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Sample records for solar x-ray flux

  1. Effect of enhanced x-ray flux on the ionosphere over Cyprus during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Md. Golam; Haralambous, Haris

    2015-06-01

    In this work we study the effect of solar flares on the ionosphere over Cyprus. Solar flares are impulsive solar activity events usually coupled with Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). The arrival and the subsequent impact of solar flares on geospace, following an eruption on the Sun's surface is almost immediate (around 9 min) whereas the impact of CMEs is rather delayed (2-3 days) as the former is based on X-ray radiation whereas the latter phenomenon is related with particles and magnetic fields travelling at lower speeds via the Solar Wind. The penetration of X-rays down to the Dregion following such an event enhances the electron density. This increase can be monitored by ionosondes, which measure the electron density up to the maximum electron density NmF2. The significance of this increase lies on the increase of signal absorption causing limited window of operating frequencies for HF communications. In this study the effect of enhanced X-ray flux on the ionosphere over Cyprus during solar flares has been investigated. To establish the correlation and extent of impact on different layers, data of X-ray intensity from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and ionospheric characteristics (D & F layer) over Nicosia station (35° N, 33° E) were examined for all solar flares during the period 2011-2014. The analysis revealed a positive and good correlation between frequency of minimum reflection, fmin and X-ray intensity for D layer demonstrating that X-rays play a dominant role in the ionization of lower ionosphere. Hence, X-ray flux can be used as a good proxy for studying the solar flare effects on lower ionosphere. The correlation coefficient between maximum electron density of F layer, NmF2 and X-ray intensity was found to be poor.

  2. Do electron flux and solar x-ray in juxtaposition prior a seismic event make signature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Umesh Prasad; Sinha, Madhurendra Nath

    2014-09-01

    Variation in the trend of electron flux graph in the ionosphere on the global map is common with respect to proton flux variation in inverse manner seen on diurnal basis. Continuous observation connected with the NOAA , IPS and SOHO satellite respectively of USA, Australia ,Japan and India have revealed the facts remarkably peculiar and interesting trend other than usual graph of Electron flux and solar x-ray decrease in peak level immediate prior a seismic event. An observation recorded in juxtaposition the trend of correlation establishes this fact. This typify the events like Iran 14th April, China 17th April 2013, with 7.8 and 7.3 MW, New Zealand 6.8 MW on 16th August 2013, Pakistan 7.8 Mw and 6.8 Mw respectively on25th September, and 26th September'2013 are the supportive illustrations to the concluding concepts. The trend is also observed during the solar coronal mass ejection event. Events occur deceptively quite similar to the pre seismicity. Its diagnostic distinction can be made with the solar data available by SWPC (Australia) forecasting for solar prominences data prediction and forecasting tool. Most of the seismic phenomena are the diagnostic preseismic phenomena as the electron flux anomaly mechanism and principle clarify on the basis of fundamental laws of electrostatics and Maxwell equation of electromagnetic wave theory. This may prove a precursory tool in the seismic event forecasting and prediction technique.

  3. Ionospheric effects of solar x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danskin, Donald

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric absorption of radio waves caused by solar x-ray bursts is measured directly by Riometers from the Canada Riometer Array. The absorption is found to be proportional to the square root of the flux intensity of the X-ray burst with time delays of 18-20 seconds between the peak X-ray emission and absorption in the ionosphere. A detailed analysis showed that some X-ray flares during 2011-2014 are more effective at producing absorption than others. Solar longitude of X-ray burst for several X-class flares shows no consistent pattern of enhancement in the absorption.

  4. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH A CONSTRAINED PEAK X-RAY FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Trevor A.; Testa, Paola; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2013-06-20

    We present an analysis of soft X-ray (SXR) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations of solar flares with an approximate C8 Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) class. Our constraint on peak GOES SXR flux allows for the investigation of correlations between various flare parameters. We show that the duration of the decay phase of a flare is proportional to the duration of its rise phase. Additionally, we show significant correlations between the radiation emitted in the flare rise and decay phases. These results suggest that the total radiated energy of a given flare is proportional to the energy radiated during the rise phase alone. This partitioning of radiated energy between the rise and decay phases is observed in both SXR and EUV wavelengths. Though observations from the EUV Variability Experiment show significant variation in the behavior of individual EUV spectral lines during different C8 events, this work suggests that broadband EUV emission is well constrained. Furthermore, GOES and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data allow us to determine several thermal parameters (e.g., temperature, volume, density, and emission measure) for the flares within our sample. Analysis of these parameters demonstrate that, within this constrained GOES class, the longer duration solar flares are cooler events with larger volumes capable of emitting vast amounts of radiation. The shortest C8 flares are typically the hottest events, smaller in physical size, and have lower associated total energies. These relationships are directly comparable with several scaling laws and flare loop models.

  5. UFCORIN: A fully automated predictor of solar flares in GOES X-ray flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muranushi, Takayuki; Shibayama, Takuya; Muranushi, Yuko Hada; Isobe, Hiroaki; Nemoto, Shigeru; Komazaki, Kenji; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-11-01

    We have developed UFCORIN, a platform for studying and automating space weather prediction. Using our system we have tested 6160 different combinations of Solar Dynamic Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager data as input data, and simulated the prediction of GOES X-ray flux for 2 years (2011-2012) with 1 h cadence. We have found that direct comparison of the true skill statistic (TSS) from small cross-validation sets is ill posed and used the standard scores (z) of the TSS to compare the performance of the various prediction strategies. The z of a strategy is a stochastic variable of the stochastically chosen cross-validation data set, and the z for the three strategies best at predicting X-, ≥M-, and ≥C-class flares are better than the average z of the 6160 strategies by 2.3σ, 2.1σ, and 3.8σ confidence levels, respectively. The best three TSS values were 0.75 ± 0.07, 0.48 ± 0.02, and 0.56 ± 0.04, respectively.

  6. Response of the equatorial electrojet to solar flare related X-ray flux enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manju, G.; Viswanathan, K. S.

    2005-03-01

    The response of ionospheric E-region electric fields and currents to solar flare related X-ray flux enhancements are studied at the magnetic equatorial location of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 77°E; dip 0.5°N) using VHF (54.95 MHz) coherent backscatter radar observations in the altitude region of 95-110 km conducted during daytime. The amplitude of the Solar Flare Effects (SFE) observed in the earth's magnetic field variations at Trivandrum have been examined in relation to that at Alibag and it is found that the ratio of the SFE amplitudes at the two stations lies in the range of 1.8-2.6. The backscattered power of the VHF radar showed a substantial reduction during the peak phase of all the strong X-rank flares studied. It has also been observed that there is a sharp fall in the ratio of the field line integrated Hall conductivity (σ2) to the field line integrated Pedersen conductivity (σ1) in the dynamo region during strong flare times in relation to normal times. The time variations of mean Doppler frequency ( f D ) of the backscattered signals have been observed to indicate a fall close to the peak phase of the strong flare events. Another new result is the radar observed presence of westward electric field for a long duration of 2-3 hours during a partial counter electrojet (CEJ) event that occurred on one of the days (8 July 1992) studied. The implications of the observations are discussed in detail.

  7. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  8. Statistical analysis of solar EUV and X-ray flux enhancements induced by solar flares and its implication to upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Huijun; Liu, Libo; He, Han; Wan, Weixing

    2011-11-01

    The 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux data and 26-34 nm EUV flux data are used to statistically analyze the relationship between enhancement in X-ray flux and that in EUV flux during solar flares in 1996-2006. The EUV enhancement does not linearly increase with X-ray flux from C-class to X-class flares. Its uprising amplitude decreases with X-ray flux. The correlation coefficients between enhancements in EUV and X-ray flux for X, M and C-class flares are only 0.66, 0.58 and 0.54, respectively, which suggests that X-ray flux is not a good index for EUV flux during solar flares. Thus, for studying more accurately solar flare effect on the ionosphere/thermosphere system, one needs to use directly EUV flux measurements. One of important reasons for depressing relationship between X-ray and EUV is that the central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location can significantly affect EUV flux variation particularly for X-class flares: the larger value of CMD results in the smaller EUV enhancement. However, there are much smaller CMD effects on EUV enhancement for M and C-class flares. The solar disc images from SOHO/EIT are utilized to estimate the percentage contribution to total EUV enhancement from the flare region and from other region. The results show the larger percentage contribution from other region for the weaker flares, which would reduce the loss of EUV radiation due to limb location of flare and then weaken the CMD effect for weaker flares like M and C-class.

  9. On the power-law distributions of X-ray fluxes from solar flares observed with GOES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You-Ping; Feng, Li; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Si-Ming; Gan, Wei-Qun

    2016-10-01

    The power-law frequency distributions of the peak flux of solar flare X-ray emission have been studied extensively and attributed to a system having self-organized criticality (SOC). In this paper, we first show that, so long as the shape of the normalized light curve is not correlated with the peak flux, the flux histogram of solar flares also follows a power-law distribution with the same spectral index as the power-law frequency distribution of the peak flux, which may partially explain why power-law distributions are ubiquitous in the Universe. We then show that the spectral indexes of the histograms of soft X-ray fluxes observed by GOES satellites in two different energy channels are different: the higher energy channel has a harder distribution than the lower energy channel, which challenges the universal power-law distribution predicted by SOC models and implies a very soft distribution of thermal energy content of plasmas probed by the GOES satellites. The temperature (T) distribution, on the other hand, approaches a power-law distribution with an index of 2 for high values of T. Hence the application of SOC models to the statistical properties of solar flares needs to be revisited.

  10. Martian upper atmosphere response to solar EUV flux and soft X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sonal; Stewart, Ian; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; Stiepen, Arnaud; Evans, J. Scott; Stevens, Michael H.; Chaffin, Michael S.; Crismani, Matteo; McClintock, William; Montmessin, Franck; Thiemann, E. M.; Eparvier, Frank; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jacosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Planetary upper atmosphere energetics is mainly governed by absorption of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. Understanding the response of planetary upper atmosphere to the daily, long and short term variation in solar flux is very important to quantify energy budget of upper atmosphere. We report a comprehensive study of Mars dayglow observations made by the IUVS instrument aboard the MAVEN spacecraft, focusing on upper atmospheric response to solar EUV flux. Our analysis shows both short and long term effect of solar EUV flux on Martian thermospheric temperature. We find a significant drop (> 100 K) in thermospheric temperature between Ls = 218° and Ls = 140°, attributed primarily to the decrease in solar activity and increase in heliocentric distance. IUVS has observed response of Martian thermosphere to the 27-day solar flux variation due to solar rotation.We also report effect of two solar flare events (19 Oct. 2014 and 24 March 2015) on Martian dayglow observations. IUVS observed about ~25% increase in observed brightness of major ultraviolet dayglow emissions below 120 km, where most of the high energy photons (< 10 nm) deposit their energy. The results presented in this talk will help us better understand the role of EUV flux in total heat budget of Martian thermosphere.

  11. MAGNETIC NON-POTENTIALITY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS AND PEAK X-RAY FLUX OF THE ASSOCIATED FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay E-mail: sgosain@prl.res.i

    2010-09-20

    Predicting the severity of solar eruptive phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections remains a great challenge despite concerted efforts to do so over the past several decades. However, the advent of high-quality vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP) has increased the possibility of meeting this challenge. In particular, the spatially averaged signed shear angle (SASSA) seems to be a unique parameter for quantifying the non-potentiality of active regions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the SASSA for predicting flare severity. For this purpose, we present case studies of the evolution of magnetic non-potentiality using 115 vector magnetograms of four active regions, namely, ARs NOAA 10930, 10960, 10961, and 10963 during 2006 December 8-15, 2007 June 3-10, 2007 June 28-July 5, and 2007 July 10-17, respectively. The NOAA ARs 10930 and 10960 were very active and produced X and M class flares, respectively, along with many smaller X-ray flares. On the other hand, the NOAA ARs 10961 and 10963 were relatively less active and produced only very small (mostly A- and B-class) flares. For this study, we have used a large number of high-resolution vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP). Our analysis shows that the peak X-ray flux of the most intense solar flare emanating from the active regions depends on the magnitude of the SASSA at the time of the flare. This finding of the existence of a lower limit of the SASSA for a given class of X-ray flares will be very useful for space weather forecasting. We have also studied another non-potentiality parameter called the mean weighted shear angle (MWSA) of the vector magnetograms along with the SASSA. We find that the MWSA does not show such distinction as the SASSA for upper limits of the GOES X-ray flux of solar flares; however, both the quantities show similar trends during the evolution of all active regions studied.

  12. Magnetic Non-potentiality of Solar Active Regions and Peak X-ray Flux of the Associated Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay

    2010-09-01

    Predicting the severity of solar eruptive phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections remains a great challenge despite concerted efforts to do so over the past several decades. However, the advent of high-quality vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP) has increased the possibility of meeting this challenge. In particular, the spatially averaged signed shear angle (SASSA) seems to be a unique parameter for quantifying the non-potentiality of active regions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the SASSA for predicting flare severity. For this purpose, we present case studies of the evolution of magnetic non-potentiality using 115 vector magnetograms of four active regions, namely, ARs NOAA 10930, 10960, 10961, and 10963 during 2006 December 8-15, 2007 June 3-10, 2007 June 28-July 5, and 2007 July 10-17, respectively. The NOAA ARs 10930 and 10960 were very active and produced X and M class flares, respectively, along with many smaller X-ray flares. On the other hand, the NOAA ARs 10961 and 10963 were relatively less active and produced only very small (mostly A- and B-class) flares. For this study, we have used a large number of high-resolution vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP). Our analysis shows that the peak X-ray flux of the most intense solar flare emanating from the active regions depends on the magnitude of the SASSA at the time of the flare. This finding of the existence of a lower limit of the SASSA for a given class of X-ray flares will be very useful for space weather forecasting. We have also studied another non-potentiality parameter called the mean weighted shear angle (MWSA) of the vector magnetograms along with the SASSA. We find that the MWSA does not show such distinction as the SASSA for upper limits of the GOES X-ray flux of solar flares; however, both the quantities show similar trends during the evolution of all active regions studied.

  13. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series Xt . The branching ratio bx is defined as bx=E[ξx/x] . The random variable ξx is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x , so ξx={Xt+1∣Xt=x} . If bx>1 , the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x , while if bx<1 , it is subcritical. For stock prices we find bx=1 within statistical uncertainty, for all x , consistent with an “efficient market hypothesis.” For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, bx is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where bx≃1 , which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for Xt and for ξx . For the BTW model the distribution of ξx is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x . Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where bx is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model—supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality.

  14. A new method for determining temperature and emission measure during solar flares from light curves of soft X-ray line fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornmann, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    A method for using the shapes of the light curves of soft X-ray line fluxes observed during the decay phase of solar flares to infer the temperature and emission measure with time is described. Light curves of the November 5, 1980 flare and several additional flares that exhibit breaks are presented, and possible causes for these breaks are discussed. Numerical models that incorporate the effects of temperature changes on the emissivity function are examined, and the model calculations are compared with the line fluxes observed during the November 5, 1980 flare. The model results are used to derive other properties of the flare.

  15. Solar x ray astronomy rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics were studied of the solar corona through the imaging of large scale coronal structures with AS&E High Resolution Soft X ray Imaging Solar Sounding Rocket Payload. The proposal for this program outlined a plan of research based on the construction of a high sensitivity X ray telescope from the optical and electronic components of the previous flight of this payload (36.038CS). Specifically, the X ray sensitive CCD camera was to be placed in the prime focus of the grazing incidence X ray mirror. The improved quantum efficiency of the CCD detector (over the film which had previously been used) allows quantitative measurements of temperature and emission measure in regions of low x ray emission such as helmet streamers beyond 1.2 solar radii or coronal holes. Furthermore, the improved sensitivity of the CCD allows short exposures of bright objects to study unexplored temporal regimes of active region loop evolution.

  16. Time Variabilities of Solar Wind Ion Fluxes and of X-ray and EUV Emissions from Comet Hyakutake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Cravens, T.; Lisse, C.; Ipavich, F.; von Steiger, R.; Shah, P.; Armstrong, T.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emissions from comet C/Hyakutake 1996 B2 made by the Rontgen X-ray satellite (ROSAT) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) revealed a total X-ray luminosity of about 500 MW.

  17. EVOLUTION OF HARD X-RAY SOURCES AND ULTRAVIOLET SOLAR FLARE RIBBONS FOR A CONFINED ERUPTION OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Schmieder, B.; Demoulin, P.; Li, H.

    2012-02-10

    We study the magnetic field structures of hard X-ray (HXR) sources and flare ribbons of the M1.1 flare in active region NOAA 10767 on 2005 May 27. We have found in a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation over the same polarity inversion line, a small pre-eruptive magnetic flux rope located next to sheared magnetic arcades. RHESSI and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) observed this confined flare in the X-ray bands and ultraviolet (UV) 1600 A bands, respectively. In this event magnetic reconnection occurred at several locations. It first started at the location of the pre-eruptive flux rope. Then, the observations indicate that magnetic reconnection occurred between the pre-eruptive magnetic flux rope and the sheared magnetic arcades more than 10 minutes before the flare peak. This implies the formation of the larger flux rope, as observed with TRACE. Next, HXR sources appeared at the footpoints of this larger flux rope at the peak of the flare. The associated high-energy particles may have been accelerated below the flux rope in or around a reconnection region. Still, the close spatial association between the HXR sources and the flux rope footpoints favors an acceleration within the flux rope. Finally, a topological analysis of a large solar region, including active regions NOAA 10766 and 10767, shows the existence of large-scale Quasi-Separatrix Layers (QSLs) before the eruption of the flux rope. No enhanced emission was found at these QSLs during the flare, but the UV flare ribbons stopped at the border of the closest large-scale QSL.

  18. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.; Maetzler, C.; Ohki, K.; Saba, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    A set of 22 simple, impulsive solar flares, identified in the OSO-5 hard X-ray data, were analyzed together with coincident microwave and meterwave radio observations. The rise times and fall times of the X-ray bursts are found to be highly correlated and effectively equal, strongly suggesting a flare energizing mechanism that is reversible. The good time resolution available for these observations reveals that the microwave emission is influenced by an additional process, evident in the tendency of the microwave emission to peak later and decay more slowly than the symmetric X-ray bursts. Meterwave emission is observed in coincidence with the 5 events which show the strongest time correlation between the X-ray and microwave burst structure. This meterwave emission is characterized by U-burst radiation, indicating confinement of the flare source.

  19. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  20. Imaging X-Ray Polarimeter for Solar Flares (IXPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosack, Michael; Black, J. Kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Shih, Albert Y.; Urba, Christian E.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of a balloon-borne Imaging X-ray Polarimeter for Solar flares (IX PS). This novel instrument, a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for photoelectric polarimetry, will be capable of measuring polarization at the few percent level in the 20-50 keV energy range during an M- or X class flare, and will provide imaging information at the approx.10 arcsec level. The primary objective of such observations is to determine the directivity of nonthermal high-energy electrons producing solar hard X-rays, and hence to learn about the particle acceleration and energy release processes in solar flares. Secondary objectives include the separation of the thermal and nonthermal components of the flare X-ray emissions and the separation of photospheric albedo fluxes from direct emissions.

  1. Research in Solar Physics: Analysis of Skylab/ATM S-056 X-Ray Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Data obtained by the X-ray event analyzer are described as well as methods used for film calibration. Topics discussed include analyses of the 15 June 1973 flare, oscillations in the solar soft X-ray flux, and deconvolution of X-ray images of the 5 September 1973 flare.

  2. Rapid spectral and flux time variations in a solar burst observed at various dm-mm wavelengths and at hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zodivaz, A. M.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Takakura, T.; Cliver, E. W.; Tapping, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    A solar burst was observed with high sensitivity and time resolution at cm-mm wavelengths by two different radio observatories (Itapetinga and Algonquin), with high spectral time resolution at dm-mm wavelengths by patrol instruments (Sagamore Hill), and at hard X-rays (HXM Hinotori). At the onset of the major burst time structure there was a rapid rise in the spectral turnover frequency (from 5 to 15 GHz), in about 10s, coincident to a reduction of the spectral index in the optically thin part of the spectrum. The burst maxima were not time coincident at the optically thin radio frequencies and at the different hard X-ray energy ranges. The profiles at higher radio frequencies exhibited better time coincidence to the high energy X-rays. The hardest X-ray spectrum (-3) coincided with peak radio emission at the higher frequency (44 GHz). The event appeared to be built up by a first major injection of softer particles followed by other injections of harder particles. Ultrafast time structures were identified as superimposed on the burst emission at the cm-mm high sensitivity data at X-rays, with predominant repetition rates ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 Hz.

  3. On the modulation of X ray fluxes in thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Michael P.; Parks, George K.

    1992-01-01

    The production of X-ray fluxes in thunderstorms has been attributed to bremsstrahlung. Assuming this, another question arises. How can a thunderstorm modulate the number density of electrons which are sufficiently energetic to produce X-rays? As a partial answer to this question, the effects of typical thunderstorm electric fields on a background population of energetic electrons, such as produced by cosmic ray secondaries and their decays or the decay of airborne radionuclides, are considered. The observed variation of X-ray flux is shown to be accounted for by a simple model involving typical electric field strengths. A necessary background electron number density is found from the model and is determined to be more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than that available from radon decay and a factor of 8 higher than that available from cosmic ray secondaries. The ionization enhancement due to energetic electrons and X-rays is discussed.

  4. The possible effect of solar soft X rays on thermospheric nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siskind, D. E.; Barth, C. A.; Cleary, D. D.

    1990-04-01

    A rocket observation of nitric oxide in the lower thermosphere during a time of high solar activity is compared to the results of calculations from a one-dimensional photochemical model. A solar soft X-ray flux of 0.75 erg/sq cm/s is needed to explain the observed NO densities. This result supports the theory that the variation in the low-latitude thermospheric NO is caused by variation in solar soft X-rays.

  5. Correction in X-ray flux in OJ 287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupe, Dirk; Komossa, S.; amp; Gomez, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We noticed an error in the current X-ray flux of OJ 287 that we reported in ATEL #9629: The flux measured by Swift in the 0.3-10 keV band should be 3.2e-14 W/m2. This means that the flux had increased by a factor of 5 compared with the values before the sun-constraint in June.

  6. Investigaion of X-ray emission from Martian exosphere at solar minimum with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, K.; Ezoe, Y.; Ohashi, T.; Terada, N.; Futaana, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We observed Mars in the X-ray wavelength range in April 2008 with Japanese Suzaku observatory. As far as we know, this was the first X-ray observation of Mars at solar minimum. Mars has been known to emit X-rays via scattering of solar X-rays and also charge exchange between neutral atom in its exosphere and solar wind ions (Dennerl 2002, Dennerl et al. 2006). Past theoretical studies (e.g., Krasnopolsky and Gladstone 1996) suggest that the neutral density varies at most by a factor of 10 due to the change of solar X-ray activities. Aiming at possible X-ray variation of Martian exsosphere, we analyzed image and spectrum data taken with Suzaku. No clear X-ray source is detected at the position of Mars in the energy band of 0.2-5 keV. We placed a stringent upper limit of X-ray oxygen line flux (0.5-0.65 keV) from Mars of 8.6e-5 [ph/cm2/s]. A comparison with XMM-Newton's results at solar maximum indicates that the exospheric density at solar minimum is less tha 4.4 times one at solar maximum.

  7. Effect of X-ray flux on polytetrafluoroethylene in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the X-ray flux in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (STAT) on the constitution of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface has been examined. The radiation dose rate for our specimen was about 10 to the 7th rad/s. The structure, magnitude and binding energy of the C(1s) and F(1s) features of the XPS spectrum and the mass spectrum of gaseous species evolved during irradiation are observed. The strong time dependence of these signals over a period of several hours indicated that the surface constitution of PTFE is greatly affected by this level of radiation dose. The results are consistent with the development of a heavily cross-linked or branched structure in the PTFE surface region and the evolution of short chain fragments into the gas phase.

  8. Low fluxes of X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Analytic and experimental investigations of the interactions of high-energy protons with spacecraft materials and light nucleus atoms were conducted. Irradiation of typical materials for scintillation detectors using accelerator-produced energetic protons and associated theoretical calculations indicate activity within detectors produced by this mechanism is significant to detection of low-level cosmic gamma radiation. Samples of several materials were flown aboard Skylab to obtain measures of the neutron and proton flux environment. Extremely weak activity was produced in the samples. Calculations of interactions of intermediate-energy protons with light nuclei were performed and a more complete theoretical model programmed for digital computation. Preliminary results appear promising for calculating products of such interactions.

  9. Hard X-Ray, Soft X-Ray, and EUV Studies of Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Document study the hard X-ray (HXR), soft X-ray (SXR) ,EUV, and magnetic nature of solar eruptions, with the objective of elucidating the physics of the eruption process. In particular, it was examine the viability of two specific eruption mechanisms, detailed in our proposal. These mechanisms are the "breakout model", and the "tether cutting model". During the second year, it was a significant progress in the goals to Data Sets Utilized. In the publications during this second year of the grant period, the data was used from the E W Imaging Telescope (EIT) and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instruments on SOHO, and from the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT), Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT), and the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) on Yooh.

  10. Rapid soft X-ray fluctuations in solar flares observed with the X-ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, D. M.; Saba, J. L. R.; Strong, K. T.

    1986-01-01

    Three flares observed by the Soft X-Ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission were studied. Flare light curves from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer and Bent Crystal Spectrometer were examined for rapid signal variations. Each flare was characterized by an initial fast (less than 1 min) burst, observed by the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS), followed by softer gradual X-ray emission lasting several minutes. From an autocorrelation function analysis, evidence was found for quasi-periodic fluctuations with rise and decay times of 10 s in the Ca XIX and Fe XXV light curves. These variations were of small amplitude (less than 20%), often coincided with hard X-ray emissions, and were prominent during the onset of the gradual phase after the initial hard X-ray burst. It is speculated that these fluctuations were caused by repeated energy injections in a coronal loop that had already been heated and filled with dense plasma associated with the initial hard X-ray burst.

  11. Solar System X-rays from Charge Exchange Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Christian, D. J.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dennerl, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Bodewits, D.; Combi, M. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Lepri, S. T.

    2013-04-01

    The discovery of high energy x-ray emission in 1996 from comet C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) uncovered a new class of x-ray emitting objects. Subsequent detections of the morphology, spectra, and time dependence of the x-rays from more than 20 comets have shown that the very soft (E < 1 keV) emission is due to a charge-exchange interaction between highly charged solar wind minor ions and the comet's extended neutral atmosphere. Many solar system objects are now known to shine in the X-ray, including Venus, Mars, the Moon, the Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, with total power outputs on the MW - GW scale. Like comets, the X-ray emission from the Earth's geo-corona, the Jovian & Saturnian aurorae, and the Martian halo are thought to be driven by charge exchange between highly charged minor (heavy) ions in the solar wind and gaseous neutral species in the bodies' atmosphere. The non-auroral X-ray emissions from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth, and those from disks of Mars, Venus, and the Moon are produced by scattering of solar X-rays. The first soft X-ray observations of Earth’s aurora by Chandra shows that it is highly variable, and the giant planet aurorae are fascinating puzzles that are just beginning to yield their secrets and may be the only x-ray sources not driven directly by the Sun in the whole system as well as properties of hot exo-solar Jupiters. Observations of local solar system charge exchange processes can also help inform us about x-rays produced at more distant hot ionized gas/cold neutral gas interfaces, like the heliopause, stellar astrospheres, galactic star forming regions, and starburst galaxies.

  12. The Focusing Optics Solar X-ray Imager (FOXSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, S.; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Ramsey, B.; Ishikawa, S.; Takahashi, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar hard x-ray instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1~keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of indirect imaging, the derived images have a low dynamic range (<30) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the solar flare acceleration process. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding particle acceleration in solar flares. The foxsi project is led by the Space Science Laboratory at the University of California. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with experience from the HERO balloon project, is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro H team (JAXA/ISAS) will provide double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI will be a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  13. Backscatter of hard X-rays in the solar atmosphere. [Calculating the reflectance of solar x ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The solar photosphere backscatters a substantial fraction of the hard X rays from solar flares incident upon it. This reflection was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation which takes into account Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption. Both isotropic and anisotropic X ray sources are considered. The bremsstrahlung from an anisotropic distribution of electrons are evaluated. By taking the reflection into account, the inconsistency is removed between recent observational data regarding the center-to-limb variation of solar X ray emission and the predictions of models in which accelerated electrons are moving down toward the photosphere.

  14. Common observations of solar X-rays from SPHINX/CORONAS-PHOTON and XRS/MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepa, Anna; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Siarkowski, Marek; Mrozek, Tomasz; Gryciuk, Magdalena; Phillips, Kenneth

    SphinX was a soft X-ray spectrophotometer constructed in the Space Research Centre of Polish Academy of Sciences. The instrument was launched on 30 January 2009 aboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite as a part of TESIS instrument package. SphinX measured total solar X-ray flux in the energy range from 1 to 15 keV during the period of very low solar activity from 20 February to 29 November 2009. For these times the solar detector (X-ray Spectrometer - XRS) onboard MESSENGER also observed the solar X-rays from a different vantage point. XRS measured the radiation in similar energy range. We present results of the comparison of observations from both instruments and show the preliminary results of physical analysis of spectra for selected flares.

  15. Scattering of Solar X-Rays by Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Clark, J.; Bhardwaj, A.; Elsner, R.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Acton, L. W.; Maurellis, A. N.; Gladstone, G. R.

    2005-01-01

    Soft X-ray emission has been observed from the disk of both Jupiter and Saturn as well as from the auroral regions of these planets. The low-latitude disk emission as observed by ROSAT, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton appears to be uniformly distributed across the disk and to be correlated with solar activity. These characteristics suggest that the source of the disk x-rays are: (1) elastic scattering of solar X-rays by atmospheric neutrals (2) absorption of solar X-rays in the carbon K-shell followed by fluorescent emission. The carbon atoms are found in methane molecules located below the homopause. In this paper we present the results of calculations of the scattering albedo and of the emitted x-ray intensity for a range of atmospheric abundances and for a number of solar irradiance spectra. The model calculations are compared with recent x-ray observations of Jupiter and Saturn.

  16. An extended superhot solar flare X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Ohki, K. I.; Tsuneta, S.

    1985-01-01

    A superhot hard X-ray source in a solar flare occulted by the solar limb was identified. Its hard X-ray image was found to show great horizontal extent but little vertical extent. An H alpha brightening at the same limb position about an hour later suggests a multi-component loop prominence system, so that it appears that a superhot source can evolve in the same manner as a normal solar soft X-ray source. The assignment of plausiable values to physical parameters in the source suggests (from the simplest form of classical thermal-conduction theory) that either new physics will be required to suppress conduction, or else that gradual energy release well after the impulsive phase of the flare must occur. In this respect too, the superhot source appears to resemble ordinary soft X-ray sources, except of course that its temperature is higher.

  17. An extended superhot solar flare X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Ohki, K. I.; Tsuneta, S.

    1985-08-01

    A superhot hard X-ray source in a solar flare occulted by the solar limb was identified. Its hard X-ray image was found to show great horizontal extent but little vertical extent. An H alpha brightening at the same limb position about an hour later suggests a multi-component loop prominence system, so that it appears that a superhot source can evolve in the same manner as a normal solar soft X-ray source. The assignment of plausiable values to physical parameters in the source suggests (from the simplest form of classical thermal-conduction theory) that either new physics will be required to suppress conduction, or else that gradual energy release well after the impulsive phase of the flare must occur. In this respect too, the superhot source appears to resemble ordinary soft X-ray sources, except of course that its temperature is higher.

  18. Weak solar flares with a detectable flux of hard X rays: Specific features of microwave radiation in the corresponding active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'eva, I. Yu.; Livshits, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The emission of very weak flares was registered at the Suzaku X-ray observatory in 2005-2009. The photon power spectrum in the 50-110 keV range for a number of these phenomena shows that some electrons accelerate to energies higher than 100 keV. The corresponding flares originate in active regions (ARs) with pronounced sunspots. As in the case of AR 10933 in January 2007 analyzed by us previously (Grigor'eva et al., 2013), the thoroughly studied weak flares in May 2007 are related to the emergence of a new magnetic field in the AR and to the currents that originate in this case. A comparison of the Suzaku data with the RATAN-600 microwave observations indicates that a new polarized source of microwave radiation develops in the AR (or the previously existing source intensifies) one-two days before a weak flare in the emerging flux regions. Arguments in favor of recent views that fields are force-free in the AR corona are put forward. The development of weak flares is related to the fact that the free energy of the currents that flow above the field neutral line at altitudes reaching several thousand kilometers is accumulated and subsequently released.

  19. Revised View of Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.; Adams, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the onset of ~20 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jetwas near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ''bright point'' in anedge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. Weexamined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels,including 304 Ang, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Ang,which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptionsof miniature (size <~10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. In manycases, much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperaturejet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption andthe hotter EUV component of the jet appears in emission. The jet bright point formsat the location from which the miniature filament erupts, analogous to theformation of a standard solar flare arcade via flare (``internal'') reconnection in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scale chromospheric filament. Thespire of the jet forms on open field lines that presumably have undergoneinterchange (''external'') reconnection with the erupting field that envelops andcarries the miniature filament. This is consistent with what we found for theonset of an on-disk coronal jet we examined in Adams et al. (2014), and theobservations of other workers. It is however not consistent with the basicversion of the ''emerging-flux model'' for X-ray jets. This work was supported byfunding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  20. Automatic Identification of Solar X-Ray Bright Points in Hinode X-Ray Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    We have automated a method that is used to find point sources in Chandra X-ray telescope data, to identify solar bright points in Hinode X-ray data. This tool, called lextrct, first identifies candidate sources that are brighter than the surrounding background. The algorithm also allows selected pixels to be excluded from the source-finding, thus allowing saturated pixels (from flares and/or active regions) to be ignored. We then use lextrct to fit the sources to two-dimensional, elliptical Gaussians. The size and orientation give an approximation of the shape of the bright points. We are in the process of analyzing observations through the Al_poly filter with a four-second exposure time, to obtain a catalogue of bright points, which will include their sizes, lifetimes, intensities, and position on the solar disk

  1. Influence of solar flares on the X-ray corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Batchelor, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Sequences of X-ray images of solar flares, obtained with the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer on the SMM spacecraft, reveal many dynamical phenomena. Movies of 20 flares recorded with 6-sec time resolution were examined. A preliminary analysis of the events as a group are presented, and some new aspects of the well-studied May 21, 1980 flare and a November 6, 1980 flare are discussed.

  2. Magnetic Untwisting in Most Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D.; Robe, D. M.

    2013-07-01

    From 54 X-ray jets observed in the polar coronal holes by Hinode’s X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during coverage in movies from Solar Dynamic Observatory’s Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) taken in its He II 304 Å band at a cadence of 12 s, we have established a basic characteristic of solar X-ray jets: untwisting motion in the spire. In this presentation, we show the progression of few of these X-ray jets in XRT images and track their untwisting in AIA He II images. From their structure displayed in their XRT movies, 19 jets were evidently standard jets made by interchange reconnection of the magnetic-arcade base with ambient open field, 32 were evidently blowout jets made by blowout eruption of the base arcade, and 3 were of ambiguous form. As was anticipated from the >10,000 km span of the base arcade in most polar X-ray jets and from the disparity of standard jets and blowout jets in their magnetic production, few of the standard X-ray jets (3 of 19) but nearly all of the blowout X-ray jets (29 of 32) carried enough cool (T ~ 10^5 K) plasma to be seen in their He II movies. In the 32 X-ray jets that showed a cool component, the He II movies show 10-100 km/s untwisting motions about the axis of the spire in all 3 standard jets and in 26 of the 29 blowout jets. Evidently, the open magnetic field in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and probably in most standard X-ray jets carries transient twist. This twist apparently relaxes by propagating out along the open field as a torsional wave. High-resolution spectrograms and Dopplergrams have shown that most Type-II spicules have torsional motions of 10-30 km/s. Our observation of similar torsional motion in X-ray jets (1) strengthens the case for Type-II spicules being made in the same way as X-ray jets, by blowout eruption of a twisted magnetic arcade in the spicule base and/or by interchange reconnection of the twisted base arcade with the ambient open field, and hence (2) strengthens the case made by Moore et al (2011

  3. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, D.; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, J. M.

