Science.gov

Sample records for solar structural facets

  1. Changing Facets of Nuclear Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covello, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    Section I. Exotic nuclear structure. Radioactive beams at TRIUMF / A. C. Shotter. Status of RI-beam factory project at RIKEN / H. Ueno. Population of neutron unbound states via two-proton knockout reactions / N. Frank ... [et al.]. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei using ISOL facilities at CERN and Jyväskylä / J. Äystö. Shell structure evolution far from stability: recent results from GANIL / F. Azaiez. Magnetic moment meaurements: pushing the limits / N. Benczer-Koller. Technique for measuring angular correlations and g-factors of excited states with large multi-detector arrays: an application to neutron rich nuclei produced in spontaneous fission / A. V. Ramayya ... [et al.]. Isospin symmetry and proton decay: identification of the 10+ isomer in [symbol]Ni / C. Fahlander ... [et al.]. Exploring the evolution of the shell structure by means of deep inelastic reactions / G. de Angelis. Studies on the exotic structure of [symbol]Al by measurements of [symbol] and P[symbol] / D. Q. Fang ... [et al.]. Extended cluster model for light and medium nuclei / M. Tomaselli ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure studies on exotic nuclei with radioactive beams - present status and future perspectives at FAIR / P. Egelhof. The SPES direct target project at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro / G. Prete ... [et al.] -- Section II. Nuclear structure and nuclear forces. Modern aspects of nuclear structure theory / J. Wambach. Correlations in nuclei: a review / R. Schiavilla. Correlated nucleons in k- and r-space / I. Sick. Roles of all-order core polarizations and Brown-Rho scaling in nucleon effective interactions / T. T. S. Kuo ... [et al.]. Ab initio and ab exitu no core shell model / J. P. Vary ... [et al.]. Ab-initio coupled cluster theory for open quantum systems / G. Hagen ... [et al.]. Symplectic no-core shell model / J. P. Draayer ... [et al.]. Role of deformed symplectic configurations in ab initio no-core shell model results / T. Dytrych ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure

  2. Optimization of spherical facets for parabolic solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. E.; Erikson, R. J.; Sturgis, J. D.; Elfe, T. B.

    1986-01-01

    Solar concentrator designs which employ deployable hexagonal panels are being developed for space power systems. An offset optical configuration has been developed which offers significant system level advantages over previously proposed collector designs for space applications. Optical analyses have been performed which show offset reflector intercept factors to be only slightly lower than those for symmetric reflectors with the same slope error. Fluxes on the receiver walls are asymmetric but manageable by varying the tilt angle of the receiver. Greater producibility is achieved by subdividing the hexagonal panels into triangular mirror facets of spherical contour. Optical analysis has been performed upon these to yield near-optimum sizes and radii.

  3. Design of a solar concentrator with hexagonal facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Vázquez, Joel; Vázquez y Montiel, Sergio

    2007-09-01

    In this work we present the optical design of a solar concentrator for an High-Flux solar furnace of a solar laboratory, these concentrator is compound for an aspheric mirror surface sectioned in 121 hexagonal facets to simplify the construction process, its total diameter is 6.6 m and a focal length is 3.68 m, also was developed the corresponding algorithm to determine the correct position and orientation of each hexagonal section that compound the arrangement. We present the results of the focused energy of this configuration and we propose a modification on the original position of the mirrors for optimizing the focusing of energy by the sun furnace. These modifications produces an increment on the energy focused on a small area in a remarkable way similar to used a parabolic mirror. The algorithm before mentioned was programmed in MathCAD and it calculates the modification of the original position of each hexagonal mirror giving us a file that ZEMAX can read. This file contains the information of each 121 mirrors from the arrangement and also the correct form, position and direction, simplifying the traditional input process one by one.

  4. Facet development for a faceted stretched-membrane dish by Solar Kinetics, Inc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertz, P. T.; Brown, D. C.; Konnerth, A., III

    1991-07-01

    A 3.6-meter diameter stretched-membrane optical facet for a parabolic dish has been successfully designed and demonstrated under contract with Sandia National Laboratories. Twelve facets identical to them will be used to make the lightweight reflector of the dish. The project goal of 2.5-mrad surface accuracy was met with each of the two full-sized prototypes, and accuracies of as low as 1.1 mrad were achieved. The facet weight is 11.7 kg/sq m (2.4 lbs/sq ft). The facet is similar in construction to the successful stretched-membrane heliostat; it has two thin metal membranes attached to a ring. However, the front membrane for this facet is plastically formed at the factor in order to achieve a shorter facet f/D (approximately 3.0). A passive tether restrains the front membrane when not in operation, that is, when the stabilizing vacuum is off. The optical surface is achieved with a silvered-acrylic film laminated to the metal membrane. The facet is expected to cost $55.40/sq m at a production rate of 10,000 facets per year and $115,000/sq m at a production rate of 500 facets a year. Several key issues have been resolved. Stress concentrations due to seams in the reflective laminate did not cause membrane rupture during forming as they have for dishes with lower focal length-to-diameter ratios. The laminate survived the forming process and simulated operation without deterioration. The optical effect of the tether on the membrane was tested and found to be very small. Most important, highly accurate shapes were obtained using a simple forming procedure. Additional tests are needed to demonstrate process repeatability and facet performance in typical operating conditions.

  5. Studying nanostructured nipple arrays of moth eye facets helps to design better thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Rahul; Fischer, Stefan; Meyer-Rochow, V Benno; Özdemir, Yasemin; Hamraz, Saeed; Knipp, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    Nipples on the surface of moth eye facets exhibit almost perfect broadband anti-reflection properties. We have studied the facet surface micro-protuberances, known as corneal nipples, of the chestnut leafminer moth Cameraria ohridella by atomic force microscopy, and simulated the optics of the nipple arrays by three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation. The influence of the dimensions and shapes of the nipples on the optics was studied. In particular, the shape of the nipples has a major influence on the anti-reflection properties. Furthermore, we transferred the structure of the almost perfect broadband anti-reflection coatings to amorphous silicon thin film solar cells. The coating that imitates the moth-eye array allows for an increase of the short circuit current and conversion efficiency of more than 40%.

  6. Structural Equation Modelling of Multiple Facet Data: Extending Models for Multitrait-Multimethod Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechger, Timo M.; Maris, Gunter

    2004-01-01

    This paper is about the structural equation modelling of quantitative measures that are obtained from a multiple facet design. A facet is simply a set consisting of a finite number of elements. It is assumed that measures are obtained by combining each element of each facet. Methods and traits are two such facets, and a multitrait-multimethod…

  7. Facet-dependent solar ammonia synthesis of BiOCl nanosheets via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Shang, Jian; Shi, Jingu; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-01-01

    Under the pressure of a fossil fuels shortage and global climate change, solar ammonia synthesis and the need to develop N2 fixation under mild conditions is becoming more urgent need; however, their intrinsic mechanisms still remain unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the kinetic inertia of N2 can be overcome using oxygen vacancies (OVs) of BiOCl as the catalytic centers to create lower energy molecular steps, which are amendable for the solar light driven N-N triple bond cleavage via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway. Moreover, the distinct structures of OVs on different BiOCl facets strongly determine the N2 fixation pathways by influencing both the adsorption structure and the activation level of N2. The fixation of terminal end-on bound N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {001} facets follows an asymmetric distal mode by selectively generating NH3, while the reduction of side-on bridging N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {010} facets is more energetically favorable in a symmetric alternating mode to produce N2H4 as the main intermediate.Under the pressure of a fossil fuels shortage and global climate change, solar ammonia synthesis and the need to develop N2 fixation under mild conditions is becoming more urgent need; however, their intrinsic mechanisms still remain unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the kinetic inertia of N2 can be overcome using oxygen vacancies (OVs) of BiOCl as the catalytic centers to create lower energy molecular steps, which are amendable for the solar light driven N-N triple bond cleavage via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway. Moreover, the distinct structures of OVs on different BiOCl facets strongly determine the N2 fixation pathways by influencing both the adsorption structure and the activation level of N2. The fixation of terminal end-on bound N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {001} facets follows an asymmetric distal mode by selectively generating NH3, while the reduction of side-on bridging N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {010} facets is more

  8. Faceting and commensurability in crystal structures of colloidal thin films.

    PubMed

    Ramiro-Manzano, F; Meseguer, F; Bonet, E; Rodriguez, I

    2006-07-14

    This Letter investigates the influence of finite size effects on the particle arrangement of thin film colloidal crystals. A rich variety of crystallographic faceting with large single domain microcrystallites is shown. Optical reflectance experiments together with scanning electron microscopy permit the identification of the crystal symmetry and the facet orientation, as well as the exact number of monolayers. When the cell thickness is not commensurable with a high symmetry layering, particles arrange themselves in a periodic distribution of (111)- and (100)-orientated face centered cubic (fcc) microcrystallites separated by planar defects. These structures can be described as a fcc ordering orientated along a vicinal surface, modified by a periodic distribution of fcc (111) stacking faults.

  9. Multi-facet concentrator of solar setup for irradiating the objects placed in a target plane with solar light

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Yampolskiy, Vladislav; Alekseev, Valerie; Son, Valentin

    2001-01-01

    According to the proposed invention, this technical result is achieved so that many-facet concentrator of a solar setup for exposure of objects, placed in a target plane, to the action of solar radiation containing a supporting frame and facets differing by that the facets of the concentrator are chosen with spherical focusing reflective surfaces of equal focal lengths and with selective coatings reflecting a desired spectral fraction of solar radiation, and are arranged on the supporting frame symmetrically with respect to the common axis of the concentrator, their optical axes being directed to the single point on the optical axis of the concentrator located before the nominal focus point of the concentrator and determining the position of arranging the target plane.

  10. Automatic methods for the adjustment of faceted solar-energy concentrators and heliostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, R. A.; Khakimov, R. A.; Abdurakhmanov, A. A.; Sizov, Iu. M.; Baranov, V. K.

    An automatic adjustment technique is described which makes possible a considerable simplification of the operation of solar-energy installations. Diagrams of devices for the automatic adjustment of the facets of a composite concentrator and of a plane heliostat are presented. An error analysis shows that the accuracy of the adjustment method is 4-5 arcmin.

  11. Facet-dependent solar ammonia synthesis of BiOCl nanosheets via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Shang, Jian; Shi, Jingu; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-01-28

    Under the pressure of a fossil fuels shortage and global climate change, solar ammonia synthesis and the need to develop N2 fixation under mild conditions is becoming more urgent need; however, their intrinsic mechanisms still remain unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the kinetic inertia of N2 can be overcome using oxygen vacancies (OVs) of BiOCl as the catalytic centers to create lower energy molecular steps, which are amendable for the solar light driven N-N triple bond cleavage via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway. Moreover, the distinct structures of OVs on different BiOCl facets strongly determine the N2 fixation pathways by influencing both the adsorption structure and the activation level of N2. The fixation of terminal end-on bound N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {001} facets follows an asymmetric distal mode by selectively generating NH3, while the reduction of side-on bridging N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {010} facets is more energetically favorable in a symmetric alternating mode to produce N2H4 as the main intermediate.

  12. Porous (001)-faceted anatase TiO2 nanorice thin film for efficient dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Athar Ali; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Mat Salleh, Muhamad

    2016-01-01

    Anatase TiO2 structures with nanorice-like morphology and high exposure of (001) facet has been successfully synthesized on an ITO surface using ammonium Hexafluoro Titanate and Hexamethylenetetramine as precursor and capping agent, respectively, under a microwave-assisted liquid-phase deposition method. These anatase TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared within five minutes of reaction time by utilizing an inverter microwave system at a normal atmospheric pressure. The morphology and the size (approximately from 6 to 70 nm) of these nanostructures can be controlled. Homogenous, porous, 5.64 ± 0.002 μm thick layer of spongy-nanorice with facets (101) and (001) was grown on ITO substrate and used as a photo-anode in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). This solar cell device has emerged out with 4.05 ± 0.10% power conversion efficiency (PCE) and 72% of incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) under AM1.5 G illumination.

  13. Facet-Dependent Catalytic Activity of Platinum Nanocrystals for Triiodide Reduction in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Dong; Hou, Yu; Yang, Shuang; Yang, Xiao Hua; Zhong, Ju Hua; Liu, Jian; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Yang, Hua Gui

    2013-01-01

    Platinum (Pt) nanocrystals have demonstrated to be an effective catalyst in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. However, pioneer facets with highest activity have been reported differently for various reaction systems. Although Pt has been the most important counter electrode material for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), suitable atomic arrangement on the exposed crystal facet of Pt for triiodide reduction is still inexplicable. Using density functional theory, we have investigated the catalytic reaction processes of triiodide reduction over {100}, {111} and {411} facets, indicating that the activity follows the order of Pt(111) > Pt(411) > Pt(100). Further, Pt nanocrystals mainly bounded by {100}, {111} and {411} facets were synthesized and used as counter electrode materials for DSCs. The highest photovoltaic conversion efficiency of Pt(111) in DSCs confirms the predictions of the theoretical study. These findings have deepened the understanding of the mechanism of triiodide reduction at Pt surfaces and further screened the best facet for DSCs successfully. PMID:23670438

  14. Tailored Synthesis of Porous TiO₂ Nanocubes and Nanoparallelepipeds with Exposed {111} Facets and Mesoscopic Void Space: A Superior Candidate for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Amoli, Vipin; Bhat, Shekha; Maurya, Abhayankar; Banerjee, Biplab; Bhaumik, Asim; Sinha, Anil Kumar

    2015-12-02

    Anatase TiO2 nanocubes and nanoparallelepipeds, with highly reactive {111} facets exposed, were developed for the first time through a modified one pot hydrothermal method, through the hydrolysis of tetrabutyltitanate in the presence of oleylamine as the morphology-controlling capping-agent and using ammonia/hydrofluoric acid for stabilizing the {111} faceted surfaces. These nanocubes/nanoparallelepipeds were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high angle annular dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM). Accordingly, a possible growth mechanism for the nanostructures is elucidated. The morphology, surface area and the pore size distribution of the TiO2 nanostructures can be tuned simply by altering the HF and ammonia dosage in the precursor solution. More importantly, optimization of the reaction system leads to the assembly of highly crystalline, high surface area, {111} faceted anatase TiO2 nanocubes/nanoparallelepipeds to form uniform mesoscopic void space. We report the development of a novel double layered photoanode for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) made of highly crystalline, self-assembled faceted TiO2 nanocrystals as upper layer and commercial titania nanoparticles paste as under layer. The bilayered DSSC made from TiO2 nanostructures with exposed {111} facets as upper layer shows a much higher power conversion efficiency (9.60%), than DSSCs fabricated with commercial (P25) titania powder (4.67%) or with anatase TiO2 nanostructures having exposed {101} facets (7.59%) as the upper layer. The improved performance in bilayered DSSC made from TiO2 nanostructures with exposed {111} facets as the upper layer is attributed to high dye adsorption and fast electron transport dynamics owing to the unique structural features of the {111} facets in TiO2. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements conducted on the cells supported these conclusions

  15. One-dimensional and (001) facetted nanostructured TiO2 photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Wang, Xiao; Hao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    As one of the most important components in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), photoanode materials have attracted massive interest and been greatly developed through the efforts of various research institutions in recent years. Photoanode materials not only provide a large surface for the sensitizer to favor charge separation, but also conduct the electrons to the collection electrode. In recent years, one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures (nanotubes (NT), nanowires (NW) and nanorods(NR)), which offer direct pathways for electron transport, and nanostructures (nanosheets (NS) and nanoparticles (NP)) with (001) crystal facets which possess higher surface energies have been widely employed as photoanode materials. In this review, the progress of 1D nanostructures and those with (001) crystal facets, as well as their photovoltaic performance in DSCs will be discussed briefly. Further efforts are needed to provide theoretical research for 1D and (001) facet nanostructured TiO2 and to improve DSC performances based on these photoanodes.

  16. Cross-cultural evidence for the two-facet structure of pride

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Chung, Joanne M.; Cheng, Joey T.; Tracy, Jessica L.; Robins, Richard W.; Chen, Xiao; Zheng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Across six studies conducted in Mainland China and South Korea, the present research extended prior findings showing that pride is comprised of two distinct conceptual and experiential facets in the U.S.: a pro-social, achievement-oriented “authentic pride”, and an arrogant, self-aggrandizing “hubristic pride”. This same two-facet structure emerged in Chinese participants’ semantic conceptualizations of pride (Study 1), Chinese and Koreans’ dispositional tendencies to experience pride (Studies 2, 3a, and 3b), Chinese and Koreans’ momentary pride experiences (Studies 3a, 3b, and 5), and Americans’ pride experiences using descriptors derived indigenously in Korea (Study 4). Together, these studies provide the first evidence that the two-facet structure of pride generalizes to cultures with highly divergent views of pride and self-enhancement processes from North America. PMID:27158171

  17. FACET ORIENTATION AND TROPISM: ASSOCIATION WITH ACCELERATED DEGENERATION OF STABILIZING STRUCTURES IN LOWER LUMBAR SPINE.

    PubMed

    Jelec, Vjekoslav; Turner, Rajka; Franić, Miljenko; Korušić, Anđelko; Rotim, Krešimir

    2016-03-01

    The influence of facet orientation and tropism on the process of spinal degeneration has been extensively studied during the last few decades, but there are still many controversies and conflicting results in this field of research. The biomechanical cause of accelerated degeneration of stabilizing structures in lower lumbar spine lies within the combination of several factors, but two most important ones are compressive load and more coronal facet orientation that offers less resistance against torsional loading. Axial rotation of lower lumbar spine is undoubtedly associated with higher strain in disc annulus, and enhanced range of secondary rotational movements may be even more significant for the progression of annular degeneration. Accordingly, more pronounced facet tropism could be having part in faster progression of disc degeneration in lower lumbar spine, as indicated by a number of recent studies. More sagittal facet orientation in patients with a higher facet osteoarthritis score at lower lumbar segments is very likely related to arthritic remodeling commonly seen in other synovial joints. There is also a possibility that it could be associated with the adaptation to partial loss of lumbar lordosis, as both coincide with advanced age.

  18. Allophycocyanin and phycocyanin crystal structures reveal facets of phycobilisome assembly.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Adir, Noam

    2013-03-01

    X-ray crystal structures of the isolated phycobiliprotein components of the phycobilisome have provided high resolution details to the description of this light harvesting complex at different levels of complexity and detail. The linker-independent assembly of trimers into hexamers in crystal lattices of previously determined structures has been observed in almost all of the phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC) structures available in the Protein Data Bank. In this paper we describe the X-ray crystal structures of PC and APC from Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942, PC from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and PC from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus crystallized in the presence of urea. All five structures are highly similar to other PC and APC structures on the levels of subunits, monomers and trimers. The Synechococcus APC forms a unique loose hexamer that may show the structural requirements for core assembly and rod attachment. While the Synechococcus PC assembles into the canonical hexamer, it does not further assemble into rods. Unlike most PC structures, the Synechocystis PC fails to form hexamers. Addition of low concentrations of urea to T. vulcanus PC inhibits this proteins propensity to form hexamers, resulting in a crystal lattice composed of trimers. The molecular source of these differences in assembly and their relevance to the phycobilisome structure is discussed.

  19. Nanocrystalline Anatase Titania Supported Vanadia Catalysts: Facet-dependent Structure of Vanadia

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei-Zhen; Gao, Feng; Li, Yan; Walter, Eric D.; Liu, Jun; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

    2015-07-09

    Titania supported vanadia, a classic heterogeneous catalyst for redox reactions, typically has nonhomogeneous vanadia species on various titania facets, making it challenging not only to determine and quantify each species but also to decouple their catalytic contributions. We prepared truncated tetragonal bipyramidal (TiO2-TTB) and rod-like (TiO2-Rod) anatase titania with only {101} and {001} facets at ratios of about 80:20 and 93:7, respectively, and used them as supports of sub-monolayer vanadia. The structure and redox properties of supported vanadia were determined by XRD, TEM, XPS, EPR, Raman, FTIR and TPR, etc. It was found that vanadia preferentially occupy TiO2 {001} facets and form isolated O=V4+(O-Ti)2 species, and with further increase in vanadia surface coverage, isolated O=V5+(O-Ti)3 and oligomerized O=V5+(O-M)3 (M = Ti or V) species form on TiO2 {101} facets. The discovery on support facet-dependent structure of vanadia on anatase titania is expected to enable the elucidation of structure-function correlations on high surface area TiO2 supported vanadia catalysts. This work was supported by U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. The research was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for DOE by Battelle.

  20. Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles with Exposed {001} Facets for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liang; Qin, Zhengfei; Yang, Jianping; Li, Xing’ao

    2015-01-01

    Anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets were synthesized from Ti powder via a sequential hydrothermal reaction process. At the first-step hydrothermal reaction, H-titanate nanowires were obtained in NaOH solution with Ti powder, and at second-step hydrothermal reaction, anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets were formed in NH4F solution. If the second-step hydrothermal reaction was carried out in pure water, the H-titanate nanowires were decomposed into random shape anatase-TiO2 nanostructures, as well as few impurity of H2Ti8O17 phase and rutile TiO2 phase. Then, the as-prepared TiO2 nanostructures synthesized in NH4F solution and pure water were applied to the photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), which exhibited power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.06% (VOC of 0.756 V, JSC of 14.80 mA/cm2, FF of 0.631) and 3.47% (VOC of 0.764 V, JSC of 6.86 mA/cm2, FF of 0.662), respectively. The outstanding performance of DSSCs based on anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets was attributed to the high activity and large special surface area for excellent capacity of dye adsorption. PMID:26190140

  1. Solar structure without computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1986-04-01

    We derive succinctly the equations of solar structure. We first present models of objects in hydrostatic equilibrium that fail as models of the sun in order to illustrate important physical requirements. Then by arguing physically that the pressure gradient can be matched to the simple function dP/dr=-kre-(r/a)2, we derive a complete analytic representation of the solar interior in terms of a one-parameter family of models. Two different conditions are then used to select the appropriate value of the parameter specifying the best model within the family: (1) the solar luminosity is equated to the thermonuclear power generated near the center and/or (2) the solar luminosity is equated to the radiative diffusion of energy from a central region. The two methods of selecting the parameter agree to within a few percent. The central conditions of the sun are well calculated by these analytic formulas, all without aid of a computer. This is an original treatment, yielding much the best description of the solar center to be found by methods of differential and integral calculus, rendering it an excellent laboratory for applied calculus.

  2. Anatase TiO(2) nanosheets with exposed (001) facets: improved photoelectric conversion efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaguo; Fan, Jiajie; Lv, Kangle

    2010-10-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are fabricated based on anatase TiO(2) nanosheets (TiO(2)-NSs) with exposed {001} facets, which were obtained by a simple one-pot hydrothermal route using HF as a morphology controlling agent and Ti(OC(4)H(9))(4) as precursor. The prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherms. The photoelectric conversion performances of TiO(2)-NSs solar cells are also compared with TiO(2) nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs) and commercial-grade Degussa P25 TiO(2) nanoparticle (P25) solar cells at the same film thickness, and their photoelectric conversion efficiencies (η) are 4.56, 4.24 and 3.64%, respectively. The enhanced performance of the TiO(2)-NS solar cell is due to their good crystallization, high pore volume, large particle size and enhanced light scattering. The prepared TiO(2) nanosheet film electrode should also find wide-ranging potential applications in various fields including photocatalysis, catalysis, electrochemistry, separation, purification and so on.

  3. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Nitta, Nariaki; Harvey, Karen

    1997-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is the study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and groundbased data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of the solar atmosphere from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the rocket flights. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. Highlights of this initial year of the contract included compilation, scaling and co-alignment of image sets, substantial progress on the Bright Point study, initial work on the Active Region and Large Scale Structure studies, DRSC slit-aspect determination work and calibration activities. One paper was presented at the 1997 Annual Meeting of the AAS/SPD in Bozeman, Montana. An initial set of calibrated spectra were placed into the public domain via the World Wide Web. Three Quarterly Progress Reports have been submitted; progress for the fourth quarter of the contract is summarized in this Final Contract Report. The intent of the investigation is to compare the physics of small- and medium-scale structure with that of large-scale structures with weak fields. A study has been identified in each size domain. The calibration of the rocket data forms an important element of the work. Of equal importance is the slit-aspect solution, which determines the correspondence between locations along the spectrograph slit and points on the solar disk.

  4. Oligoethylene-bridged diferrocene on Ag(110): Monolayer structures and adsorbate-induced faceting

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, D. Y.; Fuchs, H.; Wang, W. C.; Dou, R. F.; Chi, L. F.; Wedeking, K.; Erker, G.

    2007-11-15

    The self-assembly of a ferrocene (Fc) derivative, oligoethylene-bridged diferrocene (diFc), Fc(CH{sub 2}){sub 14}Fc, on Ag(110) surface has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ultrahigh vacuum. Three ordered structures, the majority {beta} and the minorities {alpha} and {gamma}, are formed at monolayer coverage. In {alpha} and {gamma}, a unit cell contains one molecule and the molecules are parallel to each other so that the distances between Fc groups and between oligoethylene chains are reduced. A unit cell contains five molecules in {beta}: four of them are parallel to each other but not parallel to the fifth. The interaction between diFc and Ag(110), which is relatively strong in comparison to the intermolecular interaction, is dominant for the assembly of the ordered structures. The adsorption of diFc molecules induces the reorganization of substrate steps, which prefer to follow the directions of the superstructure lattice vectors, i.e. ({+-}1,2) and ({+-}3,2) of the Ag(110) surface. The (12 13-1) facet is formed due to step bunching at regions with high step density. By using in situ STM, the process of step reorganization and faceting has been observed in real time. It is concluded that the Ag adatoms play a key role on the substrate reorganization.

  5. Oligoethylene-bridged diferrocene on Ag(110): Monolayer structures and adsorbate-induced faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, D. Y.; Wang, W. C.; Dou, R. F.; Wedeking, K.; Erker, G.; Chi, L. F.; Fuchs, H.

    2007-11-01

    The self-assembly of a ferrocene (Fc) derivative, oligoethylene-bridged diferrocene (diFc), Fc(CH2)14Fc , on Ag(110) surface has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ultrahigh vacuum. Three ordered structures, the majority β and the minorities α and γ , are formed at monolayer coverage. In α and γ , a unit cell contains one molecule and the molecules are parallel to each other so that the distances between Fc groups and between oligoethylene chains are reduced. A unit cell contains five molecules in β : four of them are parallel to each other but not parallel to the fifth. The interaction between diFc and Ag(110), which is relatively strong in comparison to the intermolecular interaction, is dominant for the assembly of the ordered structures. The adsorption of diFc molecules induces the reorganization of substrate steps, which prefer to follow the directions of the superstructure lattice vectors, i.e., (∓1,2) and (±3,2) of the Ag(110) surface. The (1213-1) facet is formed due to step bunching at regions with high step density. By using in situ STM, the process of step reorganization and faceting has been observed in real time. It is concluded that the Ag adatoms play a key role on the substrate reorganization.

  6. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Harvey, Karen

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is to study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and ground-based data. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of various features in the solar atmosphere at different heights ranging from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the, rocket flights, which took place during the declining phase of a solar cycle, 2-4 years before the minimum. The investigation is narrowly focused on comparing the physics of small- and medium-scale strong-field structures with that of large-scale, weak fields. As we close th is investigation, we have to recall that our present position in the understanding of basic solar physics problems (such as coronal heating) is much different from that in 1995 (when we proposed this investigation), due largely to the great success of SOHO and TRACE. In other words, several topics and techniques we proposed can now be better realized with data from these missions. For this reason, at some point of our work, we started concentrating on the 1992 data, which are more unique and have more supporting data. As a result, we discontinued the investigation on small-scale structures, i.e., bright points, since high-resolution TRACE images have addressed more important physics than SPDE EUV images could do. In the final year, we still spent long time calibrating the 1992 data. The work was complicated because of the old-fashioned film, which had problems not encountered with more modern CCD detectors. After our considerable effort on calibration, we were able to focus on several scientific topics, relying heavily on the SPDE UV images. They include the relation between filaments and filament channels, the identification of hot

  7. Modeling solar magnetic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, B. C.

    1985-01-01

    Some ideas in the theoretical study of force-free magnetic fields and magnetostatic fields, which are relevant to the effort of using magnetograph data as inputs to model the quasi-static, large-scale magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere are discussed. Basic physical principles will be emphasized. An attempt will be made to assess what we may learn, physically, from the models based on these ideas. There is prospect for learning useful physics and this ought to be an incentive for intensifying the efforts to improve vector magnetograph technology and to solve the basic radiative-transfer problems encountered in the interpretation of magnetograph raw data.

  8. Solar Structures Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-27

    charge, and the regulation output section. The solar array to battery section is responsible for taking in energy from the sun through the solar ...The team sought development of a means to collect and store the solar energy in a system that would most closely emulate a flight battery array...the students the ability to see how individual solar cells charge and distribute solar energy . They were also able to see how effects of external

  9. Effect of sodium on photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells assembled with anatase TiO2 nanosheets with exposed {001} facets.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Lu, Gaoqing Max; Wang, Lianzhou

    2013-02-01

    Anatase TiO(2) nanosheets with exposed reactive {001} facets were prepared in the presence of HF. The photovoltaic properties of NaOH-washed anatase TiO(2) nanosheets with exposed {001} facets were investigated by assembling the TiO(2) as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A decreased overall efficiency and increased recombination rate was observed in comparison with the H(2)O-washed counterpart by both dark current scan and open-circuit voltage decay scan, and XPS confirmed that the deleterious effect of sodium ions is responsible for this reduced efficiency in DSSCs.

  10. The Structural Validity of the Perceived Traits of the "Ideal Student" Multi-Faceted Theory among Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslovaty, Nava; Cohen, Arie; Furman, Sari

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a multi-faceted theory of "ideal high school student" traits. The trait system, as defined by several theories, is a translation of the teachers' belief system into educational objectives. The study focused on Bloom's taxonomies and the structural validity of its principles, using Similarity Structure Analysis. Aware of the…

  11. Structure of Solar Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, G.; Cantó, J.; Lara, A.; González, R.; Schwenn, R.

    Solar Ejecta (SE) have been of interest in the last years, especially those which may reach Earth environment. It is possible to observe the SE early evolution, when they are in the field of view of coronagraphs. There are few indirect observations, as the case of interplanetary scintillation, of SEs in the interplanetary medium. Finally, we observe SEs in situ when they arrive at 1 AU.The SEs structure and evolution are important to understand the origin of these phenomena but to predict the possible effects in the space weather. It is of general acceptance that SEs are "Erupting Flux Ropes" traveling trough the Solar Wind. The "shapes" have been modeled as cylinders or as "ice cream cones" in order to represent the many different projections observed on Coronagraphs.We present a model of the SE evolution based on purely Hydrodynamic considerations. This model reproduces in good approximation some of the features observed in the images and in the measures of the shocks near Earth.

  12. Structurally integrated steel solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Moore, S.W.

    1975-06-03

    Herein is disclosed a flate plate solar heat collector unit. The solar collector is integrated as a structural unit so that the collector also functions as the building roof. The functions of efficient heat collection, liquid coolant flow passages, roof structural support, and building insulation are combined into one unit.

  13. Structurally integrated steel solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Stanley W.

    1977-03-08

    Herein is disclosed a flat plate solar heat collector unit. The solar collector is integrated as a structural unit so that the collector also functions as the building roof. The functions of efficient heat collection, liquid coolant flow passages, roof structural support and building insulation are combined into one unit.

  14. Structural ordering of self-assembled clusters with competing interactions: transition from faceted to spherical clusters.

    PubMed

    Galván-Moya, J E; Nelissen, K; Peeters, F M

    2015-01-27

    The self-assembly of nanoparticles into clusters and the effect of the different parameters of the competing interaction potential on it are investigated. For a small number of particles, the structural organization of the clusters is almost unaffected by the attractive part of the potential, and for an intermediate number of particles the configuration strongly depends on the strength of it. The cluster size is controlled by the range of the interaction potential, and the structural arrangement is guided by the strength of the potential: i.e., the self-assembled cluster transforms from a faceted configuration at low strength to a spherical shell-like structure at high strength. Nonmonotonic behavior of the cluster size is found by increasing the interaction range. An approximate analytical expression is obtained that predicts the smallest cluster for a specific set of potential parameters. A Mendeleev-like table is constructed for different values of the strength and range of the attractive part of the potential in order to understand the structural ordering of the ground-state configuration of the self-assembled clusters.

  15. Surface Structure Dependence of SO2 Interaction with Ceria Nanocrystals with Well-defined Surface Facets

    DOE PAGES

    Tumuluri, Uma; Li, Meijun; Cook, Brandon G.; ...

    2015-12-02

    The effects of the surface structure of ceria (CeO2) on the nature, strength, and amount of species resulting from SO2 adsorption were studied using in situ IR and Raman spectroscopies coupled with mass spectrometry, along with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). CeO2 nanocrystals with different morphologies, namely, rods (representing a defective structure), cubes (100 facet), and octahedra (111 facet), were used to represent different CeO2 surface structures. IR and Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the structure and binding strength of adsorbed species from SO2 depend on the shape of the CeO2 nanocrystals. SO2 adsorbs mainly as surfacemore » sulfites and sulfates at room temperature on CeO2 rods, cubes, and octahedra that were either oxidatively or reductively pretreated. The formation of sulfites is more evident on CeO2 octahedra, whereas surface sulfates are more prominent on CeO2 rods and cubes. This is explained by the increasing reducibility of the surface oxygen in the order octahedra < cubes < rods. Bulk sulfites are also formed during SO2 adsorption on reduced CeO2 rods. The formation of surface sulfites and sulfates on CeO2 cubes is in good agreement with our DFT results of SO2 interactions with the CeO2(100) surface. CeO2 rods desorb SO2 at higher temperatures than cubes and octahedra nanocrystals, but bulk sulfates are formed on CeO2 rods and cubes after high-temperature desorption whereas only some surface sulfates/sulfites are left on octahedra. This difference is rationalized by the fact that CeO2 rods have the highest surface basicity and largest amount of defects among the three nanocrystals, so they bind and react with SO2 strongly and are the most degraded after SO2 adsorption cycles. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work on the effects of the surface structure and defects on the interaction of SO2 with CeO2 provides insights for the design of more sulfur-resistant CeO2-based catalysts.« less

  16. Facet Theory and the Mapping Sentence As Hermeneutically Consistent Structured Meta-Ontology and Structured Meta-Mereology.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Paul M W

    2016-01-01

    When behavior is interpreted in a reliable manner (i.e., robustly across different situations and times) its explained meaning may be seen to possess hermeneutic consistency. In this essay I present an evaluation of the hermeneutic consistency that I propose may be present when the research tool known as the mapping sentence is used to create generic structural ontologies. I also claim that theoretical and empirical validity is a likely result of employing the mapping sentence in research design and interpretation. These claims are non-contentious within the realm of quantitative psychological and behavioral research. However, I extend the scope of both facet theory based research and claims for its structural utility, reliability and validity to philosophical and qualitative investigations. I assert that the hermeneutic consistency of a structural ontology is a product of a structural representation's ontological components and the mereological relationships between these ontological sub-units: the mapping sentence seminally allows for the depiction of such structure.

  17. Examining the factor structures of the five facet mindfulness questionnaire and the self-compassion scale.

    PubMed

    Williams, Matthew J; Dalgleish, Tim; Karl, Anke; Kuyken, Willem

    2014-06-01

    The five facet mindfulness questionnaire (FFMQ; Baer, Smith, Hopkins, Krietemeyer, & Toney, 2006) and the self-compassion scale (SCS; Neff, 2003) are widely used measures of mindfulness and self-compassion in mindfulness-based intervention research. The psychometric properties of the FFMQ and the SCS need to be independently replicated in community samples and relevant clinical samples to support their use. Our primary aim was to establish the factor structures of the FFMQ and SCS in individuals with recurrent depression in remission, since mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) was developed as a treatment for preventing depressive relapse. In order to determine the consistency across populations, we examined the factor structures of the FFMQ and SCS in 3 samples: (1) a convenience sample of adults, (2) a sample of adults who practice meditation, and (3) a sample of adults who suffer from recurrent depression and were recruited to take part in a trial of MBCT. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) showed that a 4-factor hierarchical model of the FFMQ best fits the community sample and the clinical sample but that a 5-factor hierarchical model of the FFMQ best fits the meditator sample. CFA did not endorse the SCS 6-factor hierarchical structure in any of the 3 samples. Clinicians and researchers should be aware of the psychometric properties of the FFMQ to measure mindfulness when comparing meditators and nonmeditators. Further research is needed to develop a more psychometrically robust measure of self-compassion.

  18. Four-facet PCL-R structure and cognitive functioning among high violent criminal offenders.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Shoba; Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Weinberger, Linda E; Kirkish, Patricia; Garrick, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    High violent inmates (N = 126) were administered the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; Hare, Clark, Grann, & Thornton, 2000; Hare et al., 1990) and neuropsychological measures. No significant correlations were present between the overall PCL-R score and 14 cognitive measures. A violence score, computed as the total number of violent acts across all situations and types, was significantly correlated with the PCL-R total score and Facet 2 but not with the other three facets. Our data suggest that Facet 2 elevations may prove relevant to violence risk assessment; this link, however, needs further exploration with larger samples.

  19. Implementation of a PMN-PT piezocrystal-based focused array with geodesic faceted structure.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhen; Qiu, Yongqiang; Demore, Christine E M; Cochran, Sandy

    2016-07-01

    The higher performance of relaxor-based piezocrystals compared with piezoceramics is now well established, notably including improved gain-bandwidth product, and these materials have been adopted widely for biomedical ultrasound imaging. However, their use in other applications, for example as a source of focused ultrasound for targeted drug delivery, is hindered in several ways. One of the issues, which we consider here, is in shaping the material into the spherical geometries used widely in focused ultrasound. Unlike isotropic unpoled piezoceramics that can be shaped into a monolithic bowl then poled through the thickness, the anisotropic structure of piezocrystals make it impossible to machine the bulk crystalline material into a bowl without sacrificing performance. Instead, we report a novel faceted array, inspired by the geodesic dome structure in architecture, which utilizes flat piezocrystal material and maximizes fill factor. Aided by 3D printing, a prototype with f#≈ 1.2, containing 96 individually addressable elements was manufactured using 1-3 connectivity PMN-PT piezocrystal-epoxy composite. The fabrication process is presented and the array was connected to a 32-channel controller to shape and steer the beam for preliminary performance demonstration. At an operating frequency of 1MHz, a focusing gain around 30 was achieved and the side lobe intensities were all at levels below -12dB compared to main beam. We conclude that, by taking advantage of contemporary fabrication techniques and driving instrumentation, the geodesic array configuration is suitable for focused ultrasound devices made with piezocrystal.

  20. Facile synthesis of hierarchically structured BiVO4 oriented along (010) facets with different morphologies and their photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guosheng; Liu, Wei; Li, Jinying; Lv, Qiuyan; Li, Wenxin; Liang, Liting

    2016-12-01

    Hierarchically structured BiVO4 oriented along (010) facets with different morphologies are synthesized by a template-free solvothermal process in glycerol (Gly)-water mixed solvent. The effects of the volume fraction of Gly aqueous solution on the crystal structure, growth degree of (010) facets, morphology and photocatalytic activity were investigated. It is found that the volume fraction of Gly aqueous solution has strong influence on the concentration of the reaction species in the self-assembly process, and consequently induces the different morphology, as well as the crystal growth of the as-prepared BiVO4 oriented along (010) facets. A possible formation mechanism is proposed on the basis of the characterization results of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The four-leaved primrose-like BiVO4 sample exhibits the best photocatalytic activity for the photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) solution under simulated sunlight irradiation. The enhanced photocatalytic activity can be attributed to the improved separation of photogenerated electrons and holes caused by both special morphology and preferential growth of (010) facets.

  1. Entry and exit facet laser damage of optical windows with random antireflective surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Gopal; Case, Jason R.; Potter, Matthew G.; Busse, Lynda E.; Shaw, L. Brandon; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.; Poutous, Menelaos K.

    2016-12-01

    occurs at lower fluence values. All tests resulting in damage of the optical-quality polished fused silica substrates, and those with the structures on the exit side of the samples, are ballistic in nature, showing surface cracks and outward-directed debris craters, all occurring at the beam exit facet. Of interest are the results from tests completed with the rARSS located on the beam entry side; the damage caused by these tests was not typically ballistic in nature (inward directed craters) and occurred on the structured side of the samples.

  2. Periodic solar wind density structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, Nicholeen Mary

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation addresses a specific aspect of the Sun-Earth connection: we show that coronal activity creates periodic density structures in the solar wind which convect radially outward and interact with Earth's magnetosphere. First, we analyze 11 years (1995-2005) of in situ solar wind density observations from the Wind spacecraft and find that periodic density structures occur at particular sets of radial length-scales more often than others. This indicates that these density fluctuations, which have radial length-scales of hundreds of megameters, cannot be attributed entirely to turbulence. Next, we analyze their effect on Earth's magnetosphere. Though these structures are not waves in the solar wind rest frame, they appear at discrete frequencies in Earth's reference frame. They compress the magnetosphere as they convect past, driving global magnetospheric oscillations at the same discrete frequencies as the periodic density structures. Last, we investigate source regions and mechanisms of the periodic solar wind density structures. We analyze the alpha particle to proton abundance ratio during events of periodic density structures. In many events, the proton and alpha density fluctuations are anti- correlated, which strongly argues for either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma. We examine white light images of the solar wind taken with SECCHI HI1 on the STEREO spacecraft and find periodic density structures as near to the Sun as 15 solar radii. The smallest resolvable periodic structures that we identify are of comparable length to those found at 1 AU, providing further evidence that at least some periodic density structures are generated in the solar corona as the solar wind is formed. Guided by the properties observed during previous studies and the characteristics established through the work presented here, we examine possible candidate mechanisms in the solar corona that can form periodic density structures. We conclude that

  3. Broad bandwidth or high fidelity? Evidence from the structure of genetic and environmental effects on the facets of the five factor model.

    PubMed

    Briley, Daniel A; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2012-09-01

    The Five Factor Model of personality is well-established at the phenotypic level, but much less is known about the coherence of the genetic and environmental influences within each personality domain. Univariate behavioral genetic analyses have consistently found the influence of additive genes and nonshared environment on multiple personality facets, but the extent to which genetic and environmental influences on specific facets reflect more general influences on higher order factors is less clear. We applied a multivariate quantitative-genetic approach to scores on the CPI-Big Five facets for 490 monozygotic and 317 dizygotic twins who took part in the National Merit Twin Study. Our results revealed a complex genetic structure for facets composing all five factors, with both domain-general and facet-specific genetic and environmental influences. For three of the Big Five domains, models that required common genetic and environmental influences on each facet to occur by way of effects on a higher order trait did not fit as well as models allowing for common genetic and environmental effects to act directly on the facets. These results add to the growing body of literature indicating that important variation in personality occurs at the facet level which may be overshadowed by aggregating to the trait level. Research at the facet level, rather than the factor level, is likely to have pragmatic advantages in future research on the genetics of personality.

  4. Broad Bandwidth or High Fidelity? Evidence from the Structure of Genetic and Environmental Effects on the Facets of the Five Factor Model

    PubMed Central

    Briley, Daniel A.; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2017-01-01

    The Five Factor Model (FFM) of personality is well-established at the phenotypic level, but much less is known about the coherence of the genetic and environmental influences within each personality domain. Univariate behavioral genetic analyses have consistently found the influence of additive genes and nonshared environment on multiple personality facets, but the extent to which genetic and environmental influences on specific facets reflect more general influences on higher order factors is less clear. We applied a multivariate quantitative-genetic approach to scores on the CPI-Big Five facets for 490 monozygotic and 317 dizygotic twins who took part in the National Merit Twin Study. Our results revealed a complex genetic structure for facets composing all five factors, with both domain-general and facet-specific genetic and environmental influences. Models that required common genetic and environmental influences on each facet to occur by way of effects on a higher order trait did not fit as well as models allowing for common genetic and environmental effects to act directly on the facets for three of the Big Five domains. These results add to the growing body of literature indicating that important variation in personality occurs at the facet level which may be overshadowed by aggregating to the trait level. Research at the facet level, rather than the factor level, is likely to have pragmatic advantages in future research on the genetics of personality. PMID:22695681

  5. High detectivity solar-blind high-temperature deep-ultraviolet photodetector based on multi-layered (l00) facet-oriented β-Ga₂O₃ nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Qian; Hu, Junqing; Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-05-14

    Fabrication of a high-temperature deep-ultraviolet photodetector working in the solar-blind spectrum range (190-280 nm) is a challenge due to the degradation in the dark current and photoresponse properties. Herein, β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelts with (l00) facet-oriented were synthesized, and were demonstrated for the first time to possess excellent mechanical, electrical properties and stability at a high temperature inside a TEM studies. As-fabricated DUV solar-blind photodetectors using (l00) facet-oriented β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelts demonstrated enhanced photodetective performances, that is, high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio, high spectral selectivity, high speed, and high stability, importantly, at a temperature as high as 433 K, which are comparable to other reported semiconducting nanomaterial photodetectors. In particular, the characteristics of the photoresponsivity of the β-Ga2O3 nanobelt devices include a high photoexcited current (>21 nA), an ultralow dark current (below the detection limit of 10(-14) A), a fast time response (<0.3 s), a high R(λ) (≈851 A/W), and a high EQE (~4.2 × 10(3)). The present fabricated facet-oriented β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelt based devices will find practical applications in photodetectors or optical switches for high-temperature environment.

  6. Improving the performance of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells by using TiO2 nanosheets with exposed highly reactive facets.

    PubMed

    You, Ting; Jiang, Lei; Han, Ke-Li; Deng, Wei-Qiao

    2013-06-21

    We demonstrated CdS quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) based on anatase TiO2 nanosheets with exposed {001} and {100} facets. Under the illumination of one Sun (AM 1.5 G, 100 mW cm(-2)), the photovoltaic conversion efficiencies were 2.29% for a QDSSC based on {001}-TiO2 nanosheets, 2.18% for a QDSSC based on {100}-TiO2 nanosheets, and 1.46% for a QDSSC based on commercial Degussa P25. It was found that the exposed highly reactive facets of TiO2 nanosheets had a remarkable influence on the QDSSCs due to their better adsorption abilities for QDs, leading to the high short current density and the enhanced photovoltaic performance.

  7. Achieving High Current Density of Perovskite Solar Cells by Modulating the Dominated Facets of Room-Temperature DC Magnetron Sputtered TiO2 Electron Extraction Layer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aibin; Lei, Lei; Zhu, Jingting; Yu, Yu; Liu, Yan; Yang, Songwang; Bao, Shanhu; Cao, Xun; Jin, Ping

    2017-01-25

    The short circuit current density of perovskite solar cell (PSC) was boosted by modulating the dominated plane facets of TiO2 electron transport layer (ETL). Under optimized condition, TiO2 with dominant {001} facets showed (i) low incident light loss, (ii) highly smooth surface and excellent wettability for precursor solution, (iii) efficient electron extraction, and (iv) high conductivity in perovskite photovoltaic application. A current density of 24.19 mA cm(-2) was achieved as a value near the maximum limit. The power conversion efficiency was improved to 17.25%, which was the record value of PSCs with DC magnetron sputtered carrier transport layer. What is more, the room-temperature process had a great significance for the cost reduction and flexible application of PSCs.

  8. Enhanced dye-sensitized solar cells performance using anatase TiO2 mesocrystals with the Wulff construction of nearly 100% exposed {101} facets as effective light scattering layer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Hai; Song, Yeping; Fang, Liang; Ye, Naiqing; Wang, Linjiang

    2014-03-28

    Anatase TiO2 mesocrystals with a Wulff construction of nearly 100% exposed {101} facets were successfully synthesized by a facile, green solvothermal method. Their morphology, and crystal structure are characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Accordingly, a possible growth mechanism of anatase TiO2 mesocrystals is elucidated in this work. The as-prepared single anatase TiO2 mesocrystal's mean center diameter is about 500 nm, and the length is about 1 μm. They exhibit high light adsorbance, high reflectance and low transmittance in the visible region due to the unique nearly 100% exposed {101} facets. When utilized as the scattering layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), such mesocrystals effectively enhanced light harvesting and led to an increase of the photocurrent of the DSSCs. As a result, by using an anatase TiO2 mesocrystal film as a scattering overlayer of a compact commercial P25 TiO2 nanoparticle film, the double layered DSSCs show a power conversion efficiency of 7.23%, indicating a great improvement compared to the DSSCs based on a P25 film (5.39%) and anatase TiO2 mesocrystal films, respectively. The synergetic effect of P25 and the mesocrystals as well as the latters unique feature of a Wulff construction of nearly 100% exposed (101) facets are probably responsible for the enhanced photoelectrical performance. In particular, we explore the possibility of the low surface area and exposed {101} facets as an efficient light scattering layer of DSSCs. Our work suggests that anatase TiO2 mesocrystals with the Wulff construction is a promising candidate as a superior scattering material for high-performance DSSCs.

  9. Facet Theory and the Mapping Sentence As Hermeneutically Consistent Structured Meta-Ontology and Structured Meta-Mereology

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Paul M. W.

    2016-01-01

    When behavior is interpreted in a reliable manner (i.e., robustly across different situations and times) its explained meaning may be seen to possess hermeneutic consistency. In this essay I present an evaluation of the hermeneutic consistency that I propose may be present when the research tool known as the mapping sentence is used to create generic structural ontologies. I also claim that theoretical and empirical validity is a likely result of employing the mapping sentence in research design and interpretation. These claims are non-contentious within the realm of quantitative psychological and behavioral research. However, I extend the scope of both facet theory based research and claims for its structural utility, reliability and validity to philosophical and qualitative investigations. I assert that the hermeneutic consistency of a structural ontology is a product of a structural representation's ontological components and the mereological relationships between these ontological sub-units: the mapping sentence seminally allows for the depiction of such structure. PMID:27065932

  10. Teachers' Perceptions Structured through Facet Theory: Smallest Space Analysis versus Factor Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslovaty, Nava; Marshall, Anne E.; Alkin, Marvin C.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the facet theory (FT) of L. Gutman and compared it to factor analysis (FA) in the context of two research studies, one of desirable student traits perceived by 203 Israeli teachers and the other of the perceptions of 92 Israeli teachers regarding teacher professionalism. By using FT and FA, the multidimensional theory and structural…

  11. Multiwalled nanotube faceting unravelled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leven, Itai; Guerra, Roberto; Vanossi, Andrea; Tosatti, Erio; Hod, Oded

    2016-12-01

    Nanotubes show great promise for miniaturizing advanced technologies. Their exceptional physical properties are intimately related to their morphological and crystal structure. Circumferential faceting of multiwalled nanotubes reinforces their mechanical strength and alters their tribological and electronic properties. Here, the nature of this important phenomenon is fully rationalized in terms of interlayer registry patterns. Regardless of the nanotube identity (that is, diameter, chirality, chemical composition), faceting requires the matching of the chiral angles of adjacent layers. Above a critical diameter that corresponds well with experimental results, achiral multiwalled nanotubes display evenly spaced extended axial facets whose number equals the interlayer difference in circumferential unit cells. Elongated helical facets, commonly observed in experiment, appear in nanotubes that exhibit small interlayer chiral angle mismatch. When the wall chiralities are uncorrelated, faceting is suppressed and outer layer corrugation, which is induced by the Moiré superlattice, is obtained in agreement with experiments. Finally, we offer an explanation for the higher incidence of faceting in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes with respect to their carbon-based counterparts.

  12. AHF: Array-Based Half-Facet Data Structure for Mixed-Dimensional and Non-Manifold Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Dyedov, Volodymyr; Ray, Navamita; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Tautges, T.

    2014-08-31

    We present an Array-based Half-Facet mesh data structure, or AHF, for efficient mesh query and modification operations. The AHF extends the compact array-based half-edge and half-face data structures (T.J. Alumbaugh and X. Jiao, Compact array-based mesh data structures, IMR, 2005) to support mixed-dimensional and non-manifold meshes. The design goals of our data structure include generality to support such meshes, efficiency of neighborhood queries and mesh modification, compactness of memory footprint, and facilitation of interoperability of mesh-based application codes. To accomplish these goals, our data structure uses sibling half-facets as a core abstraction, coupled with other explicit and implicit representations of entities. A unique feature of our data structure is a comprehensive implementation in MATLAB, which allows rapid prototyping, debugging, testing, and deployment of meshing algorithms and other mesh-based numerical methods. We have also developed C++ implementation built on top of MOAB (T.J. Tautges, R. Meyers, and K. Merkley, MOAB: A Mesh-Oriented Database, Sandia National Laboratories, 2004). We present some comparisons of the memory requirements and computational costs, and also demonstrate its effectiveness with a few sample applications.

  13. Hexahedron Prism-Anchored Octahedronal CeO2: Crystal Facet-Based Homojunction Promoting Efficient Solar Fuel Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Zhao, Zongyan; Xu, Qinfeng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min; Zou, Zhigang

    2015-08-05

    An unprecedented, crystal facet-based CeO2 homojunction consisting of hexahedron prism-anchored octahedron with exposed prism surface of {100} facets and octahedron surface of {111} facets was fabricated through solution-based crystallographic-oriented epitaxial growth. The photocatalysis experiment reveals that growth of the prism arm on octahedron allows to activate inert CeO2 octahedron for an increase in phototocatalytic reduction of CO2 into methane. The pronounced photocatalytic performance is attributed to a synergistic effect of the following three factors: (1) band alignment of the {100} and {111} drives electrons and holes to octahedron and prism surfaces, respectively, aiming to reach the most stable energy configuration and leading to a spatial charge separation for long duration; (2) crystallographic-oriented epitaxial growth of the CeO2 hexahedron prism arm on the octahedron verified by the interfacial lattice fringe provides convenient and fast channels for the photogenerated carrier transportation between two units of homojuntion; (3) different effective mass of electrons and holes on {100} and {111} faces leads to high charge carrier mobility, more facilitating the charge separation. The proposed facet-based homojunction in this work may provide a new concept for the efficient separation and fast transfer of photoinduced charge carriers and enhancement of the photocatalytic performance.

  14. Symmetry types, systems and their multiplicity in the structure of adenovirus capsid. II. Rotational facet groups of five-, three- and two-fold symmetry axes.

    PubMed

    Nász, I; Adám, Eva

    2006-06-01

    drawn horizontally in the middle along the 6 geodetic ribbon like motifs a regular decagonal intersection forms and the capsid can be cut into two equal parts, in which the polypeptides show a 72 degree rotation from each other, but with a proper rotation the polypeptides get into a congruent position, which means 300 or 600 specific facet combinations. The capsid similar to the icosahedron has also 15 virtual mirror planes which divide the capsid into two, identically arranged halves, forming six right angle triangles on each facet, altogether 120 smaller rectangular so-called Mobius-triangles on the surface. In the three-fold symmetry axis of the facets, these triangles in two separate groups of three can be rotated symmetrically with 120 degrees according to the orientation of the polypeptide subunits in a way that the hexon and other polypeptides too nearly cover each other. Consequently, the adenovirus capsid is a symmetrically arranged body in which several various symmetry types and symmetry systems can be found and their structural symmetry elements exist simultaneously and covering each other. The icosahedral symmetry types and systems are valid and functional simultaneously and in parallel with great multiplicity, but the existence of more than 1500 structural elements in several depth levels, their order of location and distribution make the symmetry of the capsid richer and more complex.

  15. [Symmetry types, systems and multiplicity of the structure of adenovirus capsid. II. Rotational facet-groups of five-, three- and two-fold symmetry axes].

    PubMed

    Nász, István; Adám, Eva

    2006-01-08

    horizontally in the middle along the 6 geodetic ribbon like motifs a regular decagonal intersection forms and the capsid can be cut into two equal parts, in which the polypeptides show a 72 degree rotation from each other, but with a proper rotation the polypeptides get into a congruent position, which means 300 or 600 specific facet combinations. The capsid similar to the icosahedron has also 15 virtual mirror planes which divide the capsid into two, identically arranged halves, forming six right angle triangles on each facet, altogether 120 smaller rectangular so-called Mobius-triangles on the surface. In the three-fold symmetry axis of the facets, these triangles in two separate groups of three can be rotated symmetrically with 120 degrees according to the orientation of the polypeptide subunits in a way that the hexon and other polypeptides too nearly cover each other. Consequently, the adenovirus capsid is a symmetrically arranged body in which several various symmetry types and symmetry systems can be found and their structural symmetry elements exist simultaneously and covering each other. The icosahedral symmetry types and systems are valid and functional simultaneously and in parallel with great multiplicity, but the existence of more than 1500 elements in several depth levels, their order of location and distribution make the symmetry of the capsid richer and more complex.

  16. Facet control of gold nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Han, Lili; Jing, Hao; Blom, Douglas A.; Lin, Ye; Xin, Huolin L.; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-21

    While great success has been achieved in fine-tuning the aspect ratios and thereby the plasmon resonances of cylindrical Au nanorods, facet control with atomic level precision on the highly curved nanorod surfaces has long been a significantly more challenging task. The intrinsic structural complexity and lack of precise facet control of the nanorod surfaces remain the major obstacles for the atomic-level elucidation of the structure–property relationships that underpin the intriguing catalytic performance of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that the facets of single-crystalline Au nanorods can be precisely tailored using cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a unique pair of surface capping competitors to guide the particle geometry evolution during nanorod overgrowth. By deliberately maneuvering the competition between cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we have been able to create, in a highly controllable and selective manner, an entire family of nanorod-derived anisotropic multifaceted geometries whose surfaces are enclosed by specific types of well-defined high-index and low-index facets. This facet-controlled nanorod overgrowth approach also allows us to fine-tune the particle aspect ratios while well-preserving all the characteristic facets and geometric features of the faceted Au nanorods. Furthermore, taking full advantage of the combined structural and plasmonic tunability, we have further studied the facet-dependent heterogeneous catalysis on well-faceted Au nanorods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as an ultrasensitive spectroscopic tool with unique time-resolving and molecular finger-printing capabilities.

