Science.gov

Sample records for solar thermal decomposition

  1. Thermal decomposition of limestone and gypsum by solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Salman, O.A.; Khraishi, N. )

    1988-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of limestone and gypsum by concentrated solar radiation was studied. A 1.5-kW solar furnace was used to obtain the required reaction temperature. Maximum conversions of 65% and 38% were obtained for CaCO{sub 3} and CaSO{sub 4}{center dot}H{sub 2}O decomposition, respectively.

  2. Solar thermal decomposition of zinc oxide in aerosol flow for renewable hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Christopher Michael

    Hydrogen could be a clean replacement for fossil fuels. The Zn/ZnO solar thermochemical water-splitting cycle provides a renewable path to this fuel. Thermodynamic simulations showed that the Zn/ZnO cycle has the lowest temperature of all two-step metal oxide cycles, and the prediction of relatively high efficiency based on its lower temperature and number of steps led to its selection for further study. A rapid aerosol configuration for ZnO decomposition was chosen based on expectation of high reaction rates and small product particle production, and proof-of-concept experiments confirmed this assumption. Thermogravimetric studies of the thermal decomposition kinetics of ZnO showed that the rate followed a 2/3 order L'vov kinetic expression. The activation energy was found to be 353 +/- 25.9 kJ/mol, and a simple electrostatic model was used to describe the reaction mechanism. The pre-exponential factor was found, as expected, to vary inversely with the distance to a product concentration sink. Investigation of the aerosol decomposition of ZnO showed high forward conversion (˜60%) but low net yield (18%) of zinc due to recombination of product oxygen with nucleated zinc particles. Products that were initially converted had high surface area (15.5 +/- 0.13 g/m2), small particle size (5-70 nm), and relatively spherical morphology, properties desirable when considering the hydrolysis step of the water-splitting cycle. Rates in the aerosol reactor were found to be three orders of magnitude greater than those in a stationary configuration. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the aerosol reaction showed rapid particle heating and high forward conversion (>90%) in short residence times (<1.5s). Results could be used to scale a commercial size reactor, and the recommended particle size based on conversion and handling considerations was 1 mum. Reactor materials sensitive to oxidation were shown to be inappropriate for application due to high corrosion rates

  3. Pt deposited TiO2 catalyst fabricated by thermal decomposition of titanium complex for solar hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Quang Duc; Le, Thanh Son; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2014-12-01

    C, N codoped TiO2 catalyst has been synthesized by thermal decomposition of a novel water-soluble titanium complex. The structure, morphology, and optical properties of the synthesized TiO2 catalyst were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the Pt deposited TiO2 catalysts synthesized at different temperatures was evaluated by means of hydrogen evolution reaction under both UV-vis and visible light irradiation. The investigation results reveal that the photocatalytic H2 evolution rate strongly depended on the crystalline grain size as well as specific surface area of the synthesized catalyst. Our studies successfully demonstrate a simple method for the synthesis of visible-light responsive Pt deposited TiO2 catalyst for solar hydrogen production.

  4. Solar-thermal hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    Since hydrogen is not only an eventual and attractive fuel but is also a prime intermediate in the production of many fuels and chemicals, one extremely valuable utilization of a solar thermal facility would be its operation as a system for hydrogen production. Such a use would also fulfill the important requirement for energy storage. Solar thermal systems appear to offer the only practical method for significant hydrogen production from solar energy. The production could utilize advanced methods of water electrolysis if highly efficient generation of solar electricity were developed. Thermochemical cycles for water decomposition appear to be more promising if cycles that match the characteristics of solar heat sources can be developed. Advanced cycles based on solid sulfate or solid oxide decomposition reactions should interface advantageously with solar thermal systems. Sulfuric acid cycles can serve as standards of comparison for these new cycles as they are discovered and developed.

  5. Efficient planar perovskite solar cells based on 1.8 eV band gap CH3NH3PbI2Br nanosheets via thermal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Zhu, Kai

    2014-09-03

    Hybrid organometallic halide perovskite CH3NH3PbI2Br (or MAPbI2Br) nanosheets with a 1.8 eV band gap were prepared via a thermal decomposition process from a precursor containing PbI2, MABr, and MACl. The planar solar cell based on the compact layer of MAPbI2Br nanosheets exhibited 10% efficiency and a single-wavelength conversion efficiency of up to 86%. The crystal phase, optical absorption, film morphology, and thermogravimetric analysis studies indicate that the thermal decomposition process strongly depends on the composition of precursors. We find that MACl functions as a glue or soft template to control the initial formation of a solid solution with the main MAPbI2Br precursor components (i.e., PbI2 and MABr). The subsequent thermal decomposition process controls the morphology/surface coverage of perovskite films on the planar substrate and strongly affects the device characteristics.

  6. Thermal decomposition products of butyraldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatten, Courtney D.; Kaskey, Kevin R.; Warner, Brian J.; Wright, Emily M.; McCunn, Laura R.

    2013-12-01

    The thermal decomposition of gas-phase butyraldehyde, CH3CH2CH2CHO, was studied in the 1300-1600 K range with a hyperthermal nozzle. Products were identified via matrix-isolation Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectrometry in separate experiments. There are at least six major initial reactions contributing to the decomposition of butyraldehyde: a radical decomposition channel leading to propyl radical + CO + H; molecular elimination to form H2 + ethylketene; a keto-enol tautomerism followed by elimination of H2O producing 1-butyne; an intramolecular hydrogen shift and elimination producing vinyl alcohol and ethylene, a β-C-C bond scission yielding ethyl and vinoxy radicals; and a γ-C-C bond scission yielding methyl and CH2CH2CHO radicals. The first three reactions are analogous to those observed in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde, but the latter three reactions are made possible by the longer alkyl chain structure of butyraldehyde. The products identified following thermal decomposition of butyraldehyde are CO, HCO, CH3CH2CH2, CH3CH2CH=C=O, H2O, CH3CH2C≡CH, CH2CH2, CH2=CHOH, CH2CHO, CH3, HC≡CH, CH2CCH, CH3C≡CH, CH3CH=CH2, H2C=C=O, CH3CH2CH3, CH2=CHCHO, C4H2, C4H4, and C4H8. The first ten products listed are direct products of the six reactions listed above. The remaining products can be attributed to further decomposition reactions or bimolecular reactions in the nozzle.

  7. Thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, J.H.; Nulf, L.E.

    1994-10-28

    The rate of thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide (HgS) has been measured at temperatures from 265 to 345 C. These data have been analyzed using a first-order chemical reaction model for the time dependence of the reaction and the Arrhenius equation for the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Using this information, the activation energy for the reaction was found to be 55 kcal/mol. Significant reaction vessel surface effects obscured the functional form of the time dependence of the initial portion of the reaction. The data and the resulting time-temperature reaction-rate model were used to predict the decomposition rate of HgS as a function of time and temperature in thermal treatment systems. Data from large-scale thermal treatment studies already completed were interpreted in terms of the results of this study. While the data from the large-scale thermal treatment studies were consistent with the data from this report, mass transport effects may have contributed to the residual amount of mercury which remained in the soil after most of the large-scale runs.

  8. Thermal decomposition of silver acetate in silver paste for solar cell metallization: An effective route to reduce contact resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun Kim, Suk; Yun Kim, Se; Man Park, Jin; Hwan Park, Keum; Ho Lee, Jun; Mock Lee, Sang; Taek Han, In; Hyang Kim, Do; Ram Lim, Ka; Tae Kim, Won; Cheol Park, Ju; Soo Jee, Sang; Lee, Eun-Sung

    2013-08-01

    A screen printed silver/metallic glass (MG) paste formulated with Ag acetate resulted in a specific contact resistance in the range of 0.6-0.7 mΩ.cm2 on both the n- and p-type Si emitters of interdigitated back-contact solar cells. Silver nanocrystallites resulting from thermally decomposed Ag acetate prevented the Al MG frits from directly interacting with the Si emitter, thus reducing the amount of Al diffused into the Si emitters, and subsequently, the contact resistance. A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 20.3% was achieved using this technique.

  9. Solar Thermal Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Paper analyzes potential of solar thermal rockets as means of propulsion for planetary spacecraft. Solar thermal rocket uses concentrated Sunlight to heat working fluid expelled through nozzle to produce thrust.

  10. Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold P., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on Solar Thermal Propulsion (STP). Some of the topics include: 1) Ways to use Solar Energy for Propulsion; 2) Solar (fusion) Energy; 3) Operation in Orbit; 4) Propulsion Concepts; 5) Critical Equations; 6) Power Efficiency; 7) Major STP Projects; 8) Types of STP Engines; 9) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Assembly; 10) Specific Impulse; 11) Thrust; 12) Temperature Distribution; 13) Pressure Loss; 14) Transient Startup; 15) Axial Heat Input; 16) Direct Gain Engine Design; 17) Direct Gain Engine Fabrication; 18) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Components; 19) Solar Thermal Test Facility; and 20) Checkout Results.

  11. Unimolecular thermal decomposition of dimethoxybenzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, David J.; Scheer, Adam M.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Ormond, Thomas K.; Buckingham, Grant T.; Ellison, G. Barney; Nimlos, Mark R.

    2014-06-01

    The unimolecular thermal decomposition mechanisms of o-, m-, and p-dimethoxybenzene (CH3O-C6H4-OCH3) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular (μtubular) SiC reactor with a residence time of 100 μs. Product detection was carried out using single photon ionization (SPI, 10.487 eV) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix infrared absorption spectroscopy from 400 K to 1600 K. The initial pyrolytic step for each isomer is methoxy bond homolysis to eliminate methyl radical. Subsequent thermolysis is unique for each isomer. In the case of o-CH3O-C6H4-OCH3, intramolecular H-transfer dominates leading to the formation of o-hydroxybenzaldehyde (o-HO-C6H4-CHO) and phenol (C6H5OH). Para-CH3O-C6H4-OCH3 immediately breaks the second methoxy bond to form p-benzoquinone, which decomposes further to cyclopentadienone (C5H4=O). Finally, the m-CH3O-C6H4-OCH3 isomer will predominantly follow a ring-reduction/CO-elimination mechanism to form C5H4=O. Electronic structure calculations and transition state theory are used to confirm mechanisms and comment on kinetics. Implications for lignin pyrolysis are discussed.

  12. Unimolecular thermal decomposition of dimethoxybenzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, David J. Mukarakate, Calvin; Nimlos, Mark R.; Scheer, Adam M.; Ormond, Thomas K.; Buckingham, Grant T.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2014-06-21

    The unimolecular thermal decomposition mechanisms of o-, m-, and p-dimethoxybenzene (CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3}) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular (μtubular) SiC reactor with a residence time of 100 μs. Product detection was carried out using single photon ionization (SPI, 10.487 eV) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix infrared absorption spectroscopy from 400 K to 1600 K. The initial pyrolytic step for each isomer is methoxy bond homolysis to eliminate methyl radical. Subsequent thermolysis is unique for each isomer. In the case of o-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3}, intramolecular H-transfer dominates leading to the formation of o-hydroxybenzaldehyde (o-HO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CHO) and phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). Para-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3} immediately breaks the second methoxy bond to form p-benzoquinone, which decomposes further to cyclopentadienone (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}=O). Finally, the m-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3} isomer will predominantly follow a ring-reduction/CO-elimination mechanism to form C{sub 5}H{sub 4}=O. Electronic structure calculations and transition state theory are used to confirm mechanisms and comment on kinetics. Implications for lignin pyrolysis are discussed.

  13. Clean thermal decomposition of tertiary-alkyl metal thiolates to metal sulfides: environmentally-benign, non-polar inks for solution-processed chalcopyrite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jungwoo; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeki; Yoon, Yung Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-11-01

    We report the preparation of Cu2S, In2S3, CuInS2 and Cu(In,Ga)S2 semiconducting films via the spin coating and annealing of soluble tertiary-alkyl thiolate complexes. The thiolate compounds are readily prepared via the reaction of metal bases and tertiary-alkyl thiols. The thiolate complexes are soluble in common organic solvents and can be solution processed by spin coating to yield thin films. Upon thermal annealing in the range of 200–400 °C, the tertiary-alkyl thiolates decompose cleanly to yield volatile dialkyl sulfides and metal sulfide films which are free of organic residue. Analysis of the reaction byproducts strongly suggests that the decomposition proceeds via an SN1 mechanism. The composition of the films can be controlled by adjusting the amount of each metal thiolate used in the precursor solution yielding bandgaps in the range of 1.2 to 3.3 eV. The films form functioning p-n junctions when deposited in contact with CdS films prepared by the same method. Functioning solar cells are observed when such p-n junctions are prepared on transparent conducting substrates and finished by depositing electrodes with appropriate work functions. This method enables the fabrication of metal chalcogenide films on a large scale via a simple and chemically clear process.

  14. Clean thermal decomposition of tertiary-alkyl metal thiolates to metal sulfides: environmentally-benign, non-polar inks for solution-processed chalcopyrite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jungwoo; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeki; Yoon, Yung Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    We report the preparation of Cu2S, In2S3, CuInS2 and Cu(In,Ga)S2 semiconducting films via the spin coating and annealing of soluble tertiary-alkyl thiolate complexes. The thiolate compounds are readily prepared via the reaction of metal bases and tertiary-alkyl thiols. The thiolate complexes are soluble in common organic solvents and can be solution processed by spin coating to yield thin films. Upon thermal annealing in the range of 200–400 °C, the tertiary-alkyl thiolates decompose cleanly to yield volatile dialkyl sulfides and metal sulfide films which are free of organic residue. Analysis of the reaction byproducts strongly suggests that the decomposition proceeds via an SN1 mechanism. The composition of the films can be controlled by adjusting the amount of each metal thiolate used in the precursor solution yielding bandgaps in the range of 1.2 to 3.3 eV. The films form functioning p-n junctions when deposited in contact with CdS films prepared by the same method. Functioning solar cells are observed when such p-n junctions are prepared on transparent conducting substrates and finished by depositing electrodes with appropriate work functions. This method enables the fabrication of metal chalcogenide films on a large scale via a simple and chemically clear process. PMID:27827402

  15. Clean thermal decomposition of tertiary-alkyl metal thiolates to metal sulfides: environmentally-benign, non-polar inks for solution-processed chalcopyrite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jungwoo; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeki; Yoon, Yung Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-11-09

    We report the preparation of Cu2S, In2S3, CuInS2 and Cu(In,Ga)S2 semiconducting films via the spin coating and annealing of soluble tertiary-alkyl thiolate complexes. The thiolate compounds are readily prepared via the reaction of metal bases and tertiary-alkyl thiols. The thiolate complexes are soluble in common organic solvents and can be solution processed by spin coating to yield thin films. Upon thermal annealing in the range of 200-400 °C, the tertiary-alkyl thiolates decompose cleanly to yield volatile dialkyl sulfides and metal sulfide films which are free of organic residue. Analysis of the reaction byproducts strongly suggests that the decomposition proceeds via an SN1 mechanism. The composition of the films can be controlled by adjusting the amount of each metal thiolate used in the precursor solution yielding bandgaps in the range of 1.2 to 3.3 eV. The films form functioning p-n junctions when deposited in contact with CdS films prepared by the same method. Functioning solar cells are observed when such p-n junctions are prepared on transparent conducting substrates and finished by depositing electrodes with appropriate work functions. This method enables the fabrication of metal chalcogenide films on a large scale via a simple and chemically clear process.

  16. Thermal decomposition of magnesium and calcium sulfates

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, S L

    1982-04-01

    The effect of catalyst on the thermal decomposition of MgSO/sub 4/ and CaSO/sub 4/ in vacuum was studied as a function of time in Knudsen cells and for MgSO/sub 4/, in open crucibles in vacuum in a Thermal Gravimetric Apparatus. Platinum and Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were used as catalysts. The CaSO/sub 4/ decomposition rate was approximately doubled when Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was present in a Knudsen cell. Platinum did not catalyze the CaSO/sub 4/ decomposition reaction. The initial decomposition rate for MgSO/sub 4/ was approximately 5 times greater than when additives were present in Knudsen cells but only about 1.5 times greater when decomposition was done in an open crucible.

  17. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  18. Thermal decomposition and non-isothermal decomposition kinetics of carbamazepine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhen-li; Zhang, Duan-feng; Chen, Fei-xiong; Miao, Jun-yan; Ren, Bao-zeng

    2014-12-01

    The thermal stability and kinetics of isothermal decomposition of carbamazepine were studied under isothermal conditions by thermogravimetry (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at three heating rates. Particularly, transformation of crystal forms occurs at 153.75°C. The activation energy of this thermal decomposition process was calculated from the analysis of TG curves by Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Doyle, distributed activation energy model, Šatava-Šesták and Kissinger methods. There were two different stages of thermal decomposition process. For the first stage, E and log A [s-1] were determined to be 42.51 kJ mol-1 and 3.45, respectively. In the second stage, E and log A [s-1] were 47.75 kJ mol-1 and 3.80. The mechanism of thermal decomposition was Avrami-Erofeev (the reaction order, n = 1/3), with integral form G(α) = [-ln(1 - α)]1/3 (α = ˜0.1-0.8) in the first stage and Avrami-Erofeev (the reaction order, n = 1) with integral form G(α) = -ln(1 - α) (α = ˜0.9-0.99) in the second stage. Moreover, Δ H ≠, Δ S ≠, Δ G ≠ values were 37.84 kJ mol-1, -192.41 J mol-1 K-1, 146.32 kJ mol-1 and 42.68 kJ mol-1, -186.41 J mol-1 K-1, 156.26 kJ mol-1 for the first and second stage, respectively.

  19. Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Poly(3-nitratooxetane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian; Cruz, Aliza; Stoltz, Chad

    2009-06-01

    Poly(3-nitratooxetane), or PNO, is a new high-energy density polymer that is expected to increase formulation energy output without sacrificing binder stability. It is anticipated that using PNO in propellant formulations will be advantageous compared to other energetic binders such as its structural isomer poly(glycidyl nitrate) (PGN). In an effort to understand the combustion behavior of this new energetic polymer, thermal decomposition of PNO has been investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermal gravimetric analysis shows that this material is thermally stable to at least 150^oC and that exothermic decomposition peaks near 203^oC. T- Jump/FTIR was used under various conditions to identify gas- phase thermal decomposition products, including H2O, CH2O, CO2, CO, N2O, NO, NO2, and HONO (cis and trans). Additional time- resolved T-Jump/FTIR experiments suggest immediate dissociation of NO2 as the obvious first step in PNO decomposition, while previous work on the PGN polymer system suggests that the entire CH2ONO2 side chain breaks from the PGN backbone before dissociation. It is likely that different decomposition pathways are followed for each binder system due to location of available C-O and N-O moieties on each polymer.

  20. Solar Thermal Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1982-11-01

    The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

  1. Thermal Decomposition of Poly(methylphenylsilane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lujun; Zhang, Mei; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2000-03-01

    The thermal decomposition of poly(methylphenylsilane) was performed at constant heating rates and isothermal conditions. The evolved gases were studied by ionization-threshold mass spectroscopy. Pyrolysis under isothermal conditions reveals that the decomposition of poly(methylphenylsilane) is a type of depolymerization that has a first-order reaction. Kinetic analysis of the evolution spectra of CH3-Si-C6H5 radicals, phenyl and methyl substituents reveals the mechanism and activation energies of the decomposition reactions in main chains and substituents. It is found that the decomposition of main chains is a dominant reaction and results in the weight loss of approximately 90%. The effusion of phenyl and methyl substituents occurs in the two processes of rearrangement of main chains and the formation of stable Si-C containing residuals.

  2. Proper orthogonal decomposition of solar photospheric motions.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, A; Carbone, V; Lepreti, F; Primavera, L; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Veltri, P; Alfonsi, G; Straus, Th

    2005-08-05

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of the solar photosphere is studied by performing a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of line of sight velocity fields computed from high resolution data coming from the MDI/SOHO instrument. Using this technique, we are able to identify and characterize the different dynamical regimes acting in the system. Low-frequency oscillations, with frequencies in the range 20-130 microHz, dominate the most energetic POD modes (excluding solar rotation), and are characterized by spatial patterns with typical scales of about 3 Mm. Patterns with larger typical scales of approximately 10 Mm, are associated to p-modes oscillations at frequencies of about 3000 microHz.

  3. Solar thermal power towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1984-07-01

    The solar thermal central receiver technology, known as solar power towers, is rapidly evolving to a state of near-term energy availability for electrical power generation and industrial process heat applications. The systems consist of field arrays of heliostat reflectors, a central receiver boiler, short term thermal storage devices, and either turbine-generators or heat exchangers. Fluid temperatures up to 550 C are currently achievable, and technology developments are underway to reach 1100 C. Six solar power towers are now under construction or in test operation in five countries around the world.

  4. THERMAL DECOMPOSITION OF URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.; Brewer, L.

    1959-02-10

    A method is presented of preparing uranium metal of high purity consisting contacting impure U metal with halogen vapor at between 450 and 550 C to form uranium halide vapor, contacting the uranium halide vapor in the presence of H/sub 2/ with a refractory surface at about 1400 C to thermally decompose the uranium halides and deposit molten U on the refractory surface and collecting the molten U dripping from the surface. The entire operation is carried on at a sub-atmospheric pressure of below 1 mm mercury.

  5. Thermal Decomposition of IMX-104: Ingredient Interactions Govern Thermal Insensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Maharrey, Sean; Wiese-Smith, Deneille; Highley, Aaron M.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Behrens, Richard; Kay, Jeffrey J.

    2015-04-01

    This report summarizes initial studies into the chemical basis of the thermal insensitivity of INMX-104. The work follows upon similar efforts investigating this behavior for another DNAN-based insensitive explosive, IMX-101. The experiments described demonstrate a clear similarity between the ingredient interactions that were shown to lead to the thermal insensitivity observed in IMX-101 and those that are active in IMX-104 at elevated temperatures. Specifically, the onset of decomposition of RDX is shifted to a lower temperature based on the interaction of the RDX with liquid DNAN. This early onset of decomposition dissipates some stored energy that is then unavailable for a delayed, more violent release.

  6. Solar thermal financing guidebook

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

    1983-05-01

    This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

  7. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. This image, taken during the test, depicts the light being concentrated into the focal point inside the vacuum chamber. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  8. Treatment of nitrocellulose by thermal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.K.; Freedman, D.L.; Kim, B.J.

    1999-07-01

    Waste fines generated during the manufacture of nitrocellulose (NC) are classified as a RCRA K044 hazardous waste due to their explosive properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate controlled thermal treatment of NC in order to render it nonhazardous and allow for more economical ultimate disposal. The results indicate that controlled thermal decomposition at 130--150 C is a technically feasible process. Rates improved significantly at higher temperatures. At 150 C, only 10 hours were needed to reduce the nitrogen content of NC from 13.7% to below 10% (versus 105 h at 130 C), a level found in many commercial, nonhazardous grades of NC. The air flow rate over the heated NC, and the moisture content of the NC or air above it had no discernible effect on rates of nitrogen removal. Greater mass loss from the NC than what was attributable to the nitro groups alone indicated that decomposition of the polymer backbone also occurred. This was confirmed by FTIR analyses, the appearance of CO{sub 2} in the off-gas, and a lack of correlation between percent nitrogen and heat of combustion. Samples of thermally treated NC containing 9.7% nitrogen failed three of the basic tests used by the Bureau of Explosives to ascertain explosive characteristics, indicating that the product was no longer hazardous based on its energetic properties. Although technically feasible, use of thermal decomposition to treat NC fines will most likely be restricted by safety concerns. Operating close to 130 C would mitigate the risk, but considerably extends the time required for treatment. The most suitable application of this technology may instead by treatment of NC-contaminated soils.

  9. Solar Thermal Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniels, David K.

    The different approaches to the generation of power from solar energy may be roughly divided into five categories: distributed collectors; central receivers; biomass; ocean thermal energy conversion; and photovoltaic devices. The first approach (distributed collectors) is the subject of this module. The material presented is designed to…

  10. Solar Thermal Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniels, David K.

    The different approaches to the generation of power from solar energy may be roughly divided into five categories: distributed collectors; central receivers; biomass; ocean thermal energy conversion; and photovoltaic devices. The first approach (distributed collectors) is the subject of this module. The material presented is designed to…

  11. Solar thermal system engineering guidebook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcuk, M. K.; Bluhm, S. A.

    1983-05-01

    This report presents a graphical methodology for the preliminary evaluation of solar thermal energy plants by Air Force base civil engineers. The report is organized as a Guidebook with worksheets and nomograms provided for rapid estimation of solar collector area, land area, energy output, and thermal power output of a solar thermal plant. Flat plate, evacuated tube, parabolic trough, and parabolic dish solar thermal technologies are considered.

  12. Solar thermal energy receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W. (Inventor); Dustin, Miles O. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A plurality of heat pipes in a shell receive concentrated solar energy and transfer the energy to a heat activated system. To provide for even distribution of the energy despite uneven impingement of solar energy on the heat pipes, absence of solar energy at times, or failure of one or more of the heat pipes, energy storage means are disposed on the heat pipes which extend through a heat pipe thermal coupling means into the heat activated device. To enhance energy transfer to the heat activated device, the heat pipe coupling cavity means may be provided with extensions into the device. For use with a Stirling engine having passages for working gas, heat transfer members may be positioned to contact the gas and the heat pipes. The shell may be divided into sections by transverse walls. To prevent cavity working fluid from collecting in the extensions, a porous body is positioned in the cavity.

  13. Concentrating solar thermal power.

    PubMed

    Müller-Steinhagen, Hans

    2013-08-13

    In addition to wind and photovoltaic power, concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) will make a major contribution to electricity provision from renewable energies. Drawing on almost 30 years of operational experience in the multi-megawatt range, CSP is now a proven technology with a reliable cost and performance record. In conjunction with thermal energy storage, electricity can be provided according to demand. To date, solar thermal power plants with a total capacity of 1.3 GW are in operation worldwide, with an additional 2.3 GW under construction and 31.7 GW in advanced planning stage. Depending on the concentration factors, temperatures up to 1000°C can be reached to produce saturated or superheated steam for steam turbine cycles or compressed hot gas for gas turbine cycles. The heat rejected from these thermodynamic cycles can be used for sea water desalination, process heat and centralized provision of chilled water. While electricity generation from CSP plants is still more expensive than from wind turbines or photovoltaic panels, its independence from fluctuations and daily variation of wind speed and solar radiation provides it with a higher value. To become competitive with mid-load electricity from conventional power plants within the next 10-15 years, mass production of components, increased plant size and planning/operating experience will be accompanied by technological innovations. On 30 October 2009, a number of major industrial companies joined forces to establish the so-called DESERTEC Industry Initiative, which aims at providing by 2050 15 per cent of European electricity from renewable energy sources in North Africa, while at the same time securing energy, water, income and employment for this region. Solar thermal power plants are in the heart of this concept.

  14. Solar thermal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-08-01

    This annual evaluation report provides the accomplishments and progress of government-funded activities initiated, renewed, or completed during Fiscal Year 1985 (October 1, 1984 through September 30, 1985). It highlights the program tasks conducted by participating national laboratories and by contracting industrial academic, or other research institutions. The focus of the STT Program is research and development leading to the commercial readiness of four primary solar thermal concepts: (1) central receiver; (2) parabolic dish; (3) parabolic trough; and (4) hemispherical bowl.

  15. Solar Thermal Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, Clark W.; Bonometti, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    Concentrated solar thermal energy can be utilized in a variety of high temperature applications for both terrestrial and space environments. In each application, knowledge of the collector and absorber's heat exchange interaction is required. To understand this coupled mechanism, various concentrator types and geometries, as well as, their relationship to the physical absorber mechanics were investigated. To conduct experimental tests various parts of a 5,000 watt, thermal concentrator, facility were made and evaluated. This was in anticipation at a larger NASA facility proposed for construction. Although much of the work centered on solar thermal propulsion for an upper stage (less than one pound thrust range), the information generated and the facility's capabilities are applicable to material processing, power generation and similar uses. The numerical calculations used to design the laboratory mirror and the procedure for evaluating other solar collectors are presented here. The mirror design is based on a hexagonal faceted system, which uses a spherical approximation to the parabolic surface. The work began with a few two dimensional estimates and continued with a full, three dimensional, numerical algorithm written in FORTRAN code. This was compared to a full geometry, ray trace program, BEAM 4, which optimizes the curvatures, based on purely optical considerations. Founded on numerical results, the characteristics of a faceted concentrator were construed. The numerical methodologies themselves were evaluated and categorized. As a result, the three-dimensional FORTRAN code was the method chosen to construct the mirrors, due to its overall accuracy and superior results to the ray trace program. This information is being used to fabricate and subsequently, laser map the actual mirror surfaces. Evaluation of concentrator mirrors, thermal applications and scaling the results of the 10 foot diameter mirror to a much larger concentrator, were studied. Evaluations

  16. Solar thermal power system

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2010-06-15

    A solar thermal power generator includes an inclined elongated boiler tube positioned in the focus of a solar concentrator for generating steam from water. The boiler tube is connected at one end to receive water from a pressure vessel as well as connected at an opposite end to return steam back to the vessel in a fluidic circuit arrangement that stores energy in the form of heated water in the pressure vessel. An expander, condenser, and reservoir are also connected in series to respectively produce work using the steam passed either directly (above a water line in the vessel) or indirectly (below a water line in the vessel) through the pressure vessel, condense the expanded steam, and collect the condensed water. The reservoir also supplies the collected water back to the pressure vessel at the end of a diurnal cycle when the vessel is sufficiently depressurized, so that the system is reset to repeat the cycle the following day. The circuital arrangement of the boiler tube and the pressure vessel operates to dampen flow instabilities in the boiler tube, damp out the effects of solar transients, and provide thermal energy storage which enables time shifting of power generation to better align with the higher demand for energy during peak energy usage periods.

  17. Prepared by Thermal Hydro-decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasoetsopha, N.; Pinitsoontorn, S.; Kamwanna, T.; Kurosaki, K.; Ohishi, Y.; Muta, H.; Yamanaka, S.

    2014-06-01

    The polycrystalline samples of Ca3Co4- x Ga x O9+ δ (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.15) were prepared by a simple thermal hydro-decomposition method. The high density ceramics were fabricated using a spark plasma sintering technique. The crystal structure of calcined powders was characterized by x-ray diffraction. The single phase of Ca3Co4- x Ga x O9+ δ was obtained. The scanning electron micrograph illustrated the grain alignment perpendicular to the direction of the pressure in the sintering process. The evidence from x-ray absorption near edge spectra were used to confirm the oxidation state of the Ga dopant. The thermoelectric properties of the misfit-layered of Ca3Co4- x Ga x O9+ δ were investigated. Seebeck coefficient tended to decrease with increasing Ga content due to the hole-doping effect. The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity were monotonically decreased with increasing Ga content. The Ga doping of x = 0.15 showed the highest power factor of 3.99 × 10-4 W/mK2 at 1,023 K and the lowest thermal conductivity of 1.45 W/mK at 1,073 K. This resulted in the highest ZT of 0.29 at 1,073 K. From the optical absorption spectra, the electronic structure near the Fermi level show no significant change with Ga doping.

  18. The Thermal Decomposition of Basic Copper(II) Sulfate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Haruhiko; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the preparation of synthetic brochantite from solution and a thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis study of the thermal decomposition of this compound. Other analyses included are chemical analysis and IR spectroscopy. Experimental procedures and results are presented. (CW)

  19. The Thermal Decomposition of Basic Copper(II) Sulfate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Haruhiko; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the preparation of synthetic brochantite from solution and a thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis study of the thermal decomposition of this compound. Other analyses included are chemical analysis and IR spectroscopy. Experimental procedures and results are presented. (CW)

  20. Thermal decomposition of CFCl{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran, S.S.; Su, M.C.; Lim, K.P.; Michael, J.V.; Wagner, A.F.

    1996-05-02

    The thermal decomposition of CFCl{sub 3} (CFC-11) has been studied in reflected shock waves using the Cl-atom atomic resonance absorption spectroscopy (ARAS) detection technique. The first thermal rate measurements for CFCl{sub 3} (+M) {yields} CFCl{sub 2} + Cl (+M) are reported. The experimental Cl-atom concentration profiles show two distinct rates of formation. The initial fast process gives a Cl-atom yield of 2, and this is followed by slow secondary processes that are density and temperature dependent. The final Cl-atom yield is greater than 2[CFCl{sub 3}]{sub 0}. This behavior confirms that C-Cl bond scission is the dominant dissociation pathway for both CFCl{sub 3} and the product radical, CFCl{sub 2}, as observed in an earlier study from this laboratory on the related CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} decomposition. Profile fits require the fast subsequent dissociation of CFCl{sub 2}, and therefore, the short-time kinetics can be best explained as being due to C-Cl bond breaking in the parent, CFCl{sub 3}. The temperature and density dependences of the later time Cl-atom profiles suggest that the slow secondary rate can be ascribed to reactions involving the carbene diradical, CFCl. The Cl-atom data were analyzed with detailed kinetics modeling calculations. Comparison to earlier results from this laboratory on CF{sub 3}Cl, CF{sub 2}Cl, and CCl{sub 4} suggests that the C-Cl bond strength in CFCl{sub 3} should be between those for CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CCl{sub 4}. 46 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    J Abrefah GS Klinger

    2000-09-26

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the

  2. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Abrefah, John; Klinger, George S.

    2000-09-26

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene (given the identification name of 'polycube') was fabricated by mixing high-density polystyrene material ("Dylene Fines # 100") with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used in the 1960s for criticality studies during processing of spent nuclear fuel. The polycubes have since been stored for almost 40 years at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) after failure of two processes to reclaim the plutonium and uranium oxides from the polystyrene matrix. Thermal decomposition products from this highly cross-linked polystyrene matrix were characterized using Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal furnace. The decomposition studies were performed in air and helium atmospheres at about 773 K. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different compared to virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the number of organic species generated and their concentrations. In the inert (i.e., helium) atmosphere, the major volatile organic products identified (in order of decreasing concentrations) were styrene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, nathphalene, propane, .alpha.-methylbenzene, indene and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene. But in air, the major volatile organic species identified changed slightly. Concentrations of the organic species in the inert atmosphere were significantly higher than those for the air atmosphere processing. Overall, 38 volatile organic species were identified in the inert atmosphere compared to 49 species in air. Twenty of the 38 species in the inert conditions were also products in the air atmosphere. Twenty-two oxidized organic products were identified during thermal processing in air.

  3. Solar thermal collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranovitch, E.

    Thermal processes in solar flat plate collectors are described and evaluated analytically, and numerical models are presented for evaluating the performance of various designs. A flat plate collector consists of a black absorber plate which transfers absorbed heat to a fluid, a cover which limits thermal losses, and insulation to prevent backlosses. Calculated efficiencies for the collectors depend on the radiation absorbed, as well as IR losses due to natural convection, conduction, and radiation out of the collector. Formulations for the global emittance and heat transfer, as well as losses and their dependence on the Nusselt number and Grashof number are defined. Consideration is given to radiation transmission through transparent covers and Fresnel reflections at interfaces in the cover material. Finally, the performance coefficients for double-glazed and selective surface flat plate collectors are examined.

  4. Thermal- and photoactivation of aluminum hydride decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabis, I. E.; Elets, D. I.; Kuznetsov, V. G.; Baraban, A. P.; Dobrotvorskii, M. A.; Dobrotvorskii, A. M.

    2012-11-01

    Processes occurring in the phase of AlH3 dehydrogenation incubation that precedes the active decomposition of the hydride and is evidently accompanied by a change in its material properties are investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy and barometry. The electronic structures of α-AlH3 and α-AlH3:V(H0) (i.e., aluminum hydride with a neutral hydrogen atom removed) are calculated by the density functional method. It is shown that hydrogen vacancies are the source of nuclei for the metallic phase, and their emergence could be thermally activated. It is established that UV irradiation also leads to the formation of hydrogen vacancies in α-AlH3. A description of the probable mechanism for the accumulation of hydrogen vacancies at elevated temperatures and finally to the appearance of metallic phase nuclei is offered. It is shown that UV irradiation allows us to lower the temperature of the dehydrogenation of α-AlH3 crystals.

  5. Solar thermal electricity generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasemagha, Khairy Ramadan

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of modeling the thermal performance and economic feasibility of large (utility scale) and small solar thermal power plants for electricity generation. A number of solar concepts for power systems applications have been investigated. Each concept has been analyzed over a range of plant power ratings from 1 MW(sub e) to 300 MW(sub e) and over a range of capacity factors from a no-storage case (capacity factor of about 0.25 to 0.30) up to intermediate load capacity factors in the range of 0.46 to 0.60. The solar plant's economic viability is investigated by examining the effect of various parameters on the plant costs (both capital and O & M) and the levelized energy costs (LEC). The cost components are reported in six categories: collectors, energy transport, energy storage, energy conversion, balance of plant, and indirect/contingency costs. Concentrator and receiver costs are included in the collector category. Thermal and electric energy transport costs are included in the energy transport category. Costs for the thermal or electric storage are included in the energy storage category; energy conversion costs are included in the energy conversion category. The balance of plant cost category comprises the structures, land, service facilities, power conditioning, instrumentation and controls, and spare part costs. The indirect/contingency category consists of the indirect construction and the contingency costs. The concepts included in the study are (1) molten salt cavity central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-C-Salt); (2) molten salt external central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-E-Salt); (3) sodium external central receiver with sodium storage (PFCR/RE-Na); (4) sodium external central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-E-Na/Salt); (5) water/steam external central receiver with oil/rock storage (PFCR/R-E-W/S); (6) parabolic dish with stirling engine conversion and lead acid battery storage (PFDR/SLAB); (7) parabolic dish

  6. Ultralow friction of carbonate faults caused by thermal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Han, Raehee; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Hirose, Takehiro; Ree, Jin-Han; Ando, Jun-Ichi

    2007-05-11

    High-velocity weakening of faults may drive fault motion during large earthquakes. Experiments on simulated faults in Carrara marble at slip rates up to 1.3 meters per second demonstrate that thermal decomposition of calcite due to frictional heating induces pronounced fault weakening with steady-state friction coefficients as low as 0.06. Decomposition produces particles of tens of nanometers in size, and the ultralow friction appears to be associated with the flash heating on an ultrafine decomposition product. Thus, thermal decomposition may be an important process for the dynamic weakening of faults.

  7. Solar/Thermal Powerplant Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, J. M.; El Gabalawi, N.; Hill, G. M.; Slonski, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    Simulation program evaluates performances and energy costs of diverse solar/thermal powerplant configurations. Approach based on optimizing sizes of collector and storage subsystems to give minimum energy cost for specified plant rating and load factor. Methodology provides for consistent comparative evaluation of solar/thermal powerplants.

  8. High temperature solar thermal technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.; Hanseth, E. J.; Peelgren, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Some advanced technology concepts under development for high-temperature solar thermal energy systems to achieve significant energy cost reductions and performance gains and thus promote the application of solar thermal power technology are presented. Consideration is given to the objectives, current efforts and recent test and analysis results in the development of high-temperature (950-1650 C) ceramic receivers, thermal storage module checker stoves, and the use of reversible chemical reactions to transport collected solar energy. It is pointed out that the analysis and testing of such components will accelerate the commercial deployment of solar energy.

  9. High temperature solar thermal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.; Hanseth, E. J.; Peelgren, M. L.

    1980-11-01

    Some advanced technology concepts under development for high-temperature solar thermal energy systems to achieve significant energy cost reductions and performance gains and thus promote the application of solar thermal power technology are presented. Consideration is given to the objectives, current efforts and recent test and analysis results in the development of high-temperature (950-1650 C) ceramic receivers, thermal storage module checker stoves, and the use of reversible chemical reactions to transport collected solar energy. It is pointed out that the analysis and testing of such components will accelerate the commercial deployment of solar energy.

  10. Solar thermal electric hybridization issues

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T A; Bohn, M S; Price, H W

    1994-10-01

    Solar thermal electric systems have an advantage over many other renewable energy technologies because the former use heat as an intermediate energy carrier. This is an advantage as it allows for a relatively simple method of hybridization by using heat from fossil-fuel. Hybridization of solar thermal electric systems is a topic that has recently generated significant interest and controversy and has led to many diverse opinions. This paper discusses many of the issues associated with hybridization of solar thermal electric systems such as what role hybridization should play; how it should be implemented; what are the efficiency, environmental, and cost implications; what solar fraction is appropriate; how hybrid systems compete with solar-only systems; and how hybridization can impact commercialization efforts for solar thermal electric systems.

  11. Inflatable Solar Thermal Concentrator Delivered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Carol M.

    1999-01-01

    Space-based solar thermal power systems are very appealing as a space power source because they generate power efficiently. However, solar thermal (dynamic) systems currently incorporate rigid concentrators that are relatively heavy and require significant packaging volume and robust deployment schemes. In many ways, these requirements make these systems less appealing than photovoltaic systems. As an alternative to solar thermal power systems with rigid concentrators, solar thermal power systems with thin film inflation-deployed concentrators have low cost, are lightweight, and are efficiently packaged and deployed. Not only are inflatable concentrators suitable for low Earth orbit and geosynchronous orbit applications, but they can be utilized in deep space missions to concentrate solar energy to high-efficiency solar cells.

  12. Dissociative Ionization and Thermal Decomposition of Cyclopentanone.

    PubMed

    Pastoors, Johan I M; Bodi, Andras; Hemberger, Patrick; Bouwman, Jordy

    2017-09-21

    Despite the growing use of renewable and sustainable biofuels in transportation, their combustion chemistry is poorly understood, limiting our efforts to reduce harmful emissions. Here we report on the (dissociative) ionization and the thermal decomposition mechanism of cyclopentanone, studied using imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy. The fragmentation of the ions is dominated by loss of CO, C2 H4 , and C2 H5 , leading to daughter ions at m/z 56 and 55. Exploring the C5 H8 O(.)(+) potential energy surface reveals hydrogen tunneling to play an important role in low-energy decarbonylation and probably also in the ethene-loss processes, yielding 1-butene and methylketene cations, respectively. At higher energies, pathways without a reverse barrier open up to oxopropenyl and cyclopropanone cations by ethyl-radical loss and a second ethene-loss channel, respectively. A statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus model is employed to test the viability of this mechanism. The pyrolysis of cyclopentanone is studied at temperatures ranging from about 800 to 1100 K. Closed-shell pyrolysis products, namely 1,3-butadiene, ketene, propyne, allene, and ethene, are identified based on their photoion mass-selected threshold photoelectron spectrum. Furthermore, reactive radical species such as allyl, propargyl, and methyl are found. A reaction mechanism is derived incorporating both stable and reactive species, which were not predicted in prior computational studies. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  13. USAF solar thermal applications overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauger, J. S.; Simpson, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Process heat applications were compared to solar thermal technologies. The generic process heat applications were analyzed for solar thermal technology utilization, using SERI's PROSYS/ECONOMAT model in an end use matching analysis and a separate analysis was made for solar ponds. Solar technologies appear attractive in a large number of applications. Low temperature applications at sites with high insolation and high fuel costs were found to be most attractive. No one solar thermal technology emerges as a clearly universal or preferred technology, however,, solar ponds offer a potential high payoff in a few, selected applications. It was shown that troughs and flat plate systems are cost effective in a large number of applications.

  14. Solar Thermal Electricity Generating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sambeet; Tripathy, Pratyasha

    2012-08-01

    A Solar Thermal Electricity generating system also known as Solar Thermal Power plant is an emerging renewable energy technology, where we generate the thermal energy by concentrating and converting the direct solar radiationat medium/high temperature (300∫C ñ 800∫C). The resulting thermal energy is then used in a thermodynamic cycleto produce electricity, by running a heat engine, which turns a generator to make electricity. Solar thermal power is currently paving the way for the most cost-effective solar technology on a large scale and is heading to establish a cleaner, pollution free and secured future. Photovoltaic (PV) and solar thermal technologies are two main ways of generating energy from the sun, which is considered the inexhaustible source of energy. PV converts sunlight directly into electricity whereas in Solar thermal technology, heat from the sun's rays is concentrated to heat a fluid, whose steam powers a generator that produces electricity. It is similar to the way fossil fuel-burning power plants work except that the steam is produced by the collected heat rather than from the combustion of fossil fuels. In order to generate electricity, five major varieties of solar thermal technologies used are:* Parabolic Trough Solar Electric Generating System (SEGS).* Central Receiver Power Plant.* Solar Chimney Power Plant.* Dish Sterling System.* Solar Pond Power Plant.Most parts of India,Asia experiences a clear sunny weather for about 250 to 300 days a year, because of its location in the equatorial sun belt of the earth, receiving fairly large amount of radiation as compared to many parts of the world especially Japan, Europe and the US where development and deployment of solar technologies is maximum.Whether accompanied with this benefit or not, usually we have to concentrate the solar radiation in order to compensate for the attenuation of solar radiation in its way to earthís surface, which results in from 63,2 GW/m2 at the Sun to 1 kW/m2 at

  15. Effect of mechanical dispersion of lignite on its thermal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yusupov, T.S.; Shumskaya, L.G.; Burdukov, A.P.

    2007-09-15

    It is studied how the high-rate mechanical grinding affects thermal decomposition of lignite extracted from the Kansk-Achinsk Coal Basin. It has been shown that dispersion of lignite in the high energy intensive vibration-centrifugal and planetary mills causes formation of structures exhibiting lower thermal stability. That results in the shift of primary decomposition phenomena into the low-temperature region and, thus, in the higher reactivity of coals.

  16. Thermal Decomposition of Lanthanide, Yttrium, and Scandium Oxalates and Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharov, Vyacheslav A.; Bezdenezhnykh, G. V.

    1981-07-01

    Data concerning the thermal decomposition of lanthanide, yttrium, and scandium oxalates and carbonates are surveyed. The complexity of the process, the large number of stages involved, and the dependence of the composition of the intermediates in the thermal transformations on the experimental conditions is noted. Certain process characteristics have been discovered and it is concluded that the decomposition process depends on the ionic radius of the metal. The bibliography includes 83 references.

  17. Thermal Decomposition Characteristics of Orthorhombic Ammonium Perchlorate (o-AP)

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1999-03-01

    Preliminary STMBMS and SEM results of the thermal decomposition of AP in the orthorhombic phase are presented. The overall decomposition is shown to be complex and controlled by both physical and chemical processes. The data show that the physical and chemical processes can be probed and characterized utilizing SEM and STMBMS. The overall decomposition is characterized by three distinguishing features: an induction period, and accelerator period and a deceleratory period. The major decomposition event occurs in the subsurface of the AP particles and propagates towards the center of the particle with time. The amount of total decomposition is dependent upon particle size and increases from 23% for {approximately}50{micro}m-diameter AP to 33% for {approximately}200{micro}m-diameter AP. A conceptual model of the physical processes is presented. Insight into the chemical processes is provided by the gas formation rates that are measured for the gaseous products. To our knowledge, this is the first presentation of data showing that the chemical and physical decomposition processes can be identified from one another, probed and characterized at the level that is required to better understand the thermal decomposition behavior of AP. Future work is planned with the goal of obtaining data that can be used to develop a mathematical description for the thermal decomposition of o-AP.

  18. Solar Thermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biesinger, K; Cuppett, D; Dyer, D

    2012-01-30

    HVAC Retrofit and Energy Efficiency Upgrades at Clark High School, Las Vegas, Nevada The overall objectives of this project are to increase usage of alternative/renewable fuels, create a better and more reliable learning environment for the students, and reduce energy costs. Utilizing the grant resources and local bond revenues, the District proposes to reduce electricity consumption by installing within the existing limited space, one principal energy efficient 100 ton adsorption chiller working in concert with two 500 ton electric chillers. The main heating source will be primarily from low nitrogen oxide (NOX), high efficiency natural gas fired boilers. With the use of this type of chiller, the electric power and cost requirements will be greatly reduced. To provide cooling to the information technology centers and equipment rooms of the school during off-peak hours, the District will install water source heat pumps. In another measure to reduce the cooling requirements at Clark High School, the District will replace single pane glass and metal panels with Kalwall building panels. An added feature of the Kalwall system is that it will allow for natural day lighting in the student center. This system will significantly reduce thermal heat/cooling loss and control solar heat gain, thus delivering significant savings in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) costs.

  19. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, Noel C.

    2015-01-31

    This program set out to explore a scattering-based approach to concentrate sunlight with the aim of improving collector field reliability and of eliminating wind loading and gross mechanical movement through the use of a stationary collection optic. The approach is based on scattering sunlight from the focal point of a fixed collection optic into the confined modes of a sliding planar waveguide, where it is transported to stationary tubular heat transfer elements located at the edges. Optical design for the first stage of solar concentration, which entails focusing sunlight within a plane over a wide range of incidence angles (>120 degree full field of view) at fixed tilt, led to the development of a new, folded-path collection optic that dramatically out-performs the current state-of-the-art in scattering concentration. Rigorous optical simulation and experimental testing of this collection optic have validated its performance. In the course of this work, we also identified an opportunity for concentrating photovoltaics involving the use of high efficiency microcells made in collaboration with partners at the University of Illinois. This opportunity exploited the same collection optic design as used for the scattering solar thermal concentrator and was therefore pursued in parallel. This system was experimentally demonstrated to achieve >200x optical concentration with >70% optical efficiency over a full day by tracking with <1 cm of lateral movement at fixed latitude tilt. The entire scattering concentrator waveguide optical system has been simulated, tested, and assembled at small scale to verify ray tracing models. These models were subsequently used to predict the full system optical performance at larger, deployment scale ranging up to >1 meter aperture width. Simulations at an aperture widths less than approximately 0.5 m with geometric gains ~100x predict an overall optical efficiency in the range 60-70% for angles up to 50 degrees from normal. However, the

  20. Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, Dean D.

    2009-07-01

    In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

  1. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. This photograph, taken at MSFC's Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility, shows a concentrator mirror, a combination of 144 mirrors forming this 18-ft diameter concentrator, and a vacuum chamber that houses the focal point. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-foot diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  2. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. This photograph shows a fully assembled solar thermal engine placed inside the vacuum chamber at the test facility prior to testing. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has a dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on the 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move theNation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  3. Analysis of cured carbon-phenolic decomposition products to investigate the thermal decomposition of nozzle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, James M.; Daniel, Janice D.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a mass spectrometer/thermal analyzer/computer (MS/TA/Computer) system capable of providing simultaneous thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) and evolved gas detection and analysis (EGD and EGA) under both atmospheric and high pressure conditions is described. The combined system was used to study the thermal decomposition of the nozzle material that constitutes the throat of the solid rocket boosters (SRB).

  4. Mechanism of thermal decomposition of hydrated copper nitrate in vacuo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, Boris V.; Novichikhin, Alexander V.

    1995-10-01

    The general scheme of three-stage thermal decomposition of Cu(NO 3) 2·3H 2O to CuO has been refined based on evolved-gas-analysis data with a quadrupole mass analyzer (Jackson et al., Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 50 (1995) 1423). Quantitative evaluation of the composition of the gaseous products shows that the first stage involves primarily deaquation, and the second stage, primarily denitration of the original hydrated nitrate. The basic nitrate formed in the second stage most probably has the formula Cu(NO 3) 2·3Cu(OH) 2. It has been established that the molecular oxygen observed in the third stage of decomposition is produced by catalytic decomposition of NO 2 on the surface of CuO. The presence of Cu-containing ions in all stages of the process is consistent with the gasification mechanism of thermal decomposition.

  5. THERMAL FRONTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  6. Thermal Decomposition of Copper (II) Calcium (II) Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, A. G.; Polla, G.; de Perazzo, P. K.; Lanza, H.; de Benyacar, M. A. R.

    1996-05-01

    The presence of different stages in the thermal decomposition process of CuCa(HCOO) 4has been established by means of TGA at different heating rates, X-ray powder diffraction of quenched samples, and DSC methods. During the first stage, decomposition of one of the two copper formate structural units contained in the unit cell takes place. The presence of CuCa 2(HCOO) 6has been detected. Calcium formate structural units break down at higher temperatures; the last decomposition peak corresponds to the appearance of different calcium-copper oxides.

  7. The Products of the Thermal Decomposition of CH3CHO

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliou, AnGayle; Piech, Krzysztof M.; Zhang, Xu; Nimlos, Mark R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg; Osborn, David L.; Daily, John W.; Stanton, John F.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2011-04-06

    We have used a heated 2 cm x 1 mm SiC microtubular (mu tubular) reactor to decompose acetaldehyde: CH3CHO + DELTA --> products. Thermal decomposition is followed at pressures of 75 - 150 Torr and at temperatures up to 1700 K, conditions that correspond to residence times of roughly 50 - 100 mu sec in the mu tubular reactor. The acetaldehyde decomposition products are identified by two independent techniques: VUV photoionization mass spectroscopy (PIMS) and infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy after isolation in a cryogenic matrix. Besides CH3CHO, we have studied three isotopologues, CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO. We have identified the thermal decomposition products CH3(PIMS), CO (IR, PIMS), H (PIMS), H2 (PIMS), CH2CO (IR, PIMS), CH2=CHOH (IR, PIMS), H2O (IR, PIMS), and HC=CH (IR, PIMS). Plausible evidence has been found to support the idea that there are at least three different thermal decomposition pathways for CH3CHO: Radical decomposition: CH3CHO + DELTA --> CH3 + [HCO] --> CH3 + H + CO Elimination: CH3CHO + DELTA --> H2 + CH2=C=O. Isomerization/elimination: CH3CHO + DELTA --> [CH2=CH-OH] --> HC=CH + H2O. Both PIMS and IR spectroscopy show compelling evidence for the participation of vinylidene, CH2=C:, as an intermediate in the decomposition of vinyl alchohol: CH2=CH-OH + DELTA --> [CH2=C:] + H2O --> HC=CH + H2O.

  8. Thermal decomposition of 2-phenylethanol: A computational study on mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasuyuki; Ando, Hiromitsu; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations for the thermal decomposition of 2-phenylethanol have been performed using the CBS-QB3 method. Based on the potential energy surfaces at the CBS-QB3 level of theory, the preferred reaction channel for the thermal decomposition of 2-phenylethanol was the six-membered cyclic rearrangement reaction and the dehydration reaction to form styrene and H2O. Further quantum chemical calculations of the subsequent reactions followed by the six-membered cyclic rearrange reaction of 2-phenylethanol were carried out and it was revealed that the barrier height for the ring opening reaction was the lowest among all of the other subsequent reactions.

  9. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Tanioka, Seiichi

    1997-12-31

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  10. Hyaluronate depolymerization following thermal decomposition of oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, T; Yomota, C; Okada, S

    2001-01-01

    Depolymerization of sodium hyaluronate (HA) by tetracyclines was investigated. Reduction in HA molecular weight was followed by size exclusion chromatography with a low angle laser light scattering detector. On mixing with oxytetracycline hydrochloride (OTC) solution and incubating at 37 degrees C, HA was gradually depolymerized. OTC, a representative antibiotic, is known as a photosensitizer, and phototoxic side effects relevant to radicals have been reported. However, HA depolymerization required no irradiation. As time passed, OTC solution incubated at 37 degrees C got colored reddish brown, even in the dark. With reversed-phase HPLC separation, several peaks derived from decomposed OTC appeared. One of the peaks had an absorbance in the visible range. A quantitative correlation between the discoloration and the HA depolymerization rate was obtained. On the other hand, when samples were incubated below 25 degrees C, change of color was slight, and practically no HA depolymerization was observed after up to 4 h. Oxygen depletion by nitrogen saturation or addition of mannitol also prevented the depolymerization. Under anaerobic conditions, the color of the solution did not change, whereas it turned red under aerobic conditions in the presence of mannitol. The mannitol did not inhibit the OTC decomposition, but it preserved HA from damage. On the basis of the known decomposition of OTC and the results of HPLC separation, anhydrooxytetracycline can be proposed as the derivative causing HA depolymerization.

  11. Annular solar receiver thermal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratzel, A. C.; Sisson, C. E.

    1980-10-01

    Results from thermal studies performed for an annular solar receiver assembly to be used with the 2 m, 90 deg parabolic collector trough are presented. The receiver configuration modeled consists of a 2.54 cm o.d. steel tube with a black chrome selective surface and an enclosing concentric Pyrex glass envelope. Previous thermal work conducted on the parabolic cylindrical collector design established the geometry and solar noon absorbed flux distribution used. One and two dimensional thermal models were developed to provide receiver assembly temperatures, heat losses, and working fluid energy extraction data with the Therminol-66 (T-66) bulk temperature maintained at 315 C. Parameters varied in the work include wind velocity, ambient air temperature, annulus gas pressure, and T-66 flow condition (Reynolds number). Heat loss and energy extraction results are tabulated and temperature distributions from two dimensional thermal modeling are graphically presented.