    1989-11-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the AS&E Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-Ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the AS&E High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) the calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development, (2) the use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution, and (3) the application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton (1988) for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  4. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, J. Daniel; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, John M.

    1989-08-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) The calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development; (2) The use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution; and (3) The application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  5. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krucker, Sam; Christe, Steven; Glesener, Lindsay; McBride, Steve; Turin, Paul; Glaser, David; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Delory, Gregory; Lin, R. P.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Terada, Yukikatsu; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Kokubun, Motohide; Saito, Shinya; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Masuda, Satoshi; Minoshima, Takashi; Shomojo, Masumi

    2009-08-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar hard x-ray instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1 keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of indirect imaging, the derived images have a low dynamic range (<30) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the solar flare acceleration process. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding particle acceleration in solar flares. The FOXSI project is led by the Space Science Laboratory at the University of California. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with experience from the HERO balloon project, is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro H team (JAXA/ISAS) will provide double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI will be a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  6. The Focusing Optics Solar X-ray Imager (FOXSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Ramsey, B.; Ishikawa, S.; Takahashi, T.; Tajima, H.

    2010-05-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar hard x-ray instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1 keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of indirect imaging, the derived images have a low dynamic range (<30) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the solar flare acceleration process. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding particle acceleration in solar flares. The FOXSI project is led by the Space Science Laboratory at the University of California. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with experience from the HERO balloon project, is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro H team (JAXA/ISAS) will provide double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI will be a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  7. Study of a Solar X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1997-01-01

    The highly structured nature of the outer solar atmosphere seems to be intimately linked to the presence, at the solar surface, of magnetic fields that have been generated inside the Sun and have emerged to the surface. The corona is brightest (and also hottest) at just those locations where the magnetic field has emerged from inside the Sun. Dynamo theory predicts that strong magnetic fields will be generated deep in the solar interior and that bundles or 'ropes' of magnetic flux will float to the surface. When this happens, a magnetically bipolar region will become visible, extending above the surface in a three-dimensional structure. The field lines penetrate through the surface, showing two magnetic poles, and also exhibit a three-dimensional structure above the surface. The structure created by the field emergence is rooted in the (relatively) cool photosphere and extends through the chromosphere and transition region to the corona. Thus, the magnetic field creates a region, called an active region, which contains portions at temperatures from less than 10(exp 4) K to greater than 10(exp 6) K, and is therefore visible at wavelengths from the infrared through x-rays. The locations where the magnetic field leaves and reenters the visible surface are called the 'footpoints' of the coronal structures associated with the magnetic field. The magnetic fields themselves are not directly visible. However, the hot coronal plasma is, for the most part, constrained to follow the direction of the magnetic field lines in the atmosphere. Now, 100 years after the discovery of x-rays by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1896, we can routinely make observations of the solar corona from outside the Earth's atmosphere in this region of the electromagnetic spectrum. As shown by comparing x-ray images with magnetograms, the bright corona over these bipolar magnetic regions consists of closed structures that seem to follow the orientation of the magnetic field. Although we can see down to the

  8. Magnetic Untwisting in Most Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David; Robe, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    From 54 X-ray jets observed in the polar coronal holes by Hinode's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during coverage in movies from Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) taken in its He II 304 Å band at a cadence of 12 s, we have established a basic characteristic of solar X-ray jets: untwisting motion in the spire. In this presentation, we show the progression of few of these X-ray jets in XRT images and track their untwisting in AIA He II images. From their structure displayed in their XRT movies, 19 jets were evidently standard jets made by interchange reconnection of the magnetic-arcade base with ambient open field, 32 were evidently blowout jets made by blowout eruption of the base arcade, and 3 were of ambiguous form. As was anticipated from the >10,000 km span of the base arcade in most polar X-ray jets and from the disparity of standard jets and blowout jets in their magnetic production, few of the standard X-ray jets (3 of 19) but nearly all of the blowout X-ray jets (29 of 32) carried enough cool (T is approximately 105 K) plasma to be seen in their He II movies. In the 32 X-ray jets that showed a cool component, the He II movies show 10-100 km/s untwisting motions about the axis of the spire in all 3 standard jets and in 26 of the 29 blowout jets. Evidently, the open magnetic field in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and probably in most standard X-ray jets carries transient twist. This twist apparently relaxes by propagating out along the open field as a torsional wave. High-resolution spectrograms and Dopplergrams have shown that most Type-II spicules have torsional motions of 10-30 km/s. Our observation of similar torsional motion in X-ray jets strengthens the case for Type-II spicules being made in the same way as X-ray jets, by blowout eruption of a twisted magnetic arcade in the spicule base and/or by interchange reconnection of the twisted base arcade with the ambient open field. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division

  9. Soft X-ray study of solar wind charge exchange from the Earth's magnetosphere : Suzaku observations and a future X-ray imaging mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezoe, Y.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ohashi, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Fujimoto, R.; Terada, N.; Kasahara, S.; Fujimoto, M.; Mitsuda, K.; Nishijo, K.; Noda, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soft X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from the Earth's magnetosphere using the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku are shown, together with our X-ray imaging mission concept to characterize the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere. In recent years, the SWCX emission from the Earth's magnetosphere, originally discovered as unexplained noise during the soft X-ray all sky survey (Snowden et al. 1994), is receiving increased attention on studying geospace. The SWCX is a reaction between neutrals in exosphere and highly charged ions in the magnetosphere originated from solar wind. Robertson et al. (2005) modeled the SWCX emission as seen from an observation point 50 Re from Earth. In the resulting X-ray intensities, the magnetopause, bow shock and cusp were clearly visible. High sensitivity soft X-ray observation with CCDs onboard recent X-ray astronomy satellites enables us to resolve SWCX emission lines and investigate time correlation with solar wind as observed with ACE and WIND more accurately. Suzaku is the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite launched in 2005. The line of sight direction through cusp is observable, while constraints on Earth limb avoidance angle of other satellites often limits observable regions. Suzaku firstly detected the SWCX emission while pointing in the direction of the north ecliptic pole (Fujimoto et al. 2007). Using the Tsyganenko 1996 magnetic field model, the distance to the nearest SWCX region was estimated as 2-8 Re, implying that the line of sight direction can be through magnetospheric cusp. Ezoe et al. (2010) reported SWCX events toward the sub-solar side of the magnetosheath. These cusp and sub-solar side magnetosheath regions are predicted to show high SWCX fluxes by Robertson et al. (2005). On the other hand, Ishikawa et al. (2013) discovered a similarly strong SWCX event when the line of sight direction did not transverse these two regions. Motivated by these detections

  10. CORRELATION OF HARD X-RAY AND WHITE LIGHT EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego; Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 Å summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 s around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ∼50 keV. At higher electron energies the correlation decreases gradually while a rapid decrease is seen if the energy provided by low-energy electrons is added. This suggests that flare-accelerated electrons of energy ∼50 keV are the main source for white light production.

  11. Temporal evolution of an energetic electron population in an inhomogeneous medium: Application to solar hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilmer, N.; Mackinnon, A. L.; Trottet, G.

    1985-01-01

    Energetic electrons accelerated during solar flares can be studied through the hard X-ray emission they produce when interacting with the solar ambient atmosphere. In the case of the non thermal hard X-ray emission, the instanteous X-ray flux emitted at one point of the atmosphere is related to the instantaneous fast electron spectrum at that point. A hard X-ray source model then requires the understanding of the evolution in space and time of the fast particle distribution. The physical processes involved here are energy losses due to Coulomb collisions and pitch angle scattering due to both collisions and magnetic field gradients.

  12. SphinX Measurements of the 2009 Solar Minimum X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Kuzin, S.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Bakała, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B.

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 × 1047 cm-3 and 1.1 × 1048 cm-3. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  13. SphinX MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2009 SOLAR MINIMUM X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Bakala, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B.; Kuzin, S.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} cm{sup -3} and 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 48} cm{sup -3}. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  14. The Focusing Optics X-Ray Solar Imager: FOXSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krucker, Saem; Christe, Steven; Glesener, Lindsay; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; McBride, Stephen; Glaser, David; Turin, Paul; Lin, R. P.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Saito, Shinya; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Tajima, Takaaki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Masuda, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray (HXR) focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar HXR instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1 keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of an indirect imaging system, the derived images have a low dynamic range (typically <10) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the particle acceleration processes which occur there. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding impulsive energy release on the Sun. The FOXSI project is led by the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro-H team at JAXA/ISAS has provided double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI is a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  15. The Bragg solar x-ray spectrometer SolpeX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ścisłowski, D.; Sylwester, J.; Steślicki, M.; Płocieniak, S.; Bąkała, J.; Szaforz, Ż.; Kowaliński, M.; Podgórski, P.; Trzebiński, W.; Hernandez, J.; Barylak, J.; Barylak, A.; Kuzin, Sergey

    2015-09-01

    Detection of polarization and spectra measurement of X-ray solar flare emission are indispensable in improving our understanding of the processes releasing energy of these most energetic phenomena in the solar system. We shall present some details of the construction of SolpeX - an innovative Bragg soft X-ray flare polarimeter and spectrometer. The instrument is a part of KORTES - Russian instrument complex to be mounted aboard the science module to be attached to the International Space Station (2017/2018). The SolpeX will be composed of three individual measuring units: the soft X-ray polarimeter with 1-2% linear polarization detection threshold, a fast-rotating flat crystal X-ray spectrometer with a very high time resolution (0.1 s) and a simple pinhole soft X-ray imager-spectrometer with a moderate spatial (~20 arcsec), spectral (0.5 keV) and high time resolution (0.1 s). Having a fast rotating unit to be served with power, telemetry and "intelligence" poses a challenge for the designer. Some of the solutions to this will be provided and described.

  16. The correlation of solar flare hard X-ray bursts with Doppler blueshifted soft X-ray flare emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, R. D.; Doschek, G. A.; Simnett, G. M.; Rilee, M. L.; Mariska, J. T.; Culhane, J. L.; Kosugi, T.; Watanabe, T.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the temporal correlation between hard X-ray bursts and the intensity of Doppler blueshifted soft X-ray spectral line emission. We find a strong correlation for many events that have intense blueshifted spectral signatures and some correlation in events with modest blueshifts. The onset of hard X-rays frequently coincides to within a few seconds with the onset of blueshifted emission. The peak intensity of blueshifted emission is frequently close in time to the peak of the hard X-ray emission. Decay rates of the blueshifted and hard X-ray emission are similar, with the decay of the blueshifted emission tending to lag behind the hard X-ray emission in some cases. There are, however, exceptions to these conclusions, and, therefore, the results should not be generalized to all flares. Most of the data for this work were obtained from instruments flown on the Japanese Yohkoh solar spacecraft.

  17. Great microwave bursts and hard X-rays from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiehl, H. J.; Batchelor, D. A.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Price, P. N.

    1983-01-01

    The microwave and hard X-ray charateristics of 13 solar flares that produced microwave fluxes greater than 500 Solar Flux Units were analyzed. These Great Microwave Bursts were observed in the frequency range from 3 to 35 GHz at Berne, and simultaneous hard X-ray observations were made in the energy range from 30 to 500 keV with the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft. The principal aim of this analysis is to determine whether or not the same distribution of energetic electrons can explain both emissions. Correlations were found between respective temporal characteristics and, for the first time, between microwave and hard X-ray spectral characteristics. A single-temperature and a multi-temperature model from the literature were tested for consistency with the coincident X-ray and microwave spectra at microwave burst maximum. Four events are inconsistent with both of the models tested, and neither of the models attempts to explain the high-frequency part of the microwave spectrum. A model in which the emissions above and below the peak frequency originate in two different parts of a diverging magnetic loop is proposed. With this model the entire microwave spectrum of all but one of the events is explained.

  18. Energetic electrons, type III radio bursts, and impulsive solar flare X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.R.

    1981-08-01

    Observations of impulsive hard X-ray and type III radio bursts made during the maximum of the last solar activity cycle have been analyzed for a statistical study of the relationship between these two solar flare phenomena. Spectral measurements of 10--68 keV X-rays, which covered 7068 hr of observation time and the range 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/ ergs cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ of flux of X-rays > or approx. =20 keV, were made with the University of California (Berkeley) experiment aboard the OGO 5 satellite. The radio data consisted of copies of the original spectral records as well as tabulated data. The principle findings are: (1) about 20% of impulsive hard X-ray bursts are correlated with type III radio bursts; conversely, only approx.3% of the reported type III radio bursts are correlated with impulsive X-rays bursts; (2) the location of the associated H..cap alpha.. flare on the solar disk has little or no effect on the X-ray--type III burst correlation; (3) the magnitude of the X-ray--type III burst correlation increases systematically with the increase in the following quantities: intensity and starting frequency of the type III burst, peak energy flux and spectral hardness of the X-ray burst, and the peak nonthermal emission measure and spectral hardness of the ''instantaneous'' electron spectrum > or approx. =20 keV inside the x-ray source; (4) the observations are consistent with the electron populations responsible for both the X-ray and type III emissions being accelerated in a single acceleration process; (5) the observations suggest a flare model where the primary instability responsible for electron acceleration during the impulsive phase occurs in the corona. The exact location of this instability varies from one flare to another as well as during the impulsive phase of a single flare and determines the hardness of the accelerated electron spectrum and the characteristics of associated X-ray, EUV, optical, and radio emissions.

  19. Observation and modeling of geocoronal charge exchange X-ray emission during solar wind gusts

    SciTech Connect

    Wargelin, B. J.; Kornbleuth, M.; Juda, M.; Martin, P. L.

    2014-11-20

    Solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-rays are emitted when highly charged solar wind ions such as O{sup 7{sup +}} collide with neutral gas, including the Earth's tenuous outer atmosphere (exosphere or geocorona) and hydrogen and helium from the local interstellar medium drifting through the heliosphere. This geocoronal and heliospheric emission comprises a significant and varying fraction of the soft X-ray background (SXRB) and is seen in every X-ray observation, with the intensity dependent on solar wind conditions and observation geometry. Under the right conditions, geocoronal emission can increase the apparent SXRB by roughly an order of magnitude for an hour or more. In this work, we study a dozen occasions when the near-Earth solar wind flux was exceptionally high. These gusts of wind lead to abrupt changes in SWCX X-ray emission around Earth, which may or may not be seen by X-ray observatories depending on their line of sight. Using detailed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the solar wind's interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere, and element abundances and ionization states measured by ACE, we model the time-dependent brightness of major geocoronal SWCX emission lines during those gusts and compare with changes in the X-ray background measured by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We find reasonably good agreement between model and observation, with measured geocoronal line brightnesses averaged over 1 hr of up to 136 photons s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} sr{sup –1} in the O VII Kα triplet around 564 eV.

  20. HEXITEC: A Next Generation Hard X-ray Detector for Solar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert; Inglis, Andrew R.; Gregory, Kyle; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew; Veale, Matthew C.; Panessa, Marco

    2016-05-01

    There is an increasing demand in solar physics for high resolution X-ray spectroscopic imaging. Such observations would present ground-breaking opportunities to study the poorly understood high energy processes in the solar corona such as solar flares, coronal heating, etc. However, such observations require a new breed of solid-state detectors sensititve to high energy X-rays with fine independent pixels to subsample the point spread function (PSF) of the X-ray optics. They must also be capable of handling very high count rates as photon fluxes from solar flares often cause pileup in current detectors. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) has recently developed a new Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector system, dubbed HEXITEC (High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology). It is an 80x80 array of 250 micron independent pixels sensitive in the 4--80 keV band and capable of a high full frame readout rate of 10 kHz. HEXITEC provides the smallest independently read out pixels currently available, and are well matched to the few arcsecond PSF produced by the current and next generation hard X-ray focusing optics. NASA's Goddard and Marshall Space Flight Centers are collaborating with RAL to develop these detectors for use on future space-borne hard X-ray focusing telescopes. In this poster we show the latest results on HEXITEC's imaging capability, high read out rate, and energy sensitivity and reveal it to be ideal for such future instruments. The potential observations obtained by combining HEXITEC with the next generation of X-ray focusing optics could to revolutionize our understanding of high energy processes in the solar corona.

  1. Long term temporal variations of the hard X-ray flux from the Centaurus region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Peterson, L. E.; Hudson, H. S.

    1971-01-01

    The X-ray telescope aboard the third Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-3) observed the Centaurus region daily from 1967 October to 1968 February, and also for five days in 1968 June. A stable minimum flux of 0.33 + or - 0.03 photons (sq cm sec)/1 between 7.7 and 38 keV from a source around l = 305 deg is derived. Several single days show enhanced fluxes, and two extensive flaring episodes, one with a soft and the other a very hard spectrum, lasting at least ten days.

  2. Observing Solar Hard X-rays from Heliospheric Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, Gordon J.; Benz, A.; Dennis, B.; Krucker, S.; Limousin, O.; Lin, R.; Vilmer, N.

    2010-05-01

    The coming decade provides two opportunities to acquire a different observational perspective on solar hard x-ray emission. Both ESA's Solar Orbiter and NASA's Solar Probe Plus missions will be in heliocentric orbits with perihelia of 0.28 au and 0.05 au respectively. This poster indicates the unique scientific advantages of hard x-ray imaging/spectroscopy observations from such platforms. These advantages stem from three factors: First, in combination with other payload elements, the hard x-rays provide the ability to observationally link accelerated electrons at the Sun to radio observations of the propagating electrons and to direct observations of in situ electrons. Second, the substantial gain in sensitivity afforded by close-in vantage points enables exploration of the origin of non-flare associated SEP events to be studied and the character of quiescent active-region heating and electron acceleration to be evaluated. Third, the different observational perspectives provided by the heliocentric orbits compared to low-Earth orbits enable improved separation of coronal and footpoint sources as well as measurements of the isotropy of the x-ray emission. Despite the limited payload resources (mass, power, telemetry) afforded by such missions, scientifically effective hard x-ray imaging spectroscopy from 5 keV to 150 keV is still feasible. The Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX), accepted as part of the Solar Orbiter payload, combines high spectral resolution ( 1 keV FWHM at 10 keV) with spatial resolution as good as 1500 km, and can efficiently encode the data for several hundred optimized images per hour within a modest telemetry allocation and 4 kg / 4 watt budget. The X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) proposed for Solar Probe Plus, views the Sun through its thermal shield. It also features high spectral resolution from 6 to 150 keV and spatial resolution of 1500 km at perihelion. The poster describes the imaging principles and current configurations

  3. Rocket observations of solar X-rays during the eclipse of 7 March 1970.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Accardo, C. A.; Smith, L. G.; Pintal, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Measurement of the absorption profiles and residual fluxes of three bands of solar X-rays before and during the eclipse of Mar. 7, 1970. In the bands 2 to 8 A, 8 to 20 A, and 44 to 60 A the residual flux in totality is found to be respectively 5, 7, and 16% of the flux from the uneclipsed sun. It is shown that the radiation maintaining the E-layer varies in proportion to the 44- to 60-A flux. In the D-layer, ionization by the residual flux of 2 to 8 A is less important in totality than is ionization of nitric oxide by Lyman-alpha.

  4. Dichotomy of X-Ray Jets in Solar Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robe, D. M.; Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    It has been found that there are two different types of X-ray jets observed in the Sun's polar coronal holes: standard jets and blowout jets. A proposed model of this dichotomy is that a standard jet is produced by a burst of reconnection of the ambient magnetic field with the opposite-polarity leg of the base arcade. In contrast, it appears that a blowout jet is produced when the interior of the arcade has so much pent-up free magnetic energy in the form of shear and twist in the interior field that the external reconnection unleashes the interior field to erupt open. In this project, X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes taken by Hinode were searched for X-ray jets. Co-temporal movies taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory in 304 Å emission from He II, showing solar plasma at temperatures around 80,000 K, were examined for whether the identified blowout jets carry much more He II plasma than the identified standard jets. It was found that though some jets identified as standard from the X-ray movies could be seen in the He II 304 Å movies, the blowout jets carried much more 80,000 K plasma than did most standard jets. This finding supports the proposed model for the morphology and development of the two types of jets.

  5. An experimental measurement of metal multilayer x-ray reflectivity degradation due to intense x-ray flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.Y.P.

    1987-06-01

    The degradation of the x-ray reflection characteristics of metal multilayer Bragg diffractors due to intense x-ray flux was investigated. The Z-pinch plasma produced by PROTO II of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was used as the source. The plasma generated total x-ray yields of as much as 40 kJ with up to 15 kJ in the neon hydrogen- and helium-like resonance lines in nominal 20-ns pulses. Molybdenum-carbon, palladium-carbon, and tungsten-carbon metal multilayers were placed at 15 and 150 cm from the plasma center. The multilayers were at nominal angles of 5/sup 0/ and 10/sup 0/ to diffract the neon resonance lines. The time-integrated x-ray reflection of the metal multilayers was monitored by x-ray film. A fluorescer-fiber optic-visible streak camera detector system was then used to monitor the time-resolved x-ray reflection characteristics of 135 A- 2d tungsten-carbon multilayers. A large specular component in the reflectivity prevented determination of the rocking curve of the multilayer. For a neon implosion onto a vanadium-doped polyacrylic acid foam target shot, detailed modeling was attempted. The spectral flux was determined with data from 5 XRD channels and deconvolved using the code SHAZAM. The observed decay in reflectivity was assumed to correspond to the melting of the first tungsten layer. A ''conduction factor'' of 82 was required to manipulate the heat loading of the first tungsten layer such that the time of melting corresponded to the observed decay. The power at destruction was 141 MW/cm/sup 2/ and the integrated energy at destruction was 2.0 J/cm/sup 2/. 82 refs., 66 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Models of Heliospheric solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra

    2016-04-01

    The first models of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray production in the heliosphere were developed shortly after the discovery of SWCX emission at the end of 1990s. Since then, continuous monitoring of the global solar wind evolution through the solar cycle has allowed better constraints on its interaction with the interstellar neutrals. We have a fairly accurate description of the interstellar neutral density distributions in interplanetary space. However, the solar wind heavy ion fluxes, and especially their short term variability and propagation through interplanetary space, have remained relatively elusive due to the sparseness or lack of in situ data, especially towards high ecliptic latitudes. In this talk, I will present a summary the heliospheric SWCX modeling efforts, and an overview of the global solar cycle variability of heliospheric SWCX emission, while commenting on the difficulties of modeling the real-time variability of the heliospheric X-ray signal.

  7. EVIDENCE FOR POLAR X-RAY JETS AS SOURCES OF MICROSTREAM PEAKS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, Marcia

    2012-05-01

    It is proposed that the interplanetary manifestations of X-ray jets observed in solar polar coronal holes during periods of low solar activity are the peaks of the so-called microstreams observed in the fast polar solar wind. These microstreams exhibit velocity fluctuations of {+-}35 km s{sup -1}, higher kinetic temperatures, slightly higher proton fluxes, and slightly higher abundances of the low-first-ionization-potential element iron relative to oxygen ions than the average polar wind. Those properties can all be explained if the fast microstreams result from the magnetic reconnection of bright-point loops, which leads to X-ray jets which, in turn, result in solar polar plumes. Because most of the microstream peaks are bounded by discontinuities of solar origin, jets are favored over plumes for the majority of the microstream peaks.

  8. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Calculations of K alpha line emission from S, Ar, Ca and Fe are presented. It is reported that on the basis of data for hard X-ray bursts, the flux during most impulsive, non-thermal events is likely to be weak, though for a few strong bursts, a flux of approximately 100 photons/cm/s may be expected. The amount of S K alpha emission particularly is sensitively dependent on the value of the lower energy bound of the non-thermal electron distribution, offering a possible means of determining this. Thermal K alpha emission is only significant for Fe ions. The calculated thermal K alpha radiation is much less than that observed during an intense soft X-ray burst. It is concluded that a detailed temperature structure for the emission source is required in order to explain the discrepancy.

  9. The need for hard X-ray imaging observations at the next solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1988-01-01

    Canonical models of solar hard X-ray bursts; associated length and time scales; the adequacies and inadequacies of previous observations; theoretical modeling predictions; arcsecond imaging of solar hard X-rays are outlined.

  10. Goldhelox: a soft x-ray solar telescope.

    PubMed

    Durfee, D S; Moody, J W; Brady, K D; Brown, C; Campbell, B; Durfee, M K; Early, D; Hansen, E; Madsen, D W; Morey, D B; Roming, P W; Savage, M B; Eastman, P F; Jensen, V

    1995-01-01

    The Goldhelox Project is the construction and use of a near-normal incidence soft x-ray robotic solar telescope by undergraduate students at Brigham Young University. Once it is completed and tested, it will be deployed from a Get-Away-Special (GAS) canister in the bay of a space shuttle. It will image the sun at a wavelength of 171-181Å with a time resolution of 1 sec and a spatial resolution of 2.5 arcsec. The observational bandpass was chosen to image x-rays from highly ionized coronal Fe lines. The data will be an aid in better understanding the beginning phases of solar flares and how flaring relates to the physics of the corona-chromosphere transition region. Goldhelox is tentatively scheduled to fly on a space shuttle sometime in 1995 or 1996. This paper outlines the project goals, basic instrument design, and the unique aspects of making this an undergraduate endeavor. PMID:21307474

  11. Trends in NOAA Solar X-ray Imager Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Steven M.; Darnell, John A.; Seaton, Daniel B.

    2016-05-01

    NOAA has provided operational soft X-ray imaging of the sun since the early 2000’s. After 15 years of observations by four different telescopes, it is appropriate to examine the data in terms of providing consistent context for scientific missions. In particular, this presentation examines over 7 million GOES Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) images for trends in performance parameters including dark current, response degradation, and inter-calibration. Because observations from the instrument have overlapped not only with each other, but also with research observations like Yohkoh SXT and Hinode XRT, relative performance comparisons can be made. The first GOES Solar X-ray Imager was launched in 2001 and entered operations in 2003. The current SXIs will remain in operations until approximately 2020, when a new series of Solar (extreme-)Ultraviolet Imagers (SUVIs) will replace them as the current satellites reach their end of life. In the sense that the SXIs are similar to Yokoh’s SXT and Hinode’s XRT, the SUVI instruments will be similar to SOHO’s EIT and SDO’s AIA. The move to narrowband EUV imagers will better support eventual operational estimation of plasma conditions. While NOAA’s principal use of these observations is real-time space weather forecasting, they will continue to provide a reliable context measurement for researchers for decades to come.

  12. SphinX: The Solar Photometer in X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gburek, Szymon; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Kordylewski, Zbigniew; Podgorski, Piotr; Plocieniak, Stefan; Siarkowski, Marek; Sylwester, Barbara; Trzebinski, Witold; Kuzin, Sergey V.; Pertsov, Andrey A.; Kotov, Yurij D.; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2013-04-01

    Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was a spectrophotometer developed to observe the Sun in soft X-rays. The instrument observed in the energy range ≈ 1 - 15 keV with resolution ≈ 0.4 keV. SphinX was flown on the Russian CORONAS-PHOTON satellite placed inside the TESIS EUV and X telescope assembly. The spacecraft launch took place on 30 January 2009 at 13:30 UT at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Russia. The SphinX experiment mission began a couple of weeks later on 20 February 2009 when the first telemetry dumps were received. The mission ended nine months later on 29 November 2009 when data transmission was terminated. SphinX provided an excellent set of observations during very low solar activity. This was indeed the period in which solar activity dropped to the lowest level observed in X-rays ever. The SphinX instrument design, construction, and operation principle are described. Information on SphinX data repositories, dissemination methods, format, and calibration is given together with general recommendations for data users. Scientific research areas in which SphinX data find application are reviewed.

  13. The correlation timescale of the X-ray flux during the outbursts of soft X-ray transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuxiang; Yu, Wenfei; Li, Tipei

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of black hole and neutron star low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) show a positive correlation between the X-ray flux at which the low/hard(LH)-to-high/soft(HS) state transition occurs and the peak flux of the following HS state. By analyzing the data from the All Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we show that the HS state flux after the source reaches its HS flux peak still correlates with the transition flux during soft X-ray transient (SXT) outbursts. By studying large outbursts or flares of GX 339-4, Aql X-1 and 4U 1705-44, we have found that the correlation holds up to 250, 40, and 50 d after the LH-to-HS state transition, respectively. These time scales correspond to the viscous time scale in a standard accretion disk around a stellar mass black hole or a neutron star at a radius of ˜104-5 R g, indicating that the mass accretion rates in the accretion flow either correlate over a large range of radii at a given time or correlate over a long period of time at a given radius. If the accretion geometry is a two-flow geometry composed of a sub-Keplerian inflow or outflow and a disk flow in the LH state, the disk flow with a radius up to ˜105 R g would have contributed to the nearly instantaneous non-thermal radiation directly or indirectly, and therefore affects the time when the state transition occurs.

  14. THE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR FLARES OVER THREE SOLAR CYCLES USING GOES X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Daniel F.; Gallagher, Peter T.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Dennis, Brian R.; Kim Tolbert, A.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Alex Young, C.

    2012-10-15

    Solar flare X-ray emission results from rapidly increasing temperatures and emission measures in flaring active region loops. To date, observations from the X-Ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) have been used to derive these properties, but have been limited by a number of factors, including the lack of a consistent background subtraction method capable of being automatically applied to large numbers of flares. In this paper, we describe an automated Temperature and Emission measure-Based Background Subtraction method (TEBBS), that builds on the methods of Bornmann. Our algorithm ensures that the derived temperature is always greater than the instrumental limit and the pre-flare background temperature, and that the temperature and emission measure are increasing during the flare rise phase. Additionally, TEBBS utilizes the improved estimates of GOES temperatures and emission measures from White et al. TEBBS was successfully applied to over 50,000 solar flares occurring over nearly three solar cycles (1980-2007), and used to create an extensive catalog of the solar flare thermal properties. We confirm that the peak emission measure and total radiative losses scale with background subtracted GOES X-ray flux as power laws, while the peak temperature scales logarithmically. As expected, the peak emission measure shows an increasing trend with peak temperature, although the total radiative losses do not. While these results are comparable to previous studies, we find that flares of a given GOES class have lower peak temperatures and higher peak emission measures than previously reported. The TEBBS database of flare thermal plasma properties is publicly available at http://www.SolarMonitor.org/TEBBS/.

  15. The Galactic plane at faint X-ray fluxes - I. Properties and characteristics of the X-ray source population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R. S.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Byckling, K.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the serendipitous X-ray source population revealed in XMM-Newton observations targeted in the Galactic plane within the region 315° < l < 45° and |b| < 2?. Our study focuses on a sample of 2204 X-ray sources at intermediate to faint fluxes, which were detected in a total of 116 XMM-Newton fields and are listed in the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalog. We characterize each source as spectrally soft or hard on the basis of whether the bulk of the recorded counts have energies below or above 2 keV and find that the sample divides roughly equally (56 per cent:44 per cent) into these soft and hard categories. The X-ray spectral form underlying the soft sources may be represented as either a power-law continuum with Γ˜ 2.5 or a thermal spectrum with kT˜ 0.5 keV, with NH ranging from 1020 to 1022 cm-2. For the hard sources, a significantly harder continuum form is likely, that is, Γ˜ 1, with NH= 1022-1024 cm-2. For ˜50 per cent of the hard sources, the inferred column density is commensurate with the total Galactic line-of-sight value; many of these sources will be located at significant distances across the Galaxy, implying a hard-band luminosity LX > 1032 erg s-1, whereas some will be extragalactic interlopers. A high fraction (≳90 per cent) of the soft sources have potential near-infrared (NIR) (Two-Micron All-Sky Survey and/or United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey) counterparts inside their error circles, consistent with the dominant soft-X-ray-source population being relatively nearby coronally-active stars. These stellar counterparts are generally brighter than J= 16, a brightness cut-off which corresponds to the saturation of the X-ray coronal emission at LX= 10-3 Lbol. In contrast, the success rate in finding likely IR counterparts to the hard X-ray sample is no more than ≈15 per cent down to J= 16 and ≈25 per cent down to J= 20, set against a rapidly rising chance coincidence rate. The make-up of the hard-X-ray

  16. The NOAA GOES-12 Solar X-ray Imager (SXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. M.; Pizzo, V. J.; Wilkinson, D. C.; Davis, J. M.

    2001-05-01

    The Solar X-ray Imager (SXI), planned for launch in July 2001 on NOAA's GOES-12 satellite, will provide nearly uninterrupted, full-disk, soft X-ray solar movies, with a continuous frame rate significantly exceeding that for previous similar instruments. The SXI provides images with a one-minute cadence and a single-image (adjustable) dynamic range near 100. A set of metallic thin-film filters provides a degree of temperature discrimination in the 0.6-6.0 nm bandpass. The spatial resolution of approximately 10 arcseconds FWHM is sampled with 5 arcsecond pixels. NOAA's operational space weather forecasting requirements drive the observing sequences toward long-term uniformity. This will yield an excellent standardized set of contextual data products for the historical record. Sequences can be selected or modified based on solar activity levels. Data products will be made available to the research community via NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center World Wide Web site in near real-time (minutes). Among the data products are raw and calibrated images in SolarSoft compliant FITS format. Other data products will include multiple image products such as standardized movies at fixed UT times and wide dynamic range composite images. The Web interface is designed to be user friendly, providing a range of search and preview capabilities.

  17. Pulse pile-up in hard X-ray detector systems. [for solar X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    When pulse-height spectra are measured by a nuclear detection system at high counting rates, the probability that two or more pulses will arrive within the resolving time of the system is significant. This phenomenon, pulse pile-up, distorts the pulse-height spectrum and must be considered in the interpretation of spectra taken at high counting rates. A computational technique for the simulation of pile-up is developed. The model is examined in the three regimes where (1) the time between pulses is long compared to the detector-system resolving time, (2) the time between pulses is comparable to the resolving time, and (3) many pulses occur within the resolving time. The technique is used to model the solar hard X-ray experiment on the OSO-7 satellite; comparison of the model with data taken during three large flares shows excellent agreement. The paper also describes rule-of-thumb tests for pile-up and identifies the important detector design factors for minimizing pile-up, i.e., thick entrance windows and short resolving times in the system electronics.

  18. The impulsive hard X-rays from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, J.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for determining the physical arrangement of a solar flare during the impulsive phase was developed based upon a nonthermal model interpretation of the emitted hard X-rays. Accurate values are obtained for the flare parameters, including those which describe the magnetic field structure and the beaming of the energetic electrons, parameters which have hitherto been mostly inaccessible. The X-ray intensity height structure can be described readily with a single expression based upon a semi-empirical fit to the results from many models. Results show that the degree of linear polarization of the X-rays from a flaring loop does not exceed 25 percent and can easily and naturally be as low as the polarization expected from a thermal model. This is a highly significant result in that it supersedes those based upon less thorough calculations of the electron beam dynamics and requires that a reevaluation of hopes of using polarization measurements to discriminate between categories of flare models.

  19. Observation of the X-ray source Sco X-1 from Skylab. [radiant flux density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt to observe the discrete X-ray source Sco X-1 on 20 September 1973 between 0856 and 0920 UT is reported. Data obtained with the ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer, in particular the flux observed with the 1.71 to 4.96 KeV counter, is analyzed. No photographic image of the source was obtained because Sco X-1 was outside the field of view of the X-ray telescope.

  20. Soft X-ray variability over the present minimum of solar activity as observed by SphinX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Kepa, A.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Bakala, J.; Podgorski, P.; Kordylewski, Z.; Plocieniak, S.; Sylwester, B.; Trzebinski, W.; Kuzin, S.

    2011-04-01

    Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) is an instrument designed to observe the Sun in X-rays in the energy range 0.85-15.00 keV. SphinX is incorporated within the Russian TESIS X and EUV telescope complex aboard the CORONAS-Photon satellite which was launched on January 30, 2009 at 13:30 UT from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome, northern Russia. Since February, 2009 SphinX has been measuring solar X-ray radiation nearly continuously. The principle of SphinX operation and the content of the instrument data archives is studied. Issues related to dissemination of SphinX calibration, data, repository mirrors locations, types of data and metadata are discussed. Variability of soft X-ray solar flux is studied using data collected by SphinX over entire mission duration.

