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Sample records for solar structural facets

  1. Sandwich construction solar structural facets

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, R.B.; Grossman, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    Silver/glass mirrors have excellent optical properties but need a method of support in order to be used in concentrating solar thermal systems. In collaboration with the Cummins dish/Stirling development program, the authors started investigating sandwich construction as a way to integrate silver/glass mirrors into solar optical elements. In sandwich construction, membranes such as sheet metal or plastic are bonded to the front and back of a core (like a sandwich). For solar optical elements, a glass mirror is bonded to one of the membranes. This type of construction has the advantages of a high strength-to-weight ratio, and reasonable material and manufacturing cost. The inherent stiffness of sandwich construction mirror panels also facilitates large panels. This can have cost advantages for both the amount of hardware required as well as reduced installation and alignment costs. In addition, by incorporating the panels into the support structure reductions in the amount of structural support required are potentially possible. The authors have investigated sandwich construction panels that employ cores of polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyurethane foams as well as conventional aluminum and cardboard honeycombs. The authors investigations have involved fabricating 0.5 x 0.6-m (20 x 24-inch) spherical-contour panels and testing their optical properties and environmental durability. The authors have also performed preliminary cost and performance studies. Evaluations included optical testing with the SunLab 2f and VSHOT tools both before and after exposures to environmental chamber testing. The results showed that sandwich mirror panels are potentially very accurate. However, long-term degradation due to creep was evident in all of the foam core facets. The aluminum honeycomb core facets were accurate and durable. In this paper, the design principles that guided the investigations, estimates of cost, and the results of the experimental investigations are

  2. Sandwich Construction Solar Structural Facets

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, R. B.; Grossman, J.W.

    1998-12-22

    Silver/glass mirrors have excellent optical properties but need a method of support in order to be used in concentrating solar thermal systems. In collaboration with the Cummins dish/Stirling development program, they started investigating sandwich construction as a way to integrate silver/glass mirrors into solar optical elements. In sandwich construction, membranes such as sheet metal or plastic are bonded to the front and back of a core (like a sandwich). For solar optical elements, a glass mirror is bonded to one of the membranes. This type of construction has the advantages of a high strength-to-weight ratio, and reasonable material and manufacturing cost. The inherent stiffness of sandwich construction mirror panels also facilitates large panels. This can have cost advantages for both the amount of hardware required as well as reduced installation and alignment costs. In addition, by incorporating the panels into the support structure reductions in the amount of structural support required are potentially possible.

  3. Perovskite solar cells: Different facets of performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eperon, Giles E.; Ginger, David S.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of halide perovskites vary significantly between crystalline grains, but the impact of this heterogeneity on solar cell performance is unclear. Now, this variability is shown to limit the photovoltaic properties of solar cells, and its origins are linked to differing properties between crystal facets.

  4. Facet development for a faceted stretched-membrane dish by Solar Kinetics, Inc

    SciTech Connect

    Schertz, P.T.; Brown, D.C.; Konnerth, A. III )

    1991-07-01

    A 3.6-meter diameter stretched-membrane optical facet for a parabolic dish has been successfully designed and demonstrated under contract with Sandia National Laboratories. Twelve facets identical to them will be used to make the lightweight reflector of the dish. The project goal of 2.5-mrad surface accuracy was met with each of the two full-sized prototypes, and accuracies of as low as 1.1 mrad were achieved. The facet weight is 11.7 kg/m{sup 2} (2.4lbs/ft{sup 2}). The facet is similar in construction to the successful stretched-membrane heliostat; it has two thin metal membranes attached to a ring. However, the front membrane for this facet is plastically formed at the factor in order to achieve a shorter facet f/D (approximately 3.0). A passive tether restrains the from membrane when not in operation, that is, when the stabilizing vacuum is off. The optical surface is achieved with a silvered-acrylic film laminated to the metal membrane. The facet is expected to cost $55.40/m{sup 2} at a production rate of 10,000 facets per year and $115, 000/m{sup 2}-at a production rate of 500 facets a year. Several key issues have been resolved. Stress concentrations due to seams in the reflective laminate did not cause membrane rupture during forming as they have for dishes with lower focal length-to-diameter ratios. The laminate survived the forming process and simulated operation without deterioration. The optical effect of the tether on the membrane was tested and found to be very small. Most important, highly accurate shapes were obtained using a simple forming procedure. Additional tests are needed to demonstrate process repeatablility and facet performance in typical operating conditions. 18 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  5. Structural Equation Modelling of Multiple Facet Data: Extending Models for Multitrait-Multimethod Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechger, Timo M.; Maris, Gunter

    2004-01-01

    This paper is about the structural equation modelling of quantitative measures that are obtained from a multiple facet design. A facet is simply a set consisting of a finite number of elements. It is assumed that measures are obtained by combining each element of each facet. Methods and traits are two such facets, and a multitrait-multimethod…

  6. Faceting and commensurability in crystal structures of colloidal thin films.

    PubMed

    Ramiro-Manzano, F; Meseguer, F; Bonet, E; Rodriguez, I

    2006-07-14

    This Letter investigates the influence of finite size effects on the particle arrangement of thin film colloidal crystals. A rich variety of crystallographic faceting with large single domain microcrystallites is shown. Optical reflectance experiments together with scanning electron microscopy permit the identification of the crystal symmetry and the facet orientation, as well as the exact number of monolayers. When the cell thickness is not commensurable with a high symmetry layering, particles arrange themselves in a periodic distribution of (111)- and (100)-orientated face centered cubic (fcc) microcrystallites separated by planar defects. These structures can be described as a fcc ordering orientated along a vicinal surface, modified by a periodic distribution of fcc (111) stacking faults.

  7. Faceting and commensurability in crystal structures of colloidal thin films.

    PubMed

    Ramiro-Manzano, F; Meseguer, F; Bonet, E; Rodriguez, I

    2006-07-14

    This Letter investigates the influence of finite size effects on the particle arrangement of thin film colloidal crystals. A rich variety of crystallographic faceting with large single domain microcrystallites is shown. Optical reflectance experiments together with scanning electron microscopy permit the identification of the crystal symmetry and the facet orientation, as well as the exact number of monolayers. When the cell thickness is not commensurable with a high symmetry layering, particles arrange themselves in a periodic distribution of (111)- and (100)-orientated face centered cubic (fcc) microcrystallites separated by planar defects. These structures can be described as a fcc ordering orientated along a vicinal surface, modified by a periodic distribution of fcc (111) stacking faults. PMID:16907485

  8. Facet-dependent solar ammonia synthesis of BiOCl nanosheets via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Shang, Jian; Shi, Jingu; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-01-01

    Under the pressure of a fossil fuels shortage and global climate change, solar ammonia synthesis and the need to develop N2 fixation under mild conditions is becoming more urgent need; however, their intrinsic mechanisms still remain unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the kinetic inertia of N2 can be overcome using oxygen vacancies (OVs) of BiOCl as the catalytic centers to create lower energy molecular steps, which are amendable for the solar light driven N-N triple bond cleavage via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway. Moreover, the distinct structures of OVs on different BiOCl facets strongly determine the N2 fixation pathways by influencing both the adsorption structure and the activation level of N2. The fixation of terminal end-on bound N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {001} facets follows an asymmetric distal mode by selectively generating NH3, while the reduction of side-on bridging N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {010} facets is more energetically favorable in a symmetric alternating mode to produce N2H4 as the main intermediate.Under the pressure of a fossil fuels shortage and global climate change, solar ammonia synthesis and the need to develop N2 fixation under mild conditions is becoming more urgent need; however, their intrinsic mechanisms still remain unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the kinetic inertia of N2 can be overcome using oxygen vacancies (OVs) of BiOCl as the catalytic centers to create lower energy molecular steps, which are amendable for the solar light driven N-N triple bond cleavage via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway. Moreover, the distinct structures of OVs on different BiOCl facets strongly determine the N2 fixation pathways by influencing both the adsorption structure and the activation level of N2. The fixation of terminal end-on bound N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {001} facets follows an asymmetric distal mode by selectively generating NH3, while the reduction of side-on bridging N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {010} facets is more

  9. Multi-facet concentrator of solar setup for irradiating the objects placed in a target plane with solar light

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Yampolskiy, Vladislav; Alekseev, Valerie; Son, Valentin

    2001-01-01

    According to the proposed invention, this technical result is achieved so that many-facet concentrator of a solar setup for exposure of objects, placed in a target plane, to the action of solar radiation containing a supporting frame and facets differing by that the facets of the concentrator are chosen with spherical focusing reflective surfaces of equal focal lengths and with selective coatings reflecting a desired spectral fraction of solar radiation, and are arranged on the supporting frame symmetrically with respect to the common axis of the concentrator, their optical axes being directed to the single point on the optical axis of the concentrator located before the nominal focus point of the concentrator and determining the position of arranging the target plane.

  10. Facet-dependent solar ammonia synthesis of BiOCl nanosheets via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Shang, Jian; Shi, Jingu; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-01-28

    Under the pressure of a fossil fuels shortage and global climate change, solar ammonia synthesis and the need to develop N2 fixation under mild conditions is becoming more urgent need; however, their intrinsic mechanisms still remain unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the kinetic inertia of N2 can be overcome using oxygen vacancies (OVs) of BiOCl as the catalytic centers to create lower energy molecular steps, which are amendable for the solar light driven N-N triple bond cleavage via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway. Moreover, the distinct structures of OVs on different BiOCl facets strongly determine the N2 fixation pathways by influencing both the adsorption structure and the activation level of N2. The fixation of terminal end-on bound N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {001} facets follows an asymmetric distal mode by selectively generating NH3, while the reduction of side-on bridging N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {010} facets is more energetically favorable in a symmetric alternating mode to produce N2H4 as the main intermediate. PMID:26701815

  11. Simulation and optimization of faceted structure for illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihong; Engel, Thierry; Flury, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    The re-direction of incoherent light using a surface containing only facets with specific angular values is proposed. A new photometric approach is adopted since the size of each facet is large in comparison with the wavelength. A reflective configuration is employed to avoid the dispersion problems of materials. The irradiance distribution of the reflected beam is determined by the angular position of each facet. In order to obtain the specific irradiance distribution, the angular position of each facet is optimized using Zemax OpticStudio 15 software. A detector is placed in the direction which is perpendicular to the reflected beam. According to the incoherent irradiance distribution on the detector, a merit function needs to be defined to pilot the optimization process. The two dimensional angular position of each facet is defined as a variable which is optimized within a specified varying range. Because the merit function needs to be updated, a macro program is carried out to update this function within Zemax. In order to reduce the complexity of the manual operation, an automatic optimization approach is established. Zemax is in charge of performing the optimization task and sending back the irradiance data to Matlab for further analysis. Several simulation results are given for the verification of the optimization method. The simulation results are compared to those obtained with the LightTools software in order to verify our optimization method.

  12. Porous (001)-faceted anatase TiO2 nanorice thin film for efficient dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Athar Ali; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Mat Salleh, Muhamad

    2016-01-01

    Anatase TiO2 structures with nanorice-like morphology and high exposure of (001) facet has been successfully synthesized on an ITO surface using ammonium Hexafluoro Titanate and Hexamethylenetetramine as precursor and capping agent, respectively, under a microwave-assisted liquid-phase deposition method. These anatase TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared within five minutes of reaction time by utilizing an inverter microwave system at a normal atmospheric pressure. The morphology and the size (approximately from 6 to 70 nm) of these nanostructures can be controlled. Homogenous, porous, 5.64 ± 0.002 μm thick layer of spongy-nanorice with facets (101) and (001) was grown on ITO substrate and used as a photo-anode in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). This solar cell device has emerged out with 4.05 ± 0.10% power conversion efficiency (PCE) and 72% of incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) under AM1.5 G illumination.

  13. Facet-Dependent Catalytic Activity of Platinum Nanocrystals for Triiodide Reduction in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Dong; Hou, Yu; Yang, Shuang; Yang, Xiao Hua; Zhong, Ju Hua; Liu, Jian; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Yang, Hua Gui

    2013-01-01

    Platinum (Pt) nanocrystals have demonstrated to be an effective catalyst in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. However, pioneer facets with highest activity have been reported differently for various reaction systems. Although Pt has been the most important counter electrode material for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), suitable atomic arrangement on the exposed crystal facet of Pt for triiodide reduction is still inexplicable. Using density functional theory, we have investigated the catalytic reaction processes of triiodide reduction over {100}, {111} and {411} facets, indicating that the activity follows the order of Pt(111) > Pt(411) > Pt(100). Further, Pt nanocrystals mainly bounded by {100}, {111} and {411} facets were synthesized and used as counter electrode materials for DSCs. The highest photovoltaic conversion efficiency of Pt(111) in DSCs confirms the predictions of the theoretical study. These findings have deepened the understanding of the mechanism of triiodide reduction at Pt surfaces and further screened the best facet for DSCs successfully. PMID:23670438

  14. Tailored Synthesis of Porous TiO₂ Nanocubes and Nanoparallelepipeds with Exposed {111} Facets and Mesoscopic Void Space: A Superior Candidate for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Amoli, Vipin; Bhat, Shekha; Maurya, Abhayankar; Banerjee, Biplab; Bhaumik, Asim; Sinha, Anil Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Anatase TiO2 nanocubes and nanoparallelepipeds, with highly reactive {111} facets exposed, were developed for the first time through a modified one pot hydrothermal method, through the hydrolysis of tetrabutyltitanate in the presence of oleylamine as the morphology-controlling capping-agent and using ammonia/hydrofluoric acid for stabilizing the {111} faceted surfaces. These nanocubes/nanoparallelepipeds were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high angle annular dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM). Accordingly, a possible growth mechanism for the nanostructures is elucidated. The morphology, surface area and the pore size distribution of the TiO2 nanostructures can be tuned simply by altering the HF and ammonia dosage in the precursor solution. More importantly, optimization of the reaction system leads to the assembly of highly crystalline, high surface area, {111} faceted anatase TiO2 nanocubes/nanoparallelepipeds to form uniform mesoscopic void space. We report the development of a novel double layered photoanode for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) made of highly crystalline, self-assembled faceted TiO2 nanocrystals as upper layer and commercial titania nanoparticles paste as under layer. The bilayered DSSC made from TiO2 nanostructures with exposed {111} facets as upper layer shows a much higher power conversion efficiency (9.60%), than DSSCs fabricated with commercial (P25) titania powder (4.67%) or with anatase TiO2 nanostructures having exposed {101} facets (7.59%) as the upper layer. The improved performance in bilayered DSSC made from TiO2 nanostructures with exposed {111} facets as the upper layer is attributed to high dye adsorption and fast electron transport dynamics owing to the unique structural features of the {111} facets in TiO2. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements conducted on the cells supported these conclusions

  15. Cross-cultural evidence for the two-facet structure of pride

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Chung, Joanne M.; Cheng, Joey T.; Tracy, Jessica L.; Robins, Richard W.; Chen, Xiao; Zheng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Across six studies conducted in Mainland China and South Korea, the present research extended prior findings showing that pride is comprised of two distinct conceptual and experiential facets in the U.S.: a pro-social, achievement-oriented “authentic pride”, and an arrogant, self-aggrandizing “hubristic pride”. This same two-facet structure emerged in Chinese participants’ semantic conceptualizations of pride (Study 1), Chinese and Koreans’ dispositional tendencies to experience pride (Studies 2, 3a, and 3b), Chinese and Koreans’ momentary pride experiences (Studies 3a, 3b, and 5), and Americans’ pride experiences using descriptors derived indigenously in Korea (Study 4). Together, these studies provide the first evidence that the two-facet structure of pride generalizes to cultures with highly divergent views of pride and self-enhancement processes from North America. PMID:27158171

  16. Structured and disordered facets of the GPCR fold.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, A J; Flock, Tilman; Prado, Daniel Estévez; Oates, Matt E; Gough, Julian; Madan Babu, M

    2014-08-01

    The seven-transmembrane (7TM) helix fold of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been adapted for a wide variety of physiologically important signaling functions. Here, we discuss the diversity in the structured and disordered regions of GPCRs based on the recently published crystal structures and sequence analysis of all human GPCRs. A comparison of the structures of rhodopsin-like receptors (class A), secretin-like receptors (class B), metabotropic receptors (class C) and frizzled receptors (class F) shows that the relative arrangement of the transmembrane helices is conserved across all four GPCR classes although individual receptors can be activated by ligand binding at varying positions within and around the transmembrane helical bundle. A systematic analysis of GPCR sequences reveals the presence of disordered segments in the cytoplasmic side, abundant post-translational modification sites, evidence for alternative splicing and several putative linear peptide motifs that have the potential to mediate interactions with cytosolic proteins. While the structured regions permit the receptor to bind diverse ligands, the disordered regions appear to have an underappreciated role in modulating downstream signaling in response to the cellular state. An integrated paradigm combining the knowledge of structured and disordered regions is imperative for gaining a holistic understanding of the GPCR (un)structure-function relationship. PMID:25198166

  17. Nanocrystalline Anatase Titania Supported Vanadia Catalysts: Facet-dependent Structure of Vanadia

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei-Zhen; Gao, Feng; Li, Yan; Walter, Eric D.; Liu, Jun; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

    2015-07-09

    Titania supported vanadia, a classic heterogeneous catalyst for redox reactions, typically has nonhomogeneous vanadia species on various titania facets, making it challenging not only to determine and quantify each species but also to decouple their catalytic contributions. We prepared truncated tetragonal bipyramidal (TiO2-TTB) and rod-like (TiO2-Rod) anatase titania with only {101} and {001} facets at ratios of about 80:20 and 93:7, respectively, and used them as supports of sub-monolayer vanadia. The structure and redox properties of supported vanadia were determined by XRD, TEM, XPS, EPR, Raman, FTIR and TPR, etc. It was found that vanadia preferentially occupy TiO2 {001} facets and form isolated O=V4+(O-Ti)2 species, and with further increase in vanadia surface coverage, isolated O=V5+(O-Ti)3 and oligomerized O=V5+(O-M)3 (M = Ti or V) species form on TiO2 {101} facets. The discovery on support facet-dependent structure of vanadia on anatase titania is expected to enable the elucidation of structure-function correlations on high surface area TiO2 supported vanadia catalysts. This work was supported by U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. The research was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for DOE by Battelle.

  18. Mosaic and facet structures of epitaxial MnO films on Au (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinel, K.; Huth, M.; Beyer, H.; Neddermeyer, H.; Widdra, W.

    2014-01-01

    Growth and annealing behavior of epitaxial MnO films on an Au (110)-(1 × 2) substrate have been studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy. MnO (110) films have been successfully grown by Mn evaporation in an oxygen atmosphere at room temperature with subsequent annealing to 750 K. Instead of the expected (110)-like diffraction pattern complex mosaic and facet structures are found depending on annealing conditions. The mosaics are misfit-induced and display along [001] directions a misorientation of ± 1.5°. At temperatures around 850 K, mosaics gradually vanish and simultaneously a saw-tooth-like film morphology develops which is formed by ribbons of narrow (100) and (010) MnO facets. At temperatures above 850 K the film partially dewets from the substrate, and the film transforms to three-dimensional MnO islands that have a roof-like shape where large roof sides and small end sides are composed by {100} and by {111} facets, respectively. The experiments corroborate the theoretical predicted tendency of facet formation of MnO (110) surfaces.

  19. Solar animal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.K.

    1984-07-31

    The present invention entails an animal housing structure equipped with a solar heating system for heating the structure. Solar energy is collected by a roof-attic solar collector arrangement and the collected solar energy in the form of heat is transferred to passing air. The heated passing air is selectively directed to the ground underlying the structure and is channeled generally horizontally through the underlying ground at a selected depth below ground level. Heat from the air is transferred to the earth below ground level and this heat is then slowly transferred upwardly through the ground towards ground level where it is ultimately emitted from the earth and acts to heat the interior of the structure and provide warmth for the animals.

  20. Atomistic simulation study of the structure and dynamics of a faceted crystal-melt interface.

    PubMed

    Buta, Dorel; Asta, Mark; Hoyt, Jeffrey J

    2008-09-01

    A detailed analysis of the structure and dynamics of the crystal-melt interface region in silicon, modeled with the Stillinger-Weber potential, is performed via molecular dynamics simulations. The focus is on the faceted (111) crystal-melt interface, but properties of the rough (100) interface are also determined. We find an intrinsic 10-90 interface width of 0.681+/-0.001 nm for the coarse-grained density profile at the (111) interface and a 0.570+/-0.005 nm width at the (100) interface. Coarse-grained profiles of a suitably defined local order parameter are found to show a smaller width anisotropy between (111) and (100) interfaces while the order profiles exhibit a 0.20-0.25 nm shift in position toward the crystal phase relative to the corresponding density profiles. The structural analysis of the layer of melt adjacent to the (111) facet of the crystal finds ordered clusters with average lifetimes of 16 ps , as determined from autocorrelations of time-dependent layer structure factors, and cluster radii of gyration from 0.2 nm for the smallest cells to as large as 1.5 nm .

  1. Oligoethylene-bridged diferrocene on Ag(110): Monolayer structures and adsorbate-induced faceting

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, D. Y.; Fuchs, H.; Wang, W. C.; Dou, R. F.; Chi, L. F.; Wedeking, K.; Erker, G.

    2007-11-15

    The self-assembly of a ferrocene (Fc) derivative, oligoethylene-bridged diferrocene (diFc), Fc(CH{sub 2}){sub 14}Fc, on Ag(110) surface has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ultrahigh vacuum. Three ordered structures, the majority {beta} and the minorities {alpha} and {gamma}, are formed at monolayer coverage. In {alpha} and {gamma}, a unit cell contains one molecule and the molecules are parallel to each other so that the distances between Fc groups and between oligoethylene chains are reduced. A unit cell contains five molecules in {beta}: four of them are parallel to each other but not parallel to the fifth. The interaction between diFc and Ag(110), which is relatively strong in comparison to the intermolecular interaction, is dominant for the assembly of the ordered structures. The adsorption of diFc molecules induces the reorganization of substrate steps, which prefer to follow the directions of the superstructure lattice vectors, i.e. ({+-}1,2) and ({+-}3,2) of the Ag(110) surface. The (12 13-1) facet is formed due to step bunching at regions with high step density. By using in situ STM, the process of step reorganization and faceting has been observed in real time. It is concluded that the Ag adatoms play a key role on the substrate reorganization.

  2. Anatase TiO(2) nanosheets with exposed (001) facets: improved photoelectric conversion efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaguo; Fan, Jiajie; Lv, Kangle

    2010-10-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are fabricated based on anatase TiO(2) nanosheets (TiO(2)-NSs) with exposed {001} facets, which were obtained by a simple one-pot hydrothermal route using HF as a morphology controlling agent and Ti(OC(4)H(9))(4) as precursor. The prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherms. The photoelectric conversion performances of TiO(2)-NSs solar cells are also compared with TiO(2) nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs) and commercial-grade Degussa P25 TiO(2) nanoparticle (P25) solar cells at the same film thickness, and their photoelectric conversion efficiencies (η) are 4.56, 4.24 and 3.64%, respectively. The enhanced performance of the TiO(2)-NS solar cell is due to their good crystallization, high pore volume, large particle size and enhanced light scattering. The prepared TiO(2) nanosheet film electrode should also find wide-ranging potential applications in various fields including photocatalysis, catalysis, electrochemistry, separation, purification and so on.

  3. Anatase TiO2 nanosheets with exposed (001) facets: improved photoelectric conversion efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiaguo; Fan, Jiajie; Lv, Kangle

    2010-10-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are fabricated based on anatase TiO2 nanosheets (TiO2-NSs) with exposed {001} facets, which were obtained by a simple one-pot hydrothermal route using HF as a morphology controlling agent and Ti(OC4H9)4 as precursor. The prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The photoelectric conversion performances of TiO2-NSs solar cells are also compared with TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) and commercial-grade Degussa P25 TiO2 nanoparticle (P25) solar cells at the same film thickness, and their photoelectric conversion efficiencies (η) are 4.56, 4.24 and 3.64%, respectively. The enhanced performance of the TiO2-NS solar cell is due to their good crystallization, high pore volume, large particle size and enhanced light scattering. The prepared TiO2 nanosheet film electrode should also find wide-ranging potential applications in various fields including photocatalysis, catalysis, electrochemistry, separation, purification and so on.

  4. Lumbar facet syndromes.

    PubMed

    Beresford, Zach M; Kendall, Richard W; Willick, Stuart E

    2010-01-01

    Low back pain is a common presenting complaint to sports medicine providers. The lumbar spine is a complex anatomic structure with multiple potential pain generators. Epidemiologic studies have shown that the intervertebral disc is the most common pain generator in all patients with low back pain. The facet joints may account for 15%-40% of low back pain. It can be challenging at times to establish a firm diagnosis of facet pain. Facet pain can have different presentations, and pain emanating from other lumbopelvic structures can present similarly as facet joint pain. This article reviews the anatomy and biomechanics of the lumbar facet joints, presenting symptoms and physical examination findings seen with facet pain. We also will discuss diagnostic and treatment paradigms that are helpful to the clinician treating low back pain in athletes.

  5. Solar heated portable structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, E.V.; King, F.F.; King, J.M.

    1982-03-23

    A solar heated portable structure comprising a flexible bottom panel, a flexible side assembly and a flexible transmitting panel , all coupled together and supported to form an enclosed chamber. The transmitting panel is capable of transmitting a majority of the radiant energy from the solar radiation spectrum to heat the enclosed chamber like a sauna and has an area at least 0.7 the area of the bottom panel to maximize heating while minimizing material costs. The transmitting panel can be transparent to ultraviolet radiation to allow persons inside the chamber to be tanned.

  6. The Structural Validity of the Perceived Traits of the "Ideal Student" Multi-Faceted Theory among Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslovaty, Nava; Cohen, Arie; Furman, Sari

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a multi-faceted theory of "ideal high school student" traits. The trait system, as defined by several theories, is a translation of the teachers' belief system into educational objectives. The study focused on Bloom's taxonomies and the structural validity of its principles, using Similarity Structure Analysis. Aware of the…

  7. Structural ordering of self-assembled clusters with competing interactions: transition from faceted to spherical clusters.

    PubMed

    Galván-Moya, J E; Nelissen, K; Peeters, F M

    2015-01-27

    The self-assembly of nanoparticles into clusters and the effect of the different parameters of the competing interaction potential on it are investigated. For a small number of particles, the structural organization of the clusters is almost unaffected by the attractive part of the potential, and for an intermediate number of particles the configuration strongly depends on the strength of it. The cluster size is controlled by the range of the interaction potential, and the structural arrangement is guided by the strength of the potential: i.e., the self-assembled cluster transforms from a faceted configuration at low strength to a spherical shell-like structure at high strength. Nonmonotonic behavior of the cluster size is found by increasing the interaction range. An approximate analytical expression is obtained that predicts the smallest cluster for a specific set of potential parameters. A Mendeleev-like table is constructed for different values of the strength and range of the attractive part of the potential in order to understand the structural ordering of the ground-state configuration of the self-assembled clusters.

  8. Surface Structure Dependence of SO2 Interaction with Ceria Nanocrystals with Well-defined Surface Facets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tumuluri, Uma; Li, Meijun; Cook, Brandon G.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Dai, Sheng; Wu, Zili

    2015-12-02

    The effects of the surface structure of ceria (CeO2) on the nature, strength, and amount of species resulting from SO2 adsorption were studied using in situ IR and Raman spectroscopies coupled with mass spectrometry, along with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). CeO2 nanocrystals with different morphologies, namely, rods (representing a defective structure), cubes (100 facet), and octahedra (111 facet), were used to represent different CeO2 surface structures. IR and Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the structure and binding strength of adsorbed species from SO2 depend on the shape of the CeO2 nanocrystals. SO2 adsorbs mainly as surfacemore » sulfites and sulfates at room temperature on CeO2 rods, cubes, and octahedra that were either oxidatively or reductively pretreated. The formation of sulfites is more evident on CeO2 octahedra, whereas surface sulfates are more prominent on CeO2 rods and cubes. This is explained by the increasing reducibility of the surface oxygen in the order octahedra < cubes < rods. Bulk sulfites are also formed during SO2 adsorption on reduced CeO2 rods. The formation of surface sulfites and sulfates on CeO2 cubes is in good agreement with our DFT results of SO2 interactions with the CeO2(100) surface. CeO2 rods desorb SO2 at higher temperatures than cubes and octahedra nanocrystals, but bulk sulfates are formed on CeO2 rods and cubes after high-temperature desorption whereas only some surface sulfates/sulfites are left on octahedra. This difference is rationalized by the fact that CeO2 rods have the highest surface basicity and largest amount of defects among the three nanocrystals, so they bind and react with SO2 strongly and are the most degraded after SO2 adsorption cycles. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work on the effects of the surface structure and defects on the interaction of SO2 with CeO2 provides insights for the design of more sulfur-resistant CeO2-based catalysts.« less

  9. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Harvey, Karen

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is to study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and ground-based data. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of various features in the solar atmosphere at different heights ranging from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the, rocket flights, which took place during the declining phase of a solar cycle, 2-4 years before the minimum. The investigation is narrowly focused on comparing the physics of small- and medium-scale strong-field structures with that of large-scale, weak fields. As we close th is investigation, we have to recall that our present position in the understanding of basic solar physics problems (such as coronal heating) is much different from that in 1995 (when we proposed this investigation), due largely to the great success of SOHO and TRACE. In other words, several topics and techniques we proposed can now be better realized with data from these missions. For this reason, at some point of our work, we started concentrating on the 1992 data, which are more unique and have more supporting data. As a result, we discontinued the investigation on small-scale structures, i.e., bright points, since high-resolution TRACE images have addressed more important physics than SPDE EUV images could do. In the final year, we still spent long time calibrating the 1992 data. The work was complicated because of the old-fashioned film, which had problems not encountered with more modern CCD detectors. After our considerable effort on calibration, we were able to focus on several scientific topics, relying heavily on the SPDE UV images. They include the relation between filaments and filament channels, the identification of hot

  10. Examining the factor structures of the five facet mindfulness questionnaire and the self-compassion scale.

    PubMed

    Williams, Matthew J; Dalgleish, Tim; Karl, Anke; Kuyken, Willem

    2014-06-01

    The five facet mindfulness questionnaire (FFMQ; Baer, Smith, Hopkins, Krietemeyer, & Toney, 2006) and the self-compassion scale (SCS; Neff, 2003) are widely used measures of mindfulness and self-compassion in mindfulness-based intervention research. The psychometric properties of the FFMQ and the SCS need to be independently replicated in community samples and relevant clinical samples to support their use. Our primary aim was to establish the factor structures of the FFMQ and SCS in individuals with recurrent depression in remission, since mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) was developed as a treatment for preventing depressive relapse. In order to determine the consistency across populations, we examined the factor structures of the FFMQ and SCS in 3 samples: (1) a convenience sample of adults, (2) a sample of adults who practice meditation, and (3) a sample of adults who suffer from recurrent depression and were recruited to take part in a trial of MBCT. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) showed that a 4-factor hierarchical model of the FFMQ best fits the community sample and the clinical sample but that a 5-factor hierarchical model of the FFMQ best fits the meditator sample. CFA did not endorse the SCS 6-factor hierarchical structure in any of the 3 samples. Clinicians and researchers should be aware of the psychometric properties of the FFMQ to measure mindfulness when comparing meditators and nonmeditators. Further research is needed to develop a more psychometrically robust measure of self-compassion.

  11. Implementation of a PMN-PT piezocrystal-based focused array with geodesic faceted structure.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhen; Qiu, Yongqiang; Demore, Christine E M; Cochran, Sandy

    2016-07-01

    The higher performance of relaxor-based piezocrystals compared with piezoceramics is now well established, notably including improved gain-bandwidth product, and these materials have been adopted widely for biomedical ultrasound imaging. However, their use in other applications, for example as a source of focused ultrasound for targeted drug delivery, is hindered in several ways. One of the issues, which we consider here, is in shaping the material into the spherical geometries used widely in focused ultrasound. Unlike isotropic unpoled piezoceramics that can be shaped into a monolithic bowl then poled through the thickness, the anisotropic structure of piezocrystals make it impossible to machine the bulk crystalline material into a bowl without sacrificing performance. Instead, we report a novel faceted array, inspired by the geodesic dome structure in architecture, which utilizes flat piezocrystal material and maximizes fill factor. Aided by 3D printing, a prototype with f#≈ 1.2, containing 96 individually addressable elements was manufactured using 1-3 connectivity PMN-PT piezocrystal-epoxy composite. The fabrication process is presented and the array was connected to a 32-channel controller to shape and steer the beam for preliminary performance demonstration. At an operating frequency of 1MHz, a focusing gain around 30 was achieved and the side lobe intensities were all at levels below -12dB compared to main beam. We conclude that, by taking advantage of contemporary fabrication techniques and driving instrumentation, the geodesic array configuration is suitable for focused ultrasound devices made with piezocrystal.

  12. Solar efficient structure

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, F.B.

    1985-02-12

    A solar efficient structure is disclosed which comprises a central chase positioned vertically within the structure and connected in fluid communication with a duct network positioned in thermal contact with the ground and with the attic of the structure. A fan is provided for circulating air through a perforated attic duct, through the various rooms of the structure, and through the duct network and the chase. In one embodiment, the fan is reversible so as to circulate the air in one direction, or in the other direction. When operating in the heating mode, the ground acts as a heat source to heat the air circulating through the duct network. Conversely, when operating in the cooling mode, the ground acts as a heat sink to cool the airflow circulating therethrough. A dehumidifier, and a heating or cooling means is provided for assisting in the conditioning of the circulating airflow. In one embodiment, the heating means comprises a greenhouse room which permits ultraviolet radiation to enter and heat the air contained therein, and a damper means for controlling the flow rate of the air circulating through the greenhouse room. The structure is fully insulated and includes a vent skin positioned about the exterior walls and the roof thereof. A method is disclosed for insulating the roof line with loose insulation.

  13. Structure of Solar Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, G.; Cantó, J.; Lara, A.; González, R.; Schwenn, R.

    Solar Ejecta (SE) have been of interest in the last years, especially those which may reach Earth environment. It is possible to observe the SE early evolution, when they are in the field of view of coronagraphs. There are few indirect observations, as the case of interplanetary scintillation, of SEs in the interplanetary medium. Finally, we observe SEs in situ when they arrive at 1 AU.The SEs structure and evolution are important to understand the origin of these phenomena but to predict the possible effects in the space weather. It is of general acceptance that SEs are "Erupting Flux Ropes" traveling trough the Solar Wind. The "shapes" have been modeled as cylinders or as "ice cream cones" in order to represent the many different projections observed on Coronagraphs.We present a model of the SE evolution based on purely Hydrodynamic considerations. This model reproduces in good approximation some of the features observed in the images and in the measures of the shocks near Earth.

  14. Fine structure of vesiculated nerve profiles in the human lumbar facet joint.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, F; Creemers, J; Lambrichts, I; Robberechts, W

    1995-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of vesiculated nerve profiles were examined within a perivascular plexus of unmyelinated nerve fibres around small arteries and arterioles in the posterior facet joint capsule. Such profiles were exclusively observed in the dense fibrous layer and the adjacent part of the subintimal layer. The ligamentum flavum lacked any type of innervation. The vesiculated nerve profiles were tentatively classified on the basis of the fine structural appearances of their vesicular content. Two major types of nerve profiles could readily be distinguished in the capsular tissue. Both displayed a variable number of mitochondria, neurotubules and neurofilaments. The first type, containing predominantly small vesicles with an electron-dense granule or core, was frequently encountered and considered to be adrenergic in function. Profiles similar in morphology were also observed in the synovial plical tissue. A second type of profile, found in the joint capsule, contained varying proportions of small agranular (clear) vesicles and mitochondria. Some of these profiles exhibited an accumulation of mitochondria and were considered to be sensory in function. Nerve profiles filled with predominantly small flattened vesicles were occasionally encountered. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8586567

  15. Structurally integrated steel solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Moore, S.W.

    1975-06-03

    Herein is disclosed a flate plate solar heat collector unit. The solar collector is integrated as a structural unit so that the collector also functions as the building roof. The functions of efficient heat collection, liquid coolant flow passages, roof structural support, and building insulation are combined into one unit.

  16. Structurally integrated steel solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Stanley W.

    1977-03-08

    Herein is disclosed a flat plate solar heat collector unit. The solar collector is integrated as a structural unit so that the collector also functions as the building roof. The functions of efficient heat collection, liquid coolant flow passages, roof structural support and building insulation are combined into one unit.

  17. Implementation of a PMN-PT piezocrystal-based focused array with geodesic faceted structure.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhen; Qiu, Yongqiang; Demore, Christine E M; Cochran, Sandy

    2016-07-01

    The higher performance of relaxor-based piezocrystals compared with piezoceramics is now well established, notably including improved gain-bandwidth product, and these materials have been adopted widely for biomedical ultrasound imaging. However, their use in other applications, for example as a source of focused ultrasound for targeted drug delivery, is hindered in several ways. One of the issues, which we consider here, is in shaping the material into the spherical geometries used widely in focused ultrasound. Unlike isotropic unpoled piezoceramics that can be shaped into a monolithic bowl then poled through the thickness, the anisotropic structure of piezocrystals make it impossible to machine the bulk crystalline material into a bowl without sacrificing performance. Instead, we report a novel faceted array, inspired by the geodesic dome structure in architecture, which utilizes flat piezocrystal material and maximizes fill factor. Aided by 3D printing, a prototype with f#≈ 1.2, containing 96 individually addressable elements was manufactured using 1-3 connectivity PMN-PT piezocrystal-epoxy composite. The fabrication process is presented and the array was connected to a 32-channel controller to shape and steer the beam for preliminary performance demonstration. At an operating frequency of 1MHz, a focusing gain around 30 was achieved and the side lobe intensities were all at levels below -12dB compared to main beam. We conclude that, by taking advantage of contemporary fabrication techniques and driving instrumentation, the geodesic array configuration is suitable for focused ultrasound devices made with piezocrystal. PMID:27104921

  18. Broad bandwidth or high fidelity? Evidence from the structure of genetic and environmental effects on the facets of the five factor model.

    PubMed

    Briley, Daniel A; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2012-09-01

    The Five Factor Model of personality is well-established at the phenotypic level, but much less is known about the coherence of the genetic and environmental influences within each personality domain. Univariate behavioral genetic analyses have consistently found the influence of additive genes and nonshared environment on multiple personality facets, but the extent to which genetic and environmental influences on specific facets reflect more general influences on higher order factors is less clear. We applied a multivariate quantitative-genetic approach to scores on the CPI-Big Five facets for 490 monozygotic and 317 dizygotic twins who took part in the National Merit Twin Study. Our results revealed a complex genetic structure for facets composing all five factors, with both domain-general and facet-specific genetic and environmental influences. For three of the Big Five domains, models that required common genetic and environmental influences on each facet to occur by way of effects on a higher order trait did not fit as well as models allowing for common genetic and environmental effects to act directly on the facets. These results add to the growing body of literature indicating that important variation in personality occurs at the facet level which may be overshadowed by aggregating to the trait level. Research at the facet level, rather than the factor level, is likely to have pragmatic advantages in future research on the genetics of personality.

  19. Polyhedral magnetite nanocrystals with multiple facets: facile synthesis, structural modelling, magnetic properties and application for high capacity lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Su, Dawei; Horvat, Josip; Munroe, Paul; Ahn, Hyojun; Ranjbartoreh, Ali R; Wang, Guoxiu

    2012-01-01

    Polyhedral magnetite nanocrystals with multiple facets were synthesised by a low temperature hydrothermal method. Atomistic simulation and calculations on surface attachment energy successfully predicted the polyhedral structure of magnetite nanocrystals with multiple facets. X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution transmission microscopy confirmed the crystal structure of magnetite, which is consistent with the theoretical modelling. The magnetic property measurements show the superspin glass state of the polyhedral nanocrystals, which could originate from the nanometer size of individual single crystals. When applied as an anode material in lithium ion cells, magnetite nanocrystals demonstrated an outstanding electrochemical performance with a high lithium storage capacity, a satisfactory cyclability, and an excellent high rate capacity.

  20. Facet Theory and the Mapping Sentence As Hermeneutically Consistent Structured Meta-Ontology and Structured Meta-Mereology

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Paul M. W.

    2016-01-01

    When behavior is interpreted in a reliable manner (i.e., robustly across different situations and times) its explained meaning may be seen to possess hermeneutic consistency. In this essay I present an evaluation of the hermeneutic consistency that I propose may be present when the research tool known as the mapping sentence is used to create generic structural ontologies. I also claim that theoretical and empirical validity is a likely result of employing the mapping sentence in research design and interpretation. These claims are non-contentious within the realm of quantitative psychological and behavioral research. However, I extend the scope of both facet theory based research and claims for its structural utility, reliability and validity to philosophical and qualitative investigations. I assert that the hermeneutic consistency of a structural ontology is a product of a structural representation's ontological components and the mereological relationships between these ontological sub-units: the mapping sentence seminally allows for the depiction of such structure. PMID:27065932

  1. NUBEAM Sources in FACETS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletzer, A.; McCune, D.; Indireshkumar, K.; Morris, A.; Pankin, A.; Cary, J. R.

    2009-05-01

    The SciDAC project for the development of a Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS) aims at producing tokamak core-to-wall transport simulations on massively parallel architectures. Here, we report on the progress of integrating the new parallel, PlasmaState based, Monte-Carlo NUBEAM module into the FACETS framework to provide neutral beam and fusion source terms in the plasma core diffusion equations. NUBEAM has recently been improved to facilitate invocation from third party software (e.g. SWIM). This was achieved by consolidating 100s of input variables into separate structures according to machine specificity, shot specificity, or time-slice specificity. Thanks to a combination of auto-generated code and a newly developed methodology for exposing Fortran90 derived types to C, all derived type members of NUBEAM structures have become in-memory accessible to FACETS's C++ infrastructure. NUBEAM, which is the first volumetric-coupling component in FACETS, has been wrapped with methods complying to the FACETS standard interface definition for easy interchangeability of modules at run time. Examples of neutral beam computations instrumented with TAU/Paratools on leadership class machines will be presented, as well as first coupled core-source FACETS simulations.

  2. The role of shape on electronic structure and charge transport in faceted PbSe nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ananth P; Lukose, Binit; Clancy, Paulette

    2014-03-25

    We have determined the effect of shape on the charge transport characteristics of nanocrystals. Our study looked at the explicit determination of the electronic properties of faceted nanocrystals that essentially probe the limit of current computational reach, i.e., nanocrystals from 1.53 to 2.1 nm in diameter. These nanocrystals, which resemble PbSe systems, are either bare or covered in short ligands. They also differ in shape, octahedral vs cube-octahedral, and in superlattice symmetry (fcc vs bcc). We have provided insights on electron and hole coupling along different facets and overall charge mobility in bcc and fcc superlattices. We have determined that the relative areas of (100) to (111) facets, and facet atom types are important factors governing the optimization of charge transport. The calculated electronic density of states shows no role of -SCH3- ligands on states near the band gap. Electron coupling between nanocrystals is significantly higher than that of hole coupling; thiol ligands lower the ratio between electron and hole couplings. Stronger coupling exists between smaller nanocrystals. PMID:24548107

  3. High detectivity solar-blind high-temperature deep-ultraviolet photodetector based on multi-layered (l00) facet-oriented β-Ga₂O₃ nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Qian; Hu, Junqing; Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-05-14

    Fabrication of a high-temperature deep-ultraviolet photodetector working in the solar-blind spectrum range (190-280 nm) is a challenge due to the degradation in the dark current and photoresponse properties. Herein, β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelts with (l00) facet-oriented were synthesized, and were demonstrated for the first time to possess excellent mechanical, electrical properties and stability at a high temperature inside a TEM studies. As-fabricated DUV solar-blind photodetectors using (l00) facet-oriented β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelts demonstrated enhanced photodetective performances, that is, high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio, high spectral selectivity, high speed, and high stability, importantly, at a temperature as high as 433 K, which are comparable to other reported semiconducting nanomaterial photodetectors. In particular, the characteristics of the photoresponsivity of the β-Ga2O3 nanobelt devices include a high photoexcited current (>21 nA), an ultralow dark current (below the detection limit of 10(-14) A), a fast time response (<0.3 s), a high R(λ) (≈851 A/W), and a high EQE (~4.2 × 10(3)). The present fabricated facet-oriented β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelt based devices will find practical applications in photodetectors or optical switches for high-temperature environment. PMID:24520013

  4. High detectivity solar-blind high-temperature deep-ultraviolet photodetector based on multi-layered (l00) facet-oriented β-Ga₂O₃ nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Qian; Hu, Junqing; Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-05-14

    Fabrication of a high-temperature deep-ultraviolet photodetector working in the solar-blind spectrum range (190-280 nm) is a challenge due to the degradation in the dark current and photoresponse properties. Herein, β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelts with (l00) facet-oriented were synthesized, and were demonstrated for the first time to possess excellent mechanical, electrical properties and stability at a high temperature inside a TEM studies. As-fabricated DUV solar-blind photodetectors using (l00) facet-oriented β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelts demonstrated enhanced photodetective performances, that is, high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio, high spectral selectivity, high speed, and high stability, importantly, at a temperature as high as 433 K, which are comparable to other reported semiconducting nanomaterial photodetectors. In particular, the characteristics of the photoresponsivity of the β-Ga2O3 nanobelt devices include a high photoexcited current (>21 nA), an ultralow dark current (below the detection limit of 10(-14) A), a fast time response (<0.3 s), a high R(λ) (≈851 A/W), and a high EQE (~4.2 × 10(3)). The present fabricated facet-oriented β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelt based devices will find practical applications in photodetectors or optical switches for high-temperature environment.

  5. Solar interior structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    Helioseismology allows us to probe the interior structure and dynamics of the Sun, and long-term observations allow us to follow their temporal variations. This review describes the important findings of recent years, covering the interior structure, the near-surface changes related to the solar cycle and possible deeper-seated variations, the interior rotation profile, and solar-cycle related changes in the zonal and meridional flows.

  6. AHF: Array-Based Half-Facet Data Structure for Mixed-Dimensional and Non-Manifold Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Dyedov, Volodymyr; Ray, Navamita; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Tautges, T.

    2014-08-31

    We present an Array-based Half-Facet mesh data structure, or AHF, for efficient mesh query and modification operations. The AHF extends the compact array-based half-edge and half-face data structures (T.J. Alumbaugh and X. Jiao, Compact array-based mesh data structures, IMR, 2005) to support mixed-dimensional and non-manifold meshes. The design goals of our data structure include generality to support such meshes, efficiency of neighborhood queries and mesh modification, compactness of memory footprint, and facilitation of interoperability of mesh-based application codes. To accomplish these goals, our data structure uses sibling half-facets as a core abstraction, coupled with other explicit and implicit representations of entities. A unique feature of our data structure is a comprehensive implementation in MATLAB, which allows rapid prototyping, debugging, testing, and deployment of meshing algorithms and other mesh-based numerical methods. We have also developed C++ implementation built on top of MOAB (T.J. Tautges, R. Meyers, and K. Merkley, MOAB: A Mesh-Oriented Database, Sandia National Laboratories, 2004). We present some comparisons of the memory requirements and computational costs, and also demonstrate its effectiveness with a few sample applications.

  7. [Symmetry types, systems and multiplicity of the structure of adenovirus capsid. II. Rotational facet-groups of five-, three- and two-fold symmetry axes].

    PubMed

    Nász, István; Adám, Eva

    2006-01-01

    horizontally in the middle along the 6 geodetic ribbon like motifs a regular decagonal intersection forms and the capsid can be cut into two equal parts, in which the polypeptides show a 72 degree rotation from each other, but with a proper rotation the polypeptides get into a congruent position, which means 300 or 600 specific facet combinations. The capsid similar to the icosahedron has also 15 virtual mirror planes which divide the capsid into two, identically arranged halves, forming six right angle triangles on each facet, altogether 120 smaller rectangular so-called Mobius-triangles on the surface. In the three-fold symmetry axis of the facets, these triangles in two separate groups of three can be rotated symmetrically with 120 degrees according to the orientation of the polypeptide subunits in a way that the hexon and other polypeptides too nearly cover each other. Consequently, the adenovirus capsid is a symmetrically arranged body in which several various symmetry types and symmetry systems can be found and their structural symmetry elements exist simultaneously and covering each other. The icosahedral symmetry types and systems are valid and functional simultaneously and in parallel with great multiplicity, but the existence of more than 1500 elements in several depth levels, their order of location and distribution make the symmetry of the capsid richer and more complex.

  8. Hexahedron Prism-Anchored Octahedronal CeO2: Crystal Facet-Based Homojunction Promoting Efficient Solar Fuel Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Zhao, Zongyan; Xu, Qinfeng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min; Zou, Zhigang

    2015-08-01

    An unprecedented, crystal facet-based CeO2 homojunction consisting of hexahedron prism-anchored octahedron with exposed prism surface of {100} facets and octahedron surface of {111} facets was fabricated through solution-based crystallographic-oriented epitaxial growth. The photocatalysis experiment reveals that growth of the prism arm on octahedron allows to activate inert CeO2 octahedron for an increase in phototocatalytic reduction of CO2 into methane. The pronounced photocatalytic performance is attributed to a synergistic effect of the following three factors: (1) band alignment of the {100} and {111} drives electrons and holes to octahedron and prism surfaces, respectively, aiming to reach the most stable energy configuration and leading to a spatial charge separation for long duration; (2) crystallographic-oriented epitaxial growth of the CeO2 hexahedron prism arm on the octahedron verified by the interfacial lattice fringe provides convenient and fast channels for the photogenerated carrier transportation between two units of homojuntion; (3) different effective mass of electrons and holes on {100} and {111} faces leads to high charge carrier mobility, more facilitating the charge separation. The proposed facet-based homojunction in this work may provide a new concept for the efficient separation and fast transfer of photoinduced charge carriers and enhancement of the photocatalytic performance.

  9. Direct transfer of metallic photonic structures onto end facets of optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinping; Liu, Feifei; Lin, Yuanhai

    2016-07-01

    We present a flexible approach to transfer metallic photonic crystals (MPCs) onto end facets of optical fibers. The MPCs were initially fabricated on a glass substrate with a spacer layer of indium tin oxide (ITO), which was used as a buffer layer in the transferring process. The fiber ends were firstly welded on the top surface of the MPCs by a drop of polymer solution after the solvent evaporated. The ITO layer was then etched by hydrochloric acid (HCl), so that the MPCs got off the substrate and were transferred to the fiber ends. Alternatively, the MPCs may be also etched off the substrate first by immersing the sample in HCl. The ultra-thin MPC sheet consisting of gold nanolines interlaced with photoresist gratings was then transferred to cap the fiber ends. In the later approach, we can choose which side of the MPCs to be used as the contact with the fiber facet. Such methods enabled convenient nanostructuring on optical fiber tips and achieving miniaturized MPC devices with compact integration, extending significantly applications of MPCs. In particular, the fabrications presented in this manuscript enrich the lab-on-fiber engineering techniques and the resultant devices have potential applications in remote sensing and detection systems.

  10. Faceted Taxonomy-Based Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzitzikas, Yannis

    The objective of this chapter is to explain the underlying mathematical structure of faceted taxonomy-based sources and to provide some common notions and notations that are used in some parts of the book. Subsequently, and on the basis of the introduced formalism, this chapter describes the interaction between a user and an information source that supports dynamic taxonomies and faceted search.

  11. Solar heating shingle roof structure

    SciTech Connect

    Straza, G.T.

    1984-01-31

    A solar heating roof shingle roof structure which combines the functions of a roof and a fluid conducting solar heating panel. Each shingle is a hollow body of the general size and configuration of a conventional shingle, and is provided with a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet. Shingles are assembled in a normal overlapping array to cover a roof structure, with interconnections between the inlets and outlets of successive shingles to provide a fluid path through the complete array. An inlet manifold is contained in a cap used at the peak of the roof and an outlet manifold is connected to the lowest row of shingles.

  12. Commission 12: Solar Radiation & Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Thomas. J.; Martínez Pillet, Valentin; Asplund, M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Cauzzi, G.; Cram, L. E.; Dravins, D.; Gan, W.; Henzl, P.; Kosovichev, A.; Mariska, J. T.; Rovira, M. G.; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2007-03-01

    Commission 12 covers research on the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun, the "quiet" solar atmosphere, solar radiation and its variability, and the nature of relatively stable magnetic structures like sunspots, faculae and the magnetic network. There is considerable productive overlap with the other Commissions of Division II as investigations move progressively toward the fertile intellectual boundaries between traditional research disciplines. In large part, the solar magnetic field provides the linkage that connects these diverse themes. The same magnetic field that produces the more subtle variations of solar structure and radiative output over the 11 yr activity cycle is also implicated in rapid and often violent phenomena such as flares, coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and episodes of sporadic magnetic reconnection.The last three years have again brought significant progress in nearly all the research endeavors touched upon by the interests of Commission 12. The underlying causes for this success remain the same: sustained advances in computing capabilities coupled with diverse observations with increasing levels of spatial, temporal and spectral resolution. It is all but impossible to deal with these many advances here in anything except a cursory and selective fashion. Thankfully, the Living Reviews in Solar Physics; has published several extensive reviews over the last two years that deal explicitly with issues relevant to the purview of Commission 12. The reader who is eager for a deeper and more complete understanding of some of these advances is directed to http://www.livingreviews.org for access to these articles.

  13. Hydrothermal etching fabrication of TiO2@graphene hollow structures: mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals and its synergistic photocaltalytic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Zhiling; Dong, Xiaonan; Liu, Tingting

    2016-09-01

    Highly exposed facets TiO2 attracts enormous attention due to its excellent separation effect of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and induced high performance of photocatalytic activity. Herein, a novel hydrothermal etching reaction was used to synthesize graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures. Different with the reported co-exposed facets TiO2 single crystal nanoparticles, the present TiO2 core layer is composed by the mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals. Combined with the reduced graphene oxide shell layer, this graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures formed a Z-scheme photocatalytic system, which possess simultaneously the high charge-separation efficiency and strong redox ability. Additionally, the as-prepared samples show a higher absorption property for organic molecules and visible light due to the presence of graphene. All of these unique properties ensure the excellent photocatalytic activity for the graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow structures in the synergistic photo-oxidation of organic molecules and photo-reduced of Cr(VI) process. The TiO2 core composed with mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals is propose to play an important role in the fabrication of this Z-scheme photocatalytic system. Fabrication of Z-scheme photocatalytic system based on this unique exposed facets TiO2 nanocrystals will provides a new insight into the design and fabrication of advanced photocatalytic materials.

  14. Hydrothermal etching fabrication of TiO2@graphene hollow structures: mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals and its synergistic photocaltalytic effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Zhiling; Dong, Xiaonan; Liu, Tingting

    2016-09-20

    Highly exposed facets TiO2 attracts enormous attention due to its excellent separation effect of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and induced high performance of photocatalytic activity. Herein, a novel hydrothermal etching reaction was used to synthesize graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures. Different with the reported co-exposed facets TiO2 single crystal nanoparticles, the present TiO2 core layer is composed by the mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals. Combined with the reduced graphene oxide shell layer, this graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures formed a Z-scheme photocatalytic system, which possess simultaneously the high charge-separation efficiency and strong redox ability. Additionally, the as-prepared samples show a higher absorption property for organic molecules and visible light due to the presence of graphene. All of these unique properties ensure the excellent photocatalytic activity for the graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow structures in the synergistic photo-oxidation of organic molecules and photo-reduced of Cr(VI) process. The TiO2 core composed with mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals is propose to play an important role in the fabrication of this Z-scheme photocatalytic system. Fabrication of Z-scheme photocatalytic system based on this unique exposed facets TiO2 nanocrystals will provides a new insight into the design and fabrication of advanced photocatalytic materials.

  15. Hydrothermal etching fabrication of TiO2@graphene hollow structures: mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals and its synergistic photocaltalytic effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Zhiling; Dong, Xiaonan; Liu, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Highly exposed facets TiO2 attracts enormous attention due to its excellent separation effect of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and induced high performance of photocatalytic activity. Herein, a novel hydrothermal etching reaction was used to synthesize graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures. Different with the reported co-exposed facets TiO2 single crystal nanoparticles, the present TiO2 core layer is composed by the mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals. Combined with the reduced graphene oxide shell layer, this graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures formed a Z-scheme photocatalytic system, which possess simultaneously the high charge-separation efficiency and strong redox ability. Additionally, the as-prepared samples show a higher absorption property for organic molecules and visible light due to the presence of graphene. All of these unique properties ensure the excellent photocatalytic activity for the graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow structures in the synergistic photo-oxidation of organic molecules and photo-reduced of Cr(VI) process. The TiO2 core composed with mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals is propose to play an important role in the fabrication of this Z-scheme photocatalytic system. Fabrication of Z-scheme photocatalytic system based on this unique exposed facets TiO2 nanocrystals will provides a new insight into the design and fabrication of advanced photocatalytic materials. PMID:27645429

  16. Hydrothermal etching fabrication of TiO2@graphene hollow structures: mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals and its synergistic photocaltalytic effects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Zhiling; Dong, Xiaonan; Liu, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Highly exposed facets TiO2 attracts enormous attention due to its excellent separation effect of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and induced high performance of photocatalytic activity. Herein, a novel hydrothermal etching reaction was used to synthesize graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures. Different with the reported co-exposed facets TiO2 single crystal nanoparticles, the present TiO2 core layer is composed by the mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals. Combined with the reduced graphene oxide shell layer, this graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures formed a Z-scheme photocatalytic system, which possess simultaneously the high charge-separation efficiency and strong redox ability. Additionally, the as-prepared samples show a higher absorption property for organic molecules and visible light due to the presence of graphene. All of these unique properties ensure the excellent photocatalytic activity for the graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow structures in the synergistic photo-oxidation of organic molecules and photo-reduced of Cr(VI) process. The TiO2 core composed with mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals is propose to play an important role in the fabrication of this Z-scheme photocatalytic system. Fabrication of Z-scheme photocatalytic system based on this unique exposed facets TiO2 nanocrystals will provides a new insight into the design and fabrication of advanced photocatalytic materials. PMID:27645429

  17. Solar heating shingle roof structure

    SciTech Connect

    Straza, G.T.