  12. Solar thermal repowering

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    Solar central receiver technology is developing steadily with a promise of becoming a real commercial alternative for energy generation in the late 1980s. Significant potential markets have been identified, research and development of important components is proceeding well, and the first full-system verification experiment at Barstow, California, is under construction. However, much work still lies ahead. A big step toward the realization of large-scale commercial use of solar energy was taken when the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a solicitation in March 1979 for utility repowering/industrial retrofit system conceptual design studies employing solar central receivers. Twenty-two responses were evaluated, and twelve were selected for funding. The results of the twelve studies, plus one study completed earlier and one privately funded, are sufficiently encouraging to warrant proceeding to the next stage of the program: cost-shared projects chosen through open competition. Eight of he fourteen studies are for electric utility repowering of existing oil or natural gas generating plants. The other six are the first site-specific studies of the use of solar central receiver systems for industrial process heat. The industrial processes include gypsum board drying, oil refining, enhanced oil recovery, uranium ore processing, natural gas processing, and ammonia production. Site descriptions, project summaries, conceptual designs, and functional descriptions are given for each of these 14 studies.

  13. Thermal Decomposition Chemistry of Amine Borane (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, A. C.; Feigerle, J.; Smyrl, N. R.; Morrell, J. S.

    2010-01-29

    The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Amine boranes potentially can be used as a vehicular hydrogen storage material. (2) Purity of the hydrogen stream is critical for use with a fuel cell. Pure H{sub 2} can be provided by carefully conditioning the fuel (encapsulation, drying, heating rate, impurities). (3) Thermodynamics and kinetics can be controlled by conditioning as well. (4) Regeneration of the spent amine borane fuel is still the greatest challenge to its potential use. (5) Addition of hydrocarbon-substituted amine boranes alter the chemistry dramatically. (6) Decomposition of the substituted amine borane mixed system favors reaction products that are more potentially easier to regenerate the hydrogenated fuel. (7) t-butylamine borane is not the best substituted amine borane to use since it releases isobutane; however, formation of CNBH{sub x} products does occur.

  14. Thermal decomposition of substituted phenols in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.J.; Savage, P.E.

    1997-05-01

    The thermal decomposition of cresols, hydroxybenzaldehydes, nitrophenols, and benzenediols was studied in dilute aqueous solutions and in the absence of oxygen at 460 C and 250 atm for residence times around 10 s. Thermolysis under these conditions produced conversions of less than 10% for o-, m-, and p-cresol, whereas hydroxybenzaldehydes and nitrophenols were much more reactive. Global rate expressions are reported for the thermolysis of each hydroxybenzaldehyde and nitrophenol isomer. Phenol was a major product from the decomposition of all of the substituted phenols studied. For a given substituent, ortho-substituted phenols reacted more rapidly than the other isomers. For a given substituted position, nitrophenols reacted more rapidly than hydroxybenzaldehydes, which in turn reacted more rapidly than cresols. These results demonstrate that the treatment of CHO- and NO{sub 2}-substituted phenols by oxidation in supercritical water will involve the oxidation of thermal decomposition products in addition to the oxidation of the original compounds.

  15. Solar-thermal engine testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Stephen; Salvail, Pat

    2002-01-01

    A solar-thermal engine serves as a high-temperature solar-radiation absorber, heat exchanger, and rocket nozzle, collecting concentrated solar radiation into an absorber cavity and transferring this energy to a propellant as heat. Propellant gas can be heated to temperatures approaching 4,500 °F and expanded in a rocket nozzle, creating low thrust with a high specific impulse (Isp). The Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) solar-thermal engine is made of 100 percent chemically vapor deposited (CVD) rhenium. The engine ``module'' consists of an engine assembly, propellant feedline, engine support structure, thermal insulation, and instrumentation. Engine thermal performance tests consist of a series of high-temperature thermal cycles intended to characterize the propulsive performance of the engines and the thermal effectiveness of the engine support structure and insulation system. A silicone-carbide electrical resistance heater, placed inside the inner shell, substitutes for solar radiation and heats the engine. Although the preferred propellant is hydrogen, the propellant used in these tests is gaseous nitrogen. Because rhenium oxidizes at elevated temperatures, the tests are performed in a vacuum chamber. Test data will include transient and steady state temperatures on selected engine surfaces, propellant pressures and flow rates, and engine thrust levels. The engine propellant-feed system is designed to supply GN2 to the engine at a constant inlet pressure of 60 psia, producing a near-constant thrust of 1.0 lb. Gaseous hydrogen will be used in subsequent tests. The propellant flow rate decreases with increasing propellant temperature, while maintaining constant thrust, increasing engine Isp. In conjunction with analytical models of the heat exchanger, the temperature data will provide insight into the effectiveness of the insulation system, the structural support system, and the overall engine performance. These tests also provide experience on operational aspects

  16. Thermal decomposition of silane to form hydrogenated amorphous Si film

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, Myron; Ghosh, Arup K.; Wiesmann, Harold J.; Rock, Edward B.; Lutz, III, Harry A.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silano (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, at elevated temperatures of about 1700.degree.-2300.degree. C., and preferably in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-8 to 10.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseous mixture onto a substrate outside said source of thermal decomposition to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  17. Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

    2008-03-01

    Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

  18. Investigation of diaminodinitroethylene (DADNE) thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemagina, I. V.; Filin, V. P.; Loboiko, B. G.; Kazakova, M. B.; Shakhtorin, Yu. A.; Lagutina, V. M.; Taibinov, N. P.; Garmasheva, N. V.; Alekseev, A. V.

    2006-08-01

    Diaminodinitroethylene (DADNE or FOX-7) is a low-sensitive high explosive. The curve of the differential-thermal analysis (DTA) of DADNE has two obvious endothermal peaks and two exothermal peaks. DTA data permitted to suppose that DADNE has several polymorph modifications, and transitions between them are observed at temperatures ˜+115 °C and ˜+170 °C. Two exothermal peaks (at +220° C and +270 °C, correspondingly) on DTA curves correspond to the processes taking place in DADNE at temperatures over +210 °C. One possible reason for appearance of these two peaks is: DADNE has polymorph modifications with substantially different thermal stability. Attempts were made to obtain metastable (under normal conditions) polymorph modifications of DADNE. To attain this, DADNE was thermally treated in vacuum. Thermoanalysis and IR-spectroscopy demonstrated the residue on the plate to be the substance we called DADNE-T. DADNE-T was recrystallized to study specific features of its molecular structure. Data of thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy given for initial DADNE, DADNE-T and recrystallized DADNE-T. Performed investigations allow assumption that DADNE-T is a polymorph modification, which is stable within ˜ 20°C to ˜ 270°C temperatures.

  19. Thermal Decomposition of Copper (II) Dicalcium (II) Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Perazzo, P. K.; Leyva, A. G.; Polla, G.; Parisi, F.; de Benyacar, M. A. R.; Smichowski, P.; Lanza, H.

    1997-09-01

    The unit cell obtained through X-ray single crystal analysis of the synthetized CuCa 2(HCOO) 6crystals corresponds to a supercell of the basic structure described by M. Sanchis et al.( Inorg. Chem.31, 2915 (1992)). Thermal decomposition of this sample shows two stages up to 300°C; the first can be related to the superstructure, and the second corresponds to the breaking down of the remaining copper formate structural units and the simultaneous decomposition of the sample.

  20. Kinetic regularities and products of the thermal decomposition of dichlorosilane

    SciTech Connect

    Aivazyan, R.G.; Dzhabiev, T.S.; Kiryakov, N.V.

    1995-03-01

    The kinetics of the thermal decomposition of dichlorosilane is studied in quartz reactors, including reactors coated with MgO, in a stainless-steel reactor at 300-900K and 100-6500 Pa. Hydrogen, trichlorosilane, and tetrachlorosilane are found to be the principal reaction products. The conversion increases with temperature. The dependence of the decomposition rate on the dichlorosilane concentration is presented by the expression W=k[SiH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}]{sup 3/2}; the effective activation energy is equal to 180{+-}12 kJ/mol.

  1. Resolving Some Paradoxes in the Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Michael, Joe V; Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2015-07-16

    The mechanism for the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde has been revisited with an analysis of literature kinetics experiments using theoretical kinetics. The present modeling study was motivated by recent observations, with very sensitive diagnostics, of some unexpected products in high temperature microtubular reactor experiments on the thermal decomposition of CH3CHO and its deuterated analogs, CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO. The observations of these products prompted the authors of these studies to suggest that the enol tautomer, CH2CHOH (vinyl alcohol), is a primary intermediate in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde. The present modeling efforts on acetaldehyde decomposition incorporate a master equation reanalysis of the CH3CHO potential energy surface (PES). The lowest-energy process on this PES is an isomerization of CH3CHO to CH2CHOH. However, the subsequent product channels for CH2CHOH are substantially higher in energy, and the only unimolecular process that can be thermally accessed is a reisomerization to CH3CHO. The incorporation of these new theoretical kinetics predictions into models for selected literature experiments on CH3CHO thermal decomposition confirms our earlier experiment and theory-based conclusions that the dominant decomposition process in CH3CHO at high temperatures is C-C bond fission with a minor contribution (∼10-20%) from the roaming mechanism to form CH4 and CO. The present modeling efforts also incorporate a master-equation analysis of the H + CH2CHOH potential energy surface. This bimolecular reaction is the primary mechanism for removal of CH2CHOH, which can accumulate to minor amounts at high temperatures, T > 1000 K, in most lab-scale experiments that use large initial concentrations of CH3CHO. Our modeling efforts indicate that the observation of ketene, water, and acetylene in the recent microtubular experiments are primarily due to bimolecular reactions of CH3CHO and CH2CHOH with H-atoms and have no bearing on

  2. Resolving Some Paradoxes in the Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Acetaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, Joe V.; Harding, Lawrence B.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism for the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde has been revisited with an analysis of literature kinetics experiments using theoretical kinetics. The present modeling study was motivated by recent observations, with very sensitive diagnostics, of some unexpected products in high temperature micro-tubular reactor experiments on the thermal decomposition of CH3CHO and its deuterated analogs, CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO. The observations of these products prompted the authors of these studies to suggest that the enol tautomer, CH2CHOH (vinyl alcohol), is a primary intermediate in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde. The present modeling efforts on acetaldehyde decomposition incorporate a master equation re-analysis of the CH3CHO potential energy surface (PES). The lowest energy process on this PES is an isomerization of CH3CHO to CH2CHOH. However, the subsequent product channels for CH2CHOH are substantially higher in energy, and the only unimolecular process that can be thermally accessed is a re-isomerization to CH3CHO. The incorporation of these new theoretical kinetics predictions into models for selected literature experiments on CH3CHO thermal decomposition confirms our earlier experiment and theory based conclusions that the dominant decomposition process in CH3CHO at high temperatures is C-C bond fission with a minor contribution (~10-20%) from the roaming mechanism to form CH4 and CO. The present modeling efforts also incorporate a master-equation analysis of the H + CH2CHOH potential energy surface. This bimolecular reaction is the primary mechanism for removal of CH2CHOH, which can accumulate to minor amounts at high temperatures, T > 1000 K, in most lab-scale experiments that use large initial concentrations of CH3CHO. Our modeling efforts indicate that the observation of ketene, water and acetylene in the recent micro-tubular experiments are primarily due to bimolecular reactions of CH3CHO and CH2CHOH with H-atoms, and have no bearing on

  3. Reaction kinetics of paddy husk thermal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.K.; Sharma, S.K.; Singh, D.

    1996-12-31

    Paddy husk production in world is estimated to be around 80 million tons. It has a calorific value of 15 MJ/kg and thus has a tremendous potential as a renewable energy source. Its current uses are: cattle feed, raw material for paper and board, furfural production and silica industries. A large quantity of paddy husk is used in husk fired boiler furnaces at a very low efficiency. For efficient design of husk fired furnaces, reliable data on thermal characteristics of rice husk is essential which is lacking in the literature. In the present study, paddy husk was subjected to Thermogravimetric Analysis at heating rates of 10 and 100 C/min. in a thermal analyzer. The analysis was carried out in air and mixture of oxygen and nitrogen (5:95%) atmosphere. Reaction kinetic parameters such as activation energy, frequency factor and order of reaction have been evaluated and reported. These are relevant to the design of paddy husk fired gasifiers, furnaces and other thermochemical conversion equipment. The results of the thermochemical studies and their potential applications are presented in the paper.

  4. Thermal decomposition of PMC for fiber recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Pomykala, J. A.

    1999-10-22

    This paper describes efforts by Argonne National Laboratory to develop a process to recover carbon fibers from polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials. The polymer material in the matrix maybe a thermoplastic or a thermoset. Samples of panels containing PMC fibers were obtained and used in the bench-scale testing program. The authors tested three different methods for recovering these PMC fibers: thermal treatment, chemical degradation, and cryogenic methods (thermal shock treatment). The first two methods were effective in separating the carbon fibers from the polymeric substrate; the third method was not satisfactory. Carbon fibers separated from the polymer substrate using the thermal treatment method were submitted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for analysis and evaluation. The results indicated that the carbon fibers had been cleanly separated from the polymer matrix. Their intrinsic density was 1.8473 g/cm{sup 3} and their electrical resistivity was 0.001847 ohm-cm, compared to an intrinsic density of 1.75--1.9 gm/cm{sup 3} and an electrical resistivity of 0.0002--0.002 ohm-cm for virgin fibers produced from polyacrylonitrile (PAN). Although they were not sure that the samples they processed were originally produced from PAN, they used the PAN fibers for comparison. It was also demonstrated that the surface of the recovered fibers could be reactivated to energy levels equivalent to those of reactivated virgin fibers from PAN. A comparison of the mechanical properties of the recovered fibers (without surface treatment) with those of surface-treated virgin fibers from PAN revealed that the ultimate tensile strength and the elongation at brake values are about 1/3 the values for the virgin fibers. The modulus for the recycled fibers (31.4 million pounds per square inch [psi]) was about the same as that for the virgin PAN fibers (31.2 million psi). The reason for the lower tensile strength and elongation is not clear; the authors plan to investigate it further

  5. Sandia Laboratories in-house activities in support of solar thermal large power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The development of thermal energy storage subsystems for solar thermal large power applications is described. The emphasis is on characterizing the behavior of molten nitrate salts with regard to thermal decomposition, environmental interactions, and corrosion. Electrochemical techniques to determine the ionic species in the melt and for use in real time studies of corrosion are also briefly discussed.

  6. Storage systems for solar thermal power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calogeras, J. E.; Gordon, L. H.

    1978-01-01

    A major constraint to the evolution of solar thermal power systems is the need to provide continuous operation during periods of solar outage. A number of high temperature thermal energy storage technologies which have the potential to meet this need are currently under development. The development status is reviewed of some thermal energy storage technologies specifically oriented towards providing diurnal heat storage for solar central power systems and solar total energy systems. These technologies include sensible heat storage in caverns and latent heat storage using both active and passive heat exchange processes. In addition, selected thermal storage concepts which appear promising to a variety of advanced solar thermal system applications are discussed.

  7. Storage systems for solar thermal power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calogeras, J. E.; Gordon, L. H.

    1978-01-01

    A major constraint to the evolution of solar thermal power systems is the need to provide continuous operation during periods of solar outage. A number of high temperature thermal energy storage technologies which have the potential to meet this need are currently under development. The development status is reviewed of some thermal energy storage technologies specifically oriented towards providing diurnal heat storage for solar central power systems and solar total energy systems. These technologies include sensible heat storage in caverns and latent heat storage using both active and passive heat exchange processes. In addition, selected thermal storage concepts which appear promising to a variety of advanced solar thermal system applications are discussed.

  8. Mechanism of the Thermal Decomposition of Ethanethiol and Dimethylsulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melhado, William Francis; Whitman, Jared Connor; Kong, Jessica; Anderson, Daniel Easton; Vasiliou, AnGayle (AJ)

    2016-06-01

    Combustion of organosulfur contaminants in petroleum-based fuels and biofuels produces sulfur oxides (SO_x). These pollutants are highly regulated by the EPA because they have been linked to poor respiratory health and negative environmental impacts. Therefore much effort has been made to remove sulfur compounds in petroleum-based fuels and biofuels. Currently desulfurization methods used in the fuel industry are costly and inefficient. Research of the thermal decomposition mechanisms of organosulfur species can be implemented via engineering simulations to modify existing refining technologies to design more efficient sulfur removal processes. We have used a resistively-heated SiC tubular reactor to study the thermal decomposition of ethanethiol (CH_3CH_2SH) and dimethylsulfide (CH_3SCH_3). The decomposition products are identified by two independent techniques: 118.2 nm VUV photoionization mass spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The thermal cracking products for CH_3CH_2SH are CH_2CH_2, SH, and H_2S and the thermal cracking products from CH_3SCH_3 are CH_3S, CH_2S, and CH_3.

  9. Biomass pyrolysis: thermal decomposition mechanisms of furfural and benzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Vasiliou, AnGayle K; Kim, Jong Hyun; Ormond, Thomas K; Piech, Krzysztof M; Urness, Kimberly N; Scheer, Adam M; Robichaud, David J; Mukarakate, Calvin; Nimlos, Mark R; Daily, John W; Guan, Qi; Carstensen, Hans-Heinrich; Ellison, G Barney

    2013-09-14

    The thermal decompositions of furfural and benzaldehyde have been studied in a heated microtubular flow reactor. The pyrolysis experiments were carried out by passing a dilute mixture of the aromatic aldehydes (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a pulsed, heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 75-150 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range of 1200-1800 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 100-200 μsec after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 μTorr. Products were detected using matrix infrared absorption spectroscopy, 118.2 nm (10.487 eV) photoionization mass spectroscopy and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization. The initial steps in the thermal decomposition of furfural and benzaldehyde have been identified. Furfural undergoes unimolecular decomposition to furan + CO: C4H3O-CHO (+ M) → CO + C4H4O. Sequential decomposition of furan leads to the production of HC≡CH, CH2CO, CH3C≡CH, CO, HCCCH2, and H atoms. In contrast, benzaldehyde resists decomposition until higher temperatures when it fragments to phenyl radical plus H atoms and CO: C6H5CHO (+ M) → C6H5CO + H → C6H5 + CO + H. The H atoms trigger a chain reaction by attacking C6H5CHO: H + C6H5CHO → [C6H6CHO]* → C6H6 + CO + H. The net result is the decomposition of benzaldehyde to produce benzene and CO.

  10. Biomass pyrolysis: Thermal decomposition mechanisms of furfural and benzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliou, AnGayle K.; Kim, Jong Hyun; Ormond, Thomas K.; Piech, Krzysztof M.; Urness, Kimberly N.; Scheer, Adam M.; Robichaud, David J.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Nimlos, Mark R.; Daily, John W.; Guan, Qi; Carstensen, Hans-Heinrich; Ellison, G. Barney

    2013-09-01

    The thermal decompositions of furfural and benzaldehyde have been studied in a heated microtubular flow reactor. The pyrolysis experiments were carried out by passing a dilute mixture of the aromatic aldehydes (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a pulsed, heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 75-150 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range of 1200-1800 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 100-200 μsec after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 μTorr. Products were detected using matrix infrared absorption spectroscopy, 118.2 nm (10.487 eV) photoionization mass spectroscopy and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization. The initial steps in the thermal decomposition of furfural and benzaldehyde have been identified. Furfural undergoes unimolecular decomposition to furan + CO: C4H3O-CHO (+ M) → CO + C4H4O. Sequential decomposition of furan leads to the production of HC≡CH, CH2CO, CH3C≡CH, CO, HCCCH2, and H atoms. In contrast, benzaldehyde resists decomposition until higher temperatures when it fragments to phenyl radical plus H atoms and CO: C6H5CHO (+ M) → C6H5CO + H → C6H5 + CO + H. The H atoms trigger a chain reaction by attacking C6H5CHO: H + C6H5CHO → [C6H6CHO]* → C6H6 + CO + H. The net result is the decomposition of benzaldehyde to produce benzene and CO.

  11. More Efficient Solar Thermal-Energy Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal stresses and reradiation reduced. Improved design for solar thermal-energy receiver overcomes three major deficiencies of solar dynamic receivers described in literature. Concentrator and receiver part of solar-thermal-energy system. Receiver divided into radiation section and storage section. Concentrated solar radiation falls on boiling ends of heat pipes, which transmit heat to thermal-energy-storage medium. Receiver used in number of applications to produce thermal energy directly for use or to store thermal energy for subsequent use in heat engine.

  12. More Efficient Solar Thermal-Energy Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal stresses and reradiation reduced. Improved design for solar thermal-energy receiver overcomes three major deficiencies of solar dynamic receivers described in literature. Concentrator and receiver part of solar-thermal-energy system. Receiver divided into radiation section and storage section. Concentrated solar radiation falls on boiling ends of heat pipes, which transmit heat to thermal-energy-storage medium. Receiver used in number of applications to produce thermal energy directly for use or to store thermal energy for subsequent use in heat engine.

  13. High temperature solar thermal receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A design concept for a high temperature solar thermal receiver to operate at 3 atmospheres pressure and 2500 F outlet was developed. The performance and complexity of windowed matrix, tube-header, and extended surface receivers were evaluated. The windowed matrix receiver proved to offer substantial cost and performance benefits. An efficient and cost effective hardware design was evaluated for a receiver which can be readily interfaced to fuel and chemical processes or to heat engines for power generation.

  14. Pollutant content in marine debris and characterization by thermal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez, M E; Conesa, J A; Fullana, A

    2017-04-15

    Marine debris (MDs) produces a wide variety of negative environmental, economic, safety, health and cultural impacts. Most marine litter has a very low decomposition rate (plastics), leading to a gradual accumulation in the coastal and marine environment. Characterization of the MDs has been done in terms of their pollutant content: PAHs, ClBzs, ClPhs, BrPhs, PCDD/Fs and PCBs. The results show that MDs is not a very contaminated waste. Also, thermal decomposition of MDs materials has been studied in a thermobalance at different atmospheres and heating rates. Below 400-500K, the atmosphere does not affect the thermal degradation of the mentioned waste. However, at temperatures between 500 and 800K the presence of oxygen accelerates the decomposition. Also, a kinetic model is proposed for the combustion of the MDs, and the decomposition is compared with that of their main constituents, i.e., polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), nylon and polyethylene-terephthalate (PET). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Strain localization driven by thermal decomposition during seismic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. D.; Brantut, N.; Rice, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    De Paola et al. [2008] analyzed a series of faults in the Northern Apennines, Italy, hosted in anhydrite and dolomite rocks. They found a highly localized band of less than 100 microns, contained within a broader damage zone. Recent High-Velocity Friction (HVF) experiments on kaolinite-bearing gouge samples (Brantut et al. [2008]) have also shown extreme localization in samples undergoing thermal decomposition. They performed microstructural analysis on HVF samples and found an "ultralocalized deformation zone", less than ten microns wide, interpreted to be the main slipping zone in the experiment. By measuring relative humidity in the sample chamber they were also able to observe the thermal dehydration of kaolinite. These laboratory and field observations indicate that straining is extremely localized in fault materials where thermal decomposition reactions may occur. During thermal decomposition reactions pore fluid is released, leading to increases in pore pressure, and a corresponding drop in frictional heating. The reactions are endothermic, so heat is also absorbed as the reactions progress. Previous work by Sulem and Famin [2009] has investigated how these effects influence the evolution of pore pressure and temperature in a uniformly sheared gouge layer. They found that accounting for thermal decomposition reactions leads to significant pore pressure increases, and that the endothermic nature of the reaction acts to cap the maximum temperature achieved. In previous work (Platt, Rudnicki and Rice [2010]) we investigated strain localization using a model for shearing of a fluid-saturated gouge material, finding a formula for the localized zone width as a function of physical properties of the gouge. We now extend this model to include thermal decomposition. Using linear stability methods and an idealized reaction kinetic we infer a new localized zone width when decomposition is accounted for. Numerical simulations then allow us to compare this prediction to

  16. Solar-Thermal Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Stephen; Salvail, Pat; Haynes, Davy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A solar-thermal engine serves as a high-temperature solar-radiation absorber, heat exchanger, and rocket nozzle. collecting concentrated solar radiation into an absorber cavity and transferring this energy to a propellant as heat. Propellant gas can be heated to temperatures approaching 4,500 F and expanded in a rocket nozzle, creating low thrust with a high specific impulse (I(sub sp)). The Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) solar-thermal engine is made of 100 percent chemical vapor deposited (CVD) rhenium. The engine 'module' consists of an engine assembly, propellant feedline, engine support structure, thermal insulation, and instrumentation. Engine thermal performance tests consist of a series of high-temperature thermal cycles intended to characterize the propulsive performance of the engines and the thermal effectiveness of the engine support structure and insulation system. A silicone-carbide electrical resistance heater, placed inside the inner shell, substitutes for solar radiation and heats the engine. Although the preferred propellant is hydrogen, the propellant used in these tests is gaseous nitrogen. Because rhenium oxidizes at elevated temperatures, the tests are performed in a vacuum chamber. Test data will include transient and steady state temperatures on selected engine surfaces, propellant pressures and flow rates, and engine thrust levels. The engine propellant-feed system is designed to Supply GN2 to the engine at a constant inlet pressure of 60 psia, producing a near-constant thrust of 1.0 lb. Gaseous hydrogen will be used in subsequent tests. The propellant flow rate decreases with increasing propellant temperature, while maintaining constant thrust, increasing engine I(sub sp). In conjunction with analytical models of the heat exchanger, the temperature data will provide insight into the effectiveness of the insulation system, the structural support system, and the overall engine performance. These tests also provide experience on operational

  17. Condensed-phase decomposition in thermally-aged explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, K.L.; Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.

    1995-12-01

    In previous work, the isothermal decomposition of nitrocellulose (NC) was examined using two substantially different experimental techniques that are being developed to investigate condensed-phase chemistry occurring during the thermal decomposition of a variety of explosives. The confined isothermal aging technique involved confined thin-film samples heated to temperatures of 150 to 170{degrees}C, for 1 to 72 hours. Condensed-phase chemistry was monitored real-time using FTIR. Results indicated that the first step in decomposition was scission of the O-NO{sub 2} bond and subsequent formation of carbonyl and hydroxyl products. Scission of the O-NO{sub 2} bond appeared to occur by a first-order reaction. Additional unconfined rapid isothermal decomposition experiments with NC have been completed and are described in this paper. Those additional experiments extended the previous work and investigated the effect of varying film thickness (from about 0.2 to 0.6 microns), varying temperature (from about 420 to 640{degrees}C), and using {sup 15}NO{sub 2}-labled NC. The results indicated that decomposition of NC appears to involve at least two principal mechanisms: (1) O-NO{sub 2} bond scission, which is accompanied by carbonyl or hydroxyl formation, and (2) polymer fragmentation. These two mechanisms occur simultaneously. At temperatures of 170{degrees}C, or lower, polymer fragmentation appears negligible, but at temperatures of 420{degrees}C, or higher, polymer fragmentation is appreciable and occurs at rates comparable to those for O-NO{sub 2} bond scission. While polymer fragmentation may be associated with O-NO{sub 2} bond scission, at higher temperatures, additional steps must be involved in the fragmentation mechanism. At each end of the temperatures range from about 150 to 420{degrees}C, the rate of O-NO{sub 2} bond scission appears reasonably consistent with a mechanism dominated by a first-order decomposition step.

  18. Thermal decomposition of dolomite under CO2-air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subagjo, Wulandari, Winny; Adinata, Pratitis Mega; Fajrin, Anita

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a study on thermal decomposition of dolomite under CO2-air. Calcination was carried out non-isothermally by using thermogravimetry analysis-differential scanning calorimetry (TGA-DSC) with a heating rate of 10°C/minute in an air atmosphere as well as 10 vol% CO2 and 90 vol% air atmosphere from 25 to 950°C. In addition, a thermodynamic modeling was also carried out to simulate dolomite calcination in different level of CO2-air atmosphere by using FactSage® 7.0. The the main constituents of typical dolomite from Gresik, East Java include MgCO3 (magnesite), CaCO3 (calcite), Ca(OH)2, CaO, MgO, and less than 1% of metal impurities. Based on the kinetics analysis from TGA results, it is found that non-isothermal dolomite calcination in 10 vol% CO2 atmosphere is occurred in a two-stage reaction; the first stage is the decomposition of magnesite at 650-740 °C with activation energy of 161.23 kJ/mol, and the second stage is the decomposition of calcite at 775-820 °C with activation energy of 162.46 kJ/mol. The magnesite decomposition is found to follow nucleation reaction mechanism of Avrami Eroveyef (A3), while calcite decomposition follows second order chemical reaction equation. Thermodynamic modeling supports these kinetic analyses. The results of this research give insight to the kinetics of dolomite decomposition in CO2-air atmosphere.

  19. Thermal decomposition of hydroxylamine: isoperibolic calorimetric measurements at different conditions.

    PubMed

    Adamopoulou, Theodora; Papadaki, Maria I; Kounalakis, Manolis; Vazquez-Carreto, Victor; Pineda-Solano, Alba; Wang, Qingsheng; Mannan, M Sam

    2013-06-15

    Thermal decomposition of hydroxylamine, NH2OH, was responsible for two serious accidents. However, its reactive behavior and the synergy of factors affecting its decomposition are not being understood. In this work, the global enthalpy of hydroxylamine decomposition has been measured in the temperature range of 130-150 °C employing isoperibolic calorimetry. Measurements were performed in a metal reactor, employing 30-80 ml solutions containing 1.4-20 g of pure hydroxylamine (2.8-40 g of the supplied reagent). The measurements showed that increased concentration or temperature, results in higher global enthalpies of reaction per unit mass of reactant. At 150 °C, specific enthalpies as high as 8 kJ per gram of hydroxylamine were measured, although in general they were in the range of 3-5 kJ g(-1). The accurate measurement of the generated heat was proven to be a cumbersome task as (a) it is difficult to identify the end of decomposition, which after a fast initial stage, proceeds very slowly, especially at lower temperatures and (b) the environment of gases affects the reaction rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. New insights into thermal decomposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon oxyradicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Lin, He; Yang, Yang; Shao, Can; Gu, Chen; Huang, Zhen

    2014-12-04

    Thermal decompositions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) oxyradicals on various surface sites including five-membered ring, free-edge, zigzag, and armchair have been systematically investigated by using ab initio density functional theory B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) basis set. The calculation based on Hückel theory indicates that PAHs (3H-cydopenta[a]anthracene oxyradical) with oxyradicals on a five-membered ring site have high chemical reactivity. The rate coefficients of PAH oxyradical decomposition were evaluated by using Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and solving the master equations in the temperature range of 1500-2500 K and the pressure range of 0.1-10 atm. The kinetic calculations revealed that the rate coefficients of PAH oxyradical decomposition are temperature-, pressure-, and surface site-dependent, and the oxyradical on a five-membered ring is easier to decompose than that on a six-membered ring. Four-membered rings were found in decomposition of the five-membered ring, and a new reaction channel of PAH evolution involving four-membered rings is recommended.

  1. INVESTIGATION FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF UTILIZATION OF SOLAR ENERGY BY THE DECOMPOSITION OF WATER INTO HYDROGEN AND OXYGEN.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The sensitized photo-decomposition of water was studied, with the purpose of improving its ef ficiency as a means of solar energy conversion. A...spectrum to be practical as a means of solar energy conversion. Ceric ions oxidize water to yield oxygen in the dark at elevated temperatures. The thermal

  2. Solar energy thermalization and storage device

    DOEpatents

    McClelland, J.F.

    A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent is described. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

  3. Solar energy thermalization and storage device

    DOEpatents

    McClelland, John F.

    1981-09-01

    A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

  4. New kinetic model for thermal decomposition of heterogeneous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, J.A.; Font, R.; Marcilla, A.; Conesa, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    In the kinetic studies of thermal decomposition of lignocellulosic materials using dynamic TG, relationships between the biomass fraction ``w`` and the time ``t`` of the form dw/dt = {minus}k(w {minus} w{sub {infinity}}){sup n} are usually admitted, and the residue fraction at infinite time (w{sub {infinity}}) is considered constant. However, in heterogeneous solids such as lignocellulosic materials, the different polymers decompose at different temperatures, and so the value of w{sub {infinity}} is not constant, Therefore, the previous equation must be considered approximate. To illustrate this feature, experiments with kraft lignin, which decomposes in an interval of temperatures between 150 and 750 C, have been carried out. A kinetic model is proposed, bearing in mind that there is a maximum pyrolyzable fraction at each temperature. This model considers that the thermal decomposition of a heterogeneous material occurs through a great number of reactions and that at a given temperature only some fractions can decompose. The kinetic parameters (activation energy and preexponential factor) can change during the decomposition process as function of the reactions taking place. Under some assumptions, it is deduced that this model is equivalent to assume the kinetic law dw/dt = {minus}k(w{minus}w{sub {infinity}}) for first-order reaction, where the residue yield w{sub {infinity}} is a function of the temperature.

  5. Solar wind thermal electron distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Solar wind thermal electron distributions exhibit distinctive trends which suggest Coulomb collisions and geometric expansion in the interplanetary magnetic field play keys roles in electron transport. We introduce a simple numerical model incorporating these mechanisms, discuss the ramifications of model results, and assess the validity of the model in terms of ISEE-3 and Ulysses observations. Although the model duplicates the shape of the electron distributions, and explains certain other observational features, observed gradients in total electron temperature indicate the importance of additional heating mechanisms. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Storage systems for solar thermal power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calogeras, J. E.; Gordon, L. H.

    1978-01-01

    The development status is reviewed of some thermal energy storage technologies specifically oriented towards providing diurnal heat storage for solar central power systems and solar total energy systems. These technologies include sensible heat storage in caverns and latent heat storage using both active and passive heat exchange processes. In addition, selected thermal storage concepts which appear promising to a variety of advanced solar thermal system applications are discussed.

  7. Production and analysis of thermal decomposition products from polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, D. A.; Einhorn, I. N.; Hileman, F. D.; Futrell, J. H.; Voorhees, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of a strategy for analyzing the combustion process and the degradation products which are formed. One of three primary objectives in the study of polymer degradation is related to the characterization of the material to be studied and the investigation of the thermal behavior of the material. Another objective is concerned with the definition of the nature of the decomposition process by identification and quantitation of the degradation products. The third objective involves the determination of the mechanism and kinetics of the decomposition process. The methods of sample degradation include pyrolysis, oxidative degradation, flaming combustion, and the use of large-scale combustion chambers. Methods of chemical separation and identification are considered, taking into account low-boiling volatiles, high-boiling volatiles, and ancillary techniques.

  8. Theoretical study of the thermal decomposition of dimethyl disulfide.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Aäron G; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Marin, Guy B

    2010-10-07

    Despite its use in a wide variety of industrially important thermochemical processes, little is known about the thermal decomposition mechanism of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). To obtain more insight, the radical decomposition mechanism of DMDS is studied theoretically and a kinetic model is developed accounting for the formation of all the decomposition products observed in the experimental studies available in literature. Thermochemical data and rate coefficients are obtained using the high-level CBS-QB3 composite method. Among five methods tested (BMK/6-311G(2d,d,p), MPW1PW91/6-311G(2d,d,p), G3, G3B3, and CBS-QB3), the CBS-QB3 method was found to reproduce most accurately the experimental standard enthalpies of formation for a set of 17 small organosulfur compounds and the bond dissociation energies for a set of 10 sulfur bonds. Enthalpies of formation were predicted within 4 kJ mol(-1) while the mean absolute deviation on the bond dissociation enthalpies amounts to 7 kJ mol(-1). From the theoretical study, a new reaction path is identified for the formation of carbon disulfide via dithiirane (CH(2)S(2)). A reaction mechanism was constructed containing 36 reactions among 25 species accounting for the formation of all the decomposition products reported in literature. High-pressure limit rate coefficients for the 36 reactions in the reaction mechanism are presented. The kinetic model is able to grasp the experimental observations. With the recombination of thiyl radicals treated as being in the low-pressure limit, the experimentally reported first-order rate coefficients for the decomposition of DMDS are reproduced within 1 order of magnitude, while the observed product selectivities of most compounds are reproduced satisfactory. Simulations indicate that at high conversions most of the carbon disulfide forms according to the newly identified reaction path involving the formation of dithiirane.

  9. Thermal image filtering by bi-dimensional empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriloaia, Bogdan-Mihai; Vizireanu, Constantin-Radu; Fratu, Octavian; Mara, Constantin; Vizireanu, Dragos-Nicolae; Preda, Radu; Gavriloaia, Gheorghe

    2015-02-01

    The abnormal function of cells can be detected by anatomic or physiological registrations. Most of modern approaches, as ultrasound, RMN or CT, show anatomic parametric modifications of tissues or organs. They highlight areas with a larger diameter 1 cm. In the case of skin or superficial cancers, local temperature is different, and it can be put out by thermal imager. Medical imaging is a leading role in modern diagnosis for abnormal or normal tissues or organs. Some information has to be improved for a better diagnosis by reducing or removing some unwanted information like noise affecting image texture. The traditional technologies for medical image enhancement use spatial or frequency domain methods, but whole image processing will hide both partial and specific information for human signals. A particular kind of medical images is represented by thermal imaging. Recently, these images were used for skin or superficial cancers diagnosis, but very clear outlines of certain alleged affected areas need to be shown. Histogram equalization cannot highlights the edges and control the effects of enhancement. A new filtering method was introduced by Huang by using the empirical mode decomposition, EMD. An improved filtering method for thermal images, based on EMD, is presented in this paper, and permits to analyze nonlinear and non-stationary data by the adaptive decomposition into intrinsic mode surfaces. The results, evaluated by SNR ratios, are compared with other filtering methods.

  10. Programming Enhancements for Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition Workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Igou, R.E.

    1998-10-01

    This report describes a new control-and-measurement system design for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition (LTTD) process. The new design addresses problems with system reliability stemming from equipment obsolescence and addresses specific functional improvements that plant production personnel have identified, as required. The new design will also support new measurement techniques, which the Y-12 Development Division has identified for future operations. The new techniques will function in concert with the original technique so that process data consistency is maintained.

  11. Thermal Decomposition of Copper Ore Concentrate and Polyethylene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyszka, Danuta; Wieckowska, Jadwiga

    2016-10-01

    Thermal analyses (TGA and DTA) of the composite, comprised of 10% polyethylene (PE) scrap and 90% copper ore concentrate, enabled determination of the temperature range and decomposition degree of the organic matters in argon atmosphere. Products of pyrolysis were qualitatively and quantitatively determined. The results were compared to those obtained for products of pyrolysis of the composite in air. Products of pyrolysis were identified by means of the gas chromatography (GC) method alone or supported with results of mass spectrometry analyses (GC-MS).

  12. Effects of Metallo-Organic Decomposition Agents on Thermal Decomposition and Electrical Conductivity of Low-Temperature-Curing Silver Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chun-An; Lin, Pang; Lin, Hong-Ching; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2006-09-01

    Six low-temperature-curing silver pastes were prepared from silver flake, α-terpineol and various metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) compounds. The thermal decomposition behaviors of the pastes were determined. The microstructures and resistivities of screen-printed films on alumina substrate after thermal treatment were characterized and discussed. Results indicated that 2-ethylhexanoate possesses the lowest decomposition temperature (190.3 °C) among the MOD agents studied, and it forms silver particles to promote the linking of silver flake powders and thus reduces the resistivity to <13 μΩ\\cdotcm at a temperature as low as 200 °C.

  13. Average thermal characteristics of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Average solar wind electron properties based on a 1 year Vela 4 data sample-from May 1967 to May 1968 are presented. Frequency distributions of electron-to-ion temperature ratio, electron thermal anisotropy, and thermal energy flux are presented. The resulting evidence concerning heat transport in the solar wind is discussed.

  14. Mercer's spectral decomposition for the characterization of thermal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahusborde, E.; Azaïez, M.; Belgacem, F. Ben; Palomo Del Barrio, E.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate a tractable Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method used in thermography for the characterization of thermal parameters. The inverse problem to solve is based on the model of transient heat transfer. The most significant advantage is the transformation of the dynamic identification problem into a steady identification equation. The time dependence is accounted for by the SVD in a performing way. We lay down a mathematical foundation well fitted to this approach, which relies on the spectral expansion of Mercer kernels. This enables us to shed more light on most of its important features. Given its potentialities, the analysis we propose here might help users understanding the way the SVD algorithm, or the TSVD, its truncated version, operate in the thermal parameters estimation and why it is relevant and attractive. When useful, the study is complemented by some analytical and numerical illustrations realized within MATLAB's code.

  15. Pv-Thermal Solar Power Assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ansley, Jeffrey H.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2001-10-02

    A flexible solar power assembly includes a flexible photovoltaic device attached to a flexible thermal solar collector. The solar power assembly can be rolled up for transport and then unrolled for installation on a surface, such as the roof or side wall of a building or other structure, by use of adhesive and/or other types of fasteners.

  16. The DOE Solar Thermal Electric Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, T.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Electric Program is managed by the Solar thermal and biomass Power division which is part of the Office of utility Technologies. The focus of the Program is to commercialize solar electric technologies. In this regard, three major projects are currently being pursued in trough, central receiver, and dish/Stirling electric power generation. This paper describes these three projects and the activities at the National laboratories that support them.

  17. Thermal Decomposition of 3-Bromopropene. A Theoretical Kinetic Investigation.

    PubMed

    Tucceri, María E; Badenes, María P; Bracco, Larisa L B; Cobos, Carlos J

    2016-04-21

    A detailed kinetic study of the gas-phase thermal decomposition of 3-bromopropene over wide temperature and pressure ranges was performed. Quantum chemical calculations employing the density functional theory methods B3LYP, BMK, and M06-2X and the CBS-QB3 and G4 ab initio composite models provide the relevant part of the potential energy surfaces and the molecular properties of the species involved in the CH2═CH-CH2Br → CH2═C═CH2 + HBr (1) and CH2═CH-CH2Br → CH2═CH-CH2 + Br (2) reaction channels. Transition-state theory and unimolecular reaction rate theory calculations show that the simple bond fission reaction ( 2 ) is the predominant decomposition channel and that all reported experimental studies are very close to the high-pressure limit of this process. Over the 500-1400 K range a rate constant for the primary dissociation of k2,∞ = 4.8 × 10(14) exp(-55.0 kcal mol(-1)/RT) s(-1) is predicted at the G4 level. The calculated k1,∞ values lie between 50 to 260 times smaller. A value of 10.6 ± 1.5 kcal mol(-1) for the standard enthalpy of formation of 3-bromopropene at 298 K was estimated from G4 thermochemical calculations.

  18. Toxic pollutants emitted from thermal decomposition of phthalimide compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Mackie, John C; Wojtalewicz, Dominika; Kennedy, Eric M; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z

    2011-03-15

    Phthalimide (PI) and tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI) are two structurally similar compounds extensively used as intermediates for the synthesis of variety of industrial chemicals. This paper investigates the thermal decomposition of PI and THPI under oxygen rich to oxygen lean conditions, quantifying the production of toxicants and explaining their formation pathways. The experiments involved a plug flow reactor followed by silica cartridges, activated charcoal trap and a condenser, with the decomposition products identified and quantified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and micro gas chromatography (μGC). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations served to obtain dissociation energies and reaction pathways, to elucidate the reaction mechanism. The oxidation of PI and THPI produced several toxic nitrogen-containing gases and volatile organic compounds, including hydrogen cyanide, isocyanic acid, nitrogen oxides, benzonitrile, maleimide and tentatively identified benzenemethanimine. The detection of dibenzo-p-dioxin (DD) and dibenzofuran (DF) suggests potential formation of the toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in fires involving PI and THPI, in presence of a chlorine source. The oxidation of THPI produced 2-cyclohexen-1-one, a toxic unsaturated ketone. The results of the present study provide the data for quantitative risk assessments of emissions of toxicants in combustion processes involving PI and THPI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Kinetics of Thermal Decomposition of Aluminum Hydride: I-non-Isothermal Decomposition Under Vacuum and in Inert Atmosphere (Argon)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-06

    during decomposition, hydrogen gas is liberated and the initial polyhedral AlH3 crystals yield a final mix of amorphous aluminium and aluminium crystals...fastest is due to growth of the crystals. Thus, during decomposition, hydrogen gas is liberated and the initial polyhedra AlH3 crystals yield a final mix...Thermal stability; VTS ____________________________________________________________________________________ 1. Introduction Alane, AlH3 , is a

  20. Investigation of the thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid containing inorganic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Kogtev, S.E.; Nikandrov, I.S.; Borisenko, A.S.; Peretrutov, A.A.

    1986-09-20

    Oleum is recovered by thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid wastes to sulfur dioxide with conversion of the sulfur dioxide to oleum. The organic substances in sulfuric acid wastes can affect the thermal-decomposition indexes of sulfuric acid wastes. They studied the effect of toluene, nitrotoluene, benzoic acid, and carbon on the yield of sulfur dioxide and also the possibility of reduction of acid vapors by products of pyrolysis and incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. It is shown that the yield of sulfur dioxide in thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon-containing sulfuric acid wastes can be increased if the process assumes the nature of reductive decomposition.

  1. A high temperature kinetic study for the thermal unimolecular decomposition of diethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlAbbad, Mohammed; Giri, Binod Raj; Szőri, Milan; Viskolcz, Béla; Farooq, Aamir

    2017-09-01

    Thermal unimolecular decomposition of diethyl carbonate (DEC) was investigated in a shock tube by measuring ethylene concentration with a CO2 gas laser over 900-1200 K and 1.2-2.8 bar. Rate coefficients were extracted using a simple kinetic scheme comprising of thermal decomposition of DEC as initial step followed by rapid thermal decomposition of the intermediate ethyl hydrogen carbonate. Our results were further analysed using ab initio and master equation calculations to obtain pressure- and temperature-dependence of rate coefficients. Similar to alkyl esters, unimolecular decomposition of DEC is found to undergo six-center retro-ene elimination of ethylene in a concerted manner.

  2. Shock tube study on the thermal decomposition of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Wei; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Wang, Niann-Shiah; Lin, M C

    2011-07-21

    The thermal decomposition of C(2)H(5)OH highly diluted in Ar (1 and 3 ppm) has been studied by monitoring H atoms using the atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS) technique behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range 1450-1760 K at fixed pressure: 1, 1.45, and 2 atm. The rate constant and the product branching fractions have been determined by analyzing temporal profiles of H atoms; the effect of the secondary reactions on the results has been examined by using a detailed reaction mechanism composed of 103 elementary reactions. The apparent rate constant of ethanol decomposition can be expressed as k(1)/s(-1) = (5.28 ± 0.14) × 10(10) exp[-(23,530 ± 980)/T] (T = 1450-1670 K, P = 1-2 atm) without a detectable pressure dependence within the tested pressure range of this study. Branching fractions for producing CH(3) + CH(2)OH (1a) and H(2)O + C(2)H(4) (1b) have been examined by a quantitative measurement of H atoms produced in the successive decompositions of the products CH(2)OH (1a): the pressure dependence of the branching fraction for channel 1a is obtained by a linear least-squares analysis of the experimental data and can be expressed as φ(1a) = (0.71 ± 0.07) - (826 ± 116)/T, (0.92 ± 0.04) - (1108 ± 70)/T, and (1.02 ± 0.10) - (1229 ± 168)/T for T = 1450-1760 K, at P = 0.99, 1.45, and 2.0 atm, respectively. The rate constant obtained in this study is found to be consistent with previous theoretical and experimental results; however, the pressure dependence of the branching fraction obtained in this study is smaller than those of previous theoretical works. Modification of the parameters for the decomposition rate in the falloff region is suggested to be important to improve the practical modeling of the pyrolysis and combustion of ethanol. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Mechanism of thermal decomposition of 2-furyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poskrebyshev, Gregory A.

    2016-02-01

    Mechanism of thermal decomposition of 2-furyl radical is studied using UB3LYP, UBHandHLYP and UMP2/6-311++G(d, p) approaches. Thermodynamic properties of considered intermediates and products of 2-furyl radical decomposition are calculated. Two the most kinetically favorable channels of 2-furyl decomposition are found: cis-cis-5-radC(H)dbnd C(H)C(H)CO (P1) → C2H2 + radCHCO (1) and cis-trans-5-radC(H)dbnd C(H)(H)Cdbnd CO (P2) → CO + C3H3rad (2), where P1 and P2 are the intermediate products of 2-furyl radical decomposition C4H3Orad → P1 ↔ P2 ↔ trans-trans-5-radC(H)dbnd (H)CC(H)CO (P3). The values of equilibrium (Kp) and high pressure limits rate (k∞) constants of the reactions considered in the present work are calculated. The important values of k∞ = 2.85 ×1013(T/298.15) 1.05e - 138.7/RT and = 2.7 ×1012(T/298.15) 1.05e -175.7/RTs-1 are estimated, respectively, for reactions P1 → C2H2 + radCHCO and P2 → H2C = radCC(H)CO (P4) → CO + C3H3rad. The values of Kp = 3.7 ×105(T/298.15) 4.14e -11.9/RT and 3.35(T/298.15) - 0.201e -1.34/RT , respectively, for reactions C4H3Orad ↔ P1 and P1 ↔ P2 are determined. In addition, the importance of formation of most thermodynamically favorable intermediate P3 is reported and the value of Kp = 3.45 ×10-2(T/298.15) 0.317e 4.5/RT for reaction P2 ↔ P3 is calculated.

  4. Analysis of Siderite Thermal Decomposition by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, M. S.; Lin, I.-C.; McKay, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Characterization of carbonate devolitilization has important implications for atmospheric interactions and climatic effects related to large meteorite impacts in platform sediments. On a smaller scale, meteorites contain carbonates which have witnessed shock metamorphic events and may record pressure/temperature histories of impact(s). ALH84001 meteorite contains zoned Ca-Mg-Fe-carbonates which formed on Mars. Magnetite crystals are found in the rims and cores of these carbonates and some are associated with void spaces leading to the suggestion by Brearley et al. that the crystals were produced by thermal decomposition of the carbonate at high temperature, possibly by incipient shock melting or devolitilization. Golden et al. recently synthesized spherical Mg-Fe-Ca-carbonates from solution under mild hydrothermal conditions that have similar carbonate compositional zoning to those of ALH84001. They have shown experimental evidence that the carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblage in ALH84001 can result from a multistep inorganic process involving heating possibly due to shock events. Experimental shock studies on calcium carbonate prove its stability to approx. 60 GPa, well in excess of the approx. 45 GPa peak pressures indicated by other shock features in ALH84001. In addition, Raman spectroscopy of carbonate globules in ALH84001 indicates no presence of CaO and MgO. Such oxide phases should be found associated with the magnetites in voids if these magnetites are high temperature shock products, the voids resulting from devolitilization of CO2 from calcium or magnesium carbonate. However, if the starting material was siderite (FeCO3), thermal breakdown of the ALH84001 carbonate at 470 C would produce iron oxide + CO2. As no documentation of shock effects in siderite exists, we have begun shock experiments to determine whether or not magnetite is produced by the decomposition of siderite within the < 45GPa pressure window and by the resultant thermal pulse to approx

  5. Analysis of Siderite Thermal Decomposition by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, M. S.; Lin, I.-C.; McKay, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Characterization of carbonate devolitilization has important implications for atmospheric interactions and climatic effects related to large meteorite impacts in platform sediments. On a smaller scale, meteorites contain carbonates which have witnessed shock metamorphic events and may record pressure/temperature histories of impact(s). ALH84001 meteorite contains zoned Ca-Mg-Fe-carbonates which formed on Mars. Magnetite crystals are found in the rims and cores of these carbonates and some are associated with void spaces leading to the suggestion by Brearley et al. that the crystals were produced by thermal decomposition of the carbonate at high temperature, possibly by incipient shock melting or devolitilization. Golden et al. recently synthesized spherical Mg-Fe-Ca-carbonates from solution under mild hydrothermal conditions that have similar carbonate compositional zoning to those of ALH84001. They have shown experimental evidence that the carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblage in ALH84001 can result from a multistep inorganic process involving heating possibly due to shock events. Experimental shock studies on calcium carbonate prove its stability to approx. 60 GPa, well in excess of the approx. 45 GPa peak pressures indicated by other shock features in ALH84001. In addition, Raman spectroscopy of carbonate globules in ALH84001 indicates no presence of CaO and MgO. Such oxide phases should be found associated with the magnetites in voids if these magnetites are high temperature shock products, the voids resulting from devolitilization of CO2 from calcium or magnesium carbonate. However, if the starting material was siderite (FeCO3), thermal breakdown of the ALH84001 carbonate at 470 C would produce iron oxide + CO2. As no documentation of shock effects in siderite exists, we have begun shock experiments to determine whether or not magnetite is produced by the decomposition of siderite within the < 45GPa pressure window and by the resultant thermal pulse to approx

  6. Effect of urea additive on the thermal decomposition kinetics of flame retardant greige cotton nonwoven fabric

    Treesearch

    Sunghyun Nam; Brian D. Condon; Robert H. White; Qi Zhao; Fei Yao; Michael Santiago Cintrón

    2012-01-01

    Urea is well known to have a synergistic action with phosphorus-based flame retardants (FRs) in enhancing the FR performance of cellulosic materials, but the effect of urea on the thermal decomposition kinetics has not been thoroughly studied. In this study, the activation energy (Ea) for the thermal decomposition of greige...

  7. An analysis of the thermal decomposition reactions of organic electrolytes used in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campion, Christopher Lawrence

    The thermal decomposition of LiPF6 in solution with carbonate solvents has been investigated. The thermal dissociation of LiPF6 into LiF and PF5 is known. In solution, PF 5 reacts with carbonates to form a variety of decomposition products including: carbon dioxide (CO2), ethers (R2O), alkylfluorides (RF), phosphorus oxyfluoride (OPF3), and fluorophosphates (OPF 2OR, OPF(OR)2), assignment of structure is supported by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography with Mass Selective Detection (GC-MS). Similar decomposition products are observed during the thermal decomposition of carbonate solutions of LiPF6. Since solutions of LiPF6 are widely used as Li-ion battery electrolytes, there is interest among battery manufacturers and researchers as to the thermal decomposition of this electrolyte. Here we describe the structural and mechanistic investigations of the thermal decomposition of lithium-ion battery electrolytes. The electrolyte undergoes autocatalytic decomposition reactions at moderately elevated temperatures (80--100°C) to produce a large number of decomposition products. Results indicate that the thermal decomposition reactions are suppressed by the electrode, particularly the cathode, or intended stabilizing additives.

  8. Performance of a solar-thermal collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H.

    1975-01-01

    Possible means of achieving the technology required for field application of solar thermal power systems are discussed. Simplifications in construction techniques as well as in measurement techniques for parabolic trough collectors are described. Actual measurement data is also given.

  9. Place of solar thermal rockets in space

    SciTech Connect

    Selph, C.C.

    1981-05-01

    The harnessing of sunlight for propulsive energy is a recurring theme in space propulsion, particularly for applications requiring large velocity increments, such as planetary exploration or comet rendezvous. Characteristically, it is viewed in terms of the solar sail and the solar cell, but for operations in Earth orbit these approaches are less desirable because the very low thrust leads to undesirably long maneuver times. Thrust levels several orders of magnitude higher are available with solar thermal rockets, while preserving a specific impulse advantage over chemical systems. The performance advantages, penalties, technological problems, and approaches were examined for solar thermal rockets. Its suitability in several Earth orbit missions is assessed. The peculiarities of vehicle design, the nature of the thruster and the solar concentrator are presented, and AF plans to implement the development of solar rockets are outlined.

  10. Solar thermal power systems. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The work accomplished by the Aerospace Corporation from April 1973 through November 1979 in the mission analysis of solar thermal power systems is summarized. Sponsorship of this effort was initiated by the National Science Foundation, continued by the Energy Research and Development Administration, and most recently directed by the United States Department of Energy, Division of Solar Thermal Systems. Major findings and conclusions are sumarized for large power systems, small power systems, solar total energy systems, and solar irrigation systems, as well as special studies in the areas of energy storage, industrial process heat, and solar fuels and chemicals. The various data bases and computer programs utilized in these studies are described, and tables are provided listing financial and solar cost assumptions for each study. An extensive bibliography is included to facilitate review of specific study results and methodology.

