 200 ppM 20 days after fertilization to < 10 ppM within 161 days. Similar patterns had been previously observed following urea fertilization in a Douglas-fir stand. After the decline in soil mineral N, 20% (40 ppM) of fertilizer N was mineralized within 4 weeks of aerobic incubation in the laboratory at 25/sup 0/C. Nitrogen mineralization in control soils did not occur after 7 weeks incubation.

  20. Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J.; Peace, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

  1. HTO and OBT activity concentrations in soil at the historical atmospheric HT release site (Chalk River Laboratories).

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Bredlaw, M; Korolevych, V Y

    2012-01-01

    Tritium is routinely released by the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) nuclear facilities. Three International HT release experiments have been conducted at the CRL site in the past. The site has not been disturbed since the last historical atmospheric testing in 1994 and presents an opportunity to assess the retention of tritium in soil. This study is devoted to the measurement of HTO and OBT activity concentration profiles in the subsurface 25 cm of soil. In terms of soil HTO, there is no evidence from the past HT release experiments that HTO was retained. The HTO activity concentration in the soil pore water appears similar to concentrations found in background areas in Ontario. In contrast, OBT activity concentrations in soil at the same site were significantly higher than HTO activity concentrations in soil. Elevated OBT appears to reside in the top layer of the soil (0-5 cm). In addition, OBT activity concentrations in the top soil layer did not fluctuate much with season, again, quite in contrast with soil HTO. This result suggests that OBT activity concentrations retained the signature of the historical tritium releases.

  2. A laboratory pilot study of thermal decontamination of soils polluted by PCBs. Comparison with thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Risoul, V; Renauld, V; Trouvé, G; Gilot, P

    2002-01-01

    Real soils contaminated with a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls were thermally decontaminated in a laboratory scale thermal desorption apparatus, under different operating conditions including two operating pressures (P= 0.01 and 0.1 MPa), different sample masses (80-320 g), carrier gas flow rates (0-30-280 Nl h(-1)) and two initial contamination levels. A standard European soil artificially contaminated with 4-chlorobiphenyl was decontaminated using a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA). The same parametric study as cited earlier was performed. With both techniques, the extent of decontamination was studied as a function of temperature during the heating programs (2-3 degrees C min(-1) for the thermal desorption apparatus; 5 degrees C min(-1) for TGA). Only a few differences were noticed between the two techniques. The decontamination starts when the melting temperature of the contaminant is reached (30 degrees C) and is complete before 350 degrees C. Thermogravimetric analysis which does not necessitate any chemical analysis appears to be a very attractive technique to investigate the feasibility of a decontamination and to quickly determine the best operating conditions.

  3. Laboratory and field evaluation of the gas treatment approach for insitu remediation of chromate-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, E.C.; Jackson, R.L.

    1994-04-01

    Laboratory scale soil treatment tests have been conducted as part of an effort to develop and implement an in situ chemical treatment approach to the remediation of chromate-contaminated soils through the use of reactive gases. These tests involved three different soil samples that were contaminated with Cr(VI) at the 200 ppM level. Treatment of the contaminated soils was performed by passing 100 ppM and 2000 ppM concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in nitrogen through soil columns until a S:Cr mole ratio of 10:1 was achieved. The treated soils were then leached with groundwater or deionized water and analyzed to assess the extent of chromium immobilization. Test results indicate >90% immobilization of chromium and demonstrate that the treatment process is irreversible. Ongoing developmental efforts are being directed towards the demonstration and evaluation of the gas treatment approach in a field test at a chromate-contaminated site. Major planned activities associated with this demonstration include laboratory testing of waste site soil samples, design of the treatment system and injection/extraction well network, geotechnical and geochemical characterization of the test site, and identification and resolution of regulatory and safety requirements.

  4. Inhibitory and toxic effects of extracellular self-DNA in litter: a mechanism for negative plant-soil feedbacks?

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; Chiusano, Maria Luisa; Termolino, Pasquale; Mingo, Antonio; Senatore, Mauro; Giannino, Francesco; Cartenì, Fabrizio; Rietkerk, Max; Lanzotti, Virginia

    2015-02-01

    Plant-soil negative feedback (NF) is recognized as an important factor affecting plant communities. The objectives of this work were to assess the effects of litter phytotoxicity and autotoxicity on root proliferation, and to test the hypothesis that DNA is a driver of litter autotoxicity and plant-soil NF. The inhibitory effect of decomposed litter was studied in different bioassays. Litter biochemical changes were evaluated with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. DNA accumulation in litter and soil was measured and DNA toxicity was assessed in laboratory experiments. Undecomposed litter caused nonspecific inhibition of root growth, while autotoxicity was produced by aged litter. The addition of activated carbon (AC) removed phytotoxicity, but was ineffective against autotoxicity. Phytotoxicity was related to known labile allelopathic compounds. Restricted (13) C NMR signals related to nucleic acids were the only ones negatively correlated with root growth on conspecific substrates. DNA accumulation was observed in both litter decomposition and soil history experiments. Extracted total DNA showed evident species-specific toxicity. Results indicate a general occurrence of litter autotoxicity related to the exposure to fragmented self-DNA. The evidence also suggests the involvement of accumulated extracellular DNA in plant-soil NF. Further studies are needed to further investigate this unexpected function of extracellular DNA at the ecosystem level and related cellular and molecular mechanisms. PMID:25354164

  5. The Mechanics and Energetics of Soil Bioturbation by Plant Roots and Earthworms - Plastic Deformation Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Siul; Or, Dani; Schymanski, Stanislaus

    2014-05-01

    Soil structure plays a critical factor in the agricultural, hydrological and ecological functions of soils. These services are adversely impacted by soil compaction, a damage that could last for many years until functional structure is restored. An important class of soil structural restoration processes are related to biomechanical activity associated with burrowing of earthworms and root proliferation in impacted soil volumes. We study details of the mechanical processes and energetics associated with quantifying the rates and mechanical energy required for soil structural restoration. We first consider plastic cavity expansion to describe earthworm and plant root radial expansion under various conditions. We then use cone penetration models as analogues to wedging induced by root tip growth and worm locomotion. The associated mechanical stresses and strains determine the mechanical energy associated with bioturbation for different hydration conditions and root/earthworm geometries. Results illustrate a reduction in strain energy with increasing water content and trade-offs between pressure and energy investment for various root and earthworm geometries. The study provides the basic building blocks for estimating rates of soil structural alteration, the associated energetic requirements (soil carbon, plant assimilates) needed to sustain structure regeneration by earthworms and roots, and highlights potential mechanical cut-offs for such activities.

  6. Laboratory measurements of nitric oxide release from forest soil with a thick organic layer under different understory types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargsten, A.; Falge, E.; Huwe, B.; Meixner, F. X.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in the photochemistry of the troposphere. NO from soil contributes up to 40% to the global budget of atmospheric NO. Soil NO emissions are primarily caused by biological activity (nitrification and denitrification), that occurs in the uppermost centimetres of the soil, a soil region often characterized by high contents of organic material. Most studies of NO emission potentials to date have investigated mineral soil layers. In our study we sampled soil organic matter under different understories (moss, grass, spruce and blueberries) in a humid mountainous Norway spruce forest plantation in the Fichtelgebirge (Germany). We performed laboratory incubation and fumigation experiments using a customized chamber technique to determine the response of net potential NO flux to physical and chemical soil conditions (water content and temperature, bulk density, particle density, pH, C/N ratio, organic C, soil ammonium, soil nitrate). Net potential NO fluxes (in terms of mass of N) from soils of different understories ranged from 1.7-9.8 ng m-2 s-1 (grass and moss), 55.4-59.3 ng m-2 s-1 (spruce), and 43.7-114.6 ng m-2 s-1 (blueberry) at optimum water content and a soil temperature of 10°C. The water content for optimum net potential NO flux ranged between 0.76 and 0.8 gravimetric soil moisture for moss, between 1.0 and 1.1 for grass, 1.1 and 1.2 for spruce, and 1.3 and 1.9 for blueberries. Effects of soil physical and chemical characteristics on net potential NO flux were statistically significant (0.01 probability level) only for NH4+. Therefore, the effects of biogenic factors like understory type, amount of roots, and degree of mycorrhization on soil biogenic NO emission are discussed; they have the potential to explain the observed different of net potential NO fluxes. Quantification of NO emissions from the upmost soil layer is therefore an important step to quantify soil NO emissions in ecosystems with substantial organic soil

  7. Analysis of background distributions of metals in the soil at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, David; Baskin, David; Brown, Dennis; Lund, Loren; Najita, Julie; Javandel, Iraj

    2009-03-15

    As part of its Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (CAP), the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Restoration Program conducted an evaluation of naturally occurring metals in soils at the facility. The purpose of the evaluation was to provide a basis for determining if soils at specific locations contained elevated concentrations of metals relative to ambient conditions. Ambient conditions (sometimes referred to as 'local background') are defined as concentrations of metals in the vicinity of a site, but which are unaffected by site-related activities (Cal-EPA 1997). Local background concentrations of 17 metals were initially estimated by LBNL using data from 498 soil samples collected from borings made during the construction of 71 groundwater monitoring wells (LBNL 1995). These concentration values were estimated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) guidance that was available at that time (USEPA 1989). Since that time, many more soil samples were collected and analyzed for metals by the Environmental Restoration Program. In addition, the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal-EPA) subsequently published a recommended approach for calculating background concentrations of metals at hazardous waste sites and permitted facilities (Cal-EPA 1997). This more recent approach differs from that recommended by the USEPA and used initially by LBNL (LBNL 2002). The purpose of the 2002 report was to apply the recommended Cal-EPA procedure to the expanded data set for metals that was available at LBNL. This revision to the 2002 report has been updated to include more rigorous tests of normality, revisions to the statistical methods used for some metals based on the results of the normality tests, and consideration of the depth-dependence of some sample results. As a result of these modifications, estimated background concentrations for some metals have been slightly revised from

  8. Lunar surface engineering properties experiment definition. Volume 2: Mechanics of rolling sphere-soil slope interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovland, H. J.; Mitchell, J. K.

    1971-01-01

    The soil deformation mode under the action of a rolling sphere (boulder) was determined, and a theory based on actual soil failure mechanism was developed which provides a remote reconnaissance technique for study of soil conditions using boulder track observations. The failure mechanism was investigated by using models and by testing an instrumented spherical wheel. The wheel was specifically designed to measure contact pressure, but it also provided information on the failure mechanism. Further tests included rolling some 200 spheres down sand slopes. Films were taken of the rolling spheres, and the tracks were measured. Implications of the results and reevaluation of the lunar boulder tracks are discussed.

  9. Transport mechanisms of soil-bound mercury in the erosion process during rainfall-runoff events.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Luo, Xiaolin; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Xin; Zhang, Juan; Han, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Soil contamination by mercury (Hg) is a global environmental issue. In watersheds with a significant soil Hg storage, soil erosion during rainfall-runoff events can result in nonpoint source (NPS) Hg pollution and therefore, can extend its environmental risk from soils to aquatic ecosystems. Nonetheless, transport mechanisms of soil-bound Hg in the erosion process have not been explored directly, and how different fractions of soil organic matter (SOM) impact transport is not fully understood. This study investigated transport mechanisms based on rainfall-runoff simulation experiments. The experiments simulated high-intensity and long-duration rainfall conditions, which can produce significant soil erosion and NPS pollution. The enrichment ratio (ER) of total mercury (THg) was the key variable in exploring the mechanisms. The main study findings include the following: First, the ER-sediment flux relationship for Hg depends on soil composition, and no uniform ER-sediment flux function exists for different soils. Second, depending on soil composition, significantly more Hg could be released from a less polluted soil in the early stage of large rainfall events. Third, the heavy fraction of SOM (i.e., the remnant organic matter coating on mineral particles) has a dominant influence on the enrichment behavior and transport mechanisms of Hg, while clay mineral content exhibits a significant, but indirect, influence. The study results imply that it is critical to quantify the SOM composition in addition to total organic carbon (TOC) for different soils in the watershed to adequately model the NPS pollution of Hg and spatially prioritize management actions in a heterogeneous watershed.

  10. Changes in soil hydraulic properties caused by construction of a simulated waste trench at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shakofsky, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    In order to assess the effect of filled waste disposal trenches on transport-governing soil properties, comparisons were made between profiles of undisturbed soil and disturbed soil in a simulated waste trench. The changes in soil properties induced by the construction of a simulated waste trench were measured near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the semi-arid southeast region of Idaho. The soil samples were collected, using a hydraulically- driven sampler to minimize sample disruption, from both a simulated waste trench and an undisturbed area nearby. Results show that the undisturbed profile has distinct layers whose properties differ significantly, whereas the soil profile in the simulated waste trench is. by comparison, homogeneous. Porosity was increased in the disturbed cores, and, correspondingly, saturated hydraulic conductivities were on average three times higher. With higher soil-moisture contents (greater than 0.32), unsaturated hydraulic conductivities for the undisturbed cores were typically greater than those for the disturbed cores. With lower moisture contents, most of the disturbed cores had greater hydraulic conductivities. The observed differences in hydraulic conductivities are interpreted and discussed as changes in the soil pore geometry.

  11. Effect of soil disturbance on recharging fluxes: Case study on the Snake River Plain, Idaho National Laboratory, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Perkins, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    Soil structural disturbance influences the downward flow of water that percolates deep enough to become aquifer recharge. Data from identical experiments in an undisturbed silt-loam soil and in an adjacent simulated waste trench composed of the same soil material, but disturbed, included (1) laboratory- and field-measured unsaturated hydraulic properties and (2) field-measured transient water content profiles through 24 h of ponded infiltration and 75 d of redistribution. In undisturbed soil, wetting fronts were highly diffuse above 2 m depth, and did not go much deeper than 2 m. Darcian analysis suggests an average recharge rate less than 2 mm/year. In disturbed soil, wetting fronts were sharp and initial infiltration slower; water moved slowly below 2 m without obvious impediment. Richards' equation simulations with realistic conditions predicted sharp wetting fronts, as observed for disturbed soil. Such simulations were adequate for undisturbed soil only if started from a post-initial moisture distribution that included about 3 h of infiltration. These late-started simulations remained good, however, through the 76 d of data. Overall results suggest the net effect of soil disturbance, although it reduces preferential flow, may be to increase recharge by disrupting layer contrasts. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  12. Changes in soil hydraulic properties caused by construction of a simulated waste trench at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Shakofsky, S.

    1995-03-01

    In order to assess the effect of filled waste disposal trenches on transport-governing soil properties, comparisons were made between profiles of undisturbed soil and disturbed soil in a simulated waste trench. The changes in soil properties induced by the construction of a simulated waste trench were measured near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the semiarid southeast region of Idaho. The soil samples were collected, using a hydraulically-driven sampler to minimize sample disruption, from both a simulated waste trench and an undisturbed area nearby. Results show that the undisturbed profile has distinct layers whose properties differ significantly, whereas the soil profile in the simulated waste trench is, by comparison, homogeneous. Porosity was increased in the disturbed cores, and, correspondingly, saturated hydraulic conductivities were on average three times higher. With higher soil-moisture contents (greater than 0.32), unsaturated hydraulic conductivities for the undisturbed cores were typically greater than those for the disturbed cores. With lower moisture contents, most of the disturbed cores had greater hydraulic conductivities. The observed differences in hydraulic conductivities are interpreted and discussed as changes in the soil pore geometry.

  13. A laboratory evaluation of ammonia volatilization and nitrate leaching following nitrogen fertilizer application on a coarse-textured soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a series of field studies, differing rainfall patterns within the first month after nitrogen (N) fertilizer application to a coarse-textured soil significantly affected yields and N-use efficiency of irrigated corn (Zea mays L.), and responses varied with N source. A laboratory study was conducte...

  14. Interactive assessment of the splash erosion and aggregate breakdown mechanism for the soils of different semi-arid land uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deviren Saygin, S.; Erpul, G.

    2012-04-01

    Aggregate breakdown mechanism is the most important process in splash erosion, producing the detached particles which are more easily transportable. In this study we aimed to determine the relationships between splash erosion and aggregate stability in laboratory conditions using the soils of three different land uses (agricultural land, grassland and forest). The rainfall simulations were conducted with the slope degrees (%9, 15 and 20) under two rainfall intensities (80 and 120 mm h-1). The soil samples were taken from a semi arid catchment, located in Ankara, Turkey. Before located into the test pans for rainfall simulations, the soils were sieved between 8 and 0.25 mm sieve size to obtain macro aggregate sizes and then wetted to bring them at saturation. To collect the splashed soil aggregates, the splash panels were located along two sides of a pan. Splashed particles by raindrop impacts were sampled every 5 min during 60 min rainfall simulations. Soil aggregate breakdown was evaluated by the mean weight diameter values (MWD, mm) of the collected splash sediments. The results indicated that aggregate size distributions were mostly changed with the land uses types. The MWD values were between 0.32 and 0.68 mm; 0.35 and 0.56 mm; and 0.53 and 1.20 mm for the soils of the agricultural land, grassland and forest, respectively. The forest soils having higher soil organic carbon content than those of agricultural land and grassland had more stable soil structure under destructive rainfall conditions (*P < 0.05) than grassland and agricultural area. The differences in the soil organic carbon content played a very crucial role in protecting the soils of the semi arid ecosystem against the aggregate breakdown by the splash erosion process. Additionally, the highest sediment amount was obtained with the rainfall simulations over the agricultural soils. Increases in the rainfall intensity or in the rainfall energy flux also resulted in MWD variations for the splash

  15. The mechanisms for 1,3-dichloropropene dissipation in biochar-amended soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar has the potential to reduce fumigant emissions to protect air quality; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to determine effects of biochar properties, amendment rate, soil moisture, temperature, and soil type on degradation and adsorption charact...

  16. Apollo program soil mechanics experiment. [interaction of the lunar module with the lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    The soil mechanics investigation was conducted to obtain information relating to the landing interaction of the lunar module (LM) with the lunar surface, and lunar soil erosion caused by the spacecraft engine exhaust. Results obtained by study of LM landing performance on each Apollo mission are summarized.

  17. Laboratory investigation of boundary condition impacts on nitrate anion exclusion in an unsaturated soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transient unsaturated horizontal column experiments were conducted with a loam soil, under variable boundary conditions, to obtain added insight on anion exclusion processes that impact nitrate transport in soil. The boundary conditions evaluated were column inlet soil water content, initial soil w...

  18. Mechanisms controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential application for enhancing carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrow, Julie D.; Amonette, James E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2007-01-01

    Two major mechanisms, (bio)chemical alteration and physicochemical protection, stabilize soil organic carbon (SOC) and thereby control soil carbon turnover. With (bio)chemical alteration, SOC is transformed by biotic and abiotic processes to chemical forms that are more resistant to decomposition and, in some cases, more easily retained by sorption to soil solids. With physicochemical protection, biochemical attack of SOC is inhibited by organomineral interactions at molecular to millimeter scales. Stabilization of otherwise decomposable SOM can occur via sorption to soil surfaces, complexation with soil minerals, occlusion within aggregates, and deposition in pores inaccessible to decomposers and extracellular enzymes. Soil structure (i.e., the arrangement of solids and pores in the soil) is a master integrating variable that both controls and indicates the SOC stabilization status of a soil. To enhance SOC sequestration, the best option is to modify the soil physicochemical environment to favor the activities of fungi. Specific practices that accomplish this include minimizing tillage, maintaining a near-neutral soil pH and an adequate base cation exchange capacity (particularly Ca), ensuring adequate drainage, and minimizing erosion by water and wind. In some soils, amendments with various high-specific-surface micro- and mesoporous sorbents such as fly ash or charcoal can be beneficial.

  19. Warming-enhanced preferential microbial mineralization of humified boreal forest soil organic matter: Interpretation of soil profiles along a climate transect using laboratory incubations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei; Ziegler, Susan; Lane, Chad S.; Billings, Sharon A.

    2012-06-01

    Humified soil organic matter storage in boreal forests is large, and its responses to warming over relatively long timescales is critical for predicting soil feedbacks to climate change. To derive information relevant across decades to centuries from manipulative short-term experiments, we conducted incubations of soils from two forested sites along the Newfoundland-Labrador Boreal Ecosystem Latitude Transect in eastern Canada and assessed linkages between incubation data and these sites' profile characteristics. The sites differ in mean annual temperature by 3.4°C, but vegetation and soil types are similar. Organic soils (Oe + Oa) were incubated for 120 days at 15°C and 20°C, with and without a replaced Oi subhorizon possessing a distinct δ13C signature. Laboratory warming induced significantly greater mineralization and leaching of humified SOM relative to replaced Oi, congruent with greater warming-induced increases in phenol oxidase activity relative to enzymes associated with labile C acquisition (percent increases of 101% versus 50%, respectively). These data suggest that warming can influence microbial communities and their enzymatic dynamics such that relative losses of humified SOM are disproportionately enhanced. This is consistent with stable isotopic, C:N, and radiocarbon profile differences between the two sites, which suggest a greater degree of microbial processing and greater relative losses of older SOC over the preceding decades at the warmer site, given our knowledge of organic inputs in these soils. This study is a first step toward linking the divergent timescales represented by soil profiles and laboratory manipulations, an important goal for biogeochemists assessing climate change impacts on SOM dynamics.

  20. Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories/NM, Tonopah Test Range environs, 1994-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Deola, Regina Anne; Oldewage, Hans D.; Herrera, Heidi M.; Miller, Mark Laverne

    2006-05-01

    From 1994 through 2005, the Environmental Management Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), NV, has collected soil samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for the purpose of determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at TTR. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory of metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were increasing or decreasing trends which indicated that further investigation may be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Management Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

  1. Field and Laboratory Studies of Radiocesium Transfers in Soil-Water Environment at Fukushima Prefecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanba, K.; Zheleznyak, M.; Konoplev, A.; Wakiyama, Y.; Golosov, V.; Wada, T.; Tsukada, H.

    2015-12-01

    The systematic monitoring studies of radiocesium concentrations in suspended sediments and water of the Abukuma River, the largest river of Fukushima prefecture, and its tributaries at the vicinity of Fukushima city have started in Fukushima University at the end of 2011. The scale of these field studies was extended after establishment in 2013 new Institute of Environmental Radioactivity at Fukushima University which posses the comprehensive laboratory base. The field measurements of hydrochemical water parameters and concentrations of radiocesium in water and sediments are provided in the rivers of northern coastal zone of Fukushima province with the most comprehensive program for Niida River basin. The radiocesium dynamics is studied in Sakashita Reservoir and heavily contaminated irrigation ponds of Okuma town in the vicinity of FDNPP, Takanokura Reservoir, Inawashiro Lake, Hibara Lake. Comparative analysis is provided for radiocaesium wash-off parameters and distribution coefficient in rivers and surface runoff on Fukushima and Chernobyl contaminated areas for the first years after the accidents. It is found that radiocaesium distribution coefficient in rivers of Fukushima is essentially higher (1-2 orders of magnitude) than correspondent values for rivers and surface runoff of the Chernobyl zone. Normalized dissolved wash-off coefficients for watersheds of Fukushima are at least 1 order of magnitude lower correspondent values for Chernobyl zone. Normalized particulate wash-off coefficients are comparable for Fukushima and Chernobyl. Presented are results of the investigation of radiocesium vertical distribution in soils of the close-in area of the FDNPP: Okuma town and Niida River basin. It is shown that radiocesium dispersion in undisturbed forest and grassland soils at Fukushima contaminated area is significantly faster as compared to the Chernobyl 30-km zone during the first three years after the accidents.

  2. CRADA with the Belhaven group and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-081): Automated soil moisture measuring systems. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The objectives of this project were to (1) develop an improved, full- scale, inexpensive, soil moisture sensor, using innovative porous ceramic materials as the moisture wicking component and (2) demonstrate the performance of the sensor in the laboratory and in field to determine its reliability and accuracy. The opportunity for this project arose as a result of an inquiry from Belhaven to whom the soil moisture sensor developed at PNNL by John Cary was licensed. The existing Cary sensor needed research and development effort in order to create the type of soil moisture sensor envisioned by the Belhaven for use in an integrated soil moisture systems in the field. PNNL was identified as being uniquely qualified to participate in this Collaborative project.

  3. Modeling of salt-water migration through spod-podzolic soils under the field and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhina, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of highly mineralized water influence on soils is an important issue in the contemporary world. Various regions with different conditions are exposed to salt-affected soils forming. Salinization of soils is a complex process of the chemical and physical properties changes. Therefore the chain of the laboratory and field experiments should be done in order to assess the main factors promoting highly mineralized water migration. In addition to it modelling is a good way to understand and evaluate main chemical and physical transformations in soils. The chain of experiments was done to assess salt water movement in spod-podzolic soils under field and laboratory conditions. The main goals were to evaluate the rate of salt water movement through soils and to estimate velocity of the desalinization process. Field experiment was conducted on spod-podzolic soils of Kaliningrad region. There were 4 sites measuring 20*25 cm watering with salt water in amount of 5 liters per each area. The mineralization of the solution was 100 g/l. In addition to the salt affected sites, 2 non polluted grounds were assessed too. Soils samples were collected in the period of 1 week, 1 month, 3 month and 1 year after the spill had been done. The samples were taken each 10 cm 110 cm deep and in double repeatability. Main chemical and physical parameters, such as volume water content, pH, conductivity, amount of calcium ion, magnesium, sodium, and chlorite in soils etc. were measured in each sample. The second experiment was conducted to evaluate the rate of soils solutions transformation under the laboratory conditions. Organic horizon was taken from the field and was stuffed in columns with 1.0 g/cm3 density. There were 16 columns with 4 cm diameter. 14 columns were showered with salt water with the same mineralization as in the field experiment. The amount of salt water injected in columns was 104 mm per one sample which is equal to the salt water volume spilled per one area in

  4. Mechanisms controlling soil carbon sequestration under atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Sinsabaugh; D.R. Zak; D.L. Moorhead

    2008-02-19

    Increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can alter the processing and storage of organic carbon in soils. In 2000, we began studying the effects of simulated atmospheric N deposition on soil carbon dynamics in three types of northern temperate forest that occur across a wide geographic range in the Upper Great Lakes region. These ecosystems range from 100% oak in the overstory (black oak-white oak ecosystem; BOWO) to 0% overstory oak (sugar maple-basswood; SMBW) and include the sugar maple-red oak ecosystem (SMRO) that has intermediate oak abundance. The leaf litter biochemistry of these ecosystems range from highly lignified litter (BOWO) to litter of low lignin content (SMBW). We selected three replicate stands of each ecosystem type and established three plots in each stand. Each plot was randomly assigned one of three levels of N deposition (0, 30 & 80 kg N ha-1 y-1) imposed by adding NaNO3 in six equal increments applied over the growing season. Through experiments ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem scales, we produced a conceptual framework that describes the biogeochemistry of soil carbon storage in N-saturated ecosystems as the product of interactions between the composition of plant litter, the composition of the soil microbial community and the expression of extracellular enzyme activities. A key finding is that atmospheric N deposition can increase or decrease the soil C storage by modifying the expression of extracellular enzymes by soil microbial communities. The critical interactions within this conceptual framework have been incorporated into a new class of simulations called guild decomposition models.

  5. Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Constitutive Model for Vegetated Soils: Validation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switala, Barbara Maria; Veenhof, Rick; Wu, Wei; Askarinejad, Amin

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, that presence of vegetation influences stability of the slope. However, the quantitative assessment of this contribution remains challenging. It is essential to develop a numerical model, which combines mechanical root reinforcement and root water uptake, and allows modelling rainfall induced landslides of vegetated slopes. Therefore a novel constitutive formulation is proposed, which is based on the modified Cam-clay model for unsaturated soils. Mechanical root reinforcement is modelled introducing a new constitutive parameter, which governs the evolution of the Cam-clay failure surface with the degree of root reinforcement. Evapotranspiration is modelled in terms of the root water uptake, defined as a sink term in the water flow continuity equation. The original concept is extended for different shapes of the root architecture in three dimensions, and combined with the mechanical model. The model is implemented in the research finite element code Comes-Geo, and in the commercial software Abaqus. The formulation is tested, performing a series of numerical examples, which allow validation of the concept. The direct shear test and the triaxial test are modelled in order to test the performance of the mechanical part of the model. In order to validate the hydrological part of the constitutive formulation, evapotranspiration from the vegetated box is simulated and compared with the experimental results. Obtained numerical results exhibit a good agreement with the experimental data. The implemented model is capable of reproducing results of basic geotechnical laboratory tests. Moreover, the constitutive formulation can be used to model rainfall induced landslides of vegetated slopes, taking into account the most important factors influencing the slope stability (root reinforcement and evapotranspiration).

  6. Field and laboratory assessments on dissolution and fractionation of Pb from spent and unspent shots in the rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yohey

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of plant root growth on Pb dissolution from shot under laboratory and field-scale conditions. For a laboratory study, a 100-d incubation experiment was conducted to assess Pb dissolution from unspent shot (new) and spent shot (>10yr in fields) in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere (bulk) soils using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and sequential extraction methods. This study found that increasing the soil pH value to 7.5 by liming significantly reduced Pb dissolution from unspent and spent shot (<5mgL(-1)). Dissolution of Pb from shot was induced more in rhizosphere than bulk soils. Regardless of shot types, the averaged TCLP-Pb concentration in acidic and limed soils was 12.9- and 8.1-fold greater in rhizosphere than in bulk soils, respectively. For a field-scale investigation, a total of 31 individual plant samples of 6 different species and their rhizosphere soils were collected from a clay-target shooting range (<35000mgPbkg(-1)). The Pb concentration in plant aboveground tissues depended on species with a mean value of 72mgkg(-1) (15-254mgkg(-1)), which was far smaller than that reported in previous studies. Regardless of high soil Pb levels, aboveground tissue Pb concentrations of Solidago altissima (i.e., Canada goldenrod, 15mgkg(-1)) and Andropogon virginicus (i.e., broomsedge, 18mgkg(-1)) were below the toxicity threshold, suggesting that these indigenous species could have phytostabilization potentials. The limited Pb accumulation by vegetation was attributed to the abundance of soil calcite derived from spent clay-target fragments.

  7. Field and laboratory assessments on dissolution and fractionation of Pb from spent and unspent shots in the rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yohey

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of plant root growth on Pb dissolution from shot under laboratory and field-scale conditions. For a laboratory study, a 100-d incubation experiment was conducted to assess Pb dissolution from unspent shot (new) and spent shot (>10yr in fields) in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere (bulk) soils using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and sequential extraction methods. This study found that increasing the soil pH value to 7.5 by liming significantly reduced Pb dissolution from unspent and spent shot (<5mgL(-1)). Dissolution of Pb from shot was induced more in rhizosphere than bulk soils. Regardless of shot types, the averaged TCLP-Pb concentration in acidic and limed soils was 12.9- and 8.1-fold greater in rhizosphere than in bulk soils, respectively. For a field-scale investigation, a total of 31 individual plant samples of 6 different species and their rhizosphere soils were collected from a clay-target shooting range (<35000mgPbkg(-1)). The Pb concentration in plant aboveground tissues depended on species with a mean value of 72mgkg(-1) (15-254mgkg(-1)), which was far smaller than that reported in previous studies. Regardless of high soil Pb levels, aboveground tissue Pb concentrations of Solidago altissima (i.e., Canada goldenrod, 15mgkg(-1)) and Andropogon virginicus (i.e., broomsedge, 18mgkg(-1)) were below the toxicity threshold, suggesting that these indigenous species could have phytostabilization potentials. The limited Pb accumulation by vegetation was attributed to the abundance of soil calcite derived from spent clay-target fragments. PMID:24094771

  8. Understanding the mechanism behind the nitrous acid (HONO) emissions from the northern soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Hem Raj; Siljanen, Henri MP; Biasi, Christina; Maljanen, Marja

    2016-04-01

    The interest of the flux of nitrous acid (HONO) from soils has recently increased. HONO is an important source of the oxidant OH- radical in the troposphere and thus results a reduction of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the atmosphere. Soils have been recently found to be potential sources of HONO as these emissions are linked to other nitrogen cycle processes, especially presence of nitrite in soils. Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been suggested as possible yet substantial sources of HONO. Along with soil pH, other physical properties such as C:N, nitrogen availability, soil moisture and temperature may effect HONO emissions. Our preliminary results demonstrate that drained acidic peatlands with a low C:N produces higher NO, N2O and HONO emissions compared to those in pristine peatlands and upland forest soils. This study will identify the hotspots and the process involved in HONO emissions in northern ecosystems. Along with HONO, we will examine the emissions of NO and N2O to quantify the related N-gases emitted. These results will add a new piece of information in our knowledge of the nitrogen cycle. Soil samples will be collected from several boreal and arctic sites in Finland, Sweden and Russia. In the laboratory, soil samples will be manipulated based on previously described soil physical properties. This will be followed by labelling experiment coupled with selective nitrification inhibitor experiment in the soils. Our first hypothesis is that northern ecosystems are sources of HONO. Second, is that the soil properties (C:N ratio, moisture, N-availability, pH) regulate the magnitude of HONO emissions from northern soils. Third is that the first step of nitrification (ammonium oxidation) is the main pathway to produce HONO. This study will show that the northern ecosystems could be sources of HONO and therefore increasing the oxidizing capacity of the lower atmosphere.

  9. [Variation of soil respiration and its underlying mechanism in grasslands of northern China].