    1981-01-13

    A solar heating roof shingle roof structure which combines the functions of a roof and a fluid conducting solar heating panel. Each shingle is a hollow body of the general size and configuration of a conventional shingle, and is provided with a fluid inlet socket at the upper end and a fluid outlet plug at the lower end with a skirt at the lower end overlapping the plug. Shingles are assembled in an overlapping array to cover a roof structure, with interconnections between the inlets and outlets of successive longitudinally positioned shingles to provide fluid paths through the complete array. An inlet manifold is positioned at the upper end of the array or in the alternative contained in a cap used at the peak of the roof and an outlet manifold is connected to the outlet of the lowest row of shingles.

  18. Self-assembled 3D ZnO porous structures with exposed reactive {0001} facets and their enhanced gas sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin; Ahmad, Muhammad Z; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Waclawik, Eric R

    2013-07-02

    Complex three-dimensional structures comprised of porous ZnO plates were synthesized in a controlled fashion by hydrothermal methods. Through subtle changes to reaction conditions, the ZnO structures could be self-assembled from 20 nm thick nanosheets into grass-like and flower-like structures which led to the exposure of high proportions of ZnO {0001} crystal facets for both these materials. The measured surface area of the flower-like and the grass, or platelet-like ZnO samples were 72.8 and 52.4 m2∙g-1, respectively. Gas sensing results demonstrated that the porous, flower-like ZnO structures exhibited enhanced sensing performance towards NO2 gas compared with either grass-like ZnO or commercially sourced ZnO nanoparticle samples. The porous, flower-like ZnO structures provided a high surface area which enhanced the ZnO gas sensor response. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization revealed that flower-like ZnO samples possessed a higher percentage of oxygen vacancies than the other ZnO sample-types, which also contributed to their excellent gas sensing performance.

  19. Facet Control of Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Han, Lili; Jing, Hao; Blom, Douglas A; Lin, Ye; Xin, Huolin L; Wang, Hui

    2016-02-23

    While great success has been achieved in fine-tuning the aspect ratios and thereby the plasmon resonances of cylindrical Au nanorods, facet control with atomic level precision on the highly curved nanorod surfaces has long been a significantly more challenging task. The intrinsic structural complexity and lack of precise facet control of the nanorod surfaces remain the major obstacles for the atomic-level elucidation of the structure-property relationships that underpin the intriguing catalytic performance of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that the facets of single-crystalline Au nanorods can be precisely tailored using cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a unique pair of surface capping competitors to guide the particle geometry evolution during nanorod overgrowth. By deliberately maneuvering the competition between cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we have been able to create, in a highly controllable and selective manner, an entire family of nanorod-derived anisotropic multifaceted geometries whose surfaces are enclosed by specific types of well-defined high-index and low-index facets. This facet-controlled nanorod overgrowth approach also allows us to fine-tune the particle aspect ratios while well-preserving all the characteristic facets and geometric features of the faceted Au nanorods. Taking full advantage of the combined structural and plasmonic tunability, we have further studied the facet-dependent heterogeneous catalysis on well-faceted Au nanorods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as an ultrasensitive spectroscopic tool with unique time-resolving and molecular finger-printing capabilities. PMID:26795706

  20. Surface Structure Dependence of SO2 Interaction with Ceria Nanocrystals with Well-defined Surface Facets

    SciTech Connect

    Tumuluri, Uma; Li, Meijun; Cook, Brandon G.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Dai, Sheng; Wu, Zili

    2015-12-02

    The effects of the surface structure of ceria (CeO2) on the nature, strength, and amount of species resulting from SO2 adsorption were studied using in situ IR and Raman spectroscopies coupled with mass spectrometry, along with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). CeO2 nanocrystals with different morphologies, namely, rods (representing a defective structure), cubes (100 facet), and octahedra (111 facet), were used to represent different CeO2 surface structures. IR and Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the structure and binding strength of adsorbed species from SO2 depend on the shape of the CeO2 nanocrystals. SO2 adsorbs mainly as surface sulfites and sulfates at room temperature on CeO2 rods, cubes, and octahedra that were either oxidatively or reductively pretreated. The formation of sulfites is more evident on CeO2 octahedra, whereas surface sulfates are more prominent on CeO2 rods and cubes. This is explained by the increasing reducibility of the surface oxygen in the order octahedra < cubes < rods. Bulk sulfites are also formed during SO2 adsorption on reduced CeO2 rods. The formation of surface sulfites and sulfates on CeO2 cubes is in good agreement with our DFT results of SO2 interactions with the CeO2(100) surface. CeO2 rods desorb SO2 at higher temperatures than cubes and octahedra nanocrystals, but bulk sulfates are formed on CeO2 rods and cubes after high-temperature desorption whereas only some surface sulfates/sulfites are left on octahedra. This difference is rationalized by the fact that CeO2 rods have the highest surface basicity and largest amount of defects among the three nanocrystals, so they bind and react with SO2 strongly and are the most degraded after SO2 adsorption cycles. The

  1. Structural analysis of the facets and domains of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman-Aluja Personality Questionnaire (ZKA-PQ) and the NEO PI-R.

    PubMed

    García, Luis F; Escorial, Sergio; García, Óscar; Blanch, Angel; Aluja, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Aluja, Kuhlman, and Zuckerman (2010) developed an instrument for American and Spanish populations (Zuckerman-Kuhlman-Aluja Personality Questionnaire [ZKA-PQ]) that includes 4 facets for each 5 basic traits of Zuckerman's psychobiological personality model. This new instrument is intended to improve the previous measure based on the same personality model, the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ), by including the narrower traits (facets) defining the factors. This article explores the convergent and discriminant validity of the new instrument relative to the NEO PI-R in a sample from the Spanish general population. A series of exploratory factor analyses comparing both instruments was conducted. Results showed good convergent and discriminant validity between both instruments, although the ZKA-PQ had a slightly better structure than the NEO PI-R. The results support the validity of the ZKA-PQ factor domains and the facets composing them. The new instrument might be useful in both applied and research settings.

  2. Facet control of gold nanorods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Han, Lili; Jing, Hao; Blom, Douglas A.; Lin, Ye; Xin, Huolin L.; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-21

    While great success has been achieved in fine-tuning the aspect ratios and thereby the plasmon resonances of cylindrical Au nanorods, facet control with atomic level precision on the highly curved nanorod surfaces has long been a significantly more challenging task. The intrinsic structural complexity and lack of precise facet control of the nanorod surfaces remain the major obstacles for the atomic-level elucidation of the structure–property relationships that underpin the intriguing catalytic performance of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that the facets of single-crystalline Au nanorods can be precisely tailored using cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a unique pair ofmore » surface capping competitors to guide the particle geometry evolution during nanorod overgrowth. By deliberately maneuvering the competition between cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we have been able to create, in a highly controllable and selective manner, an entire family of nanorod-derived anisotropic multifaceted geometries whose surfaces are enclosed by specific types of well-defined high-index and low-index facets. This facet-controlled nanorod overgrowth approach also allows us to fine-tune the particle aspect ratios while well-preserving all the characteristic facets and geometric features of the faceted Au nanorods. Furthermore, taking full advantage of the combined structural and plasmonic tunability, we have further studied the facet-dependent heterogeneous catalysis on well-faceted Au nanorods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as an ultrasensitive spectroscopic tool with unique time-resolving and molecular finger-printing capabilities.« less

  3. Facet development for a faceted stretched-membrane dish by SAIC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The concept for a multi-facet stretched-membrane dish concentrator could reduce the cost and weight of solar thermal dish systems. A stretched-membrane mirror facet for such a multi-facet solar dish concentrator has been developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). Twelve of the 3.7-m diameter facets will be used to form a 115-m{sup 2} dish concentrator, providing 75 kW{sub th} to operate a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine for electric power production. The facet SAIC designed is focused using a vacuum system to elastically deform the thin (0.003-inch thick) stainless steel facet membranes. Elastic focusing was chosen over plastically deforming the membrane to a parabolic shape because it results in a simple manufacturing process. The SAIC facet can be focused from infinity to a minimum focal length-to-diameter ratio of about 2.7. Analytical design studies and experimental tests were performed to evaluate stresses in the ring and membranes during operation, the effects of strain cycling on the reflective surface, and to measure the optical quality of the mirror facets. SAIC produced two prototype mirror facets and they were optically tested at the Solar Energy Research Institute and at Sandia National Laboratories. The first facet showed slope errors ranging from 2.95 to 3.3 mrad over the f/d range of 2.7 to 3.0.

  4. Description of solar structure and processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    A general introduction to solar structure and processes is presented. The sun is first viewed as a spherically symmetric steady-state system, and the energy generated in the core is traced as it flows outward. The various forms and manifestations of this energy flow and the resulting uniquely defined characteristics of different atmospheric layers are described. The sources of solar activity are assumed to be differential rotation and solar magnetic fields. The interaction of these sources to produce the observed solar cycle, active regions, the active-sun corona, and solar flares is discussed. In describing solar structure and processes, only elementary physical concepts are utilized.

  5. Solar structure and terrestrial weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility that solar activity has discernible effects on terrestrial weather is considered. Research involving correlation of weather conditions with solar and geomagnetic activity is discussed.

  6. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures.

  7. Solar structure: Models and inferences from helioseismology

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    In this review the author summarizes results published during approximately the least three years concerning the state of one-dimensional solar interior modeling. She discusses the effects of refinements to the input physics, motivated by improving the agreement between calculated and observed solar oscillation frequencies, or between calculated and inferred solar structure. She has omitted two- and three-dimensional aspects of the solar structure, such as the rotation profile, detailed modeling of turbulent convection, and magnetic fields, although further progress in refining solar interior models may require including such two- and three-dimensional dynamical effects.

  8. JPL tests of a LaJet concentrator facet

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, E.W.; Argoud, M.J.

    1983-11-15

    A LaJet Energy Company (LEC) concentrator facet, 60 in. in diameter, was tested for imaging quality at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory using two methods: (1) autofocus tests with a point source of light at the facet's radius of curvature, and (2) tests with the sun close to the horizon as a distant source. These tests of the LaJet facet indicate that all of the solar image reflected by an LEC 460 solar concentrator made of like facets should fall within a 9-in. aperture if the outer facets are carefully adjusted. Such a concentrator would have acceptable performance, but complete evaluation must be made with an assembled concentrator.

  9. JPL tests of a LaJet concentrator facet

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, E.W.; Argoud, M.J.

    1983-11-01

    A LaJet Energy Company (LEC) concentrator facet, 60 in. in diameter, was tested for imaging quality. The following two methods were used: (1) autofocus tests with a point source of light at the facet's radius of curvature and (2) tests with the Sun close to the horizon as a distant source. The tests of the LaJet facet indicate that all of the solar image reflected by an LEC 460 solar concentrator made of like facets should fall within a 9-in. aperture if the outer facets are carefully adjusted. Such a concentrator would have acceptable performance, but complete evaluation must be made with an assembled concentrator.

  10. Commission 12: Solar Radiation and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander; Cauzzi, Gianna; Pillet, Valentin Martinez; Asplund, Martin; Brandenburg, Axel; Chou, Dean-Yi; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Gan, Weiqun; Kuznetsov, Vladimir D.; Rovira, Marta G.; Shchukina, Nataliya; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2012-04-01

    Commission 12 of the International Astronomical Union encompasses investigations of the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun, mostly accessible through the techniques of local and global helioseismology, the quiet solar atmosphere, solar radiation and its variability, and the nature of relatively stable magnetic structures like sunspots, faculae and the magnetic network. The Commission sees participation of over 350 scientists worldwide.

  11. Ultrasound guided, painful electrical stimulation of lumbar facet joint structures: an experimental model of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Søren; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Manniche, Claus; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative sensory testing has indicated generalized muscle hyperalgesia in patients with chronic low back pain. The temporal development of such hyperalgesia is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether generalized muscle hyperalgesia can develop within minutes of acute low back pain using a new experimental model of lumbar facet joint pain. Thirteen healthy volunteers were included and baseline pressure pain thresholds were assessed at eight separate sites, outside the area of evoked low back and referred pain. Using ultrasonography, two electrode needles were placed either side of a lumbar facet joint (right L3-4) and used to induce experimental low back pain for 10 min with continuous stimulation. Thresholds, stimulus-response relationships, distribution and quality of the electrically induced pain were recorded. Electrical facet joint stimulation induced low back pain and pain referral into the anterior leg, ipsilaterally, proximal to the knee, similar to what is observed clinically. Pressure pain thresholds did not change significantly before, during and after facet joint stimulation. In conclusion, we describe a novel model of acute experimental low back pain and demonstrate that generalized hyperalgesia did not develop within minutes of acute low back pain. PMID:19376652

  12. Testing of the prototype facets for the stretched-membrane faceted dish

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, J.W.; Houser, R.M.; Erdman, W.W.

    1991-12-01

    The Faceted Stretched-Membrane Dish Program is part of a DOE-sponsored effort to develop a commercial 25 kWe dish/Stirling system employing a twelve-facet dish concentrator. The facets will utilize the stretched-membrane technology originated in the heliostat development program. Each facet is constructed with a thin metal membrane stretched over both sides of a steel ring. When a small vacuum is induced between the membranes they assume a parabolic contour capable of concentrating sunlight at a predetermined focal length. A reflective polymer film is attached to the face of the facet of the facet to enhance the optical performance. During Phase II of the Faceted Stretched-Membrane Dish Program, Science Applications International Corp. and Solar Kinetics, Inc., constructed prototype 3.5-meter facets utilizing different design approaches to demonstrate their manufacturability and optical performance. Sandia engaged in a program to determine the on-sun performance of the facets (for f/Ds of 2.7 to 3.0). A uniformly distributed slope error was used as the basis for comparison. Flux arrays based on slope error from a computer model were compared to a measured flux array for each facet. The slope error for the facet was determined by the value that would produce a modeled array with the minimum mean square difference to the measured array. The facet produced by SAIC demonstrated uniform slope errors of 2.2 to 3.0 milliradians with peak flux intesities of 334 to 416 kW/m{sup 2}. The SKI facet had slope errors of 1.6 to 1.9 milliradians with peak flux intesities of 543 to 1186 kW/m{sup 2}.

  13. Structural Code Considerations for Solar Rooftop Installations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Sanchez, Alfred

    2014-12-01

    Residential rooftop solar panel installations are limited in part by the high cost of structural related code requirements for field installation. Permitting solar installations is difficult because there is a belief among residential permitting authorities that typical residential rooftops may be structurally inadequate to support the additional load associated with a photovoltaic (PV) solar installation. Typical engineering methods utilized to calculate stresses on a roof structure involve simplifying assumptions that render a complex non-linear structure to a basic determinate beam. This method of analysis neglects the composite action of the entire roof structure, yielding a conservative analysis based on a rafter or top chord of a truss. Consequently, the analysis can result in an overly conservative structural analysis. A literature review was conducted to gain a better understanding of the conservative nature of the regulations and codes governing residential construction and the associated structural system calculations.

  14. Design of the support structure, drive pedestal, and controls for a solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, V. R.; Ford, J. L.; Anderson, A. E.

    1991-08-01

    The glass/metal McDonnell-Douglas dish is the state-of-the-art of parabolic dish concentrators. Because of the perceived high production cost of this concentrator, the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Program is developing stretch membrane technology for large (75 kWt) solar concentrators for integration with receivers and engines in 25 kWe dish-Stirling systems. The objective of this development effort is to reduce the cost of the concentrator while maintaining the high levels of performance characteristic of glass-metal dishes. Under contract to Sandia National Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation, Solar Kinetics Inc. and WG Associates are developing a faceted stretched-membrane heliostat technology. This design will result in a low-risk, near-term concentrator for dish-Stirling systems. WG Associates has designed the support structure, drives and tracking controls for this dish. The structure is configured to support 12 stretched-membrane, 3.5-meter diameter facets in a shaped dish configuration. The dish design is sized to power a dish-Stirling system capable of producing 25 kW (electric). In the design of the structure, trade-off studies were conducted to determine the best facet arrangement, dish contour, dish focal length, tracking control and walk-off protection. As part of the design, in-depth analyses were performed to evaluate pointing accuracy, compliance with AISC steel design codes, and the economics of fabrication and installation. Detailed fabrication and installation drawings were produced, and initial production cost estimates for the dish were developed. These issues, and the final dish design, are presented in this report.

  15. Design of the support structure, drive pedestal, and controls for a solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, V.R.; Ford, J.L.; Anderson, A.E. )

    1991-08-01

    The glass/metal McDonnell-Douglas dish is the state-of-the-art of parabolic dish concentrators. Because of the perceived high production cost of this concentrator, the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Program is developing stretch-membrane technology for large (75 kWt) solar concentrators for integration with receivers and engines in 25 kWe dish-Stirling systems. The objective of this development effort is to reduce the cost of the concentrator while maintaining the high levels of performance characteristic of glass-metal dishes. Under contract to Sandia National Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation, Solar Kinetics Inc. and WG Associates are developing a faceted stretched-membrane heliostat technology. This design will result in a low-risk, near-term concentrator for dish-Stirling systems. WG Associates has designed the support structure, drives and tracking controls for this dish. The structure is configured to support 12 stretched-membrane, 3.5-meter diameter facets in a shaped dish configuration. The dish design is sized to power a dish-Stirling system capable of producing 25 kW (electric). In the design of the structure, trade-off studies were conducted to determine the best'' facet arrangement, dish contour, dish focal length, tracking control and walk-off protection. As part of the design, in-depth analyses were performed to evaluate pointing accuracy, compliance with AISC steel design codes, and the economics of fabrication and installation. Detailed fabrication and installation drawings were produced, and initial production cost estimates for the dish were developed. These issues, and the final dish design, are presented in this report. 7 refs., 33 figs., 18 tabs.

  16. Ethyl Cellulose and Cetrimonium Bromide Assisted Synthesis of Mesoporous, Hexagon Shaped ZnO Nanodisks with Exposed ±{0001} Polar Facets for Enhanced Photovoltaic Performance in Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chetia, Tridip Ranjan; Ansari, Mohammad Shaad; Qureshi, Mohammad

    2015-06-24

    Hexagon shaped mesoporous zinc oxide nanodisks (ZnO NDs) with exposed ±{0001} polar facets have been synthesized by using ethyl cellulose (EC) and cetrimonium bromide (CTAB) as the capping and structure directing agents. We have characterized ZnO NDs using analytical techniques, such as powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), diffuse reflectance UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis and proposed a plausible mechanism for the formation of ZnO NDs. EC molecules form a colloidal solution in a 1-butanol:water (3:1) solvent system having a negative zeta potential (ζ ≈ -32 mV) value which can inhibit CTAB assisted c-axis growth of ZnO crystal and encourage the formation of ZnO NDs. In the control reactions carried out in presence of only CTAB and only EC, formation of hexagonal ZnO nanorods (NRs) and ZnO nanosheets (NSs) composed of numerous ZnO nanoparticles are observed, respectively. Photovoltaic properties of ZnO NDs as compared to ZnO NRs, ZnO NSs, and conventional ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are investigated by co-sensitizing with CdS/CdSe quantum dots (QDs). An ∼35% increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE, η) is observed in ZnO NDs (η ≈ 4.86%) as compared to ZnO NPs (η ≈ 3.14%) while the values of PCE for ZnO NR and ZnO NS based devices are found to be ∼2.52% and ∼1.64%, respectively. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of the ZnO NDs based solar cell is attributed to an efficient charge separation and collection, boosted by the exposed ±(0001) facets apart from the single crystalline nature, better light-scattering effects, and high BET surface area for sensitizer particle adsorption. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis further reveals that the charge recombination resistance and photoinduced electron lifetime are substantially higher in the ZnO ND based

  17. Synthesis of {100} facet dominant anatase TiO2 nanobelts and the origin of facet-dependent photoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Wu, Kai; Li, Hexing; Xu, Guoqin; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-10

    Sword-like anatase TiO2 nanobelts exposed with 78% clean {100} facets were synthesized and the facet-dependent photoreactivity of anatase TiO2 was investigated. By quantitative comparison with the reference {001} facets, the {100} facets possessed about ten-times higher active sites density than that on {001} facets, resulting in higher photoreaction efficiency. After the active sites density normalization, the {100} and {001} facets exhibited distinct wavelength-dependent photocatalytic performance, attributed to the anisotropic electronic structures in TiO2 crystals. PMID:25255881

  18. Green synthesis of Pt-doped TiO2 nanocrystals with exposed (001) facets and mesoscopic void space for photo-splitting of water under solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Biplab; Amoli, Vipin; Maurya, Abhayankar; Sinha, Anil Kumar; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-06-21

    We report a non-trivial facile chemical approach using ionic liquid ([bmim][Cl]) as a porogen for the synthesis of (001) faceted TiO2 nanocrystals having mesoscopic void space. This faceted TiO2 nanomaterial has been doped with Pt nanoclusters through chemical impregnation. The resulting Pt-doped TiO2 nanomaterials are thoroughly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultra high resolution transmission electron microscopy (UHR-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) and N2 sorption studies. These Pt/TiO2 nanocrystals with (001) exposed facets are employed as efficient and benign catalysts for hydrogen production from pure water and methanol-water systems under one AM 1.5G sunlight illumination. The effect of platinum loading and methanol-water ratio on the photocatalytic activity of the faceted TiO2 nanocrystals are investigated and it is found that hydrogen evolution rates have been enhanced significantly upon Pt loading. Under optimized reaction conditions the highest photocatalytic activity of 11.2 mmol h(-1) g(-1) has been achieved over ca. 1.0 wt% Pt loaded Pt/TiO2 nanocrystals with (001) exposed facets, which is one of the highest hydrogen evolution rates over the noble metal/TiO2 system reported to date in the literature.

  19. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within +/-1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  20. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    PubMed Central

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  1. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  2. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-08

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  3. Ultraviolet observations of solar fine structure.

    PubMed

    Dere, K P; Bartoe, J D; Brueckner, G E; Cook, J W; Socker, D G

    1987-11-27

    The High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph was flown on the Spacelab-2 shuttle mission to perform extended observations of the solar chromosphere and transition zone at high spatial and temporal resolution. Ultraviolet spectroheliograms show the temporal development of macrospicules at the solar limb. The C IV transition zone emission is produced in discrete emission elements that must be composed of exceedingly fine (less than 70 kilometers) subresolution structures. PMID:17744366

  4. Solar photovoltaic reflective trough collection structure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Benjamin J.; Sweatt, William C.; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2015-11-19

    A photovoltaic (PV) solar concentration structure having at least two troughs encapsulated in a rectangular parallelepiped optical plastic structure, with the troughs filled with an optical plastic material, the troughs each having a reflective internal surface and approximately parabolic geometry, and the troughs each including photovoltaic cells situated so that light impinging on the optical plastic material will be concentrated onto the photovoltaic cells. Multiple structures can be connected to provide a solar photovoltaic collection system that provides portable, efficient, low-cost electrical power.

  5. Microsphere assembly of TiO2 mesoporous nanosheets with highly exposed (101) facets and application in a light-trapping quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xiyun; Ruan, Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Hongxia; Zhou, Xingfu

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of nano-titania has a significant effect on the photoelectric properties of dye-sensitized solar cells. In this study, microsphere assembly of a TiO2 mesoporous nanosheet constructed by nanocuboids was conducted via a simple hydrothermal process. The XRD pattern indicated that the hierarchical mesoporous microspheres are anatase phase with decreased (004) peaks. Raman spectrum shows enhanced Eg peaks at 143 and 638 cm-1 caused by the symmetric stretching vibration of O-Ti-O of the (101) crystalline facet in anatase TiO2. FESEM and TEM images show that well monodispersed TiO2 microspheres with a diameter of 2 μm are assembled by TiO2 mesoporous nanosheets with exposed (101) facets. The oriented attachment of TiO2 nanocuboids along the (101) direction leads to the formation of mesoporous titania nanosheets. The UV-Vis spectrum shows that the mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets have high scattering ability and light absorption by dye. Quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells that incorporate these microspheres into the top scattering layers exhibit a prominent improvement in the power conversion efficiency of 7.51%, which shows a 45.8% increase in the overall conversion efficiency when compared with the spine hierarchical TiO2 microspheres (5.15%). There is the potential application for microsphere assembly of mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets in quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells with excellent stability.

  6. Microsphere assembly of TiO2 mesoporous nanosheets with highly exposed (101) facets and application in a light-trapping quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiyun; Ruan, Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Hongxia; Zhou, Xingfu

    2015-02-28

    The morphology of nano-titania has a significant effect on the photoelectric properties of dye-sensitized solar cells. In this study, microsphere assembly of a TiO2 mesoporous nanosheet constructed by nanocuboids was conducted via a simple hydrothermal process. The XRD pattern indicated that the hierarchical mesoporous microspheres are anatase phase with decreased (004) peaks. Raman spectrum shows enhanced Eg peaks at 143 and 638 cm(-1) caused by the symmetric stretching vibration of O-Ti-O of the (101) crystalline facet in anatase TiO2. FESEM and TEM images show that well monodispersed TiO2 microspheres with a diameter of 2 μm are assembled by TiO2 mesoporous nanosheets with exposed (101) facets. The oriented attachment of TiO2 nanocuboids along the (101) direction leads to the formation of mesoporous titania nanosheets. The UV-Vis spectrum shows that the mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets have high scattering ability and light absorption by dye. Quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells that incorporate these microspheres into the top scattering layers exhibit a prominent improvement in the power conversion efficiency of 7.51%, which shows a 45.8% increase in the overall conversion efficiency when compared with the spine hierarchical TiO2 microspheres (5.15%). There is the potential application for microsphere assembly of mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets in quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells with excellent stability.

  7. Structural sizing of a solar powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. W.; Hall, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development of sizing algorithms for very lightweight aircraft structure was studied. Three types of bracing schemes were analyzed and fully cantilevered strut bracing and wire bracing and scaling rules were determined. It is found that wire bracing provides the lightest wing structure for solar high altitude powered platforms.

  8. Green synthesis of Pt-doped TiO2 nanocrystals with exposed (001) facets and mesoscopic void space for photo-splitting of water under solar irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Biplab; Amoli, Vipin; Maurya, Abhayankar; Sinha, Anil Kumar; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-06-01

    We report a non-trivial facile chemical approach using ionic liquid ([bmim][Cl]) as a porogen for the synthesis of (001) faceted TiO2 nanocrystals having mesoscopic void space. This faceted TiO2 nanomaterial has been doped with Pt nanoclusters through chemical impregnation. The resulting Pt-doped TiO2 nanomaterials are thoroughly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultra high resolution transmission electron microscopy (UHR-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) and N2 sorption studies. These Pt/TiO2 nanocrystals with (001) exposed facets are employed as efficient and benign catalysts for hydrogen production from pure water and methanol-water systems under one AM 1.5G sunlight illumination. The effect of platinum loading and methanol-water ratio on the photocatalytic activity of the faceted TiO2 nanocrystals are investigated and it is found that hydrogen evolution rates have been enhanced significantly upon Pt loading. Under optimized reaction conditions the highest photocatalytic activity of 11.2 mmol h-1 g-1 has been achieved over ca. 1.0 wt% Pt loaded Pt/TiO2 nanocrystals with (001) exposed facets, which is one of the highest hydrogen evolution rates over the noble metal/TiO2 system reported to date in the literature.We report a non-trivial facile chemical approach using ionic liquid ([bmim][Cl]) as a porogen for the synthesis of (001) faceted TiO2 nanocrystals having mesoscopic void space. This faceted TiO2 nanomaterial has been doped with Pt nanoclusters through chemical impregnation. The resulting Pt-doped TiO2 nanomaterials are thoroughly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultra high resolution transmission electron microscopy (UHR-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) and

  9. Structural evaluation of concepts for a solar energy concentrator for Space Station advanced development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred S.; Rhodes, Marvin D.

    1994-01-01

    Solar dynamic power systems have a higher thermodynamic efficiency than conventional photovoltaic systems; therefore they are attractive for long-term space missions with high electrical power demands. In an investigation conducted in support of a preliminary concept for Space Station Freedom, an approach for a solar dynamic power system was developed and a number of the components for the solar concentrator were fabricated for experimental evaluation. The concentrator consists of hexagonal panels comprised of triangular reflective facets which are supported by a truss. Structural analyses of the solar concentrator and the support truss were conducted using finite-element models. A number of potential component failure scenarios were postulated and the resulting structural performance was assessed. The solar concentrator and support truss were found to be adequate to meet a 1.0-Hz structural dynamics design requirement in pristine condition. However, for some of the simulated component failure conditions, the fundamental frequency dropped below the 1.0-Hz design requirement. As a result, two alternative concepts were developed and assessed. One concept incorporated a tetrahedral ring truss support for the hexagonal panels: the second incorporated a full tetrahedral truss support for the panels. The results indicate that significant improvements in stiffness can be obtained by attaching the panels to a tetrahedral truss, and that this concentrator and support truss will meet the 1.0-Hz design requirement with any of the simulated failure conditions.

  10. Lightweight solar concentrator structures, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Kaplan, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the program conducted by Ultramet under SBIR Phase 2 Contract NAS3-25418. The objective of this program was to develop lightweight materials and processes for advanced high accuracy Space Solar Concentrators using rigidized foam for the substrate structure with an integral optical surface.

  11. Photon management structures for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bläsi, Benedikt; Hauser, Hubert; Walk, Christian; Michl, Bernhard; Guttowski, Aron; Mellor, Alexander; Benick, Jan; Peters, Marius; Jüchter, Sabrina; Wellens, Christine; Kübler, Volker; Hermle, Martin; Wolf, Andreas J.

    2012-06-01

    Since micro- and nanostructures for photon management are of increasing importance in novel high-efficiency solar cell concepts, structuring techniques with up-scaling potential play a key role in their realization. Interference lithography and nanoimprint processes are presented as technologies for origination and replication of fine-tailored photonic structures on large areas. At first, these structure origination and replication technologies are presented in detail: With the interference pattern of two or more coherent waves, a wide variety of structures with feature sizes ranging from 100 nm to 100 μm can be generated in photoresist by interference lithography. Examples are linear gratings, crossed gratings, hexagonal structures, three dimensional photonic crystals or surface-relief diffusers. The strength of this technology is that homogeneous structures can be originated on areas of up to 1.2 x 1.2 m2. The structures in photoresist, the so-called master structures, can serve as an etching mask for a pattern transfer, as a template for infiltration with different materials or they can be replicated via electroplating and subsequent replication processes. Especially in combination with replication steps, the industrially feasible production of elaborate structures is possible. As a particularly interesting process, nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is described in detail. As a way towards industrial production, a roller NIL tool is presented. After the description of the basic technologies, three application examples for solar cells are presented with details about the design of the structures, the structuring processes, sample characterization and evaluation: (1) honeycomb structures for the front side texturization of multicrystalline silicon wafer solar cells, (2) diffractive rear side gratings for absorption enhancement in the spectral region near the band gap of silicon, and (3) plasmonic metal nanoparticle arrays manufactured by combined imprint and lift off

  12. Microsphere assembly of TiO2 mesoporous nanosheets with highly exposed (101) facets and application in a light-trapping quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiyun; Ruan, Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Hongxia; Zhou, Xingfu

    2015-02-28

    The morphology of nano-titania has a significant effect on the photoelectric properties of dye-sensitized solar cells. In this study, microsphere assembly of a TiO2 mesoporous nanosheet constructed by nanocuboids was conducted via a simple hydrothermal process. The XRD pattern indicated that the hierarchical mesoporous microspheres are anatase phase with decreased (004) peaks. Raman spectrum shows enhanced Eg peaks at 143 and 638 cm(-1) caused by the symmetric stretching vibration of O-Ti-O of the (101) crystalline facet in anatase TiO2. FESEM and TEM images show that well monodispersed TiO2 microspheres with a diameter of 2 μm are assembled by TiO2 mesoporous nanosheets with exposed (101) facets. The oriented attachment of TiO2 nanocuboids along the (101) direction leads to the formation of mesoporous titania nanosheets. The UV-Vis spectrum shows that the mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets have high scattering ability and light absorption by dye. Quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells that incorporate these microspheres into the top scattering layers exhibit a prominent improvement in the power conversion efficiency of 7.51%, which shows a 45.8% increase in the overall conversion efficiency when compared with the spine hierarchical TiO2 microspheres (5.15%). There is the potential application for microsphere assembly of mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets in quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells with excellent stability. PMID:25631573

  13. First Beam to FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

  14. SLAC All Access: FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark

    2012-07-05

    SLAC's Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests, or FACET, is a test-bed where researchers are developing the technologies required for particle accelerators of the future. Scientists from all over the world come to explore ways of improving the power and efficiency of the particle accelerators used in basic research, medicine, industry and other areas important to society. In this video, Mark Hogan, head of SLAC's Advanced Accelerator Research Department, offers a glimpse into FACET, which uses part of SLAC's historic two-mile-long linear accelerator.

  15. SLAC All Access: FACET

    ScienceCinema

    Hogan, Mark

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests, or FACET, is a test-bed where researchers are developing the technologies required for particle accelerators of the future. Scientists from all over the world come to explore ways of improving the power and efficiency of the particle accelerators used in basic research, medicine, industry and other areas important to society. In this video, Mark Hogan, head of SLAC's Advanced Accelerator Research Department, offers a glimpse into FACET, which uses part of SLAC's historic two-mile-long linear accelerator.

  16. Development of a Conceptual Structure for Architectural Solar Energy Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringel, Robert F.

    Solar subsystems and components were identified and conceptual structure was developed for architectural solar energy heating and cooling systems. Recent literature related to solar energy systems was reviewed and analyzed. Solar heating and cooling system, subsystem, and component data were compared for agreement and completeness. Significant…

  17. Development of an improved mirror facet for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schertz, Paul; Saifee, Shabbar; Lammert, Luke

    1991-01-01

    A fabrication technique was successfully developed for a metallic aluminum honeycomb, high-accuracy, lightweight, and long-life solar concentrator (mirror) for Advanced Solar Dynamic Space Power Systems. The program scope was limited to the development, fabrication, evaluation, and delivery of a solar concentrator facet (petal) that was sized for a 2-meter deployable solar concentrator. A surface accuracy of 1.0 mrad was achieved. The development incorporated tooling design, material selection, facet forming, adhesive selection, testing, and analysis. Techniques for applying levelizing, reflective, and protective optical coatings were also developed.

  18. Efficiently Enhancing Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity of Faceted TiO2 Nanocrystals by Synergistic Effects of Core-Shell Structured Au@CdS Nanoparticles and Their Selective Deposition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ruifeng; Liu, Chang; Xu, Zhenkai; Kuang, Qin; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2016-08-24

    Integrating wide bandgap semiconductor photocatalysts with visible-light-active inorganic nanoparticles (such as Au and CdS) as sensitizers is one of the most efficient methods to improve their photocatalytic activity in the visible light region. However, as for all such composite photocatalysts, a rational design and precise control over their architecture is often required to achieve optimal performance. Herein, a new TiO2-based ternary composite photocatalyst with superior visible light activity was designed and synthesized. In this composite photocatalyst, the location of the visible light sensitizers was engineered according to the intrinsic facet-induced effect of well-faceted TiO2 nanocrystals on the spatial separation of photogenerated carriers. Experimentally, core-shell structured Au@CdS nanoparticles acting as visible light sensitizers were selectively deposited onto photoreductive {101} facets of well-faceted anatase TiO2 nanocrystals through a two-step in situ photodeposition route. Because the combination of Au@CdS and specific {101} facets of TiO2 nanocrystals facilitates the transport of charges photogenerated under visible light irradiation, this well-designed ternary composite photocatalyst exhibited superior activity in visible-light-driven photocatalytic H2 evolution, as expected. PMID:27479634

  19. Facets of Subjectification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visconti, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Subjectification, as the diachronic facet of subjectivity, has raised in the last two decades a number of interesting questions in grammaticalization and semantic change theory. In this paper I shall reflect on the nature and construal of subjectification, focusing on the question, formulated by Traugott (2010a, p. 58), "whether it is possible to…

  20. Optics Design for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Y.; Bane, K.; Bentson, L.; Erickson, R.; Hogan, M.J.; Li, N.; Seeman, J.; Seryi, A.; Spencer, Cherrill M.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC

    2009-05-07

    FACET is a proposed facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. It will provide high energy, tightly focused and compressed electron and positron bunches for beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration research and other experiments. FACET will be built in the SLAC linac sector 20, where it will be separated from the LCLS located immediately downstream and will take advantage of the upstream 2 km linac for up to 23 GeV beam acceleration. FACET will also include an upgrade to linac sector 10, where a new e+ compressor chicane will be installed. The sector 20 will contain a new optics consisting of two chicanes for e+ and ebunch length compression, a final focus and an experimental line with a dump. The e+ and e- chicanes will allow the transport of e+ and ebunches together, their compression and proper positioning of e+ witness bunch behind the e- drive bunch at the plasma Interaction Point. The new optics will mostly use the existing SLAC magnets to minimize the project cost. Details of the FACET optics design and results of particle tracking simulations are presented.

  1. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  2. THE BIMODAL STRUCTURE OF THE SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Z. L.

    2015-05-01

    Some properties of the 11 yr solar cycle can be explained by the current solar dynamo models. However, some other features remain not well understood such as the asymmetry of the cycle, the double-peaked structure, and the “Waldmeier effect” that a stronger cycle tends to have less rise time and a shorter cycle length. We speculate that the solar cycle is governed by a bi-dynamo model forming two stochastic processes depicted by a bimodal Gaussian function with a time gap of about 2 yr, from which the above features can be reasonably explained. The first one describes the main properties of the cycle dominated by the current solar dynamo models, and the second one occurs either in the rising phase as a short weak explosive perturbation or in the declining phase as a long stochastic perturbation. The above function is the best one selected from several in terms of the Akaike information criterion. Through analyzing different distributions, one might speculate about the dominant physical process inside the convection zone. The secondary (main) process is found to be closely associated with complicated (simple) active ranges. In effect, the bi-dynamo model is a reduced form of a multi-dynamo model, which could occur from the base of the convection zone through its envelope and from low to high heliographic latitude, reflecting the active belts in the convection zone. These results are insensitive to the hemispheric asymmetry, smoothing filters, and distribution functions selected and are expected to be helpful in understanding the formation of solar and stellar cycles.

  3. Evidence of active region imprints on the solar wind structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    A common descriptive framework for discussing the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere uses the global magnetic field as a reference: low density, high velocity solar wind emanates from open magnetic fields, with high density, low speed solar wind flowing outward near the current sheet. In this picture, active regions, underlying closed magnetic field structures in the streamer belt, leave little or no imprint on the solar wind. We present evidence from interplanetary scintillation measurements of the 'disturbance factor' g that active regions play a role in modulating the solar wind and possibly contribute to the solar wind mass output. Hence we find that the traditional view of the solar wind, though useful in understanding many features of solar wind structure, is oversimplified and possibly neglects important aspects of solar wind dynamics

  4. New Packing Structure of Concentration Solar Receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Shang-Yu; Lee, Yueh-Mu; Shih, Zun-Hao; Hong, Hwen-Fen; Shin, Hwa-Yuh; Kuo, Cherng-Tsong

    2010-10-14

    This paper presents a solution to the temperature issue in High Concentration Photovoltaic (HCPV) module device by using different thermal conductive material and packing structure. In general, the open-circuited voltage of a device reduces with the increase of temperature and therefore degrades its efficiency. The thermal conductive material we use in this paper, silicon, has a high thermal conductive coefficient (149 W/m{center_dot}K) and steady semiconductor properties which are suitable for the application of solar receiver in HCPV module. Solar cell was soldered on a metal-plated Si substrate with a thicker SiO{sub 2} film which acts as an insulating layer. Then it was mounted on an Al-based plate to obtain a better heat dissipating result.

  5. Solar Prominence Fine Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We review recent observational and theoretical results on the fine structure and dynamics of solar prominences, beginning with an overview of prominence classifications, the proposal of possible new ``funnel prominence'' classification, and a discussion of the recent ``solar tornado'' findings. We then focus on quiescent prominences to review formation, down-flow dynamics, and the ``prominence bubble'' phenomena. We show new observations of the prominence bubble Rayleigh-Taylor instability triggered by a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear flow instability occurring along the bubble boundary. Finally we review recent studies on plasma composition of bubbles, emphasizing that differential emission measure (DEM) analysis offers a more quantitative analysis than photometric comparisons. In conclusion, we discuss the relation of prominences to coronal magnetic flux ropes, proposing that prominences can be understood as partially ionized condensations of plasma forming the return flow of a general magneto-thermal convection in the corona.

  6. On the Relationship Between Sunspot Structure and Magnetic Field Changes Associated with Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. L.; Zhang, M.

    2016-08-01

    Many previous studies have shown that magnetic fields and sunspot structures present rapid and irreversible changes associated with solar flares. In this paper, we first use five X-class flares observed by Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to show that not only do magnetic fields and sunspot structures show rapid, irreversible changes, but also that these changes are closely related both spatially and temporally. The magnitudes of the correlation coefficients between the temporal variations of the horizontal magnetic field and sunspot intensity are all larger than 0.90, with a maximum value of 0.99 and an average value of 0.96. Then, using four active regions during quiescent periods, three observed and one simulated, we show that in sunspot penumbra regions there also exists a close correlation between sunspot intensity and horizontal magnetic field strength in addition to the well-known correlation between sunspot intensity and the normal magnetic field strength. By connecting these two observational phenomena, we show that the sunspot structure change and magnetic field change are two facets of the same phenomena of solar flares; one change might be induced by the change of the other due to a linear correlation between sunspot intensity and magnetic field strength out of a local force balance.

  7. Solar wind compressible structures at ion scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, D.; Alexandrova, O.; Rocoto, V.; Pantellini, F. G. E.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Issautier, K.; Mangeney, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the solar wind turbulent cascade, the energy partition between fluid and kinetic degrees of freedom, in the vicinity of plasma characteristic scales, i.e. ion and electron Larmor radius and inertial lengths, is still under debate. In a neighborhood of the ion scales, it has been observed that the spectral shape changes and fluctuations become more compressible. Nowadays, a huge scientific effort is directed to the comprehension of the link between macroscopic and microscopic scales and to disclose the nature of compressive fluctuations, meaning that if space plasma turbulence is a mixture of quasi-linear waves (as whistler or kinetic Alfvèn waves) or if turbulence is strong with formation of coherent structures responsible for dissipation. Here we present an automatic method to identify compressible coherent structures around the ion spectral break, using Morlet wavelet decomposition of magnetic signal from Cluster spacecraft and reconstruction of magnetic fluctuations in a selected scale range. Different kind of coherent structures have been detected: from soliton-like one-dimensional structures to current sheet- or wave-like two-dimensional structures. Using a multi-satellite analysis, in order to characterize 3D geometry and propagation in plasma rest frame, we recover that these structures propagate quasi-perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, with finite velocity. Moreover, without using the Taylor hypothesis, the spatial scales of coherent structures have been estimated. Our observations in the solar wind can provide constraints on theoretical modeling of small scale turbulence and dissipation in collisionless magnetized plasmas.

  8. Nucleation-mediated synthesis and enhanced catalytic properties of Au-Pd bimetallic tripods and bipyramids with twinned structures and high-energy facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiaoli; Wang, Xue; Jiang, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    The Au-Pd alloy has been proved to be an excellent catalyst in many applications, such as the electro-oxidation of formic acid, CO oxidation and oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes. However, most of the research has been focused on the shape-controlled Au-Pd alloy NCs with a single-crystal structure. Due to the existence of high-energy atoms on the twin defects, twinned structures usually will further increase their catalytic activities. It is necessary to develop a method to prepare the Au-Pd alloy with twinned structures and investigate their catalytic properties. Herein, we successfully synthesized Au-Pd alloy tripods and bipyramids with twinned structures by the cooperation of cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The tripods contain one twin plane, while the bipyramids consist of a fivefold-twinned structure. In addition, the tripods and bipyramids are both exposed by high-energy facets. We proposed that the tripods and bipyramids are evolved from bipyramid seeds and fivefold twinned seeds, respectively. The as-prepared Au-Pd tripods and bipyramids performed better activity for electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid compared to the cubic Au-Pd nanoparticles.The Au-Pd alloy has been proved to be an excellent catalyst in many applications, such as the electro-oxidation of formic acid, CO oxidation and oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes. However, most of the research has been focused on the shape-controlled Au-Pd alloy NCs with a single-crystal structure. Due to the existence of high-energy atoms on the twin defects, twinned structures usually will further increase their catalytic activities. It is necessary to develop a method to prepare the Au-Pd alloy with twinned structures and investigate their catalytic properties. Herein, we successfully synthesized Au-Pd alloy tripods and bipyramids with twinned structures by the cooperation of cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB

  9. Low concentration ratio solar array structural configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalbandian, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    The design and structural properties of a low concentration ratio solar array are discussed. The assembled module consists of six interconnected containers which are compactly stowed in a volume of 3.24 m(3) for delivery to orbit by the shuttle. The containers deploy in accordian fashion into a rectangular area of 19.4 x 68 meters and can be attached to the user spacecraft along the longitudinal centerline of the end container housing. Five rotary incremental actuators requiring about 8 watts each will execute the 180-degree rotation at each joint. Deployable masts (three per side) are used to extend endcaps from the housing in both directions. Each direction is extended by three masts requiring about 780 watts for about 27 minutes. Concentrator elements are extended by the endcaps and are supported by cable systems that are connected between the housings and endcaps. These power generating elements contain reflector panels which concentrate light onto the solar panels consisting of an aluminum radiator with solar cells positioned within the element base formed by the reflectors. A flat wire harness collects the power output of individual elements for transfer to the module container housing harnesses.

  10. Green corona and solar sector structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Svalgaard, L.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of the green-line corona for the interval 1947-1970 suggests the existence of large-scale organization of the emission. The green-line emission at high northern latitudes (approximately 40 to 60 deg) is correlated with the emission at high southern latitudes 6, 15, and 24 days later, while the low-latitude green corona seems to be correlated on both sides of the equator with no time lag. These coronal features are recurrent with a 27-day period at all latitudes between plus or minus 60 deg, and these large-scale structures are believed to be associated with the solar magnetic sector structure. The high correlation between northern and southern high-latitude emission at 15 days time lag is explained as a signature of a two-sector structure, while four sectors are associated with the 6- and 24-day peaks.

  11. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Miller, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Solar collectors for space use are examined, including both early designs and current concepts. In particular, attention is given to stiff sandwich panels and aluminum dishes as well as inflated and umbrella-type membrane configurations. The Sunflower concentrator is described as an example of a high-efficiency collector. It is concluded that stiff reflector panels are most likely to provide the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation. A new configuration consisting of a Pactruss backup structure, with identical panels installed after deployment in space, is presented. It is estimated that concentration ratios in excess of 2000 can be achieved with this concept.

  12. FACET Emittance Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, J; Hogan, M.J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Litos, M.D.; Raubenheimer, T.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The FACET beamline consists of a chicane and final focus system to compress the 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron bunches to {approx}20 {micro}m long and {approx}10 {micro}m wide. Simulations of the FACET beamline indicate the short-duration and large, 1.5% rms energy spread beams may suffer a factor of four emittance growth from a combination of chromaticity, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Emittance growth is directly correlated to head erosion in plasma wakefield acceleration and is a limiting factor in single stage performance. Studies of the geometric, CSR, and ISR components are presented. Numerical calculation of the rms emittance can be overwhelmed by long tails in the simulated phase space distributions; more useful definitions of emittance are given. A complete simulation of the beamline is presented as well, which agrees with design specifications.

  13. MULTISCALE DYNAMICS OF SOLAR MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2012-03-20

    Multiscale topological complexity of the solar magnetic field is among the primary factors controlling energy release in the corona, including associated processes in the photospheric and chromospheric boundaries. We present a new approach for analyzing multiscale behavior of the photospheric magnetic flux underlying these dynamics as depicted by a sequence of high-resolution solar magnetograms. The approach involves two basic processing steps: (1) identification of timing and location of magnetic flux origin and demise events (as defined by DeForest et al.) by tracking spatiotemporal evolution of unipolar and bipolar photospheric regions, and (2) analysis of collective behavior of the detected magnetic events using a generalized version of the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation integral algorithm. The scale-free nature of the developed algorithms makes it possible to characterize the dynamics of the photospheric network across a wide range of distances and relaxation times. Three types of photospheric conditions are considered to test the method: a quiet photosphere, a solar active region (NOAA 10365) in a quiescent non-flaring state, and the same active region during a period of M-class flares. The results obtained show (1) the presence of a topologically complex asymmetrically fragmented magnetic network in the quiet photosphere driven by meso- and supergranulation, (2) the formation of non-potential magnetic structures with complex polarity separation lines inside the active region, and (3) statistical signatures of canceling bipolar magnetic structures coinciding with flaring activity in the active region. Each of these effects can represent an unstable magnetic configuration acting as an energy source for coronal dissipation and heating.

  14. Multiscale Dynamics of Solar Magnetic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiscale topological complexity of the solar magnetic field is among the primary factors controlling energy release in the corona, including associated processes in the photospheric and chromospheric boundaries.We present a new approach for analyzing multiscale behavior of the photospheric magnetic flux underlying these dynamics as depicted by a sequence of high-resolution solar magnetograms. The approach involves two basic processing steps: (1) identification of timing and location of magnetic flux origin and demise events (as defined by DeForest et al.) by tracking spatiotemporal evolution of unipolar and bipolar photospheric regions, and (2) analysis of collective behavior of the detected magnetic events using a generalized version of the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation integral algorithm. The scale-free nature of the developed algorithms makes it possible to characterize the dynamics of the photospheric network across a wide range of distances and relaxation times. Three types of photospheric conditions are considered to test the method: a quiet photosphere, a solar active region (NOAA 10365) in a quiescent non-flaring state, and the same active region during a period of M-class flares. The results obtained show (1) the presence of a topologically complex asymmetrically fragmented magnetic network in the quiet photosphere driven by meso- and supergranulation, (2) the formation of non-potential magnetic structures with complex polarity separation lines inside the active region, and (3) statistical signatures of canceling bipolar magnetic structures coinciding with flaring activity in the active region. Each of these effects can represent an unstable magnetic configuration acting as an energy source for coronal dissipation and heating.

  15. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.; Miller, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    The Sunflower large solar concentrator, developed in the early 1970's, is a salient example of a high-efficiency concentrator. The newly emphasized needs for solar dynamic power on the Space Station and for large, lightweight thermal sources are outlined. Existing concepts for high efficiency reflector surfaces are examined with attention to accuracy needs for concentration rates of 1000 to 3000. Concepts using stiff reflector panels are deemed most likely to exhibit the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation, particularly for the higher concentration ratios. Quantitative results are shown of the effects of surface errors for various concentration and focal-length diameter ratios. Cost effectiveness is discussed. Principal sources of high cost include the need for various dished panels for paraboloidal reflectors and the expense of ground testing and adjustment. A new configuration is presented addressing both problems, i.e., a deployable Pactruss backup structure with identical panels installed on the structure after deployment in space. Analytical results show that with reasonable pointing errors, this new concept is capable of concentration ratios greater than 2000.

  16. Magnetic fine structure of solar coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the effect of a random photospheric flow on the magnetic structure of a coronal loop is presented. An initially uniform field embedded in a perfectly conducting plasma is assumed, extending between two flat parallel plates representing the solar photosphere at both ends of the loop. The field is perturbed by a sequence of randomly phased, sinusoidal flow patterns applied at one of the boundary plates, and the corresponding sequence of force-free fields is determined. It is found that the electric currents generated by these flows develop a fine structure on a scale significantly smaller than the wavelength of the velocity patterns. This suggests that magnetic energy is transferred to smaller scale via a cascade process.

  17. Reduction of rms-error in shallow faceted large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines the potential for reducing root-mean-square surface error in shallow faceted reflectors by replacing flat facets with membrane facets. Exact solutions are obtained for the small lateral deflections of equilateral triangular and rectangular membranes subject to isotropic tension and parabolic edge deflections. These solutions are used to minimize the rms-error between a facet of a shallow paraboloidal surface and its approximating membrane facet. The resulting optimum placements and edge curvatures yield membrane facets which have significantly lower rms-errors than the corresponding best-fit flat facets. The rms-error reductions are about 55 percent for equilateral triangles and 25 percent to 93 percent for rectangles, depending on aspect ratio. The results suggest that the use of membrane facets conforming to curved structural members could yield reflectors with lower rms-error, or comparable error with larger facets and, hence, fewer structural members.

  18. The interplanetary and solar magnetic field sector structures, 1962 - 1968

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field sector structure was observed from late 1962 through 1968. During this time it has been possible to study the manner in which the sector pattern and its relation to the photospheric magnetic field configuration changes from solar minimum to solar maximum. Observations were also made relating sector boundaries to specific regions on the solar disk. These and other observations related to the solar origin of the interplanetary field are briefly reviewed.

  19. Seismic probes of solar interior magnetic structure.

    PubMed

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Birch, Aaron; Gizon, Laurent; Tromp, Jeroen

    2012-09-01

    Sun spots are prominent manifestations of solar magnetoconvection, and imaging their subsurface structure is an outstanding problem of wide physical importance. Travel times of seismic waves that propagate through these structures are typically used as inputs to inversions. Despite the presence of strongly anisotropic magnetic waveguides, these measurements have always been interpreted in terms of changes to isotropic wave speeds and flow-advection-related Doppler shifts. Here, we employ partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization to determine the appropriate parametrization of the structural properties of the magnetic interior. Seven different wave speeds fully characterize helioseismic wave propagation: the isotropic sound speed, a Doppler-shifting flow-advection velocity, and an anisotropic magnetic velocity. The structure of magnetic media is sensed by magnetoacoustic slow and fast modes and Alfvén waves, each of which propagates at a different wave speed. We show that even in the case of weak magnetic fields, significant errors may be incurred if these anisotropies are not accounted for in inversions. Translation invariance is demonstrably lost. These developments render plausible the accurate seismic imaging of magnetoconvection in the Sun. PMID:23005276

  20. Seismic probes of solar interior magnetic structure.

    PubMed

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Birch, Aaron; Gizon, Laurent; Tromp, Jeroen

    2012-09-01

    Sun spots are prominent manifestations of solar magnetoconvection, and imaging their subsurface structure is an outstanding problem of wide physical importance. Travel times of seismic waves that propagate through these structures are typically used as inputs to inversions. Despite the presence of strongly anisotropic magnetic waveguides, these measurements have always been interpreted in terms of changes to isotropic wave speeds and flow-advection-related Doppler shifts. Here, we employ partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization to determine the appropriate parametrization of the structural properties of the magnetic interior. Seven different wave speeds fully characterize helioseismic wave propagation: the isotropic sound speed, a Doppler-shifting flow-advection velocity, and an anisotropic magnetic velocity. The structure of magnetic media is sensed by magnetoacoustic slow and fast modes and Alfvén waves, each of which propagates at a different wave speed. We show that even in the case of weak magnetic fields, significant errors may be incurred if these anisotropies are not accounted for in inversions. Translation invariance is demonstrably lost. These developments render plausible the accurate seismic imaging of magnetoconvection in the Sun.

  1. Search Interface Design Using Faceted Indexing for Web Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devadason, Francis; Intaraksa, Neelawat; Patamawongjariya, Pornprapa; Desai, Kavita

    2001-01-01

    Describes an experimental system designed to organize and provide access to Web documents using a faceted pre-coordinate indexing system based on the Deep Structure Indexing System (DSIS) derived from POPSI (Postulate based Permuted Subject Indexing) of Bhattacharyya, and the facet analysis and chain indexing system of Ranganathan. (AEF)

  2. Faceted Gold Nanorods: Nanocuboids, Convex Nanocuboids, and Concave Nanocuboids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Zhou, Yadong; Villarreal, Esteban; Lin, Ye; Zou, Shengli; Wang, Hui

    2015-06-10

    Au nanorods are optically tunable anisotropic nanoparticles with built-in catalytic activities. The state-of-the-art seed-mediated nanorod synthesis offers excellent control over the aspect ratios of cylindrical Au nanorods, which enables fine-tuning of plasmon resonances over a broad spectral range. However, facet control of Au nanorods with atomic-level precision remains significantly more challenging. The coexistence of various types of low-index and high-index facets on the highly curved nanorod surfaces makes it extremely challenging to quantitatively elucidate the atomic-level structure-property relationships that underpin the catalytic competence of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that cylindrical Au nanorods undergo controlled facet evolution during their overgrowth in the presence of Cu(2+) and cationic surfactants, resulting in the formation of anisotropic nanostructures enclosed by well-defined facets, such as low-index faceting nanocuboids and high-index faceting convex nanocuboids and concave nanocuboids. These faceted Au nanorods exhibit enriched optical extinction spectral features, broader plasmonic tuning range, and enhanced catalytic tunability in comparison to the conventional cylindrical Au nanorods. The capabilities to both fine-tailor the facets and fine-tune the plasmon resonances of anisotropic Au nanoparticles open up unique opportunities for us to study, in great detail, the facet-dependent interfacial molecular transformations on Au nanocatalysts using surface-enhanced Raman scattering as a time-resolved spectroscopic tool. PMID:25927399

  3. Optics Tuning Knobs for Facet

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri; Hogan, Mark J.; Wittmer, Walter; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    FACET is a new facility under construction at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The FACET beam line is designed to provide 23 GeV tightly focused and compressed electron and positron bunches for beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration research and other experiments. Achieving optimal beam parameters for various experimental conditions requires the optics capability for tuning in a sufficiently wide range. This will be achieved by using optics tuning systems (knobs). Design of such systems for FACET is discussed.

  4. Offset truss hex solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John E. (Inventor); Sturgis, James D. (Inventor); Erikson, Raymond J. (Inventor); Waligroski, Gregg A. (Inventor); Scott, Michael A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A solar energy concentrator system comprises an offset reflector structure made up of a plurality of solar energy reflector panel sections interconnected with one another to form a piecewise approximation of a portion of a (parabolic) surface of revolution rotated about a prescribed focal axis. Each panel section is comprised of a plurality of reflector facets whose reflective surfaces effectively focus reflected light to preselected surface portions of the interior sidewall of a cylindrically shaped solar energy receiver. The longitudinal axis of the receiver is tilted at an acute angle with respect to the optical axis such that the distribution of focussed solar energy over the interior surface of the solar engine is optimized for dynamic solar energy conversion. Each reflector panel section comprises a flat, hexagonally shaped truss support framework and a plurality of beam members interconnecting diametrically opposed corners of the hexagonal framework recessed within which a plurality of (spherically) contoured reflector facets is disposed. The depth of the framework and the beam members is greater than the thickness of a reflector facet such that a reflector facet may be tilted (for controlling the effective focus of its reflected light through the receiver aperture) without protruding from the panel section.