  11. Thermal decomposition of fullerene nanowhiskers protected by amorphous carbon mask

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongxuan; Wang, Chengxiang; Miyazawa, Kun’ichi; Wang, Hongxin; Masuda, Hideki; Fujita, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Fullerene nanostructures are well known for their unique morphology, physical and mechanical properties. The thermal stability of fullerene nanostructures, such as their sublimation at high temperature is also very important for studying their structures and applications. In this work, We observed fullerene nanowhiskers (FNWs) in situ with scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM) at elevated temperatures. The FNWs exhibited different stabilities with different thermal histories during the observation. The pristine FNWs were decomposed at the temperatures higher than 300 °C in a vacuum environment. Other FNWs were protected from decomposition with an amorphous carbon (aC) film deposited on the surface. Based on high spacial resolution, aC film with periodic structure was deposited by helium ion beam induced deposition (IBID) on the surface of FNWs. Annealed at the high temperature, the fullerene molecules were selectively sublimated from the FNWs. The periodic structure was formed on the surface of FNWs and observed by HIM. Monte Carlo simulation and Raman characterization proved that the morphology of the FNWs was changed by helium IBID at high temperature. This work provides a new method of fabricating artificial structure on the surface of FNWs with periodic aC film as a mask. PMID:27991498

  12. Thermal decomposition of fullerene nanowhiskers protected by amorphous carbon mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongxuan; Wang, Chengxiang; Miyazawa, Kun’Ichi; Wang, Hongxin; Masuda, Hideki; Fujita, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    Fullerene nanostructures are well known for their unique morphology, physical and mechanical properties. The thermal stability of fullerene nanostructures, such as their sublimation at high temperature is also very important for studying their structures and applications. In this work, We observed fullerene nanowhiskers (FNWs) in situ with scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM) at elevated temperatures. The FNWs exhibited different stabilities with different thermal histories during the observation. The pristine FNWs were decomposed at the temperatures higher than 300 °C in a vacuum environment. Other FNWs were protected from decomposition with an amorphous carbon (aC) film deposited on the surface. Based on high spacial resolution, aC film with periodic structure was deposited by helium ion beam induced deposition (IBID) on the surface of FNWs. Annealed at the high temperature, the fullerene molecules were selectively sublimated from the FNWs. The periodic structure was formed on the surface of FNWs and observed by HIM. Monte Carlo simulation and Raman characterization proved that the morphology of the FNWs was changed by helium IBID at high temperature. This work provides a new method of fabricating artificial structure on the surface of FNWs with periodic aC film as a mask.

  13. Thermal Decomposition of Almandine Garnet: Mössbauer Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcova, K.; Mashlan, M.; Zboril, R.; Martinec, P.; Kula, P.

    2001-07-01

    The thermal decomposition of almandine garnet from Zoltye Vody, Ukraine, has been studied using57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Room temperature Mössbauer spectrum of the initial powdered sample is characterised by one doublet corresponding to Fe2+ in dodecahedral position 24c. In the room temperature spectra of all heated almandine samples, a doublet corresponding to γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles appeared. Depending on experimental conditions (heating temperature and time), the additional spectral lines of α-Fe2O3 and ɛ-Fe2O3 were observed in Mössbauer spectra. It is obvious that the thermal transformation of almandine garnet in air is related to the primary formation of γ-Fe2O3 superparamagnetic nanoparticles. γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles are transformed into ɛ-Fe2O3 and consequently into α-Fe2O3 at higher temperatures. The mechanism and kinetics of the individual structural transformations depend on experimental conditions — mainly on the heating temperature and size of the particles.

  14. The response of the HMX-based material PBXN-9 to thermal insults: thermal decomposition kinetics and morphological changes

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E A; Hsu, P C; Springer, H K; DeHaven, M R; Tan, N; Turner, H C

    2010-12-10

    PBXN-9, an HMX-formulation, is thermally damaged and thermally decomposed in order to determine the morphological changes and decomposition kinetics that occur in the material after mild to moderate heating. The material and its constituents were decomposed using standard thermal analysis techniques (DSC and TGA) and the decomposition kinetics are reported using different kinetic models. Pressed parts and prill were thermally damaged, i.e. heated to temperatures that resulted in material changes but did not result in significant decomposition or explosion, and analyzed. In general, the thermally damaged samples showed a significant increase in porosity and decrease in density and a small amount of weight loss. These PBXN-9 samples appear to sustain more thermal damage than similar HMX-Viton A formulations and the most likely reasons are the decomposition/evaporation of a volatile plasticizer and a polymorphic transition of the HMX from {beta} to {delta} phase.

  15. The small community solar thermal power experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiceniuk, T.

    1982-01-01

    the objectives and current status of the Small Community Solar Thermal Power Experiment are discussed. The adjustments in programs goals made in response to the changing emphasis in the area of solar energy in national policy are addressed. Planned fabrication and testing activities for the test bed concentrator, power conversion assembly, and control system are outlined.

  16. Solar Thermal Utilization: Past, Present and Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Replacement for Black Chrome Scaling Up of The Laboratory Process for the Deposition of Nanostructured Solar Selective Coatings on 6” Long Tubes Novelty...limited resources known for environmental pollution ! Biomass Gas Nuclear Coal Oil *Renewable Degrading Environment…. Imagine the earth to be a spaceship...FIELD COLLECTOR SOLAR THERMAL APPLICATIONS SOLAR WATER HEATING HEART OF THE SYSTEM – SELECTIVELY COATED ABSORBER SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATINGS 1. BLACK

  17. PV/thermal solar power assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ansley, Jeffrey H.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2004-01-13

    A flexible solar power assembly (2) includes a flexible photovoltaic device (16) attached to a flexible thermal solar collector (4). The solar power assembly can be rolled up for transport and then unrolled for installation on a surface, such as the roof (20, 25) or side wall of a building or other structure, by use of adhesive and/or other types of fasteners (23).

  18. Refractive Secondary Concentrators for Solar Thermal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing technologies that utilize solar energy for various space applications including electrical power conversion, thermal propulsion, and furnaces. Common to all of these applications is the need for highly efficient, solar concentration systems. An effort is underway to develop the innovative single crystal refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. The refractive secondary offers very high throughput efficiencies (greater than 90%), and when used in combination with advanced primary concentrators, enables very high concentration ratios (10,0(X) to 1) and very high temperatures (greater than 2000 K). Presented is an overview of the refractive secondary concentrator development effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center, including optical design and analysis techniques, thermal modeling capabilities, crystal materials characterization testing, optical coatings evaluation, and component testing. Also presented is a discussion of potential future activity and technical issues yet to be resolved. Much of the work performed to date has been in support of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Thermal Propulsion Program. The many benefits of a refractive secondary concentrator that enable efficient, high temperature thermal propulsion system designs, apply equally well to other solar applications including furnaces and power generation systems such as solar dynamics, concentrated thermal photovoltaics, and thermionics.

  19. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, C.P.

    1989-12-31

    This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

  20. USAF solar thermal applications case studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The potential of solar energy technologies to meet mission related applications for process heat was investigated. The reduction of the dependence of military installations on fossil fuels by promoting the use of more abundant resources where liquid hydrocarbons and natural gas are now used is examined. The evaluation and utilization of renewable energy systems to provide process heat and space heating are emphasized. The application of thermal energy systems is divided into four steps: (1) investigation of the potential operational cost effectiveness of selected thermal technologies; (2) selection of a site and preliminary design of point focussing solar thermal plant; (3) construction and test of an engineering prototype; and (4) installation and operation of a solar thermal energy plant.

  1. Thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Li; Proesmans, P.I.; Buelow, S.J.

    1996-10-01

    Thermal decomposition of neat NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} has been the subject of many investigations over the past years. The reaction process is surprisingly complicated and depends largely on the reaction environment. For example, trace amounts of NH{sub 3}, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O are shown to affect the reaction significantly. In this research, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} decompostion was investigated in supercritical water. Reactions were evaluated in the presence of additional components such as organic compounds (CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 3}COOH, phenol), KN(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Experiments were performed at varying temperatures, reaction times, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and organic compound concentrations. Gaseous, liquid and solid products were collected and analysed. The experimental results provided insight of the reaction chemistry which will be discussed in detail.

  2. Thermal decomposition kinetics of sorghum straw via thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Dhyani, Vaibhav; Kumar, Jitendra; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2017-09-01

    The thermal decomposition of sorghum straw was investigated by non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis, where the determination of kinetic triplet (activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and reaction model), was the key objective. The activation energy was determined using different isoconversional methods: Friedman, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO), Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS), Starink, Iterative method of Chai & Chen, Vyazovkin AIC method, and Li & Tang equation. The pre-exponential factor was calculated using Kissinger's equation; while the reaction model was predicted by comparison of z-master plot obtained from experimental values with the theoretical plots. The values of activation energy obtained from isoconversional methods were further used for evaluation of thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy. Results showed three zones of pyrolysis having average activation energy values of 151.21kJ/mol, 116.15kJ/mol, and 136.65kJ/mol respectively. The data was well fitting with two-dimension 'Valensi' model for conversion values from 0 to 0.4 with a coefficient of determination (R(2)) value of 0.988, and with third order reaction model for values from 0.4 to 0.9 with an R(2) value of 0.843. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal decomposition of acetate: III. Catalysis by mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Julie L. S.; Palmer, Donald A.; Barnes, H. L.; Drummond, S. E.

    1994-10-01

    The kinetics of thermal decarboxylation of aqueous solutions of acetic acid and sodium acetate were evaluated at 335 and 355°C in contact with various surfaces as potential catalysts. Quartz, fused quartz, calcite, natural pyrite, titanium oxide, and Au apparently do not catalyze aqueous decarboxylation reactions, in contrast to Pyrex, Ca-montmorillonite, Fe-bearing montmorillonite, hematite, synthetic pyrite, and magnetite. The dependence of the rate of acetic acid decarboxylation on the surface area of pyrite per unit solution volume was also studied. The results show that the decarboxylation of acetic acid and acetate is catalyzed heterogeneously, with the cleavage of the C-C bond occurring while the acetate molecule is adsorbed onto a surface. Entropies and enthalpies of activation obtained from these experiments are compatible with the isokinetic relationship established previously for acetic acid and acetate under similar experimental conditions, indicating the existence of a common rate-determining step. Experimental evidence indicates that oxidation of acetic acid can occur with hematite and defected magnetite. These oxidative decomposition reactions differ from the decarboxylation reaction in that CO 2 and polycondensates are produced instead of CO 2 and CH 4.

  4. Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kistner, Rainer; Price, Henry W.

    1999-04-14

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised in debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier’s perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies.

  5. Thermal Decomposition of New and Aged LX-04 and PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T D; Tarver, C; Idar, D J; Rodin, W A

    2002-04-09

    One-Dimensional-Time-To-Explosion (ODTX) experiments were conducted to study the thermal decomposition of new and aged LX-04, PBX 9501, HMX class 1 and class 2, Estane and EstaneBDNPA-F (PBX 950 1 plasticized-binder) materials. New and aged LX-04 showed comparable decomposition kinetics. The data for aged PBX 9501 showed slightly longer explosion times at equivalent temperatures. Analysis of the error in time measurement is complicated by several experimental factors but the small time change appears to be experimentally significant. The results suggest that aged PBX 9501 is slightly more thermally stable. The thermal decomposition of these materials were modeled using a coupled thermal and heat transport code (chemical TOPAZ) using separate kinetics for HMX and binder decomposition. The current kinetic models describe the longer explosion times by the loss of plasticizer-binder constituent, which was more thermally reactive.

  6. Kinetics of Thermal Decomposition of Aluminum Hydride in Argon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    investigate the decomposition kinetics of alane ( AlH3 ) in argon atmosphere and to shed light on the mechanism of alane decomposition. Two kinetic models...fastest is due to growth of the crystals. Thus, during decomposition, hydrogen gas is liberated and the initial polyhedra AlH3 crystals yield final...INTRODUCTION Recently, the interest in alane ( AlH3 ) as a solid rocket fuel has been renewed presumably after the development of new methods of

  7. Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photograph shows an overall view of the Solar Thermal Propulsion Test Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The 20-by 24-ft heliostat mirror, shown at the left, has dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on an 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror (right). The concentrator mirror then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber, shown at the front of concentrator mirror. Researchers at MSFC have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than chemical a combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propell nt. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  8. Thermal decomposition and oxidation of CH3OH.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Fang; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Xu, Ding-Wei; Wang, Niann-Shiah

    2013-01-24

    Thermal decomposition of CH(3)OH diluted in Ar has been studied by monitoring H atoms behind reflected shock waves of 100 ppm CH(3)OH + Ar. The total decomposition rate k(1) for CH(3)OH + M → products obtained in this study is expressed as, ln(k(1)/cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) = -(14.81 ± 1.22) - (38.86 ± 1.82) × 10(3)/T, over 1359-1644 K. The present result on k(1) is indicated to be substantially smaller than the extrapolation of the most of the previous experimental data but consistent with the published theoretical results [Faraday Discuss. 2002, 119, 191-205 and J. Phys. Chem. A 2007, 111, 3932-3950]. Oxidation of CH(3)OH has been studied also by monitoring H atoms behind shock waves of (0.35-100) ppm CH(3)OH + (100-400) ppm O(2) + Ar. For the low concentration CH(3)OH (below 10 ppm) + O(2) mixtures, the initial concentration of CH(3)OH is evaluated by comparing evolutions of H atoms in the same concentration of CH(3)OH with addition of 300 ppm H(2) diluted in Ar. The branching fraction for CH(3)OH + Ar → (1)CH(2) + H(2)O + Ar has been quantitatively evaluated from this comparative measurements with using recent experimental result on the yield of H atoms in the reaction of (1,3)CH(2) + O(2) [J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, 116, 9245-9254]; i.e., the branching fraction for the above reaction is evaluated as, φ(1a) = 0.20 ± 0.04 at T = 1880-2050 K, in the 1.3 and 3.5 ppm CH(3)OH + 100 ppm O(2) samples. An extended reaction mechanism for the pyrolysis and oxidation of CH(3)OH is constructed based on the results of the present study combined with the oxidation mechanism of natural gas [GRI-Mech 3.0]; evolution of H atoms can be predicted very well with this new reaction scheme over a wide concentration range for the pyrolysis (0.36-100 ppm CH(3)OH), and oxidation (0.36-100 ppm CH(3)OH + 100/400 ppm O(2)) of methanol.

  9. Hybrids of Solar Sail, Solar Electric, and Solar Thermal Propulsion for Solar-System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    Solar sails have long been known to be an attractive method of propulsion in the inner solar system if the areal density of the overall spacecraft (S/C) could be reduced to approx.10 g/sq m. It has also long been recognized that the figure (precise shape) of useful solar sails needs to be reasonably good, so that the reflected light goes mostly in the desired direction. If one could make large reflective surfaces with reasonable figure at an areal density of approx.10 g/sq m, then several other attractive options emerge. One is to use such sails as solar concentrators for solar-electric propulsion. Current flight solar arrays have a specific output of approx. 100W/kg at 1 Astronomical Unit (AU) from the sun, and near-term advances promise to significantly increase this figure. A S/C with an areal density of 10 g/sq m could accelerate up to 29 km/s per year as a solar sail at 1 AU. Using the same sail as a concentrator at 30 AU, the same spacecraft could have up to approx. 45 W of electric power per kg of total S/C mass available for electric propulsion (EP). With an EP system that is 50% power-efficient, exhausting 10% of the initial S/C mass per year as propellant, the exhaust velocity is approx. 119 km/s and the acceleration is approx. 12 km/s per year. This hybrid thus opens attractive options for missions to the outer solar system, including sample-return missions. If solar-thermal propulsion were perfected, it would offer an attractive intermediate between solar sailing in the inner solar system and solar electric propulsion for the outer solar system. In the example above, both the solar sail and solar electric systems don't have a specific impulse that is near-optimal for the mission. Solar thermal propulsion, with an exhaust velocity of the order of 10 km/s, is better matched to many solar system exploration missions. This paper derives the basic relationships between these three propulsion options and gives examples of missions that might be enabled by

  10. Hybrids of Solar Sail, Solar Electric, and Solar Thermal Propulsion for Solar-System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    Solar sails have long been known to be an attractive method of propulsion in the inner solar system if the areal density of the overall spacecraft (S/C) could be reduced to approx.10 g/sq m. It has also long been recognized that the figure (precise shape) of useful solar sails needs to be reasonably good, so that the reflected light goes mostly in the desired direction. If one could make large reflective surfaces with reasonable figure at an areal density of approx.10 g/sq m, then several other attractive options emerge. One is to use such sails as solar concentrators for solar-electric propulsion. Current flight solar arrays have a specific output of approx. 100W/kg at 1 Astronomical Unit (AU) from the sun, and near-term advances promise to significantly increase this figure. A S/C with an areal density of 10 g/sq m could accelerate up to 29 km/s per year as a solar sail at 1 AU. Using the same sail as a concentrator at 30 AU, the same spacecraft could have up to approx. 45 W of electric power per kg of total S/C mass available for electric propulsion (EP). With an EP system that is 50% power-efficient, exhausting 10% of the initial S/C mass per year as propellant, the exhaust velocity is approx. 119 km/s and the acceleration is approx. 12 km/s per year. This hybrid thus opens attractive options for missions to the outer solar system, including sample-return missions. If solar-thermal propulsion were perfected, it would offer an attractive intermediate between solar sailing in the inner solar system and solar electric propulsion for the outer solar system. In the example above, both the solar sail and solar electric systems don't have a specific impulse that is near-optimal for the mission. Solar thermal propulsion, with an exhaust velocity of the order of 10 km/s, is better matched to many solar system exploration missions. This paper derives the basic relationships between these three propulsion options and gives examples of missions that might be enabled by

  11. Solar thermal electric power information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-02-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar thermal electric power are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from five solar thermal electric power groups of respondents are analyzed: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Utilities, Electric Power Engineers, and Educators. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  12. Ab initio Kinetics and Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Mononitrobiuret and 1,5-Dinitrobiuret

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-14

    interpret products formation, as well as previous pyrolysis experiments.1 Temperature and pressure - dependent rate coefficients were calculated using...for the primary decomposition channels for MNB and DNB were quantified as functions of temperature and pressure . In addition, the thermal...symmetry. The rate coefficients for the primary decomposition channels for MNB and DNB were quantified as functions of temperature and pressure

  13. Thermal Decomposition Mechanisms of Alkylimidazolium Ionic Liquids with CN-containing Anions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    perform, display, or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT Due to the unusually high heats of vaporization of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs... vaporization of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), volatilization of RTILs through thermal decomposition and vaporization of the decomposition...ions and have distinctly different physical and chemical properties from molecular liquids . The most widely recognized characteristic of ionic liquids

  14. Fresnel Concentrators for Space Solar Power and Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Rodney; Parks, Robert W.; Craig, Harry B. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large deployable Fresnel concentrators are applicable to solar thermal propulsion and multiple space solar power generation concepts. These concentrators can be used with thermophotovoltaic, solar thermionic, and solar dynamic conversion systems. Thin polyimide Fresnel lenses and reflectors can provide tailored flux distribution and concentration ratios matched to receiver requirements. Thin, preformed polyimide film structure components assembled into support structures for Fresnel concentrators provide the capability to produce large inflation-deployed concentrator assemblies. The polyimide film is resistant to the space environment and allows large lightweight assemblies to be fabricated that can be compactly stowed for launch. This work addressed design and fabrication of lightweight polyimide film Fresnel concentrators, alternate materials evaluation, and data management functions for space solar power concepts, architectures, and supporting technology development.

  15. Solar thermal propulsion for planetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that many desirable planetary exploration missions require large injection delta-V. Solar Thermal Rocket (STR) propulsion, under study for orbit-raising applications may enhance or enable such high-energy missions. The required technology of thermal control for liquid hydrogen propellant is available for the required storage duration. Self-deploying, inflatable solar concentrators are under study. The mass penalty for passive cryogenic thermal control, liquid hydrogen tanks and solar concentrators does not compromise the specific impulse advantage afforded by the STR as compared to chemical propulsion systems. An STR injection module is characterized and performance is evaluated by comparison to electric propulsion options for the Saturn Orbiter Titan Probe (SOTP) and Uranus Flyby Uranus Probe (UFUP) missions.

  16. Studying the thermal/non-thermal crossover in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes work performed under contract NAS5-32584 for Phase 3 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) from 1 November 1993 through 1 November 1994. We have made spectral observations of the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emissions from solar flares using the Burst and Transit Source Experiment (BASTE) on CGRO. These measurements of their spectrum and time profile provided valuable information on the fundamental flare processes of energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport. Our scientific objective was to study both the thermal and non-thermal sources of solar flare hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission.

  17. Thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates of BTATz-CMDB propellant.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Wang, Bo-Zhou; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Cheng; Hu, Rong-Zu; Ren, Ying-Hui; Xu, Si-Yu; Xu, Kang-Zhen; Ren, Xiao-Ning

    2010-09-15

    The composite modified double base (CMDB) propellants (nos. RB0601 and RB0602) containing 3,6-bis (1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-yl-amino)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (BTATz) without and with the ballistic modifier were prepared and their thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates were investigated. The results show that there are three mass-loss stages in TG curve and two exothermic peaks in DSC curve for the BTATz-CMDB propellant. The first two mass-loss stages occur in succession and the temperature ranges are near apart, and the decomposition peaks of the two stages overlap each other, inducing only one visible exothermic peak appear in DSC curve during 350-550 K. The reaction mechanisms of the main exothermal decomposition processes of RB0601 and RB0602 are all classified as chemical reaction, the mechanism functions are f(alpha)=(1-alpha)(2), and the kinetic equations are dalpha/dt = 10(19.24)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T) and dalpha/dt = 10(20.32)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T). The thermal safety evaluation on the BTATz-CMDB propellants was obtained. With the substitution of 26% RDX by BTATz and with the help of the ballistic modifier in the CMDB propellant formulation, the burning rate can be improved by 89.0% at 8 MPa and 47.1% at 22 MPa, the pressure exponent can be reduced to 0.353 at 14-20 MPa. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Thermal decomposition characteristics of microwave liquefied rape straw residues using thermogravimetric analysis

    Treesearch

    Xingyan Huang; Cornelis F. De Hoop; Jiulong Xie; Chung-Yun Hse; Jinqiu Qi; Yuzhu Chen; Feng Li

    2017-01-01

    The thermal decomposition characteristics of microwave liquefied rape straw residues with respect to liquefaction condition and pyrolysis conversion were investigated using a thermogravimetric (TG) analyzer at the heating rates of 5, 20, 50

  19. Solar thermal vacuum tests of Magellan spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, James C.

    1990-01-01

    The Magellen solar/thermal/vacuum test involved a number of unique requirements and approaches. Because of the need to operate in orbit around Venus, the solar intensity requirement ranged up to 2.3 suns or Earth equivalent solar constants. Extensive modification to the solar simulator portion of the test facility were required to achieve this solar intensity. Venus albedo and infrared emission were simulated using temperature controlled movable louver panels to allow the spacecraft to view either a selectable temperature black heat source with closed louvers, or the chamber coldwall behind open louvers. The test conditions included widely varying solar intensities, multiple sun angles, alternate hardware configurations, steady state and transient cases, and cruise and orbital power profiles. Margin testing was also performed, wherein supplemental heaters were mounted to internal thermal blankets to verify spacecraft performance at higher than expected temperatures. The test was successful, uncovering some spacecraft anomalies and verifying the thermal design. The test support equipment experienced some anomalous behavior and a significant failure during the test.

  20. Solar thermal components. A bibliography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozman, W. R. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    This bibliographic series cites and abstracts literature and technical papers on components applied to solar thermal energy utilization. The quarterly volumes are divided into ten categories: material properties; flat plat collectors; concentrating collectors; thermal storage; heat pumps; coolers and heat exchangers; solar ponds and distillation; greenhouses; process pleat; and irrigation pumps. Each quarterly volume is compiled from a wide variety of data bases, report literature, technical briefs, journal articles and other traditional and non traditional sources. The Technology Application Center maintains a library containing many of the articles and publications referenced in the series.

  1. Proceedings of the Solar Thermal Technology Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyner, C. E.

    1987-08-01

    The Solar Thermal Technology Conference was held on August 26 to 28, 1987, at the Marriott Hotel, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The meeting was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories. Topics covered during the conference included a status summary of the Sandia Solar Thermal Development Project, perspectives on central and distributed receiver technology including energy collection and conversion technologies, systems analyses and applications experiments. The proceedings contain summaries (abstracts and principal visual aids) of the presentations made at the conference.

  2. Proceedings of the Solar Thermal Technology Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diver, R. B.

    1986-06-01

    The Solar Thermal Technology Conference was held on June 17 to 19, 1986 at the Marriott Hotel, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The meeting was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories. Topics covered during the conference included a status summary of the Sandia Solar Thermal Development Project, perspectives on central and distributed receiver technology including energy collection and conversion technologies, systems analyses and applications experiments. The proceedings contain summaries (abstracts plus principal visual aids) of the presentations made at the conference.

  3. Vaporisation and thermal decomposition of dialkylimidazolium halide ion ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Kevin R J; Armstrong, James P; Licence, Peter; Jones, Robert G

    2014-01-28

    Vaporisation and liquid phase thermal decomposition, TD, of two halide ion ionic liquids, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, [C8C1Im]Cl, and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide, [C8C1Im]I, are investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) line of sight mass spectrometry (LOSMS) at ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The ability to use MS to distinguish between vaporisation and TD allows the thermodynamics/kinetics of both vaporisation and TD to be investigated within the same experiments. Vaporisation of both halide ion ionic liquids is demonstrated. For both [C8C1Im]Cl and [C8C1Im]I the vapour is shown to be composed of neutral ion pairs (NIPs). The enthalpy of vaporisation at temperature T, ΔvapHT, was experimentally determined as ΔvapH455 = 151 ± 10 kJ mol(-1) for [C8C1Im]Cl and ΔvapH480 = 149 ± 8 kJ mol(-1) for [C8C1Im]I. Extrapolation of ΔvapHT to the reference temperature, 298 K, gave ΔvapH298 = 166 ± 10 kJ mol(-1) for [C8C1Im]Cl and ΔvapH298 = 167 ± 8 kJ mol(-1) for [C8C1Im]I, higher than most ΔvapH298 values measured to date for other [C8C1Im](+)-containing ionic liquids. In addition, predictions of ΔvapH298 for other halide ion ionic liquids are made. Liquid phase TD is shown to proceed via nucleophilic substitution to give two sets of products: 1-octylimidazole and methylhalide, and 1-methylimidazole and 1-octylhalide. The activation energy of TD at a temperature T, Ea,TD,T, is measured for the nucleophilic substitution of [C8C1Im]I to give methyliodide; Ea,TD,480 = 136 ± 15 kJ mol(-1). Ea,TD,T is measured for the nucleophilic substitution of [C8C1Im]Cl to give methylchloride; Ea,TD,455 = 132 ± 10 kJ mol(-1). The fact that ΔvapHT and Ea,TD,T are the same (within error) for both ionic liquids is commented upon, and conclusions are drawn as to the thermal stability of these ionic liquids.

  4. Mössbauer study of the thermal decomposition of lepidocrocite and characterization of the decomposition products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bakker, P. M. A.; de Grave, E.; Vandenberghe, R. E.; Bowen, L. H.; Pollard, R. J.; Persoons, R. M.

    1991-08-01

    is the correlation between the magnitude of the hyperfine field and the average canting angle for A-site ferric ions, whereas the B-site spins show a more uniform canting. The Mössbauer parameters of the two hematite samples with MCD104 values of respectively 61.0 and 26.5 nm display a temperature variation which is very similar to that of small-particle hematites obtained from thermal decomposition of goethite. However, for a given MCD the Morin transition temperature for the latter samples is about 30 K lower. This has tentatively been ascribed to the different mechanisms of formation, presumably resulting in slightly larger lattice parameters for the hematite particles formed from goethite, thus shifting the Morin transition to lower temperatures.

  5. The thermal decomposition of methane in a tubular reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Steinberg, M.

    1992-01-01

    The reaction rate of methane decomposition using a tubular reactor having a 1 inch inside diameter with an 8 foot long heated zone was investigated in the temperature range of 700 to 900 C with pressures ranging from 28.2 to 56.1 atm. Representing the rate by a conventional model, {minus}dC{sub CH4}/dt= k1 C{sub CH4} {minus}k2 C{sub H2}{sup 2}, the rate constant k1 for methane decomposition was determined. The activation energy, 31.3 kcal/mol, calculated by an Arrhenius Plot was lower than for previously published results for methane decomposition. This result indicates that submicron particles found in the reactor adhere to the inside of the reactor and these submicron high surface area carbon particles tend to catalyze the methane decomposition. The rate constant has been found to be approximately constant at 900 C with pressure range cited above. The rate of methane decomposition increases with methane partial pressure in first-order. The rate of the methane decomposition is favored by higher temperatures and pressures while the thermochemical equilibrium of methane decomposition is favored by lower pressures. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Electrical field-assisted thermal decomposition of boron nitride nanotube: Experiments and first principle calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2009-09-01

    We directly observed the Joule-heating-induced decomposition of multiwalled BN nanotubes using a transmission electron microscope equipped with a scanning tunneling microscope unit. The decomposition temperature is found to be dependent on an applied electrical field. We propose a model that due to the partially ionic nature of the B-N bond, the decomposition energy is both temperature- and electrical field-related: it is named as electrical field-assisted thermal decomposition. The model fits the experimental data very well and is considered to be general for all nanostructures with polar bonds.

  7. Thermal decomposition studies of cotton radiolytically grafted with phosphours- and bormine-containing flame retardants

    SciTech Connect

    Mey-Marom, A.; Behar, D.

    1980-04-01

    Thermal analysis of cotton samples grafted with traillylphosphate (TAP) and 2,2,2-tribromoethyl acrylate (TBEA) was carried out. Grafting of poly-TAP causes a significant decrease in the decomposition temperature of cotton. The cotton decomposition is acid catalyzed by H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ formed during the decomposition of the grafted poly-TAP. The HBr evolved during decomposition was monitored conitnuously during thermal analysis of cotton grafted with ploly-TBEA. No significant flame-retarding effect by HBr was found. Since grafred poly-TBEA causes a decrease in the decomposition temperature of cotton, it is suggested that the flame retardant mechanism for poly-TBEA in cotton occurs mainly in the solid phasse before most of te HBr is released.

  8. Thermal decomposition pathways for 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene (FOX-7).

    PubMed

    Booth, Ryan S; Butler, Laurie J

    2014-10-07

    In this study, we computationally investigate the initial and subsequent steps in the chemical mechanism for the gas-phase thermal decomposition of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene (FOX-7). We determine the key exothermic step in the gas-phase thermal decomposition of FOX-7 and explore the similarities and differences between FOX-7 and other geminal dinitro energetic materials. The calculations reveal a mechanism for NO loss involving a 3-member cyclic intermediate, rather than a nitro-nitrite isomerization, that occurs in the radical intermediates formed throughout the decomposition mechanism.

  9. Thermal decomposition pathways for 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene (FOX-7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Ryan S.; Butler, Laurie J.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we computationally investigate the initial and subsequent steps in the chemical mechanism for the gas-phase thermal decomposition of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene (FOX-7). We determine the key exothermic step in the gas-phase thermal decomposition of FOX-7 and explore the similarities and differences between FOX-7 and other geminal dinitro energetic materials. The calculations reveal a mechanism for NO loss involving a 3-member cyclic intermediate, rather than a nitro-nitrite isomerization, that occurs in the radical intermediates formed throughout the decomposition mechanism.

  10. Thermal decomposition studies of explosives for component applications. [hns

    SciTech Connect

    Jungst, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The explosives PETN and HNS are currently found in a variety of Sandia devices. We have carried out a number of special studies to measure decomposition rates of these materials in hardware at moderate temperatures. The goal of this work was to generate information to enable predictions of component lifetimes to be made. This presentation will discuss sampling and measurement techniques for decomposition products and show results of their application to components containing PETN and HNS.

  11. A thermal desorption study of the kinetics of uranium hydride decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillard, R. S.; Taylor, C. D.; Wermer, J. R.; Mara, N. A.; Cooley, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    The decomposition of uranium hydride powder was studied using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). In the TDS spectra, three distinct decomposition peaks were observed. However, only the high temperature peak was associated with an activation energy, calculated to be 43 kJ/mol H. This activation energy was used to construct outgassing diagrams that can be used to estimate the temperature and time dependence of UH3 decomposition. Potential models for explaining the three decomposition peaks and, thus, the decomposition mechanism are also presented and compared with H desorption energies calculated from first principles. Additional experiments on α-U coupons containing UH3 corrosion pits were also performed. In those samples in excess of 6 peaks are observed. It is shown that the first three hydrogen peaks are related to the decomposition of UH3.

  12. The solar thermal report. Volume 3, Number 5

    SciTech Connect

    1982-09-01

    This report is published by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the DOE Solar Thermal Technology Division to provide an account of work sponsored by the Division and to aid the community of people interested in solar thermal technology in gaining access to technical information. Contents include articles entitled the following: Solar system supplies thermal energy for producing chemicals at USS plant; Solar thermal power module designed for small community market; Roof-mounted trough system supplies process heat for Caterpillar plant; Solar thermal update -- 10 MW(e) pilot plant and 3-MW(t) total energy system; Solar steam processes crude oil; New York investigates solar ponds as a source of thermal energy; On-farm solar -- Finding new uses for the sun; and Topical index of solar thermal report articles.

  13. Solar thermal plant impact analysis and requirements definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The technology and economics of solar thermal electric systems (STES) for electric power production is discussed. The impacts of and requirements for solar thermal electric power systems were evaluated.

  14. Solar Thermal Power Systems parabolic dish project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truscello, V. C.

    1981-01-01

    The status of the Solar Thermal Power Systems Project for FY 1980 is summarized. Included is: a discussion of the project's goals, program structure, and progress in parabolic dish technology. Analyses and test results of concentrators, receivers, and power converters are discussed. Progress toward the objectives of technology feasibility, technology readiness, system feasibility, and system readiness are covered.

  15. ROSET. Solar Thermal Electric Power Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    O`Doherty, R.

    1982-01-01

    ROSET consists of five programs to calculate the energy output of a solar thermal electric power system. The ROSET programs provide two distinct functions. The first four (WTPREAD, FIELD, POWERT, and POWERE) use hourly weather data for a year to calculate hourly electric energy output for a solar thermal system. The last program (HISTO) uses one or more electric energy output files created by the first four programs to provide an energy distribution for each hour of a typical day. The output of ROSET is a set of energy distributions that can be used by program ULMOD as part of the overall utility value determination process. While ROSET is set up to simulate one system at a time, its constituent programs are also capable of performing parametric trade studies in a stand-alone mode. The trade studies can yield valuable information on sizing a solar thermal electric power system. Only when a single system is simulated, however, are the outputs of the various programs compatible and able to produce input for ULMOD. Auxiliary program FINAM performs an economic analysis to determine the value of solar thermal energy systems to electric utilities.

  16. Thermal effects testing at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, M. E.; Cameron, C. P.; Ghanbari, C. M.

    1992-11-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirkland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The permanent features of the facility include a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, two point-focus parabolic concentrators, and Engine Test Facility. The heliostat field contains 220 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/cm(sup 2) that is uniform over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MW(sub t). The solar beam has been used to simulate aerodynamic heating for several customers. Thermal nuclear blasts have also been simulated using a high-speed shutter in combination with heliostat control. The shutter can accommodate samples up to 1 m (times) 1 m and it has been used by several US and Canadian agencies. A glass-windowed wind tunnel is also available in the Solar Tower. It provides simultaneous exposure to the thermal flux and air flow. Each solar furnace at the facility includes a heliostat, an attenuator, and a parabolic concentrator. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/cm(sup 2) over and delivers a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kW(sub t). A second furnace produces flux levels up to 1000 W/cm(sup 2) over a 4 cm diameter and total power of 60 kW(sub t). Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11 m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/cm(sup 2) over a 2.5 cm diameter and total power of 75 kW(sub t). High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses.

  17. The correlation between elongation at break and thermal decomposition of aged EPDM cable polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šarac, T.; Devaux, J.; Quiévy, N.; Gusarov, A.; Konstantinović, M. J.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of simultaneous thermal and gamma irradiation ageing on the mechanical and physicochemical properties of industrial EPDM was investigated. Accelerated ageing, covering a wide range of dose rates, doses and temperatures, was preformed in stagnant air on EPDM polymer samples extracted from the cables in use in the Belgian nuclear power plants. The mechanical properties, ultimate tensile stress and elongation at break, are found to exhibit the strong dependence on the dose, ageing temperature and dose rate. The thermal decomposition of aged polymer is observed to be the dose dependent when thermogravimetry test is performed under air atmosphere. No dose dependence is observed when thermal decomposition is performed under nitrogen atmosphere. The thermal decomposition rates are found to fully mimic the reduction of elongation at break for all dose rates and ageing temperatures. This effect is argued to be the result of thermal and radiation mediated oxidation degradation process.

  18. Solar Thermal Propulsion Investigation Activities in NAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahara, Hironori; Shimizu, Morio

    2004-03-01

    We successfully developed the ultra-light single shell paraboloidal concentrators made of a sheet of aluminized or silvered polymer membrane, formed via plastic deformation due to stress relaxation under high temperature condition by means of Straight Formation Method. Furthermore, we improved the precision of the concentrators by taking the elastic deformation of residual stress into consideration, and obtained the best concentration performance equivalent to a highly precise paraboloidal glass mirror. In solar concentration, the diameter of solar focal image via the single shell polymer concentrator is almost equal to that via the glass mirror and they are twice as large as that of the theoretical. The ultra-light single shell polymer concentrators are very useful for the concentrator in solar thermal propulsion system and solar power station in particular, and also promising item for beamed energy propulsion.

  19. Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hebert, Peter H [Glendale, CA; Brandt, Randolph J [Palmdale, CA

    2012-06-19

    A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

  20. Borohydride Catalysis of Nitramine Thermal Decomposition and Combustion. 2. Thermal Decomposition of Catalyzed and Uncatalyzed HMX Propellant Formulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    decomposition temperature. Aaded catalyst appears to decrease m/e 70 (1,2,4- oxadiazole ?) formation at low temperature, but to increase it slightly at...Unknown A (1,2,4- oxadiazole ?), from HMX Decomposition......................................................... 17 18 Typical Mass Spectrum of...formation of 1,3,5-triazine and Unknown A (1,2,4- oxadiazole ?) were also studied. II. EXPERIMENTAL The HMX-GAP and HMX-PEG compositions were prepared at

  1. Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Ammonium Perchlorate and of an Ammonium-Perchlorate-Based Composite Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H2O, O2, Cl2, N2O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200(micro) diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20(micro) diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH3 + HClO4 followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  2. The thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate and of an ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-03-24

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200{micro} diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20{micro} diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH{sub 3} + HClO{sub 4} followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  3. Solar thermal power storage applications lead laboratory overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radosevich, L. G.

    1980-01-01

    The implementation of the applications elements of the thermal energy storage for Solar Thermal Applications program is described. The program includes the accelerated development of thermal storage technologies matched to solar thermal power system requirements and scheduled milestones. The program concentrates on storage development in the FY80 to 85 time period with emphasis on the more near-term solar thermal power system application.

  4. Decomposition mechanisms in thermally-aged thin-film explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, K.L.; Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    The isothermal decomposition of nitrocellulose (NC) has been examined using two substantially different experimental techniques, involving both confined and unconfined samples. The confined isothermal aging technique involved confined thin-film samples heated to temperatures of 150 to 170{degrees}C, for 1 to 72 hours. Condensed-phase chemistry was monitored real-time using FTIR. Results indicated that the first step in decomposition was scission of the O-NO{sub 2} bond and subsequent formation of carbonyl and hydroxyl products. Scission of the O-NO{sub 2} bond appeared to occur by a first-order reaction. The Arrhenius expression for the first-order reaction rate constant was evaluated from the experimental data. The unconfined rapid isothermal decomposition technique involved both high speed-photography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Mass spectra obtained from experiments at 420{degrees}C indicated that NO{sub 2} formation and, therefore, scission of the O-NO{sub 2} bond occurred by a first order reaction, the rate constant for which was evaluated from the experimental data. The rate constant for global pseudo-first order decomposition of NC at 450{degrees}C was also estimated from high speed photography results. Rate constants at 420 and 450{degrees}C were predicted using the Arrhenius expression developed from the confined isothermal aging results and were in good agreement with the rate constants obtained at those temperatures in the unconfined rapid decomposition experiments using TOFMS and high-speed photography. Results from these substantially different measurements gave consistent results over a temperature range of about 300{degrees}C, in which reaction rates vary by nine orders of magnitude, and indicate that the two experimental techniques being developed have good potential for studying condensed-phase decomposition of energetic materials.

  5. Thermal Decomposition of New and Aged LX-04 and PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T D; Tarver, C; Idar, D J

    2002-03-25

    One-Dimensional-Time-To-Explosion (ODTX) experiments were conducted to study the thermal decomposition of aged LX-04, aged PBX 9501, HMX class 1 and class 2, Estane and Estane/BDNPA-F (PBX 950 1 plasticized-binder) materials. The tests involved heating 12.7 mm diameter spherical samples in pre-heated aluminum anvils until explosion. The times to explosion at different heating temperatures were compared to historical data on new LX-04 and PBX 9501 compounds to study any changes to their thermal stability. New and aged LX-04 showed comparable decomposition kinetics. The data for aged PBX 9501 showed slightly longer explosion times at equivalent temperatures. Analysis of the error in time measurement is limited and complicated by several experimental factors but the small time change appears to be experimentally significant. The thermal decomposition of these PBXs were modeled using a coupled thermal and heat transport code (chemical TOPAZ) using separate kinetics for HMX and binder decomposition. Separate decomposition models were developed for HMX and the reactive PBX 9501 binder component (1:1 Estane:BDNPA/F) based on the measured explosion times. Thermal aging models can describe longer explosion times by the loss of plasticizer-binder constituent which was more thermally reactive.

  6. Decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    A cornerstone of ecosystem ecology, decomposition was recognized as a fundamental process driving the exchange of energy in ecosystems by early ecologists such as Lindeman 1942 and Odum 1960). In the history of ecology, studies of decomposition were incorporated into the International Biological Program in the 1960s to compare the nature of organic matter breakdown in various ecosystem types. Such studies still have an important role in ecological studies of today. More recent refinements have brought debates on the relative role microbes, invertebrates and environment in the breakdown and release of carbon into the atmosphere, as well as how nutrient cycling, production and other ecosystem processes regulated by decomposition may shift with climate change. Therefore, this bibliography examines the primary literature related to organic matter breakdown, but it also explores topics in which decomposition plays a key supporting role including vegetation composition, latitudinal gradients, altered ecosystems, anthropogenic impacts, carbon storage, and climate change models. Knowledge of these topics is relevant to both the study of ecosystem ecology as well projections of future conditions for human societies.

  7. Low-temperature thermal decomposition of crystalline partly and completely deuterated ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majda, Dorota; Korobov, Alexander; Filek, Urszula; Sulikowski, Bogdan; Midgley, Paul; Nicol, David A.; Klinowski, Jacek

    2011-03-01

    Although ammonium perchlorate, widely used as a rocket propellant, has been extensively investigated for many years, the mechanism of its thermal decomposition at low temperatures remains controversial. Examination of the thermal behaviour of large crystals of partly and completely deuterated ammonium perchlorate by DSC, SEM, TG and QMS reveals that the rates of thermal decomposition depend on the degree of deuteration and decrease in the sequence N[H/D] 4ClO 4 > NH 4ClO 4 > ND 4ClO 4.

  8. Preparation, X-ray crystallography, and thermal decomposition of some transition metal perchlorate complexes of hexamethylenetetramine.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurdip; Baranwal, B P; Kapoor, I P S; Kumar, Dinesh; Fröhlich, Roland

    2007-12-20

    The perchlorate complexes of manganese, nickel, and zinc with hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) of the general formula [M(H2O-HMTA-H2O)2(H2O-ClO4)2(H2O)2] (where M=Mn, Ni, and Zn) have been prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography. Thermal studies were undertaken using thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and explosion delay (DE) measurements. The kinetics of thermal decomposition of these complexes was investigated using isothermal TG data by applying isoconversional method. The decomposition pathways of the complexes have also been proposed. These were found to explode when subjected to higher temperatures.

  9. solar thermal power systems advanced solar thermal technology project, advanced subsystems development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary design for a prototype small (20 kWe) solar thermal electric generating unit was completed, consisting of several subsystems. The concentrator and the receiver collect solar energy and a thermal buffer storage with a transport system is used to provide a partially smoothed heat input to the Stirling engine. A fossil-fuel combustor is included in the receiver designs to permit operation with partial or no solar insolation (hybrid). The engine converts the heat input into mechanical action that powers a generator. To obtain electric power on a large scale, multiple solar modules will be required to operate in parallel. The small solar electric power plant used as a baseline design will provide electricity at remote sites and small communities.

  10. Preliminary Investigation of the Thermal Decomposition of Ablefoam and EF-AR20 Foam (Ablefoam Replacement)

    SciTech Connect

    ULIBARRI, TAMARA A.; DERZON, DORA K.; ERICKSON, KENNETH L.; CASTANEDA, JAIME N.; BOREK III, THEODORE T.; RENLUND, ANITA M.; MILLER, JILL C.; CLAYTON, DANIEL; FLETCHER, THOMAS H.

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary thermal decomposition experiments with Ablefoam and EF-AR20 foam (Ablefoam replacement) were done to determine the important chemical and associated physical phenomena that should be investigated to develop the foam decomposition chemistry sub-models that are required in numerical simulations of the fire-induced response of foam-filled engineered systems for nuclear safety applications. Although the two epoxy foams are physically and chemically similar, the thermal decomposition of each foam involves different chemical mechanisms, and the associated physical behavior of the foams, particularly ''foaming'' and ''liquefaction,'' have significant implications for modeling. A simplified decomposition chemistry sub-model is suggested that, subject to certain caveats, may be appropriate for ''scoping-type'' calculations.

  11. Determination of the Thermal Decomposition Products of Terephthalic Acid by Using Curie-Point Pyrolyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begüm Elmas Kimyonok, A.; Ulutürk, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    The thermal decomposition behavior of terephthalic acid (TA) was investigated by thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and Curie-point pyrolysis. TG/DTA analysis showed that TA is sublimed at 276°C prior to decomposition. Pyrolysis studies were carried out at various temperatures ranging from 160 to 764°C. Decomposition products were analyzed and their structures were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 11 degradation products were identified at 764°C, whereas no peak was observed below 445°C. Benzene, benzoic acid, and 1,1‧-biphenyl were identified as the major decomposition products, and other degradation products such as toluene, benzophenone, diphenylmethane, styrene, benzaldehyde, phenol, 9H-fluorene, and 9-phenyl 9H-fluorene were also detected. A pyrolysis mechanism was proposed based on the findings.

  12. The Influence of Magnesium Hydride on the Thermal Decomposition Properties of Nitrocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Limei; Du, Ping; Yao, Miao

    2014-05-01

    Magnesium hydride is a kind of attractive hydrogen storage material. In this article, the thermal decomposition characteristic of the pure nitrocellulose and the mixture of nitrocellulose with 5% MgH2 was investigated using an accelerating rate calorimeter. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy, Ea; preexponential factor, A; and self-accelerating decomposition temperature, TSADT, were also calculated. We easily showed that the decomposition reaction could be accelerated by adding MgH2, which indicated that MgH2 has an obvious catalytic influence on the decomposition of nitrocellulose. On the other hand, the calculated values of Ea and TSADT showed a decrease in thermal sensitivity with the addition of MgH2. These results were in accordance with our objectives. Therefore, MgH2 is very likely to be an important additive in propellants.

  13. Thermal Decomposition Behaviors and Burning Characteristics of AN/Nitramine-Based Composite Propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naya, Tomoki; Kohga, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) has attracted much attention due to its clean burning nature as an oxidizer. However, an AN-based composite propellant has the disadvantages of low burning rate and poor ignitability. In this study, we added nitramine of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) or cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) as a high-energy material to AN propellants to overcome these disadvantages. The thermal decomposition and burning rate characteristics of the prepared propellants were examined as the ratio of AN and nitramine was varied. In the thermal decomposition process, AN/RDX propellants showed unique mass loss peaks in the lower temperature range that were not observed for AN or RDX propellants alone. AN and RDX decomposed continuously as an almost single oxidizer in the AN/RDX propellant. In contrast, AN/HMX propellants exhibited thermal decomposition characteristics similar to those of AN and HMX, which decomposed almost separately in the thermal decomposition of the AN/HMX propellant. The ignitability was improved and the burning rate increased by the addition of nitramine for both AN/RDX and AN/HMX propellants. The increased burning rates of AN/RDX propellants were greater than those of AN/HMX. The difference in the thermal decomposition and burning characteristics was caused by the interaction between AN and RDX.

  14. Mechanism of thermal decomposition of carbamoyl phosphate and its stabilization by aspartate and ornithine transcarbamoylases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Xia, Jiarong; Guallar, Victor; Krilov, Goran; Kantrowitz, Evan R

    2008-11-04

    Carbamoyl phosphate (CP) has a half-life for thermal decomposition of <2 s at 100 degrees C, yet this critical metabolic intermediate is found even in organisms that grow at 95-100 degrees C. We show here that the binding of CP to the enzymes aspartate and ornithine transcarbamoylase reduces the rate of thermal decomposition of CP by a factor of >5,000. Both of these transcarbamoylases use an ordered-binding mechanism in which CP binds first, allowing the formation of an enzyme.CP complex. To understand how the enzyme.CP complex is able to stabilize CP we investigated the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of CP in aqueous solution in the absence and presence of enzyme. By quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations we show that the critical step in the thermal decomposition of CP in aqueous solution, in the absence of enzyme, involves the breaking of the C O bond facilitated by intramolecular proton transfer from the amine to the phosphate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the binding of CP to the active sites of these enzymes significantly inhibits this process by restricting the accessible conformations of the bound ligand to those disfavoring the reactive geometry. These results not only provide insight into the reaction pathways for the thermal decomposition of free CP in an aqueous solution but also show why these reaction pathways are not accessible when the metabolite is bound to the active sites of these transcarbamoylases.

  15. Full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion via photonic nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianglei; Xuan, Yimin

    2017-07-24

    Volumetric solar thermal conversion is an emerging technique for a plethora of applications such as solar thermal power generation, desalination, and solar water splitting. However, achieving broadband solar thermal absorption via dilute nanofluids is still a daunting challenge. In this work, full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion is demonstrated over a thin layer of the proposed 'photonic nanofluids'. The underlying mechanism is found to be the photonic superposition of core resonances, shell plasmons, and core-shell resonances at different wavelengths, whose coexistence is enabled by the broken symmetry of specially designed composite nanoparticles, i.e., Janus nanoparticles. The solar thermal conversion efficiency can be improved by 10.8% compared with core-shell nanofluids. The extinction coefficient of Janus dimers with various configurations is also investigated to unveil the effects of particle couplings. This work provides the possibility to achieve full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion, and may have potential applications in efficient solar energy harvesting and utilization.

  16. Thermal Performance of an Annealed Pyrolytic Graphite Solar Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Hornacek, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    A solar collector having the combined properties of high solar absorptance, low infrared emittance, and high thermal conductivity is needed for applications where solar energy is to be absorbed and transported for use in minisatellites. Such a solar collector may be used with a low temperature differential heat engine to provide power or with a thermal bus for thermal switching applications. One concept being considered for the solar collector is an Al2O3 cermet coating applied to a thermal conductivity enhanced polished aluminum substrate. The cermet coating provides high solar absorptance and the polished aluminum provides low infrared emittance. Annealed pyrolytic graphite embedded in the aluminum substrate provides enhanced thermal conductivity. The as-measured thermal performance of an annealed pyrolytic graphite thermal conductivity enhanced polished aluminum solar collector, coated with a cermet coating, will be presented.

  17. Kinetic Parameters for the Thermal Decomposition of Forest Waste Using Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaundiyal, Alok; Tewari, Pramod

    2017-05-01

    The purview of paper pivoted around the pyrolysis decomposition of forest waste (pine needle litter) by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Experiments were carried out in the presence of Nitrogen atmosphere. The experimental data was compared with those obtained by numerical solution of distributed activation energy model (DAEM). Asymptotic expansion is adopted to evaluate the pre-exponential factor, mean activation energy and variance. The correction factor Bi has been invoked to describe accurately the differential thermogravitmeric curves of thermal decomposition of pine needles.

  18. Operational experience from solar thermal energy projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, C. P.

    1984-03-01

    Over the past few years, Sandia National Laboratories were involved in the design, construction, and operation of a number of DOE-sponsored solar thermal energy systems. Among the systems currently in operation are several industrial process heat projects and the Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test systems, all of which use parabolic troughs, and the Shenandoah Total Energy Project, which uses parabolic dishes. Operational experience has provided insight to both desirable and undesirable features of the designs of these systems. Features of these systems which are also relevant to the design of parabolic concentrator thermal electric systems are discussed. Other design features discussed are system control functions which were found to be especially convenient or effective, such as local concentrator controls, rainwash controls, and system response to changing isolation. Drive systems are also discussed with particular emphasis of the need for reliability and the usefulness of a manual drive capability.

  19. Operational Experience from Solar Thermal Energy Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past few years, Sandia National Laboratories were involved in the design, construction, and operation of a number of DOE-sponsored solar thermal energy systems. Among the systems currently in operation are several industrial process heat projects and the Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test systems, all of which use parabolic troughs, and the Shenandoah Total Energy Project, which uses parabolic dishes. Operational experience has provided insight to both desirable and undesirable features of the designs of these systems. Features of these systems which are also relevant to the design of parabolic concentrator thermal electric systems are discussed. Other design features discussed are system control functions which were found to be especially convenient or effective, such as local concentrator controls, rainwash controls, and system response to changing isolation. Drive systems are also discussed with particular emphasis of the need for reliability and the usefulness of a manual drive capability.

  20. Value of solar thermal industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.R.; Fassbender, L.L.; Chockie, A.D.

    1986-03-01

    This study estimated the value of solar thermal-generated industrial process heat (IPH) as a function of process heat temperature. The value of solar thermal energy is equal to the cost of producing energy from conventional fuels and equipment if the energy produced from either source provides an equal level of service. This requirement put the focus of this study on defining and characterizing conventional process heat equipment and fuels. Costs (values) were estimated for 17 different design points representing different combinations of conventional technologies, temperatures, and fuels. Costs were first estimated for median or representative conditions at each design point. The cost impact of capacity factor, efficiency, fuel escalation rate, and regional fuel price differences were then evaluated by varying each of these factors within credible ranges.

  1. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  2. Thermal decomposition of gaseous ammonium nitrate at low pressure: kinetic modeling of product formation and heterogeneous decomposition of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Lin, M C

    2009-12-03

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH(4)NO(3) (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH(4)NO(3) at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH(3) and HNO(3), followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO(3), HNO(3) + M --> OH + NO(2) + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N(2), N(2)O, H(2)O, and NH(3), which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH(3)-NO(2) (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO(3) itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO(3) in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO(3), HNO(3) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)) --> OH + NO(2) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH(3) and H(2)O; the rate could be represented by k(2b) = 7.91 x 10(7) exp(-12 600/T) s(-1), which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO(3) decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  3. Thermal decomposition of energetic materials viewed via dynamic x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Oschwald, D.

    2014-01-13

    We describe the evolution of solid density, leading up to ignition in the slow thermal decomposition of the solid organic secondary explosive octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine. This work describes an x-ray radiographic diagnostic, allowing the study of solid density in a fully encased explosive heated to thermal explosion. The result of this study is the ability to observe and manipulate the ignition volume in a thermal explosion.

  4. Suppressed decomposition of organometal halide perovskites by impermeable electron-extraction layers in inverted solar cells.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, K O; Zhao, J; Pourdavoud, N; Becker, T; Hu, T; Olthof, S; Meerholz, K; Hoffmann, L; Gahlmann, T; Heiderhoff, R; Oszajca, M F; Luechinger, N A; Rogalla, D; Chen, Y; Cheng, B; Riedl, T

    2017-01-09

    The area of thin-film photovoltaics has been overwhelmed by organometal halide perovskites. Unfortunately, serious stability concerns arise with perovskite solar cells. For example, methyl-ammonium lead iodide is known to decompose in the presence of water and, more severely, even under inert conditions at elevated temperatures. Here, we demonstrate inverted perovskite solar cells, in which the decomposition of the perovskite is significantly mitigated even at elevated temperatures. Specifically, we introduce a bilayered electron-extraction interlayer consisting of aluminium-doped zinc oxide and tin oxide. We evidence tin oxide grown by atomic layer deposition does form an outstandingly dense gas permeation barrier that effectively hinders the ingress of moisture towards the perovskite and-more importantly-it prevents the egress of decomposition products of the perovskite. Thereby, the overall decomposition of the perovskite is significantly suppressed, leading to an outstanding device stability.