    PubMed

    Hou, Jian-Feng; Lü, Xiao-Tao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peng

    2014-10-01

    Soil respiration is one of the most important variables in terrestrial ecosystem progresses and global carbon cycle, and determines the CO2 flux from soil to atmosphere. Soil respiration also has great implications for predicting regional and even global carbon cycle changes under the background of global climate change. We measured respiration rates of soil samples collected from northern China grassland transect by short term incubation experiment in laboratory. Results showed that soil respiration rates increased with mean annual precipitation (MAP) from west sites to east sites, ranging from 0.35 to 2.09 μg CO2-C · g(-1) · h(-1). The variation range of soil respiration rates were 0.35-0.73 μg CO2-C · g(-1) · h(-1) with MAP < 100 mm, 0.57-0.98 μg CO2-C · g(-1) · h(-1) with MAP between 100 mm and 200 mm and 0.83-2.10 μg CO2-C · g(-1) · h(-1) with MAP > 300 mm, respectively. Soil respiration had a significant positive relationship with MAP, aboveground biomass, soil organic carbon and nitrogen content, while had a negative relationship with mean annual temperature and soil pH. Analysis of boosted regression tree showed that the predictors accounted for the explained variation included MAP (25.5%), aboveground biomass (23.6%), soil organic carbon content (18.3%) and soil organic nitrogen content (12.5%), and soil pH and mean annual tem- perature only explained 10.8% and 9.2% of the total variation, respectively.

  10. Laboratory and field verification of a method to estimate the extent of petroleum biodegradation in soil.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Gregory S; Hardenstine, Jeffery H; Liu, Bo; Uhler, Allen D

    2012-08-01

    We describe a new and rapid quantitative approach to assess the extent of aerobic biodegradation of volatile and semivolatile hydrocarbons in crude oil, using Shushufindi oil from Ecuador as an example. Volatile hydrocarbon biodegradation was both rapid and complete-100% of the benzene, toluene, xylenes (BTEX) and 98% of the gasoline-range organics (GRO) were biodegraded in less than 2 days. Severe biodegradation of the semivolatile hydrocarbons occurred in the inoculated samples with 67% and 87% loss of the diesel-range hydrocarbons (DRO) in 3 and 20 weeks, respectively. One-hundred percent of the naphthalene, fluorene, and phenanthrene, and 46% of the chrysene in the oil were biodegraded within 3 weeks. Percent depletion estimates based on C(30) 17α,21β(H)-hopane (hopane) underestimated the diesel-range organics (DRO) and USEPA 16 priority pollutant PAH losses in the most severely biodegraded samples. The C(28) 20S-triaromatic steroid (TAS) was found to yield more accurate depletion estimates, and a new hopane stability ratio (HSR = hopane/(hopane + TAS)) was developed to monitor hopane degradation in field samples. Oil degradation within field soil samples impacted with Shushufindi crude oil was 83% and 98% for DRO and PAH, respectively. The gas chromatograms and percent depletion estimates indicated that similar levels of petroleum degradation occurred in both the field and laboratory samples, but hopane degradation was substantially less in the field samples. We conclude that cometabolism of hopane may be a factor during rapid biodegradation of petroleum in the laboratory and may not occur to a great extent during biodegradation in the field. We recommend that the hopane stability ratio be monitored in future field studies. If hopane degradation is observed, then the TAS percent depletion estimate should be computed to correct for any bias that may result in petroleum depletion estimates based on hopane.

  11. Virtual Laboratories to Achieve Higher-Order Learning in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. S.; Gooseff, M. N.; Toto, R.

    2009-12-01

    Bloom’s higher-order cognitive skills (analysis, evaluation, and synthesis) are recognized as necessary in engineering education, yet these are difficult to achieve in traditional lecture formats. Laboratory components supplement traditional lectures in an effort to emphasize active learning and provide higher-order challenges, but these laboratories are often subject to the constraints of (a) increasing student enrollment, (b) limited funding for operational, maintenance, and instructional expenses and (c) increasing demands on undergraduate student credit requirements. Here, we present results from a pilot project implementing virtual (or online) laboratory experiences as an alternative to a traditional laboratory experience in Fluid Mechanics, a required third year course. Students and faculty were surveyed to identify the topics that were most difficult, and virtual laboratory and design components developed to supplement lecture material. Each laboratory includes a traditional lab component, requiring student analysis and evaluation. The lab concludes with a design exercise, which imposes additional problem constraints and allows students to apply their laboratory observations to a real-world situation.

  12. Soil bioturbation by earthworms and plant roots- mechanical and energetic considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, S.; Or, D.; Schymanski, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Soil structure is a key factor shaping hydrological and ecological functions including water storage, deep recharge and plant growth. Compaction adversely impacts soil ecosystem services over extended periods (years to decades) until structure and functionality are restored. An important class of soil structural restoration processes are related to biomechanical activity associated with borrowing of earthworms and root proliferation in impacted soils. This study employs a new biomechanical model to estimate stresses required for earthworm and plant root bioturbation under different conditions and the mechanical energy required. We consider steady state plastic cavity expansion to determine burrowing pressures of earthworms and plant roots as linked with models for cone penetration required for initial burrowing into soil volumes. We use earthworm physical and ecological parameters (e.g., population density, burrowing rate, and burrowing behavior) to convert mechanical deformation to estimation of energy and soil organic carbon (energy source for earthworms). Results illustrate a reduction in strain energy with increasing water content and trade-offs between pressure and energy investment for various root and earthworm geometries and soil hydration. The study provides a quantitative framework for estimating energy costs of bioturbation in terms of soil organic carbon or plant assimilates and delineates mechanical and hydration conditions that promote or constrain such activities.

  13. Testing Plastic Deformations of Materials in the Introductory Undergraduate Mechanics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romo-Kroger, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Normally, a mechanics laboratory at the undergraduate level includes an experiment to verify compliance with Hooke's law in materials, such as a steel spring and an elastic rubber band. Stress-strain curves are found for these elements. Compression in elastic bands is practically impossible to achieve due to flaccidity. A typical experiment for…

  14. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume I. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the first volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the 12 lessons included in this volume are selecting tractors and engines, diagnosing engine conditions, servicing electrical systems, servicing cooling systems, servicing fuel and…

  15. Treatment of Aroclor 1016 contaminated soil by hydrogen peroxide: laboratory column study.

    PubMed

    Viisimaa, Marika; Veressinina, Jelena; Goi, Anna

    2012-09-01

    The potential and feasibility of treating soil contaminated with electrical insulating oil, Aroclor 1016, containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with stabilized hydrogen peroxide were evaluated using columns packed with soils of two different matrixes. The column experiments showed that PCBs degraded by the stabilized hydrogen peroxide treatment in both soil matrixes, although the efficacy of the treatment depended strongly on the soil characteristics. The removal of PCB-containing oil was higher in sandy silt soil than in sandy soil. While a higher iron content promoted hydrogen peroxide oxidation of the contaminant in sandy silt soil, lower permeability and higher organic matter content contributed to an oxidation decrease as a function of depth. Dehydrogenase activity measurements indicated no substantial changes in microbial activity during the treatment of both sandy and sandy silt soils, thus offering opportunities to apply the hydrogen peroxide treatment to the remediation of PCB-contaminated soil.

  16. [Effects of biochar on soil nitrogen cycle and related mechanisms: a review].

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi-Fan; Yang, Min; Dong, Da; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2013-09-01

    Biochar has its unique physical and chemical properties, playing a significant role in soil amelioration, nutrient retention, fertility improvement, and carbon storage, and being a hotspot in the research areas of soil ecosystem, biogeochemical cycling, and agricultural carbon sequestration. As a kind of anthropogenic materials, biochar has the potential in controlling soil nitrogen (N) cycle directly or indirectly, and thus, has profound effects on soil ecological functions. This paper reviewed the latest literatures regarding the effects of biochar applications on soil N cycle, with the focuses on the nitrogen species adsorption and the biochemical processes (nitrification, denitrification, and nitrogen fixation) , and analyzed the related action mechanisms of biochar. The future research areas for better understanding the interactions between biochar and soil N cycle were proposed.

  17. Impact of temperature on the aging mechanisms of arsenic in soils: fractionation and bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guanxing; Chen, Zongyu; Wang, Jia; Hou, Qinxuan; Zhang, Ying

    2016-03-01

    The present study focused on the influence of temperature variation on the aging mechanisms of arsenic in soils. The results showed that higher temperature aggravated the decrease of more mobilizable fractions and the increase of less mobilizable or immobilizable fractions in soils over time. During the aging process, the redistribution of both carbonate-bound fraction and specifically sorbed and organic-bound fraction in soils occurred at various temperatures, and the higher temperature accelerated the redistribution of specifically sorbed and organic-bound fraction. The aging processes of arsenic in soils at different temperatures were characterized by several stages, and the aging processes were not complete within 180 days. Arsenic bioaccessibility in soils decreased significantly by the aging, and the decrease was intensified by the higher temperature. In terms of arsenic bioaccessibility, higher temperature accelerated the aging process of arsenic in soils remarkably.

  18. A laboratory-scale riffle-bed reactor system for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.B.; Quaisi, K.; Constant, W.D.

    1995-12-31

    This study investigates transport mechanisms of trinitrotoluene (TNT) within contaminated soils. Extraction and degradation parameters are modeled in a system called a riffle-bed reactor. The riffle-bed is comprised of a TNT leaching bed followed by a pool for phytodegradation. It has been documented that photodegradation and microbial transformations play a significant role in TNT disappearance. Both dynamic and static reactors were examined to determine if the leaching process was controlled by water-side or soil-side resistance, and models were developed to best fit the data. In a low-level contaminated soil, the diffusion of TNT through the soil is the limiting factor. In highly contaminated soils, the water-side resistance controls the flux.

  19. Mathematical prediction of imidacloprid persistence in two Croatian soils with different texture, organic matter content and acidity under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Broznić, Dalibor; Milin, Čedomila

    2013-01-01

    In the present laboratory study, persistence of imidacloprid (IMI) as a function of initial insecticide concentration and soil properties in two Croatian soils (Krk sandy clay and Istria clay soils) was studied and described mathematically. Upon fitting the obtained experimental data for the higher concentration level (5 mg/kg) to mathematical models, statistical parameters (R (2), scaled root mean squared error and χ (2) error) indicated that the single first-order kinetics model provided the best prediction of IMI degradation in the Krk sandy clay soil, while in the Istria clay soil biphasic degradation was observed. At the lower concentration level (0.5 mg/kg), the biphasic models Gustafson and Holden models as well as the first-order double exponential model fitted the best experimental data in both soils. The disappearance time (DT50) values estimated by the single first-order double exponential model (from 50 to 132 days) proved that IMI can be categorized as a moderately persistent pesticide. In the Krk sandy clay soil, resulting DT50 values tended to increase with an increase of initial IMI concentration, while in the Istria clay soil, IMI persistence did not depend on the concentration. Organic matter of both experimental soils provided an accelerating effect on the degradation rate. The logistic model demonstrated that the effect of microbial activity was not the most important parameter for the biodegradation of IMI in the Istria clay soil, where IMI degradation could be dominated by chemical processes, such as chemical hydrolysis. The results pointed that mathematical modeling could be considered as the most convenient tool for predicting IMI persistence and contributes to the establishment of adequate monitoring of IMI residues in contaminated soil. Furthermore, IMI usage should be strictly controlled, especially in soils with low organic matter content where the risk of soil and groundwater contamination is much higher due to its longer

  20. [Underlying mechanisms and related techniques of stand establishment of cotton on coastal saline-alkali soil].

    PubMed

    Dong, He-Zhong

    2012-02-01

    Stand establishment is the most difficult step for cotton planting on coastal saline-alkali soil. To establish and improve the techniques for stand establishment is the key in the production of high-yielding cotton on saline-alkali soil. Based on the previous studies and our own research progress in this field, this paper reviewed the effects and the underlying mechanisms of making unequal salt distribution in root zone, increasing soil moisture and temperature, establishing under-mulching greenhouse, and introducing seed coating agent in promoting stand establishment of cotton on saline-alkali soil. It was suggested that under the conditions of the average salt content in topsoil being not able to reduce, improving at least partial root zone environment through the induction of unequal salt distribution in the root zone and increasing soil moisture and temperature could significantly reduce salt injury and improve stand establishment. Flat seeding under plastic mulching on low-salinity soil, furrow seeding with mulching on moderate- or high-salinity soil, early mulching before sowing on rain-fed saline soil, and late sowing of short-season cotton in heat-limited area were the efficient techniques for improving the stand establishment of cotton on coastal saline-alkali soil. This review could provide full guarantee for the cotton stand establishment on coastal saline-alkali soil.

  1. Physical Quality Indicators and Mechanical Behavior of Agricultural Soils of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Silvia; da Silva, Alvaro Pires; Ghiberto, Pablo J; Tormena, Cássio A; Pilatti, Miguel A; Libardi, Paulo L

    2016-01-01

    Mollisols of Santa Fe have different tilth and load support capacity. Despite the importance of these attributes to achieve a sustainable crop production, few information is available. The objectives of this study are i) to assess soil physical indicators related to plant growth and to soil mechanical behavior; and ii) to establish relationships to estimate the impact of soil loading on the soil quality to plant growth. The study was carried out on Argiudolls and Hapludolls of Santa Fe. Soil samples were collected to determine texture, organic matter content, bulk density, water retention curve, soil resistance to penetration, least limiting water range, critical bulk density for plant growth, compression index, pre-consolidation pressure and soil compressibility. Water retention curve and soil resistance to penetration were linearly and significantly related to clay and organic matter (R2 = 0.91 and R2 = 0.84). The pedotransfer functions of water retention curve and soil resistance to penetration allowed the estimation of the least limiting water range and critical bulk density for plant growth. A significant nonlinear relationship was found between critical bulk density for plant growth and clay content (R2 = 0.98). Compression index was significantly related to bulk density, water content, organic matter and clay plus silt content (R2 = 0.77). Pre-consolidation pressure was significantly related to organic matter, clay and water content (R2 = 0.77). Soil compressibility was significantly related to initial soil bulk density, clay and water content. A nonlinear and significantly pedotransfer function (R2 = 0.88) was developed to predict the maximum acceptable pressure to be applied during tillage operations by introducing critical bulk density for plant growth in the compression model. The developed pedotransfer function provides a useful tool to link the mechanical behavior and tilth of the soils studied.

  2. Physical Quality Indicators and Mechanical Behavior of Agricultural Soils of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Pires da Silva, Alvaro; Ghiberto, Pablo J.; Tormena, Cássio A.; Pilatti, Miguel A.; Libardi, Paulo L.

    2016-01-01

    Mollisols of Santa Fe have different tilth and load support capacity. Despite the importance of these attributes to achieve a sustainable crop production, few information is available. The objectives of this study are i) to assess soil physical indicators related to plant growth and to soil mechanical behavior; and ii) to establish relationships to estimate the impact of soil loading on the soil quality to plant growth. The study was carried out on Argiudolls and Hapludolls of Santa Fe. Soil samples were collected to determine texture, organic matter content, bulk density, water retention curve, soil resistance to penetration, least limiting water range, critical bulk density for plant growth, compression index, pre-consolidation pressure and soil compressibility. Water retention curve and soil resistance to penetration were linearly and significantly related to clay and organic matter (R2 = 0.91 and R2 = 0.84). The pedotransfer functions of water retention curve and soil resistance to penetration allowed the estimation of the least limiting water range and critical bulk density for plant growth. A significant nonlinear relationship was found between critical bulk density for plant growth and clay content (R2 = 0.98). Compression index was significantly related to bulk density, water content, organic matter and clay plus silt content (R2 = 0.77). Pre-consolidation pressure was significantly related to organic matter, clay and water content (R2 = 0.77). Soil compressibility was significantly related to initial soil bulk density, clay and water content. A nonlinear and significantly pedotransfer function (R2 = 0.88) was developed to predict the maximum acceptable pressure to be applied during tillage operations by introducing critical bulk density for plant growth in the compression model. The developed pedotransfer function provides a useful tool to link the mechanical behavior and tilth of the soils studied. PMID:27099925

  3. Laboratory and field scale bioremediation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) contaminated soils by means of bioaugmentation and biostimulation.

    PubMed

    Garg, Nidhi; Lata, Pushp; Jit, Simran; Sangwan, Naseer; Singh, Amit Kumar; Dwivedi, Vatsala; Niharika, Neha; Kaur, Jasvinder; Saxena, Anjali; Dua, Ankita; Nayyar, Namita; Kohli, Puneet; Geueke, Birgit; Kunz, Petra; Rentsch, Daniel; Holliger, Christof; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Lal, Rup

    2016-06-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) contaminated soils were treated for a period of up to 64 days in situ (HCH dumpsite, Lucknow) and ex situ (University of Delhi) in line with three bioremediation approaches. The first approach, biostimulation, involved addition of ammonium phosphate and molasses, while the second approach, bioaugmentation, involved addition of a microbial consortium consisting of a group of HCH-degrading sphingomonads that were isolated from HCH contaminated sites. The third approach involved a combination of biostimulation and bioaugmentation. The efficiency of the consortium was investigated in laboratory scale experiments, in a pot scale study, and in a full-scale field trial. It turned out that the approach of combining biostimulation and bioaugmentation was most effective in achieving reduction in the levels of α- and β-HCH and that the application of a bacterial consortium as compared to the action of a single HCH-degrading bacterial strain was more successful. Although further degradation of β- and δ-tetrachlorocyclohexane-1,4-diol, the terminal metabolites of β- and δ-HCH, respectively, did not occur by the strains comprising the consortium, these metabolites turned out to be less toxic than the parental HCH isomers.

  4. Study of soil moisture sensor for landslide early warning system: Experiment in laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuliza, E.; Habil, H.; Munir, M. M.; Irsyam, M.; Abdullah, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    The high rate of rainfall is the main trigger factor in many cases of landslides. However, each type of soils has unique characteristics and behavior concerning the rainfall infiltration. Therefore, early warning system of landslide will be more accurate by monitoring the changes of ground water condition. In this study, the monitoring of ground water changes was designed by using soil moisture sensor and simple microcontroller for data processing. The performance of soil moisture sensor was calibrated using the gravimetric method. To determine the soil characteristic and behavior with respect to water content that induce landslides, an experiment involving small-scale landslide model was conducted. From these experiments, the electric resistance of the soil increased as soil water content increases. The increase of soil water content led to the rise of the pore pressure and soil weight which could cause soil vulnerability to the movement. In addition, the various soil types were used to determine the responses of soils that induce the slope failure. Experimental results showed that each type of soils has different volumetric water content, soil matrix suction and shear strength of the slope. This condition influenced the slope stability that trigger of landslide.

  5. Onset of a perched water table during infiltration in a gradually layered soil: Reanalysis of a laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barontini, Stefano; Grottolo, Maria; Belluardo, Giorgio; Bacchi, Baldassare; Ranzi, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    Perched water tables in the upper soil layers play a key role in water partitioning during infiltration. They are typically thin and ephemeral, and onset in soils where a decrease of hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity is observed with depth. Aiming at better understanding their dynamics, we theoretically and numerically reanalysed a laboratory experiment, during which the onset of a perched water table was observed in a reconstructed soil with gradually decreasing conductivity at saturation with depth. The laboratory prototype was a prismatic column filled with 9 different 0.1 m--deep soil layers. The grain--size distribution curve and porosity of the layers were designed in order to reproduce an exponential decay of conductivity, on the basis of the application of a modified Kozeny--Carman relationship. During the experiment the soil was artificially wetted by means of a rainfall simulator at a rate previously determined in order to maintain a constant water content on the surface for 9 hours. Istantaneous volumetric water content profiles were measured by means of 9 multiplexed TDR probes. As a result of the experiment a water content peak was observed below the soil surface. Then it emphasised and moved downward until a perched water table formed at an intermediate height in the column, about 6 h after the beginning of the experiment. The thickness of the perched water table rapidly increased upward while the wetting front slowly travelled downward. The observed patterns supported phenomenological aspects enlightened by an analytical solution of transient infiltration in a gradually layered soil and by a numerical solution of similar cases. When the perched water table onset, the infiltration was quantitatively compatible with the presence of a perched water table within the soil column, on the basis of a steady infiltration theoretical framework. Then a reanalysis of the experiment was performed by numerically solving the Richards equation for a

  6. Characterizing Feedback Control Mechanisms in Nonlinear Microbial Models of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition by Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, K.; Tang, J.; Riley, W. J.; Torn, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is regulated by biotic and abiotic processes. Feedback interactions between such processes may act to dampen oscillatory responses to perturbations from equilibrium. Indeed, although biological oscillations have been observed in small-scale laboratory incubations, the overlying behavior at the plot-scale exhibits a relatively stable response to disturbances in input rates and temperature. Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of microbial models to capture nonlinear feedbacks in SOM decomposition that linear Century-type models are unable to reproduce, such as soil priming in response to increased carbon input. However, these microbial models often exhibit strong oscillatory behavior that is deemed unrealistic. The inherently nonlinear dynamics of SOM decomposition have important implications for global climate-carbon and carbon-concentration feedbacks. It is therefore imperative to represent these dynamics in Earth System Models (ESMs) by introducing sub-models that accurately represent microbial and abiotic processes. In the present study we explore, both analytically and numerically, four microbe-enabled model structures of varying levels of complexity. The most complex model combines microbial physiology, a non-linear mineral sorption isotherm, and enzyme dynamics. Based on detailed stability analysis of the nonlinear dynamics, we calculate the system modes as functions of model parameters. This dependence provides insight into the source of state oscillations. We find that feedback mechanisms that emerge from careful representation of enzyme and mineral interactions, with parameter values in a prescribed range, are critical for both maintaining system stability and capturing realistic responses to disturbances. Corroborating and expanding upon the results of recent studies, we explain the emergence of oscillatory responses and discuss the appropriate microbe-enabled model structure for inclusion in ESMs.

  7. The impact of soil moisture content and particle size variations on heat flow in laboratory simulated wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Sara Jean

    Hydrophobic soils developing as a consequence of wildfires have a large impact on the environment. A greater understanding of when ideal hydrophobic development conditions occur is needed. This thesis aims to identify the impact of varying both soil moisture and soil particle size on the locations for ideal hydrophobic soil development under different intensities of burns. It builds on experiments completed previously to further the understanding of the effect of particle size on heat flow. All experiments done in the previous study used only dry sediment. This study focused on the role of moisture in hydrophobic soil development. A secondary goal of this thesis is to provide an opportunity to further explore convection as a mechanism of soil heating. An indoor wildfire simulator was employed, consisting of an array of propane burners, to determine the impact of varying factors under controlled conditions. The temperature levels and durations selected were based on data obtained from measurements taken during full-scale field based burns. Thermocouples were used to measure temperatures of the flames and temperatures at different depths within the sediment. Determining the impact of soil texture was done by running burns with sand, clay-loam, silt, and clay. The impact of soil moisture was determined by testing each of the sediment types with different levels of moisture. In total, twenty-four burns were completed with peak temperatures of 600°C, 900°C, and 1200°C in order to simulate typical chaparral fires.

  8. Chloroform formation in Arctic and Subarctic soils - mechanism and emissions to the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Christian N.; Johnsen, Anders R.; Jacobsen, Ole S.

    2015-04-01

    one chlorination mechanisms occurs. The competition for free halides may be high in Arctic and Subarctic soils, as more than 90% of soil chlorine and 99% of soil bromine and iodine was organically bound.

  9. [Response of Straw and Straw Biochar Returning to Soil Carbon Budget and Its Mechanism].

    PubMed

    Hou, Ya-hong; Wang, Lei; Fu, Xiao-hua; Le, Yi-quan

    2015-07-01

    Direct straw returning and straw carbonization returning are the main measures of straw returning. Because of the differences in structure and nature as well as returning process between straw and straw biochar, the soil respiration and soil carbon budget after returning must have significant differences. In this study, outdoor pot experiment was carried out to study the response of soil respiration and carbon budget to straw and straw biochar returning and its possible mechanism. The results showed that soil respiration of straw biochar returning [mean value 21. 69 µmol.(m2.s)-1] was significantly lower than that of direct straw returning [mean value 65.32 µmol.(m2.s)-1], and its soil organic carbon content ( mean value 20. 40 g . kg-1) and plant biomass (mean value 138. 56 g) were higher than those of direct straw returning (mean values 17. 76 g . kg-1 and 76. 76 g). Considering the carbon loss after the biochar preparation process, its soil carbon budget was also significantly higher than that of direct straw returning, so it was a low carbon mode of straw returning. Direct straw returning significantly promoted soil dehydrogenase activity, soil β-glycosidase activity and soil microorganism quantity, leading to higher soil respiration, but straw biochar did play an obvious role in promoting the microbial activity index. Easily oxidizable carbon (EOC) and biodegradability of straw biochar were lower than those of straw, which showed that straw biochar had higher stability, and was more difficult to degrade for soil microorganisms so its soil microbial activity was generally lower, and could be retained in the soil for a long time.

  10. Soil and crop management experiments in the Laboratory Biosphere: An analogue system for the Mars on Earth ® facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstone, S.; Nelson, M.; Alling, A.; Allen, J. P.

    During the years 2002 and 2003, three closed system experiments were carried out in the "Laboratory Biosphere" facility located in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The program involved experimentation of "Hoyt" Soy Beans, (experiment #1) USU Apogee Wheat (experiment #2) and TU-82-155 sweet potato (experiment #3) using a 5.37 m 2 soil planting bed which was 30 cm deep. The soil texture, 40% clay, 31% sand and 28% silt (a clay loam), was collected from an organic farm in New Mexico to avoid chemical residues. Soil management practices involved minimal tillage, mulching, returning crop residues to the soil after each experiment and increasing soil biota by introducing worms, soil bacteria and mycorrhizae fungi. High soil pH of the original soil appeared to be a factor affecting the first two experiments. Hence, between experiments #2 and #3, the top 15 cm of the soil was amended using a mix of peat moss, green sand, humates and pumice to improve soil texture, lower soil pH and increase nutrient availability. This resulted in lowering the initial pH of 8.0-6.7 at the start of experiment #3. At the end of the experiment, the pH was 7.6. Soil nitrogen and phosphorus has been adequate, but some chlorosis was evident in the first two experiments. Aphid infestation was the only crop pest problem during the three experiments and was handled using an introduction of Hyppodamia convergens. Experimentation showed there were environmental differences even in this 1200 cubic foot ecological system facility, such as temperature and humidity gradients because of ventilation and airflow patterns which resulted in consequent variations in plant growth and yield. Additional humidifiers were added to counteract low humidity and helped optimize conditions for the sweet potato experiment. The experience and information gained from these experiments are being applied to the future design of the Mars On Earth ® facility (Silverstone et al., Development and research program for a soil

  11. Soil and crop management experiments in the Laboratory Biosphere: an analogue system for the Mars on Earth(R) facility.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, S; Nelson, M; Alling, A; Allen, J P

    2005-01-01

    During the years 2002 and 2003, three closed system experiments were carried out in the "Laboratory Biosphere" facility located in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The program involved experimentation of "Hoyt" Soy Beans, (experiment #1) USU Apogee Wheat (experiment #2) and TU-82-155 sweet potato (experiment #3) using a 5.37 m2 soil planting bed which was 30 cm deep. The soil texture, 40% clay, 31% sand and 28% silt (a clay loam), was collected from an organic farm in New Mexico to avoid chemical residues. Soil management practices involved minimal tillage, mulching, returning crop residues to the soil after each experiment and increasing soil biota by introducing worms, soil bacteria and mycorrhizae fungi. High soil pH of the original soil appeared to be a factor affecting the first two experiments. Hence, between experiments #2 and #3, the top 15 cm of the soil was amended using a mix of peat moss, green sand, humates and pumice to improve soil texture, lower soil pH and increase nutrient availability. This resulted in lowering the initial pH of 8.0-6.7 at the start of experiment #3. At the end of the experiment, the pH was 7.6. Soil nitrogen and phosphorus has been adequate, but some chlorosis was evident in the first two experiments. Aphid infestation was the only crop pest problem during the three experiments and was handled using an introduction of Hyppodamia convergens. Experimentation showed there were environmental differences even in this 1200 cubic foot ecological system facility, such as temperature and humidity gradients because of ventilation and airflow patterns which resulted in consequent variations in plant growth and yield. Additional humidifiers were added to counteract low humidity and helped optimize conditions for the sweet potato experiment. The experience and information gained from these experiments are being applied to the future design of the Mars On Earth(R) facility (Silverstone et al., Development and research program for a soil

  12. Soil and crop management experiments in the Laboratory Biosphere: an analogue system for the Mars on Earth(R) facility.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, S; Nelson, M; Alling, A; Allen, J P

    2005-01-01

    During the years 2002 and 2003, three closed system experiments were carried out in the "Laboratory Biosphere" facility located in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The program involved experimentation of "Hoyt" Soy Beans, (experiment #1) USU Apogee Wheat (experiment #2) and TU-82-155 sweet potato (experiment #3) using a 5.37 m2 soil planting bed which was 30 cm deep. The soil texture, 40% clay, 31% sand and 28% silt (a clay loam), was collected from an organic farm in New Mexico to avoid chemical residues. Soil management practices involved minimal tillage, mulching, returning crop residues to the soil after each experiment and increasing soil biota by introducing worms, soil bacteria and mycorrhizae fungi. High soil pH of the original soil appeared to be a factor affecting the first two experiments. Hence, between experiments #2 and #3, the top 15 cm of the soil was amended using a mix of peat moss, green sand, humates and pumice to improve soil texture, lower soil pH and increase nutrient availability. This resulted in lowering the initial pH of 8.0-6.7 at the start of experiment #3. At the end of the experiment, the pH was 7.6. Soil nitrogen and phosphorus has been adequate, but some chlorosis was evident in the first two experiments. Aphid infestation was the only crop pest problem during the three experiments and was handled using an introduction of Hyppodamia convergens. Experimentation showed there were environmental differences even in this 1200 cubic foot ecological system facility, such as temperature and humidity gradients because of ventilation and airflow patterns which resulted in consequent variations in plant growth and yield. Additional humidifiers were added to counteract low humidity and helped optimize conditions for the sweet potato experiment. The experience and information gained from these experiments are being applied to the future design of the Mars On Earth(R) facility (Silverstone et al., Development and research program for a soil

  13. Laboratory evaluation of dual-frequency multisensor capacitance probes to monitor soil water and salinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Real-time information on salinity levels and transport of fertilizers are generally missing from soil profile knowledge bases. A dual-frequency multisensor capacitance probe (MCP) is now commercially available for sandy soils that simultaneously monitor volumetric soil water content (VWC, ') and sa...

  14. Controls on soil methane fluxes: Tests of biophysical mechanisms using stable isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Fischer, Joseph C.; Hedin, Lars O.

    2007-06-01

    Understanding factors that control methane exchange between soils and the atmosphere remains one of the highest priorities for climate change research. Here we use a novel isotope-based technique to investigate the relative importance of three mechanisms for explaining landscape-scale variations in soil methane emissions: (1) consumption of methane by methanotrophic bacteria, (2) quantity of carbon mineralization, or (3) relative amounts of carbon flow through nonmethanogenic versus methanogenic mineralization pathways. Application of a new, nondisruptive, 13CH4 isotope pool dilution technique permitted us to evaluate these mechanisms by distinguishing gross methane fluxes through both productive and consumptive pathways. We quantified each of these pathways in surface soils across broad moisture gradients in tropical montane environments in the Hawaiian Islands and temperate ecosystems in the northeastern United States. We found only limited support for the consumption control hypothesis because consumption was only important in dry soils. We also failed to find support for the carbon supply hypothesis, in that rates of carbon mineralization did not explain the observed variability in net fluxes across landscapes. Rather, dramatic differences in methane production, and thus emission, depended on surprisingly small diversions of soil carbon flow from nonmethanogenic to methanogenic pathways: on average, soils were a net source of methane to the atmosphere if more than 0.04% of total carbon mineralization passed through methanogenic pathways. We infer that fine-scale heterogeneity of soil redox status is critical for regulating soil methane fluxes.

  15. A laboratory study of the bioremediation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene-contaminated soil using aerobic/anoxic soil slurry reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.; Kulpa, C. F.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Notre Dame

    1998-01-01

    The successful operation of an aerobic/anoxic laboratory-scale soil slurry reactor showed that soil contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-l,3,5-trinitro-l,3,5-triazine (RDX) could be treated in batches or semicontinuously. Batch treatment resulted in the transformation of TNT. Semicontinuous treatment resulted in complete degradation of TNT. In addition to removing TNT, the slurry reactor also removed contaminants such as trinitrobenzene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, RDX, and octahydro-l,3,5,7-tetranitro-l,3,5,7-tetraazocine (HMX). Radiolabeled TNT incubated with reactor biomass showed that 23% of [{sup 14}C]TNT was mineralized, 27% was converted to biomass, and 8% was adsorbed onto the soil. The rest of the [{sup 14}C]TNT was accounted for as metabolites, including a ring cleavage product identified as 2,3-butanediol. Increasing the frequency of soil addition from once to two or three times weekly did not affect the TNT removal rates. The soil slurry reactor also maintained the bacterial population fairly well, needing only 0.3% molasses as a cosubstrate.

  16. [Microbial response mechanism for drying and rewetting effect on soil respiration in grassland ecosystem: a review].

    PubMed

    He, Yun-Long; Qi, Yu-Chun; Dong, Yun-She; Peng, Qin; Sun, Liang-Jie; Jia, Jun-Qiang; Guo, Shu-Fang; Yan, Zhong-Qing

    2014-11-01

    As one of the most important and wide distribution community type among terrestrial ecosystems, grassland ecosystem plays a critical role in the global carbon cycles and climate regulation. China has extremely rich grassland resources, which have a huge carbon sequestration potential and are an important part of the global carbon cycle. Drying and rewetting is a common natural phenomenon in soil, which might accelerate soil carbon mineralization process, increase soil respiration and exert profound influence on microbial activity and community structure. Under the background of the global change, the changes in rainfall capacity, strength and frequency would inevitably affect soil drying and wetting cycles, and thus change the microbial activity and community structure as well as soil respiration, and then exert important influence on global carbon budget. In this paper, related references in recent ten years were reviewed. The source of soil released, the trend of soil respiration over time and the relationship between soil respiration and microbial biomass, microbial activity and microbial community structure during the processes of dry-rewetting cycle were analyzed and summarized, in order to better understand the microbial response mechanism for drying and rewetting effecting on soil respiration in grassland ecosystem, and provide a certain theoretical basis for more accurate evaluation and prediction of future global carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems and climate change.