  1. TESTING EUV/X-RAY ATOMIC DATA FOR THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, Paola; Drake, Jeremy J.; Landi, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) include spectral windows in the X-ray/EUV band. Accuracy and completeness of the atomic data in this wavelength range is essential for interpretation of the spectrum and irradiance of the solar corona, and of SDO observations made with the AIA and EVE instruments. Here, we test the X-ray/EUV data in the CHIANTI database to assess their completeness and accuracy in the SDO bands, with particular focus on the 94 A and 131 A AIA passbands. Given the paucity of solar observations adequate for this purpose, we use high-resolution X-ray spectra of the low-activity solar-like corona of Procyon obtained with the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS). We find that while spectral models overall can reproduce quite well the observed spectra in the soft X-ray range {lambda} {approx}< 50 A, and at the EUV wavelengths {lambda} {approx}> 130 A, they significantly underestimate the observed flux in the 50-130 A wavelength range. The model underestimates the observed flux by a variable factor ranging from Almost-Equal-To 1.5, at short wavelengths below {approx}50 A, up to Almost-Equal-To 5-7 in the {approx}70-125 A range. In the AIA bands covered by LETGS, i.e., 94 A and 131 A, we find that the observed flux can be underestimated by large factors ({approx}3 and {approx}1.9, respectively, for the case of Procyon presented here). We discuss the consequences for analysis of AIA data and possible empirical corrections to the AIA responses to model more realistically the coronal emission in these passbands.

  2. The X-Ray through Optical Fluxes and Line Strengths of Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Nathaniel; Kasen, Daniel; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    We study the emission from tidal disruption events (TDEs) produced as radiation from black hole accretion propagates through an extended, optically thick envelope formed from stellar debris. We analytically describe key physics controlling spectrum formation, and present detailed radiative transfer calculations that model the spectral energy distribution and optical line strengths of TDEs near peak brightness. The steady-state transfer is coupled to a solver for the excitation and ionization states of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen (as a representative metal), without assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Our calculations show how an extended envelope can reprocess a fraction of soft X-rays and produce the observed optical fluxes of the order of 1043 erg s-1, with an optical/UV continuum that is not described by a single blackbody. Variations in the mass or size of the envelope may help explain how the optical flux changes over time with roughly constant color. For high enough accretion luminosities, X-rays can escape to be observed simultaneously with the optical flux. Due to optical depth effects, hydrogen Balmer line emission is often strongly suppressed relative to helium line emission (with He ii-to-H line ratios of at least 5:1 in some cases) even in the disruption of a solar-composition star. We discuss the implications of our results to understanding the type of stars destroyed in TDEs and the physical processes responsible for producing the observed flares.

  3. The X-Ray through Optical Fluxes and Line Strengths of Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Nathaniel; Kasen, Daniel; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    We study the emission from tidal disruption events (TDEs) produced as radiation from black hole accretion propagates through an extended, optically thick envelope formed from stellar debris. We analytically describe key physics controlling spectrum formation, and present detailed radiative transfer calculations that model the spectral energy distribution and optical line strengths of TDEs near peak brightness. The steady-state transfer is coupled to a solver for the excitation and ionization states of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen (as a representative metal), without assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Our calculations show how an extended envelope can reprocess a fraction of soft X-rays and produce the observed optical fluxes of the order of 1043 erg s‑1, with an optical/UV continuum that is not described by a single blackbody. Variations in the mass or size of the envelope may help explain how the optical flux changes over time with roughly constant color. For high enough accretion luminosities, X-rays can escape to be observed simultaneously with the optical flux. Due to optical depth effects, hydrogen Balmer line emission is often strongly suppressed relative to helium line emission (with He ii-to-H line ratios of at least 5:1 in some cases) even in the disruption of a solar-composition star. We discuss the implications of our results to understanding the type of stars destroyed in TDEs and the physical processes responsible for producing the observed flares.

  4. Radiative transfer of X-rays in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of resonance scattering of X-ray emission lines in the solar corona is investigated. For the resonance lines of some helium-like ions, significant optical depths are reached over distances small compared with the size of typical coronal features. A general integral equation for the transfer of resonance-line radiation under solar coronal conditions is derived. This expression is in a form useful for modeling the complex three-dimensional temperature and density structure of coronal active regions. The transfer equation is then cast in a form illustrating the terms which give rise to the attenuation or enhancement of the resonance-line intensity. The source function for helium-like oxygen (O VII) under coronal conditions is computed and discussed in terms of the relative importance of scattering.

  5. Multiple angle measurement and modeling of M-band x-ray fluxes from vacuum hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Li, Shanwei; Li, Zhichao; Jing, Longfei; Xie, Xufei; Jiang, Xiaohua; Yang, Dong; Du, Huabin; Hou, Lifei; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Hu, Guangyue; Zheng, Jian

    2016-09-01

    The energetics experiment of vacuum gold hohlraums is implemented on the Shenguang-II laser facility. The total and M-band x-ray fluxes from the laser entrance holes are measured by the flat response x-ray diodes which are set at multiple angles with respect to the axis of the hohlraums. The measured M-band fractions are from 5.72% to 7.71%, which present a specific angular distribution. Based on the fact that the M-band x-rays are mainly emitted from the under-dense high-temperature plasmas, a simplified model is developed to give a quantitative prediction of the intensity, temporal behavior, and angular distribution of the M-band x-ray flux. The results obtained with our model are in good agreement with the experimental data, showing that our model can be a useful tool for M-band x-ray investigation.

  6. Soft X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The soft X-ray emissions ( hν>1.5 keV) of solar flares mainly come from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the overwhelming bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 749, L16, 2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES ( Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. In this article we analyse the suitability of the GOES data for this type of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after September, 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend the result of Dolla et al. to a complete list of X-class flares from Cycle 24 and show that most of them (80 %) display QPPs in the impulsive phase. The pulsations show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES data, making use of time-series of irradiance differences (the digital time derivative on the 2-s sampling). We deploy different techniques to characterise the periodicity of GOES pulsations, considering the red-noise properties of the flare signals, finding a range of characteristic time scales of the QPPs for each event, but usually with no strong signature of a single period dominating in the power spectrum. The QPP may also appear on somewhat longer time scales during the later gradual phase, possibly with a greater tendency towards coherence, but the sampling noise in GOES difference data for high irradiance values (X-class flares) makes these more uncertain. We show that there is minimal phase difference between the differenced GOES energy channels, or between them and the hard X-ray variations on short time scales. During the impulsive phase, the footpoints of the newly forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations.

  7. A Comparative View of X-rays from the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ron; Gladstone, Randy; Cravens, Tom; Waite, Hunter; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Dennerl, Konrad; Lisse, Carey; Kharchenko, Vasili

    2005-01-01

    With the advent of sophisticated X-ray observatories, viz., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary X-ray astronomy is advancing at a faster pace. Several new solar system objects are now know to shine in X-rays at energies generally below 2 keV. Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth, all three magnetized planets, have been observed by Chandra and XMM-Newton. At Jupiter, both auroral and non-auroral disk X-ray emissions have been observed. The first soft X-ray observation of Earth's aurora by Chandra shows that it is highly variable. X-rays have been detected from Saturn's disk, but no convincing evidence of X-ray aurora has been seen. Several comets have been observed in X-rays by Chandra and XMM-Newton. Cometary X-rays are produced due to change exchange of solar wind ions with cold cometary neutrals. Soft X-rays have also been observed from Venus, Mars, Moon, Io, Europa, Io plasma torus, and heliosphere. The non-auroral X-ray emissions from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth, and those from sunlit disk of Mars, Venus, and Moon are produced due to scattering of solar X-rays. The spectral characteristics of X-ray emission from comets, heliosphere, darkside of Moon, and Martian halo are quite similar, but they appear to be quite different from those of Jovian auroral X-rays. The X- ray aurora on Earth is generated by electron bremsstrahlung and on Jupiter by precipitation of highly-ionized energetic heavy ions. In this paper we will present a comparative overview of X-ray emission from different solar system objects and make an attempt to synthesize a coherent picture.

  8. THE X-RAY FLUX DISTRIBUTION OF SAGITTARIUS A* AS SEEN BY CHANDRA

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, J.; Markoff, S.; Nowak, M. A.; Baganoff, F. K.; Dexter, J.; Witzel, G.; Barrière, N.; Li, Y.; Degenaar, N.; Fragile, P. C.; Gammie, C.; Goldwurm, A.; Grosso, N.; Haggard, D.

    2015-02-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the X-ray flux distribution of Sgr A* from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's 3 Ms Sgr A* X-ray Visionary Project in 2012. Our analysis indicates that the observed X-ray flux distribution can be decomposed into a steady quiescent component, represented by a Poisson process with rate Q = (5.24 ± 0.08) × 10{sup –3} counts s{sup –1}, and a variable component, represented by a power law process (dN/dF∝F {sup –ξ}, ξ=1.92{sub −0.02}{sup +0.03}). This slope matches our recently reported distribution of flare luminosities. The variability may also be described by a log-normal process with a median unabsorbed 2-8 keV flux of 1.8{sub −0.6}{sup +0.8}×10{sup −14} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} and a shape parameter σ = 2.4 ± 0.2, but the power law provides a superior description of the data. In this decomposition of the flux distribution, all of the intrinsic X-ray variability of Sgr A* (spanning at least three orders of magnitude in flux) can be attributed to flaring activity, likely in the inner accretion flow. We confirm that at the faint end, the variable component contributes ∼10% of the apparent quiescent flux, as previously indicated by our statistical analysis of X-ray flares in these Chandra observations. Our flux distribution provides a new and important observational constraint on theoretical models of Sgr A*, and we use simple radiation models to explore the extent to which a statistical comparison of the X-ray and infrared can provide insights into the physics of the X-ray emission mechanism.

  9. Ionospheric Effects of X-Ray Solar Bursts in the Brazilian Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker-Guedes, F.; Takahashi, H.; Costa, J. E.; Otsuka, Y.

    2011-12-01

    When the solar X-ray flux in the interplanetary medium reaches values above a certain threshold, some undesired effects affecting radio communications are expected. Basically, the magnitudes of these effects depend on the X-ray peak brightness and duration, which drive the intensity of the ionosphere response when the associated electromagnetic wave hit the sunlit side of the Earth atmosphere. An important aspect defining the severity of damages to HF radio communications and LF navigation signals in a certain area is the local time when each event takes place. In order to create more accurate warnings referred to possible radio signal loss or degradation in the Brazilian sector, we analyze TEC maps obtained by a GPS network, formed by dual-frequency receivers spread all over the country, to observe ionospheric local changes during several X-ray events in the 0.1-0.8 nm range measured by GOES satellite. Considering the duration, peak brightness, and local time of the events, the final purpose of this study is to understand and predict the degree of changes suffered by the ionosphere during these X-ray bursts. We intend using these results to create a radio blackout warning product to be offered by the Brazilian space weather program named EMBRACE (Estudo e Monitoramento BRAsileiro do Clima Espacial): Brazilian Monitoring and Study of Space Weather.

  10. G-133: A soft X ray solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Memorie K.; Campbell, Branton; Roming, Peter W. A.; Spute, Mark K.; Moody, J. Ward

    1992-10-01

    The GOLDHELOX Project, NASA payload number G-133, is a robotic soft x ray solar telescope designed and built by an organization of undergraduate students. The telescope is designed to observe the sun at a wavelength of 171 to 181 A. Since we require observations free from atmospheric interference, the telescope will be launched in a NASA Get-Away-Special (GAS) canister with a Motorized Door Assembly (MDA). In this paper we primarily discuss the most important elements of the telescope itself. We also elaborate on some of the technical difficulties associated with doing good science in space on a small budget (about $100,000) and mention ways in which controlling the instrument environment has reduced the complexity of the system and thus saved us money.

  11. G-133: A soft x ray solar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Memorie K.; Campbell, Branton; Roming, Peter W. A.; Spute, Mark K.; Moody, J. Ward

    1992-01-01

    The GOLDHELOX Project, NASA payload number G-133, is a robotic soft x ray solar telescope designed and built by an organization of undergraduate students. The telescope is designed to observe the sun at a wavelength of 171 to 181 A. Since we require observations free from atmospheric interference, the telescope will be launched in a NASA Get-Away-Special (GAS) canister with a Motorized Door Assembly (MDA). In this paper we primarily discuss the most important elements of the telescope itself. We also elaborate on some of the technical difficulties associated with doing good science in space on a small budget (about $100,000) and mention ways in which controlling the instrument environment has reduced the complexity of the system and thus saved us money.

  12. MESSENGER soft X-ray observations of the quiet solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Richard A.; Hudson, Hugh S.; Tolbert, Anne K; Dennis, Brian R.

    2014-06-01

    In a remarkable result from their "SphinX" experiment, Sylwester et al. (2012) found a non-varying base level of soft X-ray emission at the quietest times in 2009. We describe comparable data from the soft X-ray monitor on board MESSENGER (en route to Mercury) which had excellent coverage both in 2009 and during the true solar minimum of 2008. These observations overlap SphinX's and also are often exactly at Sun-MESSENGER-Earth conjunctions. During solar minimum the Sun-MESSENGER distance varied substantially, allowing us to use the inverse-square law to help distinguish the aperture flux (ie, solar X-rays) from that due to sources of background in the 2-5 keV range. The MESSENGER data show a non-varying background level for many months in 2008 when no active regions were present. We compare these data in detail with those from SphinX. Both sets of data reveal a different behavior when magnetic active regions are present on the Sun, and when they are not.Reference: Sylwester et al., ApJ 751, 111 (2012)

  13. EXACT – The Solar X-Ray Spectrometer CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Trevor; Glesener, Lindsay; Gebre-Egziabher, Demoz; Vogt, Ryan; Denis, Charles; Weiher, Hannah; Runnels, Joel; Vievering, Juliana

    2016-05-01

    The Experiment for X-ray Characterization and Timing (EXACT) mission will be a CubeSat based hard X-ray spectrometer used for viewing solar flares with high time precision. Solar flares and the related coronal mass ejections affect space weather and the near-Earth environment. EXACT can study the hard X-rays generated by the Sun in the declining phase of Solar Cycle 24 in order to probe electron acceleration in solar eruptive events while also serving as a precursor to future hard X-ray spectrometers that could monitor the Sun continuously.

  14. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV. PMID:27131669

  15. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  16. Miniature lightweight x-ray optics (MiXO) for solar system exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Romaine, S.

    2014-07-01

    Over the last few decades, grazing incidence X-ray optics have been a pivotal tool for advances in X-ray astronomy. They have been successfully employed in many great observatories such as ROSAT, Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton. In planetary science, X-ray observations of Solar system objects are a great tool to understand the nature of the target bodies and the evolutionary history of the Solar system as a whole. To date, X-ray observations in near-target planetary missions have been limited to collimator-based instruments due to tight mass and volume constraints, arising from the multi-instrument nature of planetary missions. In addition, unlike observations of astrophysical sources at virtually infinite distances, near-target observations of planetary bodies introduce a unique set of challenges. While true focusing X-ray optics can overcome these challenges, a practical implementation of focusing X-ray optics for planetary missions depends on the feasibility of compact lightweight X-ray optics. We review scientific motivations for X-ray observations of planetary bodies and illustrate the unique challenges encountered in planetary missions through a few examples. We introduce a new metal-ceramic hybrid technology for X-ray mirrors that can enable compact lightweight Wolter-I X-ray optics suitable for resource limited planetary missions.

  17. Frequency distributions and correlations of solar X-ray flare parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, Norma B.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1993-01-01

    Frequency distributions of flare parameters are determined from over 12,000 solar flares. The flare duration, the peak counting rate, the peak hard X-ray flux, the total energy in electrons, and the peak energy flux in electrons are among the parameters studied. Linear regression fits, as well as the slopes of the frequency distributions, are used to determine the correlations between these parameters. The relationship between the variations of the frequency distributions and the solar activity cycle is also investigated. Theoretical models for the frequency distribution of flare parameters are dependent on the probability of flaring and the temporal evolution of the flare energy build-up. The results of this study are consistent with stochastic flaring and exponential energy build-up. The average build-up time constant is found to be 0.5 times the mean time between flares.

  18. A CATALOG OF SOLAR X-RAY PLASMA EJECTIONS OBSERVED BY THE SOFT X-RAY TELESCOPE ON BOARD YOHKOH

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczak, M.; Chmielewska, E. E-mail: chmielewska@astro.uni.wroc.pl

    2012-03-01

    A catalog of X-ray plasma ejections (XPEs) observed by the Soft X-ray Telescope on board the Yohkoh satellite has been recently developed in the Astronomical Institute of University of Wroclaw. The catalog contains records of 368 events observed in years 1991-2001 including movies and cross-references to associated events like flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). One hundred sixty-three XPEs out of 368 in the catalog were not reported until now. A new classification scheme of XPEs is proposed in which morphology, kinematics, and recurrence are considered. The relation between individual subclasses of XPEs and the associated events was investigated. The results confirm that XPEs are strongly inhomogeneous, responding to different processes that occur in the solar corona. A subclass of erupting loop-like XPEs is a promising candidate to be a high-temperature precursor of CMEs.

  19. Influence of solar flare X-rays on the habitability on the Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rajmal; Awasthi, Arun K.; Tripathi, Sharad C.; Bhatt, Nipa J.; Khan, Parvaiz A.

    2012-08-01

    We probe the lethality of X-rays from solar flares to organisms on Mars based on the observations of 10 solar flares. We, firstly, estimate the doses produced by the strong flares observed by the RHESSI and GOES missions during the descending phase of sunspot cycle 23. Next, in order to realize the dependence of dose on flux and steepness of spectra, we model the incident spectra over a wide range of spectral index to estimate dose values and compare them with the observed doses. We calculate the distribution of surficial spectra visible to organisms on the martian surface by employing attenuation of X-rays due to CO2 column densities distribution over the South Pole. The surficial flux distribution after folding with the opacity of water enables us to estimate the dose distribution over the South Pole. The dose measured from the surficial spectrum produced by the observed 10 flares corresponding to the latitudes 50-60°, 60-70°, 70-80° and 80-90°S varies in the range of 6.39 × 10-9-1.80 × 10-6; 4.89 × 10-10-5.21 × 10-8; 5.10 × 10-11-5.20 × 10-9 and 4.42 × 10-10-4.89 × 10-12 gray (1 gray = 104 erg/g) respectively. Comparing the measured as well as the modeled doses with those proposed to be lethal for various organisms by Smith and Scalo (Smith, D.S., Scalo, J. [2007]. Planet. Space Sci. 55, 517-527); we report that the habitability of life on the South Pole remains unaffected even by the strongest solar flare occurred during descending phase of solar cycle 23. Further, the monthly integrated energy released by the solar flares in the most productive month viz. October 2003 and January 2005 from the GOES soft X-ray observations is estimated to be 8.43 and 3.32 × 1032 ergs respectively, which is almost equal in order to the typical energy released by a single strong X-class flare. Therefore, we propose the life near the South Pole region on the Mars remain uninfluenced by X-ray emission even during monster phenomena of energy release on the Sun and

  20. Ground calibrations of the Solar Intensity X-ray Spectrometer (SIXS) on board BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtolainen, A.; Alha, L.; Huovelin, J.; Moissl, R.; Korpela, S.; Andersson, H.; Kuparinen, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the methods, results, and analysis of the BepiColombo SIXS instruments' ground calibrations. The aim of these calibrations was to characterize the performance of the three SIXS X-ray detectors to enable reliable spectral analysis of the solar X-ray data. The ground calibrations for characterizing the performance of the three separate HPSi (High-Purity Silicon) PIN (Positive Intrinsic Negative) X-ray detectors included the following tasks. Determination of the energy resolution as a function of photon energy at different operational temperatures, determination of the detector sensitivity within the FoV (Field of View) as a function of the off-axis and roll angles, pile-up tests for determining the speed of the read out electronics, measurements of the low energy threshold of the energy scale, i.e. the minimum measurable photon energy corresponding to the adjustable software parameter, a comparison calibration of the fluorescence line fluxes with the SMART-1 XSM FS (Flight Spare) detector, and determination of the shifting of the energy scale as a function of the ambient temperature. We also describe the method and results of determining the geometrical area of the detector apertures based on the image analysis of very high resolution photographs obtained with by the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

  1. Small-scale filament eruptions as the driver of X-ray jets in solar coronal holes.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Alphonse C; Moore, Ronald L; Falconer, David A; Adams, Mitzi

    2015-07-23

    Solar X-ray jets are thought to be made by a burst of reconnection of closed magnetic field at the base of a jet with ambient open field. In the accepted version of the 'emerging-flux' model, such a reconnection occurs at a plasma current sheet between the open field and the emerging closed field, and also forms a localized X-ray brightening that is usually observed at the edge of the jet's base. Here we report high-resolution X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of 20 randomly selected X-ray jets that form in coronal holes at the Sun's poles. In each jet, contrary to the emerging-flux model, a miniature version of the filament eruptions that initiate coronal mass ejections drives the jet-producing reconnection. The X-ray bright point occurs by reconnection of the 'legs' of the minifilament-carrying erupting closed field, analogous to the formation of solar flares in larger-scale eruptions. Previous observations have found that some jets are driven by base-field eruptions, but only one such study, of only one jet, provisionally questioned the emerging-flux model. Our observations support the view that solar filament eruptions are formed by a fundamental explosive magnetic process that occurs on a vast range of scales, from the biggest mass ejections and flare eruptions down to X-ray jets, and perhaps even down to smaller jets that may power coronal heating. A similar scenario has previously been suggested, but was inferred from different observations and based on a different origin of the erupting minifilament.

  2. Small-scale filament eruptions as the driver of X-ray jets in solar coronal holes.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Alphonse C; Moore, Ronald L; Falconer, David A; Adams, Mitzi

    2015-07-23

    Solar X-ray jets are thought to be made by a burst of reconnection of closed magnetic field at the base of a jet with ambient open field. In the accepted version of the 'emerging-flux' model, such a reconnection occurs at a plasma current sheet between the open field and the emerging closed field, and also forms a localized X-ray brightening that is usually observed at the edge of the jet's base. Here we report high-resolution X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of 20 randomly selected X-ray jets that form in coronal holes at the Sun's poles. In each jet, contrary to the emerging-flux model, a miniature version of the filament eruptions that initiate coronal mass ejections drives the jet-producing reconnection. The X-ray bright point occurs by reconnection of the 'legs' of the minifilament-carrying erupting closed field, analogous to the formation of solar flares in larger-scale eruptions. Previous observations have found that some jets are driven by base-field eruptions, but only one such study, of only one jet, provisionally questioned the emerging-flux model. Our observations support the view that solar filament eruptions are formed by a fundamental explosive magnetic process that occurs on a vast range of scales, from the biggest mass ejections and flare eruptions down to X-ray jets, and perhaps even down to smaller jets that may power coronal heating. A similar scenario has previously been suggested, but was inferred from different observations and based on a different origin of the erupting minifilament. PMID:26147079

  3. X-ray studies of solar system objects: now and the next decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2016-06-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra have revealed the multiplicity of X-ray emissions from planets, comets and minor bodies in our solar system. This presentation will review the main findings so far and will look forward to the unique contributions that XMM-Newton can continue to provide in solar system exploration. As a prime example, Jupiter's polar regions show bright soft X-ray aurorae with a line-rich spectrum arising from charge exchange interactions of atmospheric neutrals with local and/or solar wind high charge-state heavy ions. At energies above ˜3 keV the auroral X-ray spectrum is featureless, pointing to an origin from electron bremsstrahlung. Jupiter's atmosphere scatters solar X-rays, so that the planet's disk displays an X-ray spectrum that closely resembles that of solar flares. The arrival of Juno at Jupiter this July will enable in situ measurements simultaneous with XMM-Newton observations, offering unique opportunities to validate models developed to describe the planet's behaviour. Unlike Jupiter, Mars and Venus lack a strong magnetic field, yet they show X-ray emissions from their disks and exospheres, via solar X-ray scattering and charge exchange. Future XMM-Newton observations of solar system targets, under different solar activity conditions, will provide ever deeper insights into their close relationships with their parent star.

  4. Time development of a small solar X-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, G. G.; Kestenbaum, H. L.; Long, K. S.; Novick, R.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Wolff, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The 5.1-7.2 A X-ray emission from the sun was studied via OSO-8 with a high-resolution PET crystal spectrometer during the week of 17 November 1975, when the sun was active. The combination of good temporal and spectral resolution permitted the analysis of the data with multithermal coronal models over the course of a small X-ray burst.

  5. Preliminary investigation of changes in x-ray multilayer optics subjected to high radiation flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.P.; Blake, R.L.; Grosso, J.S.; Selph, M.M.; Klein, M.M.; Matuska, W. Jr.; Palmer, M.A.; Liefeld, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of metal multilayers was exposed to high x-ray flux using Sandia National Laboratories' PROTO II machine in the gas puff mode. Fluxes incident on the multilayers above 700 MW/cm/sup 2/ in total radiation, in nominal 20 ns pulses, were realized. The neon hydrogen- and helium-like resonance lines were used to probe the x-ray reflectivity properties of the multilayers as they underwent change of state during the heating pulse. A fluorescer-fiber optic-streak camera system was used to monitor the changes in x-ray reflectivity as a function of time and irradiance. Preliminary results are presented for a W/C multilayer. Work in progress to model the experiment is discussed. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Joint X-Ray and Holographic Diagnostics of Heterogeneous Two-Phase Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. M.; Polyakov, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    Probability of identification of materials of the particles in a two-phase flux is estimated theoretically on the base of their specific x-ray attenuation and efficiency of the identification is estimated for randomly oriented particles of two-component dispersed phases depending on their composition, as well as sizes and shapes of the particles.

  7. Energetic electrons, Type III radio bursts, and impulsive solar flare X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of impulsive hard X-ray and type III radio bursts made during the maximum of the last solar activity cycle are analyzed. Spectral measurements of 10-68 keV X-rays were made with the University of California (Berkeley) experiment aboard the OGO 5 satellite. About 20% of impulsive hard X-ray bursts are correlated with type III radio bursts, whereas only about 3% of the reported type III radio bursts are correlated with impulsive X-ray bursts. The location of the associated H gamma flare on the solar disk has little effect on the X-ray-type III burst correlation. The magnitude of the X-ray-type III burst correlation increases systematically with an increase in the intensity and starting frequency of the radio burst, the peak energy and hardness of the X-ray burst, and the peak nonthermal emission measure and spectral hardness of the electron spectrum not less than 20 keV inside the X-ray source. Observations are consistent with the electron populations responsible for both the X-ray and type III emissions accelerated in a single acceleration process; they also suggest a flare model where the primary instability causing electron acceleration during the impulsive phase occurs in the corona.

  8. Spectral Atlas of X-ray Lines Emitted During Solar Flares Based on CHIANTI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, E.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    2005-01-01

    A spectral atlas of X-ray lines in the wavelength range 7.47-18.97 Angstroms is presented, based on high-resolution spectra obtained during two M-class solar flares (on 1980 August 25 and 1985 July 2) with the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The physical properties of the flaring plasmas are derived as a function of time using strong, isolated lines. From these properties predicted spectra using the CHIANTI database have been obtained which were then compared with wavelengths and fluxes of lines in the observed spectra to establish line identifications. identifications for nearly all the observed lines in the resulting atlas are given, with some significant corrections to previous analysis of these flare spectra.

  9. Cometary Spectra Induced by Scattering and Florescence of Hard Solar X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snios, B. T.; Lewkow, N.; Kharchenko, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate calculations of X-ray emissions from cometary atmospheres due to Scattering and Florescence (SF) of solar X-rays are carried out over the photon energy range 0.4-3.0 keV. Computations of the X-ray SF spectra are performed for different distributions of the cometary neutral gas, dust, and ice grains, including nano-size particles. The SF spectra of cometary X-rays above 1 keV are determined for different solar conditions, incorporating X-ray spectra induced by solar flares. Theoretical X-ray SF spectra are compared with the results of recent observations of several comets with the Chandra X-ray Observatory [1]. A correlation between the spectral shapes of the observed cometary and solar X-ray emissions above 1 keV has been found and analyzed. The strong similarity between the cometary SF spectra and the X-ray spectra observed from the Jupiter atmosphere with XMM-Newton [2] is analyzed in detail. Upper limits on the density of cometary nano-particles are determined through comparison of the theoretical and observational data. The X-ray SF spectra with photon energies above 1 keV are predicted for a model history of solar activity and compositions of cometary gas, dust, and ice particles, which could reflect evolutionary transformations of cometary environment. [1] Ewing, I., Christina, D. J., & Bodewits, D. et al. 2013, ApJ, 763, 66 [2] Branduardi-Raymont, G., Bhardwaj, A., & Elsner, R. F. et al. 2007, Planet. Space Sci., 55, 1126

  10. Properties of solar flare electrons, deduced from hard X-ray and spatially resolved microwave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, K. A.; Hurford, G. J.; Zirin, H.; Dulk, G. A.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    An important question concerning an understanding of impulsive solar flares is related to the energetic electrons responsible for the microwave and the hard X-ray emission. A description is presented of an investigation in which spatially resolved microwave observations of an impulsive flare and hard X-ray data from the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) are used to test the hypothesis that the two types of emission come from the same basic electron population. The considered observations are found to imply that the microwaves and hard X-rays were not produced by a common population of electrons with either a Maxwellian or single power-law energy distribution. It is suggested that the calculations should be repeated when observations of stronger events become available, for which a better determination of the X-ray spectrum is possible. The possibility is considered that microwaves and moderately hard X-rays come from spatially different regions.

  11. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struminsky, A.; Gan, W.

    2015-08-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV γ-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these γ-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and π0-decay γ-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X- ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard y-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and subsequently trapped by some magnetic structure. In-situ energetic particle measurements by GOES and STEREO (High Energy Telescope, HET) shows that five of these y-events were not accompanied by SEP events at 1 AU, even when multi-point measurements including STEREO are taken into account. Therefore accelerated protons are not always released into the heliosphere. A longer delay between the maximum temperature and the maximum emission measure characterises flares with prolonged high energy γ-emission and solar proton events.

  12. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  13. Observational techniques for solar flare gamma-rays, hard X-rays, and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Robert P.

    1989-01-01

    The development of new instrumentation and techniques for solar hard X-ray, gamma ray and neutron observations from spacecraft and/or balloon-borne platforms is examined. The principal accomplishments are: (1) the development of a two segment germanium detector which is near ideal for solar hard X-ray and gamma ray spectroscopy; (2) the development of long duration balloon flight techniques and associated instrumentation; and (3) the development of innovative new position sensitive detectors for hard X-ray and gamma rays.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WATCH Solar X-Ray Burst Catalogue (Crosby+ 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, N.; Lund, N.; Vilmer, N.; Sunyaev, R.

    1998-01-01

    Catalogue containing solar X-ray bursts measured by the Danish Wide Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-Rays (WATCH) experiment aboard the Russian satellite GRANAT in the deca-keV energy range. Table 1 lists the periods during which solar observations with WATCH are available (WATCH ON-TIME) and where the bursts listed in the catalogue have been observed. (2 data files).

  15. Characterization of neutron yield and x-ray spectra of a High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnamani, Nnaemeka; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG) is a DD plasma-based source, with a self-loading target intended for fundamental science and engineering applications, including 40 Ar/39 Ar geochronology, neutron cross section measurements, and radiation hardness testing of electronics. Our first estimate of the neutron yield, based on the population of the 4.486 hour 115 In isomer gave a neutron yield of the order 108 n/sec; optimization is ongoing to achieve the design target of 1011 n/sec. Preliminary x-ray spectra showed prominent energy peaks which are likely due to atomic line-emission from back-streaming electrons accelerated up to 100 keV impinging on various components of the HFNG chamber. Our x-ray and neutron diagnostics will aid us as we continue to evolve the design to suppress back-streaming electrons, necessary to achieve higher plasma beam currents, and thus higher neutron flux. This talk will focus on the characterization of the neutron yield and x-ray spectra during our tests. A collimation system is being installed near one of the chamber ports for improved observation of the x-ray spectra. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  16. Response of the upper atmosphere to variations in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Scott Martin

    1995-01-01

    Terrestrial far ultraviolet (FUV) airglow emissions have been suggested as a means for remote sensing the structure of the upper atmosphere. The energy which leads to the excitation of FUV airglow emissions is solar irradiance at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray wavelengths. Solar irradiance at these wavelengths is known to be highly variable; studies of nitric oxide (NO) in the lower thermosphere have suggested a variability of more than an order of magnitude in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. To properly interpret the FUV airflow, the magnitude of the solar energy deposition must be known. Previous analyses have used the electron impact excited Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands of N2 to infer the flux of photoelectrons in the atmosphere and thus to infer the magnitude of the solar irradiance. This dissertation presents the first simultaneous measurements of the FUV airglow, the major atmospheric constituent densities, and the solar EUV and soft x-ray irradiances. The measurements were made on three flights of an identical sounding rocket payload at different levels of solar activity. The linear response in brightness of the LBH bands to variations in solar irradiance is demonstrated. In addition to the N2 LBH bands, atomic oxygen lines at 135.6 and 130.4 nm are also studied. Unlike the LBH bands, these emissions undergo radiative transfer effects in the atmosphere. The OI emission at 135.6 nm is found to be well modeled using a radiative transfer calculation and the known excitation processes. Unfortunately, the assumed processes leading to OI 130.4 nm excitation are found to be insufficient to reproduce the observed variability of this emission. Production of NO in the atmosphere is examined; it is shown that a lower than previously reported variability in the solar soft x-ray irradiance is required to explain the variability of NO.

  17. SOLAR X-RAY JETS, TYPE-II SPICULES, GRANULE-SIZE EMERGING BIPOLES, AND THE GENESIS OF THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Falconer, David A.

    2011-04-10

    From Hinode observations of solar X-ray jets, Type-II spicules, and granule-size emerging bipolar magnetic fields in quiet regions and coronal holes, we advocate a scenario for powering coronal heating and the solar wind. In this scenario, Type-II spicules and Alfven waves are generated by the granule-size emerging bipoles (EBs) in the manner of the generation of X-ray jets by larger magnetic bipoles. From observations and this scenario, we estimate that Type-II spicules and their co-generated Alfven waves carry into the corona an area-average flux of mechanical energy of {approx}7 x 10{sup 5} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. This is enough to power the corona and solar wind in quiet regions and coronal holes, and therefore indicates that the granule-size EBs are the main engines that generate and sustain the entire heliosphere.

  18. Laboratory Measurements of Solar-Wind/Comet X-Ray Emission and Charge Exchange Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Cadez, I.; Greenwood, J. B.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Smith, S. J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    The detection of X-rays from comets such as Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, d Arrest, and Linear as they approach the Sun has been unexpected and exciting. This phenomenon, moreover, should be quite general, occurring wherever a fast solar or stellar wind interacts with neutrals in a comet, a planetary atmosphere, or a circumstellar cloud. The process is, O(+8) + H2O --> O(+7*) + H2O(+), where the excited O(+7*) ions are the source of the X-ray emissions. Detailed modeling has been carried out of X-ray emissions in charge-transfer collisions of heavy solar-wind Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) and interstellar/interplanetary neutral clouds. In the interplanetary medium the solar wind ions, including protons, can charge exchange with interstellar H and He. This can give rise to a soft X-ray background that could be correlated with the long-term enhancements seen in the low-energy X-ray spectrum of ROSAT. Approximately 40% of the soft X-ray background detected by Exosat, ROSAT, Chandra, etc. is due to Charge Exchange (CXE): our whole heliosphere is glowing in the soft X-ray due to CXE.

  19. Solar X-ray Astronomy Sounding Rocket Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Several broad objectives were pursued by the development and flight of the High Resolution Soft X-Ray Imaging Sounding Rocket Payload, followed by the analysis of the resulting data and by comparison with both ground based and space based observations from other investigators. The scientific objectives were: to study the thermal equilibrium of active region loop systems by analyzing the X-ray observations to determine electron temperatures, densities, and pressures; by recording the changes in the large scale coronal structures from the maximum and descending phases of Cycle 21 to the ascending phase of Cycle 22; and to extend the study of small scale coronal structures through the minimum of Cycle 21 with new emphasis on correlative observations.