  5. Suppressed decomposition of organometal halide perovskites by impermeable electron-extraction layers in inverted solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, K.O.; Zhao, J.; Pourdavoud, N.; Becker, T.; Hu, T.; Olthof, S.; Meerholz, K.; Hoffmann, L.; Gahlmann, T.; Heiderhoff, R.; Oszajca, M. F.; Luechinger, N. A.; Rogalla, D.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, B.; Riedl, T

    2017-01-01

    The area of thin-film photovoltaics has been overwhelmed by organometal halide perovskites. Unfortunately, serious stability concerns arise with perovskite solar cells. For example, methyl-ammonium lead iodide is known to decompose in the presence of water and, more severely, even under inert conditions at elevated temperatures. Here, we demonstrate inverted perovskite solar cells, in which the decomposition of the perovskite is significantly mitigated even at elevated temperatures. Specifically, we introduce a bilayered electron-extraction interlayer consisting of aluminium-doped zinc oxide and tin oxide. We evidence tin oxide grown by atomic layer deposition does form an outstandingly dense gas permeation barrier that effectively hinders the ingress of moisture towards the perovskite and—more importantly—it prevents the egress of decomposition products of the perovskite. Thereby, the overall decomposition of the perovskite is significantly suppressed, leading to an outstanding device stability. PMID:28067308

  6. Suppressed decomposition of organometal halide perovskites by impermeable electron-extraction layers in inverted solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, K. O.; Zhao, J.; Pourdavoud, N.; Becker, T.; Hu, T.; Olthof, S.; Meerholz, K.; Hoffmann, L.; Gahlmann, T.; Heiderhoff, R.; Oszajca, M. F.; Luechinger, N. A.; Rogalla, D.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, B.; Riedl, T.

    2017-01-01

    The area of thin-film photovoltaics has been overwhelmed by organometal halide perovskites. Unfortunately, serious stability concerns arise with perovskite solar cells. For example, methyl-ammonium lead iodide is known to decompose in the presence of water and, more severely, even under inert conditions at elevated temperatures. Here, we demonstrate inverted perovskite solar cells, in which the decomposition of the perovskite is significantly mitigated even at elevated temperatures. Specifically, we introduce a bilayered electron-extraction interlayer consisting of aluminium-doped zinc oxide and tin oxide. We evidence tin oxide grown by atomic layer deposition does form an outstandingly dense gas permeation barrier that effectively hinders the ingress of moisture towards the perovskite and--more importantly--it prevents the egress of decomposition products of the perovskite. Thereby, the overall decomposition of the perovskite is significantly suppressed, leading to an outstanding device stability.

  7. Results of Evaluation of Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave

    2003-01-01

    The solar thermal propulsion evaluation reported here relied on prior research for all information on solar thermal propulsion technology and performance. Sources included personal contacts with experts in the field in addition to published reports and papers. Mission performance models were created based on this information in order to estimate performance and mass characteristics of solar thermal propulsion systems. Mission analysis was performed for a set of reference missions to assess the capabilities and benefits of solar thermal propulsion in comparison with alternative in-space propulsion systems such as chemical and electric propulsion. Mission analysis included estimation of delta V requirements as well as payload capabilities for a range of missions. Launch requirements and costs, and integration into launch vehicles, were also considered. The mission set included representative robotic scientific missions, and potential future NASA human missions beyond low Earth orbit. Commercial communications satellite delivery missions were also included, because if STP technology were selected for that application, frequent use is implied and this would help amortize costs for technology advancement and systems development. A C3 Topper mission was defined, calling for a relatively small STP. The application is to augment the launch energy (C3) available from launch vehicles with their built-in upper stages. Payload masses were obtained from references where available. The communications satellite masses represent the range of payload capabilities for the Delta IV Medium and/or Atlas launch vehicle family. Results indicated that STP could improve payload capability over current systems, but that this advantage cannot be realized except in a few cases because of payload fairing volume limitations on current launch vehicles. It was also found that acquiring a more capable (existing) launch vehicle, rather than adding an STP stage, is the most economical in most cases.

  8. Structural change of metallofullerene: an easier thermal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shixiong; Zhang, Jun; Guo, Xihong; Qiu, Xiaohui; Dong, Jinquan; Yuan, Bingkai; Ibrahim, Kurash; Wang, Jiaou; Qian, Haijie; Zhao, Yuliang; Yang, Shangyuan; Hao, Jian; Zhang, Hong; Yuan, Hui; Xing, Gengmei; Sun, Baoyun

    2011-10-05

    We have studied for the first time the structural change of high-purity metallofullerene (Gd@C(82)) upon heat treatment in an ultra-high vacuum system (10(-10) Torr) and examined the decomposition product through successive analysis with MS, IR, Raman, TEM, EDS and XPS. It was found that metallofullerene (Gd@C(82)) had fully collapsed at 580 °C which was lower than that for the complete destruction of C(60). The easier decomposition should be ascribed to the encapsulated metal in the carbon cage which could induce the deformation of the C-C bond. The analysis indicated that the broken metallofullerene (Gd@C(82)) became a kind of graphite-like material with a lot of defects. The Gd atoms leaked out from the carbon cage and aggregated together to form a regular arrangement.

  9. Structural change of metallofullerene: an easier thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shixiong; Zhang, Jun; Guo, Xihong; Qiu, Xiaohui; Dong, Jinquan; Yuan, Bingkai; Ibrahim, Kurash; Wang, Jiaou; Qian, Haijie; Zhao, Yuliang; Yang, Shangyuan; Hao, Jian; Zhang, Hong; Yuan, Hui; Xing, Gengmei; Sun, Baoyun

    2011-10-01

    We have studied for the first time the structural change of high-purity metallofullerene (Gd@C82) upon heat treatment in an ultra-high vacuum system (10-10 Torr) and examined the decomposition product through successive analysis with MS, IR, Raman, TEM, EDS and XPS. It was found that metallofullerene (Gd@C82) had fully collapsed at 580 °C which was lower than that for the complete destruction of C60. The easier decomposition should be ascribed to the encapsulated metal in the carbon cage which could induce the deformation of the C-C bond. The analysis indicated that the broken metallofullerene (Gd@C82) became a kind of graphite-like material with a lot of defects. The Gd atoms leaked out from the carbon cage and aggregated together to form a regular arrangement.

  10. Investigation of the effect of intensive milling in a planetary ball mill on the thermal decomposition of basic nickel carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Książek, K.; Wacke, S.; Górecki, T.; Górecki, Cz

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics of thermal decomposition of basic nickel carbonate NiCO3Ni·(OH)2·nH2O and the effect of intensive milling in a planetary ball mill on its parameters, have been investigated. The values of the reaction heat and of the activation energy of thermal decomposition have been determined. Investigations of the thermal decomposition of the products of ball milling of investigated compound revealed a distinct effect of milling on the reaction temperature and heat consumed during the thermal decomposition of investigated compound.

  11. Solar thermal program summary, fiscal year 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    The nation faces many difficult challenges in energy supply and use. These challenges involve numerous national issues, including energy security, energy cost, international balance-of-trade, and international competitiveness. Energy use directly affects environmental quality as well. Growing, pervasive problems with atmospheric pollution, water resources, acid rain, and the greenhouse effect may ultimately limit the burning of fossil fuels. We need to find ways to ameliorate these environmental problems while maintaining assured access to the energy resources our nation requires. Concentrated sunlight is a versatile and high-quality form of energy that can help us meet our energy needs. Solar thermal energy systems concentrate the sun's radiation to generate electricity, produce high-temperature heat for industrial and commercial uses, and carry out various chemical reactions that take advantage of the unique attributes of highly concentrated sunlight. Solar thermal technology has many applications, including electrical power generation, hazardous waste destruction, and other advanced applications such as materials processing and the pumping of lasers using very high concentration. Solar thermal technology is a desirable energy supply option for several reasons.

  12. Mass spectral studies of thermal decomposition of metal nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jason G.; Fonseca, Rodney W.; Holcombe, James A.

    1995-10-01

    Residual gas analysis and static secondary ion mass spectrometry are used in an attempt to elucidate the process responsible for the appearance of metal oxides in the gas phase during low temperature nitrate decomposition of Pb, Cu, Cd and Ag nitrates in vacuo. Observed signals for MO, MNO 3+ together with M 2+ species in the gas phase during the decomposition of some of the metal nitrates indicate that a physical expulsion mechanism is probably responsible for the low temperature production of these metal-containing species. The "gasification mechanism" provided by L'vov states that metal nitrates decompose in a single mechanistic step to product MO(g), O 2 and NO 2 and that the temperature of the decomposition is predictable from thermodynamics. The observation of unexplained gas phase species, the absence of O 2 during CuO + production, and the lack of agreement between activation energies and appearance temperatures fail to support the gasification model. Instead, it is suggested that during the decomposition, which is governed by the kinetics of the process, the evolution of the gaseous products, such as O 2 and NO 2, carry the observed metal-containing species into the vapor phase when the liquid state is present on the surface (e.g. AgNO 3, Cu(NO 3) 2 or Cd(NO 3) 2). The crystal rearrangement of the solid (e.g. conversion of Pb(NO 3) 2 to PbO) and subsequent loss of integrity of the crystal lattice results in the dislocation of the metal-containing species, which are swept from the surface during the O 2 and NO 2 evolution.

  13. Thermal decomposition and vibrational spectroscopic aspects of pyridinium hexafluorophosphate (C5H5NHPF6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekgoathi, M. D. S.; Kock, L. D.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal decomposition and vibrational spectroscopic properties of pyridinium hexafluorophosphate (C5H5NHPF6) have been studied. The structure of the compound is better interpreted as having a cubic space group, based on Raman and infrared vibrational spectroscopy experiments and group theoretical correlation data between site symmetry species and the spectroscopic space group. The 13C NMR data shows three significant signals corresponding to the three chemical environments expected on the pyridinium ring i.e. γ, β and α carbons, suggesting that the position of the anion must be symmetrical with respect to the pyridinium ring's C2v symmetry. The process of thermal decomposition of the compound using TGA methods was found to follow a contracting volume model. The activation energy associated with the thermal decomposition reaction of the compound is 108.5 kJ mol-1, while the pre exponential factor is 1.51 × 109 sec-1.

  14. Preparation of MXene-Cu2O nanocomposite and effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yupeng; Wang, Libo; Li, Zhengyang; Zhou, Aiguo; Hu, Qianku; Cao, Xinxin

    2014-09-01

    MXenes are novel graphene-like 2-D materials. Cu2O is an effective additive for thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). We reported the synthesis of MXene (Ti3C2), Cu2O and MXene-Cu2O respectively. The samples were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results indicate that the MXene is composed of lots of nano-sheets and the thickness is 30 ± 10 nm, and Cu2O nanoparticles nucleate and grow heterogeneously directly on the surface of MXene. The effect of these MXene, Cu2O and MXene-Cu2O samples on the thermal decomposition of AP were investigated using TG-DSC. The results revealed that MXene-Cu2O have a great influence on the thermal decomposition of AP than that of pure MXene and Cu2O.

  15. Influence of Microwave Heating and Thermal Auxiliary on Decomposition of Siderite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celikdemir, Mehmet; Sarikaya, Musa; Depci, Tolga; Aydogmus, Ramazan

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, microwave radiation was used to decrease power inputs and roasting duration time for thermal decomposition of Deveci, Hekimhan siderite ore. The siderite was not enough to absorb adequate microwave radiation to start the decomposition or roasting reaction. Therefore, sucrose as a thermal auxiliary was added to the raw siderite ore before microwave irradiation. The effect of amount of sucrose (10 to 30% by weight) against the duration of heating and roasting temperature of the thermal decomposition of siderite was investigated in the present study. On the contrary of the literature, the experimental results showed that the siderite was decomposed in 3 minutes with addition of 30 wt% sucrose and transformed to Fe3O4. The temperature, the weight loss and the magnetic susceptibility of the roasted final product were recorded as 1100 °C, 32.14 wt.% and 15410.03*10-8 m3/kg., respectively.

  16. Thermal decomposition of mono- and bimetallic magnesium amidoborane complexes.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Jan; Piesik, Dirk F-J; Harder, Sjoerd

    2010-07-26

    Complexes of the type [(DIPPnacnac)MgNH(R)BH(3)] have been prepared (DIPPnacnac=CH{(CMe)(2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)N)}(2)). The following substituents R have been used: H, Me, iPr, DIPP (DIPP=2,6-diisopropylphenyl). Complexes [(DIPPnac- nac)MgNH(2)BH(3)].THF, [{(DIPPnac- nac)MgNH(iPr)BH(3)}(2)] and [(DIPPnacnac)MgNH(DIPP)BH(3)] were structurally characterised. The Mg amidoborane complexes decompose at a significantly higher temperature (90-110 degrees C) than the corresponding Ca amidoborane complexes (20-110 degrees C). The complexes with the smaller R substituents (H, Me) gave a mixture of decomposition products of which one could be structurally characterised as [{(DIPPnacnac)Mg}(2)(H(3)B-NMe-BH-NMe)].THF. [{(DIPP- nacnac)MgNH(iPr)BH(3)}(2)] cleanly decomposed to [(DIPPnacnac)MgH], which was characterised as a dimeric THF adduct. The amidoborane complex with the larger DIPP-substituent decomposed into a borylamide complex [(DIPPnacnac)MgN(DIPP)BH(2)], which was structurally characterised as its THF adduct. Bimetallic Mg amidoborane complexes decompose at lower temperatures (60-90 degrees C) and show a different decomposition pathway. The dinuclear Mg amidoborane complexes presented here are based on DIPPnacnac units that are either directly coupled through N-N bonding (abbreviated NN) or through a 2,6-pyridylene bridge (abbreviated PYR). Crystal structures of [PYR-{Mg(nBu)}(2)], [PYR-{MgNH(iPr)BH(3)}(2)], [NN-{MgNH(iPr)BH(3)}(2)]THF and the decomposition products [PYR-Mg(2)(iPrN-BH-iPrN-BH(3))] and [NN-Mg(2)(iPrN-BH-iPrN-BH(3))].THF are presented. The following conclusions can be drawn from these studies: i) The first step in the decomposition of a metal amidoborane complex is beta-hydride elimination, which results in formation of a metal hydride complex and R(H)N=BH(2), ii) depending on the nature of the metal, the metal hydride is either stable and can be isolated or it reacts further, iii) amidoborane anions with small R substituents decompose into the dianionic

  17. Thermal decomposition of nano-enabled thermoplastics: Possible environmental health and safety implications

    PubMed Central

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Singh, Dilpreet; Zhang, Fang; Chalbot, Marie-Cecile G.; Spielman-Sun, Eleanor; Hoering, Lutz; Kavouras, Ilias G.; Lowry, Gregory V.; Wohlleben, Wendel; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Nano-enabled products (NEPs) are currently part of our life prompting for detailed investigation of potential nano-release across their life-cycle. Particularly interesting is their end-of-life thermal decomposition scenario. Here, we examine the thermal decomposition of a widely used NEP, namely thermoplastic nanocomposites, and assess the properties of the byproducts (released aerosol and residual ash) and possible environmental health and safety implications. We focus on establishing a fundamental understanding on the effect of thermal decomposition parameters, such as polymer matrix, nanofiller properties, decomposition temperature, on the properties of byproducts using a recently-developed lab-based experimental integrated platform. Our results indicate that thermoplastic polymer matrix strongly influences size and morphology of released aerosol, while there was minimal but detectable nano-release, especially when inorganic nanofillers were used. The chemical composition of the released aerosol was found not to be strongly influenced by the presence of nanofiller at least for the low, industry-relevant loadings assessed here. Furthermore, the morphology and composition of residual ash was found to be strongly influenced by the presence of nanofiller. The findings presented here on thermal decomposition/incineration of NEPs raise important questions and concerns regarding the potential fate and transport of released engineered nanomaterials in environmental media and potential environmental health and safety implications. PMID:26642449

  18. Thermal decomposition of nano-enabled thermoplastics: Possible environmental health and safety implications.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Singh, Dilpreet; Zhang, Fang; Chalbot, Marie-Cecile G; Spielman-Sun, Eleanor; Hoering, Lutz; Kavouras, Ilias G; Lowry, Gregory V; Wohlleben, Wendel; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-03-15

    Nano-enabled products (NEPs) are currently part of our life prompting for detailed investigation of potential nano-release across their life-cycle. Particularly interesting is their end-of-life thermal decomposition scenario. Here, we examine the thermal decomposition of widely used NEPs, namely thermoplastic nanocomposites, and assess the properties of the byproducts (released aerosol and residual ash) and possible environmental health and safety implications. We focus on establishing a fundamental understanding on the effect of thermal decomposition parameters, such as polymer matrix, nanofiller properties, decomposition temperature, on the properties of byproducts using a recently-developed lab-based experimental integrated platform. Our results indicate that thermoplastic polymer matrix strongly influences size and morphology of released aerosol, while there was minimal but detectable nano-release, especially when inorganic nanofillers were used. The chemical composition of the released aerosol was found not to be strongly influenced by the presence of nanofiller at least for the low, industry-relevant loadings assessed here. Furthermore, the morphology and composition of residual ash was found to be strongly influenced by the presence of nanofiller. The findings presented here on thermal decomposition/incineration of NEPs raise important questions and concerns regarding the potential fate and transport of released engineered nanomaterials in environmental media and potential environmental health and safety implications.

  19. Nonlocal thermal transport in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Devore, C. Richard

    1987-01-01

    A flaring solar atmosphere is modeled assuming classical thermal transport, locally limited thermal transport, and nonlocal thermal transport. The classical, local, and nonlocal expressions for the heat flux yield significantly different temperature, density, and velocity profiles throughout the rise phase of the flare. Evaporation of chromospheric material begins earlier in the nonlocal case than in the classical or local calculations, but reaches much lower upward velocities. Much higher coronal temperatures are achieved in the nonlocal calculations owing to the combined effects of delocalization and flux limiting. The peak velocity and momentum are roughly the same in all three cases. A more impulsive energy release influences the evolution of the nonlocal model more than the classical and locally limited cases.

  20. Solar photovoltaic/thermal (hybrid) energy project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, D. B.

    1981-09-01

    Development of photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) collectors and residential heat pump systems is reported. Candidate collector and residential heat pump systems were evaluated using the TRNSYS computer program. It is found that combined heat pump and PV array is a promising method for achieving economical solar cooling. Where the cooling load is dominant, exclusively PV collectors rather than PV/T collectors are preferred. Where the heating load is dominant, the thermal component of PV/T collectors makes a significant contribution to heating a residence. PV/T collectors were developed whose combined efficiency approaches the efficiency of a double glazed, exclusively thermal collector. The design and operational problems of air source heat pumps are reviewed. Possible effects of compressor startup transients on PV power system operation are discussed.

  1. The comparative extinguishment performance and thermal decomposition products of halon alternative agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipczak, Robert A.

    1994-12-01

    Halon 1301, Halon 1211, and eleven alternative fire-fighting agents were compared for extinguishment effectiveness and thermal decomposition product generation, using a laboratory-scale test apparatus having methane as the fuel. Chemical analysis was conducted using a magnetic sector mass spectrometer with simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide, water, and acid gas production. Chemical mechanisms are advanced to explain how halogenated hydrocarbons extinguish fires. The major conclusion was that the alternative agents were not as effective at fighting fires as Halons and that greater amounts of acid gases were produced during extinguishment. Hydrogen fluoride was found to be the predominant thermal decomposition product for all agents.

  2. Solar thermal technology report, FY 1981. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The activities of the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Technology Program are discussed. Highlights of technical activities and brief descriptions of each technology are given. Solar thermal conversion concepts are discussed in detail, particularily concentrating collectors and salt-gradient solar ponds.

  3. An overview of SERI solar thermal research facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, F.

    1980-12-01

    A brief overview of the four Solar Energy Research Institute in-house solar thermal research laboratories is presented, including advanced component research and mid-temperature collector research field facilities, which have been combined into a single unit, the Thermal Conversion Research Station. The facility for solar energy research and applications in process heat, which is currently under construction, is also described.

  4. Ab initio kinetics and thermal decomposition mechanism of mononitrobiuret and 1,5-dinitrobiuret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongyan; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L.

    2015-05-01

    Mononitrobiuret (MNB) and 1,5-dinitrobiuret (DNB) are tetrazole-free, nitrogen-rich, energetic compounds. For the first time, a comprehensive ab initio kinetics study on the thermal decomposition mechanisms of MNB and DNB is reported here. In particular, the intramolecular interactions of amine H-atom with electronegative nitro O-atom and carbonyl O-atom have been analyzed for biuret, MNB, and DNB at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The results show that the MNB and DNB molecules are stabilized through six-member-ring moieties via intramolecular H-bonding with interatomic distances between 1.8 and 2.0 Å, due to electrostatic as well as polarization and dispersion interactions. Furthermore, it was found that the stable molecules in the solid state have the smallest dipole moment amongst all the conformers in the nitrobiuret series of compounds, thus revealing a simple way for evaluating reactivity of fuel conformers. The potential energy surface for thermal decomposition of MNB was characterized by spin restricted coupled cluster theory at the RCCSD(T)/cc-pV∞ Z//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level. It was found that the thermal decomposition of MNB is initiated by the elimination of HNCO and HNN(O)OH intermediates. Intramolecular transfer of a H-atom, respectively, from the terminal NH2 group to the adjacent carbonyl O-atom via a six-member-ring transition state eliminates HNCO with an energy barrier of 35 kcal/mol and from the central NH group to the adjacent nitro O-atom eliminates HNN(O)OH with an energy barrier of 34 kcal/mol. Elimination of HNN(O)OH is also the primary process involved in the thermal decomposition of DNB, which processes C2v symmetry. The rate coefficients for the primary decomposition channels for MNB and DNB were quantified as functions of temperature and pressure. In addition, the thermal decomposition of HNN(O)OH was analyzed via Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/multi-well master equation simulations, the results of which reveal the formation

  5. Ab initio kinetics and thermal decomposition mechanism of mononitrobiuret and 1,5-dinitrobiuret.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongyan; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L

    2015-05-28

    Mononitrobiuret (MNB) and 1,5-dinitrobiuret (DNB) are tetrazole-free, nitrogen-rich, energetic compounds. For the first time, a comprehensive ab initio kinetics study on the thermal decomposition mechanisms of MNB and DNB is reported here. In particular, the intramolecular interactions of amine H-atom with electronegative nitro O-atom and carbonyl O-atom have been analyzed for biuret, MNB, and DNB at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The results show that the MNB and DNB molecules are stabilized through six-member-ring moieties via intramolecular H-bonding with interatomic distances between 1.8 and 2.0 Å, due to electrostatic as well as polarization and dispersion interactions. Furthermore, it was found that the stable molecules in the solid state have the smallest dipole moment amongst all the conformers in the nitrobiuret series of compounds, thus revealing a simple way for evaluating reactivity of fuel conformers. The potential energy surface for thermal decomposition of MNB was characterized by spin restricted coupled cluster theory at the RCCSD(T)/cc-pV∞ Z//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level. It was found that the thermal decomposition of MNB is initiated by the elimination of HNCO and HNN(O)OH intermediates. Intramolecular transfer of a H-atom, respectively, from the terminal NH2 group to the adjacent carbonyl O-atom via a six-member-ring transition state eliminates HNCO with an energy barrier of 35 kcal/mol and from the central NH group to the adjacent nitro O-atom eliminates HNN(O)OH with an energy barrier of 34 kcal/mol. Elimination of HNN(O)OH is also the primary process involved in the thermal decomposition of DNB, which processes C2v symmetry. The rate coefficients for the primary decomposition channels for MNB and DNB were quantified as functions of temperature and pressure. In addition, the thermal decomposition of HNN(O)OH was analyzed via Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/multi-well master equation simulations, the results of which reveal the formation

  6. Ab Initio Kinetics and Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Mononitrobiuret and 1,5- Dinitrobiuret

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hongyan; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam G.

    2015-05-26

    Mononitrobiuret (MNB) and 1,5-dinitrobiuret (DNB) are tetrazole-free, nitrogen-rich, energetic compounds. For the first time, a comprehensive ab initio kinetics study on the thermal decomposition mechanisms of MNB and DNB is reported here. In particular, the intramolecular interactions of amine H-atom with electronegative nitro O-atom and carbonyl O-atom have been analyzed for biuret, MNB, and DNB at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The results show that the MNB and DNB molecules are stabilized through six-member-ring moieties via intramolecular H-bonding with interatomic distances between 1.8 and 2.0 Å, due to electrostatic as well as polarization and dispersion interactions. Furthermore, it was found that the stable molecules in the solid state have the smallest dipole moment amongst all the conformers in the nitrobiuret series of compounds, thus revealing a simple way for evaluating reactivity of fuel conformers. The potential energy surface for thermal decomposition of MNB was characterized by spin restricted coupled cluster theory at the RCCSD(T)/cc-pV∞ Z//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level. It was found that the thermal decomposition of MNB is initiated by the elimination of HNCO and HNN(O)OH intermediates. Intramolecular transfer of a H-atom, respectively, from the terminal NH2 group to the adjacent carbonyl O-atom via a six-member-ring transition state eliminates HNCO with an energy barrier of 35 kcal/mol and from the central NH group to the adjacent nitro O-atom eliminates HNN(O)OH with an energy barrier of 34 kcal/mol. Elimination of HNN(O)OH is also the primary process involved in the thermal decomposition of DNB, which processes C2v symmetry. The rate coefficients for the primary decomposition channels for MNB and DNB were quantified as functions of temperature and pressure. In addition, the thermal decomposition of HNN(O)OH was analyzed via Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus/multi-well master equation simulations, the results of which reveal the

  7. Decomposition Behavior of Curcumin during Solar Irradiation when Contact with Inorganic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Wiryani, A. S.; Rusli, A.; Purnamasari, A.; Abdullah, A. G.; Riza, L. S.

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is one of materials which have been widely used in medicine, Asian cuisine, and traditional cosmetic. Therefore, understanding the stability of curcumin has been widely studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability of curcumin solution against solar irradiation when making contact with inorganic material. As a model for the inorganic material, titanium dioxide (TiO2) was used. In the experimental method, the curcumin solution was irradiated using a solar irradiation. To confirm the stability of curcumin when contact with inorganic material, we added TiO2 micro particles with different concentrations. The results showed that the concentration of curcumin decreased during solar irradiation. The less concentration of curcumin affected the more decomposition rate obtained. The decomposition rate was increased greatly when TiO2 was added, in which the more TiO2 concentration added allowed the faster decomposition rate. Based on the result, we conclude that the curcumin is relatively stable as long as using higher concentration of curcumin and is no inorganic material existed. Then, the decomposition can be minimized by avoiding contact with inorganic material.

  8. Solar decomposition of cadmium oxide for hydrogen production. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J. D.; Yudow, B. D.; Carty, R. H.; Whaley, T. P.; Pangborn, J. B.

    1981-11-01

    The reactor developed for this study performed satisfactorily in establishing the feasibility of cadmium oxide decomposition under the realistic conditions of the solar-furnace environment. The solar-furnace environment is very appropriate for the evaluation of design concepts. However, the solar furnace probably cannot give precise rate data. The flux is too nonuniform, so temperatures of reactant and corresponding reaction rates are also nonuniform. One of the most important results of this project was the recovery of samples from the quench heat exchanger that contained a surprisingly large amount of metallic cadmium. The fact that the sample taken from the quench heat exchanger was metallic in appearance and contained between 67% and 84% metallic cadmium would tend to indicate recombination of cadmium vapor and oxygen can be effectively prevented by the quenching operation. It would also tend to confirm recent studies that show cadmium oxide does not sublime appreciably. Determination of the decomposition rate of cadmium oxide was severely limited by fluctuating and nonuniform reactant temperatures and baseline drift in the oxygen sensor. However, the estimated rate based on a single run seemed to follow a typical solid decomposition rate pattern with an initial acceleratory period, followed by a longer deceleratory period. From a preliminary flowsheet analysis of the cadmium-cadmium oxide cycle, it was determined that at a cadmium oxide decomposition temperature of 1400/sup 0/C and a requirement of 0.2 V in the electrolyzer the efficiency was 41%, assuming total quenching of the cadmium oxide decomposition products. This efficiency could increase to a maximum of 59% if total recovery of the latent heats of vaporization and fusion of the decomposition products is possible.

  9. The Autocatalytic Behavior of Trimethylindium During Thermal Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony H. McDaniel; M. D. Allendorf

    2000-02-02

    Pyrolysis of trimethylindium (TMIn) in a hot-wall flow-tube reactor has been investigated at temperatures between 573 and 723 K using a modulated molecular-beam mass-sampling technique and detailed numerical modeling. The TMIn was exposed to various mixtures of carrier gases: He, H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, in an effort to elucidate the behavior exhibited by this compound in different chemical environments. The decomposition of TMIn is a heterogeneous, autocatalytic process with an induction period that is carrier-gas dependent and lasts on the order of minutes. After activation of the tube wall, the thermolysis exhibits a steady-state behavior that is surface mediated. This result is contrary to prior literature reports, which state that decomposition occurs in the gas phase via successive loss of the CH{sub 3} ligands. This finding also suggests that the bond dissociation energy for the (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}In-CH{sub 3} bond derived from flow-tube investigations is erroneous and should be reevaluated.

  10. Kinetic analysis of overlapping multistep thermal decomposition comprising exothermic and endothermic processes: thermolysis of ammonium dinitramide.

    PubMed

    Muravyev, Nikita V; Koga, Nobuyoshi; Meerov, Dmitry B; Pivkina, Alla N

    2017-01-25

    This study focused on kinetic modeling of a specific type of multistep heterogeneous reaction comprising exothermic and endothermic reaction steps, as exemplified by the practical kinetic analysis of the experimental kinetic curves for the thermal decomposition of molten ammonium dinitramide (ADN). It is known that the thermal decomposition of ADN occurs as a consecutive two step mass-loss process comprising the decomposition of ADN and subsequent evaporation/decomposition of in situ generated ammonium nitrate. These reaction steps provide exothermic and endothermic contributions, respectively, to the overall thermal effect. The overall reaction process was deconvoluted into two reaction steps using simultaneously recorded thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) curves by considering the different physical meanings of the kinetic data derived from TG and DSC by P value analysis. The kinetic data thus separated into exothermic and endothermic reaction steps were kinetically characterized using kinetic computation methods including isoconversional method, combined kinetic analysis, and master plot method. The overall kinetic behavior was reproduced as the sum of the kinetic equations for each reaction step considering the contributions to the rate data derived from TG and DSC. During reproduction of the kinetic behavior, the kinetic parameters and contributions of each reaction step were optimized using kinetic deconvolution analysis. As a result, the thermal decomposition of ADN was successfully modeled as partially overlapping exothermic and endothermic reaction steps. The logic of the kinetic modeling was critically examined, and the practical usefulness of phenomenological modeling for the thermal decomposition of ADN was illustrated to demonstrate the validity of the methodology and its applicability to similar complex reaction processes.

  11. Thermal effects testing at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, Mark E.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The permanent features of the facility include a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, two point-focus parabolic concentrators, and Engine Test Facility. The heliostat field contains 220 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/sq cm that is uniform over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MWt. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/sq cm over and delivers a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kWt. A second furnace produces flux levels up to 1000 W/sq cm over a 4 cm diameter and total power of 60 kWt. Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11-m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/sq cm over a 2.5-cm diameter and total power of 75 kWt. High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses.

  12. Solar Probe thermal shield design and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, Jerry M.; Miyake, Robert N.; Rainen, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the major thermal shield subsystem development activities in support of the Solar Probe study being conducted at JPL. The Solar Probe spacecraft will travel to within 4 solar radii of the sun's center to perform fundamental experiments in space physics. Exposure to 2900 earth suns at perihelion requires the spacecraft to be protected within the shadow envelope of a protective shield. In addition, the mass loss rate off of the shield at elevated temperature must comply with plasma instrument requirements and has become the driver of the shield design. This paper will focus on the analytical design work to size the shield and control the shield mass loss rate for the various spacecraft options under study, the application of carbon-carbon materials for shield components, development and preparation of carbon-carbon samples for materials testing, and a materials testing program for carbon-carbon and tungsten alloys to investigate thermal/optical properties, mass loss (carbon-carbon only), material integrity, and high velocity impact behavior.

  13. Solar Probe thermal shield design and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, Jerry M.; Miyake, Robert N.; Rainen, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the major thermal shield subsystem development activities in support of the Solar Probe study being conducted at JPL. The Solar Probe spacecraft will travel to within 4 solar radii of the sun's center to perform fundamental experiments in space physics. Exposure to 2900 earth suns at perihelion requires the spacecraft to be protected within the shadow envelope of a protective shield. In addition, the mass loss rate off of the shield at elevated temperature must comply with plasma instrument requirements and has become the driver of the shield design. This paper will focus on the analytical design work to size the shield and control the shield mass loss rate for the various spacecraft options under study, the application of carbon-carbon materials for shield components, development and preparation of carbon-carbon samples for materials testing, and a materials testing program for carbon-carbon and tungsten alloys to investigate thermal/optical properties, mass loss (carbon-carbon only), material integrity, and high velocity impact behavior.

  14. Solar Thermal : Solar Electric Propulsion Hybrid Orbit Transfer Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFall, Keith A.

    2000-07-01

    This effort examined the payoffs associated with the joint application of solar thermal propulsion (STP) and electric propulsion (EP) for orbit raising. The combined use of STP (800 second specific impulse) and EP (1800 second specific impulse) for a single orbit transfer mission is motivated by the desire to leverage the higher thrust of STP with the higher specific impulse of EP to maximize mission capability. The primary objectives of this analysis were to quantify the payload, mission duration, and hydrogen propellant to payload mass ratio for a range of combined STP and EP orbit transfer missions to geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO), and contrast them to results for STP only. For STP, the hydrogen propellant to payload mass ratio is of particular interest due to payload fairing size constraints and the relatively low density of liquid hydrogen, which limit the mass of the STP propellant, and therefore the amount of payload that can be delivered. The results of the analysis include an 18% payload improvement associated with STP-EP hybrid propulsion over STP alone. The trip time needed for the STP-EP transfer varied from 101 to 143 days, compared to 41 days for the Solar only case. In addition, the amount of hydrogen propellant needed to accomplish the orbit raising to GEO per unit mass of payload decreased by 29% when the Solar Thermal - Solar Electric hybrid was used. While comprehensive comparisons of STP-EP to chemical propulsion (CP) only and to CP with EP orbit topping were also of interest, they were beyond the scope of this effort. However, a comparison of reference missions was performed. In comparison to the reference CP (328 second specific impulse) and CP-EP missions the STP-EP system provided 67% and 39% payload increases. respectively. The trip time for the CP-EP cases varied from 55 to 106 days.

  15. Solar thermal heating and cooling. A bibliography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenson, M.

    1979-01-01

    This bibliographic series cites and abstracts the literature and technical papers on the heating and cooling of buildings with solar thermal energy. Over 650 citations are arranged in the following categories: space heating and cooling systems; space heating and cooling models; building energy conservation; architectural considerations, thermal load computations; thermal load measurements, domestic hot water, solar and atmospheric radiation, swimming pools; and economics.

  16. Comparative evaluation of thermal decomposition behavior and thermal stability of powdered ammonium nitrate under different atmosphere conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Man; Chen, Xianfeng; Wang, Yujie; Yuan, Bihe; Niu, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Liao, Ruoyu; Zhang, Zumin

    2017-09-05

    In order to analyze the thermal decomposition characteristics of ammonium nitrate (AN), its thermal behavior and stability under different conditions are studied, including different atmospheres, heating rates and gas flow rates. The evolved decomposition gases of AN in air and nitrogen are analyzed with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Thermal stability of AN at different heating rates and gas flow rates are studied by differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, paired comparison method and safety parameter evaluation. Experimental results show that the major evolved decomposition gases in air are H2O, NH3, N2O, NO, NO2 and HNO3, while in nitrogen, H2O, NH3, NO and HNO3 are major components. Compared with nitrogen atmosphere, lower initial and end temperatures, higher heat flux and broader reaction temperature range are obtained in air. Meanwhile, higher air gas flow rate tends to achieve lower reaction temperature and to reduce thermal stability of AN. Self-accelerating decomposition temperature of AN in air is much lower than that in nitrogen. It is considered that thermostability of AN is influenced by atmosphere, heating rate and gas flow rate, thus changes of boundary conditions will influence its thermostability, which is helpful to its safe production, storage, transportation and utilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nitrated graphene oxide and its catalytic activity in thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenwen; Luo, Qingping; Duan, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yong; Pei, Chonghua

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • The NGO was synthesized by nitrifying homemade GO. • The N content of resulted NGO is up to 1.45 wt.%. • The NGO can facilitate the decomposition of AP and release much heat. - Abstract: Nitrated graphene oxide (NGO) was synthesized by nitrifying homemade GO with nitro-sulfuric acid. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), laser Raman spectroscopy, CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the structure of NGO. The thickness and the compositions of GO and NGO were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and elemental analysis (EA), respectively. The catalytic effect of the NGO for the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Adding 10% of NGO to AP decreases the decomposition temperature by 106 °C and increases the apparent decomposition heat from 875 to 3236 J/g.

  18. Polytypic transformations during the thermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2010-06-15

    The isothermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature leads to the formation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The phase evolution during the decomposition process was monitored using powder X-ray diffraction. The transformation of cobalt hydroxide to cobalt oxide occurs via three phase mixture while cobalt hydroxynitrate to cobalt oxide occurs through a two phase mixture. The nature of the sample and its preparation method controls the decomposition mechanism. The comparison of topotactical relationship between the precursors to the decomposed product has been reported in relation to polytypism. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal thermal decomposition studies of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature show the metastable phase formed prior to Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase.

  19. Organic and inorganic decomposition products from the thermal desorption of atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brent J.; Zhang, Yaping; Zuo, Xiaochen; Martinez, Raul E.; Walker, Michael J.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol composition is often analyzed using thermal desorption techniques to evaporate samples and deliver organic or inorganic molecules to various designs of detectors for identification and quantification. The organic aerosol (OA) fraction is composed of thousands of individual compounds, some with nitrogen- and sulfur-containing functionality and, often contains oligomeric material, much of which may be susceptible to decomposition upon heating. Here we analyze thermal decomposition products as measured by a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) capable of separating thermal decomposition products from thermally stable molecules. The TAG impacts particles onto a collection and thermal desorption (CTD) cell, and upon completion of sample collection, heats and transfers the sample in a helium flow up to 310 °C. Desorbed molecules are refocused at the head of a gas chromatography column that is held at 45 °C and any volatile decomposition products pass directly through the column and into an electron impact quadrupole mass spectrometer. Analysis of the sample introduction (thermal decomposition) period reveals contributions of NO+ (m/z 30), NO2+ (m/z 46), SO+ (m/z 48), and SO2+ (m/z 64), derived from either inorganic or organic particle-phase nitrate and sulfate. CO2+ (m/z 44) makes up a major component of the decomposition signal, along with smaller contributions from other organic components that vary with the type of aerosol contributing to the signal (e.g., m/z 53, 82 observed here for isoprene-derived secondary OA). All of these ions are important for ambient aerosol analyzed with the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), suggesting similarity of the thermal desorption processes in both instruments. Ambient observations of these decomposition products compared to organic, nitrate, and sulfate mass concentrations measured by an AMS reveal good correlation, with improved correlations for OA when compared to the AMS oxygenated OA (OOA

  20. Organic and inorganic decomposition products from the thermal desorption of atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B. J.; Zhang, Y.; Zuo, X.; Martinez, R. E.; Walker, M. J.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Goldstein, A. H.; Docherty, K. S.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol composition is often analyzed using thermal desorption techniques to evaporate samples and deliver organic or inorganic molecules to various designs of detectors for identification and quantification. The organic aerosol (OA) fraction is composed of thousands of individual compounds, some with nitrogen- and sulfur-containing functionality, and often contains oligomeric material, much of which may be susceptible to decomposition upon heating. Here we analyze thermal decomposition products as measured by a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) capable of separating thermal decomposition products from thermally stable molecules. The TAG impacts particles onto a collection and thermal desorption (CTD) cell, and upon completion of sample collection, heats and transfers the sample in a helium flow up to 310 °C. Desorbed molecules are refocused at the head of a GC column that is held at 45 °C and any volatile decomposition products pass directly through the column and into an electron impact quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS). Analysis of the sample introduction (thermal decomposition) period reveals contributions of NO+ (m/z 30), NO2+ (m/z 46), SO+ (m/z 48), and SO2+ (m/z 64), derived from either inorganic or organic particle-phase nitrate and sulfate. CO2+ (m/z 44) makes up a major component of the decomposition signal, along with smaller contributions from other organic components that vary with the type of aerosol contributing to the signal (e.g., m/z 53, 82 observed here for isoprene-derived secondary OA). All of these ions are important for ambient aerosol analyzed with the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), suggesting similarity of the thermal desorption processes in both instruments. Ambient observations of these decomposition products compared to organic, nitrate, and sulfate mass concentrations measured by an AMS reveal good correlation, with improved correlations for OA when compared to the AMS oxygenated OA (OOA) component. TAG

  1. Evaluation of solar thermal storage for base load electricity generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinberg, R.

    2012-10-01

    In order to stabilize solar electric power production during the day and prolong the daily operating cycle for several hours in the nighttime, solar thermal power plants have the options of using either or both solar thermal storage and fossil fuel hybridization. The share of solar energy in the annual electricity production capacity of hybrid solar-fossil power plants without energy storage is only about 20%. As it follows from the computer simulations performed for base load electricity demand, a solar annual capacity as high as 70% can be attained by use of a reasonably large thermal storage capacity of 22 full load operating hours. In this study, the overall power system performance is analyzed with emphasis on energy storage characteristics promoting a high level of sustainability for solar termal electricity production. The basic system parameters, including thermal storage capacity, solar collector size, and annual average daily discharge time, are presented and discussed.

  2. Dish concentrators for solar thermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1983-08-01

    Comparisons are presented of point-focusing, or 'dish' solar concentrator system features, development status, and performance levels demonstrated to date. In addition to the requirements of good optical efficiency and high geometric concentration ratios, the most important future consideration in solar thermal energy dish concentrator design will be the reduction of installed and lifetime costs, as well as the materials and labor costs of production. It is determined that technology development initiatives are needed in such areas as optical materials, design wind speeds and wind loads, structural configuration and materials resistance to prolonged exposure, and the maintenance of optical surfaces. The testing of complete concentrator systems, with energy-converting receivers and controls, is also necessary. Both reflector and Fresnel lens concentrator systems are considered.

  3. First-principles studies on the thermal decomposition behavior of FOX-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhaoyang; Xu, Jingcheng; Zhao, Jijun

    2010-06-01

    The thermal decomposition behavior for the molecular crystal of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7) at high temperature has been simulated using constant-temperature molecular dynamics and density functional theory up to 50 ps. We found that most of the energy is released within the first 15 ps of the reaction. The main products are N2 and H2O molecules, and their populations generally increase with time. Some charged groups (like NO2 + and OH-) observed in the initial stage of decomposition may promote further reaction. High-pressure effect on the thermal decomposition behavior has also been examined by simulating FOX-7 crystals of different densities.

  4. A study of the process of nonisothermal decomposition of phenolformaldehyde polymers by differential thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, O.M.; Fedoseev, S.D.; Komarova, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    A calculation has been made of the activation energy of the thermal decomposition of phenol-formaldehyde polymers. It has been established that for nonisothermal conditions the rate of performance of the process does not affect the effective activation energy calculated by means of Piloyan's equation.

  5. Thermal Decomposition and Phase Formation of Cerate-Zirconate Ceramics Prepared with Different Chelating Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Nafisah; Abdullah, Nur Athirah; Hasan, Sharizal

    2013-07-01

    Chelating agents of citric acid, lactic acid, glycine and ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) were used to synthesize a ceramic compound of Ba(Ce0.6Zr0.4)0.9Y0.1O2.95 (BCZY10) by a sol-gel method. Thermal decomposition and phase formation of the samples were analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). At heating rate of 10 °C min-1, all the samples exhibited almost similar pattern of TG-DTG profiles. A complete thermal decomposition process of the samples took place by three stages. The powders prepared using EDTA exhibited the lowest temperature for thermal decomposition since there was no significant weight loss above than 770 °C. Even after calcined at 1100 °C, the carbonate residue still remains in the samples as proven by FTIR result. The presence of this intermediate phase was also detected in XRD spectra as a small peak at 2θ≈23.9 ° corresponds to BaCO3 appeared for S1, S2 S3 and S4 samples. It was found that the chelating agents used had a decisive influence on the thermal decomposition of samples but no significant effect in reducing calcination temperature to produce a pure perovskite-like phase.

  6. Method of forming semiconducting amorphous silicon films from the thermal decomposition of fluorohydridodisilanes

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Kenneth G.; D'Errico, John J.

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of forming amorphous, photoconductive, and semiconductive silicon films on a substrate by the vapor phase thermal decomposition of a fluorohydridodisilane or a mixture of fluorohydridodisilanes. The invention is useful for the protection of surfaces including electronic devices.

  7. Effect of phosphorus and nitrogen on thermal decomposition kinetics of flame retardant cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four kinetic methods, Kissinger, Friedman, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, and modified Coats-Redfern, were used to study the activation energy, Ea, of the thermal decomposition of greige cotton nonwoven fabric treated with diammonium phosphate (DAP) and urea. The results show that the Ea is significantly influen...

  8. Thermal decomposition reactions of cotton fabric treated with piperazine-phosphonates derivatives as a flame retardant

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There has been a great scientific interest in exploring the great potential of the piperazine-phosphonates in flame retardant (FR) application on cotton fabric by investigating the thermal decomposition of cotton fabric treated with them. This research tries to understand the mode of action of the t...

  9. Thermal Decomposition of 1,5-Dinitrobiuret (DNB): Direct Dynamics Trajectory Simulations and Statistical Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-03

    to be 1,003  39 kJ/mol (5,195  200 kJ/kg) using bomb calorimetry .2 DNB detonated strongly in the steel sleeve test, without the need of adding...cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine). Thermal decomposition of DNB was examined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and

  10. A numerical study of transient, thermally-conductive solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, S. M.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient solar wind starting at the solar surface and arriving at 1 AU is performed by an implicit numerical method. The model hydrodynamic equations include thermal conduction terms for both steady and unsteady simulations. Simulation results show significant influence of thermal conduction on both steady and time-dependent solar wind. Higher thermal conduction results in higher solar wind speed, higher temperature, but lower plasma density at 1 AU. Higher base temperature at the solar surface gives lower plasma speed, lower temperature, but higher density at 1 AU. Higher base density, on the other hand, gives lower velocity, lower temperature, but higher density at 1 AU.

  11. Thermal Characterization of a Direct Gain Solar Thermal Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Reginald A.; Coleman, Hugh W.

    1999-01-01

    A thermal/fluids analysis of a direct gain solar thermal upper stage engine is presented and the results are discussed. The engine was designed and constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for ground testing in a facility that can provide about 10 kilowatts of concentrated solar energy to the engine. The engine transfers energy to a coolant (hydrogen) that is heated and accelerated through a nozzle to produce thrust. For the nominal design values and a hydrogen flowrate of 2 lb./hr., the results of the analysis show that the hydrogen temperature in the chamber (nozzle entrance) reaches about 3800 F after 30 minutes of heating and about 3850 F at steady-state (slightly below the desired design temperature of about 4100 F. Sensitivity analyses showed these results to be relatively insensitive to the values used for the absorber surface infrared emissivity and the convection coefficient within the cooling ducts but very sensitive to the hydrogen flowrate. Decreasing the hydrogen flowrate to 1 lb./hr. increases the hydrogen steady-state chamber temperature to about 4700 F, but also of course causes a decrease in thrust.

  12. Thermal Characterization of a Direct Gain Solar Thermal Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Reginald A.; Coleman, Hugh W.

    1998-01-01

    A thermal/fluids analysis of a direct gain solar thermal upper stage engine is presented and the results are discussed. The engine has been designed and constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for ground testing in a facility that can provide about 10 kilowatts of concentrated solar energy to the engine. The engine transfers that energy to a coolant (hydrogen) that is heated and accelerated through a nozzle to produce thrust. For the nominal design values and a hydrogen flowrate of 2 lb/hr., the results of the analysis show that the hydrogen temperature in the chamber (nozzle entrance) reaches about 3800 F after 30 minutes of heating and about 3850 F at steady-state (slightly below the desired design temperature of about 4100 F). Sensitivity analyses showed these results to be relatively insensitive to the values used for the absorber surface infrared emissivity and the convection coefficient within the cooling ducts but very sensitive to the hydrogen flowrate. Decreasing the hydrogen flowrate to 1 lb/hr. increases the hydrogen steady-state chamber temperature to about 4700 F, but also causes an undesirable decrease in thrust.

  13. Functional traits drive the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition among multiple arid-zone species

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xu; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Ye, Xue-Hua; Cornwell, William K.; Prinzing, Andreas; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H.C.

    2015-01-01

    In arid zones, strong solar radiation has important consequences for ecosystem processes. To better understand carbon and nutrient dynamics, it is important to know the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition of different arid-zone species. Here we investigated: (1) whether such contribution varies among plant species at given irradiance regime, (2) whether interspecific variation in such contribution correlates with interspecific variation in the decomposition rate under shade; and (3) whether this correlation can be explained by leaf traits. We conducted a factorial experiment to determine the effects of solar radiation and environmental moisture for the mass loss and the decomposition constant k-values of 13 species litters collected in Northern China. The contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition varied significantly among species. Solar radiation accelerated decomposition in particular in the species that already decompose quickly under shade. Functional traits, notably specific leaf area, might predict the interspecific variation in that contribution. Our results provide the first empirical evidence for how the effect of solar radiation on decomposition varies among multiple species. Thus, the effect of solar radiation on the carbon flux between biosphere and atmosphere may depend on the species composition of the vegetation. PMID:26282711

  14. Functional traits drive the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition among multiple arid-zone species.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xu; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Ye, Xue-Hua; Cornwell, William K; Prinzing, Andreas; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2015-08-18

    In arid zones, strong solar radiation has important consequences for ecosystem processes. To better understand carbon and nutrient dynamics, it is important to know the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition of different arid-zone species. Here we investigated: (1) whether such contribution varies among plant species at given irradiance regime, (2) whether interspecific variation in such contribution correlates with interspecific variation in the decomposition rate under shade; and (3) whether this correlation can be explained by leaf traits. We conducted a factorial experiment to determine the effects of solar radiation and environmental moisture for the mass loss and the decomposition constant k-values of 13 species litters collected in Northern China. The contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition varied significantly among species. Solar radiation accelerated decomposition in particular in the species that already decompose quickly under shade. Functional traits, notably specific leaf area, might predict the interspecific variation in that contribution. Our results provide the first empirical evidence for how the effect of solar radiation on decomposition varies among multiple species. Thus, the effect of solar radiation on the carbon flux between biosphere and atmosphere may depend on the species composition of the vegetation.

  15. Desolvation and dehydrogenation of solvated magnesium salts of dodecahydrododecaborate: relationship between structure and thermal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuenian; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Alexander, Anne-Marie; Gallucci, Judith C; Hwang, Son-Jong; Lingam, Hima Kumar; Huang, Zhenguo; Wang, Cong; Li, Huizhen; Zhao, Qianyi; Ozkan, Umit S; Shore, Sheldon G; Zhao, Ji-Cheng

    2014-06-10

    Attempts to synthesize solvent-free MgB12H12 by heating various solvated forms (H2O, NH3, and CH3OH) of the salt failed because of the competition between desolvation and dehydrogenation. This competition has been studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Products were characterized by IR, solution- and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and single-crystal or powder X-ray diffraction analysis. For hydrated salts, thermal decomposition proceeded in three stages, loss of water to form first hexahydrated then trihydrated, and finally loss of water and hydrogen to form polyhydroxylated complexes. For partially ammoniated salts, two stages of thermal decomposition were observed as ammonia and hydrogen were released with weight loss first of 14 % and then 5.5 %. Thermal decomposition of methanolated salts proceeded through a single step with a total weight loss of 32 % with the release of methanol, methane, and hydrogen. All the gaseous products of thermal decomposition were characterized by using mass spectrometry. Residual solid materials were characterized by solid-state (11)B magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction analysis by which the molecular structures of hexahydrated and trihydrated complexes were solved. Both hydrogen and dihydrogen bonds were observed in structures of [Mg(H2O)6B12H12]⋅6 H2O and [Mg(CH3OH)6B12H12]⋅6 CH3OH, which were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The structural factors influencing thermal decomposition behavior are identified and discussed. The dependence of dehydrogenation on the formation of dihydrogen bonds may be an important consideration in the design of solid-state hydrogen storage materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Optical property characterization of molten salt mixtures for thermal modeling of volumetrically absorbing solar receiver applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault-Friend, Melanie; McKrell, Thomas; Baglietto, Emilio; Gil, Antoni; Slocum, Alexander H.; Calvet, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    A method for experimentally determining the attenuation coefficient of high temperature semi-transparent liquids for volumetrically absorbing solar receiver applications was developed. The method was used to measure the attenuation coefficient over a broad spectral range in a 40 wt. % KNO3:60 wt. % NaNO3 binary nitrate molten salt mixture (solar salt). The measured absorption bands extend over 98% of the re-emission spectrum of the salt, indicating that thermal redistribution within the salt itself via radiative participating media effects is negligible. In addition, the effects of the salt's purity and thermal decomposition on the optical properties were also investigated and the light penetration depth is shown to vary significantly in the presence of impurities. The implications of these results for solar receiver design and modeling are discussed.

  17. [Characteristics of the biochemical composition of plant litter at different stages of decomposition (according to thermal analysis data)].

    PubMed

    Kosheleva, Iu P; Trofimov, S Ia

    2008-01-01

    The composition of samples of needles, leaves, sheaved cottongrass (Eriophorum vaginatum) tissues, and the L horizon of the forest floor of different degree of decomposition, isolated from the plant litter in southern taiga ecosystems, was studied by thermal analysis. It was established that plant litter decomposition is accompanied by structural changes in celluloses and that the decomposition rates of hemicellulose and structured cellulose vary at different stages of decomposition. The structural specificity and incongruent thermal decomposition of grass lignocellulose were observed in all samples of plant material. The rates at which the content of components of the plant litter decreased depended on the type and stage of decomposition of plant material. The decomposition rate of biochemical components tended to increase in better drained soils.

  18. Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device: Hybrid Nanostructures for High-Energy-Density Solar Thermal Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-09

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuel’s photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MIT’s technology would be 100% renewable, rechargeable like a battery, and emissions-free. Devices using these solar thermal fuels—called Hybrisol—can also be used without a grid infrastructure for applications such as de-icing, heating, cooking, and water purification.

  19. Electron beam induced surface nucleation and low temperature thermal decomposition of metal carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, R. R.; Mayer, T. M.

    1988-09-01

    Selective area deposition of iron, chromium, and tungsten thin films via thermal decomposition of their respective carbonyls has been performed on electron beam deposited pre-nucleated layers. The prenucleated layers were deposited either by gas phase or surface electron induced dissociation of the respective carbonyl, depending on the chemical system and operating conditions used. The presence of this layer effectively lowers the activation energy for the decomposition event. The activation energies for the decomposition of the metal carbonyls on their respective prenucleated layers were measured over the temperature range 125 to 350 C and found to be lower than for decomposition on clean silicon. The kinetics of formation of the prenucleated layers were measured over the temperature range 125 to 350 C and found to be lower than for decomposition on clean silicon. The kinetics of formation of the prenucleated layers were measured over the temperature range 125 to 350 C and found to be lower than for decomposition on clean silicon. The kinetics of formation of the prenucleated layer suggest that the formation of stable nuclei is dependent on the rate of desorption of CO from the surface. Electron stimulated desorption of CO is proposed as the mechanism for production of nuclei at low temperature by electron bombardment. Structure and composition of the nucleated layer and deposited film were examined by TEM, SEM, AES, and EDX.