  17. Direct transfer of metallic photonic structures onto end facets of optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinping; Liu, Feifei; Lin, Yuanhai

    2016-07-01

    We present a flexible approach to transfer metallic photonic crystals (MPCs) onto end facets of optical fibers. The MPCs were initially fabricated on a glass substrate with a spacer layer of indium tin oxide (ITO), which was used as a buffer layer in the transferring process. The fiber ends were firstly welded on the top surface of the MPCs by a drop of polymer solution after the solvent evaporated. The ITO layer was then etched by hydrochloric acid (HCl), so that the MPCs got off the substrate and were transferred to the fiber ends. Alternatively, the MPCs may be also etched off the substrate first by immersing the sample in HCl. The ultra-thin MPC sheet consisting of gold nanolines interlaced with photoresist gratings was then transferred to cap the fiber ends. In the later approach, we can choose which side of the MPCs to be used as the contact with the fiber facet. Such methods enabled convenient nanostructuring on optical fiber tips and achieving miniaturized MPC devices with compact integration, extending significantly applications of MPCs. In particular, the fabrications presented in this manuscript enrich the lab-on-fiber engineering techniques and the resultant devices have potential applications in remote sensing and detection systems.

  18. Hydrothermal etching fabrication of TiO2@graphene hollow structures: mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals and its synergistic photocaltalytic effects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Zhiling; Dong, Xiaonan; Liu, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Highly exposed facets TiO2 attracts enormous attention due to its excellent separation effect of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and induced high performance of photocatalytic activity. Herein, a novel hydrothermal etching reaction was used to synthesize graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures. Different with the reported co-exposed facets TiO2 single crystal nanoparticles, the present TiO2 core layer is composed by the mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals. Combined with the reduced graphene oxide shell layer, this graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures formed a Z-scheme photocatalytic system, which possess simultaneously the high charge-separation efficiency and strong redox ability. Additionally, the as-prepared samples show a higher absorption property for organic molecules and visible light due to the presence of graphene. All of these unique properties ensure the excellent photocatalytic activity for the graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow structures in the synergistic photo-oxidation of organic molecules and photo-reduced of Cr(VI) process. The TiO2 core composed with mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals is propose to play an important role in the fabrication of this Z-scheme photocatalytic system. Fabrication of Z-scheme photocatalytic system based on this unique exposed facets TiO2 nanocrystals will provides a new insight into the design and fabrication of advanced photocatalytic materials. PMID:27645429

  19. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures.

  20. Self-Assembled 3D ZnO Porous Structures with Exposed Reactive {0001} Facets and Their Enhanced Gas Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jin; Ahmad, Muhammad Z.; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Waclawik, Eric R.

    2013-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional structures comprised of porous ZnO plates were synthesized in a controlled fashion by hydrothermal methods. Through subtle changes to reaction conditions, the ZnO structures could be self-assembled from 20 nm thick nanosheets into grass-like and flower-like structures which led to the exposure of high proportions of ZnO {0001} crystal facets for both these materials. The measured surface area of the flower-like and the grass, or platelet-like ZnO samples were 72.8 and 52.4 m2·g−1, respectively. Gas sensing results demonstrated that the porous, flower-like ZnO structures exhibited enhanced sensing performance towards NO2 gas compared with either grass-like ZnO or commercially sourced ZnO nanoparticle samples. The porous, flower-like ZnO structures provided a high surface area which enhanced the ZnO gas sensor response. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization revealed that flower-like ZnO samples possessed a higher percentage of oxygen vacancies than the other ZnO sample-types, which also contributed to their excellent gas sensing performance. PMID:23820747

  1. Self-assembled 3D ZnO porous structures with exposed reactive {0001} facets and their enhanced gas sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin; Ahmad, Muhammad Z; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Waclawik, Eric R

    2013-07-02

    Complex three-dimensional structures comprised of porous ZnO plates were synthesized in a controlled fashion by hydrothermal methods. Through subtle changes to reaction conditions, the ZnO structures could be self-assembled from 20 nm thick nanosheets into grass-like and flower-like structures which led to the exposure of high proportions of ZnO {0001} crystal facets for both these materials. The measured surface area of the flower-like and the grass, or platelet-like ZnO samples were 72.8 and 52.4 m2∙g-1, respectively. Gas sensing results demonstrated that the porous, flower-like ZnO structures exhibited enhanced sensing performance towards NO2 gas compared with either grass-like ZnO or commercially sourced ZnO nanoparticle samples. The porous, flower-like ZnO structures provided a high surface area which enhanced the ZnO gas sensor response. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization revealed that flower-like ZnO samples possessed a higher percentage of oxygen vacancies than the other ZnO sample-types, which also contributed to their excellent gas sensing performance.

  2. Surface Structure Dependence of SO2 Interaction with Ceria Nanocrystals with Well-defined Surface Facets

    SciTech Connect

    Tumuluri, Uma; Li, Meijun; Cook, Brandon G.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Dai, Sheng; Wu, Zili

    2015-12-02

    The effects of the surface structure of ceria (CeO2) on the nature, strength, and amount of species resulting from SO2 adsorption were studied using in situ IR and Raman spectroscopies coupled with mass spectrometry, along with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). CeO2 nanocrystals with different morphologies, namely, rods (representing a defective structure), cubes (100 facet), and octahedra (111 facet), were used to represent different CeO2 surface structures. IR and Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the structure and binding strength of adsorbed species from SO2 depend on the shape of the CeO2 nanocrystals. SO2 adsorbs mainly as surface sulfites and sulfates at room temperature on CeO2 rods, cubes, and octahedra that were either oxidatively or reductively pretreated. The formation of sulfites is more evident on CeO2 octahedra, whereas surface sulfates are more prominent on CeO2 rods and cubes. This is explained by the increasing reducibility of the surface oxygen in the order octahedra < cubes < rods. Bulk sulfites are also formed during SO2 adsorption on reduced CeO2 rods. The formation of surface sulfites and sulfates on CeO2 cubes is in good agreement with our DFT results of SO2 interactions with the CeO2(100) surface. CeO2 rods desorb SO2 at higher temperatures than cubes and octahedra nanocrystals, but bulk sulfates are formed on CeO2 rods and cubes after high-temperature desorption whereas only some surface sulfates/sulfites are left on octahedra. This difference is rationalized by the fact that CeO2 rods have the highest surface basicity and largest amount of defects among the three nanocrystals, so they bind and react with SO2 strongly and are the most degraded after SO2 adsorption cycles. The

  3. Facet control of gold nanorods

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Han, Lili; Jing, Hao; ...

    2016-01-21

    While great success has been achieved in fine-tuning the aspect ratios and thereby the plasmon resonances of cylindrical Au nanorods, facet control with atomic level precision on the highly curved nanorod surfaces has long been a significantly more challenging task. The intrinsic structural complexity and lack of precise facet control of the nanorod surfaces remain the major obstacles for the atomic-level elucidation of the structure–property relationships that underpin the intriguing catalytic performance of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that the facets of single-crystalline Au nanorods can be precisely tailored using cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a unique pair ofmore » surface capping competitors to guide the particle geometry evolution during nanorod overgrowth. By deliberately maneuvering the competition between cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we have been able to create, in a highly controllable and selective manner, an entire family of nanorod-derived anisotropic multifaceted geometries whose surfaces are enclosed by specific types of well-defined high-index and low-index facets. This facet-controlled nanorod overgrowth approach also allows us to fine-tune the particle aspect ratios while well-preserving all the characteristic facets and geometric features of the faceted Au nanorods. Furthermore, taking full advantage of the combined structural and plasmonic tunability, we have further studied the facet-dependent heterogeneous catalysis on well-faceted Au nanorods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as an ultrasensitive spectroscopic tool with unique time-resolving and molecular finger-printing capabilities.« less

  4. The 3-D solar radioastronomy and the structure of the corona and the solar wind. [solar probes of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, J. L.; Caroubalos, C.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanism causing solar radio bursts (1 and 111) is examined. It is proposed that a nonthermal energy source is responsible for the bursts; nonthermal energy is converted into electromagnetic energy. The advantages are examined for an out-of-the-ecliptic solar probe mission, which is proposed as a means of stereoscopically viewing solar radio bursts, solar magnetic fields, coronal structure, and the solar wind.

  5. JPL tests of a LaJet concentrator facet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, E. W.; Argoud, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    A LaJet Energy Company (LEC) concentrator facet, 60 in. in diameter, was tested for imaging quality. The following two methods were used: (1) autofocus tests with a point source of light at the facet's radius of curvature; and (2) tests with the Sun close to the horizon as a distant source. The tests of the LaJet facet indicate that all of the solar image reflected by an LEC 460 solar concentrator made of like facets should fall within a 9-in. aperture if the outer facets are carefully adjusted. Such a concentrator would have acceptable performance, but complete evaluation must be made with an assembled concentrator.

  6. Continuum Modeling of Facet Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    Standard continuum models of surface dynamics are very useful for studying thin film evolution on the micron length scale. Unfortunately, they are inadequate below the roughening transition, since they do not appropriately describe faceting. Our goal is to propose a continuum approach which deals with facet dynamics in a physically accurate way. We studied in detail the dynamics of faceting in simple submicron surface structures [1], and proposed two approaches for the development of continuum models. First, we rigorously derived continuum kinetic models of the systems of interest, starting from step flow models. These models break down at singular points, which we identify as facet edges. The models are not applicable on facets, and the surface profile is obtained as a solution of the continuum model with boundary conditions at the singular points. Secondly, we showed [2] that if the existence of both steps and anti-steps in regions of small surface slope is taken into account, it is possible to construct continuum models that are valid even on facets. The solutions of both types of continuum models are in excellent agreement with step flow models. The resulting surface profiles are of relevance to experiments on decay of one dimensional periodic gratings. Our work points to a possible general continuum model for an accurate description of kinetics of crystalline surfaces below the roughening transition. [1] N. Israeli and D. Kandel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 3300 (1998); N. Israeli and D. Kandel, Phys. Rev. B 60, 5946 (1999). [2] N. Israeli and D. Kandel, preprint.

  7. Structural Code Considerations for Solar Rooftop Installations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Sanchez, Alfred

    2014-12-01

    Residential rooftop solar panel installations are limited in part by the high cost of structural related code requirements for field installation. Permitting solar installations is difficult because there is a belief among residential permitting authorities that typical residential rooftops may be structurally inadequate to support the additional load associated with a photovoltaic (PV) solar installation. Typical engineering methods utilized to calculate stresses on a roof structure involve simplifying assumptions that render a complex non-linear structure to a basic determinate beam. This method of analysis neglects the composite action of the entire roof structure, yielding a conservative analysis based on a rafter or top chord of a truss. Consequently, the analysis can result in an overly conservative structural analysis. A literature review was conducted to gain a better understanding of the conservative nature of the regulations and codes governing residential construction and the associated structural system calculations.

  8. Recovering the fine structures in solar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karovska, Margarita; Habbal, S. R.; Golub, L.; Deluca, E.; Hudson, Hugh S.

    1994-01-01

    Several examples of the capability of the blind iterative deconvolution (BID) technique to recover the real point spread function, when limited a priori information is available about its characteristics. To demonstrate the potential of image post-processing for probing the fine scale and temporal variability of the solar atmosphere, the BID technique is applied to different samples of solar observations from space. The BID technique was originally proposed for correction of the effects of atmospheric turbulence on optical images. The processed images provide a detailed view of the spatial structure of the solar atmosphere at different heights in regions with different large-scale magnetic field structures.

  9. The C-Terminal Domains of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Protein IX Assemble into an Antiparallel Structure on the Facets of the Capsid▿

    PubMed Central

    Fabry, Céline M. S.; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Moriscot, Christine; Ruigrok, Rob W. H.; Boulanger, Pierre; Schoehn, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 protein IX (pIX) has two domains connected by a flexible linker. Three N-terminal domains form triskelions on the capsid facets that cement hexons together, and the C-terminal domains of four monomers form complexes toward the facet periphery. Here we present a cryoelectron microscopy structure of recombinant adenovirus with a peptide tag added to the C terminus of pIX. The structure, made up by several C termini of pIX, is longer at both ends than the wild-type protein, and Fabs directed against the tag bind to both ends of the oligomer, demonstrating that the pIX C termini associate in an antiparallel manner. PMID:19004948

  10. Design of the support structure, drive pedestal, and controls for a solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, V. R.; Ford, J. L.; Anderson, A. E.

    1991-08-01

    The glass/metal McDonnell-Douglas dish is the state-of-the-art of parabolic dish concentrators. Because of the perceived high production cost of this concentrator, the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Program is developing stretch membrane technology for large (75 kWt) solar concentrators for integration with receivers and engines in 25 kWe dish-Stirling systems. The objective of this development effort is to reduce the cost of the concentrator while maintaining the high levels of performance characteristic of glass-metal dishes. Under contract to Sandia National Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation, Solar Kinetics Inc. and WG Associates are developing a faceted stretched-membrane heliostat technology. This design will result in a low-risk, near-term concentrator for dish-Stirling systems. WG Associates has designed the support structure, drives and tracking controls for this dish. The structure is configured to support 12 stretched-membrane, 3.5-meter diameter facets in a shaped dish configuration. The dish design is sized to power a dish-Stirling system capable of producing 25 kW (electric). In the design of the structure, trade-off studies were conducted to determine the best facet arrangement, dish contour, dish focal length, tracking control and walk-off protection. As part of the design, in-depth analyses were performed to evaluate pointing accuracy, compliance with AISC steel design codes, and the economics of fabrication and installation. Detailed fabrication and installation drawings were produced, and initial production cost estimates for the dish were developed. These issues, and the final dish design, are presented in this report.

  11. Design of the support structure, drive pedestal, and controls for a solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, V.R.; Ford, J.L.; Anderson, A.E. )

    1991-08-01

    The glass/metal McDonnell-Douglas dish is the state-of-the-art of parabolic dish concentrators. Because of the perceived high production cost of this concentrator, the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Program is developing stretch-membrane technology for large (75 kWt) solar concentrators for integration with receivers and engines in 25 kWe dish-Stirling systems. The objective of this development effort is to reduce the cost of the concentrator while maintaining the high levels of performance characteristic of glass-metal dishes. Under contract to Sandia National Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation, Solar Kinetics Inc. and WG Associates are developing a faceted stretched-membrane heliostat technology. This design will result in a low-risk, near-term concentrator for dish-Stirling systems. WG Associates has designed the support structure, drives and tracking controls for this dish. The structure is configured to support 12 stretched-membrane, 3.5-meter diameter facets in a shaped dish configuration. The dish design is sized to power a dish-Stirling system capable of producing 25 kW (electric). In the design of the structure, trade-off studies were conducted to determine the best'' facet arrangement, dish contour, dish focal length, tracking control and walk-off protection. As part of the design, in-depth analyses were performed to evaluate pointing accuracy, compliance with AISC steel design codes, and the economics of fabrication and installation. Detailed fabrication and installation drawings were produced, and initial production cost estimates for the dish were developed. These issues, and the final dish design, are presented in this report. 7 refs., 33 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. Ultrasound guided, painful electrical stimulation of lumbar facet joint structures: an experimental model of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Søren; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Manniche, Claus; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative sensory testing has indicated generalized muscle hyperalgesia in patients with chronic low back pain. The temporal development of such hyperalgesia is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether generalized muscle hyperalgesia can develop within minutes of acute low back pain using a new experimental model of lumbar facet joint pain. Thirteen healthy volunteers were included and baseline pressure pain thresholds were assessed at eight separate sites, outside the area of evoked low back and referred pain. Using ultrasonography, two electrode needles were placed either side of a lumbar facet joint (right L3-4) and used to induce experimental low back pain for 10 min with continuous stimulation. Thresholds, stimulus-response relationships, distribution and quality of the electrically induced pain were recorded. Electrical facet joint stimulation induced low back pain and pain referral into the anterior leg, ipsilaterally, proximal to the knee, similar to what is observed clinically. Pressure pain thresholds did not change significantly before, during and after facet joint stimulation. In conclusion, we describe a novel model of acute experimental low back pain and demonstrate that generalized hyperalgesia did not develop within minutes of acute low back pain.

  13. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-08

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  14. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    PubMed Central

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  15. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within +/-1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  16. Tin Oxide Crystals Exposed by Low-Energy {110} Facets for Enhanced Electrochemical Heavy Metal Ions Sensing: X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Experimental Combined with Density-Functional Theory Evidence.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen; Yang, Meng; Chen, Shao-Hua; Liu, Jin-Huai; Li, Qun-Xiang; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2017-02-21

    Herein, we revealed that the electrochemical behaviors on the detection of heavy metal ions (HMIs) would largely rely on the exposed facets of SnO2 nanoparticles. Compared to the high-energy {221} facet, the low-energy {110} facet of SnO2 possessed better electrochemical performance. The adsorption/desorption tests, density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies showed that the lower barrier energy of surface diffusion on {110} facet was critical for the superior electrochemical property, which was favorable for the ions diffusion on the electrode, and further leading the enhanced electrochemical performance. Through the combination of experiments and theoretical calculations, a reliable interpretation of the mechanism for electroanalysis of HMIs with nanomaterials exposed by different crystal facets has been provided. Furthermore, it provides a deep insight into understanding the key factor to improve the electrochemical performance for HMIs detection, so as to design high-performance electrochemical sensors.

  17. Ultraviolet observations of solar fine structure.

    PubMed

    Dere, K P; Bartoe, J D; Brueckner, G E; Cook, J W; Socker, D G

    1987-11-27

    The High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph was flown on the Spacelab-2 shuttle mission to perform extended observations of the solar chromosphere and transition zone at high spatial and temporal resolution. Ultraviolet spectroheliograms show the temporal development of macrospicules at the solar limb. The C IV transition zone emission is produced in discrete emission elements that must be composed of exceedingly fine (less than 70 kilometers) subresolution structures.

  18. Solar photovoltaic reflective trough collection structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Benjamin J.; Sweatt, William C.; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2015-11-19

    A photovoltaic (PV) solar concentration structure having at least two troughs encapsulated in a rectangular parallelepiped optical plastic structure, with the troughs filled with an optical plastic material, the troughs each having a reflective internal surface and approximately parabolic geometry, and the troughs each including photovoltaic cells situated so that light impinging on the optical plastic material will be concentrated onto the photovoltaic cells. Multiple structures can be connected to provide a solar photovoltaic collection system that provides portable, efficient, low-cost electrical power.

  19. Ethyl Cellulose and Cetrimonium Bromide Assisted Synthesis of Mesoporous, Hexagon Shaped ZnO Nanodisks with Exposed ±{0001} Polar Facets for Enhanced Photovoltaic Performance in Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chetia, Tridip Ranjan; Ansari, Mohammad Shaad; Qureshi, Mohammad

    2015-06-24

    Hexagon shaped mesoporous zinc oxide nanodisks (ZnO NDs) with exposed ±{0001} polar facets have been synthesized by using ethyl cellulose (EC) and cetrimonium bromide (CTAB) as the capping and structure directing agents. We have characterized ZnO NDs using analytical techniques, such as powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), diffuse reflectance UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis and proposed a plausible mechanism for the formation of ZnO NDs. EC molecules form a colloidal solution in a 1-butanol:water (3:1) solvent system having a negative zeta potential (ζ ≈ -32 mV) value which can inhibit CTAB assisted c-axis growth of ZnO crystal and encourage the formation of ZnO NDs. In the control reactions carried out in presence of only CTAB and only EC, formation of hexagonal ZnO nanorods (NRs) and ZnO nanosheets (NSs) composed of numerous ZnO nanoparticles are observed, respectively. Photovoltaic properties of ZnO NDs as compared to ZnO NRs, ZnO NSs, and conventional ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are investigated by co-sensitizing with CdS/CdSe quantum dots (QDs). An ∼35% increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE, η) is observed in ZnO NDs (η ≈ 4.86%) as compared to ZnO NPs (η ≈ 3.14%) while the values of PCE for ZnO NR and ZnO NS based devices are found to be ∼2.52% and ∼1.64%, respectively. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of the ZnO NDs based solar cell is attributed to an efficient charge separation and collection, boosted by the exposed ±(0001) facets apart from the single crystalline nature, better light-scattering effects, and high BET surface area for sensitizer particle adsorption. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis further reveals that the charge recombination resistance and photoinduced electron lifetime are substantially higher in the ZnO ND based

  20. Synthesis of [111]- and {010}-faceted anatase TiO2 nanocrystals from tri-titanate nanosheets and their photocatalytic and DSSC performances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changdong; Ikeuchi, Yasushi; Xu, Linfeng; Sewvandi, Galhenage A; Kusunose, Takafumi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Shunsuke; Wen, Puhong; Feng, Qi

    2015-05-07

    [111]- and {010}-faceted anatase nanocrystals with controllable crystal size and morphology were synthesized from tri-titanate H2Ti3O7 nanosheets by hydrothermal reaction. The nanostructures and the formation reaction mechanism of the obtained TiO2 nanocrystals were investigated using XRD, FE-SEM, and TEM. Furthermore, the photocatalytic and dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) performances of the synthesized anatase nanocrystals were also characterized. Two types of reactions occur in the formation process of the anatase nanocrystals. One is an in situ topochemical conversion reaction of the layered titanate structure to an anatase structure, and another is the dissolution-deposition reaction on the particle surface, which splits the formed nanosheet-like particles into small TiO2 nanocrystals. The surface photocatalytic activity and the DSSC performance of the anatase nanocrystals are dependent on the crystal facet exposed on the particle surface, which increases in the order of non-facet < [111]-facet < {010}-facet. The increasing order corresponds to the increasing order of the bandgap and energy level of the lowest valence band of the anatase nanocrystals. Furthermore, the facet of the anatase also affects the DSSC performance, which is enhanced in the order of non-facet < [111]-facet < {010}-facet.

  1. [Reliability of students' evaluations of university teaching: an analysis of four-facet data by a generalized model and structural equation modeling].

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hideki; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2004-06-01

    In our study, we examined the reliability of students' evaluation of university teaching. First, we analyzed four-facet data (teacher x rater x viewpoint x order) by the generalizability theory approach, and estimated the variance components for the facets as a G study. Then, we evaluated the reliability from the point of view of the generalizability coefficient (a reliability-like coefficient that is used when a decision concerns the relative ordering of individuals) and the index of dependability (an index that is used when a decision focuses on the absolute level of an individual's performance independent of others' performance), and examined how those indices change as the number of raters and viewpoints are changed. With these analyses we found conditions needed to maintain sufficient reliability of the evaluation for various situations. We also introduced a new method to evaluate the reliability at each level of facet by using structural equation modeling. By this method, one can examine the reliability of students' evaluation of university teaching more specifically.

  2. Structural evaluation of concepts for a solar energy concentrator for Space Station advanced development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred S.; Rhodes, Marvin D.

    1994-01-01

    Solar dynamic power systems have a higher thermodynamic efficiency than conventional photovoltaic systems; therefore they are attractive for long-term space missions with high electrical power demands. In an investigation conducted in support of a preliminary concept for Space Station Freedom, an approach for a solar dynamic power system was developed and a number of the components for the solar concentrator were fabricated for experimental evaluation. The concentrator consists of hexagonal panels comprised of triangular reflective facets which are supported by a truss. Structural analyses of the solar concentrator and the support truss were conducted using finite-element models. A number of potential component failure scenarios were postulated and the resulting structural performance was assessed. The solar concentrator and support truss were found to be adequate to meet a 1.0-Hz structural dynamics design requirement in pristine condition. However, for some of the simulated component failure conditions, the fundamental frequency dropped below the 1.0-Hz design requirement. As a result, two alternative concepts were developed and assessed. One concept incorporated a tetrahedral ring truss support for the hexagonal panels: the second incorporated a full tetrahedral truss support for the panels. The results indicate that significant improvements in stiffness can be obtained by attaching the panels to a tetrahedral truss, and that this concentrator and support truss will meet the 1.0-Hz design requirement with any of the simulated failure conditions.

  3. Lightweight solar concentrator structures, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Kaplan, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the program conducted by Ultramet under SBIR Phase 2 Contract NAS3-25418. The objective of this program was to develop lightweight materials and processes for advanced high accuracy Space Solar Concentrators using rigidized foam for the substrate structure with an integral optical surface.

  4. Multilayer solar cell waveguide structures containing metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouche, Houria.; Shabat, Mohammed. M.; Schaadt, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    Multilayer antireflection coating structures made from silicon and metamaterials are designed and investigated using the Transfer Matrix Method (TMM). The Transfer Matrix Method is a very useful algorithm for the analysis of periodic structures. We investigate in this paper two anti-reflection coating structures for silicon solar cells with a metamaterial film layer. In the first structure, the metamaterial film layer is sandwiched between a semi-infinite glass cover layer and a semi-infinite silicon substrate layer. The second structure consists of a four layers, a pair of metamaterial-dielectric layer with opposite real part of refractive indices, is placed between the two semi-infinite cover and substrate. We have simulated the absorptivity property of the structures for adjustable thicknesses by using MAPLE software. The absorptivity of the structures achieves greater than 80% for incident electromagnetic wave of transverse magnetic (TM) polarization.

  5. Control of GaN facet structures through Eu doping toward achieving semipolar { 1 1 macr 01 } and { 2 2 macr 01 } InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takanori; Takano, Shota; Hasegawa, Ryosuke; Timmerman, Dolf; Koizumi, Atsushi; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi; Fujiwara, Yasufumi

    2016-10-01

    We have grown Eu-doped GaN on striped GaN facet structures with { 1 1 ¯ 01 } faces using a selective-area-growth technique. It was found that the orientation of the Eu-doped GaN facets depends on the Eu doping conditions. Semipolar { n n ¯ 01 } (n = 2, 3) facets, which are difficult to form using conventional undoped GaN, can be obtained by changing the growth temperature and the amount of the supplied Eu precursor. InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were also fabricated on the Eu-doped semipolar facets, and their structural and luminescence properties were investigated. The MQWs fabricated on the Eu-doped semipolar { 2 2 ¯ 01 } facets have a photoluminescence decay time of 112-314 ps, which is 10 times shorter than those of conventional (0001) QWs. These results show that the Eu doping of GaN is a promising means of obtaining various semipolar facets, which can contribute to improve the radiative recombination probability.

  6. Development of a Conceptual Structure for Architectural Solar Energy Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringel, Robert F.

    Solar subsystems and components were identified and conceptual structure was developed for architectural solar energy heating and cooling systems. Recent literature related to solar energy systems was reviewed and analyzed. Solar heating and cooling system, subsystem, and component data were compared for agreement and completeness. Significant…

  7. Evidence of active region imprints on the solar wind structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    A common descriptive framework for discussing the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere uses the global magnetic field as a reference: low density, high velocity solar wind emanates from open magnetic fields, with high density, low speed solar wind flowing outward near the current sheet. In this picture, active regions, underlying closed magnetic field structures in the streamer belt, leave little or no imprint on the solar wind. We present evidence from interplanetary scintillation measurements of the 'disturbance factor' g that active regions play a role in modulating the solar wind and possibly contribute to the solar wind mass output. Hence we find that the traditional view of the solar wind, though useful in understanding many features of solar wind structure, is oversimplified and possibly neglects important aspects of solar wind dynamics

  8. THE BIMODAL STRUCTURE OF THE SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Z. L.

    2015-05-01

    Some properties of the 11 yr solar cycle can be explained by the current solar dynamo models. However, some other features remain not well understood such as the asymmetry of the cycle, the double-peaked structure, and the “Waldmeier effect” that a stronger cycle tends to have less rise time and a shorter cycle length. We speculate that the solar cycle is governed by a bi-dynamo model forming two stochastic processes depicted by a bimodal Gaussian function with a time gap of about 2 yr, from which the above features can be reasonably explained. The first one describes the main properties of the cycle dominated by the current solar dynamo models, and the second one occurs either in the rising phase as a short weak explosive perturbation or in the declining phase as a long stochastic perturbation. The above function is the best one selected from several in terms of the Akaike information criterion. Through analyzing different distributions, one might speculate about the dominant physical process inside the convection zone. The secondary (main) process is found to be closely associated with complicated (simple) active ranges. In effect, the bi-dynamo model is a reduced form of a multi-dynamo model, which could occur from the base of the convection zone through its envelope and from low to high heliographic latitude, reflecting the active belts in the convection zone. These results are insensitive to the hemispheric asymmetry, smoothing filters, and distribution functions selected and are expected to be helpful in understanding the formation of solar and stellar cycles.

  9. Solar Prominence Fine Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We review recent observational and theoretical results on the fine structure and dynamics of solar prominences, beginning with an overview of prominence classifications, the proposal of possible new ``funnel prominence'' classification, and a discussion of the recent ``solar tornado'' findings. We then focus on quiescent prominences to review formation, down-flow dynamics, and the ``prominence bubble'' phenomena. We show new observations of the prominence bubble Rayleigh-Taylor instability triggered by a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear flow instability occurring along the bubble boundary. Finally we review recent studies on plasma composition of bubbles, emphasizing that differential emission measure (DEM) analysis offers a more quantitative analysis than photometric comparisons. In conclusion, we discuss the relation of prominences to coronal magnetic flux ropes, proposing that prominences can be understood as partially ionized condensations of plasma forming the return flow of a general magneto-thermal convection in the corona.

  10. New Packing Structure of Concentration Solar Receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Shang-Yu; Lee, Yueh-Mu; Shih, Zun-Hao; Hong, Hwen-Fen; Shin, Hwa-Yuh; Kuo, Cherng-Tsong

    2010-10-14

    This paper presents a solution to the temperature issue in High Concentration Photovoltaic (HCPV) module device by using different thermal conductive material and packing structure. In general, the open-circuited voltage of a device reduces with the increase of temperature and therefore degrades its efficiency. The thermal conductive material we use in this paper, silicon, has a high thermal conductive coefficient (149 W/m{center_dot}K) and steady semiconductor properties which are suitable for the application of solar receiver in HCPV module. Solar cell was soldered on a metal-plated Si substrate with a thicker SiO{sub 2} film which acts as an insulating layer. Then it was mounted on an Al-based plate to obtain a better heat dissipating result.

  11. Diffraction Grating Structures in Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    ZAIDI,SALEEM H.; GEE,JAMES M.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.

    2000-12-01

    Sub-wavelength periodic texturing (gratings) of crystalline-silicon (c-Si) surfaces for solar cell applications can be designed for maximizing optical absorption in thin c-Si films. We have investigated c-Si grating structures using rigorous modeling, hemispherical reflectance, and internal quantum efficiency measurements. Model calculations predict almost {approximately}100% energy coupling into obliquely propagating diffraction orders. By fabrication and optical characterization of a wide range of 1D & 2D c-Si grating structures, we have achieved broad-band, low ({approximately} 5%) reflectance without an anti-reflection film. By integrating grating structures into conventional solar cell designs, we have demonstrated short-circuit current density enhancements of 3.4 and 4.1 mA/cm{sup 2} for rectangular and triangular 1D grating structures compared to planar controls. The effective path length enhancements due to these gratings were 2.2 and 1.7, respectively. Optimized 2D gratings are expected to have even better performance.

  12. Solar wind compressible structures at ion scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, D.; Alexandrova, O.; Rocoto, V.; Pantellini, F. G. E.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Issautier, K.; Mangeney, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the solar wind turbulent cascade, the energy partition between fluid and kinetic degrees of freedom, in the vicinity of plasma characteristic scales, i.e. ion and electron Larmor radius and inertial lengths, is still under debate. In a neighborhood of the ion scales, it has been observed that the spectral shape changes and fluctuations become more compressible. Nowadays, a huge scientific effort is directed to the comprehension of the link between macroscopic and microscopic scales and to disclose the nature of compressive fluctuations, meaning that if space plasma turbulence is a mixture of quasi-linear waves (as whistler or kinetic Alfvèn waves) or if turbulence is strong with formation of coherent structures responsible for dissipation. Here we present an automatic method to identify compressible coherent structures around the ion spectral break, using Morlet wavelet decomposition of magnetic signal from Cluster spacecraft and reconstruction of magnetic fluctuations in a selected scale range. Different kind of coherent structures have been detected: from soliton-like one-dimensional structures to current sheet- or wave-like two-dimensional structures. Using a multi-satellite analysis, in order to characterize 3D geometry and propagation in plasma rest frame, we recover that these structures propagate quasi-perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, with finite velocity. Moreover, without using the Taylor hypothesis, the spatial scales of coherent structures have been estimated. Our observations in the solar wind can provide constraints on theoretical modeling of small scale turbulence and dissipation in collisionless magnetized plasmas.

  13. Kinetics of faceting of crystals in growth, etching, and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, D. G.; Schmidt, L. D.; Aris, R.

    1993-03-01

    The faceting of crystals in equilibrium with the gas phase and also during crystal growth and etching conditions is studied using the Monte Carlo method. The dynamics of the transformation of unstable crystallographic orientations into hill and valley structures and the spatial patterns that develop are examined as functions of surface temperature, crystallographic orientation, and strength of interatomic potential for two transport processes: adsorption-desorption and surface diffusion. The results are compared with the continuum theory for facet formation. Thermodynamically unstable orientations break into hill and valley structures, and faceting exhibits three time regimes: disordering, facet nucleation, and coarsening of small facets to large facets. Faceting is accelerated as temperature increases, but thermal roughening can occur at high temperatures. Surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism at short times and small facets but adsorption-desorption becomes important at long times and large facets. Growth and etching promote faceting for conditions close to equilibrium but induce kinetic roughening for conditions far from equilibrium. Simultaneous irreversible growth and etching conditions with fast surface diffusion result in enhanced faceting.

  14. Low concentration ratio solar array structural configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalbandian, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    The design and structural properties of a low concentration ratio solar array are discussed. The assembled module consists of six interconnected containers which are compactly stowed in a volume of 3.24 m(3) for delivery to orbit by the shuttle. The containers deploy in accordian fashion into a rectangular area of 19.4 x 68 meters and can be attached to the user spacecraft along the longitudinal centerline of the end container housing. Five rotary incremental actuators requiring about 8 watts each will execute the 180-degree rotation at each joint. Deployable masts (three per side) are used to extend endcaps from the housing in both directions. Each direction is extended by three masts requiring about 780 watts for about 27 minutes. Concentrator elements are extended by the endcaps and are supported by cable systems that are connected between the housings and endcaps. These power generating elements contain reflector panels which concentrate light onto the solar panels consisting of an aluminum radiator with solar cells positioned within the element base formed by the reflectors. A flat wire harness collects the power output of individual elements for transfer to the module container housing harnesses.

  15. Development of an improved mirror facet for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schertz, Paul; Saifee, Shabbar; Lammert, Luke

    1991-01-01

    A fabrication technique was successfully developed for a metallic aluminum honeycomb, high-accuracy, lightweight, and long-life solar concentrator (mirror) for Advanced Solar Dynamic Space Power Systems. The program scope was limited to the development, fabrication, evaluation, and delivery of a solar concentrator facet (petal) that was sized for a 2-meter deployable solar concentrator. A surface accuracy of 1.0 mrad was achieved. The development incorporated tooling design, material selection, facet forming, adhesive selection, testing, and analysis. Techniques for applying levelizing, reflective, and protective optical coatings were also developed.

  16. Faint solar radio structures from decametric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, C.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Melnik, V. N.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: Decameter radio observations of the solar corona reveal the presence of numerous faint frequency drifting emissions, similar to “solar S bursts” which are reported in the literature. We present a statistical analysis of the characteristics of these emissions and propose a mechanism to excite the Langmuir waves thought to be at the origin of these emissions. Methods: The observations were performed between 1998 and 2002 with the Digital Spectro Polarimeter (DSP) receivers operated at the UTR-2 and Nançay decameter radio telescopes in the frequency range 15-30 MHz. Our theoretical explanation is based on Vlasov-Ampère simulations. Results: Based on the frequency drift rate, three populations of structures can be identified. The largest population presents an average negative frequency drift of -0.9 MHz s-1 and a lifetime up to 11 s (median value of 2.72 s). A second population shows a very small frequency drift of -0.1 MHz s-1 and a short lifetime of about 1 s. The third population presents an average positive frequency drift of +0.95 MHz s-1 and a lifetime of up to 3 s. Also, the frequency drift as a function of frequency is consistent with the former results, which present results in higher frequency range. No specific relationship was found between the occurrence of these emissions and the solar cycle or presence of flares. Assuming that these emissions are produced by “electron clouds” propagating the solar corona, we deduce electron velocities of about 3-5 times the electron thermal velocity. As previously shown, a localized, time-dependent modulation of the electron distribution function (heating) leads to low velocity electron clouds (consistent with observations), which, in turn, can generate Langmuir waves and electromagnetic signals by nonlinear processes.

  17. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Miller, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Solar collectors for space use are examined, including both early designs and current concepts. In particular, attention is given to stiff sandwich panels and aluminum dishes as well as inflated and umbrella-type membrane configurations. The Sunflower concentrator is described as an example of a high-efficiency collector. It is concluded that stiff reflector panels are most likely to provide the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation. A new configuration consisting of a Pactruss backup structure, with identical panels installed after deployment in space, is presented. It is estimated that concentration ratios in excess of 2000 can be achieved with this concept.

  18. Multiscale Dynamics of Solar Magnetic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiscale topological complexity of the solar magnetic field is among the primary factors controlling energy release in the corona, including associated processes in the photospheric and chromospheric boundaries.We present a new approach for analyzing multiscale behavior of the photospheric magnetic flux underlying these dynamics as depicted by a sequence of high-resolution solar magnetograms. The approach involves two basic processing steps: (1) identification of timing and location of magnetic flux origin and demise events (as defined by DeForest et al.) by tracking spatiotemporal evolution of unipolar and bipolar photospheric regions, and (2) analysis of collective behavior of the detected magnetic events using a generalized version of the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation integral algorithm. The scale-free nature of the developed algorithms makes it possible to characterize the dynamics of the photospheric network across a wide range of distances and relaxation times. Three types of photospheric conditions are considered to test the method: a quiet photosphere, a solar active region (NOAA 10365) in a quiescent non-flaring state, and the same active region during a period of M-class flares. The results obtained show (1) the presence of a topologically complex asymmetrically fragmented magnetic network in the quiet photosphere driven by meso- and supergranulation, (2) the formation of non-potential magnetic structures with complex polarity separation lines inside the active region, and (3) statistical signatures of canceling bipolar magnetic structures coinciding with flaring activity in the active region. Each of these effects can represent an unstable magnetic configuration acting as an energy source for coronal dissipation and heating.

  19. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.; Miller, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    The Sunflower large solar concentrator, developed in the early 1970's, is a salient example of a high-efficiency concentrator. The newly emphasized needs for solar dynamic power on the Space Station and for large, lightweight thermal sources are outlined. Existing concepts for high efficiency reflector surfaces are examined with attention to accuracy needs for concentration rates of 1000 to 3000. Concepts using stiff reflector panels are deemed most likely to exhibit the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation, particularly for the higher concentration ratios. Quantitative results are shown of the effects of surface errors for various concentration and focal-length diameter ratios. Cost effectiveness is discussed. Principal sources of high cost include the need for various dished panels for paraboloidal reflectors and the expense of ground testing and adjustment. A new configuration is presented addressing both problems, i.e., a deployable Pactruss backup structure with identical panels installed on the structure after deployment in space. Analytical results show that with reasonable pointing errors, this new concept is capable of concentration ratios greater than 2000.

  20. Bringing some photonic structures for solar cells to the fore.

    PubMed

    Escoubas, Ludovic; Simon, Jean-Jacques; Torchio, Philippe; Duché, David; Vedraine, Sylvain; Vervisch, Wilfried; Le Rouzo, Judikaël; Flory, François; Rivière, Guillaume; Yeabiyo, Gizachew; Derbal, Hassina

    2011-03-20

    A review on the use of photonic structures enabling a better absorption of solar radiation within solar cells is proposed. Specific geometric configurations, such as folded solar cells or fiber-based architectures, are shown to be promising solutions to reach better light absorption. Electromagnetic optimization of thin-film solar cells and the use of angular thin-film filters, proposed by several research groups, also provide solutions to better concentrate solar radiation within the active layers of solar cells. Finally, results on "photonized" solar cells comprising gratings or more advanced photonic components, such as photonic crystals or plasmonic structures, and their effects on light-matter interaction in solar cells are highlighted.

  1. SLAC All Access: FACET

    ScienceCinema

    Hogan, Mark

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests, or FACET, is a test-bed where researchers are developing the technologies required for particle accelerators of the future. Scientists from all over the world come to explore ways of improving the power and efficiency of the particle accelerators used in basic research, medicine, industry and other areas important to society. In this video, Mark Hogan, head of SLAC's Advanced Accelerator Research Department, offers a glimpse into FACET, which uses part of SLAC's historic two-mile-long linear accelerator.

  2. The interplanetary and solar magnetic field sector structures, 1962 - 1968

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field sector structure was observed from late 1962 through 1968. During this time it has been possible to study the manner in which the sector pattern and its relation to the photospheric magnetic field configuration changes from solar minimum to solar maximum. Observations were also made relating sector boundaries to specific regions on the solar disk. These and other observations related to the solar origin of the interplanetary field are briefly reviewed.

  3. Facets of Subjectification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visconti, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Subjectification, as the diachronic facet of subjectivity, has raised in the last two decades a number of interesting questions in grammaticalization and semantic change theory. In this paper I shall reflect on the nature and construal of subjectification, focusing on the question, formulated by Traugott (2010a, p. 58), "whether it is possible to…

  4. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  5. Seismic probes of solar interior magnetic structure.

    PubMed

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Birch, Aaron; Gizon, Laurent; Tromp, Jeroen

    2012-09-07

    Sun spots are prominent manifestations of solar magnetoconvection, and imaging their subsurface structure is an outstanding problem of wide physical importance. Travel times of seismic waves that propagate through these structures are typically used as inputs to inversions. Despite the presence of strongly anisotropic magnetic waveguides, these measurements have always been interpreted in terms of changes to isotropic wave speeds and flow-advection-related Doppler shifts. Here, we employ partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization to determine the appropriate parametrization of the structural properties of the magnetic interior. Seven different wave speeds fully characterize helioseismic wave propagation: the isotropic sound speed, a Doppler-shifting flow-advection velocity, and an anisotropic magnetic velocity. The structure of magnetic media is sensed by magnetoacoustic slow and fast modes and Alfvén waves, each of which propagates at a different wave speed. We show that even in the case of weak magnetic fields, significant errors may be incurred if these anisotropies are not accounted for in inversions. Translation invariance is demonstrably lost. These developments render plausible the accurate seismic imaging of magnetoconvection in the Sun.

  6. Preliminary space station solar array structural design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, J. T.; Bush, H. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Structurally efficient ways to support the large solar arrays (3,716 square meters which are currently considered for space station use) are examined. An erectable truss concept is presented for the on orbit construction of winged solar arrays. The means for future growth, maintenance, and repair are integrally designed into this concept. Results from parametric studies, which highlight the physical and structural differences between various configuration options are presented. Consideration is given to both solar blanket and hard panel arrays.

  7. Offset truss hex solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John E. (Inventor); Sturgis, James D. (Inventor); Erikson, Raymond J. (Inventor); Waligroski, Gregg A. (Inventor); Scott, Michael A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A solar energy concentrator system comprises an offset reflector structure made up of a plurality of solar energy reflector panel sections interconnected with one another to form a piecewise approximation of a portion of a (parabolic) surface of revolution rotated about a prescribed focal axis. Each panel section is comprised of a plurality of reflector facets whose reflective surfaces effectively focus reflected light to preselected surface portions of the interior sidewall of a cylindrically shaped solar energy receiver. The longitudinal axis of the receiver is tilted at an acute angle with respect to the optical axis such that the distribution of focussed solar energy over the interior surface of the solar engine is optimized for dynamic solar energy conversion. Each reflector panel section comprises a flat, hexagonally shaped truss support framework and a plurality of beam members interconnecting diametrically opposed corners of the hexagonal framework recessed within which a plurality of (spherically) contoured reflector facets is disposed. The depth of the framework and the beam members is greater than the thickness of a reflector facet such that a reflector facet may be tilted (for controlling the effective focus of its reflected light through the receiver aperture) without protruding from the panel section.

  8. Optical properties of a conjugated-polymer-sensitised solar cell: the effect of interfacial structure.

    PubMed

    Drumm, Daniel W; Bilic, A; Tachibana, Y; Miller, A; Russo, S P

    2015-06-14

    Dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSCs) have sparked considerable interest over two decades. Recently, a method of polymer-wire sensitisation was demonstrated; the polymer is suggested to form a hole transport pathway (wire) following initial charge separation. We predict the optical properties of this polymer in various interfacial configurations, including the effects of chain length and attachment to {100} or {101} TiO2 facets. Contrary to most DSSCs, the {100} facet model best describes the experimental spectrum, predicting a relative thickness of 5.7 ± 0.2 μm, although {101} attachment, if implemented, may improve collection efficiency. Long chains are optimal, and stable attachment sites show minimal differences to absorbance in the major solar emission (visible) band. Combinations of {100}, {101}, and pseudo-bulk TiO2 models in three-parameter fits to experiment confirm the relative importance of the {100} facet.

  9. Nucleation-mediated synthesis and enhanced catalytic properties of Au-Pd bimetallic tripods and bipyramids with twinned structures and high-energy facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiaoli; Wang, Xue; Jiang, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    The Au-Pd alloy has been proved to be an excellent catalyst in many applications, such as the electro-oxidation of formic acid, CO oxidation and oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes. However, most of the research has been focused on the shape-controlled Au-Pd alloy NCs with a single-crystal structure. Due to the existence of high-energy atoms on the twin defects, twinned structures usually will further increase their catalytic activities. It is necessary to develop a method to prepare the Au-Pd alloy with twinned structures and investigate their catalytic properties. Herein, we successfully synthesized Au-Pd alloy tripods and bipyramids with twinned structures by the cooperation of cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The tripods contain one twin plane, while the bipyramids consist of a fivefold-twinned structure. In addition, the tripods and bipyramids are both exposed by high-energy facets. We proposed that the tripods and bipyramids are evolved from bipyramid seeds and fivefold twinned seeds, respectively. The as-prepared Au-Pd tripods and bipyramids performed better activity for electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid compared to the cubic Au-Pd nanoparticles.The Au-Pd alloy has been proved to be an excellent catalyst in many applications, such as the electro-oxidation of formic acid, CO oxidation and oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes. However, most of the research has been focused on the shape-controlled Au-Pd alloy NCs with a single-crystal structure. Due to the existence of high-energy atoms on the twin defects, twinned structures usually will further increase their catalytic activities. It is necessary to develop a method to prepare the Au-Pd alloy with twinned structures and investigate their catalytic properties. Herein, we successfully synthesized Au-Pd alloy tripods and bipyramids with twinned structures by the cooperation of cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB

  10. Strong thin membrane structure. [solar sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A continuous process is described for producing strong lightweight structures for use as solar sails for spacecraft propulsion by radiation pressure. A thin reflective coating, such as aluminum, is applied to a rotating cylinder. A nylon mesh, applied over the aluminum coating, is then coated with a polymerizing material such as a para-xylylene monomer gas to polymerize as a film bound to the mesh and the aluminum. An emissivity increasing material such as chromium or silicon monoxide is applied to the polymer film to disperse such material colloidally into the growing polymer film, or to the final polymer film. The resulting membrane structure is then removed from the cylinder. Alternately, the membrane structure can be formed by etching a substrate in the form of an organic film such as a polymide, or a metal foil, to remove material from the substrate and reduce its thickness. A thin reflective coating (aluminum) is applied on one side of the substrate, and an emissivity increasing coating is applied on the reverse side of the substrate.

  11. The structure of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christina On-Yee

    2010-12-01

    This dissertation is devoted to expanding our understanding of the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere and variations therein with solar activity. Using spacecraft observations and numerical models, the origins of the large-scale structures and long-term trends of the solar wind are explored in order to gain insights on how our Sun determines the space environments of the terrestrial planets. I use long term measurements of the solar wind density, velocity, interplanetary magnetic field, and particles, together with models based on solar magnetic field data, to generate time series of these properties that span one solar rotation (˜27 days). From these time series, I assemble and obtain the synoptic overviews of the solar wind properties. The resulting synoptic overviews show that the solar wind around Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars is a complex co-rotating structure with recurring features and occasional transients. During quiet solar conditions, the heliospheric current sheet, which separates the positive interplanetary magnetic field from the negative, usually has a remarkably steady two- or four-sector structure that persists for many solar rotations. Within the sector boundaries are the slow and fast speed solar wind streams that originate from the open coronal magnetic field sources that map to the ecliptic. At the sector boundaries, compressed high-density and the related high-dynamic pressure ridges form where streams from different coronal source regions interact. High fluxes of energetic particles also occur at the boundaries, and are seen most prominently during the quiet solar period. The existence of these recurring features depends on how long-lived are their source regions. In the last decade, 3D numerical solar wind models have become more widely available. They provide important scientific tools for obtaining a more global view of the inner heliosphere and of the relationships between conditions at Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. When

  12. Current status of inorganic solar cells using quantum structures.

    PubMed

    Myong, Seung Yeop

    2012-01-01

    Thermalization of photogenerated carriers in bulk materials is the main bottleneck for the conversion efficiency of conventional inorganic solar cells. Furthermore, the achieved conversion efficiency has nearly saturated during the last decade despite extensive research. Therefore, new device concepts to break through the efficiency barrier are highly requested. Nanotechnologies are the building blocks for next-generation solar cells because low-dimensional quantum structures can possibly reduce thermalization and extend the light absorption range. In addition, very thin nanostructured inorganic solar cells provide us with good opportunity to reach highly competitive mass production. Hereafter, recently invented inorganic solar cells using quantum structures will be reviewed.

  13. An Integrated Facet-Based Library for Arbitrary Software Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Matthias; Polowinski, Jan; Johannes, Jendrik; Fernández, Miguel A.

    Reuse is an important means of reducing costs and effort during the development of complex software systems. A major challenge is to find suitable components in a large library with reasonable effort. This becomes even harder in today's development practice where a variety of artefacts such as models and documents play an equally important role as source code. Thus, different types of heterogeneous components exist and require consideration in a component search process. One flexible approach to structure (software component) libraries is faceted classification. Faceted classifications and in particular faceted browsing are nowadays widely used in online systems. This paper takes a fresh approach towards using faceted classification in heterogeneous software component libraries by transferring faceted browsing concepts from the web to software component libraries. It presents an architecture and implementation of such a library. This implementation is used to evaluate the applicability of facets in the context of an industry-driven case study.

  14. Foundations of reusable and interoperable facet models using category theory.

    PubMed

    Harris, Daniel R

    2016-10-01

    Faceted browsing has become ubiquitous with modern digital libraries and online search engines, yet the process is still difficult to abstractly model in a manner that supports the development of interoperable and reusable interfaces. We propose category theory as a theoretical foundation for faceted browsing and demonstrate how the interactive process can be mathematically abstracted. Existing efforts in facet modeling are based upon set theory, formal concept analysis, and light-weight ontologies, but in many regards, they are implementations of faceted browsing rather than a specification of the basic, underlying structures and interactions. We will demonstrate that category theory allows us to specify faceted objects and study the relationships and interactions within a faceted browsing system. Resulting implementations can then be constructed through a category-theoretic lens using these models, allowing abstract comparison and communication that naturally support interoperability and reuse.

  15. AHF: Array-Based Half-Facet Data Structure for Mixed-Dimensional and Non-manifold Meshes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-13

    Ray, D. Einstein, X. Jiao, and T. Tautges mesh data structures. Examples of such new demanding applications include coupled multiphysics simulations and...e.g. [5]), especially oriented , man- ifold, polygonal surface meshes with or without boundary. The DCEL uses edges as the core object . The edge within...implementation built on top of MOAB (T.J. Tautges, R. Meyers, and K. Merkley, MOAB: A Mesh- Oriented Database, Sandia National Laboratories, 2004). We

  16. Accommodation of angular incompatibilities between interfacial facets during precipitate growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, R. C.; Jiao, H.; Zhang, L. C.; Aindow, M.

    2006-03-01

    Precipitate growth in a duplex stainless steel and a titanium aluminide alloy has been studied using transmission electron microscopy. Particles with similar crystallography and acicular form arise in both cases, and are bounded by two principal facets. One facet, designated C, is based on a commensurate singular interface structure, and the coherency strains are accommodated by interfacial defects. The other facet, designated I, is based on a singular configuration that is incommensurate in one dimension. The orientation relationship (OR) between the particle and the matrix for the singular C structure is Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S), whereas that for the I facet is Pitsch. The angular incompatibility between these two types of facets must be accommodated to minimize the displacement field as particles grow. The present observations suggest that this is accomplished through the generation of crystal dislocations at facet junctions and their subsequent climb along the facets. The total density of defects needed to accommodate the angular discrepancy is fixed, but the partitioning of these dislocations between C and I facets is not. The actual partitioning determines the observed OR for a particle, and is determined by the kinetics of climb, which is likely to be different in the two facets. In the stainless steel, the observations are consistent with climb occurring in both the C and I facets, but faster in the I facet, leading to a distribution of observed ORs that is skewed away from Pitsch toward K-S. In the titanium aluminide alloy, no climb into the C facets was found, so a unique OR close to K-S arises.

  17. Long-term migration of the solar sector structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, C. L.; Heath, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic sector boundaries on the sun and in the solar wind are shown to have a high correlation with winter low pressure systems on earth. The vorticity-area index typically declines by about 10% during several days centered on the time when a sector boundary sweeps past the earth. Evidence that both the sector structure and solar activity levels can be understood as being under the influence of the same regular, internal solar mechanism is presented.

  18. Structural considerations for solar installers : an approach for small, simplified solar installations or retrofits.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Elizabeth H.; Schindel, Kay; Bosiljevac, Tom; Dwyer, Stephen F.; Lindau, William; Harper, Alan

    2011-12-01

    Structural Considerations for Solar Installers provides a comprehensive outline of structural considerations associated with simplified solar installations and recommends a set of best practices installers can follow when assessing such considerations. Information in the manual comes from engineering and solar experts as well as case studies. The objectives of the manual are to ensure safety and structural durability for rooftop solar installations and to potentially accelerate the permitting process by identifying and remedying structural issues prior to installation. The purpose of this document is to provide tools and guidelines for installers to help ensure that residential photovoltaic (PV) power systems are properly specified and installed with respect to the continuing structural integrity of the building.

  19. Search Interface Design Using Faceted Indexing for Web Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devadason, Francis; Intaraksa, Neelawat; Patamawongjariya, Pornprapa; Desai, Kavita

    2001-01-01

    Describes an experimental system designed to organize and provide access to Web documents using a faceted pre-coordinate indexing system based on the Deep Structure Indexing System (DSIS) derived from POPSI (Postulate based Permuted Subject Indexing) of Bhattacharyya, and the facet analysis and chain indexing system of Ranganathan. (AEF)

  20. Domains and Facets: A Hierarchical Approach to Personality Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrae, Robert R.

    The domain and facet approach to personality assessment is discussed. The strategy used to identify and measure aspects of the five factors of personality structure is described. Evidence concerning the factorial invariance of the resulting set of 30 facet scales and some recent evidence concerning their discriminant validity are reviewed. Some…

  1. Recent Progress in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William K.; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, Samuel C.; Dowell, E.; Guerrant, Daniel; Lawrence Dale

    2014-01-01

    Results from recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research on the structural dynamics and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment, and results from small-scale in vacuo dynamics experiments with spinning high-aspect ratio membranes. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept, used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, is also described.

  2. Recent perspectives in solar physics - Elemental composition, coronal structure and magnetic fields, solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Elemental abundances in the solar corona are studied. Abundances in the corona, solar wind and solar cosmic rays are compared to those in the photosphere. The variation in silicon and iron abundance in the solar wind as compared to helium is studied. The coronal small and large scale structure is investigated, emphasizing magnetic field activity and examining cosmic ray generation mechanisms. The corona is observed in the X-ray and EUV regions. The nature of coronal transients is discussed with emphasis on solar-wind modulation of galactic cosmic rays. A schematic plan view of the interplanetary magnetic field during sunspot minimum is given showing the presence of magnetic bubbles and their concentration in the region around 4-5 AU by a fast solar wind stream.

  3. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURES TRIGGERING SOLAR FLARES AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, K.; Bamba, Y.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Iida, Y.; Toriumi, S.; Asai, A.

    2012-11-20

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections, the most catastrophic eruptions in our solar system, have been known to affect terrestrial environments and infrastructure. However, because their triggering mechanism is still not sufficiently understood, our capacity to predict the occurrence of solar eruptions and to forecast space weather is substantially hindered. Even though various models have been proposed to determine the onset of solar eruptions, the types of magnetic structures capable of triggering these eruptions are still unclear. In this study, we solved this problem by systematically surveying the nonlinear dynamics caused by a wide variety of magnetic structures in terms of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. As a result, we determined that two different types of small magnetic structures favor the onset of solar eruptions. These structures, which should appear near the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), include magnetic fluxes reversed to the potential component or the nonpotential component of major field on the PIL. In addition, we analyzed two large flares, the X-class flare on 2006 December 13 and the M-class flare on 2011 February 13, using imaging data provided by the Hinode satellite, and we demonstrated that they conform to the simulation predictions. These results suggest that forecasting of solar eruptions is possible with sophisticated observation of a solar magnetic field, although the lead time must be limited by the timescale of changes in the small magnetic structures.