  20. Soft X-ray polychromator for the Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, B. M.; Levay, M.; Stern, R. A.; Strong, K. T.; Wolfson, C. J.; Acton, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The XRP was designed to measure the following temporal and spatial properties of the active and flaring Sun: electron temperature, departures from steady state, ion kinetic temperatures, and electron density. The Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) is capable of measuring the broadening and blue shifts often observed in the impulsive phase of flares. The six simultaneous line fluxes indicative of six different temperatures of formation observable by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS) allows the derivation of the differential emission measure of the plasma at each raster point. During the operational periods of the XRP hundreds of flares of C-level (GOES classification) were observed and brighter in both the FCS and BCS, including 5 X-flares. Associated theoretical work in atomic physics, stimulated in part by the promise of XRP measurements, has benefitted from the experimental data on solar plasmas which the XRP has provided in abundance.

  1. Photographic film as a detector for solar X-ray/XUV astronomical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of several films as detectors for solar soft X-ray (3-100 A) and XUV (100-600 A) radiation are discussed. The properties of soft-X-ray-sensitive films like the SO-212 make them useful for the glancing-incidence X-ray telescopes. Used for the MSFC X-Ray Telescope during the Skylab mission (at the wavelengths of 8.34 and 15.4 A), the SO-212 film functioned as a photon detector, achieving spatial resolution of 2.2 arc sec. Other high-resolution soft-X-ray-sensitive films include SO-242 and 101-07. For XUV detection, the SC-5, SC-7, 104-07, and 101-07 films are recommended.

  2. Radio blips and hard x-rays in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, A.O.; Bernold, T.E.X.; Dennis, B.R.

    1983-08-01

    The properties of short, narrow-band spikes occurring in groups at decimetric wavelengths have been extensively analyzed. The bursts, termed blips in the literature, have been found to appear in the impulsive phase of flares. They are associated with hard X-ray emission in 40% of all cases with simultaneous coverage. The correspondence between blips and X-ray spikes is generally not one-to-one, blips being more numerous than X-ray spikes. In some cases, however, close correlations between single events have been found. Blips have been discovered to drift in frequency and to decay in time similarly to type III bursts at lower frequency. They also resemble type II bursts in polarization. An analysis of starting frequencies, however, clearly shows that blips and type III burst belong to different statistical populations. The narrow bandwidth of blips, the major qualitative difference with respect to type III bursts, suggests that blips are the signature of electron beams which either decay or have a locally enhanced emission due to the presence of some low-frequency waves. Blips have been shown to be an impulsive phase phenomenon occurring at densities of 1--3 x 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/ in the low corona.

  3. High-energy neutrino fluxes from AGN populations inferred from X-ray surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Idunn B.; Wu, Kinwah; On, Alvina Y. L.; Saxton, Curtis J.

    2015-08-01

    High-energy neutrinos and photons are complementary messengers, probing violent astrophysical processes and structural evolution of the Universe. X-ray and neutrino observations jointly constrain conditions in active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets: their baryonic and leptonic contents, and particle production efficiency. Testing two standard neutrino production models for local source Cen A (Koers & Tinyakov and Becker & Biermann), we calculate the high-energy neutrino spectra of single AGN sources and derive the flux of high-energy neutrinos expected for the current epoch. Assuming that accretion determines both X-rays and particle creation, our parametric scaling relations predict neutrino yield in various AGN classes. We derive redshift-dependent number densities of each class, from Chandra and Swift/BAT X-ray luminosity functions (Silverman et al. and Ajello et al.). We integrate the neutrino spectrum expected from the cumulative history of AGN (correcting for cosmological and source effects, e.g. jet orientation and beaming). Both emission scenarios yield neutrino fluxes well above limits set by IceCube (by ˜4-106 × at 1 PeV, depending on the assumed jet models for neutrino production). This implies that: (i) Cen A might not be a typical neutrino source as commonly assumed; (ii) both neutrino production models overestimate the efficiency; (iii) neutrino luminosity scales with accretion power differently among AGN classes and hence does not follow X-ray luminosity universally; (iv) some AGN are neutrino-quiet (e.g. below a power threshold for neutrino production); (v) neutrino and X-ray emission have different duty cycles (e.g. jets alternate between baryonic and leptonic flows); or (vi) some combination of the above.

  4. Measurements of x-ray spectral flux and intensity distribution of APS/CHESS undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E.; Cai, Z.

    1994-09-01

    Absolute radiation flux and polarization measurements of the APS undulators may have to be made under high thermal loading conditions. A method that may circumvent the high-heat-load problem was tested during a recent APS/CHESS undulator run. The technique makes use of a Si(Li) energy-dispersive detector to measure 5--35 keV x-rays scattered from a well-defined He gas volume at controlled pressure.

  5. Measurements of x-ray spectral flux of high brightness undulators by gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E.; Cai, Z. )

    1995-02-01

    Absolute radiation flux and polarization measurements of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) undulators may have to be made under high thermal loading conditions. A method that may circumvent the high-heat-load problem was tested during a recent APS/CHESS undulator run. The technique makes use of a Si(Li) energy-dispersive detector to measure 5--35 keV x rays scattered from a well-defined He gas volume at controlled pressure.

  6. The Galactic plane at faint X-ray fluxes - II. Stacked X-ray spectra of a sample of serendipitous XMM-Newton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R. S.; Byckling, K.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the X-ray spectral properties of a sample of 138 X-ray sources detected serendipitously in XMM-Newton observations of the Galactic plane, at an intermediate to faint flux level. We divide our sample into five subgroups according to the spectral hardness of the sources, and stack (i.e. co-add) the individual source spectra within each subgroup. As expected these stacked spectra show a softening trend from the hardest to the softest subgroups, which is reflected in the inferred line-of-sight column density. The spectra of the three hardest subgroups are characterized by a hard continuum plus superimposed Fe-line emission in the 6-7 keV bandpass. The average equivalent width (EW) of the 6.7-keV He-like Fe Kα line is 170^{+35}_{-32} eV, whereas the 6.4-keV Fe K fluorescence line from neutral iron and the 6.9-keV H-like Fe Lyα line have EWs of 89^{+26}_{-25} and 81^{+30}_{-29} eV, respectively, i.e. roughly half that of the 6.7-keV line. The remaining subgroups exhibit soft thermal spectra. Virtually all of the spectrally soft X-ray sources can be associated with relatively nearby coronally active late-type stars, which are evident as bright near-infrared (NIR) objects within the X-ray error circles. On a similar basis only a minority of the spectrally hard X-ray sources have likely NIR identifications. The average continuum and Fe-line properties of the spectrally hard sources are consistent with those of magnetic cataclysmic variables but the direct identification of large numbers of such systems in Galactic X-ray surveys, probing intermediate to faint flux levels, remains challenging.

  7. Comparing SSN Index to X-Ray Flare and Coronal Mass Ejection Rates from Solar Cycles 22 - 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, L. M.; Pernak, R. L.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    The newly revised sunspot-number series allows for placing historical geoeffective storms in the context of several hundred years of solar activity. Using statistical analyses of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray observations from the past {≈} 30 years and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) catalog (1996 - present), we present sunspot-number-dependent flare and CME rates. In particular, we present X-ray flare rates as a function of sunspot number for the past three cycles. We also show that the 1 - 8 Å X-ray background flux is strongly correlated with sunspot number across solar cycles. Similarly, we show that the CME properties (e.g. proxies related to the CME linear speed and width) are also correlated with sunspot number for Solar Cycles 23 and 24. These updated rates will enable future predictions for geoeffective events and place historical storms in the context of present solar activity.

  8. Interrelation of soft and hard X-ray emissions during solar flares. I - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kiplinger, A. L.; Zarro, D. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Lemen, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The interrelation between the acceleration and heating of electrons and ions during impulsive solar flares is determined on the basis of simulataneous observations of hard and soft X-ray emission from the Solar Maximum Mission at high time resolution (6 s). For all the flares, the hard X-rays are found to have a power-law spectrum which breaks down during the rise phase and beginning of the decay phase. After that, the spectrum changes to either a single power law or a power law that breaks up at high energies. The characteristics of the soft X-ray are found to depend on the flare position. It is suggested that small-scale quasi-static electric fields are important for determining the acceleration of the X-ray-producing electrons and the outflowing chromospheric ions.

  9. Microwave and hard X-ray observations of a solar flare with a time resolution better than 100 ms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Costa, J. E. R.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Kiplinger, A.; Strauss, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous microwave and X-ray observations are presented for a solar flare detected on 1980 May 8 starting at 1937 UT. The X-ray observations were made with the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission and covered the energy range from 28-490 keV with a time resolution of 10 ms. The microwave observations were made with the 5 and 45 foot antennas at the Itapetinga Radio Obervatory at frequencies of 7 and 22 GHz, with time resolutions of 100 ms and 1 ms respectively. Detailed correlation analysis of the different time profiles of the event show that the major impulsive in the X-ray flux preceded the corresponding microwave peaks at 22 GHz by about 240 ms. For this particular burst the 22 GHz peaks preceded the 7 GHz by about 1.5s. Observed delays of the microwave peaks are too large for a simple electron beam model but they can be reconciled with the speeds of shock waves in a thermal model. Previously announced in STAR as N82-30215

  10. The spectrometer/telescope for imaging X-rays on board the ESA Solar Orbiter spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krucker, S.; Benz, A. O.; Hurford, G. J.; Arnold, N. G.; Orleański, P.; Gröbelbauer, H.-P.; Casadei, D.; Kobler, S.; Iseli, L.; Wiehl, H. J.; Csillaghy, A.; Etesi, L.; Hochmuth, N.; Battaglia, M.; Bednarzik, M.; Resanovic, R.; Grimm, O.; Viertel, G.; Commichau, V.; Howard, A.; Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Brun, S.; Vilmer, N.; Skup, K. R.; Graczyk, R.; Stolarski, M.; Michalska, M.; Nowosielski, W.; Cichocki, A.; Mosdorf, M.; Seweryn, K.; Białek, A.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Mrozek, T.; Podgorski, P.; Mann, G.; Önel, H.; Aurass, H.; Bauer, S.-M.; Bittner, W.; Dionies, F.; Paschke, J.; Plüschke, D.; Popow, E.; Rendtel, J.; Warmuth, A.; Woche, M.; Wolter, D.; Van Beek, H. F.; Farnik, F.; Lin, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Solar Orbiter is a Sun-observing mission led by the European Space Agency, addressing the interaction between the Sun and the heliosphere. It will carry ten instruments, among them the X-ray imaging spectrometer STIX. STIX will determine the intensity, spectrum, timing, and location of thermal and accelerated electrons near the Sun through their bremsstrahlung X-ray emission. This report gives a brief overview of the STIX scientific goals and covers in more detail the instrument design and challenges.

  11. THE SOLAR FLARE CHLORINE ABUNDANCE FROM RESIK X-RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Kuznetsov, V. D. E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl E-mail: kvd@izmiran.ru

    2011-09-01

    The abundance of chlorine is determined from X-ray spectra obtained with the RESIK instrument on CORONAS-F during solar flares between 2002 and 2003. Using weak lines of He-like Cl, Cl XVI, between 4.44 and 4.50 A, and with temperatures and emission measures from GOES on an isothermal assumption, we obtained A(Cl) = 5.75 {+-} 0.26 on a scale A(H) = 12. The uncertainty reflects an approximately a factor of two scatter in measured line fluxes. Nevertheless, our value represents what is probably the best solar determination yet obtained. It is higher by factors of 1.8 and 2.7 than Cl abundance estimates from an infrared sunspot spectrum and nearby H II regions. The constancy of the RESIK abundance values over a large range of flares (GOES class from below C1 to X1) argues for any fractionation that may be present in the low solar atmosphere to be independent of the degree of solar activity.

  12. Plasma Heating in Solar Flares and their Soft and Hard X-Ray Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falewicz, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop-like flares observed in X-ray are analyzed under the assumption that nonthermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 February 20 and June 2, respectively. Using a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic code for both flares, the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops and thus spatial distributions of the X-ray nonthermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges that were compared with the observed ones. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the spatial distributions of the signals in the RHESSI images was conducted for the footpoints and for all the flare loops in selected energy ranges with these quantities' fluxes obtained from the models. The best compatibility of the model and observations was obtained for the 2002 June 2 event in the 0.5-4 Å GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV, and 50-100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range show that the best compliance occurred for the 2002 June 2 flare, where the synthesized emissions were at least 30% higher than the observed emissions. For the 2002 February 20 flare, synthesized emission is about four times lower than the observed one. However, in the low energy range the best conformity was obtained for the 2002 February 20 flare, where emission from the model is about 11% lower than the observed one. The larger inconsistency occurs for the 2002 June 2 solar flare, where synthesized emission is about 12 times greater or even more than the observed emission. Some part of these differences may be caused by inevitable flaws of the applied methodology, like by an assumption that the model of the flare is

  13. Plasma heating in solar flares and their soft and hard X-ray emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop-like flares observed in X-ray are analyzed under the assumption that nonthermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 February 20 and June 2, respectively. Using a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic code for both flares, the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops and thus spatial distributions of the X-ray nonthermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges that were compared with the observed ones. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the spatial distributions of the signals in the RHESSI images was conducted for the footpoints and for all the flare loops in selected energy ranges with these quantities' fluxes obtained from the models. The best compatibility of the model and observations was obtained for the 2002 June 2 event in the 0.5-4 Å GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV, and 50-100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range show that the best compliance occurred for the 2002 June 2 flare, where the synthesized emissions were at least 30% higher than the observed emissions. For the 2002 February 20 flare, synthesized emission is about four times lower than the observed one. However, in the low energy range the best conformity was obtained for the 2002 February 20 flare, where emission from the model is about 11% lower than the observed one. The larger inconsistency occurs for the 2002 June 2 solar flare, where synthesized emission is about 12 times greater or even more than the observed emission. Some part of these differences may be caused by inevitable flaws of the applied methodology, like by an assumption that the model of the flare is

  14. Use of a priori spectral information in the measurement of x-ray flux with filtered diode arrays.

    PubMed

    Marrs, R E; Widmann, K; Brown, G V; Heeter, R F; MacLaren, S A; May, M J; Moore, A S; Schneider, M B

    2015-10-01

    Filtered x-ray diode (XRD) arrays are often used to measure x-ray spectra vs. time from spectrally continuous x-ray sources such as hohlraums. A priori models of the incident x-ray spectrum enable a more accurate unfolding of the x-ray flux as compared to the standard technique of modifying a thermal Planckian with spectral peaks or dips at the response energy of each filtered XRD channel. A model x-ray spectrum consisting of a thermal Planckian, a Gaussian at higher energy, and (in some cases) a high energy background provides an excellent fit to XRD-array measurements of x-ray emission from laser heated hohlraums. If high-resolution measurements of part of the x-ray emission spectrum are available, that information can be included in the a priori model. In cases where the x-ray emission spectrum is not Planckian, candidate x-ray spectra can be allowed or excluded by fitting them to measured XRD voltages. Examples are presented from the filtered XRD arrays, named Dante, at the National Ignition Facility and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. PMID:26520959

  15. Use of a priori spectral information in the measurement of x-ray flux with filtered diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, R. E.; Widmann, K.; Brown, G. V.; Heeter, R. F.; MacLaren, S. A.; May, M. J.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    Filtered x-ray diode (XRD) arrays are often used to measure x-ray spectra vs. time from spectrally continuous x-ray sources such as hohlraums. A priori models of the incident x-ray spectrum enable a more accurate unfolding of the x-ray flux as compared to the standard technique of modifying a thermal Planckian with spectral peaks or dips at the response energy of each filtered XRD channel. A model x-ray spectrum consisting of a thermal Planckian, a Gaussian at higher energy, and (in some cases) a high energy background provides an excellent fit to XRD-array measurements of x-ray emission from laser heated hohlraums. If high-resolution measurements of part of the x-ray emission spectrum are available, that information can be included in the a priori model. In cases where the x-ray emission spectrum is not Planckian, candidate x-ray spectra can be allowed or excluded by fitting them to measured XRD voltages. Examples are presented from the filtered XRD arrays, named Dante, at the National Ignition Facility and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  16. Ground calibrations of the X-ray detector system of the Solar Intensity X-ray Spectrometer (SIXS) on board BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huovelin, Juhani; Lehtolainen, Arto; Genzer, Maria; Korpela, Seppo; Esko, Eero; Andersson, Hans

    2014-05-01

    SIXS includes X-ray and particle detector systems for the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). Its task is to monitor the direct solar X-rays and energetic particles in a wide field of view in the energy range of 1-20 keV (X-rays), 0.1-3 MeV (electrons) and 1-30 MeV (protons). The main purpose of these measurements is to provide quantitative information on the high energy radiation incident on Mercury's surface which causes the X-ray glow of the planet measured by the MIXS instrument. The X-ray and particle measurements of SIXS are also useful for investigations of the solar corona and the magnetosphere of Mercury. The ground calibrations of the X-ray detectors of the SIXS flight model were carried out in the X-ray laboratory of the Helsinki University during May and June 2012. The aim of the ground calibrations was to characterize the performance of the SIXS instrument's three High-Purity Silicon PIN X-ray detectors and verify that they fulfil their scientific performance requirements. The calibrations included the determination of the beginning of life energy resolution at different operational temperatures, determination of the detector's sensitivity within the field of view as a function of the off-axis and roll angles, pile-up tests for determining the speed of the read out electronics, measurements of the low energy threshold of the energy scale, a cross-calibration with the SMART-1 XSM flight spare detector, and the determination of the temperature dependence of the energy scale. An X-ray tube and the detectors' internal Ti coated 55Fe calibration sources were used as primary X-ray sources. In addition, two external fluorescence sources were used as secondary X-ray sources in the determination of the energy resolutions and in the comparison calibration with the SMART-1 XSM. The calibration results show that the detectors fulfill all of the scientific performance requirements. The ground calibration data combined with the instrument house-keeping data

  17. Discovery of soft X-ray flux from 2A 1102+384 = Markarian 421

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, D. R.; Marshall, F. J.; Jernigan, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    During April 1976 a soft X-ray flux was detected with SAS 3 from the vicinity of 2A 1102+384. The average flux densities were 4.3 x 10 to the -11th and 14 x 10 to the -11th erg/sq cm per sec in the energy bands 0.1-0.28 keV and 1-6 keV, respectively. There is an indication of variability over about 0.5 day in the lowest energy band. An upper limit of 3 x 10 to the 20th H atoms per sq cm is found for the gas column density to the X-ray source. In May 1978, observations with the modulation collimators of SAS 3 yielded an accurate (40 arcsec error radius) position for the X-ray source (2-6 keV) at right ascension 11 h 1 m 39.7 s, declination + 38 deg 28 min 51 sec (equinox 1950). The earlier tentative identification by Ricketts et al. (1976) with the BL Lacertae object B2 1101+38 = Markarian 421 is thus confirmed.

  18. The Sun's X-ray Emission During the Recent Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Mirek; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Kuzin, Sergey; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2010-02-01

    The Sun recently underwent a period of a remarkable lack of major activity such as large flares and sunspots, without equal since the advent of the space age a half century ago. A widely used measure of solar activity is the amount of solar soft X-ray emission, but until recently this has been below the threshold of the X-ray-monitoring Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). There is thus an urgent need for more sensitive instrumentation to record solar X-ray emission in this range. Anticipating this need, a highly sensitive spectrophotometer called Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was included in the solar telescope/spectrometer TESIS instrument package on the third spacecraft in Russia's Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun (CORONAS-PHOTON) program, launched 30 January 2009 into a near-polar orbit. SphinX measures X-rays in a band similar to the GOES longer-wavelength channel.

  19. X-ray Emission from Pre-Main-Sequence Stars - Testing the Solar Analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    2000-01-01

    This LTSA award funded my research on the origin of stellar X-ray emission and the validity of the solar-stellar analogy. This research broadly addresses the relevance of our current understanding of solar X-ray physics to the interpretation of X-ray emission from stars in general. During the past five years the emphasis has been on space-based X-ray observations of very young stars in star-forming regions (T Tauri stars and protostars), cool solar-like G stars, and evolved high-mass Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. These observations were carried out primarily with the ASCA and ROSAT space-based observatories (and most recently with Chandra), supplemented by ground-based observations. This research has focused on the identification of physical processes that are responsible for the high levels of X-ray emission seen in pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, active cool stars, and WR stars. A related issue is how the X-ray emission of such stars changes over time, both on short timescales of days to years and on evolutionary timescales of millions of years. In the case of the Sun it is known that magnetic fields play a key role in the production of X-rays by confining the coronal plasma in loop-like structures where it is heated to temperatures of several million K. The extent to which the magnetically-confined corona interpretation can be applied to other X-ray emitting stars is the key issue that drives the research summarized here.

  20. Correlative Analysis of hard and Soft X-rays in Solar Flares using CGRO/BATSE and YOHKOH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study different mechanisms of solar flare heating by comparing their predictions with simultaneous hard and soft X-ray observations. The datasets used in this work consist of hard X-ray observations from the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and Soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Japanese Yohkoh spacecraft.

  1. The EVE plus RHESSI DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Residual Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTiernan, James; Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Solar flare spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission in the soft X-ray energy range. The low energy extent of non-thermal emission can only be loosely quantified using currently available X-ray data. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to calculate the Differential Emission Measure (DEM) for solar flares. This improvement over the isothermal approximation helps to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV.Previous work (Caspi et.al. 2014ApJ...788L..31C) concentrated on obtaining DEM models that fit both instruments' observations well. For this current project we are interested in breaks and cutoffs in the "residual" non-thermal spectrum; i.e., the RHESSI spectrum that is left over after the DEM has accounted for the bulk of the soft X-ray emission. As in our earlier work, thermal emission is modeled using a DEM that is parametrized as multiple gaussians in temperature. Non-thermal emission is modeled as a photon spectrum obtained using a thin-target emission model ('thin2' from the SolarSoft Xray IDL package). Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner.For this study, we have examined the DEM and non-thermal resuidual emission for a sample of relatively large (GOES M class and above) solar flares observed from 2011 to 2014. The results for the DEM and non-thermal parameters found using the combined EVE-RHESSI data are compared with those found using only RHESSI data.

  2. The coevolution of decimetric millisecond spikes and hard X-ray emission during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Guedel, Manuel

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of an analysis of a comprehensive data set of 27 solar flares with decimetric millisecond spikes between 1980 and 1989, simultaneously observed with the Zuerich radio spectrometers and the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer on the SMM spacecraft. Two contradictory relationships of the coevolution of hard X-ray and spiky radio emissions during flares are found: the temporal evolution of both emissions reveals a close functional dependence, but there is a substantial time delay between the two emissions. Five possible scenarios for the hard-X-ray-associated radio spike emission which may account for both their detailed coevolution and their substantial intervening time delay are discussed. All five scenarios are able to explain both the close coevolution of hard X-ray and radio emission as well as their mutual delay to some degree, but none of them can explain all observational aspects in a simple way.

  3. Thick-target bremsstrahlung interpretation of short time-scale solar hard X-ray features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    Steady-state analyses of bremsstrahlung hard X-ray production in solar flares are appropriate only if the lifetime of the high energy electrons in the X-ray source is much shorter than the duration of the observed X-ray burst. For a thick-target nonthermal model, this implies that a full time-dependent analysis is required when the duration of the burst is comparable to the collisional lifetime of the injected electrons, in turn set by the lengths and densities of the flaring region. In this paper we present the results of such a time-dependent analysis, and we point out that the intrinsic temporal signature of the thick-target production mechanism, caused by the finite travel time of the electrons through the target, may indeed rule out such a mechanism for extremely short duration hard X-ray events.

  4. A self-consistent interpretation of the solar flare extreme-ultraviolet to hard X-ray ratio in large events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosa, T. N.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    1988-01-01

    This paper shows quantitatively that when a limiting X-ray yield is considered, a universal area of 10 to the 17th sq cm used in the thick-target electron bombardment model of McClymont and Canfield (1986) cannot explain the observed hard X-ray flux in large solar flare events without recourse to extreme values of the physical parameters of the flaring corona. The return current ohmic heating produced by a beam of flux 10 to the 13th ergs/sq cm/s results in a coronal temperature in excess of 100 million K. In this case, the thermal hard X-ray emission dominates the nonthermal emission and the EUV-to-hard X-ray ratio would not decrease with increasing hard X-ray flux, as observed. Hence, any model that requires a beam flux of 10 to the 13th ergs/sq cm/s is untenable. It is proposed that these apparently contradictory results can be reconciled if the X-ray emitting area is substantially larger than the area of the chromospheric precipitation site.

  5. Wide field-of-view soft X-ray imaging for solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Snowden, S. L.; Carter, J. A.; Collado-Vega, Y.; Connor, H. K.; Cravens, T. E.; Read, A. M.; Sembay, S.; Thomas, N. E.

    2016-04-01

    Soft X-ray imagers can be used to study the mesoscale and macroscale density structures that occur whenever and wherever the solar wind encounters neutral atoms at comets, the Moon, and both magnetized and unmagnetized planets. Charge exchange between high charge state solar wind ions and exospheric neutrals results in the isotropic emission of soft X-ray photons with energies from 0.1 to 2.0 keV. At Earth, this process occurs primarily within the magnetosheath and cusps. Through providing a global view, wide field-of-view imaging can determine the significance of the various proposed solar wind-magnetosphere interaction mechanisms by evaluating their global extent and occurrence patterns. A summary of wide field-of-view (several to tens of degrees) soft X-ray imaging is provided including slumped micropore microchannel reflectors, simulated images, and recent flight results.

  6. Skylab ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer observations versus solar flare activity: An event compilation. [tables (data)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    An event compilation is presented which correlates ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer solar observations with solar flare activity. Approximately 1,070 h of pulse height analyzed X-ray proportional counter data were obtained with the X-ray event analyzer during Skylab. During its operation, 449 flares (including 343 flare peaks) were observed. Seventy events of peak X-ray emission or = Cl were simultaneously observed by ground based telescopes, SOLRAD 9 and/or Vela, and the X-ray event analyzer. These events were observed from preflare through flare rise to peak and through flare decline.

  7. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  8. Application of grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence technique to discriminate and quantify implanted solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Kitts, K.; Choi, Y.; Eng, P. J.; Ghose, S. K.; Sutton, S. R.; Rout, B.

    2009-03-15

    NASA launched the Genesis return mission to obtain pristine solar wind samples in order to better understand solar wind mechanics, solar physics, and solar system evolution. Unfortunately, the probe crash-landed shattering the collector plates necessitating the application of a grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence technique. This nondestructive methodology differentiates the terrestrial contamination from the low concentration implanted solar wind. Using this technique, the elemental depth distribution is obtained resulting in the determination of absolute solar wind elemental abundance. We describe this application and present the solar wind Fe concentration determination as an example.

  9. High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoß, S. Stahl, C.; Weigand, M.; Schütz, G.; Albrecht, J.

    2015-01-12

    The penetration of magnetic flux into high-temperature superconductors has been observed using a high-resolution technique based on x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Superconductors coated with thin soft-magnetic layers are observed in a scanning x-ray microscope under the influence of external magnetic fields. Resulting electric currents in the superconductor create an inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution above the superconductor and lead to a local reorientation of the ferromagnetic layer. Measuring the local magnetization of the ferromagnet by x-ray absorption microscopy with circular-polarized radiation allows the analysis of the magnetic flux distribution in the superconductor with a spatial resolution on the nanoscale.

  10. FOXSI-2: Upgrades of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager for its Second Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Glesener, Lindsay; Buitrago-Casas, Camilo; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Watanabe, Shin; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Turin, Paul; Shourt, Van; Foster, Natalie; Krucker, Sam

    2016-03-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket payload flew for the second time on 2014 December 11. To enable direct Hard X-Ray (HXR) imaging spectroscopy, FOXSI makes use of grazing-incidence replicated focusing optics combined with fine-pitch solid-state detectors. FOXSI’s first flight provided the first HXR focused images of the Sun. For FOXSI’s second flight several updates were made to the instrument including updating the optics and detectors as well as adding a new Solar Aspect and Alignment System (SAAS). This paper provides an overview of these updates as well as a discussion of their measured performance.

  11. Solar X-ray photography with multiplex pin-hole camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.; Burek, A. J.; Fenimore, E.; Puetter, R.

    1974-01-01

    A scatter-hole X-ray camera has been designed and flown in a rocket to measure solar X radiation. Its distinguishing feature is that many single pin-hole images are allowed to overlap - a multiplexing approach that saves space, gives practical signal-to-fog ratio, and requires special object reconstruction techniques. It was possible to reconstruct the appearance of the dominant source of solar emission on the day of rocket flight with better than one arc minute resolution. The coronal X-ray region had the same general shape and intensity distribution as the associated calcium K-line region.

  12. Solar X-Ray Spectroscopy And Polarimetry By Instrument Ping-M Onboard Interhelioprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yury; Dergachev, Valentin; Kochemasov, Alexey; Yurov, Vitaly; Tyshkevich, V.; Glyanenko, Alexander; Savchenko, Mikhail; Lazutkov, Vadim; Skorodumov, Dmitry; Trofimov, Yury; Zakharov, Mikhail; Rubtsov, Igor; Kruglov, Evgeniy

    The instrument PING-M for X-ray spectroscopy and polarimetry of solar full disk radiation is described. It will be the part of scientific instrument set for the InterHelioProbe space mission. Instrument consists of three detectors: the Soft X-ray detector (SXRD), the Hard X-ray detector (HXRD) and Hard X-ray polarimeter (PING-P). Spectrometer SXRD is based on a relatively novel type of semiconductor detector SDD (Silicon Drift Detector) that will operate in the energy range 1.5-25 keV, which is similar to GOES X-Ray Sensor (XRS) region. Unlike GOES the SXRD is capable to measure the energy of each photon with high resolution (better 200 eV at 5.9 keV) and operate with high count rate. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the SXRD should show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. HXRD operates in energy range 15-150 keV. Fast nonorganic scintillator (is based on LaBr3(Ce)) with good energy resolution (≤12% at 60keV and ≤3.5% at 662keV) is used. Apart from measurement of spectra the value of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes in flare would be revealed. In the talk the results of testing of laboratory models are presented. PING-P Hard X-ray polarimeter consists of active scatterer made of three organic p-terphenyl scintillators and six peripheral scattered radiation detectors made of CsI(Tl) scintillators. Effective area of polarimeter is about 5 cm2 in its energy range. Minimal measurable degree of polarization is 0.9 % for 100 sec exposition and X1 solar flare.

  13. Periodicities in the X-ray emission from the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Partha; Jain, Rajmal; Awasthi, Arun K. E-mail: parthares@gmail.com E-mail: awasthi@prl.res.in

    2013-11-20

    We have studied the time series of full disk integrated soft and hard X-ray emission from the solar corona during 2004 January to 2008 December, covering the entire descending phase of solar cycle 23 from a global point of view. We employ the daily X-ray index derived from 1 s cadence X-ray observations from the Si and CZT detectors of the 'Solar X-ray Spectrometer' mission in seven different energy bands ranging between 6 and 56 keV. X-ray data in the energy bands 6-7, 7-10, 10-20, and 4-25 keV from the Si detector are considered, while 10-20, 20-30, and 30-56 keV high energy observations are taken from the CZT detector. The daily time series is subjected to power spectrum analysis after appropriate correction for noise. The Lomb-Scargle periodogram technique has shown prominent periods of ∼13.5 days, ∼27 days, and a near-Rieger period of ∼181 days and ∼1.24 yr in all energy bands. In addition to this, other periods like ∼31, ∼48, ∼57, ∼76, ∼96, ∼130, ∼227, and ∼303 days are also detected in different energy bands. We discuss our results in light of previous observations and existing numerical models.

  14. High heat flux x-ray monochromators: What are the limits?

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.S.

    1997-06-01

    First optical elements at third-generation, hard x-ray synchrotrons, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), are subjected to immense heat fluxes. The optical elements include crystal monochromators, multilayers and mirrors. This paper presents a mathematical model of the thermal strain of a three-layer (faceplate, heat exchanger, and baseplate), cylindrical optic subjected to narrow beam of uniform heat flux. This model is used to calculate the strain gradient of a liquid-gallium-cooled x-ray monochromator previously tested on an undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). The resulting thermally broadened rocking curves are calculated and compared to experimental data. The calculated rocking curve widths agree to within a few percent of the measured values over the entire current range tested (0 to 60 mA). The thermal strain gradient under the beam footprint varies linearly with the heat flux and the ratio of the thermal expansion coefficient to the thermal conductivity. The strain gradient is insensitive to the heat exchanger properties and the optic geometry. This formulation provides direct insight into the governing parameters, greatly reduces the analysis time, and provides a measure of the ultimate performance of a given monochromator.

  15. On Photospheric Fluorescence and the Nature of the 17.62 Angstrom Feature in Solar X-ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Greg; Kahn, S.

    1999-01-01

    The identification of the emission line feature at 17.62 Angstroms in solar x-ray spectra is re-examined. Using a Monte Carlo technique, we compute a realistic theoretical upper limit to the observed Fe L-alpha photospheric fluorescent line strength caused by irradiation from an overlying corona. These calculations demonstrate that the photospheric Fe L-alpha characteristic line is much too weak to account for the observed 17.62 Angstrom line flux. Instead, we identify this line with the configuration interaction 2s2p3p2P-2s2p6 2S transition in Fe XVIII seen in Electron Beam Ion Trap spectra and predicted in earlier theoretical work on the Fe XVIII x-ray spectrum.

  16. Thermalisation and hard X-ray bremsstrahlung efficiency of self-interacting solar flare fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, R. K.; Helander, P.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Brown, J. C.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Most theoretical descriptions of the production of solar flare bremsstrahlung radiation assume the collision of dilute accelerated particles with a cold, dense target plasma, neglecting interactions of the fast particles with each other. This is inadequate for situations where collisions with this background plasma are not completely dominant, as may be the case in, for example, low-density coronal sources. Aims: We aim to formulate a model of a self-interacting, entirely fast electron population in the absence of a dense background plasma, to investigate its implications for observed bremsstrahlung spectra and the flare energy budget. Methods: We derive approximate expressions for the time-dependent distribution function of the fast electrons using a Fokker-Planck approach. We use these expressions to generate synthetic bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra as would be seen from a corresponding coronal source. Results: We find that our model qualitatively reproduces the observed behaviour of some flares. As the flare progresses, the model's initial power-law spectrum is joined by a lower energy, thermal component. The power-law component diminishes, and the growing thermal component proceeds to dominate the total emission over timescales consistent with flare observations. The power-law exhibits progressive spectral hardening, as is seen in some flare coronal sources. We also find that our model requires a factor of 7-10 fewer accelerated electrons than the cold, thick target model to generate an equivalent hard X-ray flux. Conclusions: This model forms the basis of a treatment of self-interactions among flare fast electrons, a process which affords a more efficient means to produce bremsstrahlung photons and so may reduce the efficiency requirements placed on the particle acceleration mechanism. It also provides a useful description of the thermalisation of fast electrons in coronal sources.

  17. Combined Radio and X-ray Diagnostics of Electron Acceleration Region in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, H.; Vilmer, N.; Kontar, E. P.

    2010-12-01

    Solar flares are believed to accelerate both upward and downward propagating electron beams which can radiate emission at radio and X-ray wavelengths correspondingly. The correlation between X-ray and radio emissions in a well observed solar flare allowed us detailed study of the electron acceleration region properties. We used the Nancey Radioheliograph, Phoenix-2 and RHESSI to infer the type III position, type III starting frequency and spectral index of the HXR emission respectively. Using these datasets, we were able to infer not only the location (the height in the corona), but to estimate the spatial size of the electron acceleration site. Using numerical simulations of the electron transport of the electron beam in the corona plasma to relate X-ray and radio data, we find that the spatial size of 10 Mm at an altitude of 50 Mm above the photosphere are consistent with the observations.