  20. The generation of hydrogen by the thermal decomposition of water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Development of an approach to the evaluation of the thermal efficiency of the process of water splitting to produce hydrogen. A way of viewing thermochemical processes - both overall and step-by-step is suggested, and some recent work on a process evaluation technique is described which provides internal checks on the thermodynamic data and calculates, in addition to the efficiency, many important process parameters.

  1. The Thermal Decomposition of Some Organic Lead Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1957-11-01

    5» Results 4 6. Discussion of Results 5 6.1 The Lead Salts of Aliphatic Aoids 5 6.2 The Lead Compounds of Aromatic Acids 7 6.3 Thermal...aliphatic carboxylic acids decompose to lead oxide in one stage which, in air, is largely oxidative in character. The compounds of the aromatic hydroxy... acids , however, first yield intermediate basio compounds of varying stability and these ultimately decompose to lead oxide at high temperatures

  2. Thermal decomposition of silane to form hydrogenated amorphous Si

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, M.; Ghosh, A.K.; Wiesmann, H.J.; Rock, E.B.; Lutz, H.A. III

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon is produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH/sub 4/) or other gases comprising H and Si, at elevated temperatures of about 1700 to 2300/sup 0/C, in a vacuum of about 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -4/ torr. A gaseous mixture is formed of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon. The gaseous mixture is deposited onto a substrate to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  3. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Thermal Decomposition of Nitroaromatic Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-20

    2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine HNS: hexanitrostilbene TACOT: tetranitrodibenzo-l,3a,4,6a-tetrazapentalene 2, 4- DNAn : 2,4-dinitroanthranil DSC... DNAn ) (References 51,59), an ill-defined explosive "coke" from long-term thermal degradation (Reference 20), and elemental carbon (Reference 62). The...report of Maksimov, at al. (Reference 59) who suggested that 2,4- DNAn or 2,4,6-trinitrobenzaldehyde (equation (27)) was the catalyst. Maksimov, &t Al

  4. Solar Thermal Propulsion Optical Figure Measuring and Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Solar thermal propulsion has been an important area of study for four years at the Propulsion Research Center. Significant resources have been devoted to the development of the UAH Solar Thermal Laboratory that provides unique, high temperature, test capabilities. The facility is fully operational and has successfully conducted a series of solar thruster shell experiments. Although presently dedicated to solar thermal propulsion, the facility has application to a variety of material processing, power generation, environmental clean-up, and other fundamental research studies. Additionally, the UAH Physics Department has joined the Center in support of an in-depth experimental investigation on Solar Thermal Upper Stage (STUS) concentrators. Laboratory space has been dedicated to the concentrator evaluation in the UAH Optics Building which includes a vertical light tunnel. Two, on-going, research efforts are being sponsored through NASA MSFC (Shooting Star Flight Experiment) and the McDonnell Douglas Corporation (Solar Thermal Upper Stage Technology Ground Demonstrator).

  5. Plasmonic nanofluids enhanced solar thermal transfer liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Mahfuzur; Younes, Hammad; Ni, George; Lu, Jin You; Raza, Aikifa; Zhang, Tie Jun; Fang, Nicholas Xuanlai; Ghaferi, Amal Al

    2017-06-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures suspended in a liquid are known to offer enhanced absorption of light and improved photo-thermal efficiency comparing with conventional solar absorbers. This approach localizes high temperatures to the interior of the liquid through efficient trapping of incoming light via scattering and absorption mechanisms. Theoretical studies show that Ag exhibits the highest efficiency of plasmonic excitations, and the plasmonic absorption band can be shifted to cover the visible wavelength ranges by loading the Ag NPs onto silica core. In this work, silica-core decorated with Ag NPs are synthesized through the chemical reduction method and their morphological and optical properties are characterized using transmission electron microscope (TEM) and UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer. The characterization results show the potentials of light absorbing plasmonic metal-dielectric nanoparticles suspended in water for producing steam at high efficiencies upon solar illumination. The experimental work suggests that the vapor generation efficiency can be as high as 63.82% at solar concentrations of 10 suns for the concentration of 0.5 wt% of palsmonic nanofluid.

  6. The products of the thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}CHO

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliou, AnGayle; Piech, Krzysztof M.; Barney Ellison, G.; Zhang Xu; Nimlos, Mark R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg; Osborn, David L.; Daily, John W.; Stanton, John F.

    2011-07-07

    We have used a heated 2 cm x 1 mm SiC microtubular ({mu}tubular) reactor to decompose acetaldehyde: CH{sub 3}CHO +{Delta}{yields} products. Thermal decomposition is followed at pressures of 75-150 Torr and at temperatures up to 1675 K, conditions that correspond to residence times of roughly 50-100 {mu}s in the {mu}tubular reactor. The acetaldehyde decomposition products are identified by two independent techniques: vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectroscopy (PIMS) and infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy after isolation in a cryogenic matrix. Besides CH{sub 3}CHO, we have studied three isotopologues, CH{sub 3}CDO, CD{sub 3}CHO, and CD{sub 3}CDO. We have identified the thermal decomposition products CH{sub 3} (PIMS), CO (IR, PIMS), H (PIMS), H{sub 2} (PIMS), CH{sub 2}CO (IR, PIMS), CH{sub 2}=CHOH (IR, PIMS), H{sub 2}O (IR, PIMS), and HC{identical_to}CH (IR, PIMS). Plausible evidence has been found to support the idea that there are at least three different thermal decomposition pathways for CH{sub 3}CHO; namely, radical decomposition: CH{sub 3}CHO +{Delta}{yields} CH{sub 3}+[HCO]{yields} CH{sub 3}+ H + CO; elimination: CH{sub 3}CHO +{Delta}{yields} H{sub 2}+ CH{sub 2}=C=O; isomerization/elimination: CH{sub 3}CHO +{Delta}{yields}[CH{sub 2}=CH-OH]{yields} HC{identical_to}CH + H{sub 2}O. An interesting result is that both PIMS and IR spectroscopy show compelling evidence for the participation of vinylidene, CH{sub 2}=C:, as an intermediate in the decomposition of vinyl alcohol: CH{sub 2}=CH-OH +{Delta}{yields}[CH{sub 2}=C:]+ H{sub 2}O {yields} HC{identical_to}CH + H{sub 2}O.

  7. Numerical analysis of thermal decomposition for RDX, TNT, and Composition B.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin Hyuk; Nyande, Baggie W; Kim, Hyoun Soo; Park, Jung Su; Lee, Woo Jin; Oh, Min

    2016-05-05

    Demilitarization of waste explosives on a commercial scale has become an important issue in many countries, and this has created a need for research in this area. TNT, RDX and Composition B have been used as military explosives, and they are very sensitive to thermal shock. For the safe waste treatment of these high-energy and highly sensitive explosives, the most plausible candidate suggested has been thermal decomposition in a rotary kiln. This research examines the safe treatment of waste TNT, RDX and Composition B in a rotary kiln type incinerator with regard to suitable operating conditions. Thermal decomposition in this study includes melting, 3 condensed phase reactions in the liquid phase and 263 gas phase reactions. Rigorous mathematical modeling and dynamic simulation for thermal decomposition were carried out for analysis of dynamic behavior in the reactor. The results showed time transient changes of the temperature, components and mass of the explosives and comparisons were made for the 3 explosives. It was concluded that waste explosives subject to heat supplied by hot air at 523.15K were incinerated safely without any thermal detonation.

  8. Extraction of Curcumin Pigment from Indonesian Local Turmeric with Its Infrared Spectra and Thermal Decomposition Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Wiryani, A. S.; Rusli, A.; Purnamasari, A.; Abdullah, A. G.; Ana; Widiaty, I.; Hurriyati, R.

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is one of the pigments which is used as a spice in Asian cuisine, traditional cosmetic, and medicine. Therefore, process for getting curcumin has been widely studied. Here, the purpose of this study was to demonstrate the simple method for extracting curcumin from Indonesian local turmeric and investigate the infrared spectra and thermal decomposition properties. In the experimental procedure, the washed turmeric was dissolved into an ethanol solution, and then put into a rotary evaporator to enrich curcumin concentration. The result showed that the present method is effective to isolate curcumin compound from Indonesian local turmeric. Since the process is very simple, this method can be used for home industrial application. Further, understanding the thermal decomposition properties of curcumin give information, specifically relating to the selection of treatment when curcumin must face the thermal-related process.

  9. Thermal decomposition of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors: evidence of solid state dimerization.

    PubMed

    Rabel Riley, Shelley R; Vickery, Rodney D; Nemeth, Gregory A; Haas, Michael J; Kasprzak, Daniel J; Maurin, Michael B

    2011-01-25

    The thermal properties of three matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors were investigated using a variety of instrumental methods. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed highly exothermic processes for all compounds above 200°C, and thermogravimetric analysis resulted in significant step-wise weight losses at the temperatures corresponding to the exothermic transitions. Hot stage microscopy observations for several compounds showed evolution of gas bubbles from crystals at temperatures that correlated with the exotherms. Thermal decomposition involving the hydroxamic acid functional group was suspected and further evaluated using various analytical techniques including reversed-phase HPLC, LC-MS-MS, TGA-FTIR and NMR. The mechanism proposed in the thermal decomposition involves a Lossen Rearrangement to form a dimeric species containing a urea linkage. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermal decomposition of propargyl alcohol: single pulse shock tube experimental and ab initio theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Sharath, N; Reddy, K P J; Arunan, E

    2014-08-07

    Thermal decomposition of propargyl alcohol (C3H3OH), a molecule of interest in interstellar chemistry and combustion, was investigated using a single pulse shock tube in the temperature ranging from 953 to 1262 K. The products identified include acetylene, propyne, vinylacetylene, propynal, propenal, and benzene. The experimentally observed overall rate constant for thermal decomposition of propargyl alcohol was found to be k = 10((10.17 ± 0.36)) exp(-(39.70 ± 1.83)/RT) s(-1). Ab initio theoretical calculations were carried out to understand the potential energy surfaces involved in the primary and secondary steps of propargyl alcohol thermal decomposition. Transition state theory was used to predict the rate constants, which were then used and refined in a kinetic simulation of the product profile. The first step in the decomposition is C-O bond dissociation, leading to the formation of two important radicals in combustion, OH and propargyl. This has been used to study the reverse OH + propargyl radical reaction, about which there appears to be no prior work. Depending on the site of attack, this reaction leads to propargyl alcohol or propenal, one of the major products at temperatures below 1200 K. A detailed mechanism has been derived to explain all the observed products.

  11. Catalytically enhanced thermal decomposition of chemically grown silicon oxide layers on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, F.; Passanante, T.; Cheynis, F.; Curiotto, S.; Bussmann, E. B.; Müller, P.

    2016-03-01

    The thermal decomposition of Si dioxide layers formed by wet chemical treatment on Si(001) has been studied by low-energy electron microscopy. Independent nucleations of voids occur into the Si oxide layers that open by reaction at the void periphery. Depending on the voids, the reaction rates exhibit large differences via the occurrence of a nonlinear growth of the void radius. This non-steady state regime is attributed to the accumulation of defects and silicon hydroxyl species at the SiO2/Si interface that enhances the silicon oxide decomposition at the void periphery.

  12. Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption study of isopropanol and tert-butanol on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Kim, Kwansoo; Yong, Kijung

    2002-09-01

    Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption of isopropanol (IPA) and tert-butanol on Si(100) were studied using temperature programed desorption. Adsorbed alcohols studied were decomposed into atomic hydrogen and alkoxy on the surface. During heating the sample up to 1000 K, acetone, propylene, and hydrogen were desorbed as decomposition products of IPA on Si(100). Desorption pathways of IPA on Si(100) were largely consistent with those on metal surfaces: beta-hydride elimination reaction to acetone and C-O scission to propylene. For tert-butanol, which has no beta-hydrogen, isobutene and hydrogen were observed as main desorption products. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of the thermal decomposition of unsaturated aldehydes: benzaldehyde, 2-butenal, and 2-furaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Grela, M.A.; Colussi, A.J.

    1986-01-30

    The thermal unimolecular decomposition of benzaldehyde (BA), crotonaldehyde (CA), and furfural (FA) have been investigated in a flow reactor at very low pressures by modulated beam mass spectrometry above 1040 K. Each reaction proceeds by a different mechanism. Whereas BA decomposes by C(O)-H bond fission CA readily undergoes decarbonylation to propene via a three-center transition-state reaction. FA decomposition into vinylketene and CO involves ring opening followed by H-atom transfer in the resulting biradical. Overall high-pressure Arrhenius parameters for the three reactions are derived from kinetic data. 26 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  14. Catalytically enhanced thermal decomposition of chemically grown silicon oxide layers on Si(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, F. Passanante, T.; Cheynis, F.; Curiotto, S.; Bussmann, E. B.; Müller, P.

    2016-03-14

    The thermal decomposition of Si dioxide layers formed by wet chemical treatment on Si(001) has been studied by low-energy electron microscopy. Independent nucleations of voids occur into the Si oxide layers that open by reaction at the void periphery. Depending on the voids, the reaction rates exhibit large differences via the occurrence of a nonlinear growth of the void radius. This non-steady state regime is attributed to the accumulation of defects and silicon hydroxyl species at the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface that enhances the silicon oxide decomposition at the void periphery.

  15. gamma-Irradiation effects on the thermal decomposition behaviour and IR absorption spectra of piperacillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouz, R. M.; Gaffar, M. A.; Abu El-Fadl, A.; Hamad, Ar. G. K.

    2003-11-01

    The thermal decomposition behaviour of unirradiated and pre-gamma-irradiated piperacillin (pipril) as a semi-synthetic penicillin antibiotic has been studied in the temperature range of (273-1072 K). The decomposition was found to proceed through three major steps both for unirradiated and gamma-irradiated samples. Neither appearance nor disappearance of new bands in the IR spectrum of piperacillin was recorded as a result of gamma-irradiation but only a decrease in the intensity of most bands was observed. A degradation mechanism was suggested to explain the bond rupture and the decrease in the intensities of IR bands of gamma-irradiated piperacillin.

  16. THE THERMAL INSTABILITY OF SOLAR PROMINENCE THREADS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Goossens, M.; Ballester, J. L.

    2011-04-10

    The fine structure of solar prominences and filaments appears as thin and long threads in high-resolution images. In H{alpha} observations of filaments, some threads can be observed for only 5-20 minutes before they seem to fade and eventually disappear, suggesting that these threads may have very short lifetimes. The presence of an instability might be the cause of this quick disappearance. Here, we study the thermal instability of prominence threads as an explanation of their sudden disappearance from H{alpha} observations. We model a prominence thread as a magnetic tube with prominence conditions embedded in a coronal environment. We assume a variation of the physical properties in the transverse direction so that the temperature and density continuously change from internal to external values in an inhomogeneous transitional layer representing the particular prominence-corona transition region (PCTR) of the thread. We use the nonadiabatic and resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations, which include terms due to thermal conduction parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, radiative losses, heating, and magnetic diffusion. We combine both analytical and numerical methods to study linear perturbations from the equilibrium state, focusing on unstable thermal solutions. We find that thermal modes are unstable in the PCTR for temperatures higher than 80,000 K, approximately. These modes are related to temperature disturbances that can lead to changes in the equilibrium due to rapid plasma heating or cooling. For typical prominence parameters, the instability timescale is of the order of a few minutes and is independent of the form of the temperature profile within the PCTR of the thread. This result indicates that thermal instability may play an important role for the short lifetimes of threads in the observations.

  17. Structure and thermal decomposition of sulfated β-cyclodextrin intercalated in a layered double hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Wei, Min; Rao, Guoying; Evans, David G.; Duan, Xue

    2004-01-01

    The sodium salt of hexasulfated β-cyclodextrin has been synthesized and intercalated into a magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxide by ion exchange. The structure, composition and thermal decomposition behavior of the intercalated material have been studied by variable temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP), and thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and a model for the structure has been proposed. The thermal stability of the intercalated sulfated β-cyclodextrin is significantly enhanced compared with the pure form before intercalation.

  18. Thermal Decomposition of RP-2 with Stabilizing Additives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    RP-2 are that the allowed sulfur content is much lower in RP-2 (0.1 mg/kg, compared to 30 mg/kg in RP-1), the allowed olefin concentration is lower...28,30-35 decahydronaphthalene (decalin), 33,35 and benzyl alcohol . 28,36-38 In related work, a major research effort initiated by the U.S. Air Force...additives (e.g., benzyl alcohol ). We would also like to test the effect of different reactor materials, particularly copper, on the thermal stability of

  19. Thermal Decomposition and Stabilisation of Poly(vinyl Chloride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskii, B. B.; Troitskaya, L. S.

    1985-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the thermal dehydrochlorination of poly(vinyl chloride) and low-molecular-weight chlorohydrocarbons which model various fragments of the polymer molecule, are discussed. Studies designed to determine the qualitative and quantitative compositions of the unstable fragments in poly(vinyl chloride) macromolecules by 13C NMR are examined. Attention is concentrated on the consideration of the mechanism of the action of the most effective thermostabilisers for the polymer - organotin compounds. The principal features of synergism in the stabilisation of poly(vinyl chloride) and the mechanism of the action of synergistic mixtures are analysed. The bibliography includes 107 references.

  20. The thermal infrared continuum in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay; Simoes, Paulo; Kerr, Graham Stewart; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gimenez de Castro, C. Guillermo; Penn, Matthew J.

    2017-08-01

    Observations of the Sun with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array have now started, and the thermal infrared will regularly be accessible from the NSF’s Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope. Motivated by the prospect of these new observations, and by recent flare detections in the mid infrared, we set out here to model and understand the source of the infrared continuum in flares, and to explore its diagnostic capability for the physical conditions in the flare atmosphere. We use the 1D radiation hydrodynamics code RADYN to calculate mid-infrared continuum emission from model atmospheres undergoing sudden deposition of energy by non-thermal electrons. We identify and characterise the main continuum thermal emission processes relevant to flare intensity enhancement in the mid- to far-infrared (2-200 micron) spectral range as free-free emission on neutrals and ions. We find that the infrared intensity evolution tracks the energy input to within a second, albeit with a lingering intensity enhancement, and provides a very direct indication of the evolution of the atmospheric ionization. The prediction of highly impulsive emission means that, on these timescales, the atmospheric hydrodynamics need not be considered in analysing the mid-IR signatures.

  1. Impact of Thermal Decomposition on Thermal Desorption Instruments: Advantage of Thermogram Analysis for Quantifying Volatility Distributions of Organic Species.

    PubMed

    Stark, Harald; Yatavelli, Reddy L N; Thompson, Samantha L; Kang, Hyungu; Krechmer, Jordan E; Kimmel, Joel R; Palm, Brett B; Hu, Weiwei; Hayes, Patrick L; Day, Douglas A; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Jayne, John T; Worsnop, Douglas R; Jimenez, Jose L

    2017-08-01

    We present results from a high-resolution chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS), operated with two different thermal desorption inlets, designed to characterize the gas and aerosol composition. Data from two field campaigns at forested sites are shown. Particle volatility distributions are estimated using three different methods: thermograms, elemental formulas, and measured partitioning. Thermogram-based results are consistent with those from an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a thermal denuder, implying that thermal desorption is reproducible across very different experimental setups. Estimated volatilities from the detected elemental formulas are much higher than from thermograms since many of the detected species are thermal decomposition products rather than actual SOA molecules. We show that up to 65% of citric acid decomposes substantially in the FIGAERO-CIMS, with ∼20% of its mass detected as gas-phase CO2, CO, and H2O. Once thermal decomposition effects on the detected formulas are taken into account, formula-derived volatilities can be reconciled with the thermogram method. The volatility distribution estimated from partitioning measurements is very narrow, likely due to signal-to-noise limits in the measurements. Our findings indicate that many commonly used thermal desorption methods might lead to inaccurate results when estimating volatilities from observed ion formulas found in SOA. The volatility distributions from the thermogram method are likely the closest to the real distributions.

  2. Mechanistic and kinetic studies of the thermal decomposition of TNAZ and NDNAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.; Homsy, J.; Behrens, R.; Bulusu, S.

    1998-12-31

    The authors have studied the mechanism and detailed reaction kinetics of the thermal decomposition of 1,3,3-trinitroazetidine (TNAZ), and separately, its key decomposition intermediate, 1-nitroso-3,3-dinitroacetidine (NDNAZ), using a simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometer (STMBMS). These decompositions were conducted in a sealed alumina cell with a 2.5 {micro}m orifice, at varying temperatures and at a range of isothermal temperatures (at 10 C intervals from 120--160 C for NDNAZ and 160--210 C for TNAZ). The gaseous products have been identified and their rates of formation have been measured as a function of time, temperature, and pressure. This system is complex, with TNAZ decomposing by four separate routes, one of which leads to NDNAZ, which itself decomposes by at least two distinct routes.

  3. Molecular beam mass spectrometry studies of the thermal decomposition of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS)

    SciTech Connect

    Wierda, C.A.; Zachariah, M.R.; Burgess, D.R.F. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Molecular beam mass spectrometry and time-of-flight techniques have been used to reveal the gas phase chemistry that occurs during the thermal decomposition of TEOS. Evidence in the authors` laboratory was consistent with the presence of the following species during decomposition at 600{degrees}C: ethylene, ethanol, acetaldehyde, possibly diethoxysilanone, triethoxysilanol, hexaethoxysiloxane. A grayish white powder, which presumably consists of silicon oxides containing residual carbon and hydrogen, was also produced. Under the following reaction conditions: reactor pressure=266 Pa (2 torr), residence time=6 ms, and TEOS partial pressure=26 Pa (0.2 torr), the onset of decomposition occurs at 400{degrees}C. The amount of TEOS decreases at residence times greater than 6 ms with concurrent increase in ethanol and ethylene. Hexaethoxysiloxane also increases at residence times between 6 and 20 ms, but then decreases at longer times probably because it reacts to form larger siloxanes and silicon oxides.

  4. Thermal Decomposition of Thermoelectric Material CoSb3: A Thermogravimetry Kinetic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fang; He, Qingli; Hu, Dinxu; Gao, Feng; Song, Hongzhang; Jia, Jianfeng; Hu, Xing

    2013-08-01

    The thermal decomposition of the thermoelectric CoSb3 alloy was investigated using thermogravimetry (TG). TG curves obtained in inert gas flow with different heating rates were used to perform kinetic analysis based on the Arrhenius equation. Kinetic parameters, such as the effective activation energy, the pre-exponential factor, and the kinetic model function f(α ) , were obtained using the Freeman-Carroll method, the multiheating rates method, and the Coats-Redfern equation. The activation energy was found to be around 200 kJ/mol, and the reaction mechanism for the decomposition of CoSb3 alloy mostly obeys the second-order chemical decomposition process f(α ) = (1 - α )2.

  5. Thermal storage technologies for solar industrial process heat applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of thermal storage subsystems for the intermediate and high temperature (100 C to 600 C) solar industrial process heat generation is presented. Primary emphasis is focused on buffering and diurnal storage as well as total energy transport. In addition, advanced thermal storage concepts which appear promising for future solar industrial process heat applications are discussed.

  6. General theme report: Working session 2, solar thermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, D. J.; Kolb, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    Currently, over 90 percent of the world's large-scale solar electric energy is generated with concentrating solar thermal power plants. Such plants have the potential to meet many of the world's future energy needs. Research efforts are generally focused on generating electricity, though a variety of other applications are being pursued. Today, the technology for using solar thermal energy is well developed, cost competitive, and in many cases, ready for widespread application. The current state of each of the solar thermal technologies and their applications is reviewed, and recommendations for increasing their use are presented. The technologies reviewed in detail are: parabolic trough systems, central tower systems, and parabolic dish systems.

  7. Thermal decomposition of MgCO3 during the atmospheric entry of micrometeoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micca Longo, G.; Longo, S.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a first study of the atmospheric entry of carbonate micrometeoroids, in an astrobiological perspective, is performed. Therefore an entry model, which includes two-dimensional dynamics, non-isothermal atmosphere, ablation and radiation losses, is build and benchmarked to literature data for silicate micrometeoroids. A thermal decomposition model of initially pure magnesium carbonate is proposed, and it includes thermal energy, mass loss and the effect of changing composition as the carbonate grain is gradually converted into oxide. Several scenarios are obtained by changing the initial speed, entry angle and grain diameter, producing a systematic comparison of silicate and carbonate grain. The results of the composite model show that the thermal behaviour of magnesium carbonate is markedly different from that of the corresponding silicate, much lower equilibration temperatures being reached in the first stages of the entry. At the same time, the model shows that the limit of a thermal protection scenario, based on magnesium carbonate, is the very high decomposition speed even at moderate temperatures, which results in the total loss of carbon already at about 100 km altitude. The present results show that, although decomposition and associated cooling are important effects in the entry process of carbonate grains, the specific scenario of pure MgCO3 micrograin does not allow complex organic matter delivery to the lower atmosphere. This suggests us to consider less volatile carbonates for further studies.

  8. Rankine-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L [Livermore, CA

    2009-12-29

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  9. Rankline-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L [Livermore, CA

    2012-03-13

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  10. Thermal stability and kinetics of decomposition of ammonium nitrate in the presence of pyrite.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Richard; Zhang, Dongke

    2009-06-15

    The interaction between ammonium nitrate based industrial explosives and pyrite-rich minerals in mining operations can lead to the occurrence of spontaneous explosion of the explosives. In an effort to provide a scientific basis for safe applications of industrial explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite, ammonium nitrate decomposition, with and without the presence of pyrite, was studied using a simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermogravimetric Analyser (DSC-TGA) and a gas-sealed isothermal reactor, respectively. The activation energy and the pre-exponential factor of ammonium nitrate decomposition were determined to be 102.6 kJ mol(-1) and 4.55 x 10(7)s(-1) without the presence of pyrite and 101.8 kJ mol(-1) and 2.57 x 10(9)s(-1) with the presence of pyrite. The kinetics of ammonium nitrate decomposition was then used to calculate the critical temperatures for ammonium nitrate decomposition with and without the presence of pyrite, based on the Frank-Kamenetskii model of thermal explosion. It was shown that the presence of pyrite reduces the temperature for, and accelerates the rate of, decomposition of ammonium nitrate. It was further shown that pyrite can significantly reduce the critical temperature of ammonium nitrate decomposition, causing undesired premature detonation of the explosives. The critical temperature also decreases with increasing diameter of the blast holes charged with the explosive. The concept of using the critical temperature as indication of the thermal stability of the explosives to evaluate the risk of spontaneous explosion was verified in the gas-sealed isothermal reactor experiments.

  11. The small community solar thermal power experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiceniuk, T.

    1981-05-01

    Contractors were asked to develop a preferred system concept, to perform sensitivity analyses, and to outline recommended approaches for the follow-on design program of a one-megawatt solar thermal demonstration plant. The systems recommended by the contractors in each of the categories were: (1) McDonnell-Douglas Astronautics Company: Central tower with field of south-facing heliostats; (2) General Electric Company: Field of parabolic dishes with steam piped to a central turbine-generator unit; and (3) Ford Aerospace and Communications Corporation: Field of parabolic dishes with a Stirling cycle engine/generator unit at the focus of each dish. A description of each of the proposed experimental plants is given.

  12. Ceramic technology for solar thermal receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudirka, A. A.; Smoak, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The high-temperature capability, resistance to corrosive environments and non-strategic nature of ceramics have prompted applications in the solar thermal field whose advantages over metallic devices of comparable performance may begin to be assessed. It is shown by a survey of point-focusing receiver designs employing a variety of ceramic compositions and fabrication methods that the state-of-the-art in structural ceramics is not sufficiently advanced to fully realize the promised benefits of higher temperature capabilities at lower cost than metallic alternatives. The ceramics considered include alumina, berylia, magnesia, stabilized zirconia, fused silica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, mullite and cordierite, processed by such methods as isostatic pressing, dry pressing, slip casting, extrusion, calendaring and injection molding.

  13. Ceramic technology for solar thermal receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudirka, A. A.; Smoak, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The high-temperature capability, resistance to corrosive environments and non-strategic nature of ceramics have prompted applications in the solar thermal field whose advantages over metallic devices of comparable performance may begin to be assessed. It is shown by a survey of point-focusing receiver designs employing a variety of ceramic compositions and fabrication methods that the state-of-the-art in structural ceramics is not sufficiently advanced to fully realize the promised benefits of higher temperature capabilities at lower cost than metallic alternatives. The ceramics considered include alumina, berylia, magnesia, stabilized zirconia, fused silica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, mullite and cordierite, processed by such methods as isostatic pressing, dry pressing, slip casting, extrusion, calendaring and injection molding.

  14. Development of Non-Tracking Solar Thermal Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston, Roland; Johnston, Bruce; Balkowski, Kevin

    2011-11-01

    The aims of this research is to develop high temperature solar thermal collectors that do not require complex solar tracking devices to maintain optimal performance. The collector technology developed through these efforts uses non-imaging optics and is referred to as an external compound parabolic concentrator. It is able to operate with a solar thermal efficiency of approximately 50% at a temperature of 200 ° C and can be readily manufactured at a cost between 15 and 18 per square foot.

  15. Solar-thermal fluid-wall reaction processing

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Alan W.; Dahl, Jaimee K.; Lewandowski, Allan A.; Bingham, Carl; Buechler, Karen J.; Grothe, Willy

    2006-04-25

    The present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal dissociation reactions requiring rapid-heating and short residence times using solar energy. In particular, the present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal reactions such as dissociation of hydrocarbon containing gases and hydrogen sulfide to produce hydrogen and dry reforming of hydrocarbon containing gases with carbon dioxide. In the methods of the invention where hydrocarbon containing gases are dissociated, fine carbon black particles are also produced. The present invention also provides solar-thermal reactors and solar-thermal reactor systems.

  16. Solar-Thermal Fluid-Wall Reaction Processing

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, A. W.; Dahl, J. K.; Lewandowski, A. A.; Bingham, C.; Raska Buechler, K. J.; Grothe, W.

    2006-04-25

    The present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal dissociation reactions requiring rapid-heating and short residence times using solar energy. In particular, the present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal reactions such as dissociation of hydrocarbon containing gases and hydrogen sulfide to produce hydrogen and dry reforming of hydrocarbon containing gases with carbon dioxide. In the methods of the invention where hydrocarbon containing gases are dissociated, fine carbon black particles are also produced. The present invention also provides solar-thermal reactors and solar-thermal reactor systems.

  17. Kinetics of the thermal decomposition and isomerization of pyrazine (1,4 diazine)

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, A.; Mackie, J.C.; Palmer, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    The isomerization and decomposition of pyrazine have been studied over the temperature range 1,200--1,480 K. The major products of decomposition were found to be acetylene and HCN, with cyanoacetylene and acrylonitrile also being significant products, although lower yields of these products were observed. The decomposition has been successfully modeled using a free radical mechanisms, with the major chain carriers being CN radicals and H atoms. The initiation reaction was found to be C{single_bond}H bond fission, to yield H atoms and pyrazyl radicals. Kinetic modeling allowed the rate of initiation to be determined, yielding a first-order rate constant given by the expression k = 10{sup 15.7} exp({minus}96.5 kcal/mol/RT) s{sup {minus}1}. The importance of CN radicals as chain carriers appears to be a significant difference in the decomposition of the dizziness compared with pyridine or 2-picoline. Accompanying the decomposition of pyrazine was the isomerization of pyrazine to pyrimidine. By kinetic modeling, the isomerization of pyrazine to pyrimidine was found to occur via a fulvenelike intermediate. The rate and mechanism of the isomerization are analogous to the isomerization of fulvene to benzene described by Melius and Miller. The thermal reactions of these species are being studied because of their relevance to the mechanism of formation of NO{sub x} through the oxidation of fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) in coal during the combustion of coal and heavy fuels.

  18. Exothermic Behavior of Thermal Decomposition of Sodium Percarbonate: Kinetic Deconvolution of Successive Endothermic and Exothermic Processes.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masayoshi; Wada, Takeshi; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2015-09-24

    This study focused on the kinetic modeling of the thermal decomposition of sodium percarbonate (SPC, sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide (2/3)). The reaction is characterized by apparently different kinetic profiles of mass-loss and exothermic behavior as recorded by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. This phenomenon results from a combination of different kinetic features of the reaction involving two overlapping mass-loss steps controlled by the physico-geometry of the reaction and successive endothermic and exothermic processes caused by the detachment and decomposition of H2O2(g). For kinetic modeling, the overall reaction was initially separated into endothermic and exothermic processes using kinetic deconvolution analysis. Then, both of the endothermic and exothermic processes were further separated into two reaction steps accounting for the physico-geometrically controlled reaction that occurs in two steps. Kinetic modeling through kinetic deconvolution analysis clearly illustrates the appearance of the net exothermic effect is the result of a slight delay of the exothermic process to the endothermic process in each physico-geometrically controlled reaction step. This demonstrates that kinetic modeling attempted in this study is useful for interpreting the exothermic behavior of solid-state reactions such as the oxidative decomposition of solids and thermal decomposition of oxidizing agent.

  19. Thermal, solution and reductive decomposition of Cu-Al layered double hydroxides into oxide products

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Sylvia; Vishnu Kamath, P.

    2009-05-15

    Cu-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with [Cu]/[Al] ratio 2 adopt a structure with monoclinic symmetry while that with the ratio 0.25 adopt a structure with orthorhombic symmetry. The poor thermodynamic stability of the Cu-Al LDHs is due in part to the low enthalpies of formation of Cu(OH){sub 2} and CuCO{sub 3} and in part to the higher solubility of the LDH. Consequently, the Cu-Al LDH can be decomposed thermally (150 deg. C), hydrothermally (150 deg. C) and reductively (ascorbic acid, ambient temperature) to yield a variety of oxide products. Thermal decomposition at low (400 deg. C) temperature yields an X-ray amorphous residue, which reconstructs back to the LDH on soaking in water or standing in the ambient. Solution decomposition under hydrothermal conditions yields tenorite at 150 deg. C itself. Reductive decomposition yields a composite of Cu{sub 2}O and Al(OH){sub 3}, which on alkali-leaching of the latter, leads to the formation of fine particles of Cu{sub 2}O (<1 {mu}m). - Graphical abstract: SEM image of (a) the Cu{sub 2}O-Al(OH){sub 3} composite obtained on reductive decomposition of CuAl{sub 4}-LDH and (b) Cu{sub 2}O obtained on leaching of Al(OH){sub 3} from (a).

  20. Application of vacuum stability test to determine thermal decomposition kinetics of nitramines bonded by polyurethane matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbeih, Ahmed; Abd-Elghany, Mohamed; Elshenawy, Tamer

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum stability test (VST) is mainly used to study compatibility and stability of energetic materials. In this work, VST has been investigated to study thermal decomposition kinetics of four cyclic nitramines, 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX) and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX), cis-1,3,4,6-tetranitrooctahydroimidazo-[4,5-d]imidazole (BCHMX), 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (ε-HNIW, CL-20), bonded by polyurethane matrix based on hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB). Model fitting and model free (isoconversional) methods have been applied to determine the decomposition kinetics from VST results. For comparison, the decomposition kinetics were determined isothermally by ignition delay technique and non-isothermally by Advanced Kinetics and Technology Solution (AKTS) software. The activation energies for thermolysis obtained by isoconversional method based on VST technique of RDX/HTPB, HMX/HTPB, BCHMX/HTPB and CL20/HTPB were 157.1, 203.1, 190.0 and 176.8 kJ mol-1 respectively. Model fitting method proved that the mechanism of thermal decomposition of BCHMX/HTPB is controlled by the nucleation model while all the other studied PBXs are controlled by the diffusion models. A linear relationship between the ignition temperatures and the activation energies was observed. BCHMX/HTPB is interesting new PBX in the research stage.

  1. Non-Equilibrium Iron Clusters Coagulation and Thermal Decomposition at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskii, A. Yu.; Zaslonko, I. S.

    The fast thermal decomposition of Fe(CO)5 (1000-8000 ppm) behind reflected shock waves was used as source of iron atoms. The growth and decomposition of iron clusters was observed using light absorption technique at λ = 632.8 nm. The iron cluster formation was studied behind incident shock waves (T = 1200 — 2000 K, p = 5 — 50 bar) and cluster decomposition behind reflected shock waves (T = 2600 — 3000 K, p = 10 — 100 bar). The temperature and pressure dependencies of observable rate constants for iron cluster growth and thermal decomposition has been obtained. The experimental data were treated using master equation solution for the cluster size distribution function. The light absorption in the system is shown to depend on the total atoms amount in the clusters with n* < n < n **, were n* ~ 3 — 5, n** ~ 104. When coagulation time is rather small that the concentration of clusters with n > n** is negligible and concentration of small clusters (n < n*) permanently decreases, light absorption increase. After that number of atoms enclosed into the clusters with n* < n < n** became decreasing and the total light-absorption cross section decreases. So, observations of the absorption gives us an important information about streams through the particle size axes, and observable rate constant kobs = dln(D)/dt is a good parameter for the description of the kinetic behavior at the broad variations of temperature and pressure for an iron cluster ensemble.

  2. Thermal decomposition pathways of hydroxylamine: theoretical investigation on the initial steps.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingsheng; Wei, Chunyang; Pérez, Lisa M; Rogers, William J; Hall, Michael B; Mannan, M Sam

    2010-09-02

    Hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) is an unstable compound at room temperature, and it has been involved in two tragic industrial incidents. Although experimental studies have been carried out to study the thermal stability of hydroxylamine, the detailed decomposition mechanism is still in debate. In this work, several density functional and ab initio methods were used in conjunction with several basis sets to investigate the initial thermal decomposition steps of hydroxylamine, including both unimolecular and bimolecular reaction pathways. The theoretical investigation shows that simple bond dissociations and unimolecular reactions are unlikely to occur. The energetically favorable initial step of decomposition pathways was determined as a bimolecular isomerization of hydroxylamine into ammonia oxide with an activation barrier of approximately 25 kcal/mol at the MPW1K level of theory. Because hydroxylamine is available only in aqueous solutions, solvent effects on the initial decomposition pathways were also studied using water cluster methods and the polarizable continuum model (PCM). In water, the activation barrier of the bimolecular isomerization reaction decreases to approximately 16 kcal/mol. The results indicate that the bimolecular isomerization pathway of hydroxylamine is more favorable in aqueous solutions. However, the bimolecular nature of this reaction means that more dilute aqueous solution will be more stable.

  3. Thermal decomposition of 3,4-bis(4'-aminofurazano-3') furoxan.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Jiangning; Ren, Xiaoning; Chen, Zhiqun; Tian, Jun; Zhou, Yanshui

    2010-05-15

    The thermal decomposition of 3,4-bis(4'-aminofurazano-3') furoxan (BAFF) was studied by DSC, TG, the combination technique of in situ thermolysis cell with rapid-scan Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (thermolysis/RSFT-IR) and the fast thermolysis probe with rapid-scan Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (fast thermolysis/RSFT-IR). The result shows that the melting point of BAFF is 168.4 degrees C, the peak temperatures of the two exothermic peaks are respectively 260.4 degrees C and 338.8 degrees C on DSC curve. The apparent activation energy E(a) and the pre-exponential factor A are respectively 122.21 kJ mol(-1) and 10(9.89)s(-1) for major exothermic decomposition process of BAFF. The kinetic equation of major exothermic decomposition for BAFF is dalpha/dt=10(10.07)exp(-1.46993 x 10(4)/T)(1-alpha) [-ln(1-alpha)](1/3). The thermal decomposition gaseous products of BAFF consist of CO(2), NO(2), N(2)O and NO. The BAFF is shown by IR spectroscopy to convert to ammonium dicyanamide (NH(4)[N(CN)(2)]), cyclic azine residues (melamine or melamine-like). Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Kinetics of Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate by TG/DSC-MS-FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yan-Li; Huang, Hao; Ren, Hui; Jiao, Qing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The method of thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry-mass spectrometry-Fourier transform infrared (TG/DSC-MS-FTIR) simultaneous analysis has been used to study thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). The processing of nonisothermal data at various heating rates was performed using NETZSCH Thermokinetics. The MS-FTIR spectra showed that N2O and NO2 were the main gaseous products of the thermal decomposition of AP, and there was a competition between the formation reaction of N2O and that of NO2 during the process with an iso-concentration point of N2O and NO2. The dependence of the activation energy calculated by Friedman's iso-conversional method on the degree of conversion indicated that the AP decomposition process can be divided into three stages, which are autocatalytic, low-temperature diffusion and high-temperature, stable-phase reaction. The corresponding kinetic parameters were determined by multivariate nonlinear regression and the mechanism of the AP decomposition process was proposed.

  5. Thermal stability and decomposition kinetic studies of acyclovir and zidovudine drug compounds.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Beigi, Ali Akbar Miran; Heydari, Rouhollah; Khatibi, Mina

    2013-03-01

    Investigations on thermal behavior of drug samples such as acyclovir and zidovudine are interesting not only for obtaining stability information for their processing in pharmaceutical industry but also for predicting their shelf lives and suitable storage conditions. The present work describes thermal behaviors and decomposition kinetics of acyclovir and zidovudine in solid state, studied by some thermal analysis techniques including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and simultaneous thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA). TG analysis revealed that thermal degradation of the acyclovir and zidovudine is started at the temperatures of 400°C and 190°C, respectively. Meanwhile, TG-DTA analysis of acyclovir indicated that this drug melts at about 256°C. However, melting of zidovudine occurred at 142°C, which is 100°C before starting its decomposition (242°C). Different heating rates were applied to study the DSC behavior of drug samples in order to compute their thermokinetic and thermodynamic parameters by non-isothermal kinetic methods. Thermokinetic data showed that both drugs at the room temperature have slow degradation reaction rates and long shelf lives. However, acyclovir is considerably more thermally stable than zidovudine.

  6. Communication: Thermal unimolecular decomposition of syn-CH3CHOO: A kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanh Lam; McCaslin, Laura; McCarthy, Michael C.; Stanton, John F.

    2016-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of syn-ethanal-oxide (syn-CH3CHOO) through vinyl hydrogen peroxide (VHP) leading to hydroxyl radical is characterized using a modification of the HEAT thermochemical protocol. The isomerization step of syn-CH3CHOO to VHP via a 1,4 H-shift, which involves a moderate barrier of 72 kJ/mol, is found to be rate determining. A two-dimensional master equation approach, in combination with semi-classical transition state theory, is employed to calculate the time evolution of various species as well as to obtain phenomenological rate coefficients. This work suggests that, under boundary layer conditions in the atmosphere, thermal unimolecular decomposition is the most important sink of syn-CH3CHOO. Thus, the title reaction should be included into atmospheric modeling. The fate of cold VHP, the intermediate stabilized by collisions with a third body, has also been investigated.

  7. Communication: Thermal unimolecular decomposition of syn-CH3CHOO: A kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Lam; McCaslin, Laura; McCarthy, Michael C; Stanton, John F

    2016-10-07

    The thermal decomposition of syn-ethanal-oxide (syn-CH3CHOO) through vinyl hydrogen peroxide (VHP) leading to hydroxyl radical is characterized using a modification of the HEAT thermochemical protocol. The isomerization step of syn-CH3CHOO to VHP via a 1,4 H-shift, which involves a moderate barrier of 72 kJ/mol, is found to be rate determining. A two-dimensional master equation approach, in combination with semi-classical transition state theory, is employed to calculate the time evolution of various species as well as to obtain phenomenological rate coefficients. This work suggests that, under boundary layer conditions in the atmosphere, thermal unimolecular decomposition is the most important sink of syn-CH3CHOO. Thus, the title reaction should be included into atmospheric modeling. The fate of cold VHP, the intermediate stabilized by collisions with a third body, has also been investigated.

  8. First-Principles Thermochemistry for the Thermal Decomposition of Titanium Tetraisopropoxide.

    PubMed

    Buerger, Philipp; Nurkowski, Daniel; Akroyd, Jethro; Mosbach, Sebastian; Kraft, Markus

    2015-07-30

    The thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) is investigated using quantum chemistry, statistical thermodynamics, and equilibrium composition analysis. A set of 981 Ti-containing candidate species are proposed systematically on the basis of the thermal breakage of bonds within a TTIP molecule. The ground state geometry, vibrational frequencies and hindrance potentials are calculated for each species at the B97-1/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. Thermochemical data are computed by applying statistical thermodynamics and, if unknown, the standard enthalpy of formation is estimated using balanced reactions. Equilibrium composition calculations are performed under typical combustion conditions for premixed flames. The thermodynamically stable decomposition products for different fuel mixtures are identified. A strong positive correlation is found between the mole fractions of Ti species containing carbon and the TTIP precursor concentration.

  9. Silver Nanoparticles and Graphitic Carbon Through Thermal Decomposition of a Silver/Acetylenedicarboxylic Salt

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Spherically shaped silver nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix were synthesized by thermal decomposition of a Ag(I)/acetylenedicarboxylic acid salt. The silver nanoparticles, which are formed either by pyrolysis at 300 °C in an autoclave or thermolysis in xylene suspension at reflux temperature, are acting catalytically for the formation of graphite layers. Both reactions proceed through in situ reduction of the silver cations and polymerization of the central acetylene triple bonds and the exact temperature of the reaction can be monitored through DTA analysis. Interestingly, the thermal decomposition of this silver salt in xylene partly leads to a minor fraction of quasicrystalline silver, as established by HR-TEM analysis. The graphitic layers covering the silver nanoparticles are clearly seen in HR-TEM images and, furthermore, established by the presence of sp2carbon at the Raman spectrum of both samples. PMID:20628449

  10. The thermal decomposition of methanol and methanethiol on the clean and modified Fe(110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Batteas, J.D.; Rufael, T.S.; Friend, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of methanol and methanethiol on the clean and modified Fe(110) surface has been examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction and temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy. Both methanethiol and methanol adsorb on the Fe(110) surface at 100 K with immediate cleavage of the terminal hydrogen to produce methylthiolate (CH{sub 3}S) and methoxy (CH{sub 3}O) coadsorbed with atomic hydrogen on the Fe surface. Heating the sample to 800 K produces gas phase methane and hydrogen, leaving a chemisorbed S overlayer in the case of methylthiolate, while methoxy decomposes via desorbing hydrogen and CO to leave a clean Fe surface. The influence of oxygen and sulfur pre-adsorption on the thermal decomposition of these species will also be described.

  11. Thermal test and analysis of concentrator solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Min; Chen, Nuofu; Wu, Jinliang; Liu, Lei; Wang, Peng; Wang, Yanshuo; Bai, Yiming

    2008-03-01

    Under high concentration the temperature of photovoltaic solar cells is very high. It is well known that the efficiency and performance of photovoltaic solar cells decrease with the increase of temperature. So cooling is indispensable for a concentrator photovoltaic solar cell at high concentration. Usually passive cooling is widely considered in a concentrator system. However, the thermal conduction principle of concentrator solar cells under passive cooling is seldom reported. In this paper, GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple junction solar cells were fabricated using metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique. The thermal conductivity performance of monolithic concentrator GaInP/GaAs/Ge cascade solar cells under 400X concentration with a heat sink were studied by testing the surface and backside temperatures of solar cells. The tested result shows that temperature difference between both sides of the solar cells is about 1K. A theoretical model of the thermal conductivity and thermal resistance of the GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple junction solar cells was built, and the calculation temperature difference between both sides of the solar cells is about 0.724K which is consistent with the result of practical test. Combining the theoretical model and the practical testing with the upper surface temperature of tested 310K, the temperature distribution of the solar cells was researched.

  12. Ab initio kinetics and thermal decomposition mechanism of mononitrobiuret and 1,5-dinitrobiuret

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hongyan E-mail: ghanshyam.vaghjiani@us.af.mil; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L. E-mail: ghanshyam.vaghjiani@us.af.mil

    2015-05-28

    Mononitrobiuret (MNB) and 1,5-dinitrobiuret (DNB) are tetrazole-free, nitrogen-rich, energetic compounds. For the first time, a comprehensive ab initio kinetics study on the thermal decomposition mechanisms of MNB and DNB is reported here. In particular, the intramolecular interactions of amine H-atom with electronegative nitro O-atom and carbonyl O-atom have been analyzed for biuret, MNB, and DNB at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The results show that the MNB and DNB molecules are stabilized through six-member-ring moieties via intramolecular H-bonding with interatomic distances between 1.8 and 2.0 Å, due to electrostatic as well as polarization and dispersion interactions. Furthermore, it was found that the stable molecules in the solid state have the smallest dipole moment amongst all the conformers in the nitrobiuret series of compounds, thus revealing a simple way for evaluating reactivity of fuel conformers. The potential energy surface for thermal decomposition of MNB was characterized by spin restricted coupled cluster theory at the RCCSD(T)/cc-pV∞ Z//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level. It was found that the thermal decomposition of MNB is initiated by the elimination of HNCO and HNN(O)OH intermediates. Intramolecular transfer of a H-atom, respectively, from the terminal NH{sub 2} group to the adjacent carbonyl O-atom via a six-member-ring transition state eliminates HNCO with an energy barrier of 35 kcal/mol and from the central NH group to the adjacent nitro O-atom eliminates HNN(O)OH with an energy barrier of 34 kcal/mol. Elimination of HNN(O)OH is also the primary process involved in the thermal decomposition of DNB, which processes C{sub 2v} symmetry. The rate coefficients for the primary decomposition channels for MNB and DNB were quantified as functions of temperature and pressure. In addition, the thermal decomposition of HNN(O)OH was analyzed via Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus/multi-well master equation simulations, the results of which

  13. Thermal Decomposition Mechanisms of Ionic Liquids by Direct Dynamics Simulations and Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-10

    hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...the Chemical Dynamics Beamline 9.0.2 at the Advanced Light Source . The likely reaction mechanisms in the thermal decomposition of RTILs are discussed...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited IL vapor source reflectron MS 7.4-15.0 eV photons, 0.025 eV resolution ALS: Chemical

  14. Thermal decomposition of carbonates in fault zones: Slip-weakening and temperature-limiting effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulem, J.; Famin, V.

    2009-03-01

    During an earthquake, the heat generated by fault friction may be large enough to activate the devolatilization of minerals forming the fault rocks. In this paper, we model the mechanical effects of calcite thermal decomposition on the slip behavior of a fault zone during an earthquake. To do so, we introduce the coupled effects of calcite volume loss, heat consumption, and CO2 production in the theoretical analysis of shear heating and thermal pressurization of pore fluids. We consider a rapidly deforming shear band consisting of a fluid-saturated carbonate rock. The equations that govern the evolution of pore pressure and temperature inside the band and the mass of emitted CO2 are deduced from the mass and energy balance of the multiphase-saturated medium and from the kinetics of the chemical decomposition of calcite. Numerical simulation of seismic slip at depths of 5 to 8 km show that decarbonation has two critical consequences on fault slip. First, the endothermic reaction of calcite decomposition limits the coseismic temperature increase to less than ˜800°C (corresponding to the initiation of the chemical reaction) inside the shear band. Second, the rapid emission of CO2 by decarbonation significantly increases the slip-weakening effect of thermal pressurization. The pore pressure reaches a maximum and then decreases due to the reduction of solid volume, causing a restrengthening of shear stress. Our theoretical study shows, on the example of decarbonation, that the thermal decomposition of minerals is an important slip-weakening process and that a large part of the frictional heat of earthquakes may go into endothermic devolatilization reactions.

  15. Physical pretreatments of wastewater algae to reduce ash content and improve thermal decomposition characteristics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Ting; Ma, Junchao; Zhang, Yuanhui; Gai, Chao; Qian, Wanyi

    2014-10-01

    Previous study showed high ash content in wastewater algae (WA) has a negative effect on bio-crude oil formation in hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). This study explored the effect of different pretreatments on ash reduction and the thermal decomposition of WA. Single-stage (e.g. centrifugation) and two-stage pretreatments (e.g. centrifugation followed by ultrasonication, C+U) were used. The apparent activation energy of the thermal decomposition (E(a)) of pretreated algae was determined. HTL was conducted to study how different pretreatments may impact on bio-crude oil formation. Compared to untreated samples, the ash content of algae with centrifugation was reduced from 28.6% to 18.6%. With C+U pretreatments, E(a) was decreased from 50.2 kJ/mol to 35.9 kJ/mol and the bio-crude oil yield was increased from 30% to 55%. These results demonstrate that pretreatments of C+U can improve the thermal decomposition behavior of WA and enhance the bio-crude oil conversion efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrafast Preparation of Monodisperse Fe3 O4 Nanoparticles by Microwave-Assisted Thermal Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhirui; Xie, Jun; Bai, Tingting; Zou, Jiemeng; Gu, Ning

    2016-08-08

    Thermal decomposition, as the main synthetic procedure for the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), is facing several problems, such as high reaction temperatures and time consumption. An improved a microwave-assisted thermal decomposition procedure has been developed by which monodisperse Fe3 O4 NPs could be rapidly produced at a low aging temperature with high yield (90.1 %). The as-synthesized NPs show excellent inductive heating and MRI properties in vitro. In contrast, Fe3 O4 NPs synthesized by classical thermal decomposition were obtained in very low yield (20.3 %) with an overall poor quality. It was found for the first time that, besides precursors and solvents, magnetic NPs themselves could be heated by microwave irradiation during the synthetic process. These findings were demonstrated by a series of microwave-heating experiments, Raman spectroscopy and vector-network analysis, indicating that the initially formed magnetic Fe3 O4 particles were able to transform microwave energy into heat directly and, thus, contribute to the nanoparticle growth.

  17. Study on the thermal decomposition kinetics of nano-sized calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Li, Dai-Xi; Shi, Hong-Yun; Jie, Deng; Xu, Yuan-Zhi

    2003-01-01

    This study of the thermal decomposition kinetics of various average diameter nano-particles of calcium carbonate by means of TG-DTA ( thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis) showed that the thermal decomposition kinetic mechanisms of the same crystal type of calcium carbonate samples do not vary with decreasing of their average diameters; their pseudo-active energy (a); and that the top-temperature of decomposition T(p) decreases gently in the scope of micron-sized diameter, but decreases sharply when the average diameter decreases from micron region to nanometer region. The extraordinary properties of nano-particles were explored by comparing the varying regularity of the mechanisms and kinetic parameters of the solid-phase reactions as well as their structural characterization with the variation of average diameters of particles. These show that the aggregation, surface effect as well as internal aberrance and stress of the nano-particles are the main reason causing both E(a) and T(p) to decline sharply with the decrease of the average diameter of nano-particles.

  18. Determination of the Volume of Water for Suppressing the Thermal Decomposition of Forest Combustibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, R. S.; Zhdanova, A. O.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2017-07-01

    From the results of experimental studies of the processes of suppressing the thermal decomposition of the typical forest combustibles (birch leaves, fir needles, asp twigs, and a mixture of these three materials) by water aerosol, the minimum volumes of the fire-extinguishing liquid have been determined (by varying the volume of samples of the forest combustibles from 0.00002 m3 to 0.0003 m3 and the area of their open surface from 0.0001 m2 to 0.018 m2). The dependences of the minimum volume of water on the area of the open surface of the forest combustible have been established. Approximation expressions for these dependences have been obtained. Forecast has been made of the minimum volume of water for suppressing the process of thermal decomposition of forest combustibles in areas from 1 cm2 to 1 km2, as well as of the characteristic quenching times by varying the water concentration per unit time. It has been shown that the amount of water needed for effective suppression of the process of thermal decomposition of forest combustibles is several times less than is customarily assumed.

  19. Thermal decomposition behavior of amino groups modified bimodal mesoporous silicas as aspirin carrier.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; Sun, Jihong; Zhang, Li; Li, Yuzhen; Ren, Bo

    2011-12-01

    Two kinds of amino groups were employed to functionalize bimodal mesoporous silicas and related drug carriers were prepared. The characterization results of XRD, N2 adsorption and desorption, FT-IR and TG all confirmed the structural integrity of the bimodal mesopore architecture after introduction treatment of functional groups and the successful adsorption of aspirin. In order to investigate the interaction among the mesoporous structure, the functional groups grafted onto the mesoporous surface and the existential microenvironment of the drug molecules inside the mesoporous channels, the thermal decomposition behaviors of amino groups modified and aspirin loaded carriers were studied based on the thermogravimetric analysis in details. According to the thermogravimetry and derivative thermogravimetry results, the apparent activation energies E(a) of thermal decomposition for all related samples have been evaluated by Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods. Meanwhile, their thermal decomposition mechanisms have been suggested by using Coats and Redfern methods. All these featured consequence could provide a deeper understanding for large loading capacity and controlled release of drug-carriers in the pharmaceutical application.