  5. The structure of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christina On-Yee

    2010-12-01

    This dissertation is devoted to expanding our understanding of the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere and variations therein with solar activity. Using spacecraft observations and numerical models, the origins of the large-scale structures and long-term trends of the solar wind are explored in order to gain insights on how our Sun determines the space environments of the terrestrial planets. I use long term measurements of the solar wind density, velocity, interplanetary magnetic field, and particles, together with models based on solar magnetic field data, to generate time series of these properties that span one solar rotation (˜27 days). From these time series, I assemble and obtain the synoptic overviews of the solar wind properties. The resulting synoptic overviews show that the solar wind around Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars is a complex co-rotating structure with recurring features and occasional transients. During quiet solar conditions, the heliospheric current sheet, which separates the positive interplanetary magnetic field from the negative, usually has a remarkably steady two- or four-sector structure that persists for many solar rotations. Within the sector boundaries are the slow and fast speed solar wind streams that originate from the open coronal magnetic field sources that map to the ecliptic. At the sector boundaries, compressed high-density and the related high-dynamic pressure ridges form where streams from different coronal source regions interact. High fluxes of energetic particles also occur at the boundaries, and are seen most prominently during the quiet solar period. The existence of these recurring features depends on how long-lived are their source regions. In the last decade, 3D numerical solar wind models have become more widely available. They provide important scientific tools for obtaining a more global view of the inner heliosphere and of the relationships between conditions at Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. When

  6. The structure of solar radio noise storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, C.; Subramanian, P.; Chambe, G.; Janardhan, P.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) routinely produces snapshot images of the full sun (field of view ~3 R⊙) at 6 or 10 frequencies between 150 and 450 MHz, with typical resolution 3 arcmin and time cadence 0.2 s. Combining visibilities from the NRH and from the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) allows us to produce images of the sun at 236 or 327 MHz, with the same field as the NRH, a resolution as low as 20 arcsec, and a time cadence 2 s. Aims: We seek to investigate the structure of noise storms (the most common non-thermal solar radio emission) which is yet poorly known. We focus on the relation of position and altitude of noise storms with the observing frequency and on the lower limit of their sizes. Methods: We use an improved version of a previously used method for combining NRH and GMRT visibilities to get high-resolution composite images and to investigate the fine structure of noise storms. We also use the NRH data over several consecutive days around the common observation days to derive the altitude of storms at different frequencies. Results: We present results for noise storms on four days. Noise storms consist of an extended halo and of one or several compact cores with relative intensity changing over a few seconds. We found that core sizes can be almost stable over one hour, with a minimum in the range 31-35 arcsec (less than previously reported). The heliocentric distances of noise storms are ~1.20 and 1.35 R⊙ at 432 and 150 MHz, respectively. Regions where storms originate are thus much denser than the ambient corona and their vertical extent is found to be less than expected from hydrostatic equilibrium. Conclusions: The smallest observed sizes impose upper limits on broadening effects due to scattering on density inhomogeneities in the low and medium corona and constrain the level of density turbulence in the solar corona. It is possible that scatter broadening has been overestimated in the past, and that the observed sizes

  7. The Many Facets of PISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Trying to understand PISA is analogous to the parable of the blind men and the elephant. There are many facets of the PISA program, and thus many ways to both applaud and critique this ambitious international program of assessment that has gained enormous importance in the crafting of contemporary educational policy. One of the facets discussed in…

  8. Long-term migration of the solar sector structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, C. L.; Heath, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic sector boundaries on the sun and in the solar wind are shown to have a high correlation with winter low pressure systems on earth. The vorticity-area index typically declines by about 10% during several days centered on the time when a sector boundary sweeps past the earth. Evidence that both the sector structure and solar activity levels can be understood as being under the influence of the same regular, internal solar mechanism is presented.

  9. Fine structure of the solar transition region - Observations and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Brueckner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of recent high spatial resolution observations of the solar transition region and temperature minimum, in the form of UV spectra and spectroheliographs from both sounding rockets and the Spacelab 2 flights of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS). Attention is given to the solar atmosphere structure implications of the HRST's observational results. The inclusion of fine structure in conjectures concerning the transition region affects the plausibility of 1D average models of the solar atmosphere, as well as the determination of temperature gradients, possible nonradiative-heating mechanisms, and the comparison of transition region structures with corresponding observations of the photosphere and corona.

  10. Recent Progress in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William K.; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, Samuel C.; Dowell, E.; Guerrant, Daniel; Lawrence Dale

    2014-01-01

    Results from recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research on the structural dynamics and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment, and results from small-scale in vacuo dynamics experiments with spinning high-aspect ratio membranes. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept, used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, is also described.

  11. Structural considerations for solar installers : an approach for small, simplified solar installations or retrofits.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Elizabeth H.; Schindel, Kay; Bosiljevac, Tom; Dwyer, Stephen F.; Lindau, William; Harper, Alan

    2011-12-01

    Structural Considerations for Solar Installers provides a comprehensive outline of structural considerations associated with simplified solar installations and recommends a set of best practices installers can follow when assessing such considerations. Information in the manual comes from engineering and solar experts as well as case studies. The objectives of the manual are to ensure safety and structural durability for rooftop solar installations and to potentially accelerate the permitting process by identifying and remedying structural issues prior to installation. The purpose of this document is to provide tools and guidelines for installers to help ensure that residential photovoltaic (PV) power systems are properly specified and installed with respect to the continuing structural integrity of the building.

  12. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURES TRIGGERING SOLAR FLARES AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, K.; Bamba, Y.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Iida, Y.; Toriumi, S.; Asai, A.

    2012-11-20

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections, the most catastrophic eruptions in our solar system, have been known to affect terrestrial environments and infrastructure. However, because their triggering mechanism is still not sufficiently understood, our capacity to predict the occurrence of solar eruptions and to forecast space weather is substantially hindered. Even though various models have been proposed to determine the onset of solar eruptions, the types of magnetic structures capable of triggering these eruptions are still unclear. In this study, we solved this problem by systematically surveying the nonlinear dynamics caused by a wide variety of magnetic structures in terms of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. As a result, we determined that two different types of small magnetic structures favor the onset of solar eruptions. These structures, which should appear near the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), include magnetic fluxes reversed to the potential component or the nonpotential component of major field on the PIL. In addition, we analyzed two large flares, the X-class flare on 2006 December 13 and the M-class flare on 2011 February 13, using imaging data provided by the Hinode satellite, and we demonstrated that they conform to the simulation predictions. These results suggest that forecasting of solar eruptions is possible with sophisticated observation of a solar magnetic field, although the lead time must be limited by the timescale of changes in the small magnetic structures.

  13. Thermally-induced structural motions of satellite solar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, John Dennis

    1999-11-01

    Satellites have experienced attitude disturbances resulting from thermally. induced structural motions of flexible appendages since the early days of the space program. Thermally-induced structural motions are typically initiated during orbital eclipse transitions when a satellite exits from or enters into the Earth's shadow. The accompanying rapid changes in thermal loading may lead to time-varying temperature differences through the cross-section of appendages resulting in differential thermal expansion and corresponding structural deformations. Since the total angular momentum of the system must be conserved, motions of flexible appendages such as booms and solar arrays result in rigid body rotations of the entire satellite. These potentially large attitude disturbances may violate satellite pointing and jitter requirements. This research investigates thermally-induced structural motions of rigid panel solar arrays (solar panels) through analytical and experimental studies. Orbital eclipse transition heating and thermal analyses were completed to study solar panel thermal behavior and provide results for input to dynamics analyses. A hybrid coordinate dynamical model was utilized to study the planar dynamics of a simple satellite consisting of a rigid hub with a cantilevered flexible solar panel undergoing thermally-induced structural motions. Laboratory experimental studies were carried out to gain new insight into thermal-structural behavior and to validate analytical models. The experimental studies investigated the thermal-structural performance of honeycomb sandwich panels and satellite solar panel hardware subject to simulated eclipse transition heating. Results from the analytical and experimental studies illustrate the importance of the through-the-thickness temperature difference and its time derivatives as well as the ratio of the characteristic thermal and structural response times in solar panel thermally-induced structural motions. The thermal-structural

  14. Facet theory applied to the construction and validation of the Aachen Aphasia Test.

    PubMed

    Willmes, K; Poeck, K; Weniger, D; Huber, W

    1983-03-01

    The linguistic performance of 120 aphasic patients of the four standard syndromes assessed by the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT) is analyzed by a nonmetric (ordinal) multidimensional scaling procedure (Smallest Space Analysis, SSA1). The linguistic structure of the test items is characterized within the framework of L. Guttman's facet theory. Three systematic components (facets) are discerned: linguistic modality, unit, and regularity. Properties of the facets as well as their relations are assessed and tested empirically by analyzing the interrelations among different items or sets of items. The spatial configurations obtained by the scaling procedure fit only partially the expectations derived from the facet-theory model. The modality facet was found to have a strong overriding influence on the aphasic test performance. The facets unit and regularity were only found for the most rigorously designed subtests. Written Language and Comprehension. The results suggest the introduction of a new combined facet linguistic complexity which reflects the dependency of the facets regularity and unit.

  15. SLAC Linac Preparations for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Bentson, L.; Kharakh, D.; Owens, A.; Schuh, P.; Seeman, J.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stanek, M.; Wittmer, W.; Yocky, G.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been cut at the two-thirds point to provide beams to two independent programs. The last third provides the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), leaving the first two-thirds available for FACET, the new experimental facility for accelerator science and test beams. In this paper, we describe this separation and projects to prepare the linac for the FACET experimental program.

  16. Supporting Structures for Flat Solar-Cell Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Strong supporting structures for flat solar photovoltaic arrays built with such commonly available materials as wood and galvanized steel sheet. Structures resist expected static loads from snow and ice as well as dynamic loads from winds and even Earthquake vibrations. Supporting structure uses inexpensive materials. Parts prefabricated to minimize assembly work in field.

  17. Dynamic of Faceted Colloidal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindoro, Melinda; Jee, Ah-Young; Yu, Changqian; Granick, Steve

    2014-03-01

    We study the emulsion induced clustering of faceted metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and their dynamics. Our approach to anisotropic building block is through the rational synthesis of water stable and highly uniform MOFs. This generates colloidal-sized MOFs of defined polyhedral shape with tunable size in micrometer range that are suitable for in situ imaging. The 3D clusters formations are promoted by hydrophilic MOFs particles confined in aqueous droplets of binary water-lutidine mixture at transition temperature. Below this temperature, the water droplet decreases in volume due to one phase mixing with lutidine which forces the N-mers of faceted particles to aggregate in close contact. We compare the faceted clusters formed to those made of spherical particles in term of the building block sphericity. Other focus of our study involves the dynamic of the clusters. We found that, unlike spherical clusters, these faceted N-mers are highly stable on large scale of temperature due to their dominant capillary force on their facet-to-facet contact.

  18. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Surface energetic and bonding characteristics of tetrahexahedral platinum nanocrystals enclosed by high-index facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Zi-Zhong; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2009-11-01

    This paper uses a molecular static approach with a many-body potential to investigate the surface energetic and bonding characteristics of tetrahexahedral platinum nanocrystals enclosed by high-index facets such as {210}, {310}, {410}, {520} and {730}. It mainly focuses on the effect of crystal size and surface Miller index on these characteristics. The results show that the surface energy and dangling bond density increase with decreasing diameter of tetrahexahedral nanocrystals and generally show an order of {210} > {730} > {520} > {310} > {410}. However, this order is not valid at crystal sizes below 7 nm or so. The results of corresponding surfaces are also presented for comparison.

  19. Impact of Financial Structure on the Cost of Solar Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.; Kreycik, C.; Bird, L.; Schwabe, P.; Cory, K.

    2012-03-01

    To stimulate investment in renewable energy generation projects, the federal government developed a series of support structures that reduce taxes for eligible investors--the investment tax credit, the production tax credit, and accelerated depreciation. The nature of these tax incentives often requires an outside investor and a complex financial arrangement to allocate risk and reward among the parties. These financial arrangements are generally categorized as 'advanced financial structures.' Among renewable energy technologies, advanced financial structures were first widely deployed by the wind industry and are now being explored by the solar industry to support significant scale-up in project development. This report describes four of the most prevalent financial structures used by the renewable sector and evaluates the impact of financial structure on energy costs for utility-scale solar projects that use photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies.

  20. The spreading of a void on a facet during electromigration

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, X.; Bauer, C.L.; Mullins, W.W.; Klinger, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    A void of cross sectional area A may spread perpendicular to the applied electric field E{sub a} during electromigration because its leading surface develops a facet whose advance is limited by the supply of steps. If the facet is immobile (no step source) and the remaining surface is free to move, and if E{sub a}A is less than a threshold value, then the void assumes a stationary elongated shape dictated by a balance between capillarity and electric field. If E{sub a}A exceeds the threshold value, however, a balance is no longer possible, and the void spreads along the facet without arrest. If the facet has limited mobility, a balance is possible for all values of E{sub a}A, resulting in an elongated moving steady-state shape. The treatment simplifies the void shape as rectangular but preserves the essential features of capillarity and surface electromigration. The authors argue that the motion of a facet on a void along the outward normal requires defects (e.g., intersecting screw dislocations) that act as step sources since homogeneous nucleation of steps on the facet is expected to be negligible. Since voids in fine-line interconnects are often observed to be partially faceted, restricted void motion and resultant spreading which depend sensitively on crystallographic features, such as defect structure and grain orientation, may indeed limit the lifetime of fine-line interconnects in electronic devices.

  1. Rough surface scattering based on facet model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khamsi, H. R.; Fung, A. K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    A model for the radar return from bare ground was developed to calculate the radar cross section of bare ground and the effect of the frequency averaging on the reduction of the variance of the return. It is shown that, by assuming that the distribution of the slope to be Gaussian and that the distribution of the length of the facet to be in the form of the positive side of a Gaussian distribution, the results are in good agreement with experimental data collected by an 8- to 18-GHz radar spectrometer system. It is also shown that information on the exact correlation length of the small structure on the ground is not necessary; an effective correlation length may be calculated based on the facet model and the wavelength of the incident wave.

  2. Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnack, D. D.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced computational techniques were used to study solar coronal heating and coronal mass ejections. A three dimensional, time dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic code was used to study the dynamic response of a model corona to continuous, slow, random magnetic footpoint displacements in the photosphere. Three dimensional numerical simulations of the response of the corona to simple smooth braiding flows in the photosphere were calculated to illustrate and understand the spontaneous formation of current filaments. Two dimensional steady state helmet streamer configurations were obtained by determining the time asymptotic state of the interaction of an initially one dimensinal transponic solar wind with a spherical potential dipole field. The disruption of the steady state helmet streamer configuration was studied as a response to shearing of the magnetic footpoints of the closed field lines under the helmet.

  3. Comparative modeling of InP solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The comparative modeling of p(+)n and n(+)p indium phosphide solar cell structures is studied using a numerical program PC-1D. The optimal design study has predicted that the p(+)n structure offers improved cell efficiencies as compared to n(+)p structure, due to higher open-circuit voltage. The various cell material and process parameters to achieve the maximum cell efficiencies are reported. The effect of some of the cell parameters on InP cell I-V characteristics was studied. The available radiation resistance data on n(+)p and p(+)p InP solar cells are also critically discussed.

  4. Facet-dependent photovoltaic efficiency variations in single grains of hybrid halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblebici, Sibel Y.; Leppert, Linn; Li, Yanbo; Reyes-Lillo, Sebastian E.; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Ed; Lee, Jiye; Melli, Mauro; Ziegler, Dominik; Angell, Daniel K.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Ashby, Paul D.; Toma, Francesca M.; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Sharp, Ian D.; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on hybrid perovskite materials have exceeded 22% efficiency due to high charge-carrier mobilities and lifetimes. Properties such as photocurrent generation and open-circuit voltage are influenced by the microscopic structure and orientation of the perovskite crystals, but are difficult to quantify on the intra-grain length scale and are often treated as homogeneous within the active layer. Here, we map the local short-circuit photocurrent, open-circuit photovoltage, and dark drift current in state-of-the-art methylammonium lead iodide solar cells using photoconductive atomic force microscopy. We find, within individual grains, spatially correlated heterogeneity in short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage up to 0.6 V. These variations are related to different crystal facets and have a direct impact on the macroscopic power conversion efficiency. We attribute this heterogeneity to a facet-dependent density of trap states. These results imply that controlling crystal grain and facet orientation will enable a systematic optimization of polycrystalline and single-crystal devices for photovoltaic and lighting applications.

  5. Facet-dependent photovoltaic efficiency variations in single grains of hybrid halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblebici, Sibel Y.; Leppert, Linn; Li, Yanbo; Reyes-Lillo, Sebastian E.; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Ed; Lee, Jiye; Melli, Mauro; Ziegler, Dominik; Angell, Daniel K.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Ashby, Paul D.; Toma, Francesca M.; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Sharp, Ian D.; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on hybrid perovskite materials have exceeded 22% efficiency due to high charge-carrier mobilities and lifetimes. Properties such as photocurrent generation and open-circuit voltage are influenced by the microscopic structure and orientation of the perovskite crystals, but are difficult to quantify on the intra-grain length scale and are often treated as homogeneous within the active layer. Here, we map the local short-circuit photocurrent, open-circuit photovoltage, and dark drift current in state-of-the-art methylammonium lead iodide solar cells using photoconductive atomic force microscopy. We find, within individual grains, spatially correlated heterogeneity in short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage up to 0.6 V. These variations are related to different crystal facets and have a direct impact on the macroscopic power conversion efficiency. We attribute this heterogeneity to a facet-dependent density of trap states. These results imply that controlling crystal grain and facet orientation will enable a systematic optimization of polycrystalline and single-crystal devices for photovoltaic and lighting applications.

  6. The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2014-01-01

    The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system, which since Pythagoras of Samos (ca. 570-495 BC) is known as the music of the spheres, is briefly reviewed from the Renaissance up to contemporary research. Copernicus' heliocentric model from 1543 suggested that the planets of our solar system form a kind of mutually ordered and quasi-synchronized system. From 1596 to 1619 Kepler formulated preliminary mathematical relations of approximate commensurabilities among the planets, which were later reformulated in the Titius-Bode rule (1766-1772), which successfully predicted the orbital position of Ceres and Uranus. Following the discovery of the ~ 11 yr sunspot cycle, in 1859 Wolf suggested that the observed solar variability could be approximately synchronized with the orbital movements of Venus, Earth, Jupiter and Saturn. Modern research has further confirmed that (1) the planetary orbital periods can be approximately deduced from a simple system of resonant frequencies; (2) the solar system oscillates with a specific set of gravitational frequencies, and many of them (e.g., within the range between 3 yr and 100 yr) can be approximately constructed as harmonics of a base period of ~ 178.38 yr; and (3) solar and climate records are also characterized by planetary harmonics from the monthly to the millennial timescales. This short review concludes with an emphasis on the contribution of the author's research on the empirical evidences and physical modeling of both solar and climate variability based on astronomical harmonics. The general conclusion is that the solar system works as a resonator characterized by a specific harmonic planetary structure that also synchronizes the Sun's activity and the Earth's climate. The special issue Pattern in solar variability, their planetary origin and terrestrial impacts (Mörner et al., 2013) further develops the ideas about the planetary-solar-terrestrial interaction with the personal contribution of 10

  7. FACET: The New User Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.J.; Erikson, R.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Li, S.Z.; Nosochkov, Y.; Phinney, N.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; Seryi, A.; Wittmer, W.; /Michigan State U.

    2011-12-13

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Its high power electron and positron beams make it a unique facility, ideal for beam-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration studies. The first 2 km of the SLAC linac produce 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron and positron beams with short bunch lengths of 20 {mu}m. A final focusing system can produce beam spots 10 {mu}m wide. User-aided Commissioning took place in summer 2011 and FACET will formally come online in early 2012. We present the User Facility, the current features, planned upgrades and the opportunities for further experiments. Accelerators are our primary tool for discovering the fundamental laws to the universe. Each new frontier we probe requires a new, more powerful method. Accelerators are therefore increasing in size and cost. The future of this field requires new accelerating techniques that can reach the high energies required over shorter distances. New concepts for high gradient acceleration include utilizing the wakes in plasma and dielectric and metallic structures. FACET was built to provide a test bed for novel accelerating concepts with its high charge and highly compressed beams. As a test facility unlike any other, it has also attracted groups interested in beam diagnostic techniques and terahertz studies. The first phase of the construction was completed in May 2011. Beam commissioning began in June and was interleaved with the installation of five experiments. Users were invited to aid with the commissioning for the month of August during which time experimental hardware and software were checked out and some first measurements were taken. FACET is currently in the process of becoming a Department of Energy User Facility for High Energy Physics.

  8. Moiré superstructures of graphene on faceted nickel islands.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yuya; Petrova, Vania; Kappes, Branden B; Ebnonnasir, Abbas; Petrov, Ivan; Xie, Ya-Hong; Ciobanu, Cristian V; Kodambaka, Suneel

    2010-11-23

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, in combination with density functional theory calculations, we investigated the morphology and electronic structure of monolayer graphene grown on the (111) and (110) facets of three-dimensional nickel islands on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate. We observed graphene domains exhibiting hexagonal and striped moiré patterns with periodicities of 22 and 12 Å, respectively, on (111) and (110) facets of the Ni islands. Graphene domains are also observed to grow, as single crystals, across adjacent facets and over facet boundaries. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy data indicate that the graphene layers are metallic on both Ni(111) and Ni(110), in agreement with the calculations. We attribute this behavior to a strong hybridization between the d-bands on Ni and the π-bands of carbon. Our findings point to the possibility of preparing large-area epitaxial graphene layers even on polycrystalline Ni substrates.

  9. Correlation between crystallographic orientation and surface faceting in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinbin; Mo, Kun; Yao, Tiankai; Lian, Jie; Fortner, Jeffrey; Jamison, Laura; Xu, Ruqing; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2016-09-01

    Here coordinated experimental efforts to quantitatively correlate crystallographic orientation and surface faceting features in UO2 are reported upon. A sintered polycrystalline UO2 sample was thermally etched to induce the formation of surface faceting features. Synchrotron Laue microdiffraction was used to obtain a precise crystallographic orientation map for the UO2 surface grains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to collect the detailed information on the surface morphology of the sample. The surface faceting features were found to be highly dependent on the crystallographic orientation. In most cases, Triple-plane structures containing one {100} plane and two {111} planes were found to dominate the surface of UO2. The orientation-faceting relationship established in this study revealed a practical and efficient method of determining crystallographic orientation based on the surface features captured by SEM images.

  10. Solar cycle and diurnal dependence of auroral structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partamies, N.; Whiter, D.; Syrjäsuo, M.; Kauristie, K.

    2014-10-01

    In order to facilitate usage of optical data in space climate studies, we have developed an automated algorithm to quantify the complexity of auroral structures as they appear in ground-based all-sky images. The image analysis is based on a computationally determined "arciness" value, which describes how arc like the auroral structures in the image are. With this new automatic method we have analyzed the type of aurora in about 1 million images of green aurora (λ = 557.7nm) captured at five camera stations in Finnish and Swedish Lapland in 1996-2007. We found that highly arc like structures can be observed in any time sector and their portion of the auroral structures varies much less than the fraction of more complex forms. The diurnal distribution of arciness is in agreement with an earlier study with high arc occurrence rate in the evening hours and steadily decreasing toward the late morning hours. The evolution of less arc-like auroral structures is more dependent on the level of geomagnetic activity and solar cycle than the occurrence of arcs. The median arciness is higher during the years close to the solar minimum than during the rest of the solar cycle. Unlike earlier proposed, the occurrence rate of both arcs and more complex auroral structures increases toward the solar maximum and decreases toward the solar minimum. The cyclic behavior of auroral structures seen in our data is much more systematic and clear than previously reported visual studies suggest. The continuous arciness index describing the complexity of auroral structures can improve our understanding on auroral morphology beyond the few commonly accepted structure classes, such as arcs, patches, and omega bands. Arciness can further be used to study the relationship of auroral structures at different complexity levels and magnetospheric dynamics.

  11. Recent Developments in Smart Adaptive Structures for Solar Sailcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worton, M. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Oakley, J.; Adetona, O.; Keel, L. H.

    2007-01-01

    The "Smart Adaptive Structures for Solar Sailcraft" development activity at MSFC has investigated issues associated with understanding how to model and scale the subsystem and multi-body system dynamics of a gossamer solar sailcraft with the objective of designing sailcraft attitude control systems. This research and development activity addressed three key tasks that leveraged existing facilities and core competencies of MSFC to investigate dynamics and control issues of solar sails. Key aspects of this effort included modeling and testing of a 30 m deployable boom; modeling of the multi-body system dynamics of a gossamer sailcraft; investigation of control-structures interaction for gossamer sailcraft; and development and experimental demonstration of adaptive control technologies to mitigate control-structures interaction.

  12. Coronal structure and the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects concerning the open coronal structure and geomagnetic disturbances are considered along with the general coronal emission characteristics and relations between the open coronal structure and the interplanetary field. The nonstatistical indicators of coronal structure are examined and questions are investigated regarding the accuracy obtained in the determination of the emission latitude and longitude in the high corona for plasma, fields, and particles. Attention is given to the problem of particle population organization by low-coronal neutral line structures in the absence of a high coronal polarity structure.

  13. Solar wind stream structure at large heliocentric distances Pioneer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Time profiles and histograms of plasma data from Pioneers 10 and 11 are examined for the period between 1975 and 1983. During this time, Pioneer 10 traveled between a heliocentric distance of 8.7 and 30.4 AU. The velocity structure of the solar wind at these heliocentric distances is found to have one of two distinct forms: approximately 70 percent of the time the solar wind has a nearly flat velocity profile. Occasionally, this flat velocity profile is accompanied by quasi-periodic variations in density and in thermal speed consistent with the concept that the 'corotating interaction regions' which are produced by the interaction of high- and low-speed streams at intermediate heliocentric distances are replaced by 'pressure regions' in the outer heliosphere. The remaining 30 percent of the time the solar wind is marked by large (50-200 km/s) long-term (30-120 days) shifts in the average solar wind velocity.

  14. The Structure and Origin of Solar Plumes: Network Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, A.; Bely-Dubau, F.; Tison, E.; Wilhelm, K.

    2009-07-01

    This study is based upon plumes seen close to the solar limb within coronal holes in the emission from ions formed in the temperature region of 1 MK, in particular, the band of Fe IX 171 Å from EIT on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. It is shown, using geometric arguments, that two distinct classes of structure contribute to apparently similar plume observations. Quasi-cylindrical structures are anchored in discrete regions of the solar surface (beam plumes), and faint extended structures require integration along the line of sight (LOS) in order to reproduce the observed brightness. This second category, sometimes called "curtains," are ubiquitous within the polar holes and are usually more abundant than the beam plumes, which depend more on the enhanced magnetic structures detected at their footpoints. It is here proposed that both phenomena are based on plasma structures in which emerging magnetic loops interact with ambient monopolar fields, involving reconnection. The important difference is in terms of physical scale. It is proposed that curtains are composed of a large number of microplumes, distributed along the LOS. The supergranule network provides the required spatial structure. It is shown by modeling that the observations can be reproduced if microplumes are concentrated within some 5 Mm of the cell boundaries. For this reason, we propose to call this second population "network plumes." The processes involved could represent a major contribution to the heating mechanism of the solar corona.

  15. Coherent structure and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the coherent structures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft. Previously established novel wavelet and higher order statistics are used in this work. We analyze the wavelet power spectrum of various solar wind plasma parameters. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series, allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data. We analyze each wavelet power spectra for transient coherency, and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. These results offer a new understanding of various processes in a turbulent regime. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for current theories of solar wind generation and describe future work for determining the relationship between the coherent structures in our ionic composition data and the structure of the coronal magnetic field. Keywords: Wavelet Power Spectrum, Coherent structure and Solar wind plasma

  16. Surface solitary waves and solitons. [in solar atmosphere and solar wind magnetic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Roberts, B.

    1984-01-01

    The solar atmosphere and solar wind are magnetically structured. The structuring can include tangential discontinuities, which can support surface waves. Such waves can be dispersive. This means that dispersion and nonlinearity can balance in such a way that solitary waves (or solitons) can result. This general point is illustrated by a two-dimensional nonlinear analysis which explicitly demonstrates the presence of long-wavelength solitary waves propagating on tangential discontinuities. If the waves are only weakly nonlinear, then they obey the Korteweg-de Vries equation and are true solitons.

  17. Coronal magnetic structure at a solar sector boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.

    1973-01-01

    The persistent large-scale coronal magnetic structure associated with a sector boundary appears to consist of a magnetic arcade loop structure extending from one solar polar region to the other in approximately the North-South direction. This structure was inferred from computer coronal magnetic field maps for days on which a stable magnetic sector boundary was near central meridian, based on an interplanetary sector boundary observed to recur during much of 1968 and 1969.

  18. Interpretation of Tadpole Structures in the Solar Radio Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried; Melnik, Valentin; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The new spectrometer on the Ukrainian radio telescope UTR-2 allows to observe the solar radio radiation at low frequencies (10-30 MHz) with a high spectral and temporal resolution. Tadpole structures were observed as special fine structures in the solar radio radiation. They show a fast drift (-2.13 MHz/s) in the dynamic radio spectrum. They appear as an ensemble of tadpoles drifting slowly (-8.3 kHz/s) from high to low frequencies. The tadpoles are interpreted as electron beams accelerated at shocks in the high corona.

  19. Facets of Speaking Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Nivja H.; Steinel, Margarita P.; Florijn, Arjen F.; Schoonen, Rob; Hulstijn, Jan H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the componential structure of second-language (L2) speaking proficiency. Participants--181 L2 and 54 native speakers of Dutch--performed eight speaking tasks and six tasks tapping nine linguistic skills. Performance in the speaking tasks was rated on functional adequacy by a panel of judges and formed the dependent variable in…

  20. Solar Array Structures for 300 kW-Class Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard; Rose, Geoff; Mann, Troy O.; Warren, Jerry E.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Kerslake, Tom; Kraft, Tom; Banik, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art solar arrays for spacecraft provide on the order of 20 kW of electrical power, and they usually consist of 3J solar cells bonded to hinged rigid panels about 1 inch in thickness. This structural construction allows specific mass and packaging volumes of up to approximately 70 W/kg and 15 kW/m3 to be achieved. Significant advances in solar array structures are required for future very-high-power spacecraft (300+ kW), such as those proposed for pre-positioning heavy cargo on or near the Moon, Mars, or asteroids using solar electric propulsion. These applications will require considerable increases in both W/kg and kW/m3, and will undoubtedly require the use of flexible-substrate designs. This presentation summarizes work sponsored by NASA's Game Changing Development Program since Oct. 2011 to address the challenge of developing 300+ kW solar arrays. The work is primarily being done at NASA Langley, NASA Glenn, and two contractor teams (ATK and DSS), with technical collaboration from AFRL/Kirtland. The near-tem objective of the project is design, analysis, and testing of 30-50 kW solar array designs that are extensible to the far-term objective of 300+ kW. The work is currently focused on three designs: the MegaFlex concept by ATK, the Mega-ROSA concept by DSS, and an in-house 300-kW Government Reference Array concept. Each of these designs will be described in the presentation. Results obtained to date by the team, as well as future work plans, for the design, analysis, and testing of these large solar array structures will be summarized.

  1. Control/structure interactions of Freedom's solar dynamic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. D.; Yunis, I.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address potential control/structures interaction (CSI) problems of large flexible multibody structures in the presence of pointing and tracking requirements. A control approach is introduced for the simultaneous tracking and vibration control of multibody space structures. The application that is discussed is Space Station Freedom configured with solar dynamic (SD) modules. The SD fine-pointing and tracking requirements may necessitate controller frequencies above the structural natural frequencies of Freedom and the SD modules. It is well known that this can give rise to CSI problems if the controller is designed without due consideration given to the structural dynamics of the system. In this paper, possible CSI problems of Freedom's solar dynamic power systems are demonstrated using a simple lumped mass model. A NASTRAN model of Freedom developed at NASA Lewis is used to demonstrate potential CSI problems and the proposed tracking and vibration control approach.

  2. Examining the Factor Structure of the 39-Item and 15-Item Versions of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire Before and After Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for People With Recurrent Depression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Research into the effectiveness and mechanisms of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) requires reliable and valid measures of mindfulness. The 39-item Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-39) is a measure of mindfulness commonly used to assess change before and after MBIs. However, the stability and invariance of the FFMQ factor structure have not yet been tested before and after an MBI; pre to post comparisons may not be valid if the structure changes over this period. Our primary aim was to examine the factor structure of the FFMQ-39 before and after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in adults with recurrent depression in remission using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Additionally, we examined whether the factor structure of the 15-item version (FFMQ-15) was consistent with that of the FFMQ-39, and whether it was stable over MBCT. Our secondary aim was to assess the general psychometric properties of both versions. CFAs showed that pre-MBCT, a 4-factor hierarchical model (excluding the “observing” facet) best fit the FFMQ-39 and FFMQ-15 data, whereas post-MBCT, a 5-factor hierarchical model best fit the data for both versions. Configural invariance across the time points was not supported for both versions. Internal consistency and sensitivity to change were adequate for both versions. Both FFMQ versions did not differ significantly from each other in terms of convergent validity. Researchers should consider excluding the Observing subscale from comparisons of total scale/subscale scores before and after mindfulness interventions. Current findings support the use of the FFMQ-15 as an alternative measure in research where briefer forms are needed. PMID:27078186

  3. A diffuse interface model of grain boundary faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, Fadi; Medlin, Douglas; Zimmerman, Jonathan; Hattar, Khalid; Foiles, Stephen

    Incorporating anisotropy into thermodynamic treatments of interfaces dates back to over a century ago. For a given orientation of two abutting grains in a pure metal, depressions in the grain boundary (GB) energy may exist as a function of GB inclination, defined by the plane normal. Therefore, an initially flat GB may facet resulting in a hill-and-valley structure. Herein, we present a diffuse interface model of GB faceting that is capable of capturing anisotropic GB energies and mobilities, and accounting for the excess energy due to facet junctions and their non-local interactions. The hallmark of our approach is the ability to independently examine the role of each of the interface properties on the faceting behavior. As a demonstration, we consider the Σ 5 < 001 > tilt GB in iron, where faceting along the { 310 } and { 210 } planes was experimentally observed. Linear stability analysis and numerical examples highlight the role of junction energy and associated non-local interactions on the resulting facet length scales. On the whole, our modeling approach provides a general framework to examine the spatio-temporal evolution of highly anisotropic GBs in polycrystalline metals. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. A diffuse interface model of grain boundary faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, F.; Medlin, D. L.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Hattar, K.; Foiles, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    Interfaces, free or internal, greatly influence the physical properties and stability of materials microstructures. Of particular interest are the processes that occur due to anisotropic interfacial properties. In the case of grain boundaries (GBs) in metals, several experimental observations revealed that an initially flat GB may facet into hill-and-valley structures with well defined planes and corners/edges connecting them. Herein, we present a diffuse interface model that is capable of accounting for strongly anisotropic GB properties and capturing the formation of hill-and-valley morphologies. The hallmark of our approach is the ability to independently examine the various factors affecting GB faceting and subsequent facet coarsening. More specifically, our formulation incorporates higher order expansions to account for the excess energy due to facet junctions and their non-local interactions. As a demonstration of the modeling capability, we consider the Σ5 <001 > tilt GB in body-centered-cubic iron, where faceting along the {210} and {310} planes was experimentally observed. Atomistic calculations were utilized to determine the inclination-dependent GB energy, which was then used as an input in our model. Linear stability analysis and simulation results highlight the role of junction energy and associated non-local interactions on the resulting facet length scales. Broadly speaking, our modeling approach provides a general framework to examine the microstructural stability of polycrystalline systems with highly anisotropic GBs.

  5. Superlattices and multilayer structures for high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, M.; Leburton, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Possible applications of superlattices to photovoltaic structures are discussed. A new concept based on doping superstructures (NIPI) can be exploited to significantly reduce recombination losses in III-V compound solar cells. A novel multijunction structure with lateral current transport is proposed. A computer simulation has been performed which shows that by optimizing the multilayer structure, short circuit current is substantially increased with minimum drop in open circuit voltage. An additional advantage of the structure is enhanced radiation tolerance. It is anticipated that this multilayer structure can be incorporated in multibandgap cells to achieve high efficiencies.

  6. Structuring of thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, Gabriele; Banse, Henrik; Wagner, Uwe; Peschel, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Laser structuring of different types of thin film layers is a state of the art process in the photovoltaic industry. TCO layers and molybdenum are structured with e.g. 1064 nm lasers. Amorphous silicon, microcrystalline silicon or cadmium telluride are ablated with 515/532 nm lasers. Typical pulse durations of the lasers in use for these material ablation processes are in the nanosecond range. Up to now the common process for CIS/CIGS cells is needle structuring. Hard metal needles scribe lines with a width of 30 to 60 μm into the semiconductor material. A laser technology would have some advantages compared to mechanical scribing. The precision of the lines would be higher (no chipping effects), the laser has no wear out. The dead area (distance from P1 structuring line to P3 structuring line) can be significantly smaller with the laser technology. So we investigate the structuring of CIS/CIGS materials with ultra short pulse lasers of different wavelengths. The ablation rates and the structuring speeds versus the repetition rates have been established. For the different layer thicknesses and line widths we determined the necessary energy densities. After all tests we can calculate the possible reduction of the dead area on the thin film module. The new technology will result in an increase in the efficiency per module of up to 4 %.

  7. Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

  8. Low-cost solar array structure development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Early studies of flat-plate arrays have projected costs on the order of $50/square meter for installed array support structures. This report describes an optimized low-cost frame-truss structure that is estimated to cost below $25/square meter, including all markups, shipping an installation. The structure utilizes a planar frame made of members formed from light-gauge galvanized steel sheet and is supposed in the field by treated-wood trusses that are partially buried in trenches. The buried trusses use the overburden soil to carry uplift wind loads and thus to obviate reinforced-concrete foundations. Details of the concept, including design rationale, fabrication and assembly experience, structural testing and fabrication drawings are included.

  9. Visible-light photocatalysis in Cu2Se nanowires with exposed {111} facets and charge separation between (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) polar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ning, Lichao; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Congjie; Yang, Heqing; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2015-05-28

    The search for active narrow band gap semiconductor photocatalysts that directly split water or degrade organic pollutants under solar irradiation remains an open issue. We synthesized Cu2Se nanowires with exposed {111} facets using ethanol and glycerol as morphology controlling agents. The {111} facets were found to be the active facets for decomposing organic contaminants in the entire solar spectrum. Based on the polar structure of the Cu2Se {111} facets, a charge separation model between polar (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) surfaces is proposed. The internal electric field between polar (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) surfaces created by spontaneous polarization drives charge separation. The reduction and oxidation reactions occur on the positive (111) and negative (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) polar surfaces, respectively. This suggests the surface-engineering of narrow band gap semiconductors as a strategy to fabricate photocatalysts with high reactivity in the entire solar spectrum. The charge separation model can deepen the understanding of charge transfer in other semiconductor nanocrystals with high photocatalytic activities and offer guidance to design more effective photocatalysts as well as new types of solar cells, photoelectrodes and photoelectric devices. PMID:25920433

  10. FRESH INSIGHTS ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE SOLAR CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne; New, Roger; Serenelli, Aldo M. E-mail: w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.uk E-mail: r.new@shu.ac.uk

    2009-07-10

    We present new results on the structure of the solar core, obtained with new sets of frequencies of solar low-degree p modes obtained from the BiSON network. We find that different methods used in extracting the different sets of frequencies cause shifts in frequencies, but the shifts are not large enough to affect solar structure results. We find that the BiSON frequencies show that the solar sound speed in the core is slightly larger than that inferred from data from Michelson Doppler Imager low-degree modes, and the uncertainties on the inversion results are smaller. Density results also change by a larger amount, and we find that solar models now tend to show smaller differences in density compared to the Sun. The result is seen at all radii, a result of the fact that conservation of mass implies that density differences in one region have to cancel out density differences in others, since our models are constructed to have the same mass as the Sun. The uncertainties on the density results are much smaller too. We attribute the change in results to having more, and lower frequency, low-degree mode frequencies available. These modes provide greater sensitivity to conditions in the core.

  11. SOLAR RADIO BURSTS WITH SPECTRAL FINE STRUCTURES IN PREFLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Tan, Baolin; Huang, Jing; Tan, Chengming; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Simões, Paulo J.A.

    2015-01-20

    Good observations of preflare activities are important for us to understand the origin and triggering mechanism of solar flares, and to predict the occurrence of solar flares. This work presents the characteristics of microwave spectral fine structures as preflare activities of four solar flares observed by the Ondřejov radio spectrograph in the frequency range of 0.8-2.0 GHz. We found that these microwave bursts which occurred 1-4 minutes before the onset of flares have spectral fine structures with relatively weak intensities and very short timescales. They include microwave quasi-periodic pulsations with very short periods of 0.1-0.3 s and dot bursts with millisecond timescales and narrow frequency bandwidths. Accompanying these microwave bursts are filament motions, plasma ejection or loop brightening in the EUV imaging observations, and non-thermal hard X-ray emission enhancements observed by RHESSI. These facts may reveal certain independent, non-thermal energy releasing processes and particle acceleration before the onset of solar flares. They may help us to understand the nature of solar flares and to predict their occurrence.

  12. The interplanetary magnetic structure that guides solar relativistic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, S.; Démoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K.-L.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Relating in-situ measurements of relativistic solar particles to their parent activity in the corona requires understanding the magnetic structures that guide them from their acceleration site to the Earth. Relativistic particle events are observed at times of high solar activity, when transient magnetic structures such as interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) often shape the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). They may introduce interplanetary paths that are longer than nominal, and magnetic connections rooted far from the nominal Parker spiral. Aims: We present a detailed study of the IMF configurations during ten relativistic solar particle events of the 23rd activity cycle to elucidate the actual IMF configuration that guides the particles to the Earth, where they are measured by neutron monitors. Methods: We used magnetic field (MAG) and plasma parameter measurements (SWEPAM) from the ACE spacecraft and determined the interplanetary path lengths of energetic particles through a modified version of the velocity dispersion analysis based on energetic particle measurements with SoHO/ERNE. Results: We find that the majority (7/10) of the events is detected in the vicinity of an ICME. Their interplanetary path lengths are found to be longer (1.5-2.6 AU) than those of the two events propagating in the slow solar wind (1.3 AU). The longest apparent path length is found in an event within the fast solar wind, probably caused by enhanced pitch angle scattering. The derived path lengths imply that the first energetic and relativistic protons are released at the Sun at the same time as electron beam emitting type III radio bursts. Conclusions: The timing of the first high-energy particle arrival on Earth is mainly determined by the type of IMF in which the particles propagate. Initial arrival times are as expected from Parker's model in the slow solar wind, and significantly longer in or near transient structures such as ICMEs.

  13. Faceted Boolean Library

    2004-06-01

    This software consists of C++ classes for intersecting pairs of triangular tiled manifold (water tight) surfaces under a Boolean operation. It contains the following classes: FSPolyhedron -- Holds the data structures for defining the vertices, connections, bounding boxes, and unit normal vectors of the triangles. The first two are input the rest are computed by this class FBIntersect -- Finds edges of intersection of the triangles in the two input polyhedra KDTree — A binarymore » space partitioning tree based on the bounding boxes of the triangles, and methods for returning triangles that intersect a given ray or overlap a given axis-aligned box FBRetriangulate -- Performs retriangulation on triangles that have been intersected and thus have new internal and/or boundary edges FBTiler — The retriangulation algorithm FBDataUtil — Various static functions used by the other classes IntegerHash — A hash table class FBClassify — Classifies triangles in body A with respect to body B with respect to inside, outside, or same orientation FBlmprint.cpp — Code for imprinting one polyhedron onto another« less

  14. Temperature-dependent side-facets of GaAs nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Mun Teng; Zheng, Kun; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Zou, Jin

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effect of growth temperature on the structural properties of Au-catalysed epitaxial GaAs semiconductor nanopillars grown by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition is investigated by electron microscopy. It has been found that the growth temperature plays a significant role on the evolution of side-facets of zinc-blende structured GaAs nanopillars. At a growth temperature of 550 °C, six \\{112\\} side-facets are formed; whereas at a higher growth temperature of 600 °C, six \\{110\\} side-facets are observed. It is believed that the formation of \\{112\\} side-facets is a kinetically dominated process while the formation of \\{110\\} side-facets is a thermodynamical process. Besides, the diffusion-induced nanopillar foundations present the same \\{112\\} edge side-facets regardless of the growth temperature.

  15. Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona During the December 4, 2002 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.; Riley, Pete; Lionello, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The solar magnetic field plays a key role in determining coronal. The principal input to MHD models is the observed solar magnetic field. 3D MHD models can be used to compare with eclipse and coronograph images, SOHO images (LOSCO, EIT), Ulysses and WIND spacecraft data, and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements. MHD computations can tell us about the structure of the corona. Eclipses can help us to verify the accuracy of the models. 4 December, 2002 total eclipce: visible in the southern hemisphere (South Atlantic, southern Africa, Indian Ocean, and Australia). Total in center Angola is at 06:00 UT.

  16. Modeling the multi-ion structure of the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Provornikova, Elena; Wang, Tongjiang

    2014-06-01

    The solar corona is typically observed in EUV by SDO/AIA and other instruments using the heavy ion emission lines such as Fe IX, Fe XII, and other ion emission lines. However, the relative (to protons) abundance of the emitting ions is very low and the collisional coupling between the Fe ions and electrons decreases rapidly with height in the low corona, while gravitational settling may become significant in quiescent long-lived magnetic structures, such as streamers. Thus, the structure of the weakly collisional solar corona imaged in Fe IX (and other heavy ions) may differ significantly from the structure of the main electron-proton constituents of the corona. The electron structure is observed by white light coronagraphs, and during solar eclipses in the low corona. I present the results of multi-fluid modeling of coronal streamers and other magnetic structures that demonstrate the effects of weak coupling between the heavy ions and the coronal electron-proton components, and show that the multi-ion coronal structure must be taken into account in interpretation of EUV observations.

  17. Radial microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshini, Bindu; Das, Mukul Kumar; Sen, Mrinal; Kumar, Subindu

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a theoretical model for radial p-n junction microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structures in the space between microwires has been developed. Incorporation of pyramidal structures results in reflection of light, which would otherwise be unused, and illuminates side walls of the microwires. This additional illumination enhances absorption and, hence, efficiency of the whole structure. Efficiency enhancement is analyzed by varying different device parameters e.g., radius and length of each microwire and packing fraction of the structure. Results show that the maximum fractional efficiency enhancement can be obtained as 30% by suitable choice of these parameters.

  18. Spectropolarimetry of fine magnetized structures in the upper solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas Anthony

    2013-12-01

    One of the earliest indications of magnetic fields acting in the solar atmosphere came at the beginning of the 20th century when George Hale noted a "decided definiteness of structure" in photographs within the Hydrogen Balmer-alpha line core. Fine structure both in the chromosphere and in the corona result from processes that are not well understood but accepted as a consequence of the solar magnetic field. Our knowledge of this field is lacking, and until recently, the assumed relationship between fine thermal structure and the magnetic field remained untested. Here, spectropolarimetric diagnostics of fine structures in the solar chromosphere and cool corona are advanced using the infrared He I triplet at 1083 nm. Precise calibration procedures are developed for the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS), recently commissioned at the Dunn Solar Telescope. Together with high-order adaptive optics, we simultaneously map fine structures while obtaining a polarimetric sensitivity of up to 2 x 10--4 of the incoming intensity. These instrument improvements result in the first maps of the He I polarized signatures within an active region superpenumbra, where Hale first recognized fine-structuring. Selective absorption and emission processes due to non-equilibrium optical pumping are recognized. Our interpretation, using advanced inversions of the He I triplet, provides confirmation of Hale's initial suspicion---the fine structures of the solar chromosphere are visual markers for the magnetic field. Yet, the fine chromospheric thermal structure is not matched by an equivalently fine magnetic structure. Our ability to measure this field suggests the utility of the He I triplet as an inner boundary condition for the inner heliospheric magnetic field. In the corona itself, we infer the vector properties of a catastrophically-cooled coronal loop, uniting space-based and ground-based instrumentation. We determine how fine loops are anchored in the photosphere via a

  19. Hinge specification for a square-faceted tetrahedral truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    A square-faceted tetrahedral truss is geometrically analyzed. Expressions are developed for single degree of freedom hinges which allow packaging of the structure into a configuration in which all members are parallel and closely packed in a square pattern. Deployment is sequential, thus providing control over the structure during deployment.

  20. Aspects of faceting in the study of percipitate interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmen, U.; Witcomb, M.J.; Westmacott, K.H.

    1989-07-01

    The role of faceting in the formation of interface structures between a precipitate and its matrix is considered and illustrated with TEM observations on a number of different alloy systems. Crystal symmetry and elastic constraints from the solid matrix are shown to be important factors in the development of morphologies and interfacial structures. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Structure and sources of solar wind in the growing phase of 24th solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Goryaev, Farid; Shugay, Julia; Rodkin, Denis; Veselovsky, Igor

    2015-04-01

    We present analysis of the solar wind (SW) structure and its association with coronal sources during the minimum and rising phase of 24th solar cycle (2009-2011). The coronal sources prominent in this period - coronal holes, small areas of open magnetic fields near active regions and transient sources associated with small-scale solar activity have been investigated using EUV solar images and soft X-ray fluxes obtained by the CORONAS-Photon/TESIS/Sphinx, PROBA2/SWAP, Hinode/EIS and AIA/SDO instruments as well as the magnetograms obtained by HMI/SDO. It was found that at solar minimum (2009) velocity and magnetic field strength of high speed wind (HSW) and transient SW from small-scale flares did not differ significantly from those of the background slow speed wind (SSW). The major difference between parameters of different SW components was seen in the ion composition represented by the C6/C5, O7/O6, Fe/O ratios and the mean charge of Fe ions. With growing solar activity, the speed of HSW increased due to transformation of its sources - small-size low-latitude coronal holes into equatorial extensions of large polar holes. At that period, the ion composition of transient SW changed from low-temperature to high-temperature values, which was caused by variation of the source conditions and change of the recombination/ionization rates during passage of the plasma flow through the low corona. However, we conclude that criteria of separation of the SW components based on the ion ratios established earlier by Zhao&Fisk (2009) for higher solar activity are not applicable to the extremely weak beginning of 24th cycle. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement eHeroes (project n° 284461, www.eheroes.eu).

  2. On the choice of parameters in solar-structure inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Basu, Sarbani; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    1999-10-01

    The observed solar p-mode frequencies provide a powerful diagnostic of the internal structure of the Sun and permit us to test in considerable detail the physics used in the theory of stellar structure. Among the most commonly used techniques for inverting such helioseismic data are two implementations of the optimally localized averages (OLA) method, namely the subtractive optimally localized averages (SOLA) and multiplicative optimally localized averages (MOLA). Both are controlled by a number of parameters, the proper choice of which is very important for a reliable inference of the solar internal structure. Here we make a detailed analysis of the influence of each parameter on the solution and indicate how to arrive at an optimal set of parameters for a given data set.

  3. A Study of the Parameters for Solar Structure Inversion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Basu, Sarbani; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    The observed solar p-mode frequencies provide an extremely useful diagnostic of the internal structure of the Sun, and permit us to test in considerable detail the physics used in the theory of stellar structure. Two implementations of the optimally localized averages (OLA) method are amongst the most commonly used techniques for inverting helioseismic data, namely the Subtractive Optimally Localized Averages (SOLA) and Multiplicative Optimally Localized Averages (MOLA). In both of them, there are a number of parameters that must be chosen in order to find the solution. Proper choice of the parameters is very important to determine correctly the variation of the internal structure along the solar radius. In this work, we make a detailed analysis on the influence of each parameter on the solution and indicate how to arrive at an optimal set of parameters for a given data set.

  4. Raman scattering characterization of space solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintairov, Alexander M.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Paleeva, E. V.; Sorokina, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    A contactless method for the determination of the free-carrier density and the composition distribution across the thickness of 3-5 multi-layer solar cell structures, using the Raman scattering method, is developed. The method includes a step analysis of Raman spectra from optical phonons and phonon-plasmon modes of different layers. The method provides simultaneous measurements of the element composition and the thickness of the structure's layers together with the free-carrier density. The results of measurements of the free-carrier density composition distributions of the liquid phase epitaxy grown AlGaAs/GaAs and GaSb solar cell structures are presented and discussed.

  5. Morphological Stability of Faceted Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbaschian, Reza; Golyshev, V. D.; Gonik, M.; Tsvetivsky, V.; deVahlDavis, G.; Leonardi, E.

    2001-01-01

    The major focus of this investigation is to study the fundamentals of layer spreading mechanisms during growth of doped Ge (a facet forming material), and to determine the conditions for morphological instability of vicinal solid-liquid interfaces. The investigation will also lead to the determination of the effect of dopants on the layer growth kinetics, step free energy, and dopant capture by the advancing ledges. The theoretical treatment of growth of faceted interfaces indicates that the kinetics of a step on a growing vicinal interface considerably depends on its angle of inclination, the melt concentration, and characteristics of flow currents in the melt. The morphological stability of the interface also depends on these parameters, as well as on the density and spreading velocity of the steps. However, the treatment of the instability of the interface by the layer growth mechanism is rather difficult because it requires exact knowledge of the thermal and solutal fields, hydrodynamics of the melt, and supercooling at the interface. The results of recent space experiments of the principal investigator involving directional solidification of faceted Bi-Sn alloys have shown that the morphological stability of various crystallographic orientations is significantly affected by the anistropy in interfacial properties of the faceted alloy in general, and the interface kinetics in particular. These findings have also raised many important and fundamental questions, particularly with respect to the behavior of interfacial steps, which need to be addressed via additional groundbased and microgravity experiments. For the present investigation we will use a novel crystal growth technique which provides axial heat flux close to the solid-liquid boundary. The Axial Heat Processing (AHP) technique allows for precise control and determination of the heat and mass transfer close to the crystallization front, and the establishment of a planar interface over the entire cross

  6. Study of Magnetic Structure in the Solar Photosphere and Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Robert W.; Avrett, Eugene; Nisenson, Peter; Uitenbroek, Han; vanBallegooijen, Adriaan

    1998-01-01

    This grant funded an observational and theoretical program to study the structure and dynamics of the solar photosphere and low chromosphere, and the spectral signatures that result. The overall goal is to learn about mechanisms that cause heating of the overlying atmosphere, and produce variability of solar emission in spectral regions important for astrophysics and space physics. The program exploited two new ground-based observational capabilities: one using the Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma for very high angular resolution observations of the photospheric intensity field (granulation) and proxies of the magnetic field (G-band images); and the other using the Near Infrared Magnetograph at the McMath-Pierce Solar Facility to map the spatial variation and dynamic behavior of the solar temperature minimum region using infrared CO lines. We have interpreted these data using a variety of theoretical and modelling approaches, some developed especially for this project. Previous annual reports cover the work done up to 31 May 1997. This final report summarizes our work for the entire period, including the period of no-cost extension from 1 June 1997 through September 30 1997. In Section 2 we discuss observations and modelling of the photospheric flowfields and their consequences for heating of the overlying atmosphere, and in Section 3 we discuss imaging spectroscopy of the CO lines at 4.67 mu.

  7. Pressure structure of solar coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishan, V.

    1987-01-01

    The steady state pressure structure of a coronal loop is discussed in terms of the MHD global invariants of an incompressible plasma. The steady state is represented by the superposition of two Chandrasekhar-Kendall functions corresponding to (n=m=0) and (n=m=1) modes. The relative contribution of the two modes (epsilon) is found to depend on the surface pressure of the coronal loop which is also the pressure of the external medium. The mixed mode state does not exist for high values of the external pressure because epsilon becomes complex.

  8. Method of making quasi-grain boundary-free polycrystalline solar cell structure and solar cell structure obtained thereby

    DOEpatents

    Gonzalez, Franklin N.; Neugroschel, Arnost

    1984-02-14

    A new solar cell structure is provided which will increase the efficiency of polycrystalline solar cells by suppressing or completely eliminating the recombination losses due to the presence of grain boundaries. This is achieved by avoiding the formation of the p-n junction (or other types of junctions) in the grain boundaries and by eliminating the grain boundaries from the active area of the cell. This basic concept can be applied to any polycrystalline material; however, it will be most beneficial for cost-effective materials having small grains, including thin film materials.

  9. Facets formation mechanism of GaN hexagonal pyramids on dot-patterns via selective MOVPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Kitamura, Shota; Sawaki, Nobuhiko

    1996-11-01

    Three-dimensional GaN pyramids have been successfully obtained on dot-patterned GaN(0001)/sapphire substrates by using the selective MOVPE technique. The dot-pattern is a hexagon arranged with a 5{micro}m width and a 10{micro}m spacing. The GaN structure comprises a hexagonal pyramid covered with six {l_brace}1{bar 1}01{r_brace} pyramidal facets on the side or a frustum of a hexagonal pyramid having a (0001) facet on the top. The facet formation mechanism has been investigated by observing the facet structure with the growth time. The {l_brace}1{bar 1}01{r_brace} facets are very stable during the growth. The (0001) facet growth is dominant at the initial growth but almost stops at a certain growth time and then the facet structure is maintained. The appearance of the self-limited (0001) facet is attributed to the balance of flux between incoming Ga atoms from the vapor phase to the (0001) surface and outgoing Ga atoms from the (0001) surface to the {l_brace}1{bar 1}01{r_brace} surface via migration. The longer the diffusion length of the Ga atoms on the (0001) surface is, the more the surface migration is enhanced, resulting in the appearance of the wider (0001) facet on the top.