  18. Using the Chandra Source-Finding Algorithm to Automatically Identify Solar X-ray Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Tennant, A.; Cirtain, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This poster details a technique of bright point identification that is used to find sources in Chandra X-ray data. The algorithm, part of a program called LEXTRCT, searches for regions of a given size that are above a minimum signal to noise ratio. The algorithm allows selected pixels to be excluded from the source-finding, thus allowing exclusion of saturated pixels (from flares and/or active regions). For Chandra data the noise is determined by photon counting statistics, whereas solar telescopes typically integrate a flux. Thus the calculated signal-to-noise ratio is incorrect, but we find we can scale the number to get reasonable results. For example, Nakakubo and Hara (1998) find 297 bright points in a September 11, 1996 Yohkoh image; with judicious selection of signal-to-noise ratio, our algorithm finds 300 sources. To further assess the efficacy of the algorithm, we analyze a SOHO/EIT image (195 Angstroms) and compare results with those published in the literature (McIntosh and Gurman, 2005). Finally, we analyze three sets of data from Hinode, representing different parts of the decline to minimum of the solar cycle.

  19. The cool component and the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of solar X-ray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Robe, Dominic

    2013-06-01

    We present results from a study of 54 polar X-ray jets that were observed in coronal X-ray movies from the X-ray Telescope on Hinode and had simultaneous coverage in movies of the cooler transition region (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) taken in the He II 304 Å band of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatory. These dual observations verify the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of polar X-ray jets previously found primarily from XRT movies alone. In accord with models of blowout jets and standard jets, the AIA 304 Å movies show a cool (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) component in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and in a small minority of standard X-ray jets, obvious lateral expansion in blowout X-ray jets but none in standard X-ray jets, and obvious axial rotation in both blowout X-ray jets and standard X-ray jets. In our sample, the number of turns of axial rotation in the cool-component standard X-ray jets is typical of that in the blowout X-ray jets, suggesting that the closed bipolar magnetic field in the jet base has substantial twist not only in all blowout X-ray jets but also in many standard X-ray jets. We point out that our results for the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of X-ray jets add credence to published speculation that type-II spicules are miniature analogs of X-ray jets, are generated by granule-size emerging bipoles, and thereby carry enough energy to power the corona and solar wind.

  20. Solar activity: The Sun as an X-ray star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1981-01-01

    The existence and constant activity of the Sun's outer atmosphere are thought to be due to the continual emergence of magnetic fields from the Solar interior and the stressing of these fields at or near the surface layers of the Sun. The structure and activity of the corona are thus symptomatic of the underlying magnetic dynamo and the existence of an outer turbulent convective zone on the Sun. A sufficient condition for the existence of coronal activity on other stars would be the existence of a magnetic dynamo and an outer convective zone. The theoretical relationship between magnetic fields and coronal activity can be tested by Solar observations, for which the individual loop structures can be resolved. A number of parameters however, which enter into the alternative theoretical formulations remain fixed in all Solar observations. To determine whether these are truly parameters of the theory observations need to be extended to nearby stars on which suitable conditions may occur.

  1. X-ray and microwave emissions from the July 19, 2012 solar flare: Highly accurate observations and kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, P. A.; Somov, B. V.

    2016-08-01

    The M7.7 solar flare of July 19, 2012, at 05:58 UT was observed with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions in the hard X-ray and optical ranges. The flare occurred at the solar limb, which allowed us to see the relative positions of the coronal and chromospheric X-ray sources and to determine their spectra. To explain the observations of the coronal source and the chromospheric one unocculted by the solar limb, we apply an accurate analytical model for the kinetic behavior of accelerated electrons in a flare. We interpret the chromospheric hard X-ray source in the thick-target approximation with a reverse current and the coronal one in the thin-target approximation. Our estimates of the slopes of the hard X-ray spectra for both sources are consistent with the observations. However, the calculated intensity of the coronal source is lower than the observed one by several times. Allowance for the acceleration of fast electrons in a collapsing magnetic trap has enabled us to remove this contradiction. As a result of our modeling, we have estimated the flux density of the energy transferred by electrons with energies above 15 keV to be ˜5 × 1010 erg cm-2 s-1, which exceeds the values typical of the thick-target model without a reverse current by a factor of ˜5. To independently test the model, we have calculated the microwave spectrum in the range 1-50 GHz that corresponds to the available radio observations.

  2. Spectrally-resolved Soft X-ray Observations and the Temperature Structure of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry; McTiernan, James; Woods, Thomas N.

    2015-04-01

    Solar X-ray observations provide important diagnostics of plasma heating and particle acceleration, during solar flares and quiescent periods. How the corona is heated to its ~1-3 MK nominal temperature remains one of the fundamental unanswered questions of solar physics; heating of plasma to tens of MK during solar flares -- particularly to the hottest observed temperatures of up to ~50 MK -- is also still poorly understood. Soft X-ray emission (~0.1-10 keV; or ~0.1-10 nm) is particularly sensitive to hot coronal plasma and serves as a probe of the thermal processes driving coronal plasma heating. Spectrally- and temporally-resolved measurements are crucial for understanding these energetic processes, but there have historically been very few such observations. We present new solar soft X-ray spectra from the Amptek X123-SDD, measuring quiescent solar X-ray emission from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution from two SDO/EVE calibration sounding rocket underflights in 2012 and 2013. Combined with observations from RHESSI, GOES/XRS, SDO/EVE, and SDO/AIA, the temperature distribution derived from these data suggest significant hot (5-10 MK) emission from active regions, and the 2013 spectra suggest a low-FIP enhancement of only ~1.6 relative to the photosphere, 40% of the usually-observed value from quiescent coronal plasma. We explore the implications of these findings on coronal heating. We discuss future missions for spectrally-resolved soft X-ray observations using the X123-SDD, including the upcoming MinXSS 3U CubeSat using the X123-SDD and scheduled for deployment in mid-2015, and the CubIXSS 6U CubeSat mission concept.

  3. Solar Control on Jupiter's Equatorial X-ray Emissions: 26-29 November 2003 XMM-Newton Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Ramsay, G.; Rodriquez, P.; Soria, R.; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    During November 26-29,2003 XMM-Newton observed X-ray emissions from Jupiter for 69 hours. The 0.7-2.0 keV X-ray disk of Jupiter is observed to be brightest at the subsolar point, and limb darkening is seen in the 0.2-2.0 keV and 0.7-2.0 keV images. We present simultaneous lightcurves of Jovian equatorial X-rays and solar X-rays measured by the GOES, SOHO/SEM, and TIMED/SEE satellites. The solar X-ray flares occurring on the Jupiter-facing side of the Sun are matched by corresponding features in the Jovian X- rays. These results support the hypothesis that X-ray emissions from Jovian low-latitudes are solar X-rays scattered and fluoresced from the planet's upper atmosphere, and confirm that the Sun directly controls the non-auroral X-rays fiom Jupiter's disk. Our study suggest that Jovian equatorial X-rays; during certain Jupiter phase, can be used to predict the occurrence of solar flare on the hemisphere of the Sun that is invisible to space weather satellites.

  4. The Relationship Between Solar Radio and Hard X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Benz, A. O.; Christe, S.; Fárník, F.; Kundu, M. R.; Mann, G.; Ning, Z.; Raulin, J.-P.; Silva-Válio, A. V. R.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Vilmer, N.; Warmuth, A.

    2011-09-01

    This review discusses the complementary relationship between radio and hard X-ray observations of the Sun using primarily results from the era of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager satellite. A primary focus of joint radio and hard X-ray studies of solar flares uses observations of nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission at radio wavelengths and bremsstrahlung hard X-rays to study the properties of electrons accelerated in the main flare site, since it is well established that these two emissions show very similar temporal behavior. A quantitative prescription is given for comparing the electron energy distributions derived separately from the two wavelength ranges: this is an important application with the potential for measuring the magnetic field strength in the flaring region, and reveals significant differences between the electrons in different energy ranges. Examples of the use of simultaneous data from the two wavelength ranges to derive physical conditions are then discussed, including the case of microflares, and the comparison of images at radio and hard X-ray wavelengths is presented. There have been puzzling results obtained from observations of solar flares at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, and the comparison of these results with corresponding hard X-ray data is presented. Finally, the review discusses the association of hard X-ray releases with radio emission at decimeter and meter wavelengths, which is dominated by plasma emission (at lower frequencies) and electron cyclotron maser emission (at higher frequencies), both coherent emission mechanisms that require small numbers of energetic electrons. These comparisons show broad general associations but detailed correspondence remains more elusive.

  5. Correlation between X-ray flux and rotational acceleration in Vela X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deeter, J. E.; Boynton, P. E.; Shibazaki, N.; Hayakawa, S.; Nagase, F.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a search for correlations between X-ray flux and angular acceleration for the accreting binary pulsar Vela X-1 are presented. Results are based on data obtained with the Hakucho satellite during the interval 1982 to 1984. In undertaking this correlation analysis, it was necessary to modify the usual statistical method to deal with conditions imposed by generally unavoidable satellite observing constraints, most notably a mismatch in sampling between the two variables. The results are suggestive of a correlation between flux and the absolute value of the angular acceleration, at a significance level of 96 percent. The implications of the methods and results for future observations and analysis are discussed.

  6. Solar flare X-ray polarimeter utilizing a large area thin beryllium scattering disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E.; Hamilton, T.; Novick, R.; Chanan, G.; Emslie, A.; Weisskopf, M.

    1989-01-01

    A model of a solar flare X-ray polarimeter utilizing a large-area thin beryllium scattering disk was developed using Monte Carlo techniques for several classes of solar flares. The solar-flare polarimeter consists of a 30-cm-diam Be disk of about 1/3 of a scattering length thickness, which is surrounded by a cylindrical detector composed of six segmented panels of NaI scintillators, each coupled to 15 photomultiplier tubes. The instrument is sensitive to X-rays from 10 to 100 keV. For a class-M-2 solar flare observed for 10 sec from a balloon at an altitude of 150,000 ft, the minimum detectable polarization at the 99 percent statistical confidence level was found to be 1-6 percent over the energy range 20-100 keV.

  7. THE TRANSIENT ACCRETING X-RAY PULSAR XTE J1946+274: STABILITY OF X-RAY PROPERTIES AT LOW FLUX AND UPDATED ORBITAL SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Marcu-Cheatham, Diana M.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Kühnel, Matthias; Müller, Sebastian; Falkner, Sebastian; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Caballero, Isabel; Jenke, Peter J.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Fürst, Felix; Grinberg, Victoria; Hemphill, Paul B.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Klochkov, Dmitry; Terada, Yukikatsu; and others

    2015-12-10

    We present a timing and spectral analysis of the X-ray pulsar XTE J1946+274 observed with Suzaku during an outburst decline in 2010 October and compare with previous results. XTE J1946+274 is a transient X-ray binary consisting of a Be-type star and a neutron star with a 15.75 s pulse period in a 172 days orbit with 2–3 outbursts per orbit during phases of activity. We improve the orbital solution using data from multiple instruments. The X-ray spectrum can be described by an absorbed Fermi–Dirac cut-off power-law model along with a narrow Fe Kα line at 6.4 keV and a weak Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Feature (CRSF) at ∼35 keV. The Suzaku data are consistent with the previously observed continuum flux versus iron line flux correlation expected from fluorescence emission along the line of sight. However, the observed iron line flux is slightly higher, indicating the possibility of a higher iron abundance or the presence of non-uniform material. We argue that the source most likely has only been observed in the subcritical (non-radiation dominated) state since its pulse profile is stable over all observed luminosities and the energy of the CRSF is approximately the same at the highest (∼5 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup −1}) and lowest (∼5 × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup −1}) observed 3–60 keV luminosities.

  8. Gamma-ray and X-ray time profiles expected from a trap-plus-precipitation model for the 7 June 1980 and 27 April 1981 solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulot, E.; Vilmer, N.; Chupp, E. L.; Dennis, B. R.; Kane, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Hard X-ray and prompt gamma-ray line emissions are the most direct signatures of, respectively, electron and ion acceleration during solar flares. The peak time of the gamma-ray emission for some events is delayed with respect to the peak time of the hard X-ray flux. These delays are either interpreted as evidence of a two-step acceleration process or as the result of the partial trapping and/or propagation of the particles from the acceleration region to the emission sites. It was shown earlier that hard X-ray and prompt gamma-ray line delays can be qualitatively reproduced in the frame of the latter hypothesis with models describing the time-dependent transport of energetic electrons and ions between these two sites. Here we focus on the close examination of the temporal evolution of X-ray and gamma-ray fluxes for the 7 June 1980 and 27 April 1981 events which exhibit delays between X-ray and gamma-ray maxima. The parameters of the ambient medium and of the accelerated particles are deduced for the two events and it is shown that the relative timing of X-ray and gamma-ray emissions is quantitatively reproduced in the present context.

  9. Athena as the next generation X-ray observatory: Solar system targets and exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Sciortino, Salvatore

    Athena studies of the solar system, by providing ever deeper insights in the complex workings of planetary magnetospheres and exospheres, will answer many of the questions left open by the pioneering work of Chandra and XMM-Newton and will add enormously to our understanding of the interactions of space plasmas and magnetic fields. The non-dispersive character of X-IFU spectroscopy will enable Jupiter’s auroral and scattered solar emissions, and the Io Plasma Torus, to be mapped spatially and spectrally at high resolution; will enable surface composition analysis through fluorescence spectra of the Galilean satellites; will establish how planetary exospheres, such as Mars’, and comets respond to the interaction with the solar wind, in a global way that in situ measurements cannot provide. The X-IFU, with its two orders of magnitude improved effective area over current spectrometers, will push the search for auroral X-ray emission on Saturn to much fainter limits, and set very sensitive constraints on Uranus X-ray emission. Athena will explore the magnetic interplay between stars and planets in X-rays by searching for X-ray spectral variability over the planet's orbital phases and for systems of different orbital eccentricity, and will investigate ingress/eclipse/egress effects for transiting hot-Jupiter exoplanets; again instrumental to this will be the vastly improved signal-to-noise ratio provided by Athena over that achieved by XMM-Newton or Chandra.

  10. SOLAR POLAR X-RAY JETS AND MULTIPLE BRIGHT POINTS: EVIDENCE FOR SYMPATHETIC ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco; Poletto, Giannina; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2012-02-15

    We present an analysis of X-ray bright points (BPs) and X-ray jets observed by Hinode/X-Ray Telescope on 2007 November 2-4, within the solar northern polar coronal hole. After selecting small subregions that include several BPs, we followed their brightness evolution over a time interval of a few hours, when several jets were observed. We find that most of the jets occurred in close temporal association with brightness maxima in multiple BPs: more precisely, most jets are closely correlated with the brightening of at least two BPs. We suggest that the jets result from magnetic connectivity changes that also induce the BP variability. We surmise that the jets and implied magnetic connectivity we describe are small-scale versions of the active-region-scale phenomenon, whereby flares and eruptions are triggered by interacting bipoles.

  11. Rocket studies of solar corona and transition region. [X-Ray spectrometer/spectrograph telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.; Bruner, E. C., Jr.; Brown, W. A.; Nobles, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The XSST (X-Ray Spectrometer/Spectrograph Telescope) rocket payload launched by a Nike Boosted Black Brant was designed to provide high spectral resolution coronal soft X-ray line information on a spectrographic plate, as well as time resolved photo-electric records of pre-selected lines and spectral regions. This spectral data is obtained from a 1 x 10 arc second solar region defined by the paraboloidal telescope of the XSST. The transition region camera provided full disc images in selected spectral intervals originating in lower temperature zones than the emitting regions accessible to the XSST. A H-alpha camera system allowed referencing the measurements to the chromospheric temperatures and altitudes. Payload flight and recovery information is provided along with X-ray photoelectric and UV flight data, transition camera results and a summary of the anomalies encountered. Instrument mechanical stability and spectrometer pointing direction are also examined.

  12. X-ray and ultraviolet investigation into the magnetic connectivity of a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, H. A. S.; Vilmer, N.; Aulanier, G.; Pariat, E.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the X-ray and UV emission detected by RHESSI and TRACE in the context of a solar flare on the 16th November 2002 with the goal of better understanding the evolution of the flare. We analysed the characteristics of the X-ray emission in the 12-25 and 25-50 keV energy range while we looked at the UV emission at 1600 Å . The flare appears to have two distinct phases of emission separated by a 25-s time delay, with the first phase being energetically more important. We found good temporal and spatial agreement between the 25-50 keV X-rays and the most intense areas of the 1600 Å UV emission. We also observed an extended 100-arcsec < 25 keV source that appears coronal in nature and connects two separated UV ribbons later in the flare. Using the observational properties in X-ray and UV wavelengths, we propose two explanations for the flare evolution in relation to the spine/fan magnetic field topology and the accelerated electrons. We find that a combination of quasi separatrix layer reconnection and null-point reconnection is required to account for the observed properties of the X-ray and UV emission.

  13. Development of precision Wolter mirrors for future solar x-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakao, Taro; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Kime, Ayumi; Goto, Takumi; Nishihara, Akihiko; Nakamori, Hiroki; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Miyake, Akira; Hashizume, Hirokazu; Maezawa, Tadakazu; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Narukage, Noriyuki

    2015-09-01

    High resolution imagery of the solar X-ray corona provides a crucial key to understand dynamics and heating processes of plasma particles there. However, X-ray imagery of the Sun with sub-arcsecond resolution has yet to be conducted due to severe technical difficulty in fabricating precision Wolter mirrors. For future X-ray observations of the Sun's corona, we are attempting to realize precision Wolter mirrors with sub-arcsecond resolution by adopting advanced surface polish and metrology methods based on nano-technology to sector mirrors which consist of a portion of an entire annulus. Following fabrication of the first engineering mirror and subsequent evaluation on the X-ray focusing performance in 2013, the second engineering mirror was made with improvements in both precision polish and metrology introduced. Measurement of focusing performance on the second mirror at SPring-8 synchrotron facility with 8 keV X-rays has demonstrated that the FWHM size of the PSF core reached down to 0.2" while its HPD (Half Power Diameter) size remained at ~3" due to the presence of small-angle scatter just outside of the core. Also, there was notable difference in the focal length between sagittal and meridional focusing which could have been caused by an error in the sag in the meridional direction of <10 nm in the mirror area. Further improvements to overcome these issues have been planned for the next engineering mirror.

  14. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-Ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Bailey, Catherine N.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; DeLuca, Edward E.; Chervenak, Jay A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Daniel P.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, Jack E.; Smith, Stephen J.; Smith, Randall K.

    2010-01-01

    High spectral resolution, high cadence, imaging x-ray spectroscopy has the potential to revolutionize the study of the solar corona. To that end we have been developing transition-edge-sensor (TES) based x-ray micro calorimeter arrays for future solar physics missions where imaging and high energy resolution spectroscopy will enable previously impossible studies of the dynamics and energetics of the solar corona. The characteristics of these x-ray microcalorimeters are significantly different from conventional micro calorimeters developed for astrophysics because they need to accommodate much higher count rates (300-1000 cps) while maintaining high energy resolution of less than 4 eV FWHM in the X-ray energy band of 0.2-10 keV. The other main difference is a smaller pixel size (less than 75 x 75 square microns) than is typical for x-ray micro calorimeters in order to provide angular resolution less than 1 arcsecond. We have achieved at energy resolution of 2.15 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 12 x 12 square micron TES sensor and 34 x 34 x 9.1 micron gold absorber, and a resolution of 2.30 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 35 x 35 micron TES and a 57 x 57 x 9.1 micron gold absorber. This performance has been achieved in pixels that are fabricated directly onto solid substrates, ie. they are not supported by silicon nitride membranes. We present the results from these detectors, the expected performance at high count-rates, and prospects for the use of this technology for future Solar missions.

  15. Compton scattering for spectroscopic detection of ultra-fast, high flux, broad energy range X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Brunetti, E.; Vieux, G.; Yang, X.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Montgomery, R.; Smith, G.; Hoek, M.; Hamilton, D. J.; Shea, V. O.; Issac, R. C.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Dias, J. M.; and others

    2013-11-15

    Compton side-scattering has been used to simultaneously downshift the energy of keV to MeV energy range photons while attenuating their flux to enable single-shot, spectrally resolved, measurements of high flux X-ray sources to be undertaken. To demonstrate the technique a 1 mm thick pixelated cadmium telluride detector has been used to measure spectra of Compton side-scattered radiation from a Cobalt-60 laboratory source and a high flux, high peak brilliance X-ray source of betatron radiation from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator.

  16. The importance of the transmission flux in evaluating the preheat effect in x-ray driven ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liling; Zhang, Lu; Zheng, Jianhua; Qing, Bo; Zhang, Jiyan; Kuang, Longyu; Li, Hang; Jiang, Shaoen

    2015-02-15

    In x-ray driven ablation, the preheat effect is caused by the high energy x-rays that pass through the ablator. Thus, the transmission flux can be used to characterize preheat effect in a certain degree. With the radiation temperature being 200 eV, the transmission flux and preheat temperature of pure polymer (CH) have been studied by using the one-dimensional multi-group radiation hydrodynamic code MULTI-1D. By studying the spectrum of the transmitted x-rays, it is found that the energy of the transmitted x-rays is in the range of 2–5 keV for pure CH ablator. This is of importance for selecting a dopant for CH ablator. We also calculated both the preheat temperature of CH near the surface of thick target (47.66 μm) and the transmission flux of a thinner target (38.66 μm). It is found that the more transmission flux leads to the higher preheat temperature. Preheat effect of graded Si-doped CH targets with different doped concentrations has also been studied. The results are consistent with this phenomenon. By analyzing the relationship between the transmission flux and the preheat temperature, we have presented a novel method to evaluate preheat effect in x-ray driven ablation.

  17. HARD X-RAY AND ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION DURING THE 2011 JUNE 7 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Inglis, A. R.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between X-ray and UV emission during flares, particularly in the context of quasi-periodic pulsations, remains unclear. To address this, we study the impulsive X-ray and UV emission during an eruptive flare on 2011 June 7 utilizing X-ray imaging from RHESSI and UV 1700 Å imaging from SDO/AIA. This event is associated with quasi-periodic pulsations in X-ray and possibly UV emission, as well as substantial parallel and perpendicular motion in the hard X-ray footpoints. The motion of the footpoints parallel to the flare ribbons is unusual; it reverses direction on at least two occasions. However, there is no associated short timescale motion of the UV bright regions. Over the same time interval, the footpoints also gradually move apart at v ≈ 12 km s{sup –1}, consistent with the gradual outward expansion of the UV ribbons and the standard flare model. Additionally, we find that the locations of the brightest X-ray and UV regions are different, particularly during the early portion of the flare impulsive phase, despite their integrated emission being strongly correlated in time. Correlation analysis of measured flare properties, such as the footpoint separation, flare shear, photospheric magnetic field, and coronal reconnection rate, reveals that—in the impulsive phase—the 25-50 keV hard X-ray flux is only weakly correlated with these properties, in contrast with previous studies. We characterize this event in terms of long-term behavior, where the X-ray non-thermal, thermal, and UV emission sources appear temporally and spatially consistent, and short-term behavior, where the emission sources are inconsistent and quasi-periodic pulsations are a dominant feature requiring explanation. We suggest that the short timescale behavior of hard X-ray footpoints and the nature of the observed quasi-periodic pulsations are determined by fundamental, as yet unobserved properties of the reconnection region and particle acceleration sites. This presents a

  18. Cometary X-Rays: Line Emission Cross Sections for Multiply Charged Solar Wind Ion Charge Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S; Olson, R E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-12-22

    Absolute line emission cross sections are presented for 1 keV/amu charge exchange collisions of multiply charged solar wind ions with H{sub 2}O, H, O, CO{sub 2}, and CO cometary targets. The present calculations are contrasted with available laboratory data. A parameter-free model is used to successfully predict the recently observed x-ray spectra of comet C/LINEAR 1999 S4. We show that the resulting spectrum is extremely sensitive to the time variations of the solar wind composition. Our results suggest that orbiting x-ray satellites may be a viable way to predict the solar wind intensities and composition on the Earth many hours before the ions reach the earth.

  19. FIRST IMAGES FROM THE FOCUSING OPTICS X-RAY SOLAR IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay; Turin, Paul; McBride, Stephen; Glaser, David; Fermin, Jose; Lin, Robert; Christe, Steven; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Saito, Shinya; Tanaka, Takaaki; White, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket payload flew for the first time on 2012 November 2, producing the first focused images of the Sun above 5 keV. To enable hard X-ray (HXR) imaging spectroscopy via direct focusing, FOXSI makes use of grazing-incidence replicated optics combined with fine-pitch solid-state detectors. On its first flight, FOXSI observed several targets that included active regions, the quiet Sun, and a GOES-class B2.7 microflare. This Letter provides an introduction to the FOXSI instrument and presents its first solar image. These data demonstrate the superiority in sensitivity and dynamic range that is achievable with a direct HXR imager with respect to previous, indirect imaging methods, and illustrate the technological readiness for a spaceborne mission to observe HXRs from solar flares via direct focusing optics.

  20. New Observations of Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Solar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Mason, J. P.; Jones, A. R.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable on many time scales. However, the actual solar soft X-ray (SXR) (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during solar quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystal spectrometers (e.g., Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g., GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with moderate energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and SAX on MESSENGER, although they did not extend to energies below ~1 keV. We present observations of solar SXR emission obtained using new instrumentation flown on recent SDO/EVE calibration rocket underflights. The photon-counting spectrometer, a commercial Amptek X123 with a silicon drift detector and an 8 μm Be window, measures the solar disk-integrated SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution and 1 s cadence. A novel imager, a pinhole X-ray camera using a cooled frame-transfer CCD (15 μm pixel pitch), Ti/Al/C filter, and 5000 line/mm Au transmission grating, images the full Sun in multiple spectral orders from ~0.1 to ~5 nm with ~10 arcsec/pixel and ~0.01 nm/pixel spatial and spectral detector scales, respectively, and 10 s cadence. These instruments are prototypes for future CubeSat missions currently being developed. We present new results of solar observations on 04 October 2013 (NASA sounding rocket 36.290). We compare with previous results from 23 June 2012 (NASA sounding rocket 36.286), during which solar activity was low and no signal was observed above ~4 keV. We compare our spectral and imaging measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including SDO/EVE, GOES/XRS, TIMED

  1. Radio and X-ray Diagnostics of Electron Beams in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, Nicole; Kontar, Eduard; Hamish; Reid, A. S.; Maksimovic, Milan

    Solar flares are associated with efficient production of energetic particles at all energies. While energetic electrons and ions interacting with the solar atmosphere produce high energy X-rays and gamma-rays, the energetic electrons escaping to the corona and interplanetary medium produce coherent radio emissions (in particular type III bursts) and may be directly detected by experiments aboard spacecraft. We shall present the results of two statistical studies combining X-ray observations from RHESSI and of type III bursts observed in the decimeter/meter range and imaged by the Nançay Radioheliograph We shall show how the combination of X-ray and radio observations allows for some events to deduce the characteristics of the electron beam acceleration sites (height and size). We shall also present the results of a recent study on the percentage of decimetric/metric type III bursts observed with Nançay which have a counterpart at lower frequencies (namely in the range 14 to 1 MHz ) observed with Wind/Waves. This study is based on a list of events for which X-ray emission (by RHESSI) is also observed in connection with the type III bursts. We shall discuss the different reasons which could explain the extent or not of the metric type III burst to the hectometric range.

  2. Implications of X-Ray Observations for Electron Acceleration and Propagation in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Aurass, H.; Battaglia, M.; Grigis, P. C.; Kontar, E. P.; Liu, W.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-rays and gamma-rays from solar flares were discovered just over fifty years ago. Since that time, the standard for the interpretation of spatially integrated flare X-ray spectra at energies above several tens of keV has been the collisional thick-target model. After the launch of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in early 2002, X-ray spectra and images have been of sufficient quality to allow a greater focus on the energetic electrons responsible for the X-ray emission, including their origin and their interactions with the flare plasma and magnetic field. The result has been new insights into the flaring process, as well as more quantitative models for both electron acceleration and propagation, and for the flare environment with which the electrons interact. In this article we review our current understanding of electron acceleration, energy loss, and propagation in flares. Implications of these new results for the collisional thick-target model, for general flare models, and for future flare studies are discussed.

  3. The First X-Ray Imaging Spectroscopy of Quiescent Solar Active Regions with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, Iain G.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Smith, David M.; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Marsh, Andrew; White, Stephen M.; Caspi, Amir; Shih, Albert Y.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first observations of quiescent active regions (ARs) using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), a focusing hard X-ray telescope capable of studying faint solar emission from high-temperature and non-thermal sources. We analyze the first directly imaged and spectrally resolved X-rays above 2 keV from non-flaring ARs, observed near the west limb on 2014 November 1. The NuSTAR X-ray images match bright features seen in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays. The NuSTAR imaging spectroscopy is consistent with isothermal emission of temperatures 3.1-4.4 MK and emission measures 1-8 × 1046 cm-3. We do not observe emission above 5 MK, but our short effective exposure times restrict the spectral dynamic range. With few counts above 6 keV, we can place constraints on the presence of an additional hotter component between 5 and 12 MK of ˜ {10}46 cm-3 and ˜ {10}43 cm-3, respectively, at least an order of magnitude stricter than previous limits. With longer duration observations and a weakening solar cycle (resulting in an increased livetime), future NuSTAR observations will have sensitivity to a wider range of temperatures as well as possible non-thermal emission.

  4. The Relationship Between Solar Radio and Hard X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Benz, A. O.; Christe, S.; Farnik, F.; Kundu, M. R.; Mann, G.; Ning, Z.; Raulin, J.-P.; Silva-Valio, A. V. R.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Vilmer, N.; Warmuth, A.

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses the complementary relationship between radio and hard Xray observations of the Sun using primarily results from the era of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager satellite. A primary focus of joint radio and hard X-ray studies of solar flares uses observations of nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission at radio wavelengths and bremsstrahlung hard X-rays to study the properties of electrons accelerated in the main flare site, since it is well established that these two emissions show very similar temporal behavior. A quantitative prescription is given for comparing the electron energy distributions derived separately from the two wavelength ranges: this is an important application with the potential for measuring the magnetic field strength in the flaring region, and reveals significant differences between the electrons in different energy ranges. Examples of the use of simultaneous data from the two wavelength ranges to derive physical conditions are then discussed, including the case of microflares, and the comparison of images at radio and hard X-ray wavelengths is presented. There have been puzzling results obtained from observations of solar flares at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, and the comparison of these results with corresponding hard X-ray data is presented. Finally, the review discusses the association of hard X-ray releases with radio emission at decimeter and meter wavelengths, which is dominated by plasma emission (at lower frequencies) and electron cyclotron maser emission (at higher frequencies), both coherent emission mechanisms that require small numbers of energetic electrons. These comparisons show broad general associations but detailed correspondence remains more elusive.

  5. Time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering methods beyond photoactivation: Utilizing high-flux X-ray sources for the study of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohit; Techert, Simone

    2016-01-01

    X-ray scattering technique, comprising of small-angle/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques is increasingly used to characterize the structure and interactions of biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution. It is a method of choice to characterize the flexible, partially folded and unfolded protein systems. X-ray scattering is the last resort for proteins that cannot be investigated by crystallography or NMR and acts as a complementary technique with different biophysical techniques to answer challenging scientific questions. The marriage of the X-ray scattering technique with the fourth dimension "time" yields structural dynamics and kinetics information for protein motions in hierarchical timescales from picoseconds to days. The arrival of the high-flux X-ray beam at third generation synchrotron sources, exceptional X-ray optics, state-of-the-art detectors, upgradation of X-ray scattering beamlines with microfluidics devices and advanced X-ray scattering data analysis procedures are the important reasons behind the shining years of X-ray scattering technique. The best days of the X-ray scattering technique are on the horizon with the advent of the nanofocus X-ray scattering beamlines and fourth generation X-ray lightsources, i.e., free electron lasers (XFELs). Complementary to the photon-triggered time-resolved X-ray scattering techniques, we will present an overview of the time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering techniques for structural dynamics of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins.

  6. Time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering methods beyond photoactivation: Utilizing high-flux X-ray sources for the study of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohit; Techert, Simone

    2016-01-01

    X-ray scattering technique, comprising of small-angle/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques is increasingly used to characterize the structure and interactions of biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution. It is a method of choice to characterize the flexible, partially folded and unfolded protein systems. X-ray scattering is the last resort for proteins that cannot be investigated by crystallography or NMR and acts as a complementary technique with different biophysical techniques to answer challenging scientific questions. The marriage of the X-ray scattering technique with the fourth dimension "time" yields structural dynamics and kinetics information for protein motions in hierarchical timescales from picoseconds to days. The arrival of the high-flux X-ray beam at third generation synchrotron sources, exceptional X-ray optics, state-of-the-art detectors, upgradation of X-ray scattering beamlines with microfluidics devices and advanced X-ray scattering data analysis procedures are the important reasons behind the shining years of X-ray scattering technique. The best days of the X-ray scattering technique are on the horizon with the advent of the nanofocus X-ray scattering beamlines and fourth generation X-ray lightsources, i.e., free electron lasers (XFELs). Complementary to the photon-triggered time-resolved X-ray scattering techniques, we will present an overview of the time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering techniques for structural dynamics of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins. PMID:26732244

  7. The ROSAT-ESO flux limited X-ray galaxy cluster survey (REFLEX II). I. Newly identified X-ray luminous clusters at z ≥ 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, G.; Böhringer, H.

    2012-02-01

    We report 19 intermediate redshift clusters newly detected in the ROSAT All-Sky survey that are spectroscopically confirmed. They form a part of 911 objects in the REFLEX II cluster catalogue with a limiting flux of 1.8 × 10-12 erg/s/cm2 in the 0.1-2.4 keV ROSAT band at redshift z ≥ 0.2. In addition we report three clusters from the REFLEX III supplementary catalogue, which contains objects below the REFLEX II flux limit but satisfies the redshift constraint above. These clusters are spectroscopically followed-up by our ESO NTT-EFOSC2 campaigns for the redshift measurement. We describe our observing and data reduction methods. We show how X-ray properties such as spectral hardness ratio and source extent can be used as important diagnostics in selecting galaxy cluster candidates. Physical properties of the clusters are subsequently calculated from the X-ray observations. This sample contains the high mass and intermediate-redshift galaxy clusters for astrophysical and cosmological applications. Based on the data obtained at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  8. Solar Magnetic Reconnection at Low Altitudes and Associated Type III Solar Radio Bursts and X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Lobzin, V. V.; Donea, A.; Tingay, S. J.; Oberoi, D.; Reiner, M. J.; Melrose, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection events are identified definitively in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) data on 25 September 2011, with double-sided jets, current sheets and cusp-like geometries on top of loops, and strong outflows at 200 km/s along pairs of open magnetic field lines. Strong type III bursts observed by the Learmonth radio spectrograph and imaged by the MurchisonWidefield Array (MWA) are demonstrated to be in very good temporal and spatial coincidence with specic SDO magnetic reconnection events and with bursts of nonthermal 3-35 keV X-rays observed by the RHESSI spacecraft. The reconnection sites are low, near heights of 5-10 Mm or 0.01 solar radii, alleviating the number problem for producing the energetic electrons and X-rays. These data, especially the images and event timings, provide direct evidence for the long-unproven but standard model for type III bursts: semi-relativistic electrons energized in magnetic reconnection regions produce radio emission as they move away from the Sun and X-rays as they move into the chromosphere. Since not all SDO events produce X-ray or type III events, different special conditions must exist for the production of strong radio, X-ray, or UV bursts by reconnection events. These conditions are both on the production of suitable energetic electrons and on the production of observable radio, X-ray, and UV emissions from these electrons.

  9. ESTIMATE OF SOLAR MAXIMUM USING THE 1-8 Å GEOSTATIONARY OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITES X-RAY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, L. M.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2014-10-01

    We present an alternate method of determining the progression of the solar cycle through an analysis of the solar X-ray background. Our results are based on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray data in the 1-8 Å band from 1986 to the present, covering solar cycles 22, 23, and 24. The X-ray background level tracks the progression of the solar cycle through its maximum and minimum. Using the X-ray data, we can therefore make estimates of the solar cycle progression and the date of solar maximum. Based upon our analysis, we conclude that the Sun reached its hemisphere-averaged maximum in solar cycle 24 in late 2013. This is within six months of the NOAA prediction of a maximum in spring 2013.