  4. Simulation of interdigitated back contact solar cell with trench structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Min; Chun, Seungju; Kang, Min Gu; Song, Hee-Eun; Lee, Jong-Han; Boo, Hyunpil; Bae, Soohyun; Kang, Yoonmook; Lee, Hae-Seok; Kim, Donghwan

    2015-02-01

    We performed two-dimensional technology computer-aided design simulations for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells with rear trench structures (TS), denoted here as TS-IBC solar cells. First, we calculated a reference simulation model for conventional IBC solar cells. We then assumed a trench structure at the rear surface of the IBC solar cell. For this structure, we analyzed solar cell performance as a function of various trench depths and type. It was found that emitter trench formation affects minority carrier collection, such that the short-circuit current density increases with increasing trench depth. However, the back-surface field (BSF) trench exhibited poor minority carrier collection, which reduced the conversion efficiency of the TS-IBC solar cells. It was also found that for the same trench depth (30 μm), the difference in conversion efficiencies of an IBC solar cell with an emitter trench and that with a BSF trench was 0.6%. We are thus convinced that the emitter trench structure is more important than the BSF trench structure.

  5. Constructing Black Titania with Unique Nanocage Structure for Solar Desalination.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guilian; Xu, Jijian; Zhao, Wenli; Huang, Fuqiang

    2016-11-23

    Solar desalination driven by solar radiation as heat source is freely available, however, hindered by low efficiency. Herein, we first design and synthesize black titania with a unique nanocage structure simultaneously with light trapping effect to enhance light harvesting, well-crystallized interconnected nanograins to accelerate the heat transfer from titania to water and with opening mesopores (4-10 nm) to facilitate the permeation of water vapor. Furthermore, the coated self-floating black titania nanocages film localizes the temperature increase at the water-air interface rather than uniformly heating the bulk of the water, which ultimately results in a solar-thermal conversion efficiency as high as 70.9% under a simulated solar light with an intensity of 1 kW m(-2) (1 sun). This finding should inspire new black materials with rationally designed structure for superior solar desalination performance.

  6. Fine Structure of Solar Acoustic Oscillations Due to Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, P. R.; Dziembowski, W.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the fine structure of high order, low degree five minute period solar oscillations following from various postulated forms of spherical rotation is predicted. The first and second order effects of rotation are included.

  7. Virioplankton community structure in Tunisian solar salterns.

    PubMed

    Boujelben, Ines; Yarza, Pablo; Almansa, Cristina; Villamor, Judith; Maalej, Sami; Antón, Josefa; Santos, Fernando

    2012-10-01

    The microbial community inhabiting Sfax solar salterns on the east coast of Tunisia has been studied by means of different molecular and culture-dependent tools that have unveiled the presence of novel microbial groups as well as a community structure different from that of other coastal hypersaline environments. We have focused on the study of the viral assemblages of these salterns and their changes along the salinity gradient and over time. Viruses from three ponds (C4, M1, and TS) encompassing salinities from moderately hypersaline to saturated (around 14, 19, and 35%, respectively) were sampled in May and October 2009 and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Additionally, for all three October samples and the May TS sample, viral metagenomic DNA was cloned in fosmids, end sequenced, and analyzed. Viral concentration, as well as virus-to-cell ratios, increased along the salinity gradient, with around 10(10) virus-like particles (VLPs)/ml in close-to-saturation ponds, which represents the highest viral concentration reported so far for aquatic systems. Four distinct morphologies could be observed with TEM (spherical, tailed, spindled, and filamentous) but with various proportions in the different samples. Metagenomic analyses indicated that every pond harbored a distinct viral assemblage whose G+C content could be roughly correlated with that of the active part of the microbial community that may have constituted the putative hosts. As previously reported for hypersaline metaviromes, most sequences did not have matches in the databases, although some were conserved among the Sfax metaviromes. BLASTx, BLASTp, and dinucleotide frequency analyses indicated that (i) factors additional to salinity could be structuring viral communities and (ii) every metavirome had unique gene contents and dinucleotide frequencies. Comparison with hypersaline metaviromes available in the databases indicated that the viral

  8. Supporting Structures for Flat Solar-Cell Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Strong supporting structures for flat solar photovoltaic arrays built with such commonly available materials as wood and galvanized steel sheet. Structures resist expected static loads from snow and ice as well as dynamic loads from winds and even Earthquake vibrations. Supporting structure uses inexpensive materials. Parts prefabricated to minimize assembly work in field.

  9. Coronal structure and flattening during total solar eclipse 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galal, A. A.; Hamid, R. H.; Beheary, M. M.; Ahmed, N. M.; Edris, K.; Marzouk, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    On the basis of well resolved observations of the solar corona taken at Salloum N-W of Egypt during the total solar eclipse of 2006 “the descending phase of solar cycle 23”, some aspects of the physics of the corona have been studied up to several solar radii. The magnetic structures of the white light corona were studied. The flattening coefficient e characterizes the shape of the isophotes of the whit-light corona and computed as a function of the distance from the disk center. The flattening index e during solar total eclipse 2006 was found to be 0.158. This result is in a good agreement with previous published results.

  10. The Many Facets of PISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Trying to understand PISA is analogous to the parable of the blind men and the elephant. There are many facets of the PISA program, and thus many ways to both applaud and critique this ambitious international program of assessment that has gained enormous importance in the crafting of contemporary educational policy. One of the facets discussed in…

  11. Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    A prototype deployer for the STACBEAM (Stacking Triangular Articulated Compact Beam) is being developed. The STACBEAM is an accordian-folded solar array blanket. The prototype was constructed as a point design for support of a 23.9-kW blanket and is described.

  12. Impact of Financial Structure on the Cost of Solar Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.; Kreycik, C.; Bird, L.; Schwabe, P.; Cory, K.

    2012-03-01

    To stimulate investment in renewable energy generation projects, the federal government developed a series of support structures that reduce taxes for eligible investors--the investment tax credit, the production tax credit, and accelerated depreciation. The nature of these tax incentives often requires an outside investor and a complex financial arrangement to allocate risk and reward among the parties. These financial arrangements are generally categorized as 'advanced financial structures.' Among renewable energy technologies, advanced financial structures were first widely deployed by the wind industry and are now being explored by the solar industry to support significant scale-up in project development. This report describes four of the most prevalent financial structures used by the renewable sector and evaluates the impact of financial structure on energy costs for utility-scale solar projects that use photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies.

  13. Concept of epitaxial silicon structures for edge illuminated solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnecki, J.; Gawlik, G.; Teodorczyk, M.; Jeremiasz, O.; Kozłowski, R.; Lipiński, D.; Krzyżak, K.; Brzozowski, A.

    2011-12-01

    A new concept of edge illuminated solar cells (EISC) based on silicon epitaxial technique has been proposed. In this kind of photovoltaic (PV) devices, sun-light illuminates directly a p-n junction through the edge of the structure which is perpendicular to junction surface. The main motivation of the presented work is preparation of a working model of an edge-illuminated silicon epitaxial solar cell sufficient to cooperation with a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) consisted of a polymer foil doped with a luminescent material. The technological processes affecting the cell I-V characteristic and PV parameters are considered.

  14. Structure for conversion of solar radiation to electricity and heat

    SciTech Connect

    Boling, N.L.; Rapp, C.F.

    1980-01-29

    Disclosed is a modified flat plate thermal collector, modified to substitute for one of its insulating flat light conducting members a flat luminescent solar collector plate coupled to a photocell and having a thin layer containing a luminescent species responsive to solar radiation, to provide a structure for producing both electrical and thermal energy, wherein said thin layer is protected from the ambient atmosphere and wherein the thin layer is out of contact with said photocell.

  15. Comparative modeling of InP solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The comparative modeling of p(+)n and n(+)p indium phosphide solar cell structures is studied using a numerical program PC-1D. The optimal design study has predicted that the p(+)n structure offers improved cell efficiencies as compared to n(+)p structure, due to higher open-circuit voltage. The various cell material and process parameters to achieve the maximum cell efficiencies are reported. The effect of some of the cell parameters on InP cell I-V characteristics was studied. The available radiation resistance data on n(+)p and p(+)p InP solar cells are also critically discussed.

  16. The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2014-01-01

    The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system, which since Pythagoras of Samos (ca. 570-495 BC) is known as the music of the spheres, is briefly reviewed from the Renaissance up to contemporary research. Copernicus' heliocentric model from 1543 suggested that the planets of our solar system form a kind of mutually ordered and quasi-synchronized system. From 1596 to 1619 Kepler formulated preliminary mathematical relations of approximate commensurabilities among the planets, which were later reformulated in the Titius-Bode rule (1766-1772), which successfully predicted the orbital position of Ceres and Uranus. Following the discovery of the ~ 11 yr sunspot cycle, in 1859 Wolf suggested that the observed solar variability could be approximately synchronized with the orbital movements of Venus, Earth, Jupiter and Saturn. Modern research has further confirmed that (1) the planetary orbital periods can be approximately deduced from a simple system of resonant frequencies; (2) the solar system oscillates with a specific set of gravitational frequencies, and many of them (e.g., within the range between 3 yr and 100 yr) can be approximately constructed as harmonics of a base period of ~ 178.38 yr; and (3) solar and climate records are also characterized by planetary harmonics from the monthly to the millennial timescales. This short review concludes with an emphasis on the contribution of the author's research on the empirical evidences and physical modeling of both solar and climate variability based on astronomical harmonics. The general conclusion is that the solar system works as a resonator characterized by a specific harmonic planetary structure that also synchronizes the Sun's activity and the Earth's climate. The special issue Pattern in solar variability, their planetary origin and terrestrial impacts (Mörner et al., 2013) further develops the ideas about the planetary-solar-terrestrial interaction with the personal contribution of 10

  17. The solar corona structures as inferred from July 11, 1991 total solar eclipse observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykora, Julius; Badalyan, O. G.

    1992-11-01

    During the 11 Jul. 1991 total solar eclipse (La Paz, Mexico), very complete photographic records of the linearly polarized light of the solar corona in continuum and in spectral line FeXIV 530.3 nm were obtained. Degree of polarization is considerably different for both the mentioned spectral regions. This follows, of course, most of all from a difference of the physical substance of polarization both in continuum and in emission spectral lines. The distinct variety of the white light degree of polarization according to the type of coronal structures is discussed. For example, the high degree of polarization is characteristic for the coronal streamers which in case of this eclipse were localized at unusually high solar latitudes. Position of the streamers is certainly reflected in an exceptional position of the heliospheric current sheet and, except of that, seriously casts doubts on the general validity of the Ludendorff's definition of the solar corona flattening.

  18. Recent Developments in Smart Adaptive Structures for Solar Sailcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worton, M. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Oakley, J.; Adetona, O.; Keel, L. H.

    2007-01-01

    The "Smart Adaptive Structures for Solar Sailcraft" development activity at MSFC has investigated issues associated with understanding how to model and scale the subsystem and multi-body system dynamics of a gossamer solar sailcraft with the objective of designing sailcraft attitude control systems. This research and development activity addressed three key tasks that leveraged existing facilities and core competencies of MSFC to investigate dynamics and control issues of solar sails. Key aspects of this effort included modeling and testing of a 30 m deployable boom; modeling of the multi-body system dynamics of a gossamer sailcraft; investigation of control-structures interaction for gossamer sailcraft; and development and experimental demonstration of adaptive control technologies to mitigate control-structures interaction.

  19. Coherent structure and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the coherent structures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft. Previously established novel wavelet and higher order statistics are used in this work. We analyze the wavelet power spectrum of various solar wind plasma parameters. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series, allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data. We analyze each wavelet power spectra for transient coherency, and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. These results offer a new understanding of various processes in a turbulent regime. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for current theories of solar wind generation and describe future work for determining the relationship between the coherent structures in our ionic composition data and the structure of the coronal magnetic field. Keywords: Wavelet Power Spectrum, Coherent structure and Solar wind plasma

  20. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-23

    2010 The writhe of helical structures in the solar corona T. Török1,2, M. A. Berger2,3, and B. Kliem2,4,5 1 LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC...2009; accepted ... ABSTRACT Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of...twist and writhe helicity . Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates

  1. Interpretation of Tadpole Structures in the Solar Radio Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried; Melnik, Valentin; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The new spectrometer on the Ukrainian radio telescope UTR-2 allows to observe the solar radio radiation at low frequencies (10-30 MHz) with a high spectral and temporal resolution. Tadpole structures were observed as special fine structures in the solar radio radiation. They show a fast drift (-2.13 MHz/s) in the dynamic radio spectrum. They appear as an ensemble of tadpoles drifting slowly (-8.3 kHz/s) from high to low frequencies. The tadpoles are interpreted as electron beams accelerated at shocks in the high corona.

  2. Solar Array Structures for 300 kW-Class Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard; Rose, Geoff; Mann, Troy O.; Warren, Jerry E.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Kerslake, Tom; Kraft, Tom; Banik, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art solar arrays for spacecraft provide on the order of 20 kW of electrical power, and they usually consist of 3J solar cells bonded to hinged rigid panels about 1 inch in thickness. This structural construction allows specific mass and packaging volumes of up to approximately 70 W/kg and 15 kW/m3 to be achieved. Significant advances in solar array structures are required for future very-high-power spacecraft (300+ kW), such as those proposed for pre-positioning heavy cargo on or near the Moon, Mars, or asteroids using solar electric propulsion. These applications will require considerable increases in both W/kg and kW/m3, and will undoubtedly require the use of flexible-substrate designs. This presentation summarizes work sponsored by NASA's Game Changing Development Program since Oct. 2011 to address the challenge of developing 300+ kW solar arrays. The work is primarily being done at NASA Langley, NASA Glenn, and two contractor teams (ATK and DSS), with technical collaboration from AFRL/Kirtland. The near-tem objective of the project is design, analysis, and testing of 30-50 kW solar array designs that are extensible to the far-term objective of 300+ kW. The work is currently focused on three designs: the MegaFlex concept by ATK, the Mega-ROSA concept by DSS, and an in-house 300-kW Government Reference Array concept. Each of these designs will be described in the presentation. Results obtained to date by the team, as well as future work plans, for the design, analysis, and testing of these large solar array structures will be summarized.

  3. Structural Features of a Solar TPV System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, V. D.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Khvostikova, O. A.; Gazaryan, P. Y.; Sadchikov, N. A.; Vlasov, A. S.; Ionova, E. A.; Andreev, V. M.

    2004-11-01

    Developed solar TPV system consists of sunlight tracker, sunlight concentrator, absorber of concentrated sunlight, selective emitter of radiation, internal reflectors of radiation from the emitter, and PV cells cooled by water or forced air. The concentration ratio exceeding 8000 suns is ensured by the developed 300W dish mirror with secondary compound parabolic concentrator. The emitter is made of tungsten evacuated in a vacuum bulb. To decrease the losses of the photons emitted back to outside of TPV system, the area of the emitter surface exceeds up to 10 times the absorber aperture area. The developed PV cells based on Ge and GaSb have a back-surface mirror, which reflects the sub-bandgap photons to the emitter increasing its temperature and overall system efficiency.

  4. Thermally-Induced Structural Disturbances of Rigid Panel Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Thornton, Earl A.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a significant number of spacecraft has been impacted negatively by attitude disturbances resulting from thermally-induced motions of flexible structures. Recent examples of spacecraft affected by these disturbances include the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Thermally-induced structural disturbances occur as the result of rapid changes in thermal loading typically initiated as a satellite exits or enters the Earth's shadow. Temperature differences in flexible appendages give rise to structural deformations, which in turn result in disturbance torques reacting back on the spacecraft. Structures which have proven susceptible to these disturbances include deployable booms and solar arrays. This paper investigates disturbances resulting from thermally-induced deformations of rigid panel solar arrays. An analytical model for the thermal-structural response of the solar array and the corresponding disturbance torque are presented. The effect of these disturbances on the attitude dynamics of a simple spacecraft is then investigated using a coupled system of governing equations which includes the effects of thermally-induced deformations. Numerical results demonstrate the effect of varying solar array geometry on the dynamic response of the system.

  5. The spreading of a void on a facet during electromigration

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, X.; Bauer, C.L.; Mullins, W.W.; Klinger, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    A void of cross sectional area A may spread perpendicular to the applied electric field E{sub a} during electromigration because its leading surface develops a facet whose advance is limited by the supply of steps. If the facet is immobile (no step source) and the remaining surface is free to move, and if E{sub a}A is less than a threshold value, then the void assumes a stationary elongated shape dictated by a balance between capillarity and electric field. If E{sub a}A exceeds the threshold value, however, a balance is no longer possible, and the void spreads along the facet without arrest. If the facet has limited mobility, a balance is possible for all values of E{sub a}A, resulting in an elongated moving steady-state shape. The treatment simplifies the void shape as rectangular but preserves the essential features of capillarity and surface electromigration. The authors argue that the motion of a facet on a void along the outward normal requires defects (e.g., intersecting screw dislocations) that act as step sources since homogeneous nucleation of steps on the facet is expected to be negligible. Since voids in fine-line interconnects are often observed to be partially faceted, restricted void motion and resultant spreading which depend sensitively on crystallographic features, such as defect structure and grain orientation, may indeed limit the lifetime of fine-line interconnects in electronic devices.

  6. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells.

  7. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-28

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells.

  8. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Surface energetic and bonding characteristics of tetrahexahedral platinum nanocrystals enclosed by high-index facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Zi-Zhong; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2009-11-01

    This paper uses a molecular static approach with a many-body potential to investigate the surface energetic and bonding characteristics of tetrahexahedral platinum nanocrystals enclosed by high-index facets such as {210}, {310}, {410}, {520} and {730}. It mainly focuses on the effect of crystal size and surface Miller index on these characteristics. The results show that the surface energy and dangling bond density increase with decreasing diameter of tetrahexahedral nanocrystals and generally show an order of {210} > {730} > {520} > {310} > {410}. However, this order is not valid at crystal sizes below 7 nm or so. The results of corresponding surfaces are also presented for comparison.

  9. Superlattices and multilayer structures for high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, M.; Leburton, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Possible applications of superlattices to photovoltaic structures are discussed. A new concept based on doping superstructures (NIPI) can be exploited to significantly reduce recombination losses in III-V compound solar cells. A novel multijunction structure with lateral current transport is proposed. A computer simulation has been performed which shows that by optimizing the multilayer structure, short circuit current is substantially increased with minimum drop in open circuit voltage. An additional advantage of the structure is enhanced radiation tolerance. It is anticipated that this multilayer structure can be incorporated in multibandgap cells to achieve high efficiencies.

  10. Rough surface scattering based on facet model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khamsi, H. R.; Fung, A. K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    A model for the radar return from bare ground was developed to calculate the radar cross section of bare ground and the effect of the frequency averaging on the reduction of the variance of the return. It is shown that, by assuming that the distribution of the slope to be Gaussian and that the distribution of the length of the facet to be in the form of the positive side of a Gaussian distribution, the results are in good agreement with experimental data collected by an 8- to 18-GHz radar spectrometer system. It is also shown that information on the exact correlation length of the small structure on the ground is not necessary; an effective correlation length may be calculated based on the facet model and the wavelength of the incident wave.

  11. Shape memory self-deployable structures for solar sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Witold; Tan, Seng; Willis, Paul; Pryor, Mark

    2008-12-01

    A cold-hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structures technology is one of the most recent results of the quest for simple, reliable and low-cost self-deployable structures. The CHEM technology utilizes shape-memory polymers in open-cell foam structures or sandwich structures made of shape-memory-polymer foam cores and polymeric laminated-composite skins. It takes advantage of a polymer's shape memory and the corresponding internal elastic recovery forces to self-deploy a compacted structure. This paper describes these structures and their major advantages over other expandable and deployable structures presently used. Previous preliminary investigations and experiments have confirmed the feasibility of certain CHEM structures for space applications. Further improvements in CHEM technology and structure design widen potential space applications, including advanced solar sail structural concepts that are revealed and described in this paper.

  12. Search for fine scale structures in high latitude solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livi, S.; Parenti, S.; Poletto, G.

    1995-01-01

    About 25 years ago, E. Parker suggested that, as a consequence of the inhomogeneous structure of the corona, the solar wind might consist of adjacent structures with different physical conditions. Since that suggestion was made, the solar wind plasma characteristics have been measured in situ through many experiments, but little has been done to check whether the solar wind shows any evidence for fine scale structures, and, in the affirmative, how far from the Sun these structures persist. A previous work on this subject, by Thieme, Marsch and Schwenn (1990), based on Helios data, lead these authors to claim that the solar wind, between 0.3 and 1 AU, is inhomogeneous on a scale consistent with the hypothesis that the plume-interplume plasmas, at those distances, still retain their identity. In this work we present preliminary results from an investigation of the solar wind fine structure from Ulysses high latitude observations. To this end, we have analyzed data over several months, during 1994, at times well after Ulysses's last encounter with the Heliospheric Current Sheet, when the spacecraft was at latitudes above 50 degrees. These data refer to high speed wind coming from southern polar coronal holes and are best suited for plume-interplume identification. We have performed a power spectra analysis of typical plasma parameters, to test whether the wind plasma consist of two distinct plasma populations. We also examined data to check whether there is any evidence for an horizontal pressure balance over the hypothesized distinct structures. Our results are discussed and compared with previous findings.

  13. FRESH INSIGHTS ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE SOLAR CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne; New, Roger; Serenelli, Aldo M. E-mail: w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.uk E-mail: r.new@shu.ac.uk

    2009-07-10

    We present new results on the structure of the solar core, obtained with new sets of frequencies of solar low-degree p modes obtained from the BiSON network. We find that different methods used in extracting the different sets of frequencies cause shifts in frequencies, but the shifts are not large enough to affect solar structure results. We find that the BiSON frequencies show that the solar sound speed in the core is slightly larger than that inferred from data from Michelson Doppler Imager low-degree modes, and the uncertainties on the inversion results are smaller. Density results also change by a larger amount, and we find that solar models now tend to show smaller differences in density compared to the Sun. The result is seen at all radii, a result of the fact that conservation of mass implies that density differences in one region have to cancel out density differences in others, since our models are constructed to have the same mass as the Sun. The uncertainties on the density results are much smaller too. We attribute the change in results to having more, and lower frequency, low-degree mode frequencies available. These modes provide greater sensitivity to conditions in the core.

  14. SOLAR RADIO BURSTS WITH SPECTRAL FINE STRUCTURES IN PREFLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Tan, Baolin; Huang, Jing; Tan, Chengming; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Simões, Paulo J.A.

    2015-01-20

    Good observations of preflare activities are important for us to understand the origin and triggering mechanism of solar flares, and to predict the occurrence of solar flares. This work presents the characteristics of microwave spectral fine structures as preflare activities of four solar flares observed by the Ondřejov radio spectrograph in the frequency range of 0.8-2.0 GHz. We found that these microwave bursts which occurred 1-4 minutes before the onset of flares have spectral fine structures with relatively weak intensities and very short timescales. They include microwave quasi-periodic pulsations with very short periods of 0.1-0.3 s and dot bursts with millisecond timescales and narrow frequency bandwidths. Accompanying these microwave bursts are filament motions, plasma ejection or loop brightening in the EUV imaging observations, and non-thermal hard X-ray emission enhancements observed by RHESSI. These facts may reveal certain independent, non-thermal energy releasing processes and particle acceleration before the onset of solar flares. They may help us to understand the nature of solar flares and to predict their occurrence.

  15. Structuring of thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, Gabriele; Banse, Henrik; Wagner, Uwe; Peschel, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Laser structuring of different types of thin film layers is a state of the art process in the photovoltaic industry. TCO layers and molybdenum are structured with e.g. 1064 nm lasers. Amorphous silicon, microcrystalline silicon or cadmium telluride are ablated with 515/532 nm lasers. Typical pulse durations of the lasers in use for these material ablation processes are in the nanosecond range. Up to now the common process for CIS/CIGS cells is needle structuring. Hard metal needles scribe lines with a width of 30 to 60 μm into the semiconductor material. A laser technology would have some advantages compared to mechanical scribing. The precision of the lines would be higher (no chipping effects), the laser has no wear out. The dead area (distance from P1 structuring line to P3 structuring line) can be significantly smaller with the laser technology. So we investigate the structuring of CIS/CIGS materials with ultra short pulse lasers of different wavelengths. The ablation rates and the structuring speeds versus the repetition rates have been established. For the different layer thicknesses and line widths we determined the necessary energy densities. After all tests we can calculate the possible reduction of the dead area on the thin film module. The new technology will result in an increase in the efficiency per module of up to 4 %.

  16. Facet-dependent photovoltaic efficiency variations in single grains of hybrid halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblebici, Sibel Y.; Leppert, Linn; Li, Yanbo; Reyes-Lillo, Sebastian E.; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Ed; Lee, Jiye; Melli, Mauro; Ziegler, Dominik; Angell, Daniel K.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Ashby, Paul D.; Toma, Francesca M.; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Sharp, Ian D.; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on hybrid perovskite materials have exceeded 22% efficiency due to high charge-carrier mobilities and lifetimes. Properties such as photocurrent generation and open-circuit voltage are influenced by the microscopic structure and orientation of the perovskite crystals, but are difficult to quantify on the intra-grain length scale and are often treated as homogeneous within the active layer. Here, we map the local short-circuit photocurrent, open-circuit photovoltage, and dark drift current in state-of-the-art methylammonium lead iodide solar cells using photoconductive atomic force microscopy. We find, within individual grains, spatially correlated heterogeneity in short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage up to 0.6 V. These variations are related to different crystal facets and have a direct impact on the macroscopic power conversion efficiency. We attribute this heterogeneity to a facet-dependent density of trap states. These results imply that controlling crystal grain and facet orientation will enable a systematic optimization of polycrystalline and single-crystal devices for photovoltaic and lighting applications.

  17. Single crystalline silicon solar cells with rib structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiba, Shuhei; Hirai, Masakazu; Abe, Yusuke; Konagai, Makoto; Ichikawa, Yukimi

    2017-02-01

    To improve the conversion efficiency of Si solar cells, we have developed a thin Si wafer-based solar cell that uses a rib structure. The open-circuit voltage of a solar cell is known to increase with deceasing wafer thickness if the cell is adequately passivated. However, it is not easy to handle very thin wafers because they are brittle and are subject to warpage. We fabricated a lattice-shaped rib structure on the rear side of a thin Si wafer to improve the wafer's strength. A silicon nitride film was deposited on the Si wafer surface and patterned to form a mask to fabricate the lattice-shaped rib, and the wafer was then etched using KOH to reduce the thickness of the active area, except for the rib region. Using this structure in a Si heterojunction cell, we demonstrated that a high open-circuit voltage (VOC) could be obtained by thinning the wafer without sacrificing its strength. A wafer with thickness of 30 μm was prepared easily using this structure. We then fabricated Si heterojunction solar cells using these rib wafers, and measured their implied VOC as a function of wafer thickness. The measured values were compared with device simulation results, and we found that the measured VOC agrees well with the simulated results. To optimize the rib and cell design, we also performed device simulations using various wafer thicknesses and rib dimensions.

  18. Update of the Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Robert D.; Peterson, Todd T.; Ehresman, Derik T.

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Project, which has achieved the successful design, fabrication, and testing of a full-scale prototypical solar dynamic concentrator, is discussed. The design and fabrication process are summarized, and the test results for the reflective facet optical performance and the concentrator structural repeatability are reported. Initial testing of structural repeatability of a seven panel portion of the concentrator was followed by assembly and testing of the full nineteen-panel structure. The testing, which consisted of theodolite and optical measurements over an assembly-disassembly-reassembly cycle, demonstrated that the concentrator maintained the as-built contour and optical characteristics. The facet development effort, which entailed developing a vapor-deposited reflective facet, produced a viable design with demonstrated optical characteristics that are within the project goals.

  19. Low-cost solar array structure development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Early studies of flat-plate arrays have projected costs on the order of $50/square meter for installed array support structures. This report describes an optimized low-cost frame-truss structure that is estimated to cost below $25/square meter, including all markups, shipping an installation. The structure utilizes a planar frame made of members formed from light-gauge galvanized steel sheet and is supposed in the field by treated-wood trusses that are partially buried in trenches. The buried trusses use the overburden soil to carry uplift wind loads and thus to obviate reinforced-concrete foundations. Details of the concept, including design rationale, fabrication and assembly experience, structural testing and fabrication drawings are included.

  20. Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona During the December 4, 2002 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.; Riley, Pete; Lionello, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The solar magnetic field plays a key role in determining coronal. The principal input to MHD models is the observed solar magnetic field. 3D MHD models can be used to compare with eclipse and coronograph images, SOHO images (LOSCO, EIT), Ulysses and WIND spacecraft data, and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements. MHD computations can tell us about the structure of the corona. Eclipses can help us to verify the accuracy of the models. 4 December, 2002 total eclipce: visible in the southern hemisphere (South Atlantic, southern Africa, Indian Ocean, and Australia). Total in center Angola is at 06:00 UT.

  1. Structure and sources of solar wind in the growing phase of 24th solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Goryaev, Farid; Shugay, Julia; Rodkin, Denis; Veselovsky, Igor

    2015-04-01

    We present analysis of the solar wind (SW) structure and its association with coronal sources during the minimum and rising phase of 24th solar cycle (2009-2011). The coronal sources prominent in this period - coronal holes, small areas of open magnetic fields near active regions and transient sources associated with small-scale solar activity have been investigated using EUV solar images and soft X-ray fluxes obtained by the CORONAS-Photon/TESIS/Sphinx, PROBA2/SWAP, Hinode/EIS and AIA/SDO instruments as well as the magnetograms obtained by HMI/SDO. It was found that at solar minimum (2009) velocity and magnetic field strength of high speed wind (HSW) and transient SW from small-scale flares did not differ significantly from those of the background slow speed wind (SSW). The major difference between parameters of different SW components was seen in the ion composition represented by the C6/C5, O7/O6, Fe/O ratios and the mean charge of Fe ions. With growing solar activity, the speed of HSW increased due to transformation of its sources - small-size low-latitude coronal holes into equatorial extensions of large polar holes. At that period, the ion composition of transient SW changed from low-temperature to high-temperature values, which was caused by variation of the source conditions and change of the recombination/ionization rates during passage of the plasma flow through the low corona. However, we conclude that criteria of separation of the SW components based on the ion ratios established earlier by Zhao&Fisk (2009) for higher solar activity are not applicable to the extremely weak beginning of 24th cycle. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement eHeroes (project n° 284461, www.eheroes.eu).

  2. Radial microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshini, Bindu; Das, Mukul Kumar; Sen, Mrinal; Kumar, Subindu

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a theoretical model for radial p-n junction microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structures in the space between microwires has been developed. Incorporation of pyramidal structures results in reflection of light, which would otherwise be unused, and illuminates side walls of the microwires. This additional illumination enhances absorption and, hence, efficiency of the whole structure. Efficiency enhancement is analyzed by varying different device parameters e.g., radius and length of each microwire and packing fraction of the structure. Results show that the maximum fractional efficiency enhancement can be obtained as 30% by suitable choice of these parameters.

  3. Correlation between crystallographic orientation and surface faceting in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinbin; Mo, Kun; Yao, Tiankai; Lian, Jie; Fortner, Jeffrey; Jamison, Laura; Xu, Ruqing; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2016-09-01

    Here coordinated experimental efforts to quantitatively correlate crystallographic orientation and surface faceting features in UO2 are reported upon. A sintered polycrystalline UO2 sample was thermally etched to induce the formation of surface faceting features. Synchrotron Laue microdiffraction was used to obtain a precise crystallographic orientation map for the UO2 surface grains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to collect the detailed information on the surface morphology of the sample. The surface faceting features were found to be highly dependent on the crystallographic orientation. In most cases, Triple-plane structures containing one {100} plane and two {111} planes were found to dominate the surface of UO2. The orientation-faceting relationship established in this study revealed a practical and efficient method of determining crystallographic orientation based on the surface features captured by SEM images.

  4. Use of land facets to design linkages for climate change.

    PubMed

    Brost, Brian M; Beier, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Least-cost modeling for focal species is the most widely used method for designing conservation corridors and linkages. However, these linkages have been based on current species' distributions and land cover, both of which will change with large-scale climate change. One method to develop corridors that facilitate species' shifting distributions is to incorporate climate models into their design. But this approach is enormously complex and prone to error propagation. It also produces outputs at a grain size (km2) coarser than the grain at which conservation decisions are made. One way to avoid these problems is to design linkages for the continuity and interspersion of land facets, or recurring landscape units of relatively uniform topography and soils. This coarse-filter approach aims to conserve the arenas of biological activity rather than the temporary occupants of those arenas. In this paper, we demonstrate how land facets can be defined in a rule-based and adaptable way, and how they can be used for linkage design in the face of climate change. We used fuzzy c-means cluster analysis to define land facets with respect to four topographic variables (elevation, slope angle, solar insolation, and topographic position), and least-cost analysis to design linkages that include one corridor per land facet. To demonstrate the flexibility of our procedures, we designed linkages using land facets in three topographically diverse landscapes in Arizona, USA. Our procedures can use other variables, including soil variables, to define land facets. We advocate using land facets to complement, rather than replace, existing focal species approaches to linkage design. This approach can be used even in regions lacking land cover maps and is not affected by the bias and patchiness common in species occurrence data.

  5. Spectropolarimetry of fine magnetized structures in the upper solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas Anthony

    2013-12-01

    One of the earliest indications of magnetic fields acting in the solar atmosphere came at the beginning of the 20th century when George Hale noted a "decided definiteness of structure" in photographs within the Hydrogen Balmer-alpha line core. Fine structure both in the chromosphere and in the corona result from processes that are not well understood but accepted as a consequence of the solar magnetic field. Our knowledge of this field is lacking, and until recently, the assumed relationship between fine thermal structure and the magnetic field remained untested. Here, spectropolarimetric diagnostics of fine structures in the solar chromosphere and cool corona are advanced using the infrared He I triplet at 1083 nm. Precise calibration procedures are developed for the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS), recently commissioned at the Dunn Solar Telescope. Together with high-order adaptive optics, we simultaneously map fine structures while obtaining a polarimetric sensitivity of up to 2 x 10--4 of the incoming intensity. These instrument improvements result in the first maps of the He I polarized signatures within an active region superpenumbra, where Hale first recognized fine-structuring. Selective absorption and emission processes due to non-equilibrium optical pumping are recognized. Our interpretation, using advanced inversions of the He I triplet, provides confirmation of Hale's initial suspicion---the fine structures of the solar chromosphere are visual markers for the magnetic field. Yet, the fine chromospheric thermal structure is not matched by an equivalently fine magnetic structure. Our ability to measure this field suggests the utility of the He I triplet as an inner boundary condition for the inner heliospheric magnetic field. In the corona itself, we infer the vector properties of a catastrophically-cooled coronal loop, uniting space-based and ground-based instrumentation. We determine how fine loops are anchored in the photosphere via a

  6. Modeling Integration and Reuse of Heterogeneous Terminologies in Faceted Browsing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Daniel R.

    2017-01-01

    We integrate heterogeneous terminologies into our category-theoretic model of faceted browsing and show that existing terminologies and vocabularies can be reused as facets in a cohesive, interactive system. Commonly found in online search engines and digital libraries, faceted browsing systems depend upon one or more taxonomies which outline the structure and content of the facets available for user interaction. Controlled vocabularies or terminologies are often externally curated and are available as a reusable resource across systems. We demonstrated previously that category theory can abstractly model faceted browsing in a way that supports the development of interfaces capable of reusing and integrating multiple models of faceted browsing. We extend this model by illustrating that terminologies can be reused and integrated as facets across systems with examples from the biomedical domain.

  7. Study of Magnetic Structure in the Solar Photosphere and Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Robert W.; Avrett, Eugene; Nisenson, Peter; Uitenbroek, Han; vanBallegooijen, Adriaan

    1998-01-01

    This grant funded an observational and theoretical program to study the structure and dynamics of the solar photosphere and low chromosphere, and the spectral signatures that result. The overall goal is to learn about mechanisms that cause heating of the overlying atmosphere, and produce variability of solar emission in spectral regions important for astrophysics and space physics. The program exploited two new ground-based observational capabilities: one using the Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma for very high angular resolution observations of the photospheric intensity field (granulation) and proxies of the magnetic field (G-band images); and the other using the Near Infrared Magnetograph at the McMath-Pierce Solar Facility to map the spatial variation and dynamic behavior of the solar temperature minimum region using infrared CO lines. We have interpreted these data using a variety of theoretical and modelling approaches, some developed especially for this project. Previous annual reports cover the work done up to 31 May 1997. This final report summarizes our work for the entire period, including the period of no-cost extension from 1 June 1997 through September 30 1997. In Section 2 we discuss observations and modelling of the photospheric flowfields and their consequences for heating of the overlying atmosphere, and in Section 3 we discuss imaging spectroscopy of the CO lines at 4.67 mu.

  8. Facet-Dependent Cr(VI) Adsorption of Hematite Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaopeng; Hou, Xiaojing; Song, Fahui; Zhao, Jincai; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-02-16

    In this study, the adsorption process of Cr(VI) on the hematite facets was systematically investigated with synchrotron-based Cr K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, density-functional theory calculation, and surface complexation models. Structural model fitting of EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that the interatomic distances of Cr-Fe were, respectively, 3.61 Å for the chromate coordinated hematite nanoplates with exposed {001} facets, 3.60 and 3.30 Å for the chromate coordinated hematite nanorods with exposed {001} and {110} facets, which were characteristic of inner-sphere complexation. In situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of two inner-sphere surface complexes with C3ν and C2ν symmetry, while the C3ν and C2ν species were assigned to monodentate and bidentate inner-sphere surface complexes with average Cr-Fe interatomic distances of 3.60 and 3.30 Å, respectively. On the basis of these experimental and theoretical results, we concluded that HCrO4(-) as dominated Cr(VI) species was adsorbed on {001} and {110} facets in inner-sphere monodentate mononuclear and bidentate binuclear configurations, respectively. Moreover, the Cr(VI) adsorption performance of hematite facets was strongly dependent on the chromate complexes formed on the hematite facets.

  9. Raman scattering characterization of space solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintairov, Alexander M.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Paleeva, E. V.; Sorokina, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    A contactless method for the determination of the free-carrier density and the composition distribution across the thickness of 3-5 multi-layer solar cell structures, using the Raman scattering method, is developed. The method includes a step analysis of Raman spectra from optical phonons and phonon-plasmon modes of different layers. The method provides simultaneous measurements of the element composition and the thickness of the structure's layers together with the free-carrier density. The results of measurements of the free-carrier density composition distributions of the liquid phase epitaxy grown AlGaAs/GaAs and GaSb solar cell structures are presented and discussed.

  10. A Study of the Structure of the Source Region of the Solar Wind in Support of a Solar Probe Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal , Shadia R.

    1998-01-01

    Despite the richness of the information about the physical properties and the structure of the solar wind provided by the Ulysses and SOHO observations, fundamental questions regarding the nature of the coronal heating mechanisms, their source, and the manifestations of the fast and slow solar wind, still remain unanswered. The last unexplored frontier to establish the connection between the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere, its extension into interplanetary space, and the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of the solar wind, is the corona between 1 and 30 R(sub s). A Solar Probe mission offers an unprecedented opportunity to explore this frontier. The uniqueness of this mission stems from its trajectory in a plane perpendicular to the ecliptic which reaches within 9 R(sub s), of the solar surface over the poles and 3 - 9 R(sub s), at the equator. With a complement of simultaneous in situ and remote sensing observations, this mission is destined to have a significant impact on our understanding of the fundamental processes that heat the corona and drive the solar wind. The Solar Probe should be able to detect remnants and signatures of the processes which heat the corona and accelerate the solar wind. The primary objective of this proposal was to explore the structure of the different source regions of the solar wind through complementary observational and theoretical studies in support of a Solar Probe mission.

  11. Visible-light photocatalysis in Cu2Se nanowires with exposed {111} facets and charge separation between (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) polar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ning, Lichao; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Congjie; Yang, Heqing; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2015-05-28

    The search for active narrow band gap semiconductor photocatalysts that directly split water or degrade organic pollutants under solar irradiation remains an open issue. We synthesized Cu2Se nanowires with exposed {111} facets using ethanol and glycerol as morphology controlling agents. The {111} facets were found to be the active facets for decomposing organic contaminants in the entire solar spectrum. Based on the polar structure of the Cu2Se {111} facets, a charge separation model between polar (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) surfaces is proposed. The internal electric field between polar (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) surfaces created by spontaneous polarization drives charge separation. The reduction and oxidation reactions occur on the positive (111) and negative (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) polar surfaces, respectively. This suggests the surface-engineering of narrow band gap semiconductors as a strategy to fabricate photocatalysts with high reactivity in the entire solar spectrum. The charge separation model can deepen the understanding of charge transfer in other semiconductor nanocrystals with high photocatalytic activities and offer guidance to design more effective photocatalysts as well as new types of solar cells, photoelectrodes and photoelectric devices.

  12. Method of making quasi-grain boundary-free polycrystalline solar cell structure and solar cell structure obtained thereby

    DOEpatents

    Gonzalez, Franklin N.; Neugroschel, Arnost

    1984-02-14

    A new solar cell structure is provided which will increase the efficiency of polycrystalline solar cells by suppressing or completely eliminating the recombination losses due to the presence of grain boundaries. This is achieved by avoiding the formation of the p-n junction (or other types of junctions) in the grain boundaries and by eliminating the grain boundaries from the active area of the cell. This basic concept can be applied to any polycrystalline material; however, it will be most beneficial for cost-effective materials having small grains, including thin film materials.

  13. Imaging solar coronal magnetic structures in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartledge, N. P.

    The study of solar coronal structures and, in particular prominences, is a key part of understanding the highly complex physical mechanisms occurring in the Sun's atmosphere. Solar prominences are important in their own right and some of the most puzzling questions in solar theory have arisen through their study. For example, how do they form and how is their mass continuously replenished? How can the magnetic field provide their continuous support against gravity over time periods of several months? How can such cool, dense material exist in thermal equilibrium in the surrounding coronal environment? Why do they erupt? A study of their structure and that of the surrounding medium is important in determining the nature of the coronal plasma and magnetic field. Also, prominences are closely associated with other key phenomena such as coronal mass ejections and eruptive solar flares which occur as a prominence loses equilibrium and rises from the solar surface. Our current understanding of these fascinating structures is extremely limited and we know very little about their basic global structure. In fact, recent prominence observations have caused our basic paradigms to be challenged (Priest, 1996) and so we must set up new models in order to gain even a fundamental understanding. Prominences are highly nonlinear, three-dimensional structures. Large feet (or barbs) reach out from the main body of a prominence and reach down to the photosphere where the dense material continuously drains away. These provide a real clue to the three-dimensional nature of the coronal field and its relation to the photospheric field. It is important, therefore, to make stereographic observations of prominences in order to gain a basic understanding of their essentially three-dimensional nature and attempt to formulate new paradigms for their structure and evolution. There is no doubt that the study of prominences in three dimensions is a crucial exercise if we are to develop a better

  14. High efficient solar tracker based on a simple shutter structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Jia; Liu, Te-Shu; Huang, Kuang-Lung; Lin, Po-Chih

    2013-09-01

    In many photovoltaic (PV) or sunlight-illumination systems, solar trackers are always essential to obtain high energy/flux concentration efficiency, and that would lead to increase cost and extra power consumption due to the complex structure and heavy weight of the trackers. To decrease the cost while without sacrificing efficiency, a Fresnellens concentrator incorporated with a simple and cheap shutter, which consists of high reflective mirrors instead of conventional trackers, is proposed in this paper to provide solar tracking during the daytime. Thus, the time-variant and slant-incident sunlight rays can be redirected to vertically incident upon the surface of the Fresnel lens by appropriately arranging mirrors and swinging them to the proper slant angles with respect to the orientation of sunlight. The computer simulation results show that power concentration efficiency over 90%, as compared with the efficiency of directly normal incident sunlight, can be achieved with the mirror reflectance of 0.97 and for any solar incident angle within +/-75 degrees to the normal of the Fresnel lens. To verify the feasibility and performance of the concentrator with the proposed shutter, a sunlight illumination system based on this novel structure is demonstrated. Both computer simulation and practical measurement results for the prototype of the sunlight illumination system are also given to compare with. The results prove the simple and high efficient shutter applicable to general PV or sunlight-illumination systems for solar tracking.

  15. Extended Solar System Structures Observed by WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Masci, Frank; Cutri, Roc; Walker, Russell; Mainzer, Amy; Bauer, James; Stevenson, Rachel; Tricarico, Pasquale

    2014-11-01

    Extended structures associated with recent asteroid collisions and comets were detected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite, which conducted the first survey of the thermal emission of the sky in 1983. Twenty-seven years later, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), conducted a more sensitive survey of the sky at wavelengths spanning the shorter IRAS bandpasses and detected many of these same structures. Initial identifications include asteroid dust bands associated with collisions giving rise to the Karin and Beagle clusters within the Koronis and Themis asteroid families, respectively. An additional pair of bands is associated with the collision giving rise to the Veritas asteroid family. Comet trails associated with short-period comets have also been observed. Type 2 trails, detected by IRAS and possibly associated with asteroid collisions within the past few thousand years, have yet to be identified. Because WISE is significantly more sensitive than IRAS in the mid-infrared, it has detected some trails extending much further over their orbits and will greatly expand the catalog of trails detected in addition to those observed by IRAS and Spitzer (the latter by targeted observations). WISE and the yet more sensitive NEOCAM survey telescope will provide important insights into the recent collisional history of the asteroid belt and the nature and evolution of comets.

  16. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  17. Engineering the electronic band structure for multiband solar cells.

    PubMed

    López, N; Reichertz, L A; Yu, K M; Campman, K; Walukiewicz, W

    2011-01-14

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaN(x)As(1-x) alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the band anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  18. Problems of interior structure, the solar dynamo and the role of SCADM in providing interior diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, N. O.

    1980-01-01

    What is already known about the structure of the Sun, the motion of its convective zone, and the solar cycle is reviewed. Topics discussed include solar variability, solar 'seismology', velocity patterns, magnetic fields, and the dynamo theory. Observations are needed to determine global properties (solar luminosity and radius), oscillations (p and g models), velocities (variation of rotation with time and depth), and magnetic fields.

  19. Radial evolution of density structure in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Richard; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    White-light measurements made by the SOHO coronagraphs (LASCO for Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph) and the HAO Mauna Loa Mk III K-coronameter are combined to follow the evolution of path-integrated density structure in the solar corona overlying both coronal hole and quiet Sun regions from 1.15 to 5.5 Ro. The global imaging provided by these two instruments confirms and strengthens earlier results discovered by spacecraft radio ranging measurements [Woo and Habbal, 1999], that the imprint of density structure at the Sun — as manifested in the background latitudinal density profile closest to the Sun at 1.15 Ro — is carried essentially radially into interplanetary space with the same density gradient. The only exceptions are coronal streamers that evolve into the heliospheric current sheet within a few solar radii of the Sun.

  20. High performance silicon solar arrays employing advanced structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockey, D. E.; Hedgepeth, J. M.; Adams, L.

    1981-01-01

    Specific design features to reduce cell mass, lower panel operating temperatures, and improve power to mass ratios for silicon solar cell arrays in space applications are presented. Because mass constraints limit payload capacity for launch into GEO, graphite/epoxy structures combined with high performance Si cells are needed to deliver a power/mass ratio of 265 W/kg, notably for Solar Electric Propulsion systems, compared with existing level of 65 W/kg. Shallow diffusion and back surface field cell technology have raised cell efficiencies to 15%, with a back emissivity of 1.64. Structural design requirements comprise Shuttle interface compatibility, full ground test capability, low mass, and high stiffness. Three array alternatives are discussed, and the STACBEAM configuration, which consists of a triangular truss and a piston deployer with folding accomplished on simple hinges, provides 0.2 Hz stiffness and achieves the design power/mass goals.

  1. A deployable structure and solar array controls experiment for STEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimoto, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    A candidate configuration for a controls experiment on the Space Technology Experiments Platform (STEP) is described. The elements of the experiment are the mast, the solar array, and an articulation module between the two. The characteristic dimensions are very compatible for integration on a pallet such a STEP's proposed configuration. The controls' objective would be the measurement of orbiter interaction as well as the system identification of the appendages. The flight experiment configuration would also provide a test bed for various active vibration controls concepts. The instrumentation being considered would measure accelerations, strains, displacements, and temperatures. The deployable mast has eight elements defining a structural bay. Uniaxial measurements would be required to define loads at a cross section of the structure. Displacements due to thermal distortion of the mast and the local state of the solar concentrator may be measured by an optical ranging technique from the orbiter aft flight deck.

  2. A diffuse interface model of grain boundary faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, Fadi; Medlin, Douglas; Zimmerman, Jonathan; Hattar, Khalid; Foiles, Stephen

    Incorporating anisotropy into thermodynamic treatments of interfaces dates back to over a century ago. For a given orientation of two abutting grains in a pure metal, depressions in the grain boundary (GB) energy may exist as a function of GB inclination, defined by the plane normal. Therefore, an initially flat GB may facet resulting in a hill-and-valley structure. Herein, we present a diffuse interface model of GB faceting that is capable of capturing anisotropic GB energies and mobilities, and accounting for the excess energy due to facet junctions and their non-local interactions. The hallmark of our approach is the ability to independently examine the role of each of the interface properties on the faceting behavior. As a demonstration, we consider the Σ 5 < 001 > tilt GB in iron, where faceting along the { 310 } and { 210 } planes was experimentally observed. Linear stability analysis and numerical examples highlight the role of junction energy and associated non-local interactions on the resulting facet length scales. On the whole, our modeling approach provides a general framework to examine the spatio-temporal evolution of highly anisotropic GBs in polycrystalline metals. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Development and support structures for high-power solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, K.

    1984-01-01

    A number of structurally efficient configurations for wing-type solar arrays are developed by a combination of deepening the planform of the blanket and structure and by partitioning the blanket with battens and frequent attachments to the support structure. This technique reduces the tension required to avoid a low natural frequency for the blanket, and the load reduction results in a lighter structure. The use of three different structures are investigated: the Astromast, the Extendible Support Structure (ESS), and a new beam called the STACBEAM (Stacking Triangular Articulated Compact Beam) and their relative performances are compared. The investigation of the STACBEAM is emphasized because its sequential deployment is more reliable for very long systems, and its linear deployment facilitates local attachments to the blanket and the development of a low mass deployer.

  4. Examining the Factor Structure of the 39-Item and 15-Item Versions of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire Before and After Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for People With Recurrent Depression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Research into the effectiveness and mechanisms of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) requires reliable and valid measures of mindfulness. The 39-item Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-39) is a measure of mindfulness commonly used to assess change before and after MBIs. However, the stability and invariance of the FFMQ factor structure have not yet been tested before and after an MBI; pre to post comparisons may not be valid if the structure changes over this period. Our primary aim was to examine the factor structure of the FFMQ-39 before and after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in adults with recurrent depression in remission using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Additionally, we examined whether the factor structure of the 15-item version (FFMQ-15) was consistent with that of the FFMQ-39, and whether it was stable over MBCT. Our secondary aim was to assess the general psychometric properties of both versions. CFAs showed that pre-MBCT, a 4-factor hierarchical model (excluding the “observing” facet) best fit the FFMQ-39 and FFMQ-15 data, whereas post-MBCT, a 5-factor hierarchical model best fit the data for both versions. Configural invariance across the time points was not supported for both versions. Internal consistency and sensitivity to change were adequate for both versions. Both FFMQ versions did not differ significantly from each other in terms of convergent validity. Researchers should consider excluding the Observing subscale from comparisons of total scale/subscale scores before and after mindfulness interventions. Current findings support the use of the FFMQ-15 as an alternative measure in research where briefer forms are needed. PMID:27078186

  5. Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    The problem of chromospheric dynamics and heating consists of two problems: one, concerning the magnetic network on the boundary of supergranulation cells (CB), where the oscillation period is seven minutes, and the other, concerning the cell interior (CI), where the oscillation period is three minutes. The observational data on the oscillations and the emission of radiation can be used to determine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere provided answers are known to three critical questions, concerning: the nature of the waves powering the bright points, the origin of the observed oscillation periods and the mechanism of chromospheric heating. The recent modeling of the dynamics of the CI, which combines a sophisticated treatment of gas dynamics and radiative transfer in a one-dimensional model with empirical velocity input from the observations, answered the first of these questions: the waves powering K(sub 2upsilon), bright points are propagating acoustic waves. This firm conclusion declares invalid the model of Leibacher & Stein, which explains the observed period with standing acoustic waves in a chromospheric cavity. On the third question, the heating of the chromosphere in the CI, their model predicts that the temperature in the chromosphere is declining in the outward direction up to a height of at least I Mm most of the time, so even the time-average temperature is dropping monotonically in the outward direction, implying that lines formed in the chromosphere up to a height of at least 1 Mm appear in absorption most of the time and everywhere in the CI. The problem of the CI can be resolved with a two-component model, which combines a model for K(sub 2upsilon), bright points with a model for the background. The bright point model has the same aims as the CS94 model, except that the empirical driving from the LRK93 observations is replaced by impulsive excitation, as suggested by the properties of the Klein-Gordon equation.

  6. The development of convective structures in the solar photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, O.; Stodilka, M.

    2016-12-01

    We study the development of convective structures in the solar photosphere on the basis of the photospheric convection models obtained using data from VTT by the solving of the inverse nonequilibrium radiative transfer problem. Temporal changes of the variations of vertical velocity and temperature within granular cells are analyzed. Features of the appearance and the disappearance of granules according to their size, the formation of "trees" of fragmenting granules are investigated.

  7. Facets of Speaking Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Nivja H.; Steinel, Margarita P.; Florijn, Arjen F.; Schoonen, Rob; Hulstijn, Jan H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the componential structure of second-language (L2) speaking proficiency. Participants--181 L2 and 54 native speakers of Dutch--performed eight speaking tasks and six tasks tapping nine linguistic skills. Performance in the speaking tasks was rated on functional adequacy by a panel of judges and formed the dependent variable in…

  8. Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

  9. Solar chromospheric fine scale structures: dynamics and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.

    2012-01-01

    The solar chromosphere is a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer of the solar atmosphere that exhibits several phenomena on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution and long-duration observations, employing mostly lines, such as Halpha, the Ca II infrared lines and the Ca II H and K lines, obtained both from ground-based telescope facilities (e.g. DST, VTT, THEMIS, SST, DOT), as well as state-of-the-art satellites (e.g. SOHO, TRACE, HINODE) reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured chromospheric environment. What is known in literature as the chromospheric fine-scale structure mainly consists of small fibrilar-like features that connect various parts of quiet/active regions or span across the chromospheric network cell interiors, showing a large diversity of both physical and dynamic characteristics. The highly dynamic, fine-scale chromospheric structures are mostly governed by flows which reflect the complex geometry and dynamics of the local magnetic field and play an important role in the propagation and dissipation of waves. A comprehensive study of these structures requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved and investigation of their intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric levels. Furthermore, due to their large number present on the solar surface, it is essential to investigate their impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through processes such as magnetic reconnection and propagation of waves. The in-depth study of all aforementioned characteristics and processes, with the further addition of non-LTE physics, as well as the use of three-dimensional numerical simulations poses a fascinating challenge for both theory and numerical modeling of chromospheric fine-scale structures.

  10. Temperature-dependent side-facets of GaAs nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Mun Teng; Zheng, Kun; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Zou, Jin

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effect of growth temperature on the structural properties of Au-catalysed epitaxial GaAs semiconductor nanopillars grown by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition is investigated by electron microscopy. It has been found that the growth temperature plays a significant role on the evolution of side-facets of zinc-blende structured GaAs nanopillars. At a growth temperature of 550 °C, six \\{112\\} side-facets are formed; whereas at a higher growth temperature of 600 °C, six \\{110\\} side-facets are observed. It is believed that the formation of \\{112\\} side-facets is a kinetically dominated process while the formation of \\{110\\} side-facets is a thermodynamical process. Besides, the diffusion-induced nanopillar foundations present the same \\{112\\} edge side-facets regardless of the growth temperature.

  11. Dynamical structure of solar radio burst type III as evidence of energy of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Zety Sharizat Binti

    2013-11-01

    Observations of low frequency solar type III radio bursts associated with the ejection of plasma oscillations localized disturbance is due to excitation atoms in the plasma frequency incoherent radiations play a dominant role at the meter and decimeter wavelengths. Here, we report the results of the dynamical structure of solar flare type III that occurred on 9th March 2012 at National Space Centre, Sg Lang, Selangor, Malaysia by using the CALLISTO system. These bursts are associated with solar flare type M6 which suddenly ejected in the active region AR 1429 starting at 03:32 UT and ending at 05:00 UT with the peak at 04:12 UT. The observation showed an initial strong burst occurred due to strong signal at the beginning of the phase. We also found that both solar burst and flares tend to be a numerous on the same day and probability of chance coincidence is high. It is clearly seen that an impulsive lace burst was detected at 4:24 UT and it is more plausible that the energies are confined to the top of the loop when we compared with X-ray results. Associated with this event was type II with velocities 1285 km/s and type IV radio sweeps along with a full halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) first seen in SOHO/LASCO C2 imagery at 09/0426 Z. We concluded that the significance of study solar burst type III lies in the fact that the emission at decimetric wavelength comes from the role of magnetic field in active region that may provide the key to the energy release mechanism in a flare.

  12. New surfaces stabilized by adsorbate-induced faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaghazchi, Payam; Jacob, Timo; Ermanoski, Ivan; Chen, Wenhua; Madey, Theodore E.

    2012-07-01

    Faceting is a form of self-assembly of single-crystal surfaces at the nanometer-scale in which an initially planar surface converts to a ‘hill-and-valley’ structure, exposing new faces of low-index surfaces. Our recent studies revealed that, upon annealing in O2, three-sided nanoscale pyramids form on Ir(210) exposing smooth {311} and partially restructured (110) faces. Through a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory, we identify this structure to be a stepped double-missing-row reconstruction, which is only stable on nanopyramidal facets, not on a planar Ir(110) surface. This faceting-enabled stabilization of a hitherto unstable surface points to a new approach to prepare nanoscale model catalysts for structure-sensitivity studies in heterogeneous (electro-)catalysis with high selectivity and reactivity.