  17. Distribution of metals in mechanical fractions of soils from a lake catchment in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Mogollón', J L; Bifano, C; Davies, B E

    1995-06-01

    Soil samples were collected from both the surface and at depth from the lowlands around Lake Valencia and from the adjacent mountains. This paper reports results for Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb and Zn in mechanical fractions of the soils. Lowland soils, developed on lacustrine sediments, show a predominance of medium- to fine-grain size fractions whereas the shallow mountain soils show the highest percentage of particles in the coarse to medium fractions. Concentrations of most of the elements investigated increased toward finer particle sizes. The generally higher metal concentrations in lowland soils compared with mountain soils are consistent with release by weathering in the uplands and accumulation in the lowlands. The presence of carbonates derived from ubiquitous shelly material in the lowland soils may explain increases of Ca and Mg in labile fractions. In the lowland area, there is little evidence for the translocation of metals in the soil profiles, despite the high rainfall of a tropical climate, and the calcareous nature of these soils could account for the immobility of metals.

  18. Soil and hydrology sciences need laboratory and field experiments in the classroom. An example from the SEDER (Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group) from the University of Valencia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; González Pelayo, Óscar; García Orenes, Fuensanta; Jordán, Antonio; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Úbeda, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    The use of experimental stations and long-term measurements in the field and in the laboratory contributed to large datasets and key information to understand the soil system and the hydrological cycle (Neal et al., 2011; García Orenes et al., 2012; López-Garrido et al., 2012; Kröpf et al., 2013; Nadal-Romero, 2013; Taguas et al., 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). However, teaching in high schools and colleagues require simple experiments to help the students to understand the soil and water resources and management. We show here the experiments and measurements we conduct within the teaching program of the Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group at the University of Valencia to help the students in the understanding of the soil and hydrologic processes. The expereriments and measurements developed are the following: (i) Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) to determine the soil water repellency; (ii) Leaves water retention capacity measured in the field; (iii) soil infiltration capacity measured with simple ring infiltrometers; (iv) measurement of the soil bulk density; and (v) measurement of the soil water content. Those experiments and measurements are applied to agriculture, rangeland and fire affected soils. Acknowledgements To the "Ministerio de Economía and Competitividad" of Spanish Government for finance the POSTFIRE project (CGL2013- 47862-C2-1-R). The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7-ENV-2013- supported this research. References García-Orenes, F., Roldán, A., Mataix-Solera, J., Cerdà, A., Campoy, M., Arcenegui, V., Caravaca, F. 2012 Soil structural stability and erosion rates influenced by agricultural management practices in a semi-arid Mediterranean agro-ecosystem. Soil Use and Management 28(4): 571-579. DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-2743.2012.00451.x Kröpfl, A. I., Cecchi, G. A., Villasuso, N. M., Distel, R. A. 2013. Degradation and recovery processes

  19. Biochar-induced changes in soil hydraulic conductivity and dissolved nutrient fluxes constrained by laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Rebecca T; Gallagher, Morgan E; Masiello, Caroline A; Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The addition of charcoal (or biochar) to soil has significant carbon sequestration and agronomic potential, making it important to determine how this potentially large anthropogenic carbon influx will alter ecosystem functions. We used column experiments to quantify how hydrologic and nutrient-retention characteristics of three soil materials differed with biochar amendment. We compared three homogeneous soil materials (sand, organic-rich topsoil, and clay-rich Hapludert) to provide a basic understanding of biochar-soil-water interactions. On average, biochar amendment decreased saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) by 92% in sand and 67% in organic soil, but increased K by 328% in clay-rich soil. The change in K for sand was not predicted by the accompanying physical changes to the soil mixture; the sand-biochar mixture was less dense and more porous than sand without biochar. We propose two hydrologic pathways that are potential drivers for this behavior: one through the interstitial biochar-sand space and a second through pores within the biochar grains themselves. This second pathway adds to the porosity of the soil mixture; however, it likely does not add to the effective soil K due to its tortuosity and smaller pore size. Therefore, the addition of biochar can increase or decrease soil drainage, and suggests that any potential improvement of water delivery to plants is dependent on soil type, biochar amendment rate, and biochar properties. Changes in dissolved carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes also differed; with biochar increasing the C flux from organic-poor sand, decreasing it from organic-rich soils, and retaining small amounts of soil-derived N. The aromaticity of C lost from sand and clay increased, suggesting lost C was biochar-derived; though the loss accounts for only 0.05% of added biochar-C. Thus, the direction and magnitude of hydraulic, C, and N changes associated with biochar amendments are soil type (composition and particle size) dependent.

  20. Biochar-Induced Changes in Soil Hydraulic Conductivity and Dissolved Nutrient Fluxes Constrained by Laboratory Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Rebecca T.; Gallagher, Morgan E.; Masiello, Caroline A.; Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The addition of charcoal (or biochar) to soil has significant carbon sequestration and agronomic potential, making it important to determine how this potentially large anthropogenic carbon influx will alter ecosystem functions. We used column experiments to quantify how hydrologic and nutrient-retention characteristics of three soil materials differed with biochar amendment. We compared three homogeneous soil materials (sand, organic-rich topsoil, and clay-rich Hapludert) to provide a basic understanding of biochar-soil-water interactions. On average, biochar amendment decreased saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) by 92% in sand and 67% in organic soil, but increased K by 328% in clay-rich soil. The change in K for sand was not predicted by the accompanying physical changes to the soil mixture; the sand-biochar mixture was less dense and more porous than sand without biochar. We propose two hydrologic pathways that are potential drivers for this behavior: one through the interstitial biochar-sand space and a second through pores within the biochar grains themselves. This second pathway adds to the porosity of the soil mixture; however, it likely does not add to the effective soil K due to its tortuosity and smaller pore size. Therefore, the addition of biochar can increase or decrease soil drainage, and suggests that any potential improvement of water delivery to plants is dependent on soil type, biochar amendment rate, and biochar properties. Changes in dissolved carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes also differed; with biochar increasing the C flux from organic-poor sand, decreasing it from organic-rich soils, and retaining small amounts of soil-derived N. The aromaticity of C lost from sand and clay increased, suggesting lost C was biochar-derived; though the loss accounts for only 0.05% of added biochar-C. Thus, the direction and magnitude of hydraulic, C, and N changes associated with biochar amendments are soil type (composition and particle size) dependent

  1. Ectomycorrhizal inoculum potential of northeastern US forest soils for American chestnut restoration: results from field and laboratory bioassays.

    PubMed

    Dulmer, Kristopher M; Leduc, Stephen D; Horton, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    American chestnut (Castanea dentata) was once a dominant overstory tree in eastern USA but was decimated by chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica). Blight-resistant chestnut is being developed as part of a concerted restoration effort to bring this heritage tree back. Here, we evaluate the potential of field soils in the northern portion of the chestnut's former range to provide ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungus inoculum for American chestnut. In our first study, chestnut seedlings were grown in a growth chamber using soil collected from three sites dominated by red oak (Quercus rubra) as inoculum and harvested after 5 months. Of the 14 EM fungi recovered on these seedlings, four species dominated in soils from all three sites: Laccaria laccata, a Tuber sp., Cenococcum geophilum, and a thelephoroid type. Seedlings grown in the nonsterilized soils were smaller than those growing in sterilized soils. In the second study, chestnut seedlings were grown from seed planted directly into soils at the same three sites. Seedlings with intermingling roots of established trees of various species were harvested after 5 months. Seventy-one EM fungi were found on the root tips of the hosts, with 38 occurring on chestnut seedlings. Multiple versus single host EM fungi were significantly more abundant and frequently encountered. The fungi observed dominating on seedlings in the laboratory bioassay were not frequently encountered in the field bioassay, suggesting that they may not have been active in mycelial networks in the field setting but were in the soils as resistant propagules that became active in the bioassay. These results show that soil from red oak stands can be used to inoculate American chestnut with locally adapted ectomycorrhizal fungi prior to outplanting, a relatively cost effective approach for restoration efforts.

  2. Intraoral laser welding: ultrastructural and mechanical analysis to compare laboratory laser and dental laser.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca; Villa, Elena; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco; Manfredi, Maddalena; Nammour, Samir

    2011-07-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been used since 1970 in dental laboratories to weld metals on dental prostheses. Recently in several clinical cases, we have suggested that the Nd:YAG laser device commonly utilized in the dental office could be used to repair broken fixed, removable and orthodontic prostheses and to weld metals directly in the mouth. The aim of this work was to evaluate, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), the quality of the weld and its mechanical strength, comparing a device normally used in dental laboratory and a device normally used in the dental office for oral surgery, the same as that described for intraoral welding. Metal plates of a Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy and steel orthodontic wires were subjected to four welding procedures: welding without filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding with filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding without filler metal using the office laser, and welding with filler metal using the office laser. The welded materials were then analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA. SEM analysis did not show significant differences between the samples although the plates welded using the office laser without filler metal showed a greater number of fissures than the other samples. EDS microanalysis of the welding zone showed a homogeneous composition of the metals. Mechanical tests showed similar elastic behaviours of the samples, with minimal differences between the samples welded with the two devices. No wire broke even under the maximum force applied by the analyser. This study seems to demonstrate that the welds produced using the office Nd:YAG laser device and the laboratory Nd:YAG laser device, as analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA, showed minimal and nonsignificant differences, although these findings need to be confirmed using a greater number of samples.

  3. Quantitative passive soil vapor sampling for VOCs--part 2: laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    McAlary, Todd; Groenevelt, Hester; Seethapathy, Suresh; Sacco, Paolo; Crump, Derrick; Tuday, Michael; Schumacher, Brian; Hayes, Heidi; Johnson, Paul; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2014-03-01

    Controlled laboratory experiments were conducted to demonstrate the use of passive samplers for soil vapor concentration monitoring. Five different passive samplers were studied (Radiello, SKC Ultra, Waterloo Membrane Sampler, ATD tubes and 3M OVM 3500). Ten different volatile organic compounds were used of varying classes (chlorinated ethanes, ethanes, and methanes, aliphatics and aromatics) and physical properties (vapor pressure, solubility and sorption). Samplers were exposed in randomized triplicates to concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 ppmv, with a relative humidity of ∼80%, a temperature of ∼24 °C, and a duration of 30 minutes in a chamber with a face velocity of about 5 cm min(-1). Passive samplers are more commonly used for longer sample durations (e.g., 8 hour workday) and higher face velocities (>600 cm min(-1)), so testing to verify the performance for these conditions was needed. Summa canister samples were collected and analyzed by EPA Method TO-15 to establish a baseline for comparison for all the passive samplers. Low-uptake rate varieties of four of the samplers were also tested at 10 ppmv under two conditions; with 5 cm min(-1) face velocity and stagnant conditions to assess whether low or near-zero face velocities would result in a low bias from the starvation effect. The results indicate that passive samplers can provide concentration measurements with accuracy (mostly within a factor of 2) and precision (RSD < 15%) comparable to conventional Summa canister samples and EPA Method TO-15 analysis. Some compounds are challenging for some passive samplers because of uncertainties in the uptake rates, or challenges with retention or recovery.

  4. Bioremediation of endosulfan contaminated soil and water -- optimization of operating conditions in laboratory scale reactors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mathava; Philip, Ligy

    2006-08-21

    A mixed bacterial culture consisted of Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus circulans-I and -II has been enriched from contaminated soil collected from the vicinity of an endosulfan processing industry. The degradation of endosulfan by mixed bacterial culture was studied in aerobic and facultative anaerobic conditions via batch experiments with an initial endosulfan concentration of 50mg/L. After 3 weeks of incubation, mixed bacterial culture was able to degrade 71.58+/-0.2% and 75.88+/-0.2% of endosulfan in aerobic and facultative anaerobic conditions, respectively. The addition of external carbon (dextrose) increased the endosulfan degradation in both the conditions. The optimal dextrose concentration and inoculum size was estimated as 1g/L and 75mg/L, respectively. The pH of the system has significant effect on endosulfan degradation. The degradation of alpha endosulfan was more compared to beta endosulfan in all the experiments. Endosulfan biodegradation in soil was evaluated by miniature and bench scale soil reactors. The soils used for the biodegradation experiments were identified as clayey soil (CL, lean clay with sand), red soil (GM, silty gravel with sand), sandy soil (SM, silty sand with gravel) and composted soil (PT, peat) as per ASTM (American society for testing and materials) standards. Endosulfan degradation efficiency in miniature soil reactors were in the order of sandy soil followed by red soil, composted soil and clayey soil in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In bench scale soil reactors, endosulfan degradation was observed more in the bottom layers. After 4 weeks, maximum endosulfan degradation efficiency of 95.48+/-0.17% was observed in red soil reactor where as in composted soil-I (moisture 38+/-1%) and composted soil-II (moisture 45+/-1%) it was 96.03+/-0.23% and 94.84+/-0.19%, respectively. The high moisture content in compost soil reactor-II increased the endosulfan concentration in the leachate. Known intermediate metabolites of

  5. Adaptation of an industrial application for an instructional laboratory in mechanical vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, W.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Extensive theoretical treatment is given to damping as the process of energy dissipation during mechanical vibration. The challenge in the classroom is to adequately convey this concept and extend it by teaching students practical applications in engineering analysis and design. Students are motivated by real-world problems; applying these types of problems with strong instructional classroom content significantly enhances the learning environment. This paper proposes the adaptation of an actual research project to a simple, yet innovative, mechanical vibrations laboratory. The adapted project involves an ongoing effort at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to investigate damping factors of various alloys used in military tank munitions. The kinetic-energy penetrators used in these tank rounds are cylindrical in shape and are a major class of weapons designed to defeat heavy armor. Unwanted transverse oscillations of these penetrators degrade the accuracy of the rounds and may lead to glancing blows off the target. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  6. [Effects and mechanisms of plant roots on slope reinforcement and soil erosion resistance: a research review].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan-Mei; Xia, Han-Ping; Li, Zhi-An; Cai, Xi-An

    2007-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in resisting the shallow landslip and topsoil erosion of slopes by raising soil shear strength. Among the models in interpreting the mechanisms of slope reinforcement by plant roots, Wu-Waldron model is a widely accepted one. In this model, the reinforced soil strength by plant roots is positively proportional to average root tensile strength and root area ratio, the two most important factors in evaluating slope reinforcement effect of plant roots. It was found that soil erosion resistance increased with the number of plant roots, though no consistent quantitative functional relationship was observed between them. The increase of soil erosion resistance by plant roots was mainly through the actions of fiber roots less than 1 mm in diameter, while fiber roots enhanced the soil stability to resist water dispersion via increasing the number and diameter of soil water-stable aggregates. Fine roots could also improve soil permeability effectively to decrease runoff and weaken soil erosion. PMID:17615891

  7. Effect of biofilm on soil hydraulic properties: laboratory studies using xanthan as surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenkranz, H.; Iden, S. C.; Durner, W.

    2012-04-01

    Many soil bacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in which they are embedded while residing in the porous matrix. EPS are often attached as a biofilm to both the bacteria cell and the soil particles. As a consequence, their influence on water flow through variably saturated porous media often cannot be neglected. While the influence of attached microbial biomass and EPS on saturated water flow has been studied extensively, its investigation for unsaturated flow in soils has found significantly less attention. The objective of this study was the quantification of the effect of biofilms on the unsaturated soil hydraulic properties. We determined the soil water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity functions of biofilm-affected soils by using xanthan as an EPS surrogate. Evaporation experiments were conducted on two sandy soil materials. The amount of added xanthan was varied in 6 stages from zero to 0.25 %. Additional measurements of soil water retention using the dewpoint method closed the remaining gap from the evaporation method to air-dryness. The experimental data were evaluated by the simplified evaporation method of Schindler. The results show that the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is reduced markedly by added xanthan and the shape of the soil water retention curve is alterated significantly for all stages of xanthan addition. The reduction in hydraulic conductivity is high enough to fully suppress stage-one evaporation for xanthan-sand mixtures. The water-holding capacity of the xanthan and the alteration of the effective pore size distribution explain these results.

  8. Microbial response to the effect of quantity and quality soil organic matter alteration after laboratory heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bárcenas-Moreno, G.; Escalante, E.; Pérez-Bejarano, A.; Zavala, L. M.; Jordán, A.

    2012-04-01

    Fire-induced soil changes influence indirectly on soil microbial response, mainly due to pH increases and organic matter alterations. Partial carbon combustion can originate both, an increase in microbial activity due to dissolved organic carbon increases (Bárcenas-Moreno and Bååth, 2099, Bárcenas-Moreno et al., 2011), as well as limitation of microbial growth, either due to diminution of some fractions of organic matter (Fernández et al., 1997) or due to the formation of toxic compounds (Widden and Parkinson, 1975; Diaz-Raviña et al., 1996). The magnitude or direction of these changes is conditioned mainly by fire intensity and plant species, so forest with different vegetation could promote different quantity and quality alterations of soil organic matter after fire which leads to different soil microbial response. The objective of this work was to differentiate between the effect of reduction of carbon content and the presence of substances with inhibitory effect on soil microorganisms, inoculating microorganisms from an unaltered forest area on heated soil extract-based culture media. Soil collected from two different vegetation forest, pine (P) and oak (O) forests, with similar soil characteristics was sieved and heated at 450 °C in a muffle furnace. Heated and unheated soil was used to prepare culture media resulting in different treatments: pine unheated (PUH), pine heated at 450 °C (P450), Oak unheated (OUH) and oak heated at 450 °C (O450). To isolate inhibition of microbial proliferation and nutrient limitation, different nutritive supplements were added to the media, obtaining two levels of nutrient status for each media described above: no nutrients added (-) and nutrients added (+). Colony forming units (CFU) were enumerated as estimation of viable and cultivable microbial abundance and soil parameters characterization was also realized. Significant differences were found between CFU isolated using heated and unheated soil extract-based media

  9. Geophysical surveys combined with laboratory soil column experiments to identify and explore risk areas for soil and water pollution in feedlots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo-Pérez, Antonio Jesus; Sainato, Claudia Mabel; Jairo Márquez-Molina, John; Giráldez, Juan Vicente; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Changes of land use without a correct planning may produce its deterioration with their social, economical and environmental irreversible consequences over short to medium time range. In Argentina, the expansion of soybean fields induced a reduction of the area of pastures dedicated to stockbreeding. As cattle activity is being progressively concentrated on small pens, at feedlots farms, problems of soil and water pollution, mainly by nitrate, have been detected. The characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of soil water content is very important because the mostly advective transport of solutes. To avoid intensive soil samplings, very expensive, one has to recur to geophysical exploration methods. The objective of this work was to identify risk areas within a feedlot of the NW zone of Buenos Aires Province, in Argentina through geophysical methods. The surveys were carried out with an electromagnetic induction profiler EMI-400 (GSSI) and a Time domain Reflectometry (TDR) survey of depth 0-0.10 m with soil sampling and measurement of moisture content with gravimetric method (0-1.0 m). Several trenches were dug inside the pens and also at a test site, where texture, apparent density, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), electrical conductivity of the saturation paste extract and organic matter content (OM) were measured. The water retention curves for these soils were also determined. At one of the pens undisturbed soil columns were extracted at 3 locations. Laboratory analysis for 0-1.0 m indicated that soil texture was classified as sandy loam, average organic matter content (OM) was greater than 2.3% with low values of apparent density in the first 10 cm. The range of spatial dependence of data suggested that the number of soil samples could be reduced. Soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and soil moisture were well correlated and indicated a clear spatial pattern in the corrals. TDR performance was acceptable to identify the spatial

  10. Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico environs, 1993-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Deola, Regina Anne; Oldewage, Hans D.; Herrera, Heidi; Miller, Mark Laverne

    2006-03-01

    From 1993 through 2005, the Environmental Management Department of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM), has collected soil and sediment samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for the purpose of determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at the Laboratories. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory for metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were year-to-year increasing or decreasing trends which indicated that further investigation may be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Management Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to assess potential current operational impacts or to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

  11. Low-concentration tailing and subsequent quicklime-enhanced remediation of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by mechanical soil aeration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Du, Xiaoming; Shi, Yi; Xu, Zhu; Fang, Jidun; Li, Zheng; Li, Fasheng

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical soil aeration has long been regarded as an effective ex-situ remediation technique and as suitable for remediation of large-scale sites contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at low cost. However, it has been reported that the removal efficiency of VOCs from soil is relatively low in the late stages of remediation, in association with tailing. Tailing may extend the remediation time required; moreover, it typically results in the presence of contaminants residues at levels far exceeding regulations. In this context, the present study aimed to discuss the tailing that occurs during the process of remediation of soils contaminated artificially with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs) and to assess possible quicklime-enhanced removal mechanisms. The results revealed the following conclusions. First, temperature and aeration rate can be important controls on both the timing of appearance of tailing and the levels of residual contaminants. Furthermore, the addition of quicklime to soil during tailing can reduce the residual concentrations rapidly to below the remedial target values required for site remediation. Finally, mechanical soil aeration can be enhanced using quicklime, which can improve the volatilization of VCHs via increasing soil temperature, reducing soil moisture, and enhancing soil permeability. Our findings give a basic understanding to the elimination of the tailing in the application of mechanical soil aeration, particularly for VOCs-contaminated soils.

  12. Response of Atmospheric-Methane Oxidation to Methane-Flux Manipulation in a Laboratory Soil-Column Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Mignola, I.; Henneberger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Upland soils are an important sink for atmospheric methane (CH4). Uptake of atmospheric CH4 in soils is generally diffusion limited, and is mediated by aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria (MOB) that possess a high-affinity form of a key enzyme, allowing CH4 consumption at near-atmospheric concentrations (≤ 1.9 µL/L). As cultivation attempts for these high-affinity MOB have shown little success, there remains much speculation regarding their functioning in different environments. For example, it is frequently assumed that they are highly sensitive to physical disturbance, but their response in activity and abundance to changes in substrate availability remains largely unknown. We present results of a laboratory column experiment conducted to investigate the response in activity and abundance of high-affinity MOB to an increase in CH4 flux. Intact soil cores, collected at a field site where atmospheric CH4 oxidation activity is frequently quantified, were transferred into two 1-m-long, 12-cm-dia. columns. The columns were operated at constant temperature in the dark, their headspace being continuously flushed with air. Diffusive gas-transport conditions were maintained in the reference column, whereas CH4 flux was increased in several steps in the treatment column by inducing advective gas flow using a diaphragm pump. Soil-gas samples periodically collected from ports installed along the length of the columns were analyzed for CH4 content. Together with measurements of soil-water content, atmospheric CH4 oxidation was quantified using the soil-profile method. First results indicate that atmospheric CH4 oxidation activity comparable with the field was maintained in the reference column throughout the experiment. Moreover, high-affinity MOB quickly adjusted to an increase in CH4 flux in the treatment column, efficiently consuming CH4. Quantification of MOB abundance is currently ongoing. Our data provide new insights into controls on atmospheric CH4 oxidation in soils.

  13. Cadmium transfer and detoxification mechanisms in a soil-mulberry-silkworm system: phytoremediation potential.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingyun; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Shuifeng

    2015-11-01

    Phytoremediation has been proven to be an environmentally sound alternative for the recovery of contaminated soils, and the economic profit that comes along with the process might stimulate its field use. This study investigated cadmium (Cd) transfer and detoxification mechanisms in a soil-mulberry-silkworm system to estimate the suitability of the mulberry and silkworm as an alternative method for the remediation of Cd-polluted soil; it also explored the underlying mechanisms regulating the trophic transfer of Cd. The results show that both the mulberry and silkworm have high Cd tolerance. The transfer factor suggests that the mulberry has high potential for Cd extraction from polluted soil. The subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in mulberry leaves show that cell wall deposition and vacuolar compartmentalization play important role in Cd tolerance. In the presence of increasing Cd concentrations in silkworm food, detoxification mechanisms (excretion and homeostasis) were activated so that excess Cd was excreted in fecal balls, and metallothionein levels in the mid-gut, the posterior of the silk gland, and the fat body of silkworms were enhanced. And, the Cd concentrations in silk are at a low level, ranging from 0.02 to 0.21 mg kg(-1). Therefore, these mechanisms of detoxification can regulate Cd trophic transfer, and mulberry planting and silkworm breeding has high phytoremediation potential for Cd-contaminated soil.

  14. Effects of hydromechanical loading history and antecedent soil mechanical damage on shallow landslide triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Linfeng; Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that the sudden triggering of rainfall-induced shallow landslides is preceded by accumulation of local internal failures in the soil mantle before their abrupt coalescence into a landslide failure plane. The mechanical status of a hillslope at any given time reflects competition between local damage accumulated during antecedent rainfall events and rates of mechanical healing (e.g., rebonding of microcracks and root regrowth). This dynamic interplay between damage accumulation and healing rates determines the initial mechanical state for landslide modeling. We evaluated the roles of these dynamic processes on landslide characteristics and patterns using a hydromechanical landslide-triggering model for a sequence of rainfall scenarios. The progressive nature of soil failure was represented by the fiber bundle model formalism that considers threshold strength of mechanical bonds linking adjacent soil columns and bedrock. The antecedent damage induced by prior rainfall events was expressed by the fraction of broken fibers that gradually regain strength or mechanically heal at rates specific to soil and roots. Results indicate that antecedent damage accelerates landslide initiation relative to pristine (undamaged) hillslopes. The volumes of first triggered landslides increase with increasing antecedent damage; however, for heavily damaged hillslopes, landslide volumes tend to decrease. Elapsed time between rainfall events allows mechanical healing that reduces the effects of antecedent damage. This study proposed a quantitative framework for systematically incorporating hydromechanical loading history and information on precursor events (e.g., such as recorded by acoustic emissions) into shallow landslide hazard assessment.

  15. Impact of hydraulic suction history on crack growth mechanics in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Hallett, P. D.

    2008-05-01

    The mechanics of crack formation and the influence of soil stress history were described using the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) measured with fractography. Two soils were studied: a model soil consisting of 40% Ca-bentonite and 60% fine silica sand and a remolded paddy soil with similar clay content and mineralogy. Fracture testing used deep-notch bend specimens formed by molding soils at the liquid limit into rectangular bars, equilibrating to soil water suction ranging from 5 kPa to 50 kPa (with some 50 kPa specimens wetted to 5 kPa), and inserting a crack 0.4× specimen thickness. Bend tests at a constant displacement rate of 1 mm min-1 provided data on applied force and load point displacement. The growth and geometry of the cracks were quantified from a series of images to determine the CTOA. Modulus of rupture, evaluated from the peak force, increased as water suction increased. However, rewetting did not alter the peak stress from the 50 kPa value, indicating that shrinkage-induced consolidation was more important than the soil water suction at the onset of testing. CTOA measured during stable crack growth decreased with drying. CTOA decreased even further when specimens equilibrated initially to 50 kPa were rewetted to 5 kPa. These results suggested that CTOA was primarily governed by the stiffness, although rewetting probably altered the capillary stresses in advance of the crack tip. Our future work will combine CTOA with a model that couples hydrological and mechanical processes to take into account the dependency of CTOA on the soil water regime so that crack propagation in soil can be predicted.

  16. Laboratory-scale measurement of trace gas fluxes from landfarm soils.

    PubMed

    Ausma, Sandra; Edwards, Grant C; Gillespie, Terry J

    2003-01-01

    Trace gas emissions from refinery and bioremediation landfarms were investigated in a mesocosm-scale simulator facility. Five simulators were constructed and integrated with a data acquisition system and trace gas analyzers, allowing automated real-time sampling and calculation of total hydrocarbon (THC), CO2, and water vapor fluxes. Experiments evaluating the influence of simulated cultivation and rainfall on trace gas fluxes from the soil surfaces were conducted. Results were compared with published field results. Results showed that cultivating dry or moderately wet soil resulted in brief enhancements of THC fluxes, up to a factor of 10, followed by a sharp decline. Cultivating dry soil did not enhance respiration. Cultivating wet soil did result in sustained elevated levels of respiration. Total hydrocarbon emissions were also briefly enhanced in wet soils, but to a lesser magnitude than in dry soil. Hydrocarbon fluxes from refinery landfarm soil were very low for the duration of the experiments. This lead to the conclusion that elevated THC fluxes would only be expected during waste application. An evaluation of the influence of simultaneous water vapor fluxes on other trace gas fluxes highlighted the importance in lab-scale experiments of correcting trace gas fluxes from soils. The results from this research can be used to guide management practices at landfarms and to provide data to aid in assessing the effect of landfarms.

  17. Microbial bioavailability of pyrene in three laboratory-contaminated soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Pravecek, Tasha L; Christman, Russell F; Pfaender, Frederic K

    2006-06-30

    Changes in bioavailability of pyrene in three uncontaminated soils were examined under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Three soils were aerobically aged with pyrene and [(14)C]pyrene for 63 days, then incubated with water, nitrate, or sulfate under aerobic or anaerobic conditions for one year. Under aerobic conditions, microorganisms in two soils mineralized 58-82% of the added [(14)C]pyrene. The two soils amended with nitrate were seen to have enhanced aerobic mineralization rates. In one of these soils, non-extractable pyrene was seen to decrease over the course of the study due to desorption and mineralization, nitrate amendment enhanced this effect. Under anaerobic conditions, generated with a N(2):CO(2)(g) headspace, two soils with nitrate or sulfate amendment showed an increase in extractable [(14)C]pyrene at 365 days relative to inhibited controls, presumably due to microbially mediated oxidation-reduction potential and pH alteration of the soil environment. These observations in different soils incubated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions have important implications relative to the impact of microbial electron acceptors on bioavailability and transport of non-polar organic compounds in the environment suggesting that, given enough time, under the appropriate environmental conditions, non-extractable material becomes bioavailable. This information should be considered when assessing site specific exposure risks at PAH contaminated locations. PMID:16574273

  18. Model development and applications at the USDA-ARS National Soil Erosion Research Laboratory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has a long history of development of soil erosion prediction technology, initially with empirical equations like the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE), and more recently with process-based models such as the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP)...

  19. New instruments for soil physics class: Improving the laboratory and field seminars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipa, Vladimir; Jankovec, Jakub; Snehota, Michal

    2014-05-01

    Teaching soil science and soil physics is an important part of the curriculum of many programs with focus on technical and natural sciences. Courses of soil science and namely soil physics have a long tradition at the faculty of Civil Engineering of the Czech Technical University in Prague. Students receive the theoretical foundations about soil classification, soil physics, soil chemistry and soil hydraulic characteristics in the course. In practical seminars students perform measurements of physical, hydraulic and chemical characteristics of soils, thus a comprehensive survey of soil is done in the given site. So far, students had the opportunity to use old, manually operated instrumentation. The project aims to improve the attractiveness of soil physics course and to extend the practical skills of students by introducing new tasks and by involving modern automated equipment. New instruments were purchased with the support of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under the project FRVS No. 1162/2013 G1. Specifically, two tensiometers T8 with multi-functional handheld read-out unit (UMS, GmbH) and manual Mini Disk Infiltrometer (Decagon Devices, Inc.) were purchased and incorporated into the course. In addition, newly designed MultiDisk the automated mini disk Infiltrometer (CTU in Prague) and combined temperature and soil moisture TDT sensor TMS 2 (TOMST®, s.r.o.), were made freely available for soil physics classes and included into the courses. Online tutorials and instructional videos were developed. Detailed multimedia teaching materials were introduced so that students are able to work more independently. Students will practice operating the digital tensiometer T8 with integrated temperature sensor and manual Mini Disk Infiltrometer (diameter disk: 4.4 cm, suction range: 0.5 to 7.0 cm of suction) and MultiDisk the automated mini disk Infiltrometer (see Klipa et al., EGU2014-7230) and combined temperature and soil moisture TDT

  20. Impact of Offshore Wind Energy Plants on the Soil Mechanical Behaviour of Sandy Seafloors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Nina; Lambers-Huesmann, Maria; Zeiler, Manfred; Zoellner, Christian; Kopf, Achim

    2010-05-01

    Over the last decade, wind energy has become an important renewable energy source. Especially, the installation of offshore windfarms offers additional space and higher average wind speeds than the well-established windfarms onshore. Certainly, the construction of offshore wind turbines has an impact on the environment. In the framework of the Research at Alpha VEntus (RAVE) project in the German offshore wind energy farm Alpha Ventus (north of the island Borkum in water depths of about 30 m) a research plan to investigate the environmental impact had been put into place. An ongoing study focuses on the changes in soil mechanics of the seafloor close to the foundations and the development of scour. Here, we present results of the first geotechnical investigations after construction of the plants (ca. 1 - 6 months) compared to geotechnical measurements prior to construction. To study the soil mechanical behaviour of the sand, sediment samples from about thirty different positions were measured in the laboratory to deliver, e.g., grain size (0.063 - 0.3 mm), friction angles (~ 32°), unit weight (~ 19.9 kN/m³) and void ratios (~ 0.81). For acoustic visualisation, side-scan-sonar (towed and stationary) and multibeam-echosounders (hull mounted) were used. Data show a flat, homogenous seafloor prior to windmill erection, and scouring effects at and in the vicinity of the foundations afterwards. Geotechnical in-situ measurements were carried out using a standard dynamic Cone Penetration Testing lance covering the whole windfarm area excluding areas in a radius < 50 m from the installed windmills (due the accessibility with the required research vessel). In addition, the small free-fall penetrometer Nimrod was deployed at the same spots, and furthermore, in the areas close to the tripod foundations (down to a distance of ~ 5 m from the central pile). Before construction, CPT as well as Nimrod deployments confirm a flat, homogenous sandy area with tip resistance values

  1. Experimental studies on the physico-mechanical properties of jet-grout columns in sandy and silty soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Muge K.