  10. A comparison of the height distributions of solar flare hard X-rays in thick target and thermal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    The height structure of hard X-ray bremsstrahlung emission in solar flares is computed for two different models of bremsstrahlung production: emission from a descending beam of nonthermal electrons, and thermal emission from a coronally confined hot plasma. It is shown how these models give rise to hard X-ray spatial distributions which are distinguishable by current instrumentation, and that, therefore, the models may be distinguished by such spatially resolved hard X-ray measurements.

  11. Modeling of the EUV and X-Ray Emission Spectra Induced by the Solar Winds Ions in the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out investigation of the EUV and X-ray emission spectra induced in interaction between the Solar Wind (SW) and interstellar neutral gas. The spectra of most important SW ions have been computed for the charge-exchange mechanism of X-ray emission using new accurate spectroscopic data from recent laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. Total spectra have been constructed as a sum of spectra induced in the charge-exchange collisions by individual O(exp q+), C(exp q+), N(exp q+), Ne(exp q+), Mg (exp q+) and Fe(exp q+) ions. Calculations have been performed for X-ray emission from the heliospheric hydrogen and helium gas. X-ray maps of the heliosphere have been computed. The power density of X-ray sources in the heliospheric ecliptic plane is shown for the H gas and for the He gas. Distances from the Sun (0,0) are given in AU. The helium cone is clear seen in the X-ray map of the charge-exchange emission induced by the solar wind. X-ray emission spectra detected by the Chandra X-ray telescope from the "dark" side of Moon has been identified as a X-ray background emission induced by the solar wind from the geocorona. Spectra and intensities of this charge-exchange X-rays have been compared with the heliospheric component of the X-ray background. Observations and modeling of the SW spectra induced from the geocorona indicate a strong presence of emission lines of highly charged oxygen ions. Anisotropy in distribution of heliospheric X-rays has been predicted and calculated for the regions of the fast and slow solar winds.

  12. An X-Ray Flux-Limited Sample of Galaxy Clusters: Physical Properties and Cosmological Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiprich, Thomas H.

    2001-07-01

    An X-ray selected and X-ray flux-limited sample comprising the 63 X-ray brightest galaxy clusters in the sky (excluding the galactic band, called HIFLUGCS) has been constructed based on the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. The flux limit has been set at 2x10^-11 erg/s/cm^2 in the energy band 0.1-2.4 keV. It has been shown that a high completeness is indicated by several tests. Due to the high flux limit this sample can be used for a variety of applications requiring a statistical cluster sample without any corrections to the effective survey volume. Mainly high quality pointed observations have been used to determine fluxes and physical cluster parameters. It has been shown that a tight correlation exists between the X-ray luminosity and the gravitational mass using HIFLUGCS and an extended sample of 106 galaxy clusters. The relation and its scatter have been quantified using different fitting methods. A comparison to theoretical and numerical predictions shows an overall agreement. This relation may be directly applied in large X-ray cluster surveys or dark matter simulations for conversions between X-ray luminosity and gravitating mass. Data from the performance verification phase of the recently launched X-ray satellite observatory XMM-Newton on the galaxy cluster Abell 1835 has been analyzed, in order to test the assumption of isothermality of the cluster gas in the outer parts applied throughout the work. It has been found that the measured outer temperature profile is consistent with being isothermal. In the inner regions a clear drop of the temperature by a factor of two has been found. Physical properties of the cluster sample have been studied by analyzing relations between different cluster parameters. The overall properties are well understood but in detail deviations from simple expectations have been found. It has been found that the gas mass fraction (fgas) does not vary as a function of intracluster gas temperature. For galaxy groups (kTx < 2 keV), however, a

  13. Automated Solar Flare Statistics in Soft X-Rays over 37 Years of GOES Observations: The Invariance of Self-organized Criticality during Three Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Freeland, Samuel L.

    2012-08-01

    We analyzed the soft X-ray light curves from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites over the last 37 years (1975-2011) and measured with an automated flare detection algorithm over 300,000 solar flare events (amounting to ≈5 times higher sensitivity than the NOAA flare catalog). We find a power-law slope of α F = 1.98 ± 0.11 for the (background-subtracted) soft X-ray peak fluxes that is invariant through three solar cycles and agrees with the theoretical prediction α F = 2.0 of the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) model. For the soft X-ray flare rise times, we find a power-law slope of α T = 2.02 ± 0.04 during solar cycle minima years, which is also consistent with the prediction α T = 2.0 of the FD-SOC model. During solar cycle maxima years, the power-law slope is steeper in the range of α T ≈ 2.0-5.0, which can be modeled by a solar-cycle-dependent flare pile-up bias effect. These results corroborate the FD-SOC model, which predicts a power-law slope of α E = 1.5 for flare energies and thus rules out significant nanoflare heating. While the FD-SOC model predicts the probability distribution functions of spatio-temporal scaling laws of nonlinear energy dissipation processes, additional physical models are needed to derive the scaling laws between the geometric SOC parameters and the observed emissivity in different wavelength regimes, as we derive here for soft X-ray emission. The FD-SOC model also yields statistical probabilities for solar flare forecasting.

  14. AUTOMATED SOLAR FLARE STATISTICS IN SOFT X-RAYS OVER 37 YEARS OF GOES OBSERVATIONS: THE INVARIANCE OF SELF-ORGANIZED CRITICALITY DURING THREE SOLAR CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Freeland, Samuel L.

    2012-08-01

    We analyzed the soft X-ray light curves from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites over the last 37 years (1975-2011) and measured with an automated flare detection algorithm over 300,000 solar flare events (amounting to Almost-Equal-To 5 times higher sensitivity than the NOAA flare catalog). We find a power-law slope of {alpha}{sub F} = 1.98 {+-} 0.11 for the (background-subtracted) soft X-ray peak fluxes that is invariant through three solar cycles and agrees with the theoretical prediction {alpha}{sub F} = 2.0 of the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) model. For the soft X-ray flare rise times, we find a power-law slope of {alpha}{sub T} = 2.02 {+-} 0.04 during solar cycle minima years, which is also consistent with the prediction {alpha}{sub T} = 2.0 of the FD-SOC model. During solar cycle maxima years, the power-law slope is steeper in the range of {alpha}{sub T} Almost-Equal-To 2.0-5.0, which can be modeled by a solar-cycle-dependent flare pile-up bias effect. These results corroborate the FD-SOC model, which predicts a power-law slope of {alpha}{sub E} = 1.5 for flare energies and thus rules out significant nanoflare heating. While the FD-SOC model predicts the probability distribution functions of spatio-temporal scaling laws of nonlinear energy dissipation processes, additional physical models are needed to derive the scaling laws between the geometric SOC parameters and the observed emissivity in different wavelength regimes, as we derive here for soft X-ray emission. The FD-SOC model also yields statistical probabilities for solar flare forecasting.

  15. Microwave imaging of a solar limb flare - Comparison of spectra and spatial geometry with hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, E. J.; Kundu, M. R.; Dennis, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A solar limb flare was mapped using the Very Large Array (VLA) together with hard X-ray (HXR) spectral and spatial observations of the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Microwave flux records from 2.8 to 19.6 GHz were instrumental in determining the burst spectrum, which has a maximum at 10 GHz. The flux spectrum and area of the burst sources were used to determine the number of electrons producing gyrosynchrotron emission, magnetic field strength, and the energy distribution of gyrosynchrotron-emitting electrons. Applying the thick target model to the HXR spectrum, the number of high energy electrons responsible for the X-ray bursts was found to be 10 to the 36th, and the electron energy distribution was approximately E exp -5, significantly different from the parameters derived from the microwave observations. The HXR imaging observations exhibit some similiarities in size and structure o the first two burst sources mapped with the VLA. However, during the initial burst, the HXR source was single and lower in the corona than the double 6 cm source. The observations are explained in terms of a single loop with an isotropic high-energy electron distribution which produced the microwaves, and a larger beamed component which produced the HXR at the feet of the loop.

  16. Hard X-Ray Flare Source Sizes Measured with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Pernak, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of 18 double hard X-ray sources seen at energies above 25 keV are analyzed to determine the spatial extent of the most compact structures evident in each case. The following four image reconstruction algorithms were used: Clean, Pixon, and two routines using visibilities maximum entropy and forward fit (VFF). All have been adapted for this study to optimize their ability to provide reliable estimates of the sizes of the more compact sources. The source fluxes, sizes, and morphologies obtained with each method are cross-correlated and the similarities and disagreements are discussed. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the major axes of the sources with assumed elliptical Gaussian shapes are generally well correlated between the four image reconstruction routines and vary between the RHESSI resolution limit of approximately 2" up to approximately 20" with most below 10". The FWHM of the minor axes are generally at or just above the RHESSI limit and hence should be considered as unresolved in most cases. The orientation angles of the elliptical sources are also well correlated. These results suggest that the elongated sources are generally aligned along a flare ribbon with the minor axis perpendicular to the ribbon. This is verified for the one flare in our list with coincident Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images. There is evidence for significant extra flux in many of the flares in addition to the two identified compact sources, thus rendering the VFF assumption of just two Gaussians inadequate. A more realistic approximation in many cases would be of two line sources with unresolved widths. Recommendations are given for optimizing the RHESSI imaging reconstruction process to ensure that the finest possible details of the source morphology become evident and that reliable estimates can be made of the source dimensions.

  17. Relation between electric current densities and X-ray emissions from particles accelerated during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, Sophie; Vilmer, Nicole; Bommier, Veronique

    The energy released during solar flares is believed to be stored in non-potential magnetic fields associated with electric currents. This energy is partially transferred to particle acceleration. We studied for several X-class flares located near the solar disk center the relation between the location of the X-ray emissions produced by energetic electrons accelerated in the corona and the magnetic field and vertical component of the electric current density in the photosphere. The study is based on X-ray images with data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and magnetic field maps and current density maps calculated with the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes from the spectropolarimetric measurements of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). A comparison between X-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images from the SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) complete the study. We shall present preliminary conclusions on the link between particle acceleration and the presence of electric currents in the active region.

  18. Radio and X-ray diagnostics of electron acceleration and propagation in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N.; Reid, H.

    2015-12-01

    Efficient particle acceleration is observed in association with solar flares. X-ray and radio emissions provide valuable information on the properties of electron acceleration, interaction and propagation. In particular, type III radio bursts observed in a whole frequency band from several hundred MHz to tens of MHz allow to diagnose the propagation of electron beams from the flare acceleration site in the corona to the outer solar atmosphere. We will present here the results of a study based on ten years of data (2002-2011) starting with a list of coronal type III bursts. We will reexamine long-standing questions on the connections between type III bursts and HXR flares using combined data from RHESSI, the Phoenix 2 and Blein 7M radiospectrometers, the NRH and Wind/Waves: -Do all coronal type III bursts have X-ray counterparts? -What kind of correlation between X-ray and radio intensities? -Do all coronal type III bursts have an Interplanetary component? We will further describe how these kind of studies can be continued in the future using the combination of ground-based measurements with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe + observations.

  19. The spectrometer telescope for imaging x-rays on board the Solar Orbiter mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, A. O.; Krucker, S.; Hurford, G. J.; Arnold, N. G.; Orleanski, P.; Gröbelbauer, H.-P.; Klober, S.; Iseli, L.; Wiehl, H. J.; Csillaghy, A.; Etesi, L.; Hochmuth, N.; Battaglia, M.; Bednarzik, M.; Resanovic, R.; Grimm, O.; Viertel, G.; Commichau, V.; Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Brun, S.; Vilmer, N.; Skup, K. R.; Graczyk, R.; Stolarski, M.; Michalska, M.; Nowosielski, W.; Cichocki, A.; Mosdorf, M.; Seweryn, K.; Przepiórka, A.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Mrozek, T.; Podgorski, P.; Mann, G.; Aurass, H.; Popow, E.; Onel, H.; Dionies, F.; Bauer, S.; Rendtel, J.; Warmuth, A.; Woche, M.; Plüschke, D.; Bittner, W.; Paschke, J.; Wolker, D.; Van Beek, H. F.; Farnik, F.; Kasparova, J.; Veronig, A. M.; Kienreich, I. W.; Gallagher, P. T.; Bloomfield, D. S.; Piana, M.; Massone, A. M.; Dennis, B. R.; Schwarz, R. A.; Lin, R. P.

    2012-09-01

    The Spectrometer Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) is one of 10 instruments on board Solar Orbiter, a confirmed Mclass mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) within the Cosmic Vision program scheduled to be launched in 2017. STIX applies a Fourier-imaging technique using a set of tungsten grids (at pitches from 0.038 to 1 mm) in front of 32 pixelized CdTe detectors to provide imaging spectroscopy of solar thermal and non-thermal hard X-ray emissions from 4 to 150 keV. The status of the instrument reviewed in this paper is based on the design that passed the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) in early 2012. Particular emphasis is given to the first light of the detector system called Caliste-SO.

  20. Experimental study of spectral and spatial distribution of solar X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.; Catura, R. C.; Culhane, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The study of the physical conditions within the solar corona and the development of instrumentation and technical expertise necessary for advanced studies of solar X-ray emission are reported. Details are given on the Aerobee-borne-X-ray spectrometer/monochromator and also on the observing program. Preliminary discussions of some results are presented and include studies of helium-like line emission, mapping O(VII) and Ne(IX) lines, survey of O(VII) and Ne(IX) lines, study of plage regions and small flares, and analysis of line emission from individual active regions. It is concluded that the use of large-area collimated Bragg spectrometers to scan narrow wavelength intervals and the capability of the SPARCS pointing control to execute a complex observing program are established.

  1. Solar hard X-ray images observed by Astro-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohki, K.; Tsuneta, S.; Nitta, N.; Takakura, T.; Makishima, K.; Murakami, T.; Ogawara, Y.; Oda, M.

    Observations with the solar X-ray telescope on board the Astro A satellite are reviewed and analyzed. The instrument has a sensitivity range in the 17-60 keV interval. A total of 20 large X-ray events were observed between February and August 1981. Analyses are presented of one limb and one disk event. The April 27 limb flare in region 3049 produced a count increase to 60,000/sec on the lowest energy channel. An April 2 event showed a size less than 10 arcsec on the solar surface. An electron density of 6.2 x 10 to the 46/cu cm was calculated, with field particles exceeding 20 billion/cu cm. Details of the satellite scanning capabilities are described.

  2. Fast-scanning high-flux microprobe for biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy and microXAS

    SciTech Connect

    Barrea, R.A.; Gore, D.; Kujala, N.; Karanfil, C.; Kozyrenko, S.; Heurich, R.; Vukonich, M.; Huang, R.; Paunesku, T.; Woloschak, G.; Irving, T.C.

    2010-07-23

    There is a growing interest in the biomedical community in obtaining information concerning the distribution and local chemical environment of metals in tissues and cells. Recently, biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has emerged as the tool of choice to address these questions. A fast-scanning high-flux X-ray microprobe, built around a recently commissioned pair of 200 mm-long Rh-coated silicon Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors, has been constructed at BioCAT beamline 18ID at the Advanced Photon Source. The new optical system delivers a flux of 1.3 x 10{sup 12} photons s{sup -1} into a minimum focal spot size of {approx}3-5 {micro}m FWHM. A set of Si drift detectors and bent Laue crystal analyzers may be used in combination with standard ionization chambers for X-ray fluorescence measurements. BioCAT's scanning software allows fast continuous scans to be performed while acquiring and storing full multichannel analyzer spectra per pixel on-the-fly with minimal overhead time (<20 ms per pixel). Together, the high-flux X-ray microbeam and the rapid-scanning capabilities of the BioCAT beamline allow the collection of XFM and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (microXAS) measurements from as many as 48 tissue sections per day. This paper reports the commissioning results of the new instrument with representative XFM and microXAS results from tissue samples.

  3. New Solar Soft X-ray Observations from the X123 Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; McTiernan, J. M.; Warren, H. P.; Woods, T. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Amptek X123 is a new soft X-ray photon-counting spectrometer, based on a silicon drift detector with integrated thermoelectric cooler, vacuum housing, and multi-channel analyzer (including pulse pile-up rejection), capable of measuring solar line and continuum emission from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution. It was flown on two recent SDO/EVE sounding rocket calibration underflights, is the primary science instrument on the upcoming Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) NASA CubeSat, and is part of the proposed instrument payload for the CubeSat Imaging X-ray Solar Spectrometer (CubIXSS) mission concept. With the best resolution yet obtained from a broadband X-ray spectrometer, the X123 will enable new studies of plasma heating and particle acceleration, during flares and quiescent periods, and help to fill a crucial observational gap from ~0.2 to ~1.2 keV, not currently measured by existing instruments but critical for understanding solar-driven dynamics in Earth's upper atmosphere (ionosphere, thermosphere, mesosphere). We present results from a new analysis of X123 data obtained from the SDO/EVE rocket flights. In preparation for future MinXSS and CubIXSS data, we adapt a recently-developed technique combining EUV and X-ray spectra from SDO/EVE and RHESSI, respectively, to obtain a self-consistent differential emission measure (DEM) over the full range of coronal temperatures, ~2-50 MK. Including the X123 rocket X-ray spectra, we apply the adapted technique to examine both the coronal DEM and composition during quiescent (non-flaring) times with varying activity levels, obtaining constraints on the high-temperature extent of the quiescent DEM, the elemental abundances, and any potential non-thermal emission, and use the observations to extrapolate the spectrum to the poorly-observed ~0.2-1.2 keV band. We compare these results with those from a parallel technique using SDO/AIA imaging data. We discuss the implications for coronal plasma

  4. The solar X-ray/cosmic gamma-ray burst experiment aboard Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Sommer, M.; Atteia, J.-L.; Boer, M.; Cline, T.; Cotin, F.; Henoux, J.-C.; Kane, S.; Lowes, P.; Niel, M.

    1992-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Ulysses solar X-ray/cosmic gamma-ray burst experiment, and the unique features of the Ulysses mission which will help to achieve them are described. After a discussion of the special design constraints imposed by the mission, the sensor systems, consisting of two CsI scintillators and two Si surface barrier detectors covering the energy range 5-150 keV are described. Their operating modes and inflight performance are also given.

  5. Quasi-periodic pulsations in solar hard X-ray and microwave flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosugi, Takeo; Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1986-01-01

    For more than a decade, various studies have pointed out that hard X-ray and microwave time profiles of some solar flares show quasi-periodic fluctuations or pulsations. Nevertheless, it was not until recently that a flare displaying large amplitude quasi-periodic pulsations in X-rays and microwaves was observed with good spectral coverage and with a sufficient time resolution. The event occurred on June 7, 1980, at approximately 0312 UT, and exhibits seven intense pulses with a quasi-periodicity of approximately 8 seconds in microwaves, hard X-rays, and gamma-ray lines. On May 12, 1983, at approximately 0253 UT, another good example of this type of flare was observed both in hard X-rays and in microwaves. Temporal and spectral characteristics of this flare are compared with the event of June 7, 1980. In order to further explore these observational results and theoretical scenarios, a study of nine additional quasi-periodic events were incorporated with the results from the two flares described. Analysis of these events are briefly summarized.

  6. Energetic Electrons in Solar Flares - As Viewed in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Hard X-ray observations provide the most direct diagnostic we have of the suprathermal electrons and the hottest thermal plasma present in solar flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) is obtaining the most comprehensive observations of individual solar flares ever available in hard X-rays. For the first time, high-resolution spectra are available for a large number of flares that accurately display the spectral shape and its evolution and, in many cases, allow us to identify the transition from the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by suprathermal electrons to the bremsstrahlung at lower energies emitted by thermal plasma. Also, for the first time, images can be produced in arbitrary energy bands above 3 keV, and spectra of distinct imaged components can be obtained. I will review what we have learned from RHESSI observations about flare suprathermal electron distributions and their evolution Next, I will present computations of the energy deposited by these suprathermal electrons in individual flares and compare this with the energy contained in the hot thermal plasma. I will point out unsolved problems in deducing both suprathermal electron distributions and the energy content of the thermal plasma, and discuss possible solutions. Finally, I will present evidence that electron acceleration is associated with magnetic reconnection in the corona.

  7. The Origin of the Local 1/4-KeV X-Ray Flux in Both Charge Exhange and a Hot Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galeazzi, M.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; Porter, F. S.; Robertson, I. P.; Snowden, S. L.; Thomas, N. E.; Uprety, Y.; Ursino, E.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    The solar neighbourhood is the closest and most easily studied sample of the Galactic interstellar medium, an understanding of which is essential for models of star formation and galaxy evolution. Observations of an unexpectedly intense diffuse flux of easily absorbed 1/4-kiloelectronvolt X-rays coupled with the discovery that interstellar space within about a hundred parsecs of the Sun is almost completely devoid of cool absorbing gas, led to a picture of a 'local cavity' filled with X-ray-emitting hot gas, dubbed the local hot bubble. This model was recently challenged by suggestions that the emission could instead be readily produced within the Solar System by heavy solar-wind ions exchanging electrons with neutral H and He in interplanetary space, potentially removing the major piece of evidence for the local existence of million-degree gas within the Galactic disk. Here we report observations showing that the total solar wind charge-exchange contribution is approximately 40 percent of the 1/4-keV flux in the Galactic plane. The fact that the measured flux is not dominated by charge exchange supports the notion of a million-degree hot bubble extending about a hundred parsecs from the Sun.

  8. The origin of the local 1/4-keV X-ray flux in both charge exchange and a hot bubble.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, M; Chiao, M; Collier, M R; Cravens, T; Koutroumpa, D; Kuntz, K D; Lallement, R; Lepri, S T; McCammon, D; Morgan, K; Porter, F S; Robertson, I P; Snowden, S L; Thomas, N E; Uprety, Y; Ursino, E; Walsh, B M

    2014-08-14

    The solar neighbourhood is the closest and most easily studied sample of the Galactic interstellar medium, an understanding of which is essential for models of star formation and galaxy evolution. Observations of an unexpectedly intense diffuse flux of easily absorbed 1/4-kiloelectronvolt X-rays, coupled with the discovery that interstellar space within about a hundred parsecs of the Sun is almost completely devoid of cool absorbing gas, led to a picture of a 'local cavity' filled with X-ray-emitting hot gas, dubbed the local hot bubble. This model was recently challenged by suggestions that the emission could instead be readily produced within the Solar System by heavy solar-wind ions exchanging electrons with neutral H and He in interplanetary space, potentially removing the major piece of evidence for the local existence of million-degree gas within the Galactic disk. Here we report observations showing that the total solar-wind charge-exchange contribution is approximately 40 per cent of the 1/4-keV flux in the Galactic plane. The fact that the measured flux is not dominated by charge exchange supports the notion of a million-degree hot bubble extending about a hundred parsecs from the Sun. PMID:25079321

  9. Planetary Protection: X-ray Super-Flares Aid Formation of "Solar Systems"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory imply that X-ray super-flares torched the young Solar System. Such flares likely affected the planet-forming disk around the early Sun, and may have enhanced the survival chances of Earth. By focusing on the Orion Nebula almost continuously for 13 days, a team of scientists used Chandra to obtain the deepest X-ray observation ever taken of this or any star cluster. The Orion Nebula is the nearest rich stellar nursery, located just 1,500 light years away. These data provide an unparalleled view of 1400 young stars, 30 of which are prototypes of the early Sun. The scientists discovered that these young suns erupt in enormous flares that dwarf - in energy, size, and frequency -- anything seen from the Sun today. Illustration of Large Flares Illustration of Large Flares "We don't have a time machine to see how the young Sun behaved, but the next best thing is to observe Sun-like stars in Orion," said Scott Wolk of Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "We are getting a unique look at stars between one and 10 million years old - a time when planets form." A key result is that the more violent stars produce flares that are a hundred times as energetic as the more docile ones. This difference may specifically affect the fate of planets that are relatively small and rocky, like the Earth. "Big X-ray flares could lead to planetary systems like ours where Earth is a safe distance from the Sun," said Eric Feigelson of Penn State University in University Park, and principal investigator for the international Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project. "Stars with smaller flares, on the other hand, might end up with Earth-like planets plummeting into the star." Animation of X-ray Flares from a Young Sun Animation of X-ray Flares from a "Young Sun" According to recent theoretical work, X-ray flares can create turbulence when they strike planet-forming disks, and this affects the position of rocky planets as they

  10. Using the Chandra ACIS x-ray imager as a background particle flux detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Peter G.; Grant, Catherine E.

    2012-09-01

    The ACIS instrument aboard the Chandra Observatory can be easily damaged by low-energy charged particles, principally protons that implant themselves in the X-ray sensitive CCDs, creating charge traps that degrade the energy resolution and detection efficiency. During periods of high background radiation, ACIS must be moved out of the focal plane of the Chandra telescope and, whenever possible, this action should be taken autonomously since the spacecraft only maintains ground contact for limited periods. The EPHIN detector has been monitoring the particle background since Chandra was launched in 1999, but it is no longer sufficiently sensitive, so the question arose whether ACIS could take over this task. Examining the ACIS data archive, a particular measured quantity—the rate of occurrence of CCD pixels found to contain electric charge that exceeded a predetermined threshold—was often correlated with particle background flux. An algorithm was developed to distinguish this behavior from random fluctuations in the above-threshold rate and the algorithm parameters were adjusted to find the maximum number of high radiation flux “triggers” from the data archive with the minimum number of false positives. The algorithm has been encoded as a patch to ACIS flight software and, after extensive ground testing, has been installed within the instrument.

  11. Coronal evolution of solar-like stars: X-ray spectroscopy of stars in star- forming regions and the solar neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telleschi, Alessandra Silvia

    Solar-like stars are strong X-ray emitters in both their pre-main sequence (PMS) and main-sequence (MS) phases. In analogy to the Sun, X-rays are thought to originate in a corona. However, in the case of pre-main sequence stars, accretion processes might influence the X-ray properties of the stars. In this thesis, results from X-ray spectroscopy of main-sequence solar analogs, pre-main sequence solar-like stars and a Herbig Ae/Be star are presented and discussed. All X-ray spectra have been obtained by the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) and the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) on board the XMM-Newton satellite. In the first part of the thesis, high-resolution (RGS) X-ray spectra of a sample of six main-sequence G-type stars with ages between [approximate] 0.1 Gyr and [approximate] 1.6 Gyr have been analyzed. Using individual spectral lines, the Emission Measure Distributions (EMD) and the coronal abundances have been derived. As a solar analog evolves, its rotation rate decreases and its internal magnetic dynamo weakens, resulting in a decrease of magnetic activity and a decrease of the star's X-ray luminosity. The mean coronal temperatures derived from the EMDs decrease from [approximate] 10 MK for the youngest stars to [approximate] 4 MK for the oldest star in our stellar sample. These results have been interpreted with a model in which the coronal emission is produced by a superposition of stochastically occurring flares; more active stars are found to require a larger range of flare energies than less active stars. Abundances change from an inverse First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect, where abundances with high FIP are enhanced with respect to abundances with low FIP, to a solar-like FIP effect at ages >= 0.3 Gyr. The analysis has then been extended to pre-main sequence stars in the Taurus- Auriga complex. The results presented here are part of a large survey, the "XMM-Newton Extended Survey of the Taurus Molecular Cloud" (XEST). High- and

  12. Stereoscopic observations of hard x ray sources in solar flares made with GRO and other spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.; Hurley, K.; Mctiernan, J. M.; Laros, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the launch of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) in Apr. 1991, the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument on GRO has recorded a large number of solar flares. Some of these flares have also been observed by the Gamma-Ray Burst Detector on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) and/or by the Solar X-Ray/Cosmic Gamma-Ray Burst Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft. A preliminary list of common flares observed during the period May-Jun. 1991 is presented and the possible joint studies are indicated.

  13. Microwave, soft and hard X-ray imaging observations of two solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Erskine, F. T.; Schmahl, E. J.; Machado, M. E.; Rovira, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    A set of microwave and hard X-ray observations of two flares observed simultaneously with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Solar Maximum Mission Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (SMM-HXIS) are presented. The LVA was used at 6 cm to map the slowly varying and burst components in three neighboring solar active regions (Boulder Nos. 2522, 2530, and 2519) from approximately 14:00 UT until 01:00 UT on June 24-25, 1980. Six microwave bursts less than 30 sfu were observed, and for the strongest of these, two-dimensional 'snapshot' (10 s) maps with spatial resolution of 5 in. were synthesized. HXIS data show clear interconnections between regions 2522 and 2530. The X-ray observations present a global picture of flaring activity, while the VLA data show the complexity of the small magnetic structures associated with the impulsive phase phenomena. It is seen that energy release did not occur in a single isolated magnetic structure, but over a large area of intermingled loop structures.

  14. The spectrometer telescope for imaging X-rays (STIX) on board Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, Nicole; Krucker, Samuel; Karol Seweryn, D..; Orleanski, Piotr; Limousin, Olivier; Meuris, Aline; Brun, Allan Sacha; Grimm, Oliver; Groebelbauer, HansPeter; Rendtel, J.

    The Spectrometer Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) is one of 10 instruments on board Solar Orbiter, a confirmed M-class mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) within the Cosmic Vision program scheduled to be launched in 2017. STIX applies a Fourier-imaging technique using a set of tungsten grids (at pitches from 0.038 to 1 mm) in front of 32 pixelized CdTe detectors to provide imaging spectroscopy of solar thermal and non-thermal hard X-ray emissions from 4 to 150 keV. The paper presents the status of the instrument for the Critical Design Review to be held with ESA in June 2014. Particular emphasis is given to the CdTe hybrid detector called Caliste-SO for high resolution hard X-ray spectroscopy from 4 to 150 keV: Characterizations of the first production batch are reported. Caliste-SO spectrometer units could also fulfill the needs for the SORENTO instrument of the Russian Interhelioprobe mission currently in assessment study.

  15. Evidence for Alfvén waves in solar x-ray jets.

    PubMed

    Cirtain, J W; Golub, L; Lundquist, L; van Ballegooijen, A; Savcheva, A; Shimojo, M; Deluca, E; Tsuneta, S; Sakao, T; Reeves, K; Weber, M; Kano, R; Narukage, N; Shibasaki, K

    2007-12-01

    Coronal magnetic fields are dynamic, and field lines may misalign, reassemble, and release energy by means of magnetic reconnection. Giant releases may generate solar flares and coronal mass ejections and, on a smaller scale, produce x-ray jets. Hinode observations of polar coronal holes reveal that x-ray jets have two distinct velocities: one near the Alfvén speed ( approximately 800 kilometers per second) and another near the sound speed (200 kilometers per second). Many more jets were seen than have been reported previously; we detected an average of 10 events per hour up to these speeds, whereas previous observations documented only a handful per day with lower average speeds of 200 kilometers per second. The x-ray jets are about 2 x 10(3) to 2 x 10(4) kilometers wide and 1 x 10(5) kilometers long and last from 100 to 2500 seconds. The large number of events, coupled with the high velocities of the apparent outflows, indicates that the jets may contribute to the high-speed solar wind. PMID:18063786

  16. Evidence for Alfvén waves in solar x-ray jets.

    PubMed

    Cirtain, J W; Golub, L; Lundquist, L; van Ballegooijen, A; Savcheva, A; Shimojo, M; Deluca, E; Tsuneta, S; Sakao, T; Reeves, K; Weber, M; Kano, R; Narukage, N; Shibasaki, K

    2007-12-01

    Coronal magnetic fields are dynamic, and field lines may misalign, reassemble, and release energy by means of magnetic reconnection. Giant releases may generate solar flares and coronal mass ejections and, on a smaller scale, produce x-ray jets. Hinode observations of polar coronal holes reveal that x-ray jets have two distinct velocities: one near the Alfvén speed ( approximately 800 kilometers per second) and another near the sound speed (200 kilometers per second). Many more jets were seen than have been reported previously; we detected an average of 10 events per hour up to these speeds, whereas previous observations documented only a handful per day with lower average speeds of 200 kilometers per second. The x-ray jets are about 2 x 10(3) to 2 x 10(4) kilometers wide and 1 x 10(5) kilometers long and last from 100 to 2500 seconds. The large number of events, coupled with the high velocities of the apparent outflows, indicates that the jets may contribute to the high-speed solar wind.

  17. First Results From the NOAA GOES-12 Solar X-ray Imager (SXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. M.; Pizzo, V. J.; Balch, C. C.

    2001-12-01

    NOAA's GOES-12 weather satellite, launched into geosynchronus orbit on 23 July 2001, carries NOAA's first Solar X-ray Imager (SXI). When it enters regular operations this instrument will provide nearly uninterrupted, full-disk, broadband soft X-ray solar movies, with a continuous frame rate significantly exceeding that for previous similar instruments. The SXI provides images with a one-minute cadence and a single-image (adjustable) dynamic range near 100. A set of metallic thin-film filters provides a degree of temperature discrimination in the 0.6-6.0 nm bandpass. The spatial resolution of approximately 10 arcseconds FWHM is sampled with 5 arcsecond pixels. We present first observational results for the SXI from its post-launch check-out period. Observed coronal phenomenology -- some of it perhaps unique to SXI's spectral band, cadence and continuity of observations -- is presented. Multi-band observations of coronal holes, X-ray bright points, active regions, flares and post-flare loops are presented and qualitatively compared to contemporaneous observations by Yohkoh SXT and SOHO EIT.

  18. The possible importance of synchrotron/inverse Compton losses to explain fast MM-wave and hard X-ray emission of a solar event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, E.; Kaufmann, P.; Costa, J. E. R.; Vaz, A. M. Z.; Dennis, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The solar burst of 21 May 1984 presented a number of unique features. The time profile consisted of seven major structures (seconds), with a turnover frequency or approx. 90 GHz, well correlated in time to hard X-ray emission. Each structure consisted of multiple fast pulses (.1 seconds), which were analyzed in detail. A proportionality between the repetition rate of the pulses and the burst fluxes at 90 GHz and or approx. 100 keV hard X-rays, and an inverse proportionality between repetition rates and hard X-rays power law indices have been found. A synchrotron/inverse Compton model has been applied to explain the emission of the fast burst structures, which appear to be possible for the first three or four structures.

  19. The possible importance of synchrotron/inverse Compton losses to explain fast mm-wave and hard X-ray emission of a solar event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, E.; Kaufmann, P.; Costa, J. E. R.; Zodivaz, A. M.; Dennis, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The solar burst of 21 May 1984, presented a number of unique features. The time profile consisted of seven major structures (seconds), with a turnover frequency of greater than or approximately 90 GHz, well correlated in time to hard X-ray emission. Each structure consisted of multiple fast pulses (0.1 seconds), which were analyzed in detail. A proportionality between the repetition rate of the pulses and the burst fluxes at 90 GHz and greater than or approximately 100 keV hard X-rays, and an inverse proportionality between repetition rates and hard X-ray power law indices were found. A synchrotron/inverse Compton model was applied to explain the emission of the fast burst structures, which appear to be possible for the first three or four structures.

  20. The effect of beam-driven return current instability on solar hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, D.; Mcquillan, P.; Brown, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of electrostatic wave generation by a return current driven by a small area electron beam during solar hard X-ray bursts is discussed. The marginal stability method is used to solve numerically the electron and ion heating equations for a prescribed beam current evolution. When ion-acoustic waves are considered, the method appears satisfactory and, following an initial phase of Coulomb resistivity in which T sub e/T sub i rise, predicts a rapid heating of substantial plasma volumes by anomalous ohmic dissipation. This hot plasma emits so much thermal bremsstrahlung that, contrary to previous expectations, the unstable beam-plasma system actually emits more hard X-rays than does the beam in the purely collisional thick target regime relevant to larger injection areas. Inclusion of ion-cyclotron waves results in ion-acoustic wave onset at lower T sub e/T sub i and a marginal stability treatment yields unphysical results.