  13. The Analysis of the Development Dynamics and Structural Balance of Solar Energy in the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, A. E.; Chekardovskiy, S. M.; Akulov, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents data the analysis of the development dynamics and structural balance of solar energy in the world. In the article presents information about total installed production capacity of solar energy, the world solar energy production capacity distribution and the European Union energy market structure in 2000 and 2015 years.

  14. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  15. Colloidal quantum dot solar cells exploiting hierarchical structuring.

    PubMed

    Labelle, André J; Thon, Susanna M; Masala, Silvia; Adachi, Michael M; Dong, Haopeng; Farahani, Maryam; Ip, Alexander H; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-02-11

    Extremely thin-absorber solar cells offer low materials utilization and simplified manufacture but require improved means to enhance photon absorption in the active layer. Here, we report enhanced-absorption colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells that feature transfer-stamped solution-processed pyramid-shaped electrodes employed in a hierarchically structured device. The pyramids increase, by up to a factor of 2, the external quantum efficiency of the device at absorption-limited wavelengths near the absorber band edge. We show that absorption enhancement can be optimized with increased pyramid angle with an appreciable net improvement in power conversion efficiency, that is, with the gain in current associated with improved absorption and extraction overcoming the smaller fractional decrease in open-circuit voltage associated with increased junction area. We show that the hierarchical combination of micron-scale structured electrodes with nanoscale films provides for an optimized enhancement at absorption-limited wavelengths. We fabricate 54.7° pyramid-patterned electrodes, conformally apply the quantum dot films, and report pyramid CQD solar cells that exhibit a 24% improvement in overall short-circuit current density with champion devices providing a power conversion efficiency of 9.2%.

  16. Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays, phase 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays were investigated. The STACBEAM (stacking triangular articulated compact beam) concept was selected. The primary component, the solar array blanket, is stored in a folded configuration and is deployed by controlled linear extension. Blanket stiffness is attained by axially tensioning the blanket and by providing periodic lateral ribs and standoffs which attach the blanket to the beam at several places along its length. The STACBEAM deploys sequentially (one bay at a time) using a deployer of sufficient rigidity so that beam stiffness is not degraded during deployment. The beam does not rotate during deployment, thus making blanket beam attachment possible in the packaged condition. In addition to high bending stiffness, the STACBEAM possesses high torsional rigidity due to nonflexible diagonals. The concept is adaptable to various size and loading requirements by changing member diameter and baylength, thus affecting the ratio of packaged and deployed length.

  17. Numerical modeling of perovskite solar cells with a planar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyukov, S. P.; Sayenko, A. V.; Ivanova, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The paper is devoted to the research and development of high-efficiency solar cells with a planar perovskite n-i-p structure. A numerical model of this solar cell in the drift- diffusion approximation based on Poisson equation and continuity equations provided to determine their photoelectric characteristics and design optimization. The author considers the spectral photogeneration, bulk and surface recombination, transport charge carriers in perovskite and their collection by the electron and hole transport layers. As a result of the simulation, it was obtained efficiency dependence on perovskite absorber material thickness and lifetime (diffusion length) of the charge carriers. It is found that in addition to absorption coefficient optimal perovskite thickness is determined largely by the charge carrier diffusion length, and it has the upper limit in thickness of 500-600 nm.

  18. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the third year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona," between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period June 16, 1998 to August 15, 1999. This is also the final report for this contract. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the three-year duration of this contract we have published 49 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 3 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles. We summarize our progress during the third year of the contract. Full descriptions of our work can be found in the cited publications, a few of which are attached to this report.

  19. MUNI Ways and Structures Building Integrated Solar Membrane Project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Randall

    2014-07-03

    The initial goal of the MUNI Ways and Structures Building Integrated Solar Membrane Installation Project was for the City and County of San Francisco (CCSF) to gain experience using the integrated higher efficiency solar photovoltaic (PV) single-ply membrane product, as it differs from the conventional, low efficiency, thin-film PV products, to determine the feasibility of success of larger deployment. As several of CCSF’s municipal rooftops are constrained with respect to weight restrictions, staff of the Energy Generation Group of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) proposed to install a solar PV system using single-ply membrane The installation of the 100 kW (DC-STC) lightweight photo voltaic (PV) system at the MUNI Ways and Structures Center (700 Pennsylvania Ave., San Francisco) is a continuation of the commitment of the City and County of San Francisco (CCSF) to increase the pace of municipal solar development, and serve its municipal facilities with clean renewable energy. The fourteen (14) solar photovoltaic systems that have already been installed at CCSF municipal facilities are assisting in the reduction of fossil-fuel use, and reduction of greenhouse gases from fossil combustion. The MUNI Ways & Structures Center roof has a relatively low weight-bearing capacity (3.25 pounds per square foot) and use of traditional crystalline panels was therefore rejected. Consequently it was decided to use the best available highest efficiency Building-Integrated PV (BIPV) technology, with consideration for reliability and experience of the manufacturer which can meet the low weight-bearing capacity criteria. The original goal of the project was to provide an opportunity to monitor the results of the BIPV technology and compare these results to other City and County of San Francisco installed PV systems. The MUNI Ways and Structures Center was acquired from the Cookson Doors Company, which had run the Center for many decades. The building was

  20. Hinge specification for a square-faceted tetrahedral truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    A square-faceted tetrahedral truss is geometrically analyzed. Expressions are developed for single degree of freedom hinges which allow packaging of the structure into a configuration in which all members are parallel and closely packed in a square pattern. Deployment is sequential, thus providing control over the structure during deployment.

  1. Imperfectly geometric shapes of nanograting structures as solar absorbers with superior performance for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huu, Nghia; Cada, Michael; Pištora, Jaromír

    2014-03-10

    The expectation of perfectly geometric shapes of subwavelength grating (SWG) structures such as smoothness of sidewalls and sharp corners and nonexistence of grating defects is not realistic due to micro/nanofabrication processes. This work numerically investigates optical properties of an optimal solar absorber comprising a single-layered silicon (Si) SWG deposited on a finite Si substrate, with a careful consideration given to effects of various types of its imperfect geometry. The absorptance spectra of the solar absorber with different geometric shapes, namely, the grating with attached nanometer-sized features at the top and bottom of sidewalls and periodic defects within four and ten grating periods are investigated comprehensively. It is found that the grating with attached features at the bottom absorbs more energy than both the one at the top and the perfect grating. In addition, it is shown that the grating with defects in each fourth period exhibits the highest average absorptance (91%) compared with that of the grating having defects in each tenth period (89%), the grating with attached features (89%), and the perfect one (86%). Moreover, the results indicate that the absorptance spectrum of the imperfect structures is insensitive to angles of incidence. Furthermore, the absorptance enhancement is clearly demonstrated by computing magnetic field, energy density, and Poynting vector distributions. The results presented in this study prove that imperfect geometries of the nanograting structure display a higher absorptance than the perfect one, and provide such a practical guideline for nanofabrication capabilities necessary to be considered by structure designers.

  2. New facets of the STS polytope generated from known facets of the ATS polytope.

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetti, Neil; Fischetti, Matteo; Balas, Egon; Carr, Robert D.

    2005-05-01

    While it had been known for a long time how to transform an asymmetric traveling salesman (ATS) problem on the complete graph with n vertices into a symmetric traveling salesman (STS) problem on an incomplete graph with 2n vertices, no method was available for using this correspondence to derive facets of the symmetric polytope from facets of the asymmetric polytope until the work of E. Balas and M. Fischetti in [Lifted cycle inequalities for the asymmetric traveling salesman problem, Mathematics of Operations Research 24 (2) (1999) 273-292] suggested an approach. The original Balas-Fischetti method uses a standard sequential lifting procedure for the computation of the coefficient of the edges that are missing in the incomplete STS graph, which is a difficult task when addressing classes of (as opposed to single) inequalities. In this paper we introduce a systematic procedure for accomplishing the lifting task. The procedure exploits the structure of the tight STS tours and organizes them into a suitable tree structure. The potential of the method is illustrated by deriving large new classes of facet-defining STS inequalities.

  3. Solar concentrator advanced development project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Robert D.; Ehresman, Derik T.

    1987-01-01

    A solar dynamic concentrator design developed for use with a solar-thermodynamic power generation module intended for the Space Station is considered. The truss hexagonal panel reflector uses a modular design approach and is flexible in attainable flux profiles and assembly techniques. Preliminary structural, thermal, and optical analysis results are discussed. Accuracy of the surface reflectors should be within 5 mrad rms slope error, resulting in the need for close fabrication tolerances. Significant fabrication issues to be addressed include the facet reflective and protective coating processes and the surface specularity requirements.

  4. Doubly slanted layer structures in holographic gelatin emulsions: solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jenny; Chan, Po Shan; Sun, Caiming; Wing Ho, Choi; Tam, Wing Yim

    2010-04-01

    We have fabricated doubly slanted layer structures in holographic gelatin emulsions using a double-exposure two-beam interference from two light sources with different wavelengths. The doubly slanted layers, with different spacings and overlapping with each other, are fabricated such that they are slanted in opposite directions making a 30° angle with the holographic plate. The doubly slanted layer structures exhibit photonic stop bands corresponding to the two layered structures. More importantly, diffracted light beams from the slanted layers travel in different directions and emerge, through internal reflections, at the opposite edges of the gelatin plate. The doubly slanted layer structures could be used as solar concentrators such that sunlight is separated into different components and steered directly to photovoltaics with the corresponding wavelength sensitivities to enhance energy conversion efficiency.

  5. Structure of Water Ice in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David; Jenniskens, Peter; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Nearly all of the properties of solar system ices (chemical reaction rates, volatile retention and release, vaporization behavior, thermal conductivity, infrared spectral characteristics and the like) are a direct consequence of ice structure. However, the characterization of astrophysical ices and their laboratory analogs has typically utilized indirect measurements which yield phenomenological interpretations. When water ice is vapor-deposited at 14 K and warmed until it volatilizes in moderate vacuum, the ice undergoes a series of amorphous to amorphous and amorphous to crystalline structural transitions which we have characterized by diffraction methods. These structural transitions correlate with and underlie many phenomena observed in laboratory infrared and gas release experiments. The elucidation of the dynamic structural changes which occur in vapor-deposited water ice as a function of time, temperature and radiation history allows for the more complete interpretation of remote observations of astrophysical ices and their laboratory analogs.

  6. Facets formation mechanism of GaN hexagonal pyramids on dot-patterns via selective MOVPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Kitamura, Shota; Sawaki, Nobuhiko

    1996-11-01

    Three-dimensional GaN pyramids have been successfully obtained on dot-patterned GaN(0001)/sapphire substrates by using the selective MOVPE technique. The dot-pattern is a hexagon arranged with a 5{micro}m width and a 10{micro}m spacing. The GaN structure comprises a hexagonal pyramid covered with six {l_brace}1{bar 1}01{r_brace} pyramidal facets on the side or a frustum of a hexagonal pyramid having a (0001) facet on the top. The facet formation mechanism has been investigated by observing the facet structure with the growth time. The {l_brace}1{bar 1}01{r_brace} facets are very stable during the growth. The (0001) facet growth is dominant at the initial growth but almost stops at a certain growth time and then the facet structure is maintained. The appearance of the self-limited (0001) facet is attributed to the balance of flux between incoming Ga atoms from the vapor phase to the (0001) surface and outgoing Ga atoms from the (0001) surface to the {l_brace}1{bar 1}01{r_brace} surface via migration. The longer the diffusion length of the Ga atoms on the (0001) surface is, the more the surface migration is enhanced, resulting in the appearance of the wider (0001) facet on the top.

  7. Ionization potentials of (112) and (112¯) facet surfaces of CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinuma, Yoyo; Oba, Fumiyasu; Kumagai, Yu; Tanaka, Isao

    2012-12-01

    The ionization potentials of the faceted and nonfaceted (110) surfaces of CuInSe2 (CIS) and CuGaSe2 (CGS), which are key components of CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) thin-film solar cells, are investigated using first-principles calculations based on a hybrid Hartree-Fock density functional theory approach. Slab models of the chalcopyrite (110) surface with both (112) and (112¯) facets on each surface of the slab are employed. Surface energy evaluations point out that two types of faceted surfaces with point defects, namely a combination of CuIn (CuGa) and InCu (GaCu) antisites and a combination of Cu vacancies and InCu (GaCu) antisites, are the most stable depending on the chemical potentials. The ionization potentials are evaluated with two definitions: One highly sensitive to and the other less sensitive to localized surface states. The latter varies by 0.4 eV in CIS and 0.5 eV in CGS with the surface structure. The ionization potentials are reduced by 0.2 eV for faceted surfaces with CuIn (CuGa) and InCu (GaCu) antisites when the effects of the localized surface states are considered. The values of both ionization potentials are similar between CIS and CGS with a difference of about 0.1 eV for the most stable surface structures.

  8. Effects of Dye Structure in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, Anna R.

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are photovoltaic devices that may compete with standard silicon solar cells due to their ease of construction and lower cost [32]. Ruthenium dye structures, such as N3 (Ru -- (4,4' -- dicarboxylic acid -- 2,2' -- bipyridine)2(NCS)2), have shown promise for collection efficiencies near silicon photovoltaic levels [20, 33]. DSSCs have not achieved the reproducibility and maximum efficiency of silicon solar cells [33, 34]. Altering ligands on the dye molecules may affect the energies of light that are absorbed by the DSSC. Photovoltaic testing, including current versus voltage tests, of DSSCs with both narrow band monochromated light sources and broadband (AM1.5 solar simulator) allows comparison between maximum efficiency, short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, and spectral response (SR) for the dye molecules. By studying how the efficiency and power output change with different dye structures, the nature of how to increase efficiency of the DSSC can be addressed. Conjugation length of the ligands in ruthenium dye molecules can be shown, through square-well and Huckel theory calculations, to have a role in changing the HOMO-LUMO gap of the molecules and the absorption of specific wavelengths of light by the DSSC. The efficiency, max power, short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and SR were all measured for the DSSCs at wavelengths from 350 nm to 690 nm using a monochromated light source. Measurements taken at 20 nm steps reveal trends in the photon acceptance for dye molecules that can be linked to the conjugation length of the ligands in the dye through the SR. The change in the SR centroid and UV-VIS measurements indicate a trend toward increasing optimal wavelength with increasing conjugation length in the dye molecules; however these trends are not as pronounced as theoretical calculations for the dyes. This difference in wavelength shift occurs due to the theoretical calculations accounting for only the ligands

  9. Solar Multiple Eruptions from a Confined Magnetic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Chae, Jongchul

    2016-09-01

    How eruption can recur from a confined magnetic structure is discussed based on the Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of the NOAA active region 11444, which produced three eruptions within 1.5 hr on 2012 March 27. The active region (AR) had the positive-polarity magnetic fields in the center surrounded by the negative-polarity fields around. Since such a distribution of magnetic polarity tends to form a dome-like magnetic fan structure confined over the AR, the multiple eruptions were puzzling. Our investigation reveals that this event exhibits several properties distinct from other eruptions associated with magnetic fan structures: (i) a long filament encircling the AR was present before the eruptions; (ii) expansion of the open-closed boundary (OCB) of the field lines after each eruption was suggestive of the growing fan-dome structure, and (iii) the ribbons inside the closed magnetic polarity inversion line evolved in response to the expanding OCB. It thus appears that in spite of multiple eruptions the fan-dome structure remained undamaged, and the closing back field lines after each eruption rather reinforced the fan-dome structure. We argue that the multiple eruptions could occur in this AR in spite of its confined magnetic structure because the filament encircling the AR was adequate for slipping through the magnetic separatrix to minimize the damage to its overlying fan-dome structure. The result of this study provides a new insight into the productivity of eruptions from a confined magnetic structure.

  10. Design of a lattice-based faceted classification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David A.; Atkins, John

    1992-01-01

    We describe a software reuse architecture supporting component retrieval by facet classes. The facets are organized into a lattice of facet sets and facet n-tuples. The query mechanism supports precise retrieval and flexible browsing.

  11. Morphological Stability of Faceted Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbaschian, Reza; Golyshev, V. D.; Gonik, M.; Tsvetivsky, V.; deVahlDavis, G.; Leonardi, E.

    2001-01-01

    The major focus of this investigation is to study the fundamentals of layer spreading mechanisms during growth of doped Ge (a facet forming material), and to determine the conditions for morphological instability of vicinal solid-liquid interfaces. The investigation will also lead to the determination of the effect of dopants on the layer growth kinetics, step free energy, and dopant capture by the advancing ledges. The theoretical treatment of growth of faceted interfaces indicates that the kinetics of a step on a growing vicinal interface considerably depends on its angle of inclination, the melt concentration, and characteristics of flow currents in the melt. The morphological stability of the interface also depends on these parameters, as well as on the density and spreading velocity of the steps. However, the treatment of the instability of the interface by the layer growth mechanism is rather difficult because it requires exact knowledge of the thermal and solutal fields, hydrodynamics of the melt, and supercooling at the interface. The results of recent space experiments of the principal investigator involving directional solidification of faceted Bi-Sn alloys have shown that the morphological stability of various crystallographic orientations is significantly affected by the anistropy in interfacial properties of the faceted alloy in general, and the interface kinetics in particular. These findings have also raised many important and fundamental questions, particularly with respect to the behavior of interfacial steps, which need to be addressed via additional groundbased and microgravity experiments. For the present investigation we will use a novel crystal growth technique which provides axial heat flux close to the solid-liquid boundary. The Axial Heat Processing (AHP) technique allows for precise control and determination of the heat and mass transfer close to the crystallization front, and the establishment of a planar interface over the entire cross

  12. White light coronal structures and flattening during six total solar eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzouk, B. A.; Stoeva, P.; Stoev, A.

    2016-12-01

    Solar corona is very important part of the solar atmosphere, which is not available every time and it is very difficult to observe it. From solar corona we can get more information about outer sun layers. Large-scale structure of the solar corona can be studied during total solar eclipses. The structure, shape and brightness of the solar corona significantly change from eclipse to eclipse. They depend on activity of the sun. At maximum solar activity, the corona is very bright and uniform around the solar limb. There are a lot of bright coronal streamers and other active regions on it. During minimum of solar activity the solar corona stretches at the equator and become elliptical. Flattening index is the first quantitative parameter introduced for analyses of the global structure of the solar corona. It varies with respect to the phase of the solar activity and sunspot number. In this paper we study the solar corona during the 1990, 1999, 2006, 2008, 2009 and 2012 total solar eclipses. We obtain flattening coefficients for all the six eclipses by using a new computer program. Our results are in a good agreement with published results.

  13. `Fingerprint' Fine Structure in the Solar Decametric Radio Spectrum Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, E. Y.; Zaitsev, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Dorovskyy, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    We study a unique fine structure in the dynamic spectrum of the solar radio emission discovered by the UTR-2 radio telescope (Kharkiv, Ukraine) in the frequency band of 20 - 30 MHz. The structure was observed against the background of a broadband type IV radio burst and consisted of parallel drifting narrow bands of enhanced emission and absorption on the background emission. The observed structure differs from the widely known zebra pattern at meter and decimeter wavelengths by the opposite directions of the frequency drift within a single stripe at a given time. We show that the observed properties can be understood in the framework of the radiation mechanism by virtue of the double plasma resonance effect in a nonuniform coronal magnetic trap. We propose a source model providing the observed frequency drift of the stripes.

  14. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For the meeting of the AAS/SPD in Albuquerque, NM, I organized a Topical Session of the AAS on Structure and Dynamics of Chromospheres. The grant support was used to bring to the US two of the speakers from abroad. I had invited them for presentations at the Session: Dr. Klaus Wilhelm, the former PI of the SUMER instrument on SOHO, from the Max-Planck Institut in Lindau, Germany, and Dr. Sirajul Hasan, from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore, India. Both speakers preceded their trip to the AAS meeting with a stay at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, where they interacted with members of the Solar and Stellar Physics division. The highlights of the visits were the talks at the AAS/SPD meeting, in which six invited speakers told the audience of astronomers about current problems in solar physics and their relation to stellar problems. An important result of the visits is a paper by Dr. Wilhelm and me on 'Observations of the upper solar chromosphere with SUMER on SOHO', which has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics for publication.

  15. Division II: Commission 12: Solar Radiation and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander; Cauzzi, Gianna; Pillet, Valentin Martinez; Asplund, Martin; Brandenburg, Axel; Chou, Dean-Yi; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Gan, Weiqun; Kuznetsov, Vladimir D.; Rovira, Marta G.; Shchukina, Nataliya; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2015-08-01

    The President of C12, Alexander Kosovichev, presented the status of the Commission and its working Group(s). Primary activities included organization of international meetings (IAU Symposia, Special Sessions and Joint Discussion); review and support of proposals for IAU sponsored meetings; organization of working groups on the Commission topics to promote the international cooperation; preparation of triennial report on the organizational and science activities of Commission members. Commission 12 broadly encompasses topics of solar research which include studies of the Sun's internal structure, composition, dynamics and magnetism (through helioseismology and other techniques), studies of the quiet photosphere, chromosphere and corona, and also research of the mechanisms of solar radiation, and its variability on various time scales. Some overlap with topics covered by Commission 10 Solar Activity is unavoidable, and many activities are sponsored jointly by these two commissions. The Commission website can be found at http://sun.stanford.edu/IAU-Com12/, with information about related IAU Symposiums and activities, and links to appropriate web sites.

  16. Vacuum-deposited diphenyl-diketo-pyrrolopyrrole solar cell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, G.; Dobrikov, G.; Heinrichova, P.; Karashanova, D.; Dimov, D.; Vala, M.; Weiter, M.; Zhivkov, I.

    2016-03-01

    Photoelectrical parameters were measured of solar cell ITO|PEDOT:PSS|composite| Al samples. The active composite film was deposited in vacuum by co-evaporation of 3,6-bis(5-(benzofuran-2-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-2,5-bis(2-ethylhexyl)pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4(2H,5H)-dione (DPP(TBFu)2) and fullerene (C60). Additional DPP(TBFu)2:C60 composite films were studied by spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and visible region (UV-VIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that solvent annealing (SVA) of composite DPP(TBFu)2:C60 vacuum-deposited films with tetrahydrofuran vapors improves the solar cell parameters by increasing the efficiency more than tenfold. This could be related to the more homogenized structure of the SVA composite film, as observed by SEM. The increased light absorption, as shown by UV-VIS spectroscopy, around the peak at 350 nm contributed to the better SVA solar cell performance. Photogeneration in the samples follows a monomolecular mechanism.

  17. Venus exospheric structure - The role of solar radiation pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, James

    1989-01-01

    The existence of a 'hot' population of hydrogen atoms in the Venus exosphere is well known. In the outer coronal region where it is dominant, r greater than about 2.0 R(V) (Venus radii), hydrogen atoms are also subject to a relatively strong radiation pressure exerted by resonant scattering of solar Lyman-alpha photons. Collisionless models illustrating the consequent structure are discussed, with the nonthermal population mimicked by a dual Maxwellian exobase kinetic distribution. In these models, a considerable fraction of the 'hot' atoms outside 2.0 R(V) belongs to the quasi-satellite component, this fraction exceeding 1/2 for r values between about 4.0 and 10.0 R(V). Solar ionization of bound atoms occurs mainly outside the ionopause, yielding a partial escape flux greater than about 2,000,000/sq cm per sec over the dayside exobase for assumed solar conditions. The inclusion of a cold exobase prescribed by Pioneer Venus observations has little influence on the outer region (in particular, the quasi-satellite component is unaltered) except that the transition to 'hot' kinetic character occurs closer to the exobase on the nightside due to the colder main exobase temperatures there.

  18. Thermal stability analysis of the fine structure of solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, Pascal; Malherbe, Jean-Marie; Schmieder, Brigitte; Raadu, Mickael A.

    1986-01-01

    The linear thermal stability of a 2D periodic structure (alternatively hot and cold) in a uniform magnetic field is analyzed. The energy equation includes wave heating (assumed proportional to density), radiative cooling and both conduction parallel and orthogonal to magnetic lines. The equilibrium is perturbed at constant gas pressure. With parallel conduction only, it is found to be unstable when the length scale 1// is greater than 45 Mn. In that case, orthogonal conduction becomes important and stabilizes the structure when the length scale is smaller than 5 km. On the other hand, when the length scale is greater than 5 km, the thermal equilibrium is unstable, and the corresponding time scale is about 10,000 s: this result may be compared to observations showing that the lifetime of the fine structure of solar prominences is about one hour; consequently, our computations suggest that the size of the unresolved threads could be of the order of 10 km only.

  19. Complex Dynamic Flows in Solar Flare Sheet Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David E.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Observations of high-energy emission from solar flares often reveal the presence of large sheet-like structures, sometimes extending over a space comparable to the Sun's radius. Given that these structures are found between a departing coronal mass ejection and the post-eruption flare arcade, it is natural to associate the structure with a current sheet; though the relationship is unclear. Moreover, recent high-resolution observations have begun to reveal that the motions in this region are highly complex, including reconnection outflows, oscillations, and apparent wakes and eddies. We present a detailed first look at the complicated dynamics within this supra-arcade plasma, and consider implications for the interrelationship between the plasma and its embedded magnetic field.

  20. Generation of magnetic structures on the solar photosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gangadhara, R. T.; Krishan, V.; Bhowmick, A. K.; Chitre, S. M.

    2014-06-20

    The lower solar atmosphere is a partially ionized plasma consisting of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms. In this, which is essentially a three-fluid system, the Hall effect arises from the treatment of the electrons and ions as two separate fluids and the ambipolar diffusion arises from the inclusion of neutrals as the third fluid. The Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion have been shown to be operational in a region beginning from near the photosphere up to the chromosphere. In a partially ionized plasma, the magnetic induction is subjected to ambipolar diffusion and the Hall drift in addition to the usual resistive dissipation. These nonlinear effects create sharp magnetic structures which then submit themselves to various relaxation mechanisms. A first-principles derivation of these effects in a three-fluid system and an analytic solution to the magnetic induction equation in a stationary state are presented, which in the general case includes the Hall effect, ambipolar diffusion, and ohmic dissipation. The temporal evolution of the magnetic field is then investigated under the combined as well as the individual effects of the Hall drift and ambipolar diffusion to demonstrate the formation of steep magnetic structures and the resultant current sheet formation. These structures have just the right features for the release of magnetic energy into the solar atmosphere.

  1. Generation of Magnetic Structures on the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadhara, R. T.; Krishan, V.; Bhowmick, A. K.; Chitre, S. M.

    2014-06-01

    The lower solar atmosphere is a partially ionized plasma consisting of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms. In this, which is essentially a three-fluid system, the Hall effect arises from the treatment of the electrons and ions as two separate fluids and the ambipolar diffusion arises from the inclusion of neutrals as the third fluid. The Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion have been shown to be operational in a region beginning from near the photosphere up to the chromosphere. In a partially ionized plasma, the magnetic induction is subjected to ambipolar diffusion and the Hall drift in addition to the usual resistive dissipation. These nonlinear effects create sharp magnetic structures which then submit themselves to various relaxation mechanisms. A first-principles derivation of these effects in a three-fluid system and an analytic solution to the magnetic induction equation in a stationary state are presented, which in the general case includes the Hall effect, ambipolar diffusion, and ohmic dissipation. The temporal evolution of the magnetic field is then investigated under the combined as well as the individual effects of the Hall drift and ambipolar diffusion to demonstrate the formation of steep magnetic structures and the resultant current sheet formation. These structures have just the right features for the release of magnetic energy into the solar atmosphere.

  2. PivotPaths: Strolling through Faceted Information Spaces.

    PubMed

    Dork, M; Riche, Nathalie Henry; Ramos, G; Dumais, S

    2012-12-01

    We present PivotPaths, an interactive visualization for exploring faceted information resources. During both work and leisure, we increasingly interact with information spaces that contain multiple facets and relations, such as authors, keywords, and citations of academic publications, or actors and genres of movies. To navigate these interlinked resources today, one typically selects items from facet lists resulting in abrupt changes from one subset of data to another. While filtering is useful to retrieve results matching specific criteria, it can be difficult to see how facets and items relate and to comprehend the effect of filter operations. In contrast, the PivotPaths interface exposes faceted relations as visual paths in arrangements that invite the viewer to `take a stroll' through an information space. PivotPaths supports pivot operations as lightweight interaction techniques that trigger gradual transitions between views. We designed the interface to allow for casual traversal of large collections in an aesthetically pleasing manner that encourages exploration and serendipitous discoveries. This paper shares the findings from our iterative design-and-evaluation process that included semi-structured interviews and a two-week deployment of PivotPaths applied to a large database of academic publications.

  3. Kinetic faceting and anomalous coarsening in elastically inhomogeneous multiphase systems.

    PubMed

    Perez, Danny; Lewis, Laurent J

    2007-02-16

    With a view of finding a route toward microstructural stability in alloys, we numerically study the impact of elastic inhomogeneities on the growth of inclusions in multiphase systems. We show that growth can proceed either continuously at rough interfaces, or in a layer-by-layer fashion following an elastically induced kinetic faceting process. In the former case, the chemical potential of the inclusions is a smooth function of size, while in the latter case, elasticity increases the barrier for nucleation of new terraces on the facets, leading to an oscillatory behavior of the chemical potential and hence a strong resistance against coarsening, opening up the possibility to stabilize the structure.

  4. A Study of the Structure of the Source Region of the Solar Wind in Support of a Solar Probe Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, Shadia R.; Forman, M. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Despite the richness of the information about the physical properties and the structure of the solar wind provided by the Ulysses and SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) observations, fundamental questions regarding the nature of the coronal heating mechanisms, their source, and the manifestations of the fast and slow solar wind, still remain unanswered. The last unexplored frontier to establish the connection between the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere, its extension into interplanetary space, and the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of the solar wind, is the corona between 1 and 30 R(sub s). A Solar Probe mission offers an unprecedented opportunity to explore this frontier. Its uniqueness stems from its trajectory in a plane perpendicular to the ecliptic which reaches within 9 R(sub s) of the solar surface over the poles and 3 - 9 R(sub s) at the equator. With a complement of simultaneous in situ and remote sensing observations, this mission is destined to detect remnants and signatures of the processes which heat the corona and accelerate the solar wind. In support of this mission, we fulfilled the following two long-term projects: (1) Study of the evolution of waves and turbulence in the solar wind (2) Exploration of signatures of physical processes and structures in the corona. A summary of the tasks achieved in support of these projects are given below. In addition, funds were provided to support the Solar Wind 9 International Conference which was held in October 1998. A brief report on the conference is also described in what follows.

  5. Impact of structural heterogeneity in solar absorber layers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toney, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Impact of structural heterogeneity in solar absorber layers Michael F Toney SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Structural and morphological heterogeneity is common in thin film and emerging solar cell absorber layers, including organic photovoltaic bulk heterojunctions (OPV BHJs), hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (HOIP), and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe), and has a significant impact on the (opto)electronic heterogeneity and hence absorber properties. In this talk I will use X-ray based methods, including scattering and spectroscopies, to characterize and quantify the heterogeneity in OPV BHJs and HOIP absorber layers. The BHJ films are blends of the small molecule X2 and [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) where it has been established that there are three distinct region of the films - pure PC71BM, pure X2 and intimately mixed X2:PC71BM. This talk will show how the absolute concentration of the mixed phase can be used to explain the large PC71BM:X2 composition range where good performance is observed [1]. The talk will also show that spin cast CH3NH3PbI3 films consistent of both crystalline and amorphous regions, which can explain previous heterogeneity in the PL imaging [2]. [1] Huang et al., Adv. Energy Mater. 4, 1301886 (2014). [2] deQuilettes et al., Science 348, 683 (2015).

  6. Empirically Derived Strength of Residential Roof Structures for Solar Installations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Sanchez, Alfred; Campos, Ivan A.; Gerstle, Walter H.

    2014-12-01

    Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet structural design codes. This work is intended to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong given the conservatism in codes, documented allowable strengths, roof structure system effects, and beam composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction. This report provides results from a testing program to provide actual load carrying capacity of residential rooftops. The results reveal that the actual load carrying capacity of structural members and systems tested are significantly stronger than allowable loads provided by the International Residential Code (IRC 2009) and the national structural code found in Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10). Engineering analysis of residential rooftops typically ignores the system affects and beam composite action in determining rooftop stresses given a potential PV installation. This extreme conservatism combined with conservatism in codes and published allowable stress values for roof building materials (NDS 2012) lead to the perception that well built homes may not have adequate load bearing capacity to enable a rooftop PV installation. However, based on the test results presented in this report of residential rooftop structural systems, the actual load bearing capacity is several times higher than published values (NDS 2012).

  7. High Efficiency c-Silicon Solar Cells Based on Micro-Nanoscale Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    High Efficiency c- Silicon Solar Cells Based on Micro-nanoscale Structure by Fred Semendy, Priyalal Wijewarnasuriya, and Nibir K. Dhar...20783-1197 ARL-TR-5576 June 2011 High Efficiency c- Silicon Solar Cells Based on Micro-nanoscale Structure Fred Semendy and Priyalal...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Efficiency c- Silicon Solar Cells Based on Micro-nanoscale Structure 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  8. The Cool and Belkin Faceted Classification of Information Interactions Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The complexity of human information activity is a challenge for both practice and research in information sciences and information management. Literature presents a wealth of approaches to analytically structure and make sense of human information activity including a faceted classification model of information interactions published…

  9. Three-dimensional evaluation of the facet joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folio, Les R.

    1990-04-01

    Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging nave revolurionalized analysis of vertebral anatomy and pathology. Further advances with 3-dimensional imaging have recently become an important adjunct for diagnosis and treatment in structural abnormalities. Facets are intimately related to their surrounding musculature and malalignment may cause pain directly or indirectly. High resolution 3-dimensional reformations of CT Scans give us new insight on structure and function of facet joints, since their motion and architecture are ever complex. It is well documented in the literature that facet joint biomecnanics is a partial contributor to the myriad at causes of low back The term "facet Joint syndrome" was coined in 1933 by GhorMley.3 The osteopathic lesion complex is well defined by LeRoy and McCole and comparison of roentgenographic findings before and after manipulation has teen described by Long and Lioyd.4,5 since alterations in facet biamechanics are an important aspect of osteopathic manipulative therapy (OT), 3-dimensional hign resolution imaging will prove to be a great asset in osteopathic research. Rotating the spine allows for different viewing perspectives to provide optimal and consistent measurements of the facet joint. Rotations are performed on the X, Y and 7, axis and measurements pre and post-manipulation are performed and compared on matching axis and perspectives. Rotation about the X, Y and Z axis help appreciate the 3-dimensionality of the vertebral column to project to the viewer a feeling that the spine is floating in space before them. This does give the viewer a 3-D understanding of the object however, only at a perspective at a Lime.

  10. Static stability of the Space Station solar array FASTMast structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, John F.; Acquaviva, Thomas H.

    1995-01-01

    The combined loads test of the 3-Bay FASTMast marks the end of the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) effort to characterize the behavior of the principal Space Station solar array support structure. The primary objective of this test and analysis effort was to develop a method to predict structural stability failure modes under flight-like applied loads. Included at the beginning of this report is a brief historical perspective of the hardware design development and FASTMast structural stability problem evolution. Once an understanding of the solution process has been established, test and analysis details are presented and related to the postulated failure theories. The combined load test series subjected the structure to a combination of transverse, moment, and torsion loads similar to that expected in the service environment. Nonlinear finite element (FE) models were developed and large displacement analyses were performed to support the test effort and failure mode predictions. Details of the test configuration as well as test and analysis results are presented. The results were then critiqued to establish valid and successful support of the failure mode assessments. Finally, study conclusions are drawn and recommendations for safe operation of the FASTMast structure are presented for consideration.

  11. Inverted Silicon Nanopencil Array Solar Cells with Enhanced Contact Structures

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaoguang; Shu, Lei; Lin, Hao; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Guofa; Yip, SenPo; Xiu, Fei; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-01-01

    Although three-dimensional nanostructured solar cells have attracted extensive research attention due to their superior broadband and omnidirectional light-harvesting properties, majority of them are still suffered from complicated fabrication processes as well as disappointed photovoltaic performances. Here, we employed our newly-developed, low-cost and simple wet anisotropic etching to fabricate hierarchical silicon nanostructured arrays with different solar cell contact design, followed by systematic investigations of their photovoltaic characteristics. Specifically, nano-arrays with the tapered tips (e.g. inverted nanopencils) are found to enable the more conformal top electrode deposition directly onto the nanostructures for better series and shunt conductance, but its insufficient film coverage at the basal plane would still restrict the charge carrier collection. In contrast, the low-platform contact design facilitates a substantial photovoltaic device performance enhancement of ~24%, as compared to the one of conventional top electrode design, due to the shortened current path and improved lateral conductance for the minimized carrier recombination and series resistance. This enhanced contact structure can not only maintain excellent photon-trapping behaviors of nanostructures, but also help to eliminate adverse impacts of these tapered nano-morphological features on the contact resistance, providing further insight into design consideration in optimizing the contact geometry for high-performance nanostructured photovoltaic devices. PMID:27671709

  12. Inverted Silicon Nanopencil Array Solar Cells with Enhanced Contact Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoguang; Shu, Lei; Lin, Hao; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Guofa; Yip, Senpo; Xiu, Fei; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-09-01

    Although three-dimensional nanostructured solar cells have attracted extensive research attention due to their superior broadband and omnidirectional light-harvesting properties, majority of them are still suffered from complicated fabrication processes as well as disappointed photovoltaic performances. Here, we employed our newly-developed, low-cost and simple wet anisotropic etching to fabricate hierarchical silicon nanostructured arrays with different solar cell contact design, followed by systematic investigations of their photovoltaic characteristics. Specifically, nano-arrays with the tapered tips (e.g. inverted nanopencils) are found to enable the more conformal top electrode deposition directly onto the nanostructures for better series and shunt conductance, but its insufficient film coverage at the basal plane would still restrict the charge carrier collection. In contrast, the low-platform contact design facilitates a substantial photovoltaic device performance enhancement of ~24%, as compared to the one of conventional top electrode design, due to the shortened current path and improved lateral conductance for the minimized carrier recombination and series resistance. This enhanced contact structure can not only maintain excellent photon-trapping behaviors of nanostructures, but also help to eliminate adverse impacts of these tapered nano-morphological features on the contact resistance, providing further insight into design consideration in optimizing the contact geometry for high-performance nanostructured photovoltaic devices.

  13. Inverted Silicon Nanopencil Array Solar Cells with Enhanced Contact Structures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoguang; Shu, Lei; Lin, Hao; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Guofa; Yip, SenPo; Xiu, Fei; Ho, Johnny C

    2016-09-27

    Although three-dimensional nanostructured solar cells have attracted extensive research attention due to their superior broadband and omnidirectional light-harvesting properties, majority of them are still suffered from complicated fabrication processes as well as disappointed photovoltaic performances. Here, we employed our newly-developed, low-cost and simple wet anisotropic etching to fabricate hierarchical silicon nanostructured arrays with different solar cell contact design, followed by systematic investigations of their photovoltaic characteristics. Specifically, nano-arrays with the tapered tips (e.g. inverted nanopencils) are found to enable the more conformal top electrode deposition directly onto the nanostructures for better series and shunt conductance, but its insufficient film coverage at the basal plane would still restrict the charge carrier collection. In contrast, the low-platform contact design facilitates a substantial photovoltaic device performance enhancement of ~24%, as compared to the one of conventional top electrode design, due to the shortened current path and improved lateral conductance for the minimized carrier recombination and series resistance. This enhanced contact structure can not only maintain excellent photon-trapping behaviors of nanostructures, but also help to eliminate adverse impacts of these tapered nano-morphological features on the contact resistance, providing further insight into design consideration in optimizing the contact geometry for high-performance nanostructured photovoltaic devices.

  14. MODEL COMPARISON FOR THE DENSITY STRUCTURE ACROSS SOLAR CORONAL WAVEGUIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2015-10-01

    The spatial variation of physical quantities, such as the mass density, across solar atmospheric waveguides governs the timescales and spatial scales for wave damping and energy dissipation. The direct measurement of the spatial distribution of density, however, is difficult, and indirect seismology inversion methods have been suggested as an alternative. We applied Bayesian inference, model comparison, and model-averaging techniques to the inference of the cross-field density structuring in solar magnetic waveguides using information on periods and damping times for resonantly damped magnetohydrodynamic transverse kink oscillations. Three commonly employed alternative profiles were used to model the variation of the mass density across the waveguide boundary. Parameter inference enabled us to obtain information on physical quantities such as the Alfvén travel time, the density contrast, and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The inference results from alternative density models were compared and their differences quantified. Then, the relative plausibility of the considered models was assessed by performing model comparison. Our results indicate that the evidence in favor of any of the three models is minimal, unless the oscillations are strongly damped. In such a circumstance, the application of model-averaging techniques enables the computation of an evidence-weighted inference that takes into account the plausibility of each model in the calculation of a combined inversion for the unknown physical parameters.

  15. Model Comparison for the Density Structure across Solar Coronal Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arregui, I.; Soler, R.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2015-10-01

    The spatial variation of physical quantities, such as the mass density, across solar atmospheric waveguides governs the timescales and spatial scales for wave damping and energy dissipation. The direct measurement of the spatial distribution of density, however, is difficult, and indirect seismology inversion methods have been suggested as an alternative. We applied Bayesian inference, model comparison, and model-averaging techniques to the inference of the cross-field density structuring in solar magnetic waveguides using information on periods and damping times for resonantly damped magnetohydrodynamic transverse kink oscillations. Three commonly employed alternative profiles were used to model the variation of the mass density across the waveguide boundary. Parameter inference enabled us to obtain information on physical quantities such as the Alfvén travel time, the density contrast, and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The inference results from alternative density models were compared and their differences quantified. Then, the relative plausibility of the considered models was assessed by performing model comparison. Our results indicate that the evidence in favor of any of the three models is minimal, unless the oscillations are strongly damped. In such a circumstance, the application of model-averaging techniques enables the computation of an evidence-weighted inference that takes into account the plausibility of each model in the calculation of a combined inversion for the unknown physical parameters.

  16. SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE MODULATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH COHERENT MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Trenchi, L.; Bruno, R.; D'amicis, R.; Marcucci, M. F.; Telloni, D.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Weberg, M.

    2013-06-10

    In situ observations of solar energetic particles (SEPs) often show rapid variations of their intensity profile, affecting all energies simultaneously, without time dispersion. A previously proposed interpretation suggests that these modulations are directly related to the presence of magnetic structures with a different magnetic topology. However, no compelling evidence of local changes in magnetic field or in plasma parameters during SEP modulations has been reported. In this paper, we performed a detailed analysis of SEP events and we found several signatures in the local magnetic field and/or plasma parameters associated with SEP modulations. The study of magnetic helicity allowed us to identify magnetic boundaries, associated with variations of plasma parameters, which are thought to represent the borders between adjacent magnetic flux tubes. It is found that SEP dispersionless modulations are generally associated with such magnetic boundaries. Consequently, we support the idea that SEP modulations are observed when the spacecraft passes through magnetic flux tubes, filled or devoid of SEPs, which are alternatively connected and not connected with the flare site. In other cases, we found SEP dropouts associated with large-scale magnetic holes. A possible generation mechanism suggests that these holes are formed in the high solar corona as a consequence of magnetic reconnection. This reconnection process modifies the magnetic field topology, and therefore, these holes can be magnetically isolated from the surrounding plasma and could also explain their association with SEP dropouts.

  17. Solar Observations during Skylab, April 1973-February 1974. I. Coronal X-Ray Structure. II. Solar Flare Activity,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    Telephone: (704) 258-25501 World Dats Center A for Solor -Terrestrial Physics Geigrphy.Navironmmtel Data and Information Service, MOMA World Data...association of a solar wind stream with a coronal hole photographed on a rocket flight in 1970 (1.iager et at., 1973]. Later, the ASE Skylab data from the S...054 X-ray spectrographic telescope allowed us to extend the associations between coronal X-ray structure and solar wind streams [Krieage et at., 1976

  18. The Structure of the Solar Wind at Large Heliocentric Distances: CIRs and their Successors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1997-01-01

    Co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) and their associated shock pairs are dominant structures in the solar wind between the heliocentric distances of 2 and 8 AU. At larger heliocentric distances, these structures undergo a qualitative change. Shocks decay to a point where they are often difficult to detect, and may have little influence on the dynamics of the solar wind. Interaction regions spread and merge, though they appear to retain their identity to surprisingly large distances from the Sun. Solar wind and IMF data from the Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, and Voyager 2 spacecraft were used to conduct a comprehensive survey of CIRs and their successors between heliocentric distances of 1 and 55 AU over the last two solar cycles. The structure of the solar wind varied in a consistent fashion with heliocentric distance. Similar structures were observed at similar heliocentric distances by all three spacecraft during different portions of the solar cycle.

  19. The Structure of the Solar Wind at Large Heliocentric Distances: CIRs and their Successors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    Co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) and their associated shock pairs are dominant structures in the solar wind between the heliocentric distances of 2 and 8 AU. At larger heliocentric distances, these structures undergo a qualitative change. Shocks decay to a point where they are often difficult to detect, and may have little influence on the dynamics of the solar wind. Interaction regions spread and merge, though they appear to retain their identity to surprisingly large distances from the Sun. Solar wind and IMF data from the Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, and Voyager 2 spacecraft were used to conduct a comprehensive survey of CIRs and their successors between heliocentric distances of 1 and 55 AU over the last two solar cycles. The structure of the solar wind varied in a consistent fashion with heliocentric distance. Similar structures were observed at similar heliocentric distances by all three spacecraft during different portions of the solar cycle.

  20. Effects of CeO2 Support Facets on VOx/CeO2 Catalysts in Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Wei, Zhehao; Gao, Feng; Kovarik, Libor; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

    2014-05-13

    CeO2 supports with dominating facets, i.e., low index (100), (110) and (111) facets, are prepared. The facet effects on the structure and catalytic performance of supported vanadium oxide catalysts are investigated using oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol as a model reaction. In the presence of mixed facets, Infrared and Raman characterizations demonstrate that surface vanadia species preferentially deposit on CeO2 (100) facets, presumably because of its higher surface energy. At the same surface vanadium densities, VOx species on (100) facets show better dispersion, followed by (110) and (111) facets. The VOx species on CeO2 nanorods with (110) and (100) facets display higher activity and lower apparent activation energies compared to that on CeO2 nanopolyhedras with dominating (111) facets and CeO2 nanocubes with dominating (100) facets. The higher activity for VOx/CeO2(110) might be related to the more abundant oxygen vacancies present on the (110) facets, evidenced from Raman spectroscopic measurements.

  1. Attaching solar collectors to a structural framework utilizing a flexible clip

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, John S

    2014-03-25

    Methods and apparatuses described herein provide for the attachment of solar collectors to a structural framework in a solar array assembly. A flexible clip is attached to either end of each solar collector and utilized to attach the solar collector to the structural framework. The solar collectors are positioned to allow a member of the framework to engage a pair of flexible clips attached to adjacent solar collectors during assembly of the solar array. Each flexible clip may have multiple frame-engaging portions, each with a flange on one end to cause the flexible clip to deflect inward when engaged by the framework member during assembly and to guide each of the frame-engaging portions into contact with a surface of the framework member for attachment.

  2. The Role of Magnetic Helicity in Structuring the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Two of the most widely observed and striking features of the Sun's magnetic field are coronal loops, which are smooth and laminar, and prominences or filaments, which are strongly sheared. Loops are puzzling because they show little evidence of tangling or braiding, at least on the quiet Sun, despite the chaotic nature of the solar surface convection. Prominences are mysterious because the origin of their underlying magnetic structure—filament channels—is poorly understood at best. These two types of features would seem to be quite unrelated and wholly distinct. We argue that, on the contrary, they are inextricably linked and result from a single process: the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona by photospheric motions and the subsequent evolution of this helicity by coronal reconnection. In this paper, we present numerical simulations of the response of a Parker (1972) corona to photospheric driving motions that have varying degrees of helicity preference. We obtain four main conclusions: (1) in agreement with the helicity condensation model of Antiochos (2013), the inverse cascade of helicity by magnetic reconnection in the corona results in the formation of filament channels localized about polarity inversion lines; (2) this same process removes most complex fine structure from the rest of the corona, resulting in smooth and laminar coronal loops; (3) the amount of remnant tangling in coronal loops is inversely dependent on the net helicity injected by the driving motions; and (4) the structure of the solar corona depends only on the helicity preference of the driving motions and not on their detailed time dependence. We discuss the implications of our results for high-resolution observations of the corona.

  3. The Many Facets and Applications of Text Structure in Supporting Educational Trajectories of Elementary and Middle Grade Children in Content Area Reading Comprehension and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albro, Elizabeth; Williams, Joanna P.; Wijekumar, Kausalai; Meyer, Bonnie J. F.; Harris, Karen R.

    2015-01-01

    Content area reading comprehension and writing have been a challenge for children in the U.S. schools for many years as evidenced by state and national assessments. One promising solution to the problem is text structure based instruction that promotes strategic selection, encoding, retrieval, and use of information for myriads of activities…

  4. Complex Dynamic Flows in Solar Flare Sheet Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, David Eugene; Reeves, K. K.; Savage, S. L.

    2012-05-01

    Observations of high-energy emission from solar flares often reveal the presence of large sheet-like structures, sometimes extending over a space comparable to the Sun's radius. Given that these structures are found between a departing coronal mass ejection and the post-eruption flare arcade, it is natural to associate the structure with a current sheet; though the relationship is unclear. Moreover, recent high-resolution observations have begun to reveal that the motions in this region are highly complex, including reconnection outflows, oscillations, and apparent wakes and eddies. We present a detailed first look at the complicated dynamics within this supra-arcade plasma, and consider implications for the interrelationship between the plasma and its embedded magnetic field. This work is supported by NASA under contract SP02H3901R from Lockheed-Martin to MSU (DMcK), contract SP02H1701R from Lockheed-Martin to SAO (KKR), and contract NNM07AB07C with the Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. SLS is supported via a NASA/GSFC NPP appointment administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities and under the mentorship of G. Holman.

  5. Input Shaping to Reduce Solar Array Structural Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael J.; Tolson, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Structural vibrations induced by actuators can be minimized using input shaping. Input shaping is a feedforward method in which actuator commands are convolved with shaping functions to yield a shaped set of commands. These commands are designed to perform the maneuver while minimizing the residual structural vibration. In this report, input shaping is extended to stepper motor actuators. As a demonstration, an input-shaping technique based on pole-zero cancellation was used to modify the Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) actuator commands for the Lewis satellite. A series of impulses were calculated as the ideal SADA output for vibration control. These impulses were then discretized for use by the SADA stepper motor actuator and simulated actuator outputs were used to calculate the structural response. The effectiveness of input shaping is limited by the accuracy of the knowledge of the modal frequencies. Assuming perfect knowledge resulted in significant vibration reduction. Errors of 10% in the modal frequencies caused notably higher levels of vibration. Controller robustness was improved by incorporating additional zeros in the shaping function. The additional zeros did not require increased performance from the actuator. Despite the identification errors, the resulting feedforward controller reduced residual vibrations to the level of the exactly modeled input shaper and well below the baseline cases. These results could be easily applied to many other vibration-sensitive applications involving stepper motor actuators.

  6. Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knasel, Don; Ehresman, Derik

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Project has successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a full scale prototypical solar dynamic concentrator for space station applications. A Truss Hexagonal Panel reflector was selected as a viable solar concentrator concept to be used for space station applications. This concentrator utilizes a modular design approach and is flexible in attainable flux profiles and assembly techniques. The detailed design of the concentrator, which included structural, thermal and optical analysis, identified the feasibility of the design and specific technologies that were required to fabricate it. The needed surface accuracy of the reflectors surface was found to be very tight, within 5 mrad RMS slope error, and results in very close tolerances for fabrication. To meet the design requirements, a modular structure composed of hexagonal panels was used. The panels, made up of graphite epoxy box beams provided the strength, stiffness and dimensional stability needed. All initial project requirements were met or exceeded by hardware demonstration. Initial testing of structural repeatability of a seven panel portion of the concentrator was followed by assembly and testing of the full nineteen panel structure. The testing, which consisted of theodolite and optical measurements over an assembly-disassembly-reassembly cycle, demonstrated that the concentrator maintained the as-built contour and optical characteristics. The facet development effort within the project, which included developing the vapor deposited reflective facet, produced a viable design with demonstrated optical characteristics that are within the project goals.

  7. FacetGist: Collective Extraction of Document Facets in Large Technical Corpora.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Tarique; Ren, Xiang; Parameswaran, Aditya; Han, Jiawei

    2016-10-01

    Given the large volume of technical documents available, it is crucial to automatically organize and categorize these documents to be able to understand and extract value from them. Towards this end, we introduce a new research problem called Facet Extraction. Given a collection of technical documents, the goal of Facet Extraction is to automatically label each document with a set of concepts for the key facets (e.g., application, technique, evaluation metrics, and dataset) that people may be interested in. Facet Extraction has numerous applications, including document summarization, literature search, patent search and business intelligence. The major challenge in performing Facet Extraction arises from multiple sources: concept extraction, concept to facet matching, and facet disambiguation. To tackle these challenges, we develop FacetGist, a framework for facet extraction. Facet Extraction involves constructing a graph-based heterogeneous network to capture information available across multiple local sentence-level features, as well as global context features. We then formulate a joint optimization problem, and propose an efficient algorithm for graph-based label propagation to estimate the facet of each concept mention. Experimental results on technical corpora from two domains demonstrate that Facet Extraction can lead to an improvement of over 25% in both precision and recall over competing schemes.

  8. FacetGist: Collective Extraction of Document Facets in Large Technical Corpora

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Tarique; Ren, Xiang; Parameswaran, Aditya; Han, Jiawei

    2017-01-01

    Given the large volume of technical documents available, it is crucial to automatically organize and categorize these documents to be able to understand and extract value from them. Towards this end, we introduce a new research problem called Facet Extraction. Given a collection of technical documents, the goal of Facet Extraction is to automatically label each document with a set of concepts for the key facets (e.g., application, technique, evaluation metrics, and dataset) that people may be interested in. Facet Extraction has numerous applications, including document summarization, literature search, patent search and business intelligence. The major challenge in performing Facet Extraction arises from multiple sources: concept extraction, concept to facet matching, and facet disambiguation. To tackle these challenges, we develop FacetGist, a framework for facet extraction. Facet Extraction involves constructing a graph-based heterogeneous network to capture information available across multiple local sentence-level features, as well as global context features. We then formulate a joint optimization problem, and propose an efficient algorithm for graph-based label propagation to estimate the facet of each concept mention. Experimental results on technical corpora from two domains demonstrate that Facet Extraction can lead to an improvement of over 25% in both precision and recall over competing schemes. PMID:28210517

  9. New facets of antifungal therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Lin; Yu, Shang-Jie; Heitman, Joseph; Wellington, Melanie; Chen, Ying-Lien

    2017-02-17

    Invasive fungal infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, and such infections are a substantial burden to healthcare systems around the world. However, the clinically available armamentarium for invasive fungal diseases is limited to 3 main classes (i.e., polyenes, triazoles, and echinocandins), and each has defined limitations related to spectrum of activity, development of resistance, and toxicity. Further, current antifungal therapies are hampered by limited clinical efficacy, high rates of toxicity, and significant variability in pharmacokinetic properties. New antifungal agents, new formulations, and novel combination regimens may improve the care of patients in the future by providing improved strategies to combat challenges associated with currently available antifungal agents. Likewise, therapeutic drug monitoring may be helpful, but its present use remains controversial due to the lack of available data. This article discusses new facets of antifungal therapy with a focus on new antifungal formulations and the synergistic effects between drugs used in combination therapy.

  10. Understanding how lake populations of arctic char are structured and function with special consideration of the potential effects of climate change: a multi-faceted approach.

    PubMed

    Budy, Phaedra; Luecke, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Size dimorphism in fish populations, both its causes and consequences, has been an area of considerable focus; however, uncertainty remains whether size dimorphism is dynamic or stabilizing and about the role of exogenous factors. Here, we explored patterns among empirical vital rates, population structure, abundance and trend, and predicted the effects of climate change on populations of arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) in two lakes. Both populations cycle dramatically between dominance by small (≤300 mm) and large (>300 mm) char. Apparent survival (Φ) and specific growth rates (SGR) were relatively high (40-96%; SGR range 0.03-1.5%) and comparable to those of conspecifics at lower latitudes. Climate change scenarios mimicked observed patterns of warming and resulted in temperatures closer to optimal for char growth (15.15 °C) and a longer growing season. An increase in consumption rates (28-34%) under climate change scenarios led to much greater growth rates (23-34%). Higher growth rates predicted under climate change resulted in an even greater predicted amplitude of cycles in population structure as well as an increase in reproductive output (Ro) and decrease in generation time (Go). Collectively, these results indicate arctic char populations (not just individuals) are extremely sensitive to small changes in the number of ice-free days. We hypothesize years with a longer growing season, predicted to occur more often under climate change, produce elevated growth rates of small char and act in a manner similar to a "resource pulse," allowing a sub-set of small char to "break through," thus setting the cycle in population structure.