    2016-04-01

    The term of ground improvement states to the modification of the engineering properties of soils. Jet-grouting is one of the grouting methods among various ground improvement techniques. During jet-grouting, different textures of columns can be obtained depending on the characteristics of surrounding subsoil as well as the adopted jet-grouting system for each site is variable. In addition to textural properties, strength and index parameters of jet-grout columns are highly affected by the adjacent soil. In this study, the physical and mechanical properties of jet-grout columns constructed at two different sites in silty and sandy soil conditions were determined by laboratory tests. A number of statistical relationships between physical and mechanical properties of soilcrete were established in this study in order to investigate the dependency of numerous variables. The relationship between qu and γd is more reliable for sandy soilcrete than that of silty columns considering the determination coefficients. Positive linear relationships between Vp and γd with significantly high determination coefficients were obtained for the jet-grout columns in silt and sand. The regression analyses indicate that the P-wave velocity is a very dominant parameter for the estimation of physical and mechanical properties of jet-grout columns and should be involved during the quality control of soilcrete material despite the intensive use of uniaxial compressive strength test. Besides, it is concluded that the dry unit weight of jet-grout column is a good indicator of the efficiency of employed operational parameters during jet-grouting.

  2. Overland flow generation mechanisms affected by topsoil treatment: Application to soil conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso-González, P.; Ruiz-Sinoga, J. D.; Martínez-Murillo, J. F.; Lavee, H.

    2015-01-01

    Hortonian overland-flow is responsible for significant amounts of soil loss in Mediterranean geomorphological systems. Restoring the native vegetation is the most effective way to control runoff and sediment yield. During the seeding and plant establishment, vegetation cover may be better sustained if soil is amended with an external source. Four amendments were applied in an experimental set of plots: straw mulching (SM); mulch with chipped branches of Aleppo Pine (Pinus halepensis L.) (PM); TerraCottem hydroabsorbent polymer (HP); and sewage sludge (RU). Plots were afforested following the same spatial pattern, and amendments were mixed with the soil at the rate 10 Mg ha- 1. This research demonstrates the role played by the treatments in overland flow generation mechanism. On one hand, the high macroporosity of SM and PM, together with the fact that soil moisture increased with depth, explains weak overland flow and thus low sediment yield due to saturation conditions. Therefore, regarding overland flow and sediment yield, RU behaves similarly to SM and PM. On the other hand, when HP was applied, overland flow developed quickly with relatively high amounts. This, together with the decrease downward in soil moisture along the soil profile, proved that mechanisms of overland flow are of the Hortonian type.

  3. [Roles of rhizosphere in remediation of contaminated soils and its mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuhe; Zhou, Qixing; Zhang, Kaisong; Liang, Jidong

    2003-01-01

    Rhizosphere is a special 'ecological remediation unit' to treat contaminated soils, which contains a great quantity of microorganisms such as fungi and rhizobacteria living with plant roots. Thus, physiological and ecological roles of plant roots to remedy contaminated soils, to accumulate and to solidify heavy metals, to absorb and degrade organic pollutants in rhizosphere were illustrated, and the function of mycorrhizospheric fungi to absorb, barrier and chelate heavy metals, to degrade organic pollutants through their metabolism activities, the action of rhizobacteria to absorb and solidify heavy metals, to degrade organic pollutants in rhizosphere through their active living activities, and the combined remediation of fungi and bacteria to pollutants in rhizosphere and their relevant mechanisms were explained. It was suggested that the remediation role of rhizosphere was the main part of phytoremediation, and one of the main basic theories to remedy contaminated soils by the activity of green plants and other organisms. The use of hyperaccumulative plants in remedying soils contaminated by some heavy metals would be prospective. It would be one of the important approach to contaminated soils remediation by organic pollutants through the mechanism of screening some special plants whose roots had strong secreting ability to absorb and accumulate dissolvent organic pollutants on the basis of inoculating specific or non-specific fungi and bacteria from the rhizosphere. This will be a developing trend of research on the remediation of contaminated soils by organic pollutants.

  4. Photodegradation of antibiotics on soil surfaces: laboratory studies on sulfadiazine in an ozone-controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Wolters, André; Steffens, Markus

    2005-08-15

    Among the processes affecting transport and degradation of antibiotics released to the environment during application of manure and slurry to agricultural land, photochemical transformations are of particular interest. Drying-out of the top soil layer under field conditions enables sorption of surface-applied antibiotics to soil dust, thus facilitating direct, indirect, and sensitized photodegradation at the soil/atmosphere interface. For studying various photochemical transformation processes of sulfadiazine, a photovolatility chamber designed in accordance with the requirements of the USEPA Guideline and 161-3 was used. Application of 14C-labeled sulfadiazine enabled complete mass balances and allowed for investigating the impact of various surfaces (glass and soil dust) and environmental factors, i.e., irradiation and atmospheric ozone, on photodegradation and volatilization. Volatilization was shown to be a negligible process. Even after increasing the air temperature up to 35 degrees C only minor amounts of sulfadiazine and transformation products (0.01-0.28% of applied radioactivity) volatilized. Due to direct and indirect photodegradation, the highest extent of mineralization to 14CO2 (3.9%), the formation of degradation products and of nonextractable soil residues was measured in irradiated soil dust experiments using ozone concentrations of 200 ppb. However, even in the dark significant mineralization was observed when ozone was present, indicating ozone-controlled transformation of sulfadiazine to occur at the soil surface.

  5. [Arbuscular mycorrhizal bioremediation and its mechanisms of organic pollutants-contaminated soils].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuling; Ling, Wanting; Gao, Yanzheng; Li, Fuchun; Xiong, Wei

    2006-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM), the symbiont of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and host plant root, has been proved to be able to improve soil structure and enhance the plant resistance to environmental stress. There are more than 170 kinds of AMF worldwide. Recently, the promoted degradation of organic pollutants in soils in the presence of AM was observed, and AM bioremediation (AMB) is becoming a promising and perspective remediation technique for organic pollutants-contaminated soils. This paper reviewed the research progress on the AMB of soils contaminated by typical organic pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAEs, petroleum, and pesticides. The mechanisms of AMB mainly include the metabolism of organic pollutants by AM fungi, the degradation of these pollutants by the enzymes derived from AM exudation and by the enhanced root exudation and rhizospheric microbial activity in the presence of AM, and the removal of the pollutants by plant uptake and accumulation. As a new approach for the remediation of contaminated soils, some aspects involved in AMB, e.g., the screening of high efficient AM fungi, efficacy of co-existing AM fungi, soil ageing, and plant uptake of organic pollutants from soils in the presence of AM, still need to be further investigated.

  6. Woody Plant Invasion Changes Soil Water Storage Dynamics And Shifts Runoff Generation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, L.; Zou, C.; Stebler, E.

    2015-12-01

    Infiltration excess and saturation excess are the main runoff generation mechanisms for rangeland watersheds, while the role of subsurface stormflow is highly variable. Climate, topography, vegetation, and edaphic factors determine the runoff generation processes for a given location and a substantial change in any of these factors, either alone or combined, could result in a change in soil water storage dynamics and cause a shift in the runoff generation mechanisms. Three paired experimental watersheds were established in 2010 to quantify the streamflow responses to woody plant invasion into grassland in the South-central Great Plains. Here, we compare the runoff generation mechanisms under both vegetation types using soil water content and surface runoff data from 2011 to 2014. These data were collected every 5-15 minutes during the period experiencing both extremely high and low precipitation events. The objectives of this study include: 1). Understand change in soil moisture content and storage dynamic across the entire soil profile under grassland and woody plant invaded grassland watersheds; 2). Determine the dominant runoff mechanism for each vegetation type; and 3). Illustrate the process which shifts the runoff generation mechanisms. These results are important in understanding the impact of woody plant expansions on altering surface water and groundwater availability and therefore affect water resources sustainability management in the South-central Great Plains.

  7. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  8. Strategizing a Comprehensive Laboratory Protocol to Determine the Decomposability of Soil Organic Matter in Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedel, C.; Ernakovich, J. G.; Harden, J. W.; Natali, S.; Richter, A.; Schuur, E.; Treat, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter decomposition depends on physical, chemical, and biological factors, such as the amount and quality of the organic matter stored, abiotic conditions (such as soil temperature and moisture), microbial community dynamics, and physical protection by soil minerals. Soils store immense amounts of carbon with 1330-1580 Pg of carbon in the permafrost region alone. Increasing temperatures in the Arctic will thaw large amounts of previously frozen organic carbon making it available for decomposition. The rate at which carbon is being released from permafrost soils is crucial for understanding future changes in permafrost carbon storage and carbon flux to the atmosphere. The potential magnitude and form of carbon release (carbon dioxide or methane) from permafrost can be investigated using soil incubation studies. Over the past 20 years, many incubation studies have been published with soils from the permafrost zone and three recent syntheses have summarized current findings from aerobic and anaerobic incubation studies. However, the breadth of the incubation synthesis projects was hampered by incomplete meta-data and the use of different methods. Here, we provide recommendations to improve and standardize future soil incubation studies (which are not limited to permafrost soils) to make individual studies useful for inclusion in syntheses and meta-analyses, which helps to broaden their impact on our understanding of organic matter cycling. Additionally, we identify gaps in the understanding of permafrost carbon decomposability, that, when coupled with emerging knowledge from field observations and experiments, can be implemented in future studies to gain a better overview of the overall decomposability of permafrost carbon.

  9. Formulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling behavior of unsaturated soils based on hybrid mixture theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guo-Qing; Zhao, Cheng-Gang; Sheng, Dai-Chao; Zhou, An-Nan

    2014-08-01

    Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) coupling processes in unsaturated soils are very important in both theoretical researches and engineering applications. A coupled formulation based on hybrid mixture theory is derived to model the THM coupling behavior of unsaturated soils. The free-energy and dissipative functions for different phases are derived from Taylor's series expansions. Constitutive relations for THM coupled behaviors of unsaturated soils, which include deformation, entropy change, fluid flow, heat conduction, and dynamic compatibility conditions on the interfaces, are then established. The number of field equations is shown to be equal to the number of unknown variables; thus, a closure of this coupling problem is established. In addition to modifications of the physical conservation equations with coupling effect terms, the constitutive equations, which consider the coupling between elastoplastic deformation of the soil skeleton, fluid flow, and heat transfer, are also derived.

  10. Enrichment behavior and transport mechanism of soil-bound PAHs during rainfall-runoff events.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Luo, Xiaolin; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Bin; Han, Feng; Lin, Zhongrong; Wang, Xuejun

    2012-12-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) transported by surface runoff result in nonpoint source pollution and jeopardize aquatic ecosystems. The transport mechanism of PAHs during rainfall-runoff events has been rarely studied regarding pervious areas. An experimental system was setup to simulate the runoff pollution process on PAHs-contaminated soil. The enrichment behavior of soil-bound PAHs was investigated. The results show that soil organic matters (SOM), rather than clay particles, seem to be the main carrier of PAHs. The enrichment is highly conditioned on runoff and erosion processes, and its magnitude varies among PAH compounds. It is not feasible to build a simple and universal relationship between enrichment ratio and sediment discharge following the traditional enrichment theory. To estimate the flux of PAHs from pervious areas, soil erosion process has to be clearly understood, and both organic carbon content and composition of SOM should be factored into the calculation.

  11. Aspirin and clopidogrel resistance: possible mechanisms and clinical relevance. Part II: Potential causes and laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Vadász, Dávid; Sztriha, László K; Sas, Katalin; Vécsei, László

    2013-01-30

    Recent meta-analyses have indicated that patients with vascular disease demonstrated by laboratory tests to be aspirin or clopidogrel-resistant are at an increased risk of major vascular events. The suggested mechanisms of aspirin resistance include genetic polymorphism, alternative pathways of platelet activation, aspirin-insensitive thromboxane biosynthesis, drug interactions, or a low aspirin dose. Clopidogrel resistance is likely to develop as a result of a decreased bioavailability of the active metabolite, due to genetic variation or concomitant drug treatment. Additional work is required to improve and validate laboratory tests of platelet function, so that they may become useful tools for selection of the most appropriate antiplatelet therapy for an individual patient. Improvements in antiplatelet treatment strategies in the future should lead to a reduction in premature vascular events. PMID:23607225

  12. Color estimation of forest-steppe soils by digital photography under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeeva, A. A.; Aleksandrova, A. B.; Koposov, G. F.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical values in the RGB, HSB, and L*a*b systems for the colors of structurally differentiated soils (Luvisols) in the Volga-Kama forest-steppe have been obtained using a digital camera. A high correlation has been revealed between the soil color and the content of humus in the range 0.39-6%. When the content of humus exceeds 6%, the color of humus horizon varies only slightly. A regression equation within the RRGB range from 85 to 173 has been calculated for the rapid determination of humus content in low- and medium-humus texturally differentiated soils of the Volga-Kama forest-steppe.

  13. A laboratory experiment on the behaviour of soil-derived core and intact polar GDGTs in aquatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterse, F.; Moy, C. M.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2015-02-01

    We have performed incubation experiments in order to examine the behaviour of soil-derived branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) membrane lipids upon entering an aquatic environment and to evaluate the processes that potentially take place during their fluvial transport from land to sea. We incubated a soil from the Rakaia River catchment on the South Island of New Zealand using Rakaia River water and ocean water collected near the river mouth as inocula for a period of up to 152 days. The concentrations, as well as the relative distribution of brGDGTs derived from intact polar ("living"; IPL) lipids and core ("fossil"; CL) lipids remained unaltered over the course of the experiment. Although the stability of the brGDGTs may be a consequence of the higher than natural soil : water ratio used in the laboratory experiment, the substantial increase (27-72%) in the total pool of isoprenoid GDGTs (isoGDGTs) in all incubation setups, including the control using distilled water, indicates that entering an aquatic environment does influence the behaviour of soil-derived GDGTs. However, the availability of water appears to be more important than its properties. As a consequence of increasing isoGDGT concentrations, a decrease in Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether (BIT) index values - a proxy for the relative input of fluvially discharged soil material into a marine system - became evident after an incubation period of 30 days, with a maximum final decrease of 0.88 to 0.74 in the experiment with river water. The relative distribution within the isoGDGT pool shows changes with time, suggesting that isoGDGT producers may either have different rates of membrane adaptation or production/degradation, or that preferential release from the soil matrix or a shift in source organism(s) may take place. While the apparent stability of soil brGDGTs during this incubation experiment reinforces their potential as tracers for land-sea transport of soil organic carbon and

  14. The uptake of radionuclides by beans, squash, and corn growing in contaminated alluvial soils at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Fresquez, P R; Armstrong, D R; Mullen, M A; Naranjo, L

    1998-01-01

    Pinto beans (Phaselous vulgaris), sweet corn (Zea mays), and zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo) were grown in a field pot study using alluvial floodplain soils contaminated with various radionuclides within Los Alamos Canyon (LAC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. Soils as well as washed edible (fruit) and nonedible (stems and leaves) crop tissues were analyzed for tritium (3H), cesium (137Cs), strontium (90Sr), plutonium (238Pu and 239,240Pu), americium (241Am), and total uranium (totU). Most radionuclides, with the exception of 3H and totU, in soil and crop tissues from LAC were detected in significantly higher concentrations (p < 0.05) than in soil or crop tissues collected from regional background locations. Significant differences in radionuclide concentrations among crop species (squash were generally higher than beans or corn) and plant parts (nonedible tissue were generally higher than edible tissue) were observed. Most soil-to-plant concentration ratios for radionuclides in edible and nonedible crop tissues grown in soils from LAC were within default values in the literature commonly used in dose and risk assessment models. Overall, the maximum net positive committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE)--the CEDE plus two sigma for each radioisotope minus background and then all positive doses summed--to a hypothetical 50-year resident that ingested 352 lb ([160 kg]; the maxiumum ingestion rate per person per year) of beans, corn, and squash in equal proportions was 74 mrem y-1 (740 microS y-1). This upper bound dose was below the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit of 100 mrem y-1 (1000 microS y-1) from all pathways and corresponds to a risk of an excess cancer fatality of 3.7 x 10(-5) (37 in a million), which is also below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guideline of 10(-4). PMID:9491570

  15. Application of wastewater from paper and food seasoning industries with green manure to increase soil organic carbon: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Ching; Arun, A B; Rekha, P D; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2008-09-01

    This laboratory scale experiment was designed to study the suitability of organic wastes from paper and food seasoning industries to improve the soil organic carbon for rice cultivation. Lignin-rich wastewater from paper industry and nitrogen-rich effluent from a food industry at suitably lower concentrations were used at two levels of green manure to enhance the soil organic carbon fraction over time. Both the groups of soils with or without Sesbania were incubated under submerged condition at 25 degrees C for 15 days. Wastewaters from paper industry (WP), food industry (WS), and a combination of WP+WS were added separately to both the treatment groups in flasks. After 103 days of incubation, from all the three treatments and control, total organic carbon and alkali-soluble organic carbon fractions were analyzed. Results indicated that in all the three treatments containing green manure amended with industrial wastewaters, the organic carbon content increased significantly. The alkali-soluble organic carbon fraction was increased by 59% in the soil amended with green manure containing WS and by 31% in the treatment without green manure compared to control. The paper mill waste water namely, WP, increased the organic carbon only in the soil containing green manure by 63%. The combined treatment of WP+WS with green manure increased alkali-soluble organic carbon fraction by 90% compared to control, while in the treatment without green manure, the organic carbon increase was 71%. Overall, the combined treatment WP+WS with green manure could increase the alkali-soluble organic carbon fraction more than all other treatments. Hence, wastewater rich in organics from paper and food industries can be efficiently used to temporarily increase the soil organic carbon content.

  16. Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories, Kauai Test Facility, HI, 1999-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mark Laverne

    2007-11-01

    In 1999, 2002, and 2007, the Environmental Programs and Assurance Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) at the Kauai Test Facility (KTF), HI, has collected soil samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at KTF. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory for metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were increasing or decreasing trends that indicated that further investigation might be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Programs and Assurance Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

  17. Modeling the transport of soil fumigants at field and laboratory scales

    SciTech Connect

    Jury, W.A.

    1995-12-31

    Soil fumigants have taken on increased importance in recent years because of concerns about their contribution to stratospheric ozone depletion. These concerns have heightened the need for transport models of fumigant movement and fate in soil, both for environmental impact assessment, and to study alternative management strategies. Because of their high vapor pressure and density, fumigants cannot simply be modeled by diffusion, except at low concentration. Pressure-driven mass flow and density effects must be taken into account as well. During the early stages of release, these latter two effects will be dominant. This paper will discuss the processes governing fumigant transport and volatilization in soil, and how fumigant fate is represented with simple and complex models. It will also provide some examples of modeling methyl bromide fate in soil and its loss to the atmosphere.

  18. Fate of glyphosate and degradates in cover crop residues and underlying soil: A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Cassigneul, A; Benoit, P; Bergheaud, V; Dumeny, V; Etiévant, V; Goubard, Y; Maylin, A; Justes, E; Alletto, L

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of cover crops (CC) may lead to an increase in glyphosate application for their destruction. Sorption and degradation of (14)C-glyphosate on and within 4 decaying CC-amended soils were compared to its fate in a bare soil. (14)C-Glyphosate and its metabolites distribution between mineralized, water-soluble, NH4OH-soluble and non-extractable fractions was determined at 5 dates during a 20 °C/84-d period. The presence of CC extends (14)C-glyphosate degradation half-life from 7 to 28 days depending on the CC. (14)C-Glyphosate dissipation occurred mainly through mineralization in soils and through mineralization and bound residue formation in decaying CC. Differences in sorption and degradation levels were attributed to differences in composition and availability to microorganisms. CC- and soil-specific dissipation patterns were established with the help of explicit relationships between extractability and microbial activity.

  19. Soil memory as a potential mechanism for encouraging sustainable plant health and productivity.

    PubMed

    Lapsansky, Erin R; Milroy, Arwen M; Andales, Marie J; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2016-04-01

    The unspecified components of plant-microbe and plant-microbiome associations in the rhizosphere are complex, but recent research is simplifying our understanding of these relationships. We propose that the strong association between hosts, symbionts, and pathogens could be simplified by the concept of soil memory, which explains how a plant could promote their fecundity and protect their offspring through tightly associated relationships with the soil. Although there are many questions surrounding the mechanisms of this phenomenon, recent research has exposed evidence of its existence. Along with evidence from observations and mechanisms related to soil memory, we report means to utilize our understanding as sustainable protection for agricultural crops and propose future research questions.

  20. Viscosity, electrical conductivity, and cesium volatility of ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) vitrified soils with limestone and sodium additives

    SciTech Connect

    Shade, J.W.; Piepel, G.F.

    1990-05-01

    Engineering- and pilot-scale tests of the in situ vitrification (ISV) process have been conducted for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to successfully demonstrate the feasibility of applying ISV to seepage trenches and pits at ORNL. These sites contain soil that overlies crushed limestone fill; therefore, the ISV process is applied to a soil-limestone mixture. Previous testing indicated that while a good retention level of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr was achieved in the melt, it would be desirable to improve {sup 137}Cs retention to 99.99% if possible to minimize activity in the off-gas system. Previous testing was limited to one soil-limestone composition. Both Cs volatility and ISV power requirements are in part dependent on melt temperature and viscosity, which depend on melt composition. The study described in this report determined the effect of varying soil and limestone compositions, as well as the addition of a sodium flux, on melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and Cs volatility. 10 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Role of Soil-derived Dissolved Substances in Arsenic Transport and Transformation in Laboratory Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhangrong; Cai, Yong; Liu, Guangliang; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Snyder, George H.; Cisar, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved substances derived from soil may interact with both soil surfaces and with arsenic and subsequently influence arsenic mobility and species transformation. The purpose of this study was to investigate arsenic transport and transformation in porous media with a specific focus on the impact of soil-derived dissolved substances, mainly consisting of inorganic colloids and dissolved organic matter (DOM), on these processes. Arsenic transport and transformation through columns, which were packed with uncoated sand (UC) or naturally coated sand (NC) and fed with arsenate (AsV) or monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) spiked influents, were investigated in the presence or absence of soil-derived dissolved substances. The presence of soil-derived inorganic colloids and/or DOM clearly enhanced As transport through the column, with the fraction of As leached out of column (referring to the total amount added) being increased from 23 to 46% (UC) and 21 to 50% (NC) in AsV experiments while 46 to 64% (UC) and 28 to 63% (NC) in MMA experiments. The association of arsenic with DOM and the competitive adsorption between arsenic and DOM could account for, at least partly, the enhanced As movement. Distinct species transformation of As during transport through soil columns was observed. When AsV was the initial species spiked in the influent solutions, only arsenite (AsIII) was detected in the effluents for UC columns; while both AsIII (dominant) and AsV were present for NC columns, with AsIII being the dominant species. When MMA was initially spiked in the influent solutions, all method detectable As species, AsIII, AsV, MMA, and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA) were present in the effluents for both soil columns. These results indicate that risk assessment associated with As contamination, particularly due to previous organoarsenical pesticide applications, should take into account the role of soil-derived dissolved substances in promoting As transport and As species transformation

  2. Role of soil-derived dissolved substances in arsenic transport and transformation in laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangrong; Cai, Yong; Liu, Guangliang; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Snyder, George H; Cisar, John L

    2008-11-15

    Dissolved substances derived from soil may interact with both soil surfaces and with arsenic and subsequently influence arsenic mobility and species transformation. The purpose of this study was to investigate arsenic transport and transformation in porous media with a specific focus on the impact of soil-derived dissolved substances, mainly consisting of inorganic colloids and dissolved organic matter (DOM), on these processes. Arsenic transport and transformation through columns, which were packed with uncoated sand (UC) or naturally coated sand (NC) and fed with arsenate (AsV) or monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) spiked influents, were investigated in the presence or absence of soil-derived dissolved substances. The presence of soil-derived inorganic colloids and/or DOM clearly enhanced As transport through the column, with the fraction of As leached out of column (referring to the total amount added) being increased from 23 to 46% (UC) and 21 to 50% (NC) in AsV experiments while 46 to 64% (UC) and 28 to 63% (NC) in MMA experiments. The association of arsenic with DOM and the competitive adsorption between arsenic and DOM could account for, at least partly, the enhanced As movement. Distinct species transformation of As during transport through soil columns was observed. When AsV was the initial species spiked in the influent solutions, only arsenite (AsIII) was detected in the effluents for UC columns; while both AsIII (dominant) and AsV were present for NC columns, with AsIII being the dominant species. When MMA was initially spiked in the influent solutions, all method detectable As species, AsIII, AsV, MMA, and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA) were present in the effluents for both soil columns. These results indicate that risk assessment associated with As contamination, particularly due to previous organoarsenical pesticide applications, should take into account the role of soil-derived dissolved substances in promoting As transport and As species transformation.

  3. Laboratory Experiments on Electrochemical Remediation of the Environment Part 3: Microscale Electrokinetic Processing of Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Singh, Mono M.; Pike, Ronald M.; Szafran, Zvi

    1998-05-01

    Electrochemical remediation of the environment is gaining widespread acceptance due to the mild conditions used, the cleanliness of the electron as a reagent, the easiness for automation, its versatility, etc. In this paper three phenomena are presented at the microscale level, originating from the application of an electric field to a simulated soil sample: a) Demonstration of metal ion migration, b) Demonstration of the creation and movement of an acidic and a basic front, and c) Demonstration of water movement through soil.

  4. Dissolved Organic Matter as a Mechanism for Carbon Stabilization at Depth in Wet Tropical Forest Volcanic Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Kramer, M. G.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in many biological and chemical processes in soils. Our understanding of the types of plant and microbially-derived organic matter that accumulate in soils and the mechanisms responsible for their transformation and stabilization is still limited. In particular, we know very little about how microbial activity and water movement contribute to the production of DOM and the formation of stable C in soils. In well-drained soils under wet climates, DOM is potentially a primary pathway for the transport of C from the surface litter layers and the zones of highest microbial activity to deeper horizons in the soil profile where the potential for long-term storage increases. The mechanisms for long-term stabilization of organic C in deep mineral horizons include an accumulation of chemically recalcitrant C, strong sorption of soluble and otherwise labile C to mineral and/or metals making them inaccessible to decomposers, and microenvironmental conditions (low pH, low O2) which result in incomplete decomposition and persistence of labile C. Although most work to date has focused on the role of dissolved organic C and N (DOC and DON) in the C and N cycles of temperate forests, DOM fluxes may be even more important in forests in the wet tropics, where high rainfall and high primary productivity could lead to greater DOM production. In order to address the role of DOC in the transport and stabilization of C in mineral horizons, we are studying DOC production, transformation, and loss pathways in volcanic soils dominated by highly reactive, non-crystalline minerals (allophane). We are quantifying flux and solute concentrations (C, N, cations, anions) in rainwater, throughfall, and in soil water. We have installed tension and zero tension lysimeters throughout sequentially deeper organic and mineral horizons in an intermediate aged soil (ca. 350k years) under wet (ca. 3000 mm mean annual rainfall) native tropical forest

  5. Testing the application of Teflon/quartz soil solution samplers for DOM sampling in the Critical Zone: Field and laboratory approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, E. M.; Perdrial, J. N.; Vazquez, A.; Hernández, S.; Chorover, J.

    2010-12-01

    Elizabeth Dolan1,2, Julia Perdrial3, Angélica Vázquez-Ortega3, Selene Hernández-Ruiz3, Jon Chorover3 1Deptartment of Soil, Environmental, and Atmospheric Science, University of Missouri. 2Biosphere 2, University of Arizona. 3Deptartment of Soil, Water, and Environmental Science, University of Arizona. Abstract: The behavior of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soil is important to many biogeochemical processes. Extraction methods to obtain DOM from the unsaturated zone remain a current focus of research as different methods can influence the type and concentration of DOM obtained. Thus, the present comparison study involves three methods for soil solution sampling to assess their impact on DOM quantity and quality: 1) aqueous soil extracts, 2) solution yielded from laboratory installed suction cup samplers and 3) solutions from field installed suction cup samplers. All samples were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon and total nitrogen concentrations. Moreover, DOM quality was analyzed using fluorescence, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopies. Results indicate higher DOC values for laboratory extracted DOM: 20 mg/L for aqueous soil extracts and 31 mg/L for lab installed samplers compared to 12 mg/L for field installed samplers. Large variations in C/N ratios were also observed ranging from 1.5 in laboratory extracted DOM to 11 in field samples. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices of DOM solutions obtained for the laboratory extraction methods showed higher intensities in regions typical for fulvic and humic acid-like materials relative to those extracted in the field. Similarly, the molar absorptivity calculated from DOC concentration normalization of UV-Vis absorbance of the laboratory-derived solutions was significantly higher as well, indicating greater aromaticity. The observed differences can be attributed to soil disturbance associated with obtaining laboratory derived solution samples. Our results indicate that laboratory extraction methods are not

  6. Micro-electro-mechanical systems projects at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, J.A.

    1995-08-04

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) MicroTechnology Center has developed a wide variety of special capabilities used to design, build, and test MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). Our customers are both the LLNL Programs and a variety of external customers. Typical applications include: custom microstructures for scientific experiments; physical sensors; photonics; miniature tools for catheter-based surgery; and microinstruments for chemical analysis for biomedicine, environments and treaty verification. The majority of our prototype MEMS devices are fabricated with bulk silicon micromachining, but we also utilize surface micromachining capabilities.

  7. Using a scoop to derive soil mechanical parameters on the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargl, Günter; Poganski, Joshua; Kömle, Norbert I.; Schweiger, Helmut; Macher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We will report on the possibility of using the scoop attached to the instrument deployment arm to perform soil mechanical experiments directly on the surface of Mars. The Phoenix mission flown 2009 had an instrument deployment arm which was also used to sample surface material indo instruments mounted on the lander deck. The flight spare of this arm will again be flown to Mars on board the InSight mission. Although, the primary purpose of the arm and the attached scoop was not soil mechanical investigations it was already demonstrated by the Phoenix mission that the arm can be used to perform auxiliary investigations of the surface materials. We will report on modelling efforts using a Discrete Element Software package to demonstrate that simple soil mechanical experiments can be used to derive essential material parameters like e.g. angle of repose and others. This is of particular interest since it would be possible to implement experiments using the hardware of the InSight mission. PIC Cross section cut through a trench dug out by the scoop and the pile of the deposed material which both can be used to derive soil mechanical parameters.

  8. Larval susceptibility of an insecticide-resistant western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) population to soil insecticides: laboratory bioassays, assays of detoxification enzymes, and field performance.

    PubMed

    Wright, R J; Scharf, M E; Meinke, L J; Zhou, X; Siegfried, B D; Chandler, L D

    2000-02-01

    Soil insecticides were evaluated in laboratory and field studies against larvae of an insecticide resistant population (Phelps County, NE) of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Insecticide toxicity was evaluated by topical application of technical insecticides to 3rd instars from Saunders County, NE (susceptible) and Phelps County populations. Resistance ratios (LD50 Phelps County/LD50 Saunders County) for the insecticides methyl parathion, tefluthrin, carbofuran, terbufos, and chlorpyrifos were 28.0, 9.3, 8.7, 2.6 and 1.3, respectively. Biochemical investigation of suspected enzymatic resistance mechanisms in 3rd instars identified significant elevation of esterase activity (alpha and beta naphthyl acetate hydrolysis [3.8- and 3.9-fold]). Examination of 3rd instar esterases by native PAGE identified increased intensity of several isoenzymes in the resistant population. Assays of cytochrome P450 activity (4-CNMA demethylation and aldrin epoxidation) did not identify elevated activity in resistant 3rd instars. Granular soil insecticides were applied at planting to corn, Zea mays L., in replicated field trials in 1997 and 1998 at the same Phelps County site as the source of resistant rootworms for the laboratory studies. In 1997, planting time applications of Counter 20CR, Counter 15 G (terbufos), and Lorsban 15 G (chlorpyrifos) resulted in the lowest root injury ratings (1-6 Iowa scale); 2.50, 2.55, 2.65, respectively (untreated check root rating of 4.55). In 1998, all insecticides performed similarly against a lower rootworm density (untreated check root rating of 3.72). These studies suggest that resistance previously documented in adults also is present in 3rd instars, esterases are possibly involved as resistance mechanisms, and resistance to methyl parathion in adults is also evident in larvae, but does not confer cross-resistance in larvae to all organophosphate insecticides.

  9. Laboratory investigations of Mars: chemical and spectroscopic characteristics of a suite of clays as Mars soil analogs.

    PubMed

    Banin, A; Carle, G C; Chang, S; Coyne, L M; Orenberg, J B; Scattergood, T W

    1988-01-01

    Two major questions have been raised by prior explorations of Mars. Has there ever been abundant water on Mars? Why is the iron found in the Martian soil not readily seen in the reflectance spectra of the surface? The work reported here describes a model soil system of Mars Soil Analog Materials, MarSAM, with attributes which could help resolve both of these dilemmas. The first set of MarSAM consisted of a suite of variably iron/calcium-exchanged montmorillonite clays. Several properties, including chemical composition, surface-ion composition, water adsorption isotherms, and reflectance spectra, of these clays have been examined. Also, simulations of the Viking Labeled Release Experiment using the MarSAM were performed. The results of these studies show that surface iron and adsorbed water are important determinants of clay behavior as evidenced by changes in reflectance, water absorption, and clay surface reactions. Thus, these materials provide a model soil system which reasonably satisfies the constraints imposed by the Viking analyses and remote spectral observations of the Martian surface, and which offers a sink for significant amounts of water. Finally, our initial results may provide insights into the mechanisms of reactions that occur on clay surfaces as well as a more specific approach to determining the mineralogy of Martian soils.

  10. Mixture toxicity and tissue interactions of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in earthworms (Oligochaeta) in laboratory and field soils: a critical evaluation of data.