  20. Kinetic and chemical characterization of thermal decomposition of dicumylperoxide in cumene.

    PubMed

    Di Somma, Ilaria; Marotta, Raffaele; Andreozzi, Roberto; Caprio, Vincenzo

    2011-03-15

    Dicumylperoxide (DCP) is one of the most used peroxides in the polymer industry. It has been reported that its thermal decomposition can result in runaway phenomena and thermal explosions with significant economic losses and injuries to people. In the present paper thermal behaviour of dicumylperoxide in cumene was investigated over the temperature range of 393-433 K under aerated and de-aerated conditions. The results indicated that when oxygen was present, the decomposition rate did not follow a simple pseudo-first order kinetic as previously reported in literature. A satisfactory fit of the experimental data was, in this case, achieved by means of kinetic expression derived under the assumption of an autocatalytic scheme of reaction. The reaction rate was, on the contrary, correctly described by a pseudo-first order kinetic in absence of oxygen. Under both aerated and de-aerated conditions, chemical analysis showed that the decomposition mainly resulted in the formation of acetophenone and dimethylphenylcarbinol with minor occurrence of 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-diphenylbutane. The formation of methane and ethane was also invariably observed while the appearance of cumylhydroperoxide as a reaction intermediate was detected under only aerated conditions. Therefore, two reaction schemes were proposed to explain system behaviour in the presence of oxygen and after its purging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermal and carbothermic decomposition of Na2CO3 and Li2CO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Wan; Lee, Hae-Geon

    2001-02-01

    In order to elucidate the decomposition mechanism of Na2CO3 and Li2CO3 in mold-powder systems employed in the continuous casting of steel, decompositions of Na2CO3 and Li2CO3 were investigated using thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) methods at temperatures up to 1200 °C, under a flow of argon gas. For the case of pure Na2CO3, the thermal decomposition started from its melting point and continued as the temperature was increased, but at a very slow rate. For Li2CO3, however, the decomposition occurred at much faster rates than that for Na2CO3. When carbon black was added to the carbonate particles, the decomposition rates of both Na2CO3 and Li2CO3 were significantly enhanced. From mass-balanced calulations and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses of the reaction products, it is concluded that decompositions of Na2CO3 and Li2CO3 with carbon black take place according to the respective reactions of Na2CO3 (1) + 2C (s) = 2Na (g) + 3CO (g) and Li2CO3 (l) + C (s) = Li2O (s) + 2CO (g). It was found that liquid droplets of Na2CO3 were initially isolated due to carbon particles surrounding them, but, as the carbon particles were consumed, the liquid droplets were gradually agglomerated. This effected a reduction of the total surface area of the carbonate, resulting in a dependence of the decomposition rate on the amount of carbon black. For the case of Li2CO3, on the other hand, hardly any agglomeration occurred up to the completion of decomposition, and, hence, the rate was almost independent of the amount of carbon black mixed. The apparent activation energies for the decomposition of Na2CO3 and Li2CO3 with carbon black were found to be similar and were estimated to be 180 to 223 kJ mole-1.

  2. Convex Decompositions of Thermal Equilibrium for Non-interacting Non-relativistic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenu, Aurelia; Branczyk, Agata; Sipe, John

    2016-05-01

    We provide convex decompositions of thermal equilibrium for non-interacting non-relativistic particles in terms of localized wave packets. These quantum representations offer a new tool and provide insights that can help relate to the classical picture. Considering that thermal states are ubiquitous in a wide diversity of fields, studying different convex decompositions of the canonical ensemble is an interesting problem by itself. The usual classical and quantum pictures of thermal equilibrium of N non-interacting, non-relativistic particles in a box of volume V are quite different. The picture in classical statistical mechanics is about (localized) particles with a range of positions and velocities; in quantum statistical mechanics, one considers the particles (bosons or fermions) associated with energy eigenstates that are delocalized through the whole box. Here we provide a representation of thermal equilibrium in quantum statistical mechanics involving wave packets with a localized coordinate representation and an expectation value of velocity. In addition to derive a formalism that may help simplify particular calculations, our results can be expected to provide insights into the transition from quantum to classical features of the fully quantum thermal state.

  3. Solar radiation uncorks the lignin bottleneck on plant litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, A.; Ballare, C. L.; Méndez, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Plant litter decomposition is an essential process in the first stages of carbon and nutrient turnover in terrestrial ecosystems, and together with soil microbial biomass, provide the principal inputs of carbon for the formation of soil organic matter. Photodegradation, the photochemical mineralization of organic matter, has been recently identified as a mechanism for previously unexplained high rates of litter mass loss in low rainfall ecosystems; however, the generality of this process as a control on carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems is not known, and the indirect effects of photodegradation on biotic stimulation of carbon turnover have been debated in recent studies. We demonstrate that in a wide range of plant species, previous exposure to solar radiation, and visible light in particular, enhanced subsequent biotic degradation of leaf litter. Moreover, we demonstrate that the mechanism for this enhancement involves increased accessibility for microbial enzymes to plant litter carbohydrates due to a reduction in lignin content. Photodegradation of plant litter reduces the structural and chemical bottleneck imposed by lignin in secondary cell walls. In litter from woody plant species, specific interactions with ultraviolet radiation obscured facilitative effects of solar radiation on biotic decomposition. The generalized positive effect of solar radiation exposure on subsequent microbial activity is mediated by increased accessibility to cell wall polysaccharides, which suggests that photodegradation is quantitatively important in determining rates of mass loss, nutrient release and the carbon balance in a broad range of terrestrial ecosystems.

  4. Solid-phase thermal decomposition of 2,4-dinitroimidazole (2,4-DNI)

    SciTech Connect

    Minier, L.; Behrens, R. Jr.; Bulusu, S.

    1996-07-01

    The solid-phase thermal decomposition of the insensitive energetic aromatic heterocycle 2,4-dinitroimidazole (2,4-DNI: mp 265--274 C) is studied utilizing simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) between 200 and 247 C. The pyrolysis products have been identified using perdeuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled isotopomers. The products consist of low molecular-weight gases and a thermally stable solid residue. The major gaseous products are NO, CO{sub 2}, CO, N{sub 2}, HNCO and H{sub 2}O. Minor gaseous products are HCN, C{sub 2}N{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, C{sub 3}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}N{sub 3}O and NH{sub 3}. The elemental formula of the residue is C{sub 2}HN{sub 2}O and FTIR analysis suggests that it is polyurea- and polycarbamate-like in nature. The rates of formation of the gaseous products and their respective quantities have been determined for a typical isothermal decomposition experiment at 235 C. The temporal behaviors of the gas formation rates indicate that the overall decomposition is characterized by a sequence of four events: (1) an early decomposition period induced by impurities and H{sub 2}O, (2) an induction period where CO{sub 2} and NO are the primary products formed at relatively constant rates, (3) an autoacceleratory period that peaks when the sample is depleted and (4) a final period in which the residue decomposes. Arrhenius parameters for the induction period are E{sub a} = 46.9 {+-} 0.7 kcal/mol and Log(A) = 16.3 {+-} 0.3. Decomposition pathways that are consistent with the data are presented.

  5. Solid-phase thermal decomposition of 2,4-dinitroimidazole (2,4-DNI)

    SciTech Connect

    Minier, L.; Behrens, R. Jr.; Bulusu, S.

    1996-12-31

    The solid-phase thermal decomposition of the insensitive energetic nitroaromatic heterocycle 2,4-dinitroimidazole (2,4-DNI: mp 265--274C) is studied utilizing simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) between 200 and 247C. The pyrolysis products have been identified using perdeuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled isotopomers. The products consist of low molecular-weight gases and a thermally stable solid residue. The major gaseous products are NO, CO{sub 2}, CO, N{sub 2}, HNCO and H{sub 2}O. Minor gaseous products are HCN, C{sub 2}N{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, C{sub 3}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}N{sub 3}O and NH{sub 3}. The elemental formula of the residue is C{sub 2}HN{sub 2}O and FTIR analysis suggests that it is polyurea- and polycarbamate-like in nature. Rates of formation of the gaseous products and their respective quantities have been determined for a typical isothermal decomposition experiment at 235C. The temporal behaviors of the gas formation rates indicate that the overall decomposition is characterized by a sequence of four events; (1) an early decomposition period induced by impurities and water, (2) an induction period where C0{sub 2} and NO are the primary products formed at relatively constant rates, (3) an autoacceleratory period that peaks when the sample is depleted and (4) a final period in which the residue decomposes. Arrhenius parameters for the induction period are E{sub a} = 46.9 {plus_minus} 0.7 kcal/mol and Log(A) = 16.3 {plus_minus} 0.3. Decomposition pathways that are consistent with the data are presented.

  6. Flow pyrolysis and direct and silicon tetrafluoride-sensitized laser-induced decomposition of tetralin. Identification of retro-[2 + 4] cleavage as the primary homogeneous thermal decomposition channel

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Michael R.; Comita, Paul B.; Moore, C. Bradley; Bergman, Robert G.

    1980-08-01

    In an effort to determine the products and mechanism of the truly homogeneous thermal decomposition of the aromatic hydrocarbon tetralin, we have examined the products formed from this compound upon energization by conventional flow pyrolysis, infrared multiphoton excitation, and SiF{sub 4}-sensitized infrared laser thermal activation. Six major products are formed in these reactions, but the product ratios depend upon the mode of energization. Flow pyrolysis gives a result analogous to those observed earlier; i.e. almost exclusive dehydrogenation, leading to dihydronaphthalene and naphthalene. Direct and sensitized IR laser-induced decomposition, however, leads to ethylene loss (presumably by an initial retro-[2+4] reaction) as the predominent decomposition mode, giving benzocyclobutene. We believe these results are due to the fact that direct thermal decomposition, both in our experiments as well as in previous studies, involves predominant surface-catalysis. In the laser-induced reactions, which are uncomplicated by problems due to surface-catalysis, the true homogeneous decomposition takes place, and this involves retro-[2+4] cleavage. Mechanistic details of these processes were studied by examining the isotope distribution in the products formed on SiF{sub 4}-sensitized laser photolysis of 1,1,4,4-tetradeuteriotetralin.

  7. Organic and inorganic decomposition products from the thermal desorption of atmospheric particles

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brent J.; Zhang, Yaping; Zuo, Xiaochen; Martinez, Raul E.; Walker, Michael J.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-11

    Here, atmospheric aerosol composition is often analyzed using thermal desorption techniques to evaporate samples and deliver organic or inorganic molecules to various designs of detectors for identification and quantification. The organic aerosol (OA) fraction is composed of thousands of individual compounds, some with nitrogen- and sulfur-containing functionality and, often contains oligomeric material, much of which may be susceptible to decomposition upon heating. Here we analyze thermal decomposition products as measured by a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) capable of separating thermal decomposition products from thermally stable molecules. The TAG impacts particles onto a collection and thermal desorption (CTD) cell, and upon completion of sample collection, heats and transfers the sample in a helium flow up to 310 °C. Desorbed molecules are refocused at the head of a gas chromatography column that is held at 45 °C and any volatile decomposition products pass directly through the column and into an electron impact quadrupole mass spectrometer. Analysis of the sample introduction (thermal decomposition) period reveals contributions of NO+ (m/z 30), NO2+ (m/z 46), SO+ (m/z 48), and SO2+ (m/z 64), derived from either inorganic or organic particle-phase nitrate and sulfate. CO2+ (m/z 44) makes up a major component of the decomposition signal, along with smaller contributions from other organic components that vary with the type of aerosol contributing to the signal (e.g., m/z  53, 82 observed here for isoprene-derived secondary OA). All of these ions are important for ambient aerosol analyzed with the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), suggesting similarity of the thermal desorption processes in both instruments. Ambient observations of these decomposition products compared to organic, nitrate, and sulfate

  8. Organic and inorganic decomposition products from the thermal desorption of atmospheric particles

    DOE PAGES

    Williams, Brent J.; Zhang, Yaping; Zuo, Xiaochen; ...

    2016-04-11

    Here, atmospheric aerosol composition is often analyzed using thermal desorption techniques to evaporate samples and deliver organic or inorganic molecules to various designs of detectors for identification and quantification. The organic aerosol (OA) fraction is composed of thousands of individual compounds, some with nitrogen- and sulfur-containing functionality and, often contains oligomeric material, much of which may be susceptible to decomposition upon heating. Here we analyze thermal decomposition products as measured by a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) capable of separating thermal decomposition products from thermally stable molecules. The TAG impacts particles onto a collection and thermal desorption (CTD) cell, and upon completionmore » of sample collection, heats and transfers the sample in a helium flow up to 310 °C. Desorbed molecules are refocused at the head of a gas chromatography column that is held at 45 °C and any volatile decomposition products pass directly through the column and into an electron impact quadrupole mass spectrometer. Analysis of the sample introduction (thermal decomposition) period reveals contributions of NO+ (m/z 30), NO2+ (m/z 46), SO+ (m/z 48), and SO2+ (m/z 64), derived from either inorganic or organic particle-phase nitrate and sulfate. CO2+ (m/z 44) makes up a major component of the decomposition signal, along with smaller contributions from other organic components that vary with the type of aerosol contributing to the signal (e.g., m/z  53, 82 observed here for isoprene-derived secondary OA). All of these ions are important for ambient aerosol analyzed with the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), suggesting similarity of the thermal desorption processes in both instruments. Ambient observations of these decomposition products compared to organic, nitrate, and sulfate mass concentrations measured by an AMS reveal good correlation, with improved correlations for OA when compared to the AMS

  9. Solar synthetic fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgen, E.; Bilgen, C.

    In this paper, a thermodynamic study is presented on solar hydrogen production using concentrated solar energy. In the first part, the direct decomposition process has been studied. The temperature requirements at various partial pressures of H2O, H2 and H yields, thermal efficiency and separation of products are discussed. In the second part, using consistent costing bases, the cost of hydrogen is estimated for solar-direct decomposition process and solar-electrolysis process. It has been found that the solar-direct decomposition process concept provides hydrogen costs in the range of $22/GJ which are lower by $15-$26 than those provided by a solar electrolysis process.

  10. Beam-Forming Concentrating Solar Thermal Array Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Thomas A. (Inventor); Dimotakis, Paul E. (Inventor); Hoppe, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to concentrating solar-power systems and, more particularly, beam-forming concentrating solar thermal array power systems. A solar thermal array power system is provided, including a plurality of solar concentrators arranged in pods. Each solar concentrator includes a solar collector, one or more beam-forming elements, and one or more beam-steering elements. The solar collector is dimensioned to collect and divert incoming rays of sunlight. The beam-forming elements intercept the diverted rays of sunlight, and are shaped to concentrate the rays of sunlight into a beam. The steering elements are shaped, dimensioned, positioned, and/or oriented to deflect the beam toward a beam output path. The beams from the concentrators are converted to heat at a receiver, and the heat may be temporarily stored or directly used to generate electricity.

  11. Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery (STEOR). Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzinga, E.; Arnold, C.; Allen, D.; Garman, R.; Joy, P.; Mitchell, P.; Shaw, H.

    1980-11-01

    Detailed information describing the technical, economic, operational, and environmental feasibility of solar thermal enhanced oil recovery using line focusing distributed collectors is presented. The site description, conceptual designs, foundation design for solar collectors, design basis and preliminary design are given. The fatigue testing of flexible hoses is described. Solar control and a failure modes and effects analysis of solar thermal system are presented. The basis for the preliminary cost estimate and backup data for the market and economic analysis are presented. The environmental impact analysis and air quality analysis are given. Engineering drawings and specifications are included.

  12. Applicability of advanced automotive heat engines to solar thermal power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Evans, D. G.; Alger, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The requirements of a solar thermal power system are reviewed and compared with the predicted characteristics of automobile engines under development. A good match is found in terms of power level and efficiency when the automobile engines, designed for maximum powers of 65-100 kW (87 to 133 hp) are operated to the nominal 20-40 kW electric output requirement of the solar thermal application. At these reduced power levels it appears that the automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines have the potential to deliver the 40+ percent efficiency goal of the solar thermal program.

  13. Thermal Decomposition of 2-Pentanol: A Shock Tube Study and RRKM Calculations.

    PubMed

    Parandaman, A; Rajakumar, B

    2016-10-07

    A single pulse shock tube was used to study the thermal decomposition of 2-pentanol in the temperatures between 1110 and 1325 K. Three major decomposition products are methane, ethylene, and propylene. The minor products detected in lower concentration are ethane, acetylene, acetaldehyde, 1-pentene, and 2-pentene. The rate coefficient for the overall decomposition of 2-pentanol was found to be ktotal(exp)(1110-1325 K) = (4.01 ± 0.51) × 10(9) exp(-(36.2 ± 4.7)/RT) s(-1), where the activation energies are given in kcal mol(-1). To simulate reactant and product distribution over the experimentally studied temperatures between 1110 and 1325 K, a reaction scheme was constructed with 34 species and 39 reactions. In addition to this, the temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients were computed for various unimolecular dissociation pathways using RRKM theory. The high pressure limit rate coefficient for overall decomposition of 2-pentanol was obtained to be ktotal(theory)(500-2500 K) = (9.67 ± 1.11) × 10(14) exp(-(67.7 ± 2.9)/RT) s(-1). The calculated high pressure rate coefficients and experimentally measured rate constants are in good agreement with each other. The reaction is primarily governed by the unimolecular elimination of water.

  14. Effect of air in the thermal decomposition of 50 mass% hydroxylamine/water.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Lizbeth O; Rogers, William J; Mannan, M S

    2002-11-11

    This paper presents experimental measurements of 50 mass% hydroxylamine (HA)/water thermal decomposition in air and vacuum environments using an automatic pressure tracking adiabatic calorimeter (APTAC). Overall kinetics, onset temperatures, non-condensable pressures, times to maximum rate, heat and pressure rates versus temperature, and mixture vapor pressures for the experiments in vacuum were similar when compared to the corresponding data for HA decomposition in air. Determined was an overall activation energy of 119+/-8 kJ/mol (29+/-2 kcal/mol), which is low compared to 257 kJ/mol (61.3 kcal/mol) required to break the H(2)N-OH bond reported in the literature. The availability of oxygen from air did not affect detected runaway decomposition products, which were H(2), N(2), N(2)O, NO, and NH(3), for samples run in vacuum or with air above the sample. A delta H(rxn) of -117 kJ/mol (28 kcal/mol) was estimated for the HA decomposition reaction under runaway conditions.

  15. The decomposition of methanol on Ru(001) studied using laser induced thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckert, A. A.; Brand, J. L.; Mak, C. H.; Koehler, B. G.; George, S. M.

    1987-08-01

    The decomposition reaction of methanol on Ru(001) was studied using laser induced thermal desorption (LITD). The LITD studies, combined with temperature programmed desorption and Auger electron spectroscopy measurements, allowed absolute product yields for the three competing surface pathways to be determined over the entire range of chemisorbed methanol coverages at a heating rate of β=2.6 K/s. At the lowest methanol coverages of θ≤0.07θs, where θs is the surface coverage of a saturated chemisorbed layer, all the methanol reacted between 220-280 K. This methanol decomposition reaction yielded desorption-limited H2 and CO as reaction products. At higher coverages, molecular desorption and the second methanol decomposition reaction involving C-O bond breakage became increasingly important. At θ=θs, 50% of the initial methanol coverage desorbed, 24% produced H2 and CO and 26% left C on the surface. Isothermal LITD kinetic measurements were carried out at low methanol coverages of θ≤0.07θs at various temperatures from 180 to 220 K. The initial decomposition rates obtained from the isothermal LITD studies displayed first order kinetics. The decomposition kinetics at later times could not be fit by first order kinetics and suggested a self-poisoned reaction. Subsequent LITD studies revealed that CO inhibited the decomposition reaction. The product CO inhibition was modeled by first order kinetics with a CO-coverage dependent activation barrier. The observed first order reaction kinetics at low methanol coverage could be expressed by the pre-exponential ν=106 s-1 and the coverage-dependent activation barrier E=7 kcal/mol+αθCO/θCO,s, where α=20 kcal/mol and θCO/θCO,s is the dimensionless CO coverage normalized to the CO saturation coverage θCO,s. Isotopic LITD studies revealed that the decomposition kinetics of CH3OH, CD3OH, and CH3OD were identical. This equivalence suggested that the hindered rotation of the surface methoxy species is the reaction

  16. Solar thermal program summary. Volume 2: Research summaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    The Federal government has conducted the National Solar Thermal Technology Program since 1975. Its purpose is to provide focus, direction, and funding for the development of solar thermal technology as an energy option for the United States. More than a decade of research and development has brought solar thermal systems to a point where they have proven useful for generating electricity and process heat. Improvements to these during the 1980s led to reductions in capital and energy costs of 80 percent. Parabolic trough systems are now considered technically mature and are being used in the world's largest solar electric systems, generating electricity for less than $0.12/kWh. Central receiver and dish technologies have also been demonstrated in several plants throughout the world. The cost of concentrators, the largest cost component of solar thermal systems, has dropped from $900 to $1300/sq m in 1978 to $70 to $16/sq m today, while performance has improved significantly. Solar thermal technology has also shown strong potential for advanced applications, such as destroying hazardous wastes and processing materials and chemicals. This annual summary provides an overview of the government-funded activities within the National Solar Thermal Technology Program. Tasks conducted in house by the participating national laboratories or under contract to industry and academic and other research institutions are highlighted. This document covers those activities initiated, renewed, or completed during FY 1989.

  17. Solar Orbiter- Solar Array- Thermal Design for an Extreme Temperature Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Jens; Paarmann, Carola; Lindner, Anton; Kreutz, Martin; Oberhuttinger, Carola; Costello, Ian; Icardi, Lidia

    2014-08-01

    The Solar Orbiter mission is an interdisciplinary mission to the sun, carried out by ESA in collaboration with NASA. The spacecraft will approach the sun close to 0.28 AU. At this distance, the solar array has to be operated under high solar array inclination angles to limit the temperatures to a maximum qualification temperature of 200°C for the photo voltaic assembly (PVA). Nevertheless, extreme temperatures appear at specific locations of the solar array which require purpose-built temperature protection measures. A very specific thermal protection is needed to keep the PVA and its supporting structures within the qualified temperature range and simultaneously minimize the thermal flux into the spacecraft.This paper describes the Solar Orbiter solar array design in general and its specific thermal design in particular. It describes the interdisciplinary steps between thermal- and mechanical analysis as well as design engineering necessary to result to the different shielding methods.

  18. Solar coronal non-thermal processes (Solar Maximum Mission)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1983-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission was used to study solar coronal phenomena in hard X-radiation, since its instrument complement included the first solar hard X-ray telescope. Phenomena related to those discovered from OSO-5 and OSO-7 observations were emphasized.

  19. Cellophane and filter paper as cellulosic support for silver nanoparticles and its thermal decomposition catalysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva Pereira, Bruna; Silva, Marcela Fernandes; Bittencourt, Paulo Rodrigo Stival; de Oliveira, Daniela Martins Fernandes; Pineda, Edgardo Alfonso Gómez; Hechenleitner, Ana Adelina Winkler

    2015-11-20

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted great attention due to its optical, electrical and thermal properties. Cellulosic supports for these nanoparticles are of particular interest because of its availability, flexibility and biocompatibility. In this work, AgNPs were synthesized using two cellulosic materials, cellophane (CP) and filter paper (FP), as matrix support. Cellulosic materials were immersed in an aqueous solution of silver nitrate containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and then reduced with hydroxylamine. The obtained nanocomposites (CP-AgNPs and FP-AgNPs) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (DRX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). AgNPs of near 15nm anchored onto cellulosic surfaces were detected. The thermal properties of these materials were investigated through thermogravimetry (TG). Their kinetic of thermal decomposition was studied by the Vyasovkin method of dynamic isoconvertion, which indicated a catalytic effect of AgNPs in the cellulose thermal decomposition reaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prediction of the thermal decomposition of organic peroxides by validated QSPR models.

    PubMed

    Prana, Vinca; Rotureau, Patricia; Fayet, Guillaume; André, David; Hub, Serge; Vicot, Patricia; Rao, Li; Adamo, Carlo

    2014-07-15

    Organic peroxides are unstable chemicals which can easily decompose and may lead to explosion. Such a process can be characterized by physico-chemical parameters such as heat and temperature of decomposition, whose determination is crucial to manage related hazards. These thermal stability properties are also required within many regulatory frameworks related to chemicals in order to assess their hazardous properties. In this work, new quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR) models were developed to predict accurately the thermal stability of organic peroxides from their molecular structure respecting the OECD guidelines for regulatory acceptability of QSPRs. Based on the acquisition of 38 reference experimental data using DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) apparatus in homogenous experimental conditions, multi-linear models were derived for the prediction of the decomposition heat and the onset temperature using different types of molecular descriptors. Models were tested by internal and external validation tests and their applicability domains were defined and analyzed. Being rigorously validated, they presented the best performances in terms of fitting, robustness and predictive power and the descriptors used in these models were linked to the peroxide bond whose breaking represents the main decomposition mechanism of organic peroxides.

  1. Thermal decomposition of wood and cellulose in the presence of solvent vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Jakab, E.; Liu, K.; Meuzelaar, H.L.C.

    1997-06-01

    The thermal decomposition of white birch wood and filter pulp was studied in water and methanol vapor at 2 MPa pressure in a flow-through reactor. The abundance of the volatile products was monitored by on-line GC/MS using repetitive sampling in combination with fast separation on a short capillary column. The reactor was heated to 400 C at 20 C/min and the intensity profile of the product ions within the 30--200 amu range recorded. The system was capable of separating the profiles of typical hemicellulose products evolved at lower temperature from the characteristic cellulose and lignin products detected from wood. Char yields in methanol were similar to those in an inert gas atmosphere; however, the presence of water markedly increased the amount of char produced. The product distribution of cellulose was strongly affected by the solvents. In methanol, pyran derivatives dominate besides levoglucosan and glycolaldehyde, whereas the relative abundance of 2-furaldehyde and 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde increased in the presence of water. Water catalysis was also indicated by lowering the decomposition temperatures of cellulose. High-pressure (6.5 MPa) thermogravimetric experiments in helium or hydrogen atmospheres were also found to lower the reaction temperature of wood. This observation can be explained by the catalytic effect of reaction water released during the thermal decomposition of wood.

  2. Kinetic model for thermal decomposition of energetic materials from ReaxFF molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Oleg; Yanilkin, Alexey

    2015-06-01

    In the present work we perform molecular dynamics simulations of the thermal decomposition of isolated molecules and single crystals of PETN, RDX and HMX. For isolated molecules we use multi-replica approach with different preconditioned atomic velocities to obtain statistics of the decomposition. In this model we only consider the initial stage of the reactions, that shows first order kinetics. In the model of single crystal, we directly observe reaction pathways that result in product formation, as well as the dependences of concentrations of main chemical species on time after heating. Initial temperatures are in the range of 1000 to 2800 K. On the basis of the obtained dependences of concentrations we propose a kinetic model that describes thermal decomposition process. Reaction rate constants are well described by the Arrhenius law. Activation energies for the initial stage appear to be lowered by 30-60 kJ/mole in condensed phase compared to the isolated molecule. We compare these results between different ReaxFF parametrizations and DFT calculations. Please refer the correspondence to this author.

  3. Decomposition and Cell Failure Mechanisms in Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinli; Kelly, Timothy L

    2017-01-03

    Perovskite solar cells have experienced a remarkably rapid rise in power conversion efficiencies, with state-of-the-art devices now competing with multicrystalline silicon and thin-film cadmium telluride in terms of efficiency. Unfortunately, the lead halide perovskite absorbers suffer from a lack of chemical stability and decompose in response to a variety of environmental stimuli. In this Forum Article, we provide a brief overview of the decomposition mechanisms in lead halide perovskite thin films, as well as the processes contributing to cell failure in finished devices. We finish by briefly surveying recent efforts to extend the device lifetime. Ultimately, if perovskite solar cells can be made stable, they will be an exciting, highly complementary addition to existing photovoltaic technologies.

  4. Solar-thermal conversion and thermal energy storage of graphene foam-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianbin; Li, Renyuan; Tang, Bo; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-01

    Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy the continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a commonly used PCM, paraffin wax. The high macroporosity and low density of the graphene foam allow for high weight fraction of the PCM to be incorporated, which enhances the heat storage capacity of the composite. The interconnected graphene sheets in the composite provide (1) the solar-thermal conversion capability, (2) high thermal conductivity and (3) form stability of the composite. Under light irradiation, the composite effectively collects and converts the light energy into thermal energy, and the converted thermal energy is stored in the PCM and released in an elongated period of time for sustained utilization. This study provides a promising route for sustainable utilization of solar energy.Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy the continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a

  5. A learning curve for solar thermal power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzer, Werner J.; Dinter, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Photovoltaics started its success story by predicting the cost degression depending on cumulated installed capacity. This so-called learning curve was published and used for predictions for PV modules first, then predictions of system cost decrease also were developed. This approach is less sensitive to political decisions and changing market situations than predictions on the time axis. Cost degression due to innovation, use of scaling effects, improved project management, standardised procedures including the search for better sites and optimization of project size are learning effects which can only be utilised when projects are developed. Therefore a presentation of CAPEX versus cumulated installed capacity is proposed in order to show the possible future advancement of the technology to politics and market. However from a wide range of publications on cost for CSP it is difficult to derive a learning curve. A logical cost structure for direct and indirect capital expenditure is needed as the basis for further analysis. Using derived reference cost for typical power plant configurations predictions of future cost have been derived. Only on the basis of that cost structure and the learning curve levelised cost of electricity for solar thermal power plants should be calculated for individual projects with different capacity factors in various locations.

  6. Mechanism and Kinetics of Thermal Decomposition of MgCl2 × 6H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiong-Zhu; Lu, Gui-Min; Wang, Jin; Yu, Jian-Guo

    2010-10-01

    The reaction mechanism and kinetic behavior of thermal decomposition of MgCl2 × 6H2O were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. The results showed that the thermal decomposition process of MgCl2 × 6H2O could be divided into six stages. In the first two stages, four crystalline waters were lost. The dehydration and hydrolysis coexisted during the third and fourth stages. The fifth stage corresponded to the evaporation of 0.3 crystalline waters, and one molecular hydrogen chloride was eliminated in the last stage. The kinetic analysis of the thermal decomposition process was performed using the Doyle, Coats-Redfern, and Malek methods. The results suggested that the mechanisms of six stages were two-dimensional phase boundary mechanism, three-dimensional phase boundary mechanism, nucleation and nuclei growth mechanism (Avrami-Erofeev equation n = 3), two-dimensional phase boundary mechanism, three-dimensional diffusion mechanism (cylinder and G-B equation), and nucleation and nuclei growth mechanism (Avrami-Erofeev equation n = 1), respectively. The apparent active energies of six stages were 66.8 kJ × mol-1, 138.0 kJ × mol-1, 77.2 kJ × mol-1, 135.6 kJ × mol-1, 77.4 kJ × mol-1, and 92.2 kJ × mol-1, respectively. The frequency factors were 3.6 × 109 s-1, 8.8 × 1017 s-1, 4.6 × 109 s-1, 3.0 × 1014 s-1, 78.6 s-1, and 1.2 × 103 s-1, respectively.

  7. Non-isothermal kinetic analysis of thermal decomposition of the Ca-bentonite from Santai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-hui; He, Chuan; Wang, Ling; Li, Zhong-quan; Deng, Miao; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong-kui; Feng, Qian

    2015-06-01

    The thermal decompositions of Ca-bentonites (CaB) from Santai, Shichuan Province, China, over the temperature range of 30-1,100 °C were investigated by simultaneous thermal analyzer. Non-isothermal kinetic analysis was employed to study the thermal decomposition mechanism by using Netzsch Thermokinetics software. Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Friedman isoconversional methods were used to calculate the activation energy and analyze the reaction steps. The probable mechanism and the corresponding kinetic parameters were determined by multivariate non-linear regression program. The results show that the thermal decomposition process of CaB over the temperature range of 30-800 °C is a kind of six-step, competitive reaction ( F 1 D 3 F n C 1E F n F n model). The dehydration reaction is controlled by two consecutive mechanisms, nucleation and growth, followed by a diffusion-controlled reaction ( F 1 D 3 model), the first step: E = 61.68 kJ mol-1, log A = 6.75 s-1; the second step: E = 50.73 kJ mol-1, log A = 3.11 s-1. The dehydroxylation reaction is controlled by three-step competitive mechanisms, an autocatalytically activated, initial reaction followed by n-order competitive reaction ( C 1E F n F n model), the first step: E = 124.74 kJ mol-1, log A = 5.67 s-1; the second step: E = 245.29 kJ mol-1, log A = 11.69 s-1; the third step : E = 261.73 kJ mol-1, log A = 11.23 s-1. A combination reaction of the dehydration and dehydroxylation is observed, and controlled by one n-order reaction ( F n model), E = 8.99 kJ mol-1, log A = -1.91 s-1.

  8. Effects of pressure on the thermal decomposition kinetics, chemical reactivity and phase behavior of RDX

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.J. ); Block, S.; Piermarini, G.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of pressure on the thermal decomposition kinetics, chemical reactivity, and phase behavior of RDX have been studied by a combination of measurement techniques in conjunction with a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. These techniques include Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for kinetic measurements and phase identification, energy dispersive x-ray powder diffraction for identification of the observed polymorphic forms and also compression measurements, and optical polarizing microscopy for visual detection and confirmation of phase transformations and determinations of transition pressures. The ruby method of pressure measurement was used in all methods employed. Studies were generally limited to the region where decomposition rates could be measured within reasonable laboratory time, i.e., below 10 GPa and 573 K. The P-T phase diagram for RDX was determined to 573 K and 7.0/GPa, delineating the stability fields of three solid phases, and the liquidus.

  9. Examination of the thermal decomposition of kraft pine lignin by Fourier transform infrared evolved gas analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner, R.A.; Lephardt, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of kraft lignin was examined by Fourier-transform IR evolved-gas analysis, a technique designed for on-the-fly, simultaneous monitoring of multiple vapor-phase species. Initial degradation occurs at 120-300 degrees from bond fragmentation in the phenylpropane side chains as evidenced by the formation of HCO2H, HCHO, CO2, H2O and SO2. The presence of SO2 is supporting evidence that S from the kraft pulping process may be incorporated into the lignin structure in the form of sulfoxide and(or) sulfone linkages. Major decomposition initiates at approximately 300 degrees and extends to 480 degrees at which point half the intital weight has been lost. MeOH 2-methoxyphenol (guaiacol), and a 2-methoxy-4-alkyl- substituted phenol are the most apparent species evolving in this region and indicate fragmentation of the major chain linkages between the monomeric phenol units in the lignin structure.

  10. Solar thermal technology evaluation, fiscal year 1982. Volume 2: Technical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The technology base of solar thermal energy is investigated. The materials, components, subsystems, and processes capable of meeting specific energy cost targets are emphasized, as are system efficiency and reliability.

  11. Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Durgun, E; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-03-21

    Solar-thermal fuels reversibly store solar energy in the chemical bonds of molecules by photoconversion, and can release this stored energy in the form of heat upon activation. Many conventional photoswichable molecules could be considered as solar thermal fuels, although they suffer from low energy density or short lifetime in the photoinduced high-energy metastable state, rendering their practical use unfeasible. We present a new approach to the design of chemistries for solar thermal fuel applications, wherein well-known photoswitchable molecules are connected by different linker agents to form molecular rings. This approach allows for a significant increase in both the amount of stored energy per molecule and the stability of the fuels. Our results suggest a range of possibilities for tuning the energy density and thermal stability as a function of the type of the photoswitchable molecule, the ring size, or the type of linkers.

  12. Solar thermal power generation. A bibliography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Bibliographies and abstracts are cited under the following topics: (1) energy overviews; (2) solar overviews; (3) conservation; (4) economics, law; (5) thermal power; (6) thermionic, thermoelectric; (7) ocean; (8) wind power; (9) biomass and photochemical; and (10) large photovoltaics.

  13. Kinetic and microstructural studies of thermal decomposition in uranium mononitride compacts subjected to heating in high-purity helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunev, A. V.; Mikhalchik, V. V.; Tenishev, A. V.; Baranov, V. G.

    2016-07-01

    Although uranium mononitride has a high melting point (≈3100 K), it often decomposes well below this temperature. The threshold and kinetics of thermal decomposition depend on samples' chemical content and on gas environment. However, most experiments with uranium nitride samples were done so far in vacuum conditions and did not allow thorough examination of reaction kinetics at high temperatures. This research focuses on studying the different stages of thermal decomposition in uranium nitride samples subjected to heating in helium. Mass loss and thermal effects are identified with simultaneous thermal analysis (STA), while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are used to register phase and compositional changes. Thermal decomposition in uranium nitride samples is found to be a multi-stage process with the final stage characterized by uranium vaporization. The results are useful for estimating the high-temperature behaviour of uranium nitride fuel during its fabrication and performance in some of Gen IV reactors.

  14. Solar panel thermal cycling testing by solar simulation and infrared radiation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    For the solar panels of the European Space Agency (ESA) satellites OTS/MAROTS and ECS/MARECS the thermal cycling tests were performed by using solar simulation methods. The performance data of two different solar simulators used and the thermal test results are described. The solar simulation thermal cycling tests for the ECS/MARECS solar panels were carried out with the aid of a rotatable multipanel test rig by which simultaneous testing of three solar panels was possible. As an alternative thermal test method, the capability of an infrared radiation method was studied and infrared simulation tests for the ultralight panel and the INTELSAT 5 solar panels were performed. The setup and the characteristics of the infrared radiation unit using a quartz lamp array of approx. 15 sq and LN2-cooled shutter and the thermal test results are presented. The irradiation uniformity, the solar panel temperature distribution, temperature changing rates for both test methods are compared. Results indicate the infrared simulation is an effective solar panel thermal testing method.

  15. CP: AN INVESTIGATION OF COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS, AND REACTION TO VARIOUS STIMULI

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K; Fontes, A T

    2005-03-23

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear heating rates, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, CP was decomposed at linear heating rates of 1, 3, and 7 C/min and the kinetic triplet calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  16. High temperature electrical conductivity and thermal decomposition of phenolic- and silicon-based dielectrics for fireset housings

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.T. Jr.; Biefeld, R.M.

    1981-08-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity and thermal decomposition characteristics of several phenolic- and silicone-based materials of interest for fireset case housings have been measured to 600 to 700/sup 0/C. The materials are phenolic or silicone resins reinforced with glass chopped fabric or cloth. The conductivity temperature dependence was measured during decomposition in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of approx. 10/sup 0/C/minute. Applied electric fields were from 4 x 10/sup 2/ to 4 x 10/sup 3/ volts/cm. Thermal decomposition characteristics were investigated by mass spectroscopy in vacuum and thermal gravimetric analysis in nitrogen and air. Nearly ohmic voltage-current characteristics were obtained, except where decomposition and/or outgassing was pronounced.

  17. Thermal conditions in houses with solar cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyshchaeva, O.; Kakabaev, A.; Biashimov, B.

    A method is proposed for calculating the heat balance of a house cooled by a solar absorption cooling system. Calculations and experimental data show that a solar cooling unit without a storage device can maintain a stable temperature of about 26 C (mean solar radiation density of 700 kcal/sq m hr) inside the house.

  18. A quasimechanism of melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, Bryan F

    2009-01-01

    It has been know for half a century that many crystalline organic solids undergo an acceleration in the rate of thermal decomposition as the melting temperature is approached. This acceleration terminates at the melting point, exhibiting an Arrhenius-like temperature dependence in the faster decomposition rate from the liquid phase. This observation has been modeled previously using various premelting behaviors based on e.g. freezing point depression induced by decomposition products or solvent impurities. These models do not, however, indicate a mechanism for liquid formation and acceleration which is an inherent function of the bulk thermodynamics of the molecule. Here we show that such an inherent thermodynamic mechanism for liquid formation exists in the form of the so-called quasi-liquid layer at the solid surface. We explore a kinetic mechanism which describes the acceleration of rate and is a function of the free energies of sublimation and vaporization. We construct a differential rate law from these thermodynamic free energies and a normalized progress variable. We further construct a reduced variable formulation of the model which is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and show that it is applicable to the observed melt acceleration in several common organic crystalline solids. A component of the differential rate law, zero order in the progress variable, is shown to be proportional to the thickness of the quasiliquid layer predicted by a recent thermodynamic theory for this phenomenon. This work therefore serves not only to provide new insight into thermal decomposition in a broad class or organic crystalline solids, but also further validates the underlying thermodynamic nature of the phenomenon of liquid formation on the molecular surface at temperatures below the melting point.

  19. The effects of solar radiation on thermal comfort.

    PubMed

    Hodder, Simon G; Parsons, Ken

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between simulated solar radiation and thermal comfort. Three studies investigated the effects of (1) the intensity of direct simulated solar radiation, (2) spectral content of simulated solar radiation and (3) glazing type on human thermal sensation responses. Eight male subjects were exposed in each of the three studies. In Study 1, subjects were exposed to four levels of simulated solar radiation: 0, 200, 400 and 600 Wm(-2). In Study 2, subjects were exposed to simulated solar radiation with four different spectral contents, each with a total intensity of 400 Wm(-2) on the subject. In Study 3, subjects were exposed through glass to radiation caused by 1,000 Wm(-2) of simulated solar radiation on the exterior surface of four different glazing types. The environment was otherwise thermally neutral where there was no direct radiation, predicted mean vote (PMV)=0+/-0.5, [International Standards Organisation (ISO) standard 7730]. Ratings of thermal sensation, comfort, stickiness and preference and measures of mean skin temperature (t(sk)) were taken. Increase in the total intensity of simulated solar radiation rather than the specific wavelength of the radiation is the critical factor affecting thermal comfort. Thermal sensation votes showed that there was a sensation scale increase of 1 scale unit for each increase of direct radiation of around 200 Wm(-2). The specific spectral content of the radiation has no direct effect on thermal sensation. The results contribute to models for determining the effects of solar radiation on thermal comfort in vehicles, buildings and outdoors.

  20. Mass Spectrometry Characterization of the Thermal Decomposition/Digestion (TDD) at Cysteine in Peptides and Proteins in the Condensed Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Franco; Zhang, Shaofeng; Kandar, Sujit Kumar; Lu, Liang

    2011-11-01

    We report on the characterization by mass spectrometry (MS) of a rapid, reagentless and site-specific cleavage at the N-terminus of the amino acid cysteine (C) in peptides and proteins induced by the thermal decomposition at 220-250 °C for 10 s in solid samples. This thermally induced cleavage at C occurs under the same conditions and simultaneously to our previously reported thermally induced site-specific cleavage at the C-terminus of aspartic acid (D) (Zhang, S.; Basile, F. J. Proteome Res. 2007, 6, (5), 1700-1704). The C cleavage proceeds through cleavage of the nitrogen and α-carbon bond (N-terminus) of cysteine and produces modifications at the cleavage site with an amidation (-1 Da) of the N-terminal thermal decomposition product and a -32 Da mass change of the C-terminal thermal decomposition product, the latter yielding either an alanine or β-alanine residue at the N-terminus site. These modifications were confirmed by off-line thermal decomposition electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS, tandem MS (MS/MS) analyses and accurate mass measurements of standard peptides. Molecular oxygen was found to be required for the thermal decomposition and cleavage at C as it induced an initial cysteine thiol side chain oxidation to sulfinic acid. Similar to the thermally induced D cleavage, missed cleavages at C were also observed. The combined thermally induced digestion process at D and C, termed thermal decomposition/digestion (TDD), was observed on several model proteins tested under ambient conditions and the site-specificity of the method confirmed by MS/MS.

  1. Mass Spectrometry Characterization of the Thermal Decomposition/Digestion (TDD) at Cysteine in Peptides and Proteins in the Condensed Phase

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Franco; Zhang, Shaofeng; Kandar, Sujit Kumar; Lu, Liang

    2011-01-01

    We report on the characterization by mass spectrometry (MS) of a rapid, reagentless and site-specific cleavage at the N-terminus of the amino acid cysteine (C) in peptides and proteins induced by the thermal decomposition at 220–250 °C for 10 seconds in solid samples. This thermally induced cleavage at C occurs under the same conditions and simultaneously to our previously reported thermally induced site-specific cleavage at the C-terminus of aspartic acid (D) (Zhang, S.; Basile, F., J. Proteome Res. 2007, 6, (5), 1700–1704). The C cleavage proceeds through cleavage of the nitrogen and α–carbon bond (N-terminus) of cysteine and produces modifications at the cleavage site with an amidation (−1 amu) of the N-terminal thermal decomposition product and a −32 amu mass change of the C-terminal thermal decomposition product, the latter yielding either an alanine or β-alanine residue at the N-terminus site. These modifications were confirmed by off-line thermal decomposition electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS, tandem MS (MS/MS) analyses and accurate mass measurements of standard peptides. Molecular oxygen was found to be required for the thermal decomposition and cleavage at C as it induced an initial cysteine thiol side chain oxidation to sulfinic acid. Similar to the thermally induced D cleavage, missed cleavages at C were also observed. The combined thermally induced digestion process at D and C, termed Thermal Decomposition/Digestion (TDD), was observed on several model proteins tested under ambient conditions and the site-specificity of the method confirmed by MS/MS. PMID:21952765

  2. Mass spectrometry characterization of the thermal decomposition/digestion (TDD) at cysteine in peptides and proteins in the condensed phase.

    PubMed

    Basile, Franco; Zhang, Shaofeng; Kandar, Sujit Kumar; Lu, Liang

    2011-11-01

    We report on the characterization by mass spectrometry (MS) of a rapid, reagentless and site-specific cleavage at the N-terminus of the amino acid cysteine (C) in peptides and proteins induced by the thermal decomposition at 220-250 °C for 10 s in solid samples. This thermally induced cleavage at C occurs under the same conditions and simultaneously to our previously reported thermally induced site-specific cleavage at the C-terminus of aspartic acid (D) (Zhang, S.; Basile, F. J. Proteome Res. 2007, 6, (5), 1700-1704). The C cleavage proceeds through cleavage of the nitrogen and α-carbon bond (N-terminus) of cysteine and produces modifications at the cleavage site with an amidation (-1 Da) of the N-terminal thermal decomposition product and a -32 Da mass change of the C-terminal thermal decomposition product, the latter yielding either an alanine or β-alanine residue at the N-terminus site. These modifications were confirmed by off-line thermal decomposition electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS, tandem MS (MS/MS) analyses and accurate mass measurements of standard peptides. Molecular oxygen was found to be required for the thermal decomposition and cleavage at C as it induced an initial cysteine thiol side chain oxidation to sulfinic acid. Similar to the thermally induced D cleavage, missed cleavages at C were also observed. The combined thermally induced digestion process at D and C, termed thermal decomposition/digestion (TDD), was observed on several model proteins tested under ambient conditions and the site-specificity of the method confirmed by MS/MS.

  3. Solar thermal program summary. Volume 1: Overview, fiscal year 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-02-01

    The goal of the solar thermal program is to improve overall solar thermal systems performance and provide cost-effective energy options that are strategically secure and environmentally benign. Major research activities include energy collection technology, energy conversion technology, and systems and applications technology for both CR and DR systems. This research is being conducted through research laboratories in close coordination with the solar thermal industry, utilities companies, and universities. The Solar Thermal Technology Program is pursuing the development of critical components and subsystems for improved energy collection and conversion devices. This development follows two basic paths: for CR systems, critical components include stretched membrane heliostats, direct absorption receivers (DARs), and transport subsystems for molten salt heat transfer fluids. These components offer the potential for a significant reduction in system costs; and for DR systems, critical components include stretched membrane dishes, reflux receivers, and Stirling engines. These components will significantly increase system reliability and efficiency, which will reduce costs. The major thrust of the program is to provide electric power. However, there is an increasing interest in the use of concentrated solar energy for applications such as detoxifying hazardous wastes and developing high-value transportable fuels. These potential uses of highly concentrated solar energy still require additional experiments to prove concept feasibility. The program goal of economically competitive energy reduction from solar thermal systems is being cooperatively addressed by industry and government.

  4. Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Volatile-bearing Iron Minerals Under Mars-like Pressures: New Insights into Energetics and Mechanisms of Thermal Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, I-C.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.

    2000-01-01

    Lepidocrocite and siderite both exhibit different enthalpic events during their decomposition at reduced pressures when compared to those at ambient pressure, allowing us looking into the mechanisms of thermal decomposition at Mars-like pressures.

  5. Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Volatile-bearing Iron Minerals Under Mars-like Pressures: New Insights into Energetics and Mechanisms of Thermal Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, I-C.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.

    2000-01-01

    Lepidocrocite and siderite both exhibit different enthalpic events during their decomposition at reduced pressures when compared to those at ambient pressure, allowing us looking into the mechanisms of thermal decomposition at Mars-like pressures.

  6. Thermal performance trade-offs for point focusing solar collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, L.

    1978-01-01

    Solar thermal conversion performance is assessed in this paper for representative point focusing distributed systems. Trade-off comparisons are made in terms of concentrator quality, solar receiver operating temperature, and power conversion efficiency. Normalized system performance is presented on a unit concentrator area basis for integrated annual electric energy production.

  7. Survey of EPA facilities for solar thermal energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. V.; Overly, P. T.; Bell, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    A study was done to assess the feasibility of applying solar thermal energy systems to EPA facilities. A survey was conducted to determine those EPA facilities where solar energy could best be used. These systems were optimized for each specific application and the system/facility combinations were ranked on the basis of greatest cost effectiveness.

  8. ERDA's central receiver solar thermal power system studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippy, L. J.; Heaton, T. R.

    1977-01-01

    The utilization of solar energy for electrical power production was studied. Efforts underway on the central receiver solar thermal power system are presented. Preliminary designs are included of pilot plant utilizing large numbers of heliostats in a collector field. Safety hazards are also discussed, as well as the most beneficial location of such a plant within the United States.

  9. Thermal efficiency of single-pass solar air collector

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Zamry; Ibarahim, Zahari; Yatim, Baharudin; Ruslan, Mohd Hafidz

    2013-11-27

    Efficiency of a finned single-pass solar air collector was studied. This paper presents the experimental study to investigate the effect of solar radiation and mass flow rate on efficiency. The fins attached at the back of absorbing plate to improve the thermal efficiency of the system. The results show that the efficiency is increased proportional to solar radiation and mass flow rate. Efficiency of the collector archived steady state when reach to certain value or can be said the maximum performance.

  10. Solar-thermal experimental projects on the Spanish Plataforma Solar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasse, W.

    1981-11-01

    The Plataforma Solar with an area of 1,000,000 sq m is located in Spain at a distance of approximately 50 km from the Mediterranean. In May 1979, nine members of the International Energy Agency (IEA) decided to support the construction of Small Solar Power Systems (SSPS). The countries involved include West Germany, the U.S., Spain, and Italy. The SSPS are to demonstrate the operational feasibility of solar technologies which have been mainly developed in Germany and the U.S. In addition, data are to be obtained regarding the relative competitive position of two different operational concepts for SSPS. The concepts are related to the central receiver system (solar tower) and the distributed collector system. Attention is also given to the Spanish solar power station CESA-1 and the German-Spanish technology program GAST, which is to explore the technological limits of solar-energy systems.

  11. Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis of the Thermal Stabilities of Nitroaromatic Compounds Following Different Decomposition Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Huo, Xing; Gramatica, Paola

    2013-02-01

    The decomposition behavior of energetic materials is very important for the safety problems concerning their production, transportation, use and storage, because molecular decomposition is intimately connected to their explosive properties. Nitroaromatic compounds, particularly nitrobenzene derivatives, are often considered as prototypical energetic molecules, and some of them are commonly used as high explosives. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) represents a potential tool for predicting the thermal stability properties of energetic materials. But it is reported that constructing general reliable models to predict their stability and their potential explosive properties is a very difficult task. In this work, we make our efforts to investigate the relationship between the molecular structures and corresponding thermal stabilities of 77 nitrobenzene derivatives with various substituent functional groups (in ortho, meta and/or para positions). The proposed best MLR model, developed by the new software QSARINS, based on Genetic Algorithm for variable selection and with various validation tools, is robust, stable and predictive with R(2) of 0.86, QLOO (2) of 0.79 and CCC of 0.90. The results indicated that, though difficult, it is possible to build predictive, externally validated QSAR models to estimate the thermal stability of nitroaromatic compounds. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Study of thermal decomposition mechanisms and low-level detection of explosives using pulsed photoacoustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehya, F.; Chaudhary, A. K.; Srinivas, D.; Muralidharan, K.

    2015-11-01

    We report a novel time-resolved photoacoustic-based technique for studying the thermal decomposition mechanisms of some secondary explosives such as RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine), picric acid, 4,6-dinitro-5-(4-nitro-1 H-imidazol-1-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d] [1-3] triazole, and 5-chloro-1-(4-nitrophenyl)-1 H-tetrazole. A comparison of the thermal decomposition mechanisms of these secondary explosives was made by detecting NO2 molecules released under controlled pyrolysis between 25 and 350 °C. The results show excellent agreement with the thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA-DTA) results. A specially designed PA cell made of stainless steel was filled with explosive vapor and pumped using second harmonic, i.e., λ = 532 nm, pulses of duration 7 ns at a 10 Hz repetition rate, obtained using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The use of a combination of PA and TGA-DTA techniques enables the study of NO2 generation, and this method can be used to scale the performance of these explosives as rocket fuels. The minimum detection limits of the four explosives were 38 ppmv to 69 ppbv, depending on their respective vapor pressures.

  13. Kinetics of switch grass pellet thermal decomposition under inert and oxidizing atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sriraam R; Hopke, Philip K

    2012-12-01

    Grass pellets are a renewable resource that have energy content similar to that of wood. However, the higher ash and chlorine content affects combustion. Thermal degradation analysis of a fuel is useful in developing effective combustion. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the thermal degradation of grass pellets under inert (nitrogen) and oxidizing (air) atmospheres was conducted. Non-isothermal conditions were employed with 4 different heating rates. Kinetic parameters (activation energy and pre-exponential factors) were estimated using the iso-conversional method. Both pyrolysis and oxidative atmospheric thermal degradation exhibited two major loss process: volatilization of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and burning or slow oxidation of the residual char. The activation energy and pre-exponential factors were high for the oxidizing environment. During pyrolysis, major decomposition occurred with 40% to 75% conversion of the mass to gas with an activation energy of 314 kJ/mol. In air the decomposition occurred with 30% to 55% conversion with an activation energy of 556 kJ/mol. There was a substantial effect of heating rate on mass loss and mass loss rate. The TG shifted to higher temperature ranges on increasing the heating rate. In both pyrolyzing and oxidizing conditions, average combustion and devolatilization rates increased. Enhanced combustion takes place with higher activation energy in oxidizing atmosphere compared to the inert atmosphere due to presence of air.

  14. Thermal Decomposition of Trinitrotoluene (TNT) with a New One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T D; Simpson, R L; Maienschein, J; Tarver, C

    2001-03-23

    The thermal explosion of trinitrotoluene (TNT) is used as a basis for evaluating the performance of a new One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX) apparatus. The ODTX experiment involves holding a 12.7 mm-diameter spherical explosive sample under confinement (150 MPa) at a constant elevated temperature until the confining pressure is exceeded by the evolution of gases during chemical decomposition. The resulting time to explosion as a function of temperature provides valuable decomposition kinetic information. A comparative analysis of the measurements obtained from the new unit and an older system is presented. Discussion on selected performance aspects of the new unit will also be presented. The thermal explosion of TNT is highly dependent on the material. Analysis of the time to explosion is complicated by historical and experimental factors such as material variability, sample preparation, temperature measurement and system errors. Many of these factors will be addressed. Finally, a kinetic model using a coupled thermal and heat transport code (chemical TOPAZ) was used to match the experimental data.