  10. Imaging solar coronal magnetic structures in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartledge, N. P.

    The study of solar coronal structures and, in particular prominences, is a key part of understanding the highly complex physical mechanisms occurring in the Sun's atmosphere. Solar prominences are important in their own right and some of the most puzzling questions in solar theory have arisen through their study. For example, how do they form and how is their mass continuously replenished? How can the magnetic field provide their continuous support against gravity over time periods of several months? How can such cool, dense material exist in thermal equilibrium in the surrounding coronal environment? Why do they erupt? A study of their structure and that of the surrounding medium is important in determining the nature of the coronal plasma and magnetic field. Also, prominences are closely associated with other key phenomena such as coronal mass ejections and eruptive solar flares which occur as a prominence loses equilibrium and rises from the solar surface. Our current understanding of these fascinating structures is extremely limited and we know very little about their basic global structure. In fact, recent prominence observations have caused our basic paradigms to be challenged (Priest, 1996) and so we must set up new models in order to gain even a fundamental understanding. Prominences are highly nonlinear, three-dimensional structures. Large feet (or barbs) reach out from the main body of a prominence and reach down to the photosphere where the dense material continuously drains away. These provide a real clue to the three-dimensional nature of the coronal field and its relation to the photospheric field. It is important, therefore, to make stereographic observations of prominences in order to gain a basic understanding of their essentially three-dimensional nature and attempt to formulate new paradigms for their structure and evolution. There is no doubt that the study of prominences in three dimensions is a crucial exercise if we are to develop a better

  11. Design of a lattice-based faceted classification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David A.; Atkins, John

    1992-01-01

    We describe a software reuse architecture supporting component retrieval by facet classes. The facets are organized into a lattice of facet sets and facet n-tuples. The query mechanism supports precise retrieval and flexible browsing.

  12. A Study of the Structure of the Source Region of the Solar Wind in Support of a Solar Probe Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal , Shadia R.

    1998-01-01

    Despite the richness of the information about the physical properties and the structure of the solar wind provided by the Ulysses and SOHO observations, fundamental questions regarding the nature of the coronal heating mechanisms, their source, and the manifestations of the fast and slow solar wind, still remain unanswered. The last unexplored frontier to establish the connection between the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere, its extension into interplanetary space, and the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of the solar wind, is the corona between 1 and 30 R(sub s). A Solar Probe mission offers an unprecedented opportunity to explore this frontier. The uniqueness of this mission stems from its trajectory in a plane perpendicular to the ecliptic which reaches within 9 R(sub s), of the solar surface over the poles and 3 - 9 R(sub s), at the equator. With a complement of simultaneous in situ and remote sensing observations, this mission is destined to have a significant impact on our understanding of the fundamental processes that heat the corona and drive the solar wind. The Solar Probe should be able to detect remnants and signatures of the processes which heat the corona and accelerate the solar wind. The primary objective of this proposal was to explore the structure of the different source regions of the solar wind through complementary observational and theoretical studies in support of a Solar Probe mission.

  13. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  14. Three dimensional structures of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Three dimensional structure of an active region is determined from observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 2, 6, and 20 cm. This region exhibits a single magnetic loop of length approx. 10 to the 10th power cm. The 2 cm radiation is mostly thermal bremsstrahlung and originates from the footpoints of the loop. The 6 and 20 cm radiation is dominated by the low harmonic gyroresonance radiation and originates from the upper portion of the legs or the top of the loop. The loop broadens toward the apex. The top of the loop is not found to be the hottest point, but two temperature maxima on either side of the loop apex are observed, which is consistent with the model proposed for long loops. From 2 and 6 cm observations it can be concluded that the electron density and temperature cannot be uniform in a plane perpendicular to the axis of the loop; the density should decrease away from the axis of the loop.

  15. Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    The problem of chromospheric dynamics and heating consists of two problems: one, concerning the magnetic network on the boundary of supergranulation cells (CB), where the oscillation period is seven minutes, and the other, concerning the cell interior (CI), where the oscillation period is three minutes. The observational data on the oscillations and the emission of radiation can be used to determine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere provided answers are known to three critical questions, concerning: the nature of the waves powering the bright points, the origin of the observed oscillation periods and the mechanism of chromospheric heating. The recent modeling of the dynamics of the CI, which combines a sophisticated treatment of gas dynamics and radiative transfer in a one-dimensional model with empirical velocity input from the observations, answered the first of these questions: the waves powering K(sub 2upsilon), bright points are propagating acoustic waves. This firm conclusion declares invalid the model of Leibacher & Stein, which explains the observed period with standing acoustic waves in a chromospheric cavity. On the third question, the heating of the chromosphere in the CI, their model predicts that the temperature in the chromosphere is declining in the outward direction up to a height of at least I Mm most of the time, so even the time-average temperature is dropping monotonically in the outward direction, implying that lines formed in the chromosphere up to a height of at least 1 Mm appear in absorption most of the time and everywhere in the CI. The problem of the CI can be resolved with a two-component model, which combines a model for K(sub 2upsilon), bright points with a model for the background. The bright point model has the same aims as the CS94 model, except that the empirical driving from the LRK93 observations is replaced by impulsive excitation, as suggested by the properties of the Klein-Gordon equation.

  16. Structural damages of maxillofacial biopolymers under solar aging.

    PubMed

    Eleni, P N; Krokida, M K; Frangou, M J; Polyzois, G L; Maroulis, Z B; Marinos-Kouris, D

    2007-09-01

    Additional types of silicone biopolymers are widely used in maxillofacial prosthetics. Therefore, the knowledge of the solar radiation's effect on their structural stability is highly important. Four different industrially synthesized biomaterials were examined, called Episil Europe 1, Europe 2, Europe 3 and Africa 3, which were exposed to solar radiation (UVA, UVB) for eight different time periods (from 8 to 168 h). Structural damages due to irradiation exposure were investigated by mechanical tests (compression) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) methods. Simple mathematical models were developed, containing parameters with physical meaning such as maximum stress (sigma(max)), maximum strain (epsilon), elasticity parameter (E), and viscoelastic parameter (p), for the compression test, and melting temperature (T (m)) and Enthalpy in melting point (Heat) for DSC. With increasing irradiation time their maximum stress and strain decreased significantly, and the materials lost their elasticity and molecular stability. A decrement in their melting points and heats was observed as irradiation time was increasing. Finally, experimental results demonstrated that solar radiation has a severe effect on the structural stability of the examined biomaterials.

  17. Solar chromospheric fine scale structures: dynamics and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.

    2012-01-01

    The solar chromosphere is a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer of the solar atmosphere that exhibits several phenomena on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution and long-duration observations, employing mostly lines, such as Halpha, the Ca II infrared lines and the Ca II H and K lines, obtained both from ground-based telescope facilities (e.g. DST, VTT, THEMIS, SST, DOT), as well as state-of-the-art satellites (e.g. SOHO, TRACE, HINODE) reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured chromospheric environment. What is known in literature as the chromospheric fine-scale structure mainly consists of small fibrilar-like features that connect various parts of quiet/active regions or span across the chromospheric network cell interiors, showing a large diversity of both physical and dynamic characteristics. The highly dynamic, fine-scale chromospheric structures are mostly governed by flows which reflect the complex geometry and dynamics of the local magnetic field and play an important role in the propagation and dissipation of waves. A comprehensive study of these structures requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved and investigation of their intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric levels. Furthermore, due to their large number present on the solar surface, it is essential to investigate their impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through processes such as magnetic reconnection and propagation of waves. The in-depth study of all aforementioned characteristics and processes, with the further addition of non-LTE physics, as well as the use of three-dimensional numerical simulations poses a fascinating challenge for both theory and numerical modeling of chromospheric fine-scale structures.

  18. Atomic structure of interface states in silicon heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    George, B M; Behrends, J; Schnegg, A; Schulze, T F; Fehr, M; Korte, L; Rech, B; Lips, K; Rohrmüller, M; Rauls, E; Schmidt, W G; Gerstmann, U

    2013-03-29

    Combining orientation dependent electrically detected magnetic resonance and g tensor calculations based on density functional theory we assign microscopic structures to paramagnetic states involved in spin-dependent recombination at the interface of hydrogenated amorphous silicon crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterojunction solar cells. We find that (i) the interface exhibits microscopic roughness, (ii) the electronic structure of the interface defects is mainly determined by c-Si, (iii) we identify the microscopic origin of the conduction band tail state in the a-Si:H layer, and (iv) present a detailed recombination mechanism.

  19. Novel photocatalytic antibacterial activity of TiO2 microspheres exposing 100% reactive {111} facets.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Qin, Ying; Cao, Qingqing; Hu, Bingqing; Huang, Zhiwei; Ye, Ling; Tang, Xingfu

    2011-12-21

    TiO(2) microspheres constructed by well-crystallized faceted nanorods with high aspect ratios expose 100% photocatalytic reactive {111} facets on the spherical surface. The microspheres demonstrated excellent photocatalytic antibacterial activity towards Staphylococcus aureus due to effective suppression of photoinduced electron-hole pair recombination and active TiO(2)@˙OH core-shell structure. PMID:22051605

  20. Three-dimensional evaluation of the facet joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folio, Les R.

    1990-04-01

    Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging nave revolurionalized analysis of vertebral anatomy and pathology. Further advances with 3-dimensional imaging have recently become an important adjunct for diagnosis and treatment in structural abnormalities. Facets are intimately related to their surrounding musculature and malalignment may cause pain directly or indirectly. High resolution 3-dimensional reformations of CT Scans give us new insight on structure and function of facet joints, since their motion and architecture are ever complex. It is well documented in the literature that facet joint biomecnanics is a partial contributor to the myriad at causes of low back The term "facet Joint syndrome" was coined in 1933 by GhorMley.3 The osteopathic lesion complex is well defined by LeRoy and McCole and comparison of roentgenographic findings before and after manipulation has teen described by Long and Lioyd.4,5 since alterations in facet biamechanics are an important aspect of osteopathic manipulative therapy (OT), 3-dimensional hign resolution imaging will prove to be a great asset in osteopathic research. Rotating the spine allows for different viewing perspectives to provide optimal and consistent measurements of the facet joint. Rotations are performed on the X, Y and 7, axis and measurements pre and post-manipulation are performed and compared on matching axis and perspectives. Rotation about the X, Y and Z axis help appreciate the 3-dimensionality of the vertebral column to project to the viewer a feeling that the spine is floating in space before them. This does give the viewer a 3-D understanding of the object however, only at a perspective at a Lime.

  1. Dynamical structure of solar radio burst type III as evidence of energy of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Zety Sharizat Binti

    2013-11-01

    Observations of low frequency solar type III radio bursts associated with the ejection of plasma oscillations localized disturbance is due to excitation atoms in the plasma frequency incoherent radiations play a dominant role at the meter and decimeter wavelengths. Here, we report the results of the dynamical structure of solar flare type III that occurred on 9th March 2012 at National Space Centre, Sg Lang, Selangor, Malaysia by using the CALLISTO system. These bursts are associated with solar flare type M6 which suddenly ejected in the active region AR 1429 starting at 03:32 UT and ending at 05:00 UT with the peak at 04:12 UT. The observation showed an initial strong burst occurred due to strong signal at the beginning of the phase. We also found that both solar burst and flares tend to be a numerous on the same day and probability of chance coincidence is high. It is clearly seen that an impulsive lace burst was detected at 4:24 UT and it is more plausible that the energies are confined to the top of the loop when we compared with X-ray results. Associated with this event was type II with velocities 1285 km/s and type IV radio sweeps along with a full halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) first seen in SOHO/LASCO C2 imagery at 09/0426 Z. We concluded that the significance of study solar burst type III lies in the fact that the emission at decimetric wavelength comes from the role of magnetic field in active region that may provide the key to the energy release mechanism in a flare.

  2. Structuring of the Magnetospheric Plasma by the Solar Terrestrial Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Dominique

    The existence of a magnetospheric cavity around a planet depends on the interactions of the planet including its atmospheric and magnetic environment with the interplanetary medium. A magnetized planet like the Earth sets a magnetic obstacle against the supersonic super-Alfvénic solar wind flow. The solar wind pressure shapes the magnetosphere, compressing it on the dayside to a few Earth's radii while the nightside tail extends to hundreds of Earth's radii. Away from a homogeneous and constant distribution, very different plasma regions have been identified inside the magnetosphere. Mass and energy transfers with the solar wind are considered as responsible for the magnetospheric plasma structure and dynamics at large-scale as well as for impulsive or transient events. However, these transfer processes remain poorly understood, and reconnection and other working assumptions are presently put forward and developed. Detailed descriptions of the magnetosphere at various complexity levels can be found in textboo ks on space plasma physics. This simplified introduction only aims at proposing keys to get an insight into the structure of the magnetospheric plasma, into a few basic concepts and specific processes at the root of the present understanding and also into questions and issues to be addressed in the future.

  3. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  4. Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays, phase 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays were investigated. The STACBEAM (stacking triangular articulated compact beam) concept was selected. The primary component, the solar array blanket, is stored in a folded configuration and is deployed by controlled linear extension. Blanket stiffness is attained by axially tensioning the blanket and by providing periodic lateral ribs and standoffs which attach the blanket to the beam at several places along its length. The STACBEAM deploys sequentially (one bay at a time) using a deployer of sufficient rigidity so that beam stiffness is not degraded during deployment. The beam does not rotate during deployment, thus making blanket beam attachment possible in the packaged condition. In addition to high bending stiffness, the STACBEAM possesses high torsional rigidity due to nonflexible diagonals. The concept is adaptable to various size and loading requirements by changing member diameter and baylength, thus affecting the ratio of packaged and deployed length.

  5. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the third year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona," between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period June 16, 1998 to August 15, 1999. This is also the final report for this contract. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the three-year duration of this contract we have published 49 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 3 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles. We summarize our progress during the third year of the contract. Full descriptions of our work can be found in the cited publications, a few of which are attached to this report.

  6. THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURE OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H. K.; Bale, S. D.; Mallet, A.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Horbury, T. S.; Wicks, R. T.

    2012-10-20

    We present a measurement of the scale-dependent, three-dimensional structure of the magnetic field fluctuations in inertial range solar wind turbulence with respect to a local, physically motivated coordinate system. The Alfvenic fluctuations are three-dimensionally anisotropic, with the sense of this anisotropy varying from large to small scales. At the outer scale, the magnetic field correlations are longest in the local fluctuation direction, consistent with Alfven waves. At the proton gyroscale, they are longest along the local mean field direction and shortest in the direction perpendicular to the local mean field and the local field fluctuation. The compressive fluctuations are highly elongated along the local mean field direction, although axially symmetric perpendicular to it. Their large anisotropy may explain why they are not heavily damped in the solar wind.

  7. Doubly slanted layer structures in holographic gelatin emulsions: solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jenny; Chan, Po Shan; Sun, Caiming; Wing Ho, Choi; Tam, Wing Yim

    2010-04-01

    We have fabricated doubly slanted layer structures in holographic gelatin emulsions using a double-exposure two-beam interference from two light sources with different wavelengths. The doubly slanted layers, with different spacings and overlapping with each other, are fabricated such that they are slanted in opposite directions making a 30° angle with the holographic plate. The doubly slanted layer structures exhibit photonic stop bands corresponding to the two layered structures. More importantly, diffracted light beams from the slanted layers travel in different directions and emerge, through internal reflections, at the opposite edges of the gelatin plate. The doubly slanted layer structures could be used as solar concentrators such that sunlight is separated into different components and steered directly to photovoltaics with the corresponding wavelength sensitivities to enhance energy conversion efficiency.

  8. Structure of Water Ice in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David; Jenniskens, Peter; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Nearly all of the properties of solar system ices (chemical reaction rates, volatile retention and release, vaporization behavior, thermal conductivity, infrared spectral characteristics and the like) are a direct consequence of ice structure. However, the characterization of astrophysical ices and their laboratory analogs has typically utilized indirect measurements which yield phenomenological interpretations. When water ice is vapor-deposited at 14 K and warmed until it volatilizes in moderate vacuum, the ice undergoes a series of amorphous to amorphous and amorphous to crystalline structural transitions which we have characterized by diffraction methods. These structural transitions correlate with and underlie many phenomena observed in laboratory infrared and gas release experiments. The elucidation of the dynamic structural changes which occur in vapor-deposited water ice as a function of time, temperature and radiation history allows for the more complete interpretation of remote observations of astrophysical ices and their laboratory analogs.

  9. MUNI Ways and Structures Building Integrated Solar Membrane Project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Randall

    2014-07-03

    The initial goal of the MUNI Ways and Structures Building Integrated Solar Membrane Installation Project was for the City and County of San Francisco (CCSF) to gain experience using the integrated higher efficiency solar photovoltaic (PV) single-ply membrane product, as it differs from the conventional, low efficiency, thin-film PV products, to determine the feasibility of success of larger deployment. As several of CCSF’s municipal rooftops are constrained with respect to weight restrictions, staff of the Energy Generation Group of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) proposed to install a solar PV system using single-ply membrane The installation of the 100 kW (DC-STC) lightweight photo voltaic (PV) system at the MUNI Ways and Structures Center (700 Pennsylvania Ave., San Francisco) is a continuation of the commitment of the City and County of San Francisco (CCSF) to increase the pace of municipal solar development, and serve its municipal facilities with clean renewable energy. The fourteen (14) solar photovoltaic systems that have already been installed at CCSF municipal facilities are assisting in the reduction of fossil-fuel use, and reduction of greenhouse gases from fossil combustion. The MUNI Ways & Structures Center roof has a relatively low weight-bearing capacity (3.25 pounds per square foot) and use of traditional crystalline panels was therefore rejected. Consequently it was decided to use the best available highest efficiency Building-Integrated PV (BIPV) technology, with consideration for reliability and experience of the manufacturer which can meet the low weight-bearing capacity criteria. The original goal of the project was to provide an opportunity to monitor the results of the BIPV technology and compare these results to other City and County of San Francisco installed PV systems. The MUNI Ways and Structures Center was acquired from the Cookson Doors Company, which had run the Center for many decades. The building was

  10. [Septic arthritis of thoracic facet joint].

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelghani, K; Gérard-Dran, D; Combe, B

    2009-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the facet joint is a rare condition. We report a case of septic arthritis of both a thoracic facet joint and a wrist. Clinical manifestations were consistent with a spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated infection of facet joints of T1 and T2. A surgical biopsy of the wrist isolated a type B streptococcus. The same organism was found in urine culture. The patient had an uneventful recovery on antibiotics.

  11. Solar Multiple Eruptions from a Confined Magnetic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Chae, Jongchul

    2016-09-01

    How eruption can recur from a confined magnetic structure is discussed based on the Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of the NOAA active region 11444, which produced three eruptions within 1.5 hr on 2012 March 27. The active region (AR) had the positive-polarity magnetic fields in the center surrounded by the negative-polarity fields around. Since such a distribution of magnetic polarity tends to form a dome-like magnetic fan structure confined over the AR, the multiple eruptions were puzzling. Our investigation reveals that this event exhibits several properties distinct from other eruptions associated with magnetic fan structures: (i) a long filament encircling the AR was present before the eruptions; (ii) expansion of the open-closed boundary (OCB) of the field lines after each eruption was suggestive of the growing fan-dome structure, and (iii) the ribbons inside the closed magnetic polarity inversion line evolved in response to the expanding OCB. It thus appears that in spite of multiple eruptions the fan-dome structure remained undamaged, and the closing back field lines after each eruption rather reinforced the fan-dome structure. We argue that the multiple eruptions could occur in this AR in spite of its confined magnetic structure because the filament encircling the AR was adequate for slipping through the magnetic separatrix to minimize the damage to its overlying fan-dome structure. The result of this study provides a new insight into the productivity of eruptions from a confined magnetic structure.

  12. Contacting ZnO Individual Crystal Facets by Direct Write Lithography.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Nikolay; Volk, János; Erdélyi, Róbert; Lukács, István Endre; Nagata, Takahiro; Sturm, Chris; Grundmann, M

    2016-09-14

    Many advanced electronic devices take advantage of properties developed at the surface facets of grown crystals with submicrometer dimensions. Electrical contacts to individual crystal facets can make possible the investigations of facet-dependent properties such as piezoelectricity in ZnO or III-nitride crystals having noncentrosymmetric structure. However, a lithography-based method for developing contacts to individual crystal facets with submicrometer size has not yet been demonstrated. In this report we study the use of electron beam-induced deposition (EBID), a direct write lithography method, for contacting individual facets of ZnO pillars within an electron microscope. Correlating structural and in situ deposition and electrical data, we examine proximity effects during the EBID and evaluate the process against obtaining electrically insulated contact lines on neighboring and diametrically opposite ZnO facets. Parameters such as incident beam energy geometry and size of the facets were investigated with the view of minimizing unwanted proximity broadening effects. Additionally, we show that the EBID direct write method has the required flexibility, resolution, and minimized proximity deposition for creating prototype devices. The devices were used to observe facet-dependent effects induced by mechanical stress on single ZnO pillar structures. PMID:27533719

  13. Effects of Dye Structure in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, Anna R.

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are photovoltaic devices that may compete with standard silicon solar cells due to their ease of construction and lower cost [32]. Ruthenium dye structures, such as N3 (Ru -- (4,4' -- dicarboxylic acid -- 2,2' -- bipyridine)2(NCS)2), have shown promise for collection efficiencies near silicon photovoltaic levels [20, 33]. DSSCs have not achieved the reproducibility and maximum efficiency of silicon solar cells [33, 34]. Altering ligands on the dye molecules may affect the energies of light that are absorbed by the DSSC. Photovoltaic testing, including current versus voltage tests, of DSSCs with both narrow band monochromated light sources and broadband (AM1.5 solar simulator) allows comparison between maximum efficiency, short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, and spectral response (SR) for the dye molecules. By studying how the efficiency and power output change with different dye structures, the nature of how to increase efficiency of the DSSC can be addressed. Conjugation length of the ligands in ruthenium dye molecules can be shown, through square-well and Huckel theory calculations, to have a role in changing the HOMO-LUMO gap of the molecules and the absorption of specific wavelengths of light by the DSSC. The efficiency, max power, short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and SR were all measured for the DSSCs at wavelengths from 350 nm to 690 nm using a monochromated light source. Measurements taken at 20 nm steps reveal trends in the photon acceptance for dye molecules that can be linked to the conjugation length of the ligands in the dye through the SR. The change in the SR centroid and UV-VIS measurements indicate a trend toward increasing optimal wavelength with increasing conjugation length in the dye molecules; however these trends are not as pronounced as theoretical calculations for the dyes. This difference in wavelength shift occurs due to the theoretical calculations accounting for only the ligands

  14. The Many Facets and Applications of Text Structure in Supporting Educational Trajectories of Elementary and Middle Grade Children in Content Area Reading Comprehension and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albro, Elizabeth; Williams, Joanna P.; Wijekumar, Kausalai; Meyer, Bonnie J. F.; Harris, Karen R.

    2015-01-01

    Content area reading comprehension and writing have been a challenge for children in the U.S. schools for many years as evidenced by state and national assessments. One promising solution to the problem is text structure based instruction that promotes strategic selection, encoding, retrieval, and use of information for myriads of activities…

  15. Vacuum-deposited diphenyl-diketo-pyrrolopyrrole solar cell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, G.; Dobrikov, G.; Heinrichova, P.; Karashanova, D.; Dimov, D.; Vala, M.; Weiter, M.; Zhivkov, I.

    2016-03-01

    Photoelectrical parameters were measured of solar cell ITO|PEDOT:PSS|composite| Al samples. The active composite film was deposited in vacuum by co-evaporation of 3,6-bis(5-(benzofuran-2-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-2,5-bis(2-ethylhexyl)pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4(2H,5H)-dione (DPP(TBFu)2) and fullerene (C60). Additional DPP(TBFu)2:C60 composite films were studied by spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and visible region (UV-VIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that solvent annealing (SVA) of composite DPP(TBFu)2:C60 vacuum-deposited films with tetrahydrofuran vapors improves the solar cell parameters by increasing the efficiency more than tenfold. This could be related to the more homogenized structure of the SVA composite film, as observed by SEM. The increased light absorption, as shown by UV-VIS spectroscopy, around the peak at 350 nm contributed to the better SVA solar cell performance. Photogeneration in the samples follows a monomolecular mechanism.

  16. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For the meeting of the AAS/SPD in Albuquerque, NM, I organized a Topical Session of the AAS on Structure and Dynamics of Chromospheres. The grant support was used to bring to the US two of the speakers from abroad. I had invited them for presentations at the Session: Dr. Klaus Wilhelm, the former PI of the SUMER instrument on SOHO, from the Max-Planck Institut in Lindau, Germany, and Dr. Sirajul Hasan, from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore, India. Both speakers preceded their trip to the AAS meeting with a stay at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, where they interacted with members of the Solar and Stellar Physics division. The highlights of the visits were the talks at the AAS/SPD meeting, in which six invited speakers told the audience of astronomers about current problems in solar physics and their relation to stellar problems. An important result of the visits is a paper by Dr. Wilhelm and me on 'Observations of the upper solar chromosphere with SUMER on SOHO', which has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics for publication.

  17. Division II: Commission 12: Solar Radiation and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander; Cauzzi, Gianna; Pillet, Valentin Martinez; Asplund, Martin; Brandenburg, Axel; Chou, Dean-Yi; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Gan, Weiqun; Kuznetsov, Vladimir D.; Rovira, Marta G.; Shchukina, Nataliya; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2015-08-01

    The President of C12, Alexander Kosovichev, presented the status of the Commission and its working Group(s). Primary activities included organization of international meetings (IAU Symposia, Special Sessions and Joint Discussion); review and support of proposals for IAU sponsored meetings; organization of working groups on the Commission topics to promote the international cooperation; preparation of triennial report on the organizational and science activities of Commission members. Commission 12 broadly encompasses topics of solar research which include studies of the Sun's internal structure, composition, dynamics and magnetism (through helioseismology and other techniques), studies of the quiet photosphere, chromosphere and corona, and also research of the mechanisms of solar radiation, and its variability on various time scales. Some overlap with topics covered by Commission 10 Solar Activity is unavoidable, and many activities are sponsored jointly by these two commissions. The Commission website can be found at http://sun.stanford.edu/IAU-Com12/, with information about related IAU Symposiums and activities, and links to appropriate web sites.

  18. Complex Dynamic Flows in Solar Flare Sheet Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David E.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Observations of high-energy emission from solar flares often reveal the presence of large sheet-like structures, sometimes extending over a space comparable to the Sun's radius. Given that these structures are found between a departing coronal mass ejection and the post-eruption flare arcade, it is natural to associate the structure with a current sheet; though the relationship is unclear. Moreover, recent high-resolution observations have begun to reveal that the motions in this region are highly complex, including reconnection outflows, oscillations, and apparent wakes and eddies. We present a detailed first look at the complicated dynamics within this supra-arcade plasma, and consider implications for the interrelationship between the plasma and its embedded magnetic field.

  19. Thermal stability analysis of the fine structure of solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, Pascal; Malherbe, Jean-Marie; Schmieder, Brigitte; Raadu, Mickael A.

    1986-01-01

    The linear thermal stability of a 2D periodic structure (alternatively hot and cold) in a uniform magnetic field is analyzed. The energy equation includes wave heating (assumed proportional to density), radiative cooling and both conduction parallel and orthogonal to magnetic lines. The equilibrium is perturbed at constant gas pressure. With parallel conduction only, it is found to be unstable when the length scale 1// is greater than 45 Mn. In that case, orthogonal conduction becomes important and stabilizes the structure when the length scale is smaller than 5 km. On the other hand, when the length scale is greater than 5 km, the thermal equilibrium is unstable, and the corresponding time scale is about 10,000 s: this result may be compared to observations showing that the lifetime of the fine structure of solar prominences is about one hour; consequently, our computations suggest that the size of the unresolved threads could be of the order of 10 km only.

  20. Generation of magnetic structures on the solar photosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gangadhara, R. T.; Krishan, V.; Bhowmick, A. K.; Chitre, S. M.

    2014-06-20

    The lower solar atmosphere is a partially ionized plasma consisting of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms. In this, which is essentially a three-fluid system, the Hall effect arises from the treatment of the electrons and ions as two separate fluids and the ambipolar diffusion arises from the inclusion of neutrals as the third fluid. The Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion have been shown to be operational in a region beginning from near the photosphere up to the chromosphere. In a partially ionized plasma, the magnetic induction is subjected to ambipolar diffusion and the Hall drift in addition to the usual resistive dissipation. These nonlinear effects create sharp magnetic structures which then submit themselves to various relaxation mechanisms. A first-principles derivation of these effects in a three-fluid system and an analytic solution to the magnetic induction equation in a stationary state are presented, which in the general case includes the Hall effect, ambipolar diffusion, and ohmic dissipation. The temporal evolution of the magnetic field is then investigated under the combined as well as the individual effects of the Hall drift and ambipolar diffusion to demonstrate the formation of steep magnetic structures and the resultant current sheet formation. These structures have just the right features for the release of magnetic energy into the solar atmosphere.

  1. Effects of CeO2 Support Facets on VOx/CeO2 Catalysts in Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Wei, Zhehao; Gao, Feng; Kovarik, Libor; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

    2014-05-13

    CeO2 supports with dominating facets, i.e., low index (100), (110) and (111) facets, are prepared. The facet effects on the structure and catalytic performance of supported vanadium oxide catalysts are investigated using oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol as a model reaction. In the presence of mixed facets, Infrared and Raman characterizations demonstrate that surface vanadia species preferentially deposit on CeO2 (100) facets, presumably because of its higher surface energy. At the same surface vanadium densities, VOx species on (100) facets show better dispersion, followed by (110) and (111) facets. The VOx species on CeO2 nanorods with (110) and (100) facets display higher activity and lower apparent activation energies compared to that on CeO2 nanopolyhedras with dominating (111) facets and CeO2 nanocubes with dominating (100) facets. The higher activity for VOx/CeO2(110) might be related to the more abundant oxygen vacancies present on the (110) facets, evidenced from Raman spectroscopic measurements.

  2. Understanding how lake populations of arctic char are structured and function with special consideration of the potential effects of climate change: a multi-faceted approach.

    PubMed

    Budy, Phaedra; Luecke, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Size dimorphism in fish populations, both its causes and consequences, has been an area of considerable focus; however, uncertainty remains whether size dimorphism is dynamic or stabilizing and about the role of exogenous factors. Here, we explored patterns among empirical vital rates, population structure, abundance and trend, and predicted the effects of climate change on populations of arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) in two lakes. Both populations cycle dramatically between dominance by small (≤300 mm) and large (>300 mm) char. Apparent survival (Φ) and specific growth rates (SGR) were relatively high (40-96%; SGR range 0.03-1.5%) and comparable to those of conspecifics at lower latitudes. Climate change scenarios mimicked observed patterns of warming and resulted in temperatures closer to optimal for char growth (15.15 °C) and a longer growing season. An increase in consumption rates (28-34%) under climate change scenarios led to much greater growth rates (23-34%). Higher growth rates predicted under climate change resulted in an even greater predicted amplitude of cycles in population structure as well as an increase in reproductive output (Ro) and decrease in generation time (Go). Collectively, these results indicate arctic char populations (not just individuals) are extremely sensitive to small changes in the number of ice-free days. We hypothesize years with a longer growing season, predicted to occur more often under climate change, produce elevated growth rates of small char and act in a manner similar to a "resource pulse," allowing a sub-set of small char to "break through," thus setting the cycle in population structure.

  3. Amazing growth of helium crystal facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsymbalenko, V. L.

    2015-11-01

    This review systematizes experimental data from the study of two unusual phenomena: the superslow growth of a perfect, growth-defect-free crystal facet, and the abrupt transition of a crystal facet to an anomalous state with a growth rate greater by two to three orders of magnitude than the normal value (the 'burstlike growth effect').

  4. Empirically Derived Strength of Residential Roof Structures for Solar Installations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Sanchez, Alfred; Campos, Ivan A.; Gerstle, Walter H.

    2014-12-01

    Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet structural design codes. This work is intended to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong given the conservatism in codes, documented allowable strengths, roof structure system effects, and beam composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction. This report provides results from a testing program to provide actual load carrying capacity of residential rooftops. The results reveal that the actual load carrying capacity of structural members and systems tested are significantly stronger than allowable loads provided by the International Residential Code (IRC 2009) and the national structural code found in Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10). Engineering analysis of residential rooftops typically ignores the system affects and beam composite action in determining rooftop stresses given a potential PV installation. This extreme conservatism combined with conservatism in codes and published allowable stress values for roof building materials (NDS 2012) lead to the perception that well built homes may not have adequate load bearing capacity to enable a rooftop PV installation. However, based on the test results presented in this report of residential rooftop structural systems, the actual load bearing capacity is several times higher than published values (NDS 2012).

  5. Measured and predicted root-mean-square errors in square and triangular antenna mesh facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Deflection shapes of square and equilateral triangular facets of two tricot-knit, gold plated molybdenum wire mesh antenna materials were measured and compared, on the basis of root mean square (rms) differences, with deflection shapes predicted by linear membrane theory, for several cases of biaxial mesh tension. The two mesh materials contained approximately 10 and 16 holes per linear inch, measured diagonally with respect to the course and wale directions. The deflection measurement system employed a non-contact eddy current proximity probe and an electromagnetic distance sensing probe in conjunction with a precision optical level. Despite experimental uncertainties, rms differences between measured and predicted deflection shapes suggest the following conclusions: that replacing flat antenna facets with facets conforming to parabolically curved structural members yields smaller rms surface error; that potential accuracy gains are greater for equilateral triangular facets than for square facets; and that linear membrane theory can be a useful tool in the design of tricot knit wire mesh antennas.

  6. Growth of Au@Ag core-shell pentatwinned nanorods: tuning the end facets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiqing; Goh, Hao Ying Johnny; Firdoz, Shaik; Lu, Xianmao

    2013-09-16

    Au@Ag core-shell nanorods with tunable end facets are obtained by coating Au bipyramids (BPs) with Ag. The resultant nanorods exhibit a pentatwinned crystal structure with tips terminated with either {110} or {111} facets. The control over the end facets is achieved by varying the capping agents and tuning the reduction rate of Ag. Specifically, when Ag is reduced slowly, Au@Ag nanorods with flat {110} end facets are formed with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as the capping agent. If CTAB is replaced with cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), Au@Ag nanorods with tips terminated with {111} facets are obtained. However, at a high Ag reduction rate, dumbbell-shaped Au@Ag nanorods are formed, with either CTAB or CTAC as the capping agent. The morphological evolution of the nanorods in each case is closely followed and a growth mechanism is proposed. PMID:23934938

  7. A Study of the Structure of the Source Region of the Solar Wind in Support of a Solar Probe Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, Shadia R.; Forman, M. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Despite the richness of the information about the physical properties and the structure of the solar wind provided by the Ulysses and SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) observations, fundamental questions regarding the nature of the coronal heating mechanisms, their source, and the manifestations of the fast and slow solar wind, still remain unanswered. The last unexplored frontier to establish the connection between the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere, its extension into interplanetary space, and the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of the solar wind, is the corona between 1 and 30 R(sub s). A Solar Probe mission offers an unprecedented opportunity to explore this frontier. Its uniqueness stems from its trajectory in a plane perpendicular to the ecliptic which reaches within 9 R(sub s) of the solar surface over the poles and 3 - 9 R(sub s) at the equator. With a complement of simultaneous in situ and remote sensing observations, this mission is destined to detect remnants and signatures of the processes which heat the corona and accelerate the solar wind. In support of this mission, we fulfilled the following two long-term projects: (1) Study of the evolution of waves and turbulence in the solar wind (2) Exploration of signatures of physical processes and structures in the corona. A summary of the tasks achieved in support of these projects are given below. In addition, funds were provided to support the Solar Wind 9 International Conference which was held in October 1998. A brief report on the conference is also described in what follows.

  8. Static stability of the Space Station solar array FASTMast structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, John F.; Acquaviva, Thomas H.

    1995-01-01

    The combined loads test of the 3-Bay FASTMast marks the end of the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) effort to characterize the behavior of the principal Space Station solar array support structure. The primary objective of this test and analysis effort was to develop a method to predict structural stability failure modes under flight-like applied loads. Included at the beginning of this report is a brief historical perspective of the hardware design development and FASTMast structural stability problem evolution. Once an understanding of the solution process has been established, test and analysis details are presented and related to the postulated failure theories. The combined load test series subjected the structure to a combination of transverse, moment, and torsion loads similar to that expected in the service environment. Nonlinear finite element (FE) models were developed and large displacement analyses were performed to support the test effort and failure mode predictions. Details of the test configuration as well as test and analysis results are presented. The results were then critiqued to establish valid and successful support of the failure mode assessments. Finally, study conclusions are drawn and recommendations for safe operation of the FASTMast structure are presented for consideration.

  9. The Role of Structural Models in the Solar Sail Flight Validation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.

    2004-01-01

    NASA is currently soliciting proposals via the New Millennium Program ST-9 opportunity for a potential Solar Sail Flight Validation (SSFV) experiment to develop and operate in space a deployable solar sail that can be steered and provides measurable acceleration. The approach planned for this experiment is to test and validate models and processes for solar sail design, fabrication, deployment, and flight. These models and processes would then be used to design, fabricate, and operate scaleable solar sails for future space science missions. There are six validation objectives planned for the ST9 SSFV experiment: 1) Validate solar sail design tools and fabrication methods; 2) Validate controlled deployment; 3) Validate in space structural characteristics (focus of poster); 4) Validate solar sail attitude control; 5) Validate solar sail thrust performance; 6) Characterize the sail's electromagnetic interaction with the space environment. This poster presents a top-level assessment of the role of structural models in the validation process for in-space structural characteristics.

  10. Inverted Silicon Nanopencil Array Solar Cells with Enhanced Contact Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoguang; Shu, Lei; Lin, Hao; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Guofa; Yip, Senpo; Xiu, Fei; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-09-01

    Although three-dimensional nanostructured solar cells have attracted extensive research attention due to their superior broadband and omnidirectional light-harvesting properties, majority of them are still suffered from complicated fabrication processes as well as disappointed photovoltaic performances. Here, we employed our newly-developed, low-cost and simple wet anisotropic etching to fabricate hierarchical silicon nanostructured arrays with different solar cell contact design, followed by systematic investigations of their photovoltaic characteristics. Specifically, nano-arrays with the tapered tips (e.g. inverted nanopencils) are found to enable the more conformal top electrode deposition directly onto the nanostructures for better series and shunt conductance, but its insufficient film coverage at the basal plane would still restrict the charge carrier collection. In contrast, the low-platform contact design facilitates a substantial photovoltaic device performance enhancement of ~24%, as compared to the one of conventional top electrode design, due to the shortened current path and improved lateral conductance for the minimized carrier recombination and series resistance. This enhanced contact structure can not only maintain excellent photon-trapping behaviors of nanostructures, but also help to eliminate adverse impacts of these tapered nano-morphological features on the contact resistance, providing further insight into design consideration in optimizing the contact geometry for high-performance nanostructured photovoltaic devices.

  11. MODEL COMPARISON FOR THE DENSITY STRUCTURE ACROSS SOLAR CORONAL WAVEGUIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2015-10-01

    The spatial variation of physical quantities, such as the mass density, across solar atmospheric waveguides governs the timescales and spatial scales for wave damping and energy dissipation. The direct measurement of the spatial distribution of density, however, is difficult, and indirect seismology inversion methods have been suggested as an alternative. We applied Bayesian inference, model comparison, and model-averaging techniques to the inference of the cross-field density structuring in solar magnetic waveguides using information on periods and damping times for resonantly damped magnetohydrodynamic transverse kink oscillations. Three commonly employed alternative profiles were used to model the variation of the mass density across the waveguide boundary. Parameter inference enabled us to obtain information on physical quantities such as the Alfvén travel time, the density contrast, and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The inference results from alternative density models were compared and their differences quantified. Then, the relative plausibility of the considered models was assessed by performing model comparison. Our results indicate that the evidence in favor of any of the three models is minimal, unless the oscillations are strongly damped. In such a circumstance, the application of model-averaging techniques enables the computation of an evidence-weighted inference that takes into account the plausibility of each model in the calculation of a combined inversion for the unknown physical parameters.

  12. Inverted Silicon Nanopencil Array Solar Cells with Enhanced Contact Structures

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaoguang; Shu, Lei; Lin, Hao; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Guofa; Yip, SenPo; Xiu, Fei; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-01-01

    Although three-dimensional nanostructured solar cells have attracted extensive research attention due to their superior broadband and omnidirectional light-harvesting properties, majority of them are still suffered from complicated fabrication processes as well as disappointed photovoltaic performances. Here, we employed our newly-developed, low-cost and simple wet anisotropic etching to fabricate hierarchical silicon nanostructured arrays with different solar cell contact design, followed by systematic investigations of their photovoltaic characteristics. Specifically, nano-arrays with the tapered tips (e.g. inverted nanopencils) are found to enable the more conformal top electrode deposition directly onto the nanostructures for better series and shunt conductance, but its insufficient film coverage at the basal plane would still restrict the charge carrier collection. In contrast, the low-platform contact design facilitates a substantial photovoltaic device performance enhancement of ~24%, as compared to the one of conventional top electrode design, due to the shortened current path and improved lateral conductance for the minimized carrier recombination and series resistance. This enhanced contact structure can not only maintain excellent photon-trapping behaviors of nanostructures, but also help to eliminate adverse impacts of these tapered nano-morphological features on the contact resistance, providing further insight into design consideration in optimizing the contact geometry for high-performance nanostructured photovoltaic devices. PMID:27671709

  13. Method for partially coating laser diode facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dholakia, Anil R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Bars of integral laser diode devices cleaved from a wafer are placed with their p regions abutting and n regions abutting. A thin BeCu mask having alternate openings and strips of the same width as the end facets is used to mask the n region interfaces so that multiple bars can be partially coated over their exposed p regions with a reflective or partial reflective coating. The partial coating permits identification of the emitting facet from the fully coated back facet during a later device mounting procedure.

  14. Discrete subresolution structures in the solar transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dere, K. P.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.; Brueckner, G. E.; Cook, J. W.; Socker, D. G.

    1987-09-01

    During operations on the Spacelab-2 Shuttle mission, the NRL High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS) recorded spectra of a variety of solar features in the 1200 - 1700 Å wavelength region which contains spectral lines and continua well suited for investigating the temperature minimum, the chromosphere and transition zone. These data show that, at the highest spatial resolution, the transition zone spectra are broken up from a continuous intensity distribution along the slit into discrete emission elements. If these structures are modelled as an ensemble of subresolution filaments, one finds that these filaments have typical radii of from 3 to 30 km and that the cross-sectional fill factor is in the range from 10-5 to 10-2.

  15. The Structure of the Solar Wind at Large Heliocentric Distances: CIRs and their Successors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1997-01-01

    Co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) and their associated shock pairs are dominant structures in the solar wind between the heliocentric distances of 2 and 8 AU. At larger heliocentric distances, these structures undergo a qualitative change. Shocks decay to a point where they are often difficult to detect, and may have little influence on the dynamics of the solar wind. Interaction regions spread and merge, though they appear to retain their identity to surprisingly large distances from the Sun. Solar wind and IMF data from the Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, and Voyager 2 spacecraft were used to conduct a comprehensive survey of CIRs and their successors between heliocentric distances of 1 and 55 AU over the last two solar cycles. The structure of the solar wind varied in a consistent fashion with heliocentric distance. Similar structures were observed at similar heliocentric distances by all three spacecraft during different portions of the solar cycle.

  16. The Structure of the Solar Wind at Large Heliocentric Distances: CIRs and their Successors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    Co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) and their associated shock pairs are dominant structures in the solar wind between the heliocentric distances of 2 and 8 AU. At larger heliocentric distances, these structures undergo a qualitative change. Shocks decay to a point where they are often difficult to detect, and may have little influence on the dynamics of the solar wind. Interaction regions spread and merge, though they appear to retain their identity to surprisingly large distances from the Sun. Solar wind and IMF data from the Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, and Voyager 2 spacecraft were used to conduct a comprehensive survey of CIRs and their successors between heliocentric distances of 1 and 55 AU over the last two solar cycles. The structure of the solar wind varied in a consistent fashion with heliocentric distance. Similar structures were observed at similar heliocentric distances by all three spacecraft during different portions of the solar cycle.

  17. Input Shaping to Reduce Solar Array Structural Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael J.; Tolson, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Structural vibrations induced by actuators can be minimized using input shaping. Input shaping is a feedforward method in which actuator commands are convolved with shaping functions to yield a shaped set of commands. These commands are designed to perform the maneuver while minimizing the residual structural vibration. In this report, input shaping is extended to stepper motor actuators. As a demonstration, an input-shaping technique based on pole-zero cancellation was used to modify the Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) actuator commands for the Lewis satellite. A series of impulses were calculated as the ideal SADA output for vibration control. These impulses were then discretized for use by the SADA stepper motor actuator and simulated actuator outputs were used to calculate the structural response. The effectiveness of input shaping is limited by the accuracy of the knowledge of the modal frequencies. Assuming perfect knowledge resulted in significant vibration reduction. Errors of 10% in the modal frequencies caused notably higher levels of vibration. Controller robustness was improved by incorporating additional zeros in the shaping function. The additional zeros did not require increased performance from the actuator. Despite the identification errors, the resulting feedforward controller reduced residual vibrations to the level of the exactly modeled input shaper and well below the baseline cases. These results could be easily applied to many other vibration-sensitive applications involving stepper motor actuators.

  18. Structures and Intermittency in Small Scales Solar Wind Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sahraoui, Fouad; Goldstein, Melvyn

    2010-03-25

    Several observations in space plasmas have reported the presence of coherent structures at different plasma scales. Structure formation is believed to result from nonlinear interactions between the plasma modes, which depend strongly on their phase synchronization. Despite this important role of the phases in turbulence, very limited work has been devoted to study the phases as potential tracers of nonlinearities in comparison with the wealth of literature on power spectra of turbulence where phases are totally missed. The reason why the phases are seldom used is probably because they usually appear to be completely mixed (due to their dependence on an arbitrary time origin and to 2pi periodicity). To handle the phases properly, a new method based on using surrogate data has been developed recently to detect coherent structures in magnetized plasmas [Sahraoui, PRE, 2008]. Here, we show new applications of the technique to study the nature (weak vs strong, self-similar vs intermittent) of the small scale turbulence in the solar wind using the Cluster observations.

  19. Magnetic structure and origin of counter-streaming mass flows in solar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuandeng

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic structure and origin of counter-streaming mass flows in solar prominences are hitherto unknown, however, these issues are vitally important for understanding the instability and eruption of solar and stellar prominences, as well as the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Here we report high-resolution observations of a quiescent solar prominence that clearly manifests the magnetic structure and origin of counter-streaming mass flows in solar prominences. Based on the observational results, we propose a new prominence model in the present paper, which can reconcile many discrepancies in previous studies, for example, the distribution of magnetic fields in solar prominences, the relationship between the photospheric magnetic fields and the ends of prominence feet, as well as the origin of counterstreaming mass flows in solar prominences. In addition, we also find that the photospheric pressure-driven three and five minutes oscillations can effectively modulate the kinematics of solar prominences.

  20. Attaching solar collectors to a structural framework utilizing a flexible clip

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, John S

    2014-03-25

    Methods and apparatuses described herein provide for the attachment of solar collectors to a structural framework in a solar array assembly. A flexible clip is attached to either end of each solar collector and utilized to attach the solar collector to the structural framework. The solar collectors are positioned to allow a member of the framework to engage a pair of flexible clips attached to adjacent solar collectors during assembly of the solar array. Each flexible clip may have multiple frame-engaging portions, each with a flange on one end to cause the flexible clip to deflect inward when engaged by the framework member during assembly and to guide each of the frame-engaging portions into contact with a surface of the framework member for attachment.

  1. FACET: SLAC___s New User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.-J.; England, R.J.; Erickson, R.A.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.D.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seeman, J.T.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The first User Run started in spring 2012 with 20 GeV, 3 nC electron beams. The facility is designed to provide short (20 {micro}m) bunches and small (20 {micro}m wide) spot sizes, producing uniquely high power beams. FACET supports studies from many fields but in particular those of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration. The creation of drive and witness bunches and shaped bunch profiles is possible with 'Notch' Collimation. FACET is also a source of THz radiation for material studies. Positrons will be available at FACET in future user runs. We present the User Facility and the available tools and opportunities for future experiments.

  2. Stability of crystal facets in gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Katz-Boon, Hadas; Walsh, Michael; Dwyer, Christian; Mulvaney, Paul; Funston, Alison M; Etheridge, Joanne

    2015-03-11

    Metal nanocrystals can be grown in a variety of shapes through the modification of surface facet energies via surfactants. However, the surface facets are only a few atoms wide, making it extremely challenging to measure their geometries and energies. Here, we locate and count atoms in Au nanorods at successive time intervals using quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy. This enables us to determine the atomic-level geometry and the relative stability of the facets and to expound their relationship to the overall three-dimensional nanocrystal shape and size. We reveal coexisting high- and low-index facets with comparable stability and dimensions and find the geometry of the nanorods is remarkably stable, despite significant atom movements. This information provides unique insights into the mechanisms that govern growth kinetics and nanocrystal morphology. PMID:25658226

  3. Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knasel, Don; Ehresman, Derik

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Project has successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a full scale prototypical solar dynamic concentrator for space station applications. A Truss Hexagonal Panel reflector was selected as a viable solar concentrator concept to be used for space station applications. This concentrator utilizes a modular design approach and is flexible in attainable flux profiles and assembly techniques. The detailed design of the concentrator, which included structural, thermal and optical analysis, identified the feasibility of the design and specific technologies that were required to fabricate it. The needed surface accuracy of the reflectors surface was found to be very tight, within 5 mrad RMS slope error, and results in very close tolerances for fabrication. To meet the design requirements, a modular structure composed of hexagonal panels was used. The panels, made up of graphite epoxy box beams provided the strength, stiffness and dimensional stability needed. All initial project requirements were met or exceeded by hardware demonstration. Initial testing of structural repeatability of a seven panel portion of the concentrator was followed by assembly and testing of the full nineteen panel structure. The testing, which consisted of theodolite and optical measurements over an assembly-disassembly-reassembly cycle, demonstrated that the concentrator maintained the as-built contour and optical characteristics. The facet development effort within the project, which included developing the vapor deposited reflective facet, produced a viable design with demonstrated optical characteristics that are within the project goals.

  4. FACET: Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilmoria, Karl D.; Banavar, Sridhar; Chatterji, Gano B.; Sheth, Kapil S.; Grabbe, Shon

    2000-01-01

    FACET (Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool) is an Air Traffic Management research tool being developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. This paper describes the design, architecture and functionalities of FACET. The purpose of FACET is to provide E simulation environment for exploration, development and evaluation of advanced ATM concepts. Examples of these concepts include new ATM paradigms such as Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management, airspace redesign and new Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for controllers working within the operational procedures of the existing air traffic control system. FACET is currently capable of modeling system-wide en route airspace operations over the contiguous United States. Airspace models (e.g., Center/sector boundaries, airways, locations of navigation aids and airports) are available from databases. A core capability of FACET is the modeling of aircraft trajectories. Using round-earth kinematic equations, aircraft can be flown along flight plan routes or great circle routes as they climb, cruise and descend according to their individual aircraft-type performance models. Performance parameters (e.g., climb/descent rates and speeds, cruise speeds) are obtained from data table lookups. Heading, airspeed and altitude-rate dynamics are also modeled. Additional functionalities will be added as necessary for specific applications. FACET software is written in Java and C programming languages. It is platform-independent, and can be run on a variety of computers. FACET has been designed with a modular software architecture to enable rapid integration of research prototype implementations of new ATM concepts. There are several advanced ATM concepts that are currently being implemented in FACET airborne separation assurance, dynamic density predictions, airspace redesign (re-sectorization), benefits of a controller DST for direct-routing, and the integration of commercial space transportation system operations into the U.S. National

  5. Labyrinth-induced faceted electrochemical growth.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Maik R J; Cunha, Pedro M S; Steiner, Ullrich

    2014-04-16

    A path-length bias of nucleated electrochemical growth in a 3D periodic nano-maze is found to cause facet formation of an intrinsically isotropic material in a porous self-assembled gyroid network. This is the first report of faceted electrochemical growth that is not based on the crystallographic order of the constituent building blocks, but rather reflects the symmetry of the template in which the material is synthesized.

  6. Modelling the Internal Structure and Evolution of Small Icy Bodies of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prialnik, D.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the internal structure of icy bodies of the solar system is simulated by numerical codes. The results are compared to available observations. The activity of comets and the differentiated structure of large bodies can be explained.

  7. MultiFacet: A Faceted Interface for Browsing Large Multimedia Collections

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Michael J.; Hampton, Shawn D.; Endert, Alexander; Roberts, Ian E.; Payne, Deborah A.

    2013-10-31

    Faceted browsing is a common technique for exploring collections where the data can be grouped into a number of pre-defined categories, most often generated from textual metadata. Historically, faceted browsing has been applied to a single data type such as text or image data. However, typical collections contain multiple data types, such as information from web pages that contain text, images, and video. Additionally, when browsing a collection of images and video, facets are often created based on the metadata which may be incomplete, inaccurate, or missing altogether instead of the actual visual content contained within those images and video. In this work we address these limitations by presenting MultiFacet, a faceted browsing interface that supports multiple data types. MultiFacet constructs facets for images and video in a collection from the visual content using computer vision techniques. These visual facets can then be browsed in conjunction with text facets within a single interface to reveal relationships and phenomena within multimedia collections. Additionally, we present a use case based on real-world data, demonstrating the utility of this approach towards browsing a large multimedia data collection.

  8. MAGNETIC STRUCTURE PRODUCING X- AND M-CLASS SOLAR FLARES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, S.; Magara, T.; Choe, G. S.; Hayashi, K.; Shiota, D.

    2013-06-10

    We study the three-dimensional magnetic structure of the solar active region 11158, which produced one X-class and several M-class flares on 2011 February 13-16. We focus on the magnetic twist in four flare events, M6.6, X2.2, M1.0, and M1.1. The magnetic twist is estimated from the nonlinear force-free field extrapolated from the vector fields obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory using the magnetohydrodynamic relaxation method developed by Inoue et al. We found that strongly twisted lines ranging from half-turn to one-turn twists were built up just before the M6.6 and X2.2 flares and disappeared after that. Because most of the twists remaining after these flares were less than a half-turn twist, this result suggests that the buildup of magnetic twist over the half-turn twist is a key process in the production of large flares. On the other hand, even though these strong twists were also built up just before the M1.0 and M1.1 flares, most of them remained afterward. Careful topological analysis before the M1.0 and M1.1 flares shows that the strongly twisted lines were surrounded mostly by the weakly twisted lines formed in accordance with the clockwise motion of the positive sunspot, whose footpoints are rooted in strong magnetic flux regions. These results imply that these weakly twisted lines might suppress the activity of the strongly twisted lines in the last two M-class flares.

  9. Electrostatic solitary structures in the solar wind plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Satyavir; Singh Lakhina, Gurbax; Rubia, R.

    2016-07-01

    Recent observations have shown the existence of coherent electrostatic structures observed in the solar wind at 1 AU which could accelerate the charged particles. Electrostatic solitary waves are studied in a homogeneous, collisionless, and magnetized three-component plasma model relevant to the solar wind plasma. The theoretical model consists of hot protons, hot heavier ions (doubly charged helium ions) and suprathermal electrons having kappa distribution. Sagdeev pseudopotential technique is used to study the arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic solitary wave. The study shows that when the heavier ion temperature is not exactly 4 times the proton temperature, we observe a new slow ion-acoustic mode in addition to the usual fast ion-acoustic mode. It is found that fast ion-acoustic mode supports only positive potential solitons. However, slow ion-acoustic mode is found to support both positive and negative potential solitons/double layers. The effect of various parameters such as the spectral index, κ, Mach number, temperature and number density of ions is studied on the evolution of ion-acoustic solitary waves as well as their existence domains. It is found that the limitation on the attainable amplitudes of fast ion-acoustic solitons is attributed to, that the number density of protons should remain real valued. While, for the slow ion-acoustic solitons the upper limit is provided by the requirement that the number density of heavier ion should remain real. In the presence of the double layers, the occurrence of the double layer limits the attainable amplitudes of the slow ion-acoustic solitons.

  10. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  11. EFFECT OF SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC NEUTRALS ON EQUILIBRIUM FIELD STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Arber, T. D.; Botha, G. J. J.; Brady, C. S. E-mail: G.J.J.Botha@warwick.ac.u

    2009-11-10

    Solar coronal equilibrium fields are often constructed by nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation from photospheric magnetograms. It is well known that the photospheric field is not force-free and the correct lower boundary for NLFFF construction ought to be the top of the chromosphere. To compensate for this, pre-filtering algorithms are often applied to the photospheric data to remove the non-force-free components. Such pre-filtering models, while physically constrained, do not address the mechanisms that may be responsible for the field becoming force-free. The chromospheric field can change through, for example, field expansion due to gravitational stratification, reconnection, or flux emergence. In this paper, we study and quantify the effect of the chromospheric neutrals on equilibrium field structures. It is shown that, depending on the degree to which the photospheric field is not force-free, the chromosphere will change the structure of the equilibrium field. This is quantified to give an estimate of the change in alpha profiles one might expect due to neutrals in the chromosphere. Simple scaling of the decay time of non-force-free components of the magnetic field due to chromospheric neutrals is also derived. This is used to quantify the rate at which, or equivalent at which height, the chromosphere is expected to become force-free.

  12. RESOLVING THE INTERNAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE OF THE SOLAR NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.; Martinez Pillet, V.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Schmidt, W.

    2012-10-20

    We analyze the spectral asymmetry of Stokes V (circularly polarized) profiles of an individual network patch in the quiet Sun observed by Sunrise/IMaX. At a spatial resolution of 0.''15-0.''18, the network elements contain substructure which is revealed by the spatial distribution of Stokes V asymmetries. The area asymmetry between the red and blue lobes of Stokes V increases from nearly zero at the core of the structure to values close to unity at its edges (single-lobed profiles). Such a distribution of the area asymmetry is consistent with magnetic fields expanding with height, i.e., an expanding magnetic canopy (which is required to fulfill pressure balance and flux conservation in the solar atmosphere). Inversion of the Stokes I and V profiles of the patch confirms this picture, revealing a decreasing field strength and increasing height of the canopy base from the core to the periphery of the network patch. However, the non-roundish shape of the structure and the presence of negative area and amplitude asymmetries reveal that the scenario is more complex than a canonical flux tube expanding with height surrounded by downflows.