  1. Constraints on energy release in solar flares from RHESSI and GOES X-ray observations. II. Energetics and energy partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, A.; Mann, G.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We derive constraints on energy release, transport and conversion processes in solar flares based on a detailed characterization of the physical parameters of both the thermal plasma and the accelerated nonthermal electrons based on X-ray observations. In particular, we address the questions of whether the energy required to heat the thermal plasma can be supplied by nonthermal particles, and how the energetics derived from X-rays compare to the total bolometric radiated energy. Methods: Time series of spectral fits and images for 24 flares ranging from GOES class C3.4 to X17.2 were obtained using RHESSI hard X-ray observations. This has been supplemented by GOES soft X-ray fluxes. In our companion Paper I, we have used this data set to obtain the basic physical parameters for the thermal plasma (using the isothermal approximation) and the injected energetic electrons (assuming the thick-target model). Here, we used this data set to derive the flare energetics, including thermal energy, radiative and conductive energy loss, gravitational and flow energy of the plasma, and kinetic energy of the injected electrons. We studied how the thermal energies compare to the energy in nonthermal electrons, and how the various energetics and energy partition depend on flare importance. Results: All flare energetics show a good to excellent correlation with the peak GOES flux. The gravitational energy of the evaporated plasma and the kinetic energy of plasma flows can be neglected in the discussion of flare energetics. The radiative energy losses are comparable to the maximum thermal energy, while the conductive losses are considerably higher than the maximum thermal energy, especially in weaker flares. The total heating requirement of the hot plasma amounts to ≈50% of the total bolometric energy loss, with the conductive losses as a major contribution. The nonthermal energy input by energetic electrons is not sufficient to account for the total heating requirements of

  2. First flight of SMASH, the SwRI Miniature Assembly for Solar Hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; Laurent, Glenn Thomas; Shoffner, Michael; Higuera Caubilla, David; Meurisse, Jeremie; Smith, Kelly; Shih, Albert Y.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; DeForest, Craig; Mansour, Nagi N.; Hathaway, David H.

    2016-05-01

    The SwRI Miniature Assembly for Solar Hard X-rays (SMASH) was successfully flown from Antarctica in January (19-30) 2016, as a piggy-back instrument on the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) high altitude balloon payload. SMASH is a technological demonstration of a new miniaturized hard X-ray (HXR) detector for use on CubeSats and other small spacecraft, including the proposed CubeSat Imaging X-ray Solar Spectrometer (CubIXSS).HXRs are the observational signatures of energetic processes on the Sun, including plasma heating and particle acceleration. One of the goals of CubIXSS will be to address the question of how plasma is heated during solar flares, including the relationship between thermal plasma and non-thermal particles. SMASH demonstrated the space-borne application of the commercial off-the-shelf Amptek X123-CdTe, a miniature cadmium telluride photon-counting HXR spectrometer. The CdTe detector has a physical area of 25 mm^2 and 1 mm fully-depleted thickness, with a ~100 micron Be window; with on-board thermoelectric cooling and pulse pile-up rejection, it is sensitive to solar photons from ~5 to ~100 keV with ~0.5-1.0 keV FWHM resolution. Photons are accumulated into histogram spectra with customizable energy binning and integration time. With modest resource requirements (~1/8 U, ~200 g, ~2.5 W) and low cost (~$10K), the X123-CdTe is an attractive solution for HXR measurements from budget- and resource-limited platforms such as CubeSats. SMASH flew two identical X123-CdTe detectors for redundancy and increased collecting area; the supporting electronics (power, CPU) were largely build-to-print using the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat design.We review the SMASH mission, design, and detector performance during the 12-day Antarctic flight. We present current progress on our data analysis of observed solar flares, and discuss future applications of the space-qualified X123-CdTe detector, including the CubIXSS mission

  3. XMM-Newton detects X-ray 'solar cycle' in distant star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    The Sun as observed by SOHO hi-res Size hi-res: 708 Kb The Sun as observed by SOHO The Sun as observed by the ESA/NASA SOHO observatory near the minimum of the solar cycle (left) and near its maximum (right). The signs of solar activity near the maximum are clearly seen. New XMM-Newton observations suggest that this behaviour may be typical of stars like the Sun, such as HD 81809 in the constellation Hydra. Solar flare - 4 November 2003 The huge flare produced on 4 November 2003 This image of the Sun, obtained by the ESA/NASA SOHO observatory, shows the powerful X-ray flare that took place on 4 November 2003. The associated coronal mass ejection, coming out of the Sun at a speed of 8.2 million kilometres per hour, hit the Earth several hours later and caused disruptions to telecommunication and power distribution lines. New XMM-Newton observations suggest that this behaviour may be typical of stars like the Sun, such as HD 81809 in the constellation Hydra. Since the time Galileo discovered sunspots, in 1610, astronomers have measured their number, size and location on the disc of the Sun. Sunspots are relatively cooler areas on the Sun that are observed as dark patches. Their number rises and falls with the level of activity of the Sun in a cycle of about 11 years. When the Sun is very active, large-scale phenomena take place, such as the flares and coronal mass ejections observed by the ESA/NASA solar observatory SOHO. These events release a large amount of energy and charged particles that hit the Earth and can cause powerful magnetic storms, affecting radio communications, power distribution lines and even our weather and climate. During the solar cycle, the X-ray emission from the Sun varies by a large amount (about a factor of 100) and is strongest when the cycle is at its peak and the surface of the Sun is covered by the largest number of spots. ESA's X-ray observatory, XMM-Newton, has now shown for the first time that this cyclic X-ray behaviour is common to

  4. Solar X-ray polarimetry and spectrometry instrument PING-M for the Interhelioprobe mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yu. D.; Yurov, V. N.; Glyanenko, A. S.; Lupar, E. E.; Kochemasov, A. V.; Trofimov, Yu. A.; Zakharov, M. S.; Faradzhaev, R. M.; Tyshkevich, V. G.; Rubtsov, I. V.; Dergachev, V. A.; Kruglov, E. M.; Lazutkov, V. P.; Savchenko, M. I.; Skorodumov, D. V.

    2016-08-01

    The PING-M experiment is designed to investigate solar X-ray activity. The instrument includes a hard X-ray polarimeter (PING-P), a hard X-ray spectrometer (HXRS) and a soft X-ray spectrometer (SXRS). PING-P has the energy range of 20-150 keV and an effective area of about 2.5 cm2. It uses three organic scintillation detectors as active scatterers, which work in coincidence with six absorber detectors, based on CsI(Tl) scintillator. This technique allows us to considerably improve the polarimeter sensitivity. HXRS has the energy range of 20-600 keV and an effective area of about 15 cm2. It is based on a fast inorganic scintillator (LaBr3(Ce) or CeBr3) with a relatively high energy resolution of 3.5-4.5% at 662 keV. The SXRS energy range is 1.5-25 keV, and its aperture is ø0.1 mm, which provides the registration of solar flares in the range from C1 to X20 class of GOES scale. It is based on a SDD semiconductor detector with an energy resolution better than 200 eV at 5.9 keV line. The experiment will be performed onboard the Russian interplanetary mission Interhelioprobe which is planned for launch after 2025. The instrument will allow us to investigate angular and energy distributions of accelerated electrons, plasma heating processes, etc. Stereoscopic polarimetry and spectrometric observations will be possible if a similar instrument is installed onboard a near Earth satellite, or the second probe of the Interhelioprobe mission.

  5. A comparison of the thick-target model with stereo data on the height structure of solar hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. C.; Carlaw, V. A.; Cromwell, D.; Kane, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The thick target, hard solar X-ray source height structure is predicted for the case of a beam that is injected vertically downward, having a power law spectrum, being dominated by Coulomb collisional energy losses, and being structurally characterized by the ratio of hard X-ray flux from an upper part of the source to that from the entire source. These predictions are compared with the flux ratios at 150 and 350 keV which were observed by two spacecraft for five events in which the solar limb occults part of the source for one spacecraft. The energy dependence of the occultation ratio is found to be inconsistent with that predicted by the model, and it is concluded that noncollisional losses must be significant in beam dynamics.

  6. Spectroscopic analysis of solar and cosmic X-ray spectra. 1: The nature of cosmic X-ray spectra and proposed analytical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. B. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the study of the solar corona are reviewed as an introduction to a discussion of modifications required for the study of cosmic sources. Spectroscopic analysis of individual sources and the interstellar medium is considered. The latter was studied via analysis of its effect on the spectra of selected individual sources. The effects of various characteristics of the ISM, including the presence of grains, molecules, and ionization, are first discussed, and the development of ISM models is described. The expected spectral structure of individual cosmic sources is then reviewed with emphasis on supernovae remnants and binary X-ray sources. The observational and analytical requirements imposed by the characteristics of these sources are identified, and prospects for the analysis of abundances and the study of physical parameters within them are assessed. Prospects for the spectroscopic study of other classes of X-ray sources are also discussed.

  7. Amplitude and phase changes on VLF/LF radio signals depending on solar zenith angle during occurrences of solar X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulic, Desanka; Sreckovic, Vladimir; Mihajlov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The focus of this work is on the extraction of D-region electron density that is induced by the intensive X-ray flux under different solar zenith angle. The sensitivity of Very Low and Low Frequency (VLF and LF) propagation in the lower ionosphere makes it an ideal probe for remotely sensing the ambient state and localized perturbations of the ionosphere. The basis of this work is amplitude and phase data acquired by monitoring DHO/23.40 kHz and NSC/45.90 kHz radio signals during the period of ascending and maximum of the solar cycle 24. All the data were recorded at Belgrade station (44.85 ^{0} N, 20.38 ^{0} E) by AWESOME system. DHO-BEL and NSC-BEL are short paths with distances of 1300 and 953 km, respectively. These paths are in the same time zone. The diurnal amplitude and phase variations on VLF/LF radio signal against time vary in characteristic ways that are caused by solar zenith angles over path. Two amplitude minima are observed when sunrise and sunset terminators reach the middle of the propagation path. During daytime condition there are two amplitude minima (in morning and afternoon) developed under solar zenith angles χ ˜80 ^{0} over short path. In this study we considered amplitude and phase perturbations on VLF/LF radio signal induced by solar X-ray flares under solar zenith angles which are close with timings of amplitude minima during daytime under normal ionospheric condition. We expected and estimated differences in amplitude and phase perturbations on DHO/23.40 kHz and NSC/45.90 kHz radio signals induced by solar X-ray flares which occurrences are under solar zenith angles χ ≤ 80 ^{0}. The observations include solar flares with magnitudes in the range from C2 (I_{X} = 2 10^{-6} Wm^{-2} of X-ray flux in the band at 0.1 - 0.8 nm) to X2.1 (I_{X} = 2.1 10^{-4} Wm^{-2}) class. For example on 11 March 2015 occurred X2.1 class flare with maximum of intensity at 16:22 UT, when solar angle was χ = 81^{0} at Belgrade. One day before, under normal

  8. Design of Molecular Solar Cells via Feedback from Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Himpsel, Franz J.

    2015-06-12

    Spectroscopy with soft X-rays was used to develop new materials and novel designs for solar cells and artificial photosynthesis. In order to go beyond the widely-used trial-and-error approach of gradually improving a particular design, we started from the most general layout of a solar cell (or a photo-electrochemical device) and asked which classes of materials are promising for best performance. For example, the most general design of a solar cell consists of a light absorber, an electron donor, and an electron acceptor. These are characterized by four energy levels, which were measured by a combination of spectroscopic X-ray techniques. Tuning synchrotron radiation to the absorption edges of specific elements provided element- and bond-selectivity. The spectroscopic results were complemented by state-of-the-art calculations of the electronic states. These helped explaining the observed energy levels and the orbitals associated with them. The calculations were extended to a large class of materials (for example thousands of porphyrin dye complexes) in order to survey trends in the energy level structure. A few highlights serve as examples: 1) Organic molecules combining absorber, donor, and acceptor with atomic precision. 2) Exploration of highly p-doped diamond films as inert, transparent electron donors. 3) Surface-sensitive characterization of nanorod arrays used as photoanodes in water splitting. 4) Computational design of molecular complexes for efficient solar cells using two photons.

  9. X-ray Solar Flare Induced Ionospheric Perturbations Observed by VLF Sferics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, J.; Cohen, M.

    2015-12-01

    VLF waves are a useful diagnostic for D-region ionospheric disturbances due to their efficient global propagation. The D-region is too high for balloons, too low for satellites, and not ionized enough for radar reflections. Traditionally, ionosphere disturbances have been sensed using dedicated VLF transmitters allowing for only single propagation path analysis since there are only a handful of transmitters. A lightning stroke, however, releases an intense amount of VLF radio energy known as a Radio Atmospheric, or 'sferic' which propagates through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Lightning is globally spread and very frequent, so a sferic is therefore also a useful diagnostic of the D-region when ionized by solar flare x-ray bursts. We present observations of lightning-generated sferics during strong solar flares. The advantage to using sferics is that many individual thunderstorms effectively act as separate VLF transmitting sources. During the solar flare there is a significant change in magnitude and frequency content of sferics. This disturbance varies with distance from the source. The difference in magnitude and arrival time of these sferics have local maximums and minimums, and appears to oscillate with distance. We investigate the effect of solar x-ray flares on the observed sferics as a function of angle of arrival to the receiver. We utilize modeling of the Earth-ionosphere system to compare to the experimental data.

  10. Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer: A Science-Oriented, University 3U CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, James P.; Woods, Thomas N.; Caspi, Amir; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Moore, Christopher; Jones, Andrew; Kohnert, Rick; Li, Xinlin; Palo, Scott; Solomon, Stanley C.

    2016-03-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3-Unit (3U) CubeSat developed at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado, Boulder (CU). Over 40 students contributed to the project with professional mentorship and technical contributions from professors in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department at CU and from LASP scientists and engineers. The scientific objective of MinXSS is to study processes in the dynamic Sun, from quiet-Sun to solar flares, and to further understand how these changes in the Sun influence the Earth's atmosphere by providing unique spectral measurements of solar soft x-rays (SXRs). The enabling technology providing the advanced solar SXR spectral measurements is the Amptek X123, a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) silicon drift detector (SDD). The Amptek X123 has a low mass (~324 g after modification), modest power consumption (~2.50 W), and small volume (6.86 cm x 9.91 cm x 2.54 cm), making it ideal for a CubeSat. This paper provides an overview of the MinXSS mission: the science objectives, project history, subsystems, and lessons learned that can be useful for the small-satellite community.

  11. Second flight of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager sounding rocket [FOXSI-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago-Casas, J. C.; Krucker, S.; Christe, S.; Glesener, L.; Ishikawa, S. N.; Ramsey, B.; Foster, N. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket experiment that has flown twice to test a direct focusing method for measuring solar hard X-rays (HXRs). These HXRs are associated with particle acceleration mechanisms at work in powering solar flares and aid us in investigating the role of nanoflares in heating the solar corona. FOXSI-1 successfully flew for the first time on November 2, 2012. After some upgrades including the addition of extra mirrors to two optics modules and the inclusion of new fine-pitch CdTe strip detectors, in addition to the Si detectors from FOXSI-1, the FOXSI-2 payload flew successfully again on December 11, 2014. During the second flight four targets on the Sun were observed, including at least three active regions, two microflares, and ~1 minute of quiet Sun observation. This work is focused in giving an overview of the FOXSI rocket program and a detailed description of the upgrades for the second flight. In addition, we show images and spectra investigating the presence of no thermal emission for each of the flaring targets that we observed during the second flight.

  12. Solar flares X-ray polarimetry in a wide energy band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiani, Sergio; Campana, Riccardo; Costa, Enrico; Muleri, Fabio; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Soffitta, Paolo; Del Monte, Ettore; Rubini, Alda

    2012-07-01

    Polarimetry of solar flares X-ray emission is an additional tool for investigating particles dynamics within the solar atmosphere. Accelerated electrons by magnetic reconnection in the corona produce bremsstrahlung radiation as primary emission in the footpoints of a solar flare which has moreover the possibility to be Compton backscattered resulting in albedo emission. Non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission is expected to be a significant above 15 keV and highly polarized. The albedo component peaks between 20 and 50 keV, its polarization properties depend on the Compton scattering angle. Such a diffusion modifies the spectrum and the polarization of the primary bremsstrahlung emission. Hard X-ray polarimetry, spectroscopy and imaging are therefore necessary to disentangle and modeling the different components in a solar flare. We present a non imaging Compton polarimeter sensitive from 20 keV designed as a single scattering unit surrounded by absorbers of high atomic number. A photelectric polarimeter based on the Gas Pixel Detector technology sensitive in the 15-35 keV energy band can be coupled for imaging.

  13. Characteristics of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Emissions: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2007-05-01

    The main theme of this dissertation is the investigation of the physics of acceleration and transport of particles in solar flares and their radiative signatures. The observational studies, using hard X-rays (HXRs) observed by RHESSI, concentrate on four flares, which support the classical magnetic reconnection model of flares in various ways. In the 11/03/2003 X3.9 flare, there is an upward motion of the loop-top source, accompanied by a systematic increase in the separation of the foot-point sources at a comparable speed. This is consistent with the reconnection model with an inverted-Y geometry. The 04/30/2002 M1.3 event exhibits rarely observed two coronal sources, with very similar spectra and their higher-energy emission being close together. This suggests that reconnection occurs between the two sources. In the 10/29/2003 X10 flare, the logarithmic total HXR flux of the two foot-points correlates with their mean magnetic field. The foot-points show asymmetric HXR fluxes, qualitatively consistent with the magnetic mirroring effect. The 11/13/2003 M1.7 flare reveals evidence of chromospheric evaporation directly imaged by RHESSI for the first time. The emission centroids move toward the loop-top, indicating a density increase in the loop. The theoretical modeling of this work combines the Stanford stochastic acceleration model with the NRL hydrodynamic model to study the interplay of the particle acceleration, transport, and radiation effects and the atmospheric response to the energy deposition by electrons. I find that low-energy electrons in the quasi-thermal portion of the spectrum affects the hydrodynamics by producing more heating in the corona than the previous models that used a power-law spectrum with a low-energy cutoff. The Neupert effect is found to be present and effects of suppression of thermal conduction are tested in the presence of hydrodynamic flows. I gratefully thank my adviser, Prof. Vahe' Petrosian, my collaborators, and funding support

  14. The Soft X-Ray/Microwave Ratio of Solar and Stellar Flares and Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, A. O.; Guedel, M.

    1994-01-01

    We have carried out plasma diagnostics of solar flares using soft X-ray (SXR) and simultaneous microwave observations and have compared the ratio of X-ray to microwave luminosities of solar flares with various active late-type stars available in the published literature. Both the SXR low-level ('quiescent') emission from stellar coronae and the flaring emission from the Sun and stars are generally interpreted as thermal radiations of coronal plasmas. On the other hand, the microwave emission of stars and solar flares is generally attributed to an extremely hot or nonthermal population of electrons. Solar flare SXR are conventionally measured in a narrower and harder passband than the stellar sources. Observations of the GOES-2 satellite in two energy channels have been used to estimate the luminosity of solar flares as it would appear in the ROSAT satellite passband. The solar and stellar flare luminosities fit well at the lower end of the active stellar coronae. The flare SXR/microwave ratio is similar to the ratio for stellar coronae. The average ratio follows a power-law relation L(sub X) varies as L(sub R)(sup 0.73 +/- 0.03) over 10 orders of magnitude from solar microflares to RS CVn and FK Com-type coronae. Dwarf Me and Ke stars, and RS CVn stars are also compatible with a linear SXR/microwave relation, but the ratio is slightly different for each type of star. Considering the differences between solar flares, stellar flares and the various active stellar coronae, the similarity of the SXR/microwave ratios is surprising. It suggests that the energetic electrons in low-level stellar coronae observed in microwaves are related in a similar way to the coronal thermal plasma as flare electrons to the flare thermal plasma, and, consequently, that the heating mechanism of active stellar coronae is a flare-like process.

  15. Solar flare composition and thermodynamics from RESIK X-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J.; Kępa, A.; Mrozek, T.; Phillips, K. J. H. E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl E-mail: kennethjhphillips@yahoo.com

    2014-06-01

    Previous estimates of the solar flare abundances of Si, S, Cl, Ar, and K from the RESIK X-ray crystal spectrometer on board the CORONAS-F spacecraft were made on the assumption of isothermal X-ray emission. We investigate the effect on these estimates by relaxing this assumption and instead determining the differential emission measure (DEM) or thermal structure of the emitting plasma by re-analyzing RESIK data for a GOES class M1.0 flare on 2002 November 14 (SOL2002-11-14T22:26) for which there was good data coverage. The analysis method uses a maximum-likelihood (Withbroe-Sylwester) routine for evaluating the DEM. In a first step, called here AbuOpt, an optimized set of abundances of Si, S, Ar, and K is found that is consistent with the observed spectra. With these abundances, the DEM evolution during the flare is found. The abundance optimization leads to revised abundances of silicon and sulfur in the flare plasma: A(S) = 6.94 ± 0.06 and A(Si) = 7.56 ± 0.08 (on a logarithmic scale with A(H) = 12). Previously determined abundances of Ar, K, and Cl from an isothermal assumption are still the preferred values. During the flare's maximum phase, the X-ray-emitting plasma has a basically two-temperature structure, with the cooler plasma with approximately constant temperature (3-6 MK) and a hotter plasma with temperature 16-21 MK. Using imaging data from the RHESSI hard X-ray spacecraft, the emission volume of the hot plasma is deduced from which lower limits of the electron density N{sub e} and the thermal content of the plasma are given.

  16. Hard X-ray and radio investigations prior to or during the impulsive phase of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Pick, M.; Raoult, A.

    1984-01-01

    A comparative study of radiation in the different spectral ranges, including X-ray and radio observations, can establish constraints for the electron acceleration/injection mechanisms. Such investigation, focusing on the activity prior to and during the impulsive phase of solar flares, is presented. Observations provide evidence for electron acceleration prior to the impulsive phase. The association between type-III groups and hard X-ray bursts becomes more apparent with increasing starting frequency of the former observed during the impulsive phase. It is shown that pure type-III burst groups, when they are associated with X-rays, do not correspond to an intense X-ray emission. In contrast, the type-III/V events can be associated with strong X-ray emission. Radioheliograph observations place constraints on the geometry of the injection/acceleration site. 12 references.

  17. On-board In-flight Energy Scale Cross-calibration Effects of Solar X-ray Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Väänänen, Mikko

    2009-11-01

    We have surveyed previous spaceborne calibrations, and present results of new cross-calibrations of the X-ray solar instruments: SMART-1 XSM, GOES, RHESSI and Messenger XRS. We use XSM as the baseline instrument, and establish its ground, in-flight and cross-calibration status. Based on these calibrations, we show the relative importance of having an on-board in-flight calibration source for the energy scale with the technical twin instruments XRS and XSM. An observed energy scale drift of 168 eV (0.9%) influenced final fluxes by 25-35% in the 2-5 keV band. An ideal generic in-flight calibration source is discussed in view of the XSM-XRS simulation and the in-flight calibration of the microwave CMB instruments in particular.

  18. Electronic structure measurements of metal-organic solar cell dyes using x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Phillip S.

    The focus of this thesis is twofold: to report the results of X-ray absorption studies of metal-organic dye molecules for dye-sensitized solar cells and to provide a basic training manual on X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques and data analysis. The purpose of our research on solar cell dyes is to work toward an understanding of the factors influencing the electronic structure of the dye: the choice of the metal, its oxidation state, ligands, and cage structure. First we study the effect of replacing Ru in several common dye structures by Fe. First-principles calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the C 1s and N 1s edges are combined to investigate transition metal dyes in octahedral and square planar N cages. Octahedral molecules are found to have a downward shift in the N 1s-to-pi* transition energy and an upward shift in C 1s-to-pi* transition energy when Ru is replaced by Fe, explained by an extra transfer of negative charge from Fe to the N ligands compared to Ru. For the square planar molecules, the behavior is more complex because of the influence of axial ligands and oxidation state. Next the crystal field parameters for a series of phthalocyanine and porphyrins dyes are systematically determined using density functional calculations and atomic multiplet calculations with polarization-dependent X-ray absorption spectra. The polarization dependence of the spectra provides information on orbital symmetries which ensures the determination of the crystal field parameters is unique. A uniform downward scaling of the calculated crystal field parameters by 5-30% is found to be necessary to best fit the spectra. This work is a part of the ongoing effort to design and test new solar cell dyes. Replacing the rare metal Ru with abundant metals like Fe would be a significant advance for dye-sensitized solar cells. Understanding the effects of changing the metal centers in these dyes in terms of optical absorption, charge transfer, and electronic

  19. Control of the Soft X-ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, L. A.; Levay, M.; Gilbreth, C. W.; Finch, M. L.; Bentley, R. D.; Firth, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite consists of two largely independent instruments: the Flat Crystal Spectrometer, a highly collimated scanning spectrometer mounted on a raster platform, and the Bent Crystal Spectrometer, a broadly collimated spectrometer providing high time-resolution (128 ms) spectra for the study of rapidly evolving phenomena. Each instrument is controlled by a microcomputer system built around an RCA 1802 microprocessor. This paper presents a discussion of the motivation for using a microprocessor in this application, and the design concepts that were implemented. The effectiveness of the approach as seen after several months of operation will also be discussed.

  20. High resolution hard X-ray spectra of solar and cosmic sources. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    High resolution hard X-ray observations of a large solar flare and the Crab Nebula were obtained during balloon flights using an array of cooled germanium planar detectors. In addition, high time resolution high sensitivity measurements were obtained with a 300 square cm NaI/CsI phoswich scintillator. The Crab spectrum from both flights was searched without finding evidence of line emission below 200 keV. In particular, for the 73 keV line previously reported a 3 sigma upper limit for a narrow (1 keV FWHM) line .0019 and .0014 ph square cm/sec for the 1979 and 1980 flights, respectively was obtained.

  1. TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF X-RAY SOLAR FLARE LOOPS: LENGTH, CORPULENCE, POSITION, TEMPERATURE, PLASMA PRESSURE, AND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2013-04-01

    The spatial and spectral properties of three solar flare coronal X-ray loops are studied before, during, and after the peak X-ray emission. Using observations from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we deduce the temporal changes in emitting X-ray length, corpulence, volume, position, number density, and thermal pressure. We observe a decrease in the loop length, width, and volume before the X-ray peak, and an increasing number density and thermal pressure. After the X-ray peak, volume increases and loop corpulence grows due to increasing width. The volume variations are more pronounced than the position variations, often known as magnetic field line contraction. We believe this is the first dedicated study examining the temporal evolution of X-ray loop lengths and widths. Collectively, the observations also show for the first time three temporal phases given by peaks in temperature, X-ray emission, and thermal pressure, with the minimum volume coinciding with the X-ray peak. Although the volume of the flaring plasma decreases before the peak in X-ray emission, the relationship between temperature and volume does not support simple compressive heating in a collapsing magnetic trap model. Within a low {beta} plasma, shrinking loop widths perpendicular to the guiding field can be explained by squeezing the magnetic field threading the region. Plasma heating leads to chromospheric evaporation and growing number density. This produces increasing thermal pressure and decreasing loop lengths as electrons interact at shorter distances and we believe after the X-ray peak, the increasing loop corpulence.

  2. Solar X-ray Emission Measured by the Vernov Mission During September - October of 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Svertilov, S. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Rozhkov, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    Solar hard X-ray and γ-ray emissions were measured by the Detector of the Roentgen and Gamma-ray Emissions (DRGE) instrument, which is part of the RELEC set of instruments operated onboard the Russian satellite Vernov, from July 8, 2014 until December 10, 2014 (on a solar-synchronous orbit with an apogee of 830 km, perigee of 640 km, and an inclination of 98.4°. RELEC measurements of 18 flares with X-ray energy {>} 30 keV, taken in September - October 2014, were connected with the same active region with the number AR 12172 during the first rotation and AR 12192 during the next one. These measurements were compared to the data obtained with RHESSI, Konus-Wind, Fermi Observatory, Radio Solar Telescope Net (RSTN), and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) operating at the same time. Quasi-periodicities with similar periods of 7±2 s were found in about one third of all flares measured by RELEC (Vernov) from September 24 until October 30, 2014.

  3. Short-term X-ray spectral variability of the quasar PDS 456 observed in a low-flux state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzeu, G. A.; Reeves, J. N.; Nardini, E.; Braito, V.; Costa, M. T.; Tombesi, F.; Gofford, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a recent, 2013 Suzaku campaign on the nearby (z = 0.184) luminous (Lbol ˜ 1047 erg s-1) quasar PDS 456. This consisted of three observations, covering a total duration of ˜1 Ms and a net exposure of 455 ks. During these observations, the X-ray flux was unusually low, suppressed by a factor of >10 in the soft X-ray band when compared to previous observations. We investigated the broad-band continuum by constructing a spectral energy distribution (SED), making use of the optical/UV photometry and hard X-ray spectra from the later simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR campaign in 2014. The high-energy part of this low-flux SED cannot be accounted for by physically self-consistent accretion disc and corona models without attenuation by absorbing gas, which partially covers a substantial fraction of the line of sight towards the X-ray continuum. At least two layers of absorbing gas are required, of column density log (NH,low/cm-2) = 22.3 ± 0.1 and log (NH,high/cm-2) = 23.2 ± 0.1, with average line-of-sight covering factors of ˜80 per cent (with typical ˜5 per cent variations) and 60 per cent (±10-15 per cent), respectively. During these observations PDS 456 displays significant short-term X-ray spectral variability, on time-scales of ˜100 ks, which can be accounted for by variable covering of the absorbing gas along the line of sight. The partial covering absorber prefers an outflow velocity of v_pc = 0.25^{+0.01}_{-0.05} c at the >99.9 per cent confidence level over the case where vpc = 0. This is consistent with the velocity of the highly ionized outflow responsible for the blueshifted iron K absorption profile. We therefore suggest that the partial covering clouds could be the denser, or clumpy part of an inhomogeneous accretion disc wind. Finally estimates are placed upon the size-scale of the X-ray emission region from the source variability. The radial extent of the X-ray emitter is found to be of the order ˜15-20Rg

  4. Hard X-ray and gamma-ray imaging spectroscopy for the next solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Spicer, D. S.; Davis, J. M.; Hurford, G. J.; Lin, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives and principles are described of a single spectroscopic imaging package that can provide effective imaging in the hard X- and gamma-ray ranges. Called the High-Energy Solar Physics (HESP) mission instrument for solar investigation, the device is based on rotating modulation collimators with germanium semiconductor spectrometers. The instrument is planned to incorporate thick modulation plates, and the range of coverage is discussed. The optics permit the coverage of high-contrast hard X-ray images from small- and medium-sized flares with large signal-to-noise ratios. The detectors allow angular resolution of less than 1 arcsec, time resolution of less than 1 arcsec, and spectral resolution of about 1 keV. The HESP package is considered an effective and important instrument for investigating the high-energy solar events of the near-term future efficiently.

  5. Data Acquisition, Control, Communication and Computation System of Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Amish B.; Vadher, N. M.; Jain, Rajma; Dave, Hemant; Shah, Vishal; Manian, K. S. B.; Kayasth, Satish; Patel, Vinod; Ubale, Girish; Shah, Kirit; Solanki, Chirag; Deshpande, M. R.; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Umapathy, C. N.; Viswanath, N.; Kulkarni, Ravi; Kumar, P. S.

    2006-09-01

    The Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) mission onboardGSAT- 2 Indian Spacecraft was launched on 08 May 2003 using GSLV-D2 rocket by Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). SOXS aims to study solar flares, which are the most violent and energetic phenomena in the solar system, in the energy range of 4-56 keV with high spectral and temporal resolution. SOXS employs state-of-the-art semiconductor devices, viz., Si-Pin and CZT detectors to achieve sub-keV energy resolution requirements. In this paper, we present an overview of data acquisition, control,communication and computation of low energy payload of the SOXS mission.

  6. Characterization of X-ray and Type III radio bursts during solar cycle 24 for short-term warning of solar energetic particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Laurenza, Monica; Storini, Marisa; Lepreti, Fabio; Cliver, Edward W.

    2016-04-01

    The empirical model developed by Laurenza et al. (2009), based on data from 1995 to 2005, can provide short-term warnings of solar energetic proton (SEP) events that meet or exceed the Space Weather Prediction Center threshold of J (≥ 10MeV) = 10 p cm-2 s-1 sr-1, within 10 minutes after the maximum of the associated soft X-ray flare. The ≥ M2 X-ray and type III bursts occurred in the period 2006 - 2014 were used to compute the parameters of the model, i.e. the time-integrated soft X-ray intensity and time-integrated intensity of type III radio emission at about 1 MHz. The probability distribution functions associated with both parameters were derived. It was found that both the occurrence and the fluence of X-ray bursts is noticeably reduced in solar cycle 24 (35% and 30%, respectively, compared to solar cycle 23). The radio fluence of type III bursts associated to the considered X-ray events was lower of about 30% as well. Moreover, in order to test the accuracy of the model, the probability of detection (POD) and the False Alarm Rate (FAR) were evaluated by using the new database. The obtained verification measures show a good performance of the model: POD= 59% and FAR= 30%, which are, respectively, comparable and even lower with respect to those obtained from the datset on which the model was developed. Moreover, the performance is very high when major SEP events, having a peak flux ≥ 100 pfu, are considered (POD=79%, FAR=5%), i. e., for the most hazardous Space Weather conditions. Finally, the median warning time (as computed by Nunez (2011)) was estimated to be of about 11 h, highly exceeding that obtained through other competing techniques. References [1] Laurenza, M., E. W. Cliver, J. Hewitt, M. Storini, A. Ling, C. C. Balch, and M. L. Kaiser (2009), Space Weather, 7, S04008, doi:10.1029/2007SW000379. [2] Núñez, M. (2011), Predicting solar energetic proton events (E > 10 MeV), Space Weather, 9, S07003, doi:10.1029/2010SW000640.

  7. Comparison of solar hard X-ray and UV line and continuum bursts with high time resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwig, L. E.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of data sets from the UV Spectrometer and Polarimeter and Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer instruments on SMM has established the close relationship of the impulsive phase hard X-ray and UV continuum and OV line emissions, lending support to the notion that they have a similar origin low in the solar atmosphere. These results severely constrain models that attempt to explain impulsive phase hard X-rays and UV emission; alternative processes of impulsive-phase UV continuum production should accordingly be considered. Attention is given to an electron beam 'hole boring' mechanism and a photoionization radiation transport mechanism.

  8. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Sources of Hard X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Zimovets, I. V.; Morgachev, A. S.; Struminsky, A. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the spatio-temporal evolution of sources of hard X-ray (HXR) pulsations in solar flares. We concentrate on disk flares whose impulsive phases are accompanied by a series of more than three successive peaks (pulsations) of HXR emission detected in the RHESSI 50 - 100 keV energy channel with a four-second time cadence. Twenty-nine such flares observed from February 2002 to June 2015 with characteristic time differences between successive peaks P ≈8 - 270 s are studied. The main observational result of the analysis is that sources of HXR pulsations in all flares are not stationary, they demonstrate apparent movements or displacements in the parent active regions from pulsation to pulsation. The flares can be subdivided into two main groups depending on the character of the dynamics of the HXR sources. Group 1 consists of 16 flares ( 55~%) that show systematic dynamics of the HXR sources from pulsation to pulsation with respect to a magnetic polarity inversion line (MPIL), which has a simple extended trace on the photosphere. Group 2 consists of 13 flares ( 45~%) that show more chaotic displacements of the HXR sources with respect to an MPIL with a more complex structure, and sometimes several MPILs are present in the parent active regions of such flares. Based on the observations, we conclude that the mechanism of the flare HXR pulsations (at least with time differences of the considered range) is related to successive triggering of the flare energy release process in different magnetic loops (or bundles of loops) of the parent active regions. Group 1 flare regions consist of loops stacked into magnetic arcades that are extended along MPILs. Group 2 flare regions have more complex magnetic structures, and the loops are arranged more chaotically and randomly there. We also found that at least 14 ( 88~%) group 1 flares and 11 ( 85~%) group 2 flares are accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), i.e. the absolute majority of the

  9. Recent developments in transition-edge strip detectors for solar x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, Adam J.; Deiker, Steven W.; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent D.; Martinez-Galarce, Dennis S.; Shing, Lawrence; Stern, Robert A.; Ullom, Joel N.; Vale, Leila R.