  15. Thermogravimetric and kinetic analysis of thermal decomposition characteristics of low-lipid microalgae.

    PubMed

    Gai, Chao; Zhang, Yuanhui; Chen, Wan-Ting; Zhang, Peng; Dong, Yuping

    2013-12-01

    The thermal decomposition behavior of two microalgae, Chlorella pyrenoidosa (CP) and Spirulina platensis (SP), were investigated on a thermogravimetric analyzer under non-isothermal conditions. Iso-conversional Vyazovkin approach was used to calculate the kinetic parameters, and the universal integral method was applied to evaluate the most probable mechanisms for thermal degradation of the two feedstocks. The differential equations deduced from the models were compared with experimental data. For the range of conversion fraction investigated (20-80%), the thermal decomposition process of CP could be described by the reaction order model (F3), which can be calculated by the integral equation of G(α) = [(1 - α)(-2) - 1]/2. And the apparent activation energy was in the range of 58.85-114.5 kJ/mol. As for SP, it can be described by the reaction order model (F2), which can be calculated by the integral equation of G(α) = (1 - α)(-1) - 1, and the range of apparent activation energy was 74.35-140.1 kJ/mol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PROPERTIES OF CP: COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS, AND REACTION TO SPARK, FRICTION AND IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K

    2005-09-28

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear and isothermal heating, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, was used to monitor CP decomposition at linear heating rates of 1-7 C min{sup -1} in perforated pans and of 0.1-1.0 C min{sup -1} in sealed pans. The kinetic triplet was calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05, and predictions for 210 and 240 C are compared to isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  17. Thermal degradation kinetics and decomposition mechanism of PBSu nanocomposites with silica-nanotubes and strontium hydroxyapatite nanorods.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, D G; Roumeli, E; Chrissafis, K; Lioutas, Ch; Triantafyllidis, K; Bikiaris, D; Boccaccini, A R

    2014-03-14

    Novel poly(butylene succinate) (PBSu) nanocomposites containing 5 and 20 wt% mesoporous strontium hydroxyapatite nanorods (SrHNRs) and silica nanotubes (SiNTs) were prepared by melt-mixing. A systematic investigation of the thermal stability and decomposition kinetics of PBSu was performed using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (Py-GC-MS) and thermogravimetry (TG). Thorough studies of evolving decomposition compounds along with the isoconversional and model-fitting analysis of mass loss data led to the proposal of a decomposition mechanism for PBSu. Moreover, the effects of SrHNRs and SiNTs on the thermal stability and decomposition kinetics of PBSu were also examined in detail. The complementary use of these techniques revealed that the incorporation of SiNTs in PBSu does not induce significant effects neither on its thermal stability nor on its decomposition mechanism. In contrast, the addition of SrHNRs resulted in the catalysis of the initial decomposition steps of PBSu and also in modified decomposition mechanisms and activation energies. The evolving gaseous products of PBSu and their evolution pattern in the SiNT nanocomposites were the same as in neat PBSu, while they were slightly modified for the SrHNR nanocomposites, confirming the findings from thermogravimetric analysis.

  18. Dynamic weakening and thermal decomposition during the Heart Mountain mega-landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Smith, S. A.; Anders, M. H.; Di Toro, G.

    2012-12-01

    The 3400-km2 Heart Mountain landslide of northwestern Wyoming and southwestern Montana is the largest subaerial landslide known. This Eocene age slide slid ˜50 km on a carbonate rich basal layer ranging in thickness from a few tens of centimeters to several meters, along a shallow 2° slope, posing a long-standing question regarding its emplacement mechanism. It has recently been suggested that such large displacement was aided by strong dynamic weakening mechanism, thermal pressurization due to shear heating and thermal decomposition in the basal layer slip zone, with theoretical simulations suggesting slip velocities ranging between tens of meters per second to more than 100 ms-1. In this study, we present the results of a suite of high velocity friction experiments in a rotary shear configuration on initially intact carbonates collected from the Heart Mountain region, in attempt to reproduce conditions experienced in the slip zone of the basal section during emplacement of the landslide. Gouges were prepared from initially intact hostrocks of Madison limestone and Bighorn dolomite, and were sheared for a range of displacements up to 6 metres at normal stresses up to 25 MPa at slip rates up to 2 m/s. Mechanical results generally show strong dynamic weakening with peak friction dropping from 0.7 to a steady state friction as low as 0.1. Microstructural observations of the highly polished slip surfaces produced show localization of the principal slip surface to less than 100 microns thick. Thermal decomposition is evidenced by degassing bubbles in the rims of dolomite clasts, and the release of CO2 as measured by mass spectrometer during experiments, indicating that temperatures in the slip zone quickly reached the decomposition temperature of carbonates (at least 700 degrees) within just a few metres of slip. These results compare favorably with theoretical calculations and ample field evidence for carbonate decomposition during the emplacement. Independent

  19. The spectral properties of uranium hexafluoride and its thermal decomposition products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krascella, N. L.

    1976-01-01

    This investigation was initiated to provide basic spectral data for gases of interest to the plasma core reactor concept. The attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation by helium at pressures up to 20 atm over path lengths of about 61 cm and in the approximate wavelength range between 80 and 300 nm was studied. Measurements were also conducted to provide basic VUV data with respect to UF6 and UF6/argon mixtures in the wavelength range between 80 and 120 nm. Finally, an investigation was initiated to provide basic spectral emission and absorption data for UF6 and possible thermal decomposition products of UF6 at elevated temperatures.

  20. Non-chemically Pure Magnetites Produced from Thermal Decomposition of Ankerites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez López, C.; Romanek, C.; Rodríguez-Navarro, A.; Pérez-González, T.; Rodríguez Navarro, C.

    2008-12-01

    It has been claimed that chemically pure magnetites (Fe3O4) can be obtained from thermal decomposition of (Fe, Mg, Ca)CO3 (Golden et al., 2004). Such an observation is critical, since it opens the possibility of an inorganic way of formation of the magnetites found on Martian meteorite ALH84001. Such a chemical purity is one of the parameters used, so far, to recognize bacterial origin of natural magnetites (Thomas-Keptra et al., 2001), since it has been demonstrated that biologically-controlled magnetites are chemically pure (Bazylinski and Frankel, 2004) . However, while Golden et al. (2004) obtained pure magnetite from an almost pure precursor, the ankerite cores in ALH84001 in which magnetites are embedded are far from being chemically pure, since they contain considerable amounts of Ca and Mg (Kopp and Humayun, 2003). In this study we have performed several experiments to analyze the chemical purity of magnetites produced by thermal decomposition of four ankerite samples sinthetized in the laboratory, and containing different amounts of Ca, Fe and Mg. Such a thermal decomposition was achieved by two procedures: (1) by heating the samples at 470°C under CO2 pressure and (2) by decomposing the ankerite "in situ" under the TEM (Transmission electron Microscopy) electron beam. Magnetite produced by the first procedure was analyzed by XRD to determine whether or not the resulting solid was a mixture of oxides or rather a solid solution of (Ca, Fe and Mg)oxide. Magnetites formed by the two methods were studied by High Resolution TEM. The chemical composition of about 20 crystals of each experiment was analyzed by EDAX. Under our experimental conditions, ankerites decomposed in magnetite crystals of about 5 nanometers in size. Magentite crystals arranged to keep the morphology of the precursor. Our results confirm that any of these magnetites is chemically pure, but rather, each one of them is a solid solution of Ca and Mg. Therefore, chemically pure magnetites

  1. Proceedings of the Fifth Parabolic Dish Solar Thermal Power Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. W. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The proceedings of the Fifth Parabolic Dish Solar Thermal Power Program Annual Review are presented. The results of activities within the Parabolic Dish Technology and Module/Systems Development element of the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Energy Systems Program were emphasized. Among the topics discussed were: overall Project and Program aspects, Stirling and Brayton module development, concentrator and engine/receiver development along with associated hardware and test results; distributed systems operating experience; international parabolic dish development activities; and non-DOE-sponsored domestic dish activities. Solar electric generation was also addressed.

  2. Solar Thermal Radiant Heating at Pohakuloa Training Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Solar collector panels. • Sizing the array: Using thermal storage of 256,000 BTU/day and 4’ x 10’ flat panel collectors with output of...be arranged side-by-side on the south- facing pitch of roof. – Racked at 30 angle to maximize winter sun. Flat plate solar collectors E2S2– June 2010...radiant heat flooring project will combine solar thermal hot water system with in-floor radiant heating. – Flooring heat only; no domestic water. – Flat

  3. Thermal energy storage for CSP (Concentrating Solar Power)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Py, Xavier; Sadiki, Najim; Olives, Régis; Goetz, Vincent; Falcoz, Quentin

    2017-07-01

    The major advantage of concentrating solar power before photovoltaic is the possibility to store thermal energy at large scale allowing dispatchability. Then, only CSP solar power plants including thermal storage can be operated 24 h/day using exclusively the solar resource. Nevertheless, due to a too low availability in mined nitrate salts, the actual mature technology of the two tanks molten salts cannot be applied to achieve the expected international share in the power production for 2050. Then alternative storage materials are under studies such as natural rocks and recycled ceramics made from industrial wastes. The present paper is a review of those alternative approaches.

  4. Increasing the efficiency of solar thermal panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrnjac, M.; Latinović, T.; Dobrnjac, S.; Živković, P.

    2016-08-01

    The popularity of solar heating systems is increasing for several reasons. These systems are reliable, adaptable and pollution-free, because the renewable solar energy is used. There are many variants of solar systems in the market mainly constructed with copper pipes and absorbers with different quality of absorption surface. Taking into account the advantages and disadvantages of existing solutions, in order to increase efficiency and improve the design of solar panel, the innovative solution has been done. This new solar panel presents connection of an attractive design and the use of constructive appropriate materials with special geometric shapes. Hydraulic and thermotechnical tests that have been performed on this panel showed high hydraulic and structural stability. Further development of the solar panel will be done in the future in order to improve some noticed disadvantages.

  5. High-temperature Raman study of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals related to thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaignac, A. L. O.; Lima, R. J. C.; Façanha Filho, P. F.; Moreno, A. J. D.; Freire, P. T. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work high-temperature Raman spectra are used to compare temperature dependence of the lattice mode wavenumber of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals. Anharmonic effects observed are associated with intermolecular N-H· · ·O hydrogen bond that plays an important role in thermal decomposition process of these materials. Short and strong hydrogen bonds in L-alanine crystal were associated with anharmonic effects in lattice modes leading to low thermal stability compared to taurine crystals. Connection between thermal decomposition process and anharmonic effects is furnished for the first time.

  6. Solar-thermal conversion and thermal energy storage of graphene foam-based composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianbin; Li, Renyuan; Tang, Bo; Wang, Peng

    2016-08-14

    Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy the continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a commonly used PCM, paraffin wax. The high macroporosity and low density of the graphene foam allow for high weight fraction of the PCM to be incorporated, which enhances the heat storage capacity of the composite. The interconnected graphene sheets in the composite provide (1) the solar-thermal conversion capability, (2) high thermal conductivity and (3) form stability of the composite. Under light irradiation, the composite effectively collects and converts the light energy into thermal energy, and the converted thermal energy is stored in the PCM and released in an elongated period of time for sustained utilization. This study provides a promising route for sustainable utilization of solar energy.

  7. Thermal performance of a hot-air solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Report contains procedures and results of thermal-performance tests on double-glazed air solar collector. Four types of tests were carried out including thermal-efficiency and stagnation tests, collector time-constant tests to assess effects of transients, and incident-angle modifier tests. Data are presented in tables and as graphs and are discussed and analyzed.

  8. Improved thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, R.L.; Lauf, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates to a thermal storage apparatus and more particularly to an apparatus for use in conjunction with solar dynamic energy storage systems. The invention is comprised of a thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

  9. Focal Point Inside the Vacuum Chamber for Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on an 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. This photograph is a close-up view of a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber at the MSFC Solar Thermal Propulsion Test facility. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  10. Materials characterization and design for solar-thermal propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delarosa, M. J.; Tuffias, R. H.

    1993-11-01

    Solar-thermal propulsion relies on the convection of concentrated solar energy into kinetic energy (in the exhaust gases) in order to provide thrust. Solar radiation is focused into a blackbody cavity in which the heat is absorbed and transferred to the hydrogen fuel through a thermal absorber/heat exchanger. Performance increases are obtained by increasing the efficiency of the absorber, thereby increasing the heat transfer to the hydrogen fuel. The absorber/exchanger itself provides structural properties, which involves the severe structural constraint of needing to withstand the high internal hydrogen pressure. Thus, the absorber/exchanger becomes the critical component in the thruster, and the enabling technology for the development of a successful solar-heated hydrogen propulsion system is a combination of materials and processing. The maximum operating temperature of a solar-thermal propulsion devices is governed primarily by the strength and resistance of hydrogen degradation of the constituent materials at the operating temperature of 3000 K and above. Six candidate refractory materials were selected for investigation with regard to their potential for use in solar-thermal propulsion, with the aim of developing a properties and processing database in advance of designing, fabricating, and testing a solar-powered rocket engine (SPRE).

  11. Focal Point Inside the Vacuum Chamber for Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have designed, fabricated, and tested the first solar thermal engine, a non-chemical rocket engine that produces lower thrust but has better thrust efficiency than a chemical combustion engine. MSFC turned to solar thermal propulsion in the early 1990s due to its simplicity, safety, low cost, and commonality with other propulsion systems. Solar thermal propulsion works by acquiring and redirecting solar energy to heat a propellant. The 20- by 24-ft heliostat mirror (not shown in this photograph) has dual-axis control that keeps a reflection of the sunlight on an 18-ft diameter concentrator mirror, which then focuses the sunlight to a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber. The focal point has 10 kilowatts of intense solar power. This photograph is a close-up view of a 4-in focal point inside the vacuum chamber at the MSFC Solar Thermal Propulsion Test facility. As part of MSFC's Space Transportation Directorate, the Propulsion Research Center serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. The mission is to move the Nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft-like access to Earth orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space.

  12. Transient Thermal Analysis of a Refractive Secondary Solar Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    A secondary concentrator is an optical device that accepts solar energy from a primary concentrator and further intensifies and directs the solar flux. The refractive secondary is one such device; fabricated from an optically clear solid material that can efficiently transmit the solar energy by way of refraction and total internal reflection. When combined with a large state-of-the-art rigid or inflatable primary concentrator, the refractive secondary enables solar concentration ratios of 10,000 to 1. In support of potential space solar thermal power and propulsion applications, the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a single-crystal refractive secondary concentrator for use at temperatures exceeding 2000K. Candidate optically clear single-crystal materials like sapphire and zirconia are being evaluated for this application. To support this evaluation, a three-dimensional transient thermal model of a refractive secondary concentrator in a typical solar thermal propulsion application was developed. This paper describes the model and presents thermal predictions for both sapphire and zirconia prototypes. These predictions are then used to establish parameters for analyzing and testing the materials for their ability to survive thermal shock and stress.

  13. Solar thermal organic rankine cycle for micro-generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkahli, N. A.; Abdullah, H.; Darus, A. N.; Jalaludin, A. F.

    2012-06-01

    The conceptual design of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) driven by solar thermal energy is developed for the decentralized production of electricity of up to 50 kW. Conventional Rankine Cycle uses water as the working fluid whereas ORC uses organic compound as the working fluid and it is particularly suitable for low temperature applications. The ORC and the solar collector will be sized according to the solar flux distribution in the Republic of Yemen for the required power output of 50 kW. This will be a micro power generation system that consists of two cycles, the solar thermal cycle that harness solar energy and the power cycle, which is the ORC that generates electricity. As for the solar thermal cycle, heat transfer fluid (HTF) circulates the cycle while absorbing thermal energy from the sun through a parabolic trough collector and then storing it in a thermal storage to increase system efficiency and maintains system operation during low radiation. The heat is then transferred to the organic fluid in the ORC via a heat exchanger. The organic fluids to be used and analyzed in the ORC are hydrocarbons R600a and R290.

  14. Solar thermal bowl concepts and economic comparisons for electricity generation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Brown, D.R.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Allemann, R.T.; Coomes, E.P.; Craig, S.N.; Drost, M.K.; Humphreys, K.K.; Nomura, K.K.

    1988-04-01

    This study is aimed at providing a relative comparison of the thermodynamic and economic performance in electric applications for fixed mirror distributed focus (FMDF) solar thermal concepts which have been studied and developed in the DOE solar thermal program. Following the completion of earlier systems comparison studies in the late 1970's there have been a number of years of progress in solar thermal technology. This progress includes developing new solar components, improving component and system design details, constructing working systems, and collecting operating data on the systems. This study povides an update of the expected performance and cost of the major components, and an overall system energy cost for the FMDDF concepts evaluated. The projections in this study are for the late 1990's and are based on the potential capabilities that might be achieved with further technology development.

  15. The thermal decomposition of fine-grained micrometeorites, observations from mid-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttle, Martin David; Genge, Matthew J.; Folco, Luigi; Russell, Sara S.

    2017-06-01

    We analysed 44 fine-grained and scoriaceous micrometeorites. A bulk mid-IR spectrum (8-13 μm) for each grain was collected and the entire micrometeorite population classified into 5 spectral groups, based on the positions of their absorption bands. Corresponding carbonaceous Raman spectra, textural observations from SEM-BSE and bulk geochemical data via EMPA were collected to aid in the interpretation of mid-IR spectra. The 5 spectral groups identified correspond to progressive thermal decomposition. Unheated hydrated chondritic matrix, composed predominantly of phyllosilicates, exhibit smooth, asymmetric spectra with a peak at ∼10 μm. Thermal decomposition of sheet silicates evolves through dehydration, dehydroxylation, annealing and finally by the onset of partial melting. Both CI-like and CM-like micrometeorites are shown to pass through the same decomposition stages and produce similar mid-IR spectra. Using known temperature thresholds for each decomposition stage it is possible to assign a peak temperature range to a given micrometeorite. Since the temperature thresholds for decomposition reactions are defined by the phyllosilicate species and the cation composition and that these variables are markedly different between CM and CI classes, atmospheric entry should bias the dust flux to favour the survival of CI-like grains, whilst preferentially melting most CM-like dust. However, this hypothesis is inconsistent with empirical observations and instead requires that the source ratio of CI:CM dust is heavily skewed in favour of CM material. In addition, a small population of anomalous grains are identified whose carbonaceous and petrographic characteristics suggest in-space heating and dehydroxylation have occurred. These grains may therefore represent regolith micrometeorites derived from the surface of C-type asteroids. Since the spectroscopic signatures of dehydroxylates are distinctive, i.e. characterised by a reflectance peak at 9.0-9.5 μm, and since

  16. A Review of Study on Thermal Energy Transport System by Synthesis and Decomposition Reactions of Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiusheng; Yabe, Akira; Kajiyama, Shiro; Fukuda, Katsuya

    The study on thermal energy transport system by synthesis and decomposition reactions of methanol was reviewed. To promote energy conservation and global environment protection, a two-step liquid-phase methanol synthesis process, which starts with carbonylation of methanol to methyl formate, then followed by the hydrogenolysis of the formate, was studied to recover wasted or unused discharged heat from industrial sources for the thermal energy demands of residential and commercial areas by chemical reactions. The research and development of the system were focused on the following three points. (1) Development of low-temperature decomposition and synthetic catalysts, (2) Development of liquid phase reactor (heat exchanger accompanying chemical reaction), (3) Simulation of the energy transport efficiency of entire system which contains heat recovery and supply sections. As the result of the development of catalyst, promising catalysts which agree with the development purposes for the methyl formate decomposition reaction and the synthetic reaction are being developed though some studies remain for the methanol decomposition and synthetic reactions. In the fundamental development of liquid phase reactor, the solubilities of CO and H2 gases in methanol and methyl formate were measured by the method of total pressure decrease due to absorption under pressures up to 1500kPa and temperatures up to 140°C. The diffusivity of CO gas in methanol was determined by measuring the diameter and solution time of single CO bubbles in methanol. The chemical reaction rate of methanol synthesis by hydrogenolysis of methyl formate was measured using a plate-type of Raney copper catalyst in a reactor with rectangular channel and in an autoclave reactor. The reaction characteristics were investigated by carrying out the experiments at various temperatures, flow rates and at various catalyst development conditions. We focused on the effect of Raney copper catalyst thickness on the liquid

  17. Solar Thermal Power Plants with Parabolic-Trough Collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarza, E.; Valenzuela, L.; León, J.

    2004-12-01

    Parabolic-trough collectors (PTC) are solar concentrating devices suitable to work in the 150°C- 400°C temperature range. Power plants based on this type of solar collectors are a very efficient way to produce electricity with solar energy. At present, there are eight commercial solar plants (called SEGS-II, III,.. IX) producing electricity with parabolic-trough collectors and their total output power is 340 MW. Though all SEGS plants currently in operation use thermal oil as a heat transfer fluid between the solar field and the power block, direct steam generation (DSG) in the receiver tubes is a promising option to reduce the cost of electricity produced with parabolic- trough power plants. Most of technical uncertainties associated to the DSG technology were studied and solved in the DISS project and it is expected that this new technology will be commercially available in a short term. In Spain, the Royal Decree No. 436/204 (March 12th , 2004) has defined a premium of 0,18€/kWh for the electricity produced by solar thermal power plants, thus promoting the installation of solar thermal power plants up to a limit of 200 MW. Due to the current legal and financial framework defined in Spain, several projects to install commercial solar power plants with parabolic-trough collectors are currently underway.

  18. Crystallinity dependent thermal degradation in organic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunho; Sohn, Jiho; Tyagi, Priyanka; Lee, Changhee

    2017-01-01

    An operating solar cell undergoes solar heating; thus, the degradation study of organic photo-voltaic (OPV) with a thermal stress is required for their practical applications. We present a thermal degradation study on OPVs fabricated with photo-active polymers having different crystalline phase. Light intensity dependent analysis for different thermal stress duration is performed. In crystalline, the degradation majorly occurs due to drop in open-circuit voltage while in amorphous one it is due to drop in short-circuit current. Physical mechanism in both systems is explained and supported by the X-ray diffraction, morphological and optical characterization.

  19. High temperature solar thermal technology: The North Africa Market

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    High temperature solar thermal (HTST) technology offers an attractive option for both industrialized and non-industrialized countries to generate electricity and industrial process steam. The purpose of this report is to assess the potential market for solar thermal applications in the North African countries of Algeria, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. North Africa was selected because of its outstanding solar resource base and the variety of applications to be found there. Diminishing oil and gas resources, coupled with expanding energy needs, opens a large potential market for the US industry. The US high temperature solar trough industry has little competition globally and could build a large market in these areas. The US is already familiar with certain solar markets in North Africa due to the supplying of substantial quantities of US-manufactured flat plate collectors to this region.

  20. High temperature solar thermal technology: The North Africa Market

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    High temperature solar thermal (HTST) technology offers an attractive option for both industrialized and non-industrialized countries to generate electricity and industrial process steam. The purpose of this report is to assess the potential market for solar thermal applications in the North African countries of Algeria, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. North Africa was selected because of its outstanding solar resource base and the variety of applications to be found there. Diminishing oil and gas resources, coupled with expanding energy needs, opens a large potential market for the US industry. The US high temperature solar trough industry has little competition globally and could build a large market in these areas. The US is already familiar with certain solar markets in North Africa due to the supplying of substantial quantities of US-manufactured flat plate collectors to this region.

  1. Thermal efficiency evaluation of solar rings in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Seyed Ebrahim; Ranjbar, Ali Akbar

    2016-12-01

    In this article, the thermal efficiency of solar rings in tubes is investigated numerically. The effect of the distance between solar rings and the size of the rings on fluid flow and heat transfer are studied. This numerical simulation is implemented by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Characteristics of the Nusselt number, friction factor, and thermal performance factor are investigated. The heat transfer fluid is Therminol 55 oil and the analysis is carried out based on the renormalization-group (RNG) k-ɛ turbulence model. The computation results show that the Nusselt number is augmented in comparison with the smooth tube, which confirms that the solar ring has a good effect of heat transfer enhancement. Also, by decreasing the distance between solar rings, the heat transfer coefficient increases, but by increasing the inner diameter of the solar rings, the Nusselt number decreases.

  2. Thermal evaluation of advanced solar dynamic heat receiver performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Roger A.

    1989-01-01

    The thermal performance of a variety of concepts for thermal energy storage as applied to solar dynamic applications is discussed. It is recognized that designs providing large thermal gradients or large temperature swings during orbit are susceptible to early mechanical failure. Concepts incorporating heat pipe technology may encounter operational limitations over sufficiently large ranges. By reviewing the thermal performance of basic designs, the relative merits of the basic concepts are compared. In addition the effect of thermal enhancement and metal utilization as applied to each design provides a partial characterization of the performance improvements to be achieved by developing these technologies.

  3. Performance test procedures for thermal collectors - Solar simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillett, W. B.

    The design and use of solar simulators is reviewed in the light of the experience reported by participants in the collaborative collector testing programmes of Commission of the European Communities and the International Energy Agency. Experience with the Compact Source Iodide lamp at Cardiff is used to illustrate the need for correcting both outdoor and solar simulator test results to reference conditions of solar and thermal irradiance. It is suggested that further work is required on the development of procedures for predicting typical outdoor performance from solar simulator measurements where collectors contain new materials or complex geometries.

  4. Thermal test procedure for a paraboloid concentrator solar cooker

    SciTech Connect

    Mullick, S.C.; Kandpal, T.C.; Kumar, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Suitable thermal tests have been identified for performance evaluation of a concentrating solar cooker. These tests provide parameters that characterize the performance of the solar cooker, and are more or less independent of the climatic variables. The overall heat loss factor is obtained from the cooling curve and the optical efficiency factor is determined from the heating curve - both under full load conditions. The performance characteristic curve for the solar cooker is obtained and discussed. The study indicates that the no load test, which is useful in the case of a box type solar cooker, is not appropriate in the case of concentrator type cookers.

  5. Comparison of selective transmitters for solar thermal applications.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert A; Hewakuruppu, Yasitha; DeJarnette, Drew; Otanicar, Todd P

    2016-05-10

    Solar thermal collectors are radiative heat exchangers. Their efficacy is dictated predominantly by their absorption of short wavelength solar radiation and, importantly, by their emission of long wavelength thermal radiation. In conventional collector designs, the receiver is coated with a selectively absorbing surface (Black Chrome, TiNOx, etc.), which serves both of these aims. As the leading commercial absorber, TiNOx consists of several thin, vapor deposited layers (of metals and ceramics) on a metal substrate. In this technology, the solar absorption to thermal emission ratio can exceed 20. If a solar system requires an analogous transparent component-one which transmits the full AM1.5 solar spectrum, but reflects long wavelength thermal emission-the technology is much less developed. Bespoke "heat mirrors" are available from optics suppliers at high cost, but the closest mass-produced commercial technology is low-e glass. Low-e glasses are designed for visible light transmission and, as such, they reflect up to 50% of available solar energy. To address this technical gap, this study investigated selected combinations of thin films that could be deposited to serve as transparent, selective solar covers. A comparative numerical analysis of feasible materials and configurations was investigated using a nondimensional metric termed the efficiency factor for selectivity (EFS). This metric is dependent on the operation temperature and solar concentration ratio of the system, so our analysis covered the practical range for these parameters. It was found that thin films of indium tin oxide (ITO) and ZnS-Ag-ZnS provided the highest EFS. Of these, ITO represents the more commercially viable solution for large-scale development. Based on these optimized designs, proof-of-concept ITO depositions were fabricated and compared to commercial depositions. Overall, this study presents a systematic guide for creating a new class of selective, transparent

  6. Measurements of thermal parameters of solar modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górecki, K.; Krac, E.

    2016-04-01

    In the paper the methods of measuring thermal parameters of photovoltaic panels - transient thermal impedance and the absorption factor of light-radiation are presented. The manner of realising these methods is described and the results of measurements of the considered thermal parameters of selected photovoltaic panels are presented. The influence of such selected factors as a type of the investigated panel and its mounting manner on transient thermal impedance of the considered panels is also discussed.

  7. Validation of Heat Transfer Thermal Decomposition and Container Pressurization of Polyurethane Foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Sarah Nicole; Dodd, Amanda B.; Larsen, Marvin E.; Suo-Anttila, Jill M.; Erickson, Kenneth L

    2014-09-01

    Polymer foam encapsulants provide mechanical, electrical, and thermal isolation in engineered systems. In fire environments, gas pressure from thermal decomposition of polymers can cause mechanical failure of sealed systems. In this work, a detailed uncertainty quantification study of PMDI-based polyurethane foam is presented to assess the validity of the computational model. Both experimental measurement uncertainty and model prediction uncertainty are examined and compared. Both the mean value method and Latin hypercube sampling approach are used to propagate the uncertainty through the model. In addition to comparing computational and experimental results, the importance of each input parameter on the simulation result is also investigated. These results show that further development in the physics model of the foam and appropriate associated material testing are necessary to improve model accuracy.

  8. Pyrolytic and Kinetic Characteristics of the Thermal Decomposition of Perilla frutescens Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quancheng; Sheng, Guihua

    2012-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of Perilla frutescens polysaccharide was examined by thermogravimetry, differential thermogravimetry, and differential thermal analysis. The results showed that the mass loss of the substance proceeded in three steps. The first stage can be attributed to the expulsion of the water from ambient temperature to 182°C. The second stage corresponded to devolatilization from 182°C to 439°C. The residue slowly degraded in the third stage. The weight loss in air is faster than that in nitrogen, because the oxygen in air accelerated the pyrolytic reaction speed reaction. The heating rate significantly affected the pyrolysis of the sample. Similar activation energies of the degradation process (210–211 kJ mol−1) were obtained by the FWO, KAS, and Popescu techniques. According to Popescu mechanism functions, the possible kinetic model was estimated to be Avrami–Erofeev 20 g(α) = [−ln(1–α)]4. PMID:23300715

  9. Size dependence of the thermal decomposition kinetics of nano- CaC2O4: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qingshan; Cui, Zixiang; Xue, Yongqiang

    2015-10-01

    In the processes of preparation and application of nanomaterials, the thermal decomposition of nanoparticles is often involved. An improved general theory of thermal decomposition kinetics of nanoparticles, developed over the past 10 years, was presented in this paper where the relations between reaction kinetic parameters and particle size were derived. Experimentally, the thermal decomposition kinetics of nano-sized calcium oxalate (nano- CaC2O4 with different sizes was studied by means of Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA) at different heating rates. The values of the apparent activation energy and the logarithm of pre-exponential factor were calculated using the equation of Iterative Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (IKAS) and its deformations. The influence regularities of particle size on the apparent activation energy and the pre-exponential factor were summarized, which are consistent with the thermal decomposition kinetics theory of nanoparticles. Based on the theory, the method of obtaining the surface thermodynamic properties by the determination of kinetic parameters was presented. Theoretical and experimental results show that the particle size, through the effect on the surface thermodynamic properties, has notable effect on the thermal decomposition kinetics. With the particle size decreasing, the partial molar surface enthalpy and the partial molar surface entropy increases, leading to the decrease of the apparent activation energy and the pre-exponential factor, respectively. Furthermore, the apparent activation energy, the pre-exponential factor, the partial molar surface enthalpy and the partial molar surface entropy are linearly related to the reciprocal of particle diameter, respectively.

  10. Mechanism of thermal decomposition of K2FeO4 and BaFeO4: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Virender K.; Machala, Libor

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents thermal decomposition of potassium ferrate(VI) (K2FeO4) and barium ferrate(VI) (BaFeO4) in air and nitrogen atmosphere. Mössbauer spectroscopy and nuclear forward scattering (NFS) synchrotron radiation approaches are reviewed to advance understanding of electron-transfer processes involved in reduction of ferrate(VI) to Fe(III) phases. Direct evidences of Fe V and Fe IV as intermediate iron species using the applied techniques are given. Thermal decomposition of K2FeO4 involved Fe V, Fe IV, and K3FeO3 as intermediate species while BaFeO3 (i.e. Fe IV) was the only intermediate species during the decomposition of BaFeO4. Nature of ferrite species, formed as final Fe(III) species, of thermal decomposition of K2FeO4 and BaFeO4 under different conditions are evaluated. Steps of the mechanisms of thermal decomposition of ferrate(VI), which reasonably explained experimental observations of applied approaches in conjunction with thermal and surface techniques, are summarized.

  11. Solar simulation test up to 13 solar constants for the thermal balance of the Solar Orbiter EUI instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Laurence; Zhukova, Maria; Jacques, Lionel; Halain, Jean-Philippe; Hellin, Marie-Laure; Jamotton, Pierre; Renotte, Etienne; Rochus, Pierre; Liebecq, Sylvie; Mazzoli, Alexandra

    2014-07-01

    Solar Orbiter EUI instrument was submitted to a high solar flux to correlate the thermal model of the instrument. EUI, the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, is developed by a European consortium led by the Centre Spatial de Liège for the Solar Orbiter ESA M-class mission. The solar flux that it shall have to withstand will be as high as 13 solar constants when the spacecraft reaches its 0.28AU perihelion. It is essential to verify the thermal design of the instrument, especially the heat evacuation property and to assess the thermo-mechanical behavior of the instrument when submitted to high thermal load. Therefore, a thermal balance test under 13 solar constants was performed on the first model of EUI, the Structural and Thermal Model. The optical analyses and experiments performed to characterize accurately the thermal and divergence parameters of the flux are presented; the set-up of the test, and the correlation with the thermal model performed to deduce the unknown thermal parameters of the instrument and assess its temperature profile under real flight conditions are also presented.

  12. Synthesis and thermal decomposition properties of hydrogen-rich phosphorus salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel

    2010-12-01

    Complex metal hydrides continue to be investigated as solid-materials for hydrogen storage. Traditional interstitial metal hydrides offer favorable thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen release but do not meet energy density requires. Anionic metal hydrides, and complex metal hydrides like magnesium borohydride have higher energy densities compared to interstitial metal hydrides, but poor kinetics and/or thermodynamically unfavorable side products limit their deployment as hydrogen storage materials in transportation applications. Main-group anionic materials such as the bis(borane)hypophosphite salt [PH2(BH3)2] have been known for decades, but only recently have we begun to explore their ability to release hydrogen. We have developed a new procedure for synthesizing the lithium and sodium hypophosphite salts. Routes for accessing other metal bis(borane)hypophosphite salts will be discussed. A significant advantage of this class of material is the air and water stability of the anion. Compared to metal borohydrides, which reactive violently with water, these phosphorus-based salts can be dissolved in protic solvents, including water, with little to no decomposition over the course of multiple days. The ability of these salts to release hydrogen upon heating has been assessed. While preliminary results indicate phosphine and boron-containing species are released, hydrogen is also a major component of the volatile species observed during the thermal decomposition. Additives such as NaH or KH mixed with the sodium salt Na[PH2(BH3)2] significantly perturb the decomposition reaction and greatly increase the mass loss as determined by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). This symbiotic behavior has the potential to affect the hydrogen storage ability of bis(borane)hypophosphite salts.

  13. In Situ Thermal Decomposition of Exfoliated Two-Dimensional Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolong; Wood, Joshua D; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Cho, EunKyung; Hersam, Mark C

    2015-03-05

    With a semiconducting band gap and high charge carrier mobility, two-dimensional (2D) black phosphorus (BP)—often referred to as phosphorene—holds significant promise for next generation electronics and optoelectronics. However, as a 2D material, it possesses a higher surface area to volume ratio than bulk BP, suggesting that its chemical and thermal stability will be modified. Herein, an atomic-scale microscopic and spectroscopic study is performed to characterize the thermal degradation of mechanically exfoliated 2D BP. From in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy, decomposition of 2D BP is observed to occur at ∼400 °C in vacuum, in contrast to the 550 °C bulk BP sublimation temperature. This decomposition initiates via eye-shaped cracks along the [001] direction and then continues until only a thin, amorphous red phosphorus like skeleton remains. In situ electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and energy-loss near-edge structure changes provide quantitative insight into this chemical transformation process.

  14. An investigation on the modelling of kinetics of thermal decomposition of hazardous mercury wastes.

    PubMed

    Busto, Yailen; M G Tack, Filip; Peralta, Luis M; Cabrera, Xiomara; Arteaga-Pérez, Luis E

    2013-09-15

    The kinetics of mercury removal from solid wastes generated by chlor-alkali plants were studied. The reaction order and model-free method with an isoconversional approach were used to estimate the kinetic parameters and reaction mechanism that apply to the thermal decomposition of hazardous mercury wastes. As a first approach to the understanding of thermal decomposition for this type of systems (poly-disperse and multi-component), a novel scheme of six reactions was proposed to represent the behaviour of mercury compounds in the solid matrix during the treatment. An integration-optimization algorithm was used in the screening of nine mechanistic models to develop kinetic expressions that best describe the process. The kinetic parameters were calculated by fitting each of these models to the experimental data. It was demonstrated that the D₁-diffusion mechanism appeared to govern the process at 250°C and high residence times, whereas at 450°C a combination of the diffusion mechanism (D₁) and the third order reaction mechanism (F3) fitted the kinetics of the conversions. The developed models can be applied in engineering calculations to dimension the installations and determine the optimal conditions to treat a mercury containing sludge.

  15. Mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes during thermal decomposition of carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Martin F.; Franchi, Ian A.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Teresa L.; Brack, André; Kurat, Gero; Pillinger, Colin T.

    2002-01-01

    Nearly all chemical processes fractionate 17O and 18O in a mass-dependent way relative to 16O, a major exception being the formation of ozone from diatomic oxygen in the presence of UV radiation or electrical discharge. Investigation of oxygen three-isotope behavior during thermal decomposition of naturally occurring carbonates of calcium and magnesium in vacuo has revealed that, surprisingly, anomalous isotopic compositions are also generated during this process. High-precision measurements of the attendant three-isotope fractionation line, and consequently the magnitude of the isotopic anomaly (Δ17O), demonstrate that the slope of the line is independent of the nature of the carbonate but is controlled by empirical factors relating to the decomposition procedure. For a slope identical to that describing terrestrial silicates and waters (0.5247 ± 0.0007 at the 95% confidence level), solid oxides formed during carbonate pyrolysis fit a parallel line offset by −0.241 ± 0.042‰. The corresponding CO2 is characterized by a positive offset of half this magnitude, confirming the mass-independent nature of the fractionation. Slow, protracted thermolysis produces a fractionation line of shallower slope (0.5198 ± 0.0007). These findings of a 17O anomaly being generated from a solid, and solely by thermal means, provide a further challenge to current understanding of the nature of mass-independent isotopic fractionation. PMID:12167677

  16. Research on the Thermal Decomposition Reaction Kinetics and Mechanism of Pyridinol-Blocked Isophorone Diisocyanate

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Sen; He, Jingwei; Luo, Weixun; Liu, Fang

    2016-01-01

    A series of pyridinol-blocked isophorone isocyanates, based on pyridinol including 2-hydroxypyridine, 3-hydroxypyridine, and 4-hydroxypyridine, was synthesized and characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and FTIR spectra. The deblocking temperature of blocked isocyanates was established by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and the CO2 evaluation method. The deblocking studies revealed that the deblocking temperature was increased with pyridinol nucleophilicity in this order: 3-hydroxypyridine > 4-hydroxypyridine > 2-hydroxypyridine. The thermal decomposition reaction of 4-hydroxypyridine blocked isophorone diisocyanate was studied by thermo-gravimetric analysis. The Friedman–Reich–Levi (FRL) equation, Flynn–Wall–Ozawa (FWO) equation, and Crane equation were utilized to analyze the thermal decomposition reaction kinetics. The activation energy calculated by FRL method and FWO method was 134.6 kJ·mol−1 and 126.2 kJ·mol−1, respectively. The most probable mechanism function calculated by the FWO method was the Jander equation. The reaction order was not an integer because of the complicated reactions of isocyanate. PMID:28787907

  17. Synthesis of seaweed based carbon acid catalyst by thermal decomposition of ammonium sulfate for biodiesel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ee, Tang Zo; Lim, Steven; Ling, Pang Yean; Huei, Wong Kam; Chyuan, Ong Hwai

    2017-04-01

    Experiment was carried out to study the feasibility of biomass derived solid acid catalyst for the production of biodiesel using Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD). Malaysia indigenous seaweed was selected as the biomass to be carbonized as the catalyst support. Sulfonation of seaweed based carbon material was carried out by thermal decomposition of ammonium sulfate, (NH4)2SO4. The effects of carbonization temperature at 200 to 600°C on the catalyst physical and chemical properties were studied. The effect of reaction parameters on the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield was studied by varying the concentration of ammonium sulfate (5.0 to 40.0 w/v%) and thermal decomposition time (15 to 90 min). Characterizations of catalyst were carried out to study the catalyst surface morphology with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), acid density with back titration and functional group attached with FT-IR. Results showed that when the catalyst sulfonated with 10.0 w/v% ammonium sulfate solution and heated to 235°C for 30 min, the highest FAME yield achieved was 23.7% at the reaction condition of 5.0 wt.% catalyst loading, esterification time of 4 h, methanol to PFAD molar ratio of 20:1 at 100°C reaction temperature.

  18. Investigation of thermodynamic parameters in the thermal decomposition of plastic waste-waste lube oil compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Sang; Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Sung Hyun

    2010-07-01

    Thermal decomposition properties of plastic waste-waste lube oil compounds were investigated under nonisothermal conditions. Polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were selected as representative household plastic wastes. A plastic waste mixture (PWM) and waste lube oil (WLO) were mixed with mixing ratios of 33, 50, and 67 (w/w) % on a PWM weight basis, and thermogravimetric (TG) experiments were performed from 25 to 600 degrees C. The Flynn-Wall method and the Ozawa-Flynn-Wall method were used for analyses of thermodynamic parameters. In this study, activation energies of PWM/WLO compounds ranged from 73.4 to 229.6 kJ/mol between 0.2 and 0.8 of normalized mass conversions, and the 50% PWM/WLO compound had lower activation energies and enthalpies among the PWM/WLO samples at each mass conversion. At the point of maximum differential mass conversion, the analyzed activation energies, enthalpies, entropies, and Gibbs free energies indicated that mixing PWM and WLO has advantages in reducing energy to decrease the degree of disorder. However, no difference in overall energy that would require overcoming both thermal decomposition reactions and degree of disorder was observed among PWM/WLO compounds under these experimental conditions.

  19. Characterization and antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles prepared by a thermal decomposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Le Thi; Phan, Vu Ngoc; Lan, Hoang; Thuy, Nguyen Thanh; Hien, Tran Minh; Huy, Tran Quang; Quy, Nguyen Van; Chinh, Huynh Dang; Tung, Le Minh; Tuan, Pham Anh; Lam, Vu Dinh; Le, Anh-Tuan

    2013-11-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing need of efficient synthetic protocols using eco-friendly conditions including low costs and green chemicals for production of metal nanoparticles. In this work, silver nanoparticles (silver NPs) with average particle size about 10 nm were synthesized by using a thermal decomposition technique. Unlike the colloidal chemistry method, the thermal decomposition method developed has advantages such as the high crystallinity, single-reaction synthesis, and easy dispersion ability of the synthesized NPs in organic solvents. In a modified synthesis process, we used sodium oleate as a capping agent to modify the surface of silver NPs because the oleate has a C18 tail with a double bond in the middle, therefore, forming a kink which is to be effective for aggregative stability. Importantly, the as-synthesized silver NPs have demonstrated strong antimicrobial effects against various bacteria and fungi strains. Electron microscopic studies reveal physical insights into the interaction and bactericidal mechanism between the prepared silver NPs and tested bacteria in question. The observed excellent antibacterial and antifungal activity of the silver NPs make them ideal for disinfection and biomedicine applications.

  20. Recombination Reactions in the Thermal Decomposition of Anisole: An Investigation of Benzene and Naphthalene Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Adam; Ellison, Barney; Mukarakate, Calvin; Robichaud, David; Nimlos, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Thermal decompositions of anisole (C6H5OCH3) and methyl-deuterated anisole (C6H5OCD3) are studied using a hyperthermal tubular reactor and photoionization reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Gas exiting the reactor is subject to a supersonic expansion after a residence time of 65 μs, allowing detection of highly chemically reactive radical species. Anisole decomposes through loss of a methyl group (CH3) to form phenoxy radical (C6H5O), followed by ejection of a CO to form cyclopentadienyl radical (c-C5H5; CPDR). Benzene is generated primarily by thermal decomposition of methylcyclopentadiene (C5H5CH3; MCPD). The MCPD results from methyl radical recombination with CPDR. The MCPD then undergoes two hydrogen atom losses and a ring expansion resulting in benzene. At Twall = 1200 C -- 1300 C a large amount of propargyl radical (CH2CCH) is observed. Propargyl radical recombination accounts for a small fraction of the observed benzene. Naphthalene and its precursor intermediates (C10H10, C10H9), resulting from CPDR recombination, are also observed. The presence of benzene and naphthalene is confirmed with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI).

  1. Synthesis and Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of the Energetic Compound 3,5-Dinitro-4-nitroxypyrazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiao-Qin; Cao, Duan-Lin; Cui, Jian-Lan

    2016-07-01

    A novel energetic material, 3,5-dinitro-4-nitroxypyrazole (DNNP), was synthesized via nitration and nucleophilic substitution reaction using 4-chloropyrazole as raw material. The structure of DNNP was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and elemental analysis. Its detonation properties were calculated and compared with those of other commonly used energetic compounds. The thermal decomposition mechanism of DNNP was studied by means of thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry coupled with a mass spectrometry (DSC-MS). The results show that the detonation properties of DNNP were better than those of TNT and comparable to those of 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX). In addition, the thermal decomposition mechanism of DNNP was supposed. Initially, the O-NO2 bond was broken, thereby producing a nitropyrazole oxygen radical. Subsequently, the nitropyrazole oxygen radical was decomposed by free radical cleavage of nitro or isomerized to nitritepyrazole and subsequently decomposed by free radical cleavage of the nitroso group. Finally, pyrazole ring fission occurred and produced N2, NO, N2O, and CO2.

  2. Influence of thermal treatment on the formation of zirconia nanostructured powder by thermal decomposition of different precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoia, Marcela; Barvinschi, Paul; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Negrea, Adina; Barvinschi, Floricica

    2013-10-01

    The paper presents some results concerning the preparation of zirconia powders starting from ZrOCl2·8H2O by using two synthesis methods: (a) precipitation with NH3, at 90 °C, and (b) thermal decomposition of carboxylate precursors, obtained in the reaction of zirconium nitrate and two different alcohols, 1,3-propanediol (PD) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), at 150 °C. The precursors obtained at different temperatures have been characterized by thermal analysis (TG, DTA) and FT-IR spectroscopy. DTA analysis evidenced very clearly the transition temperatures between zirconia crystalline phases. The precursors have been annealed at different temperatures in order to obtain zirconia powders and the as obtained powders have been characterized by means of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). In case of precipitation method the presence of the tetragonal phase was observed at 400 °C, while the monoclinic phase appears at temperatures higher than 400 °C, becoming major crystalline phase starting with 700 °C. In case of the powders prepared by thermal decomposition of carboxylate precursors, the tetragonal phase was formed at temperatures below 700 °C, when the monoclinic phase begin to crystallize as secondary phase, in a higher proportion for the samples synthesized with 1,3-propanediol. All powders annealed at 1200 °C are pure monoclinic zirconia. SEM images have evidenced for the zirconia powders annealed at 1000 °C particles with diameters up to 150 nm, agglomerated in micrometer-sized aggregates, more individualized and homogenous than that obtained in the case of zirconia powder synthesized with poly(vinyl alcohol).

  3. Solar Collector Thermal Power System. Volume 3. Basic Study and Experimental Evaluation of Thermal Train Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    AD/A-000 942 SOLAR -COLLECTOR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM. VOLUME III. BASIC STUDY AND EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THERMAL TRAIN COMPONENTS Robert Richter...Experimental 16 Aug 1971 to 28 Jun 1974 Evaluation of Thermal Train 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER Components 4074-Final 7. AUTHOR(s) 1. CONTRACT OR GRANT...complete thermal train . The effort comprised the design, fabrication, and testing of the heat pipe as an individual component and the integration and

  4. Parameter-free Automatic Solar Active Region Detection by Hermite Function Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, Brian J.

    2012-11-01

    We present a new method for the automated detection of sunspots and active regions (ARs) from full-disk observations of the photospheric Stokes vector. The algorithm relies on a Hermite function decomposition of observed Stokes polarization profiles as a function of position on the solar disk. This approach is unique in that it requires no user-defined tunable parameters, like intensity or magnetic field thresholds, and utilizes no information traditionally exploited by other detection schemes to signal the presence of an AR. It is truly a black-box approach, utilizing a self-consistent statistical analysis of the Hermite coefficients. We present the method and show the results of its application to Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun Vector Spectromagnetograph full-disk observations. Detection efficiency is presented for a one-month time series of daily photospheric observations, and we derive a skill-score for the method during this time period.

  5. Solar radiation influence on the decomposition process of diclofenac in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Peter; von Tümpling, Wolf

    2007-03-01

    Diclofenac can be detected in surface water of many rivers with human impacts worldwide. The observed decrease of the diclofenac concentration in waters and the formation of its photochemical transformation products under the impact of natural irradiation during one to 16 days are explained in this article. In semi-natural laboratory tests and in a field experiment it could be shown, that sunlight stimulates the decomposition of diclofenac in surface waters. During one day intensive solar radiation in middle European summer diclofenac decomposes in the surface layer of the water (0 to 5 cm) up to 83%, determined in laboratory exposition experiments. After two weeks in a field experiment, the diclofenac was not detectable anymore in the water surface layer (limit of quantification: 5 ng/L). At a water depth of 50 cm, within two weeks 96% of the initial concentration was degraded, while in 100 cm depth 2/3 of the initial diclofenac concentration remained. With the decomposition, stable and meta-stable photolysis products were formed and observed by UV detection. Beyond that the chemical structure of these products were determined. Three transformation products, that were not described in the literature so far, were identified and quantified with GC-MS.

  6. Tehachapi solar thermal system first annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.

    1993-05-01

    The staff of the Southwest Technology Development Institute (SWTDI), in conjunction with the staff of Industrial Solar Technology (IST), have analyzed the performance, operation, and maintenance of a large solar process heat system in use at the 5,000 inmate California Correctional Institution (CCI) in Tehachapi, CA. This report summarizes the key design features of the solar plant, its construction and maintenance histories through the end of 1991, and the performance data collected at the plant by a dedicated on-site data acquisition system (DAS).

  7. Solar thermal power systems. Annual technical progress report, FY 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Gerald W.

    1980-06-01

    The Solar Thermal Power Systems Program is the key element in the national effort to establish solar thermal conversion technologies within the major sectors of the national energy market. It provides for the development of concentrating mirror/lens heat collection and conversion technologies for both central and dispersed receiver applications to produce electricity, provide heat at its point of use in industrial processes, provide heat and electricity in combination for industrial, commercial, and residential needs, and ultimately, drive processes for production of liquid and gaseous fuels. This report is the second Annual Technical Progress Report for the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program and is structured according to the organization of the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program on September 30, 1979. Emphasis is on the technical progress of the projects rather than on activities and individual contractor efforts. Each project description indicates its place in the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program, a brief history, the significant achievements and real progress during FY 1979, also future project activities as well as anticipated significant achievements are forecast. (WHK)

  8. Long-term goals for solar thermal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Brown, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    This document describes long-term performance and cost goals for three solar thermal technologies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) developed these goals in support of the Draft Five Year Research and Development Plan for the National Solar Thermal Technology Program (DOE 1984b). These technology goals are intended to provide targets that, if met, will lead to the widespread use of solar thermal technologies in the marketplace. Goals were developed for three technologies and two applications: central receiver and dish technologies for utility-generated electricity applications, and central receiver, dish, and trough technologies for industrial process heat applications. These technologies and applications were chosen because they are the primary technologies and applications that have been researched by DOE in the past. System goals were developed through analysis of future price projections for energy sources competing with solar thermal in the middle-to-late 1990's time frame. The system goals selected were levelized energy costs of $0.05/kWh for electricity and $9/MBtu for industrial process heat (1984 $). Component goals established to meet system goals were developed based upon projections of solar thermal component performance and cost which could be achieved in the same time frame.

  9. Long-term goals for solar thermal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. A.; Dirks, J. A.; Brown, D. R.

    1985-05-01

    Long-term performance and cost goals for three solar thermal technologies are discussed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) developed these goals in support of the Draft Five Year Research and Development Plan for the National Solar Thermal Technology Program (DOE 1984b). These technology goals are intended to provide targets that, if met, will lead to the widespread use of solar thermal technologies in the marketplace. Goals were developed for three technologies and two applications: central receiver and dish technologies for utility-generated electricity applications, and central receiver, dish, and trough technologies for industrial process heat applications. These technologies and applications were chosen because they are the primary technologies and applications that have been researched by DOE in the past. System goals were developed through analysis of future price projections for energy sources competing with solar thermal in the middle-to-late 1990's time frame. The system goals selected were levelized energy costs of 0.05/kWh for electricity and $9/MBtu for industrial process heat (1984 $). Component goals established to meet system goals were developed based upon projections of solar thermal component performance and cost which could be achieved in the same time frame.

  10. Solar energy thermally powered electrical generating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, William R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A thermally powered electrical generating system for use in a space vehicle is disclosed. The rate of storage in a thermal energy storage medium is controlled by varying the rate of generation and dissipation of electrical energy in a thermally powered electrical generating system which is powered from heat stored in the thermal energy storage medium without exceeding a maximum quantity of heat. A control system (10) varies the rate at which electrical energy is generated by the electrical generating system and the rate at which electrical energy is consumed by a variable parasitic electrical load to cause storage of an amount of thermal energy in the thermal energy storage system at the end of a period of insolation which is sufficient to satisfy the scheduled demand for electrical power to be generated during the next period of eclipse. The control system is based upon Kalman filter theory.

  11. Mathematical simulation of thermal decomposition processes in coking polymers during intense heating

    SciTech Connect

    Shlenskii, O.F.; Polyakov, A.A.

    1994-12-01

    Description of nonstationary heat transfer in heat-shielding materials based on cross-linked polymers, mathematical simulation of chemical engineering processes of treating coking and fiery coals, and designing calculations all require taking thermal destruction kinetics into account. The kinetics of chemical transformations affects the substance density change depending on the temperature, the time, the heat-release function, and other properties of materials. The traditionally accepted description of the thermal destruction kinetics of coking materials is based on formulating a set of kinetic equations, in which only chemical transformations are taken into account. However, such an approach does not necessarily agree with the obtained experimental data for the case of intense heating. The authors propose including the parameters characterizing the decrease of intermolecular interaction in a comparatively narrow temperature interval (20-40 K) into the set of kinetic equations. In the neighborhood of a certain temperature T{sub 1}, which is called the limiting temperature of thermal decomposition, a decrease in intermolecular interaction causes an increase in the rates of chemical and phase transformations. The effect of the enhancement of destruction processes has been found experimentally by the contact thermal analysis method.

  12. Solar Thermal Propulsion for Microsatellite Manoeuvring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    of 14-cm and 56-cm diameter solar concentrating mirrors has clearly validated initial optical ray trace modelling and suggests that there is...concentrating mirror’s focus, permitting multiple mirror inputs to heat a single receiver and allowing the receiver to be placed anywhere on the host...The STE is conceptually simple, relying on a mirror or lens assembly to collect and concentrate incident solar radiation. This energy is focused, by

  13. Solar thermal electricity in 1998: An IEA/SolarPACES summary of status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Tyner, C.E.; Kolb, G.J.; Meinecke, W.; Trieb, F.

    1998-07-01

    Research and development activities sponsored by countries within the International Energy Agency`s solar thermal working group. SolarPACES, have helped reduce the cost of solar thermal systems to one-fifth that of the early pilot plants. Continued technological improvements are currently being proven in next-generation demonstration plants. These advances, along with cost reductions made possible by scale-up to larger production and construction of a succession of power plants, have made solar thermal systems the lowest-cost solar energy in the world and promise cost-competitiveness with fossil-fuel plants in the future. Solar thermal technologies are appropriate for a wide range of applications, including dispatchable central-station power plants where they can meet peak-load to near-base-load needs of a utility, and distributed, modular power plants for both remote and grid-connected applications. In this paper, the authors present the collective position of the SolarPACES community on solar electricity-generating technology. They discuss the current status of the technology and likely near-term improvements; the needs of target markets; and important technical and financial issues that must be resolved for success in near-term global markets.

  14. Thermally-Induced Structural Disturbances of Rigid Panel Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Thornton, Earl A.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a significant number of spacecraft has been impacted negatively by attitude disturbances resulting from thermally-induced motions of flexible structures. Recent examples of spacecraft affected by these disturbances include the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Thermally-induced structural disturbances occur as the result of rapid changes in thermal loading typically initiated as a satellite exits or enters the Earth's shadow. Temperature differences in flexible appendages give rise to structural deformations, which in turn result in disturbance torques reacting back on the spacecraft. Structures which have proven susceptible to these disturbances include deployable booms and solar arrays. This paper investigates disturbances resulting from thermally-induced deformations of rigid panel solar arrays. An analytical model for the thermal-structural response of the solar array and the corresponding disturbance torque are presented. The effect of these disturbances on the attitude dynamics of a simple spacecraft is then investigated using a coupled system of governing equations which includes the effects of thermally-induced deformations. Numerical results demonstrate the effect of varying solar array geometry on the dynamic response of the system.