  13. Reconstruction of Helio-Latitudinal Structure of the Solar Wind Proton Speed and Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokół, Justyna M.; Swaczyna, Paweł; Bzowski, Maciej; Tokumaru, Munetoshi

    2015-09-01

    The modeling of the heliosphere requires continuous three-dimensional solar wind data. The in-situ out-of-ecliptic measurements are very rare, so that other methods of solar wind detection are needed. We use the remote-sensing data of the solar wind speed from observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) to reconstruct spatial and temporal structures of the solar wind proton speed from 1985 to 2013. We developed a method of filling the data gaps in the IPS observations to obtain continuous and homogeneous solar wind speed records. We also present a method to retrieve the solar wind density from the solar wind speed, utilizing the invariance of the solar wind dynamic pressure and energy flux with latitude. To construct the synoptic maps of the solar wind speed we use the decomposition into spherical harmonics of each of the Carrington rotation map. To fill the gaps in time we apply the singular spectrum analysis to the time series of the coefficients of spherical harmonics. We obtained helio-latitudinal profiles of the solar wind proton speed and density over almost three recent solar cycles. The accuracy in the reconstruction is, due to computational limitations, about 20 %. The proposed methods allow us to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of the model of the solar wind parameters presented in our previous paper (Sokół et al., Solar Phys. 285, 167, 2013) and give a better insight into the time variations of the solar wind structure. Additionally, the solar wind density is reconstructed more accurately and it fits better to the in-situ measurements from Ulysses.

  14. Wavelet analysis of the structure of microstreams in the polar solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, M.; Ruzmaikin, A.; McComas, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The fluctuations in solar-wind velocity measured by the Ulysses spacecraft above the polar regions of the Sun are organized into structures called microstreams. The application of wavelet transformations to the Ulysses data reveals the scales and positions of the microstreams and their association with variations in the helium content of the solar wind. It is concluded that the microstreams must have their origin in solar structures associated with the acceleration of the solar wind with little modification resulting from interplanetary phenomena. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Organizational culture, creative behavior, and information and communication technology (ICT) usage: a facet analysis.

    PubMed

    Carmeli, Abraham; Sternberg, Akiva; Elizur, D

    2008-04-01

    Despite the prominence of organizational culture (OC), this concept is controversial and its structure has yet to be systematically analyzed. This study develops a three-pronged formal definitional framework on the basis of facet theory (FT) and explores behavior modality, referent, and object. This facet analysis (FA) of OC accounts successfully for variation in both creative behavior at work and the usage of information and communication technologies (ICTs). An analysis of data collected from 230 employees in the financial industry indicates that a radex structure was obtained for work and ICT. The behavior modality facet ordered the space from center to periphery, and referents facet relates to the direction angles away from the origin.

  16. Organizational culture, creative behavior, and information and communication technology (ICT) usage: a facet analysis.

    PubMed

    Carmeli, Abraham; Sternberg, Akiva; Elizur, D

    2008-04-01

    Despite the prominence of organizational culture (OC), this concept is controversial and its structure has yet to be systematically analyzed. This study develops a three-pronged formal definitional framework on the basis of facet theory (FT) and explores behavior modality, referent, and object. This facet analysis (FA) of OC accounts successfully for variation in both creative behavior at work and the usage of information and communication technologies (ICTs). An analysis of data collected from 230 employees in the financial industry indicates that a radex structure was obtained for work and ICT. The behavior modality facet ordered the space from center to periphery, and referents facet relates to the direction angles away from the origin. PMID:18422410

  17. Foam Inflated Rigidized Truss Structure Developed for an SRS Technologies Solar Concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Dean M.

    1996-01-01

    A foam inflated rigidized (KR) truss structure to support a single chamber solar concentrator has been developed and demonstrated. This technology promises to advance the state of the art in construction of lightweight, deployable solar concentrators for solar thermal propulsion applications. In this paper the design, analysis, deployment and integration of this structure are discussed. A KR structure is a rigid composite tube that can be formed in space by inflating a resin impregnated fabric skin with a solvent swollen polymeric foam. Once inflated, the skin resin is cured using the available ultraviolet radiation. By using high strength and stiffness fiber materials, a stiff, strong, lightweight structure is produced (Lester, 1994).

  18. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toeroek, T.; Berger, M. A.; Kliem, B.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of twist and writhe helicity. Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates to the writhe, which fraction of helicity is contained in writhe, and how much helicity is exchanged between twist and writhe when they erupt. Aims. Here we perform a quantitative investigation of these questions relevant for coronal flux ropes. Methods. The decomposition of the writhe of a curve into local and nonlocal components greatly facilitates its computation. We use it to study the relation between writhe and projected S shape of helical curves and to measure writhe and twist in numerical simulations of flux rope instabilities. The results are discussed with regard to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results. (1) We demonstrate that the relation between writhe and projected S shape is not unique in principle, but that the ambiguity does not affect low-lying structures, thus supporting the established empirical rule which associates stable forward (reverse) S shaped structures low in the corona with positive (negative) helicity. (2) Kink-unstable erupting flux ropes are found to transform a far smaller fraction of their twist helicity into writhe helicity than often assumed. (3) Confined flux rope eruptions tend to show stronger writhe at low heights than ejective eruptions (CMEs). This argues against suggestions that the writhing facilitates the rise of the rope through the overlying field. (4) Erupting filaments which are S shaped already before the eruption and keep the sign of their axis writhe (which is expected if field of one chirality dominates the source volume of the eruption), must reverse their S shape in the course of the rise. Implications for the occurrence of the helical kink instability in such events are discussed.

  19. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant supported research on the structure of the quiet, nonmagnetic chromosphere and on wave excitation and propagation in both the nonmagnetic chromosphere and the magnetic network. The work on the structure of the chromosphere culminated in the recognition that between two competing views of the solar chromosphere, older models by Avrett and collaborators (referred to as VAL) and the newer, dynamical model by Carlsson & Stein (referred to as CS), the clear decision is in favor of the older models, and this in spite of the evident lack of physics, which does not include wave motion and oscillations. The contrast between the static VAL models and the dynamical CS model can be stated most succinctly by comparing the temperature variation implied by the VAL models and the temperature fluctuations of the CS model, which are, respectively, of the order of 10% for the VAL model (at heights where hydrogen is 50% ionized) and a factor of 10 (at the upper boundary of their chromospheric model). The huge fluctuations of the CS model have never been observed, whereas the smaller temperature variations of the VAL models are consistent with ground-based and space-based observations. While it should be obvious which model describes the Sun and which one fails, the case is far from settled in the minds of solar physicists. Thus, much educational work remains to be done and, of course, more research to develop arguments that make the case more convincing. The research on waves and oscillations has been based on a unified theory of excitation of acoustic waves in the field-free atmosphere and of transverse and longitudinal waves in magnetic flux tubes located in the magnetic network by noting, first, that impulsive excitation of all these waves in gravitationally stratified media leads to oscillations at the respective cutoff frequencies and, second, that the observed oscillation frequencies in the nonmagnetic and magnetic parts of the chromosphere match corresponding cutoff

  20. High-efficiency solar cells based on micro-nano scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Achyut K.; Olah, Robert; Mizuno, Genki; Sengupta, Rabi; Park, Jin-Hong; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal; Dhar, Nibir K.

    2010-04-01

    Higher efficiency solar cells are required to reduce solar array mass, stowed volume, and cost for numerous commercial and military applications. Conventional solar cell made of thin-film or crystal-Si (c-Si) or other thin films have limited conversion efficiency of 10 to 20% with the cost of 3-5/Wp. Current state-of-the-art crystalline multijunction solar cells are 30 % efficient with the cost of 30 to 40 /Wp. Increasing conversion efficiency of > 30% will enable to reduce the cost < $1/Wp and useful for various power platforms supporting mobile wireless, laptop, tent applications. Solar cell comprises with three dimensional blocks are shown to be higher conversion-efficiency than standard flat-type solar cell. Incorporating nano-scaled blocks in solar cell structures are shown to be increased performances due to (i) increase of the surface area to volume ratio, (ii) brining the junction closer to the carrier generation region which eliminate the carrier recombination , (iii) absorption of all incident photon flux, and (iv) broadening the absorption spectrum. Our activities on next generation high performance solar cells based on micro-nano scaled structures and various material systems will be presented. Details fabrication process of micro-nano scaled solar cell friendly to mass scale manufacturing will be also be described. We have achieved more than 20x optical performance enhancement for the solar cell based on micro-scaled structures, than that of flat-type (standard) solar cell, fabricated on the same Si substrate and same process. Simulation results showed that significant improvement in conversion efficiency more than 30% is possible for even c-Si solar cell based on the micro-nano scaled structures. Key issues and challenges for bringing it to the manufacturing will be discussed.

  1. Interplanetary shock waves and the structure of solar wind disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of interplanetary shock waves are reviewed, with emphasis on the large-scale characteristics of the associated solar wind disturbances and on the relationship of these disturbances to solar activity. The sum of observational knowledge indicates that shock waves propagate through the solar wind along a broad, roughly spherical front, ahead of plasma and magnetic field ejected from solar flares. Typically, the shock front reaches 1 AU about two days after its flare origin, and is of intermediate strength. Not all large flares produce observable interplanetary shock waves; the best indicator of shock production appears to be the generation of both type 2 and type 4 radio bursts by a flare. Theoretical models of shock propagation in the solar wind can account for the typically observed shock strength, transit time, and shape.

  2. Detecting and disentangling nonlinear structure from solar flux time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Roszman, L.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in solar activity has grown in the past two decades for many reasons. Most importantly for flight dynamics, solar activity changes the atmospheric density, which has important implications for spacecraft trajectory and lifetime prediction. Building upon the previously developed Rayleigh-Benard nonlinear dynamic solar model, which exhibits many dynamic behaviors observed in the Sun, this work introduces new chaotic solar forecasting techniques. Our attempt to use recently developed nonlinear chaotic techniques to model and forecast solar activity has uncovered highly entangled dynamics. Numerical techniques for decoupling additive and multiplicative white noise from deterministic dynamics and examines falloff of the power spectra at high frequencies as a possible means of distinguishing deterministic chaos from noise than spectrally white or colored are presented. The power spectral techniques presented are less cumbersome than current methods for identifying deterministic chaos, which require more computationally intensive calculations, such as those involving Lyapunov exponents and attractor dimension.

  3. Tracing Rays In A Solar Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, Kent; Gallo, Chris

    1989-01-01

    OFFSET is ray-tracing computer code for analysis of optics of solar collector. Code models distributions of solar flux within receiver cavity, produced by reflections from collector. Developed to model mathematically offset solar collector of solar dynamic electric power system being developed for Space Station Freedom. Used to develop revised collector-facet concept of four groups of toroidally contoured facets. Also used to develop methods for tailoring distribution of flux incident on receiver. Written in FORTRAN 77 (100 percent).

  4. Monolithic-Structured Single-Layered Textile-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Min Ju; Cha, Seung I.; Kim, Han Seong; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Dong Y.

    2016-01-01

    Textile-structured solar cells are frequently discussed in the literature due to their prospective applications in wearable devices and in building integrated solar cells that utilize their flexibility, mechanical robustness, and aesthetic appearance, but the current approaches for textile-based solar cells—including the preparation of fibre-type solar cells woven into textiles—face several difficulties from high friction and tension during the weaving process. This study proposes a new structural concept and fabrication process for monolithic-structured textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells that are fabricated by a process similar to the cloth-making process, including the preparation of wires and yarns that are woven for use in textiles, printed, dyed, and packaged. The fabricated single-layered textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells successfully act as solar cells in our study, even under bending conditions. By controlling the inter-weft spacing and the number of Ti wires for the photoelectrode conductor, we have found that the performance of this type of dye-sensitized solar cell was notably affected by the spacing between photoelectrodes and counter-electrodes, the exposed areas of Ti wires to photoelectrodes, and photoelectrodes’ surface morphology. We believe that this study provides a process and concept for improved textile-based solar cells that can form the basis for further research. PMID:27708359

  5. Monolithic-Structured Single-Layered Textile-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min Ju; Cha, Seung I.; Kim, Han Seong; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Dong Y.

    2016-10-01

    Textile-structured solar cells are frequently discussed in the literature due to their prospective applications in wearable devices and in building integrated solar cells that utilize their flexibility, mechanical robustness, and aesthetic appearance, but the current approaches for textile-based solar cells—including the preparation of fibre-type solar cells woven into textiles—face several difficulties from high friction and tension during the weaving process. This study proposes a new structural concept and fabrication process for monolithic-structured textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells that are fabricated by a process similar to the cloth-making process, including the preparation of wires and yarns that are woven for use in textiles, printed, dyed, and packaged. The fabricated single-layered textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells successfully act as solar cells in our study, even under bending conditions. By controlling the inter-weft spacing and the number of Ti wires for the photoelectrode conductor, we have found that the performance of this type of dye-sensitized solar cell was notably affected by the spacing between photoelectrodes and counter-electrodes, the exposed areas of Ti wires to photoelectrodes, and photoelectrodes’ surface morphology. We believe that this study provides a process and concept for improved textile-based solar cells that can form the basis for further research.

  6. Structural Analysis and Test Comparison of a 20-Meter Inflation-Deployed Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Mann, Troy; Lichodziejewski, David; Derbes, Billy

    2006-01-01

    Under the direction of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Office, the team of L Garde, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Ball Aerospace, and NASA Langley Research Center has been developing a scalable solar sail configuration to address NASA s future space propulsion needs. Prior to a flight experiment of a full-scale solar sail, a comprehensive test program was implemented to advance the technology readiness level of the solar sail design. These tests consisted of solar sail component, subsystem, and sub-scale system ground tests that simulated the aspects of the space environment such as vacuum and thermal conditions. In July 2005, a 20-m four-quadrant solar sail system test article was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Space Power Facility to measure its static and dynamic structural responses. Key to the maturation of solar sail technology is the development of validated finite element analysis (FEA) models that can be used for design and analysis of solar sails. A major objective of the program was to utilize the test data to validate the FEA models simulating the solar sail ground tests. The FEA software, ABAQUS, was used to perform the structural analyses to simulate the ground tests performed on the 20-m solar sail test article. This paper presents the details of the FEA modeling, the structural analyses simulating the ground tests, and a comparison of the pretest and post-test analysis predictions with the ground test results for the 20-m solar sail system test article. The structural responses that are compared in the paper include load-deflection curves and natural frequencies for the beam structural assembly and static shape, natural frequencies, and mode shapes for the solar sail membrane. The analysis predictions were in reasonable agreement with the test data. Factors that precluded better correlation of the analyses and the tests were unmeasured initial conditions in the test set-up.

  7. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  8. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  9. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  10. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-13

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  11. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  12. Extraversion and psychopathology: A facet-level analysis.

    PubMed

    Watson, David; Stasik, Sara M; Ellickson-Larew, Stephanie; Stanton, Kasey

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this study was to explicate how the lower order facets of extraversion are related to psychopathology. We used a "bottom-up" approach in which specific extraversion scales from 3 comprehensive personality inventories were used to model these facets as latent factors. We collected both self-report and interview measures of a broad range of psychopathology from a large community sample. Replicating previous findings using a similar approach (Naragon-Gainey & Watson, 2014; Naragon-Gainey, Watson, & Markon, 2009), structural analyses yielded four factors: Positive Emotionality, Sociability, Assertiveness, and Experience Seeking. Scores on these latent dimensions were related to psychopathology in correlational analyses and in two sets of regressions (the first series used the four facets as predictors; the second included composite scores on the other Big Five domains as additional predictors). These results revealed a striking level of specificity. As predicted, Positive Emotionality displayed especially strong negative links to depressive symptoms and diagnoses. Sociability also was negatively related to psychopathology, showing particularly strong associations with indicators of social dysfunction and the negative symptoms of schizotypy (i.e., social anxiety, social aloofness, and restricted affectivity). Assertiveness generally had weak associations at the bivariate level but was negatively related to social anxiety and was positively correlated with some forms of externalizing. Finally, Experience Seeking had substantial positive associations with a broad range of indicators related to externalizing and bipolar disorder; it also displayed negative links to agoraphobia. These differential correlates demonstrate the importance of examining personality-psychopathology relations at the specific facet level. PMID:25751628

  13. Consensually defined facets of personality as prospective predictors of change in depression symptoms.

    PubMed

    Naragon-Gainey, Kristin; Watson, David

    2014-08-01

    Depression has robust associations with personality, showing a strong relation with neuroticism and more moderate associations with extraversion and conscientiousness. In addition, each Big Five domain can be decomposed into narrower facets. However, we currently lack consensus as to the contents of Big Five facets, with idiosyncrasies across instruments; moreover, few studies have examined associations with depression. In the current study, community participants completed six omnibus personality inventories; self-reported depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and 5 years later. Exploratory factor analyses suggested three to five facets in each domain, and these facets served as prospective predictors of depression in hierarchical regressions, after accounting for baseline and trait depression. In these analyses, high anger (from neuroticism), low positive emotionality (extraversion), low conventionality (conscientiousness), and low culture (openness to experiences) were significant prospective predictors of depression. Results are discussed in regard to personality structure and assessment, as well as personality-psychopathology associations.

  14. Facets of emotional awareness and associations with emotion regulation and depression.

    PubMed

    Boden, Matthew Tyler; Thompson, Renee J

    2015-06-01

    Emotion theories posit that effective emotion regulation depends upon the nuanced information provided by emotional awareness; attending to and understanding one's own emotions. Additionally, the strong associations between facets of emotional awareness and various forms of psychopathology may be partially attributable to associations with emotion regulation. These logically compelling hypotheses are largely uninvestigated, including which facets compose emotional awareness and how they relate to emotion regulation strategies and psychopathology. We used exploratory structural equation modeling of individual difference measures among a large adult sample (n = 919) recruited online. Results distinguished 4 facets of emotional awareness (type clarity, source clarity, involuntary attention to emotion, and voluntary attention to emotion) that were differentially associated with expressive suppression, acceptance of emotions, and cognitive reappraisal. Facets were associated with depression both directly and indirectly via associations with emotion regulation strategies. We discuss implications for theory and research on emotional awareness, emotion regulation, and psychopathology.

  15. Erosion Triangular Facets as Markers of Order in an Open Dissipative System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliaga, Guido

    2015-07-01

    The complexity and non-linearity of the morphogenetic system which is responsible for shaping the Earth's surface have been widely recognised by many authors who have documented the fractal nature of erosion. In this paper, two peculiar kinds of landforms are compared to point out ordered structures, i.e. triangular facets that arise in different geomorphic systems, due to the principle of morphologic convergence. Occurrence of triangular facets has been documented in mountainous areas in relation to base level changes and hydrographical network evolution; similarly shaped landforms are present even in recent tectonic uplift areas along faults. The spatial distribution of the two kinds of facets has been investigated in two river basins located in Liguria (northern Italy) and in a mountainous area in Oman. The results of this analysis document the different spatial features of the two kinds of facets.

  16. Laser ionized preformed plasma at FACET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, S. Z.; Adli, E.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Edstrom, S. A.; Fisher, A. S.; Frederico, J.; Frisch, J. C.; Gessner, S.; Gilevich, S.; Hering, P.; Hogan, M. J.; Jobe, R. K.; Litos, M.; May, J. E.; Walz, D. R.; Yakimenko, V.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Marsh, K. A.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Muggli, P.

    2014-08-01

    The Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC installed a 10-TW Ti : sapphire laser system for pre-ionized plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. High energy (500 mJ), short (50 fs) pulses of 800 nm laser light at 1 Hz are used at the FACET experimental area to produce a plasma column. The laser pulses are stretched to 250 fs before injection into a vapor cell, where the laser is focused by an axicon lens to form a plasma column that can be sustained over the desired radius and length. A 20 GeV electron bunch interacts with this preformed plasma to generate a non-linear wakefield, thus accelerating a trailing witness bunch with gradients on the order of several GV m-1. The experimental setup and the methods for producing the pre-ionized plasma for plasma wakefield acceleration experiments performed at FACET are described.

  17. Facet engineering of high power single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levi, Moshe; Shamay, Moshe; Tesler, Renana; Rappaport, Noam; Don, Yaroslav; Karni, Yoram; Schnitzer, Itzhak; Sicron, Noam; Shusterman, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    The ever increasing demand for high-power, high-reliability operation of single emitters at 9xx nm wavelengths requires the development of laser diodes with improved facet regions immune to both catastrophic and wear-out failure modes. In our study, we have evaluated several laser facet definition technologies in application to 90 micron aperture single emitters in asymmetric design (In)GaAs/AlGaAs based material emitting at 915, 925 and 980nm. A common epitaxy and emitter design makes for a straightforward comparison of the facet technologies investigated. Our study corroborates a clear trend of increasing difficulty in obtaining reliable laser operation from 980nm down to 915nm. At 980nm, one can employ dielectric facet passivation with a pre-clean cycle delivering a device lifetime in excess of 3,000 hours at increasing current steps. At 925nm, quantum-well intermixing can be used to define non-absorbing mirrors giving good device reliability, albeit with a large efficiency penalty. Vacuum cleaved emitters have delivered excellent reliability at 915nm, and can be expected to perform just as well at 925 and 980nm. Epitaxial regrowth of laser facets is under development and has yet to demonstrate an appreciable reliability improvement. Only a weak correlation between start-of-life catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) levels and reliability was established. The optimized facet design has delivered maximum powers in excess of 19 MW/sq.cm (rollover limited) and product-grade 980nm single emitters with a slope efficiency of >1 W/A and a peak efficiency of >60%. The devices have accumulated over 1,500 hours of CW operation at 11W. A fiber-coupled device emits 10W ex-fiber with 47% efficiency.

  18. Overview of Solar Seismology: Oscillations as Probes of Internal Structure and Dynamics in the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomre, J.

    1984-01-01

    The physical nature of solar oscillations is reviewed. The nomenclature of the subject and the techniques used to interpret the oscillations are discussed. Many of the acoustic and gravity waves that can be observed in the atmosphere of the Sun are actually resonant or standing modes of the interior; precise measurements of the frequencies of such modes allow deductions of the internal structure and dynamics of this star. The scientific objectives of such studies of solar seismic disturbances, or of solar seismology, are outlined. The reasons why it would be very beneficial to carry out further observations of solar oscillations both from ground based networks and from space will be discussed.

  19. Highly Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells with Tunable Structural Color

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The performance of perovskite solar cells has been progressing over the past few years and efficiency is likely to continue to increase. However, a negative aspect for the integration of perovskite solar cells in the built environment is that the color gamut available in these materials is very limited and does not cover the green-to-blue region of the visible spectrum, which has been a big selling point for organic photovoltaics. Here, we integrate a porous photonic crystal (PC) scaffold within the photoactive layer of an opaque perovskite solar cell following a bottom-up approach employing inexpensive and scalable liquid processing techniques. The photovoltaic devices presented herein show high efficiency with tunable color across the visible spectrum. This now imbues the perovskite solar cells with highly desirable properties for cladding in the built environment and encourages design of sustainable colorful buildings and iridescent electric vehicles as future power generation sources. PMID:25650872

  20. Window structure for passivating solar cells based on gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Allen M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Passivated gallium arsenide solar photovoltaic cells with high resistance to moisture and oxygen are provided by means of a gallium arsenide phosphide window graded through its thickness from arsenic rich to phosphorus rich.

  1. Highly efficient perovskite solar cells with tunable structural color.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Anaya, Miguel; Lozano, Gabriel; Calvo, Mauricio E; Johnston, Michael B; Míguez, Hernán; Snaith, Henry J

    2015-03-11

    The performance of perovskite solar cells has been progressing over the past few years and efficiency is likely to continue to increase. However, a negative aspect for the integration of perovskite solar cells in the built environment is that the color gamut available in these materials is very limited and does not cover the green-to-blue region of the visible spectrum, which has been a big selling point for organic photovoltaics. Here, we integrate a porous photonic crystal (PC) scaffold within the photoactive layer of an opaque perovskite solar cell following a bottom-up approach employing inexpensive and scalable liquid processing techniques. The photovoltaic devices presented herein show high efficiency with tunable color across the visible spectrum. This now imbues the perovskite solar cells with highly desirable properties for cladding in the built environment and encourages design of sustainable colorful buildings and iridescent electric vehicles as future power generation sources.

  2. SEISMOLOGY OF STANDING KINK OSCILLATIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Arregui, I.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2010-10-20

    We investigate standing kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a prominence fine structure modeled as a straight and cylindrical magnetic tube only partially filled with the prominence material and with its ends fixed at two rigid walls representing the solar photosphere. The prominence plasma is partially ionized and a transverse inhomogeneous transitional layer is included between the prominence thread and the coronal medium. Thus, ion-neutral collisions and resonant absorption are the damping mechanisms considered. Approximate analytical expressions of the period, the damping time, and their ratio are derived for the fundamental mode in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. We find that the dominant damping mechanism is resonant absorption, which provides damping ratios in agreement with the observations, whereas ion-neutral collisions are irrelevant for damping. The values of the damping ratio are independent of both the prominence thread length and its position within the magnetic tube, and coincide with the values for a tube fully filled with the prominence plasma. The implications of our results in the context of the MHD seismology technique are discussed, pointing out that the reported short-period (2-10 minutes) and short-wavelength (700-8000 km) thread oscillations may not be consistent with a standing mode interpretation and could be related to propagating waves. Finally, we show that the inversion of some prominence physical parameters, e.g., Alfven speed, magnetic field strength, transverse inhomogeneity length scale, etc., is possible using observationally determined values of the period and damping time of the oscillations along with the analytical approximations of these quantities.

  3. Solar selective black cobalt: preparation, structure, and thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.B.; Ignatiev, A.; Zajac, G.

    1980-08-01

    In the quest for an electroplated selective black coating stable to 500 /sup 0/C in air, black cobalts have been prepared by three techniques to yield (a) plated cobalt sulphides, (b) plated cobalt oxide-hydroxide, and (c) cobalt oxide prepared by thermal oxidation of electropolated cobalt metal. The optical properties of the various coatings are analyzed before and after exposure to air for extended periods of time at temperatures in the 300 /sup 0/--500 /sup 0/C range. The sulfide black cobalt is not acceptable as a high-temperature selective absorber due to severe thermal degradation. The plated oxide is a good selective absorber to about 400 /sup 0/C, and the thermally oxidized black to a slightly higher temperature, but degrades at 500 /sup 0/C. Structure studies via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) are reported which yield a full account of the coating chemistry before and after heating. The studies reveal that the high solar absorptance of the acceptable black cobalt coatings is due to a continuation of a porous outer layer grading into nondense oxides of cobalt; either CoO or Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/, depending on the film. Absorption is intrinsic but not due to metal particles as in black chrome. A limited amount of optical degradation occurs upon heating the oxide black cobalt in air due to oxidation of hydroxide. However, the major degradation problem is shown to be substrate oxidation in contrast to black chrome where film oxidation is the principal problem.

  4. Fading Coronal Structure and the Onset of Turbulence in the Young Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, C. E.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Viall, N. M.; Cranmer, S. R.

    2016-09-01

    Above the top of the solar corona, the young, slow solar wind transitions from low-β, magnetically structured flow dominated by radial structures to high-β, less structured flow dominated by hydrodynamics. This transition, long inferred via theory, is readily apparent in the sky region close to 10° from the Sun in processed, background-subtracted solar wind images. We present image sequences collected by the inner Heliospheric Imager instrument on board the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO/HI1) in 2008 December, covering apparent distances from approximately 4° to 24° from the center of the Sun and spanning this transition in the large-scale morphology of the wind. We describe the observation and novel techniques to extract evolving image structure from the images, and we use those data and techniques to present and quantify the clear textural shift in the apparent structure of the corona and solar wind in this altitude range. We demonstrate that the change in apparent texture is due both to anomalous fading of the radial striae that characterize the corona and to anomalous relative brightening of locally dense puffs of solar wind that we term “flocculae.” We show that these phenomena are inconsistent with smooth radial flow, but consistent with the onset of hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic instabilities leading to a turbulent cascade in the young solar wind.

  5. Structure of magnetic field in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    This work is concerned with empirical data on magnetic field in the solar wind in frame of a concept of dissipative solar wind, developed in papers (Solar Wind 7 Conf., Pergamon Press, 1992, 165 and 1992 STEP/5th COSPAR Coll. Pergamon Press, 1994, 117; 235; 803). Interplanetary magnetic fields should be classified with respect to their origin. It is very important for all the theoretical problems from the necessity to specify correctly boundary and initial conditions: the magnetic field must be sewed with its source. One should select the field, connected directly with the Sun (stretched out from it), and the field of moving electric currents. It occured central in discussion about the velocity of Alfven waves, probably warming up the solar wind, relative to the Sun, the magnetic field and solar wind plasma. The selection problem corresponds to an inverse problem and obviously has no single solution. The dissipative model of the solar wind introduce the slipping and leakage of plasma relative to magnetic field. There are no 'interplanetary current sheets' in it. But temporal fluctuations from the filamentation of electric currents play the key role. As a whole, the new concept requires the re-interpretation of main objects in the interplanetary magnetic field.

  6. Plasma and field observation of the structures in the polar solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComas, D. J.; Barraclough, B. L.; Gosling, J. T.; Hammond, C. M.; Phillips, J. L.; Neugebauer, M.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Since passing essentially continuously into regions of solar wind from the southern polar coronal hole at approximately 36 deg S, Ulysses has observed frequent structures lasting from several hours to several days. In addition to Alfven waves and coronal mass ejections, which have been discussed by previous authors, two other sorts of structures are routinely evident. This paper provides the first report of these structures in the high latitude solar wind: (1) small scale compressional structures, and (2) pressure balance structures. The compressional structures are driven by faster solar wind overtaking the slower solar wind ahead of it and exhibit the plasma and field properties expected for compressions. However, unlike large scale stream interaction regions observed in and near the ecliptic plane, these structures are much smaller scale and are transient, not recurring from one rotation to the next. The pressure balance structures are indicated by roughly equal increases in the plasma pressure and decreases in the magnetic field pressure. These structures, which are several degrees across, are more dense and have higher plasma pressures and betas than the surrounding solar wind. These pressure balance structures seem to be likely manifestations of 'polar plumes.'

  7. Multi-spacecraft observations of heliographic latitude-longitude structure in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, E. J., Jr.; Smith, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    The heliographic latitude-longitude structure of high speed solar winds observed prior to the maximum of sunspot cycle 20 is investigated by multi-spacecraft comparisons. It is shown that differences in solar wind structures are due to two different kinds of spatial structures. One structure is found to be consistent with the simultaneous existence of a single, broad stream at latitudes above 7 deg N and a series of narrow streams at lower latitudes, while the other is consistent with the existence of a latitudinally sloping stream boundary near the solar equator. For latitude separations less than 3.5 deg, cross-correlations of Explorer-Mariner velocities show only previously reported systematic increases in velocity with latitude, and for latitude separations from 3.5 to 6.2 deg, differences in high speed streams shift in longitude and/or amplitude are also identified on a timescale of one solar rotation.

  8. Device modeling of perovskite solar cells based on structural similarity with thin film inorganic semiconductor solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minemoto, Takashi; Murata, Masashi

    2014-08-01

    Device modeling of CH3NH3PbI3-xCl3 perovskite-based solar cells was performed. The perovskite solar cells employ a similar structure with inorganic semiconductor solar cells, such as Cu(In,Ga)Se2, and the exciton in the perovskite is Wannier-type. We, therefore, applied one-dimensional device simulator widely used in the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells. A high open-circuit voltage of 1.0 V reported experimentally was successfully reproduced in the simulation, and also other solar cell parameters well consistent with real devices were obtained. In addition, the effect of carrier diffusion length of the absorber and interface defect densities at front and back sides and the optimum thickness of the absorber were analyzed. The results revealed that the diffusion length experimentally reported is long enough for high efficiency, and the defect density at the front interface is critical for high efficiency. Also, the optimum absorber thickness well consistent with the thickness range of real devices was derived.

  9. [Interventions on facet joints. Techniques of facet joint injection, medial branch block and radiofrequency ablation].

    PubMed

    Artner, J; Klessinger, S

    2015-10-01

    Fluoroscopy-guided interventions on facet joints have been used for decades for the symptomatic management of pain in spinal disorders. A large number of imaging techniques are used to achieve a precise and safe needle placement in interventional procedures. Pulsed fluoroscopy is one of the most widely used and well-accepted tools for these procedures. This article presents a technical overview of commonly used fluoroscopy-guided interventions on the facet joints of the cervical and lumbar spine, such as facet joint injection, blockade of the medial nerve branches and radiofrequency ablation.

  10. Alignment and focus of mirrored facets of a heliosat

    DOEpatents

    Yellowhair, Julius E; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Diver, Richard B; Moss, Timothy A

    2013-11-12

    Various technologies pertaining to aligning and focusing mirrored facets of a heliostat are described herein. Updating alignment and/or focus of mirrored facets is undertaken through generation of a theoretical image, wherein the theoretical image is indicative of a reflection of the target via the mirrored facets when the mirrored facets are properly aligned. This theoretical image includes reference points that are overlaid on an image of the target as reflected by the mirrored facets of the heliostat. A technician adjusts alignment/focus of a mirrored facet by causing reflected reference markings to become aligned with the reference points in the theoretical image.

  11. Solar cycle effects on the structure of the electron density profiles in the dayside ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliore, Arvydas J.; Luhmann, Janet G.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of observations from the changes in the electron density structure of the dayside ionosphere of Venus that were brought about by changing solar activity. The ionopause height is generally low for values of the solar zenith angle below about 50 deg regardless of the phase in the solar cycle. At solar maximum, and at times of intermediate solar activity, the ionopause height for solar zenith angles greater than about 50 deg is highly variable, ranging from a minimum of about 200 km to a maximum of more than 1000 km. At times of solar minimum the great majority of all ionopause heights for all solar zenith angles are uniformly low, lying between 200 and 300 km. It is argued that the compressed nature of the Venus atmosphere at solar minimum is produced by permeation of the ionosphere by the solar wind magnetic field, which occurs when the solar wind dynamic pressure exceeds the ionospheric plasma pressure.

  12. Problem of time: facets and Machian strategy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Edward

    2014-10-01

    The problem of time is that "time" in each of ordinary quantum theory and general relativity are mutually incompatible notions. This causes difficulties in trying to put these two theories together to form a theory of quantum gravity. The problem of time has eight facets in canonical approaches. I clarify that all but one of these facets already occur at the classical level, and reconceptualize and re-name some of these facets as follows. The frozen formalism problem becomes temporal relationalism, the thin sandwich problem becomes configurational relationalism, via the notion of best matching. The problem of observables becomes the problem of beables, and the functional evolution problem becomes the constraint closure problem. I also outline how each of the global and multiple-choice problems of time have their own plurality of facets. This article additionally contains a local resolution to the problem of time at the conceptual level and which is actually realizable for the relational triangle and minisuperspace models. This resolution is, moreover, Machian, and has three levels: classical, semiclassical, and a combined semiclassical-histories-timeless records scheme. I end by delineating the current frontiers of this program toward resolution of the problem of time in the cases of full general relativity and of slightly inhomogeneous cosmology.

  13. Problem of time: facets and Machian strategy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Edward

    2014-10-01

    The problem of time is that "time" in each of ordinary quantum theory and general relativity are mutually incompatible notions. This causes difficulties in trying to put these two theories together to form a theory of quantum gravity. The problem of time has eight facets in canonical approaches. I clarify that all but one of these facets already occur at the classical level, and reconceptualize and re-name some of these facets as follows. The frozen formalism problem becomes temporal relationalism, the thin sandwich problem becomes configurational relationalism, via the notion of best matching. The problem of observables becomes the problem of beables, and the functional evolution problem becomes the constraint closure problem. I also outline how each of the global and multiple-choice problems of time have their own plurality of facets. This article additionally contains a local resolution to the problem of time at the conceptual level and which is actually realizable for the relational triangle and minisuperspace models. This resolution is, moreover, Machian, and has three levels: classical, semiclassical, and a combined semiclassical-histories-timeless records scheme. I end by delineating the current frontiers of this program toward resolution of the problem of time in the cases of full general relativity and of slightly inhomogeneous cosmology. PMID:25266113

  14. Implementation of submicrometric periodic surface structures toward improvement of organic-solar-cell performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocoyer, C.; Rocha, L.; Sicot, L.; Geffroy, B.; de Bettignies, R.; Sentein, C.; Fiorini-Debuisschert, C.; Raimond, P.

    2006-03-01

    Submicrometric periodic patterning of an organic solar cell surface is investigated in order to optimize the photovoltaic conversion efficiency of the device. Patterning is achieved using a single-step all-optical technique based on photoinduced mass transport in azopolymer films. The polymer film with a structured surface is used as a substrate for an organic solar cell based on a copper phthalocyanine/C60 heterojunction. The effect of periodic patterning is investigated through the solar-cell optical-absorption properties and external quantum efficiency measurements. The possibility to increase the short circuit current density and the corresponding photovoltaic conversion efficiency is evidenced with one-dimensional periodic structures.

  15. Nonlinear stress analysis of the whole lumbar spine in torsion--mechanics of facet articulation.

    PubMed

    Shirazi-Adl, A

    1994-03-01

    The response of the whole ligamentous lumbar spine in axial torsion is studied. Attention is focused on the inter-segmental variations, role of articular facets, presence of coupled movements, intervertebral stresses and the effects of a structural alteration at a level on the response. A detailed three-dimensional finite element model (L1-S1) was used for nonlinear stress analyses under torques of up to 15 N m. In right axial torque, extra cases of larger gap limit for more effective articulation, of loss of L4-L5 disc fluid content, and of removal of L4-L5 compression facet were also studied. The intersegmental results varied from one level to the next. The facet contact occurred at the lateral posterior regions of articular surfaces. The interference gap distance between facet articular surfaces, and not the orientation of articular surfaces, was the primary factor in the relative effectiveness of facets in resisting torsion. Coupled motions of upward translation and flexion rotation were noted at all levels under torques in both left and right directions. Loss of disc fluid content at the L4-L5 level resulted in larger facet contact force and axial rotation at the same level. Removal of the L4-L5 compression facet substantially increased the axial rotation, intradiscal pressure, maximum fibre strain, and strains in capsular ligaments at the same L4-L5 level. In axial torque, the disc failure appeared to be unlikely. Relatively large facet forces were generated that further increased with a loss in disc fluid content. PMID:8051189

  16. AgI microplate monocrystals with polar {0001} facets: spontaneous photocarrier separation and enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Qin; Zheng, Xiaoli; Yang, Shihe

    2014-02-24

    Elucidating the facet-dependent photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalysts is important in improving the overall efficiency of photocatalysis. Furthermore, combining facet control with selective deposition of oxidation and/or reduction cocatalysts on specific faces of semiconductor photocatalysts is potentially an effective strategy to synergistically optimize the functionality of photocatalysts. In the present study, high-purity wurtzite-type β-AgI platelet microcrystals with polar {0001} facets were prepared by a facile polyvinylpyrrolidone-assisted precipitation reaction. The polar-faceted AgI microplates were used as archetypes to demonstrate preferential diametric migration (i.e., effective separation) of photogenerated electrons and holes along the c axis. Such vectorial electron-hole separation stems from the asymmetric surface structures, which give rise to distinct photoexcited reaction behaviors on the ±(0001) polar facets of wurtzite-type semiconductors. Furthermore, on selective deposition of Ag and MnOx (1.5facets, respectively, photocatalytic activity of the AgI microplates in degrading organic pollutants was dramatically enhanced thanks to the broad light-absorption range, strong dye-adsorption ability, and effective spatial separation of photocarriers. PMID:24449437

  17. Optical properties of a grating-nanorod assembly structure for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhihao; Cheng, Qiang; Song, Jinlin; Si, Mengting; Luo, Zixue

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a grating-nanorod assembly structure that can be applied to silicon solar cells. The optical properties of the assembly structure are examined by applying the finite difference time domain method in the 300-1100 nm wavelength region, where the average spectral absorptance of the structure can reach 0.955. This high absorptance is attributed to guided mode resonance and microcavity effect. The transient and steady-state magnetic field distribution of the structure reveals the underlying mechanisms of such extraordinary phenomena. Absorptance is further investigated at different diameters and lengths of the nanorod component. The effects of incident angle on absorptance are also discussed. The solar cells of the structure can yield an optimum conversion efficiency of 25.91%. Thus, the proposed structure can be applied to silicon solar cells.

  18. Modelling of solar magnetic field and prominence structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shi Tsan

    1988-01-01

    Using plasma theory, the interaction is studied between high frequency and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves from which a set of coupling equations resulted. On the basis of this formalism, the modulation instabilities of an electromagnetic soliton in a current sheet are examined, and it is shown that there is a resistive instability at the onset of the magnetic field reconnection. This mechanism could be used to explain the onset of solar flares and prominences. To improve the resolution of vector magnetic fields at the sun's surface, state-of-the-art optics is examined to improve the design and fabrication of a new spaceborne solar vector magnetograph as part of the SAMEX (Solar Active Measurements Experiment) program.

  19. The average solar wind in the inner heliosphere: Structures and slow variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenn, R.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements from the HELIOS solar probes indicated that apart from solar activity related disturbances there exist two states of the solar wind which might result from basic differences in the acceleration process: the fast solar wind (v 600 kms(-)1) emanating from magnetically open regions in the solar corona and the "slow" solar wind (v 400 kms(-)1) correlated with the more active regions and its mainly closed magnetic structures. In a comprehensive study using all HELIOS data taken between 1974 and 1982 the average behavior of the basic plasma parameters were analyzed as functions of the solar wind speed. The long term variations of the solar wind parameters along the solar cycle were also determined and numerical estimates given. These modulations appear to be distinct though only minor. In agreement with earlier studies it was concluded that the major modulations are in the number and size of high speed streams and in the number of interplanetary shock waves caused by coronal transients. The latter ones usually cause huge deviations from the averages of all parameters.

  20. Solar Energetic Particle Production by Shocks in Fast and Slow Solar Wind Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    2002-05-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events at 1 AU are produced by coronal and interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Shocks from fast (V > 900 km/s) CMEs should be produced more easily in slow solar wind regions where the flow and fast-mode MHD wave speeds are low and less easily in fast solar wind regions where those speeds are high. We might therefore expect to observe more intense SEP events at 1 AU when the Earth lies in a slow wind region than when it lies in a fast wind region. While stream-stream interactions wash out the slow-fast stream boundaries in the solar wind speed profiles at 1 AU, the O+7/O+6 signatures of the streams are unchanged at 1 AU. We use the 20 MeV proton intensities from the EPACT instrument on Wind, the associated CMEs observed with the Lasco coronagraph on SOHO, and the ACE SWICS/SWIMS solar wind values of O+7/O+6 to look for variations of peak SEP intensities as a function of O+7/O+6. We find no significant dependence of the SEP intensities on O+7/O+6 for either poorly connected or well connected CME source regions or for different CME speed ranges. While a broad range of angular widths are associated with fast (V > 900 km/s) CMEs, we find that no fast CMEs with widths < 60 degrees are associated with SEP events. On the other hand, nearly all fast halo CMEs are associated with SEP events. Thus the CME widths are more important in SEP production than previously thought, but the solar wind source regions in which SEPs are produced are not a significant factor.

  1. Using Facet Clusters to Guide Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, Lane; DeWater, L. S.; Vokos, S.; Kraus, P.

    2006-12-01

    The Department of Physics and the School of Education at Seattle Pacific University, together with FACET Innovations, LLC, are beginning the second year of a five-year NSF TPC project, Improving the Effectiveness of Teacher Diagnostic Skills and Tools. We are working in partnership with school districts in Washington State to help teachers make their classrooms into better diagnostic learning environments. In this talk, we describe initial efforts to construct content-rich professional development courses for teachers, which are infused with diagnostic assessment that target the fine structure of student ideas in specific topical areas. * Supported in part by NSF grant #ESI-0455796, The Boeing Corporation, and the SPU Science Initiative.

  2. The structures, mass motions and footpoints of solar filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramanasastry, Aparna

    This thesis focuses on identifying the mechanism by which solar filaments acquire mass. Some of the speculations for how a filament gets its mass are 1) injection of mass from the chromosphere into the filament structure, and 2) condensation of mass from the corona into the region of the filament channel. Mass motion at the footpoints of the filaments is studied to detect mass entering and leaving the filament body. The magnetic properties of the footpoints of the filaments are also studied. Recommendations are drawn by comparing observational properties obtained in this study with the features used in some of the previously developed models. The datasets used for this study are high-resolution image sets of centerline and Doppler wings of Halpha, obtained using the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT). The data were obtained on Oct 30, 2010. The data set contains three filaments in an active region in the northern hemisphere of the Sun. The images in each wavelength are aligned and made into movies to find the footpoints of the filaments through which the mass goes into and comes out of the filaments from and to the chromosphere, respectively. The magnetic properties of the footpoints are studied by overlaying the magnetogram images with the DOT images by using full-disk Halpha images for matching the features in the two. Of the three filaments, one of the filaments is observed to be stable throughout the duration of the observations; another filament erupts after about two hours of the beginning of observations; and the third filament is in its early stages of formation. The ends of the stable filament are clearly observed whereas the ends of the erupting filament and the forming filament are observed clearly intermittently during the duration of the observations. The animations of the region near the ends of filament 1 reveal definite injection and draining of mass via the footpoints into and out of the filament. The mass motion into and out of the filaments are observed

  3. Facet-Selective Epitaxy of Compound Semiconductors on Faceted Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Max N; Day, Robert W; Gao, Ruixuan; No, You-Shin; Kim, Sun-Kyung; McClelland, Arthur A; Bell, David C; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Integration of compound semiconductors with silicon (Si) has been a long-standing goal for the semiconductor industry, as direct band gap compound semiconductors offer, for example, attractive photonic properties not possible with Si devices. However, mismatches in lattice constant, thermal expansion coefficient, and polarity between Si and compound semiconductors render growth of epitaxial heterostructures challenging. Nanowires (NWs) are a promising platform for the integration of Si and compound semiconductors since their limited surface area can alleviate such material mismatch issues. Here, we demonstrate facet-selective growth of cadmium sulfide (CdS) on Si NWs. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that crystalline CdS is grown epitaxially on the {111} and {110} surface facets of the Si NWs but that the Si{113} facets remain bare. Further analysis of CdS on Si NWs grown at higher deposition rates to yield a conformal shell reveals a thin oxide layer on the Si{113} facet. This observation and control experiments suggest that facet-selective growth is enabled by the formation of an oxide, which prevents subsequent shell growth on the Si{113} NW facets. Further studies of facet-selective epitaxial growth of CdS shells on micro-to-mesoscale wires, which allows tuning of the lateral width of the compound semiconductor layer without lithographic patterning, and InP shell growth on Si NWs demonstrate the generality of our growth technique. In addition, photoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy show that the epitaxial shells display strong and clean band edge emission, confirming their high photonic quality, and thus suggesting that facet-selective epitaxy on NW substrates represents a promising route to integration of compound semiconductors on Si. PMID:26057208

  4. The Ouroboros Model, selected facets.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Knud

    2011-01-01

    The Ouroboros Model features a biologically inspired cognitive architecture. At its core lies a self-referential recursive process with alternating phases of data acquisition and evaluation. Memory entries are organized in schemata. The activation at a time of part of a schema biases the whole structure and, in particular, missing features, thus triggering expectations. An iterative recursive monitor process termed 'consumption analysis' is then checking how well such expectations fit with successive activations. Mismatches between anticipations based on previous experience and actual current data are highlighted and used for controlling the allocation of attention. A measure for the goodness of fit provides feedback as (self-) monitoring signal. The basic algorithm works for goal directed movements and memory search as well as during abstract reasoning. It is sketched how the Ouroboros Model can shed light on characteristics of human behavior including attention, emotions, priming, masking, learning, sleep and consciousness.

  5. Management of lumbar zygapophysial (facet) joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Falco, Frank JE; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic validity and therapeutic value of lumbar facet joint interventions in managing chronic low back pain. METHODS: The review process applied systematic evidence-based assessment methodology of controlled trials of diagnostic validity and randomized controlled trials of therapeutic efficacy. Inclusion criteria encompassed all facet joint interventions performed in a controlled fashion. The pain relief of greater than 50% was the outcome measure for diagnostic accuracy assessment of the controlled studies with ability to perform previously painful movements, whereas, for randomized controlled therapeutic efficacy studies, the primary outcome was significant pain relief and the secondary outcome was a positive change in functional status. For the inclusion of the diagnostic controlled studies, all studies must have utilized either placebo controlled facet joint blocks or comparative local anesthetic blocks. In assessing therapeutic interventions, short-term and long-term reliefs were defined as either up to 6 mo or greater than 6 mo of relief. The literature search was extensive utilizing various types of electronic search media including PubMed from 1966 onwards, Cochrane library, National Guideline Clearinghouse, clinicaltrials.gov, along with other sources including previous systematic reviews, non-indexed journals, and abstracts until March 2015. Each manuscript included in the assessment was assessed for methodologic quality or risk of bias assessment utilizing the Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies checklist for diagnostic interventions, and Cochrane review criteria and the Interventional Pain Management Techniques - Quality Appraisal of Reliability and Risk of Bias Assessment tool for therapeutic interventions. Evidence based on the review of the systematic assessment of controlled studies was graded utilizing a modified schema of qualitative evidence with best evidence synthesis, variable from level I to level V

  6. The Janus Facet of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kardos, Julianna; Jablonkai, István; Bóta, Attila; Visy, Júlia

    2015-01-01

    Application of nanoscale materials (NMs) displays a rapidly increasing trend in electronics, optics, chemical catalysis, biotechnology, and medicine due to versatile nature of NMs and easily adjustable physical, physicochemical, and chemical properties. However, the increasing abundance of NMs also poses significant new and emerging health and environmental risks. Despite growing efforts, understanding toxicity of NMs does not seem to cope with the demand, because NMs usually act entirely different from those of conventional small molecule drugs. Currently, large-scale application of available safety assessment protocols, as well as their furthering through case-by-case practice, is advisable. We define a standard work-scheme for nanotoxicity evaluation of NMs, comprising thorough characterization of structural, physical, physicochemical, and chemical traits, followed by measuring biodistribution in live tissue and blood combined with investigation of organ-specific effects especially regarding the function of the brain and the liver. We propose a range of biochemical, cellular, and immunological processes to be explored in order to provide information on the early effects of NMs on some basic physiological functions and chemical defense mechanisms. Together, these contributions give an overview with important implications for the understanding of many aspects of nanotoxicity. PMID:26075225

  7. Facets for Discovery and Exploration in Text Collections

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Stuart J.; Roberts, Ian E.; Cramer, Nicholas O.

    2011-10-24

    Faceted classifications of text collections provide a useful means of partitioning documents into related groups, however traditional approaches of faceting text collections rely on comprehensive analysis of the subject area or annotated general attributes. In this paper we show the application of basic principles for facet analysis to the development of computational methods for facet classification of text collections. Integration with a visual analytics system is described with summaries of user experiences.

  8. Structure of the magnetic field at altitudes of 1-1.15 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtemov, Z. S.; Stepanyan, N. N.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Rudenko, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the characteristics of unipolar structures detected at latitudes from -40° to +40°, longitudes of 0°-360°, and altitudes of 1-1.15 solar radii during the period from May 1996 (the 23rd solar minimum) to October 2000 (the 23rd solar maximum) has been carried out. Synoptic maps of the solar radial magnetic field calculated in a potential approximation are used. The boundaries between unipolar structures with opposite magnetic polarities ("+/-" and "-/+" polarities) form chains extending along meridians at all the considered latitudes and altitudes. Depending on the latitude, the single-peaked distributions of the number of structures found at the lowest altitudes are replaced by double-peaked distributions at higher altitudes. The time variations of the total number of structures are non-monotonic. The growth in the number of unipolar structures begins before the growth in the Wolf number. This indicates that new unipolar structures already appear together with flocculi, preceding the formation of sunspots. It is found that structures with positive field have larger mean sizes that do structures with negative field. The polar field in the northern hemisphere penetrates to middle latitudes of the southern hemisphere. The existence of sets of structures with typical sizes is shown. The sizes of the smallest structures vary little with latitude, but increase slightly with altitude.

  9. Results from Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Clarke, C.I.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.; Litos, M.D.; Walz, D.R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Adli, E.; /U. Oslo

    2011-12-13

    We report initial results of the Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) Experiments performed at FACET - Facility for Advanced aCcelertor Experimental Tests at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. At FACET a 23 GeV electron beam with 1.8 x 10{sup 10} electrons is compressed to 20 {mu}m longitudinally and focused down to 10 {mu}m x 10 {mu}m transverse spot size for user driven experiments. Construction of the FACET facility completed in May 2011 with a first run of user assisted commissioning throughout the summer. The first PWFA experiments will use single electron bunches combined with a high density lithium plasma to produce accelerating gradients > 10 GeV/m benchmarking the FACET beam and the newly installed experimental hardware. Future plans for further study of plasma wakefield acceleration will be reviewed. The experimental hardware and operation of the plasma heat-pipe oven have been successfully commissioned. Plasma wakefield acceleration was not observed because the electron bunch density was insufficient to ionize the lithium vapor. The remaining commissioning time in summer 2011 will be dedicated to delivering the FACET design parameters for the experimental programs which will begin in early 2012. PWFA experiments require the shorter bunches and smaller transverse sizes to create the plasma and drive large amplitude wakefields. Low emittance and high energy will minimize head erosion which was found to be a limiting factor in acceleration distance and energy gain. We will run the PWFA experiments with the design single bunch conditions in early 2012. Future PWFA experiments at FACET are discussed in [5][6] and include drive and witness bunch production for high energy beam manipulation, ramped bunch to optimize tranformer ratio, field-ionized cesium plasma, preionized plasmas, positron acceleration, etc.. We will install a notch collimator for two-bunch operation as well as new beam diagnostics such as the X-band TCAV [7] to resolve the two bunches

  10. Does lumbar facet arthrosis precede disc degeneration? A postmortem study.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Jason David; Lee, Michael J; Cassinelli, Ezequiel; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2007-11-01

    It is believed lumbar degeneration begins in the disc, where desiccation and collapse lead to instability and compensatory facet arthrosis. We explored the contrary contention that facet degeneration precedes disc degeneration by examining 647 skeletal lumbar spines. Using facet osteophytosis as a measure of facet degeneration and vertebral rim osteophytosis as a measure of disc degeneration, we assumed bone degeneration in both locations equally reflected the progression of those in the soft tissues. We graded arthrosis Grade 0 to 4 on a continuum from no arthritis to ankylosis. The data were analyzed for different age groups to examine patterns of degeneration with age. Specimens younger than 30 years of age had a higher prevalence of facet osteophytosis compared with vertebral rim osteophotosis at L1-L2 and L2-L3. Specimens aged 30 to 39 years showed more facet osteophytosis than vertebral rim osteophytosis at L4-L5. Specimens older than 40 years, however, showed more vertebral rim osteophytosis compared with facet osteophytosis at all levels except L4-L5 and L5-S1. This skeletal study suggests facet osteophytosis appears early in the degenerative process, preceding vertebral rim osteophytosis of degenerating intervertebral discs. However, once facets begin deteriorating with age, vertebral rim osteophytosis overtakes continued facet osteophytosis. These data challenge the belief that facet osteophytosis follows vertebral rim osteophytosis; rather, it appears vertebral rim osteophytosis progresses more rapidly in later years, but facet osteophotosis occurs early, predominating in younger individuals.

  11. Identifying Facets of Problem Solving in Mathematics Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klieme, Eckhard; Clausen, Marten

    Facets of problem solving instruction (PSI) were studied in German mathematics classrooms. Nine different facets of PSI were identified from the research literature, and a video rating form was developed to assess these facets and teacher effectiveness. Videotaped mathematics lessons (n=147) for German eighth graders from the sample for the Third…

  12. The plasma structure of coronal hole solar wind: Origins and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2016-06-01

    Whereas slow solar wind is known to be highly structured, the fast (coronal hole origin) wind is usually considered to be homogeneous. Using measurements from Helios 1 + 2, ACE, Wind, and Ulysses, structure in the coronal hole origin solar wind is examined from 0.3 AU to 2.3 AU. Care is taken to collect and analyze intervals of "unperturbed coronal hole plasma." In these intervals, solar wind structure is seen in the proton number density, proton temperature, proton specific entropy, magnetic field strength, magnetic field to density ratio, electron heat flux, helium abundance, heavy-ion charge-state ratios, and Alfvenicity. Typical structure amplitudes are factors of 2, far from homogeneous. Variations are also seen in the solar wind radial velocity. Using estimates of the motion of the solar wind origin footpoint on the Sun for the various spacecraft, the satellite time series measurements are converted to distance along the photosphere. Typical variation scale lengths for the solar wind structure are several variations per supergranule. The structure amplitude and structure scale sizes do not evolve with distance from the Sun from 0.3 to 2.3 AU. An argument is quantified that these variations are the scale expected for solar wind production in open magnetic flux funnels in coronal holes. Additionally, a population of magnetic field foldings (switchbacks, reversals) in the coronal hole plasma is examined: this population evolves with distance from the Sun such that the magnetic field is mostly Parker spiral aligned at 0.3 AU and becomes more misaligned with distance outward.

  13. Structure and evolution of the large scale solar and heliospheric magnetic fields. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Structure and evolution of large scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in the interval 1976-1983 were studied using observations from the Stanford Solar Observatory and a potential field model. The solar wind in the heliosphere is organized into large regions in which the magnetic field has a componenet either toward or away from the sun. The model predicts the location of the current sheet separating these regions. Near solar minimum, in 1976, the current sheet lay within a few degrees of the solar equator having two extensions north and south of the equator. Soon after minimum the latitudinal extent began to increase. The sheet reached to at least 50 deg from 1978 through 1983. The complex structure near maximum occasionally included multiple current sheets. Large scale structures persist for up to two years during the entire interval. To minimize errors in determining the structure of the heliospheric field particular attention was paid to decreasing the distorting effects of rapid field evolution, finding the optimum source surface radius, determining the correction to the sun's polar field, and handling missing data. The predicted structure agrees with direct interplanetary field measurements taken near the ecliptic and with coronameter and interplanetary scintillation measurements which infer the three dimensional interplanetary magnetic structure. During most of the solar cycle the heliospheric field cannot be adequately described as a dipole.

  14. High-performance deployable structures for the support of high-concentration ratio solar array modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobrem, M.