  11. Image-guided facet joint injection

    PubMed Central

    Peh, WCG

    2011-01-01

    Chronic spine pain poses a peculiar diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to multiple pain sources, overlapping clinical features and nonspecific radiological findings. Facet joint injection is an interventional pain management tool for facet-related spinal pain that can be effectively administered by a radiologist. This technique is the gold standard for identifying facet joints as the source of spinal pain. The major indications for facet injections include strong clinical suspicion of the facet syndrome, focal tenderness over the facet joints, low back pain with normal radiological findings, post-laminectomy syndrome with no evidence of arachnoiditis or recurrent disc disease, and persistent low back pain after spinal fusion. The contraindications are more ancillary, with none being absolute. Like any synovial joint degeneration, inflammation and injury can lead to pain on motion, initiating a vicious cycle of physical deconditioning, irritation of facet innervations and muscle spasm. Image-guided injection of local anesthetic and steroid into or around the facet joint aims to break this vicious cycle and thereby provide pain relief. This outpatient procedure has high diagnostic accuracy, safety and reproducibility but the therapeutic outcome is variable. PMID:21655113

  12. Exploring relations among mindfulness facets and various meditation practices: Do they work in different ways?

    PubMed

    Cebolla, Ausiàs; Campos, Daniel; Galiana, Laura; Oliver, Amparo; Tomás, Jose Manuel; Feliu-Soler, Albert; Soler, Joaquim; García-Campayo, Javier; Demarzo, Marcelo; Baños, Rosa María

    2017-03-01

    Several meditation practices are associated with mindfulness-based interventions but little is known about their specific effects on the development of different mindfulness facets. This study aimed to assess the relations among different practice variables, types of meditation, and mindfulness facets. The final sample was composed of 185 participants who completed an on-line survey, including information on the frequency and duration of each meditation practice, lifetime practice, and the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire. A Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes structural model was specified, estimated, and tested. Results showed that the Model's overall fit was adequate: χ(2) (1045)=1542.800 (p<0.001), CFI=0.902, RMSEA=0.042. Results revealed that mindfulness facets were uniquely related to the different variables and types of meditation. Our findings showed the importance of specific practices in promoting mindfulness, compared to compassion and informal practices, and they pointed out which one fits each mindfulness facet better.

  13. Measured and predicted root-mean-square errors in square and triangular antenna mesh facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Deflection shapes of square and equilateral triangular facets of two tricot-knit, gold plated molybdenum wire mesh antenna materials were measured and compared, on the basis of root mean square (rms) differences, with deflection shapes predicted by linear membrane theory, for several cases of biaxial mesh tension. The two mesh materials contained approximately 10 and 16 holes per linear inch, measured diagonally with respect to the course and wale directions. The deflection measurement system employed a non-contact eddy current proximity probe and an electromagnetic distance sensing probe in conjunction with a precision optical level. Despite experimental uncertainties, rms differences between measured and predicted deflection shapes suggest the following conclusions: that replacing flat antenna facets with facets conforming to parabolically curved structural members yields smaller rms surface error; that potential accuracy gains are greater for equilateral triangular facets than for square facets; and that linear membrane theory can be a useful tool in the design of tricot knit wire mesh antennas.

  14. Damping of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Solar Prominence Fine Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution observations of solar filaments and prominences reveal that these large-scale coronal structures are formed by a myriad of long and thin ribbons, here called threads, which are piled up to form the prominence body. Evidences suggest that these fine structures are magnetic flux tubes anchored in the solar photosphere, which are partially filled with the cool and dense prominence material. Individual and collective oscillations of prominence and filament fine structures are frequently reported by means of oscillatory variations in Doppler signals and spectral line intensity. Common features of these observations are that the reported oscillatory periods are usually in a narrow range between 2 and 10 minutes, that the velocity amplitudes are smaller than ˜3 km/s, and that the oscillations seem to be strongly damped after a few periods. Typically, the ratio of the damping time, tD, to the period, P, is tD/P < 10. While the oscillations have been interpreted in the context of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, i.e., in terms of the MHD normal modes supported by the filament thread body and/or propagating MHD waves, the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the damping are not well-known and a comparative study between different damping mechanisms is needed. In this Thesis, we study the efficiency of several physical mechanisms for the damping of MHD oscillations in prominence fine structures. Both individual and collective oscillations of threads are analyzed. We model a filament thread as a straight cylindrical magnetic flux tube with prominence conditions, embedded in a magnetized environment representing the solar coronal medium. The basic MHD equations are applied to the model and contain non-ideal terms accounting for effects as, e.g., non-adiabatic mechanisms, magnetic diffusion, ion-neutral collisions, etc., that may be of relevance in prominence plasmas and whose role on the damping of the oscillations is assessed. Our method combines

  15. EFFECT OF SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC NEUTRALS ON EQUILIBRIUM FIELD STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Arber, T. D.; Botha, G. J. J.; Brady, C. S. E-mail: G.J.J.Botha@warwick.ac.u

    2009-11-10

    Solar coronal equilibrium fields are often constructed by nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation from photospheric magnetograms. It is well known that the photospheric field is not force-free and the correct lower boundary for NLFFF construction ought to be the top of the chromosphere. To compensate for this, pre-filtering algorithms are often applied to the photospheric data to remove the non-force-free components. Such pre-filtering models, while physically constrained, do not address the mechanisms that may be responsible for the field becoming force-free. The chromospheric field can change through, for example, field expansion due to gravitational stratification, reconnection, or flux emergence. In this paper, we study and quantify the effect of the chromospheric neutrals on equilibrium field structures. It is shown that, depending on the degree to which the photospheric field is not force-free, the chromosphere will change the structure of the equilibrium field. This is quantified to give an estimate of the change in alpha profiles one might expect due to neutrals in the chromosphere. Simple scaling of the decay time of non-force-free components of the magnetic field due to chromospheric neutrals is also derived. This is used to quantify the rate at which, or equivalent at which height, the chromosphere is expected to become force-free.

  16. RESOLVING THE INTERNAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE OF THE SOLAR NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.; Martinez Pillet, V.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Schmidt, W.

    2012-10-20

    We analyze the spectral asymmetry of Stokes V (circularly polarized) profiles of an individual network patch in the quiet Sun observed by Sunrise/IMaX. At a spatial resolution of 0.''15-0.''18, the network elements contain substructure which is revealed by the spatial distribution of Stokes V asymmetries. The area asymmetry between the red and blue lobes of Stokes V increases from nearly zero at the core of the structure to values close to unity at its edges (single-lobed profiles). Such a distribution of the area asymmetry is consistent with magnetic fields expanding with height, i.e., an expanding magnetic canopy (which is required to fulfill pressure balance and flux conservation in the solar atmosphere). Inversion of the Stokes I and V profiles of the patch confirms this picture, revealing a decreasing field strength and increasing height of the canopy base from the core to the periphery of the network patch. However, the non-roundish shape of the structure and the presence of negative area and amplitude asymmetries reveal that the scenario is more complex than a canonical flux tube expanding with height surrounded by downflows.

  17. Facet-Dependent Photoreduction on Single ZnO Crystals.

    PubMed

    Debroye, Elke; Van Loon, Jordi; Yuan, Haifeng; Janssen, Kris P F; Lou, Zaizhu; Kim, Sooyeon; Majima, Tetsuro; Roeffaers, Maarten B J

    2017-01-19

    Photocatalytic reactions occur at the crystal-solution interface, and hence specific crystal facet expression and surface defects can play an important role. Here we investigate the structure-related photoreduction at zinc oxide (ZnO) microparticles via integrated light and electron microscopy in combination with silver metal photodeposition. This enables a direct visualization of the photoreduction activity at specific crystallographic features. It is found that silver nanoparticle photodeposition on dumbbell-shaped crystals mainly takes place at the edges of O-terminated (0001̅) polar facets. In contrast, on ZnO microrods photodeposition is more homogeneously distributed with an increased activity at {101̅1̅} facets. Additional time-resolved measurements reveal a direct spatial link between the enhanced photoactivity and increased charge carrier lifetimes. These findings contradict previous observations based on indirect, bulk-scale experiments, assigning the highest photocatalytic activity to polar facets. The presented research demonstrates the need for advanced microscopy techniques to directly probe the location of photocatalytic activity.

  18. Facet-Dependent Photoreduction on Single ZnO Crystals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Photocatalytic reactions occur at the crystal–solution interface, and hence specific crystal facet expression and surface defects can play an important role. Here we investigate the structure-related photoreduction at zinc oxide (ZnO) microparticles via integrated light and electron microscopy in combination with silver metal photodeposition. This enables a direct visualization of the photoreduction activity at specific crystallographic features. It is found that silver nanoparticle photodeposition on dumbbell-shaped crystals mainly takes place at the edges of O-terminated (0001̅) polar facets. In contrast, on ZnO microrods photodeposition is more homogeneously distributed with an increased activity at {101̅1̅} facets. Additional time-resolved measurements reveal a direct spatial link between the enhanced photoactivity and increased charge carrier lifetimes. These findings contradict previous observations based on indirect, bulk-scale experiments, assigning the highest photocatalytic activity to polar facets. The presented research demonstrates the need for advanced microscopy techniques to directly probe the location of photocatalytic activity. PMID:28001412

  19. Foam inflated rigidized truss structure developed for an SRS Technologies solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, D.M.; Cannon, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    A foam inflated rigidized (FIR) truss structure to support a single chamber solar concentrator has been developed and demonstrated. This technology promises to advance the state of the art in construction of lightweight, deployable solar concentrators for solar thermal propulsion applications. In this paper the design, analysis, deployment and integration of this structure are discussed. A FIR structure is a rigid composite tube that can be formed in space by inflating a resin impregnated fabric skin with a solvent swollen polymeric foam. Once inflated, the skin resin is cured using the available ultraviolet radiation. By using high strength and stiffness fiber materials, a stiff, strong, lightweight structure is produced (Lester, 1994).

  20. Modification of the solar wind plasma and magnetic structures in magnetosheath: correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liudmila, Rakhmanova; Zastenker, Georgy; Riazantseva, Maria

    The report is devoted to the modification of the solar wind (SW) structures during transferring through the bow shock and magnetosheath (MSH). The study is based on the correlation analysis of data obtained from two closely located THEMIS spacecrafts placed in SW and MSH simultaneously. We find out that bow shock and MSH typically add only high frequency fluctuations (with frequencies exceeding 0.01-0.02 Hz) to the variations of solar wind parameters. We observed time variations of correlation coefficient calculated on 2-hour and 30-minute data intervals. We find that that small-scale solar wind structures are extremely modified in MSH though structures of larger scales transfer to the MSH without modification. We suggest that the amplitude of structure , amplitude of IMF and the value of the density of the solar wind plasma are the main parameters controlling the level of modification of the solar wind structure’s in MSH.

  1. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toeroek, T.; Berger, M. A.; Kliem, B.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of twist and writhe helicity. Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates to the writhe, which fraction of helicity is contained in writhe, and how much helicity is exchanged between twist and writhe when they erupt. Aims. Here we perform a quantitative investigation of these questions relevant for coronal flux ropes. Methods. The decomposition of the writhe of a curve into local and nonlocal components greatly facilitates its computation. We use it to study the relation between writhe and projected S shape of helical curves and to measure writhe and twist in numerical simulations of flux rope instabilities. The results are discussed with regard to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results. (1) We demonstrate that the relation between writhe and projected S shape is not unique in principle, but that the ambiguity does not affect low-lying structures, thus supporting the established empirical rule which associates stable forward (reverse) S shaped structures low in the corona with positive (negative) helicity. (2) Kink-unstable erupting flux ropes are found to transform a far smaller fraction of their twist helicity into writhe helicity than often assumed. (3) Confined flux rope eruptions tend to show stronger writhe at low heights than ejective eruptions (CMEs). This argues against suggestions that the writhing facilitates the rise of the rope through the overlying field. (4) Erupting filaments which are S shaped already before the eruption and keep the sign of their axis writhe (which is expected if field of one chirality dominates the source volume of the eruption), must reverse their S shape in the course of the rise. Implications for the occurrence of the helical kink instability in such events are discussed.

  2. Tracing Rays In A Solar Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, Kent; Gallo, Chris

    1989-01-01

    OFFSET is ray-tracing computer code for analysis of optics of solar collector. Code models distributions of solar flux within receiver cavity, produced by reflections from collector. Developed to model mathematically offset solar collector of solar dynamic electric power system being developed for Space Station Freedom. Used to develop revised collector-facet concept of four groups of toroidally contoured facets. Also used to develop methods for tailoring distribution of flux incident on receiver. Written in FORTRAN 77 (100 percent).

  3. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant supported research on the structure of the quiet, nonmagnetic chromosphere and on wave excitation and propagation in both the nonmagnetic chromosphere and the magnetic network. The work on the structure of the chromosphere culminated in the recognition that between two competing views of the solar chromosphere, older models by Avrett and collaborators (referred to as VAL) and the newer, dynamical model by Carlsson & Stein (referred to as CS), the clear decision is in favor of the older models, and this in spite of the evident lack of physics, which does not include wave motion and oscillations. The contrast between the static VAL models and the dynamical CS model can be stated most succinctly by comparing the temperature variation implied by the VAL models and the temperature fluctuations of the CS model, which are, respectively, of the order of 10% for the VAL model (at heights where hydrogen is 50% ionized) and a factor of 10 (at the upper boundary of their chromospheric model). The huge fluctuations of the CS model have never been observed, whereas the smaller temperature variations of the VAL models are consistent with ground-based and space-based observations. While it should be obvious which model describes the Sun and which one fails, the case is far from settled in the minds of solar physicists. Thus, much educational work remains to be done and, of course, more research to develop arguments that make the case more convincing. The research on waves and oscillations has been based on a unified theory of excitation of acoustic waves in the field-free atmosphere and of transverse and longitudinal waves in magnetic flux tubes located in the magnetic network by noting, first, that impulsive excitation of all these waves in gravitationally stratified media leads to oscillations at the respective cutoff frequencies and, second, that the observed oscillation frequencies in the nonmagnetic and magnetic parts of the chromosphere match corresponding cutoff

  4. Monolithic-Structured Single-Layered Textile-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Min Ju; Cha, Seung I; Kim, Han Seong; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Dong Y

    2016-10-06

    Textile-structured solar cells are frequently discussed in the literature due to their prospective applications in wearable devices and in building integrated solar cells that utilize their flexibility, mechanical robustness, and aesthetic appearance, but the current approaches for textile-based solar cells-including the preparation of fibre-type solar cells woven into textiles-face several difficulties from high friction and tension during the weaving process. This study proposes a new structural concept and fabrication process for monolithic-structured textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells that are fabricated by a process similar to the cloth-making process, including the preparation of wires and yarns that are woven for use in textiles, printed, dyed, and packaged. The fabricated single-layered textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells successfully act as solar cells in our study, even under bending conditions. By controlling the inter-weft spacing and the number of Ti wires for the photoelectrode conductor, we have found that the performance of this type of dye-sensitized solar cell was notably affected by the spacing between photoelectrodes and counter-electrodes, the exposed areas of Ti wires to photoelectrodes, and photoelectrodes' surface morphology. We believe that this study provides a process and concept for improved textile-based solar cells that can form the basis for further research.

  5. Monolithic-Structured Single-Layered Textile-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Min Ju; Cha, Seung I.; Kim, Han Seong; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Dong Y.

    2016-01-01

    Textile-structured solar cells are frequently discussed in the literature due to their prospective applications in wearable devices and in building integrated solar cells that utilize their flexibility, mechanical robustness, and aesthetic appearance, but the current approaches for textile-based solar cells—including the preparation of fibre-type solar cells woven into textiles—face several difficulties from high friction and tension during the weaving process. This study proposes a new structural concept and fabrication process for monolithic-structured textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells that are fabricated by a process similar to the cloth-making process, including the preparation of wires and yarns that are woven for use in textiles, printed, dyed, and packaged. The fabricated single-layered textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells successfully act as solar cells in our study, even under bending conditions. By controlling the inter-weft spacing and the number of Ti wires for the photoelectrode conductor, we have found that the performance of this type of dye-sensitized solar cell was notably affected by the spacing between photoelectrodes and counter-electrodes, the exposed areas of Ti wires to photoelectrodes, and photoelectrodes’ surface morphology. We believe that this study provides a process and concept for improved textile-based solar cells that can form the basis for further research. PMID:27708359

  6. Monolithic-Structured Single-Layered Textile-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min Ju; Cha, Seung I.; Kim, Han Seong; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Dong Y.

    2016-10-01

    Textile-structured solar cells are frequently discussed in the literature due to their prospective applications in wearable devices and in building integrated solar cells that utilize their flexibility, mechanical robustness, and aesthetic appearance, but the current approaches for textile-based solar cells—including the preparation of fibre-type solar cells woven into textiles—face several difficulties from high friction and tension during the weaving process. This study proposes a new structural concept and fabrication process for monolithic-structured textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells that are fabricated by a process similar to the cloth-making process, including the preparation of wires and yarns that are woven for use in textiles, printed, dyed, and packaged. The fabricated single-layered textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells successfully act as solar cells in our study, even under bending conditions. By controlling the inter-weft spacing and the number of Ti wires for the photoelectrode conductor, we have found that the performance of this type of dye-sensitized solar cell was notably affected by the spacing between photoelectrodes and counter-electrodes, the exposed areas of Ti wires to photoelectrodes, and photoelectrodes’ surface morphology. We believe that this study provides a process and concept for improved textile-based solar cells that can form the basis for further research.

  7. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-13

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  8. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  9. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  10. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  11. Structural Analysis and Test Comparison of a 20-Meter Inflation-Deployed Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Mann, Troy; Lichodziejewski, David; Derbes, Billy

    2006-01-01

    Under the direction of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Office, the team of L Garde, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Ball Aerospace, and NASA Langley Research Center has been developing a scalable solar sail configuration to address NASA s future space propulsion needs. Prior to a flight experiment of a full-scale solar sail, a comprehensive test program was implemented to advance the technology readiness level of the solar sail design. These tests consisted of solar sail component, subsystem, and sub-scale system ground tests that simulated the aspects of the space environment such as vacuum and thermal conditions. In July 2005, a 20-m four-quadrant solar sail system test article was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Space Power Facility to measure its static and dynamic structural responses. Key to the maturation of solar sail technology is the development of validated finite element analysis (FEA) models that can be used for design and analysis of solar sails. A major objective of the program was to utilize the test data to validate the FEA models simulating the solar sail ground tests. The FEA software, ABAQUS, was used to perform the structural analyses to simulate the ground tests performed on the 20-m solar sail test article. This paper presents the details of the FEA modeling, the structural analyses simulating the ground tests, and a comparison of the pretest and post-test analysis predictions with the ground test results for the 20-m solar sail system test article. The structural responses that are compared in the paper include load-deflection curves and natural frequencies for the beam structural assembly and static shape, natural frequencies, and mode shapes for the solar sail membrane. The analysis predictions were in reasonable agreement with the test data. Factors that precluded better correlation of the analyses and the tests were unmeasured initial conditions in the test set-up.

  12. Interplanetary shock waves and the structure of solar wind disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of interplanetary shock waves are reviewed, with emphasis on the large-scale characteristics of the associated solar wind disturbances and on the relationship of these disturbances to solar activity. The sum of observational knowledge indicates that shock waves propagate through the solar wind along a broad, roughly spherical front, ahead of plasma and magnetic field ejected from solar flares. Typically, the shock front reaches 1 AU about two days after its flare origin, and is of intermediate strength. Not all large flares produce observable interplanetary shock waves; the best indicator of shock production appears to be the generation of both type 2 and type 4 radio bursts by a flare. Theoretical models of shock propagation in the solar wind can account for the typically observed shock strength, transit time, and shape.

  13. Detecting and disentangling nonlinear structure from solar flux time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Roszman, L.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in solar activity has grown in the past two decades for many reasons. Most importantly for flight dynamics, solar activity changes the atmospheric density, which has important implications for spacecraft trajectory and lifetime prediction. Building upon the previously developed Rayleigh-Benard nonlinear dynamic solar model, which exhibits many dynamic behaviors observed in the Sun, this work introduces new chaotic solar forecasting techniques. Our attempt to use recently developed nonlinear chaotic techniques to model and forecast solar activity has uncovered highly entangled dynamics. Numerical techniques for decoupling additive and multiplicative white noise from deterministic dynamics and examines falloff of the power spectra at high frequencies as a possible means of distinguishing deterministic chaos from noise than spectrally white or colored are presented. The power spectral techniques presented are less cumbersome than current methods for identifying deterministic chaos, which require more computationally intensive calculations, such as those involving Lyapunov exponents and attractor dimension.

  14. Further Study of Isolated Electrostatic Structures in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, P. J.

    2003-12-01

    A large number of short (sub-millisecond) waveforms has been observed by the Waves Time Domain Sampler on Wind. Similar waveforms have been analyzed by Mangeney et al (1999). They and Lacombe et al (2002) concentrated on double layer-like waveforms having a net potential change, but this study concentrates on electron hole-like waveforms with little potential change. The waveforms are compact, having Debye-length scales. They are often shorter than the X antenna, 100 m tip to tip, and this allows determination of their size and velocity. In many cases they are associated with magnetic discontinuities, and also in many cases occur in close proximity to ion acoustic wave bursts, from which they may evolve. Like the cases analyzed by Mangeney et al, they are quite weak, leading to electric fields of a few tenths of a millivolt per meter. Their structures are generally consistent with electron holes. Lacombe, C., C.Salem, A.Mangeney, D.Hubert, C.Perche, J-L.Bougeret, P.J.Kellogg, K.Goetz, J-M.Bosqued, "Evidence for the interplanetary potential? WIND observations of electrostatic fluctuations", Annales Geophysicae, 20, 609-618, 2002 Mangeney A., C.Salem, C.Lacombe, J-L.Bougeret, C.Perche, R.Manning, P.J.Kellogg, K.Goetz, S.J.Monson, J-M.Bosqued, "WIND observations of coherent electrostatic waves in the solar wind" Annales Geophysicae 17, 307-320, 1999

  15. Automatic detection and extraction of ultra-fine bright structure observed with new vacuum solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Linhua

    2017-02-01

    Solar magnetic structures exhibit a wealth of different spatial and temporal scales. Presently, solar magnetic element is believed to be the ultra-fine magnetic structure in the lower solar atmospheric layer, and the diffraction limit of the largest-aperture solar telescope (New Vacuum Solar Telescope; NVST) of China is close to the spatial scale of magnetic element. This implies that modern solar observations have entered the era of high resolution better than 0.2 arc-second. Since the year of 2011, the NVST have successfully established and obtained huge observational data. Moreover, the ultra-fine magnetic structure rooted in the dark inter-graunlar lanes can be easily resolved. Studies on the observational characteristics and physical mechanism of magnetic bright points is one of the most important aspects in the field of solar physics, so it is very important to determine the statistical and physical parameters of magnetic bright points with the feature extraction techniques and numerical analysis approaches. For identifying such ultra-fine magnetic structure, an automatically and effectively detection algorithm, employed the Laplacian transform and the morphological dilation technique, is proposed and examined. Then, the statistical parameters such as the typical diameter, the area distribution, the eccentricity, and the intensity contrast are obtained. And finally, the scientific meaning for investigating the physical parameters of magnetic bright points are discussed, especially for understanding the physical processes of solar magnetic energy transferred from the photosphere to the corona.

  16. Modification of flux profiles using a faceted concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, A.; Scholl, K.; Bingham, C.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a faceted solar concentrator allows for some flexibility in aiming strategy and in the intensity of the resulting flux profile at the target. This can be an advantage when considering applications that do not necessarily require maximum concentration, particularly emerging, new applications in solar processed advanced materials. This paper will describe both an analysis of predicted flux profiles for several different aiming strategies using the SOLFUR computer code and experiments to characterize the actual flux profiles realized with a selected aiming strategy. The SOLFUR code models each of the furnace components explicitly. Aim points for each facet can be specified. Thus many strategies for adjusting aim points can be easily explored. One strategy calls for creating as uniform a flux over as large an area as possible. We explored this strategy analytically and experimentally. The experimental data consist of flux maps generated by a video imaging system calibrated against absolute flux measurements taken with circular foil calorimeters. Results from the analytical study and a comparison with the experimental data indicate that uniform profiles can be produced over fairly large areas.

  17. Near-Sun solar wind consequences of solar structure and dynamic phenomena observed by radio scintillation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Since radio propagation measurements using either natural or spacecraft radio signals are used for probing the solar wind in the vicinity of the sun, they represent a key tool for studying the interplanetary consequences of solar structure and dynamic phenomena. New information on the near sun consequences was obtained from radio scintillation observations of coherent spacecraft signals. The results covering density fluctuations, fractional density fluctuations, coronal streamers, heliospheric current sheets, coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks are reviewed. A joint ICE S-band (13 cm wavelength) Doppler scintillation measurement with the SOHO white-light coronograph (LASCO) is described.

  18. Evolution of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field sector structure during the last 15 solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhmyanin, Mikhail

    We have inferred for the first time Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) polarities from ground-based geomagnetic observations back to 1844. Reconstructions are reliable enough to study sector structure of the IMF in the past. The inferred daily polarities demonstrate solar-cycle changes during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We have analyzed statistics of the sector boundaries and found recurrences that reflect evolution of the solar wind sources. Additionally, seasonal variations of the ratio of positive and negative sectors provide evidence of solar magnetic field reversals during the last 15 solar cycles.

  19. Overview of Solar Seismology: Oscillations as Probes of Internal Structure and Dynamics in the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomre, J.

    1984-01-01

    The physical nature of solar oscillations is reviewed. The nomenclature of the subject and the techniques used to interpret the oscillations are discussed. Many of the acoustic and gravity waves that can be observed in the atmosphere of the Sun are actually resonant or standing modes of the interior; precise measurements of the frequencies of such modes allow deductions of the internal structure and dynamics of this star. The scientific objectives of such studies of solar seismic disturbances, or of solar seismology, are outlined. The reasons why it would be very beneficial to carry out further observations of solar oscillations both from ground based networks and from space will be discussed.

  20. Magnetic field sector structure and origins of solar wind streams in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugay, Yulia; Slemzin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Igor

    2014-08-01

    The origins of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field sector structure in the beginning of the magnetic polarity reversal of 24th solar cycle were investigated using the Wilcox Solar Observatory magnetic field measurements and their products as well as the solar wind data from ACE and the SDO/AIA EUV images. The dominance of the quadrupole harmonics in the solar magnetic field in this period resulted in a four-sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field. The dominating source of recurrent high-speed solar wind stream was a large trans-equatorial coronal hole of negative polarity evolving in the course of the polarity reversal process. The contribution of ICMEs to the high-speed solar wind did not exceed 17% of the total flux. The solar wind density flux averaged over the year amounted to 1 × 108 cm-2 s-1 which is considerably lower than the typical long-term value (2-4 × 108 cm-2 s-1). The slow-speed component of solar wind density flux constituted in average more than 68% of the total flux, the high-speed component was about 10%, reaching the maximum of 32% in some Carrington rotations.

  1. The Chernyshenko Conscientiousness Scales: A New Facet Measure of Conscientiousness.

    PubMed

    Green, Jessica A; O'Connor, Daryl B; Gartland, Nicola; Roberts, Brent W

    2016-06-01

    The current research sought to validate the Chernyshenko Conscientiousness Scales (CCS), a novel measure designed to assess six facets of conscientiousness. Data from 7,569 U.S. participants and 649 U.K. participants were analyzed to assess the internal reliability and factorial structure of the scales. Test-retest reliability, convergent and divergent validity, and criterion-related validity were also evaluated using a separate U.K. sample (n = 118; n = 80 for test-retest). The results showed that those items designed to measure industriousness, order, self-control, traditionalism, and virtue were best represented by a five-factor structure, broadly consistent with the five scales. However, the content and structure of the responsibility scale requires further investigation. Overall, the CCS has the potential to be a useful alternative to the faceted measures of conscientiousness that are currently available. However, future research is required to refine a number of problematic items and to clarify which facets can be better described as interstitial dimensions between conscientiousness and other Big Five domains.

  2. FACET: SLAC___s New User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.-J.; England, R.J.; Erickson, R.A.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.D.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seeman, J.T.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The first User Run started in spring 2012 with 20 GeV, 3 nC electron beams. The facility is designed to provide short (20 {micro}m) bunches and small (20 {micro}m wide) spot sizes, producing uniquely high power beams. FACET supports studies from many fields but in particular those of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration. The creation of drive and witness bunches and shaped bunch profiles is possible with 'Notch' Collimation. FACET is also a source of THz radiation for material studies. Positrons will be available at FACET in future user runs. We present the User Facility and the available tools and opportunities for future experiments.

  3. Window structure for passivating solar cells based on gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Allen M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Passivated gallium arsenide solar photovoltaic cells with high resistance to moisture and oxygen are provided by means of a gallium arsenide phosphide window graded through its thickness from arsenic rich to phosphorus rich.

  4. Highly Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells with Tunable Structural Color

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The performance of perovskite solar cells has been progressing over the past few years and efficiency is likely to continue to increase. However, a negative aspect for the integration of perovskite solar cells in the built environment is that the color gamut available in these materials is very limited and does not cover the green-to-blue region of the visible spectrum, which has been a big selling point for organic photovoltaics. Here, we integrate a porous photonic crystal (PC) scaffold within the photoactive layer of an opaque perovskite solar cell following a bottom-up approach employing inexpensive and scalable liquid processing techniques. The photovoltaic devices presented herein show high efficiency with tunable color across the visible spectrum. This now imbues the perovskite solar cells with highly desirable properties for cladding in the built environment and encourages design of sustainable colorful buildings and iridescent electric vehicles as future power generation sources. PMID:25650872

  5. Highly efficient perovskite solar cells with tunable structural color.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Anaya, Miguel; Lozano, Gabriel; Calvo, Mauricio E; Johnston, Michael B; Míguez, Hernán; Snaith, Henry J

    2015-03-11

    The performance of perovskite solar cells has been progressing over the past few years and efficiency is likely to continue to increase. However, a negative aspect for the integration of perovskite solar cells in the built environment is that the color gamut available in these materials is very limited and does not cover the green-to-blue region of the visible spectrum, which has been a big selling point for organic photovoltaics. Here, we integrate a porous photonic crystal (PC) scaffold within the photoactive layer of an opaque perovskite solar cell following a bottom-up approach employing inexpensive and scalable liquid processing techniques. The photovoltaic devices presented herein show high efficiency with tunable color across the visible spectrum. This now imbues the perovskite solar cells with highly desirable properties for cladding in the built environment and encourages design of sustainable colorful buildings and iridescent electric vehicles as future power generation sources.

  6. Device modeling of perovskite solar cells based on structural similarity with thin film inorganic semiconductor solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minemoto, Takashi; Murata, Masashi

    2014-08-01

    Device modeling of CH3NH3PbI3-xCl3 perovskite-based solar cells was performed. The perovskite solar cells employ a similar structure with inorganic semiconductor solar cells, such as Cu(In,Ga)Se2, and the exciton in the perovskite is Wannier-type. We, therefore, applied one-dimensional device simulator widely used in the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells. A high open-circuit voltage of 1.0 V reported experimentally was successfully reproduced in the simulation, and also other solar cell parameters well consistent with real devices were obtained. In addition, the effect of carrier diffusion length of the absorber and interface defect densities at front and back sides and the optimum thickness of the absorber were analyzed. The results revealed that the diffusion length experimentally reported is long enough for high efficiency, and the defect density at the front interface is critical for high efficiency. Also, the optimum absorber thickness well consistent with the thickness range of real devices was derived.

  7. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  8. Surface Activation of Faceted Photocatalyst: When Metal Cocatalyst Determines the Nature of the Facets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Liu, Maochang; Zhou, Zhaohui; Guo, Liejin

    2015-11-01

    Pt nanoparticles with tunable size are prepared on the entire surface of facet-engineered Cu2WS4 decahedral photocatalyst via a kinetic-controlled chemical reduction process. The {101} facets of the photocatalyst which featured photo-oxidation, are successfully activated for photoreduction by Pt. The resulting photocatalyst shows an activity nine times higher compared to that of the only {001}-facets activated catalyst obtained by a conventional in situ photodeposition route.

  9. FACET: Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilmoria, Karl D.; Banavar, Sridhar; Chatterji, Gano B.; Sheth, Kapil S.; Grabbe, Shon

    2000-01-01

    FACET (Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool) is an Air Traffic Management research tool being developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. This paper describes the design, architecture and functionalities of FACET. The purpose of FACET is to provide E simulation environment for exploration, development and evaluation of advanced ATM concepts. Examples of these concepts include new ATM paradigms such as Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management, airspace redesign and new Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for controllers working within the operational procedures of the existing air traffic control system. FACET is currently capable of modeling system-wide en route airspace operations over the contiguous United States. Airspace models (e.g., Center/sector boundaries, airways, locations of navigation aids and airports) are available from databases. A core capability of FACET is the modeling of aircraft trajectories. Using round-earth kinematic equations, aircraft can be flown along flight plan routes or great circle routes as they climb, cruise and descend according to their individual aircraft-type performance models. Performance parameters (e.g., climb/descent rates and speeds, cruise speeds) are obtained from data table lookups. Heading, airspeed and altitude-rate dynamics are also modeled. Additional functionalities will be added as necessary for specific applications. FACET software is written in Java and C programming languages. It is platform-independent, and can be run on a variety of computers. FACET has been designed with a modular software architecture to enable rapid integration of research prototype implementations of new ATM concepts. There are several advanced ATM concepts that are currently being implemented in FACET airborne separation assurance, dynamic density predictions, airspace redesign (re-sectorization), benefits of a controller DST for direct-routing, and the integration of commercial space transportation system operations into the U.S. National

  10. 3D Solar Wind Structure Features Characterizing the Rise of Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Ellenburg, M. A.; Riley, P.; Lee, C. O.; Arge, C. N.; Jian, L.; Russell, C. T.; Simunac, K.; Galvin, A. B.; Petrie, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    Since the launch of the STEREO mission in 2006, there has been renewed interest in the 3D structure of the solar wind, spurred in part by the unusual cycle 23 solar minimum and current solar cycle rise. Of particular significance for this subject has been the ubiquitous occurrence of low latitude coronal holes and coronal pseudo-streamers. These coupled features have been common both because of the relative strength of high order spherical harmonic content of the global coronal field, and the weakness of the field compared to the previous two well-observed cycles. We consider the effects of the low latitude coronal holes and pseudo-streamers on the near-ecliptic solar wind and interplanetary field. In particular, we illustrate how the now common passage of streams with low latitude sources and pseudo-streamer boundaries is changing our traditional perceptions of local solar wind structures.

  11. Solar wind and coronal structure near sunspot minimum - Pioneer and SMM observations from 1985-1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Hundhausen, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in solar wind speed and magnetic polarity observed at the Pioneer spacecraft are discussed here in terms of the changing magnetic geometry implied by SMM coronagraph observations over the period 1985-1987. The pattern of recurrent solar wind streams, the long-term average speed, and the sector polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field all changed in a manner suggesting both a temporal variation, and a changing dependence on heliographic latitude. Coronal observations during this epoch show a systematic variation in coronal structure and the magnetic structure imposed on the expanding solar wind. These observations suggest interpretation of the solar wind speed variations in terms of the familiar model where the speed increases with distance from a nearly flat interplanetary current sheet, and where this current sheet becomes aligned with the solar equatorial plane as sunspot minimum approaches, but deviates rapidly from that orientation after minimum.

  12. SEISMOLOGY OF STANDING KINK OSCILLATIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Arregui, I.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2010-10-20

    We investigate standing kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a prominence fine structure modeled as a straight and cylindrical magnetic tube only partially filled with the prominence material and with its ends fixed at two rigid walls representing the solar photosphere. The prominence plasma is partially ionized and a transverse inhomogeneous transitional layer is included between the prominence thread and the coronal medium. Thus, ion-neutral collisions and resonant absorption are the damping mechanisms considered. Approximate analytical expressions of the period, the damping time, and their ratio are derived for the fundamental mode in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. We find that the dominant damping mechanism is resonant absorption, which provides damping ratios in agreement with the observations, whereas ion-neutral collisions are irrelevant for damping. The values of the damping ratio are independent of both the prominence thread length and its position within the magnetic tube, and coincide with the values for a tube fully filled with the prominence plasma. The implications of our results in the context of the MHD seismology technique are discussed, pointing out that the reported short-period (2-10 minutes) and short-wavelength (700-8000 km) thread oscillations may not be consistent with a standing mode interpretation and could be related to propagating waves. Finally, we show that the inversion of some prominence physical parameters, e.g., Alfven speed, magnetic field strength, transverse inhomogeneity length scale, etc., is possible using observationally determined values of the period and damping time of the oscillations along with the analytical approximations of these quantities.

  13. MultiFacet: A Faceted Interface for Browsing Large Multimedia Collections

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Michael J.; Hampton, Shawn D.; Endert, Alexander; Roberts, Ian E.; Payne, Deborah A.

    2013-10-31

    Faceted browsing is a common technique for exploring collections where the data can be grouped into a number of pre-defined categories, most often generated from textual metadata. Historically, faceted browsing has been applied to a single data type such as text or image data. However, typical collections contain multiple data types, such as information from web pages that contain text, images, and video. Additionally, when browsing a collection of images and video, facets are often created based on the metadata which may be incomplete, inaccurate, or missing altogether instead of the actual visual content contained within those images and video. In this work we address these limitations by presenting MultiFacet, a faceted browsing interface that supports multiple data types. MultiFacet constructs facets for images and video in a collection from the visual content using computer vision techniques. These visual facets can then be browsed in conjunction with text facets within a single interface to reveal relationships and phenomena within multimedia collections. Additionally, we present a use case based on real-world data, demonstrating the utility of this approach towards browsing a large multimedia data collection.

  14. Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays. Phase 1, 2 and 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.; Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Structural concepts for deploying and supporting lightweight solar-array blankets for geosynchronous electrical power are evaluated. It is recommended that the STACBEAM solar-array system should be the object of further study and detailed evaluation. The STACBEAM system provides high stiffness at low mass, and with the use of a low mass deployment mechanism, full structural properties can be maintained throughout deployment. The stowed volume of the STACBEAM is acceptably small, and its linear deployment characteristic allows periodic attachments to the solar-array blanket to be established in the stowed configuration and maintained during deployment.

  15. Speckle imaging of solar small scale structure. 2: Study of small scale structure in active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Luehe, O.

    1994-01-01

    The speckle imaging technique which is described in the first paper of this series (von der Luehe 1993) was used to analyze time series of high angular resolution images of solar small scale structure at a wavelength of 585 nm in active regions with the 76 cm diameter vacuum tower telescope at National Solar Observatory (NSO)/Sac Peak. Two sets of reconstructed images with a field of 4 by 4 arcsec which cover a period of 36 min and 83 min were generated and analyzed. The image reconstructions are supplemented with simultaneous large field photographs taken within a 15 A passband centered on the Ca II K (3933) line. The prime objective of the observing program was the study of the structure and the dynamics of the continuum wavelength counterpart of facular points which appear with high contrast in the Ca pictures, i.e., continuum bright points (CBPs). In addition to CBPs, the reconstructions allow studying other small scale phenomena. Results of the studies are given.

  16. Dynesys dynamic stabilization-related facet arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Hao; Tsai, Tzu-Yun; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dynamic stabilization devices are designed to stabilize the spine while preserving some motion. However, there have been reports demonstrating limited motion at the instrumented level of the lumbar spine after Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS). The causes of this limited motion and its actual effects on outcomes after DDS remain elusive. In this study, the authors investigate the incidence of unintended facet arthrodesis after DDS and clinical outcomes. METHODS This retrospective study included 80 consecutive patients with 1- or 2-level lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent laminectomy and DDS. All medical records, radiological data, and clinical evaluations were analyzed. Imaging studies included pre- and postoperative radiographs, MR images, and CT scans. Clinical outcomes were measured by a visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. Furthermore, all patients had undergone postoperative CT for the detection of unintended arthrodesis of the facets at the indexed level, and range of motion was measured on standing dynamic radiographs. RESULTS A total of 70 patients (87.5%) with a mean age of 64.0 years completed the minimum 24-month postoperative follow-up (mean duration 29.9 months). Unintended facet arthrodesis at the DDS instrumented level was demonstrated by CT in 38 (54.3%) of the 70 patients. The mean age of patients who had facet arthrodesis was 9.8 years greater than that of the patients who did not (68.3 vs 58.5 years, p = 0.009). There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes, including VAS back and leg pain, ODI, and JOA scores between patients with and without the unintended facet arthrodesis. Furthermore, those patients older than 60 years were more likely to have unintended facet arthrodesis (OR 12.42) and immobile spinal segments (OR 2.96) after DDS. Regardless of whether unintended facet arthrodesis was present or not, clinical

  17. Surface Processes of Faceted Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy and high precision optical interferometry allow to analyze the processes that are in the core of our present understanding of faceted crystal growth. Some of these processes will be reviewed. Recent experiments suggest that the Gibbs-Thomson Law (GTL) may not be applicable to the weakly fluctuating strongly polygonized steps, with low kink density. Propagation rate of a straight short step segment changes with the segment length much steeper than predicted by GTL. If the step fluctuations are still well developed, the typical transition length may be determined just by the radius of rounded comers of the polygonized step. If fluctuations do not have enough time to develop, the kinetic effects may be essential. Indeed, 'communications' between comers of a short straight step segment may occur and, thus, the GTL may be implemented only via kink exchange. E.g., dissolutions of this short segment at macroscopic equilibrium occurs as follows: The kinks are split from one comer as a result of fluctuations, and annihilate with kinks of the opposite sign generated by another comer. Similarly, an exchange via chain of kinks on a rough step is the mechanism to implement the GT Law. If there is a supersaturation with respect to a large crystal, the kinks not only diffuse along the step, but move back the generating comers. This 'wind' prevents communication between the comers and places upper limit supersaturation only below which GTL is applicable. Steps replace kinks in the 3D case, though, of course, another dimensionality brings about another physics. Another specific problem to think about is if fluctuations are always fast enough to provide enough kinks for linear dependence of step rate on supersaturation. Increasing azimuthal polygonization of growth hillocks is a sign of insufficient fluctuation rate. Morphological stability of vicinal faces is usually considered on the basis of mutually parallel steps. Azimuthal anisotropy and interlacing of

  18. Breathing of heliospheric structures triggered by the solar-cycle activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, K.; Fahr, H. J.

    2003-06-01

    Solar wind ram pressure variations occuring within the solar activity cycle are communicated to the outer heliosphere as complicated time-variabilities, but repeating its typical form with the activity period of about 11 years. At outer heliospheric regions, the main surviving solar cycle feature is a periodic variation of the solar wind dynamical pressure or momentum flow, as clearly recognized by observations of the VOYAGER-1/2 space probes. This long-periodic variation of the solar wind dynamical pressure is modeled here through application of appropriately time-dependent inner boundary conditions within our multifluid code to describe the solar wind - interstellar medium interaction. As we can show, it takes several solar cycles until the heliospheric structures adapt to an average location about which they carry out a periodic breathing, however, lagged in phase with respect to the solar cycle. The dynamically active heliosphere behaves differently from a static heliosphere and especially shows a historic hysteresis in the sense that the shock structures move out to larger distances than explained by the average ram pressure. Obviously, additional energies are pumped into the heliosheath by means of density and pressure waves which are excited. These waves travel outwards through the interface from the termination shock towards the bow shock. Depending on longitude, the heliospheric sheath region memorizes 2-3 (upwind) and up to 6-7 (downwind) preceding solar activity cycles, i.e. the cycle-induced waves need corresponding travel times for the passage over the heliosheath. Within our multifluid code we also adequately describe the solar cycle variations in the energy distributions of anomalous and galactic cosmic rays, respectively. According to these results the distribution of these high energetic species cannot be correctly described on the basis of the actually prevailing solar wind conditions.

  19. Flexible organic solar cells including efficiency enhancing grating structures.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina; Liu, Yinghui; Madsen, Morten; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2013-04-12

    In this work, a new method for the fabrication of organic solar cells containing functional light-trapping nanostructures on flexible substrates is presented. Polyimide is spin-coated on silicon support substrates, enabling standard micro- and nanotechnology fabrication techniques, such as photolithography and electron-beam lithography, besides the steps required for the bulk-heterojunction organic solar cell fabrication. After the production steps, the solar cells on polyimide are peeled off the silicon support substrates, resulting in flexible devices containing nanostructures for light absorption enhancement. Since the solar cells avoid using brittle electrodes, the performance of the flexible devices is not affected by the peeling process. We have investigated three different nanostructured grating designs and conclude that gratings with a 500 nm pitch distance have the highest light-trapping efficiency for the selected active layer material (P3HT:PCBM), resulting in an enhancement of about 34% on the solar cell efficiency. The presented method can be applied to a large variety of flexible nanostructured devices in future applications.

  20. Flexible organic solar cells including efficiency enhancing grating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melina de Oliveira Hansen, Roana; Liu, Yinghui; Madsen, Morten; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2013-04-01

    In this work, a new method for the fabrication of organic solar cells containing functional light-trapping nanostructures on flexible substrates is presented. Polyimide is spin-coated on silicon support substrates, enabling standard micro- and nanotechnology fabrication techniques, such as photolithography and electron-beam lithography, besides the steps required for the bulk-heterojunction organic solar cell fabrication. After the production steps, the solar cells on polyimide are peeled off the silicon support substrates, resulting in flexible devices containing nanostructures for light absorption enhancement. Since the solar cells avoid using brittle electrodes, the performance of the flexible devices is not affected by the peeling process. We have investigated three different nanostructured grating designs and conclude that gratings with a 500 nm pitch distance have the highest light-trapping efficiency for the selected active layer material (P3HT:PCBM), resulting in an enhancement of about 34% on the solar cell efficiency. The presented method can be applied to a large variety of flexible nanostructured devices in future applications.

  1. Optical properties of a grating-nanorod assembly structure for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhihao; Cheng, Qiang; Song, Jinlin; Si, Mengting; Luo, Zixue

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a grating-nanorod assembly structure that can be applied to silicon solar cells. The optical properties of the assembly structure are examined by applying the finite difference time domain method in the 300-1100 nm wavelength region, where the average spectral absorptance of the structure can reach 0.955. This high absorptance is attributed to guided mode resonance and microcavity effect. The transient and steady-state magnetic field distribution of the structure reveals the underlying mechanisms of such extraordinary phenomena. Absorptance is further investigated at different diameters and lengths of the nanorod component. The effects of incident angle on absorptance are also discussed. The solar cells of the structure can yield an optimum conversion efficiency of 25.91%. Thus, the proposed structure can be applied to silicon solar cells.

  2. Characterization of degenerative human facet joints and facet joint capsular tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Ali, Mir H.; Wydra, Frank; Li, Xin; Hamilton, John L.; An, Howard S.; Cs-Szabo, Gabriella; Andrews, Steven; Moric, Mario; Xiao, Guozhi; Wang, James H-C; Chen, Di; Cavanaugh, John M.; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Lumbar facet joint degeneration (FJD) may be an important cause of low back pain (LBP) and sciatica. The goal of this study was to characterize cellular alterations of inflammatory factor expression and neovascularization in human degenerative facet joint capsular (FJC) tissue, defined as the fibrous connective tissue lined with synovium that surrounds the joint. The role of these alterations in FJC tissues in pain stimulation was also assessed. Design Lumbar facet joints (FJs) were obtained from consented patients undergoing spinal reconstruction surgery and cadaveric donors with no medical history of back pain. Histological analyses of the FJ were performed to assess general structure, cellular morphology, and proteoglycan content; immunohistochemistry was used to reveal inflammatory factors and neovascularization. Cytokine antibody array and quantitative real- time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were used to determine the production of multiple pro- and anti- inflammatory cytokines, and western blotting (WB) was used to assay for cartilage-degrading enzymes and pain mediators. Studies using ex vivo rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) co-culture with human FJC tissues were also performed. Results Increased neovascularization, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and pain-related axonal-promoting factors were observed in degenerative FJC tissues surgically obtained from symptomatic subjects; this was not seen in normal donor tissues. Increased angiogenic factor, VEGF, axonal promoting factor (NGF/TrkA) and sensory neuronal distribution were also detected in degenerative FJC tissues from subjects with LBP. qPCR and WB results demonstrated highly upregulated inflammatory cytokines, pain mediators, and cartilage-degrading enzymes in degenerative FJCs compared to normal. The DRG and FJC tissue ex vivo co-culture results demonstrated that degenerative FJCs from subjects reporting severe LBP altered the functional properties of DRG sensory neurons, as

  3. Modelling of solar magnetic field and prominence structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shi Tsan

    1988-01-01

    Using plasma theory, the interaction is studied between high frequency and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves from which a set of coupling equations resulted. On the basis of this formalism, the modulation instabilities of an electromagnetic soliton in a current sheet are examined, and it is shown that there is a resistive instability at the onset of the magnetic field reconnection. This mechanism could be used to explain the onset of solar flares and prominences. To improve the resolution of vector magnetic fields at the sun's surface, state-of-the-art optics is examined to improve the design and fabrication of a new spaceborne solar vector magnetograph as part of the SAMEX (Solar Active Measurements Experiment) program.

  4. The structures, mass motions and footpoints of solar filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramanasastry, Aparna

    This thesis focuses on identifying the mechanism by which solar filaments acquire mass. Some of the speculations for how a filament gets its mass are 1) injection of mass from the chromosphere into the filament structure, and 2) condensation of mass from the corona into the region of the filament channel. Mass motion at the footpoints of the filaments is studied to detect mass entering and leaving the filament body. The magnetic properties of the footpoints of the filaments are also studied. Recommendations are drawn by comparing observational properties obtained in this study with the features used in some of the previously developed models. The datasets used for this study are high-resolution image sets of centerline and Doppler wings of Halpha, obtained using the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT). The data were obtained on Oct 30, 2010. The data set contains three filaments in an active region in the northern hemisphere of the Sun. The images in each wavelength are aligned and made into movies to find the footpoints of the filaments through which the mass goes into and comes out of the filaments from and to the chromosphere, respectively. The magnetic properties of the footpoints are studied by overlaying the magnetogram images with the DOT images by using full-disk Halpha images for matching the features in the two. Of the three filaments, one of the filaments is observed to be stable throughout the duration of the observations; another filament erupts after about two hours of the beginning of observations; and the third filament is in its early stages of formation. The ends of the stable filament are clearly observed whereas the ends of the erupting filament and the forming filament are observed clearly intermittently during the duration of the observations. The animations of the region near the ends of filament 1 reveal definite injection and draining of mass via the footpoints into and out of the filament. The mass motion into and out of the filaments are observed

  5. Heliolatitude structure of the solar wind proton speed and density at 1 AU for heliospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Justyna Maria; Swaczyna, Pawel; Bzowski, Maciej; Tokumaru, Munetoshi

    2014-05-01

    The heliolatitudinal structure of solar wind proton speed and density varies with solar activity. A model of its variation with time is needed for heliospheric studies and modeling. It is important for the global heliospheric structure, allows for an assessment of ionization rates of neutral species in the heliosphere and interpretation of observations of the energetic neutral atoms and neutral interstellar atoms. Sokół et al. 2013 presented a model of the heliolatitudinal and time variations of solar wind structure based on results of the computer assisted tomography analysis of the solar wind speed enabled by remote-sensing observations of interplanetary scintillations, in-situ measurements from Ulysses, and in-ecliptic measurements from various missions gathered in the OMNI2 database. They determined the 3D structure of solar wind on a yearly time grid from 1990 to 2011. Now we increase the time resolution of the grid used in the model. Because of the weather conditions in Japan, where the interplanetary scintillation observations are carried out, the solar wind data sets contain systematic gaps. For the purposes of the increase of the time resolution of the model for heliospheric studies the method of filling of these gap is needed. We present a comparison of various methods of gap filling. We present results of the investigation of the procedures of reconstruction of the solar wind density with the use of the solar wind invariants published in the literature. Additionally we study various algorithms of extrapolation of the heliolatitudinal time series of the solar wind proton speed and number density in time.

  6. A comprehensive study for the plasmonic thin-film solar cell with periodic structure.

    PubMed

    Sha, Wei E I; Choy, Wallace C H; Chew, Weng Cho

    2010-03-15

    A comprehensive study of the plasmonic thin-film solar cell with the periodic strip structure is presented in this paper. The finite-difference frequency-domain method is employed to discretize the inhomogeneous wave function for modeling the solar cell. In particular, the hybrid absorbing boundary condition and the one-sided difference scheme are adopted. The parameter extraction methods for the zeroth-order reflectance and the absorbed power density are also discussed, which is important for testing and optimizing the solar cell design. For the numerical results, the physics of the absorption peaks of the amorphous silicon thin-film solar cell are explained by electromagnetic theory; these peaks correspond to the waveguide mode, Floquet mode, surface plasmon resonance, and the constructively interference between adjacent metal strips. The work is therefore important for the theoretical study and optimized design of the plasmonic thin-film solar cell.

  7. Facets of emotional awareness and associations with emotion regulation and depression.

    PubMed

    Boden, Matthew Tyler; Thompson, Renee J

    2015-06-01

    Emotion theories posit that effective emotion regulation depends upon the nuanced information provided by emotional awareness; attending to and understanding one's own emotions. Additionally, the strong associations between facets of emotional awareness and various forms of psychopathology may be partially attributable to associations with emotion regulation. These logically compelling hypotheses are largely uninvestigated, including which facets compose emotional awareness and how they relate to emotion regulation strategies and psychopathology. We used exploratory structural equation modeling of individual difference measures among a large adult sample (n = 919) recruited online. Results distinguished 4 facets of emotional awareness (type clarity, source clarity, involuntary attention to emotion, and voluntary attention to emotion) that were differentially associated with expressive suppression, acceptance of emotions, and cognitive reappraisal. Facets were associated with depression both directly and indirectly via associations with emotion regulation strategies. We discuss implications for theory and research on emotional awareness, emotion regulation, and psychopathology.

  8. Pathological eating behaviors, BMI, and facet-level traits: the roles of conscientiousness, neuroticism, and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Ellickson-Larew, Stephanie; Naragon-Gainey, Kristin; Watson, David

    2013-12-01

    The current study examined the bivariate and multivariate associations of personality with Body Mass Index (BMI) and several eating behavior inventories, focusing on facets of Neuroticism, Conscientiousness, and Impulsivity. Simultaneous multiple regressions showed that the facets Traditionalism, Urgency, and low Vulnerability were significant predictors of BMI. A factor analysis of the eating behavior scales revealed two dimensions: (a) Food and Body Preoccupation and (b) Cued Eating; Neuroticism, low Conscientiousness, and Perfectionism were significant predictors of both eating behavior factors. In addition, the Depression facet predicted Food and Body Preoccupation, and low Temperance predicted Cued Eating. Implications are discussed for the structure of eating pathology and the specificity of facet traits to eating behaviors and obesity.

  9. Erosion Triangular Facets as Markers of Order in an Open Dissipative System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliaga, Guido

    2015-07-01

    The complexity and non-linearity of the morphogenetic system which is responsible for shaping the Earth's surface have been widely recognised by many authors who have documented the fractal nature of erosion. In this paper, two peculiar kinds of landforms are compared to point out ordered structures, i.e. triangular facets that arise in different geomorphic systems, due to the principle of morphologic convergence. Occurrence of triangular facets has been documented in mountainous areas in relation to base level changes and hydrographical network evolution; similarly shaped landforms are present even in recent tectonic uplift areas along faults. The spatial distribution of the two kinds of facets has been investigated in two river basins located in Liguria (northern Italy) and in a mountainous area in Oman. The results of this analysis document the different spatial features of the two kinds of facets.

  10. Solar concentrator advanced development program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knasel, D.; Ehresman, D.

    1989-10-01

    The Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Project has successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a full scale prototypical solar dynamic concentrator for space station applications. A Truss Hexagonal Panel reflector was selected as a viable solar concentrator concept to be used for space station applications. This concentrator utilizes a modular design approach and is flexible in attainable flux profiles and assembly techniques. The detailed design of the concentrator, which included structural, thermal and optical analysis, identified the feasibility of the design and specific technologies that were required to fabricate it. The needed surface accuracy of the reflectors surface was found to be very tight, within 5 mrad RMS slope error, and results in very close tolerances for fabrication. To meet the design requirements, a modular structure composed of hexagonal panels was used. The panels, made up of graphite epoxy box beams provided the strength, stiffness and dimensional stability needed. All initial project requirements were met or exceeded by hardware demonstration. Initial testing of structural repeatability of a seven panel portion of the concentrator was followed by assembly and testing of the full nineteen panel structure. The testing, which consisted of theodolite and optical measurements over an assembly-disassembly-reassembly cycle, demonstrated that the concentrator maintained the as-built contour and optical characteristics. The facet development effort within the project, which included developing the vapor deposited reflective facet, produced a viable design with demonstrated optical characteristics that are within the project goals.

  11. Structure of the magnetic field at altitudes of 1-1.15 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtemov, Z. S.; Stepanyan, N. N.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Rudenko, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the characteristics of unipolar structures detected at latitudes from -40° to +40°, longitudes of 0°-360°, and altitudes of 1-1.15 solar radii during the period from May 1996 (the 23rd solar minimum) to October 2000 (the 23rd solar maximum) has been carried out. Synoptic maps of the solar radial magnetic field calculated in a potential approximation are used. The boundaries between unipolar structures with opposite magnetic polarities ("+/-" and "-/+" polarities) form chains extending along meridians at all the considered latitudes and altitudes. Depending on the latitude, the single-peaked distributions of the number of structures found at the lowest altitudes are replaced by double-peaked distributions at higher altitudes. The time variations of the total number of structures are non-monotonic. The growth in the number of unipolar structures begins before the growth in the Wolf number. This indicates that new unipolar structures already appear together with flocculi, preceding the formation of sunspots. It is found that structures with positive field have larger mean sizes that do structures with negative field. The polar field in the northern hemisphere penetrates to middle latitudes of the southern hemisphere. The existence of sets of structures with typical sizes is shown. The sizes of the smallest structures vary little with latitude, but increase slightly with altitude.