  15. Thermally-Induced Structural Disturbances of Rigid Panel Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Thornton, Earl A.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a significant number of spacecraft has been impacted negatively by attitude disturbances resulting from thermally-induced motions of flexible structures. Recent examples of spacecraft affected by these disturbances include the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Thermally-induced structural disturbances occur as the result of rapid changes in thermal loading typically initiated as a satellite exits or enters the Earth's shadow. Temperature differences in flexible appendages give rise to structural deformations, which in turn result in disturbance torques reacting back on the spacecraft. Structures which have proven susceptible to these disturbances include deployable booms and solar arrays. This paper investigates disturbances resulting from thermally-induced deformations of rigid panel solar arrays. An analytical model for the thermal-structural response of the solar array and the corresponding disturbance torque are presented. The effect of these disturbances on the attitude dynamics of a simple spacecraft is then investigated using a coupled system of governing equations which includes the effects of thermally-induced deformations. Numerical results demonstrate the effect of varying solar array geometry on the dynamic response of the system.

  16. Thermal and electrochemical decomposition of lithium peroxide in non-catalyzed carbon cathodes for Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Beyer, H; Meini, S; Tsiouvaras, N; Piana, M; Gasteiger, H A

    2013-07-14

    The decomposition of lithium peroxide during the charging process of lithium-air batteries is investigated. A novel preparation method for electrodes in the discharged state, i.e., prefilled with Li2O2 using polyethylene oxide as a binder, is presented. The composition and reactivity of Li2O2-prefilled electrodes are examined by thermal analysis coupled with on-line mass spectrometry. Voltage profiles and gas evolution during the charging process of Li2O2-prefilled electrodes in battery cells are correlated with the thermal decomposition process of Li2O2 and its impact on other electrode compounds. It is found that both thermal Li2O2 decomposition and the electrochemical decomposition of Li2O2 during charging enhance the oxidation of the electrolyte, the binder, and/or carbon, which is suggested to be due to the formation of "nascent" oxygen during Li2O2 decomposition into O2 and Li2O (thermally) or into O2 and lithium ions (electrochemically).

  17. Empirical mode decomposition analysis of random processes in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolotkov, D. Y.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Coloured noisy components with a power law spectral energy distribution are often shown to appear in solar signals of various types. Such a frequency-dependent noise may indicate the operation of various randomly distributed dynamical processes in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We develop a recipe for the correct usage of the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) technique in the presence of coloured noise, allowing for clear distinguishing between quasi-periodic oscillatory phenomena in the solar atmosphere and superimposed random background processes. For illustration, we statistically investigate extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission intensity variations observed with SDO/AIA in the coronal (171 Å), chromospheric (304 Å), and upper photospheric (1600 Å) layers of the solar atmosphere, from a quiet sun and a sunspot umbrae region. Methods: EMD has been used for analysis because of its adaptive nature and essential applicability to the processing non-stationary and amplitude-modulated time series. For the comparison of the results obtained with EMD, we use the Fourier transform technique as an etalon. Results: We empirically revealed statistical properties of synthetic coloured noises in EMD, and suggested a scheme that allows for the detection of noisy components among the intrinsic modes obtained with EMD in real signals. Application of the method to the solar EUV signals showed that they indeed behave randomly and could be represented as a combination of different coloured noises characterised by a specific value of the power law indices in their spectral energy distributions. On the other hand, 3-min oscillations in the analysed sunspot were detected to have energies significantly above the corresponding noise level. Conclusions: The correct accounting for the background frequency-dependent random processes is essential when using EMD for analysis of oscillations in the solar atmosphere. For the quiet sun region the power law index was found to increase

  18. Cost-Effective Solar Thermal Energy Storage: Thermal Energy Storage With Supercritical Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: UCLA and JPL are creating cost-effective storage systems for solar thermal energy using new materials and designs. A major drawback to the widespread use of solar thermal energy is its inability to cost-effectively supply electric power at night. State-of-the-art energy storage for solar thermal power plants uses molten salt to help store thermal energy. Molten salt systems can be expensive and complex, which is not attractive from a long-term investment standpoint. UCLA and JPL are developing a supercritical fluid-based thermal energy storage system, which would be much less expensive than molten-salt-based systems. The team’s design also uses a smaller, modular, single-tank design that is more reliable and scalable for large-scale storage applications.

  19. Conceptual design and system analysis study for a hybrid solar photovoltaic/solar thermal electric power system. Volume 3: Appendices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-07-01

    Hybrid photovoltaic/solar thermal electric conversion systems were analyzed. Several types of hybrid systems, photovoltaic only systems, and solar thermal electric systems in terms of performance and cost were compared. The computer code used in the analyses and background information on heat engines, thermal efficiencies of photovoltaic thermal collectors, and optical considerations for central receiver plants is also described.

  20. Results of accelerated thermal cycle tests of solar cells modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P.; Mueller, R.; Salama, M.; Yasui, R.

    1976-01-01

    Various candidate solar panel designs were evaluated, both theoretically and experimentally, with respect to their thermal cycling survival capability, and in particular with respect to an accelerated simulation of thermal cycles representative of Viking '75 mission requirements. The experimental results were obtained on 'mini-panels' thermally cycled in a newly installed automated test facility herein described. The resulting damage was analyzed physically and theoretically, and on the basis of these analyses the panel design was suitably modified to significantly improve its ability to withstand the thermal environment. These successful modifications demonstrate the value of the complementary theoretical-experimental approach adopted, and discussed in detail in this paper.

  1. High-temperature molten salt solar thermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, R. J.; Leach, J. W.; Stern, G.

    Conceptual designs of a solar thermal central receiver and a thermal storage subsystem were analyzed to estimate thermal losses and to assess the economics of high-temperature applications with molten salt transport fluids. Modifications to a receiver design being developed by the Martin Marietta Corporation were studied to investigate possible means for improving efficiency at high temperatures. Computations were made based on conceptual design of internally insulated high temperature storage tanks to estimate cost and performance. A study of a potential application of the system for thermochemical production of hydrogen indicates that thermal storage at 1100 C will be economically attractive.

  2. The Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage

    DOE PAGES

    Sioshansi, Ramteen; Denholm, Paul

    2010-06-14

    Our paper examines the value of concentrating solar power (CSP) and thermal energy storage (TES) in a number of regions in the southwestern United States. Our analysis also shows that TES can increase the value of CSP by allowing more thermal energy from a CSP plant's solar field to be used, allowing a CSP plant to accommodate a larger solar field, and by allowing CSP generation to be shifted to hours with higher energy prices. We also analyze the sensitivity of this value to a number of factors, including the optimization period, price and solar forecasting, ancillary service sales, andmore » dry cooling of the CSP plant, and also estimate the capacity value of a CSP plant with TES. We further discuss the value of CSP plants and TES net of capital costs.« less

  3. Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2010-02-01

    This paper examines the value of concentrating solar power (CSP) and thermal energy storage (TES) in four regions in the southwestern United States. Our analysis shows that TES can increase the value of CSP by allowing more thermal energy from a CSP plant?s solar field to be used, by allowing a CSP plant to accommodate a larger solar field, and by allowing CSP generation to be shifted to hours with higher energy prices. We analyze the sensitivity of CSP value to a number of factors, including the optimization period, price and solar forecasting, ancillary service sales, capacity value and dry cooling of the CSP plant. We also discuss the value of CSP plants and TES net of capital costs.

  4. The Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Sioshansi, Ramteen; Denholm, Paul

    2010-06-14

    Our paper examines the value of concentrating solar power (CSP) and thermal energy storage (TES) in a number of regions in the southwestern United States. Our analysis also shows that TES can increase the value of CSP by allowing more thermal energy from a CSP plant's solar field to be used, allowing a CSP plant to accommodate a larger solar field, and by allowing CSP generation to be shifted to hours with higher energy prices. We also analyze the sensitivity of this value to a number of factors, including the optimization period, price and solar forecasting, ancillary service sales, and dry cooling of the CSP plant, and also estimate the capacity value of a CSP plant with TES. We further discuss the value of CSP plants and TES net of capital costs.

  5. Technical use of solar energy: Conversion from solar to thermal energy, solar cooling and thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafa, A.; Fisch, N.; Hahne, E.; Kraus, K.; Seemann, D.; Seifert, B.; Sohns, J.; Schetter, G.; Schweigerer, W.

    1983-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies in the field of solar energy utilization are reviewed. Specific topics considered are: flat plate water collectors, solar absorbers, air collectors, solar absorption cooling, solar simulators, aquifiers, latent heat stores, and space heating systems.

  6. Thermal performance of evacuated tube heat pipe solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, Nandy; Kristian, M. R.; David, R.; Haliansyah, K.; Ariantara, Bambang

    2016-06-01

    The high fossil energy consumption not only causes the scarcity of energy but also raises problems of global warming. Increasing needs of fossil fuel could be reduced through the utilization of solar energy by using solar collectors. Indonesia has the abundant potential for solar energy, but non-renewable energy sources still dominate energy consumption. With heat pipe as passive heat transfer device, evacuated tube solar collector is expected to heat up water for industrial and home usage without external power supply needed to circulate water inside the solar collector. This research was conducted to determine the performance of heat pipe-based evacuated tube solar collector as solar water heater experimentally. The experiments were carried out using stainless steel screen mesh as a wick material, and water and Al2O3-water 0.1% nanofluid as working fluid, and applying inclination angles of 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°. To analyze the heat absorbed and transferred by the prototype, water at 30°C was circulated through the condenser. A 150 Watt halogen lamp was used as sun simulator, and the prototype was covered by an insulation box to obtain a steady state condition with a minimum affection of ambient changes. Experimental results show that the usage of Al2O3-water 0.1% nanofluid at 30° inclination angle provides the highest thermal performance, which gives efficiency as high as 0.196 and thermal resistance as low as 5.32 °C/W. The use of nanofluid as working fluid enhances thermal performance due to high thermal conductivity of the working fluid. The increase of the inclination angle plays a role in the drainage of the condensate to the evaporator that leads to higher thermal performance until the optimal inclination angle is reached.

  7. China experiments with solar-thermal power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2009-04-01

    Construction is due to start later this month on an experimental solar-thermal power plant in the shadow of China's Great Wall that will bring clean energy to 30 000 households by 2010. Built on the outskirts of Beijing at a cost of £10m, the 1.5MW Dahan plant will cover an area the size of 10 football pitches, and will serve as a platform for experiments on different solar-power technologies.

  8. Solar photovoltaic/thermal residential experiment, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugle, S. T.; Leith, J. R.; Svane, M. S.

    1981-08-01

    Performance and operation of photovoltaic and thermal solar heating and cooling systems were evaluated in order to assess the feasibility of hybrid photovoltaic/thermal collectors. Experiments were carried out at an instrumented single-family dwelling/research facility at the University of Texas at Arlington. The cooling load was the dominant comfort consideration, since the climate at the research site (in north central Texas) is generally regarded as humid subtropical with hot summers. Several solar-assisted heating and cooling configurations were considered for a basic system comprised of the photovoltaic and thermal collectors, a thermal storage tank, and a two-speed heat pump. The photovoltaic array, with an area of 109 sq. m was part of a utility-interactive ('line-stuffing') power system. Average solar-to-dc conversion efficiency of the array was 4.7%. Efficiency of the thermal collectors, with an area of 48.4 sq. m, was 5 to 20% and was dependent upon the difference between the glycol-water collector loop and thermal storage tank temperatures. Design objectives and operational strategies for hybrid photovoltaic/thermal collector systems were developed.

  9. Unimolecular thermal decomposition of phenol and d5-phenol: Direct observation of cyclopentadiene formation via cyclohexadienone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Adam M.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Robichaud, David J.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Carstensen, Hans-Heinrich; Barney Ellison, G.

    2012-01-01

    The pyrolyses of phenol and d5-phenol (C6H5OH and C6D5OH) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular (μtubular) SiC reactor. Product detection is via both photon ionization (10.487 eV) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Gas exiting the heated reactor (375 K-1575 K) is subject to a free expansion after a residence time in the μtubular reactor of approximately 50-100 μs. The expansion from the reactor into vacuum rapidly cools the gas mixture and allows the detection of radicals and other highly reactive intermediates. We find that the initial decomposition steps at the onset of phenol pyrolysis are enol/keto tautomerization to form cyclohexadienone followed by decarbonylation to produce cyclopentadiene; C6H5OH → c-C6H6 = O → c-C5H6 + CO. The cyclopentadiene loses a H atom to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical which further decomposes to acetylene and propargyl radical; c-C5H6 → c-C5H5 + H → HC≡CH + HCCCH2. At higher temperatures, hydrogen loss from the PhO-H group to form phenoxy radical followed by CO ejection to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical likely contributes to the product distribution; C6H5O-H → C6H5O + H → c-C5H5 + CO. The direct decarbonylation reaction remains an important channel in the thermal decomposition mechanisms of the dihydroxybenzenes. Both catechol (o-HO-C6H4-OH) and hydroquinone (p-HO-C6H4-OH) are shown to undergo decarbonylation at the onset of pyrolysis to form hydroxycyclopentadiene. In the case of catechol, we observe that water loss is also an important decomposition channel at the onset of pyrolysis.

  10. Thermal decomposition rate of MgCO3 as an inorganic astrobiological matrix in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisceglia, E.; Longo, G. Micca; Longo, S.

    2017-04-01

    Carbonate minerals, likely of hydrothermal origins and included into orthopyroxenite, have been extensively studied in the ALH84001 meteorite. In this meteorite, nanocrystals comparable with those produced by magnetotactic bacteria have been found into a carbonate matrix. This leads naturally to a discussion of the role of such carbonates in panspermia theories. In this context, the present work sets the basis of a criterion to evaluate whether a carbonate matrix in a meteor entering a planetary atmosphere would be able to reach the surface. As a preliminary step, the composition of carbonate minerals in the ALH84001 meteorite is reviewed; in view of the predominance of Mg in these carbonates, pure magnesite (MgCO3) is proposed as a mineral model. This mineral is much more sensitive to high temperatures reached during an entry process, compared with silicates, due to facile decomposition into MgO and gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2). A most important quantity for further studies is therefore the decomposition rate expressed as CO2 evaporation rate J (molecules/m2 s). An analytical expression for J(T) is given using the Langmuir law, based on CO2 pressure in equilibrium with MgCO3 and MgO at the surface temperature T. Results suggest that carbonate minerals rich in magnesium may offer much better thermal protection to embedded biological matter than silicates and significantly better than limestone, which was considered in previous studies, in view of the heat absorbed by their decomposition even at moderate temperatures. This first study can be extended in the future to account for more complex compositions, including Fe and Ca.

  11. Thermal decomposition of dolomite under CO2: insights from TGA and in situ XRD analysis.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Perejon, Antonio; Medina, Santiago; Perez-Maqueda, Luis A

    2015-11-28

    Thermal decomposition of dolomite in the presence of CO2 in a calcination environment is investigated by means of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The in situ XRD results suggest that dolomite decomposes directly at a temperature around 700 °C into MgO and CaO. Immediate carbonation of nascent CaO crystals leads to the formation of calcite as an intermediate product of decomposition. Subsequently, decarbonation of this poorly crystalline calcite occurs when the reaction is thermodynamically favorable and sufficiently fast at a temperature depending on the CO2 partial pressure in the calcination atmosphere. Decarbonation of this dolomitic calcite occurs at a lower temperature than limestone decarbonation due to the relatively low crystallinity of the former. Full decomposition of dolomite leads also to a relatively low crystalline CaO, which exhibits a high reactivity as compared to limestone derived CaO. Under CO2 capture conditions in the Calcium-Looping (CaL) process, MgO grains remain inert yet favor the carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO especially in the solid-state diffusion controlled phase. The fundamental mechanism that drives the crystallographic transformation of dolomite in the presence of CO2 is thus responsible for its fast calcination kinetics and the high carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO, which makes natural dolomite a potentially advantageous alternative to limestone for CO2 capture in the CaL technology as well as SO2in situ removal in oxy-combustion fluidized bed reactors.

  12. A thermal control surface for the Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Kevin A. J.; Carton, James G.; Norman, Andrew; McCaul, Terry; Twomey, Barry; Stanton, Kenneth T.

    2015-12-01

    A high-absorptivity/high-emissivity (flat absorber) bone char-based thermal control surface known as SolarBlack has been developed for use on rigid and flexible metallic substrates, including titanium, aluminium, copper, stainless steel, Inconel and magnesium alloys. This work describes the thermo-optical properties, stability, and qualification of this surface for use on the European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter mission. SolarBlack is deposited using a proprietry coating technique known as CoBlast and currently stands as the baseline coating for the spacecraft's front surface heat-shield, which is composed of 50 μm titanium foils (1.3×0.3 m) that have been constructed to cover the 3.1×2.4 m2 shield. The heat shield makes use of the material's highly stable ratio of solar absorptance to near-normal thermal emissivity (αs/εN) as well as its low electrical resistivity to regulate both temperature and electrostatic dissipation in service. SolarBlack also currently stands as the baseline surface for the High-gain and Medium-gain antennae as well as a number of other components on the spacecraft. The thermo-optical stability of SolarBlack was determined using the STAR Facility space environment simulator in ESTEC., Material characterisation was carried out using: SEM, UV/Vis/NIR spectrometry, and IR emissometry. The coating performance was verified on the Structural Thermal Model using ESA's Large Space Simulator.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope solar cell module thermal cycle test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Alexander; Edge, Ted; Willowby, Douglas; Gerlach, Lothar

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array consists of two identical double roll-out wings designed after the Hughes flexible roll-up solar array (FRUSA) and was developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) to meet specified HST power output requirements at the end of 2 years, with a functional lifetime of 5 years. The requirement that the HST solar array remain functional both mechanically and electrically during its 5-year lifetime meant that the array must withstand 30,000 low Earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. In order to evaluate the ability of the array to meet this requirement, an accelerated thermal cycle test in vacuum was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), using two 128-cell solar array modules which duplicated the flight HST solar array. Several other tests were performed on the modules. The thermal cycle test was interrupted after 2,577 cycles, and a 'cold-roll' test was performed on one of the modules in order to evaluate the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit. A posttest static shadow test was performed on one of the modules in order to analyze temperature gradients across the module. Finally, current in-flight electrical performance data from the actual HST flight solar array will be tested.

  14. High Performance Flat Plate Solar Thermal Collector Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Rockenbaugh, Caleb; Dean, Jesse; Lovullo, David; Lisell, Lars; Barker, Greg; Hanckock, Ed; Norton, Paul

    2016-09-01

    This report was prepared for the General Services Administration by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The Honeycomb Solar Thermal Collector (HSTC) is a flat plate solar thermal collector that shows promising high efficiencies over a wide range of climate zones. The technical objectives of this study are to: 1) verify collector performance, 2) compare that performance to other market-available collectors, 3) verify overheat protection, and 4) analyze the economic performance of the HSTC both at the demonstration sites and across a matrix of climate zones and utility markets.

  15. Thermal Decomposition of C7H7 Radicals; Benzyl, Tropyl, and Norbornadienyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Grant; Ellison, Barney; Daily, John W.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2015-06-01

    Benzyl radical (C6H5CH2) and two other C7H7 radicals are commonly encountered in the combustion of substituted aromatic compounds found in biofuels and gasoline. High temperature pyrolysis of benzyl radical requires isomerization to other C7H7 radicals that may include cycloheptatrienyl (tropyl) radical (cyc-C7H7) and norbornadienyl radical. The thermal decomposition of all three radicals has now been investigated using a micro-reactor that heats dilute gas-phase samples up to 1600 K and has a residence time of about 100 μ-sec. The pyrolysis products exit the reactor into a supersonic expansion and are detected using synchrotron-based photoionization mass spectrometry and matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy. The products of the pyrolysis of benzyl radical (C6H5CH2) along with three isotopomers (C6H513CH2, C6D5CH2, and C6H5CD2) were detected and identified. The distribution of 13C atoms and D atoms indicate that multiple different decomposition pathways are active. Buckingham, G. T., Ormond, T. K., Porterfield, J. P., Hemberger, P., Kostko, O., Ahmed, M., Robichaud, D. J., Nimlos, M. R., Daily, J. W., Ellison, G. B. 2015, Journal of Chemical Physics 142 044307

  16. Structural, optical and magnetic properties of gadolinium sesquioxide nanobars synthesized via thermal decomposition of gadolinium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Manigandan, R.; Giribabu, K.; Suresh, R.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.; Narayanan, V.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobars are synthesized by decomposition of C{sub 6}H{sub 20}Gd{sub 2}O{sub 22}. • The nanoparticles are rectangular bar shape with high porous surface. • The combination of magnetic and optical properties within a single particle. • The Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobars have tailorable nanostructure, wide bandgap and are paramagnetic. - Abstract: Gadolinium oxide nanobars were obtained by thermal decomposition of gadolinium oxalate, which was synthesized by the chemical precipitation method along with glycerol. The functional group analysis and formation of gadolinium oxide from gadolinium oxalate were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analyzer. The crystal structure, average crystallite size, and lattice parameter were analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Moreover, Raman shifts, elemental composition and morphology of the gadolinium oxide was widely investigated by the laser Raman microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, FE-SEM-EDAX and HR-TEM, respectively. Furthermore, the optical properties like band gap, absorbance measurement of the gadolinium oxide were extensively examined. In addition, the paramagnetic property of gadolinium oxide nanobars was explored by the vibrating sample magnetometer.

  17. Band gap energy and optical transitions in polyenes formed by thermal decomposition of polyvinyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulak, A. I.; Bondarava, G. V.; Shchurevich, O. A.

    2013-07-01

    The band gap of the ensemble of oligoene clusters formed by thermocatalytic decomposition of polyvinyl alcohol is parametrized using optical absorption spectra. A band gap energy of E gm =1.53 ± 0.02 eV at the end of an infinite polyene chain is found by extrapolating the energies of π → π* transitions in clusters with a number of double bonds varying from 4 to 12. This value is close to the band gap of trans-polyacetylene and the lower bound for the Tauc energy E gT =1.50 eV, which characterizes the minimum interband transition energy. E gT is essentially independent of the concentration of oligoene clusters, which is determined by the concentration of the AlCl3 thermal decomposition catalyst. The Urbach energy determined from the long wavelength edge of the spectrum falls from 2.21 to 0.66 eV as the AlCl3 concentration is raised from 11.1 to 41.7 mmol per mol of polyvinyl alcohol structural units.

  18. Theoretical Study of the Thermal Decomposition of Carboxylic Acids at Pyrolysis Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J. M.; Robichaud, D. J.; Nimlos, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are important in the processing of biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals. They are formed from the pretreatment and pyrolysis of hemicellulose biopolymers and are released from the decomposition of sugars. They result from the deconstruction of polyhydroxyalkanoates (bacterial carbon storage polymers) from fatty acids derived from algae, bacteria, and oil crops. The thermal deoxygenation of carboxylic acids is an important step in the conversion of biomass into aliphatic hydrocarbons suitable for use in renewable biofuels and as petrochemical replacements. Decarboxylation, a primary decomposition pathway under pyrolysis conditions, represents an ideal conversion process, because it eliminates two atoms of oxygen for every carbon atom removed. Problematically, additional deoxygenation processes exist (e.g. dehydration) that are in direct competition with decarboxylation and result in the formation of reactive and more fragmented end products. To better understand the competition between decarboxylation and other deoxygenation processes and to gain insight into possible catalysts that would favor decarboxylation, we have investigated the mechanisms and thermochemistry of the various unimolecular and bimolecular deoxygenation pathways for a family of C1-C4 organic acids using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2X/6-311++G(2df,p) level of theory.

  19. Enhanced Thermal Decomposition Properties of CL-20 through Space-Confining in Three-Dimensional Hierarchically Ordered Porous Carbon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; He, Simin; Huang, Bing; Wu, Peng; Qiao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Liyuan; Yang, Guangcheng; Huang, Hui

    2017-03-29

    High energy and low signature properties are the future trend of solid propellant development. As a new and promising oxidizer, hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is expected to replace the conventional oxidizer ammonium perchlorate to reach above goals. However, the high pressure exponent of CL-20 hinders its application in solid propellants so that the development of effective catalysts to improve the thermal decomposition properties of CL-20 still remains challenging. Here, 3D hierarchically ordered porous carbon (3D HOPC) is presented as a catalyst for the thermal decomposition of CL-20 via synthesizing a series of nanostructured CL-20/HOPC composites. In these nanocomposites, CL-20 is homogeneously space-confined into the 3D HOPC scaffold as nanocrystals 9.2-26.5 nm in diameter. The effect of the pore textural parameters and surface modification of 3D HOPC as well as CL-20 loading amount on the thermal decomposition of CL-20 is discussed. A significant improvement of the thermal decomposition properties of CL-20 is achieved with remarkable decrease in decomposition peak temperature (from 247.0 to 174.8 °C) and activation energy (from 165.5 to 115.3 kJ/mol). The exceptional performance of 3D HOPC could be attributed to its well-connected 3D hierarchically ordered porous structure, high surface area, and the confined CL-20 nanocrystals. This work clearly demonstrates that 3D HOPC is a superior catalyst for CL-20 thermal decomposition and opens new potential for further applications of CL-20 in solid propellants.

  20. Heat engine development for solar thermal power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, H. Q.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1981-01-01

    The parabolic dish solar collector systems for converting sunlight to electrical power through a heat engine will, require a small heat engine of high performance long lifetime to be competitive with conventional power systems. The most promising engine candidates are Stirling, high temperature Brayton, and combined cycle. Engines available in the current market today do not meet these requirements. The development of Stirling and high temperature Brayton for automotive applications was studied which utilizes much of the technology developed in this automotive program for solar power engines. The technical status of the engine candidates is reviewed and the components that may additional development to meet solar thermal system requirements are identified.

  1. Heat engine development for solar thermal power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, H. Q.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1981-01-01

    The parabolic dish solar collector systems for converting sunlight to electrical power through a heat engine will, require a small heat engine of high performance long lifetime to be competitive with conventional power systems. The most promising engine candidates are Stirling, high temperature Brayton, and combined cycle. Engines available in the current market today do not meet these requirements. The development of Stirling and high temperature Brayton for automotive applications was studied which utilizes much of the technology developed in this automotive program for solar power engines. The technical status of the engine candidates is reviewed and the components that may additional development to meet solar thermal system requirements are identified.

  2. A new solar thermal electricity/cooling generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pytlinski, J. T.; Cherng, J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a basic thermodynamic and economic study of a combined solar thermal electricity generation and refrigeration system employing a Rankine cycle or refrigeration cycle respectively. The study demonstrates the technical and economical feasibility of retrofitting a water-ammonia solar powered absorption refrigeration system with a turbine and electric generator for the purpose of electricity generation. Through optimization of the system, an increase in the solar energy conversion efficiency and a decrease in the payback period could be expected.

  3. Analysis of dynamic effects in solar thermal energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    The paper examines a study the purpose of which is to assess the performance of solar thermal power systems insofar as it depends on the dynamic character of system components and the solar radiation which drives them. Using a dynamic model, the daily operation of two conceptual solar conversion systems was simulated under varying operating strategies and several different time-dependent radiation intensity functions. These curves ranged from smoothly varying input of several magnitudes to input of constant total energy whose intensity oscillated with periods from 1/4 hour to 6 hours.

  4. Reduction of radiative heat losses for solar thermal receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Clifford K.; Christian, Joshua M.; Ortega, Jesus D.; Yellowhair, Julius; Mosquera, Matthew J.; Andraka, Charles E.

    2014-10-01

    Solar thermal receivers absorb concentrated sunlight and can operate at high temperatures exceeding 600°C for production of heat and electricity. New fractal-like designs employing light-trapping structures and geometries at multiple length scales are proposed to increase the effective solar absorptance and efficiency of these receivers. Radial and linear structures at the micro (surface coatings and depositions), meso (tube shape and geometry), and macro (total receiver geometry and configuration) scales redirect reflected solar radiation toward the interior of the receiver for increased absorptance. Hotter regions within the interior of the receiver also reduce thermal emittance due to reduced local view factors in the interior regions, and higher concentration ratios can be employed with similar surface irradiances to reduce the effective optical aperture and thermal losses. Coupled optical/fluid/thermal models have been developed to evaluate the performance of these designs relative to conventional designs. Results show that fractal-like structures and geometries can reduce total radiative losses by up to 50% and increase the thermal efficiency by up to 10%. The impact was more pronounced for materials with lower inherent solar absorptances (< 0.9). Meso-scale tests were conducted and confirmed model results that showed increased light-trapping from corrugated surfaces relative to flat surfaces.

  5. Semiconductor-based Multilayer Selective Solar Absorber for Unconcentrated Solar Thermal Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nathan H; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Shanhui; Minnich, Austin J

    2017-07-13

    Solar thermal energy conversion has attracted substantial renewed interest due to its applications in industrial heating, air conditioning, and electricity generation. Achieving stagnation temperatures exceeding 200 °C, pertinent to these technologies, with unconcentrated sunlight requires spectrally selective absorbers with exceptionally low emissivity in the thermal wavelength range and high visible absorptivity for the solar spectrum. In this Communication, we report a semiconductor-based multilayer selective absorber that exploits the sharp drop in optical absorption at the bandgap energy to achieve a measured absorptance of 76% at solar wavelengths and a low emittance of approximately 5% at thermal wavelengths. In field tests, we obtain a peak temperature of 225 °C, comparable to that achieved with state-of-the-art selective surfaces. With straightforward optimization to improve solar absorption, our work shows the potential for unconcentrated solar thermal systems to reach stagnation temperatures exceeding 300 °C, thereby eliminating the need for solar concentrators for mid-temperature solar applications such as supplying process heat.

  6. Semiconductor-based Multilayer Selective Solar Absorber for Unconcentrated Solar Thermal Energy Conversion

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas, Nathan H.; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Shanhui; ...

    2017-07-13

    Solar thermal energy conversion has attracted substantial renewed interest due to its applications in industrial heating, air conditioning, and electricity generation. Achieving stagnation temperatures exceeding 200 °C, pertinent to these technologies, with unconcentrated sunlight requires spectrally selective absorbers with exceptionally low emissivity in the thermal wavelength range and high visible absorptivity for the solar spectrum. In this Communication, we then report a semiconductor-based multilayer selective absorber that exploits the sharp drop in optical absorption at the bandgap energy to achieve a measured absorptance of 76% at solar wavelengths and a low emittance of approximately 5% at thermal wavelengths. In fieldmore » tests, we obtain a peak temperature of 225 °C, comparable to that achieved with state-of-the-art selective surfaces. Furthemore, with straightforward optimization to improve solar absorption, our work shows the potential for unconcentrated solar thermal systems to reach stagnation temperatures exceeding 300 °C, thereby eliminating the need for solar concentrators for mid-temperature solar applications such as supplying process heat« less

  7. Development of Boundary Condition Independent Reduced Order Thermal Models using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghupathy, Arun; Ghia, Karman; Ghia, Urmila

    2008-11-01

    Compact Thermal Models (CTM) to represent IC packages has been traditionally developed using the DELPHI-based (DEvelopment of Libraries of PHysical models for an Integrated design) methodology. The drawbacks of this method are presented, and an alternative method is proposed. A reduced-order model that provides the complete thermal information accurately with less computational resources can be effectively used in system level simulations. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD), a statistical method, can be used to reduce the order of the degree of freedom or variables of the computations for such a problem. POD along with the Galerkin projection allows us to create reduced-order models that reproduce the characteristics of the system with a considerable reduction in computational resources while maintaining a high level of accuracy. The goal of this work is to show that this method can be applied to obtain a boundary condition independent reduced-order thermal model for complex components. The methodology is applied to the 1D transient heat equation.

  8. Thermal decomposition study of Mn doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Tasmira J.; Chaki, S. H.; Tailor, J. P.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2016-05-01

    Fe3O4 is an excellent magnetic material among iron oxides. It has a cubic inverse spinel structure exhibiting distinguished electric and magnetic properties. In this paper the authors report the synthesis of Mn doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles by wet chemical reduction technique at ambient temperature and its thermal characterization. Ferric chloride hexa-hydrate (FeCl3•6H2O), manganese chloride tetra-hydrate (MnCl2•4H2O) and sodium boro-hydrate (NaBH4) were used for synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles at ambient temperature. The elemental composition of the as-synthesized Mn doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles were determined by energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) technique. Thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were carried out on the Mn doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the temperature range of ambient to 1124 K. The thermo-curves revealed that the particles decompose by four steps. The kinetic parameters were evaluated using non-mechanistic equations for the thermal decomposition.

  9. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-12-30

    The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG-DSC-MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10K/min from room temperature to 350°C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200°C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO2, NH3, SO2 and N2O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals.

  10. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOEpatents

    McClelland, John F.

    1985-06-18

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls, Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  11. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOEpatents

    McClelland, John F.

    1986-04-08

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls. Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  12. Large-scale solar thermal collector concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal collector could be used ultimately to power steamplant to produce electricity. Collector would consist of two major subsystems: (1) series of segmented tracking mirrors with two axes of rotation and (2) absorber mounted on centrally located tower.

  13. Surface studies of the thermal decomposition of triethylgallium on GaAs (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrell, A. J.; Wee, A. T. S.; Fairbrother, D. H.; Singh, N. K.; Foord, J. S.; Davies, G. J.; Andrews, D. A.

    1990-10-01

    The adsorption and surface decomposition of triethylgallium (TEG) on GaAs (100) has been studied using XPS and thermal desorption techniques. TEG is found to adsorb in a molecular form on the Ga rich (4×1) surface below 150 K. As the surface temperature is raised, this molecular state dissociates to form Ga and adsorbed ethyl species. The overall cracking reaction occurs in competition with the desorption of TEG and diethylgallium (DEG). Under the conditions of our experiments the adsorbed ethyl species formed above are found to dissociate above 600 K to form mainly gas phase ethene and hydrogen with traces of ethane, resulting in the formation of a pure Ga layer within the sensitivity limits imposed by XPS.

  14. Mutagenicity of aerosols from the oxidative thermal decomposition of rigid polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Zitting, A; Falck, K; Skyttä, E

    1980-01-01

    The aerosol fraction of the oxidative thermal decomposition products (700 degrees C) of rigid polyurethane foam was collected on glass fiber filters and fractionated into either-soluble neutral, acidic, and basic fractions and water-soluble compounds. The fractions showed mutagenic activity in a bacterial fluctuation test with Salmonella typhimurium TA98 or Escherichia coli CM891 as the tester strains. All the fractions induced mutations in both strains after metabolic activation with rat liver S-9 mix. The basic and the water-soluble fractions were mutagenic for S. typhimurium TA 98 even without activation. Thin-layer chromatography showed the presence of several primary aromatic amines in the aerosol. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were not detected by glass capillary gas chromatogaphy.

  15. Effect of surfactants on the size and shape of cobalt nanoparticles synthesized by thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Huiping; Huang, Yuqiang; Lee, Hyosook; Suh, Yong Jae; Kim, Chongoh

    2006-04-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles with various morphologies were synthesized by thermal decomposition of cobalt acetate in the presence of various surfactants at 260 °C. A combination of surfactants consisting of sufficient amount of oleic acid together with polyvinylpyrrolidone and oleylamine resulted in well-dispersed cubic cobalt nanoparticles of ~25 nm in average size. When 1,2-dodecanediol was added as a reducing agent to the surfactant mixture, triangular-prism-shaped nanoparticles of ~50 nm in average size were synthesized. Furthermore, an injection of trioctylphosphine into the reactor as an additional surfactant decreased the particle size to ~10 nm. The XRD pattern of the prism-like particles corresponded to hexagonal close-packed crystalline phase of cobalt.

  16. Thermal Analysis of porous fin with uniform magnetic field using Adomian decomposition Sumudu transform method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Trushit; Meher, Ramakanta

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a Roseland approximation to radiate heat transfer, Darcy's model to simulate the flow in porous media and finite-length fin with insulated tip to study the thermal performance and to predict the temperature distribution in a vertical isothermal surface. The energy balance equations of the porous fin with several temperature dependent properties are solved using the Adomian Decomposition Sumudu Transform Method (ADSTM). The effects of various thermophysical parameters, such as the convection-conduction parameter, Surface-ambient radiation parameter, Rayleigh numbers and Hartman number are determined. The results obtained from the ADSTM are further compared with the fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method and Least Square Method(LSM) (Hoshyar et al. 2016 ) to determine the accuracy of the solution.

  17. Multiple Mechanisms for the Thermal Decomposition of Metallaisoxazolin-5-ones from Computational Investigations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen-Chen; Hawthorne, M Frederick; Houk, K N; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo

    2017-08-18

    The thermal decompositions of metallaisoxazolin-5-ones containing Ir, Rh, or Co are investigated using density functional theory. The experimentally observed decarboxylations of these molecules are found to proceed through retro-(3+2)-cycloaddition reactions, generating the experimentally reported η(2) side-bonded nitrile complexes. These intermediates can isomerize in situ to yield a η(1) nitrile complex. A competitive alternative pathway is also found where the decarboxylation happens concertedly with an aryl migration process, producing a η(1) isonitrile complex. Despite their comparable stability, these η(1) bonded species were not detected experimentally. The experimentally detected η(2) side bound species are likely involved in the subsequent C-H activation reactions with hydrocarbon solvents reported for some of these metallaisoxazolin-5-ones.

  18. Thermal decomposition study of monovarietal extra virgin olive oil by simultaneous thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry: relation with chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Stefano; Cerretani, Lorenzo; Bendini, Alessandra; Chiavaro, Emma

    2009-06-10

    Thermal decomposition of 12 monovarietal extra virgin olive oils from different geographical origins (eight from Italy, two from Spain, and the others from Tunisia) was evaluated by simultaneous thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses. All extra virgin olive oils showed a complex multistep decomposition pattern with the first step that exhibited a quite different profile among samples. Thermal properties of the two peaks obtained by the deconvolution of the first step of decomposition by DSC were related to the chemical composition of the samples (triacylglycerols, fatty acids, total phenols and antioxidant activity). Onset temperatures of the thermal decomposition transition and T(p) values of both deconvoluted peaks as well as the sum of enthalpy were found to exhibit statistically significant correlations with chemical components of the samples, in particular palmitic and oleic acids and related triacylglycerols. Activation energy values of the second deconvoluted peak obtained by the application of kinetic procedure to the first step of decomposition were also found to be highly statistically correlated to the chemical composition, and a stability scale among samples was proposed on the basis of its values.

  19. Parallel computation for reservoir thermal simulation: An overlapping domain decomposition approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongxiao

    2005-11-01

    In this dissertation, we are involved in parallel computing for the thermal simulation of multicomponent, multiphase fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs. We report the development and applications of such a simulator. Unlike many efforts made to parallelize locally the solver of a linear equations system which affects the performance the most, this research takes a global parallelization strategy by decomposing the computational domain into smaller subdomains. This dissertation addresses the domain decomposition techniques and, based on the comparison, adopts an overlapping domain decomposition method. This global parallelization method hands over each subdomain to a single processor of the parallel computer to process. Communication is required when handling overlapping regions between subdomains. For this purpose, MPI (message passing interface) is used for data communication and communication control. A physical and mathematical model is introduced for the reservoir thermal simulation. Numerical tests on two sets of industrial data of practical oilfields indicate that this model and the parallel implementation match the history data accurately. Therefore, we expect to use both the model and the parallel code to predict oil production and guide the design, implementation and real-time fine tuning of new well operating schemes. A new adaptive mechanism to synchronize processes on different processors has been introduced, which not only ensures the computational accuracy but also improves the time performance. To accelerate the convergence rate of iterative solution of the large linear equations systems derived from the discretization of governing equations of our physical and mathematical model in space and time, we adopt the ORTHOMIN method in conjunction with an incomplete LU factorization preconditioning technique. Important improvements have been made in both ORTHOMIN method and incomplete LU factorization in order to enhance time performance without affecting

  20. Experimental and modeling study of the thermal decomposition of methyl decanoate

    PubMed Central

    Herbinet, Olivier; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Warth, Valérie; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    The experimental study of the thermal decomposition of methyl decanoate was performed in a jet-stirred reactor at temperatures ranging from 773 to 1123 K, at residence times between 1 and 4 s, at a pressure of 800 Torr (106.6 kPa) and at high dilution in helium (fuel inlet mole fraction of 0.0218). Species leaving the reactor were analyzed by gas chromatography. Main reaction products were hydrogen, carbon oxides, small hydrocarbons from C1 to C3, large 1-olefins from 1-butene to 1-nonene, and unsaturated esters with one double bond at the end of the alkyl chain from methyl-2-propenoate to methyl-8-nonenoate. At the highest temperatures, the formation of polyunsaturated species was observed: 1,3-butadiene, 1,3-cyclopentadiene, benzene, toluene, indene, and naphthalene. These results were compared with previous ones about the pyrolysis of n-dodecane, an n-alkane of similar size. The reactivity of both molecules was found to be very close. The alkane produces more olefins while the ester yields unsaturated oxygenated compounds. A detailed kinetic model for the thermal decomposition of methyl decanoate has been generated using the version of software EXGAS which was updated to take into account the specific chemistry involved in the oxidation of methyl esters. This model contains 324 species and 3231 reactions. It provided a very good prediction of the experimental data obtained in jet-stirred reactor. The formation of the major products was analyzed. The kinetic analysis showed that the retro-ene reactions of intermediate unsaturated methyl esters are of importance in low reactivity systems. PMID:23710078

  1. Model predictive control of a solar-thermal reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saade Saade, Maria Elizabeth

    Solar-thermal reactors represent a promising alternative to fossil fuels because they can harvest solar energy and transform it into storable and transportable fuels. The operation of solar-thermal reactors is restricted by the available sunlight and its inherently transient behavior, which affects the performance of the reactors and limits their efficiency. Before solar-thermal reactors can become commercially viable, they need to be able to maintain a continuous high-performance operation, even in the presence of passing clouds. A well-designed control system can preserve product quality and maintain stable product compositions, resulting in a more efficient and cost-effective operation, which can ultimately lead to scale-up and commercialization of solar thermochemical technologies. In this work, we propose a model predictive control (MPC) system for a solar-thermal reactor for the steam-gasification of biomass. The proposed controller aims at rejecting the disturbances in solar irradiation caused by the presence of clouds. A first-principles dynamic model of the process was developed. The model was used to study the dynamic responses of the process variables and to identify a linear time-invariant model used in the MPC algorithm. To provide an estimation of the disturbances for the control algorithm, a one-minute-ahead direct normal irradiance (DNI) predictor was developed. The proposed predictor utilizes information obtained through the analysis of sky images, in combination with current atmospheric measurements, to produce the DNI forecast. In the end, a robust controller was designed capable of rejecting disturbances within the operating region. Extensive simulation experiments showed that the controller outperforms a finely-tuned multi-loop feedback control strategy. The results obtained suggest that our controller is suitable for practical implementation.

  2. An analytical comparison of the efficiency of solar thermal collector arrays with and without external manifolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An analytical comparison of the efficiency of solar thermal collector arrays with and without external manifolds is reported. A FORTRAN computer program was written for the computation of the thermal performance of solar thermal collector arrays with and without external manifolds. Arrays constructed from two example solar thermal collectors are computated. Typical external manifold sizes and thermal insulations are presented graphically and are compared with the thermal performance of the collector alone.

  3. Study of condition-dependent decomposition reactions; Part I. The thermal behaviour and decomposition of 2-nitrobenzoyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Lever, Sarah D; Papadaki, Maria

    2004-11-11

    The risks associated with batch processing in the manufacture of chemicals and pharmaceuticals via highly exothermic reactions are of special interest due to the possibility of runaway reactions. o-Nitrated benzoyl chlorides are intermediates in the production of agrochemicals and are produced via the reaction of o-nitrated carboxylic acids with thionyl chloride in a solvent mixture. ortho-Nitrated acyl chlorides have exploded violently on attempted distillation on numerous occasions. An inadequate investigation of the process prior to large-scale operation is the most likely cause. Here we present preliminary results of studies on the decomposition of 2-nitrobenzoyl chloride. This study has revealed that the decomposition reaction is strongly condition dependent. The heating rate of the sample plays a preponderant role in the course of the decomposition reaction. That renders the interpretation of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) or adiabatic calorimetry measurements, which are routinely used to assess the thermochemistry and safety of the large-scale reactions, problematic. Following this on-going study, we report here key features of the system that have been identified.

  4. Solar wind thermally induced magnetic fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Navarro, R E; Moya, P S; Muñoz, V; Araneda, J A; F-Viñas, A; Valdivia, J A

    2014-06-20

    A kinetic description of Alfvén-cyclotron magnetic fluctuations for anisotropic electron-proton quasistable plasmas is studied. An analytical treatment, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, consistently shows that spontaneous fluctuations in plasmas with stable distributions significantly contribute to the observed magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind, as seen, for example, in [S. D. Bale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 211101 (2009)], even far below from the instability thresholds. Furthermore, these results, which do not require any adjustable parameters or wave excitations, are consistent with the results provided by hybrid simulations. It is expected that this analysis contributes to our understanding of the nature of magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind.

  5. Thermocline Thermal Storage Test for Large-Scale Solar Thermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    ST.LAURENT,STEVEN J.

    2000-08-14

    Solar thermal-to-electric power plants have been tested and investigated at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) since the late 1970s, and thermal storage has always been an area of key study because it affords an economical method of delivering solar-electricity during non-daylight hours. This paper describes the design considerations of a new, single-tank, thermal storage system and details the benefits of employing this technology in large-scale (10MW to 100MW) solar thermal power plants. Since December 1999, solar engineers at Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) have designed and are constructing a thermal storage test called the thermocline system. This technology, which employs a single thermocline tank, has the potential to replace the traditional and more expensive two-tank storage systems. The thermocline tank approach uses a mixture of silica sand and quartzite rock to displace a significant portion of the volume in the tank. Then it is filled with the heat transfer fluid, a molten nitrate salt. A thermal gradient separates the hot and cold salt. Loading the tank with the combination of sand, rock, and molten salt instead of just molten salt dramatically reduces the system cost. The typical cost of the molten nitrate salt is $800 per ton versus the cost of the sand and rock portion at $70 per ton. Construction of the thermocline system will be completed in August 2000, and testing will run for two to three months. The testing results will be used to determine the economic viability of the single-tank (thermocline) storage technology for large-scale solar thermal power plants. Also discussed in this paper are the safety issues involving molten nitrate salts and other heat transfer fluids, such as synthetic heat transfer oils, and the impact of these issues on the system design.

  6. Solar cells based on GaAs: Thermal behavior study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicelli, Emmanuel; Martaj, Nadia; Dollet, Alain; Perona, Arnaud; Pincemin, Sandrine; Cuminal, Yvan

    2015-09-01

    Current CPV electricity costs are still higher than those of conventional PV (thin films or silicon). This is due to additional components (tracker, Fresnel lens, optical guide…) required for CPV and to a lesser extent, to the very high price of III-V multi-junction solar cells. One way to lower CPV costs is to reduce the size of solar cells and operate at higher concentration [1]. One of the main potential limitations for the use of PV cells at very high solar concentration is cell overheating. The goal of this work is to study and better understand the thermal behavior of PV cells in high solar concentrations conditions (˜ 2000 suns). For that purpose, we have designed and prepared PV cells with platinum resistors included. Temperature measurements performed on these cells in real solar concentration conditions have allowed us to validate thermal simulations of our devices that could be used to optimize the thermal management of the cell under high concentration.

  7. Mir Cooperative Solar Array Project Accelerated Life Thermal Cycling Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint U.S./Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA will be used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station. The MCSA was brought to Mir by space shuttle Atlantis in November 1995. This report describes an accelerated thermal life cycle test which was performed on two samples of the MCSA. In eight months time, two MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles. There was no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early and removed from consideration. The nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell is briefly discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the U.S. solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit). This was considered a successful development test.

  8. Solar cells based on GaAs: Thermal behavior study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicelli, Emmanuel; Martaj, Nadia; Bennacer, Rachid; Dollet, Alain; Perona, Arnaud; Pincemin, Sandrine; Cuminal, Yvan

    2016-03-01

    Current CPV electricity costs are still higher than those of conventional PV (thin films or silicon). This is due to additional components (tracker, Fresnel lens, optical guide…) required for CPV and to a lesser extent, to the very high price of III-V multi-junction solar cells. One way to lower CPV costs is to reduce the size of solar cells and operate at higher concentration [1]. One of the main potential limitations for the use of PV cells at very high solar concentration is cell overheating. The goal of this work is to study and better understand the thermal behavior of PV cells in high solar concentrations conditions (˜ 2000 suns). For that purpose, we have designed and prepared PV cells with platinum resistors included. Temperature measurements performed on these cells in real solar concentration conditions have allowed us to validate thermal simulations of our devices that could be used to optimize the thermal management of the cell under high concentration. At the request of the authors of the paper, an updated version of this article was published on 31 March 2016. In the original article supplied to AIP Publishing an author was omitted as well as a credit line on the last page. These errors have been corrected in the updated republished article.

  9. Magnetite Formation from Thermal Decomposition of Siderite: Implications for Inorganic Magnetite Formation in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, RIchard V.

    2002-01-01

    A biogenic mechanism for formation of a subpopulation magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been suggested [McKay et al., 1996; Thomas-Keprta, et al., 2000]. We are developing experimental evidence for an alternating working hypothesis, that the subpopulation was produced inorganically by the thermal decomposition of siderite [Golden et al., 2000].

  10. The Correlation of Animal Response Data with the Yields of Selected Thermal Decomposition Products for Typical Aircraft Interior Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    C. P., et al., Fire Testing of Cabin Materials Used in Commercial Aircraft, Report No. FAA—NA—77—53—LR, September 1977. 11. Barrow, C., Alarie , Y...32, 78, 1977. 12. Barrow, C. S., Alarie , Y., Stock, M. F., Sensory Irritation and Incapacitation Evoked by Thermal Decomposition Products of Polymers

  11. Mechanism of thermal decomposition of a pesticide for safety concerns: case of Mancozeb.

    PubMed

    Giroud, N; Dorge, S; Trouvé, G

    2010-12-15

    Thermal decomposition under both air and inert atmospheres of a commercial Mancozeb product was investigated through thermogravimetric analysis and laboratory scale thermal treatment from 20°C to 950°C, with analysis of gaseous and solid products. The aim of this study is the understanding of the thermal degradation mechanisms of a pesticide under different atmospheres and the chemical identification of the solid and gaseous pollutants which can be emitted during warehouse fires and which can constitute a threat for health and environment. Pyrolysis of Mancozeb takes place between 20°C and 950°C and lead essentially to CS(2) and H(2)S emissions with formation at 950°C of MnS and ZnS. Thermal oxidation of Mancozeb under air occurs between 150°C and 950°C with formation of CO, CO(2) and sulphur gases (CS(2) and SO(2)). The first step (155-226°C) is the loss of CS(2) and the formation of ethylene thiourea, ZnS and MnS. The metallic sulphides are oxidized in ZnO and MnSO(4) between 226°C and 650°C (steps 2 and 3). MnSO(4) is then oxidized in Mn(3)O(4) during the last step (step 4) between 650°C and 950°C. At 950°C, carbon recovery is close to 95%. Sulphur recovery is close to 98% with an equal partition between SO(2) and CS(2).

  12. CVD Rhenium Engines for Solar-Thermal Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Duffy, Andrew J.; Tucker, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Solar-thermal upper-stage propulsion systems have the potential to provide specific impulse approaching 900 seconds, with 760 seconds already demonstrated in ground testing. Such performance levels offer a 100% increase in payload capability compared to state-of-the-art chemical upper-stage systems, at lower cost. Although alternatives such as electric propulsion offer even greater performance, the 6- to 18- month orbital transfer time is a far greater deviation from the state of the art than the one to two months required for solar propulsion. Rhenium metal is the only material that is capable of withstanding the predicted thermal, mechanical, and chemical environment of a solar-thermal propulsion device. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most well-established and cost-effective process for the fabrication of complex rhenium structures. CVD rhenium engines have been successfully constructed for the Air Force ISUS program (bimodal thrust/electricity) and the NASA Shooting Star program (thrust only), as well as under an Air Force SBIR project (thrust only). The bimodal engine represents a more long-term and versatile approach to solar-thermal propulsion, while the thrust-only engines provide a potentially lower weight/lower cost and more near-term replacement for current upper-stage propulsion systems.

  13. Fuels and chemicals from biomass using solar thermal energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, G.; Leitheiser, R.; Wayman, M.

    1981-01-01

    The significant nearer term opportunities for the application of solar thermal energy to the manufacture of fuels and chemicals from biomass are summarized, with some comments on resource availability, market potential and economics. Consideration is given to the production of furfural from agricultural residues, and the role of furfural and its derivatives as a replacement for petrochemicals in the plastics industry.

  14. Solar Program Assessment: Environmental Factors - Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This report presents the environmental problems which may arise with the further development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, one of the eight Federally-funded solar technologies. To provide a background for this environmental analysis, the history and basic concepts of the technology are reviewed, as are its economic and resource requirements.…

  15. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, M.; Gilbride, T.; Ruiz, K.; Steward, H.; Love, P.

    2007-06-01

    This document is the sixth volume of the Building America Best Practices Series. It presents information that is useful throughout the United States for enhancing the energy efficiency practices in the specific climate zones that are presented in the first five Best Practices volumes. It provides an introduction to current photovoltaic and solar thermal building practices. Information about window selection and shading is included.

  16. Fuels and chemicals from biomass using solar thermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giori, G.; Leitheiser, R.; Wayman, M.

    1981-05-01

    The significant nearer term opportunities for the application of solar thermal energy to the manufacture of fuels and chemicals from biomass are summarized, with some comments on resource availability, market potential and economics. Consideration is given to the production of furfural from agricultural residues, and the role of furfural and its derivatives as a replacement for petrochemicals in the plastics industry.

  17. CVD Rhenium Engines for Solar-Thermal Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Duffy, Andrew J.; Tucker, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Solar-thermal upper-stage propulsion systems have the potential to provide specific impulse approaching 900 seconds, with 760 seconds already demonstrated in ground testing. Such performance levels offer a 100% increase in payload capability compared to state-of-the-art chemical upper-stage systems, at lower cost. Although alternatives such as electric propulsion offer even greater performance, the 6- to 18- month orbital transfer time is a far greater deviation from the state of the art than the one to two months required for solar propulsion. Rhenium metal is the only material that is capable of withstanding the predicted thermal, mechanical, and chemical environment of a solar-thermal propulsion device. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most well-established and cost-effective process for the fabrication of complex rhenium structures. CVD rhenium engines have been successfully constructed for the Air Force ISUS program (bimodal thrust/electricity) and the NASA Shooting Star program (thrust only), as well as under an Air Force SBIR project (thrust only). The bimodal engine represents a more long-term and versatile approach to solar-thermal propulsion, while the thrust-only engines provide a potentially lower weight/lower cost and more near-term replacement for current upper-stage propulsion systems.

  18. Parabolic Dish Solar Thermal Power Annual Program Review Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The results of activities of the parabolic dish technology and applications development element of DOE's Solar Thermal Energy System Program are presented. Topics include the development and testing of concentrators, receivers, and power conversion units; system design and development for engineering experiments; economic analysis and marketing assessment; and advanced development activities. A panel discussion concerning industrial support sector requirements is also documented.

  19. Thermal storage requirements for parabolic dish solar power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, L.; Steele, H.

    1980-01-01

    The cost effectiveness of a high temperature thermal storage system is investigated for a representative parabolic dish solar power plant. The plant supplies electrical power in accordance with a specific, seasonally varying demand profile. The solar power received by the plant is supplemented by power from fuel combustion. The cost of electricity generated by the solar power plant is calculated, using the cost of mass-producible subsystems (specifically, parabolic dishes, receivers, and power conversion units) now being designed for this type of solar plant. The trade-off between fuel and thermal storage is derived in terms of storage effectiveness, the cost of storage devices, and the cost of fuel. Thermal storage requirements, such as storage capacity, storage effectiveness, and storage cost are established based on the cost of fuel and the overall objective of minimizing the cost of the electricity produced by the system. As the cost of fuel increases at a rate faster than general inflation, thermal storage systems in the $40 to $70/kWthr range could become cost effective in the near future.

  20. Better Thermal Insulation in Solar-Array Laminators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.; Knox, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Glass marbles improve temperature control. Modified vacuum laminator for photovoltaic solar arrays includes thermal insulation made of conventional glass marbles. Marbles serve as insulation for temperature control of lamination process at cure temperatures as high as 350 degrees F. Used to replace original insulation made of asbestos cement.