    PubMed

    Weltje, L

    1998-05-01

    Soil organisms inhabiting contaminated field sites are usually exposed to mixtures of toxicants. In such mixtures, toxicants can interact to express enhanced or weakened toxicity. Therefore, mixture effects should be considered in risk assessment methods for polluted soils. Data on mixture toxicity to soil organisms are scarce, however. In this paper, data on sublethal toxicity and tissue concentrations of Cd. Cu, Pb and Zn mixtures in earthworms are evaluated and compared with data on other organisms. Toxic effects were mainly antagonistic for total soil concentrations and nearly concentration-additive for 0.01 M CaCl2-extractable soil concentrations. Evidence to support concentration-additive behaviour of metals was found in interaction patterns within earthworm tissues. A method is proposed to assess the sublethal toxicity of metal mixtures in field soils to earthworms, based on single metal experiments from the laboratory. Finally, suggestions are made on how to incorporate mixture toxicity in risk assessment for polluted soils. PMID:9570111

  11. Recycling vs. stabilisation of soil sugars - a long-term laboratory incubation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-06-01

    Independent of its chemical structure carbon (C) persists in soil for several decades, controlled by stabilisation and recycling. To disentangle the importance of the two factors on the turnover dynamics of soil sugars, an important compound of soil organic matter (SOM), a three year incubation experiment was conducted on a silty loam soil under different types of land use (arable land, grassland and forest) by adding 13C-labeled glucose. The compound specific isotope analysis of soil sugars was used to examine the dynamics of different sugars during incubation. Sugar dynamics were dominated by a pool of high mean residence times (MRT) indicating that recycling plays an important role for sugars. However, this was not substantially affected by soil C content. Six months after label addition the contribution of the label was much higher for microbial biomass than for CO2 production for all examined soils, corroborating that substrate recycling was very effective within the microbial biomass. Two different patterns of tracer dynamics could be identified for different sugars: while fucose (fuc) and mannose (man) showed highest label contribution at the beginning of the incubation with a subsequent slow decline, galactose (gal) and rhamnose (rha) were characterised by slow label incorporation with subsequently constant levels, which indicates that recycling is dominating the dynamics of these sugars. This may correspond to (a) different microbial growing strategies (r and K-strategist) or (b) location within or outside the cell membrane (lipopolysaccharides vs. exopolysaccharides) and thus be subject of different re-use within the microbial food web. Our results show how the microbial community recycles substrate very effectively and that high losses of substrate only occur during initial stages after substrate addition.

  12. Laboratory assessment of the mobility of water-dispersed engineered nanoparticles in a red soil (Ultisol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dengjun; Su, Chunming; Zhang, Wei; Hao, Xiuzhen; Cang, Long; Wang, Yujun; Zhou, Dongmei

    2014-11-01

    Soils are major sinks of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) as results of land applications of sewage sludge, accidental spills, or deliberate applications of ENPs (e.g., nano-pesticides). In this study, the transport behaviors of four widely used ENPs (i.e., titanium dioxide [TiO2], buckminsterfullerene [C60], single-walled carbon nanotube [SWNT], and elemental silver [Ag0]) were investigated in water-saturated columns packed with either a quartz sand, a red soil (Ultisol), or sand/soil mixtures with soil mass fraction (λ) from 0% to 100% at slightly acidic solution pH (4.0-5.0). The mobility of tested ENPs decreased significantly with increasing λ, which was attributed to increased surface area and/or retention sites imparted by iron oxides, clay minerals, and organic matter in the red soil. Breakthrough curves of all ENPs exhibited blocking effects (decreasing deposition rate over time) and were well-described using an unfavorable and favorable, two-site kinetic attachment model accounting for random sequential adsorption on the favorable site. Modeled maximum retention capacity and first-order attachment rate coefficient on the favorable site both increased linearly with increasing λ, suggesting that transport parameters of ENPs in natural soils may be accurately extrapolated from transport parameters in the sand/soil mixtures. In addition, the mobility of three negatively charged ENPs (C60, SWNT, and Ag0 NPs) was reversely correlated with their average hydrodynamic diameters, highlighting that the average hydrodynamic diameter of negatively charged ENPs is the dominant physicochemical characteristics controlling their mobility in the Ultisol.

  13. A mechanism for preseismic steady rupture fronts observed in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Y.; Ampuero, J.-P.

    2011-11-01

    It has been shown that the onset of frictional instability is characterized by a transition from stable, quasi-static rupture growth to unstable, inertially-controlled high-speed rupture. In particular, slow rupture fronts propagating at a steady speed Vslow of the order of 5% of the S-wave speed have been observed prior to the onset of dynamic rupture in recent fault-friction laboratory experiments. However, the precise mechanism governing this Vslow stage is unknown. Here we reproduce this phenomenon in numerical simulations of earthquake sequences that incorporate laboratory-derived rate-and-state friction laws. Our simulations show that the Vslow stage originates from a stress concentration inherited from the coalescence of interseismic slow creep fronts. Its occurrence is limited to a narrow range of the parameter space but is found in simulations with two commonly-used state-variable evolution laws in the rate-and-state formulation. The sensitivity of the speed Vslow to the model parameters suggests that the propagation speed Vslow reported in laboratory experiments may also be sensitive to parameters of friction and stress conditions. Our results imply that time and space dimensions associated with the propagation of Vslow on natural faults can be as much as a few seconds and several hundred meters, respectively. Hence the detection of such preseismic signals may be possible with near-field high-resolution observations.

  14. A mechanism for preseismic steady rupture fronts observed in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    It has been shown that the onset of frictional instability is characterized by a transition from stable, quasi-static rupture growth to unstable, inertially-controlled high-speed rupture. In particular, slow `steady' fronts (which we call "V_slow") systematically propagating at ~5% of the S-wave speed prior to the onset of unstable rupture have been observed in recent fault-friction laboratory experiments (Nielsen et al., 2010). However, the precise mechanism of the occurrence of V_slow is unknown. Here we reproduce the occurrence of V_slow in numerical simulations of earthquake sequences that incorporate laboratory-derived rate-and-state friction laws. Our simulations show that the propagation of V_slow originates from a stress concentration inherited from the coalescence of interseismic slow creep fronts. The occurrence of V_slow is limited in a narrow range of the parameter space but is found in simulations with two commonly-used state-variable evolution laws in the rate-and-state formulation. Sensitivity of the speed of V_slow to the model parameters suggests that the previous laboratory experiments may have been carried out under special conditions. Our results imply that time and space dimensions associated with the propagation of V_slow on natural faults can be as much as a few seconds and several hundred meters, respectively. Hence the detection of such preseismic signals may be possible with near-field high-sampling GPS stations.

  15. Recent Results from a Laboratory Study of Charging Mechanisms in a Dusty Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venturini, Catherine C.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Comfort, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    A laboratory investigation has been developed to experimentally study the interaction of micron sized particles with plasmas and electromagnetic radiation. The intent is to investigate under what conditions particles of various compositions and sizes become charged, or discharged, while exposed to an electron beam and UV radiation. This investigation uses a unique laboratory technique known as electrodynamic suspension of particles. Here, a single charged micron size particle is suspended in a quadrupole trap and then subjected to a controlled environment. In this paper, we will discuss recent results from this experiment in which different materials including polystyrene and aluminum oxide, and sizes ranging from 10 microns to 1 micron have been used to determine charge to mass ratios and then subjected to an electron beam and /or UV radiation. In each instance, the particle's charge as well as beam current flux and radiation intensity flux is measured. These results will be compared with initial results using salt crystals. It was found that a negatively charged salt crystal exposed for 30 minutes to a 500 eV electron beam with primary electron beam current of -3.06 x 10(exp -5) picoamps yielded a secondary electron current of 3.23 x 10(exp -5) picoamps. Additionally, the particle was observed to be steadily losing charge over this time interval. By studying the microphysics of one particle, a better understanding of theoretical models and other laboratory results associated with particle charging mechanisms can be achieved.

  16. [Stabilization Treatment of Pb and Zn in Contaminated Soils and Mechanism Studies].

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-qiang; Li, Xiao-mingi; Chen, Can; Chen, Xun-feng; Zhong, Yu; Zhong, Zhen-yu; Wan, Yong; Wang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the combined application of potassium dihydrogen phosphate, quick lime and potassium chloride was used to immobilize the Pb and Zn in contaminated soils. The efficiency of the process was evaluated through leaching tests and Tessier sequential extraction procedure. The mechanism of stabilization was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to reveal the mechanism of stabilization. The results showed that the stabilizing efficiency of Pb contaminated soils was above 80% and the leaching concentrations of Pb, Zn were far below the threshold when the ratio of exogenous P and soil (mol · mol⁻¹) was 2:1-4: 1, the dosing ratio of CaO was 0.1%-0.5% ( mass fraction) and the dosage of potassium chloride was 0.02-0. 04 mol. Meanwhile, Pb and Zn in soil were transformed from the exchangeable fraction into residual fraction, which implied that the migration of Pb, Zn in soil could be confined by the stabilization treatment. XRD and SEM analysis revealed that Ca-P-Pb precipitation, lead orthophosphate [PbHP0₄, Pb₃ (PO₄)₂], pyromorphite (Pb-PO₄-Cl/OH) and mixed heavy metal deposits (Fe-PO₄- Ca-Pb-Zn-OH) could be formed after solidification/stabilization in which Pb and Zn could be wrapped up to form a solidified composition and to prevent leaching. PMID:27012000

  17. Soil-based treatments of mechanically collected cyanobacterial blooms from Lake Taihu: efficiencies and potential risks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Jia, Yunlu; Li, Enhua; Zhao, Shuang; Zhou, Qichao; Liu, Liming; Song, Lirong

    2012-12-18

    In China, mechanical collection of cyanoblooms followed by soil-based treatments has been widely used as emergency strategies in many eutrophicated freshwaters. This study was to evaluate both efficiencies and potential risks of typical soil-based technologies. Results from this study indicated that over 90% of cyanobacterial biomass and 96% of dissolved microcystins (MCs) could be restrained in soils via three-level systems, which were much better than single-level systems. High concentrations of MCs, ranged from 65 to 276 ng g⁻¹ and from 2.12 to 6.6 ng g⁻¹, were found in soils around treatment systems and croplands, respectively. In the soil solutions, MCs ranged from 0.35 to 2.0 μg L⁻¹, showing a potentially high leaching risk. In the samples from shallow groundwater near the treatment systems, MC concentrations were detected as high as 1.2 μg L⁻¹. Moreover, bioaccumulations of MCs varied between 22 and 365 μg kg⁻¹, and 19-222 μg kg⁻¹ were found in 13 kinds of crops and 7 kinds of wild grass, respectively. Our results indicated for the first time that current soil-based technologies were effective but could pose potential environmental, ecological, and public health risks. Further improvements of these technologies were also proposed based on our findings.

  18. Carbon dioxide emissions under different soil tillage systems in mechanically harvested sugarcane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Olaya, A. M.; Cerri, C. E. P.; La Scala, N., Jr.; Dias, C. T. S.; Cerri, C. C.

    2013-03-01

    Soil tillage and other methods of soil management may influence CO2 emissions because they accelerate the mineralization of organic carbon in the soil. This study aimed to quantify the CO2 emissions under conventional tillage (CT), minimum tillage (MT) and reduced tillage (RT) during the renovation of sugarcane fields in southern Brazil. The experiment was performed on an Oxisol in the sugarcane-planting area with mechanical harvesting. An undisturbed or no-till (NT) plot was left as a control treatment. The CO2 emissions results indicated a significant interaction (p < 0.001) between tillage method and time after tillage. By quantifying the accumulated emissions over the 44 days after soil tillage, we observed that tillage-induced emissions were higher after the CT system than the RT and MT systems, reaching 350.09 g m-2 of CO2 in CT, and 51.7 and 5.5 g m-2 of CO2 in RT and MT respectively. The amount of C lost in the form of CO2 due to soil tillage practices was significant and comparable to the estimated value of potential annual C accumulation resulting from changes in the harvesting system in Brazil from burning of plant residues to the adoption of green cane harvesting. The CO2 emissions in the CT system could respond to a loss of 80% of the potential soil C accumulated over one year as result of the adoption of mechanized sugarcane harvesting. Meanwhile, soil tillage during the renewal of the sugar plantation using RT and MT methods would result in low impact, with losses of 12% and 2% of the C that could potentially be accumulated during a one year period.

  19. Mechanisms of strontium uptake by laboratory and brewing strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, S.V.; Tobin, J.M. )

    1992-12-01

    Concern over transfer of toxic metals from microorgansims to higher organisms and interest in the biotechnological potential of microorganisms for metal removal and/or recovery has increased interest in the processes involved in heavy metal uptake. Strontium is a trace element with no know essential biological role, but a long half-live and discharge as a constituent of radioactive wastewaters from nuclear reactors and in fall-out make its fate in the environment a concern. In this study, strontium uptake in biomass obtained from laboratory and industrial sources was examined. The mechanisms of Sr[sup 2+] uptake were examined and uptake capacities for Sr[sup 2+] were compared in both live and denatured forms of laboratory and brewery-derived strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Release of cellular Ca[sup 2+], Mg[sup 2+], and H[sup +] in response to metabolism-independent and -dependent Sr[sup 2+] uptake processes, was determined for all biomass types. The results indicate clear differences in the mechanisms of both Sr[sup 2+] adsorption and intracellular Sr[sup 2+] accumulation between the yeasts examined. They point out the strong influence that the differential ecophysiology of strains from a single genus may exert on metal uptake characteristics and on external binding and intracellular distribution of essential ions.

  20. Quantifying soil surface photolysis under conditions simulating water movement in the field: a new laboratory test design.

    PubMed

    Hand, Laurence H; Nichols, Carol; Kuet, Sui F; Oliver, Robin G; Harbourt, Christopher M; El-Naggar, Essam M

    2015-10-01

    Soil surface photolysis can be a significant dissipation pathway for agrochemicals under field conditions, although it is assumed that such degradation ceases once the agrochemical is transported away from the surface following rainfall or irrigation and subsequent drainage of soil porewater. However, as both downward and upward water movements occur under field conditions, relatively mobile compounds may return to the surface, prolonging exposure to ultraviolet light and increasing the potential for degradation by photolysis. To test this hypothesis, a novel experimental system was used to quantify the contribution of photolysis to the overall dissipation of a new herbicide, bicyclopyrone, under conditions that mimicked field studies more closely than the standard laboratory test guidance. Soil cores were taken from 3 US field study sites, and the surfaces were treated with [(14) C]-bicyclopyrone. The radioactivity was redistributed throughout the cores using a simulated rainfall event, following which the cores were incubated under a xenon-arc lamp with continuous provision of moisture from below and a wind simulator to induce evaporation. After only 2 d, most of the test compound had returned to the soil surface. Significantly more degradation was observed in the irradiated samples than in a parallel dark control sample. Degradation rates were very similar to those observed in both the thin layer photolysis study and the field dissipation studies and significantly faster than in the soil metabolism studies conducted in the dark. Thus, for highly soluble, mobile agrochemicals, such as bicyclopyrone, photolysis is not terminated permanently by rainfall or irrigation but can resume following transport to the surface in evaporating water. PMID:26010776

  1. Quantifying soil surface photolysis under conditions simulating water movement in the field: a new laboratory test design.

    PubMed

    Hand, Laurence H; Nichols, Carol; Kuet, Sui F; Oliver, Robin G; Harbourt, Christopher M; El-Naggar, Essam M

    2015-10-01

    Soil surface photolysis can be a significant dissipation pathway for agrochemicals under field conditions, although it is assumed that such degradation ceases once the agrochemical is transported away from the surface following rainfall or irrigation and subsequent drainage of soil porewater. However, as both downward and upward water movements occur under field conditions, relatively mobile compounds may return to the surface, prolonging exposure to ultraviolet light and increasing the potential for degradation by photolysis. To test this hypothesis, a novel experimental system was used to quantify the contribution of photolysis to the overall dissipation of a new herbicide, bicyclopyrone, under conditions that mimicked field studies more closely than the standard laboratory test guidance. Soil cores were taken from 3 US field study sites, and the surfaces were treated with [(14) C]-bicyclopyrone. The radioactivity was redistributed throughout the cores using a simulated rainfall event, following which the cores were incubated under a xenon-arc lamp with continuous provision of moisture from below and a wind simulator to induce evaporation. After only 2 d, most of the test compound had returned to the soil surface. Significantly more degradation was observed in the irradiated samples than in a parallel dark control sample. Degradation rates were very similar to those observed in both the thin layer photolysis study and the field dissipation studies and significantly faster than in the soil metabolism studies conducted in the dark. Thus, for highly soluble, mobile agrochemicals, such as bicyclopyrone, photolysis is not terminated permanently by rainfall or irrigation but can resume following transport to the surface in evaporating water.

  2. The Mechanical Potential of the Language Laboratory. ERIC Focus Reports on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Edward M.

    The basic mechanical functions of the foreign language laboratory described in this report enable utilization of authentic target language, linguistically effective learning devices, visuals, and facilities for monitoring and testing. Brief descriptions of 11 laboratory functions include: (1) isolation (physical, acoustical, and psychological),…

  3. 14. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,311(463AM3)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory FacilityMechanical' Mare ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,311(463A-M-3)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory Facility-Mechanical' - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Battery Test Office & Storage Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  4. Nature's amazing biopolymer: basic mechanical and hydrological properties of soil affected by plant exudates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Roose, Tiina; Raffan, Annette; George, Timothy; Bengough, Glyn; Brown, Lawrie; Keyes, Sam; Daly, Keith; Hallett, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Plant exudates are known to have a very large impact on soil physical properties through changes in mechanical and hydrological processes driven by long-chain polysaccharides and surface active compounds. Whilst these impacts are well known, the basic physical properties of these exudates have only been reported in a small number of studies. We present data for exudates obtained from barley roots and chia seeds, incorporating treatments examining biological decomposition of the exudates. When these exudates were added to a sandy loam soil, contact angle and drop penetration time increased exponentially with increasing exudate concentration. These wetting properties were strongly correlated with both exudate density and zero-shear viscosity, but not with exudate surface tension. Water holding capacity and water repellency of exudate mixed soil tremendously increased with exudate concentration, however they were significantly reduced on decomposition when measured after 14 days of incubation at 16C. Mechanical stability greatly increased with increasing exudate amendment to soils, which was assessed using a rheological amplitude sweep test near saturation, at -50 cm matric potential (field capacity) using indentation test, and at air-dry condition using the Brazilian test. This reflects that exudates not only attenuate plant water stress but also impart mechanical stability to the rhizosphere. These data are highly relevant to the understanding and modelling of rhizosphere development, which is the next phase of our research.

  5. [Strategies and mechanisms of soil springtails in adapting lower temperature environment: research progress].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Yun-Biao; Wu, Dong-Hui

    2012-12-01

    Low temperature and drought are the main environmental factors threatening the animals living in arctic area and cold temperate regions. To adapt the severe environment, the animals should adopt appropriate strategies. As a group of arthopods with freeze-avoiding strategy, soil springtails have the similar ecological mechanisms and modes of cold resistance/tolerance as insects, manifesting in the cold acclimation and drought tolerance to decrease the damage of ice crystal formation. During cold acclimation, there are a rapid increase of glycerol, a rapid decrease of fucose and glucose, and the production of anti-freeze proteins (AFP) , and exists the inter-transformation of different kinds of lipids to improve the flow of cell membrane to protect the cell from low temperature injury. In addition, soil springtails have their own specific modes and mechanisms to tolerate low temperature stress, mainly the vertical migration under the protection of snow cover and the excretion of ice nucleator from haemolymph, illustrating that it's of significance to research the cryobiology of soil springtails. This paper summarized the modes and mechanisms of soil springtails in tolerating low temperature environment, reviewed the research progress on the eco-physiology of the springtails, discussed the existing problems of the researches on the low temperature tolerance of the springtails, and prospected the research directions of the springtails low temperature ecology under the background of global change. PMID:23479899

  6. Experimental study of the pH influence on the transport mechanisms of phenols in soil.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Silvia; Zanetti, Maria Chiara; Genon, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The study of the transport mechanisms connected to solid-liquid interactions is fundamental in the determination of the extension of the pollution of a site and in the evaluation of the best remediation process to be applied. The sorption of hydrophobic ionizable organic contaminants from the groundwaters is supervised not only by the physico-chemical properties of soil and pollutants, but also by the groundwaters pH, which deeply influences their solubility in the aqueous media, and consequently their transport mechanisms in the aquifer. In this work an experimental study of the sorption of phenol and 2-nitrophenol on two soils, different in particle-size distribution, CEC and organic carbon content, was realized. The sorption potential of the soils was evaluated by means of a physical, mineralogical and chemical characterization. The experimental data coming from some batch tests, performed at pH values equal to 4, 7 and 10 were fitted by means of linear, Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms models. The soil-contaminants interaction mechanisms that influence the isotherms shapes were then analyzed and discussed, and a comparison between the theoretical and experimental values of the partitioning coefficient KD was performed.

  7. Soil moisture redistribution as a mechanism of facilitation in savanna tree-shrub clusters.

    PubMed

    Zou, C B; Barnes, P W; Archer, S; McMurtry, C R

    2005-08-01

    Plant-soil water relations were examined in the context of a selective removal study conducted in tree-shrub communities occupying different but contiguous soil types (small discrete clusters on shallow, duplex soils versus larger, extensive groves on deep, sandy soils) in a subtropical savanna parkland. We (1) tested for the occurrence of soil moisture redistribution by hydraulic lift (HL), (2) determined the influence of edaphic factors on HL, and (3) evaluated the significance of HL for overstory tree-understory shrub interactions. Diel cycling and nocturnal increases in soil water potential (Psisoil), characteristic signatures of HL, occurred intermittently throughout an annual growth cycle in both communities over a range of moisture levels (Psisoil=-0.5 to -6.0 MPa) but only when soils were distinctly stratified with depth (dry surface/wet deep soil layers). The magnitude of mean (+/-SE) diel fluctuations in Psisoil (0.19+/-0.01 MPa) did not differ on the two community types, though HL occurred more frequently in groves (deep soils) than clusters (shallow soils). Selective removal of either Prosopis glandulosa overstory or mixed-species shrub understory reduced the frequency of HL, indicating that Prosopis and at least one other woody species was conducting HL. For Zanthoxylum fagara, a shallow-rooted understory shrub, Prosopis removal from clusters decreased leaf water potential (Psileaf) and net CO2 exchange (A) during periods of HL. In contrast, overstory removal had neutral to positive effects on more deeply-rooted shrub species (Berberis trifoliolata and Condalia hookeri). Removal of the shrub understory in groves increased A in the overstory Prosopis. Results indicate the following: (a) HL is common but temporally dynamic in these savanna tree-shrub communities; (b) edaphic factors influencing the degree of overstory/understory development, rooting patterns and soil moisture distribution influence HL; (c) net interactions between overstory and

  8. Mechanical instability induced by water weakening in laboratory fluid injection tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C.; Dautriat, J.; Sarout, J.; Delle Piane, C.; Menéndez, B.; Macault, R.; Bertauld, D.

    2015-06-01

    To assess water-weakening effects in reservoir rocks, previous experimental studies have focused on changes in the failure envelopes derived from mechanical tests conducted on rocks fully saturated either with water or with inert fluids. So far, little attention has been paid to the mechanical behavior during fluid injection under conditions similar to enhanced oil recovery operations. We studied the effect of fluid injection on the mechanical behavior of the weakly consolidated Sherwood sandstone in laboratory experiments. Our specimens were instrumented with 16 ultrasonic P wave transducers for both passive and active acoustic monitoring during loading and fluid injection to record the acoustic signature of fluid migration in the pore space and the development of damage. Calibration triaxial tests were conducted on three samples saturated with air, water, or oil. In a second series of experiments, water and inert oil were injected into samples critically loaded up to 80% or 70% of the dry or oil-saturated compressive strength, respectively, to assess the impact of fluid migration on mechanical strength and elastic properties. The fluids were injected with a low back pressure to minimize effective stress variations during injection. Our observations show that creep takes place with a much higher strain rate for water injection compared to oil injection. The most remarkable difference is that water injection in both dry and oil-saturated samples triggers mechanical instability (macroscopic failure) within half an hour whereas oil injection does not after several hours. The analysis of X-ray computed tomography images of postmortem samples revealed that the mechanical instability was probably linked to loss of cohesion in the water-invaded region.

  9. Laboratory analysis of soil hydraulic properties of CDBM 2 and CDBM 3 samples

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    Daniel B. Stephens & Associates, Inc. (DBS&A) was requested by Dr. Alan Stoker of Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform laboratory analysis for properties of CDBM 2 and CDBM 3 samples, as outlined in Subcontract No. 9-XTI-027EE-1. The scope of work included conducting tests for the following properties: Initial moisture content, dry bulk density, and calculated porosity; Saturated hydraulic conductivity; Moisture characteristics; Unsaturated hydraulic properties (calculated); and Transient outflow.

  10. Effect of organic carbon on sorption of human adenovirus to soil particles and laboratory containers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A key factor controlling the relationship between virus release and human exposure is how virus particles interact with soils, sediments and other solid particles in the environment and in engineered treatment systems. Finding no previous investigations of human adenovirus (HAdV)...

  11. Laboratory Assessment of the Mobility of Water-Dispersed Engineered Nanoparticles in a Red Soil (Ultisol)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soils are major sinks of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) as results of land applications of sewage sludge, accidental spills, or deliberate applications of ENPs (e.g., nano-pesticides). In this study, the transport behaviors of four widely used ENPs (titanium dioxide [TiO2], buck...

  12. Laboratory-scale measurements and simulations of effect of application methods on soil methyl bromide emission

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, J.; Yates, S.R.; Spencer, W.F.

    1997-01-01

    Methyl bromide (bromomethane, MeBr), which originates from the oceans, fumigation, and a few other sources, is reportedly contributing to the ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Due to the heavy reliance on this fumigant in the production of many crops, it is of particular importance to accurately quantify the atmospheric input of MeBr arising from agricultural uses, and develop feasible measures to minimize these emissions. In this study, we determined the effect of two important application variables, surface tarp and injection depth, on MeBr transport and transformation in the soil and its emission from the soil surface under controlled conditions. Following 20- and 30-cm injections, covering the soil surface with 1-mil (0.025 mm) high-density polyethylene film resulted in an average of 48% reduction in MeBr emission. Increasing the injection depth from 20 to 60 cm caused a decrease in MeBr emission of 54% under untarped conditions and 40% under tarped conditions. The influence of application methods on MeBr atmospheric emissions should be considered when estimating the contribution of agricultural fumigation to the overall atmospheric MeBr burden on a global scale. The results also indicate that MeBr emission after soil fumigation may be substantially minimized by using surface tarpaulins and deep injections. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A MULTI-LABORATORY EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR DETECTING ENTERIC VIRUSES IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two candidate methods for the recovery and detection of viruses in soil were subjected to round robin comparative testing by members of the American Society for Testing and Materials D19:24:04:04 Subcommittee Task Group. Selection of the methods, designated “Berg” and “Goyal,” wa...

  14. Mixed Redox Catalytic Destruction of Chlorinated Solvents in Soils and Groundwater: From the Laboratory to the Field

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Rupp, Erik; Bell, Suzanne; Willinger, Martin; Foley, Theresa; Barbaris, Brian; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Arnold, Robert G.; Betterton, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A new thermocatalytic method to destroy chlorinated solvents has been developed in the laboratory and tested in a pilot field study. The method employs a conventional Pt/Rh catalyst on a ceramic honeycomb. Reactions proceed at moderate temperatures in the simultaneous presence of oxygen and a reductant (mixed redox conditions) to minimize catalyst deactivation. In the laboratory, stable operation with high conversions (above 90% at residence times shorter than 1 s) for perchloroethylene (PCE) is achieved using hydrogen as the reductant. A molar ratio of H2/O2 = 2 yields maximum conversions; the temperature required to produce maximum conversions is sensitive to influent PCE concentration. When a homologous series of aliphatic alkanes is used to replace hydrogen as the reductant, the resultant mixed redox conditions also produce high PCE conversions. It appears that the dissociation energy of the C–H bond in the respective alkane molecule is a strong determinant of the activation energy, and therefore the reaction rate, for PCE conversion. This new method was employed in a pilot field study in Tucson, Arizona. The mixed redox system was operated semicontinuously for 240 days with no degradation of catalyst performance and complete destruction of PCE and trichloroethylene in a soil vapor extraction gas stream. Use of propane as the reductant significantly reduced operating costs. Mixed redox destruction of chlorinated solvents provides a potentially viable alternative to current soil and groundwater remediation technologies. PMID:18991945

  15. The Martian near surface environment: Analysis of Antarctic soils and laboratory experiments on putative Martian organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Paul Douglas, Jr.

    Understanding the physical properties as well as the potential for organic material in the Martian near-surface environment can give us a glimpse into the history of the site with regards to water, soil formation processes, as well as the conditions necessary for life. This work is done to support the interpretation of data from the Phoenix Mars Lander as well as other past and future landed missions. The Antarctic Dry Valleys are a hyper-arid cold polar desert that is the most Mars-like place on Earth. Soils from two different soil and climate regimes are analyzed to determine their physical properties such as mineralogy, particle size, shape, color, and specific surface area. These data are used to describe the sample locations in Antarctica and infer properties of Martian soils by comparison to Antarctic sites. I find that the particle size distribution can be used to determine the water history of the site and that the behavior of soluble species in the soil can also be used to trace the movement of water through the soil and could be instructive in understanding how soil organic material is processed by the environment. Continuing with the theme of soil organic matter, we revisit the Viking conclusions with regards to organics on Mars and look at the Phoenix data on the same subject. First, we assume that Mars receives organic material from meteoritic infall. These organics will be processed by chemical oxidants as well as UV light down to 200 nm. Chemical oxidation is predicted to produce molecules such as mellitic acid, which could preserve up to 10% of the original organic mass. Using mellitic acid and other similar organic molecules, we irradiate these molecules with Mars-like ultraviolet light, analyzing the gases that come off as irradiation takes place. We find that organic molecules can survive Mars-like UV conditions as layers of UV-resistant organics build up, shielding the remaining organic material. Additionally, the gas products of irradiation

  16. Hydrodispersive characterization of a sandy porous medium by tracer tests carried out in laboratory on undisturbed soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, Aldo Pedro; Fallico, Carmine; Rios, Ana C.; Fernanda Rivera, Maria; Santillan, Patricio; Salazar, Mario

    2013-04-01

    The contamination of large areas and correspondent aquifers often imposes to implement some recovery operations which are generally complex and very expensive. Anyway, these interventions necessarily require the preventive characterization of the aquifers to be reclaimed and in particular the knowledge of the relevant hydrodispersive parameters. The determination of these parameters requires the implementation tracer tests for the specific site (Sauty JP, 1978). To reduce cost and time that such test requires tracer tests on undisturbed soil samples, representative of the whole aquifer, can be performed. These laboratory tests are much less expensive and require less time, but the results are certainly less reliable than those obtained by field tests for several reasons, including the particular scale of investigation. In any case the hydrodispersive parameters values, obtained by tests carried out in laboratory, can provide useful information on the considered aquifer, allowing to carry out initial verifications on the transmission and propagation of the pollutants in the aquifer considered. For this purpose, tracer tests with inlet of short time were carried out in the Soil Physics Laboratory of the Department of Soil Protection (University of Calabria), on a series of sandy soil samples with six different lengths, repeating each test with three different water flow velocities (5 m/d; 10 m/s and 15 m/d) (J. Feyen et al., 1998). The lengths of the samples taken into account are respectively 15 cm, 24 cm, 30 cm, 45 cm, 60 cm and 75 cm, while the solution used for each test was made of 100 ml of water and NaCl with a concentration of this substance corresponding to 10 g/L. For the porous medium taken into consideration a particle size analysis was carried out, resulting primarily made of sand, with total porosity equal to 0.33. Each soil sample was placed in a flow cell in which was inlet the tracer from the bottom upwards, measuring by a conductivimeter the

  17. Development of an ultrasonic process for detoxifying groundwater and soil: Laboratory research. Annual report for fiscal year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.M.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is conducting laboratory research to study the effectiveness of a new technique in which ultrasonic energy is used to convert chlorinated organic compounds into nonhazardous end products. Destruction efficiencies of greater than 99% were achieved for the organic compounds in aqueous solution. Key process parameters, such as solution pH values, steady-state temperatures under operating conditions, ultrasonic-power intensities, and oxidant concentrations, were investigated. In addition, a detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for the destruction of the organic compounds under an ultrasonic filed was developed and incorporated into a computational model. The agreement between the model and experimental results is generally good.

  18. Is the rhizosphere priming effect an important mechanism for nitrogen mineralisation in soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Conor; Baggs, Elizabeth; Morley, Nicholas; Wall, David; Paterson, Eric

    2015-04-01

    In soil, nitrogen is mobilised from soil organic matter (SOM) to pools more readily available to plants (mineralisation), mediated by the microbial biomass. Multiple mechanisms underpin this process, including the priming effect (PE) which is increasingly recognised as an important driver of N mineralisation. The PE is where microbes utilize labile carbon from roots (root exudates or senescing plant material) for energy and subsequently mineralise SOM for nutrients, inevitably mobilising nutrients from SOM to plant available pools. However, the mechanism and regulators underpinning PE's are virtually unknown. This work investigates the importance of priming for N mineralisation. We hypothesized that 1) addition of labile C would increase gross N mineralisation and plant N uptake, and that this is soil-specific; 2) the stoichiometry of primed and basal mineralisation fluxes would be different, indicative of these processes being functionally distinct; and 3) the presence of fertilizer nitrogen and grazing would reduce primed and basal mineralisation and reduce plant uptake of SOM derived N. To do this we coupled continuous steady-state 13C labelling and 15N isotope dilution to measure specific gross C and N fluxes from two contrasting soils. Addition of carbon increased gross C and N fluxes from SOM, but the effect was soil-specific. The C-to-N ratio of the flux from 'primed' SOM was much lower than that of the basal flux indicating that the release of labile carbon from plant roots functions as a nutrient acquisition response, increasing mineralisation of SOM. Addition of N fertiliser resulted in negative priming of SOM, but overall and in both soils, the plant accessed more SOM-derived N. Grazing and priming were closely coupled, with grazing increasing SOM priming. Our results demonstrate that priming effects are an integral component of N mineralisation and should be incorporated into nitrogen cycling models.