  12. Extraversion and psychopathology: A facet-level analysis.

    PubMed

    Watson, David; Stasik, Sara M; Ellickson-Larew, Stephanie; Stanton, Kasey

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this study was to explicate how the lower order facets of extraversion are related to psychopathology. We used a "bottom-up" approach in which specific extraversion scales from 3 comprehensive personality inventories were used to model these facets as latent factors. We collected both self-report and interview measures of a broad range of psychopathology from a large community sample. Replicating previous findings using a similar approach (Naragon-Gainey & Watson, 2014; Naragon-Gainey, Watson, & Markon, 2009), structural analyses yielded four factors: Positive Emotionality, Sociability, Assertiveness, and Experience Seeking. Scores on these latent dimensions were related to psychopathology in correlational analyses and in two sets of regressions (the first series used the four facets as predictors; the second included composite scores on the other Big Five domains as additional predictors). These results revealed a striking level of specificity. As predicted, Positive Emotionality displayed especially strong negative links to depressive symptoms and diagnoses. Sociability also was negatively related to psychopathology, showing particularly strong associations with indicators of social dysfunction and the negative symptoms of schizotypy (i.e., social anxiety, social aloofness, and restricted affectivity). Assertiveness generally had weak associations at the bivariate level but was negatively related to social anxiety and was positively correlated with some forms of externalizing. Finally, Experience Seeking had substantial positive associations with a broad range of indicators related to externalizing and bipolar disorder; it also displayed negative links to agoraphobia. These differential correlates demonstrate the importance of examining personality-psychopathology relations at the specific facet level.

  13. Structure and evolution of the large scale solar and heliospheric magnetic fields. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Structure and evolution of large scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in the interval 1976-1983 were studied using observations from the Stanford Solar Observatory and a potential field model. The solar wind in the heliosphere is organized into large regions in which the magnetic field has a componenet either toward or away from the sun. The model predicts the location of the current sheet separating these regions. Near solar minimum, in 1976, the current sheet lay within a few degrees of the solar equator having two extensions north and south of the equator. Soon after minimum the latitudinal extent began to increase. The sheet reached to at least 50 deg from 1978 through 1983. The complex structure near maximum occasionally included multiple current sheets. Large scale structures persist for up to two years during the entire interval. To minimize errors in determining the structure of the heliospheric field particular attention was paid to decreasing the distorting effects of rapid field evolution, finding the optimum source surface radius, determining the correction to the sun's polar field, and handling missing data. The predicted structure agrees with direct interplanetary field measurements taken near the ecliptic and with coronameter and interplanetary scintillation measurements which infer the three dimensional interplanetary magnetic structure. During most of the solar cycle the heliospheric field cannot be adequately described as a dipole.

  14. High-performance deployable structures for the support of high-concentration ratio solar array modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobrem, M.

    1985-01-01

    A study conducted on high-performance deployable structures for the support of high-concentration ratio solar array modules is discussed. Serious consideration is being given to the use of high-concentration ratio solar array modules or applications such as space stations. These concentrator solar array designs offer the potential of reduced cost, reduced electrical complexity, higher power per unit area, and improved survivability. Arrays of concentrators, such as the miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator modules, present a serious challenge to the structural design because their mass per unit area (5.7 kg/square meters) is higher than that of flexible solar array blankets, and the requirement for accurate orientation towards the Sun (plus or minus 0.5 degree) requires structures with improved accuracy potentials. In addition, use on a space station requires relatively high structural natural frequencies to avoid deleterious interactions with control systems and other large structural components. The objective here is to identify and evaluate conceptual designs of structures suitable for deploying and accurately supporting high-concentration ratio solar array modules.

  15. Spatial separation of photogenerated electrons and holes among {010} and {110} crystal facets of BiVO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rengui; Zhang, Fuxiang; Wang, Donge; Yang, Jingxiu; Li, Mingrun; Zhu, Jian; Zhou, Xin; Han, Hongxian; Li, Can

    2013-02-01

    Charge separation is crucial for increasing the activity of semiconductor-based photocatalysts, especially in water splitting reactions. Here we show, using monoclinic bismuth vanadate crystal as a model photocatalyst, that efficient charge separation can be achieved on different crystal facets, as evidenced by the reduction reaction with photogenerated electrons and oxidation reaction with photogenerated holes, which take place separately on the {010} and {110} facets under photo-irradiation. Based on this finding, the reduction and oxidation cocatalysts are selectively deposited on the {010} and {110} facets respectively, resulting in much higher activity in both photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic water oxidation reactions, compared with the photocatalyst with randomly distributed cocatalysts. These results show that the photogenrated electrons and holes can be separated between the different facets of semiconductor crystals. This finding may be useful in semiconductor physics and chemistry to construct highly efficient solar energy conversion systems.

  16. Spatial separation of photogenerated electrons and holes among {010} and {110} crystal facets of BiVO4.

    PubMed

    Li, Rengui; Zhang, Fuxiang; Wang, Donge; Yang, Jingxiu; Li, Mingrun; Zhu, Jian; Zhou, Xin; Han, Hongxian; Li, Can

    2013-01-01

    Charge separation is crucial for increasing the activity of semiconductor-based photocatalysts, especially in water splitting reactions. Here we show, using monoclinic bismuth vanadate crystal as a model photocatalyst, that efficient charge separation can be achieved on different crystal facets, as evidenced by the reduction reaction with photogenerated electrons and oxidation reaction with photogenerated holes, which take place separately on the {010} and {110} facets under photo-irradiation. Based on this finding, the reduction and oxidation cocatalysts are selectively deposited on the {010} and {110} facets respectively, resulting in much higher activity in both photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic water oxidation reactions, compared with the photocatalyst with randomly distributed cocatalysts. These results show that the photogenrated electrons and holes can be separated between the different facets of semiconductor crystals. This finding may be useful in semiconductor physics and chemistry to construct highly efficient solar energy conversion systems.

  17. Periodic Density Structures and the Origin of the Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viall-Kepko, Nicholeen M.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    The source of the slow solar wind has challenged scientists for years. Periodic density structures (PDSs), observed regularly in the solar wind at 1 AU (Astronomical Unit), can be used to address this challenge. These structures have length scales of hundreds to several thousands of megameters and frequencies of tens to hundreds of minutes. Two lines of evidence indicate that PDSs are formed in the solar corona as part of the slow solar wind release and/or acceleration processes. The first is corresponding changes in compositional data in situ, and the second is PDSs observed in the inner Heliospheric Imaging data on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) suite. The periodic nature of these density structures is both a useful identifier as well as an important physical constraint on their origin. In this paper, we present the results of tracking periodic structures identified in the inner Heliospheric Imager in SECCHI back in time through the corresponding outer coronagraph (COR2) images. We demonstrate that the PDSs are formed around or below 2.5 solar radii-the inner edge of the COR2 field of view. We compute the occurrence rates of PDSs in 10 days of COR2 images both as a function of their periodicity and location in the solar corona, and we find that this set of PDSs occurs preferentially with a periodicity of approximately 90 minutes and occurs near streamers. Lastly, we show that their acceleration and expansion through COR2 is self-similar, thus their frequency is constant at distances beyond 2.5 solar radii.

  18. Sail film materials and supporting structure for a solar sail, a preliminary design, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, W. M. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Solar sailing technology was examined in relation to a mission to rendezvous with Halley's Comet. Development of an ultra-light, highly reflecting material system capable of operating at high solar intensity for long periods of time was emphasized. Data resulting from the sail materials study are reported. Topics covered include: basic film; coatings and thermal control; joining and handling; system performance; and supporting structures assessment for the heliogyro.

  19. Periodic Density Structures and the Origin of the Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-07-01

    The source of the slow solar wind has challenged scientists for years. Periodic density structures (PDSs), observed regularly in the solar wind at 1 AU, can be used to address this challenge. These structures have length scales of hundreds to several thousands of megameters and frequencies of tens to hundreds of minutes. Two lines of evidence indicate that PDSs are formed in the solar corona as part of the slow solar wind release and/or acceleration processes. The first is corresponding changes in compositional data in situ, and the second is PDSs observed in the inner Heliospheric Imaging data on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) suite. The periodic nature of these density structures is both a useful identifier as well as an important physical constraint on their origin. In this paper, we present the results of tracking periodic structures identified in the inner Heliospheric Imager in SECCHI back in time through the corresponding outer coronagraph (COR2) images. We demonstrate that the PDSs are formed around or below 2.5 solar radii—the inner edge of the COR2 field of view. We compute the occurrence rates of PDSs in 10 days of COR2 images both as a function of their periodicity and location in the solar corona, and we find that this set of PDSs occurs preferentially with a periodicity of ˜90 minutes and occurs near streamers. Lastly, we show that their acceleration and expansion through COR2 is self-similar, thus their frequency is constant at distances beyond 2.5 solar radii.

  20. Facet engineering of high power single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levi, Moshe; Shamay, Moshe; Tesler, Renana; Rappaport, Noam; Don, Yaroslav; Karni, Yoram; Schnitzer, Itzhak; Sicron, Noam; Shusterman, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    The ever increasing demand for high-power, high-reliability operation of single emitters at 9xx nm wavelengths requires the development of laser diodes with improved facet regions immune to both catastrophic and wear-out failure modes. In our study, we have evaluated several laser facet definition technologies in application to 90 micron aperture single emitters in asymmetric design (In)GaAs/AlGaAs based material emitting at 915, 925 and 980nm. A common epitaxy and emitter design makes for a straightforward comparison of the facet technologies investigated. Our study corroborates a clear trend of increasing difficulty in obtaining reliable laser operation from 980nm down to 915nm. At 980nm, one can employ dielectric facet passivation with a pre-clean cycle delivering a device lifetime in excess of 3,000 hours at increasing current steps. At 925nm, quantum-well intermixing can be used to define non-absorbing mirrors giving good device reliability, albeit with a large efficiency penalty. Vacuum cleaved emitters have delivered excellent reliability at 915nm, and can be expected to perform just as well at 925 and 980nm. Epitaxial regrowth of laser facets is under development and has yet to demonstrate an appreciable reliability improvement. Only a weak correlation between start-of-life catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) levels and reliability was established. The optimized facet design has delivered maximum powers in excess of 19 MW/sq.cm (rollover limited) and product-grade 980nm single emitters with a slope efficiency of >1 W/A and a peak efficiency of >60%. The devices have accumulated over 1,500 hours of CW operation at 11W. A fiber-coupled device emits 10W ex-fiber with 47% efficiency.

  1. Coronal sources of the intrastream structure of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. D.; Bridge, H. S.

    1983-01-01

    Short time scale changes in the bulk speed were found not to coincide with X-ray transients near the sub-earth point nor with the number of X-ray bright points within a coronal hole and near the equator. The changes in bulk speed, it is shown, are associated with changes in light areas in a hole which may be associated with the opening or closing of magnetic field lines within the coronal hole. That there is a causal connection between these sudden changes (apperance or disappearance) in light area and sudden changes in the bulk speed of the solar wind is further evidenced by the spatial proximity on the Sun of these changing light regions to the source position of stream lines from Levine's model that connect into the same solar wind streams.

  2. Structure of impulsive phase of solar flares from microwave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1981-01-01

    Variation of the microwave intensity and spectrum due to gyro-synchrotron radiation from semi-relativistic particles injected at the top of a closed magnetic loop is described. Using the recent high spatial resolution X-ray observations from the HXIS experiment of Solar Maximum Mission and from observations by the Very Large Array (VLA), it is shown that the high microwave brightness observed at the top of the flare loop can come about if (1) the magnetic field from top to footpoints of the loop does not increase very rapidly, and (2) the accelerated particles injected in the loop have a nearly isotropic pitch angle distribution. The limits on the rate of increase of the magnetic field and/or the average pitch angle depend on the geometry and location of the loop on the solar disk.

  3. Structure of the solar oscillation with period near 160 minutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The solar oscillation with period near 160 minutes is found to be unique in a spectrum computed over the range of periods from about 71 to 278 minutes. A best estimate of the period is 160.0095 + or - 0.001 minutes, which is different from 160 minutes (one ninth of a day) by a highly significant amount. The width of the peak is approximately equal to the limiting resolution that can be obtained from an observation lasting 6 years, which suggests that the damping time of the oscillations is considerably longer than 6 years. A suggestion that this peak might be the result of a beating phenomenon between the five minute data averages and a solar oscillation with period near five minutes is shown to be incorrect by recomputing a portion of the spectrum using 15 second data averages.

  4. Recent Advances in the Inverted Planar Structure of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lei; You, Jingbi; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-19

    Inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite solar cells research could be traced back to 2009, and initially showed 3.8% efficiency. After 6 years of efforts, the efficiency has been pushed to 20.1%. The pace of development was much faster than that of any type of solar cell technology. In addition to high efficiency, the device fabrication is a low-cost solution process. Due to these advantages, a large number of scientists have been immersed into this promising area. In the past 6 years, much of the research on perovskite solar cells has been focused on planar and mesoporous device structures employing an n-type TiO2 layer as the bottom electron transport layer. These architectures have achieved champion device efficiencies. However, they still possess unwanted features. Mesoporous structures require a high temperature (>450 °C) sintering process for the TiO2 scaffold, which will increase the cost and also not be compatible with flexible substrates. While the planar structures based on TiO2 (regular structure) usually suffer from a large degree of J-V hysteresis. Recently, another emerging structure, referred to as an "inverted" planar device structure (i.e., p-i-n), uses p-type and n-type materials as bottom and top charge transport layers, respectively. This structure derived from organic solar cells, and the charge transport layers used in organic photovoltaics were successfully transferred into perovskite solar cells. The p-i-n structure of perovskite solar cells has shown efficiencies as high as 18%, lower temperature processing, flexibility, and, furthermore, negligible J-V hysteresis effects. In this Account, we will provide a comprehensive comparison of the mesoporous and planar structures, and also the regular and inverted of planar structures. Later, we will focus the discussion on the development of the inverted planar structure of perovskite solar cells, including film growth, band alignment, stability, and hysteresis. In the film growth part, several

  5. Needle Profile Grating Structure for Absorption Enhancement in GaAs Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yile; Zhang, Xu; Guo, Minqiang; Sun, Xiaohong; Yu, Yanguang; Xi, Jiangtao

    2015-11-01

    We conduct a systematic study of thin film solar cells consisting of a GaAs needle profile (NP) grating structure as a light-trapping layer. The influence of geometric parameters on the optical absorption of the NP grating is investigated using rigorous coupled wave analysis and the finite element method. This type of structure can lead to broadband optical absorption enhancement throughout the wavelength range that we studied. Our simulation results reveal that the absorption efficiency of NP grating can be improved significantly compared with its rectangular grating counterpart. The proposed structure is expected to illuminate the design and fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells.

  6. Inferring solar structure variations from photometric and helioseismic observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Present large scale photometric and helioseismic data may be related to spatial and temporal deviations from an otherwise static, spherical solar convection zone (SCZ). New space experiments combine precise photometric, helioseismic, and magnetic observational capabilities (like SOHO and MDI) and will provide data needed to understand the interaction of magnetic fields and global scale circulation in the SCZ. Even simple physical arguments make it clear that the anticipated accuracy of these new experiments virtually guarantees new constraints on models of the SCZ.

  7. Coronal hole structure and the high speed solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, Thomas E.; Leer, Egil

    1997-01-01

    The basic physical processes which are important in the acceleration of high speed wind from coronal holes are reviewed. The early works of Birkeland and Parker are discussed. The extension of Parker's work is included. It is shown that the greatest area of uncertainty is that of coronal heating. It is demonstrated that in modeling solar wind acceleration, it is important to carry out a study on the chromosphere-corona-wind system analysis.

  8. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1998-01-01

    Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the period covered by this report we have published 17 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 4 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles.

  9. A Change in the Solar He II EUV Global Network Structure as an Indicator of the Geo-Effectiveness of Solar Minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didkovsky, L.; Gurman, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Solar activity during 2007 - 2009 was very low, causing anomalously low thermospheric density. A comparison of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance in the He II spectral band (26 to 34 nm) from the Solar Extreme ultraviolet Monitor (SEM), one of instruments on the Charge Element and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) for the two latest solar minima showed a decrease of the absolute irradiance of about 15 +/- 6 % during the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24 compared with the Cycle 22/23 minimum when a yearly running-mean filter was used. We found that some local, shorter-term minima including those with the same absolute EUV flux in the SEM spectral band show a higher concentration of spatial power in the global network structure from the 30.4 nm SOHO/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) images for the local minimum of 1996 compared with the minima of 2008 - 2011.We interpret this higher concentration of spatial power in the transition region's global network structure as a larger number of larger-area features on the solar disk. These changes in the global network structure during solar minima may characterize, in part, the geo-effectiveness of the solar He II EUV irradiance in addition to the estimations based on its absolute levels.

  10. Examining Periodic Solar-Wind Density Structures Observed in the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of small-scale, periodic, solar-wind density enhancements (length scales as small as approximately equals 1000 Mm) observed in images from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) aboard STEREO-A. We discuss their possible relationship to periodic fluctuations of the proton density that have been identified at 1 AU using in-situ plasma measurements. Specifically, Viall, Kepko, and Spence examined 11 years of in-situ solar-wind density measurements at 1 AU and demonstrated that not only turbulent structures, but also nonturbulent, periodic density structures exist in the solar wind with scale sizes of hundreds to one thousand Mm. In a subsequent paper, Viall, Spence, and Kasper analyzed the alpha-to-proton solar-wind abundance ratio measured during one such event of periodic density structures, demonstrating that the plasma behavior was highly suggestive that either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma created those density structures. Large periodic density structures observed at 1 AU, which were generated in the corona, can be observable in coronal and heliospheric white-light images if they possess sufficiently high density contrast. Indeed, we identify such periodic density structures as they enter the HI field of view and follow them as they advect with the solar wind through the images. The smaller, periodic density structures that we identify in the images are comparable in size to the larger structures analyzed in-situ at 1 AU, yielding further evidence that periodic density enhancements are a consequence of coronal activity as the solar wind is formed.

  11. Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry Methods for Solar Sails and Other Gossamer Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Jonathan T.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight and inflatable gossamer space structures are designed to be tightly packaged for launch, then deploy or inflate once in space. These properties will allow for in-space construction of very large structures 10 to 1000 meters in size such as solar sails, inflatable antennae, and space solar power stations using a single launch. Solar sails are of particular interest because of their potential for propellantless propulsion. Gossamer structures do, however, have significant complications. Their low mass and high flexibility make them very difficult to test on the ground. The added mass and stiffness of attached measurement devices can significantly alter the static and dynamic properties of the structure. This complication necessitates an alternative approach for characterization. This paper discusses the development and application of photogrammetry and videogrammetry methods for the static and dynamic characterization of gossamer structures, as four specific solar sail applications demonstrate. The applications prove that high-resolution, full-field, non-contact static measurements of solar sails using dot projection photogrammetry are possible as well as full-field, noncontact, dynamic characterization using dot projection videogrammetry.

  12. Barrier potential design criteria in multiple-quantum-well-based solar-cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohaidat, Jihad M.; Shum, Kai; Wang, W. B.; Alfano, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The barrier potential design criteria in multiple-quantum-well (MQW)-based solar-cell structures is reported for the purpose of achieving maximum efficiency. The time-dependent short-circuit current density at the collector side of various MQW solar-cell structures under resonant condition was numerically calculated using the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The energy efficiency of solar cells based on the InAs/Ga(y)In(1-y)As and GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As MQW structues were compared when carriers are excited at a particular solar-energy band. Using InAs/Ga(y)In(1-y)As MQW structures it is found that a maximum energy efficiency can be achieved if the structure is designed with barrier potential of about 450 meV. The efficiency is found to decline linearly as the barrier potential increases for GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As MQW-structure-based solar cells.

  13. Lateral-Structure Single-Crystal Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells via Piezoelectric Poling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qingfeng; Song, Jingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Ducharme, Stephen; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-04-13

    Single-crystal perovskite solar cells with a lateral structure yield an efficiency enhancement 44-fold that of polycrystalline thin films, due to the much longer carrier diffusion length. A piezoelectric effect observed in perovskite single-crystal and the strain-generated grain-boundaries enable ion migration to form a p-i-n structure.

  14. Solar Thermal Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, Clark W.; Bonometti, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    Concentrated solar thermal energy can be utilized in a variety of high temperature applications for both terrestrial and space environments. In each application, knowledge of the collector and absorber's heat exchange interaction is required. To understand this coupled mechanism, various concentrator types and geometries, as well as, their relationship to the physical absorber mechanics were investigated. To conduct experimental tests various parts of a 5,000 watt, thermal concentrator, facility were made and evaluated. This was in anticipation at a larger NASA facility proposed for construction. Although much of the work centered on solar thermal propulsion for an upper stage (less than one pound thrust range), the information generated and the facility's capabilities are applicable to material processing, power generation and similar uses. The numerical calculations used to design the laboratory mirror and the procedure for evaluating other solar collectors are presented here. The mirror design is based on a hexagonal faceted system, which uses a spherical approximation to the parabolic surface. The work began with a few two dimensional estimates and continued with a full, three dimensional, numerical algorithm written in FORTRAN code. This was compared to a full geometry, ray trace program, BEAM 4, which optimizes the curvatures, based on purely optical considerations. Founded on numerical results, the characteristics of a faceted concentrator were construed. The numerical methodologies themselves were evaluated and categorized. As a result, the three-dimensional FORTRAN code was the method chosen to construct the mirrors, due to its overall accuracy and superior results to the ray trace program. This information is being used to fabricate and subsequently, laser map the actual mirror surfaces. Evaluation of concentrator mirrors, thermal applications and scaling the results of the 10 foot diameter mirror to a much larger concentrator, were studied. Evaluations

  15. High-efficiency heterojunction crystalline Si solar cell and optical splitting structure fabricated by applying thin-film Si technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Adachi, Daisuke; Uzu, Hisashi; Ichikawa, Mitsuru; Terashita, Toru; Meguro, Tomomi; Nakanishi, Naoaki; Yoshimi, Masashi; Hernández, José Luis

    2015-08-01

    Thin-film Si technology for solar cells has been developed for over 40 years. Improvements in the conversion efficiency and industrialization of thin-film Si solar cells have been realized through continuous research and development of the thin-film Si technology. The thin-film Si technology covers a wide range of fields such as fundamental understanding of the nature of thin-film Si, cell/module production, simulation, and reliability technologies. These technologies are also significant for solar cells other than the thin-film Si solar cells. Utilizing the highly developed thin-film Si solar cell technology, we have achieved ∼24% efficiency heterojunction crystalline Si solar cells using 6-in. wafers and >26% efficiency solar cells with an optical splitting structure. These results indicate that further improvement of thin-film Si technology and its synergy with crystalline Si solar cell technology will enable further improvement of solar cells with efficiencies above 26%.

  16. 17.6%-Efficient radial junction solar cells using silicon nano/micro hybrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kangmin; Hwang, Inchan; Kim, Namwoo; Choi, Deokjae; Um, Han-Don; Kim, Seungchul; Seo, Kwanyong

    2016-07-01

    We developed a unique nano- and microwire hybrid structure by selectively modifying only the tops of microwires using metal-assisted chemical etching. The proposed nano/micro hybrid structure not only minimizes surface recombination but also absorbs 97% of incident light under AM 1.5G illumination, demonstrating outstanding light absorption compared to that of planar (59%) and microwire arrays (85%). The proposed hybrid solar cells with an area of 1 cm2 exhibit power conversion efficiencies (Eff) of up to 17.6% under AM 1.5G illumination. In particular, the solar cells show a high short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 39.5 mA cm-2 because of the high light-absorbing characteristics of the nanostructures. This corresponds to an approximately 61.5% and 16.5% increase in efficiency compared to that of a planar silicon solar cell (Eff = 10.9%) and a microwire solar cell (Eff = 15.1%), respectively. Therefore, we expect the proposed hybrid structure to become a foundational technology for the development of highly efficient radial junction solar cells.We developed a unique nano- and microwire hybrid structure by selectively modifying only the tops of microwires using metal-assisted chemical etching. The proposed nano/micro hybrid structure not only minimizes surface recombination but also absorbs 97% of incident light under AM 1.5G illumination, demonstrating outstanding light absorption compared to that of planar (59%) and microwire arrays (85%). The proposed hybrid solar cells with an area of 1 cm2 exhibit power conversion efficiencies (Eff) of up to 17.6% under AM 1.5G illumination. In particular, the solar cells show a high short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 39.5 mA cm-2 because of the high light-absorbing characteristics of the nanostructures. This corresponds to an approximately 61.5% and 16.5% increase in efficiency compared to that of a planar silicon solar cell (Eff = 10.9%) and a microwire solar cell (Eff = 15.1%), respectively. Therefore, we expect the

  17. Photonic and plasmonic structures for enhancing efficiency of thin film silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattnaik, Sambit

    Crystalline silicon solar cells use high cost processing techniques as well as thick materials that are ˜ 200µm thick to convert solar energy into electricity. From a cost viewpoint, it is highly advantageous to use thin film solar cells which are generally made in the range of 0.1-3µm in thickness. Due to this low thickness, the quantity of material is greatly reduced and so is the number and complexity of steps involved to complete a device, thereby allowing a continuous processing capability improving the throughput and hence greatly decreasing the cost. This also leads to faster payback time for the end user of the photovoltaic panel. In addition, due to the low thickness and the possibility of deposition on flexible foils, the photovoltaic (PV) modules can be flexible. Such flexible PV modules are well suited for building-integrated applications and for portable, foldable, PV power products. For economical applications of solar cells, high efficiency is an important consideration. Since Si is an indirect bandgap material, a thin film of Si needs efficient light trapping to achieve high optical absorption. The previous work in this field has been mostly based on randomly textured back reflectors. In this work, we have used a novel approach, a periodic photonic and plasmonic structure, to optimize current density of the devices by absorbing longer wavelengths without hampering other properties. The two dimensional diffraction effect generated by a periodic structure with the plasmonic light concentration achieved by silver cones to efficiently propagate light in the plane at the back surface of a solar cell, achieves a significant increase in optical absorption. Using such structures, we achieved a 50%+ increase in short circuit current in a nano-crystalline (nc-Si) solar cell relative to stainless steel. In addition to nc-Si solar cells on stainless steel, we have also used the periodic photonic structure to enhance optical absorption in amorphous cells and

  18. Alignment and focus of mirrored facets of a heliosat

    DOEpatents

    Yellowhair, Julius E; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Diver, Richard B; Moss, Timothy A

    2013-11-12

    Various technologies pertaining to aligning and focusing mirrored facets of a heliostat are described herein. Updating alignment and/or focus of mirrored facets is undertaken through generation of a theoretical image, wherein the theoretical image is indicative of a reflection of the target via the mirrored facets when the mirrored facets are properly aligned. This theoretical image includes reference points that are overlaid on an image of the target as reflected by the mirrored facets of the heliostat. A technician adjusts alignment/focus of a mirrored facet by causing reflected reference markings to become aligned with the reference points in the theoretical image.

  19. [Interventions on facet joints. Techniques of facet joint injection, medial branch block and radiofrequency ablation].

    PubMed

    Artner, J; Klessinger, S

    2015-10-01

    Fluoroscopy-guided interventions on facet joints have been used for decades for the symptomatic management of pain in spinal disorders. A large number of imaging techniques are used to achieve a precise and safe needle placement in interventional procedures. Pulsed fluoroscopy is one of the most widely used and well-accepted tools for these procedures. This article presents a technical overview of commonly used fluoroscopy-guided interventions on the facet joints of the cervical and lumbar spine, such as facet joint injection, blockade of the medial nerve branches and radiofrequency ablation.

  20. Interplanetary Scintillation Observations of the Large-Scale Structure of the Solar Wind Using EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Breen, A. R.; Habbal, S. R.; Fallows, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) taken with the European Incoherent SCATter radar (EISCAT) in northern Scandinavia can be used to study the evolution of the solar wind as it expands through interplanetary space. IPS arises from changes in the apparent brightness of distant, compact radio sources due to scattering by density irregularities in the solar wind and can be used to obtain estimates of the solar wind speed. In this paper we present the results of a study of the large-scale structure of the fast solar wind under near solar minimum conditions, using data taken with the EISCAT system, and the extremely long baseline observations which combine the EISCAT and MERLIN systems. The latter are the best measurements to date of meridional components of velocity in the inner solar wind. In particular, the existence of a gradient in solar wind velocity of the fast wind over the polar crown, at latitudes corresponding to the x-ray and ultra-violet coronal hole boundary, as reported by Habbal and Woo (2001), is also explored.

  1. Solar cell structure incorporating a novel single crystal silicon material

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.; Wu, Chung P.

    1983-01-01

    A novel hydrogen rich single crystal silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystal silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semiconductor devices such as single crystal silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystal silicon without hydrogen.

  2. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1998-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the first year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the period covered by this report we have published 26 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 4 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles.

  3. Comparative studies on solar cell structures using zinc phthalocyanine and fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egginger, M.; Koeppe, R.; Meghdadi, F.; Troshin, P. A.; Lyubovskaya, R. N.; Meissner, D.; Sariciftci, N. S.

    2006-04-01

    We compare different structures of organic solar cells based on zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and fullerene derivatives as electron donor and acceptor materials, respectively. Bilayer devices are fabricated and characterized by current-voltage and spectrally resolved photocurrent measurements. In a novel approach, the ZnPc was combined with soluble fullerene derivatives. With a pyrrolidinofullerene bearing chelating pyrridyl-groups we observed a complexation between donor and acceptor molecules. Due to a favorable structuring of the donor-acceptor interface this leads to a significant enhancement of the solar cell performance compared to similar devices where no complexation takes place. Coevaporated bulk heterojunction mixed-layers are introduced between the pristine layers. In these optimized structures short circuit currents up to 13 mA/cm2 are observed. We investigate the voltage dependence of the spectrally resolved photocurrent of ZnPc / Buckminsterfullerene bilayer solar cells and interpret the results in terms of the Gartner model.

  4. Osteoarthritis of the spine: the facet joints.

    PubMed

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Katz, Jeffrey N; Suri, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the spine involves the facet joints, which are located in the posterior aspect of the vertebral column and, in humans, are the only true synovial joints between adjacent spinal levels. Facet joint osteoarthritis (FJ OA) is widely prevalent in older adults, and is thought to be a common cause of back and neck pain. The prevalence of facet-mediated pain in clinical populations increases with increasing age, suggesting that FJ OA might have a particularly important role in older adults with spinal pain. Nevertheless, to date FJ OA has received far less study than other important OA phenotypes such as knee OA, and other features of spine pathoanatomy such as degenerative disc disease. This Review presents the current state of knowledge of FJ OA, including relevant anatomy, biomechanics, epidemiology, and clinical manifestations. We present the view that the modern concept of FJ OA is consonant with the concept of OA as a failure of the whole joint, and not simply of facet joint cartilage.

  5. Problem of time: facets and Machian strategy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Edward

    2014-10-01

    The problem of time is that "time" in each of ordinary quantum theory and general relativity are mutually incompatible notions. This causes difficulties in trying to put these two theories together to form a theory of quantum gravity. The problem of time has eight facets in canonical approaches. I clarify that all but one of these facets already occur at the classical level, and reconceptualize and re-name some of these facets as follows. The frozen formalism problem becomes temporal relationalism, the thin sandwich problem becomes configurational relationalism, via the notion of best matching. The problem of observables becomes the problem of beables, and the functional evolution problem becomes the constraint closure problem. I also outline how each of the global and multiple-choice problems of time have their own plurality of facets. This article additionally contains a local resolution to the problem of time at the conceptual level and which is actually realizable for the relational triangle and minisuperspace models. This resolution is, moreover, Machian, and has three levels: classical, semiclassical, and a combined semiclassical-histories-timeless records scheme. I end by delineating the current frontiers of this program toward resolution of the problem of time in the cases of full general relativity and of slightly inhomogeneous cosmology.

  6. Facets of psychopathy among mentally disordered offenders: clinical comorbidity patterns and prediction of violent and criminal behavior.

    PubMed

    Wallinius, Märta; Nilsson, Thomas; Hofvander, Björn; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Stålenheim, Gunilla

    2012-07-30

    The complexity and consequences of psychopathy are still debated, and its relation to other mental disorders, pathological personality traits, and criminality needs to be further investigated by clinical, longitudinal studies using structured diagnostic instruments. The present study used two groups of mentally disordered offenders (N=153) investigated with in-depth clinical assessments and prospective long-term follow-up to identify the convergence between 1) the four facets of psychopathy defined by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; Interpersonal, Affective, Lifestyle, and Antisocial), 2) mental disorders according to SCID I and II interviews, 3) personality traits as measured by the Karolinska Scales of Personality, and 4) criminal recidivism. The Interpersonal facet differed substantially from the other three facets by not being significantly associated with substance use disorders, antisocial personality disorder (the other facets at P≤0.001 level), or personality traits involving impulsive and aggressive antisocial behaviors (the other facets at P<0.01 level). Furthermore, the interpersonal facet could not predict violent recidivism better than random. The Antisocial facet outperformed not only the other facets but also the total PCL-R score in the prediction of violent recidivism, P<0.001.The findings confirm psychopathy as a heterogeneous phenomenon and have clinical implications for assessments of psychopathy and violence risk assessments in clinical and forensic contexts.

  7. Repeated Structures Found After the Solar Maximum in the Butterfly Diagrams of Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, M. Y.; Storini, M.

    2003-09-01

    The influence of the solar cycle evolution on the coronal hole space-time distribution is well known, for polar as well as for equatorial isolated sources of high speed solar wind. Among them the long-lived coronal holes occurrence from the sunspot cycle 21 on is investigated, using the coronal hole catalogue based on HeI (1083 nm) observations (Sanchez-Ibarra and Barraza-Paredes). In at least these two solar cycles (n. 21 and n. 22) a similar structure in the latitude-time diagram of coronal holes is found. The area occurs shortly after the solar maximum at around ~35° heliolatitude and consists of over several Carrington Rotations stable coronal holes (>5 Carr. Rot.s). The diagonal disappears 2-3 years later at the helioequator. Furthermore, the analysis results in a close relation between long-lived isolated coronal holes and the soft X-class flares.

  8. Deconstructing Solar Photovoltaic Pricing: The Role of Market Structure, Technology, and Policy

    SciTech Connect

    Gillingham, Kenneth; Deng, Hao; Wiser, Ryan; Darghouth, Naim; Nemet, Gregory; Barbose, Galen; Rai, Varun; Dong, C. G.

    2014-12-15

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) system prices in the United States display considerable heterogeneity both across geographic locations and within a given location. Such heterogeneity may arise due to state and federal policies, differences in market structure, and other factors that influence demand and costs. This paper examines the relative importance of such factors on equilibrium solar PV system prices in the United States using a detailed dataset of roughly 100,000 recent residential and small commercial installations. As expected, we find that PV system prices differ based on characteristics of the systems. More interestingly, we find evidence suggesting that search costs and imperfect competition affect solar PV pricing. Installer density substantially lowers prices, while regions with relatively generous financial incentives for solar PV are associated with higher prices.

  9. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2002-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the second quarter of the first year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation. and covers the period November 16, 1999 to February 15, 2000. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) model. The topics studied include: the effect of emerging flux on the stability of helmet streamers, coronal loops and streamers, the solar magnetic field, the solar wind, and open magnetic field lines.

  10. A novel organic-inorganic hybrid tandem solar cell with inverted structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, A.; Faez, R.

    2017-04-01

    A novel organic-inorganic hybrid tandem solar cell with inverted structure is proposed. This efficient double-junction hybrid tandem solar cell consists of a single-junction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) subcell with n-i-p structure as front cell and a P3HT:PCBM organic subcell with inverted structure as back cell. In order to optimize the hybrid tandem cell, we have performed a simulation based on transfer matrix method. We have compared the characteristics of this novel structure with a conventional structure. As a result, a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.1 and 24% improvement compared to the conventional hybrid tandem cell was achieved. We also discuss the high potential of this novel structure for realizing high-stability organic-inorganic hybrid photovoltaic devices.

  11. Trench process and structure for backside contact solar cells with polysilicon doped regions

    DOEpatents

    De Ceuster, Denis; Cousins, Peter John; Smith, David D.

    2010-12-14

    A solar cell includes polysilicon P-type and N-type doped regions on a backside of a substrate, such as a silicon wafer. An interrupted trench structure separates the P-type doped region from the N-type doped region in some locations but allows the P-type doped region and the N-type doped region to touch in other locations. Each of the P-type and N-type doped regions may be formed over a thin dielectric layer. Among other advantages, the resulting solar cell structure allows for increased efficiency while having a relatively low reverse breakdown voltage.

  12. Trench process and structure for backside contact solar cells with polysilicon doped regions

    DOEpatents

    De Ceuster, Denis; Cousins, Peter John; Smith, David D

    2014-03-18

    A solar cell includes polysilicon P-type and N-type doped regions on a backside of a substrate, such as a silicon wafer. An interrupted trench structure separates the P-type doped region from the N-type doped region in some locations but allows the P-type doped region and the N-type doped region to touch in other locations. Each of the P-type and N-type doped regions may be formed over a thin dielectric layer. Among other advantages, the resulting solar cell structure allows for increased efficiency while having a relatively low reverse breakdown voltage.

  13. Dye-sensitized solar cells: Atomic scale investigation of interface structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei; Zhang, Fan; Meng, Sheng

    2014-08-01

    Recent progress in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) research is reviewed, focusing on atomic-scale investigations of the interface electronic structures and dynamical processes, including the structure of dye adsorption onto TiO2, ultrafast electron injection, hot-electron injection, multiple-exciton generation, and electron—hole recombination. Advanced experimental techniques and theoretical approaches are briefly summarized, and then progressive achievements in photovoltaic device optimization based on insights from atomic scale investigations are introduced. Finally, some challenges and opportunities for further improvement of dye solar cells are presented.

  14. Trench process and structure for backside contact solar cells with polysilicon doped regions

    SciTech Connect

    De Ceuster, Denis; Cousins, Peter John; Smith, David D

    2013-05-28

    A solar cell includes polysilicon P-type and N-type doped regions on a backside of a substrate, such as a silicon wafer. An interrupted trench structure separates the P-type doped region from the N-type doped region in some locations but allows the P-type doped region and the N-type doped region to touch in other locations. Each of the P-type and N-type doped regions may be formed over a thin dielectric layer. Among other advantages, the resulting solar cell structure allows for increased efficiency while having a relatively low reverse breakdown voltage.

  15. Structural concepts for very large (400-meter-diameter) solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Hedgepeth, John M.

    1989-01-01

    A general discussion of various types of large space structures is presented. A brief overview of the history of space structures is presented to provide insight into the current state-of-the art. Finally, the results of a structural study to assess the viability of very large solar concentrators are presented. These results include weight, stiffness, part count, and in-space construction time.

  16. 17.6%-Efficient radial junction solar cells using silicon nano/micro hybrid structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kangmin; Hwang, Inchan; Kim, Namwoo; Choi, Deokjae; Um, Han-Don; Kim, Seungchul; Seo, Kwanyong

    2016-08-14

    We developed a unique nano- and microwire hybrid structure by selectively modifying only the tops of microwires using metal-assisted chemical etching. The proposed nano/micro hybrid structure not only minimizes surface recombination but also absorbs 97% of incident light under AM 1.5G illumination, demonstrating outstanding light absorption compared to that of planar (59%) and microwire arrays (85%). The proposed hybrid solar cells with an area of 1 cm(2) exhibit power conversion efficiencies (Eff) of up to 17.6% under AM 1.5G illumination. In particular, the solar cells show a high short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 39.5 mA cm(-2) because of the high light-absorbing characteristics of the nanostructures. This corresponds to an approximately 61.5% and 16.5% increase in efficiency compared to that of a planar silicon solar cell (Eff = 10.9%) and a microwire solar cell (Eff = 15.1%), respectively. Therefore, we expect the proposed hybrid structure to become a foundational technology for the development of highly efficient radial junction solar cells.

  17. Ultra-fine-scale filamentary structures in the Outer Corona and the Solar Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Filamentary structures following magnetic field lines pervade the Sun's atmosphere and offer us insight into the solar magnetic field. Radio propagation measurements have shown that the smallest filamentary structures in the solar corona are more than 2 orders of magnitude finer than those seen in solar imaging. Here we use radio Doppler measurements to characterize their transverse density gradient and determine their finest scale in the outer corona at 20-30 R(circled dot operator), where open magnetic fields prevail. Filamentary structures overly active regions have the steepest gradient and finest scale, while those overlying coronal holes have the shallowest gradient and least finest scale. Their organization by the underlying corona implies that these subresolution structures extend radially from the entire Sun, confirming that they trace the coronal magnetic field responsible for the radial expansion of the solar wind. That they are rooted all over the Sun elucidates the association between the magnetic field of the photosphere and that of the corona, as revealed by the similarity between the power spectra of the photospheric field and the coronal density fluctuations. This association along with the persistence of filamentary structures far from the Sun demonstrate that subresolution magnetic fields must play an important role not only in magnetic coupling of the photosphere and corona, but also in coronal heating and solar wind acceleration through the process of small-scale magnetic reconnection. They also explain why current widely used theoretical models that extrapolate photospheric magnetic fields into the corona do not predict the correct source of the solar wind.

  18. Facets for Discovery and Exploration in Text Collections

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Stuart J.; Roberts, Ian E.; Cramer, Nicholas O.

    2011-10-24

    Faceted classifications of text collections provide a useful means of partitioning documents into related groups, however traditional approaches of faceting text collections rely on comprehensive analysis of the subject area or annotated general attributes. In this paper we show the application of basic principles for facet analysis to the development of computational methods for facet classification of text collections. Integration with a visual analytics system is described with summaries of user experiences.

  19. Management of lumbar zygapophysial (facet) joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Falco, Frank JE; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic validity and therapeutic value of lumbar facet joint interventions in managing chronic low back pain. METHODS: The review process applied systematic evidence-based assessment methodology of controlled trials of diagnostic validity and randomized controlled trials of therapeutic efficacy. Inclusion criteria encompassed all facet joint interventions performed in a controlled fashion. The pain relief of greater than 50% was the outcome measure for diagnostic accuracy assessment of the controlled studies with ability to perform previously painful movements, whereas, for randomized controlled therapeutic efficacy studies, the primary outcome was significant pain relief and the secondary outcome was a positive change in functional status. For the inclusion of the diagnostic controlled studies, all studies must have utilized either placebo controlled facet joint blocks or comparative local anesthetic blocks. In assessing therapeutic interventions, short-term and long-term reliefs were defined as either up to 6 mo or greater than 6 mo of relief. The literature search was extensive utilizing various types of electronic search media including PubMed from 1966 onwards, Cochrane library, National Guideline Clearinghouse, clinicaltrials.gov, along with other sources including previous systematic reviews, non-indexed journals, and abstracts until March 2015. Each manuscript included in the assessment was assessed for methodologic quality or risk of bias assessment utilizing the Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies checklist for diagnostic interventions, and Cochrane review criteria and the Interventional Pain Management Techniques - Quality Appraisal of Reliability and Risk of Bias Assessment tool for therapeutic interventions. Evidence based on the review of the systematic assessment of controlled studies was graded utilizing a modified schema of qualitative evidence with best evidence synthesis, variable from level I to level V

  20. Recent Advances in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics, Stability, and Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Lyle, Karen H.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, S. Chad; Dowell, Earl H.; Guerrant, Daniel V.; Lawrence, Dale

    2015-01-01

    Results from recent NASA sponsored research on the structural dynamics, stability, and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, and solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment. Recent results from terrestrial 1-g blade dynamics and control experiments on "rope ladder" membrane blade analogs, and small-scale in vacuo system identification experiments with hanging and spinning high-aspect ratio membranes will also be presented. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept is used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, and is also described. Blade torsional dynamic response and control are also shown to be significantly improved through the use of edge stiffening structural features or inclusion of modest tip masses to increase centrifugal stiffening of the blade structure. An output-only system identification procedure suitable for on-orbit blade dynamics investigations is also developed and validated using ground tests of spinning sub-scale heliogyro blade models. Overall, analytical and experimental investigations to date indicate no intractable stability or control issues for the heliogyro solar sail concept.

  1. Growth and properties of AIIIBV QD structures for intermediate band solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskočil, J.; Gladkov, P.; Petříček, O.; Hospodková, A.; Pangrác, J.

    2015-03-01

    Intermediate band solar cells theoretically offer a promising way to significantly increase cell efficiency compared to a single-junction solar cell. We focused on the preparation of antimony containing materials as a covering of QD layers. In this article we discuss how the concentration gradient of GaAsSb strain reducing layers can influence the resulting optical properties of the solar cell structures. The main principle of the structure is that the absorption of light is achieved at QD excited states with a better overlap of electron and hole wave functions. With fast relaxation of carriers to the ground state, the electrons and holes are quickly spatially separated. Two different composition gradients of GaAsSb SRL were used for the solar cell structure. One or five quantum dot stacks were compared. The maximal PC increased approximately 17 times with increasing number of QD layers from 1 to 5. The highest PC was achieved for sample I5A with increasing concentration of Sb in the SRL, especially in the QD absorption region. The possible explanation is a better carrier separation in this type of structure suppressing the radiative recombination rate in QDs. These results suggest a high application potential of this structure for photovoltaics.

  2. Ternary blend polymer solar cells with self-assembled structure for enhancing power conversion efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Li, Hongfei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Kisslinger, Kim; Satija, Sushil; Rafailovich, Miriam

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells are an area of intense interest due to their advantages such as mechanical flexibility. The active layer is typically spin coated from the solution of polythiophene derivatives (donor) and fullerenes (acceptor) and interconnected domains are formed because of phase separation. However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of BHJ solar cell is restricted by the disordered inner structures in the active layer, donor or acceptor domains isolated from electrodes. Here we report a self-assembled columnar structure formed by phase separation between (PCDTBT) and polystyrene (PS) for the active layer morphology optimization. The BHJ solar cell device based on this structure is promising for exhibiting higher performance due to the shorter carrier transportation pathway and larger interfacial area between donor and acceptor. The surface morphology is investigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the columnar structure is studied by investigation of cross-section of the blend thin film of PCDTBT and PS under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The different morphological structures formed via phase segregation are correlated with the performance of the BHJ solar cells.

  3. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Marcie

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  4. Thermally induced structural evolution and performance of mesoporous block copolymer-directed alumina perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kwan Wee; Moore, David T; Saliba, Michael; Sai, Hiroaki; Estroff, Lara A; Hanrath, Tobias; Snaith, Henry J; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-05-27

    Structure control in solution-processed hybrid perovskites is crucial to design and fabricate highly efficient solar cells. Here, we utilize in situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy to investigate the structural evolution and film morphologies of methylammonium lead tri-iodide/chloride (CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x)) in mesoporous block copolymer derived alumina superstructures during thermal annealing. We show the CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x) material evolution to be characterized by three distinct structures: a crystalline precursor structure not described previously, a 3D perovskite structure, and a mixture of compounds resulting from degradation. Finally, we demonstrate how understanding the processing parameters provides the foundation needed for optimal perovskite film morphology and coverage, leading to enhanced block copolymer-directed perovskite solar cell performance.

  5. Light trapping in thin-film silicon solar cells with photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, Lucio C.; Bozzola, Angelo; Kowalczewski, Piotr; Liscidini, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Efficient photovoltaic conversion of solar energy requires optimization of both light absorption and carrier collection. This manuscript reviews theoretical studies of thin-film silicon solar cells with various kinds of ordered and disordered photonic structures. Light trapping capabilities of these systems are analyzed by means of rigorous coupled-wave analysis and compared with the so-called Lambertian limit as given by a fully randomizing light scatterer. The best photonic structures are found to require proper combinations of order and disorder, and can be fabricated starting from pre-patterned rough substrates. Carrier collection is studied by means of analytic models and by full electro-optical simulations. The results indicate that thin-film silicon solar cells can outperform bulk ones with comparable material quality, provided surface recombination is kept below a critical level, which is compatible with present-day surface passivation technologies.

  6. Concept Definition Study for In-Space Structural Characterization of a Lightweight Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Jones, Thomas W.; Spellman, Regina; Scott, Willis; Mockensturm, Eric M.; Liddle, Donn; Oshel, Ed; Snyder, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A Concept Definition Study (CDS) was conducted to develop a proposed "Lightweight High-Voltage Stretched-Lens Concentrator Solar Array Experiment" under NASA's New Millennium Program Space Technology-6 (NMP ST-6) activity. As part of a multi-organizational team, NASA Langley Research Center's role in this proposed experiment was to lead Structural Characterization of the solar array during the flight experiment. In support of this role, NASA LaRC participated in the CDS to de.ne an experiment for static, dynamic, and deployment characterization of the array. In this study, NASA LaRC traded state-of-the-art measurement approaches appropriate for an in-space, STS-based flight experiment, provided initial analysis and testing of the lightweight solar array and lens elements, performed a lighting and photogrammetric simulation in conjunction with JSC, and produced an experiment concept definition to meet structural characterization requirements.

  7. Control-structure interaction study for the Space Station solar dynamic power module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, J.; Ianculescu, G.; Ly, J.; Kim, M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate the feasibility of using a conventional PID (proportional plus integral plus derivative) controller design to perform the pointing and tracking functions for the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic power module. Using this simple controller design, the control/structure interaction effects were also studied without assuming frequency bandwidth separation. From the results, the feasibility of a simple solar dynamic control solution with a reduced-order model, which satisfies the basic system pointing and stability requirements, is suggested. However, the conventional control design approach is shown to be very much influenced by the order of reduction of the plant model, i.e., the number of the retained elastic modes from the full-order model. This suggests that, for complex large space structures, such as the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic, the conventional control system design methods may not be adequate.

  8. Formulation and Application of the Generalized Multilevel Facets Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Liu, Chih-Yu

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors develop a generalized multilevel facets model, which is not only a multilevel and two-parameter generalization of the facets model, but also a multilevel and facet generalization of the generalized partial credit model. Because the new model is formulated within a framework of nonlinear mixed models, no efforts are…

  9. Identifying Facets of Problem Solving in Mathematics Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klieme, Eckhard; Clausen, Marten

    Facets of problem solving instruction (PSI) were studied in German mathematics classrooms. Nine different facets of PSI were identified from the research literature, and a video rating form was developed to assess these facets and teacher effectiveness. Videotaped mathematics lessons (n=147) for German eighth graders from the sample for the Third…

  10. Results from Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Clarke, C.I.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.; Litos, M.D.; Walz, D.R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Adli, E.; /U. Oslo

    2011-12-13

    We report initial results of the Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) Experiments performed at FACET - Facility for Advanced aCcelertor Experimental Tests at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. At FACET a 23 GeV electron beam with 1.8 x 10{sup 10} electrons is compressed to 20 {mu}m longitudinally and focused down to 10 {mu}m x 10 {mu}m transverse spot size for user driven experiments. Construction of the FACET facility completed in May 2011 with a first run of user assisted commissioning throughout the summer. The first PWFA experiments will use single electron bunches combined with a high density lithium plasma to produce accelerating gradients > 10 GeV/m benchmarking the FACET beam and the newly installed experimental hardware. Future plans for further study of plasma wakefield acceleration will be reviewed. The experimental hardware and operation of the plasma heat-pipe oven have been successfully commissioned. Plasma wakefield acceleration was not observed because the electron bunch density was insufficient to ionize the lithium vapor. The remaining commissioning time in summer 2011 will be dedicated to delivering the FACET design parameters for the experimental programs which will begin in early 2012. PWFA experiments require the shorter bunches and smaller transverse sizes to create the plasma and drive large amplitude wakefields. Low emittance and high energy will minimize head erosion which was found to be a limiting factor in acceleration distance and energy gain. We will run the PWFA experiments with the design single bunch conditions in early 2012. Future PWFA experiments at FACET are discussed in [5][6] and include drive and witness bunch production for high energy beam manipulation, ramped bunch to optimize tranformer ratio, field-ionized cesium plasma, preionized plasmas, positron acceleration, etc.. We will install a notch collimator for two-bunch operation as well as new beam diagnostics such as the X-band TCAV [7] to resolve the two bunches

  11. The Janus Facet of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kardos, Julianna; Jablonkai, István; Bóta, Attila; Visy, Júlia

    2015-01-01

    Application of nanoscale materials (NMs) displays a rapidly increasing trend in electronics, optics, chemical catalysis, biotechnology, and medicine due to versatile nature of NMs and easily adjustable physical, physicochemical, and chemical properties. However, the increasing abundance of NMs also poses significant new and emerging health and environmental risks. Despite growing efforts, understanding toxicity of NMs does not seem to cope with the demand, because NMs usually act entirely different from those of conventional small molecule drugs. Currently, large-scale application of available safety assessment protocols, as well as their furthering through case-by-case practice, is advisable. We define a standard work-scheme for nanotoxicity evaluation of NMs, comprising thorough characterization of structural, physical, physicochemical, and chemical traits, followed by measuring biodistribution in live tissue and blood combined with investigation of organ-specific effects especially regarding the function of the brain and the liver. We propose a range of biochemical, cellular, and immunological processes to be explored in order to provide information on the early effects of NMs on some basic physiological functions and chemical defense mechanisms. Together, these contributions give an overview with important implications for the understanding of many aspects of nanotoxicity. PMID:26075225

  12. Structural Analysis of an Inflation-Deployed Solar Sail With Experimental Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Michii, Yuki; Lichodziejewski, David; Derbes, Billy; Mann, Troy O.

    2005-01-01

    Under the direction of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Office, the team of L Garde, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Ball Aerospace, and NASA Langley Research Center has been developing a scalable solar sail configuration to address NASA s future space propulsion needs. Prior to a flight experiment of a full-scale solar sail, a comprehensive phased test plan is currently being implemented to advance the technology readiness level of the solar sail design. These tests consist of solar sail component, subsystem, and sub-scale system ground tests that simulate the vacuum and thermal conditions of the space environment. Recently, two solar sail test articles, a 7.4-m beam assembly subsystem test article and a 10-m four-quadrant solar sail system test article, were tested in vacuum conditions with a gravity-offload system to mitigate the effects of gravity. This paper presents the structural analyses simulating the ground tests and the correlation of the analyses with the test results. For programmatic risk reduction, a two-prong analysis approach was undertaken in which two separate teams independently developed computational models of the solar sail test articles using the finite element analysis software packages: NEiNastran and ABAQUS. This paper compares the pre-test and post-test analysis predictions from both software packages with the test data including load-deflection curves from static load tests, and vibration frequencies and mode shapes from structural dynamics tests. The analysis predictions were in reasonable agreement with the test data. Factors that precluded better correlation of the analyses and the tests were uncertainties in the material properties, test conditions, and modeling assumptions used in the analyses.

  13. Balance of optical, structural, and electrical properties of textured liquid phase crystallized Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Preidel, V. Amkreutz, D.; Haschke, J.; Wollgarten, M.; Rech, B.; Becker, C.

    2015-06-14

    Liquid phase crystallized Si thin-film solar cells on nanoimprint textured glass substrates exhibiting two characteristic, but distinct different surface structures are presented. The impact of the substrate texture on light absorption, the structural Si material properties, and the resulting solar cell performance is analyzed. A pronounced periodic substrate texture with a vertical feature size of about 1 μm enables excellent light scattering and light trapping. However, it also gives rise to an enhanced Si crystal defect formation deteriorating the solar cell performance. In contrast, a random pattern with a low surface roughness of 45 nm allows for the growth of Si thin films being comparable to Si layers on planar reference substrates. Amorphous Si/crystalline Si heterojunction solar cells fabricated on the low-roughness texture exhibit a maximum open circuit voltage of 616 mV and internal quantum efficiency peak values exceeding 90%, resulting in an efficiency potential of 13.2%. This demonstrates that high quality crystalline Si thin films can be realized on nanoimprint patterned glass substrates by liquid phase crystallization inspiring the implementation of tailor-made nanophotonic light harvesting concepts into future liquid phase crystallized Si thin film solar cells on glass.

  14. Defect character at grain boundary facet junctions: Analysis of an asymmetric Σ = 5 grain boundary in Fe

    DOE PAGES

    Medlin, D. L.; Hattar, K.; Zimmerman, J. A.; ...

    2016-11-16

    Grain boundaries often develop faceted morphologies in systems for which the interfacial free energy depends on the boundary inclination. Although the mesoscale thermodynamic basis for such morphological evolution has been extensively studied, the influence of line defects, such as secondary grain boundary dislocations, on the facet configurations has not been thoroughly explored. In this paper, through a combination of atomistic simulations and electron microscopic observations, we examine in detail the structure of an asymmetric Σ = 5 [001] grain boundary in well-annealed, body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe. The observed boundary forms with a hill-and-valley morphology composed of nanoscale {310} and {210}more » facets. Our analysis clarifies the atomic structure of the {310}/{210} facet junctions and identifies the presence of an array of secondary grain boundary dislocations that are localized to these junctions. Analysis of the Burgers vectors of the grain boundary dislocations, which are of type (1/5)<310> and (1/5)<120>, shows that the defect density is consistent with that required to accommodate a small observed angular deviation from the exact Σ = 5 orientation relationship. As a result, these observations and analysis suggest a crucial role for secondary grain boundary dislocations in dictating the length-scale of grain boundary facets, a consideration which has not been included in prior analyses of facet evolution and equilibrium facet length.« less

  15. Defect character at grain boundary facet junctions: Analysis of an asymmetric Σ = 5 grain boundary in Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, D. L.; Hattar, K.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Abdeljawad, F.; Foiles, S. M.

    2016-11-16

    Grain boundaries often develop faceted morphologies in systems for which the interfacial free energy depends on the boundary inclination. Although the mesoscale thermodynamic basis for such morphological evolution has been extensively studied, the influence of line defects, such as secondary grain boundary dislocations, on the facet configurations has not been thoroughly explored. In this paper, through a combination of atomistic simulations and electron microscopic observations, we examine in detail the structure of an asymmetric Σ = 5 [001] grain boundary in well-annealed, body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe. The observed boundary forms with a hill-and-valley morphology composed of nanoscale {310} and {210} facets. Our analysis clarifies the atomic structure of the {310}/{210} facet junctions and identifies the presence of an array of secondary grain boundary dislocations that are localized to these junctions. Analysis of the Burgers vectors of the grain boundary dislocations, which are of type (1/5)<310> and (1/5)<120>, shows that the defect density is consistent with that required to accommodate a small observed angular deviation from the exact Σ = 5 orientation relationship. As a result, these observations and analysis suggest a crucial role for secondary grain boundary dislocations in dictating the length-scale of grain boundary facets, a consideration which has not been included in prior analyses of facet evolution and equilibrium facet length.