    1985-01-01

    A study conducted on high-performance deployable structures for the support of high-concentration ratio solar array modules is discussed. Serious consideration is being given to the use of high-concentration ratio solar array modules or applications such as space stations. These concentrator solar array designs offer the potential of reduced cost, reduced electrical complexity, higher power per unit area, and improved survivability. Arrays of concentrators, such as the miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator modules, present a serious challenge to the structural design because their mass per unit area (5.7 kg/square meters) is higher than that of flexible solar array blankets, and the requirement for accurate orientation towards the Sun (plus or minus 0.5 degree) requires structures with improved accuracy potentials. In addition, use on a space station requires relatively high structural natural frequencies to avoid deleterious interactions with control systems and other large structural components. The objective here is to identify and evaluate conceptual designs of structures suitable for deploying and accurately supporting high-concentration ratio solar array modules.

  15. How faceted liquid droplets grow tails

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Shani; Sapir, Zvi; Schultz, Moty; Butenko, Alexander V.; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Deutsch, Moshe; Sloutskin, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Liquid droplets, widely encountered in everyday life, have no flat facets. Here we show that water-dispersed oil droplets can be reversibly temperature-tuned to icosahedral and other faceted shapes, hitherto unreported for liquid droplets. These shape changes are shown to originate in the interplay between interfacial tension and the elasticity of the droplet’s 2-nm-thick interfacial monolayer, which crystallizes at some T = Ts above the oil’s melting point, with the droplet’s bulk remaining liquid. Strikingly, at still-lower temperatures, this interfacial freezing (IF) effect also causes droplets to deform, split, and grow tails. Our findings provide deep insights into molecular-scale elasticity and allow formation of emulsions of tunable stability for directed self-assembly of complex-shaped particles and other future technologies. PMID:26733673

  16. How faceted liquid droplets grow tails.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Shani; Sapir, Zvi; Schultz, Moty; Butenko, Alexander V; Ocko, Benjamin M; Deutsch, Moshe; Sloutskin, Eli

    2016-01-19

    Liquid droplets, widely encountered in everyday life, have no flat facets. Here we show that water-dispersed oil droplets can be reversibly temperature-tuned to icosahedral and other faceted shapes, hitherto unreported for liquid droplets. These shape changes are shown to originate in the interplay between interfacial tension and the elasticity of the droplet's 2-nm-thick interfacial monolayer, which crystallizes at some T = Ts above the oil's melting point, with the droplet's bulk remaining liquid. Strikingly, at still-lower temperatures, this interfacial freezing (IF) effect also causes droplets to deform, split, and grow tails. Our findings provide deep insights into molecular-scale elasticity and allow formation of emulsions of tunable stability for directed self-assembly of complex-shaped particles and other future technologies. PMID:26733673

  17. Neurophysiological markers of multiple facets of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Neal, Lauren B; Gable, Philip A

    2016-03-01

    Human behavior is influenced by three core personality systems: approach, avoidance, and supervisory control. The supervisory control system is inversely related to impulsivity. Although past research has related some aspects of impulsivity to frontal hemispheric asymmetry, impulsivity as a multi-faceted construct has not been studied in relation with frontal asymmetry. In addition, past work has potentially confounded impulsivity with approach-motivation. In the current study, greater relative left frontal activity was related to multiple facets of impulsivity: negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and positive urgency. Regressing both positive and negative urgency on frontal asymmetry revealed that approach-related positive urgency related to greater left frontal activity, but withdrawal-related negative urgency marginally related to greater right frontal activity. These results suggest that impulsivity, independent of affective valence, relates to greater left frontal activity. When controlling for trait approach motivation, the relationship between impulsivity and left frontal activity is unchanged.

  18. Structure and evolution of solar supergranulation using SDO/HMI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudier, Th.; Švanda, M.; Rieutord, , M.; Malherbe, J. M.; Burston, R.; Gizon, L.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Studying the motions on the solar surface is fundamental for understanding how turbulent convection transports energy and how magnetic fields are distributed across the solar surface. Aims: From horizontal velocity measurements all over the visible disc of the Sun and using data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI), we investigate the structure and evolution of solar supergranulation. Methods: Horizontal velocity fields were measured by following the proper motions of solar granules using a newly developed version of the coherent structure tracking code. With this tool, maps of horizontal divergence were computed. We then segmented and identified supergranular cells and followed their histories by using spatio-temporal labelling. With this data set we derived the fundamental properties of supergranulation, including their motion. Results: We find values of the fundamental parameters of supergranulation similar to previous studies: a mean lifetime of 1.5 days and a mean diameter of 25 Mm. The tracking of individual supergranular cells reveals the solar differential rotation and a poleward circulation trend of the meridional flow. The shape of the derived differential rotation and meridional flow does not depend on the cell size. If there is a background magnetic field, the diverging flows in supergranules are weaker. Conclusions: This study confirms that supergranules are suitable tracers that may be used to investigate the large-scale flows of the solar convection as long as they are detectable enough on the surface.

  19. Elusive Magnetic Structures in the Sun and Solar-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.

    2000-12-01

    The magnetic structures of the Sun are very inhomogeneous, with irregularities smaller than the smallest sizes that we resolve from Earth. Such irregularities are not properly accounted for by standard magnetic field diagnostic techniques. We have identified a quantitatively important bias that has remained unnoticed hitherto. Intense magnetic fields embedded in inhomogeneous magnetic structures produce little light and easily escape detection. These elusive magnetic fields, which cheat standard observing techniques, seem to be common. We estimate that they carry at least half of the solar magnetic flux. Should the bias be so severe, it would cast doubts on the present interpretation of many solar magnetic phenomena. Since magnetic field measurements in solar-type stars reproduce solar methods, they are liable to the same systematic errors.

  20. The solar wind structure and heliospheric magnetic field in the solar Cycle 23-24 minimum and in the increasing phase of Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. E.; Zhao, L.; Fisk, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    The solar wind structure and the heliospheric magnetic field were substantially different in the latest solar minimum between solar Cycle 23 and 24 from the previous minimum. Compared with the previous minimum, in the latest solar minimum, the heliospheric magnetic field strength was substantially reduced; the streamer-associated-low-temperature solar wind (streamer-stalk wind) was distributed in a narrower region relative to the heliospheric current sheet (HCS); the slow-proton-speed solar wind was scattered in a wider latitudinal region; and there are more large and steady coronal holes at low latitude. We offer an explanation for the decreased magnetic-field strength and the narrowed streamer-stalk wind based on an analysis of the Ulysses and ACE in-situ observations. Solar-wind composition data are used to demonstrate that there are two distinct structures of solar wind: solar wind likely to originate from the stalk of the streamer belt (the highly elongated loops that underlie the HCS), and solar wind from outside this region. The region outside the streamer-stalk region is noticeably larger in the Cycle 23-24 minimum; however, the increased area can account for the reduction in the heliospheric magnetic-field strength in that minimum. Thus, the total magnetic flux contained in this region is the same in the two minima. To have a further understanding of the solar wind structure and its solar source, we ballistically map the ACE in-situ observation back along a radial trajectory from 1 AU to the solar source surface (r = 2.5Rsun) using the observed proton speeds. Then we track the field line from the source surface to the solar surface using a potential-field-source-surface (PFSS) extrapolation model. So the ACE observations, including the heliospheric magnetic field, the solar wind compositional and dynamic properties at 1AU, can be connected to their coronal sources on the solar surface. Synoptic maps showing this connection will be provided, and based on

  1. Coronal sources of the intrastream structure of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. D.; Bridge, H. S.

    1983-01-01

    Short time scale changes in the bulk speed were found not to coincide with X-ray transients near the sub-earth point nor with the number of X-ray bright points within a coronal hole and near the equator. The changes in bulk speed, it is shown, are associated with changes in light areas in a hole which may be associated with the opening or closing of magnetic field lines within the coronal hole. That there is a causal connection between these sudden changes (apperance or disappearance) in light area and sudden changes in the bulk speed of the solar wind is further evidenced by the spatial proximity on the Sun of these changing light regions to the source position of stream lines from Levine's model that connect into the same solar wind streams.

  2. Block copolymer morphologies in dye-sensitized solar cells: probing the photovoltaic structure-function relation.

    PubMed

    Crossland, Edward J W; Nedelcu, Mihaela; Ducati, Caterina; Ludwigs, Sabine; Hillmyer, Marc A; Steiner, Ullrich; Snaith, Henry J

    2009-08-01

    We integrate mesostructured titania arrays into dye-sensitized solar cells by replicating ordered, oriented one-dimensional (1D) columnar and three-dimensional (3D) bicontinuous gyroid block copolymer phases. The solar cell performance, charge transport, and recombination are investigated. We observe faster charge transport in 1D "wires" than through 3D gyroid arrays. However, owing to their structural instability, the surface area of the wire arrays is low, inhibiting the solar cell performance. The gyroid morphology, on the other hand, outperforms the current state-of-the-art mesoporous nanoparticle films.

  3. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1998-01-01

    Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the period covered by this report we have published 17 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 4 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles.

  4. Periodic Density Structures and the Origin of the Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viall-Kepko, Nicholeen M.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    The source of the slow solar wind has challenged scientists for years. Periodic density structures (PDSs), observed regularly in the solar wind at 1 AU (Astronomical Unit), can be used to address this challenge. These structures have length scales of hundreds to several thousands of megameters and frequencies of tens to hundreds of minutes. Two lines of evidence indicate that PDSs are formed in the solar corona as part of the slow solar wind release and/or acceleration processes. The first is corresponding changes in compositional data in situ, and the second is PDSs observed in the inner Heliospheric Imaging data on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) suite. The periodic nature of these density structures is both a useful identifier as well as an important physical constraint on their origin. In this paper, we present the results of tracking periodic structures identified in the inner Heliospheric Imager in SECCHI back in time through the corresponding outer coronagraph (COR2) images. We demonstrate that the PDSs are formed around or below 2.5 solar radii-the inner edge of the COR2 field of view. We compute the occurrence rates of PDSs in 10 days of COR2 images both as a function of their periodicity and location in the solar corona, and we find that this set of PDSs occurs preferentially with a periodicity of approximately 90 minutes and occurs near streamers. Lastly, we show that their acceleration and expansion through COR2 is self-similar, thus their frequency is constant at distances beyond 2.5 solar radii.

  5. Periodic Density Structures and the Origin of the Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-07-01

    The source of the slow solar wind has challenged scientists for years. Periodic density structures (PDSs), observed regularly in the solar wind at 1 AU, can be used to address this challenge. These structures have length scales of hundreds to several thousands of megameters and frequencies of tens to hundreds of minutes. Two lines of evidence indicate that PDSs are formed in the solar corona as part of the slow solar wind release and/or acceleration processes. The first is corresponding changes in compositional data in situ, and the second is PDSs observed in the inner Heliospheric Imaging data on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) suite. The periodic nature of these density structures is both a useful identifier as well as an important physical constraint on their origin. In this paper, we present the results of tracking periodic structures identified in the inner Heliospheric Imager in SECCHI back in time through the corresponding outer coronagraph (COR2) images. We demonstrate that the PDSs are formed around or below 2.5 solar radii—the inner edge of the COR2 field of view. We compute the occurrence rates of PDSs in 10 days of COR2 images both as a function of their periodicity and location in the solar corona, and we find that this set of PDSs occurs preferentially with a periodicity of ˜90 minutes and occurs near streamers. Lastly, we show that their acceleration and expansion through COR2 is self-similar, thus their frequency is constant at distances beyond 2.5 solar radii.

  6. Sail film materials and supporting structure for a solar sail, a preliminary design, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, W. M. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Solar sailing technology was examined in relation to a mission to rendezvous with Halley's Comet. Development of an ultra-light, highly reflecting material system capable of operating at high solar intensity for long periods of time was emphasized. Data resulting from the sail materials study are reported. Topics covered include: basic film; coatings and thermal control; joining and handling; system performance; and supporting structures assessment for the heliogyro.

  7. Recent Advances in the Inverted Planar Structure of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lei; You, Jingbi; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-19

    Inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite solar cells research could be traced back to 2009, and initially showed 3.8% efficiency. After 6 years of efforts, the efficiency has been pushed to 20.1%. The pace of development was much faster than that of any type of solar cell technology. In addition to high efficiency, the device fabrication is a low-cost solution process. Due to these advantages, a large number of scientists have been immersed into this promising area. In the past 6 years, much of the research on perovskite solar cells has been focused on planar and mesoporous device structures employing an n-type TiO2 layer as the bottom electron transport layer. These architectures have achieved champion device efficiencies. However, they still possess unwanted features. Mesoporous structures require a high temperature (>450 °C) sintering process for the TiO2 scaffold, which will increase the cost and also not be compatible with flexible substrates. While the planar structures based on TiO2 (regular structure) usually suffer from a large degree of J-V hysteresis. Recently, another emerging structure, referred to as an "inverted" planar device structure (i.e., p-i-n), uses p-type and n-type materials as bottom and top charge transport layers, respectively. This structure derived from organic solar cells, and the charge transport layers used in organic photovoltaics were successfully transferred into perovskite solar cells. The p-i-n structure of perovskite solar cells has shown efficiencies as high as 18%, lower temperature processing, flexibility, and, furthermore, negligible J-V hysteresis effects. In this Account, we will provide a comprehensive comparison of the mesoporous and planar structures, and also the regular and inverted of planar structures. Later, we will focus the discussion on the development of the inverted planar structure of perovskite solar cells, including film growth, band alignment, stability, and hysteresis. In the film growth part, several

  8. Lateral-Structure Single-Crystal Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells via Piezoelectric Poling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qingfeng; Song, Jingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Ducharme, Stephen; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-04-13

    Single-crystal perovskite solar cells with a lateral structure yield an efficiency enhancement 44-fold that of polycrystalline thin films, due to the much longer carrier diffusion length. A piezoelectric effect observed in perovskite single-crystal and the strain-generated grain-boundaries enable ion migration to form a p-i-n structure. PMID:26836224

  9. Lateral-Structure Single-Crystal Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells via Piezoelectric Poling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qingfeng; Song, Jingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Ducharme, Stephen; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-04-13

    Single-crystal perovskite solar cells with a lateral structure yield an efficiency enhancement 44-fold that of polycrystalline thin films, due to the much longer carrier diffusion length. A piezoelectric effect observed in perovskite single-crystal and the strain-generated grain-boundaries enable ion migration to form a p-i-n structure.

  10. Structures in the polar solar wind: Plasma and field observations from Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Barraclough, B.L.; Gosling, J.T.; Hammond, C.M.; Phillips, J.L.; Neugebauer, M.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.J.

    1996-07-01

    The Ulysses measurements of the solar wind plasma and magnetic fields for the 36-69 deg.south latitude are analyzed. The plasma compressional structures and pressure balance structures are identified in addition to Alfven waves and coronal mass ejection. {copyright} {bold 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Examining Periodic Solar-Wind Density Structures Observed in the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of small-scale, periodic, solar-wind density enhancements (length scales as small as approximately equals 1000 Mm) observed in images from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) aboard STEREO-A. We discuss their possible relationship to periodic fluctuations of the proton density that have been identified at 1 AU using in-situ plasma measurements. Specifically, Viall, Kepko, and Spence examined 11 years of in-situ solar-wind density measurements at 1 AU and demonstrated that not only turbulent structures, but also nonturbulent, periodic density structures exist in the solar wind with scale sizes of hundreds to one thousand Mm. In a subsequent paper, Viall, Spence, and Kasper analyzed the alpha-to-proton solar-wind abundance ratio measured during one such event of periodic density structures, demonstrating that the plasma behavior was highly suggestive that either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma created those density structures. Large periodic density structures observed at 1 AU, which were generated in the corona, can be observable in coronal and heliospheric white-light images if they possess sufficiently high density contrast. Indeed, we identify such periodic density structures as they enter the HI field of view and follow them as they advect with the solar wind through the images. The smaller, periodic density structures that we identify in the images are comparable in size to the larger structures analyzed in-situ at 1 AU, yielding further evidence that periodic density enhancements are a consequence of coronal activity as the solar wind is formed.

  12. Barrier potential design criteria in multiple-quantum-well-based solar-cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohaidat, Jihad M.; Shum, Kai; Wang, W. B.; Alfano, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The barrier potential design criteria in multiple-quantum-well (MQW)-based solar-cell structures is reported for the purpose of achieving maximum efficiency. The time-dependent short-circuit current density at the collector side of various MQW solar-cell structures under resonant condition was numerically calculated using the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The energy efficiency of solar cells based on the InAs/Ga(y)In(1-y)As and GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As MQW structues were compared when carriers are excited at a particular solar-energy band. Using InAs/Ga(y)In(1-y)As MQW structures it is found that a maximum energy efficiency can be achieved if the structure is designed with barrier potential of about 450 meV. The efficiency is found to decline linearly as the barrier potential increases for GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As MQW-structure-based solar cells.

  13. Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry Methods for Solar Sails and Other Gossamer Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Jonathan T.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight and inflatable gossamer space structures are designed to be tightly packaged for launch, then deploy or inflate once in space. These properties will allow for in-space construction of very large structures 10 to 1000 meters in size such as solar sails, inflatable antennae, and space solar power stations using a single launch. Solar sails are of particular interest because of their potential for propellantless propulsion. Gossamer structures do, however, have significant complications. Their low mass and high flexibility make them very difficult to test on the ground. The added mass and stiffness of attached measurement devices can significantly alter the static and dynamic properties of the structure. This complication necessitates an alternative approach for characterization. This paper discusses the development and application of photogrammetry and videogrammetry methods for the static and dynamic characterization of gossamer structures, as four specific solar sail applications demonstrate. The applications prove that high-resolution, full-field, non-contact static measurements of solar sails using dot projection photogrammetry are possible as well as full-field, noncontact, dynamic characterization using dot projection videogrammetry.

  14. Using self-report assessment methods to explore facets of mindfulness.

    PubMed

    Baer, Ruth A; Smith, Gregory T; Hopkins, Jaclyn; Krietemeyer, Jennifer; Toney, Leslie

    2006-03-01

    The authors examine the facet structure of mindfulness using five recently developed mindfulness questionnaires. Two large samples of undergraduate students completed mindfulness questionnaires and measures of other constructs. Psychometric properties of the mindfulness questionnaires were examined, including internal consistency and convergent and discriminant relationships with other variables. Factor analyses of the combined pool of items from the mindfulness questionnaires suggested that collectively they contain five clear, interpretable facets of mindfulness. Hierarchical confirmatory factor analyses suggested that at least four of the identified factors are components of an overall mindfulness construct and that the factor structure of mindfulness may vary with meditation experience. Mindfulness facets were shown to be differentially correlated in expected ways with several other constructs and to have incremental validity in the prediction of psychological symptoms. Findings suggest that conceptualizing mindfulness as a multifaceted construct is helpful in understanding its components and its relationships with other variables.

  15. A Change in the Solar He II EUV Global Network Structure as an Indicator of the Geo-Effectiveness of Solar Minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didkovsky, L.; Gurman, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Solar activity during 2007 - 2009 was very low, causing anomalously low thermospheric density. A comparison of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance in the He II spectral band (26 to 34 nm) from the Solar Extreme ultraviolet Monitor (SEM), one of instruments on the Charge Element and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) for the two latest solar minima showed a decrease of the absolute irradiance of about 15 +/- 6 % during the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24 compared with the Cycle 22/23 minimum when a yearly running-mean filter was used. We found that some local, shorter-term minima including those with the same absolute EUV flux in the SEM spectral band show a higher concentration of spatial power in the global network structure from the 30.4 nm SOHO/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) images for the local minimum of 1996 compared with the minima of 2008 - 2011.We interpret this higher concentration of spatial power in the transition region's global network structure as a larger number of larger-area features on the solar disk. These changes in the global network structure during solar minima may characterize, in part, the geo-effectiveness of the solar He II EUV irradiance in addition to the estimations based on its absolute levels.

  16. 17.6%-Efficient radial junction solar cells using silicon nano/micro hybrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kangmin; Hwang, Inchan; Kim, Namwoo; Choi, Deokjae; Um, Han-Don; Kim, Seungchul; Seo, Kwanyong

    2016-07-01

    We developed a unique nano- and microwire hybrid structure by selectively modifying only the tops of microwires using metal-assisted chemical etching. The proposed nano/micro hybrid structure not only minimizes surface recombination but also absorbs 97% of incident light under AM 1.5G illumination, demonstrating outstanding light absorption compared to that of planar (59%) and microwire arrays (85%). The proposed hybrid solar cells with an area of 1 cm2 exhibit power conversion efficiencies (Eff) of up to 17.6% under AM 1.5G illumination. In particular, the solar cells show a high short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 39.5 mA cm-2 because of the high light-absorbing characteristics of the nanostructures. This corresponds to an approximately 61.5% and 16.5% increase in efficiency compared to that of a planar silicon solar cell (Eff = 10.9%) and a microwire solar cell (Eff = 15.1%), respectively. Therefore, we expect the proposed hybrid structure to become a foundational technology for the development of highly efficient radial junction solar cells.We developed a unique nano- and microwire hybrid structure by selectively modifying only the tops of microwires using metal-assisted chemical etching. The proposed nano/micro hybrid structure not only minimizes surface recombination but also absorbs 97% of incident light under AM 1.5G illumination, demonstrating outstanding light absorption compared to that of planar (59%) and microwire arrays (85%). The proposed hybrid solar cells with an area of 1 cm2 exhibit power conversion efficiencies (Eff) of up to 17.6% under AM 1.5G illumination. In particular, the solar cells show a high short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 39.5 mA cm-2 because of the high light-absorbing characteristics of the nanostructures. This corresponds to an approximately 61.5% and 16.5% increase in efficiency compared to that of a planar silicon solar cell (Eff = 10.9%) and a microwire solar cell (Eff = 15.1%), respectively. Therefore, we expect the

  17. Photonic and plasmonic structures for enhancing efficiency of thin film silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattnaik, Sambit

    Crystalline silicon solar cells use high cost processing techniques as well as thick materials that are ˜ 200µm thick to convert solar energy into electricity. From a cost viewpoint, it is highly advantageous to use thin film solar cells which are generally made in the range of 0.1-3µm in thickness. Due to this low thickness, the quantity of material is greatly reduced and so is the number and complexity of steps involved to complete a device, thereby allowing a continuous processing capability improving the throughput and hence greatly decreasing the cost. This also leads to faster payback time for the end user of the photovoltaic panel. In addition, due to the low thickness and the possibility of deposition on flexible foils, the photovoltaic (PV) modules can be flexible. Such flexible PV modules are well suited for building-integrated applications and for portable, foldable, PV power products. For economical applications of solar cells, high efficiency is an important consideration. Since Si is an indirect bandgap material, a thin film of Si needs efficient light trapping to achieve high optical absorption. The previous work in this field has been mostly based on randomly textured back reflectors. In this work, we have used a novel approach, a periodic photonic and plasmonic structure, to optimize current density of the devices by absorbing longer wavelengths without hampering other properties. The two dimensional diffraction effect generated by a periodic structure with the plasmonic light concentration achieved by silver cones to efficiently propagate light in the plane at the back surface of a solar cell, achieves a significant increase in optical absorption. Using such structures, we achieved a 50%+ increase in short circuit current in a nano-crystalline (nc-Si) solar cell relative to stainless steel. In addition to nc-Si solar cells on stainless steel, we have also used the periodic photonic structure to enhance optical absorption in amorphous cells and

  18. Solar Thermal Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, Clark W.; Bonometti, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    Concentrated solar thermal energy can be utilized in a variety of high temperature applications for both terrestrial and space environments. In each application, knowledge of the collector and absorber's heat exchange interaction is required. To understand this coupled mechanism, various concentrator types and geometries, as well as, their relationship to the physical absorber mechanics were investigated. To conduct experimental tests various parts of a 5,000 watt, thermal concentrator, facility were made and evaluated. This was in anticipation at a larger NASA facility proposed for construction. Although much of the work centered on solar thermal propulsion for an upper stage (less than one pound thrust range), the information generated and the facility's capabilities are applicable to material processing, power generation and similar uses. The numerical calculations used to design the laboratory mirror and the procedure for evaluating other solar collectors are presented here. The mirror design is based on a hexagonal faceted system, which uses a spherical approximation to the parabolic surface. The work began with a few two dimensional estimates and continued with a full, three dimensional, numerical algorithm written in FORTRAN code. This was compared to a full geometry, ray trace program, BEAM 4, which optimizes the curvatures, based on purely optical considerations. Founded on numerical results, the characteristics of a faceted concentrator were construed. The numerical methodologies themselves were evaluated and categorized. As a result, the three-dimensional FORTRAN code was the method chosen to construct the mirrors, due to its overall accuracy and superior results to the ray trace program. This information is being used to fabricate and subsequently, laser map the actual mirror surfaces. Evaluation of concentrator mirrors, thermal applications and scaling the results of the 10 foot diameter mirror to a much larger concentrator, were studied. Evaluations

  19. Solar cell structure incorporating a novel single crystal silicon material

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.; Wu, Chung P.

    1983-01-01

    A novel hydrogen rich single crystal silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystal silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semiconductor devices such as single crystal silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystal silicon without hydrogen.

  20. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1998-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the first year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the period covered by this report we have published 26 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 4 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles.

  1. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DISTORTION DIRECTLY ATTRIBUTABLE TO A STRUCTURED SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Savani, N. P.; Owens, M. J.; Forsyth, R. J.; Rouillard, A. P.; Davies, J. A.

    2010-05-01

    We present the first observational evidence of the near-Sun distortion of the leading edge of a coronal mass ejection (CME) by the ambient solar wind into a concave structure. On 2007 November 14, a CME was observed by coronagraphs onboard the STEREO-B spacecraft, possessing a circular cross section. Subsequently the CME passed through the field of view of the STEREO-B Heliospheric Imagers where the leading edge was observed to distort into an increasingly concave structure. The CME observations are compared to an analytical flux rope model constrained by a magnetohydrodynamic solar wind solution. The resultant bimodal speed profile is used to kinematically distort a circular structure that replicates the initial shape of the CME. The CME morphology is found to change rapidly over a relatively short distance. This indicates an approximate radial distance in the heliosphere where the solar wind forces begin to dominate over the magnetic forces of the CME influencing the shape of the CME.

  2. Short solar events with evidence of repetitive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Upendra D.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.

    1987-01-01

    Several short (less than 40 s) solar hard X-ray events (greater than 100 keV) have been observed simultaneously with identical instruments on the Venera 11, 12, 13, and 14 and Prognoz 7 (Franco-Soviet Signe experiments) spacecraft. High time resolution (equal to or greater than 2 ms) data were stored in memory when a trigger occurred. The observations reported here were made by Prognoz 7 and V12 which were closer to the sun at the time and provided good statistics. Observations of modulation with a period of 1.6 s for the event on 1978 December 3 are presented. Also presented is evidence for fast time fluctuations from an event on 1979 November 6, observed with Venera 12, and another on 1981 September 6, observed with the Solar Maximum Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer. Power spectrum analysis, epoch folding, and Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the statistical significance of persistent time delays between features. The results are discussed in light of the MHD model proposed by Zaitsev and Stepanov (1982) and Zaitsev, Stepanov, and Chernov (1984).

  3. Enhanced Gas-Sensing Properties of the Hierarchical TiO₂ Hollow Microspheres with Exposed High-Energy {001} Crystal Facets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Liang, Yan; Wang, Guozhong; Liu, Liangliang; Yuan, Cailei; Yu, Ting; Li, Qinliang; Zeng, Fanyan; Gu, Gang

    2015-11-11

    Anatase hierarchical TiO2 with innovative designs (hollow microspheres with exposed high-energy {001} crystal facets, hollow microspheres without {001} crystal facets, and solid microspheres without {001} crystal facets) were synthesized via a one-pot hydrothermal method and characterized. Based on these materials, gas sensors were fabricated and used for gas-sensing tests. It was found that the sensor based on hierarchical TiO2 hollow microspheres with exposed high-energy {001} crystal facets exhibited enhanced acetone sensing properties compared to the sensors based on the other two materials due to the exposing of high-energy {001} crystal facets and special hierarchical hollow structure. First-principle calculations were performed to illustrate the sensing mechanism, which suggested that the adsorption process of acetone molecule on TiO2 surface was spontaneous, and the adsorption on high-energy {001} crystal facets would be more stable than that on the normally exposed {101} crystal facets. Further characterization indicated that the {001} surface was highly reactive for the adsorption of active oxygen species, which was also responsible for the enhanced sensing performance. The present studies revealed the crystal-facets-dependent gas-sensing properties of TiO2 and provided a new insight into improving the gas sensing performance by designing hierarchical hollow structure with special-crystal-facets exposure.

  4. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2002-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the second quarter of the first year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation. and covers the period November 16, 1999 to February 15, 2000. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) model. The topics studied include: the effect of emerging flux on the stability of helmet streamers, coronal loops and streamers, the solar magnetic field, the solar wind, and open magnetic field lines.

  5. Deconstructing Solar Photovoltaic Pricing: The Role of Market Structure, Technology, and Policy

    SciTech Connect

    Gillingham, Kenneth; Deng, Hao; Wiser, Ryan; Darghouth, Naim; Nemet, Gregory; Barbose, Galen; Rai, Varun; Dong, C. G.

    2014-12-15

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) system prices in the United States display considerable heterogeneity both across geographic locations and within a given location. Such heterogeneity may arise due to state and federal policies, differences in market structure, and other factors that influence demand and costs. This paper examines the relative importance of such factors on equilibrium solar PV system prices in the United States using a detailed dataset of roughly 100,000 recent residential and small commercial installations. As expected, we find that PV system prices differ based on characteristics of the systems. More interestingly, we find evidence suggesting that search costs and imperfect competition affect solar PV pricing. Installer density substantially lowers prices, while regions with relatively generous financial incentives for solar PV are associated with higher prices.

  6. Silicon quantum dot superlattice solar cell structure including silicon nanocrystals in a photogeneration layer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The solar cell structure of n-type poly-silicon/5-nm-diameter silicon nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous silicon oxycarbide matrix (30 layers)/p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon/Al electrode was fabricated on a quartz substrate. An open-circuit voltage and a fill factor of 518 mV and 0.51 in the solar cell were obtained, respectively. The absorption edge of the solar cell was 1.49 eV, which corresponds to the optical bandgap of the silicon nanocrystal materials, suggesting that it is possible to fabricate the solar cells with silicon nanocrystal materials, whose bandgaps are wider than that of crystalline silicon. PACS 85.35.Be; 84.60.Jt; 78.67.Bf PMID:24936160

  7. CT of facet distraction in flexion injuries of the thoracolumbar spine: the "naked" facet.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, J P; Ullrich, C G; Yuan, H A; Kieffer, S A

    1980-03-01

    Vertical distraction of the articular processes is an important sign of ligamentous disruption due to flexion injuries of the thoracolumbar spine. In addition to illustrating this finding in cross section (the "naked" facet), computed tomography in the transaxial plane allows assessment of the presence and position of fracture fragments that may encroach on the spinal canal. Image reconstruction in sagittal and coronal planes provides a clear demonstration of the degree of bony compression, facet distraction, and kyphosis associated with flexion injuries without additional patient manipulation or radiation exposure.

  8. ZnO disk-like structures and their application in dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. X.; Yang, Y.; Sun, X. W.

    2016-08-01

    Hexagonal ZnO nanodisks, nanorings and porous nanodisks were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. The morphologies, structure and their optical properties of the various ZnO disk-like structures were characterized and their growth mechanism was investigated. The prepared ZnO disk-like nanostructures were used in the fabrication of the dye-sensitized solar cells. Improved photovoltaic properties were achieved for the porous disk solar cells due to their special geometry enabled better light harvesting and reduced recombination.

  9. Trench process and structure for backside contact solar cells with polysilicon doped regions

    DOEpatents

    De Ceuster, Denis; Cousins, Peter John; Smith, David D

    2013-05-28

    A solar cell includes polysilicon P-type and N-type doped regions on a backside of a substrate, such as a silicon wafer. An interrupted trench structure separates the P-type doped region from the N-type doped region in some locations but allows the P-type doped region and the N-type doped region to touch in other locations. Each of the P-type and N-type doped regions may be formed over a thin dielectric layer. Among other advantages, the resulting solar cell structure allows for increased efficiency while having a relatively low reverse breakdown voltage.

  10. Trench process and structure for backside contact solar cells with polysilicon doped regions

    DOEpatents

    De Ceuster, Denis; Cousins, Peter John; Smith, David D

    2014-03-18

    A solar cell includes polysilicon P-type and N-type doped regions on a backside of a substrate, such as a silicon wafer. An interrupted trench structure separates the P-type doped region from the N-type doped region in some locations but allows the P-type doped region and the N-type doped region to touch in other locations. Each of the P-type and N-type doped regions may be formed over a thin dielectric layer. Among other advantages, the resulting solar cell structure allows for increased efficiency while having a relatively low reverse breakdown voltage.

  11. Trench process and structure for backside contact solar cells with polysilicon doped regions

    DOEpatents

    De Ceuster, Denis; Cousins, Peter John; Smith, David D.

    2010-12-14

    A solar cell includes polysilicon P-type and N-type doped regions on a backside of a substrate, such as a silicon wafer. An interrupted trench structure separates the P-type doped region from the N-type doped region in some locations but allows the P-type doped region and the N-type doped region to touch in other locations. Each of the P-type and N-type doped regions may be formed over a thin dielectric layer. Among other advantages, the resulting solar cell structure allows for increased efficiency while having a relatively low reverse breakdown voltage.

  12. Facet-dependent electrical conductivity properties of Cu2O crystals.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Hsu, Shih-Chen; Ke, Wei-Hong; Chen, Lih-Juann; Huang, Michael H

    2015-03-11

    It is interesting to examine facet-dependent electrical properties of single Cu2O crystals, because such study greatly advances our understanding of various facet effects exhibited by semiconductors. We show a Cu2O octahedron is highly conductive, a cube is moderately conductive, and a rhombic dodecahedron is nonconductive. The conductivity differences are ascribed to the presence of a thin surface layer having different degrees of band bending. When electrical connection was made on two different facets of a rhombicuboctahedron, a diode-like response was obtained, demonstrating the potential of using single polyhedral nanocrystals as functional electronic components. Density of state (DOS) plots for three layers of Cu2O (111), (100), and (110) planes show respective metallic, semimetal, and semiconducting band structures. By examining DOS plots for varying number of planes, the surface layer thicknesses responsible for the facet-dependent electrical properties of Cu2O crystals have been determined to be below 1.5 nm for these facets.

  13. Asymmetric anatase TiO2 nanocrystals with exposed high-index facets and their excellent lithium storage properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao Bin; Chen, Jun Song; Lou, Xiong Wen (David); Hng, Huey Hoon

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a unique organic solvent system to synthesize asymmetric anatase TiO2 nanocrystals with a bipyramidal structure, where the upper pyramid is bound by (201) facets, and the lower pyramid is bound by (401) surfaces. Due to the high surface energy of these (401) high-index facets, the nanocrystals tend to assemble on these facets to minimize the free energy, leading to the formation of a dandelion-like hierarchical structure.In this work, we demonstrate a unique organic solvent system to synthesize asymmetric anatase TiO2 nanocrystals with a bipyramidal structure, where the upper pyramid is bound by (201) facets, and the lower pyramid is bound by (401) surfaces. Due to the high surface energy of these (401) high-index facets, the nanocrystals tend to assemble on these facets to minimize the free energy, leading to the formation of a dandelion-like hierarchical structure. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedures, supplementary BET/SEM/TEM/XRD/electrochemical data. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10854a

  14. 17.6%-Efficient radial junction solar cells using silicon nano/micro hybrid structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kangmin; Hwang, Inchan; Kim, Namwoo; Choi, Deokjae; Um, Han-Don; Kim, Seungchul; Seo, Kwanyong

    2016-08-14

    We developed a unique nano- and microwire hybrid structure by selectively modifying only the tops of microwires using metal-assisted chemical etching. The proposed nano/micro hybrid structure not only minimizes surface recombination but also absorbs 97% of incident light under AM 1.5G illumination, demonstrating outstanding light absorption compared to that of planar (59%) and microwire arrays (85%). The proposed hybrid solar cells with an area of 1 cm(2) exhibit power conversion efficiencies (Eff) of up to 17.6% under AM 1.5G illumination. In particular, the solar cells show a high short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 39.5 mA cm(-2) because of the high light-absorbing characteristics of the nanostructures. This corresponds to an approximately 61.5% and 16.5% increase in efficiency compared to that of a planar silicon solar cell (Eff = 10.9%) and a microwire solar cell (Eff = 15.1%), respectively. Therefore, we expect the proposed hybrid structure to become a foundational technology for the development of highly efficient radial junction solar cells. PMID:27405387

  15. 17.6%-Efficient radial junction solar cells using silicon nano/micro hybrid structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kangmin; Hwang, Inchan; Kim, Namwoo; Choi, Deokjae; Um, Han-Don; Kim, Seungchul; Seo, Kwanyong

    2016-08-14

    We developed a unique nano- and microwire hybrid structure by selectively modifying only the tops of microwires using metal-assisted chemical etching. The proposed nano/micro hybrid structure not only minimizes surface recombination but also absorbs 97% of incident light under AM 1.5G illumination, demonstrating outstanding light absorption compared to that of planar (59%) and microwire arrays (85%). The proposed hybrid solar cells with an area of 1 cm(2) exhibit power conversion efficiencies (Eff) of up to 17.6% under AM 1.5G illumination. In particular, the solar cells show a high short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 39.5 mA cm(-2) because of the high light-absorbing characteristics of the nanostructures. This corresponds to an approximately 61.5% and 16.5% increase in efficiency compared to that of a planar silicon solar cell (Eff = 10.9%) and a microwire solar cell (Eff = 15.1%), respectively. Therefore, we expect the proposed hybrid structure to become a foundational technology for the development of highly efficient radial junction solar cells.

  16. Large-scale structure of the solar corona and inner heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the solar corona influences solar activity particularly coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The helmet streamers that are observed to dominate the structure of the inner corona are formed by the interaction of the solar wind with coronal magnetic fields. We have simulated this interaction in three dimensions using the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. In order to create a realistic model, we use the magnetic field that is observed at the Sun's surface (deduced from daily Wilcox Solar Observatory magnetograms) as input, in combination with specified density and temperature profiles at the surface. A self-consistent 3D solar-wind solution is developed by integrating the MHD equations in time to steady state. Such solutions can reproduce the observed structures that are seen in coronagraph images and eclipse photographs of the corona. This model allows us to accurately determine the position of the heliospheric current sheet. We will compare the results obtained from our model with Ulysses observations during the period May-June 1993, and with an eclipse photograph of the corona on November 3, 1994.

  17. Ultra-fine-scale filamentary structures in the Outer Corona and the Solar Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Filamentary structures following magnetic field lines pervade the Sun's atmosphere and offer us insight into the solar magnetic field. Radio propagation measurements have shown that the smallest filamentary structures in the solar corona are more than 2 orders of magnitude finer than those seen in solar imaging. Here we use radio Doppler measurements to characterize their transverse density gradient and determine their finest scale in the outer corona at 20-30 R(circled dot operator), where open magnetic fields prevail. Filamentary structures overly active regions have the steepest gradient and finest scale, while those overlying coronal holes have the shallowest gradient and least finest scale. Their organization by the underlying corona implies that these subresolution structures extend radially from the entire Sun, confirming that they trace the coronal magnetic field responsible for the radial expansion of the solar wind. That they are rooted all over the Sun elucidates the association between the magnetic field of the photosphere and that of the corona, as revealed by the similarity between the power spectra of the photospheric field and the coronal density fluctuations. This association along with the persistence of filamentary structures far from the Sun demonstrate that subresolution magnetic fields must play an important role not only in magnetic coupling of the photosphere and corona, but also in coronal heating and solar wind acceleration through the process of small-scale magnetic reconnection. They also explain why current widely used theoretical models that extrapolate photospheric magnetic fields into the corona do not predict the correct source of the solar wind.

  18. Faceting and coarsening dynamics in the complex Swift-Hohenberg equation.

    PubMed

    Gelens, Lendert; Knobloch, Edgar

    2009-10-01

    The complex Swift-Hohenberg equation models pattern formation arising from an oscillatory instability with a finite wave number at onset and finds applications in lasers, optical parametric oscillators, and photorefractive oscillators. We show that with real coefficients this equation exhibits two classes of localized states: localized in amplitude only or localized in both amplitude and phase. The latter are associated with phase-winding states in which the real and imaginary parts of the order parameter oscillate periodically but with a constant phase difference between them. The localized states take the form of defects connecting phase-winding states with equal and opposite phase lag, and can be stable over a wide range of parameters. The formation of these defects leads to faceting of states with initially spatially uniform phase. Depending on parameters these facets may either coarsen indefinitely, as described by a Cahn-Hilliard equation, or the coarsening ceases leading to a frozen faceted structure. PMID:19905429

  19. Facet personality and surface-level diversity as team mental model antecedents: implications for implicit coordination.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David M; Bell, Suzanne T; Dierdorff, Erich C; Belohlav, James A

    2012-07-01

    Team mental models (TMMs) have received much attention as important drivers of effective team processes and performance. Less is known about the factors that give rise to these shared cognitive structures. We examined potential antecedents of TMMs, with a specific focus on team composition variables, including various facets of personality and surface-level diversity. Further, we examined implicit coordination as an important outcome of TMMs. Results suggest that team composition in terms of the cooperation facet of agreeableness and racial diversity were significantly related to team-focused TMM similarity. TMM similarity was also positively predictive of implicit coordination, which mediated the relationship between TMM similarity and team performance. Post hoc analyses revealed a significant interaction between the trust facet of agreeableness and racial diversity in predicting TMM similarity. Results are discussed in terms of facilitating the emergence of TMMs and corresponding implications for team-related human resource practices.

  20. Interferometric technique for faceted microstructure metrology using an index matching liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, Daryl; Suratkar, Amit; Davies, Angela; Farahi, Faramarz; Ottevaere, Heidi; Thienpont, Hugo

    2010-02-01

    Microstructured optical products are becoming more widespread due to advances in manufacturing. Many of these structures contain faceted surfaces with steep slopes. Adequate metrology for such surfaces is lacking. We describe an interferometric technique that combines plane wave illumination with an index matching liquid to achieve high quality, high speed measurements of such faceted microstructures. We account for refraction at the interfaces, rather than consider only optical path length changes due to the index liquid, and this significantly improves the facet angle measurement. We demonstrate the technique with the measurement of an array of micropyramids and show that our results are in good agreement with measurements taken on a contact profilometer. We also extend the technique to measure opaque microcorner cubes by implementing an intermediate replication step.

  1. [Facets of diagnostics of mentalization in children].

    PubMed

    Juen, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Clinical relevance of variations within the ability to mentalize is usually reported in the field of psychopathology in adults. This might be due to difficulties in methods for empirical assessment of this capacity in children. In this short report the author discusses facets and abilities of how to engage the inner world of young children with story stem techniques and especially how to register variations in the ability to mentalize. Ideas for assessment in early childhood are presented and illustrated along two clinical vignettes. This paper gives a short impression of clinical diagnostics of mentalization in childhood. PMID:25478751

  2. FIRO-B: factors and facets.

    PubMed

    Macrosson, W D

    2000-02-01

    10 FIRO-B intercorrelation matrices were factor analysed; one matrix was derived from new FIRO-B data, all the other matrices were found in the literature. The correlation matrices were also subjected to meta-analysis. The findings suggested that the four FIRO-B scales associated with Inclusion and Affection are facets of the ubiquitous interpersonal superfactor, Nurturance, but the two FIRO-B Control scales each express an orthogonal construct both of which relate to the super-factor, Dominance.

  3. Fabrication of faceted nanopores in magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shujing; Cao, Fan; Zheng, He; Sheng, Huaping; Liu, Chun; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Dongshan; Wang, Jianbo

    2013-12-09

    In this paper, using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, we showed the fabrication of faceted nanopores with various shapes in magnesium by focused electron beam (e-beam). The characteristics of nanopore shapes and the crystallographic planes corresponding to the edges of the nanopores were discussed in detail. Interestingly, by manipulating the e-beam (e.g., irradiation direction and duration), the nanopore shape and size could be effectively controlled along different directions. Our results provide important insight into the nanopore patterning in metallic materials and are of fundamental importance concerning the relevant applications, such as nanopore-based sensor, etc.

  4. Recent Advances in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics, Stability, and Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Lyle, Karen H.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, S. Chad; Dowell, Earl H.; Guerrant, Daniel V.; Lawrence, Dale

    2015-01-01

    Results from recent NASA sponsored research on the structural dynamics, stability, and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, and solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment. Recent results from terrestrial 1-g blade dynamics and control experiments on "rope ladder" membrane blade analogs, and small-scale in vacuo system identification experiments with hanging and spinning high-aspect ratio membranes will also be presented. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept is used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, and is also described. Blade torsional dynamic response and control are also shown to be significantly improved through the use of edge stiffening structural features or inclusion of modest tip masses to increase centrifugal stiffening of the blade structure. An output-only system identification procedure suitable for on-orbit blade dynamics investigations is also developed and validated using ground tests of spinning sub-scale heliogyro blade models. Overall, analytical and experimental investigations to date indicate no intractable stability or control issues for the heliogyro solar sail concept.

  5. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Marcie

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  6. Using Self-Report Assessment Methods to Explore Facets of Mindfulness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Ruth A.; Smith, Gregory T.; Hopkins, Jaclyn; Krietemeyer, Jennifer; Toney, Leslie

    2006-01-01

    The authors examine the facet structure of mindfulness using five recently developed mindfulness questionnaires. Two large samples of undergraduate students completed mindfulness questionnaires and measures of other constructs. Psychometric properties of the mindfulness questionnaires were examined, including internal consistency and convergent…

  7. A hybrid approach to software repository retrieval: Blending faceted classification and type signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David A.

    1992-01-01

    We present a user interface for software reuse repository that relies both on the informal semantics of faceted classification and the formal semantics of type signatures for abstract data types. The result is an interface providing both structural and qualitative feedback to a software reuser.

  8. The Relation between Different Facets of Creativity and the Dark Side of Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahmen-Wassenberg, Phoebe; Kämmerle, Monika; Unterrainer, Human-Friedrich; Fink, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relation between different facets of creativity and personality, focusing on the dark side of personality. In a sample of 247 students, psychometric measures for the assessment of the dark triad of personality (subclinical narcissism, Machiavellianism, subclinical psychopathy), personality organization (structural deficit:…

  9. Concept Definition Study for In-Space Structural Characterization of a Lightweight Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Jones, Thomas W.; Spellman, Regina; Scott, Willis; Mockensturm, Eric M.; Liddle, Donn; Oshel, Ed; Snyder, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A Concept Definition Study (CDS) was conducted to develop a proposed "Lightweight High-Voltage Stretched-Lens Concentrator Solar Array Experiment" under NASA's New Millennium Program Space Technology-6 (NMP ST-6) activity. As part of a multi-organizational team, NASA Langley Research Center's role in this proposed experiment was to lead Structural Characterization of the solar array during the flight experiment. In support of this role, NASA LaRC participated in the CDS to de.ne an experiment for static, dynamic, and deployment characterization of the array. In this study, NASA LaRC traded state-of-the-art measurement approaches appropriate for an in-space, STS-based flight experiment, provided initial analysis and testing of the lightweight solar array and lens elements, performed a lighting and photogrammetric simulation in conjunction with JSC, and produced an experiment concept definition to meet structural characterization requirements.

  10. Coherent structures and turbulent spectrum in solar wind plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. P.; Yadav, N.; Kumari, Anju

    2013-08-15

    The present paper investigates the localization of a uniform plane kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) due to the coupling with the density/magnetic field fluctuations associated with a magnetosonic wave propagating in the transverse direction, i.e., perpendicular to the background magnetic field. To gain the physical insight into this evolution, a simplified analytical model based on the Mathieu equation has also been studied. Numerical method has also been used to analyse the evolution of KAW. The magnetic fluctuation spectrum follows Kolmogorovian scaling above the proton gyroradius scalelength, which is regarded as the inertial range. Below this scale, a steepened spectrum has been obtained in the dispersive range with power law index ∼−2.5, which continues up to the dissipation range. Our results reveal that the proposed mechanism may be an interesting physical mechanism for transferring the energy from larger lengthscales to smaller lengthscales in the solar wind plasmas. Relevance of the present study with Cluster spacecraft observations has also been discussed.

  11. Structural Analysis of an Inflation-Deployed Solar Sail With Experimental Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Michii, Yuki; Lichodziejewski, David; Derbes, Billy; Mann, Troy O.

    2005-01-01

    Under the direction of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Office, the team of L Garde, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Ball Aerospace, and NASA Langley Research Center has been developing a scalable solar sail configuration to address NASA s future space propulsion needs. Prior to a flight experiment of a full-scale solar sail, a comprehensive phased test plan is currently being implemented to advance the technology readiness level of the solar sail design. These tests consist of solar sail component, subsystem, and sub-scale system ground tests that simulate the vacuum and thermal conditions of the space environment. Recently, two solar sail test articles, a 7.4-m beam assembly subsystem test article and a 10-m four-quadrant solar sail system test article, were tested in vacuum conditions with a gravity-offload system to mitigate the effects of gravity. This paper presents the structural analyses simulating the ground tests and the correlation of the analyses with the test results. For programmatic risk reduction, a two-prong analysis approach was undertaken in which two separate teams independently developed computational models of the solar sail test articles using the finite element analysis software packages: NEiNastran and ABAQUS. This paper compares the pre-test and post-test analysis predictions from both software packages with the test data including load-deflection curves from static load tests, and vibration frequencies and mode shapes from structural dynamics tests. The analysis predictions were in reasonable agreement with the test data. Factors that precluded better correlation of the analyses and the tests were uncertainties in the material properties, test conditions, and modeling assumptions used in the analyses.

  12. Structural Studies of Potential 1 eV Solar Cell Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, A.; Al-Jassim, M.; Friedman, D.; Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2000-01-01

    Structural studies using transmission electron microscopy have been made on 1-eV band-gap materials, lattice-matched to GaAs and Ge substrates, grown by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy for use in multijunction, high-efficiency solar cells.

  13. Structural Design Concepts for a Multi-Megawatt Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles; Hickman, J. Mark

    1991-01-01

    As a part of the Space Exploratory Initiative (SEI), NASA-Lewis is studying Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) spacecraft to be used as a cargo transport vehicle to Mars. Two preliminary structural design concepts are offered for SEP spacecraft: a split blanket array configuration, and a ring structure. The split blanket configuration is an expansion of the photovoltaic solar array design proposed for Space Station Freedom and consists of eight independent solar blankets stretched and supported from a central mast. The ring structural concept is a circular design with the solar blanket stretched inside a ring. This concept uses a central mast with guy wires to provide additional support to the ring. The two design concepts are presented, then compared by performing stability, normal modes, and forced response analyses for varying levels of blanket and guy wire preloads. The ring structure configuration is shown to be advantageous because it is much stiffer, more stable, and deflects less under loading than the split blanket concept.

  14. Material structure-composite morphology-photovoltaic performance relationship for organic bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Troshin, Pavel A; Mukhacheva, Olga A; Goryachev, Andrey E; Dremova, Nadezhda N; Voylov, Dmitry; Ulbricht, Christoph; Egbe, Daniel A M; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Razumov, Vladimir F

    2012-10-01

    Conjugated PPV-PPE copolymer has been investigated in organic solar cells in combination with twelve different fullerene derivatives. It was shown that the length of solubilizing alkyl chains in the fullerene derivative structures correlates well with the performance of photovoltaic cells.

  15. Balance of optical, structural, and electrical properties of textured liquid phase crystallized Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preidel, V.; Amkreutz, D.; Haschke, J.; Wollgarten, M.; Rech, B.; Becker, C.

    2015-06-01

    Liquid phase crystallized Si thin-film solar cells on nanoimprint textured glass substrates exhibiting two characteristic, but distinct different surface structures are presented. The impact of the substrate texture on light absorption, the structural Si material properties, and the resulting solar cell performance is analyzed. A pronounced periodic substrate texture with a vertical feature size of about 1 μm enables excellent light scattering and light trapping. However, it also gives rise to an enhanced Si crystal defect formation deteriorating the solar cell performance. In contrast, a random pattern with a low surface roughness of 45 nm allows for the growth of Si thin films being comparable to Si layers on planar reference substrates. Amorphous Si/crystalline Si heterojunction solar cells fabricated on the low-roughness texture exhibit a maximum open circuit voltage of 616 mV and internal quantum efficiency peak values exceeding 90%, resulting in an efficiency potential of 13.2%. This demonstrates that high quality crystalline Si thin films can be realized on nanoimprint patterned glass substrates by liquid phase crystallization inspiring the implementation of tailor-made nanophotonic light harvesting concepts into future liquid phase crystallized Si thin film solar cells on glass.

  16. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, Maxim; Airapetian, Vladimir; Lin, Haosheng

    2016-08-01

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131) to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D) coronal electron density in the range of heights from 1.5 to 4 R_⊙ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 Å band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below ˜ 2.5 R_⊙. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  17. Balance of optical, structural, and electrical properties of textured liquid phase crystallized Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Preidel, V. Amkreutz, D.; Haschke, J.; Wollgarten, M.; Rech, B.; Becker, C.

    2015-06-14

    Liquid phase crystallized Si thin-film solar cells on nanoimprint textured glass substrates exhibiting two characteristic, but distinct different surface structures are presented. The impact of the substrate texture on light absorption, the structural Si material properties, and the resulting solar cell performance is analyzed. A pronounced periodic substrate texture with a vertical feature size of about 1 μm enables excellent light scattering and light trapping. However, it also gives rise to an enhanced Si crystal defect formation deteriorating the solar cell performance. In contrast, a random pattern with a low surface roughness of 45 nm allows for the growth of Si thin films being comparable to Si layers on planar reference substrates. Amorphous Si/crystalline Si heterojunction solar cells fabricated on the low-roughness texture exhibit a maximum open circuit voltage of 616 mV and internal quantum efficiency peak values exceeding 90%, resulting in an efficiency potential of 13.2%. This demonstrates that high quality crystalline Si thin films can be realized on nanoimprint patterned glass substrates by liquid phase crystallization inspiring the implementation of tailor-made nanophotonic light harvesting concepts into future liquid phase crystallized Si thin film solar cells on glass.

  18. Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2013-07-09

    A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

  19. Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-07-24

    A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

  20. Transverse effects in plasma wakefield acceleration at FACET - Simulation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Adli, E.; Hogan, M.; Frederico, J.; Litos, M. D.; An, W.; Mori, W.

    2012-12-21

    We investigate transverse effects in the plasma-wakefield acceleration experiments planned and ongoing at FACET. We use PIC simulation tools, mainly QuickPIC, to simulate the interaction of the drive electron beam and the plasma. In FACET a number of beam dynamics knobs, including dispersion and bunch length knobs, can be used to vary the beam transverse characteristics in the plasma. We present simulation results and the status of the FACET experimental searches.

  1. Penumbral-like Structures in the Solar Photosphere: the Role of Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, Francesca; Romano, Paolo; Cristaldi, Alice; Falco, Mariachiara; Guglielmino, Salvo L.

    Observations of the solar photosphere rarely show the appearance of so-called orphan penumbrae, filamentary structures very similar to a bundle of sunspot penumbral filaments, but not connected to any umbra. We report on the plasma flows and on the magnetic properties of such structures observed in different active regions using the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. We also benefit from continuous observations acquired by the SDO satellite and from some high-resolution data acquired by the DOT telescope. We find that these structures can form in different ways: one seems to break off the penumbra of a nearby sunspot, others are formed through the emergence of new flux. Our analysis suggests that, for these latter features, the horizontal component of the emerging field can be trapped in the photosphere by the overlying fields and form a structure resembling penumbral filaments due to the combination of photospheric flux emergence and magneto-convection in inclined fields.

  2. Weakly faceted cellular patterns versus growth-induced plastic deformation in thin-sample directional solidification of monoclinic biphenyl.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Akamatsu, Silvère; Faivre, Gabriel

    2009-11-01

    We present an experimental study of thin-sample directional solidification (T-DS) in impure biphenyl. The platelike growth shape of the monoclinic biphenyl crystals includes two low-mobility (001) facets and four high-mobility {110} facets. Upon T-DS, biphenyl plates oriented with (001) facets parallel to the sample plane can exhibit either a strong growth-induced plastic deformation (GID), or deformation-free weakly faceted (WF) growth patterns. We determine the respective conditions of appearance of these phenomena. GID is shown to be a long-range thermal-stress effect, which disappears when the growth front has a cellular structure. An early triggering of the cellular instability allowed us to avoid GID and study the dynamics of WF patterns as a function of the orientation of the crystal.

  3. The functional role of tabular structures for large reef fishes: avoiding predators or solar irradiance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, J. T.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    Large reef fishes may often be seen sheltering under tabular structures on coral reefs. There are two principle explanations for this behaviour: avoidance of predation or avoidance of solar irradiance. This study sought supporting evidence to distinguish between these two explanations by examining the usage of tabular structures on a shallow mid-shelf reef of the Great Barrier Reef at midday and sunset. If predation avoidance is most important, usage should increase towards sunset; conversely, if avoidance of solar radiation is most important, more fishes should use cover at midday. Underwater video observations revealed that tabular structures were extensively used by large reef fishes at midday, being characterised by numerous species, especially Lutjanidae and Haemulidae. In contrast, at sunset, tabular structures were used by significantly fewer large reef fishes, being characterised mostly by species of unicornfish ( Naso spp.). Resident times of fishes using tabular structures were also significantly longer at midday (28:06 ± 5:55 min) than at sunset (07:47 ± 2:19 min). The results suggest that the primary function of tabular structures for large reef fishes is the avoidance of solar irradiance. This suggestion is supported by the position of fishes when sheltering. The majority of large reef fishes were found to shelter under the lip of tabular structure, facing outwards. This behaviour is thought to allow protection from harmful downwelling UV-B irradiance while allowing the fish to retain photopic vision and survey more of the surrounding area. These findings help to explain the importance of tabular structures for large reef fishes on coral reefs, potentially providing a valuable energetic refuge from solar irradiance.