  19. E. coli RS2GFP Retention Mechanisms in Laboratory-Scale Fractured Rocks: A Statistical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. N.; Qu, J.; Dickson, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    With billions of gallons of groundwater being withdrawn every day in the US and Canada, it is imperative to understand the mechanisms which jeopardize this resource and the health of those who rely on it. Porous media aquifers have typically been considered to provide significant filtration of particulate matter (e.g. microorganisms), while the fractures in fractured rock aquifers and aquitards are considered to act as contaminant highways allowing a large fraction of pathogens to travel deep into an aquifer relatively quickly. Recent research results indicate that fractured rocks filter out more particulates than typically believed. The goal of the research presented here is to quantify the number of E. coli RS2GFP retained in a single, saturated, laboratory-scale fracture, and to relate the retention of E. coli RS2GFP to the aperture field characteristics and groundwater flow rate. To achieve this goal, physical experiments were conducted at the laboratory-scale to quantify the retention of E. coli RS2GFP through several single, saturated, dolomitic limestone fractures under a range of flow rates. These fractures were also cast with a transparent epoxy in order to visualize the transport mechanisms in the various different aperture fields. The E. coli RS2GFP is tagged with a green-fluorescent protein (GFP) that is used to obtain visualization data when excited by ultraviolet light. A series of experiments was conducted, each of which involved the release of a known number of E. coli RS2GFP at the upstream end of the fracture and measuring the effluent concentration profile. These experiments were conducted using both the natural rock and transparent cast of several different aperture fields, under a range of flow rates. The effects of different aperture field characteristics and flow rates on the retention of E. coli RS2GFP will be determined by conducting a statistical analysis of the retention data under different experimental conditions. The images captured

  20. Correlating laboratory observations of fracture mechanical properties to hydraulically-induced microseismicity in geothermal reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen L. Karner, Ph.D

    2006-02-01

    To date, microseismicity has provided an invaluable tool for delineating the fracture network produced by hydraulic stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. While the locations of microseismic events are of fundamental importance, there is a wealth of information that can be gleaned from the induced seismicity (e.g. fault plane solutions, seismic moment tensors, source characteristics). Closer scrutiny of the spatial and temporal evolution of seismic moment tensors can shed light on systematic characteristics of fractures in the geothermal reservoir. When related to observations from laboratory experiments, these systematic trends can be interpreted in terms of mechanical processes that most likely operate in the fracture network. This paper reports on mechanical properties that can be inferred from observations of microseismicity in geothermal systems. These properties lead to interpretations about fracture initiation, seismicity induced after hydraulic shut-in, spatial evolution of linked fractures, and temporal evolution of fracture strength. The correlations highlight the fact that a combination of temperature, stressing rate, time, and fluid-rock interactions can alter the mechanical and fluid transport properties of fractures in geothermal systems.

  1. Nitrogen Mineralization of a Loam Soil Supplemented with Organic-Inorganic Amendments under Laboratory Incubation.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, M Kaleem; Khaliq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of nitrogen (N) supplying capacity of organic amendments applied to a soil is of immense importance to examine synchronization, N release capacity, and fertilizer values of these added materials. The aims of the present study was to determine the potential N mineralization and subsequent nitrification of separate and combined use of poultry manure (PM), wheat straw residues (WSR), and urea N (UN) applied to a loam soil incubated periodically over 140 days period. In addition, changes in total soil N and carbon contents were also monitored during the study. Treatments included: PM100, WSR100, PM50 + WSR50, UN100, UN50 + PM50, UN50 + WSR50, UN50 + PM25 + WSR25, and a control (unfertilized). All the amendments were applied on an N-equivalent basis at the rate of 200 mg N kg(-1). Results indicated that a substantial quantity of N had been released from the added amendments into the soil mineral pool and the net cumulative N mineralized varied between 39 and 147 mg N kg(-1), lowest in the WSR and highest in the UN50 + PM50. Significant differences were observed among the amendments and the net mineral N derived from a separate and combined use of PM was greater than the other treatments. The net cumulative N nitrified (NCNN) varied between 16 and 126 mg kg(-1), highest in UN50 + PM50 treatment. On average, percentage conversion of added N into available N by different amendments varied between 21 and 80%, while conversion of applied N into NO3 (-)-N ranged between 9 and 65%, and the treatment UN50 + PM50 displayed the highest N recovery. Urea N when applied alone showed disappearance of 37% N (N unaccounted for) at the end while application of PM and WSR with UN reduced N disappearance and increased N retention in the mineral pool for a longer period. Organic amendments alone or in combination with UN improved organic matter buildup and increased soil N concentration. These results demonstrate the existence of substantial amounts of N reserves present

  2. Nitrogen Mineralization of a Loam Soil Supplemented with Organic-Inorganic Amendments under Laboratory Incubation.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, M Kaleem; Khaliq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of nitrogen (N) supplying capacity of organic amendments applied to a soil is of immense importance to examine synchronization, N release capacity, and fertilizer values of these added materials. The aims of the present study was to determine the potential N mineralization and subsequent nitrification of separate and combined use of poultry manure (PM), wheat straw residues (WSR), and urea N (UN) applied to a loam soil incubated periodically over 140 days period. In addition, changes in total soil N and carbon contents were also monitored during the study. Treatments included: PM100, WSR100, PM50 + WSR50, UN100, UN50 + PM50, UN50 + WSR50, UN50 + PM25 + WSR25, and a control (unfertilized). All the amendments were applied on an N-equivalent basis at the rate of 200 mg N kg(-1). Results indicated that a substantial quantity of N had been released from the added amendments into the soil mineral pool and the net cumulative N mineralized varied between 39 and 147 mg N kg(-1), lowest in the WSR and highest in the UN50 + PM50. Significant differences were observed among the amendments and the net mineral N derived from a separate and combined use of PM was greater than the other treatments. The net cumulative N nitrified (NCNN) varied between 16 and 126 mg kg(-1), highest in UN50 + PM50 treatment. On average, percentage conversion of added N into available N by different amendments varied between 21 and 80%, while conversion of applied N into NO3 (-)-N ranged between 9 and 65%, and the treatment UN50 + PM50 displayed the highest N recovery. Urea N when applied alone showed disappearance of 37% N (N unaccounted for) at the end while application of PM and WSR with UN reduced N disappearance and increased N retention in the mineral pool for a longer period. Organic amendments alone or in combination with UN improved organic matter buildup and increased soil N concentration. These results demonstrate the existence of substantial amounts of N reserves present

  3. Nitrogen Mineralization of a Loam Soil Supplemented with Organic–Inorganic Amendments under Laboratory Incubation

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, M. Kaleem; Khaliq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of nitrogen (N) supplying capacity of organic amendments applied to a soil is of immense importance to examine synchronization, N release capacity, and fertilizer values of these added materials. The aims of the present study was to determine the potential N mineralization and subsequent nitrification of separate and combined use of poultry manure (PM), wheat straw residues (WSR), and urea N (UN) applied to a loam soil incubated periodically over 140 days period. In addition, changes in total soil N and carbon contents were also monitored during the study. Treatments included: PM100, WSR100, PM50 + WSR50, UN100, UN50 + PM50, UN50 + WSR50, UN50 + PM25 + WSR25, and a control (unfertilized). All the amendments were applied on an N-equivalent basis at the rate of 200 mg N kg-1. Results indicated that a substantial quantity of N had been released from the added amendments into the soil mineral pool and the net cumulative N mineralized varied between 39 and 147 mg N kg-1, lowest in the WSR and highest in the UN50 + PM50. Significant differences were observed among the amendments and the net mineral N derived from a separate and combined use of PM was greater than the other treatments. The net cumulative N nitrified (NCNN) varied between 16 and 126 mg kg-1, highest in UN50 + PM50 treatment. On average, percentage conversion of added N into available N by different amendments varied between 21 and 80%, while conversion of applied N into NO3-–N ranged between 9 and 65%, and the treatment UN50 + PM50 displayed the highest N recovery. Urea N when applied alone showed disappearance of 37% N (N unaccounted for) at the end while application of PM and WSR with UN reduced N disappearance and increased N retention in the mineral pool for a longer period. Organic amendments alone or in combination with UN improved organic matter buildup and increased soil N concentration. These results demonstrate the existence of substantial amounts of N reserves present in PM

  4. Molecular mechanisms underlying the close association between soil Burkholderia and fungi.

    PubMed

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Zühlke, Daniela; Carlier, Aurélien; Barberán, Albert; Fierer, Noah; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species belonging to the genus Burkholderia have been repeatedly reported to be associated with fungi but the extent and specificity of these associations in soils remain undetermined. To assess whether associations between Burkholderia and fungi are widespread in soils, we performed a co-occurrence analysis in an intercontinental soil sample collection. This revealed that Burkholderia significantly co-occurred with a wide range of fungi. To analyse the molecular basis of the interaction, we selected two model fungi frequently co-occurring with Burkholderia, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani, and analysed the proteome changes caused by cultivation with either fungus in the widespread soil inhabitant B. glathei, whose genome we sequenced. Co-cultivation with both fungi led to very similar changes in the B. glathei proteome. Our results indicate that B. glathei significantly benefits from the interaction, which is exemplified by a lower abundance of several starvation factors that were highly expressed in pure culture. However, co-cultivation also gave rise to stress factors, as indicated by the increased expression of multidrug efflux pumps and proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Our data suggest that the ability of Burkholderia to establish a close association with fungi mainly lies in the capacities to utilize fungal-secreted metabolites and to overcome fungal defense mechanisms. This work indicates that beneficial interactions with fungi might contribute to the survival strategy of Burkholderia species in environments with sub-optimal conditions, including acidic soils. PMID:25989372

  5. Molecular mechanisms underlying the close association between soil Burkholderia and fungi.

    PubMed

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Zühlke, Daniela; Carlier, Aurélien; Barberán, Albert; Fierer, Noah; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species belonging to the genus Burkholderia have been repeatedly reported to be associated with fungi but the extent and specificity of these associations in soils remain undetermined. To assess whether associations between Burkholderia and fungi are widespread in soils, we performed a co-occurrence analysis in an intercontinental soil sample collection. This revealed that Burkholderia significantly co-occurred with a wide range of fungi. To analyse the molecular basis of the interaction, we selected two model fungi frequently co-occurring with Burkholderia, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani, and analysed the proteome changes caused by cultivation with either fungus in the widespread soil inhabitant B. glathei, whose genome we sequenced. Co-cultivation with both fungi led to very similar changes in the B. glathei proteome. Our results indicate that B. glathei significantly benefits from the interaction, which is exemplified by a lower abundance of several starvation factors that were highly expressed in pure culture. However, co-cultivation also gave rise to stress factors, as indicated by the increased expression of multidrug efflux pumps and proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Our data suggest that the ability of Burkholderia to establish a close association with fungi mainly lies in the capacities to utilize fungal-secreted metabolites and to overcome fungal defense mechanisms. This work indicates that beneficial interactions with fungi might contribute to the survival strategy of Burkholderia species in environments with sub-optimal conditions, including acidic soils.

  6. Dissolving mechanism of strain P17 on insoluble phosphorus of yellow-brown soil.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chuan-qing; Cao, Guang-xiang; Huang, Wei-yi; Luan, Xing-she; Yang, Yi-fei

    2014-01-01

    Strain P17 was a bacterial strain identified as Bacillus megaterium isolated from ground accumulating phosphate rock powder. The fermentation broth of strain P17 and the yellow-brown soil from Nanjing Agricultural University garden were collected to conduct this study. The simulation of fixed insoluble phosphorous forms after applying calcium superphosphate into yellow-brown soil was performed in pots, while available P and total P of soil were extremely positive correlative with those of groundwater. Then the dissolving effect of strain P17 on insoluble P of yellow-brown soil was studied. Results showed that Bacillus megaterium strain P17 had notable solubilizing effect on insoluble phosphates formed when too much water-soluble phosphorous fertilizer used. During 100 days after inoculation, strain P17 was dominant. Until the 120th day, compared with water addition, available P of strain P17 inoculation treated soil increased by 3 times with calcium superphosphate addition. Besides available P, pH, activity of acid and alkaline phosphatase and population of P-solubilizing microbes were detected respectively. P-solubilizing mechanism of P-solubilizing bacteria strain P17 seems to be a synergetic effect of pH decrease, organic acids, phosphatase, etc. PMID:25477929

  7. Dissolving mechanism of strain P17 on insoluble phosphorus of yellow-brown soil

    PubMed Central

    Chuan-qing, Zhong; Guang-xiang, Cao; Wei-yi, Huang; Xing-she, Luan; Yi-fei, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Strain P17 was a bacterial strain identified as Bacillus megaterium isolated from ground accumulating phosphate rock powder. The fermentation broth of strain P17 and the yellow-brown soil from Nanjing Agricultural University garden were collected to conduct this study. The simulation of fixed insoluble phosphorous forms after applying calcium superphosphate into yellow-brown soil was performed in pots, while available P and total P of soil were extremely positive correlative with those of groundwater. Then the dissolving effect of strain P17 on insoluble P of yellow-brown soil was studied. Results showed that Bacillus megaterium strain P17 had notable solubilizing effect on insoluble phosphates formed when too much water-soluble phosphorous fertilizer used. During 100 days after inoculation, strain P17 was dominant. Until the 120th day, compared with water addition, available P of strain P17 inoculation treated soil increased by 3 times with calcium superphosphate addition. Besides available P, pH, activity of acid and alkaline phosphatase and population of P-solubilizing microbes were detected respectively. P-solubilizing mechanism of P-solubilizing bacteria strain P17 seems to be a synergetic effect of pH decrease, organic acids, phosphatase, etc. PMID:25477929

  8. Soil nitrate reducing processes – drivers, mechanisms for spatial variation, and significance for nitrous oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Madeline; Morley, Nicholas; Baggs, Elizabeth M.; Daniell, Tim J.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial processes of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are two important nitrate reducing mechanisms in soil, which are responsible for the loss of nitrate (NO3−) and production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O). A number of factors are known to control these processes, including O2 concentrations and moisture content, N, C, pH, and the size and community structure of nitrate reducing organisms responsible for the processes. There is an increasing understanding associated with many of these controls on flux through the nitrogen cycle in soil systems. However, there remains uncertainty about how the nitrate reducing communities are linked to environmental variables and the flux of products from these processes. The high spatial variability of environmental controls and microbial communities across small sub centimeter areas of soil may prove to be critical in determining why an understanding of the links between biotic and abiotic controls has proved elusive. This spatial effect is often overlooked as a driver of nitrate reducing processes. An increased knowledge of the effects of spatial heterogeneity in soil on nitrate reduction processes will be fundamental in understanding the drivers, location, and potential for N2O production from soils. PMID:23264770

  9. Soil biochar amendment as a climate change mitigation tool: Key parameters and mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Brassard, Patrick; Godbout, Stéphane; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2016-10-01

    Biochar, a solid porous material obtained from the carbonization of biomass under low or no oxygen conditions, has been proposed as a climate change mitigation tool because it is expected to sequester carbon (C) for centuries and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soils. This review aimed to identify key biochar properties and production parameters that have an effect on these specific applications of the biochar. Moreover, mechanisms involved in interactions between biochar and soils were highlighted. Following a compilation and comparison of the characteristics of 76 biochars from 40 research studies, biochars with a lower N content, and consequently a higher C/N ratio (>30), were found to be more suitable for mitigation of N2O emissions from soils. Moreover, biochars produced at a higher pyrolysis temperature, and with O/C ratio <0.2, H/Corg ratio <0.4 and volatile matter below 80% may have high C sequestration potential. Based on these observations, biochar production and application to the field can be used as a tool to mitigate climate change. However, it is important to determine the pyrolysis conditions and feedstock needed to produce a biochar with the desired properties for a specific application. More research studies are needed to identify the exact mechanisms involved following biochar amendment to soil.

  10. Soil biochar amendment as a climate change mitigation tool: Key parameters and mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Brassard, Patrick; Godbout, Stéphane; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2016-10-01

    Biochar, a solid porous material obtained from the carbonization of biomass under low or no oxygen conditions, has been proposed as a climate change mitigation tool because it is expected to sequester carbon (C) for centuries and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soils. This review aimed to identify key biochar properties and production parameters that have an effect on these specific applications of the biochar. Moreover, mechanisms involved in interactions between biochar and soils were highlighted. Following a compilation and comparison of the characteristics of 76 biochars from 40 research studies, biochars with a lower N content, and consequently a higher C/N ratio (>30), were found to be more suitable for mitigation of N2O emissions from soils. Moreover, biochars produced at a higher pyrolysis temperature, and with O/C ratio <0.2, H/Corg ratio <0.4 and volatile matter below 80% may have high C sequestration potential. Based on these observations, biochar production and application to the field can be used as a tool to mitigate climate change. However, it is important to determine the pyrolysis conditions and feedstock needed to produce a biochar with the desired properties for a specific application. More research studies are needed to identify the exact mechanisms involved following biochar amendment to soil. PMID:27420171

  11. Volatile organic compound emissions from straw-amended agricultural soils and their relations to bacterial communities: A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Wang, Zhe; Wu, Ting; Wang, Xinming; Dai, Wanhong; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Ran; Zhang, Yonggan; Shi, Chengfei

    2016-07-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from agricultural soil amended with wheat straw and their associations with bacterial communities for a period of 66days under non-flooded and flooded conditions. The results indicated that ethene, propene, ethanol, i-propanol, 2-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-butanone, 2-pentanone and acetophenone were the 10 most abundant VOCs, making up over 90% of the total VOCs released under the two water conditions. The mean emission of total VOCs from the amended soils under the non-flooded condition (5924ng C/(kg·hr)) was significantly higher than that under the flooded condition (2211ng C/(kg·hr)). One "peak emission window" appeared at days 0-44 or 4-44, and over 95% of the VOC emissions occurred during the first month under the two water conditions. Bacterial community analysis using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that a relative increase of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and γ-Proteobacteria but a relative decrease of Acidobacteria with time were observed after straw amendments under the two water conditions. Cluster analysis revealed that the soil bacterial communities changed greatly with incubation time, which was in line with the variation of the VOC emissions over the experimental period. Most of the above top 10 VOCs correlated positively with the predominant bacterial species of Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Verrucomicrobia but correlated negatively with the dominant bacterial species of Actinobacteria under the two water conditions. These results suggested that bacterial communities might play an important role in VOC emissions from straw-amended agricultural soils. PMID:27372141

  12. Final Verification Success Story Using the Triad Approach at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Melton Valley Soils and Sediment Project

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.A.; Haas, D.A.; Cange, J.B.

    2006-07-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently published guidance on the Triad approach, which supports the use of smarter, faster, and better technologies and work strategies during environmental site assessment, characterization, and cleanup. The Melton Valley Soils and Sediment Project (Project) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory embraced this three-pronged approach to characterize contaminants in soil/sediment across the 1000-acre Melton Valley Watershed. Systematic Project Planning is the first of three prongs in the Triad approach. Management initiated Project activities by identifying key technical personnel, included regulators early in the planning phase, researched technologies, and identified available resources necessary to meet Project objectives. Dynamic Work Strategies is the second prong of the Triad approach. Core Team members, including State and Federal regulators, helped develop a Sampling and Analysis Plan that allowed experienced field managers to make real-time, in-the-field decisions and, thus, to adjust to conditions unanticipated during the planning phase. Real-time Measurement Technologies is the third and last prong of the Triad approach. To expedite decision-making, the Project incorporated multiple in-field technologies, including global positioning system equipment integrated with field screening instrumentation, magnetometers for utility clearance, and an on-site gamma spectrometer (spec) for rapid contaminant speciation and quantification. As a result of a relatively complex but highly efficient program, a Project field staff of eight collected approximately 1900 soil samples for on-site gamma spec analysis (twenty percent were also shipped for off-site analyses), 4.7 million gamma radiation measurements, 1000 systematic beta radiation measurements, and 3600 systematic dose rate measurements between July 1, 2004, and October 31, 2005. The site database previously contained results for less than 500 soil samples dating

  13. Metallurgical Laboratory Treatability Study: An Analysis of Passive Soil Vapor Extraction Wells - June 2000 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B.D.

    2001-01-29

    The passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) system at the MetLab of the Savannah River Site has been operating since May 1998. The results to date on the treatability study indicate the technology is performing well. Well concentrations are decreasing and contour maps of the vadose zone soil gas plume show a decrease in the extent of the plume. In the 2 years of operation approximately 270 pounds of chlorinated organic contaminants have been removed by natural barometric pumping of wells fitted with BaroBall valves (low pressure check valves). The PSVE system is performing well in a cost-effective manner. It is recommended that this system be allowed to continue operating to complete the remediation and to continue monitoring activities to verify and monitor the anticipated contaminant removal rates. The treatability study should be considered successfully completed and the remediation should be considered in full operation.

  14. Laboratory measurements of upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    An effort to investigate the potential of remote sensing for monitoring nonpoint source pollution was conducted. Spectral reflectance characteristics for four types of soil sediments were measured for mixture concentrations between 4 and 173 ppm. For measurements at a spectral resolution of 32 mm, the spectral reflectances of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments were distinctly different over the wavelength range from 400 to 980 nm at each concentration tested. At high concentrations, spectral differences between the various sediments could be detected by measurements with a spectral resolution of 160 nm. At a low concentration, only small differences were observed between the various sediments when measurements were made with 160 nm spectral resolution. Radiance levels generally varied in a nonlinear manner with sediment concentration; linearity occurred in special cases, depending on sediment type, concentration range, and wavelength.

  15. Laboratory implementation of quantum-control-mechanism identification through Hamiltonian encoding and observable decoding

    SciTech Connect

    Rey-de-Castro, R.; Rabitz, H.

    2010-06-15

    We report on the laboratory implementation of quantum-control-mechanism identification through Hamiltonian encoding and observable decoding (HE-OD). Over a sequence of experiments, HE-OD introduces a special encoded signature into the components of a previously determined control field expressed in a chosen representation. The outcome appears as a modulated signal in the controlled system observable. Decoding the modulated signal identifies the hierarchy of correlations between components of the control field in a particular representation. In cases where the initial quantum state and observable operator are fully known, then HE-OD can also identify the transition amplitudes of the various Dyson expansion orders contributing to the controlled dynamics. The basic principles of HE-OD are illustrated for second harmonic generation when the components of the field representation are simply taken as the pixels in the pulse shaper. The outcome of HE-OD agrees well with simulations, verifying the concept.

  16. Failure mechanisms of polyester fiber anterior cruciate ligament implants: A human retrieval and laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Amis, A A; Kempson, S A

    1999-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that ACL implant failure is often caused by bone impingement in knee extension following malplacement of the tibial tunnel. This study examined polyethylene terephtalate fiber ACL implants retrieved from a clinical study, and, to confirm the hypothesis, also set up a laboratory study intended to duplicate the failure mechanism. SEM and TEM examination of 25 ruptured implants gave details of fiber failure morphology, with shearing into longitudinal fibrils, followed by rupture, when the fibrils burst apart. Cadaver joints were run in a knee simulator, with deliberately impinging ACL implants. SEM examination of implants abraded in the knee in vitro showed identical fiber damage patterns, thus confirming the impingement hypothesis. PMID:10421698

  17. Seasonal fluctuations of bacterial community diversity in agricultural soil and experimental validation by laboratory disturbance experiments.

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph; Wehrli, Bernhard; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2008-08-01

    Natural fluctuations in soil microbial communities are poorly documented because of the inherent difficulty to perform a simultaneous analysis of the relative abundances of multiple populations over a long time period. Yet, it is important to understand the magnitudes of community composition variability as a function of natural influences (e.g., temperature, plant growth, or rainfall) because this forms the reference or baseline against which external disturbances (e.g., anthropogenic emissions) can be judged. Second, definition of baseline fluctuations in complex microbial communities may help to understand at which point the systems become unbalanced and cannot return to their original composition. In this paper, we examined the seasonal fluctuations in the bacterial community of an agricultural soil used for regular plant crop production by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiling (T-RFLP) of the amplified 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene diversity. Cluster and statistical analysis of T-RFLP data showed that soil bacterial communities fluctuated very little during the seasons (similarity indices between 0.835 and 0.997) with insignificant variations in 16S rRNA gene richness and diversity indices. Despite overall insignificant fluctuations, between 8 and 30% of all terminal restriction fragments changed their relative intensity in a significant manner among consecutive time samples. To determine the magnitude of community variations induced by external factors, soil samples were subjected to either inoculation with a pure bacterial culture, addition of the herbicide mecoprop, or addition of nutrients. All treatments resulted in statistically measurable changes of T-RFLP profiles of the communities. Addition of nutrients or bacteria plus mecoprop resulted in bacteria composition, which did not return to the original profile within 14 days. We propose that at less than 70% similarity in T-RFLP, the bacterial communities risk to

  18. The Slumgullion Natural Laboratory: Landsliding Mechanisms Inferred from Seismic and Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, W. H.; Kean, J. W.; Gomberg, J. S.; Bodin, P.; Wang, G.; Coe, J. A.; MacQueen, P.; Foster, K.; Creager, K.

    2009-12-01

    Effective mitigation of landslide hazards requires accurate characterization of landslide subsurface geometry and failure mode, both of which are difficult to obtain. To evaluate a new geophysical approach for landslide and faulting characterization in a natural setting, we recently deployed an array of 88 single-channel seismometers complemented by geodetic measurements made using GPS and a robotic total-station theodolite at the 3.9-km-long Slumgullion landslide in southwestern Colorado. This landslide was selected because of its size, nearly continuous movement, and the documentation of its failure modes from previous continuous monitoring and laboratory testing. Our previous studies identified that the landslide material (soil and weathered rock) dilates during shear and has very low permeability. These characteristics result in generation of excess negative pore-water pressures along shear surfaces that restrain movement by increasing effective normal stresses. We’ve also observed that lateral shear boundaries episodically relocate, forming new shear surfaces. Although we have only just completed the data-gathering phase, we’ve identified that landslide movement varies considerably, sometimes occurring aseismically and other times producing seismic tremor and localized slidequakes. Our working hypothesis is that steady aseismic slip occurs where shear-zone porosity is at critical state, tremor radiates from areas where increased effective stress from shear-zone dilation sporadically resists movement, and slidequakes are produced from similarly dilating areas, especially where and when new shear surfaces are formed. Complex rearrangements between individual kinematic units comprising the landslide may also affect its mode of failure and slip and consequent observables. Further analyses of geodetic, seismic, and environmental data will refine our hypotheses. Location estimates of the large number of observed seismic events may constrain the geometry of the

  19. Calculation set for design and optimization of vegetative soil covers Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-02-01

    This study demonstrates that containment of municipal and hazardous waste in arid and semiarid environments can be accomplished effectively without traditional, synthetic materials and complex, multi-layer systems. This research demonstrates that closure covers combining layers of natural soil, native plant species, and climatic conditions to form a sustainable, functioning ecosystem will meet the technical equivalency criteria prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. In this study, percolation through a natural analogue and an engineered cover is simulated using the one-dimensional, numerical code UNSAT-H. UNSAT-H is a Richards. equation-based model that simulates soil water infiltration, unsaturated flow, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, and deep percolation. This study incorporates conservative, site-specific soil hydraulic and vegetation parameters. Historical meteorological data are used to simulate percolation through the natural analogue and an engineered cover, with and without vegetation. This study indicates that a 3-foot (ft) cover in arid and semiarid environments is the minimum design thickness necessary to meet the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-prescribed technical equivalency criteria of 31.5 millimeters/year and 1 x 10{sup -7} centimeters/second for net annual percolation and average flux, respectively. Increasing cover thickness to 4 or 5 ft results in limited additional improvement in cover performance.

  20. Redistribution of soil nitrogen, carbon and organic matter by mechanical disturbance during whole-tree harvesting in northern hardwoods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, D.F.; Huntington, T.G.; Wayne, Martin C.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate whether mechanical mixing during harvesting could account for losses observed from forest floor, we measured surface disturbance on a 22 ha watershed that was whole-tree harvested. Surface soil on each 10 cm interval along 81, randomly placed transects was classified immediately after harvesting as mineral or organic, and as undisturbed, depressed, rutted, mounded, scarified, or scalped (forest floor scraped away). We quantitatively sampled these surface categories to collect soil in which preharvest forest floor might reside after harvest. Mechanically mixed mineral and organic soil horizons were readily identified. Buried forest floor under mixed mineral soil occurred in 57% of mounds with mineral surface soil. Harvesting disturbed 65% of the watershed surface and removed forest floor from 25% of the area. Mechanically mixed soil under ruts with organic or mineral surface soil, and mounds with mineral surface soil contained organic carbon and nitrogen pools significantly greater than undisturbed forest floor. Mechanical mixing into underlying mineral soil could account for the loss of forest floor observed between the preharvest condition and the second growing season after whole-tree harvesting. ?? 1992.

  1. Soil Water Content Sensor Response to Organic Matter Content under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Fares, Ali; Awal, Ripendra; Bayabil, Haimanote K

    2016-08-05

    Studies show that the performance of soil water content monitoring (SWCM) sensors is affected by soil physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of organic matter on SWCM sensor responses remains less understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to (i) assess the effect of organic matter on the accuracy and precision of SWCM sensors using a commercially available soil water content monitoring sensor; and (ii) account for the organic matter effect on the sensor's accuracy. Sand columns with seven rates of oven-dried sawdust (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 18% v/v, used as an organic matter amendment), thoroughly mixed with quartz sand, and a control without sawdust were prepared by packing quartz sand in two-liter glass containers. Sand was purposely chosen because of the absence of any organic matter or salinity, and also because sand has a relatively low cation exchange capacity that will not interfere with the treatment effect of the current work. Sensor readings (raw counts) were monitored at seven water content levels (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, and 0.30 cm³ cm(-3)) by uniformly adding the corresponding volumes of deionized water in addition to the oven-dry one. Sensor readings were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the organic matter level and water content. Sensor readings were strongly correlated with the organic matter level (R² = 0.92). In addition, the default calibration equation underestimated the water content readings at the lower water content range (<0.05 cm³ cm(-3)), while it overestimated the water content at the higher water content range (>0.05 cm³ cm(-3)). A new polynomial calibration equation that uses raw count and organic matter content as covariates improved the accuracy of the sensor (RMSE = 0.01 cm³ cm(-3)). Overall, findings of this study highlight the need to account for the effect of soil organic matter content to improve the accuracy and precision of the tested sensor under different soils and

  2. Soil Water Content Sensor Response to Organic Matter Content under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Ali; Awal, Ripendra; Bayabil, Haimanote K.

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that the performance of soil water content monitoring (SWCM) sensors is affected by soil physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of organic matter on SWCM sensor responses remains less understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to (i) assess the effect of organic matter on the accuracy and precision of SWCM sensors using a commercially available soil water content monitoring sensor; and (ii) account for the organic matter effect on the sensor’s accuracy. Sand columns with seven rates of oven-dried sawdust (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 18% v/v, used as an organic matter amendment), thoroughly mixed with quartz sand, and a control without sawdust were prepared by packing quartz sand in two-liter glass containers. Sand was purposely chosen because of the absence of any organic matter or salinity, and also because sand has a relatively low cation exchange capacity that will not interfere with the treatment effect of the current work. Sensor readings (raw counts) were monitored at seven water content levels (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, and 0.30 cm3 cm−3) by uniformly adding the corresponding volumes of deionized water in addition to the oven-dry one. Sensor readings were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the organic matter level and water content. Sensor readings were strongly correlated with the organic matter level (R2 = 0.92). In addition, the default calibration equation underestimated the water content readings at the lower water content range (<0.05 cm3 cm−3), while it overestimated the water content at the higher water content range (>0.05 cm3 cm−3). A new polynomial calibration equation that uses raw count and organic matter content as covariates improved the accuracy of the sensor (RMSE = 0.01 cm3 cm−3). Overall, findings of this study highlight the need to account for the effect of soil organic matter content to improve the accuracy and precision of the tested sensor under different soils and

  3. Soil Water Content Sensor Response to Organic Matter Content under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Fares, Ali; Awal, Ripendra; Bayabil, Haimanote K

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that the performance of soil water content monitoring (SWCM) sensors is affected by soil physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of organic matter on SWCM sensor responses remains less understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to (i) assess the effect of organic matter on the accuracy and precision of SWCM sensors using a commercially available soil water content monitoring sensor; and (ii) account for the organic matter effect on the sensor's accuracy. Sand columns with seven rates of oven-dried sawdust (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 18% v/v, used as an organic matter amendment), thoroughly mixed with quartz sand, and a control without sawdust were prepared by packing quartz sand in two-liter glass containers. Sand was purposely chosen because of the absence of any organic matter or salinity, and also because sand has a relatively low cation exchange capacity that will not interfere with the treatment effect of the current work. Sensor readings (raw counts) were monitored at seven water content levels (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, and 0.30 cm³ cm(-3)) by uniformly adding the corresponding volumes of deionized water in addition to the oven-dry one. Sensor readings were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the organic matter level and water content. Sensor readings were strongly correlated with the organic matter level (R² = 0.92). In addition, the default calibration equation underestimated the water content readings at the lower water content range (<0.05 cm³ cm(-3)), while it overestimated the water content at the higher water content range (>0.05 cm³ cm(-3)). A new polynomial calibration equation that uses raw count and organic matter content as covariates improved the accuracy of the sensor (RMSE = 0.01 cm³ cm(-3)). Overall, findings of this study highlight the need to account for the effect of soil organic matter content to improve the accuracy and precision of the tested sensor under different soils and

  4. A Unique Laboratory to Explore Soil-Wine Relationships, North Canterbury, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R.; Tomasino, E.; Tonkin, P.; Webb, T.; Burns, S. F.; Weersing, M.