  16. Structural Design Concepts for a Multi-Megawatt Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Hickman, J. Mark

    1991-01-01

    As a part of the Space Exploratory Initiative (SEI), NASA-Lewis is studying Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) spacecraft to be used as a cargo transport vehicle to Mars. Two preliminary structural design concepts are offered for SEP spacecraft: a split blanket array configuration, and a ring structure. The split blanket configuration is an expansion of the photovoltaic solar array design proposed for Space Station Freedom and consists of eight independent solar blankets stretched and supported from a central mast. The ring structural concept is a circular design with the solar blanket stretched inside a ring. This concept uses a central mast with guy wires to provide additional support to the ring. The two design concepts are presented, then compared by performing stability, normal modes, and forced response analyses for varying levels of blanket and guy wire preloads. The ring structure configuration is shown to be advantageous because it is much stiffer, more stable, and deflects less under loading than the split blanket concept.

  17. Differential relations of depression and social anxiety symptoms to the facets of extraversion/positive emotionality.

    PubMed

    Naragon-Gainey, Kristin; Watson, David; Markon, Kristian E

    2009-05-01

    Previous research has shown that both depression and social anxiety--2 facets of internalizing psychopathology--are characterized by low levels of extraversion/positive emotionality (E/PE). However, little is known about the relations of the facets of E/PE with the symptoms of depression and social anxiety. This study utilized multiple measures of each facet of E/PE, as well as depression and social anxiety symptoms. Self-report data were collected from large samples of college students and psychiatric outpatients. Separate factor analyses in each sample revealed a 4-factor structure of E/PE consisting of Sociability, Positive Emotionality, Ascendance, and Fun-Seeking. Structural equation modeling revealed that, after controlling for the higher order internalizing factor and the overlap among the E/PE facets, social anxiety was broadly related to all 4 facets of E/PE, whereas depression was strongly related to only low positive emotionality. Implications for hierarchical models of personality and psychopathology, assessment and treatment, and etiological models are discussed.

  18. Facets of Emotional Clarity and Suspiciousness

    PubMed Central

    Boden, Matthew Tyler; Berenbaum, Howard

    2012-01-01

    In a college student sample, we explored the relations between individual differences in facets of emotional clarity and suspiciousness. Previous theory and research has treated emotional clarity as a one-dimensional construct. Boden and Berenbaum (2011) proposed that a second facet of emotional clarity, source awareness (a general understanding of the cause of their emotions), could be distinguished from type awareness (a general understanding of the type of emotions [anger, fear] experienced). We found that source and type awareness were incrementally, inversely associated with suspiciousness when statistically accounting for the extent to which emotions are attended to, and gender. Additionally, source awareness significantly predicted suspiciousness after accounting for anger, anxious arousal, and social anxiety, whereas type awareness did not. Findings are consistent with the hypothesis that, among individuals with low source and type awareness, suspicious beliefs are formed to make sense of and explain emotional arousal. PMID:22736879

  19. How faceted liquid droplets grow tails

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Shani; Sapir, Zvi; Schultz, Moty; Butenko, Alexander V.; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Deutsch, Moshe; Sloutskin, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Liquid droplets, widely encountered in everyday life, have no flat facets. Here we show that water-dispersed oil droplets can be reversibly temperature-tuned to icosahedral and other faceted shapes, hitherto unreported for liquid droplets. These shape changes are shown to originate in the interplay between interfacial tension and the elasticity of the droplet’s 2-nm-thick interfacial monolayer, which crystallizes at some T = Ts above the oil’s melting point, with the droplet’s bulk remaining liquid. Strikingly, at still-lower temperatures, this interfacial freezing (IF) effect also causes droplets to deform, split, and grow tails. Our findings provide deep insights into molecular-scale elasticity and allow formation of emulsions of tunable stability for directed self-assembly of complex-shaped particles and other future technologies. PMID:26733673

  20. Nonradiative Step Facets in Semiconductor Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ana M; Zhang, Yunyan; Tait, Edward W; Hine, Nicholas D M; Liu, Huiyun; Beanland, Richard

    2017-04-12

    One of the main advantages of nanowires for functional applications is their high perfection, which results from surface image forces that act on line defects such as dislocations, rendering them unstable and driving them out of the crystal. Here we show that there is a class of step facets that are stable in nanowires, with no long-range strain field or dislocation character. In zinc-blende semiconductors, they take the form of Σ3 (112) facets with heights constrained to be a multiple of three {111} monolayers. Density functional theory calculations show that they act as nonradiative recombination centers and have deleterious effects on nanowire properties. We present experimental observations of these defects on twin boundaries and twins that terminate inside GaAsP nanowires and find that they are indeed always multiples of three monolayers in height. Strategies to use the three-monolayer rule during growth to prevent their formation are discussed.

  1. Plasmonic crystal cavity on single-mode optical fiber end facet for label-free biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaolong; Yi, Hui; Long, Jing; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Jie; Yang, Tian

    2016-06-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) devices on single-mode optical fiber (SMF) end facets are desired for label-free biosensing, due to flexible light delivery, in vivo inspection capability, and seamless integration with fiber-optic communication techniques. We report a plasmonic crystal cavity structure that has a steep resonance near the plasmonic bandedge, a fabrication process to efficiently transfer and align the structure onto a bare SMF end facet, and characterization of its sensing performance. With a sensitivity of 571 nm RIU-1, a figure of merit of 68 RIU-1 and a real-time refractive index detection limit of 3.5 × 10-6 RIU, our sensors can be readily applied in common SPR biosensing experiments. They are over an order of magnitude more sensitive than reported modified-end multimode fiber SPR devices, while there are no reports on previous SMF end facet devices' detection limits which have very low figures of merit.

  2. Penumbral-like Structures in the Solar Photosphere: the Role of Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, Francesca; Romano, Paolo; Cristaldi, Alice; Falco, Mariachiara; Guglielmino, Salvo L.

    Observations of the solar photosphere rarely show the appearance of so-called orphan penumbrae, filamentary structures very similar to a bundle of sunspot penumbral filaments, but not connected to any umbra. We report on the plasma flows and on the magnetic properties of such structures observed in different active regions using the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. We also benefit from continuous observations acquired by the SDO satellite and from some high-resolution data acquired by the DOT telescope. We find that these structures can form in different ways: one seems to break off the penumbra of a nearby sunspot, others are formed through the emergence of new flux. Our analysis suggests that, for these latter features, the horizontal component of the emerging field can be trapped in the photosphere by the overlying fields and form a structure resembling penumbral filaments due to the combination of photospheric flux emergence and magneto-convection in inclined fields.

  3. Controlled synthesis and facets-dependent photocatalysis of TiO2 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Nitish; Park, Yohan; Sohn, Youngku; Pradhan, Debabrata

    2015-04-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a wide band gap semiconductor that has been extensively used in several environmental applications including degradation of organic hazardous chemicals, water splitting to generate hydrogen, dye sensitized solar cells, self cleaning agents, and pigments. Herein we demonstrate the synthesis of TiO2 nanocrystals (NCs) with the shapes of ellipsoids, rods, cuboids, and sheets with different exposed facets using a noncorrosive and nontoxic chemical (i.e. diethanolamine) as the shape controlling agent, unlike hydrofluoric acid commonly used. The TiO2 NCs of diverse shapes with different exposed facets were tested for photocatalytic hydroxyl radical (OH•) formation, which determines their photocatalytic behavior and the results were compared with the standard P-25 Degussa. The formation rate of OH• per specific surface area was found to be >6 fold higher for rod-shaped TiO2 NCs than that of commercial Degussa P25 catalyst. The highest photocatalytic activity of rod-shaped TiO2 NCs is ascribed to the unique chemical environment of {010} exposed facets which facilitates the electron/hole separation in presence of {101} facets.

  4. DETECTION OF SMALL-SCALE GRANULAR STRUCTURES IN THE QUIET SUN WITH THE NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, V. I.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Goode, P. R.; Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2012-09-10

    Results of a statistical analysis of solar granulation are presented. A data set of 36 images of a quiet-Sun area on the solar disk center was used. The data were obtained with the 1.6 m clear aperture New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory and with a broadband filter centered at the TiO (705.7 nm) spectral line. The very high spatial resolution of the data (diffraction limit of 77 km and pixel scale of 0.''0375) augmented by the very high image contrast (15.5% {+-} 0.6%) allowed us to detect for the first time a distinct subpopulation of mini-granular structures. These structures are dominant on spatial scales below 600 km. Their size is distributed as a power law with an index of -1.8 (which is close to the Kolmogorov's -5/3 law) and no predominant scale. The regular granules display a Gaussian (normal) size distribution with a mean diameter of 1050 km. Mini-granular structures contribute significantly to the total granular area. They are predominantly confined to the wide dark lanes between regular granules and often form chains and clusters, but different from magnetic bright points. A multi-fractality test reveals that the structures smaller than 600 km represent a multi-fractal, whereas on larger scales the granulation pattern shows no multi-fractality and can be considered as a Gaussian random field. The origin, properties, and role of the population of mini-granular structures in the solar magnetoconvection are yet to be explored.

  5. Spatial Structures of Polar Magnetic Field During the Last Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, T.

    2009-05-01

    The Sun's polar field is closely related to the large scale coronal structure. It is important for coronal modeling and greatly affects the result. However, the polar field is not well observed because the ecliptic lies near the Sun's equator. In this study, we make use of the data from various observatories (MDI/WSO/MWO/Hinode) to study its spatial structures during the last solar cycle. The result is useful to improve the polar field extrapolation schemes.

  6. HRTS observations of the fine structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere and transition zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dere, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    Arc-second UV observations of the Sun by the NRL High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS) have led to the discovery of dynamic fine structures such as 400 km/s coronal jets and chromospheric jets (spicules) and have provided new information about the structure and dynamics of the transition zone. These observations are reviewed and their relevance to the origin of the solar wind is discussed.

  7. Flexible perovskite solar cells based on the metal-insulator-semiconductor structure.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Li, Heng; Zhao, Yicheng; Zhou, Wenke; Fu, Rui; Pan, Huiyue; Zhao, Qing

    2016-09-14

    The metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure is applied to perovskite solar cells, in which the traditional compact layer TiO2 is replaced by Al2O3 as the hole blocking material to realize an all-low-temperature process. Flexible devices based on this structure are also realized with excellent flexibility, which hold 85% of their initial efficiency after bending 100 times.

  8. The functional role of tabular structures for large reef fishes: avoiding predators or solar irradiance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, J. T.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    Large reef fishes may often be seen sheltering under tabular structures on coral reefs. There are two principle explanations for this behaviour: avoidance of predation or avoidance of solar irradiance. This study sought supporting evidence to distinguish between these two explanations by examining the usage of tabular structures on a shallow mid-shelf reef of the Great Barrier Reef at midday and sunset. If predation avoidance is most important, usage should increase towards sunset; conversely, if avoidance of solar radiation is most important, more fishes should use cover at midday. Underwater video observations revealed that tabular structures were extensively used by large reef fishes at midday, being characterised by numerous species, especially Lutjanidae and Haemulidae. In contrast, at sunset, tabular structures were used by significantly fewer large reef fishes, being characterised mostly by species of unicornfish ( Naso spp.). Resident times of fishes using tabular structures were also significantly longer at midday (28:06 ± 5:55 min) than at sunset (07:47 ± 2:19 min). The results suggest that the primary function of tabular structures for large reef fishes is the avoidance of solar irradiance. This suggestion is supported by the position of fishes when sheltering. The majority of large reef fishes were found to shelter under the lip of tabular structure, facing outwards. This behaviour is thought to allow protection from harmful downwelling UV-B irradiance while allowing the fish to retain photopic vision and survey more of the surrounding area. These findings help to explain the importance of tabular structures for large reef fishes on coral reefs, potentially providing a valuable energetic refuge from solar irradiance.

  9. Solar cells based on InP/GaP/Si structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvitsiani, O.; Laperashvil, D.; Laperashvili, T.; Mikelashvili, V.

    2016-10-01

    Solar cells (SCs) based on III-V semiconductors are reviewed. Presented work emphases on the Solar Cells containing Quantum Dots (QDs) for next-generation photovoltaics. In this work the method of fabrication of InP QDs on III-V semiconductors is investigated. The original method of electrochemical deposition of metals: indium (In), gallium (Ga) and of alloys (InGa) on the surface of gallium phosphide (GaP), and mechanism of formation of InP QDs on GaP surface is presented. The possibilities of application of InP/GaP/Si structure as SC are discussed, and the challenges arising is also considered.

  10. Superlattices and NiPi structures in new forms of cascade solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leburton, J. P.; Hess, K.

    1986-01-01

    The activity in the field of photovoltaic semiconductor superstructures is described. Progress was accomplished in the two principal directions previously defined in our initial proposal, i.e.: (1) Theoretical investigation of the optical properties of superlattices; and (2) New solar cell concepts and device modeling. Although important information concerning the optical constants of superlattices and multiple quantum well structures was obtained from our computer model, most of the theoretical efforts have progressively shifted from the former to the latter aspect of the project because of the discovery of a new kind of photovoltaic device which may exhibit improved performances with respect to conventional solar cells.

  11. On the use of tensegrity structures for kinetic solar facades of smart buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, F.; De Chiara, E.; Skelton, R. E.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the use of tensegrity structures with morphing and prestress-stability capabilities for the design of active solar façades of smart buildings. Morphing tensegrity lattices are used to design shading screens composed of umbrella-shaped ‘eyes’ that are opened and closed by adjusting the elongation in a limited number of cables. Prestressable lattices are instead employed to design superstable Venetian blinds that are composed of orientable slats. Future use of tensegrity solutions for next-generation smart buildings are outlined, with the aim of designing kinetic solar façades that combine morphing abilities with prestress-stability.

  12. Third-generation solar cells based on quaternary copper compounds with the kesterite-type structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitin, V. V.; Novikov, G. F.

    2017-02-01

    The state of the art in the studies aimed at improving the efficiency and reducing the cost of solar energy cells is analyzed. A possible way to achieve these goals is to use absorber layers made of semiconductor materials based on a new, poorly studied class of quaternary copper compounds Cu2ZnSnX4 (X=S, Se) with the kesterite-type structure. Methods of synthesis and the chemical composition of the kesterite absorber layers are discussed. Various types and operating principles of thin-film solar cells as well as main factors influencing parameters of these devices are considered. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  13. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the fourth quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere," NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and covers the period May 16, 2001 to August 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) model.

  14. Improved efficiency of ultra-thin µc-Si solar cells with photonic-crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Kenji; De Zoysa, Menaka; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Umeda, Takami; Kawamoto, Yosuke; Noda, Susumu

    2015-09-21

    We investigate the improvement of the conversion efficiency of ultra-thin (~500nm-thick) microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si) solar cells incorporating photonic-crystal structures, where light absorption is strongly enhanced by the multiple resonant modes in the photonic crystal. We focus on the quality of the intrinsic μc-Si layer deposited on the substrate, which is structured to form a photonic crystal at its upper surface with a period of several hundred nanometers. We first study the crystalline quality from the viewpoint of the crystalline fraction and show that the efficiency can be improved when the deposition conditions for the μc-Si layer are tuned to give an almost constant crystalline fraction of ~50% across the entire film. We then study the influence of the photonic-crystal structure on the crystalline quality. From transmission-electron microscope images, we show that the collision of μc-Si grains growing at different angles occurs when a photonic-crystal structure with an angular surface is used; this can be suppressed by introducing a rounded surface structure. As a result, we demonstrate an efficiency of 8.7% in a ~500-nm thick, homo-junction μc-Si solar cell, which has only ~1/4 the thickness of typical μc-Si solar cells. We also discuss the possibility of further improving the efficiency by performing calculations that focus on the absorption characteristics of the fabricated cell structure.

  15. Enhanced Gas-Sensing Properties of the Hierarchical TiO₂ Hollow Microspheres with Exposed High-Energy {001} Crystal Facets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Liang, Yan; Wang, Guozhong; Liu, Liangliang; Yuan, Cailei; Yu, Ting; Li, Qinliang; Zeng, Fanyan; Gu, Gang

    2015-11-11

    Anatase hierarchical TiO2 with innovative designs (hollow microspheres with exposed high-energy {001} crystal facets, hollow microspheres without {001} crystal facets, and solid microspheres without {001} crystal facets) were synthesized via a one-pot hydrothermal method and characterized. Based on these materials, gas sensors were fabricated and used for gas-sensing tests. It was found that the sensor based on hierarchical TiO2 hollow microspheres with exposed high-energy {001} crystal facets exhibited enhanced acetone sensing properties compared to the sensors based on the other two materials due to the exposing of high-energy {001} crystal facets and special hierarchical hollow structure. First-principle calculations were performed to illustrate the sensing mechanism, which suggested that the adsorption process of acetone molecule on TiO2 surface was spontaneous, and the adsorption on high-energy {001} crystal facets would be more stable than that on the normally exposed {101} crystal facets. Further characterization indicated that the {001} surface was highly reactive for the adsorption of active oxygen species, which was also responsible for the enhanced sensing performance. The present studies revealed the crystal-facets-dependent gas-sensing properties of TiO2 and provided a new insight into improving the gas sensing performance by designing hierarchical hollow structure with special-crystal-facets exposure.

  16. Structure, dynamics, and seasonal variability of the Mars-solar wind interaction: MAVEN Solar Wind Ion Analyzer in-flight performance and science results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Harada, Y.; Collinson, G.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; McFadden, J. P.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Eparvier, F.; Luhmann, J. G.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the in-flight performance of the Solar Wind Ion Analyzer (SWIA) and observations of the Mars-solar wind interaction made during the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) prime mission and a portion of its extended mission, covering 0.85 Martian years. We describe the data products returned by SWIA and discuss the proper handling of measurements made with different mechanical attenuator states and telemetry modes, and the effects of penetrating and scattered backgrounds, limited phase space coverage, and multi-ion populations on SWIA observations. SWIA directly measures solar wind protons and alpha particles upstream from Mars. SWIA also provides proxy measurements of solar wind and neutral densities based on products of charge exchange between the solar wind and the hydrogen corona. Together, upstream and proxy observations provide a complete record of the solar wind experienced by Mars, enabling organization of the structure, dynamics, and ion escape from the magnetosphere. We observe an interaction that varies with season and solar wind conditions. Solar wind dynamic pressure, Mach number, and extreme ultraviolet flux all affect the bow shock location. We confirm the occurrence of order-of-magnitude seasonal variations of the hydrogen corona. We find that solar wind Alfvén waves, which provide an additional energy input to Mars, vary over the mission. At most times, only weak mass loading occurs upstream from the bow shock. However, during periods with near-radial interplanetary magnetic fields, structures consistent with Short Large Amplitude Magnetic Structures and their wakes form upstream, dramatically reconfiguring the Martian bow shock and magnetosphere.

  17. Latitudinal velocity structures up to the solar poles estimated from interplanetary scintillation tomography analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, M.; Fujiki, K.; Ohmi, T.; Tokumaru, M.; Yokobe, A.; Hakamada, K.

    2001-08-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft observed high-speed wind at high latitudes up to 80° and found that the high-speed solar wind increased in velocity gradually with latitude and that the velocity had asymmetry between Northern and Southern Hemispheres. We have investigated the velocity increase up to the polar regions for the Carrington rotations of 1908-1915 in the year 1996. For this purpose we have made tomographic analyses of the latitudinal structure of the solar wind speed using interplanetary scintillation data obtained at heliocentric distances of 0.1-0.9 AU and latitudes up to 90°. The tomographic analysis method was modified from its previous version [Kojima et al., 1998] so that it could obtain more reliable solutions with better sensitivity in the polar region than the previous method. The results from the observations in 1996 showed that the velocity increased with latitude and had the N-S asymmetry as observed by Ulysses. These features persisted during the period analyzed. Since the asymmetry was found in rather short period observations of several Carrington rotations and at distances within 0.9 AU, it is caused neither by temporal evolution of the solar wind structures nor by interactions in the solar wind in interplanetary space. These global latitudinal velocity structures agree qualitatively with the magnetic flux expansion factor.

  18. Numerical study of the propagation characteristics of coronal mass ejections in a structured ambient solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufen; Feng, Xueshang

    2017-02-01

    Using a three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, we analyze and study the propagation characteristics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched at different positions in a realistic structured ambient solar wind. Here the ambient solar wind structure during the Carrington rotation 2095 is selected, which is the characteristics of activity rising phase. CMEs with a simple spherical plasmoid structure are initiated at different solar latitudes with respect to the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) and the Earth in the same ambient solar wind. Then, we numerically obtained the evolution process of the CMEs from the Sun to the interplanetary space. When the Earth and the CME launch position are located on the same side of the HCS, the arrival time of the shock at the Earth is faster than that when the Earth and the CME launch position are located on the opposite side of the HCS. The disturbance amplitudes for the same side event are also larger than those for the opposite side event. This may be due to the fact that the HCS between the CME and the Earth for the opposite side event hinders its propagation and weaken it. The CMEs tend to deflect toward the HCS in the latitudinal direction near the corona and then propagate almost parallel to the HCS in the interplanetary space. This deflecting tendency may be caused by the dynamic action of near-Sun magnetic pressure gradient force on the ejected coronal plasma.

  19. Solar system history as recorded in the Saturnian ring structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1983-01-01

    Holberg's analysis of the Voyager Saturn photographs in reflected and transparent light, and occultation data of stars seen through the rings are discussed. A hyperfine structure, with 10,000 ringlets can be explained by the Baxter-Thompson negative diffusion. This gives the ringlets a stability which makes it possible to interpret them as fossils, which originated at cosmogonic times. It is shown that the bulk structure can be explained by the combined cosmogonic shadows of the satellites Mimas, Janus and the Shepherd satellites. This structure originated at the transition from the plasma phase to the planetesimal phase. The shadows are not simple void regions but exhibit a characteristic signature. Parts of the fine structure, explained by Holberg as resonances with satellites, are interpreted as cosmogonic shadow effects. However, there are a number of ringlets which can neither be explained by cosmogonic nor by resonance effects. Analysis of ring data can reconstruct the plasma-planetesimal transition with an accuracy of a few percent.

  20. Structural configuration options for the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylim, Adrian

    1989-01-01

    In order to meet the growing power demands of the Space Station, the electrical power system design includes an option to provide additional power capability in increments of 50 kWe of power. Each increment consists of a pair of two solar dynamic power modules (SDPMs), each of which containing a closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) thermodynamic engine. A solar dynamic radiator (SDR) enables the CBC to reject the waste heat to the surrounding space environment. This paper analyzes three alternatives to the baseline configuration of the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic radiator and discusses their merits based on Space Shuttle cargo capabilities, location with respect to the SDPM supporting structure, thermal performance, drag, concentrator shading, mass, and other issues of concenrn. Results indicating the advantages and disadvantages of each option are presented along with diagrams of the alternative configurations.

  1. The unresolved fine structure resolved: IRIS observations of the solar transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansteen, V.; De Pontieu, B.; Carlsson, M.; Lemen, J.; Title, A.; Boerner, P.; Hurlburt, N.; Tarbell, T. D.; Wuelser, J. P.; Pereira, T. M. D.; De Luca, E. E.; Golub, L.; McKillop, S.; Reeves, K.; Saar, S.; Testa, P.; Tian, H.; Kankelborg, C.; Jaeggli, S.; Kleint, L.; Martínez-Sykora, J.

    2014-10-01

    The heating of the outer solar atmospheric layers, i.e., the transition region and corona, to high temperatures is a long-standing problem in solar (and stellar) physics. Solutions have been hampered by an incomplete understanding of the magnetically controlled structure of these regions. The high spatial and temporal resolution observations with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) at the solar limb reveal a plethora of short, low-lying loops or loop segments at transition-region temperatures that vary rapidly, on the time scales of minutes. We argue that the existence of these loops solves a long-standing observational mystery. At the same time, based on comparison with numerical models, this detection sheds light on a critical piece of the coronal heating puzzle.

  2. Evolution of the solar nebula. I - Nonaxisymmetric structure during nebula formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the equations of hydrodynamics, gravitation, and radiative transfer in three spatial dimensions are used to model the formation and time evolution of the early solar nebula in order to learn whether or not gravitational torques between nonaxisymmetric structures in the solar nebula can transport angular momentum rapidly enough to produce nebula clearing on astronomically indicated (10 to the 5 to 10 to the 7 yr) time scales. The models involve solutions for the collapse of spherical clouds with assumed initial density and rotation profiles onto protosuns of variable mass. Most of the models assume uniform initial density and rotation, and have variations in the initial parameters of cloud mass, cloud rotation rate, and protosun mass which are chosen to simulate a range of possible phases of early solar nebula evolution. The models show little tendency for directly forming small numbers of giant gaseous protoplanets through gaseous gravitational instability.

  3. Evolution of the solar nebula. I. Nonaxisymmetric structure during nebula formation

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, A.P. )

    1989-10-01

    Numerical solutions of the equations of hydrodynamics, gravitation, and radiative transfer in three spatial dimensions are used to model the formation and time evolution of the early solar nebula in order to learn whether or not gravitational torques between nonaxisymmetric structures in the solar nebula can transport angular momentum rapidly enough to produce nebula clearing on astronomically indicated (10 to the 5 to 10 to the 7 yr) time scales. The models involve solutions for the collapse of spherical clouds with assumed initial density and rotation profiles onto protosuns of variable mass. Most of the models assume uniform initial density and rotation, and have variations in the initial parameters of cloud mass, cloud rotation rate, and protosun mass which are chosen to simulate a range of possible phases of early solar nebula evolution. The models show little tendency for directly forming small numbers of giant gaseous protoplanets through gaseous gravitational instability. 69 refs.

  4. The unresolved fine structure resolved: IRIS observations of the solar transition region.

    PubMed

    Hansteen, V; De Pontieu, B; Carlsson, M; Lemen, J; Title, A; Boerner, P; Hurlburt, N; Tarbell, T D; Wuelser, J P; Pereira, T M D; De Luca, E E; Golub, L; McKillop, S; Reeves, K; Saar, S; Testa, P; Tian, H; Kankelborg, C; Jaeggli, S; Kleint, L; Martínez-Sykora, J

    2014-10-17

    The heating of the outer solar atmospheric layers, i.e., the transition region and corona, to high temperatures is a long-standing problem in solar (and stellar) physics. Solutions have been hampered by an incomplete understanding of the magnetically controlled structure of these regions. The high spatial and temporal resolution observations with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) at the solar limb reveal a plethora of short, low-lying loops or loop segments at transition-region temperatures that vary rapidly, on the time scales of minutes. We argue that the existence of these loops solves a long-standing observational mystery. At the same time, based on comparison with numerical models, this detection sheds light on a critical piece of the coronal heating puzzle.

  5. Facile synthesis of bird's nest-like TiO2 microstructure with exposed (001) facets for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guozhong; Zhang, Shuqu; Wang, Longlu; Liu, Ran; Zeng, Yunxiong; Xia, Xinnian; Liu, Yutang; Luo, Shenglian

    2017-01-01

    The scrupulous design of hierarchical structure and highly active crystal facets exposure is essential for the creation of photocatalytic system. However, it is still a big challenge for scrupulous design of TiO2 architectures. In this paper, bird's nest-like anatase TiO2 microstructure with exposed highly active (001) surface has been successfully synthesized by a facile one-step solvothermal method. Methylene blue (MB) is chosen as a model pollutant to evaluate photocatalytic activity of as-obtained TiO2 samples. The results show that the photocatalytic activity of the bird's nest-like sample is more excellent than P25 in the degradation of MB due to high specific surface area and highly active (001) crystal facets exposure when tested under simulated solar light. Besides, it can be readily separated from the photocatalytic system by sedimentation after photocatalytic reaction, which is a significant advantage against conventional powder photocatalyst. The bird's nest-like microspheres with novel structure may have potential application in photocatalysis and other fields.

  6. OBSERVATIONAL ASPECTS OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORONAL STRUCTURE OVER A SOLAR ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Huw; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    2010-02-10

    Solar rotational tomography is applied to almost eleven years of Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph C2/Solar and Heliospheric Observatory data, revealing for the first time the behavior of the large-scale coronal density structures, also known as streamers, over almost a full solar activity cycle. This study gives an overview of the main results of this project. (1) Streamers are most often shaped as extended, narrow plasma sheets. The sheets can be extremely narrow at times (<=0.14 x 10{sup 6} km at 4 R{sub sun}). This is over twice their heliocentric angular thickness at 1 AU. (2) At most times outside the height of solar maximum, there are two separate stable large helmet streamer belts extending from mid-latitudes (in both north and south). At solar minimum, the streamers converge and join near the equator, giving the impression of a single large helmet streamer. Outside of solar minimum, the two streamers do not join, forming separate high-density sheets in the extended corona (one in the north, another in the south). At solar maximum, streamers rise radially from their source regions, while during the ascending and descending activity phases, streamers are skewed toward the equator. (3) For most of the activity cycle, streamers share the same latitudinal extent as filaments on the disk, showing that large-scale stable streamers are closely linked to the same large-scale photospheric magnetic configuration, which give rise to large filaments. (4) The poleward footpoints of the streamers are often above crown polar filaments and the equatorial footpoints are above filaments or active regions (or above the photospheric neutral lines which underlie these structures). The high-density structures arising from the equatorial active regions either rise and form the equatorial footpoints of mid-latitude quiescent streamers, or form unstable streamers at the equator, not connected to the quiescent streamer structure at higher latitude (so there are often three

  7. Corotating solar wind structures and recurrent trains of enhanced diurnal variation in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Yeeram, T.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Kamyan, N.; Nutaro, T. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th E-mail: p_chang24@hotmail.com

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with a vertical cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, were utilized to determine the diurnal anisotropy (DA) of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) near Earth during solar minimum conditions between 2007 November and 2010 November. We identified trains of enhanced DA over several days, which often recur after a solar rotation period (∼27 days). By investigating solar coronal holes as identified from synoptic maps and solar wind parameters, we found that the intensity and anisotropy of cosmic rays are associated with the high-speed streams (HSSs) in the solar wind, which are in turn related to the structure and evolution of coronal holes. An enhanced DA was observed after the onset of some, but not all, HSSs. During time periods of recurrent trains, the DA was often enhanced or suppressed according to the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field B, which suggests a contribution from a mechanism involving a southward gradient in the GCR density, n, and a gradient anisotropy along B × ∇n. In one non-recurrent and one recurrent sequence, an HSS from an equatorial coronal hole was merged with that from a trailing mid-latitude extension of a polar coronal hole, and the slanted HSS structure in space with suppressed GCR density can account for the southward GCR gradient. We conclude that the gradient anisotropy is a source of temporary changes in the GCR DA under solar minimum conditions, and that the latitudinal GCR gradient can sometimes be explained by the coronal hole morphology.

  8. Novel solar tower structure to lower plant cost and construction risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterseim, J. H.; White, S.; Hellwig, U.

    2016-05-01

    In recent times the interest in solar tower power plants is increasing with various plants being built in the last years and currently under construction, e.g. Ivanpah and Crescent Dunes in the US and Khi Solar One in South Africa. The higher cycle efficiency leads to lower levelised cost of electricity. However, further cost reductions are required and this paper compares a novel and patented solar tower structure with a conventional concrete tower. The novel solar tower design is cable-stayed which has the benefit that the cables absorb a large part of the wind and buckling loads. A tower that has to cope with fewer wind and buckling forces can have a significantly smaller diameter than a concrete tower, which enables workshop manufacture, sea and road transport, and rapid on-site installation. The case study provided in this paper finds that the tower area affected by wind can be reduced by up to 45%, installation time shortened by up to 66%, and tower cost by 20-40%. The novel design allows the construction and transport of the solar tower in few large modules, which are pre-manufactured including piping, cables, platform, ladders etc. The few modules can be assembled and installed rapidly not only lowering plant cost and construction time but also project risk.

  9. Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona for the Total Solar Eclipse of March 29,2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. a.; Lionello, R.; Riley, P.; TItov, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the use of a three-dimensional MHD model to predict the s tructure of the corona prior to the total solar eclipse of March 29, 2006. The calculation uses the observed photospheric radial magnetic f ield as a boundary condition. We use a new version of our model that has an improved description of energy transport in the corona. The mo del allows us to predict the emission of X-ray and EUV radiation in t he corona. We compare the predicted polarization brightness in the co rona with four observations of the eclipse from Greece, Egypt, and Li bya, and we demonstrate that the model accurately predicts the largescale structure of the corona. We also compare X-ray emission from the model with GOES/SXI images.

  10. Rocket borne solar eclipse experiment to measure the temperature structure of the solar corona via lyman-. cap alpha. line profile observations

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, H.V.

    1981-01-01

    A rocket borne experiment to measure the temperature structure of the inner solar corona via the doppler broadening of the resonance hydrogen Lyman-..cap alpha.. (lambda1216A) radiation scattered by ambient neutral hydrogen atoms was attempted during the 16 Feb 1980 solar eclipse. Two Nike-Black Brant V sounding rockets carrying instrumented payloads were launched into the path of the advancing eclipse umbra from the San Marco satellite launch platform 3 miles off the east coast of Kenya.

  11. Finest Filamentary Structures of the Corona in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Richard; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in our understanding of electron density fluctuations observed by radio occultation measurements has demonstrated that a break in the vicinity of 1 Hz in the temporal frequency spectrum of the density fluctuations provides a measure of the size of the finest filamentary structures in the solar corona. Breaks in frequency have been inferred from the density spectra deduced by Coles et al. from 1979-1980 Voyager phase scintillation and spectral broadening measurements. These results show that the finest filamentary structures are found in the extensions or stalks of coronal streamers--the likely sources of the slow solar wind--and are over a factor of 3 smaller than those in the fast wind emanating from coronal holes. The inferred sizes of the finest filamentary structures are approximately 6 km in the slow wind at 8 Rsolar and 22 km in the fast wind at 9.1 Rsolar.

  12. Two cases of convecting structure in the slow solar wind turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Xin; He, Jiansen; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Linghua

    2016-03-01

    The slow solar wind turbulence has recently been considered as fully evolved turbulence which can be described by critical balance theory. However, here we present two cases of convecting structure that support a different understanding. By using the measurements from WIND spacecraft in the slow solar wind, we find that Elsässer variables Z± of these two cases do not represent inward and outward Alfvén waves, but are determined mainly by the magnetic variations, including tangentially varying structures. We then propose that the slow wind turbulence may be composed of convecting magnetic-field tangential and directional turnings, as well as current sheets, which may be considered as left-over fossils from Kolmogorov fluid turbulence. The fluid kinetic energy has been damped out, and the remaining magnetic fluctuations thus tend to become force-free structures.

  13. FLOWS AND WAVES IN BRAIDED SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, V.; Datta, A.; Banerjee, D.

    2015-03-01

    We study the high frequency dynamics in the braided magnetic structure of an active region (AR 11520) moss as observed by the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C). We detect quasi-periodic flows and waves in these structures. We search for high frequency dynamics while looking at power maps of the observed region. We find that shorter periodicities (30–60 s) are associated with small spatial scales which can be resolved by Hi-C only. We detect quasi-periodic flows with a wide range of velocities, from 13–185 km s{sup −1}, associated with braided regions. This can be interpreted as plasma outflows from reconnection sites. We also find short period and large amplitude transverse oscillations associated with the braided magnetic region. Such oscillations could be triggered by reconnection or such oscillations may trigger reconnection.

  14. Facet-dependent electrical conductivity properties of Cu2O crystals.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Hsu, Shih-Chen; Ke, Wei-Hong; Chen, Lih-Juann; Huang, Michael H

    2015-03-11

    It is interesting to examine facet-dependent electrical properties of single Cu2O crystals, because such study greatly advances our understanding of various facet effects exhibited by semiconductors. We show a Cu2O octahedron is highly conductive, a cube is moderately conductive, and a rhombic dodecahedron is nonconductive. The conductivity differences are ascribed to the presence of a thin surface layer having different degrees of band bending. When electrical connection was made on two different facets of a rhombicuboctahedron, a diode-like response was obtained, demonstrating the potential of using single polyhedral nanocrystals as functional electronic components. Density of state (DOS) plots for three layers of Cu2O (111), (100), and (110) planes show respective metallic, semimetal, and semiconducting band structures. By examining DOS plots for varying number of planes, the surface layer thicknesses responsible for the facet-dependent electrical properties of Cu2O crystals have been determined to be below 1.5 nm for these facets.

  15. Mechanisms of morphological evolution on faceted core-shell nanowire surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Aqua, Jean-Noël; Voorhees, Peter W.; Davis, Stephen H.

    2016-06-01

    Core-shell nanowires with radial heterostructures hold great promise in photonic and electronic applications and controlling the formation of these heterostructures in the core-shell configuration remains a challenge. Recently, GaAs nanowires have been used as substrates to create AlGaAs shells. The deposition of the AlGaAs layer leads to the spontaneous formation of Al-rich stripes along certain crystallographic directions and quantum dots/wires near the apexes of the shell. A general two-dimensional model has been developed for the motion of the faceted solid-vapor interfaces for pure materials that accounts for capillarity and deposition. With this model, the growth processes and morphological evolution of shells of nanowires around hexagonal cores (six small facets {112} in the corners of six equivalent facets {110}) are investigated in detail both analytically and numerically. It is found that deposition can yield facets that are not present on the Wulff shape. These small facets can have slowly time-varying sizes that can lead to stripe structures and quantum dots/wires depending on the balances between diffusion and deposition. The effects of deposition rates and polarity (or asymmetry) on planes {112} on the development of the configurations of nanowires are discussed. The numerical results are compared with experimental results giving almost quantitative agreement, despite the fact that only pure materials are treated herein whereas the experiments deal with alloys.

  16. Photovoltaic switching mechanism in lateral structure hybrid perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yongbo; Chae, Jungseok; Shao, Yuchuan; Wang, Qi; Xiao, Zhengguo; Centrone, Andrea; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-06-05

    In this study, long range electromigration of methylammonium ions (MA+) in methyl ammonium lead tri-iodide (MAPbI3) film is observed directly using the photo­thermal induced resonance technique. The electromigration of MA+ leads to the formation of a lateral p-i-n structure, which is the origin of the switchable photovoltaic effect in MAPbI3 perovskite devices.

  17. Photovoltaic switching mechanism in lateral structure hybrid perovskite solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Yongbo; Chae, Jungseok; Shao, Yuchuan; ...

    2015-06-05

    In this study, long range electromigration of methylammonium ions (MA+) in methyl ammonium lead tri-iodide (MAPbI3) film is observed directly using the photo­thermal induced resonance technique. The electromigration of MA+ leads to the formation of a lateral p-i-n structure, which is the origin of the switchable photovoltaic effect in MAPbI3 perovskite devices.

  18. Visualization of Bacterial Microcompartment Facet Assembly Using High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are proteinaceous organelles widespread among bacterial phyla. They compartmentalize enzymes within a selectively permeable shell and play important roles in CO2 fixation, pathogenesis, and microbial ecology. Here, we combine X-ray crystallography and high-speed atomic force microscopy to characterize, at molecular resolution, the structure and dynamics of BMC shell facet assembly. Our results show that preformed hexamers assemble into uniformly oriented shell layers, a single hexamer thick. We also observe the dynamic process of shell facet assembly. Shell hexamers can dissociate from and incorporate into assembled sheets, indicating a flexible intermolecular interaction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the self-assembly and dynamics of shell proteins are governed by specific contacts at the interfaces of shell proteins. Our study provides novel insights into the formation, interactions, and dynamics of BMC shell facets, which are essential for the design and engineering of self-assembled biological nanoreactors and scaffolds based on BMC architectures. PMID:26617073

  19. Visualization of Bacterial Microcompartment Facet Assembly Using High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Markus; Faulkner, Matthew; Aussignargues, Clément; Paasch, Bradley C; Barrett, Steve; Kerfeld, Cheryl A; Liu, Lu-Ning

    2016-03-09

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are proteinaceous organelles widespread among bacterial phyla. They compartmentalize enzymes within a selectively permeable shell and play important roles in CO2 fixation, pathogenesis, and microbial ecology. Here, we combine X-ray crystallography and high-speed atomic force microscopy to characterize, at molecular resolution, the structure and dynamics of BMC shell facet assembly. Our results show that preformed hexamers assemble into uniformly oriented shell layers, a single hexamer thick. We also observe the dynamic process of shell facet assembly. Shell hexamers can dissociate from and incorporate into assembled sheets, indicating a flexible intermolecular interaction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the self-assembly and dynamics of shell proteins are governed by specific contacts at the interfaces of shell proteins. Our study provides novel insights into the formation, interactions, and dynamics of BMC shell facets, which are essential for the design and engineering of self-assembled biological nanoreactors and scaffolds based on BMC architectures.

  20. CT of facet distraction in flexion injuries of the thoracolumbar spine: the "naked" facet.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, J P; Ullrich, C G; Yuan, H A; Kieffer, S A

    1980-03-01

    Vertical distraction of the articular processes is an important sign of ligamentous disruption due to flexion injuries of the thoracolumbar spine. In addition to illustrating this finding in cross section (the "naked" facet), computed tomography in the transaxial plane allows assessment of the presence and position of fracture fragments that may encroach on the spinal canal. Image reconstruction in sagittal and coronal planes provides a clear demonstration of the degree of bony compression, facet distraction, and kyphosis associated with flexion injuries without additional patient manipulation or radiation exposure.

  1. Approximating solar/stellar structure without a computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorish, John F.

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer a method for the approximate solution of the stellar interior equations (SIE) which determine the structure of a star. It is intended to avoid the use of a computer for a first approximation thereby saving valuable computer time. New dimensionless variables are developed which are dependent upon the SIE and are substituted into a simple series expansion. The values for pressure, temperature, mass, etc., per shell within the star are derived in this way. The obtained model is compared to a standard computer model and is found to be rather agreeable. The model developed is for the present sun.

  2. Reaction centres: the structure and evolution of biological solar power.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, Peter; Fyfe, Paul K; Jones, Michael R

    2002-02-01

    Reaction centres are complexes of pigment and protein that convert the electromagnetic energy of sunlight into chemical potential energy. They are found in plants, algae and a variety of bacterial species, and vary greatly in their composition and complexity. New structural information has highlighted features that are common to the different types of reaction centre and has provided insights into some of the key differences between reaction centres from different sources. New ideas have also emerged on how contemporary reaction centres might have evolved and on the possible origin of the first chlorophyll-protein complexes to harness the power of sunlight.

  3. Effect of Structure, Temperature, and Metal Work Function on Performance of Organometallic Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. I.; Aïssa, B.

    2017-01-01

    The impact of hole transport materials (HTMs) on the performance of methylammonium lead halide (CH3NH3PbI3)-based perovskite solar cells has been investigated using computational analysis. The main objective is to replace the HTM with the aim of enhancing the lifetime and decreasing the overall cost of the device. As the CH3NH3PbI3 absorber layer shows an absorption coefficient as high as 105/cm, all photons with incident energy larger the material bandgap are absorbed within only a 400-nm-thick layer. Also, all the electronic and optical properties of such an absorber layer are suitable for use in photovoltaic (PV) devices. Hence, the effects of the HTM thickness, operating temperature, incident light spectrum, and metal electrode work function on the charge collection were studied numerically. For a cell with Cu2O as HTM, efficiency exceeding 25% is predicted for a 350-nm-thick absorber layer. Also, a fully optimized device architecture without HTM shows the possibility of fabricating a perovskite solar cell with PV efficiency exceeding 15%. We expect considerable minimization of the energy loss in this structure due to charge transfer across the heterojunction. Moreover, the effect of temperature on perovskite solar cells and potential electrodes with different work functions has been investigated. Our results are believed to help open an experimental avenue to achieve optimum results for perovskite solar cells with various structures.

  4. Effect of Structure, Temperature, and Metal Work Function on Performance of Organometallic Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. I.; Aïssa, B.

    2017-03-01

    The impact of hole transport materials (HTMs) on the performance of methylammonium lead halide (CH3NH3PbI3)-based perovskite solar cells has been investigated using computational analysis. The main objective is to replace the HTM with the aim of enhancing the lifetime and decreasing the overall cost of the device. As the CH3NH3PbI3 absorber layer shows an absorption coefficient as high as 105/cm, all photons with incident energy larger the material bandgap are absorbed within only a 400-nm-thick layer. Also, all the electronic and optical properties of such an absorber layer are suitable for use in photovoltaic (PV) devices. Hence, the effects of the HTM thickness, operating temperature, incident light spectrum, and metal electrode work function on the charge collection were studied numerically. For a cell with Cu2O as HTM, efficiency exceeding 25% is predicted for a 350-nm-thick absorber layer. Also, a fully optimized device architecture without HTM shows the possibility of fabricating a perovskite solar cell with PV efficiency exceeding 15%. We expect considerable minimization of the energy loss in this structure due to charge transfer across the heterojunction. Moreover, the effect of temperature on perovskite solar cells and potential electrodes with different work functions has been investigated. Our results are believed to help open an experimental avenue to achieve optimum results for perovskite solar cells with various structures.

  5. Long-wavelength torsional modes of solar coronal plasma structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasheghani Farahani, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; van Doorsselaere, T.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: We consider the effects of the magnetic twist and plasma rotation on the propagation of torsional m = 0 perturbations of cylindrical plasma structures (straight magnetic flux tubes) in the case when the wavelength is much longer than the cylinder diameter. Methods: The second order thin flux tube approximation is used to derive dispersion relations and phase relations in linear long-wavelength axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic waves in uniformly twisted and rotating plasma structures. Results: Asymptotic dispersion relations linking phase speeds with the plasma parameters are derived. When twist and rotation are both present, the phase speed of torsional waves depends upon the direction of the wave propagation, and also the waves are compressible. The phase relations show that in a torsional wave the density and azimuthal magnetic field perturbations are in phase with the axial magnetic field perturbations and anti-phase with tube cross-section perturbations. In a zero-β non-rotating plasma cylinder confined by the equilibrium twist, the density perturbation is found to be about 66 percent of the amplitude of the twist perturbation in torsional waves.

  6. The Relation between Different Facets of Creativity and the Dark Side of Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahmen-Wassenberg, Phoebe; Kämmerle, Monika; Unterrainer, Human-Friedrich; Fink, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relation between different facets of creativity and personality, focusing on the dark side of personality. In a sample of 247 students, psychometric measures for the assessment of the dark triad of personality (subclinical narcissism, Machiavellianism, subclinical psychopathy), personality organization (structural deficit:…

  7. A hybrid approach to software repository retrieval: Blending faceted classification and type signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David A.

    1992-01-01

    We present a user interface for software reuse repository that relies both on the informal semantics of faceted classification and the formal semantics of type signatures for abstract data types. The result is an interface providing both structural and qualitative feedback to a software reuser.

  8. Enhancement of Solar Energetic Particles During a Shock Magnetic Cloud Interacting Complex Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Yuming; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S.

    2008-11-01

    The behavior of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in a shock magnetic cloud interacting complex structure observed by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft on 5 November 2001 is analyzed. A strong shock causing magnetic field strength and solar wind speed increases of about 41 nT and 300 km s-1, respectively, propagated within a preceding magnetic cloud (MC). It is found that an extraordinary SEP enhancement appeared at the high-energy (≥10 MeV) proton intensities and extended over and only over the entire period of the shock MC structure passing through the spacecraft. Such SEP behavior is much different from the usual picture that the SEPs are depressed in MCs. The comparison of this event with other top SEP events of solar cycle 23 (2000 Bastille Day and 2003 Halloween events) shows that such an enhancement resulted from the effects of the shock MC complex structure leading to the highest ≥10 MeV proton intensity of solar cycle 23. Our analysis suggests that the relatively isolated magnetic field configuration of MCs combined with an embedded strong shock could significantly enhance the SEP intensity; SEPs are accelerated by the shock and confined into the MC. Further, we find that the SEP enhancement at lower energies happened not only within the shock MC structure but also after it, probably owing to the presence of a following MC-like structure. This is consistent with the picture that SEP fluxes could be enhanced in the magnetic topology between two MCs, which was proposed based on numerical simulations by Kallenrode and Cliver ( Proc. 27th ICRC 8, 3318, 2001b).

  9. Alfvén waves in the structured solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cally, Paul S.

    2017-04-01

    A simple model of a periodic ensemble of closely packed flux tubes, sitting atop a vertically stratified layer, reveals that an incident fast wave from below preferentially converts almost immediately to Alfvén waves in the flux tubes, with kink waves restricted to at most a very few Fourier modes. This suggests that observations of coronal kink modes in such structured systems may greatly underestimate the net wave-energy flux being transported into and through the corona, much of which may reside in harder-to-observe Alfvén waves. The processes of mode conversion/resonant absorption and Alfvén phase mixing are implicated. It is suggested that the Sun's internal p-mode field - the 5-min oscillations - may contribute substantially to the process by supplying incident fast waves in the chromosphere that scatter and mode-convert in the tube ensemble.

  10. FACETS -- Infrastructure for Integrated Fusion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shasharina, Svetlana; Cary, John; Carlsson, Johan; Hakim, Ammar; Kruger, Scott; Miah, Mahmood; Pletzer, Alexander; Vadlamani, Srinath; Wade-Stein, David; Balay, Satish; McInnes, Lois; Zhang, Hong; Candy, Jeff; Fahey, Mark; Cohen, Ron; Epperly, Tom; Rognlien, Tom; Estep, Don; Pankin, Alexei; Malony, Allen; Morris, Alan; Shende, Sameer; Indireshkumar, Keshavamurthy; McCune, Douglas; Pigarov, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    It is desirable that an infrastructure for integrated fusion modeling has support for: legacy and new components used interchangeably; consistent management of components lifecycle; allocating parallel resources consistent with the nature of participating components and the problem scope; components written in multiple programming languages; composition of sequentially and concurrently executing components respecting dependencies; tight and loose coupling of components; testing and validation of separate and integrated components; and use of multiple platforms from desktops to LCFs. In this poster we will describe the status of the FACETS with respect to these features.

  11. Effect of coherent structures on energetic particle intensity in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessein, Jeffrey A.

    Solar energetic particles in the solar wind are accelerated in both solar flares and shocks assocated with fast coronal mass ejections. They follow the interplanetary magnetic field and, upon reaching Earth, have implications for space weather. Space weather affects astronaut health and orbiting equipment through radiation hazard and electrical infrastructure on the ground with ground induced currents. Economic im- pacts include disruption of GPS and redirection of commercial polar flights due to a dangerous radiation environment over the poles. By studying how these particles interact with the magnetic fields we can better predict onset times and diffusion of these events. We find, using superposed epoch analysis and conditional statisitics from spacecraft observations that there is a strong association between energetic particles in the solar wind and magnetic discontinuities. This may be related to turbulent dissipa- tion mechanisms in which coherent structures in the solar wind seem to be preferred sites of heating, plasma instabilites and dissipation. In the case of energetic particles, magnetic reconnection and transport in flux tubes are likely to play a role. Though we focus on data away from large shocks, trapping can occur in the downstream region of shocks due to the preponderance of compressive turbulence in these areas. This thesis lays the ground work for the results described above with an intro- duction to solar wind and heliospheric physics in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 is an intro- duction to the acceleration mechanisms that give rise to observed energetic particle events. Chapter 3 describes various data analysis techniques and statistics that are bread and butter when analyzing spacecraft data for turbulence and energetic particle studies. Chapter 4 is a digression that covers preliminary studies that were done on the side; scale dependent kurtosis, ergodic studies and initial conditions for simulations. Chapter 5 contains that central published

  12. Simulated In Situ Measurements and Structural Analysis of Reconnection-Driven Solar Polar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Merrill A.; Uritsky, Vadim M.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Solar polar jets are observed to originate in regions within the open field of solar coronal holes. These so called “anemone” regions are associated with an embedded dipole topology, consisting of a fan-separatrix and a spine line emanating from a null point occurring at the top of the dome shaped fan surface (Antiochos 1998). In this study, we analyze simulations using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) that take into account gravity, solar wind, and spherical geometry to generate polar jets by reconnection between a twisted embedded bipole and the surrounding open field (Karpen et al. 2015). These new simulations confirm and extend previous Cartesian studies of polar jets based on this mechanism (Pariat et al. 2009, 2010, 2015). Focusing on the plasma density, velocity, and magnetic field, we interpolate the adaptively gridded simulation data onto a regular grid, and analyze the signatures that the jet produces as it propagates outward from the solar surface. The trans-Alfvénic nature of the jet front is confirmed by temporally differencing the plasma mass density and comparing the result with the local Alfvén speed. We perform a preliminary analysis of the magnetized plasma turbulence, and examine how the turbulence affects the overall structure of the jet. We also conduct simulated spacecraft fly-throughs of the jet, illustrating the signatures that spacecraft such as Solar Probe Plus may encounter in situ as the jet propagates into the heliosphere. These fly-throughs are performed in several different velocity regimes to better model the changing velocity of Solar Probe Plus relative to the Sun and its jets over the course of the mission.This research was supported by NASA grant NNG11PL10A 670.036 to CUA/IACS (M.A.R. and V.M.U.) and the Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology (J.T.K. and C.R.D.) program.

  13. Direct Correlation Between Film Structure and Solar Cell Efficiency for HWCVD Amorphous Silicon Germanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, A. H.; Xu, Y.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Williamson, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    The film structure and H bonding of high deposition rate a-SiGe:H i-layers, deposited by HWCVD and containing {approx}40 at.% Ge, have been investigated using deposition conditions which replicate those used in n-i-p solar cell devices. Increasing the germane source gas depletion in HWCVD causes not only a decrease in solar cell efficiency from 8.64% to less than 7.0%, but also an increase in both the i-layer H preferential attachment ratio (PA) and the film microstructure fraction (R{sup {sq_bullet}}). Measurements of the XRD medium range order over a wide range of germane depletion indicate that this order is already optimum for the HWCVD i-layers, suggesting that energetic bombardment of a-SiGe:H films may not always be necessary to achieve well ordered films. Preliminary structural comparisons are also made between HWCVD and PECVD device layers.

  14. Stacbeam - An efficient, low-mass, sequentially deployable structure. [for satellite solar power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Design features of the stacking triangular articulated compact beam (Stacbeam) as a candidate truss structure for GEOS spacecraft solar power arrays are explored. Solar arrays of increasing size require folding, noninterfering structures, minimal thermal effects, slow and controlled deployment, and a high aspect ratio. The Stacbeam consists of a triangular batten frame perpendicular to the beam axis, three longerons attached at the corners of the batten frame and mounted parallel to the beam axis, and three diagonals to provide shear and torsional stiffness. Locking hinges are installed at the midpoint and ends of each longeron and at the midpoint and ends of each diagonal. The material is graphite/epoxy composite with a 120 GPa modulus and a 1500 kg/sq m density. Successful vertical deployment on the ground has been effected with a prototype deployer, together with horizontal cantilever in a fully deployed configuration.

  15. Metamaterial-plasmonic absorber structure for high efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Sun, Tianyi; Paudel, Trilochan; Zhang, Yi; Ren, Zhifeng; Kempa, Krzysztof

    2012-01-11

    We show that a planar structure, consisting of an ultrathin semiconducting layer topped with a solid nanoscopically perforated metallic film and then a dielectric interference film, can highly absorb (superabsorb) electromagnetic radiation in the entire visible range, and thus can become a platform for high-efficiency solar cells. The perforated metallic film and the ultrathin absorber in this broadband superabsorber form a metamaterial effective film, which negatively refracts light in this broad frequency range. Our quantitative simulations confirm that the superabsorption bandwidth is maximized at the checkerboard pattern of the perforations. These simulations show also that the energy conversion efficiency of a single-junction amorphous silicon solar cell based on our optimized structure can exceed 12%.

  16. Efficient direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion by in situ interface transformation of a tandem structure.

    PubMed

    May, Matthias M; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Lackner, David; Dimroth, Frank; Hannappel, Thomas

    2015-09-15

    Photosynthesis is nature's route to convert intermittent solar irradiation into storable energy, while its use for an industrial energy supply is impaired by low efficiency. Artificial photosynthesis provides a promising alternative for efficient robust carbon-neutral renewable energy generation. The approach of direct hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting utilizes customized tandem absorber structures to mimic the Z-scheme of natural photosynthesis. Here a combined chemical surface transformation of a tandem structure and catalyst deposition at ambient temperature yields photocurrents approaching the theoretical limit of the absorber and results in a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 14%. The potentiostatically assisted photoelectrode efficiency is 17%. Present benchmarks for integrated systems are clearly exceeded. Details of the in situ interface transformation, the electronic improvement and chemical passivation are presented. The surface functionalization procedure is widely applicable and can be precisely controlled, allowing further developments of high-efficiency robust hydrogen generators.

  17. Thin film solar cell design based on photonic crystal and diffractive grating structures.

    PubMed

    Mutitu, James G; Shi, Shouyuan; Chen, Caihua; Creazzo, Timothy; Barnett, Allen; Honsberg, Christiana; Prather, Dennis W

    2008-09-15

    In this paper we present novel light trapping designs applied to multiple junction thin film solar cells. The new designs incorporate one dimensional photonic crystals as band pass filters that reflect short light wavelengths (400 - 867 nm) and transmit longer wavelengths(867 -1800 nm) at the interface between two adjacent cells. In addition, nano structured diffractive gratings that cut into the photonic crystal layers are incorporated to redirect incoming waves and hence increase the optical path length of light within the solar cells. Two designs based on the nano structured gratings that have been realized using the scattering matrix and particle swarm optimization methods are presented. We also show preliminary fabrication results of the proposed devices.