  4. Flexible perovskite solar cells based on the metal-insulator-semiconductor structure.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Li, Heng; Zhao, Yicheng; Zhou, Wenke; Fu, Rui; Pan, Huiyue; Zhao, Qing

    2016-09-14

    The metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure is applied to perovskite solar cells, in which the traditional compact layer TiO2 is replaced by Al2O3 as the hole blocking material to realize an all-low-temperature process. Flexible devices based on this structure are also realized with excellent flexibility, which hold 85% of their initial efficiency after bending 100 times. PMID:27524362

  5. Facet effects of palladium nanocrystals for oxygen reduction in ionic liquids and for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongan; Chi, Xiaowei; Zou, Shouzhong; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2016-03-01

    Palladium nanocrystals enclosed by {100} and {110} crystal facets, were successfully synthesized through an aqueous one-pot synthesis method. A new thermal annealing approach was developed for fabricating these palladium nanocrystals as a working electrode on a gas permeable membrane to study the facet effects of the oxygen reduction process in an ionic liquid, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Bmpy][NTf2]). Results were compared with the same processes at a conventional platinum electrode. Our study shows that the structural difference between the two facets of Pd nanocrystals has little effect on the oxygen reduction process but significantly affects the oxidation process of the superoxide. It is found that the Pd{110}/IL interface can better stabilize superoxide radicals revealed by a more positive oxidation potential compared to that of Pd{100}. In addition, the analytical characteristic of utilizing both palladium nanocrystals as electrodes for oxygen sensing is comparable with a polycrystal platinum oxygen sensor, in which Pd{110} presents the best sensitivity and lowest detection limit. Our results demonstrate the facet-dependence of oxygen reduction in an ionic liquid medium and provide the fundamental information needed to guide the applications of palladium nanocrystals in electrochemical gas sensor and fuel cell research.Palladium nanocrystals enclosed by {100} and {110} crystal facets, were successfully synthesized through an aqueous one-pot synthesis method. A new thermal annealing approach was developed for fabricating these palladium nanocrystals as a working electrode on a gas permeable membrane to study the facet effects of the oxygen reduction process in an ionic liquid, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Bmpy][NTf2]). Results were compared with the same processes at a conventional platinum electrode. Our study shows that the structural difference between the two facets of Pd

  6. DETECTION OF SMALL-SCALE GRANULAR STRUCTURES IN THE QUIET SUN WITH THE NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, V. I.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Goode, P. R.; Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2012-09-10

    Results of a statistical analysis of solar granulation are presented. A data set of 36 images of a quiet-Sun area on the solar disk center was used. The data were obtained with the 1.6 m clear aperture New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory and with a broadband filter centered at the TiO (705.7 nm) spectral line. The very high spatial resolution of the data (diffraction limit of 77 km and pixel scale of 0.''0375) augmented by the very high image contrast (15.5% {+-} 0.6%) allowed us to detect for the first time a distinct subpopulation of mini-granular structures. These structures are dominant on spatial scales below 600 km. Their size is distributed as a power law with an index of -1.8 (which is close to the Kolmogorov's -5/3 law) and no predominant scale. The regular granules display a Gaussian (normal) size distribution with a mean diameter of 1050 km. Mini-granular structures contribute significantly to the total granular area. They are predominantly confined to the wide dark lanes between regular granules and often form chains and clusters, but different from magnetic bright points. A multi-fractality test reveals that the structures smaller than 600 km represent a multi-fractal, whereas on larger scales the granulation pattern shows no multi-fractality and can be considered as a Gaussian random field. The origin, properties, and role of the population of mini-granular structures in the solar magnetoconvection are yet to be explored.

  7. Solar system history as recorded in the Saturnian ring structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1983-01-01

    Holberg's analysis of the Voyager Saturn photographs in reflected and transparent light, and occultation data of stars seen through the rings are discussed. A hyperfine structure, with 10,000 ringlets can be explained by the Baxter-Thompson negative diffusion. This gives the ringlets a stability which makes it possible to interpret them as fossils, which originated at cosmogonic times. It is shown that the bulk structure can be explained by the combined cosmogonic shadows of the satellites Mimas, Janus and the Shepherd satellites. This structure originated at the transition from the plasma phase to the planetesimal phase. The shadows are not simple void regions but exhibit a characteristic signature. Parts of the fine structure, explained by Holberg as resonances with satellites, are interpreted as cosmogonic shadow effects. However, there are a number of ringlets which can neither be explained by cosmogonic nor by resonance effects. Analysis of ring data can reconstruct the plasma-planetesimal transition with an accuracy of a few percent.

  8. Superlattices and NiPi structures in new forms of cascade solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leburton, J. P.; Hess, K.

    1986-01-01

    The activity in the field of photovoltaic semiconductor superstructures is described. Progress was accomplished in the two principal directions previously defined in our initial proposal, i.e.: (1) Theoretical investigation of the optical properties of superlattices; and (2) New solar cell concepts and device modeling. Although important information concerning the optical constants of superlattices and multiple quantum well structures was obtained from our computer model, most of the theoretical efforts have progressively shifted from the former to the latter aspect of the project because of the discovery of a new kind of photovoltaic device which may exhibit improved performances with respect to conventional solar cells.

  9. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the fourth quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere," NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and covers the period May 16, 2001 to August 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) model.

  10. On the use of tensegrity structures for kinetic solar facades of smart buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, F.; De Chiara, E.; Skelton, R. E.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the use of tensegrity structures with morphing and prestress-stability capabilities for the design of active solar façades of smart buildings. Morphing tensegrity lattices are used to design shading screens composed of umbrella-shaped ‘eyes’ that are opened and closed by adjusting the elongation in a limited number of cables. Prestressable lattices are instead employed to design superstable Venetian blinds that are composed of orientable slats. Future use of tensegrity solutions for next-generation smart buildings are outlined, with the aim of designing kinetic solar façades that combine morphing abilities with prestress-stability.

  11. Dynamics of solar filaments. IV - Structure and mass flow of an active region filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmieder, B.; Malherbe, J. M.; Simon, G.; Poland, A. I.

    1985-01-01

    An active region filament near the center of the solar disk was observed on September 29-30, 1980, with the Multichannel Subtractive Double Pass Spectrograph of the Meudon solar tower and the UV Spectrograph and Polarimeter aboard the SMM satellite. H-alpha and C IV measurements are presently used to study brightness and material velocity in the 10,000 and 100,000 K temperature ranges, and photospheric magnetograms are used to investigate the underlying magnetic field. Attention is given to the constraints imposed on possible filament structures by observations, as well as the expected MHD relationships.

  12. Natural evolution inspired design of light trapping structure in thin film organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Yu, Shuangcheng; Chen, Wei; Sun, Cheng

    2013-09-01

    Light trapping has been developed to effectively enhance the efficiency of the thin film solar cell by extending the pathlength for light interacting with the active materials. Searching for optimal light trapping design requires a delicate balance among all the competing physical processes, including light refraction, reflection, and absorption. The existing design methods mainly depend on engineers' intuition to predefine the topology of the light-trapping structure. However, these methods are not capable of handling the topological variation in reaching the optimal design. In this work, a systematic approach based on Genetic Algorithm is introduced to design the scattering pattern for effective light trapping. Inspired by natural evolution, this method can gradually improve the performance of light trapping structure through iterative procedures, producing the most favorable structure with minimized reflection and substantial enhancement in light absorption. Both slot waveguide based solar cell and a more realistic organic solar with a scattering layer consisting of nano-scale patterned front layer is optimized to maximize absorption by strongly coupling incident sun light into the localized photonic modes supported by the multilayer system. Rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) is implemented to evaluate the absorbance. The optimized slot waveguide cell achieves a broadband absorption efficiency of 48.1% and more than 3-fold increase over the Yablonovitch limit and the optimized realistic organic cell exhibits nearly 50% average absorbance over the solar spectrum with short circuit current density five times larger than the control case using planar ITO layer.

  13. FLOWS AND WAVES IN BRAIDED SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, V.; Datta, A.; Banerjee, D.

    2015-03-01

    We study the high frequency dynamics in the braided magnetic structure of an active region (AR 11520) moss as observed by the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C). We detect quasi-periodic flows and waves in these structures. We search for high frequency dynamics while looking at power maps of the observed region. We find that shorter periodicities (30–60 s) are associated with small spatial scales which can be resolved by Hi-C only. We detect quasi-periodic flows with a wide range of velocities, from 13–185 km s{sup −1}, associated with braided regions. This can be interpreted as plasma outflows from reconnection sites. We also find short period and large amplitude transverse oscillations associated with the braided magnetic region. Such oscillations could be triggered by reconnection or such oscillations may trigger reconnection.

  14. Photovoltaic switching mechanism in lateral structure hybrid perovskite solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yuan, Yongbo; Chae, Jungseok; Shao, Yuchuan; Wang, Qi; Xiao, Zhengguo; Centrone, Andrea; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-06-05

    In this study, long range electromigration of methylammonium ions (MA+) in methyl ammonium lead tri-iodide (MAPbI3) film is observed directly using the photo­thermal induced resonance technique. The electromigration of MA+ leads to the formation of a lateral p-i-n structure, which is the origin of the switchable photovoltaic effect in MAPbI3 perovskite devices.

  15. Photovoltaic switching mechanism in lateral structure hybrid perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yongbo; Chae, Jungseok; Shao, Yuchuan; Wang, Qi; Xiao, Zhengguo; Centrone, Andrea; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-06-05

    In this study, long range electromigration of methylammonium ions (MA+) in methyl ammonium lead tri-iodide (MAPbI3) film is observed directly using the photo­thermal induced resonance technique. The electromigration of MA+ leads to the formation of a lateral p-i-n structure, which is the origin of the switchable photovoltaic effect in MAPbI3 perovskite devices.

  16. Structural configuration options for the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylim, Adrian

    1989-01-01

    In order to meet the growing power demands of the Space Station, the electrical power system design includes an option to provide additional power capability in increments of 50 kWe of power. Each increment consists of a pair of two solar dynamic power modules (SDPMs), each of which containing a closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) thermodynamic engine. A solar dynamic radiator (SDR) enables the CBC to reject the waste heat to the surrounding space environment. This paper analyzes three alternatives to the baseline configuration of the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic radiator and discusses their merits based on Space Shuttle cargo capabilities, location with respect to the SDPM supporting structure, thermal performance, drag, concentrator shading, mass, and other issues of concenrn. Results indicating the advantages and disadvantages of each option are presented along with diagrams of the alternative configurations.

  17. OBSERVATIONAL ASPECTS OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORONAL STRUCTURE OVER A SOLAR ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Huw; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    2010-02-10

    Solar rotational tomography is applied to almost eleven years of Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph C2/Solar and Heliospheric Observatory data, revealing for the first time the behavior of the large-scale coronal density structures, also known as streamers, over almost a full solar activity cycle. This study gives an overview of the main results of this project. (1) Streamers are most often shaped as extended, narrow plasma sheets. The sheets can be extremely narrow at times (<=0.14 x 10{sup 6} km at 4 R{sub sun}). This is over twice their heliocentric angular thickness at 1 AU. (2) At most times outside the height of solar maximum, there are two separate stable large helmet streamer belts extending from mid-latitudes (in both north and south). At solar minimum, the streamers converge and join near the equator, giving the impression of a single large helmet streamer. Outside of solar minimum, the two streamers do not join, forming separate high-density sheets in the extended corona (one in the north, another in the south). At solar maximum, streamers rise radially from their source regions, while during the ascending and descending activity phases, streamers are skewed toward the equator. (3) For most of the activity cycle, streamers share the same latitudinal extent as filaments on the disk, showing that large-scale stable streamers are closely linked to the same large-scale photospheric magnetic configuration, which give rise to large filaments. (4) The poleward footpoints of the streamers are often above crown polar filaments and the equatorial footpoints are above filaments or active regions (or above the photospheric neutral lines which underlie these structures). The high-density structures arising from the equatorial active regions either rise and form the equatorial footpoints of mid-latitude quiescent streamers, or form unstable streamers at the equator, not connected to the quiescent streamer structure at higher latitude (so there are often three

  18. Diagnostics Challenges for FACET-II

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Christine

    2015-10-07

    FACET-II is a prospective user facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The facility will focus on high-energy, high-brightness beams and their interaction with plasma and lasers. The accelerator is designed for high-energy-density electron beams with peak currents of approximately 50 kA (potentially 100 kA) that are focused down to below 10x10 micron transverse spot size at an energy of 10 GeV. Subsequent phases of the facility will provide positron beams above 10 kA peak current to the experiment station. Experiments will require well characterised beams; however, the high peak current of the electron beam can lead to material failure in wirescanners, optical transition radiation screens and other instruments critical for measurement or delivery. The radiation environment and space constraints also put additional pressure on diagnostic design.

  19. Explorations in statistics: statistical facets of reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2016-06-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This eleventh installment of Explorations in Statistics explores statistical facets of reproducibility. If we obtain an experimental result that is scientifically meaningful and statistically unusual, we would like to know that our result reflects a general biological phenomenon that another researcher could reproduce if (s)he repeated our experiment. But more often than not, we may learn this researcher cannot replicate our result. The National Institutes of Health and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology have created training modules and outlined strategies to help improve the reproducibility of research. These particular approaches are necessary, but they are not sufficient. The principles of hypothesis testing and estimation are inherent to the notion of reproducibility in science. If we want to improve the reproducibility of our research, then we need to rethink how we apply fundamental concepts of statistics to our science.

  20. Detecting the Multiple Facets of Biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Jarzyna, Marta A; Jetz, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Interest in, and opportunities to include functional and phylogenetic attributes of species in community ecology and biogeography are rapidly growing and seen as vital for the assessment of status and trends in biodiversity. However, the fundamental underlying evidence remains the (co-)occurrence of the biological units, such as species, in time and space and our ability to appropriately detect and quantify them. Here, we examine the implications of imperfect detection of species for functional and phylogenetic diversity (FD and PD) estimates. We explore how FD and PD might have different detectabilities than taxonomic diversity (TD) and how all three might vary differently along spatial and environmental gradients. We also extend occupancy modeling and dendrogram-based methods to address the imperfect detection of different biodiversity facets. PMID:27168115

  1. FACET Tolerances for Static and Dynamic Misalignments

    SciTech Connect

    Federico, Joel

    2012-07-13

    The Facility for AdvancedAccelerator and Experimental Tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is designed to deliver a beam with a transverse spot size on the order of 10 {micro}m x 10 {micro}m in a new beamline constructed at the two kilometer point of the SLAC linac. Commissioning the beamline requires mitigating alignment errors and their effects, which can be significant and result in spot sizes orders of magnitude larger. Sextupole and quadrupole alignment errors in particular can introduce errors in focusing, steering, and dispersion which can result in spot size growth, beta mismatch, and waist movement. Alignment errors due to static misalignments, mechanical jitter, energy jitter, and other physical processes can be analyzed to determine the level of accuracy and precision that the beamline requires. It is important to recognize these effects and their tolerances in order to deliver a beam as designed.

  2. Facet joint disturbance induced by miniscrews in plated cervical laminoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Li, Huibo; Wang, Beiyu; Li, Tao; Gong, Quan; Song, Yueming; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A retrospective cohort study. Plated cervical laminoplasty is an increasingly common technique. A unique facet joint disturbance induced by lateral mass miniscrews penetrating articular surface was noticed. Facet joints are important to maintain cervical spine stability and kinetic balance. Whether this facet joint disturbance could affect clinical and radiologic results is still unknown. The objective of this study is to investigate the clinical and radiologic outcomes of patients with facet joints disturbance induced by miniscrews in plated cervical laminoplasty. A total of 105 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation between May 2010 and February 2014 were comprised. Postoperative CT images were used to identify whether facet joints destroyed by miniscrews. According to facet joints destroyed number, all the patients were divided into: group A (none facet joint destroyed), group B (1–2 facet joints destroyed), and group C (≥3 facet joints destroyed). Clinical data (JOA, VAS, and NDI scores), radiologic data (anteroposterior diameter and Palov ratio), and complications (axial symptoms and C5 palsy) were evaluated and compared among the groups. There were 38, 40, and 27 patients in group A, B, and C, respectively. The overall facet joints destroyed rate was 30.7%. All groups gained significant JOA and NDI scores improvement postoperatively. The preoperative JOA, VAS, NDI scores, and postoperative JOA scores did not differ significantly among the groups. The group C recorded significant higher postoperative VAS scores than group A (P = 0.002) and B (P = 0.014) and had significant higher postoperative NDI scores than group A (P = 0.002). The pre- and postoperative radiologic data were not significant different among the groups. The group C had a significant higher axial symptoms incidence than group A (12/27 vs 8/38, P = 0.041). Facet joints disturbance caused by miniscrews in plated cervical laminoplasty may not influence

  3. Novel nanostructured high efficiency light-harvesting device structure for a solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Singh, Pooja; Neogi, Arup; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Choi, Tae-Youl

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we present a novel photoconductive device structure for a solar cell application. β -Silicon Carbide (β -SiC) nanowire(NW) was placed in between silver (Ag) nanodot(ND) array. With much shorter size than an incoming photon wavelength, Ag ND created plasmonic oscillation, mainly attributed to dipole oscillating term, according to Mie scattering theory. Because of more optical modes in the higher refractive index, the radiation pattern from the dipole oscillation was mostly expanded onto the β -SiC NW rather than free space. We found that Ag ND array played role as collecting and concentrating light to create denser optical paths into the semiconducting β -SiC NW, which in turn provided higher quantum yield for photoconductivity. Since the structure was nanoscaled (i.e. NW and ND), this novel device structure can be a miniaturized building block for high demanding solar cell applications as one of the energy solutions.

  4. Disentangling The Magnetic Field Structure Of Sunspots - Stereoscopic Polarimetry With Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D. A. N.,; Schlichenmaier, R.; Fleck, B.; Fritz, G.

    2007-01-01

    Sunspots exhibit complex, highly structured magnetic fields and flows. Disentangling the atmospheric structure of sunspots is a great challenge, and can only be achieved by the combination of spectropolarimetry at high spatial resoultion and detailed modeling efforts. We use a generalized 3D the embeds magnetic flux tuber in a stratified atmosphere and calculates the emerging polarization of spectrail lines for arbitrary viewing angles. The resulting polarization maps are a very efficient tool to distinguish between different atmospheric scenarios and determine the 3D structure of the magnetic field and the flow field. In this contribution, we present synthetic maps of the net circular polarication (NCP) as a function of the heliocentric angle for different spectral lines of interest. Among these are the Fe I 617.3 nm line which would be observed by the VIM instrument abard Solar Orbiter and the Fe I 630.2 nm line which will be observed by Hinode (formerly known as Solar-B).

  5. Self-assembly Columnar Structure in Active Layer of Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Cheng; Segui, Jennifer; Yu, Yingjie; Li, Hongfei; Akgun, Bulent; Satijia, Sushil. K.; Gersappe, Dilip; Nam, Chang-Yong; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2012-02-01

    Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells are an area of intense interest due to their flexibility and relatively low cost. However, due to the disordered inner structure in active layer, the power conversion efficiency of BHJ solar cell is relatively low. Our research provides the method to produce ordered self-assembly columnar structure within active layer of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell by introducing polystyrene (PS) into the active layer. The blend thin film of polystyrene, poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) at different ratio are spin coated on substrate and annealed in vacuum oven for certain time. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show uniform phase segregation on the surface of polymer blend thin film and highly ordered columnar structure is then proven by etching the film with ion sputtering. TEM cross-section technology is also used to investigate the column structure. Neutron reflectometry was taken to establish the confinement of PCBM at the interface of PS and P3HT. The different morphological structures formed via phase segregation will be correlated with the performance of the PEV cells to be fabricated at the BNL-CFN.

  6. Experiment and modal analysis on the primary mirror structure of Space Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Zhiping; Yang, Shimo; Hu, Qiqian

    2006-06-01

    Primary mirror with Φ 1m and f 3.5m is the most important optical part in Space Solar Telescope (SST), which is designed to make observations of transient and steady state solar hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic processes and is being researched and manufactured by National Astronomical Observatories. The primary mirror structure(PMS), a crucial linker for the optical and other subsystems, includes primary mirror and its supporting frame. Therefore, this part must satisfy the optical sufficient strength, stiffness, and thermal stability requirements under the space environment and in the launching process. In this paper the primary mirror structure and its connection are described. The scheme of modal analysis and experiment is built, according to the specific dynamic requirements of the primary mirror structure in Space Solar Telescope. The dynamic response on the primary mirror structure is analyzed with MSC.NASTRAN software. Comparing these results with mode parameters obtained from modal experiment analysis. Modal experiment uses freely hanging primary mirror structure, simple input multi-output, and modal parameter identification through CADA-X software. Both results provide evidences to develop this satellite design.

  7. Corotating Solar Wind Structures and Recurrent Trains of Enhanced Diurnal Variation in Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeeram, T.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Kamyan, N.; Nutaro, T.

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with a vertical cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, were utilized to determine the diurnal anisotropy (DA) of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) near Earth during solar minimum conditions between 2007 November and 2010 November. We identified trains of enhanced DA over several days, which often recur after a solar rotation period (~27 days). By investigating solar coronal holes as identified from synoptic maps and solar wind parameters, we found that the intensity and anisotropy of cosmic rays are associated with the high-speed streams (HSSs) in the solar wind, which are in turn related to the structure and evolution of coronal holes. An enhanced DA was observed after the onset of some, but not all, HSSs. During time periods of recurrent trains, the DA was often enhanced or suppressed according to the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field B, which suggests a contribution from a mechanism involving a southward gradient in the GCR density, n, and a gradient anisotropy along B × ∇n. In one non-recurrent and one recurrent sequence, an HSS from an equatorial coronal hole was merged with that from a trailing mid-latitude extension of a polar coronal hole, and the slanted HSS structure in space with suppressed GCR density can account for the southward GCR gradient. We conclude that the gradient anisotropy is a source of temporary changes in the GCR DA under solar minimum conditions, and that the latitudinal GCR gradient can sometimes be explained by the coronal hole morphology.

  8. Corotating solar wind structures and recurrent trains of enhanced diurnal variation in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Yeeram, T.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Kamyan, N.; Nutaro, T. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th E-mail: p_chang24@hotmail.com

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with a vertical cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, were utilized to determine the diurnal anisotropy (DA) of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) near Earth during solar minimum conditions between 2007 November and 2010 November. We identified trains of enhanced DA over several days, which often recur after a solar rotation period (∼27 days). By investigating solar coronal holes as identified from synoptic maps and solar wind parameters, we found that the intensity and anisotropy of cosmic rays are associated with the high-speed streams (HSSs) in the solar wind, which are in turn related to the structure and evolution of coronal holes. An enhanced DA was observed after the onset of some, but not all, HSSs. During time periods of recurrent trains, the DA was often enhanced or suppressed according to the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field B, which suggests a contribution from a mechanism involving a southward gradient in the GCR density, n, and a gradient anisotropy along B × ∇n. In one non-recurrent and one recurrent sequence, an HSS from an equatorial coronal hole was merged with that from a trailing mid-latitude extension of a polar coronal hole, and the slanted HSS structure in space with suppressed GCR density can account for the southward GCR gradient. We conclude that the gradient anisotropy is a source of temporary changes in the GCR DA under solar minimum conditions, and that the latitudinal GCR gradient can sometimes be explained by the coronal hole morphology.

  9. Novel solar tower structure to lower plant cost and construction risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterseim, J. H.; White, S.; Hellwig, U.

    2016-05-01

    In recent times the interest in solar tower power plants is increasing with various plants being built in the last years and currently under construction, e.g. Ivanpah and Crescent Dunes in the US and Khi Solar One in South Africa. The higher cycle efficiency leads to lower levelised cost of electricity. However, further cost reductions are required and this paper compares a novel and patented solar tower structure with a conventional concrete tower. The novel solar tower design is cable-stayed which has the benefit that the cables absorb a large part of the wind and buckling loads. A tower that has to cope with fewer wind and buckling forces can have a significantly smaller diameter than a concrete tower, which enables workshop manufacture, sea and road transport, and rapid on-site installation. The case study provided in this paper finds that the tower area affected by wind can be reduced by up to 45%, installation time shortened by up to 66%, and tower cost by 20-40%. The novel design allows the construction and transport of the solar tower in few large modules, which are pre-manufactured including piping, cables, platform, ladders etc. The few modules can be assembled and installed rapidly not only lowering plant cost and construction time but also project risk.

  10. Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona for the Total Solar Eclipse of March 29,2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. a.; Lionello, R.; Riley, P.; TItov, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the use of a three-dimensional MHD model to predict the s tructure of the corona prior to the total solar eclipse of March 29, 2006. The calculation uses the observed photospheric radial magnetic f ield as a boundary condition. We use a new version of our model that has an improved description of energy transport in the corona. The mo del allows us to predict the emission of X-ray and EUV radiation in t he corona. We compare the predicted polarization brightness in the co rona with four observations of the eclipse from Greece, Egypt, and Li bya, and we demonstrate that the model accurately predicts the largescale structure of the corona. We also compare X-ray emission from the model with GOES/SXI images.

  11. Rocket borne solar eclipse experiment to measure the temperature structure of the solar corona via lyman-. cap alpha. line profile observations

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, H.V.

    1981-01-01

    A rocket borne experiment to measure the temperature structure of the inner solar corona via the doppler broadening of the resonance hydrogen Lyman-..cap alpha.. (lambda1216A) radiation scattered by ambient neutral hydrogen atoms was attempted during the 16 Feb 1980 solar eclipse. Two Nike-Black Brant V sounding rockets carrying instrumented payloads were launched into the path of the advancing eclipse umbra from the San Marco satellite launch platform 3 miles off the east coast of Kenya.

  12. The temperature and density structure in the closed field regions of the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, J. F.; Sukhorukova, G. V.; Axford, W. I.

    1999-10-01

    In this paper we study the temperature and density structure in the closed field region of the solar corona using a dipole plus current sheet model to simulate the global solar magnetic field and a heating function of the same type used in models of the fast wind. The heat equation, describing the redistributing effects of heat conduction on the heat input in the presence of radiative losses, is solved simultaneously with hydrostatic pressure balance. At the base we prescribe the temperature and assume that the heat flux is zero there. We also insist that the heat flux is zero at the equator. This ensures that whatever heat has been added is radiated away. From the mathematical viewpoint this additional requirement sets up an eigenvalue problem which implies that the density at the base must be chosen in just the right way to fulfill the condition of zero heat flux at the equator. Thus our model not only provides the temperature and density structure in the closed regions of a global solar magnetic field appropriate to solar minimum but also predicts the latitudinal variation of the base density whose characteristic value is determined by the ratio of the amplitudes of the heating to the cooling. However it should be stressed that this last prediction represents, at best, an approximation to the real stale of affairs which is more complex and involves the connection of the coronal field lines to the magnetic funnels of the chromospheric network.

  13. Comparison of Ring Current and Radiation Belt Responses during Transient Solar Wind Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, T. L.; Roeder, J. L.; Lemon, C.; Fennell, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of radiation belt dynamics provides insight into the physical mechanisms of trapping, energization, and loss of energetic particles in the magnetosphere. It is well known that the storm-time ring current response to solar wind drivers changes the magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere, which modifies radiation belt particle trajectories as well as the magnetopause and geomagnetic cutoff locations. What is not well known is the detailed space-time structure of solar wind transient features that drive the dynamics of the ring-current and radiation belt response. We compare observed responses of the ring current and radiation belts during two geomagnetic storms of similar intensity on 15 November 2012 and 29 June 2013. Using the self-consistent ring current model RCM-Equilibrium (RCM-E), which ensures a force-balanced ring-current response at each time step, we generate a simulated ring current in response to the changing conditions as the storm evolves on a timescale of hours. Observations of the plasma sheet particles, fields, and solar wind parameters are used to specify the dynamic boundary conditions as the storm evolves. This allows more realistic magnetospheric field and plasma dynamics during solar wind transients than can be obtained from existing empirical models. Using a spatial mapping algorithm developed by Mulligan et al., (2012) we create two-dimensional contour maps of the solar wind bulk plasma parameters using ACE, Wind, Geotail, and THEMIS data to quantitatively follow upstream spatial variations in the radial and azimuthal dimensions driving the storm. We perform a comparison of how the structure and impact angle of the solar wind transients affect the intensity and duration of energization of the ring current and radiation belt at various energies. We also investigate how the varying geomagnetic conditions determined by the solar wind affect dominant loss mechanisms such as magnetopause shadowing. Comparison of energetic particle

  14. Stability and Electronic Structures of CuxS Solar Cell Absorbers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S. H.; Xu, Q.; Huang, B.; Zhao, Y.; Yan, Y.; Noufi, R.

    2012-07-01

    Cu{sub x}S is one of the most promising solar cell absorber materials that has the potential to replace the leading thin-film solar cell material Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} for high efficiency and low cost. In the past, solar cells based on Cu{sub x}S have reached efficiency as high as 10%, but it also suffers serious stability issues. To further improve its efficiency and especially the stability, it is important to understand the stability and electronic structure of Cu{sub x}S. However, due to the complexity of their crystal structures, no systematic theoretical studies have been carried out to understand the stability and electronic structure of the Cu{sub x}S systems. In this work, using first-principles method, we have systematically studied the crystal and electronic band structures of Cu{sub x}S (1.25 < x {le} 2). For Cu{sub 2}S, we find that all the three chalcocite phases, i.e., the low-chalcocite, the high-chalcocite, and the cubic-chalcocite phases, have direct bandgaps around 1.3-1.5 eV, with the low-chalcocite being the most stable one. However, Cu vacancies can form spontaneously in these compounds, causing instability of Cu{sub 2}S. We find that under Cu-rich condition, the anilite Cu{sub 1.75}S is the most stable structure. It has a predicted bandgap of 1.4 eV and could be a promising solar cell absorber.

  15. Validation of the magnetic energy vs. helicity scaling in solar magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.; Moraitis, K.; Georgoulis, M. K.; Archontis, V.

    2014-10-01

    Aims: We assess the validity of the free magnetic energy - relative magnetic helicity diagram for solar magnetic structures. Methods: We used two different methods of calculating the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity budgets: a classical, volume-calculation nonlinear force-free (NLFF) method applied to finite coronal magnetic structures and a surface-calculation NLFF derivation that relies on a single photospheric or chromospheric vector magnetogram. Both methods were applied to two different data sets, namely synthetic active-region cases obtained by three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and observed active-region cases, which include both eruptive and noneruptive magnetic structures. Results: The derived energy-helicity diagram shows a consistent monotonic scaling between relative helicity and free energy with a scaling index 0.84 ± 0.05 for both data sets and calculation methods. It also confirms the segregation between noneruptive and eruptive active regions and the existence of thresholds in both free energy and relative helicity for active regions to enter eruptive territory. Conclusions: We consider the previously reported energy-helicity diagram of solar magnetic structures as adequately validated and envision a significant role of the uncovered scaling in future studies of solar magnetism.

  16. Comparison of output power for solar cells with standard and structured ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehleisen, Wolfgang; Neumaier, Lukas; Hirschl, Christina; Maier, Thomas; Schwark, Michael; Seufzer, Siegfried; Battistutti, Rene; Pedevilla, Mathias; Scheurer, Jög; Lorenz, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The optical loss due to the busbar grid and soldered interconnector ribbons on a three busbar standard multicrystalline silicon solar cell's front side is at 2.3%. One way to reduce this optical loss on cell level and in a photovoltaic (PV) module is to use deep structured ribbons as cell connectors. The standard soldered, flat ribbon is replaced with a glued, multiple structured ribbon. The investigation of shiny soldered flat ribbons and multiple structured ribbons in single-cell mini modules demonstrates the light angle dependency and the benefit for the structured alternative. Additional yield measurements for conventional photovoltaic modules with soldered flat and glued multiple structured ribbons technologies were studied under laboratory conditions as well as in outdoor measurements. The simulations and the experimental findings confirmed that the new structured ribbon design increases the short circuit current and the yield by about 2%.

  17. Study of compressible coherent structures, close to ion scales, in solar wind turbulence using Cluster data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Denise; Alexandrova, Olga; Mangeney, André; Maksimovic, Milan; Rocoto, Virgile; Pantellini, Filippo; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Issautier, Karine

    2015-04-01

    The interplanetary medium, a weakly collisional and fully turbulent medium, can be considered the best natural laboratory to study the dynamical behavior of turbulent plasmas. A fundamental question in solar wind plasma physics is whether, space plasma turbulence can be considered as a mixture of quasi-linear waves or if the turbulence is strong with formation of coherent structures responsible for the dissipation. Here we present an automatic method to identify compressible coherent structures using Morlet wavelet decomposition of magnetic signal from Cluster spacecraft and reconstruction of magnetic fluctuations in a selected scale range (0.033-0.2 Hz). Different kind of coherent structures have been detected: from soliton-like compressible structures to current sheet- or vortex-like alfvenic structures. A multi-satellite analysis, in order to characterize 3D geometry and propagation in plasma rest frame, reveals that these structures propagate quasi-perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, with finite velocity. Moreover, the spatial scales of coherent structures have been estimated: for the selected frequency range, the distribution of spatial scales is picked around ~30 ion Larmor radius or ion inertial length (~1200 km). Our observations in the solar wind can provide constraints on theoretical modeling of small-scale turbulence and dissipation in collisionless magnetized plasmas.

  18. Simulated In Situ Measurements and Structural Analysis of Reconnection-Driven Solar Polar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Merrill A.; Uritsky, Vadim M.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Solar polar jets are observed to originate in regions within the open field of solar coronal holes. These so called “anemone” regions are associated with an embedded dipole topology, consisting of a fan-separatrix and a spine line emanating from a null point occurring at the top of the dome shaped fan surface (Antiochos 1998). In this study, we analyze simulations using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) that take into account gravity, solar wind, and spherical geometry to generate polar jets by reconnection between a twisted embedded bipole and the surrounding open field (Karpen et al. 2015). These new simulations confirm and extend previous Cartesian studies of polar jets based on this mechanism (Pariat et al. 2009, 2010, 2015). Focusing on the plasma density, velocity, and magnetic field, we interpolate the adaptively gridded simulation data onto a regular grid, and analyze the signatures that the jet produces as it propagates outward from the solar surface. The trans-Alfvénic nature of the jet front is confirmed by temporally differencing the plasma mass density and comparing the result with the local Alfvén speed. We perform a preliminary analysis of the magnetized plasma turbulence, and examine how the turbulence affects the overall structure of the jet. We also conduct simulated spacecraft fly-throughs of the jet, illustrating the signatures that spacecraft such as Solar Probe Plus may encounter in situ as the jet propagates into the heliosphere. These fly-throughs are performed in several different velocity regimes to better model the changing velocity of Solar Probe Plus relative to the Sun and its jets over the course of the mission.This research was supported by NASA grant NNG11PL10A 670.036 to CUA/IACS (M.A.R. and V.M.U.) and the Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology (J.T.K. and C.R.D.) program.

  19. Effect of coherent structures on energetic particle intensity in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessein, Jeffrey A.

    Solar energetic particles in the solar wind are accelerated in both solar flares and shocks assocated with fast coronal mass ejections. They follow the interplanetary magnetic field and, upon reaching Earth, have implications for space weather. Space weather affects astronaut health and orbiting equipment through radiation hazard and electrical infrastructure on the ground with ground induced currents. Economic im- pacts include disruption of GPS and redirection of commercial polar flights due to a dangerous radiation environment over the poles. By studying how these particles interact with the magnetic fields we can better predict onset times and diffusion of these events. We find, using superposed epoch analysis and conditional statisitics from spacecraft observations that there is a strong association between energetic particles in the solar wind and magnetic discontinuities. This may be related to turbulent dissipa- tion mechanisms in which coherent structures in the solar wind seem to be preferred sites of heating, plasma instabilites and dissipation. In the case of energetic particles, magnetic reconnection and transport in flux tubes are likely to play a role. Though we focus on data away from large shocks, trapping can occur in the downstream region of shocks due to the preponderance of compressive turbulence in these areas. This thesis lays the ground work for the results described above with an intro- duction to solar wind and heliospheric physics in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 is an intro- duction to the acceleration mechanisms that give rise to observed energetic particle events. Chapter 3 describes various data analysis techniques and statistics that are bread and butter when analyzing spacecraft data for turbulence and energetic particle studies. Chapter 4 is a digression that covers preliminary studies that were done on the side; scale dependent kurtosis, ergodic studies and initial conditions for simulations. Chapter 5 contains that central published

  20. A combined tvd-lax-friedrichs scheme and its application in multi-streamer structure solar wind modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Wei, F.; Wu, S.; Fan, Q.

    By employing a modified Lax-Friedrichs scheme for the fluid part and MacCormack II scheme for the magnetic induction part in MHD equations and taking consideration of large-scale structure of solar-terrestrial simulation, a combined TVD type numerical model is introduced for solar wind m deling. To show theo validation of this new model, its ability of modeling solar wind background with multi-streamer structures is investigated here, showing strong robustness and stability without any artificial diffusion added. Numerical results are in agreement with former widely accepted ones by giving fine structures.

  1. Thin film solar cell design based on photonic crystal and diffractive grating structures.

    PubMed

    Mutitu, James G; Shi, Shouyuan; Chen, Caihua; Creazzo, Timothy; Barnett, Allen; Honsberg, Christiana; Prather, Dennis W

    2008-09-15

    In this paper we present novel light trapping designs applied to multiple junction thin film solar cells. The new designs incorporate one dimensional photonic crystals as band pass filters that reflect short light wavelengths (400 - 867 nm) and transmit longer wavelengths(867 -1800 nm) at the interface between two adjacent cells. In addition, nano structured diffractive gratings that cut into the photonic crystal layers are incorporated to redirect incoming waves and hence increase the optical path length of light within the solar cells. Two designs based on the nano structured gratings that have been realized using the scattering matrix and particle swarm optimization methods are presented. We also show preliminary fabrication results of the proposed devices.

  2. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  3. Understanding the Global Structure and Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress made during the first six months of the second year of the NASA Living with a Star program contract Understanding the global structure and evolution of coronal mass ejections in the solar wind, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period November 18, 2003 - May 17,2004. Under this contract SAIC has conducted numerical and data analysis related to fundamental issues concerning the origin, intrinsic properties, global structure, and evolution of coronal mass ejections in the solar wind. During this working period we have focused on a quantitative assessment of 5 flux rope fitting techniques. In the following sections we summarize the main aspects of this work and our proposed investigation plan for the next reporting period. Thus far, our investigation has resulted in 6 refereed scientific publications and we have presented the results at a number of scientific meetings and workshops.

  4. Efficient direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion by in situ interface transformation of a tandem structure

    PubMed Central

    May, Matthias M.; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Lackner, David; Dimroth, Frank; Hannappel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis is nature's route to convert intermittent solar irradiation into storable energy, while its use for an industrial energy supply is impaired by low efficiency. Artificial photosynthesis provides a promising alternative for efficient robust carbon-neutral renewable energy generation. The approach of direct hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting utilizes customized tandem absorber structures to mimic the Z-scheme of natural photosynthesis. Here a combined chemical surface transformation of a tandem structure and catalyst deposition at ambient temperature yields photocurrents approaching the theoretical limit of the absorber and results in a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 14%. The potentiostatically assisted photoelectrode efficiency is 17%. Present benchmarks for integrated systems are clearly exceeded. Details of the in situ interface transformation, the electronic improvement and chemical passivation are presented. The surface functionalization procedure is widely applicable and can be precisely controlled, allowing further developments of high-efficiency robust hydrogen generators. PMID:26369620

  5. In-Space Structural Validation Plan for a Stretched-Lens Solar Array Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Jones, Thomas W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes in-space structural validation plans for a proposed Space Shuttle-based flight experiment. The test article is an innovative, lightweight solar array concept that uses pop-up, refractive stretched-lens concentrators to achieve a power/mass density of at least 175 W/kg, which is more than three times greater than current capabilities. The flight experiment will validate this new technology to retire the risk associated with its first use in space. The experiment includes structural diagnostic instrumentation to measure the deployment dynamics, static shape, and modes of vibration of the 8-meter-long solar array and several of its lenses. These data will be obtained by photogrammetry using the Shuttle payload-bay video cameras and miniature video cameras on the array. Six accelerometers are also included in the experiment to measure base excitations and small-amplitude tip motions.

  6. Direct Correlation Between Film Structure and Solar Cell Efficiency for HWCVD Amorphous Silicon Germanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, A. H.; Xu, Y.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Williamson, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    The film structure and H bonding of high deposition rate a-SiGe:H i-layers, deposited by HWCVD and containing {approx}40 at.% Ge, have been investigated using deposition conditions which replicate those used in n-i-p solar cell devices. Increasing the germane source gas depletion in HWCVD causes not only a decrease in solar cell efficiency from 8.64% to less than 7.0%, but also an increase in both the i-layer H preferential attachment ratio (PA) and the film microstructure fraction (R{sup {sq_bullet}}). Measurements of the XRD medium range order over a wide range of germane depletion indicate that this order is already optimum for the HWCVD i-layers, suggesting that energetic bombardment of a-SiGe:H films may not always be necessary to achieve well ordered films. Preliminary structural comparisons are also made between HWCVD and PECVD device layers.

  7. Efficient direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion by in situ interface transformation of a tandem structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Matthias M.; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Lackner, David; Dimroth, Frank; Hannappel, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Photosynthesis is nature's route to convert intermittent solar irradiation into storable energy, while its use for an industrial energy supply is impaired by low efficiency. Artificial photosynthesis provides a promising alternative for efficient robust carbon-neutral renewable energy generation. The approach of direct hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting utilizes customized tandem absorber structures to mimic the Z-scheme of natural photosynthesis. Here a combined chemical surface transformation of a tandem structure and catalyst deposition at ambient temperature yields photocurrents approaching the theoretical limit of the absorber and results in a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 14%. The potentiostatically assisted photoelectrode efficiency is 17%. Present benchmarks for integrated systems are clearly exceeded. Details of the in situ interface transformation, the electronic improvement and chemical passivation are presented. The surface functionalization procedure is widely applicable and can be precisely controlled, allowing further developments of high-efficiency robust hydrogen generators.

  8. Efficient direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion by in situ interface transformation of a tandem structure.

    PubMed

    May, Matthias M; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Lackner, David; Dimroth, Frank; Hannappel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis is nature's route to convert intermittent solar irradiation into storable energy, while its use for an industrial energy supply is impaired by low efficiency. Artificial photosynthesis provides a promising alternative for efficient robust carbon-neutral renewable energy generation. The approach of direct hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting utilizes customized tandem absorber structures to mimic the Z-scheme of natural photosynthesis. Here a combined chemical surface transformation of a tandem structure and catalyst deposition at ambient temperature yields photocurrents approaching the theoretical limit of the absorber and results in a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 14%. The potentiostatically assisted photoelectrode efficiency is 17%. Present benchmarks for integrated systems are clearly exceeded. Details of the in situ interface transformation, the electronic improvement and chemical passivation are presented. The surface functionalization procedure is widely applicable and can be precisely controlled, allowing further developments of high-efficiency robust hydrogen generators. PMID:26369620

  9. The nature of stream-stream interaction in the large-scale structure of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    The stream-stream interaction between a slow solar wind and its leading faster solar wind is considered. A hydrodynamic model comprising double-layered rarefactions and recompressions is proposed toward understanding the observed large-scale structure near the trailing portion of a high-speed stream.

  10. Zeroing In on Mindfulness Facets: Similarities, Validity, and Dimensionality across Three Independent Measures.

    PubMed

    Siegling, Alex B; Petrides, K V

    2016-01-01

    The field of mindfulness has seen a proliferation of psychometric measures, characterised by differences in operationalisation and conceptualisation. To illuminate the scope of, and offer insights into, the diversity apparent in the burgeoning literature, two distinct samples were used to examine the similarities, validity, and dimensionality of mindfulness facets and subscales across three independent measures: the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS), and Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS). Results revealed problematic associations of FFMQ Observe with the other FFMQ facets and supported a four-factor structure (omitting this facet), while disputing the originally envisaged five-factor model; thus, solidifying a pattern in the literature. Results also confirmed the bidimensional nature of the PHLMS and TMS subscales, respectively. A joint Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed that PHLMS Acceptance could be assimilated within the FFMQ's four-factor model (as a distinct factor). The study offers a way of understanding interrelationships between the available mindfulness scales, so as to help practitioners and researchers make a more informed choice when conceptualising and operationalising mindfulness.

  11. Zeroing In on Mindfulness Facets: Similarities, Validity, and Dimensionality across Three Independent Measures.

    PubMed

    Siegling, Alex B; Petrides, K V

    2016-01-01

    The field of mindfulness has seen a proliferation of psychometric measures, characterised by differences in operationalisation and conceptualisation. To illuminate the scope of, and offer insights into, the diversity apparent in the burgeoning literature, two distinct samples were used to examine the similarities, validity, and dimensionality of mindfulness facets and subscales across three independent measures: the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS), and Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS). Results revealed problematic associations of FFMQ Observe with the other FFMQ facets and supported a four-factor structure (omitting this facet), while disputing the originally envisaged five-factor model; thus, solidifying a pattern in the literature. Results also confirmed the bidimensional nature of the PHLMS and TMS subscales, respectively. A joint Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed that PHLMS Acceptance could be assimilated within the FFMQ's four-factor model (as a distinct factor). The study offers a way of understanding interrelationships between the available mindfulness scales, so as to help practitioners and researchers make a more informed choice when conceptualising and operationalising mindfulness. PMID:27055017

  12. Zeroing In on Mindfulness Facets: Similarities, Validity, and Dimensionality across Three Independent Measures

    PubMed Central

    Siegling, Alex B.; Petrides, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    The field of mindfulness has seen a proliferation of psychometric measures, characterised by differences in operationalisation and conceptualisation. To illuminate the scope of, and offer insights into, the diversity apparent in the burgeoning literature, two distinct samples were used to examine the similarities, validity, and dimensionality of mindfulness facets and subscales across three independent measures: the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS), and Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS). Results revealed problematic associations of FFMQ Observe with the other FFMQ facets and supported a four-factor structure (omitting this facet), while disputing the originally envisaged five-factor model; thus, solidifying a pattern in the literature. Results also confirmed the bidimensional nature of the PHLMS and TMS subscales, respectively. A joint Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed that PHLMS Acceptance could be assimilated within the FFMQ’s four-factor model (as a distinct factor). The study offers a way of understanding interrelationships between the available mindfulness scales, so as to help practitioners and researchers make a more informed choice when conceptualising and operationalising mindfulness. PMID:27055017

  13. A practical scale for Multi-Faceted Organizational Health Climate Assessment.

    PubMed

    Zweber, Zandra M; Henning, Robert A; Magley, Vicki J

    2016-04-01

    The current study sought to develop a practical scale to measure 3 facets of workplace health climate from the employee perspective as an important component of a healthy organization. The goal was to create a short, usable yet comprehensive scale that organizations and occupational health professionals could use to determine if workplace health interventions were needed. The proposed Multi-faceted Organizational Health Climate Assessment (MOHCA) scale assesses facets that correspond to 3 organizational levels: (a) workgroup, (b) supervisor, and (c) organization. Ten items were developed and tested on 2 distinct samples, 1 cross-organization and 1 within-organization. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses yielded a 9-item, hierarchical 3-factor structure. Tests confirmed MOHCA has convergent validity with related constructs, such as perceived organizational support and supervisor support, as well as discriminant validity with safety climate. Lastly, criterion-related validity was found between MOHCA and health-related outcomes. The multi-faceted nature of MOHCA provides a scale that has face validity and can be easily translated into practice, offering a means for diagnosing the shortcomings of an organization or workgroup's health climate to better plan health and well-being interventions.

  14. From crystal steps to continuum laws: Behavior near large facets in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margetis, Dionisios; Nakamura, Kanna

    2011-06-01

    The passage from discrete schemes for surface line defects (steps) to nonlinear macroscopic laws for crystals is studied via formal asymptotics in one space dimension. Our goal is to illustrate by explicit computations the emergence from step motion laws of continuum-scale power series expansions for the slope near the edges of large, flat surface regions (facets). We consider surface diffusion kinetics via the Burton, Cabrera and Frank (BCF) model by which adsorbed atoms diffuse on terraces and attach-detach at steps. Nearest-neighbor step interactions are included. The setting is a monotone train of N steps separating two semi-infinite facets at fixed heights. We show how boundary conditions for the continuum slope and flux, and expansions in the height variable near facets, may emerge from the algebraic structure of discrete schemes as N→∞. Our technique relies on the use of self-similar discrete slopes, conversion of discrete schemes to sum equations, and their reduction to nonlinear integral equations for the continuum-scale slope. Approximate solutions to the continuum equations near facet edges are constructed formally by direct iterations. For elastic-dipole and multipole step interactions, the continuum slope is found in agreement with a previous hypothesis of ‘local equilibrium’.

  15. Possible variants of microwave-beam structure for satellite solar power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanke, V. A.; Lesota, S. K.; Rachnikov, A. V.

    1988-07-01

    An analysis is made of the maximum efficiency of the microwave-beam transmission channel in a satellite solar power system that can be realized for a discrete 10-step amplitude distribution of the transmitting-antenna field. High-efficiency variants of the channel structure are found which are characterized by a high mean field intensity on the receiving antenna and an increased overall level of transmitted power for fixed values of maximum power density on the transmitting and receiving antennas.

  16. Basic mechanisms study for MIS solar cell structures on GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The solar cell structure examined is the MIS configuration on (n) GaAs. The metal room temperature oxide/(n) GaAs materials system was studied. Metals with electronegativities varying from 2.4 (Au) to 1.5 (Al) were used as the upper electrode. The thinnest metallization that did not interfere with the measurement techniques (by introducing essentially transmission line series resistance problems across a device) was used. Photovoltaic response was not optimized.

  17. A strategy to design novel structure photochromic sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenjun; Wang, Jiaxing; Zheng, Zhiwei; Hu, Yue; Jin, Jiayu; Zhang, Qiong; Hua, Jianli

    2015-01-01

    Two sensitizers with novel structure were designed and synthetized by introducing photochromic bisthienylethene (BTE) group into the conjugated system. Thanks to the photochromic effect the sensitizers have under ultraviolet and visible light, the conjugated bridge can be restructured and the resulting two photoisomers showed different behaviors in photovoltaic devices. This opens up a new research way for the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). PMID:25716204

  18. Single-Crystal CdTe Homojunction Structures for Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Peng-Yu; Dahal, Rajendra; Wang, Gwo-Ching; Zhang, Shengbai; Lu, Toh-Ming; Bhat, Ishwara B.

    2015-09-01

    We report two different CdTe homojunction solar cell structures. Single-crystal CdTe homojunction solar cells were grown on GaAs single-crystal substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Arsenic and iodine were used as dopants for p-type and n-type CdTe, respectively. Another homojunction solar cell structure was fabricated by growing n-type CdTe directly on bulk p-type CdTe single-crystal substrates. The electrical properties of the different layers were characterized by Hall measurements. When arsine was used as arsenic source, the highest hole concentration was ~6 × 1016 cm-3 and the activation efficiency was ~3%. Very abrupt arsenic doping profiles were observed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. For n-type CdTe with a growth temperature of 250°C and a high Cd/Te ratio the electron concentration was ~4.5 × 1016 cm-3. Because of the 300 nm thick n-type CdTe layer, the short circuit current of the solar cell grown on the bulk CdTe substrate was less than 10 mA/cm2. The open circuit voltage of the device was 0.86 V. According to a prediction based on measurement of short circuit current density ( J sc) as a function of open circuit voltage ( V oc), an open circuit voltage of 0.92 V could be achieved by growing CdTe solar cells on bulk CdTe substrates.

  19. Fine structure of Langmuir waves produced by a solar electron event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Williams, D. J.; Bolton, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of highly structured bursts of Langmuir waves produced by energetic electrons ejected from a solar flare using wideband plasma wave measurements on the Galileo spacecraft are reported. Attention is given to the solar flare that occurred on December 10, 1990, while the spacecraft was at a radial distance of 0.98 AU from the sun. This flare emitted a stream of energetic electrons and an associated type III radio event, both of which were detected by Galileo. A large number of intense Langmuir wave bursts were detected near the local electron plasma frequency, which was about 25 kHz. The bursts, which lasted about 1.5 hr, coincided with the arrival of the solar electrons. The bursts are highly structured and consist mainly of isolated wave packets with durations as short as 1 ms and beat-type waveforms with beat frequencies ranging from 200 to 500 Hz. The highly structured envelopes of these waves are strongly suggestive of nonlinear parametric decay processes such as those predicted by various theories dealing with the saturation of beam-driven electrostatic instabilities.

  20. Semiconductor wire array structures, and solar cells and photodetectors based on such structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Atwater, Harry A.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Petykiewicz, Jan A.

    2014-08-19

    A structure comprising an array of semiconductor structures, an infill material between the semiconductor materials, and one or more light-trapping elements is described. Photoconverters and photoelectrochemical devices based on such structure also described.

  1. Fine Magnetic Structure and Origin of Counter-streaming Mass Flows in a Quiescent Solar Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Yu; Liu, Ying D.; Chen, P. F.; Su, Jiangtao; Xu, Zhi; Liu, Zhong

    2015-11-01

    We present high-resolution observations of a quiescent solar prominence that consists of a vertical and a horizontal foot encircled by an overlying spine and has ubiquitous counter-streaming mass flows. While the horizontal foot and the spine were connected to the solar surface, the vertical foot was suspended above the solar surface and was supported by a semicircular bubble structure. The bubble first collapsed, then reformed at a similar height, and finally started to oscillate for a long time. We find that the collapse and oscillation of the bubble boundary were tightly associated with a flare-like feature located at the bottom of the bubble. Based on the observational results, we propose that the prominence should be composed of an overlying horizontal spine encircling a low-lying horizontal and vertical foot, in which the horizontal foot consists of shorter field lines running partially along the spine and has ends connected to the solar surface, while the vertical foot consists of piling-up dips due to the sagging of the spine fields and is supported by a bipolar magnetic system formed by parasitic polarities (i.e., the bubble). The upflows in the vertical foot were possibly caused by the magnetic reconnection at the separator between the bubble and the overlying dips, which intruded into the persistent downflow field and formed the picture of counter-streaming mass flows. In addition, the counter-streaming flows in the horizontal foot were possibly caused by the imbalanced pressure at the both ends.

  2. Integrated Orbit, Attitude, and Structural Control System Design for Space Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica (Technical Monitor); Moore, Chris (Technical Monitor); Wie, Bong; Roithmayr, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to develop an integrated orbit, attitude, and structural control system architecture for very large Space Solar Power Satellites (SSPS) in geosynchronous orbit. This study focuses on the 1.2-GW Abacus SSPS concept characterized by a 3.2 x 3.2 km solar-array platform, a 500-m diameter microwave beam transmitting antenna, and a 500 700 m earth-tracking reflector. For this baseline Abacus SSPS configuration, we derive and analyze a complete set of mathematical models, including external disturbances such as solar radiation pressure, microwave radiation, gravity-gradient torque, and other orbit perturbation effects. The proposed control system architecture utilizes a minimum of 500 1-N electric thrusters to counter, simultaneously, the cyclic pitch gravity-gradient torque, the secular roll torque caused by an o.set of the center-of-mass and center-of-pressure, the cyclic roll/yaw microwave radiation torque, and the solar radiation pressure force whose average value is about 60 N.

  3. Integrated Orbit, Attitude, and Structural Control Systems Design for Space Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to develop an integrated orbit, attitude, and structural control systems architecture for very large Space Solar Power Satellites (SSPS) in geosynchronous orbit. This study focuses on the 1.2-GW Abacus SSPS concept characterized by a 3.2 x 3.2 km solar-array platform, a 500-m diameter microwave beam transmitting antenna, and a 500 x 700 m earth-tracking reflector. For this baseline Abacus SSPS configuration, we derive and analyze a complete set of mathematical models, including external disturbances such as solar radiation pressure, microwave radiation, gravity-gradient torque, and other orbit perturbation effects. The proposed control systems architecture utilizes a minimum of 500 1-N electric thrusters to counter, simultaneously, the cyclic pitch gravity-gradient torque, the secular roll torque caused by an offset of the center-of-mass and center-of-pressure, the cyclic roll/yaw microwave radiation torque, and the solar radiation pressure force whose average value is about 60 N.

  4. FINE MAGNETIC STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF COUNTER-STREAMING MASS FLOWS IN A QUIESCENT SOLAR PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Yu; Xu, Zhi; Liu, Zhong; Liu, Ying D.; Chen, P. F.; Su, Jiangtao

    2015-11-20

    We present high-resolution observations of a quiescent solar prominence that consists of a vertical and a horizontal foot encircled by an overlying spine and has ubiquitous counter-streaming mass flows. While the horizontal foot and the spine were connected to the solar surface, the vertical foot was suspended above the solar surface and was supported by a semicircular bubble structure. The bubble first collapsed, then reformed at a similar height, and finally started to oscillate for a long time. We find that the collapse and oscillation of the bubble boundary were tightly associated with a flare-like feature located at the bottom of the bubble. Based on the observational results, we propose that the prominence should be composed of an overlying horizontal spine encircling a low-lying horizontal and vertical foot, in which the horizontal foot consists of shorter field lines running partially along the spine and has ends connected to the solar surface, while the vertical foot consists of piling-up dips due to the sagging of the spine fields and is supported by a bipolar magnetic system formed by parasitic polarities (i.e., the bubble). The upflows in the vertical foot were possibly caused by the magnetic reconnection at the separator between the bubble and the overlying dips, which intruded into the persistent downflow field and formed the picture of counter-streaming mass flows. In addition, the counter-streaming flows in the horizontal foot were possibly caused by the imbalanced pressure at the both ends.

  5. The solar wind interaction with Venus - Pioneer Venus observations of bow shock location and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Scarf, F. L.; Wolfe, J. H.; Mihalov, J. D.; Intriligator, D. S.; Brace, L. H.; Taylor, H. A.; Daniell, R. E.

    1980-12-01

    Pioneer Venus observations are used in carrying out a study of the location and structure of the Venus bow shock. The trace of the shock in the solar wind aberrated terminator plane is almost circular at an altitude of 1.38 Venus radii independent of interplanetary magnetic field orientation with an extrapolated subsolar height of 0.38 Venus radii. Gas dynamic relations and scaling of the terrestrial analogue are used in determining the effective impenetrable obstacle altitude from the mean shock surface with the conclusion that it lies beneath the observed height of the ionopause. The short-term variability in shock position is similar to that found at the earth; over the long-term bow shock, altitude varies by up to approximately 35% in phase with the solar cycle for reasons other than changing solar wind Mach number. In contrast to ionopause position, which is shown to be well determined by external pressure measurements, it is found that bow shock altitude is only weakly dependent on ionopause height and solar wind dynamic pressure.