    2012-12-01

    The special character of North Canterbury is a reflection of its geological history - a region of oblique crustal convergence forming northeast striking folds, creating hill, valley and basin topography. Cretaceous to Tertiary glauconitic sediments, limestones, sandstones and weathered conglomerates overlie basement greywacke sandstones and siltstones. During the late Quaternary, erosion infilled valleys with locally sourced sediments, and basins with greywacke alluvium. Calcareous and noncalcareous loess mantles are locally sourced. Detailed soil mapping of vineyards planted between 1980 and 2000 reveal bedrock and colluvial hill slopes with clayey Haplustolls and Argiustolls, fans with deep silty Hapustalfs and terraces with deep alluvium forming clayey Calciusterts and gravels forming Haplustepts. Definitions of terroir variously include physical attributes such as climate, landscapes, soils and vines, together with cultural traditions represented by grape varieties and systems for canopy management, which come together in particular sensory attributes displayed by certain wines. We have recently begun to explore terroir in the context of New Zealand Pinot Noir (the variety considered by many as most able to communicate details of local geography and site). The assessment of wine sensory attributes is not a trivial task. Our experience is that scale is an important influence as ferment size decreases. We recommend the use of commercially produced wines for such studies. Our work has been carried out using statistically valid designs with expert but untrained panelists. In these circumstances the meaning ascribed to particular attributes may vary between panelists but there is evidence to support the contention that expert panelists tend to share a standard vocabulary and are likely to be familiar with appropriate conceptual models of the wines that allow their differentiation. Our results confirm that Pinot Noir wines from climatically differing regions of New

  5. Microbial metabolism in soil at low temperatures: Mechanisms unraveled by position-specific 13C labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bore, Ezekiel

    2016-04-01

    Microbial transformation of organic substances in soil is the most important process of the C cycle. Most of the current studies base their information about transformation of organic substances on incubation studies under laboratory conditions and thus, we have a profound knowledge on SOM transformations at ambient temperatures. However, metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze microbial metabolism at low soil temperatures, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were incubated at three temperature; 5, -5 -20 oC. Soils were sampled after 1, 3 and 10 days and additionally after 30 days for samples at -20 °C. The 13C from individual molecule position was quantifed in respired CO2, bulk soil, extractable organic C and extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. 13CO2 released showed a dominance of the flux from C-1 position at 5 °C. Consequently, at 5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway of glucose metabolization. In contrast to -5 °C and -20 oC, metabolic behaviors completely switched towards a preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 position. With decreasing temperature, microorganism strongly shifted towards metabolization of glucose via glycolysis which indicates a switch to cellular maintenance. High recoveries of 13C in extractable microbial biomass at -5 °C indicates optimal growth condition for the microorganisms. PLFA analysis showed high incorporation of 13C into Gram negative bacteria at 5 °C but decreased with temperature. Gram positive bacteria out-competed Gram negatives with decreasing temperature. This study revealed a remarkable microbial activity at temperatures below 0 °C, differing significantly from that at ambient

  6. Fertilization and pH effects on processes and mechanisms controlling dissolved inorganic phosphorus in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devau, Nicolas; Hinsinger, Philippe; Le Cadre, Edith; Colomb, Bruno; Gérard, Frédéric

    2011-05-01

    We used of a set of mechanistic adsorption models (1-pK TPM, ion exchange and Nica-Donnan) within the framework of the component additive (CA) approach in an attempt to determine the effect of repeated massive application of inorganic P fertilizer on the processes and mechanisms controlling the concentration of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) in soils. We studied the surface layer of a Luvisol with markedly different total concentrations of inorganic P as the result of different P fertilizer history (i.e. massive or no application for 40 years). Soil pH was made to vary from acid to alkaline. Soil solutions were extracted with water and CaCl 2 (0.01 M). The occurrence of montmorillonite led us to determine the binding properties of P and Ca ions for this clay mineral. Satisfactory results were obtained using generic values for model parameters and soil-specific ones, which were either determined directly by measurements or estimated from the literature. We showed that adsorption largely controlled the variations of DIP concentration and that, because of kinetic constrains, only little Ca-phosphates may be precipitated under alkaline conditions, particularly in the P fertilized treatment. The mineral-P pool initially present in both P treatments did not dissolve significantly during the course of the experiments. The adsorption of Ca ions onto soil minerals also promoted adsorption of P ions through electrostatic interactions. The intensity of the mechanism was high under neutral to alkaline conditions. Changes in DIP concentration as a function of these environmental variables can be related to changes in the contribution of the various soil minerals to P adsorption. The extra P adsorbed in the fertilized treatment compared with the control treatment was mainly adsorbed onto illite. This clay mineral was the major P-fixing constituent from neutral to alkaline pH conditions, because the repulsion interactions between deprotonated hydroxyl surface sites and P

  7. Laboratory evidence for particle mobilization as a mechanism for permeability enhancement via dynamic stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Thibault; Brodsky, Emily E.; Marone, Chris; Elsworth, Derek

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that seismic waves can increase the permeability in natural systems, yet the mechanism remains poorly understood. We investigate the underlying mechanics by generating well-controlled, repeatable permeability enhancement in laboratory experiments. Pore pressure oscillations, simulating dynamic stresses, were applied to intact and fractured Berea sandstone samples under confining stresses of tens of MPa. Dynamic stressing produces an immediate permeability enhancement ranging from 1 to 60%, which scales with the amplitude of the dynamic strain (7×10-7 to 7×10-6) followed by a gradual permeability recovery. We investigated the mechanism by: (1) recording deformation of samples both before and after fracturing during the experiment, (2) varying the chemistry of the water and therefore particle mobility, (3) evaluating the dependence of permeability enhancement and recovery on dynamic stress amplitude, and (4) examining micro-scale pore textures of the rock samples before and after experiments. We find that dynamic stressing does not produce permanent deformation in our samples. Water chemistry has a pronounced effect on the sensitivity to dynamic stressing, with the magnitude of permeability enhancement and the rate of permeability recovery varying with ionic strength of the pore fluid. Permeability recovery rates generally correlate with the permeability enhancement sensitivity. Microstructural observations of our samples show clearing of clay particulates from fracture surfaces during the experiment. From these four lines of evidence, we conclude that a flow-dependent mechanism associated with mobilization of fines controls both the magnitude of the permeability enhancement and the recovery rate in our experiments. We also find that permeability sensitivity to dynamic stressing increases after fracturing, which is a process that generates abundant particulate matter in situ. Our results suggest that fluid permeability in many areas of the

  8. Geoecohydrological mechanisms couple soil and leaf water dynamics and facilitate species coexistence in shallow soils of a tropical semiarid mixed forest.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Robles, Ulises; Arredondo, J Tulio; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Vargas, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    Trees growing on shallow rocky soils must have exceptional adaptations when underlying weathered bedrock has no deep fractures for water storage. Under semiarid conditions, hydrology of shallow soils is expected to decouple from plant hydrology, as soils dry out as a result of rapid evaporation and competition for water increases between coexisting tree species. Gas exchange and plant-water relations were monitored for 15 months for Pinus cembroides and Quercus potosina tree species in a tropical semiarid forest growing on c. 20-cm-deep soils over impermeable volcanic bedrock. Soil and leaf water potential maintained a relatively constant offset throughout the year in spite of high intra-annual fluctuations reaching up to 5 MPa. Thus, hydrology of shallow soils did not decouple from hydrology of trees even in the driest period. A combination of redistribution mechanisms of water stored in weathered bedrock and hypodermic flow accessible to oak provided the source of water supply to shallow soils, where most of the actively growing roots occurred. This study demonstrates a unique geoecohydrological mechanism that maintains a tightly coupled hydrology between shallow rocky soils and trees, as well as species coexistence in this mixed forest, where oak facilitates water access to pine. PMID:25711344

  9. Geoecohydrological mechanisms couple soil and leaf water dynamics and facilitate species coexistence in shallow soils of a tropical semiarid mixed forest.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Robles, Ulises; Arredondo, J Tulio; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Vargas, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    Trees growing on shallow rocky soils must have exceptional adaptations when underlying weathered bedrock has no deep fractures for water storage. Under semiarid conditions, hydrology of shallow soils is expected to decouple from plant hydrology, as soils dry out as a result of rapid evaporation and competition for water increases between coexisting tree species. Gas exchange and plant-water relations were monitored for 15 months for Pinus cembroides and Quercus potosina tree species in a tropical semiarid forest growing on c. 20-cm-deep soils over impermeable volcanic bedrock. Soil and leaf water potential maintained a relatively constant offset throughout the year in spite of high intra-annual fluctuations reaching up to 5 MPa. Thus, hydrology of shallow soils did not decouple from hydrology of trees even in the driest period. A combination of redistribution mechanisms of water stored in weathered bedrock and hypodermic flow accessible to oak provided the source of water supply to shallow soils, where most of the actively growing roots occurred. This study demonstrates a unique geoecohydrological mechanism that maintains a tightly coupled hydrology between shallow rocky soils and trees, as well as species coexistence in this mixed forest, where oak facilitates water access to pine.

  10. The National Sedimentation Laboratory: 50 years of soil and water research in a changing environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The papers in this issue are based on selected presentations made at a symposium convened to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the National Sedimentation Laboratory (NSL) of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), located in Oxford, Mississippi. ...

  11. The variation of the mechanical properties of rock on spatial scales from the laboratory to outcrop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, J.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Maclaughlin, M.; Turner, A. L.; GEOX^TM

    2011-12-01

    We have installed a dense array of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) strain and temperature sensors on the 4100'-level (1250 m) at the site of the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD. The sensor installation site is composed of the Precambrian Poorman formation that contains deformed and metamorphosed Precambrian sediments that is anisotropic including a well-developed foliation, quartz veins, and several joint sets. We have installed nine Micron Optics Inc. OS3600 tube gages. Four of these gages are mounted on the surface of the rock mass and attached to rock bolts that extend 2 m into the rock mass. The other five OS3600 sensors are embedded in drill holes into the rock mass. Additionally, we have developed a new method for measuring in situ strain and temperature in intact rock masses. Fiber optically instrumented rock strain and temperature strips (FROSTS) are 2 m-long strips of 304 stainless steel specially designed to measure temperature and both shortening and elongation in an intact rock mass. FROSTS have FBG strain and temperature sensors mounted on them at 30 cm interval and are grouted into a drill hole in a rock mass. In May 2011, we performed an active loading experiment that consisted of using two hydraulic rams to apply over 200 kN of force to the rock mass. Elastic strain was measured with the fiber optic sensor array. A one-dimensional Boussinesq solution calculates a Young's Modulus of 6.25 GPa for the rock mass. The laboratory-determined values for Young's Modulus in the Poorman formation vary between 49.6 and 94.5 GPa. The difference between the laboratory and field values can be attributed to the closing of fractures and microcracks in the rock mass making the rock mass more compliant than the smaller specimens used for the laboratory experiments. The results of the active loading experiment have implications for the up-scaling of rock mechanical properties between the laboratory and field scales.

  12. Laboratory investigation of spray generation mechanism in wind-wave interaction under strong wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the reduction of sea surface aerodynamic drag coefficient at hurricane conditions [1]. In this paper the mechanism of generation of spray in the near-surface layer of the atmosphere in a strong wind through the mechanism of «bag-breakup instability» was investigated in laboratory conditions with the help of high-speed video shooting. The laboratory experiments were performed on the Thermostratified Wind-Wave Channel of the IAP RAS (length 10 m, cross section of air channel 0.4 x 0.4 m, wind velocity up to 24 m/s) [2]. Experiments were carried out for the wind speeds from 14 to 22 m/s. In this range spray generation characteristics change dramatically from almost no spray generation to so called catastrophic regime with multiple cascade breakups on each crest. Shooting was performed with High-speed digital camera NAC Memrecam HX-3 in two different setups to obtain both statistical data and detailed spray generation mechanism overview. In first setup bright LED spotlight with mate screen the side of a channel was used for horizontal shadow-method shooting. Camera was placed in semi-submerged box on the opposite side of the channel. Shooting was performed at the distance of 7.5 m from the beginning of the working section. Series of short records of the surface evolution were made at 10 000 fps with 55 to 119 µm/px scale revealed the dominant mechanism of spray generation - bag-breakup instability. Sequences of high resolution images allowed investigating the details of this "bags" evolution. Shadow method provided better image quality for such conditions than side illumination and fluorescence methods. To obtain statistical data on "bags" sizes and densities vertical shadow method was used. Submerged light box was created with two 300 W underwater lamps and mate screen places at the fetch of 6.5 m. Long records (up to 8 seconds) were made with 4500 fps at 124-256 µm/px scales. Specially developed software

  13. [Effects of phosphorous fertilizers on phytoavailability of cadmium in its contaminated soil and related mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-Bing; Ji, Xiong-Hui; Peng, Hua; Tian, Fa-Xiang; Wu, Jia-Mei; Shi, Li-Hong

    2012-06-01

    To explore an effective measure to ensure the safety of rice quality in cadmium (Cd)-contaminated farmland, a pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effects of of low Cd content (Cd < 0.2 mg x kg(-1)) phosphorous fertilizers with an application rate of 0.10 or 0.20 g P2O5 x kg(-1) on the phytoavailability of Cd in its contaminated p add y soil, with the related mechanisms discussed. Compared with no phosphorous fertilization, applying 0.10 P2O5 x kg(-1) of calcium magnesium phosphate (CMP) and monopotassium phosphate (MKP) increased soil pH and decreased soil available Cd content significantly, and CMP and calcium superphosphate (CSP) decreased the Cd accumulation in rice significantly. When the application rate was up to 0.20 g P2O5 x kg(-1), calcium hydrogen phosphate (CHP) increased the soil pH and decreased the soil available Cd content significantly, and CMP, MKP, and CHP decreased the DTPA-extractable soil Cd content by 11.8%, 9.8%, and 11.8%, and the NH4 OAc-extractable soil Cd content by 9.5%, 7.1%, and 7.1%, respectively. All test phosphorous fertilizers could significantly decrease the stem and leaf Cd contents, with a decrement of 24.9%-50.8%, and except CHP, the others could significantly decrease the Cd content of brown rice. With the application CMP and CSP, the Cd content of brown rice was close to the National Hygienic Standard for Grains (GB 2715-2005). Among the test phosphorous fertilizers, those can increase soil pH (CMP, MKP, and CHP) could significantly decrease the availability of soil Cd significantly, and those containing calcium (CMP and CSP) were more effective in decreasing the Cd accumulation in rice. The efficiency of the phosphorous fertilizers was mainly determined by their chemical properties. Alkaline calcium-containing phosphorous fertilizers were more effective in decreasing the Cd absorption and accumulation in rice plant in Cd-contaminated farmland. PMID:22937647

  14. [Effects of phosphorous fertilizers on phytoavailability of cadmium in its contaminated soil and related mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-Bing; Ji, Xiong-Hui; Peng, Hua; Tian, Fa-Xiang; Wu, Jia-Mei; Shi, Li-Hong

    2012-06-01

    To explore an effective measure to ensure the safety of rice quality in cadmium (Cd)-contaminated farmland, a pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effects of of low Cd content (Cd < 0.2 mg x kg(-1)) phosphorous fertilizers with an application rate of 0.10 or 0.20 g P2O5 x kg(-1) on the phytoavailability of Cd in its contaminated p add y soil, with the related mechanisms discussed. Compared with no phosphorous fertilization, applying 0.10 P2O5 x kg(-1) of calcium magnesium phosphate (CMP) and monopotassium phosphate (MKP) increased soil pH and decreased soil available Cd content significantly, and CMP and calcium superphosphate (CSP) decreased the Cd accumulation in rice significantly. When the application rate was up to 0.20 g P2O5 x kg(-1), calcium hydrogen phosphate (CHP) increased the soil pH and decreased the soil available Cd content significantly, and CMP, MKP, and CHP decreased the DTPA-extractable soil Cd content by 11.8%, 9.8%, and 11.8%, and the NH4 OAc-extractable soil Cd content by 9.5%, 7.1%, and 7.1%, respectively. All test phosphorous fertilizers could significantly decrease the stem and leaf Cd contents, with a decrement of 24.9%-50.8%, and except CHP, the others could significantly decrease the Cd content of brown rice. With the application CMP and CSP, the Cd content of brown rice was close to the National Hygienic Standard for Grains (GB 2715-2005). Among the test phosphorous fertilizers, those can increase soil pH (CMP, MKP, and CHP) could significantly decrease the availability of soil Cd significantly, and those containing calcium (CMP and CSP) were more effective in decreasing the Cd accumulation in rice. The efficiency of the phosphorous fertilizers was mainly determined by their chemical properties. Alkaline calcium-containing phosphorous fertilizers were more effective in decreasing the Cd absorption and accumulation in rice plant in Cd-contaminated farmland.

  15. Contingency in the Direction and Mechanics of Soil Organic Matter Responses to Increased Rainfall

    SciTech Connect

    Berhe, Asmeret A.; Suttle, K. Blake; Burton, Sarah D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-09-03

    Shifts in regional precipitation patterns will be a major component of global climate change. Rainfall will show greater and more variable changes in response to rising earth surface temperatures than most other climatic variables, and will be a major driver of ecosystem change. We studied the consequences of predicted changes in California’s rainy season for storage and stabilization mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM). In a controlled and replicated experiment, we amended rainfall over large plots of natural grassland in accordance with alternative scenarios of future climate change. Results show that increases in annual rainfall have important consequences for soil C storage, but that the strength and even direction of these effects depend entirely on seasonal timing. Rainfall increases during the winter rainy season led to pronounced C loss from soil while rainfall increases after the typical rainy season increased soil C stocks. Analysis of mineral-OM associations reveals a powerful mechanism underlying this difference: increased winter rainfall vastly diminished the role of Fe and Al oxides in SOM stabilization. Dithionite extractable crystalline Fe oxides explained more than 35 percent of the variability in C storage in ambient control and spring-addition treatments, compared to less than 0.01 percent in the winter-addition treatment. Likewise, poorly crystalline Fe and Al oxides explained more than 25 and 40 percent of the variability in C storage, respectively, in the control and spring-addition treatments compared to less than 5 percent in the -winter-addition treatment. Increases in annual precipitation identical in amount but at three-month offsets produced opposite effects on soil C storage. These results highlight the complexity inherent in biospheric feedbacks to the climate system, and the way that careful experimentation can penetrate that complexity to improve predictions of ecosystem and climatic change.

  16. Laboratory and 3-D-distinct element analysis of failure mechanism of slope under external surcharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Cheng, Y. M.

    2014-09-01

    Landslide is a major disaster resulting in considerable loss of human lives and property damages in hilly terrain in Hong Kong, China and many other countries. The factor of safety and the critical slip surface for slope stabilization are the main considerations for slope stability analysis in the past, while the detailed post-failure conditions of the slopes have not been considered in sufficient details. There are however increasing interest on the consequences after the initiation of failure which includes the development and propagation of the failure surfaces, the amount of failed mass and runoff and the affected region. To assess the development of slope failure in more details and to consider the potential danger of slopes after failure has initiated, the slope stability problem under external surcharge is analyzed by the distinct element method (DEM) and laboratory model test in the present research. A more refined study about the development of failure, microcosmic failure mechanism and the post-failure mechanism of slope will be carried out. The numerical modeling method and the various findings from the present work can provide an alternate method of analysis of slope failure which can give additional information not available from the classical methods of analysis.

  17. A laboratory study on the MSW mechanical behavior in triaxial apparatus.

    PubMed

    Karimpour-Fard, Mehran; Machado, Sandro Lemos; Shariatmadari, Nader; Noorzad, Ali

    2011-08-01

    Shear strength characterization of MSW materials is a mandatory task when performing analyses related to landfill design and landfill geometry improvements. Despite the considerable amount of research focusing on MSW mechanical behavior there remain certain aspects which are not completely understood and deserve attention in particular the case of the undrained behavior of MSW. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive laboratory testing program using a large-scale triaxial apparatus at the Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil. The effect of factors such as confining pressure, unit weight, fiber content, rate of loading and over-consolidation on the MSW mechanical response were investigated. Tested samples presented typical MSW shear/strain curves (concave upward) in all the tests, despite the pore water pressure reaching levels almost equal to the confining pressure. The obtained results show that increasing confining stress, unit weight, loading rate, fiber content and over-consolidation lead to an increase in the MSW shear strength. The importance of the fibrous components in the waste behavior is highlighted and graphs showing the variation of the MSW shear strength with fiber content in different drainage conditions are shown. The authors believe these results could be of interest to many companies, especially considering the new trend of plastic material recycling (prior landfilling) for energy recovery purposes. PMID:21478006

  18. Laboratory photometric measurement of particulate soils out to very large phase angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, Paul; Bonne, Ulrich A.; Stolovy, Susan; Veverka, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, the objectives were to develop the laboratory methods and tools to conduct photometric observations of dark particulate samples over a large range of phase angles and to demonstrate whether forward scattering behavior can be seen in a surface constructed of low albedo material. The researchers also examined the adequacy of various model formulations of P (alpha) to describe the effective scattering properties of their sample.

  19. AstroBioLab: A Mobile Biotic and Soil Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, J. L.; Zent, A. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Quinn, R. C.; Navarro-Gonzalex, R.; Gonez-Silva, B.; McKay, C. P.

    2003-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and NASA Ames Research Center are currently developing a mobile Astrobiology Laboratory (AstroBioLab) for a series of field campaigns using the Chilean Atacama Desert as a Martian surface analog site. The Astrobiology Science and Technology for Exploring Planets (ASTEP) program funded AstroBioLab is designed around the Mars Organic Detector (MOD) instrument and the Mars Oxidant Instrument (MOI) which provide complementary data sets. Using this suite of Mars Instrument Development Program (MIDP) and Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) derived in situ instruments, which provide state-of-the-art organic compound detection (attomolar sensitivity) and depth profiling of oxidation chemistry, we measure and correlate the interplay of organic compounds, inorganic oxidants, UV irradiation and water abundance. This mobile laboratory studies the proposition that intense UV irradiation coupled with low levels of liquid water generates metastable oxidizing species that can consume moderate amounts of seeded organic compounds. Results from the initial spring 2003 field campaign will be presented.

  20. Mechanisms of soil degradation and consequences for carbon stocks on Tibetan grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Schleuss, Per-Marten; Miehe, Georg; Heitkamp, Felix; Sebeer, Elke; Spielvogel, Sandra; Xu, Xingliang; Guggenberger, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Tibetan grasslands provide tremendous sinks for carbon (C) and represent important grazing ground. Strong degradation - the destroying the upper root-mat/soil horizon of Kobresia pastures, has dramatic consequences for soil organic carbon (SOC) and nutrient storage. To demonstrate specific degradation patterns and elucidate mechanisms, as well as to assess consequences for SOC storage, we investigated a sequence of six degradation stages common over the whole Kobresia ecosystem. The soil degradation sequence consists of following mechanisms: Overgrazing and trampling by livestock provide the prerequisite for grassland degradation as both (a) cause plant dying, (b) reduce grassland recovery and (c) destroy protective Kobresia root-mats. These anthropogenic induced processes are amplified by naturally occurring degradation in harsh climate. The frequently repeated soil moisture and temperature fluctuations induce volume changes and tensions leading to polygonal cracking of the root mats. Then the plants die and erosion gradually extend the surface cracks. Soil erosion cause a high SOC loss from the upper horizons (0-10 cm: ~5.1 kg C m-2), whereas SOC loss beneath the surface cracks is caused by both, decreasing root C-input and SOC mineralization (SOC losses by mineralization: ~2.5 kg C m-2). Root biomass decreases with degradation and indicated lower C input. The negative δ13C shift of SOC reflects intensive decomposition and corresponds to a relative enrichment of 13C depleted lignin components. We conclude that the combined effects of overgrazing and harsh climate reduce root C input, increase SOC decomposition and initiate erosion leading to SOC loss up to 70% of intact soil (0-30 cm: ~7.6 kg C m-2). Consequently, a high amount of C is released back to the atmosphere as CO2, or is deposited in depressions and river beds creating a potential source of N2O and CH4. Concluding, anthropogenically induced overgrazing makes the Kobresia root-mat sensitive to natural

  1. The ROSETTA PHILAE Lander damping mechanism as probe for the Comet soil strength.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roll, R.

    2015-10-01

    The ROSETTA Lander is equipped with an one axis damping mechanism to dissipate kinetic energy during the touch down. This damping is necessary to avoid damages to the Lander by a hard landing shock and more important to avoid re-bouncing from ground with high velocity. The damping mechanism works best for perpendicular impact, which means the velocity vector is parallel to the damper axis and all three feet touch the ground at the same time. That is usually not the case. Part of the impact energy can be transferred into rotational energy at ground contact if the impact is not perpendicular. This energy will lift up the Lander from the ground if the harpoons and the hold down thruster fail, as happen in mission. The damping mechanism itself is an electrical generator, driven by a spindle inside a telescopic tube. This tube was extended in mission for landing by 200mm. A maximum damping length of 140mm would be usually required to compensate a landing velocity of 1m/s, if the impact happens perpendicular on hard ground. After landing the potentiometer of the telescopic tube reading shows a total damping length of only 42,5mm. The damping mechanism and the overall mechanical behavior of the Lander at touch down are well tested and characterized and transferred to a multi-body computer model. The incoming and outgoing flightpath of PHILAE allow via computer-simulation the reconstruction of the touch down. It turns out, that the outgoing flight direction is dominated by the local ground slope and that the damping length is strongly dependent on the soil strength. Damping of soft comet ground must be included to fit the damping length measured. Scenario variations of the various feet contact with different local surface features (stone or regolith) and of different soil models finally lead to a restricted range for the soil strength at the touch down area.

  2. Relative Roles of Soil Moisture, Nutrient Supply, Depth, and Mechanical Impedance in Determining Composition and Structure of Wisconsin Prairies.

    PubMed

    Wernerehl, Robert W; Givnish, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Ecologists have long classified Midwestern prairies based on compositional variation assumed to reflect local gradients in moisture availability. The best known classification is based on Curtis' continuum index (CI), calculated using the presence of indicator species thought centered on different portions of an underlying moisture gradient. Direct evidence of the extent to which CI reflects differences in moisture availability has been lacking, however. Many factors that increase moisture availability (e.g., soil depth, silt content) also increase nutrient supply and decrease soil mechanical impedance; the ecological effects of the last have rarely been considered in any ecosystem. Decreased soil mechanical impedance should increase the availability of soil moisture and nutrients by reducing the root costs of retrieving both. Here we assess the relative importance of soil moisture, nutrient supply, and mechanical impedance in determining prairie composition and structure. We used leaf δ13C of C3 plants as a measure of growing-season moisture availability, cation exchange capacity (CEC) x soil depth as a measure of mineral nutrient availability, and penetrometer data as a measure of soil mechanical impedance. Community composition and structure were assessed in 17 remnant prairies in Wisconsin which vary little in annual precipitation. Ordination and regression analyses showed that δ13C increased with CI toward "drier" sites, and decreased with soil depth and % silt content. Variation in δ13C among remnants was 2.0‰, comparable to that along continental gradients from ca. 500-1500 mm annual rainfall. As predicted, LAI and average leaf height increased significantly toward "wetter" sites. CI accounted for 54% of compositional variance but δ13C accounted for only 6.2%, despite the strong relationships of δ13C to CI and CI to composition. Compositional variation reflects soil fertility and mechanical impedance more than moisture availability. This study is the

  3. Relative Roles of Soil Moisture, Nutrient Supply, Depth, and Mechanical Impedance in Determining Composition and Structure of Wisconsin Prairies

    PubMed Central

    Wernerehl, Robert W.; Givnish, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Ecologists have long classified Midwestern prairies based on compositional variation assumed to reflect local gradients in moisture availability. The best known classification is based on Curtis’ continuum index (CI), calculated using the presence of indicator species thought centered on different portions of an underlying moisture gradient. Direct evidence of the extent to which CI reflects differences in moisture availability has been lacking, however. Many factors that increase moisture availability (e.g., soil depth, silt content) also increase nutrient supply and decrease soil mechanical impedance; the ecological effects of the last have rarely been considered in any ecosystem. Decreased soil mechanical impedance should increase the availability of soil moisture and nutrients by reducing the root costs of retrieving both. Here we assess the relative importance of soil moisture, nutrient supply, and mechanical impedance in determining prairie composition and structure. We used leaf δ13C of C3 plants as a measure of growing-season moisture availability, cation exchange capacity (CEC) x soil depth as a measure of mineral nutrient availability, and penetrometer data as a measure of soil mechanical impedance. Community composition and structure were assessed in 17 remnant prairies in Wisconsin which vary little in annual precipitation. Ordination and regression analyses showed that δ13C increased with CI toward “drier” sites, and decreased with soil depth and % silt content. Variation in δ13C among remnants was 2.0‰, comparable to that along continental gradients from ca. 500–1500 mm annual rainfall. As predicted, LAI and average leaf height increased significantly toward “wetter” sites. CI accounted for 54% of compositional variance but δ13C accounted for only 6.2%, despite the strong relationships of δ13C to CI and CI to composition. Compositional variation reflects soil fertility and mechanical impedance more than moisture availability. This

  4. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of Cd(II) on loess soil from China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Tang, Xiaowu; Chen, Yunmin; Zhan, Liangtong; Li, Zhenze; Tang, Qiang

    2009-12-15

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal that has caused serious public health problems. It is necessary to find a cost effective method to deal with wastewater containing Cd(II). Loess soils in China have proven to be a potential adsorbent for Cd(II) removal from wastewater. The adsorption capacity of loess towards Cd(II) has been determined to be about 9.37 mg g(-1). Slurry concentration, initial solution pH, reaction time and temperature have also been found to significantly influence the efficiency of Cd(II) removal. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics of loess soil from China can be best-fit with the Langmuir model and pseudo-second order kinetics model, respectively. The thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption process was spontaneous, endothermic and the system disorder increased with duration. The natural organic matter in loess soil is mainly responsible for Cd(II) removal at pH < 4.2, while clay minerals contribute to a further gradual adsorption process. Chemical precipitation dominates the adsorption stage at pH > 8.97. Further studies using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra of Cd(II) laden loess soil and Cd(II) species distribution have confirmed the adsorption mechanism.

  5. Joint laboratory investigations of the physical and mechanical properties of the COSC-1 drill core, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Lebedev, Maxim; Ask, Maria; Wenning, Quinn; Zappone, Alba; Berthet, Théo; Malehmir, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    The Caledonian orogen is an early to middle Paleozoic mountain chain with size dimension similar to the Alpine-Himalayan orogen. Parts of the Caledonian orogen have been deeply eroded and provide excellent exposure of rocks that were emplaced into the middle and lower crust during orogenesis. These exposed rock units therefore provide the possibility to study processes of mountain building that are often inaccessible in more modern orogens, and represent the targets for the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides deep drilling project (COSC-1). The main target of COSC-1 was the high grade Seve nappe complex. Temperature estimates indicate granulite facies conditions at the top of this nappe, grading to lower amphibolitic conditions downwards through the nappe. Discovery of micro-diamond included in garnets from the nearby Åreskutan mountain hints at an ultra-high pressure origin in parts of the Seve nappe complex. The COSC-1 deep drilling project presents a unique opportunity to study the laboratory physical properties of a 2.5 km drill core, which can be correlated to downhole logging measurements and for the interpretation of surface geophysical experiments. In a joint effort that comprises five laboratories, the physical properties the COSC drill core are investigated. Measurement schemes and preliminary results from this cooperative effort are presented. The physical properties suite of measurements on the core includes (i) density, (ii) porosity, (iii) ultrasonic wave velocity and anisotropy at elevated confining pressure, (iv) seismic attenuation and (v) permeability (and anisotropy of permeability). Mechanical properties include uniaxial and triaxial compressive strength at different confining pressures, and subsequent calculation of internal and residual friction angles. The joint investigations will also serve to cross-validate and calibrate different laboratory techniques that are used to measure physical properties. The rock units

  6. Microbiological changes during bioremediation of explosives-contaminated soils in laboratory and pilot-scale bioslurry reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M. E.; Manning, J. F., Jr.; Environmental Research

    2004-01-01

    Changes in the microbial community during bioremediation of explosives-contaminated soil in a molasses-fed bioslurry process were examined. Upon addition of molasses to laboratory-scale reactors, total culturable heterotrophs increased rapidly by three to four orders of magnitude. However, heat-shocked heterotrophs and the percentage of gram-positive bacterial isolates did not increase until the soluble concentrations of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TNB) began to decrease. The number of identified phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and the total PLFA concentration also exhibited an immediate increase in response to molasses addition, while the concentration of branched PLFA, indicative of the gram-positive population, remained low until soluble TNT and TNB concentrations had significantly decreased. This same general relationship between explosives degradation and gram-positive-specific PLFA was observed during an experiment with a large field-scale bioslurry lagoon reactor. These results indicate that the gram-positive organisms, which have been shown to be severely impacted by even low concentrations of TNT and TNB [Current Microbiol. 35 (1997) 77; Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 17 (1998) 2185], are able to increase in concentrations after explosives compounds are reduced to non-inhibitory levels, and should therefore be able to reestablish themselves in remediated soils.

  7. Effects of pesticides on soil invertebrates in laboratory studies: a review and analysis using species sensitivity distributions.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Geoff K; Jansch, Stephan; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; Römbke, Jörg; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2006-09-01

    Species sensitivity distributions (SSD) and 5% hazardous concentrations (HC5) are distribution-based approaches for assessing environmental risks of pollutants. These methods have potential for application in pesticide risk assessments, but their applicability for assessing pesticide risks to soil invertebrate communities has not been evaluated. Using data obtained in a systematic review, the present study investigates the relevance of SSD and HC5 for predicting pesticide risks to soil invertebrates. Altogether, 1950 laboratory toxicity data were obtained, representing 250 pesticides and 67 invertebrate taxa. The majority (96%) of pesticides have toxicity data for fewer than five species. Based on a minimum of five species, the best available endpoint data (acute mortality median lethal concentration) enabled SSD and HC5 to be calculated for 11 pesticides (atrazine, carbendazim, chlorpyrifos, copper compounds, diazinon, dimethoate, gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane, lambda-cyhalothrin, parathion, pentachlorophenol, and propoxur). Arthropods and oligochaetes exhibit pronounced differences in their sensitivity to most of these pesticides. The standard test earthworm species, Eisenia fetida sensu lato, is the species that is least sensitive to insecticides based on acute mortality, whereas the standard Collembola test species, Folsomia candida, is among the most sensitive species for a broad range of toxic modes of action (biocide, fungicide, herbicide, and insecticide). These findings suggest that soil arthropods should be tested routinely in regulatory risk assessments. In addition, the data indicate that the uncertainty factor for earthworm acute mortality tests (i.e., 10) does not fully cover the range of earthworm species sensitivities and that acute mortality tests would not provide the most sensitive risk estimate for earthworms in the majority (95%) of cases.