  18. Efficient direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion by in situ interface transformation of a tandem structure

    PubMed Central

    May, Matthias M.; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Lackner, David; Dimroth, Frank; Hannappel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis is nature's route to convert intermittent solar irradiation into storable energy, while its use for an industrial energy supply is impaired by low efficiency. Artificial photosynthesis provides a promising alternative for efficient robust carbon-neutral renewable energy generation. The approach of direct hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting utilizes customized tandem absorber structures to mimic the Z-scheme of natural photosynthesis. Here a combined chemical surface transformation of a tandem structure and catalyst deposition at ambient temperature yields photocurrents approaching the theoretical limit of the absorber and results in a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 14%. The potentiostatically assisted photoelectrode efficiency is 17%. Present benchmarks for integrated systems are clearly exceeded. Details of the in situ interface transformation, the electronic improvement and chemical passivation are presented. The surface functionalization procedure is widely applicable and can be precisely controlled, allowing further developments of high-efficiency robust hydrogen generators. PMID:26369620

  19. In-Space Structural Validation Plan for a Stretched-Lens Solar Array Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Jones, Thomas W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes in-space structural validation plans for a proposed Space Shuttle-based flight experiment. The test article is an innovative, lightweight solar array concept that uses pop-up, refractive stretched-lens concentrators to achieve a power/mass density of at least 175 W/kg, which is more than three times greater than current capabilities. The flight experiment will validate this new technology to retire the risk associated with its first use in space. The experiment includes structural diagnostic instrumentation to measure the deployment dynamics, static shape, and modes of vibration of the 8-meter-long solar array and several of its lenses. These data will be obtained by photogrammetry using the Shuttle payload-bay video cameras and miniature video cameras on the array. Six accelerometers are also included in the experiment to measure base excitations and small-amplitude tip motions.

  20. Understanding the Global Structure and Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress made during the first six months of the second year of the NASA Living with a Star program contract Understanding the global structure and evolution of coronal mass ejections in the solar wind, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period November 18, 2003 - May 17,2004. Under this contract SAIC has conducted numerical and data analysis related to fundamental issues concerning the origin, intrinsic properties, global structure, and evolution of coronal mass ejections in the solar wind. During this working period we have focused on a quantitative assessment of 5 flux rope fitting techniques. In the following sections we summarize the main aspects of this work and our proposed investigation plan for the next reporting period. Thus far, our investigation has resulted in 6 refereed scientific publications and we have presented the results at a number of scientific meetings and workshops.

  1. Sparse Bayesian Inference and the Temperature Structure of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.; Byers, Jeff M.; Crump, Nicholas A.

    2017-02-01

    Measuring the temperature structure of the solar atmosphere is critical to understanding how it is heated to high temperatures. Unfortunately, the temperature of the upper atmosphere cannot be observed directly, but must be inferred from spectrally resolved observations of individual emission lines that span a wide range of temperatures. Such observations are “inverted” to determine the distribution of plasma temperatures along the line of sight. This inversion is ill posed and, in the absence of regularization, tends to produce wildly oscillatory solutions. We introduce the application of sparse Bayesian inference to the problem of inferring the temperature structure of the solar corona. Within a Bayesian framework a preference for solutions that utilize a minimum number of basis functions can be encoded into the prior and many ad hoc assumptions can be avoided. We demonstrate the efficacy of the Bayesian approach by considering a test library of 40 assumed temperature distributions.

  2. Efficient direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion by in situ interface transformation of a tandem structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Matthias M.; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Lackner, David; Dimroth, Frank; Hannappel, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Photosynthesis is nature's route to convert intermittent solar irradiation into storable energy, while its use for an industrial energy supply is impaired by low efficiency. Artificial photosynthesis provides a promising alternative for efficient robust carbon-neutral renewable energy generation. The approach of direct hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting utilizes customized tandem absorber structures to mimic the Z-scheme of natural photosynthesis. Here a combined chemical surface transformation of a tandem structure and catalyst deposition at ambient temperature yields photocurrents approaching the theoretical limit of the absorber and results in a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 14%. The potentiostatically assisted photoelectrode efficiency is 17%. Present benchmarks for integrated systems are clearly exceeded. Details of the in situ interface transformation, the electronic improvement and chemical passivation are presented. The surface functionalization procedure is widely applicable and can be precisely controlled, allowing further developments of high-efficiency robust hydrogen generators.

  3. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  4. Advanced Deployable Shell-Based Composite Booms for Small Satellite Structural Applications Including Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    State of the art deployable structures are mainly being designed for medium to large size satellites. The lack of reliable deployable structural systems for low cost, small volume, rideshare-class spacecraft severely constrains the potential for using small satellite platforms for affordable deep space science and exploration precursor missions that could be realized with solar sails. There is thus a need for reliable, lightweight, high packaging efficiency deployable booms that can serve as the supporting structure for a wide range of small satellite systems including solar sails for propulsion. The National Air and Space Administration (NASA) is currently investing in the development of a new class of advanced deployable shell-based composite booms to support future deep space small satellite missions using solar sails. The concepts are being designed to: meet the unique requirements of small satellites, maximize ground testability, permit the use of low-cost manufacturing processes that will benefit scalability, be scalable for use as elements of hierarchical structures (e.g. trusses), allow long duration storage, have high deployment reliability, and have controlled deployment behavior and predictable deployed dynamics. This paper will present the various rollable boom concepts that are being developed for 5-20 m class size deployable structures that include solar sails with the so-called High Strain Composites (HSC) materials. The deployable composite booms to be presented are being developed to expand the portfolio of available rollable booms for small satellites and maximize their length for a given packaged volume. Given that solar sails are a great example of volume and mass optimization, the booms were designed to comply with nominal solar sail system requirements for 6U CubeSats, which are a good compromise between those of smaller form factors (1U, 2U and 3U CubeSats) and larger ones (12 U and 27 U future CubeSats, and ESPA-class microsatellites). Solar

  5. Comparison of output power for solar cells with standard and structured ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehleisen, Wolfgang; Neumaier, Lukas; Hirschl, Christina; Maier, Thomas; Schwark, Michael; Seufzer, Siegfried; Battistutti, Rene; Pedevilla, Mathias; Scheurer, Jög; Lorenz, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The optical loss due to the busbar grid and soldered interconnector ribbons on a three busbar standard multicrystalline silicon solar cell's front side is at 2.3%. One way to reduce this optical loss on cell level and in a photovoltaic (PV) module is to use deep structured ribbons as cell connectors. The standard soldered, flat ribbon is replaced with a glued, multiple structured ribbon. The investigation of shiny soldered flat ribbons and multiple structured ribbons in single-cell mini modules demonstrates the light angle dependency and the benefit for the structured alternative. Additional yield measurements for conventional photovoltaic modules with soldered flat and glued multiple structured ribbons technologies were studied under laboratory conditions as well as in outdoor measurements. The simulations and the experimental findings confirmed that the new structured ribbon design increases the short circuit current and the yield by about 2%.

  6. Study of compressible coherent structures, close to ion scales, in solar wind turbulence using Cluster data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Denise; Alexandrova, Olga; Mangeney, André; Maksimovic, Milan; Rocoto, Virgile; Pantellini, Filippo; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Issautier, Karine

    2015-04-01

    The interplanetary medium, a weakly collisional and fully turbulent medium, can be considered the best natural laboratory to study the dynamical behavior of turbulent plasmas. A fundamental question in solar wind plasma physics is whether, space plasma turbulence can be considered as a mixture of quasi-linear waves or if the turbulence is strong with formation of coherent structures responsible for the dissipation. Here we present an automatic method to identify compressible coherent structures using Morlet wavelet decomposition of magnetic signal from Cluster spacecraft and reconstruction of magnetic fluctuations in a selected scale range (0.033-0.2 Hz). Different kind of coherent structures have been detected: from soliton-like compressible structures to current sheet- or vortex-like alfvenic structures. A multi-satellite analysis, in order to characterize 3D geometry and propagation in plasma rest frame, reveals that these structures propagate quasi-perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, with finite velocity. Moreover, the spatial scales of coherent structures have been estimated: for the selected frequency range, the distribution of spatial scales is picked around ~30 ion Larmor radius or ion inertial length (~1200 km). Our observations in the solar wind can provide constraints on theoretical modeling of small-scale turbulence and dissipation in collisionless magnetized plasmas.

  7. Single-Crystal CdTe Homojunction Structures for Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Peng-Yu; Dahal, Rajendra; Wang, Gwo-Ching; Zhang, Shengbai; Lu, Toh-Ming; Bhat, Ishwara B.

    2015-09-01

    We report two different CdTe homojunction solar cell structures. Single-crystal CdTe homojunction solar cells were grown on GaAs single-crystal substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Arsenic and iodine were used as dopants for p-type and n-type CdTe, respectively. Another homojunction solar cell structure was fabricated by growing n-type CdTe directly on bulk p-type CdTe single-crystal substrates. The electrical properties of the different layers were characterized by Hall measurements. When arsine was used as arsenic source, the highest hole concentration was ~6 × 1016 cm-3 and the activation efficiency was ~3%. Very abrupt arsenic doping profiles were observed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. For n-type CdTe with a growth temperature of 250°C and a high Cd/Te ratio the electron concentration was ~4.5 × 1016 cm-3. Because of the 300 nm thick n-type CdTe layer, the short circuit current of the solar cell grown on the bulk CdTe substrate was less than 10 mA/cm2. The open circuit voltage of the device was 0.86 V. According to a prediction based on measurement of short circuit current density ( J sc) as a function of open circuit voltage ( V oc), an open circuit voltage of 0.92 V could be achieved by growing CdTe solar cells on bulk CdTe substrates.

  8. Two-dimensional structure of the solar wind near the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Washimi, H.; Ogino, T.; Yoshino, Y.

    1987-05-01

    The two-dimensional structure of the solar wind near the sun is analyzed by the method of MHD simulation. The helmet-streamer configuration with a sharp boundary between the closed and open field regions has been reproduced. Due to the pressure-driven current in the sheet, the magnetic field, which has a dipole configuration at the photosphere, is found to behave like R/sup -2/ at a large distance, R, from the sun. copyrightAmerican Geophysical Union 1987

  9. Basic mechanisms study for MIS solar cell structures on GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The solar cell structure examined is the MIS configuration on (n) GaAs. The metal room temperature oxide/(n) GaAs materials system was studied. Metals with electronegativities varying from 2.4 (Au) to 1.5 (Al) were used as the upper electrode. The thinnest metallization that did not interfere with the measurement techniques (by introducing essentially transmission line series resistance problems across a device) was used. Photovoltaic response was not optimized.

  10. Investigation of Structural Dynamics in a 2-Meter Square Solar Sail Model Including Axial Load Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, D. B.; Virgin, L. N.; Belvin, W. K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a parameter study of the effect of boom axial loading on the global dynamics of a 2-meter solar sail scale model. The experimental model used is meant for building expertise in finite element analysis and experimental execution, not as a predecessor to any planned flight mission or particular design concept. The results here are to demonstrate the ability to predict and measure structural dynamics and mode shapes in the presence of axial loading.

  11. Facile preparation of smooth perovskite films for efficient meso/planar hybrid structured perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Yu, Hua; Yun, Jung-Ho; Lyu, Miaoqiang; Wang, Qiong; Wang, Lianzhou

    2015-06-21

    Smooth organolead halide perovskite films for meso/planar hybrid structured perovskite solar cells were prepared by a simple compressed air blow-drying method under ambient conditions. The resultant perovskite films show high surface coverage, leading to a device power conversion efficiency of over 10% with an open circuit voltage up to 1.003 V merely using pristine poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as a hole transporter.

  12. Analysis of structural deformation and concentrator misalignment in a roll-tilt solar tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Kuang; Fang, June-Yuan

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is, using finite element analysis, to investigate the effects of gravity and wind loadings on structural deformation and concentrator misalignment in a high concentrator photovoltaic (HCPV) system equipped with a roll-tilt form of solar tracker. Self-weight and a wind of 12 m/s blowing to the front, lateral, and rear sides of the solar tracker, were applied to calculate the stress distribution, structural deformation, and concentrator misalignment. No structural failure was predicted for all components in the given solar tracker according to von Mises failure criterion. An agreement in the trend of variation of concentrator misalignment and normal displacement of Fresnel lens in each concentrator module was found. For all cases investigated, the maximum concentrator misalignment was of 0.142° for a wind speed of 12 m/s with wind direction of 90° at a tilt angle of 1° and it was within the range of an acceptance angle of 0.5° for the given concentrator modules. Consequently, the given HCPV system is expected to operate safely under the effect of a wind speed of 12 m/s and below with a good efficiency in power generation.

  13. New views on the emission and structure of the solar transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hui; Marsch, Eckart; Tu, Chuanyi; Curdt, Werner; He, Jiansen

    2010-04-01

    The Sun is the only star that we can spatially resolve and it can be regarded as a fundamental plasma laboratory of astrophysics. The solar transition region (TR), the layer between the solar chromosphere and corona, plays an important role in solar wind origin and coronal heating. Recent high-resolution observations made by SOHO, TRACE, and Hinode indicate that the TR is highly nonuniform and magnetically structured. Through a combination of spectroscopic observations and magnetic field extrapolations, the TR magnetic structures and plasma properties have been found to be different in coronal holes and in the quiet Sun. In active regions, the TR density and temperature structures also differ in sunspots and the surrounding plage regions. Although the TR is believed to be a dynamic layer, quasi-steady flows lasting from several hours to several days are often present in the quiet Sun, coronal holes, and active regions, indicating some kind of plasma circulation/convection in the TR and corona. The emission of hydrogen Lyman lines, which originates from the lower TR, has also been intensively investigated in the recent past. Observations show clearly that the flows and dynamics in the middle and upper TR can greatly modify the Lyman line profiles.

  14. Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2013-07-09

    A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

  15. Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-07-24

    A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

  16. Facet effects of palladium nanocrystals for oxygen reduction in ionic liquids and for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongan; Chi, Xiaowei; Zou, Shouzhong; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2016-03-01

    Palladium nanocrystals enclosed by {100} and {110} crystal facets, were successfully synthesized through an aqueous one-pot synthesis method. A new thermal annealing approach was developed for fabricating these palladium nanocrystals as a working electrode on a gas permeable membrane to study the facet effects of the oxygen reduction process in an ionic liquid, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Bmpy][NTf2]). Results were compared with the same processes at a conventional platinum electrode. Our study shows that the structural difference between the two facets of Pd nanocrystals has little effect on the oxygen reduction process but significantly affects the oxidation process of the superoxide. It is found that the Pd{110}/IL interface can better stabilize superoxide radicals revealed by a more positive oxidation potential compared to that of Pd{100}. In addition, the analytical characteristic of utilizing both palladium nanocrystals as electrodes for oxygen sensing is comparable with a polycrystal platinum oxygen sensor, in which Pd{110} presents the best sensitivity and lowest detection limit. Our results demonstrate the facet-dependence of oxygen reduction in an ionic liquid medium and provide the fundamental information needed to guide the applications of palladium nanocrystals in electrochemical gas sensor and fuel cell research.Palladium nanocrystals enclosed by {100} and {110} crystal facets, were successfully synthesized through an aqueous one-pot synthesis method. A new thermal annealing approach was developed for fabricating these palladium nanocrystals as a working electrode on a gas permeable membrane to study the facet effects of the oxygen reduction process in an ionic liquid, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Bmpy][NTf2]). Results were compared with the same processes at a conventional platinum electrode. Our study shows that the structural difference between the two facets of Pd

  17. On the reality of a sun-weather effect. [solar magnetic structure effect on vorticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.; Scherrer, P. H.

    1976-01-01

    It has been reported by Wilcox et al. (1973, 1974) that the solar magnetic sector structure extended away from the sun by the solar wind has an effect on the terrestrial atmospheric vorticity, the effect being a decrease in the vorticity area index with a width of about 5 days and a minimum 1 day after the sector boundary is swept past the earth by the solar wind. In the present study the vorticity area index is filtered so as to reject variations with periods less than 3 days or greater than 13 days. The 500 mb vorticity area index is used since the observations are more homogeneous. The persistence of the solar sector/atmospheric vorticity effect in the new data when the number of sector boundary passages is increased from 54 to 131 and in the independent latitude zones 35 deg N to 55 deg N and greater than 54 deg N, as well as the greater depth of the effect near sector boundary passages as compared with all other minima, suggest that the effect is real. This is further strengthened by the analysis of Hines and Halevy (1975).

  18. FINE MAGNETIC STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF COUNTER-STREAMING MASS FLOWS IN A QUIESCENT SOLAR PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Yu; Xu, Zhi; Liu, Zhong; Liu, Ying D.; Chen, P. F.; Su, Jiangtao

    2015-11-20

    We present high-resolution observations of a quiescent solar prominence that consists of a vertical and a horizontal foot encircled by an overlying spine and has ubiquitous counter-streaming mass flows. While the horizontal foot and the spine were connected to the solar surface, the vertical foot was suspended above the solar surface and was supported by a semicircular bubble structure. The bubble first collapsed, then reformed at a similar height, and finally started to oscillate for a long time. We find that the collapse and oscillation of the bubble boundary were tightly associated with a flare-like feature located at the bottom of the bubble. Based on the observational results, we propose that the prominence should be composed of an overlying horizontal spine encircling a low-lying horizontal and vertical foot, in which the horizontal foot consists of shorter field lines running partially along the spine and has ends connected to the solar surface, while the vertical foot consists of piling-up dips due to the sagging of the spine fields and is supported by a bipolar magnetic system formed by parasitic polarities (i.e., the bubble). The upflows in the vertical foot were possibly caused by the magnetic reconnection at the separator between the bubble and the overlying dips, which intruded into the persistent downflow field and formed the picture of counter-streaming mass flows. In addition, the counter-streaming flows in the horizontal foot were possibly caused by the imbalanced pressure at the both ends.

  19. Panchromatic quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells based on a parallel tandem structure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Na; Yang, Yueyong; Huang, Xiaoming; Wu, Huijue; Luo, Yanhong; Li, Dongmei; Meng, Qingbo

    2013-04-01

    A tandem-structure sensitized solar cell, comprising different inorganic semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as sensitizers in two different compartments, has been designed for the first time with the aim of extending the light-absorption range of current technologies. In this system, the CdS/CdSe co-sensitized quantum-dot solar cell (QDSC) is in the upper part, whereas the PbS/CdS co-sensitized QDSC is in the lower part; these are connected in parallel with each other. In the middle of the tandem solar cell, a Cu2 S mesh counter electrode is employed. By optimizing the electrode thickness and QD-deposition time, short-circuit photocurrent density values of as high as 25.12 mA cm(-2) have been achieved; this value is nearly equal to the sum of the two constituent QD-sensitized devices and gives rise to a solar power-conversion efficiency of 5.06 %.

  20. Solar wind density structure at 1 AU and comparison to Doppler scintillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddleston, D. E.; Woo, R.; Neugebauer, M.

    1996-07-01

    Results of a survey of solar wind density fluctuations in different flow types observed by ISEE-3 at 1 AU are presented and compared with Doppler scintillation measurements. We consider coronal hole, plasma sheet, interstream, CME and sheath interaction region flow types. For the quasi-stationary solar wind, densities (N) and density fluctuation levels (ΔN) are low in coronal hole flow, and high in the plasma sheet containing the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The highest fluctuation levels are found in the sheath compression regions between CMEs and associated forward shocks. The streamer structure around the HCS broadens and erodes with distance from the Sun, and the broadened Doppler scintillation signature at 1 AU is in good qualitative agreement with ISEE-3 superposed epoch analysis. The observed asymmetry about the HCS is an expected result of solar wind dynamic evolution. A greater contrast between flow types is seen in ΔN levels rather than in N itself. Doppler scintillation responds to ΔN and thus provides a sensitive means of detecting interplanetary disturbances. However, we find that ΔN/N is not constant in the solar wind, and thus enhanced scintillation cannot unambiguously imply enhanced density.

  1. Integrated Orbit, Attitude, and Structural Control Systems Design for Space Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to develop an integrated orbit, attitude, and structural control systems architecture for very large Space Solar Power Satellites (SSPS) in geosynchronous orbit. This study focuses on the 1.2-GW Abacus SSPS concept characterized by a 3.2 x 3.2 km solar-array platform, a 500-m diameter microwave beam transmitting antenna, and a 500 x 700 m earth-tracking reflector. For this baseline Abacus SSPS configuration, we derive and analyze a complete set of mathematical models, including external disturbances such as solar radiation pressure, microwave radiation, gravity-gradient torque, and other orbit perturbation effects. The proposed control systems architecture utilizes a minimum of 500 1-N electric thrusters to counter, simultaneously, the cyclic pitch gravity-gradient torque, the secular roll torque caused by an offset of the center-of-mass and center-of-pressure, the cyclic roll/yaw microwave radiation torque, and the solar radiation pressure force whose average value is about 60 N.

  2. Integrated Orbit, Attitude, and Structural Control System Design for Space Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica (Technical Monitor); Moore, Chris (Technical Monitor); Wie, Bong; Roithmayr, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to develop an integrated orbit, attitude, and structural control system architecture for very large Space Solar Power Satellites (SSPS) in geosynchronous orbit. This study focuses on the 1.2-GW Abacus SSPS concept characterized by a 3.2 x 3.2 km solar-array platform, a 500-m diameter microwave beam transmitting antenna, and a 500 700 m earth-tracking reflector. For this baseline Abacus SSPS configuration, we derive and analyze a complete set of mathematical models, including external disturbances such as solar radiation pressure, microwave radiation, gravity-gradient torque, and other orbit perturbation effects. The proposed control system architecture utilizes a minimum of 500 1-N electric thrusters to counter, simultaneously, the cyclic pitch gravity-gradient torque, the secular roll torque caused by an o.set of the center-of-mass and center-of-pressure, the cyclic roll/yaw microwave radiation torque, and the solar radiation pressure force whose average value is about 60 N.

  3. Self-organization of local magnetoplasma structures in the upper layers of the solar convection zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumak, O. V.

    2013-08-01

    Self-organization and evolution of magnetoplasma structures in the upper layers of the solar convection zone are discussed as a process of diffuse aggregation of magnetic flux tubes. Equations describing the tube motion under the action of magnetic interaction forces, hydrodynamic forces, and random forces are written explicitly. The process of aggregation of magnetic flux tubes into magnetic flux clusters of different shapes and dimensions is simulated numerically. The obtained structures are compared with the observed morphological types of sunspot groups. The quantitative comparison with the observational data was performed by comparing the fractal dimensions of the photospheric magnetic structures observed in solar active regions with those of structures obtained in the numerical experiment. The model has the following free parameters: the numbers of magnetic flux tubes with opposite polarities on the considered area element ( Nn and Ns), the average radius of the cross section of the magnetic flux tube ( a), its effective length ( l), the twist factor of the tube field ( k), and the absolute value of the average velocity of chaotic tube displacements ( d). Variations in these parameters in physically reasonable limits leads to the formation of structures (tube clusters of different morphological types) having different fractal dimensions. Using the NOAA 10488 active region, which appeared and developed into a complicated configuration near the central meridian, as an example, it is shown that good quantitative agreement between the fractal dimensions is achieved at the following parameters of the model: Nn = Ns = 250 ± 50; a = 150 ± 50 km; l ˜ 5000 km, and d = 80 ± 10 m/s. These results do not contradict the observational data and theoretical estimates obtained in the framework of the Parker "spaghetti" model and provide new information on the physical processes resulting in the origin and evolution of local magnetic plasma structures in the near

  4. A generalized approach to modeling absorption and photocurrent in solar cells with light scattering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2016-10-01

    The spatial dependence of absorption in optical structures is important for determining the performance of optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells and photodetectors. When random scattering structures are introduced, the absorption can be difficult to calculate without direct simulation or broad simplifying assumptions. Here we present a theoretical framework for calculating the absorption in individual layers of arbitrary stratified media composed of any combination of coherent thin-films and/or incoherent thick slabs in the presence of randomizing scattering structures. This model allows for accurate predictions of generated carriers in photovoltaic systems. We discuss how these equations may be implemented to describe several common special cases as well as a few complex, non-traditional structures to show the wide range of applicability. Finally, we perform experiments on two multilayer structures with interlaced scattering layers to demonstrate utility and accuracy of the technique.

  5. Structural assessment of a Space Station solar dynamic heat receiver thermal energy storage canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, M. T.; Kerslake, T. W.; Thompson, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper assesses the structural performance of a Space Station thermal energy storage (TES) canister subject to orbital solar flux variation and engine cold start-up operating conditions. The impact of working fluid temperature and salt-void distribution on the canister structure are assessed. Both analytical and experimental studies were conducted to determine the temperature distribution of the canister. Subsequent finite-element structural analyses of the canister were performed using both analytically and experimentally obtained temperatures. The Arrhenius creep law was incorporated into the procedure, using secondary creep data for the canister material, Haynes-188 alloy. The predicted cyclic creep strain accumulations at the hot spot were used to assess the structural performance of the canister. In addition, the structural performance of the canister based on the analytically-determined temperature was compared with that based on the experimentally-measured temperature data.

  6. Structural assessment of a space station solar dynamic heat receiver thermal energy storage canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. L.; Kerslake, T. W.; Tong, M. T.

    1988-01-01

    The structural performance of a space station thermal energy storage (TES) canister subject to orbital solar flux variation and engine cold start up operating conditions was assessed. The impact of working fluid temperature and salt-void distribution on the canister structure are assessed. Both analytical and experimental studies were conducted to determine the temperature distribution of the canister. Subsequent finite element structural analyses of the canister were performed using both analytically and experimentally obtained temperatures. The Arrhenius creep law was incorporated into the procedure, using secondary creep data for the canister material, Haynes 188 alloy. The predicted cyclic creep strain accumulations at the hot spot were used to assess the structural performance of the canister. In addition, the structural performance of the canister based on the analytically determined temperature was compared with that based on the experimentally measured temperature data.

  7. Reverse Epitaxy of Ge: Ordered and Faceted Surface Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Xin; Keller, Adrian; Helm, Manfred; Fassbender, Jürgen; Facsko, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    Normal incidence ion irradiation at elevated temperatures, when amorphization is prevented, induces novel nanoscale patterns of crystalline structures on elemental semiconductors by a reverse epitaxial growth mechanism: on Ge surfaces irradiation at temperatures above the recrystallization temperature of 250°C leads to self-organized patterns of inverse pyramids. Checkerboard patterns with fourfold symmetry evolve on the Ge (100) surface, whereas on the Ge (111) surface, isotropic patterns with a sixfold symmetry emerge. After high-fluence irradiations, these patterns exhibit well-developed facets. A deterministic nonlinear continuum equation accounting for the effective surface currents due to an Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier for diffusing vacancies reproduces remarkably well our experimental observations.

  8. The Magnetic Structure of H-alpha Macrospicules in Solar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.; Wang, H.; Sakurai, T.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements by Ulysses in the high-speed polar solar wind have shown the wind to carry some fine-scale structures in which the magnetic field reverses direction by having a switchback fold in it. The lateral span of these magnetic switchbacks, translated back to the Sun, is of the scale of the lanes and cells of the magnetic network in which the open magnetic field of the polar coronal hole and polar solar wind are rooted. This suggests that the magnetic switchbacks might be formed from network-scale magnetic loops that erupt into the corona and then undergo reconnection with the open field. This possibility motivated us to undertake the study reported here of the structure of Ha macrospicules observed at the limb in polar coronal holes, to determine whether a significant fraction of these eruptions appear to be erupting loops. From a search of the polar coronal holes in 6 days of image- processed full-disk Ha movies from Big Bear Solar Observatory, we found a total of 35 macrospicules. Nearly all of these (32) were of one or the other of two different forms: 15 were in the form of an erupting loop, and 17 were in the form of a single column spiked jet. The erupting-loop macrospicules are appropriate for producing the magnetic switchbacks in the polar wind. The spiked-jet macrospicules show the appropriate structure and evolution to be driven by reconnection between network-scale closed field (a network bipole) and the open field rooted against the closed field. This evidence for reconnection in a large fraction of our macrospicules (1) suggests that many spicules may be generated by similar but smaller reconnection events and (2) supports the view that coronal heating and solar wind acceleration in coronal holes and in quiet regions are driven by explosive reconnection events in the magnetic network.

  9. The Magnetic Structure of H-Alpha Macrospicules in Solar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.; Wang, H.; Sakuri, T.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements by Ulysses in the high-speed polar solar wind have shown the wind to carry some fine-scale structures in which the magnetic field reverses direction by having a switchback fold in it. The lateral span of these magnetic switchbacks, translated to the Sun, is of the scale of the lanes and cells of the magnetic network in which the open magnetic flux of the polar coronal hole and polar solar wind are rooted. This suggests that the magnetic switchbacks might be formed from network-scale magnetic loops that erupt into the corona and then undergo reconnection with the open field. This possibility motivated us to undertake the study reported here of the structure of H-alpha macrospicules observed at the limb in polar coronal holes, to determine whether a significant fraction of these eruptions appear to be erupting loops. From a search of the polar-coronal holes in 6 days of image-processed full-disk H-alpha movies from Big Bear Solar Observatory, we found a total of 35 macrospicules. Nearly all of these (32) were of one or the other of two different forms: 15 were in the form of an erupting loop, and 17 were in the form of a single-column spiked jet. The erupting-loop macrospicules are appropriate for producing the magnetic switchbacks in the polar wind. The spiked-jet macrospicules show the appropriate structure and evolution to be driven by reconnection between network-scale closed field (a network bipole) and the open field rooted against the closed field. This evidence for reconnection in a large fraction of our macrospicules (1) suggests that many spicules may be generated by similar but smaller reconnection events, and (2) supports the view that coronal heating and solar wind acceleration in coronal holes and in quiet regions and corona are driven by explosive reconnection events in the magnetic network.

  10. Enhanced performance of dye-sensitized solar cells via plasmonic sandwiched structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Su-Jien; Lee, Kuang-Che; Wu, Jyun-Lin; Wu, Jun-Yi

    2011-07-01

    The plasmonic structure of sandwiched TiO2/NPs-Ag/TiO2 electrodes was fabricated by sputter technology and sol-gel and spin coating procedure to enhance the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells. The improvement of the incident photon to photocurrent efficiency spectrum corresponding to the strong absorption and damping reflection indicated light trapping of plasmonic structure to elongate the optical pathways of photons. More light trapped close to photocurrent collecting electrode provides better charge-collection and light harvesting efficiencies. As a result of improved dye absorption, about 23% enhancement in photocurrent density has been achieved.

  11. The Complex Structure of Magnetic Field Discontinuities in the Turbulent Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Antonella; Perri, Silvia; Servidio, Sergio; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    Using high resolution Cluster satellite observations, we show that the turbulent solar wind is populated by magnetic discontinuities at different scales, going from proton down to electron scales, whose structure resembles the Harris equilibrium profile in plasmas. Using a multi-dimensional intermittency technique, we establish that these structures are connected through the scales. We show that observations are consistent with a scenario where many current layers develop in turbulence, and where the outflow of these reconnection events are characterized by complex sub-proton networks of secondary islands, in a self-similar way, confirming that ``reconnection in turbulence'' and ``turbulent reconnection'' coexist in space plasmas.

  12. Structural mechanics of the solar-A Soft X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurcevich, B. K.; Bruner, M. E.; Gowen, K. F.

    1992-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) is one of four major instruments that constitute the payload of the NASA-Japanese mission YOHKOH (formerly known as Solar-A), scheduled to be launched in August, 1991. This paper describes the design of the SXT, the key system requirements, and the SXT optical and structural systems. Particular attention is given to the design considerations for stiffness and dimensional stability, temperature compensation, and moisture sensitivyty control. Consideration is also given to the X-ray mirror, the aspect telescope, the entrance filters, the mechanical structure design, the aft support plate and mount, the SXT finite element model, and other subsystems.

  13. Semiconductor wire array structures, and solar cells and photodetectors based on such structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Atwater, Harry A.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Petykiewicz, Jan A.

    2014-08-19

    A structure comprising an array of semiconductor structures, an infill material between the semiconductor materials, and one or more light-trapping elements is described. Photoconverters and photoelectrochemical devices based on such structure also described.

  14. Unresolved Fine-scale Structure in Solar Coronal Loop-tops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, E.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Wedemeyer, S.; Antolin, P.

    2014-12-01

    New and advanced space-based observing facilities continue to lower the resolution limit and detect solar coronal loops in greater detail. We continue to discover even finer substructures within coronal loop cross-sections, in order to understand the nature of the solar corona. Here, we push this lower limit further to search for the finest coronal loop substructures, through taking advantage of the resolving power of the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope/CRisp Imaging Spectro-Polarimeter (CRISP), together with co-observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA). High-resolution imaging of the chromospheric Hα 656.28 nm spectral line core and wings can, under certain circumstances, allow one to deduce the topology of the local magnetic environment of the solar atmosphere where its observed. Here, we study post-flare coronal loops, which become filled with evaporated chromosphere that rapidly condenses into chromospheric clumps of plasma (detectable in Hα) known as a coronal rain, to investigate their fine-scale structure. We identify, through analysis of three data sets, large-scale catastrophic cooling in coronal loop-tops and the existence of multi-thermal, multi-stranded substructures. Many cool strands even extend fully intact from loop-top to footpoint. We discover that coronal loop fine-scale strands can appear bunched with as many as eight parallel strands within an AIA coronal loop cross-section. The strand number density versus cross-sectional width distribution, as detected by CRISP within AIA-defined coronal loops, most likely peaks at well below 100 km, and currently, 69% of the substructure strands are statistically unresolved in AIA coronal loops.

  15. Ancient cellular structures and modern humans: change of survival strategies before prolonged low solar activity period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragulskaya, Mariya; Rudenchik, Evgeniy; Gromozova, Elena; Voychuk, Sergei; Kachur, Tatiana

    The study of biotropic effects of modern space weather carries the information about the rhythms and features of adaptation of early biological systems to the outer space influence. The influence of cosmic rays, ultraviolet waves and geomagnetic field on early life has its signs in modern biosphere processes. These phenomena could be experimentally studied on present-day biological objects. Particularly inorganic polyphosphates, so-called "fossil molecules", attracts special attention as the most ancient molecules which arose in inanimate nature and have been accompanying biological objects at all stages of evolution. Polyphosphates-containing graves of yeast's cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain Y-517, , from the Ukrainian Collection of Microorganisms was studied by daily measurements during 2000-2013 years. The IZMIRAN daily data base of physiological parameters dynamics during 2000-2013 years were analyzed simultaneously (25 people). The analysis showed significant simultaneous changes of the statistical parameters of the studied biological systems in 2004 -2006. The similarity of simultaneous changes of adaptation strategies of human organism and the cell structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the 23-24 cycles of solar activity are discussed. This phenomenon could be due to a replacement of bio-effective parameters of space weather during the change from 23rd to 24th solar activity cycle and nonstandard geophysical peculiarities of the 24th solar activity cycle. It could be suggested that the observed similarity arose as the optimization of evolution selection of the living systems in expectation of probable prolonged period of low solar activity (4-6 cycles of solar activity).

  16. Unresolved fine-scale structure in solar coronal loop-tops

    SciTech Connect

    Scullion, E.; Van der Voort, L. Rouppe; Wedemeyer, S.; Antolin, P.

    2014-12-10

    New and advanced space-based observing facilities continue to lower the resolution limit and detect solar coronal loops in greater detail. We continue to discover even finer substructures within coronal loop cross-sections, in order to understand the nature of the solar corona. Here, we push this lower limit further to search for the finest coronal loop substructures, through taking advantage of the resolving power of the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope/CRisp Imaging Spectro-Polarimeter (CRISP), together with co-observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA). High-resolution imaging of the chromospheric Hα 656.28 nm spectral line core and wings can, under certain circumstances, allow one to deduce the topology of the local magnetic environment of the solar atmosphere where its observed. Here, we study post-flare coronal loops, which become filled with evaporated chromosphere that rapidly condenses into chromospheric clumps of plasma (detectable in Hα) known as a coronal rain, to investigate their fine-scale structure. We identify, through analysis of three data sets, large-scale catastrophic cooling in coronal loop-tops and the existence of multi-thermal, multi-stranded substructures. Many cool strands even extend fully intact from loop-top to footpoint. We discover that coronal loop fine-scale strands can appear bunched with as many as eight parallel strands within an AIA coronal loop cross-section. The strand number density versus cross-sectional width distribution, as detected by CRISP within AIA-defined coronal loops, most likely peaks at well below 100 km, and currently, 69% of the substructure strands are statistically unresolved in AIA coronal loops.

  17. Non-uniform Solar Temperature Field on Large Aperture, Fully-Steerable Telescope Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a 110-m fully steerable radio telescope was used as an analysis platform and the integral parametric finite element model of the antenna structure was built in the ANSYS thermal analysis module. The boundary conditions of periodic air temperature, solar radiation, long-wave radiation shadows of the surrounding environment, etc. were computed at 30 min intervals under a cloudless sky on a summer day, i.e., worstcase climate conditions. The transient structural temperatures were then analyzed under a period of several days of sunshine with a rational initial structural temperature distribution until the whole set of structural temperatures converged to the results obtained the day before. The non-uniform temperature field distribution of the entire structure and the main reflector surface RMS were acquired according to changes in pitch and azimuth angle over the observation period. Variations in the solar cooker effect over time and spatial distributions in the secondary reflector were observed to elucidate the mechanism of the effect. The results presented here not only provide valuable realtime data for the design, construction, sensor arrangement and thermal deformation control of actuators but also provide a troubleshooting reference for existing actuators.

  18. Charge Transport in Two-Photon Semiconducting Structures for Solar Fuels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohua; Du, Kang; Haussener, Sophia; Wang, Kaiying

    2016-10-20

    Semiconducting heterostructures are emerging as promising light absorbers and offer effective electron-hole separation to drive solar chemistry. This technology relies on semiconductor composites or photoelectrodes that work in the presence of a redox mediator and that create cascade junctions to promote surface catalytic reactions. Rational tuning of their structures and compositions is crucial to fully exploit their functionality. In this review, we describe the possibilities of applying the two-photon concept to the field of solar fuels. A wide range of strategies including the indirect combination of two semiconductors by a redox couple, direct coupling of two semiconductors, multicomponent structures with a conductive mediator, related photoelectrodes, as well as two-photon cells are discussed for light energy harvesting and charge transport. Examples of charge extraction models from the literature are summarized to understand the mechanism of interfacial carrier dynamics and to rationalize experimental observations. We focus on a working principle of the constituent components and linking the photosynthetic activity with the proposed models. This work gives a new perspective on artificial photosynthesis by taking simultaneous advantages of photon absorption and charge transfer, outlining an encouraging roadmap towards solar fuels.

  19. Solar Wind Speed Structure in the Inner Corona at 3-12 Ro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Estimates of solar wind speed obtained by Armstrong et al. [1986] based on 1983 VLA multiple-station intensity scintillation measurements inside 12 R(sub o) have been correlated with the electron density structure observed in white-light coronagraph measurements. The observed large- scale and apparently systematic speed variations are found to depend primarily on changes in heliographic latitude and longitude, which leads to the first results on large-scale speed structure in the acceleration region of the solar wind. Over an equatorial hole, solar wind speed is relatively steady, with peak-to-peak variations of 50 km/s and an average of 230 km/s. In contrast, the near-Sun flow speed across the streamer belt shows regular large-scale variations in the range of 100-300 km/s. Based on four groups of data, the gradient is 36 km/s per degree in heliocentric coordinates (corresponding to a rise of 260 km/s over a spatial distance on the Sun of two arcmin) with a standard deviation of 2.4 km/s per degree. The lowest speeds most likely coincide with the stalks of coronal streamers observed in white-light measurements. The detection of significant wind shear over the streamer belt is consistent with in situ and scintillation measurements showing that the density spectrum has a power-law form characteristic of fully developed turbulence over a much broader range of scales than in neighboring regions.

  20. Combined Effects of Pyramid-Like Structures and Antireflection Coating on Si Solar Cell Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chanseob; Oh, Junghwa; Lee, Byeungleul; Kim, Bonghwan

    2015-10-01

    We developed a novel process for synthesizing Si solar cells with improved efficiencies. The process involved the formation of pyramid-like structures on the Si substrate and the deposition and subsequent thermal annealing of an antireflection coating. The process consisted of three main stages. First, pyramid-like structures were textured on the Si substrate by reactive ion etching and subsequently etched using a mixture of HF, HNO3, and deionized water for 300 s. Next, an antireflection coating was deposited on the substrate and was subsequently thermally annealed in a furnace in a N2 atmosphere. After the annealing process, the minority carrier lifetime increased by approximately 40 μs. Further, because of the increase in the minority carrier lifetime and the uniform doping of the substrate, the leakage current decreased. As a result, the efficiency of resulting solar cell increased to 17.24%, in contrast to that of the reference cell, which was only 15.89%. Thus, uniform doping and the thermal annealing of the antireflective coating improved solar cell efficiency.

  1. Facet joint disturbance induced by miniscrews in plated cervical laminoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Li, Huibo; Wang, Beiyu; Li, Tao; Gong, Quan; Song, Yueming; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A retrospective cohort study. Plated cervical laminoplasty is an increasingly common technique. A unique facet joint disturbance induced by lateral mass miniscrews penetrating articular surface was noticed. Facet joints are important to maintain cervical spine stability and kinetic balance. Whether this facet joint disturbance could affect clinical and radiologic results is still unknown. The objective of this study is to investigate the clinical and radiologic outcomes of patients with facet joints disturbance induced by miniscrews in plated cervical laminoplasty. A total of 105 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation between May 2010 and February 2014 were comprised. Postoperative CT images were used to identify whether facet joints destroyed by miniscrews. According to facet joints destroyed number, all the patients were divided into: group A (none facet joint destroyed), group B (1–2 facet joints destroyed), and group C (≥3 facet joints destroyed). Clinical data (JOA, VAS, and NDI scores), radiologic data (anteroposterior diameter and Palov ratio), and complications (axial symptoms and C5 palsy) were evaluated and compared among the groups. There were 38, 40, and 27 patients in group A, B, and C, respectively. The overall facet joints destroyed rate was 30.7%. All groups gained significant JOA and NDI scores improvement postoperatively. The preoperative JOA, VAS, NDI scores, and postoperative JOA scores did not differ significantly among the groups. The group C recorded significant higher postoperative VAS scores than group A (P = 0.002) and B (P = 0.014) and had significant higher postoperative NDI scores than group A (P = 0.002). The pre- and postoperative radiologic data were not significant different among the groups. The group C had a significant higher axial symptoms incidence than group A (12/27 vs 8/38, P = 0.041). Facet joints disturbance caused by miniscrews in plated cervical laminoplasty may not influence

  2. The spatial and temperature structure of vacuum spark plasmas. [comparison with solar flare spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Goldsmith, S.; Schwob, J. L.; Doschek, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    The spatial and temperature structures of the X-ray emitting components of low-inductance vacuum-spark plasmas are investigated. The plasmas produced by low-inductance vacuum sparks show striking resemblances to solar-flare plasmas. High-resolution photographs show that the spark plasmas are composed of hot (about 30 million K) compact sources (less than 20 microns) and cooler (about 10 million K) larger sources (of the order of 100 microns). Both types of sources may be produced by the same plasma at different times. The differences between the solar flare iron-line spectrum near 1.9 A and the spark iron-line spectrum are discussed and interpreted.

  3. Open structure ZnO/CdSe core/shell nanoneedle arrays for solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Open structure ZnO/CdSe core/shell nanoneedle arrays were prepared on a conducting glass (SnO2:F) substrate by solution deposition and electrochemical techniques. A uniform CdSe shell layer with a grain size of approximately several tens of nanometers was formed on the surface of ZnO nanoneedle cores after annealing at 400°C for 1.5 h. Fabricated solar cells based on these nanostructures exhibited a high short-circuit current density of about 10.5 mA/cm2 and an overall power conversion efficiency of 1.07% with solar illumination of 100 mW/cm2. Incident photo-to-current conversion efficiencies higher than 75% were also obtained. PMID:22995031

  4. Detection of small-scale structures in the dissipation regime of solar-wind turbulence.

    PubMed

    Perri, S; Goldstein, M L; Dorelli, J C; Sahraoui, F

    2012-11-09

    Recent observations of the solar wind have pointed out the existence of a cascade of magnetic energy from the scale of the proton Larmor radius ρ(p) down to the electron Larmor radius ρ(e) scale. In this Letter we study the spatial properties of magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind and find that at small scales the magnetic field does not resemble a sea of homogeneous fluctuations, but rather a two-dimensional plane containing thin current sheets and discontinuities with spatial sizes ranging from l >/~ ρ(p) down to ρ(e) and below. These isolated structures may be manifestations of intermittency that localize sites of turbulent dissipation. Studying the relationship between turbulent dissipation, reconnection, and intermittency is crucial for understanding the dynamics of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  5. Back surface cell structures for reducing recombination in CZ silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, R. R.; Mitchell, K. W.; Gee, J. M.

    1994-12-01

    Mass-produced terrestrial CZ silicon solar cells are currently entering the domain in which bulk diffusion length is comparable to the cell thickness, so that recombination at the back surface can have a significant effect on device performance. Three manufacturable processes that address the problem of back recombination are examined here: boron diffusion from a deposited doped SiO2, layer; Al-alloyed layers using screen-printed paste; and use of a collecting n* layer on the back interdigitated with the positive electrode. 104 sq cm cells fabricated at Siemens Solar Industries using these back surface structures are characterized by current-voltage, spectral response, photoconductivity decay, and SIMS measurements.

  6. HEATING OF THE PARTIALLY IONIZED SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE BY WAVES IN MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Shelyag, S.; Przybylski, D.; Khomenko, E.; Vicente, A. de

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we show a “proof of concept” of the heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere due to wave dissipation caused by the effects of partial ionization. Numerical modeling of non-linear wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube, embedded in the solar atmosphere, is performed by solving a system of single-fluid quasi-MHD equations, which take into account the ambipolar term from the generalized Ohm’s law. It is shown that perturbations caused by magnetic waves can be effectively dissipated due to ambipolar diffusion. The energy input by this mechanism is continuous and shown to be more efficient than dissipation of static currents, ultimately leading to chromospheric temperature increase in magnetic structures.

  7. Open structure ZnO/CdSe core/shell nanoneedle arrays for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxue; Wei, Lin; Zhang, Guanghua; Jiao, Jun

    2012-09-20

    Open structure ZnO/CdSe core/shell nanoneedle arrays were prepared on a conducting glass (SnO2:F) substrate by solution deposition and electrochemical techniques. A uniform CdSe shell layer with a grain size of approximately several tens of nanometers was formed on the surface of ZnO nanoneedle cores after annealing at 400°C for 1.5 h. Fabricated solar cells based on these nanostructures exhibited a high short-circuit current density of about 10.5 mA/cm2 and an overall power conversion efficiency of 1.07% with solar illumination of 100 mW/cm2. Incident photo-to-current conversion efficiencies higher than 75% were also obtained.

  8. Heating of the Partially Ionized Solar Chromosphere by Waves in Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelyag, S.; Khomenko, E.; de Vicente, A.; Przybylski, D.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we show a “proof of concept” of the heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere due to wave dissipation caused by the effects of partial ionization. Numerical modeling of non-linear wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube, embedded in the solar atmosphere, is performed by solving a system of single-fluid quasi-MHD equations, which take into account the ambipolar term from the generalized Ohm’s law. It is shown that perturbations caused by magnetic waves can be effectively dissipated due to ambipolar diffusion. The energy input by this mechanism is continuous and shown to be more efficient than dissipation of static currents, ultimately leading to chromospheric temperature increase in magnetic structures.

  9. Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry Methods Development for Solar Sail Structures. Masters Thesis awarded by George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S. (Technical Monitor); Black, Jonathan T.

    2003-01-01

    This report discusses the development and application of metrology methods called photogrammetry and videogrammetry that make accurate measurements from photographs. These methods have been adapted for the static and dynamic characterization of gossamer structures, as four specific solar sail applications demonstrate. The applications prove that high-resolution, full-field, non-contact static measurements of solar sails using dot projection photogrammetry are possible as well as full-field, non-contact, dynamic characterization using dot projection videogrammetry. The accuracy of the measurement of the resonant frequencies and operating deflection shapes that were extracted surpassed expectations. While other non-contact measurement methods exist, they are not full-field and require significantly more time to take data.

  10. Small molecule solution-processed bulk heterojunction solar cells with inverted structure using porphyrin donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takaki; Hatano, Junichi; Nakagawa, Takafumi; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing tetraethynyl porphyrin derivative (TE-Por) as a small molecule donor material, we fabricated a small molecule solution-processed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell with inverted structure, which exhibited 1.6% power conversion efficiency (JSC (short-circuit current) = 4.6 mA/cm2, VOC (open-circuit voltage) = 0.90 V, and FF (fill factor) = 0.39) in the device configuration indium tin oxide/TiOx (titanium sub-oxide)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester:TE-Por (5:1)/MoOx (molybdenum sub-oxide)/Au under AM1.5 G illumination at 100 mW/cm2. Without encapsulation, the small molecule solution-processed inverted BHJ solar cell also showed remarkable durability to air, where it kept over 73% of its initial power conversion efficiency after storage for 28 days under ambient atmosphere in the dark.

  11. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the third quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period February 16, 2001 to May 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model.In this report we summarize the accomplishments made by our group during the first seven quarters of our Sun-Earth Connection Theory Program contract. The descriptions are intended to illustrate our principal results. A full account can be found in the referenced publications.

  12. Diagnostics Challenges for FACET-II

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Christine

    2015-10-07

    FACET-II is a prospective user facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The facility will focus on high-energy, high-brightness beams and their interaction with plasma and lasers. The accelerator is designed for high-energy-density electron beams with peak currents of approximately 50 kA (potentially 100 kA) that are focused down to below 10x10 micron transverse spot size at an energy of 10 GeV. Subsequent phases of the facility will provide positron beams above 10 kA peak current to the experiment station. Experiments will require well characterised beams; however, the high peak current of the electron beam can lead to material failure in wirescanners, optical transition radiation screens and other instruments critical for measurement or delivery. The radiation environment and space constraints also put additional pressure on diagnostic design.

  13. FACET Tolerances for Static and Dynamic Misalignments

    SciTech Connect

    Federico, Joel

    2012-07-13

    The Facility for AdvancedAccelerator and Experimental Tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is designed to deliver a beam with a transverse spot size on the order of 10 {micro}m x 10 {micro}m in a new beamline constructed at the two kilometer point of the SLAC linac. Commissioning the beamline requires mitigating alignment errors and their effects, which can be significant and result in spot sizes orders of magnitude larger. Sextupole and quadrupole alignment errors in particular can introduce errors in focusing, steering, and dispersion which can result in spot size growth, beta mismatch, and waist movement. Alignment errors due to static misalignments, mechanical jitter, energy jitter, and other physical processes can be analyzed to determine the level of accuracy and precision that the beamline requires. It is important to recognize these effects and their tolerances in order to deliver a beam as designed.

  14. Explorations in statistics: statistical facets of reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2016-06-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This eleventh installment of Explorations in Statistics explores statistical facets of reproducibility. If we obtain an experimental result that is scientifically meaningful and statistically unusual, we would like to know that our result reflects a general biological phenomenon that another researcher could reproduce if (s)he repeated our experiment. But more often than not, we may learn this researcher cannot replicate our result. The National Institutes of Health and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology have created training modules and outlined strategies to help improve the reproducibility of research. These particular approaches are necessary, but they are not sufficient. The principles of hypothesis testing and estimation are inherent to the notion of reproducibility in science. If we want to improve the reproducibility of our research, then we need to rethink how we apply fundamental concepts of statistics to our science.

  15. Design guideline of Si nanohole/PEDOT:PSS hybrid structure for solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Lei; Rusli; Wang, Xincai; Zheng, Hongyu; Wang, Hao; Yu, Hongyu

    2013-09-01

    The finite element method is used to simulate light absorption in periodic hybrid Si nanohole (SiNH)/PEDOT:PSS arrays. The structural periodicity (P) and hole diameter (D) of the hybrid SiNH structure are varied to maximize light absorption. In terms of the solar cell performance under the AM1.5G spectrum, the highest ultimate efficiency achieved is 30.5%, when the D/P ratio is 0.8 and P is 600 nm. We have successfully fabricated the SiNH structure based on a low cost electroless chemical etching approach using a silver catalyst. The SiNH diameters formed vary from ∼200 to 300 nm, with periodicities from ∼300 to 1000 nm. The SiNH structure reveals a low average reflectance of 4% for incident light in the range 300 to 1100 nm.

  16. Design guideline of Si nanohole/PEDOT:PSS hybrid structure for solar cell application.

    PubMed

    Hong, Lei; Rusli; Wang, Xincai; Zheng, Hongyu; Wang, Hao; Yu, Hongyu

    2013-09-06

    The finite element method is used to simulate light absorption in periodic hybrid Si nanohole (SiNH)/PEDOT:PSS arrays. The structural periodicity (P) and hole diameter (D) of the hybrid SiNH structure are varied to maximize light absorption. In terms of the solar cell performance under the AM1.5G spectrum, the highest ultimate efficiency achieved is 30.5%, when the D/P ratio is 0.8 and P is 600 nm. We have successfully fabricated the SiNH structure based on a low cost electroless chemical etching approach using a silver catalyst. The SiNH diameters formed vary from ∼200 to 300 nm, with periodicities from ∼300 to 1000 nm. The SiNH structure reveals a low average reflectance of 4% for incident light in the range 300 to 1100 nm.

  17. Do Quasi-Regular Structures Really Exist in the Solar Photosphere? I. Observational Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getling, A. V.

    2006-12-01

    Two series of solar-granulation images - the La Palma series of 5 June 1993 and the SOHO MDI series of 17 - 18 January 1997 - are analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. New evidence is presented for the existence of long-lived, quasi-regular structures (first reported by Getling and Brandt, Astron. Astrophys. 382, L5 (paper I), 2002), which no longer appear unusual in images averaged over 1 - 2-hour time intervals. Such structures appear as families of light and dark concentric rings or families of light and dark parallel strips (“ridges” and “trenches” in the brightness distributions). In some cases, rings are combined with radial “spokes” and can thus form “web” patterns. The characteristic width of a ridge or trench is somewhat larger than the typical size of granules. Running-average movies constructed from the series of images are used to seek such structures. An algorithm is developed to obtain, for automatically selected centres, the radial distributions of the azimuthally averaged intensity, which highlight the concentric-ring patterns. We also present a time-averaged granulation image processed with a software package intended for the detection of geological structures in aerospace images. A technique of running-average-based correlations between the brightness variations at various points of the granular field is developed and indications are found for a dynamical link between the emergence and sinking of hot and cool parcels of the solar plasma. In particular, such a correlation analysis confirms our suggestion that granules - overheated blobs - may repeatedly emerge on the solar surface. Based on our study, the critical remarks by Rast ( Astron. Astrophys. 392, L13, 2002) on the original paper by Getling and Brandt (paper I) can be dismissed.

  18. Enhancing the absorption capabilities of thin-film solar cells using sandwiched light trapping structures.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, S; Kirah, K; Ghannam, R; Khalil, A S G; Anis, W

    2015-06-10

    A novel structure for thin-film solar cells is simulated with the purpose of maximizing the absorption of light in the active layer and of reducing the parasitic absorption in other layers. In the proposed structure, the active layer is formed from an amorphous silicon thin film sandwiched between silicon nanowires from above and photonic crystal structures from below. The upper electrical contact consists of an indium tin oxide layer, which serves also as an antireflection coating. A metal backreflector works additionally as the other contact. The simulation was done using a new reliable, efficient and generic optoelectronic approach. The suggested multiscale simulation model integrates the finite-difference time-domain algorithm used in solving Maxwell's equation in three dimensions with a commercial simulation platform based on the finite element method for carrier transport modeling. The absorption profile, the external quantum efficient, and the power conversion efficiency of the suggested solar cell are calculated. A noticeable enhancement is found in all the characteristics of the novel structure with an estimated 32% increase in the total conversion efficiency over a cell without any light trapping mechanisms.

  19. InGaN-based thin film solar cells: Epitaxy, structural design, and photovoltaic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Koide, Yasuo; Sumiya, Masatomo

    2015-03-14

    In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N, with the tunable direct bandgaps from ultraviolet to near infrared region, offers a promising candidate for the high-efficiency next-generation thin-film photovoltaic applications. Although the adoption of thick InGaN film as the active region is desirable to obtain efficient light absorption and carrier collection compared to InGaN/GaN quantum wells structure, the understanding on the effect from structural design is still unclear due to the poor-quality InGaN films with thickness and difficulty of p-type doping. In this paper, we comprehensively investigate the effects from film epitaxy, doping, and device structural design on the performances of the InGaN-based solar cells. The high-quality InGaN thick film is obtained on AlN/sapphire template, and p-In{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N is achieved with a high hole concentration of more than 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}. The dependence of the photovoltaic performances on different structures, such as active regions and p-type regions is analyzed with respect to the carrier transport mechanism in the dark and under illumination. The strategy of improving the p-i interface by using a super-thin AlN interlayer is provided, which successfully enhances the performance of the solar cells.

  20. Possible burst-like facet growth mode at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovrić, Davorin; Vučić, Zlatko; Gladić, Jadranko

    2008-07-01

    A decade ago, a burst-like growth mode of c-facets of 4He crystals growing at mK temperatures, characterized by the alternation of time intervals during which the facet does not advance with the intervals of its fast advancement, was found [J.P. Ruutu, P.J. Hakonen, A.V. Babkin, A.Y. Parshin, J.S. Penttilä, J.P. Saramäki, G. Tvalashvili, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 4187]. We investigate the possibility that a similar facet growth mode exists for facets at high growth temperatures. We have applied the digital laser interferometry for monitoring facet kinetics of spherical copper selenide single crystals during their growth at constant volume growth rate around 800 K. Our analysis of directly measured (1 1 1) facet advancement curves has revealed that they consist of time intervals during which the facet does not advance vertically alternating with the time intervals of enhanced growth, resembling the burst-like facet growth mode. The results are discussed in terms of the enhancement of the local supersaturation induced by the existence of nucleation barrier.