  6. Correlation of the Global Photospheric Magnetic Field Structure with the Latitudinal Sunspot Distribution in the solar cycles 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavryuseva, E.; Zharkov, S.; Zharkova, V.

    begin table htbp begin center begin tabular p 442pt hline begin itemize item We compare a basic topology of large scale solar magnetic field with newline the distribution of the sunspot activity in latitude and newline in time in the past 2 solar cycles newline The large scale magnetic fields were composed from the data of WSO observatory the sunspot characteristics we extracted for the cycle 23 from the Solar Feature Catalogues underline http solar inf brad ac uk newline newline The magnetic field variations reveal a 4-zonal structure with 22-year periodicity and running waves through the solar latitudes with the two years periods The results are compared with the sunspot latitudinal variations in time and cumulitative variations in the butterfly diagrams The comparison results are used to explain the double peaks and variable character of the solar activity that can be used for its modelling and prediction end itemize hline end tabular label tab6 end center end table

  7. Novel (115) faceting induced by Sr adsorbed on Si(114)-2 × 1 with subsurface C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hidong; Kim, Yanghui; Lkhagvasuren, Altaibaatar; Zhang, Rui; Seo, Jae M.

    2016-09-01

    The Sr-induced structural evolution of Si(114)-2 × 1, through depositing SrF2 on the reconstructed surface held at 800 °C, has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy. By submonolayer of adsorbed Sr atoms, any well-defined facet besides (113) has not been formed on the clean Si(114)-2 × 1 surface, while a well-ordered and sawtooth-like structure composed of a (113) facet and its compensating (115) facet has been formed on Si(114)-2 × 1 with subsurface C atoms. Such a contrasting result is due to the stress-compensating mechanism between adsorbed Sr atoms and subsurface C atoms making the (115) facet stable. From the present studies, it has been confirmed that a stable and sawtooth-like structure covering the whole surface can be formed by modulating the surface stress even if the high-index surface does not have a pair of stable facets near the direction of the substrate.

  8. Structural assessment of a space station solar dynamic heat receiver thermal energy storage canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. L.; Kerslake, T. W.; Tong, M. T.

    1988-01-01

    The structural performance of a space station thermal energy storage (TES) canister subject to orbital solar flux variation and engine cold start up operating conditions was assessed. The impact of working fluid temperature and salt-void distribution on the canister structure are assessed. Both analytical and experimental studies were conducted to determine the temperature distribution of the canister. Subsequent finite element structural analyses of the canister were performed using both analytically and experimentally obtained temperatures. The Arrhenius creep law was incorporated into the procedure, using secondary creep data for the canister material, Haynes 188 alloy. The predicted cyclic creep strain accumulations at the hot spot were used to assess the structural performance of the canister. In addition, the structural performance of the canister based on the analytically determined temperature was compared with that based on the experimentally measured temperature data.

  9. Structural assessment of a Space Station solar dynamic heat receiver thermal energy storage canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, M. T.; Kerslake, T. W.; Thompson, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper assesses the structural performance of a Space Station thermal energy storage (TES) canister subject to orbital solar flux variation and engine cold start-up operating conditions. The impact of working fluid temperature and salt-void distribution on the canister structure are assessed. Both analytical and experimental studies were conducted to determine the temperature distribution of the canister. Subsequent finite-element structural analyses of the canister were performed using both analytically and experimentally obtained temperatures. The Arrhenius creep law was incorporated into the procedure, using secondary creep data for the canister material, Haynes-188 alloy. The predicted cyclic creep strain accumulations at the hot spot were used to assess the structural performance of the canister. In addition, the structural performance of the canister based on the analytically-determined temperature was compared with that based on the experimentally-measured temperature data.

  10. Precursor salt assisted syntheses of high-index faceted concave hexagon and nanorod-like polyoxometalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jaya; Ganguly, Mainak; Mondal, Chanchal; Negishi, Yuichi; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into five distinctive shapes through straightforward and indirect routes. Explicit regulation of the structural arrangements of ACM and CMOH has been studied in detail with altered precursor salt concentration employing our laboratory developed modified hydrothermal (MHT) method. Morphologically different ACM 3D architectures are evolved with higher molybdate concentration, whereas 1D growth of CMOH is observed with increased copper concentration. Interesting morphological transformation of the products has been accomplished employing one precursor salt at a time without using any other foreign reagent. It has been proven that large ACMs become labile in the presence of incoming Cu(ii) and NH4+ ions of the precursor salts. A new strategy for the conversion of faceted ACMs (hexagonal plate, circular plate and hollow flower) to exclusive CMOH nanorods through a Cu(ii) assisted reaction has been adopted. According to thermodynamic consideration, the synthesis of rare concave nanostructures with high index facet is still challenging due to their higher reactivity. In this study, concave hexagonal ACM with high index facet {hkl} has been successfully prepared for the first time from hexagonal ACM through simple etching with ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM), which is another precursor salt. Hexagonal ACM corrugates to a concave hexagon because of the higher reactivity of the {001} crystal plane than that of the {010} plane. It has been shown that high index facet exposed concave hexagonal ACM serves as a better catalyst for the photodegradation of dye than the other microstructures enclosed by low index facets.This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into

  11. The Magnetic Structure of H-alpha Macrospicules in Solar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.; Wang, H.; Sakurai, T.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements by Ulysses in the high-speed polar solar wind have shown the wind to carry some fine-scale structures in which the magnetic field reverses direction by having a switchback fold in it. The lateral span of these magnetic switchbacks, translated back to the Sun, is of the scale of the lanes and cells of the magnetic network in which the open magnetic field of the polar coronal hole and polar solar wind are rooted. This suggests that the magnetic switchbacks might be formed from network-scale magnetic loops that erupt into the corona and then undergo reconnection with the open field. This possibility motivated us to undertake the study reported here of the structure of Ha macrospicules observed at the limb in polar coronal holes, to determine whether a significant fraction of these eruptions appear to be erupting loops. From a search of the polar coronal holes in 6 days of image- processed full-disk Ha movies from Big Bear Solar Observatory, we found a total of 35 macrospicules. Nearly all of these (32) were of one or the other of two different forms: 15 were in the form of an erupting loop, and 17 were in the form of a single column spiked jet. The erupting-loop macrospicules are appropriate for producing the magnetic switchbacks in the polar wind. The spiked-jet macrospicules show the appropriate structure and evolution to be driven by reconnection between network-scale closed field (a network bipole) and the open field rooted against the closed field. This evidence for reconnection in a large fraction of our macrospicules (1) suggests that many spicules may be generated by similar but smaller reconnection events and (2) supports the view that coronal heating and solar wind acceleration in coronal holes and in quiet regions are driven by explosive reconnection events in the magnetic network.

  12. The Magnetic Structure of H-Alpha Macrospicules in Solar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.; Wang, H.; Sakuri, T.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements by Ulysses in the high-speed polar solar wind have shown the wind to carry some fine-scale structures in which the magnetic field reverses direction by having a switchback fold in it. The lateral span of these magnetic switchbacks, translated to the Sun, is of the scale of the lanes and cells of the magnetic network in which the open magnetic flux of the polar coronal hole and polar solar wind are rooted. This suggests that the magnetic switchbacks might be formed from network-scale magnetic loops that erupt into the corona and then undergo reconnection with the open field. This possibility motivated us to undertake the study reported here of the structure of H-alpha macrospicules observed at the limb in polar coronal holes, to determine whether a significant fraction of these eruptions appear to be erupting loops. From a search of the polar-coronal holes in 6 days of image-processed full-disk H-alpha movies from Big Bear Solar Observatory, we found a total of 35 macrospicules. Nearly all of these (32) were of one or the other of two different forms: 15 were in the form of an erupting loop, and 17 were in the form of a single-column spiked jet. The erupting-loop macrospicules are appropriate for producing the magnetic switchbacks in the polar wind. The spiked-jet macrospicules show the appropriate structure and evolution to be driven by reconnection between network-scale closed field (a network bipole) and the open field rooted against the closed field. This evidence for reconnection in a large fraction of our macrospicules (1) suggests that many spicules may be generated by similar but smaller reconnection events, and (2) supports the view that coronal heating and solar wind acceleration in coronal holes and in quiet regions and corona are driven by explosive reconnection events in the magnetic network.

  13. Vertical structure and size distributions of Martian aerosols from solar occultation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chassefiere, E.; Blamont, J. E.; Krasnopol'skii, V. A.; Korablev, O. I.; Atreya, S. K.; West, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Phobos 2 spectrometer measurements of solar occultations close to the evening terminator have furnished data on the vertical structure of the Martian aerosols near the northern spring equinox. Since the thermal structure derived from saturated IR profiles of water vapor does not allow the reaching of the CO2 frost point at cloud altitudes, said clouds' particles may be formed by H2O ice. Dust was also monitored at two wavelengths; it is assumed that the dust particles are levitated by eddy mixing. A parallel is drawn between these thin clouds and the polar mesospheric clouds observed on earth.

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Five Facets Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) in a Meditating and a Non-Meditating Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bruin, Esther I.; Topper, Maurice; Muskens, Jan G. A. M.; Bogels, Susan M.; Kamphuis, Jan H.

    2012-01-01

    The factor structure, internal consistency, construct validity, and predictive validity of the Dutch version of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-NL) were studied in a sample of meditators (n = 288) and nonmeditators (n = 451). A five-factor structure was demonstrated in both samples, and the FFMQ-NL and its subscales were shown to…

  15. Craniovertebral Junction Instability: A Review of Facts about Facets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Craniovertebral junction surgery involves an appropriate philosophical, biomechanical and anatomical understanding apart from high degree of technical skill and ability of controlling venous and arterial bleeding. The author presents his 30-year experience with treating complex craniovertebral junction instability related surgical issues. The facets of atlas and axis form the primary site of movements at the craniovertebral junction. All craniovertebral junction instability is essentially localized to the atlantoaxial facet joint. Direct manipulation and fixation of the facets forms the basis of treatment for instability. PMID:26240728

  16. Precursor salt assisted syntheses of high-index faceted concave hexagon and nanorod-like polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Pal, Jaya; Ganguly, Mainak; Mondal, Chanchal; Negishi, Yuichi; Pal, Tarasankar

    2015-01-14

    This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into five distinctive shapes through straightforward and indirect routes. Explicit regulation of the structural arrangements of ACM and CMOH has been studied in detail with altered precursor salt concentration employing our laboratory developed modified hydrothermal (MHT) method. Morphologically different ACM 3D architectures are evolved with higher molybdate concentration, whereas 1D growth of CMOH is observed with increased copper concentration. Interesting morphological transformation of the products has been accomplished employing one precursor salt at a time without using any other foreign reagent. It has been proven that large ACMs become labile in the presence of incoming Cu(II) and NH4(+) ions of the precursor salts. A new strategy for the conversion of faceted ACMs (hexagonal plate, circular plate and hollow flower) to exclusive CMOH nanorods through a Cu(II) assisted reaction has been adopted. According to thermodynamic consideration, the synthesis of rare concave nanostructures with high index facet is still challenging due to their higher reactivity. In this study, concave hexagonal ACM with high index facet {hkl} has been successfully prepared for the first time from hexagonal ACM through simple etching with ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM), which is another precursor salt. Hexagonal ACM corrugates to a concave hexagon because of the higher reactivity of the {001} crystal plane than that of the {010} plane. It has been shown that high index facet exposed concave hexagonal ACM serves as a better catalyst for the photodegradation of dye than the other microstructures enclosed by low index facets. PMID:25500856

  17. [Ultraviolet spectroscopic study on the fine structures in the solar polar hole].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Dong; Liu, Guo-Hong

    2014-07-01

    Fine structures in the south solar polar coronal hole were observed by N IV line of SOHO/SUMER spectrograph. The scales of the fine structures range spatially range from 1 arcsec to several arcsecs, temporally from 1 min to several minutes, and parts of them are in strip shape along the slit direction. The line-of-sight velocity of them is up to tens of km x s(-1) with red and blue shift intercrossed occasionally, which appear periodically as long as 100 minutes in some regions. Part of the fine structures can be clearly observed at the Ne V III line with higher formation temperature in the same spectral window. The time and location of some fine structures with high velocity in the Ne V III spectrum are almost the same as that in N IV spectrum, but they are extended and diffused in the Ne V III spectrum. Some fine structures have non-Gaussian profiles with the line-of-sight Doppler velocities up to 150 km x s(-1) in the N IV blue/red wings, which is similar with the explosive events in the transition region. In the past, explosive events are small-scale dynamic phenomena often observed in the quiet-sun (QS) region, while their properties in coronal holes (CHs) remain unclear. Here, we find the EE-like events with strong dynamics in the south solar polar coronal hole by N IV line of SOHO/SUMER spectrograph.

  18. Effect of vegetation structure on subcanopy solar radiation: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, A.; Dubayah, R.; Hofton, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Vertical structure of vegetation canopy influences spatial variability of radiation regime under forest canopies. A comparison of transmittance profiles and subcanopy radiation regime for two structurally different forest sites is done based on ray tracing and principles of radiative transfer using Lidar data. Medium footprint waveform Lidar data from Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) was collected from the sites in Sierra National Forest (SNF), California and Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC), Maryland in 2008 and 2003 respectively. Sites in both forest areas have varying vegetation structure with SNF sites representing mixed conifers whereas the sites in SERC represent eastern broadleaf trees. The Lidar waveform is processed to derive canopy gap probability as a function of height which is used to derive transmittance profiles and solar radiation as a function of canopy height using a 3-D light transmittance model. Geostatistics is applied to compare how the vertical and horizontal distribution of solar radiation under sub-canopy surface varies with varying vertical canopy structures such as foliage density, canopy cover and canopy height. This comparison is expected to increase knowledge on vegetation structure effects forest canopies.

  19. Non-uniform Solar Temperature Field on Large Aperture, Fully-Steerable Telescope Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a 110-m fully steerable radio telescope was used as an analysis platform and the integral parametric finite element model of the antenna structure was built in the ANSYS thermal analysis module. The boundary conditions of periodic air temperature, solar radiation, long-wave radiation shadows of the surrounding environment, etc. were computed at 30 min intervals under a cloudless sky on a summer day, i.e., worstcase climate conditions. The transient structural temperatures were then analyzed under a period of several days of sunshine with a rational initial structural temperature distribution until the whole set of structural temperatures converged to the results obtained the day before. The non-uniform temperature field distribution of the entire structure and the main reflector surface RMS were acquired according to changes in pitch and azimuth angle over the observation period. Variations in the solar cooker effect over time and spatial distributions in the secondary reflector were observed to elucidate the mechanism of the effect. The results presented here not only provide valuable realtime data for the design, construction, sensor arrangement and thermal deformation control of actuators but also provide a troubleshooting reference for existing actuators.

  20. Compressive Coherent Structures at Ion Scales in the Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, D.; Alexandrova, O.; Mangeney, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Lacombe, C.; Rakoto, V.; Kasper, J. C.; Jovanovic, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of magnetic field fluctuations in a slow solar wind stream, close to ion scales, where an increase of the level of magnetic compressibility is observed. Here, the nature of these compressive fluctuations is found to be characterized by coherent structures. Although previous studies have shown that current sheets can be considered the principal cause of intermittency at ion scales, here we show for the first time that, in the case of the slow solar wind, a large variety of coherent structures contributes to intermittency at proton scales, and current sheets are not the most common. Specifically, we find compressive (δ {b}\\parallel \\gg δ {b}\\perp ), linearly polarized structures in the form of magnetic holes, solitons, and shock waves. Examples of Alfvénic structures (δ {b}\\perp \\gt δ {b}\\parallel ) are identified as current sheets and vortex-like structures. Some of these vortices have δ {b}\\perp \\gg δ {b}\\parallel , as in the case of Alfvén vortices, but the majority of them are characterized by δ {b}\\perp ≳ δ {b}\\parallel . Thanks to multi-point measurements by the Cluster spacecraft, for about 100 structures we could determine the normal, the propagation velocity, and the spatial scale along this normal. Independently of the nature of the structures, the normal is always perpendicular to the local magnetic field, meaning that k ⊥ ≫ k ∥. The spatial scales of the studied structures are found to be between two and eight times the proton gyroradius. Most of them are simply convected by the wind, but 25% propagate in the plasma frame. Possible interpretations of the observed structures and the connection with plasma heating are discussed.

  1. Ancient cellular structures and modern humans: change of survival strategies before prolonged low solar activity period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragulskaya, Mariya; Rudenchik, Evgeniy; Gromozova, Elena; Voychuk, Sergei; Kachur, Tatiana

    The study of biotropic effects of modern space weather carries the information about the rhythms and features of adaptation of early biological systems to the outer space influence. The influence of cosmic rays, ultraviolet waves and geomagnetic field on early life has its signs in modern biosphere processes. These phenomena could be experimentally studied on present-day biological objects. Particularly inorganic polyphosphates, so-called "fossil molecules", attracts special attention as the most ancient molecules which arose in inanimate nature and have been accompanying biological objects at all stages of evolution. Polyphosphates-containing graves of yeast's cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain Y-517, , from the Ukrainian Collection of Microorganisms was studied by daily measurements during 2000-2013 years. The IZMIRAN daily data base of physiological parameters dynamics during 2000-2013 years were analyzed simultaneously (25 people). The analysis showed significant simultaneous changes of the statistical parameters of the studied biological systems in 2004 -2006. The similarity of simultaneous changes of adaptation strategies of human organism and the cell structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the 23-24 cycles of solar activity are discussed. This phenomenon could be due to a replacement of bio-effective parameters of space weather during the change from 23rd to 24th solar activity cycle and nonstandard geophysical peculiarities of the 24th solar activity cycle. It could be suggested that the observed similarity arose as the optimization of evolution selection of the living systems in expectation of probable prolonged period of low solar activity (4-6 cycles of solar activity).

  2. Propagation of the 12 May 1997 interplanetary coronal mass ejection in evolving solar wind structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrcil, D.; Pizzo, V. J.; Arge, C. N.

    2005-02-01

    Recently, we simulated the 12 May 1997 coronal mass ejection (CME) event with a numerical three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model (Odstrcil et al., 2004), in which the background solar wind was determined from the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) coronal model (Riley et al., 2001) and the transient disturbance was determined from the cone model (Zhao et al., 2002). Although we reproduced with some fidelity the arrival of the shock and interplanetary CME at Earth, detailed analysis of the simulations showed a poorly defined shock and discrepancies in the standoff distance between the shock and the driving ejecta and in the inclination of the shock with respect to the Sun-Earth line. In this paper, we investigate these problems in more detail. First, we use an alternative coronal outflow model, the so-called Wang-Sheeley-Arge-Mount Wilson Observatory (WSA-MWO) model (Arge and Pizzo, 2000; Arge et al., 2002; Arge et al., 2004), to assess the effect of using synoptic, full rotation coronal maps that differ in method of preparation. Second, we investigate how differences in the presumed evolution of the coronal stream structure affect the propagation of the disturbance. We incorporate two time-dependent boundary conditions for the ambient solar wind as determined by the WSA model, one derived from pseudo daily updated maps and one derived from artificially modified full rotation maps. Numerical results from these different scenarios are compared with solar wind observations at Earth. We find that heliospheric simulations with the SAIC and WSA full rotation models provide qualitatively similar parameters of the background solar wind and transient disturbances at Earth. Improved agreement with the observations is achieved by artificially modified maps that simulate the rapid displacement of the coronal hole boundary after the CME eruption. We also consider how multipoint temporal profiles of solar wind parameters and multiperspective synthetic

  3. Unresolved fine-scale structure in solar coronal loop-tops

    SciTech Connect

    Scullion, E.; Van der Voort, L. Rouppe; Wedemeyer, S.; Antolin, P.

    2014-12-10

    New and advanced space-based observing facilities continue to lower the resolution limit and detect solar coronal loops in greater detail. We continue to discover even finer substructures within coronal loop cross-sections, in order to understand the nature of the solar corona. Here, we push this lower limit further to search for the finest coronal loop substructures, through taking advantage of the resolving power of the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope/CRisp Imaging Spectro-Polarimeter (CRISP), together with co-observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA). High-resolution imaging of the chromospheric Hα 656.28 nm spectral line core and wings can, under certain circumstances, allow one to deduce the topology of the local magnetic environment of the solar atmosphere where its observed. Here, we study post-flare coronal loops, which become filled with evaporated chromosphere that rapidly condenses into chromospheric clumps of plasma (detectable in Hα) known as a coronal rain, to investigate their fine-scale structure. We identify, through analysis of three data sets, large-scale catastrophic cooling in coronal loop-tops and the existence of multi-thermal, multi-stranded substructures. Many cool strands even extend fully intact from loop-top to footpoint. We discover that coronal loop fine-scale strands can appear bunched with as many as eight parallel strands within an AIA coronal loop cross-section. The strand number density versus cross-sectional width distribution, as detected by CRISP within AIA-defined coronal loops, most likely peaks at well below 100 km, and currently, 69% of the substructure strands are statistically unresolved in AIA coronal loops.

  4. Combined Effects of Pyramid-Like Structures and Antireflection Coating on Si Solar Cell Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chanseob; Oh, Junghwa; Lee, Byeungleul; Kim, Bonghwan

    2015-10-01

    We developed a novel process for synthesizing Si solar cells with improved efficiencies. The process involved the formation of pyramid-like structures on the Si substrate and the deposition and subsequent thermal annealing of an antireflection coating. The process consisted of three main stages. First, pyramid-like structures were textured on the Si substrate by reactive ion etching and subsequently etched using a mixture of HF, HNO3, and deionized water for 300 s. Next, an antireflection coating was deposited on the substrate and was subsequently thermally annealed in a furnace in a N2 atmosphere. After the annealing process, the minority carrier lifetime increased by approximately 40 μs. Further, because of the increase in the minority carrier lifetime and the uniform doping of the substrate, the leakage current decreased. As a result, the efficiency of resulting solar cell increased to 17.24%, in contrast to that of the reference cell, which was only 15.89%. Thus, uniform doping and the thermal annealing of the antireflective coating improved solar cell efficiency.

  5. Solar Wind Speed Structure in the Inner Corona at 3-12 Ro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Estimates of solar wind speed obtained by Armstrong et al. [1986] based on 1983 VLA multiple-station intensity scintillation measurements inside 12 R(sub o) have been correlated with the electron density structure observed in white-light coronagraph measurements. The observed large- scale and apparently systematic speed variations are found to depend primarily on changes in heliographic latitude and longitude, which leads to the first results on large-scale speed structure in the acceleration region of the solar wind. Over an equatorial hole, solar wind speed is relatively steady, with peak-to-peak variations of 50 km/s and an average of 230 km/s. In contrast, the near-Sun flow speed across the streamer belt shows regular large-scale variations in the range of 100-300 km/s. Based on four groups of data, the gradient is 36 km/s per degree in heliocentric coordinates (corresponding to a rise of 260 km/s over a spatial distance on the Sun of two arcmin) with a standard deviation of 2.4 km/s per degree. The lowest speeds most likely coincide with the stalks of coronal streamers observed in white-light measurements. The detection of significant wind shear over the streamer belt is consistent with in situ and scintillation measurements showing that the density spectrum has a power-law form characteristic of fully developed turbulence over a much broader range of scales than in neighboring regions.

  6. Antibody molecules discriminate between crystalline facets of a gallium arsenide semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Artzy Schnirman, Arbel; Zahavi, Efrat; Yeger, Hadas; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Benhar, Itai; Reiter, Yoram; Sivan, Uri

    2006-09-01

    Seamless integration of biomolecules with manmade materials will most likely rely on molecular recognition and specific binding. In the following we show that combinatorial antibody libraries, based on the vast repertoire of the human immune system, can be harnessed to generate such binders. As a demonstration, we isolate antibody fragments that discriminate and bind selectively GaAs (111A) facets as opposed to GaAs (100). The isolated antibodies are utilized for exclusive localization of a fluorescent dye on (111A) surfaces in a structure comprising a mixture of (100) and (111A) surfaces. The potential importance of structure rigidity to facet recognition is suggested vis-a-vis published experiments with short and longer peptides.

  7. The Archaeotools project: faceted classification and natural language processing in an archaeological context.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, S; Richards, J; Ciravegna, F; Waller, S; Chapman, S; Zhang, Z

    2009-06-28

    This paper describes 'Archaeotools', a major e-Science project in archaeology. The aim of the project is to use faceted classification and natural language processing to create an advanced infrastructure for archaeological research. The project aims to integrate over 1 x 10(6) structured database records referring to archaeological sites and monuments in the UK, with information extracted from semi-structured grey literature reports, and unstructured antiquarian journal accounts, in a single faceted browser interface. The project has illuminated the variable level of vocabulary control and standardization that currently exists within national and local monument inventories. Nonetheless, it has demonstrated that the relatively well-defined ontologies and thesauri that exist in archaeology mean that a high level of success can be achieved using information extraction techniques. This has great potential for unlocking and making accessible the information held in grey literature and antiquarian accounts, and has lessons for allied disciplines.

  8. Heating of the Partially Ionized Solar Chromosphere by Waves in Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelyag, S.; Khomenko, E.; de Vicente, A.; Przybylski, D.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we show a “proof of concept” of the heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere due to wave dissipation caused by the effects of partial ionization. Numerical modeling of non-linear wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube, embedded in the solar atmosphere, is performed by solving a system of single-fluid quasi-MHD equations, which take into account the ambipolar term from the generalized Ohm’s law. It is shown that perturbations caused by magnetic waves can be effectively dissipated due to ambipolar diffusion. The energy input by this mechanism is continuous and shown to be more efficient than dissipation of static currents, ultimately leading to chromospheric temperature increase in magnetic structures.

  9. Analysis of OSO data to determine the structure and energy balance of the solar chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avrett, E. H.; Kalkofen, W.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed reexamination of the temperature-density structure of the photosphere and low chromosphere shows that the middle and upper chromosphere, which directly emits most of the OSO spectrum, is sensitive to conditions in this underlying region of the atmosphere. A model of this region is based on a unified compilation of all recently published broadband flux and central intensity observations of the solar spectrum from 500 microns in the far infrared to 1220 A in the far ultraviolet. This extensive compilation includes the OSO 4 and 6 observations in the wavelength range 1400 to 1220 A. A model is presented of the quiet solar atmosphere in the height range between the temperature minimum and the upper part of the chromosphere-corona transition region. This model is based on statistical equilibrium calculations of H, He 1, He 2, Si 1, C 1, and other ions.

  10. Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry Methods Development for Solar Sail Structures. Masters Thesis awarded by George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S. (Technical Monitor); Black, Jonathan T.

    2003-01-01

    This report discusses the development and application of metrology methods called photogrammetry and videogrammetry that make accurate measurements from photographs. These methods have been adapted for the static and dynamic characterization of gossamer structures, as four specific solar sail applications demonstrate. The applications prove that high-resolution, full-field, non-contact static measurements of solar sails using dot projection photogrammetry are possible as well as full-field, non-contact, dynamic characterization using dot projection videogrammetry. The accuracy of the measurement of the resonant frequencies and operating deflection shapes that were extracted surpassed expectations. While other non-contact measurement methods exist, they are not full-field and require significantly more time to take data.

  11. Structure of the solar chromosphere. II - The underlying photosphere and temperature-minimum region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernazza, J. E.; Avrett, E. H.; Loeser, R.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a non-LTE empirical model of the quiet solar photosphere and the temperature-minimum region. The continuous spectrum computed from this model is in good overall agreement with available disk-center observations throughout the wavelength range from 0.125 to 500 microns. It is found that (1) absolute-intensity measurements are needed in the range between 1 and 2 microns to establish the structure of the deepest observable layers; (2) absolute-intensity or flux measurements are needed in the range between 20 and 200 microns to determine whether the minimum solar temperature occurring between the photosphere and the chromosphere is as low as indicated by present observations or much higher, as recent theoretical predictions indicate; (3) studies of the far-ultraviolet spectrum based on the assumption of LTE can be substantially in error; and (4) line opacity seems to account for the 'missing opacity' in the ultraviolet.

  12. The structure of the white-light corona and the large-scale solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sime, D. G.; Mccabe, M. K.

    1990-01-01

    The large-scale density structure of the white-light solar corona is compared to the organization of the solar magnetic field as identified by the appearance of neutral lines in the photosphere to examine whether any consistent relationship exists between the two. During the period covering Carrington rotations 1717 to 1736 brightness enhancements in the low corona tend to lie over the global neutral sheet identified in the photospheric magnetic field. The brightest of these enhancements are associated with neutral lines throguh active regions. These associations are not 1-1, but do hold both in stable and evolving conditions of the corona. A significant number of long-lived neutral lines is found, including filaments seen in H-alpha, for which there are not coronal enhancements.

  13. Structures and photovoltaic properties of copper oxides/fullerene solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oku, Takeo; Motoyoshi, Ryosuke; Fujimoto, Kazuya; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Jeyadevan, Balachandran; Cuya, John

    2011-11-01

    Copper oxide (CuOx) thin films were produced by spin-coating and electrodeposition methods, and their microstructures and photovoltaic properties were investigated. Thin film solar cells based on the Cu2O/C60 and CuO/C60 heterojunction or bulk heterojunction structures were fabricated on F-doped or In-doped SnO2, which showed photovoltaic activity under air mass 1.5 simulated sunlight conditions. Microstructures of the CuOx thin films were examined by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, which indicated the presence of Cu2O and CuO nanoparticles. The energy levels of the present solar cells were also discussed.

  14. Conceptual design study of a solar concentrator/support structure: A three dimensional finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purasinghe, R.; Laug, K. K.

    1993-11-01

    Under the space environment the paraboloid solar concentrators and support structures can deform and hence the focal point of the concentrators can diffuse. If this diffusion is large, energy will not concentrate on the thruster as desired. This paper addresses this aspect of pointing and accuracy analysis of solar concentrators, due to equivalent thrust loads. The previous studies were limited to the concentrator system being modeled with a simplified finite element model that includes only the support struts and torus. The torus model was made up of several equal length beams. The simple model did not contain the paraboloid reflector, and assumes the reflector does not effect the deformation of the torus. In the present study the inflated parabolic reflector is included in the model. The results demonstrate the nonuniform displacements on the reflector that confirms the reflector's potato chipping effect.

  15. Conceptual Design Study of a Solar Concentrator/Support Structure: A Three Dimensional Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purasinghe, R.

    1993-01-01

    Under the space environment the paraboloid solar concentrators and support structures can deform and hence the focal point of the concentrators can diffuse. If this diffusion is large, energy will not concentrate on the thruster as desired. This paper addresses this aspect of pointing and accuracy analysis of solar concentrators, due to equivalent thrust loads. The previous studies were limited to the concentrator system being modeled with a simplified finite element model that includes only the support struts and torus. The torus model was made up of several equal length beams. The simple model did not contain the paraboloid reflector, and assumes the reflector does not affect the deformation of the torus. In the present study the inflated parabolic reflector is included in the model. The results demonstrate the non uniform displacements on the reflector that confirms the reflector's potato chipping effect.

  16. Solar wind suprathermal electron Stahl widths across high-speed stream structures

    SciTech Connect

    Skoug, Ruth M; Steinberg, John T; Goodrich, Katherine A; Anderson, Brett R

    2011-01-03

    Suprathermal electrons (100-1500 eV) observed in the solar wind typically show a strahl distribution, that is, a beam directed away from the Sun along the magnetic field direction. The strahl width observed at 1 AU is highly variable, ranging from 10-70 degrees. The obsenred finite width of the strahl results from the competition between beam focusing as the interplanetary magnetic field strength drops with distance from the Sun, and pitch-angle scattering as the beam interacts with the solar wind plasma in transit from the sun. Here we examine strahl width, observed with ACE SWEPAM across high-speed stream structures to investigate variations in electron scattering as a function of local plasma characteristics. We find that narrow strahls (less than 20 degrees wide), indicating reduced scattering, are observed within high-speed streams. Narrow strahls are also observed in both very low temperature solar wind, in association with ICMEs. Case studies of high-speed streams typically show the strahl narrowing at the leading edge of the stream. In some cases, the strahl narrows at the reverse shock or pressure wave, in other cases at the stream interface. The narrowing can either occur discontinuously or gradually over a period of hours. Within the high-speed wind, the strahl remains narrow for a period of hours to days, and then gradually broadens. The strahl width is roughly constant at all energies across these structures. For some fraction of high-speed streams, counterstreaming is associated with passage of the corotating interaction region. In these cases, we find the widths of the two counterstreaming beams frequently differ by more than 40 degrees. This dramatic difference in strahl width contrasts with observations in the solar wind as a whole, in which counterstreaming strahls typically differ in width by less than 20 degrees.

  17. Highly reactive {001} facets of TiO2-based composites: synthesis, formation mechanism and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wee-Jun; Tan, Lling-Lling; Chai, Siang-Piao; Yong, Siek-Ting; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2014-02-21

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely investigated metal oxides due to its extraordinary surface, electronic and catalytic properties. However, the large band gap of TiO2 and massive recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs limit its photocatalytic and photovoltaic efficiency. Therefore, increasing research attention is now being directed towards engineering the surface structure of TiO2 at the most fundamental and atomic level namely morphological control of {001} facets in the range of microscale and nanoscale to fine-tune its physicochemical properties, which could ultimately lead to the optimization of its selectivity and reactivity. The synthesis of {001}-faceted TiO2 is currently one of the most active interdisciplinary research areas and demonstrations of catalytic enhancement are abundant. Modifications such as metal and non-metal doping have also been extensively studied to extend its band gap to the visible light region. This steady progress has demonstrated that TiO2-based composites with {001} facets are playing and will continue to play an indispensable role in the environmental remediation and in the search for clean and renewable energy technologies. This review encompasses the state-of-the-art research activities and latest advancements in the design of highly reactive {001} facet-dominated TiO2via various strategies, including hydrothermal/solvothermal, high temperature gas phase reactions and non-hydrolytic alcoholysis methods. The stabilization of {001} facets using fluorine-containing species and fluorine-free capping agents is also critically discussed in this review. To overcome the large band gap of TiO2 and rapid recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, modifications are carried out to manipulate its electronic band structure, including transition metal doping, noble metal doping, non-metal doping and incorporating graphene as a two-dimensional (2D) catalyst support. The advancements made in these aspects are

  18. InGaN-based thin film solar cells: Epitaxy, structural design, and photovoltaic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Koide, Yasuo; Sumiya, Masatomo

    2015-03-01

    InxGa1-xN, with the tunable direct bandgaps from ultraviolet to near infrared region, offers a promising candidate for the high-efficiency next-generation thin-film photovoltaic applications. Although the adoption of thick InGaN film as the active region is desirable to obtain efficient light absorption and carrier collection compared to InGaN/GaN quantum wells structure, the understanding on the effect from structural design is still unclear due to the poor-quality InGaN films with thickness and difficulty of p-type doping. In this paper, we comprehensively investigate the effects from film epitaxy, doping, and device structural design on the performances of the InGaN-based solar cells. The high-quality InGaN thick film is obtained on AlN/sapphire template, and p-In0.08Ga0.92N is achieved with a high hole concentration of more than 1018 cm-3. The dependence of the photovoltaic performances on different structures, such as active regions and p-type regions is analyzed with respect to the carrier transport mechanism in the dark and under illumination. The strategy of improving the p-i interface by using a super-thin AlN interlayer is provided, which successfully enhances the performance of the solar cells.

  19. InGaN-based thin film solar cells: Epitaxy, structural design, and photovoltaic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Koide, Yasuo; Sumiya, Masatomo

    2015-03-14

    In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N, with the tunable direct bandgaps from ultraviolet to near infrared region, offers a promising candidate for the high-efficiency next-generation thin-film photovoltaic applications. Although the adoption of thick InGaN film as the active region is desirable to obtain efficient light absorption and carrier collection compared to InGaN/GaN quantum wells structure, the understanding on the effect from structural design is still unclear due to the poor-quality InGaN films with thickness and difficulty of p-type doping. In this paper, we comprehensively investigate the effects from film epitaxy, doping, and device structural design on the performances of the InGaN-based solar cells. The high-quality InGaN thick film is obtained on AlN/sapphire template, and p-In{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N is achieved with a high hole concentration of more than 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}. The dependence of the photovoltaic performances on different structures, such as active regions and p-type regions is analyzed with respect to the carrier transport mechanism in the dark and under illumination. The strategy of improving the p-i interface by using a super-thin AlN interlayer is provided, which successfully enhances the performance of the solar cells.

  20. The Time Structure of Ground Level Enhancements in Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraal, H.; McCracken, K. G.

    2012-10-01

    In a recent paper McCracken et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 113:A12101, 2008) proposed that the Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) of 20 January 2005 may have been produced by more than one acceleration mechanism, with the first acceleration due to the solar flare and the second one due to the CME associated with that event. They also noted several other GLEs with similar multiple pulse structures. This paper systematically investigates all the GLEs of solar cycle 23, from GLE 55 on 6 November 1997 to GLE 70 on 13 December 2006, to study their morphology and pulse structure, and to determine whether the multiple structures that may be found in these events are qualitatively similar to that of the GLE of 20 January 2005. We use all the data of all NMs that saw each event, to have as much directional and spectral information as possible. It is shown that three of these 16 events do contain such double-pulse structures, and the properties of these three are discussed in some detail.

  1. Effect of the stacked structure on performance in CZTSSe thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Ching; Lin, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the influence of stacked structures on the formation of secondary phases, as pertaining to the performance of Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells. Absorber layer precursors of ZnS/Cu/Sn (Sample A) and ZnS/Cu/Sn/Cu/Sn (Sample B) were prepared by sputtering and selenization. Secondary phases of Cu2SnSe3, Cu2-xS and ZnS were observed at the bottom of the absorber layer in Sample A, while only ZnS secondary phases appeared in the absorber layer of Sample B. The structure of stacked precursors was shown to have a significant influence on the formation of secondary phases as well as the crystal quality of the CZTSSe absorber layer. CZTSSe thin film solar cells were prepared from a structure of glass/Mo/CZTSSe/CdS/ZnO:Al/Al. Sample B demonstrated cell efficiency of 2.4%, which is far superior to the 0.75% efficiency of Sample A. The existence of Cu2-xS and Cu2SnSe3 secondary phases degraded the crystal quality of the absorber layer and increased the number of defects in the crystalline structure.

  2. Enhancing the absorption capabilities of thin-film solar cells using sandwiched light trapping structures.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, S; Kirah, K; Ghannam, R; Khalil, A S G; Anis, W

    2015-06-10

    A novel structure for thin-film solar cells is simulated with the purpose of maximizing the absorption of light in the active layer and of reducing the parasitic absorption in other layers. In the proposed structure, the active layer is formed from an amorphous silicon thin film sandwiched between silicon nanowires from above and photonic crystal structures from below. The upper electrical contact consists of an indium tin oxide layer, which serves also as an antireflection coating. A metal backreflector works additionally as the other contact. The simulation was done using a new reliable, efficient and generic optoelectronic approach. The suggested multiscale simulation model integrates the finite-difference time-domain algorithm used in solving Maxwell's equation in three dimensions with a commercial simulation platform based on the finite element method for carrier transport modeling. The absorption profile, the external quantum efficient, and the power conversion efficiency of the suggested solar cell are calculated. A noticeable enhancement is found in all the characteristics of the novel structure with an estimated 32% increase in the total conversion efficiency over a cell without any light trapping mechanisms. PMID:26192857

  3. Hydrothermal growth of multi-facet anatase spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jin-Ming; Song, Xiao-Mei; Ma, Lu-Yao; Wei, Xiao-Dan

    2011-03-01

    Titania with various nanostructures can be synthesized by several F --mediated procedures. In this paper, we report the synthesis of a novel multi-facet microsphere consisting of etched single-crystalline anatase by simply immersing metallic Ti plates in an HF aqueous solution under hydrothermal conditions. The etched multi-facet sphere was found to grow through the nucleation and growth of truncated bipyramids on a previously precipitated one to assemble a microsphere, and its subsequent etching by HF to expose the thermodynamic stable {1 0 1} facets. The photocatalytic activity of such etched multi-facet sphere thin films was evaluated utilizing rhodamine B and sulfonic salicylic acid in water as target molecules and compared with commercial Degussa P25 titania nanoparticles.

  4. Geometrical and energetical structural changes in organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells probed using photoelectron spectroscopy and DFT.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Susanna K; Josefsson, Ida; Ellis, Hanna; Amat, Anna; Pastore, Mariachiara; Oscarsson, Johan; Lindblad, Rebecka; Eriksson, Anna I K; Johansson, Erik M J; Boschloo, Gerrit; Hagfeldt, Anders; Fantacci, Simona; Odelius, Michael; Rensmo, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of alkoxy chain length in triarylamine based donor-acceptor organic dyes are investigated with respect to the electronic and molecular surface structures on the performance of solar cells and the electron lifetime. The dyes were investigated when adsorbed on TiO2 in a configuration that can be used for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Specifically, the two dyes D35 and D45 were compared using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The differences in solar cell characteristics when longer alkoxy chains are introduced in the dye donor unit are attributed to geometrical changes in dye packing while only minor differences were observed in the electronic structure. A higher dye load was observed for D45 on TiO2. However, D35 based solar cells result in higher photocurrent although the dye load is lower. This is explained by different geometrical structures of the dyes on the surface.

  5. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect

    Malony, Allen D; Shende, Sameer S; Huck, Kevin A; Mr. Alan Morris, and Mr. Wyatt Spear

    2012-03-14

    The goal of the FACETS project (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) was to provide a multiphysics, parallel framework application (FACETS) that will enable whole-device modeling for the U.S. fusion program, to provide the modeling infrastructure needed for ITER, the next step fusion confinement device. Through use of modern computational methods, including component technology and object oriented design, FACETS is able to switch from one model to another for a given aspect of the physics in a flexible manner. This enables use of simplified models for rapid turnaround or high-fidelity models that can take advantage of the largest supercomputer hardware. FACETS does so in a heterogeneous parallel context, where different parts of the application execute in parallel by utilizing task farming, domain decomposition, and/or pipelining as needed and applicable. ParaTools, Inc. was tasked with supporting the performance analysis and tuning of the FACETS components and framework in order to achieve the parallel scaling goals of the project. The TAU Performance System® was used for instrumentation, measurement, archiving, and profile / tracing analysis. ParaTools, Inc. also assisted in FACETS performance engineering efforts. Through the use of the TAU Performance System, ParaTools provided instrumentation, measurement, analysis and archival support for the FACETS project. Performance optimization of key components has yielded significant performance speedups. TAU was integrated into the FACETS build for both the full coupled application and the UEDGE component. The performance database provided archival storage of the performance regression testing data generated by the project, and helped to track improvements in the software development.

  6. Facet joint changes after application of lumbar nonfusion dynamic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects on adjacent-segment pathology after nonfusion dynamic stabilization is unclear, and, in particular, changes at the adjacent facet joints have not been reported in a clinical study. This study aims to compare changes in the adjacent facet joints after lumbar spinal surgery. METHODS Patients who underwent monosegmental surgery at L4-5 with nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system (Dynesys group) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation (fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Facet joint degeneration was evaluated at each segment using the CT grading system. RESULTS The Dynesys group included 15 patients, while the fusion group included 22 patients. The preoperative facet joint degeneration CT grades were not different between the 2 groups. Compared with the preoperative CT grades, 1 side of the facet joints at L3-4 and L4-5 had significantly more degeneration in the Dynesys group. In the fusion group, significant facet joint degeneration developed on both sides at L2-3, L3-4, and L5-S1. The subjective back and leg pain scores were not different between the 2 groups during follow-up, but functional outcome based on the Oswestry Disability Index improved less in the fusion group than in the Dynesys group. CONCLUSIONS Nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system had a greater preventative effect on facet joint degeneration in comparison with that obtained using fusion surgery. The Dynesys system, however, resulted in facet joint degeneration at the instrumented segments and above. An improved physiological nonfusion dynamic stabilization system for lumbar spinal surgery should be developed.

  7. Analysis on linac quadrupole misalignment in FACET commissioning 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    In this note, the analysis on linac quadrupole misalignment is presented for the FACET linac section LI05-09 plus LI11-19. The effectiveness of the beam-based alignment technique is preliminarily confirmed by the measurement. Beam-based alignment technique was adopted at SLAC linac since SLC time. Here the beam-based alignment algorithms are further developed and applied in the FACET commissioning during 2012 run.

  8. Facet-selective nucleation and conformal epitaxy of Ge shells on Si nanowires

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nguyen, Binh -Minh; Swartzentruber, Brian; Ro, Yun Goo; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-10-08

    Knowledge of nanoscale heteroepitaxy is continually evolving as advances in material synthesis reveal new mechanisms that have not been theoretically predicted and are different than what is known about planar structures. In addition to a wide range of potential applications, core/shell nanowire structures offer a useful template to investigate heteroepitaxy at the atomistic scale. We show that the growth of a Ge shell on a Si core can be tuned from the theoretically predicted island growth mode to a conformal, crystalline, and smooth shell by careful adjustment of growth parameters in a narrow growth window that has not been exploredmore » before. In the latter growth mode, Ge adatoms preferentially nucleate islands on the {113} facets of the Si core, which outgrow over the {220} facets. Islands on the low-energy {111} facets appear to have a nucleation delay compared to the {113} islands; however, they eventually coalesce to form a crystalline conformal shell. As a result, synthesis of epitaxial and conformal Si/Ge/Si core/multishell structures enables us to fabricate unique cylindrical ring nanowire field-effect transistors, which we demonstrate to have steeper on/off characteristics than conventional core/shell nanowire transistors.« less

  9. Facet-selective nucleation and conformal epitaxy of Ge shells on Si nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Binh -Minh; Swartzentruber, Brian; Ro, Yun Goo; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-10-08

    Knowledge of nanoscale heteroepitaxy is continually evolving as advances in material synthesis reveal new mechanisms that have not been theoretically predicted and are different than what is known about planar structures. In addition to a wide range of potential applications, core/shell nanowire structures offer a useful template to investigate heteroepitaxy at the atomistic scale. We show that the growth of a Ge shell on a Si core can be tuned from the theoretically predicted island growth mode to a conformal, crystalline, and smooth shell by careful adjustment of growth parameters in a narrow growth window that has not been explored before. In the latter growth mode, Ge adatoms preferentially nucleate islands on the {113} facets of the Si core, which outgrow over the {220} facets. Islands on the low-energy {111} facets appear to have a nucleation delay compared to the {113} islands; however, they eventually coalesce to form a crystalline conformal shell. As a result, synthesis of epitaxial and conformal Si/Ge/Si core/multishell structures enables us to fabricate unique cylindrical ring nanowire field-effect transistors, which we demonstrate to have steeper on/off characteristics than conventional core/shell nanowire transistors.

  10. Morphology of solar wind fluctuations and structure in the vicinity of the Sun from radio propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.

    1995-01-01

    Radio propagation measurements represent a powerful means for remote probing of electron density and solar wind speed in the acceleration region of the solar wind not yet explored by in situ measurements. Recent investigations based on radio propagation measurements have led to considerable progress in our knowledge of the general morphology of solar wind fluctuations and structure, especially in terms of their relationship to solar wind properties that have been observed directly by fields and particles measurements, and to coronal features observed in white-light measurements. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the latest results on quasi-stationary structure covering the large scale variation of solar wind speed over the streamer belt and coronal hole regions, coronal streamers (source of slow solar wind) and their associated small-scale electron density structure, plumes, density and fractional or relative density fluctuations, and the spectral characteristics of the electron density fluctuations. The radio propagation measurements not only reveal new information on the structure near the Sun, but also show that the structure appears to undergo substantial evolution on its way to 0.3 AU, the closest radial distance for which direct in situ spacecraft measurements are available.

  11. Zinc-oxide-based nanostructured materials for heterostructure solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bobkov, A. A.; Maximov, A. I.; Moshnikov, V. A. Somov, P. A.; Terukov, E. I.

    2015-10-15

    Results obtained in the deposition of nanostructured zinc-oxide layers by hydrothermal synthesis as the basic method are presented. The possibility of controlling the structure and morphology of the layers is demonstrated. The important role of the procedure employed to form the nucleating layer is noted. The faceted hexagonal nanoprisms obtained are promising for the fabrication of solar cells based on oxide heterostructures, and aluminum-doped zinc-oxide layers with petal morphology, for the deposition of an antireflection layer. The results are compatible and promising for application in flexible electronics.

  12. Solar module having reflector between cells

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    A photovoltaic module comprising an array of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells disposed in a planar and mutually spaced relationship between a light-transparent front cover member in sheet form and a back sheet structure is provided with a novel light-reflecting means disposed between adjacent cells for reflecting light falling in the areas between cells back toward said transparent cover member for further internal reflection onto the solar cells. The light-reflecting comprises a flexible plastic film that has been embossed so as to have a plurality of small V-shaped grooves in its front surface, and a thin light-reflecting coating on said front surface, the portions of said coating along the sides of said grooves forming light-reflecting facets, said grooves being formed so that said facets will reflect light impinging thereon back into said transparent cover sheet with an angle of incidence greater than the critical angle, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to said solar modules, thereby increasing the current output of the module.

  13. Multi-Quantum Well Structures to Improve the Performance of Multijunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samberg, Joshua Paul

    Current, lattice matched triple junction solar cell efficiency is approximately 44% at a solar concentration of 942x. Higher efficiency for such cells can be realized with the development of a 1eV bandgap material lattice matched to Ge. One of the more promising materials for this application is that of the InGaAs/GaAsP multi-quantum well (MQW) structure. By inserting a stress/strain-balanced InGaAs/GaAsP MQW structure into the iregion of a GaAs p-i-n diode, the absorption edge of the p-i-n diode can be red shifted with respect to that of a standard GaAs p-n diode. Compressive stress in the InGaAs wells are balanced via GaAsP barriers subjected to tensile stress. Individually, the InGaAs and GaAsP layers are grown below their critical layer thickness to prevent the formation of misfit and threading dislocations. Until recently InGaAs/GaAsP MQWs have been somewhat hindered by their usage of low phosphorus-GaAsP barriers. Presented within is the development of a high-P composition GaAsP and the merits for using such a high composition of phosphorus are discussed. It is believed that these barriers represent the highest phosphorus content to date in such a structure. By using high composition GaAsP the carriers are collected via tunneling (for barriers .30A) as opposed to thermionic emission. Thus, by utilizing thin, high content GaAsP barriers one can increase the percentage of the intrinsic region in a p-i-n structure that is comprised of the InGaAs well in addition to increasing the number of periods that can be grown for a given depletion width. However, standard MQWs of this type inherently possess undesirable compressive strain and quantum size effects (QSE) that cause the optical absorption of the InGaAs wells to blue shift. To circumvent these deleterious QSEs stress balanced, pseudomorphic InGaAs/GaAsP staggered MQWs were developed. Tunneling is still a viable mode for carrier transport in the staggered MQW structures. GaAs interfacial layers within the multi

  14. Facet Model and Mathematical Morphology for Surface Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Abidi, B.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Hunt, M.A.; Sari-Sarraf, H.

    1999-11-13

    This paper describes an algorithm for the automatic segmentation and representation of surface structures and non-uniformities in an industrial setting. The automatic image processing and analysis algorithm is developed as part of a complete on-line web characterization system of a papermaking process at the wet end. The goal is to: (1) link certain types of structures on the surface of the web to known machine parameter values, and (2) find the connection between detected structures at the beginning of the line and defects seen on the final product. Images of the pulp mixture (slurry), carried by a fast moving table, are obtained using a stroboscopic light and a CCD camera. This characterization algorithm succeeded where conventional contrast and edge detection techniques failed due to a poorly controlled environment. The images obtained have poor contrast and contain noise caused by a variety of sources. After a number of enhancement steps, conventional segmentation methods still f ailed to detect any structures and are consequently discarded. Techniques tried include the Canny edge detector, the Sobel, Roberts, and Prewitt's filters, as well as zero crossings. The facet model algorithm, is then applied to the images with various parameter settings and is found to be successful in detecting the various topographic characteristics of the surface of the slurry. Pertinent topographic elements are retained and a filtered image computed. Carefully tailored morphological operators are then applied to detect and segment regions of interest. Those regions are then selected according to their size, elongation, and orientation. Their bounding rectangles are computed and represented. Also addressed in this paper are aspects of the real time implementation of this algorithm for on-line use. The algorithm is tested on over 500 images of slurry and is found to segment and characterize nonuniformities on all 500 images.

  15. Percutaneous Facet Screw Fixation in the Treatment of Symptomatic Recurrent Lumbar Facet Joint Cyst: A New Technique.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Gallo, Giacomo; Bertrand, Anne-Sophie; Bard, Robert L; Kelekis, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of percutaneous treatment of symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst resistant to all medical treatments including facet joint steroid injection. Percutaneous transfacet fixation was then performed at L4-L5 level with a cannulated screw using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. The procedure time was 30 min. Using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain decreased from 9.5, preoperatively, to 0 after the procedure. At 6-month follow-up, an asymptomatic cystic recurrence was observed, which further reduced at the 1-year follow-up. Pain remained stable (VAS at 0) during all follow-ups. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous cyst rupture associated with facet screw fixation could be an alternative to surgery in patients suffering from a symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst.

  16. Facet-selective photodeposition of gold nanoparticles on faceted ZnO crystals for visible light photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Wuyou; Miao, Yuanquan; Feng, Gang; Zhang, Rongbin

    2016-08-01

    Hexagonal prism-like ZnO crystals dominated with polar facets were synthesized using a hydrothermal method. The Gold (Au) nanoparticles were selectively photodeposited on the polar surfaces of faceted ZnO crystals as a result of anisotropic photocatalytic activities of the polar and nonpolar facets. The size of Au nanoparticles uniformly dispersed on the polar facets increased with increasing Au-loading amount. These Au-loaded ZnO crystals showed an additional visible light absorption band from 400nm to 800nm. The 0.1wt% Au-loaded ZnO crystals with visible light absorption peak at approximately 690nm exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation.

  17. Facet-selective photodeposition of gold nanoparticles on faceted ZnO crystals for visible light photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Wuyou; Miao, Yuanquan; Feng, Gang; Zhang, Rongbin

    2016-08-01

    Hexagonal prism-like ZnO crystals dominated with polar facets were synthesized using a hydrothermal method. The Gold (Au) nanoparticles were selectively photodeposited on the polar surfaces of faceted ZnO crystals as a result of anisotropic photocatalytic activities of the polar and nonpolar facets. The size of Au nanoparticles uniformly dispersed on the polar facets increased with increasing Au-loading amount. These Au-loaded ZnO crystals showed an additional visible light absorption band from 400nm to 800nm. The 0.1wt% Au-loaded ZnO crystals with visible light absorption peak at approximately 690nm exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation. PMID:27156091

  18. 18F-Sodium Fluoride PET-CT Hybrid Imaging of the Lumbar Facet Joints: Tracer Uptake and Degree of Correlation to CT-graded Arthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mabray, Marc C.; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Behr, Spencer C.; Pampaloni, Miguel H.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Dillon, William P.; Talbott, Jason F.

    2016-01-01

    We aim to evaluate 18F-NaF uptake by facet joints with hybrid PET-CT technique. Specifically, we evaluate NaF uptake in the facet joints of the lower lumbar spine, and correlate with the morphologic grade of facet arthropathy on CT. 30 consecutive patients who underwent standard vertex to toes NaF PET-CT for re-staging of primary neoplastic disease without measurable or documented bony metastases were identified. Maximum (SUVmax) and average (SUVavg) standardized uptake values were calculated for each L3-4, L4-5, and L5-S1 facet joint (n = 180) and normalized to average uptake in the non-diseased femur. A Pathria grade (0-3) was assigned to each facet based upon the CT morphology. Spearman's rank correlation was performed for normalized SUVmax and SUVavg with Pathria grade. ANOVA was performed with Tukey-Kramer pairwise tests to evaluate differences in uptake between Pathria groups. Facet normalized SUVmax (r = 0.31, P < 0.001) and SUVavg (r = 0.28, P < 0.001) demonstrated a mild positive correlation with CT Pathria grade. There was a wide range of uptake values within each Pathria grade subgroup with statistically significant differences in uptake only between Pathria grade 3 as compared to grades 0, 1, and 2. In conclusion, NaF uptake and morphologic changes of the facet joint on CT are weakly correlated. Physiologic information provided by NaF uptake is often discrepant with structural findings on CT suggesting NaF PET may supplement conventional structural imaging for identification of pain generating facet joints. Prospective investigation into the relationship of facet joint NaF uptake with pain and response to pain interventions is warranted. PMID:27134557

  19. Structure-property relationships of small bandgap conjugated polymers for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Stefan; Zhang, Fengling; Inganäs, Olle; Andersson, Mats R

    2009-12-01

    Conjugated polymers as electron donors in solar cells based on donor/acceptor combinations are of great interest, partly due to the possibility of converting solar light with a low materials budget. Six small bandgap polymers with optical bandgap ranging from 1.0-1.9 eV are presented in this paper. All polymers utilize an electron donor-acceptor-donor (DAD) segment in the polymer backbone, creating a partial charge-transfer, to decrease the bandgap. The design, synthesis and the optical characteristics as well as the solar cell characteristics of the polymers are discussed. The positions of the energy levels of the conjugated polymer relative to the electron acceptor are of significant importance and determine not only the driving force for exciton dissociation but also the maximum open-circuit voltage. This work also focuses on investigating the redox behavior of the described conjugated polymers and electron acceptors using square wave voltammetry. Comparing the electrochemical data gives important information of the structure-property relationships of the polymers.

  20. Performance enhancement of ITO/oxide/semiconductor MOS-structure silicon solar cells with voltage biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Min-Chun; Lee, Yi-Yu; Hou, Zhong-Fu; Liao, Changn-Jyun

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the photovoltaic performance enhancement of a p-n junction silicon solar cell using a transparent-antireflective ITO/oxide film deposited on the spacing of the front-side finger electrodes and with a DC voltage applied on the ITO-electrode. The depletion width of the p-n junction under the ITO-electrode was induced and extended while the absorbed volume and built-in electric field were also increased when the biasing voltage was increased. The photocurrent and conversion efficiency were increased because more photo-carriers are generated in a larger absorbed volume and because the carriers transported and collected more effectively due to higher biasing voltage effects. Compared to a reference solar cell (which was biased at 0 V), a conversion efficiency enhancement of 26.57% (from 12.42% to 15.72%) and short-circuit current density enhancement of 42.43% (from 29.51 to 42.03 mA/cm2) were obtained as the proposed MOS-structure solar cell biased at 2.5 V. In addition, the capacitance-volt (C-V) measurement was also used to examine the mechanism of photovoltaic performance enhancement due to the depletion width being enlarged by applying a DC voltage on an ITO-electrode.