  8. Secondary electron emission from lunar soil by solar wind type ion impact: Laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukes, Catherine; Bu, Caixia; Baragiola, Raul A.

    2015-11-01

    Introduction: The lunar surface potential is determined by time-varying fluxes of electrons and ions from the solar wind, photoelectrons ejected by UV photons, cosmic rays, and micrometeorite impacts. Solar wind ions have a dual role in the charging process, adding positive charge to the lunar regolith upon impact and ejecting negative secondary electrons (SE). Electron emission occurs when the energy from the impacting ion is transferred to the solid, ionizing and damaging the material; electrons with kinetic energy greater than the ionization potential (band gap + electron affinity) are ejected from the solid[1].Experiment: We investigate the energy distribution of secondary electrons ejected from Apollo soils of varying maturity and lunar analogs by 4 keV He+. Soils are placed into a shallow Al cup and compressed. In-situ low-energy oxygen plasma is used to clean atmospheric contaminants from the soil before analysis[2]. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ascertains that the sample surface is clean. Experiments are conducted in a PHI 560 system (<10-9 Torr), equipped with a double-pass, cylindrical-mirror electron energy analyzer (CMA) and μ-metal shield. The spectrometer is used to measure SE distributions, as well as for in situ surface characterization. A small negative bias (~5V) with respect to the grounded entrance grid of the CMA may be placed on the sample holder in order to expose the low energy cutoff.To measure SE energy distributions, primary ions rastered over a ~6 x 6 mm2 area are incident on the sample at ~40° relative to the surface normal, while SE emitted with an angle of 42.3°± 3.5° in a cone are analyzed.Results: The energy distribution of SE ejected from 4 keV He ion irradiation of albite with no bias applied shows positive charging of the surface. The general shape and distribution peak (~4 eV) are consistent with spectra for low energy ions on insulating material[1].Acknowledgements: We thank the NASA LASER program for support

  9. Overland flow generation mechanisms affected by topsoil treatment: Application to soil conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Paloma, Hueso; Juan Francisco, Martinez-Murillo; Damian, Ruiz-Sinoga Jose; Hanoch, Lavee

    2015-04-01

    Hortonian overland-flow is responsible for significant amounts of soil loss in Mediterranean geomorphological systems. Restoring the native vegetation is the most effective way to control runoff and sediment yield. During the seeding and plant establishment, vegetation cover may be better sustained if soil is amended with an external source. Four amendments were applied in an experimental set of plots: straw mulching (SM); mulch with chipped branches of Aleppo Pine (Pinus halepensis L.) (PM); TerraCotten hydroabsobent polymers (HP); sewage sludge (RU); and control (C). Plots were afforested following the same spatial pattern, and amendments were mixed with the soil at the rate 10 Mg ha-1. This research demonstrates the role played by the treatments in overland flow generation mechanism (runoff, overland flow and soil moisture along the soil profile). The general overland flow characteristics showed that in the C plots the average overland flow was 8.0 ± 22.0 l per event, and the HP plots produced a similar mean value (8.1 ± 20.1 l). The average overland flow per event was significantly less for soil amended with SM, PM or RU (2.7 ± 8.3 l; 1.3 ± 3.5 l and 2.2 ± 5.9 l, respectively). There was a similar trend with respect to the maximum overland flow. The mean sediment yield per event was relatively high in the C and HP plots (8.6 ± 27.8 kg and 14.8 ± 43.4 kg, respectively), while significantly lower values were registered in the SM, PM and RU plots (0.4 ± 1.0 kg; 0.2 ± 0.3 kg and 0.2 ± 0.3 kg, respectively). Very similar trends were found for the maximum sediment yield. Regarding to the soil moisture values, there was a difference in the trends between the C and HP plots and the SM, PM and RU plots. In the C and HP plots the general trend was for a decrease in soil moisture downward through the soil profile, while in the SM, PM and RU plots the soil moisture remained relatively constant or increased, except for the RU treatment in which the soil moisture

  10. A new mechanism for calcium loss in forest-floor soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.; Shortle, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    CALCIUM is the fifth most abundant element in trees, and is an essential component for wood formation and the maintenance of cell walls. Depletion of Ca from the rooting zone can result in acidification of soil1 and surface water2 and possibly growth decline and dieback of red spruce3,4. During the past six decades, concentrations of root-available Ca (exchangeable and acid-ex tract able forms) in forest-floor soils have decreased in the northeastern United States5,6. Both net forest growth and acid deposition have been put forth as mechanisms that can account for this Ca depletion5,6. Here, however, we present data collected in red spruce forests in the northeastern United States that are inconsistent with either of these mechanisms. We propose that aluminium, mobilized in the mineral soil by acid deposition, is transported into the forest floor in a reactive form that reduces storage of Ca, and thus its availability for root uptake. This results in potential stress to trees and, by increasing the demand for Ca, also decreases neutralization of drainage waters, thereby leading to acidification of lakes and streams.

  11. Failure mechanisms of concrete slab-soil double-layer structure subjected to underground explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z.; Zhang, W.; Cho, C.; Han, X.

    2014-09-01

    The failure mechanism of a concrete slab-soil double-layer structure subjected to an underground explosion was investigated by experimental and numerical methods in this paper. Two underground explosion depths of 150 and 350 mm were tested. The typical failure modes such as the conoid spall of concrete, the bulge of the concrete slab and the cavity in the soil were obtained experimentally. Numerical simulations of the experiments were performed using a hydrodynamic code to analyze the effects of both the stress wave and the expansion of the blast products. Based on the experimental and numerical results, the effects of explosive depth, blast wave front and expansion of the blast products on the failure modes and failure mechanisms were discussed. The underground explosion process at different explosion depths was also analyzed. The results show that attenuation of the stress wave in the soil is significant. The blast wave front and the expansion of the blast products play different roles at different explosion depths. At the explosion depth of 150 mm, the failure mode is mainly caused by a point load induced by the blast wave front, whereas at the depth of 350 mm a sphere-shaped load resulting from the expansion of the blast products is a key factor for failure.

  12. Soil properties and perceived disturbance of grasslands subjected to mechanized military training: Evaluation of an index

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Althoff, D.P.; Althoff, P.S.; Lambrecht, N.D.; Gipson, P.S.; Pontius, J.S.; Woodford, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanized maneuver training impacts the landscape by creating depressions, compacting soils, producing bare ground areas, transporting seeds of invasive plants, and crushing vegetation. We measured 3 physical, 13 chemical, and 2 biological soil properties and used a disturbance index (DI) based on perceptions of soil conditions on a military installation to assess the condition of 100 ?? 100 m plots (1 ha): 10 in 2002 and 10 in 2004. Potential DI scores range from 0 (no appreciable evidence of disturbance) to 1 (>95 per cent of the plot disturbed). Bulk density, porosity (%), and water content (%) - all at 5-1-10-0cm depth, and nematode family richness (NFR) were significantly, negatively correlated (Spearman coefficients, rs) with the DI of both years. The strong negative correlation (rs., = -0.69 in 2002, -0.79 in 2004) of NFR with the DI appears to reflect the status of nematode diversity and, therefore, may serve as a useful, inexpensive approach to rapidly assessing grasslands subjected to mechanized military training. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Simulation of estrogen transport and behavior in laboratory soil columns using a cellular automata model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qingcai; Shi, Jianghong; Liu, Xiaowei; Wu, Wei; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Hui

    2013-03-01

    A cellular automata model (CA model) was used to simulate the soil column leaching process of estrogens during the processes of migration and transformation. The results of the simulated leaching experiment showed that the first-order degradation rates of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), 17β-estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1) were 0.131 h- 1 for E2, 0.099 h- 1 for E1 and 0.064 h- 1 for EE2 in the EE2 and E2 leaching process, and the first-order sorption rates were 5.94 h- 1 for E2, 5.63 h- 1 for EE2, 3.125 h- 1 for E1. Their sorption rates were positively correlated with the n-octanol/water partition coefficients. When the diffusion rate was low, its impact on the simulation results was insignificant. The increase in sorption and degradation rates caused the decrease in the total estrogens that leached. In addition, increasing the sorption rate could delay the emerging time of the maximum concentration of estrogen that leached, whereas increasing the degradation rate could shorten the emerging time of the maximum concentration of estrogen that leached. The comparison made between the experimental data and the simulation results of the CA model and the HYDRUS-1D software showed that the establishment of one-component and multi-component CA models could simulate EE2 and E2 soil column leaching processes, and the CA models achieve an intuitive, dynamic, and visual simulation.

  14. Towards a green analytical laboratory: microextraction techniques as a useful tool for the monitoring of polluted soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Viñas, Pilar; Campillo, Natalia; Hernandez Cordoba, Manuel; Perez Sirvent, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Microextraction techniques are a valuable tool at the analytical laboratory since they allow sensitive measurements of pollutants to be carried out by means of easily available instrumentation. There is a large number of such procedures involving miniaturized liquid-liquid or liquid-solid extractions with the common denominator of using very low amounts (only a few microliters) or even none of organic solvents. Since minimal amounts of reagents are involved, and the generation of residues is consequently minimized, the approach falls within the concept of Green Analytical Chemistry. This general methodology is useful both for inorganic and organic pollutants. Thus, low amounts of metallic ions can be measured without the need of using ICP-MS since this instrument can be replaced by a simple AAS spectrometer which is commonly present in any laboratory and involves low acquisition and maintenance costs. When dealing with organic pollutants, the microextracts obtained can be introduced into liquid or gas chromatographs equipped with common detectors and there is no need for the most sophisticated and expensive mass spectrometers. This communication reports an overview of the advantages of such a methodology, and gives examples for the determination of some particular contaminants in soil and water samples The authors are grateful to the Comunidad Autonóma de la Región de Murcia , Spain (Fundación Séneca, 19888/GERM/15) for financial support

  15. The Viking X ray fluorescence experiment - Sampling strategies and laboratory simulations. [Mars soil sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, A. K.; Castro, A. J.; Clark, B. C.; Toulmin, P., III; Rose, H., Jr.; Keil, K.; Gooding, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Ten samples of Mars regolith material (six on Viking Lander 1 and four on Viking Lander 2) have been delivered to the X ray fluorescence spectrometers as of March 31, 1977. An additional six samples at least are planned for acquisition in the remaining Extended Mission (to January 1979) for each lander. All samples acquired are Martian fines from the near surface (less than 6-cm depth) of the landing sites except the latest on Viking Lander 1, which is fine material from the bottom of a trench dug to a depth of 25 cm. Several attempts on each lander to acquire fresh rock material (in pebble sizes) for analysis have yielded only cemented surface crustal material (duricrust). Laboratory simulation and experimentation are required both for mission planning of sampling and for interpretation of data returned from Mars. This paper is concerned with the rationale for sample site selections, surface sampler operations, and the supportive laboratory studies needed to interpret X ray results from Mars.

  16. [Effect and mechanism of immobilization of cadmium and lead compound contaminated soil using new hybrid material].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Xu, Ying-Ming; Liang, Xue-Feng; Sun, Yang; Qin, Xu

    2011-02-01

    The effect of new hybrid material and its compound treatments with phosphate on immobilization of cadmium and lead in contaminated soil was investigated using a pot-culture experiment, and the immobilization mechanism of hybrid material was clarified through analysis of heavy metal fractions, sorption equilibration experiment and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The single treatments of hybrid material could not significantly promote growth of Brassica chinensis, while the compound treatments of hybrid material and phosphate markedly increased dry biomass of shoots and roots, with maximal increases of 75.53% and 151.22%, respectively. Different hybrid material treatments could significantly reduce Cd and Pb concentrations in shoots, with maximal reductions of 66.79% and 48.62%, respectively, and the compound amendment treatments appeared more efficient than the single amendment treatments in reducing Cd and Pb uptake of B. chinensis. Different hybrid material treatments could significantly decrease concentrations of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) extractable Cd and Pb, and the compound hybrid material treatments appeared more efficient than the single treatments in reducing TCLP extractable Cd and Pb. Through the formation of bidentate ligand between metal ions and surface sulfhydryl by complexing reaction, the hybrid material could absorb and fix mobile fractions of Cd and Pb in soil, and promote transformation of acid extractable Cd and Pb into residual fraction, resulting in significant reduction of heavy metals bioavailability and mobility and then fixing remediation of contaminated soil. In summary, the compound treatment of hybrid material and phosphate is the most effective treatment for immobilization of Cd and Pb in contaminated soils, and the hybrid material inactivates Cd and Pb in soil mainly through special chemical adsorption. PMID:21528587

  17. Coevolution of topography, soils, and vegetation in upland landscapes: Using cinder cones to elucidate ecohydrogeomorphic feedback mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, L.; Pelletier, J. D.; Rasmussen, C.

    2013-12-01

    The study of landscape evolution in upland environments requires analysis of complex interactions among topography, soil development, and vegetation cover under changing climatic conditions. Earth surface scientists lack a comprehensive understanding of these interactions in part due to their interdisciplinary nature, our limited ability to reconstruct the progression of landscape states through time, and the limited spatially-distributed data available for paleoclimate conditions. In this study, we investigate the interactions and feedbacks among topography, soil development, and vegetation cover in upland environments using remote sensing, geochemistry, and numerical modeling. We focus on quantifying the evolution of late Quaternary cinder cones within several volcanic fields, spanning a range of climates, as a function of age and microclimate, which varies with elevation and slope aspect. Cinder cones are excellent natural laboratories for studying the evolution of upland landscapes because they begin their evolution at a known time in the past (i.e. many cinder cones have been radiometrically dated) and because they often have unusually uniform initial conditions (i.e. they form close to the angle of repose and are comprised of well-sorted volcaniclastic parent materials). As such, cinder cones of different ages with similar size and climatic history can provide an approximate time progression illustrating how a dated hillslope has evolved over geologic time scales. Data suggest that rates of soil development and fluvial erosion are low on younger cones, which have surfaces consisting mostly of permeable cinders, but increase significantly after eolian deposits reduce the permeability of the cone surface. Further, data demonstrate that microclimatic differences between north and south facing slopes lead to systematic variations in biomass. Additionally, north-facing slopes on cinder cones are found to be steeper than corresponding south-facing slopes. The

  18. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

    2009-08-14

    The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in

  19. [Study on mechanism of SOM stabilization of paddy soils under long-term fertilizations].

    PubMed

    Luo, Lu; Zhou, Ping; Tong, Cheng-Li; Shi, Hui; Wu, Jin-Shui; Huang, Tie-Ping

    2013-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was applied to study the structure of soil organic matter (SOM) of paddy soils under long-term different fertilization treatments. The aim was to clarify the different distribution of SOM between different fertilization methods and between topsoil and subsoil, and to explore the stability mechanism of SOM under different fertilization treatments. The results showed that the content of topsoil organic carbon (SOC) was the highest under organic-inorganic fertilizations, with the increment of SOC by 18.5%, 12.9% and 18.4% under high organic manure (HOM), low organic manure (LOM) and straw returning (STW) respectively compared with no fertilization treatment (CK). The long-term fertilizations also changed the chemical structure of SOM. As compared with CK, different fertilization treatments increased the functional group absorbing intensity of chemical resistance compounds (aliphatic, aromaticity), carbohydrate and organo-silicon compounds, which was the most distinctive under treatments of HOM, LOM and STW. For example, the absorbing intensity of alkyl was 0.30, 0.25 and 0.29 under HOM, LOM and STW, respectively. These values were increased by 87% , 56% and 81% as compared with that under CK treatment. The functional group absorbing intensity of SOM in the topsoil was stronger than that in the subsoil, with the most distinctive difference under HOM, LOM and STW treatments. The present research indicated that the enhanced chemical resistance of functional group of SOM may contribute to the high contents of SOC in the paddy soils under long-term organic-inorganic fertilizations, which also suggested a chemical stabilization mechanism of SOM in the paddy soils.

  20. The relative importance of decomposition and transport mechanisms in accounting for soil organic carbon profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenet, B.; Eglin, T.; Vasilyeva, N.; Peylin, P.; Ciais, P.; Chenu, C.

    2013-04-01

    Soil is the major terrestrial reservoir of carbon and a substantial part of this carbon is stored in deep layers, typically deeper than 50 cm below the surface. Several studies underlined the quantitative importance of this deep soil organic carbon (SOC) pool and models are needed to better understand this stock and its evolution under climate and land-uses changes. In this study, we tested and compared three simple theoretical models of vertical transport for SOC against SOC profiles measurements from a long-term bare fallow experiment carried out by the Central-Chernozem State Natural Biosphere Reserve in the Kursk Region of Russia. The transport schemes tested are diffusion, advection and both diffusion and advection. They are coupled to three different formulations of soil carbon decomposition kinetics. The first formulation is a first order kinetics widely used in global SOC decomposition models; the second one, so-called "priming" model, links SOC decomposition rate to the amount of fresh organic matter, representing the substrate interactions. The last one is also a first order kinetics, but SOC is split into two pools. Field data are from a set of three bare fallow plots where soil received no input during the past 20, 26 and 58 yr, respectively. Parameters of the models were optimised using a Bayesian method. The best results are obtained when SOC decomposition is assumed to be controlled by fresh organic matter (i.e., the priming model). In comparison to the first-order kinetic model, the priming model reduces the overestimation in the deep layers. We also observed that the transport scheme that improved the fit with the data depended on the soil carbon mineralisation formulation chosen. When soil carbon decomposition was modelled to depend on the fresh organic matter amount, the transport mechanism which improved best the fit to the SOC profile data was the model representing both advection and diffusion. Interestingly, the older the bare fallow is, the

  1. Studies on the Mechanism of Telavancin Decreased Susceptibility in a Laboratory-Derived Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Lunde, Christopher S.; Benton, Bret M.

    2013-01-01

    Telavancin is a novel semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide derivative of vancomycin with a dual mode of action. This study sought to understand the mechanisms of decreased telavancin susceptibility in a laboratory-derived Staphlococcus aureus mutant TlvDSMED1952. There were extensive changes in the transcriptome of TlvDSMED1952 compared to the susceptible parent strain MED1951. Genes upregulated included cofactor biosynthesis genes, cell wall-related genes, fatty acid biosynthesis genes, and stress genes. Downregulated genes included lysine operon biosynthesis genes and lrgB, which are induced by telavancin in susceptible strains, agr and kdpDE genes, various cell surface protein genes, phenol-soluble modulin genes, several protease genes, and genes involved in anaerobic metabolism. The decreased susceptibility mutant had somewhat thicker cell walls and a decreased autolytic activity that may be related to decreased proteolytic peptidoglycan hydrolase processing. Membrane fatty acid changes correlated with increased membrane fluidity were observed. It seems likely that there are multiple genetic changes associated with the development of decreased telavancin susceptibility. The TlvDS mutant showed some similar features to vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus and decreased daptomycin susceptibility strains, but also exhibited its own unique features. PMID:23551248

  2. Studies on the mechanism of telavancin decreased susceptibility in a laboratory-derived mutant.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Lunde, Christopher S; Benton, Bret M; Wilkinson, Brian J

    2013-08-01

    Telavancin is a novel semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide derivative of vancomycin with a dual mode of action. This study sought to understand the mechanisms of decreased telavancin susceptibility in a laboratory-derived Staphlococcus aureus mutant Tlv(DS)MED1952. There were extensive changes in the transcriptome of Tlv(DS)MED1952 compared to the susceptible parent strain MED1951. Genes upregulated included cofactor biosynthesis genes, cell wall-related genes, fatty acid biosynthesis genes, and stress genes. Downregulated genes included lysine operon biosynthesis genes and lrgB, which are induced by telavancin in susceptible strains, agr and kdpDE genes, various cell surface protein genes, phenol-soluble modulin genes, several protease genes, and genes involved in anaerobic metabolism. The decreased susceptibility mutant had somewhat thicker cell walls and a decreased autolytic activity that may be related to decreased proteolytic peptidoglycan hydrolase processing. Membrane fatty acid changes correlated with increased membrane fluidity were observed. It seems likely that there are multiple genetic changes associated with the development of decreased telavancin susceptibility. The Tlv(DS) mutant showed some similar features to vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus and decreased daptomycin susceptibility strains, but also exhibited its own unique features.

  3. Application of the SmartSampling Methodology to the Evaluation of Contaminated Landscape Soils at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    RAUTMAN,CHRISTOPHER A.

    2000-08-01

    Portions of the SmartSampling{trademark} analysis methodology have been applied to the evaluation of radioactive contaminated landscape soils at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Specifically, the spatial, volumetric distribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) contamination within Area of Concern 16E-1 has been modeled probabilistically using a geostatistical methodology, with the purpose of identifying the likelihood of successfully reducing, with respect to a pre-existing, baseline remediation plan, the volume of soil that must be disposed of offsite during clean-up. The principal objective of the analysis was to evaluate the likelihood of successful deployment of the Segmented Gate System (SGS), a novel remediation approach that emphasizes real-time separation of clean from contaminated materials during remediation operations. One primary requirement for successful application of the segmented gate technology investigated is that a variety of contaminant levels exist at the deployment site, which would enable to the SGS to discriminate material above and below a specified remediation threshold value. The results of this analysis indicate that there is potential for significant volume reduction with respect to the baseline remediation plan at a threshold excavation level of 23 pCi/g {sup 137}Cs. A reduction of approximately 50%, from a baseline volume of approximately 1,064.7 yd{sup 3} to less than 550 yd{sup 3}, is possible with acceptance of only a very small level of engineering risk. The vast majority of this volume reduction is obtained by not excavating almost all of levels 3 and 4 (from 12 to 24 inches in depth), which appear to be virtually uncontaminated, based on the available data. Additional volume reductions related to soil materials on levels 1 (depths of 0--6 inches) and 2 (6--12 inches) may be possible, specifically through use of the SGS technology. Level-by-level evaluation of simulation results suggests that as much as 26 percent of level 1 and as

  4. Sorption kinetics during macropore transport of organic contaminants in soils: Laboratory experiments and analytical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. Mokhlesur; Liedl, Rudolf; Grathwohl, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Preferential solute transport coupled with diffusion into the surrounding matrix region has been examined in a silty loam soil by conducting macropore column experiments for various hydrophobic organic compounds (phenanthrene, 1, 2-DCB, TCE, carbofuran) representing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorobenzenes, chlorinated solvents, and pesticides. A new and ready-to-use analytical solution was developed for this setting to model the breakthrough curves. The model accounts for advection in the macropore region, diffusion into the matrix region, and linear sorption in both regions. In this setting, hydrodynamic dispersion is negligible as proved by a comparison of an advection-dispersion model of finite pulse input. Conservative tracer experiments were predicted very well with independently determined transport parameters except for the tortuosity factor, which was used as a fitting parameter for the pore diffusion coefficient in the matrix. In case of sorbing solutes the sorption coefficient (Kd) was used as additional fitting parameter. The fitted Kd was 65% smaller for less sorbing compounds, e.g., carbofuran, and 80% less for strongly sorbing compounds, e.g., phenanthrene compared to the independently determined Kd from batch experiments. This indicates that sorption equilibrium was not obtained completely during the matrix diffusion at the timescale of the macropore flow experiment.

  5. Influence of hydraulic hysteresis on the mechanical behavior of unsaturated soils and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Charbel N.

    Unsaturated soils are commonly widespread around the world, especially at shallow depths from the surface. The mechanical behavior of this near surface soil is influenced by the seasonal variations such as rainfall or drought, which in turn may have a detrimental effect on many structures (e.g. retaining walls, shallow foundations, mechanically stabilized earth walls, soil slopes, and pavements) in contact with it. Thus, in order to better understand this behavior, it is crucial to study the complex relationship between soil moisture content and matric suction (a stress state variable defined as pore air pressure minus pore water pressure) known as the Soil Water Characteristic Curve (SWCC). In addition, the influence of hydraulic hysteresis on the behavior of unsaturated soils, soil-structure interaction (i.e. rough and smooth steel interfaces, soil-geotextile interfaces) and pavement subgrade (depicted herein mainly by resilient modulus, Mr) was also studied. To this end, suction-controlled direct shear tests were performed on soils, rough and smooth steel interfaces and geotextile interface under drying (D) and wetting after drying (DW). The shearing behavior is examined in terms of the two stress state variables, matric suction and net normal stress. Results along the D and DW paths indicated that peak shear strength increased with suction and net normal stress; while in general, the post peak shear strength was not influenced by suction for rough interfaces and no consistent trend was observed for soils and soil-geotextiles interfaces. Contrary to saturated soils, results during shearing at higher suction values (i.e. 25 kPa and above) showed a decrease in water content eventhough the sample exhibited dilation. A behavior postulated to be related to disruption of menisci and/or non-uniformity of pore size which results in an increase in localized pore water pressures. Interestingly, wetting after drying (DW) test results showed higher peak and post peak shear

  6. Requirement of polyphosphate by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 for competitive fitness and heat tolerance in laboratory media and sterile soil.

    PubMed

    Silby, Mark W; Nicoll, Julie S; Levy, Stuart B

    2009-06-01

    Knowledge of the genetic basis for bacterial survival and persistence in soil is a critical component in the development of successful biological control strategies and for understanding the ecological success of bacteria. We found a locus specifying polyphosphate kinase (ppk) and a nonpredicted antisense RNA (iiv8) in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to be necessary for optimal competitive fitness in LB broth culture and sterile loam soil. Pf0-1 lacking ppk and iiv8 was more than 10-fold less competitive against wild-type Pf0-1 in sterile loam soil low in inorganic phosphate. Studies indicated that ppk, and not iiv8, was required for competitive fitness. No role for iiv8 was identified. While a ppk and iiv8 mutant of Pf0-1 did not have increased sensitivity to osmotic, oxidative, and acid stress, it was more sensitive to elevated temperatures in laboratory medium and during growth in sterile soil. ppk was shown to be part of the Pho regulon in P. fluorescens, being upregulated in response to a low external P(i) concentration. Of importance, overproduction of polyphosphate in the soil environment appears to be more deleterious than production of none at all. Our findings reveal a new role for polyphosphate (and the need for proper regulation of its production) in competitive fitness of P. fluorescens in laboratory and soil environments.

  7. Selection of indigenous isolates of entomopathogenic soil fungus Metarhizium anisopliae under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Skalický, Aleš; Bohatá, Andrea; Šimková, Jana; Osborne, Lance S; Landa, Zdeněk

    2014-07-01

    Eight native isolates of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin were obtained by monitoring soils cultivated in a conventional manner. These isolates were compared in three areas: (a) conidial germination, (b) radial growth and sporulation and (c) ability of conidia to infect Tenebrio molitor larvae. All bioassays were carried out at constant temperatures of 10, 15, and 20 °C. Conidia of individual isolates demonstrated differences in germination after a 24-h long incubation at all evaluated temperatures. At 20 °C, the germination ranged from 67 to 100 % and at 15 °C from 5.33 to 46.67 %. At 10 °C, no germination was observed after 24 h; nevertheless, it was 8.67-44.67 % after 48 h. In terms of radial growth, the culture diameters and the associated production of spores of all isolates increased with increasing temperature. At 10 °C, sporulation was observed in three isolates while all remaining cultures appeared sterile. Three weeks post-inoculation, conidia of all assessed isolates caused 100 % cumulative mortality of treated larvae of T. molitor at 15 and 20 °C with the exception of isolate 110108 that induced 81.33 % mortality at 15 °C. At 10 °C, larval cumulative mortality ranged from 6.67 to 85.33 % depending on the isolate. Isolates 110108 and 110111 showed significantly slower outset and a much lower rate of infection at all temperatures compared to other tested isolates of M. anisopliae. The bioassays were carried out with the purpose to sort and select indigenous isolates of M. anisopliae useful as biocontrol agents in their original habitat.

  8. Selection of indigenous isolates of entomopathogenic soil fungus Metarhizium anisopliae under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Skalický, Aleš; Bohatá, Andrea; Šimková, Jana; Osborne, Lance S; Landa, Zdeněk

    2014-07-01

    Eight native isolates of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin were obtained by monitoring soils cultivated in a conventional manner. These isolates were compared in three areas: (a) conidial germination, (b) radial growth and sporulation and (c) ability of conidia to infect Tenebrio molitor larvae. All bioassays were carried out at constant temperatures of 10, 15, and 20 °C. Conidia of individual isolates demonstrated differences in germination after a 24-h long incubation at all evaluated temperatures. At 20 °C, the germination ranged from 67 to 100 % and at 15 °C from 5.33 to 46.67 %. At 10 °C, no germination was observed after 24 h; nevertheless, it was 8.67-44.67 % after 48 h. In terms of radial growth, the culture diameters and the associated production of spores of all isolates increased with increasing temperature. At 10 °C, sporulation was observed in three isolates while all remaining cultures appeared sterile. Three weeks post-inoculation, conidia of all assessed isolates caused 100 % cumulative mortality of treated larvae of T. molitor at 15 and 20 °C with the exception of isolate 110108 that induced 81.33 % mortality at 15 °C. At 10 °C, larval cumulative mortality ranged from 6.67 to 85.33 % depending on the isolate. Isolates 110108 and 110111 showed significantly slower outset and a much lower rate of infection at all temperatures compared to other tested isolates of M. anisopliae. The bioassays were carried out with the purpose to sort and select indigenous isolates of M. anisopliae useful as biocontrol agents in their original habitat. PMID:24338078

  9. Axenic mass cultivation of the free-living soil amoeba, Acanthamoeba castellanii in a laboratory fermentor.

    PubMed

    Weekers, P H; Wijen, J P; Lomans, B P; Vogels, G D

    1996-05-01

    Axenic mass cultivation of Acanthamoeba castellanii in laboratory fermentors (141) yielded after 20 days approximately 3 g cells (wet weight). After a short lag phase amoebal cell numbers increased exponentially to a maximum of 3.5 x 10(5) cells per ml until cell death occurred after 20 days. Optical density and protein concentrations revealed identical patterns. During amoebal growth only 12-19% of the initially added glucose (100 mM) as sole carbon source was used. Large amounts of ammonia (1 g in 10.51 culture volume) were excreted into the medium which subsequently raised the pH from 6.6 to 7.7, and from 6.6 to 6.8 in 2 and 20 mM buffered media, respectively. Growth inhibition and cell death could not be explained by a depletion of glucose or oxygen limitations during growth. The production of ammonia had a growth inhibitory effect, however, the sudden termination of the exponential growth phase and cell death could not be explained by the toxic influence of ammonia only. PMID:8836429

  10. Mercury retorting of calcine waste, contaminated soils and railroad ballast at the Idaho National Egineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cotten, G.B.; Rothermel, J.S.; Sherwood, J.; Heath, S.A.; Lo, T.Y.R.

    1996-02-28

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been involved in nuclear reactor research and development for over 40 years. One of the earliest major projects involved the development of a nuclear powered aircraft engine, a long-term venture which used mercury as a shielding medium. Over the course of several years, a significant amount of mercury was spilled along the railroad tracks where the test engines were transported and stored. In addition, experiments with volume reduction of waste through a calcine process employing mercury as a catalyst resulted in mercury contaminated calcine waste. Both the calcine and Test Area North wastes have been identified in Department of Energy Action Memorandums to be retorted, thereby separating the mercury from the various contaminated media. Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company awarded the Mercury Retort contract to ETAS Corporation and assigned Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. to manage the treatment field activities. The mercury retort process entails a mobile unit which consists of four trailer-mounted subsystems requiring electricity, propane, and a water supply. This mobile system demonstrates an effective strategy for retorting waste and generating minimal secondary waste.

  11. Transient Liquid Water as a Mechanism for Induration of Soil Crusts on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, G. A.; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N.; Clark, B. C.; Farmer, J.; Grotzinger, J.; Greeley, R.; McLennan, S. M.; Richter, L.; Yen, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Viking and the Mars Exploration Rover missions observed that the surface of Mars is encrusted by a thinly cemented layer tagged as "duricrust". A hypothesis to explain the formation of duricrust on Mars should address not only the potential mechanisms by which these materials become cemented, but also the textural and compositional components of cemented Martian soils. Elemental analyzes at five sites on Mars show that these soils have sulfur content of up to 4%, and chlorine content of up to 1%. This is consistent with the presence of sulfates and halides as mineral cements. . For comparison, the rock "Adirondack" at the MER site, after the exterior layer was removed, had nearly five times lower sulfur and chlorine content , and the Martian meteorites have ten times lower sulfur and chlorine content, showing that the soil is highly enriched in the saltforming elements compared with rock.Here we propose two alternative models to account for the origin of these crusts, each requiring the action of transient liquid water films to mediate adhesion and cementation of grains. Two alternative versions of the transient water hypothesis are offered, a top down hypothesis that emphasizes the surface deposition of frost, melting and downward migration of liquid water and a bottom up alternative that proposes the presence of interstitial ice/brine, with the upward capillary migration of liquid water.

  12. Integrating Statistical Mechanics with Experimental Data from the Rotational-Vibrational Spectrum of HCl into the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findley, Bret R.; Mylon, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a computer exercise that bridges spectroscopy and thermodynamics using statistical mechanics and the experimental data taken from the commonly used laboratory exercise involving the rotational-vibrational spectrum of HCl. Based on the results from the analysis of their HCl spectrum, students calculate bulk thermodynamic properties…

  13. A Multi-State Factor-Analytic and Psychometric Meta-Analysis of Agricultural Mechanics Laboratory Management Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, Billy R.; Saucier, P. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the 50 agricultural mechanics laboratory management competencies identified by Johnson and Schumacher in 1989 have served as the basis for numerous needs assessments of secondary agriculture teachers. This study reevaluated Johnson and Schumacher's instrument, as modified by Saucier, Schumacher, Funkenbusch, Terry, and…