    2008-07-01

    LMSAL and NIST are developing position-sensitive x-ray strip detectors based on Transition Edge Sensor (TES) microcalorimeters optimized for solar physics. By combining high spectral (E/ΔE ~1600) and temporal (single photon Δt ~10μs) resolutions with imaging capabilities, these devices will be able to study high-temperature (>10 MK) x-ray lines as never before. Diagnostics from these lines should provide significant new insight into the physics of both microflares and the early stages of flares. Previously, the large size of traditional TESs, along with the heat loads associated with wiring large arrays, presented obstacles to using these cryogenic detectors for solar missions. Implementing strip detector technology at small scales, however, addresses both issues: here, a line of substantially smaller effective pixels requires only two TESs, decreasing both the total array size and the wiring requirements for the same spatial resolution. Early results show energy resolutions of Δ ΕFWHM ~30eV and spatial resolutions of ~10-15 μm, suggesting the strip-detector concept is viable.

  10. Behaviour of Electron Content in the Ionospheric D-Region During Solar X-Ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović Drakul, M.; Čadež, V. M.; Bajčetić, J.; Popović, L. Č.; Blagojević, D.; Nina, A.

    2016-08-01

    One of the most important parameters in ionospheric plasma research, also having a wide practical application in wireless satellite telecommunications, is the total electron content (TEC) representing the columnal electron number density. The F-region with high electron density provides the biggest contribution to TEC while the relatively weakly ionized plasma of the D-region (60 km - 90 km above Earth's surface) is often considered as a negligible cause of satellite signal disturbances. However, sudden intensive ionization processes, like those induced by solar X-ray flares, can cause relative increases of electron density that are significantly larger in the D-region than in regions at higher altitudes. Therefore, one cannot exclude a priori the D-region from investigations of ionospheric influences on propagation of electromagnetic signals emitted by satellites. We discuss here this problem which has not been sufficiently treated in literature so far. The obtained results are based on data collected from the D-region monitoring by very low frequency radio waves and on vertical TEC calculations from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal analyses, and they show noticeable variations in the D-region's electron content (TEC_{D}) during activity of a solar X-ray flare (it rises by a factor of 136 in the considered case) when TEC_{D} contribution to TEC can reach several percent and which cannot be neglected in practical applications like global positioning procedures by satellites.

  11. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager Small Explorer Concept Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Dennis, Brian R.; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We present the FOXSI (Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager) small explorer (SMEX) concept, a mission dedicated to studying particle acceleration and energy release on the Sun. FOXSI is designed as a 3-axis stabilized spacecraft in low-Earth orbit making use of state-of-the-art grazing incidence focusing optics combined withpixelated solid-state detectors, allowing for direct imaging of solar X-rays. The current design being studied features multiple telescopes with a 14 meter focal length enabled by a deployable boom.FOXSI will observe the Sun in the 3-100 keV energy range. The FOXSI imaging concept has already been tested on two sounding rocket flights, in 2012 and 2014 and on the HEROES balloon payload flight in 2013. FOXSI will image the Sun with an angular resolution of 5'', a spectral resolution of 0.5 keV, and sub-second temporal resolution. FOXSI is a direct imaging spectrometer with high dynamic range and sensitivity and will provide a brand-new perspective on energy release on the Sun. We describe the mission and its science objectives.

  12. HARD X-RAY IMAGING OF INDIVIDUAL SPECTRAL COMPONENTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; Shih, Albert Y.; McTiernan, James M.; Krucker, Säm

    2015-09-20

    We present a new analytical technique, combining Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations, to visualize solar flare emission as a function of spectral component (e.g., isothermal temperature) rather than energy. This computationally inexpensive technique is applicable to all spatially invariant spectral forms and is useful for visualizing spectroscopically determined individual sources and placing them in context, e.g., comparing multiple isothermal sources with nonthermal emission locations. For example, while extreme ultraviolet images can usually be closely identified with narrow temperature ranges, due to the emission being primarily from spectral lines of specific ion species, X-ray images are dominated by continuum emission and therefore have a broad temperature response, making it difficult to identify sources of specific temperatures regardless of the energy band of the image. We combine RHESSI calibrated X-ray visibilities with spatially integrated spectral models including multiple isothermal components to effectively isolate the individual thermal sources from the combined emission and image them separately. We apply this technique to the 2002 July 23 X4.8 event studied in prior works, and image for the first time the super-hot and cooler thermal sources independently. The super-hot source is farther from the footpoints and more elongated throughout the impulsive phase, consistent with an in situ heating mechanism for the super-hot plasma.

  13. Recent Developments in Transition-Edge Strip Detectors for Solar X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, Adam J.; Deiker, Steven W.; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent D.; Martinez-Galarce, Dennis S.; Shing, Lawrence; Stern, Robert A.; Ullom, Joel N.; Vale, Leila R.

    2008-01-01

    LMSAL and NIST are developing position-sensitive x-ray strip detectors based on Transition Edge Sensor (TES) microcalorimeters optimized for solar physics. By combining high spectral (E/ delta E approximately equals 1600) and temporal (single photon delta t approximately equals 10 micro s) resolutions with imaging capabilities, these devices will be able to study high-temperature (>l0 MK) x-ray lines as never before. Diagnostics from these lines should provide significant new insight into the physics of both microflares and the early stages of flares. Previously, the large size of traditional TESs, along with the heat loads associated with wiring large arrays, presented obstacles to using these cryogenic detectors for solar missions. Implementing strip detector technology at small scales, however, addresses both issues: here, a line of substantially smaller effective pixels requires only two TESs, decreasing both the total array size and the wiring requirements for the same spatial resolution. Early results show energy resolutions of delta E(sub fwhm) approximately equals 30 eV and spatial resolutions of approximately 10-15 micron, suggesting the strip-detector concept is viable.

  14. Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B.; Allen, Maxwell J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Multispectral Solar Telescope Array is a rocket-borne observatory which encompasses seven compact soft X-ray/EUV, multilayer-coated, and two compact far-UV, interference film-coated, Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes. Extensive measurements are presented on the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the X-ray/EUV telescopes. Attention is given to systematic errors and measurement errors.

  15. Soft X-ray diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Peng; Emslie, A. Gordon; Mariska, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of the impulsive-phase Ca XIX w line profile on the form of the flare energy input (assumed to be due to the collisional degradation of a beam of high-energy electrons) is considered. The injected flux spectrum has the form of a power law with a low-energy 'knee', and the effects of varying the total energy flux, spectral index, and knee energy on the w line profile during the impulsive phase have been evaluated. Early in the burst, blueshifts of order 400 km/s are noted, and the peak intensity of the blueshifted component together with spatially unresolved hard X-ray burst spectra can be used to determine the beam filling factor.

  16. Digital performance improvements of a CdTe pixel detector for high flux energy-resolved X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbene, L.; Gerardi, G.; Principato, F.

    2015-03-01

    Photon counting detectors with energy resolving capabilities are desired for high flux X-ray imaging. In this work, we present the performance of a pixelated Schottky Al/p-CdTe/Pt detector (4×4) coupled to a custom-designed digital readout electronics for high flux measurements. The detector (4×4×2 mm3) has an anode layout based on an array of 16 pixels with a geometric pitch of 1 mm (pixel size of 0.6 mm). The 4-channel readout electronics is able to continuously digitize and process the signals from each pixel, performing multi-parameter analysis (event arrival time, pulse shape, pulse height, pulse time width, etc.) even at high fluxes and at different throughput and energy resolution conditions. The spectroscopic response of the system to monochromatic X-ray sources, at both low and high rates, is presented with particular attention to the mitigation of some typical spectral distortions (pile-up, baseline shifts and charge sharing). At a photon counting rate of 520 kcps/pixel, the system exhibits an energy resolution (FWHM at 59.5 keV) of 4.6%, 7.1% and 9% at throughputs of 0.9%, 16% and 82%, respectively. Measurements of Ag-target X-ray spectra also show the ability of the system to perform accurate estimation of the input counting rate up to 1.1 Mcps/pixel. The aim of this work is to point out, beside the appealing properties of CdTe detectors, the benefits of the digital approach in the development of high-performance energy resolved photon counting (ERPC) systems for high flux X-ray imaging.

  17. Solar-B X-ray Telescope (XRT) Concept Study Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Leon

    1999-10-01

    The X-ray observations from the Yohkoh SXT provided the greatest step forward in our understanding of the solar corona in nearly two decades. Expanding on the accomplishments of Yohkoh, we believe that the scientific objectives of the Solar-B mission are achieved with a significantly improved X-ray telescope (XRT) similar to the SXT. The Solar-B XRT will have twice the spatial resolution and a broader temperature response, while building on the knowledge gained from the successful Yohkoh mission. We present the scientific justification for this view, discuss the instrumental requirements that flow from the scientific objectives, and describe the instrumentation to meet these requirements. We then provide a detailed discussion of the design activities carried out during Phase A, noting the conclusions that were reached in terms of their implications for the detailed design activities which are now commencing. Details of the instrument that have changed as a result of the Phase A studied are specifically noted, and areas of concern going into Phase B are highlighted. XRT is a grazing-incidence (GI) modified Wolter I X-ray telescope, of 35cm inner diameter and 2.7m focal length. The 2048x2048 back-illuminated CCD (now an ISAS responsibility) has 13.5 micron pixels, corresponding to 1.0 arcsec and giving full Sun field of view. This will be the highest resolution GI X-ray telescope ever flown for Solar coronal studies, and it has been designed specifically to observe both the high and low temperature coronal plasma. A small optical telescope provides visible light images for co-alignment with the Solar-B optical and EUV instruments. The XRT science team is working in close cooperation with our Japanese colleagues in the design and construction of this instrument. All of the expertise and resources of the High Energy and Solar/Stellar Divisions of the Center for Astrophysics are being made available to this program, and our team will carry its full share of

  18. Solar-B X-ray Telescope (XRT) Concept Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1999-01-01

    The X-ray observations from the Yohkoh SXT provided the greatest step forward in our understanding of the solar corona in nearly two decades. Expanding on the accomplishments of Yohkoh, we believe that the scientific objectives of the Solar-B mission are achieved with a significantly improved X-ray telescope (XRT) similar to the SXT. The Solar-B XRT will have twice the spatial resolution and a broader temperature response, while building on the knowledge gained from the successful Yohkoh mission. We present the scientific justification for this view, discuss the instrumental requirements that flow from the scientific objectives, and describe the instrumentation to meet these requirements. We then provide a detailed discussion of the design activities carried out during Phase A, noting the conclusions that were reached in terms of their implications for the detailed design activities which are now commencing. Details of the instrument that have changed as a result of the Phase A studied are specifically noted, and areas of concern going into Phase B are highlighted. XRT is a grazing-incidence (GI) modified Wolter I X-ray telescope, of 35cm inner diameter and 2.7m focal length. The 2048x2048 back-illuminated CCD (now an ISAS responsibility) has 13.5 micron pixels, corresponding to 1.0 arcsec and giving full Sun field of view. This will be the highest resolution GI X-ray telescope ever flown for Solar coronal studies, and it has been designed specifically to observe both the high and low temperature coronal plasma. A small optical telescope provides visible light images for co-alignment with the Solar-B optical and EUV instruments. The XRT science team is working in close cooperation with our Japanese colleagues in the design and construction of this instrument. All of the expertise and resources of the High Energy and Solar/Stellar Divisions of the Center for Astrophysics are being made available to this program, and our team will carry its full share of

  19. Persistent time intervals between features in solar flare hard X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Upendra D.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Talon, R.; Vedrenne, G.

    1986-01-01

    Several solar hard X-ray events (greater than 100 keV) were observed simultaneously with identical instruments on the Venera 11, 12, 13, 14, and Prognoz spacecraft. High time resolution (= 2 ms) data were stored in memory when a trigger occurred. The observations of modulation are presented with a period of 1.6 s for the event on December 3, 1978. Evidence is also presented for fast time fluctuations from an event on November 6, 1979, observed from Venera 12 and another on September 6, 1981, observed from the Solar Maximum Mission. Power spectrum analysis, epoch folding, and Monte Carlo simulation were used to evaluate the statistical significance of persistent time delays between features. The results are discussed in light of the MHD model proposed by Zaitsev and Stepanov.

  20. Dips in X-Ray Flux Associated with Superluminal Ejections in the Radio Galaxy 3C 120

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Jorstad, S. G.; Gomez, J. L.; Aller, M. F.

    2001-01-01

    We compare the RXTE X-ray light curve of 3C 120 from our late 1997 to early 2000 observations, plus early 1997 archival data, with both the cm-wave light curves (University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory) and the times of ejections of apparent superluminal components (from VLBA observations). There is no correlation between the X-ray and radio light curves. However, the epochs of all four observed superluminal ejections correspond, to within the errors, with pronounced dips in the X-ray light curves (photon energies in the range 2-20 keV). This behavior is similar to that of the binary-system 'microquasar' GRS1915+105 in the Milky Way galaxy, although in 3C 120 there is no evidence for rapid, quasi-periodic fluctuations in X-ray flux. These observations therefore support the notion that in active galactic nuclei eruptions of energetic outflow are related to excess accretion onto a supermassive black hole.

  1. A novel approach for x-ray scattering experiments in magnetic fields utilizing trapped flux in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Das, R.K.; Islan, Z.; Ruff, J.P.C.; Sawh, R.P.; Weinstein, R.; Canfield, Paul C.; Kim, J.-W.; Lang, J.C.

    2012-06-08

    We introduce a novel approach to x-ray scattering studies in applied magnetic fields by exploiting vortices in superconductors. This method is based on trapping magnetic flux in a small disk-shaped superconductor (known as a trapped field magnet, TFM) with a single-crystal sample mounted on or at close proximity to its surface. This opens an unrestricted optical access to the sample and allows magnetic fields to be applied precisely along the x-ray momentum transfer, facilitating polarization-sensitive experiments that have been impractical or impossible to perform to date. The TFMs used in our study remain stable and provide practically uniform magnetic fields for days, which are sufficient for comprehensive x-ray diffraction experiments, specifically x-ray resonance exchange scattering (XRES) to study field-induced phenomena at a modern synchrotron source. The TFM instrument has been used in a “proof-of-principle” XRES study of a meta-magnetic phase in a rare-earth compound, TbNi2Ge2, in order to demonstrate its potential.

  2. Diamond monochromator for high heat flux synchrotron x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.M.; Smither, R.K.; Davey, S.; Purohit, A.

    1993-01-28

    Single crystal silicon has been the material of choice for x-ray monochromators for the past several decades. However, the need for suitable monochromators to handle the high heat load of the next generation synchrotron x-ray beams on the one hand and the rapid and on-going advances in synthetic diamond technology on the other make a compelling case for the consideration of a diamond monochromator system. In this paper, we consider various aspects, advantages and disadvantages, and promises and pitfalls of such a system and evaluate the comparative performance of a diamond monochromator subjected to the high heat load of the most powerful x-ray beam that will become available in the next few years. The results of experiments performed to evaluate the diffraction properties of a currently available synthetic single crystal diamond are also presented. Fabrication of a diamond-based monochromator is within present technical means.

  3. Diamond monochromator for high heat flux synchrotron x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.M.; Smither, R.K.; Davey, S.; Purohit, A.

    1992-12-01

    Single crystal silicon has been the material of choice for x-ray monochromators for the past several decades. However, the need for suitable monochromators to handle the high heat load of the next generation synchrotron x-ray beams on the one hand and the rapid and on-going advances in synthetic diamond technology on the other make a compelling case for the consideration of a diamond mollochromator system. In this Paper, we consider various aspects, advantage and disadvantages, and promises and pitfalls of such a system and evaluate the comparative an monochromator subjected to the high heat load of the most powerful x-ray beam that will become available in the next few years. The results of experiments performed to evaluate the diffraction properties of a currently available synthetic single crystal diamond are also presented. Fabrication of diamond-based monochromator is within present technical means.

  4. Small-Scale Filament Eruptions Leading to Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse; Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the onset of ~10 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jet was near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ``bright point'' in an edge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. We examined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels, including 304 Å, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Å, which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptions of miniature (size <~10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. Much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperature jet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption and the hotter EUV component of the jet appears in emission. The jet bright point forms at the location from which the miniature filament erupts, analogous to the formation of a standard solar flare arcade in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scalechromospheric filament. The spire of the jet forms on open field lines that presumably have undergone interchange reconnection with the erupting field that envelops and carries the miniature filament. Thus these X-ray jets and their bright points are made by miniature filament eruptions via ``internal'' and ``external'' reconnection of the erupting field. This is consistent with what we found for the onset of an on-disk coronal jet we examined in Adams et al. (2014). This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  5. Statistical study of the correlation of hard X-ray and type III radio bursts in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Petrosian, Vahe; Benz, A. O.

    1990-01-01

    A large number of hard X-ray events which occurred during the maximum of solar cycle 21 have been analyzed in order to study their correlation with type III bursts. It is found that the distribution of occurrences of hard X-ray bursts correlated with type III radio bursts is significantly different from the distribution of all hard X-ray bursts. This result is consistent with the assumption that the hard X-ray and type III intensities are somewhat correlated. A bivariate distribution function of the burst intensities is fitted to the data and is used to determine that the typical ratio of X-ray intensity to type II intensity is about 10 and that the ratio of the number of X-ray producing-electrons to type III-producing electrons is about 1000. Three models which have been proposed to explain the relation between the accelerated hard X-ray and type III-producing electrons are examined in the context of these observations.

  6. Statistical study of the correlation of hard X-ray and type III radio bursts in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, R.J.; Petrosian, V.; Benz, A.O. Zuerich Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule )

    1990-08-01

    A large number of hard X-ray events which occurred during the maximum of solar cycle 21 have been analyzed in order to study their correlation with type III bursts. It is found that the distribution of occurrences of hard X-ray bursts correlated with type III radio bursts is significantly different from the distribution of all hard X-ray bursts. This result is consistent with the assumption that the hard X-ray and type III intensities are somewhat correlated. A bivariate distribution function of the burst intensities is fitted to the data and is used to determine that the typical ratio of X-ray intensity to type II intensity is about 10 and that the ratio of the number of X-ray producing-electrons to type III-producing electrons is about 1000. Three models which have been proposed to explain the relation between the accelerated hard X-ray and type III-producing electrons are examined in the context of these observations. 17 refs.

  7. A normal incidence, high resolution X-ray telescope for solar coronal observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts directed toward the completion of an X-ray telescope assembly design, the procurement of major components, and the coordination of optical fabrication and X-ray multilayer testing are reported.

  8. High-flux x-ray undulator radiation from proposed B factory storage rings at Cornell University

    SciTech Connect

    Bilderback, D.H.; Batterman, B.W.; Bedzyk, M.J.; Brock, J.; Finkelstein, K.; Headrick, R.; Shen, Q. )

    1992-01-01

    Two intersecting storage rings (8 GeV, 1 A and 3.5 GeV, 2 A) have been proposed to be built at Cornell University to enhance both the production of {ital B} mesons and synchrotron radiation. Exceedingly high x-ray flux from 3-m long undulators will be the new feature of a {ital B} factory for the CHESS laboratory. The flux produced integrated over the central cone of radiation can be as much as an order of magnitude higher than from the third-generation storage rings (now under construction) operating at 0.1 A.

  9. A real-time electronic imaging system for solar X-ray observations from sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; Ting, J. W.; Gerassimenko, M.

    1979-01-01

    A real-time imaging system for displaying the solar coronal soft X-ray emission, focussed by a grazing incidence telescope, is described. The design parameters of the system, which is to be used primarily as part of a real-time control system for a sounding rocket experiment, are identified. Their achievement with a system consisting of a microchannel plate, for the conversion of X-rays into visible light, and a slow-scan vidicon, for recording and transmission of the integrated images, is described in detail. The system has a quantum efficiency better than 8 deg above 8 A, a dynamic range of 1000 coupled with a sensitivity to single photoelectrons, and provides a spatial resolution of 15 arc seconds over a field of view of 40 x 40 square arc minutes. The incident radiation is filtered to eliminate wavelengths longer than 100 A. Each image contains 3.93 x 10 to the 5th bits of information and is transmitted to the ground where it is processed by a mini-computer and displayed in real-time on a standard TV monitor.

  10. Glass sample preparation and performance investigations. [solar x-ray imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1992-01-01

    This final report details the work performed under this delivery order from April 1991 through April 1992. The currently available capabilities for integrated optical performance modeling at MSFC for large and complex systems such as AXAF were investigated. The Integrated Structural Modeling (ISM) program developed by Boeing for the U.S. Air Force was obtained and installed on two DECstations 5000 at MSFC. The structural, thermal and optical analysis programs available in ISM were evaluated. As part of the optomechanical engineering activities, technical support was provided in the design of support structure, mirror assembly, filter wheel assembly and material selection for the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program. As part of the fabrication activities, a large number of zerodur glass samples were prepared in different sizes and shapes for acid etching, coating and polishing experiments to characterize the subsurface damage and stresses produced by the grinding and polishing operations. Various optical components for AXAF video microscope and the x-ray test facility were also fabricated. A number of glass fabrication and test instruments such as a scatter plate interferometer, a gravity feed saw and some phenolic cutting blades were fabricated, integrated and tested.

  11. Mission Overview of the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Caspi, Amir; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jones, Andrew; Kohnert, Rick; Li, Xinlin; Mason, James; Moore, Christopher; Palo, Scott; Rouleau, Colden; Solomon, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3-Unit (3U) CubeSat to study the energy distribution of solar flare soft X-ray (SXR) emissions of the quiet Sun, active regions, and during flares and to model the solar SXR impact in Earth’s ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere (ITM) using these MinXSS solar measurements. The energy variability in the SXR range can vary by more than a factor of 100, yet we have limited spectral measurements in the SXR to accurately quantify the spectral dependence of this variability. Energy from SXR radiation is deposited mostly in the ionospheric E-region, from ~80 to ~150 km, but the precise altitude is strongly dependent on the SXR spectrum because of the steep slope and structure of the photoionization cross sections of atmospheric gases in this wavelength range. The new MinXSS solar SXR spectra measurements and associated modeling of the solar spectra and Earth’s ITM response will address these outstanding issues. MinXSS includes an Amptek X123 X-ray spectrometer to measure solar irradiance spectra from 0.5 - 30 keV [2.5- 0.04 nm] with a nominal 0.15 keV energy resolution [spectral resolution of 0.7 nm at 2.5 nm and 0.0002 nm at 0.04 nm] and a SXR photometer with similar spectral sensitivity. Both of these SXR instruments had pre-flight calibrations with an accuracy of about 5% at the National Institute for Standard and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF). This presentation will include an overview of the MinXSS CubeSat design and development that involved over 40 graduate students supervised by professors and professionals at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The MinXSS CubeSat was launched in December 2015 to the International Space Station (ISS) and awaits deployment from the ISS in April-May 2016. Assuming MinXSS has been deployed before June, we also intend to present first light observations from MinXSS to highlight solar SXR spectra and SXR variability

  12. Mission Overview of the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Caspi, Amir; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jones, Andrew; Kohnert, Rick; Li, Xinlin; Mason, James; Moore, Christopher; Palo, Scott; Rouleau, Colden; Solomon, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3-Unit (3U) CubeSat to study the energy distribution of solar flare soft X-ray (SXR) emissions of the quiet Sun, active regions, and during flares and to model the solar SXR impact in Earth’s ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere (ITM) using these MinXSS solar measurements. The energy variability in the SXR range can vary by more than a factor of 100, yet we have limited spectral measurements in the SXR to accurately quantify the spectral dependence of this variability. Energy from SXR radiation is deposited mostly in the ionospheric E-region, from ~80 to ~150 km, but the precise altitude is strongly dependent on the SXR spectrum because of the steep slope and structure of the photoionization cross sections of atmospheric gases in this wavelength range. The new MinXSS solar SXR spectra measurements and associated modeling of the solar spectra and Earth’s ITM response will address these outstanding issues. MinXSS includes an Amptek X123 X-ray spectrometer to measure solar irradiance spectra from 0.5 – 30 keV [2.5– 0.04 nm] with a nominal 0.15 keV energy resolution [spectral resolution of 0.7 nm at 2.5 nm and 0.0002 nm at 0.04 nm] and a SXR photometer with similar spectral sensitivity. Both of these SXR instruments had pre-flight calibrations with an accuracy of about 5% at the National Institute for Standard and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF). This presentation will include an overview of the MinXSS CubeSat design and development that involved over 40 graduate students supervised by professors and professionals at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The MinXSS CubeSat was launched in December 2015 to the International Space Station (ISS) and awaits deployment from the ISS in April-May 2016. Assuming MinXSS has been deployed before June, we also intend to present first light observations from MinXSS to highlight solar SXR spectra and SXR variability

  13. Numerical modeling of the sensitivity of x-ray driven implosions to low-mode flux asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Scott, R H H; Clark, D S; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Edwards, M J; Haan, S W; Jones, O S; Spears, B K; Marinak, M M; Town, R P J; Norreys, P A; Suter, L J

    2013-02-15

    The sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion implosions, of the type performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1], to low-mode flux asymmetries is investigated numerically. It is shown that large-amplitude, low-order mode shapes (Legendre polynomial P(4), resulting from low-order flux asymmetries, cause spatial variations in capsule and fuel momentum that prevent the deuterium and tritium (DT) "ice" layer from being decelerated uniformly by the hot spot pressure. This reduces the transfer of implosion kinetic energy to internal energy of the central hot spot, thus reducing the neutron yield. Furthermore, synthetic gated x-ray images of the hot spot self-emission indicate that P(4) shapes may be unquantifiable for DT layered capsules. Instead the positive P(4) asymmetry "aliases" itself as an oblate P(2) in the x-ray images. Correction of this apparent P(2) distortion can further distort the implosion while creating a round x-ray image. Long wavelength asymmetries may be playing a significant role in the observed yield reduction of NIF DT implosions relative to detailed postshot two-dimensional simulations.

  14. REPEATED, DELAYED TORQUE VARIATIONS FOLLOWING X-RAY FLUX ENHANCEMENTS IN THE MAGNETAR 1E 1048.1–5937

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, R. F.; Kaspi, V. M.; Scholz, P.; Ng, C.-Y.; Beardmore, A. P.; Gehrels, N.; Kennea, J. A.

    2015-02-10

    We report on two years of flux and spin evolution monitoring of 1E 1048.1–5937, a 6.5 s X-ray pulsar identified as a magnetar. Using Swift X-Ray Telescope data, we observed an X-ray outburst consisting of an increase in the persistent 1-10 keV flux by a factor of 6.3 ± 0.2, beginning on 2011 December 31 (MJD 55926). Following a delay of ∼100 days, the magnetar entered a period of large torque variability, with ν-dot reaching a factor of 4.55 ± 0.05 times the nominal value, before decaying in an oscillatory manner over a timescale of months. We show by comparing to previous outbursts from the source that this pattern of behavior may repeat itself with a quasi-period of ∼1800 days. We compare this phenomenology to periodic torque variations in radio pulsars, finding some similarities that suggest a magnetospheric origin for the behavior of 1E 1048.1–5937.

  15. Comparison of Damped Oscillations in Solar and Stellar X-Ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, I.-H.; Cho, K.-S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kim, S.; Kumar, P.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the similarity and difference of the quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed in the decay phase of solar and stellar flares at X-rays. We identified 42 solar flares with pronounced QPPs, observed with RHESSI, and 36 stellar flares with QPPs, observed with XMM-Newton. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method and least-squares fit by a damped sine function were applied to obtain the periods (P) and damping times (τ) of the QPPs. We found that (1) the periods and damping times of the stellar QPPs are 16.21 ± 15.86 minutes and 27.21 ± 28.73 minutes, while those of the solar QPPs are 0.90 ± 0.56 and 1.53 ± 1.10 minutes, respectively; (2) the ratios of the damping times to the periods (τ /P) observed in the stellar QPPs (1.69 ± 0.56) are statistically identical to those of solar QPPs (1.74 ± 0.77) and (3) the scalings of the QPP damping time with the period are well described by the power law in both solar and stellar cases. The power indices of the solar and stellar QPPs are 0.96 ± 0.10 and 0.98+/- 0.05, respectively. This scaling is consistent with the scalings found for standing slow magnetoacoustic and kink modes in solar coronal loops. Thus, we propose that the underlying mechanism responsible for the stellar QPPs is the natural magnetohydrodynamic oscillation in the flaring or adjacent coronal loops, as in the case of solar flares.

  16. Time delay between γ-ray lines and hard X-ray emissions during the 23 July 2002 solar flare interpreted by a trap plus precipitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.

    2007-06-01

    Context: The 23 July 2002 event was the first γ-ray flare observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Analysis of the time profiles of the hard X-ray and gamma-ray radiations of this flare shows a time delay between hard X-ray at 150 keV and gamma ray line emissions. Aims: We aim to interpret this delay in terms of transport of the particles accelerated during the flare. Methods: In this paper, we focus on the interpretation of this delay in the context of a trap plus precipitation model for energetic particles. Results: The time profiles of hard-X-ray and prompt gamma-ray line fluxes can be reproduced given that electrons and ions are injected and partially trapped in different coronal loop systems with slightly different characteristics such as density and length, and that the energetic electron-to-ion ratio varies from peak to peak during the flare. Conclusions: The results obtained from this analysis are discussed with respect to the constraints provided by the X-ray and gamma-ray images previously obtained, as well as with previously published analysis of the same event

  17. A double layer model for solar X-ray and microwave pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapping, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    The wide range of wavelengths over which quasi-periodic pulsations have been observed suggests that the mechanism causing them acts upon the supply of high energy electrons driving the emission processes. A model is described which is based upon the radial shrinkage of a magnetic flux tube. The concentration of the current, along with the reduction in the number of available charge carriers, can rise to a condition where the current demand exceeds the capacity of the thermal electrons. Driven by the large inductance of the external current circuit, an instability takes place in the tube throat, resulting in the formation of a potential double layer, which then accelerates electrons and ions to MeV energies. The double layer can be unstable, collapsing and reforming repeatedly. The resulting pulsed particle beams give rise to pulsating emission which are observed at radio and X-ray wavelengths.

  18. Comparative Analysis of VLF Signal Variation along Trajectory Induced by X-ray Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolarski, A.; Grubor, D.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative qualitative analysis of amplitude and phase delay variations was carried out along the trajectory of GQD/22.1 kHz and NAA/24.0 kHz VLF signal traces, propagating from Skelton (UK) and Maine (USA) toward Belgrade, induced by four isolated solar X-ray flare events occurred during the period from September 2005 to December 2006. For monitoring, recording and for storage of VLF data at the Institute of Physics in Belgrade, Serbia, the AbsPAL system was used. For modeling purposes of propagating conditions along GQD and NAA signal propagation paths, LWPCv21 program code was used. Occurred solar flare events induced lower ionosphere electron density height profile changes, causing perturbations in VLF wave propagation within Earth-ionosphere waveguides. As analyzed VLF signals characterize by different propagation parameters along trajectories from their transmitters to the Belgrade receiver site, their propagation is affected in different ways for different solar flare events and also for the same solar flare events.

  19. DUAL-STAGE RECONNECTION DURING SOLAR FLARES OBSERVED IN HARD X-RAY

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yan; Jing Ju; Wang Haimin; Cao Wenda

    2010-02-01

    In this Letter, we present hard X-ray (HXR) observation by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager of the 2003 October 29 X10 flare. Two pairs of HXR conjugate footpoints have been identified during the early impulsive phase. This geometric configuration is very much in the manner predicted by the 'tether-cutting' scenario first proposed by Moore and Roumeliotis. The HXR light curves show that the outer pair of footpoints disappeared much faster than the other pair. This temporal behavior further confirms that this event is a good example of the 'tether-cutting' model. In addition, we reconstructed a three-dimensional magnetic field based on the nonlinear force-free extrapolation and found that each pair of HXR footpoints were indeed linked by corresponding magnetic field lines.

  20. X-Ray Emission from Pre-Main-Sequence Stars - Testing the Solar Analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    1998-01-01

    This LTSA award funds my research on the origin of stellar X-ray emission and the solar-stellar analogy. The focus during most of this reporting period continued to be on the reduction and analysis of data acquired with the ASCA observatory (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics). During the last few months of this reporting period, considerable time and effort was also devoted to the submission of AXAF observing proposals in preparation for the upcoming AXAF launch. During this reporting period, five papers appeared in refereed journals for which I was either author or co-author, and two additional papers have recently been submitted to ApJ. Also, three conference proceedings papers were submitted. These publications are listed in the attached bibliography.

  1. The soft X-ray coronal mass ejection above solar limb of 1998 April 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-juan

    Using the observational materials of SXT/HXT aboard satellite Yohkoh and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) on 1998-04-23, a comprehensive study of the soft X-ray coronal mass ejection (CME) above solar SE limb shows that there were two magnetic dipolar sources (MDSs), one magnetic capacity belt (MCB) between the MDSs, one neutral current sheet (NCS) and some rare activation sources (ASs). When the MCB was changed by the ASs to become a magnetic energy belt (MEB), both mass and energy were concentrated to form the NCS. When the MDSs were connected by the MEB, the NCS was formed and the CME occurred. Mass was ejected not only from the NCS, but also from the whole MEB. The expanding loop of the CME had the two MDSs as footpoints. The top of the loop was always inclined towards the footpoint of the weaker source, and its locus marks the NCS.

  2. SID case studies utilizing a VLF solar x-ray flare monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielides, Michael; Spanier, Felix; Manninen, Jyrki; Skripachev, Vladimir

    Intense ultraviolet and x-ray radiation originating from solar flares are sources for sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID), which are enhancing the VLF radio propagation and are phenomena of the ionospheric D and E regions. Since summer 2012 the InFlaMo project is operating novel low cost SDR receivers as the main German participation to the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) in Germany, Finland, Russia and South Africa. The first objective of this paper is the presentation of the InFlaMo project and its novelty. The second aim is presenting case-studies, which are combining observations made together with other ionospheric sounders as well as with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) data showing trans-ionospheric radio-link disturbances accompanying the SID. Especially, disturbances of the trans-ionospheric radio-link are phenomena of the F region. Finally, the involved vertical ionospheric coupling effects are discussed within the presented case studies.

  3. On the physics of a long decay X-ray event. [on solar limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krall, K. R.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Mcquire, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses the long decay X-ray event which appeared as an expanding loop system on the solar limb on 13-14 Aug. 1973 which was also observed temporally and spectrally. A one-dimensional hydrodynamic study was undertaken to investigate increasing and decreasing phases of the event; it was shown that the inferred temperature gradients along the loops during the heating phase are consistent with unrestricted dynamic and conductive flows along the magnetic field lines. It was concluded that it cannot be definitely stated that enhanced emission at the tops of the loops is due to pressure gradients along the field lines; also, the large emission measure variations in the 10 to the 5th to 10 to the 6th K plasma during the event's decline may be due to the temperature dependence of radiative decay within a multiloop configuration.

  4. The Night Time Sun: X-Ray Observations of the Solar Twin 18 Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jared; Guinan, E. F.; Engle, S. G.; DeWarf, L.; Hall, J. C.; DePasquale, J.; Thompson, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    Since the study by Porto de Mello & da Silva(1997,ApJ,482) the nearby 5.5-mag G2V star 18 Scorpii has been considered one of the best solar twins, being a near-perfect match to our Sun in all physical characteristics(Teff, R, log(g), MV, metallicity, luminosity, and chromospheric CaII H&K emissions). Also, 18 Sco has a rotation period of PRot=22.7±0.5 days(Petit et al. 2008), which is very close to that of the Sun. In addition, ongoing CaII H&K observations carried out at Lowell Observatory indicate a possible 7-11yr. activity cycle. However, until our X-ray observations with XMM-Newton in Aug 2005, 18 Sco had never been observed in this spectral region. The analysis of these measurements yield an X-ray luminosity and coronal plasma temperature of LX=8±1.5ergs/s and TCorona 1.5-2 MK. These data were taken near mid-cycle and match very closely with those of the Sun(LX 6-30ergs/s TCorona 2 MK). In addition to these measures, interferometric angular diameter measures with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer yield a stellar diameter of 0.975±0.162 R/RSun. Fitting the star's observed properties to current evolution models indicates a mass of M=0.98±0.05 MSun and an age of 4-5 Gyr. This age estimate (4.4±0.4 Gyr) is in excellent agreement with an age inferred from age-rotation-activity relations from the Sun in Time project. These observations demonstrate that 18 Sco is a bonafide solar twin out through the X-ray portion of the spectrum. Such a distinction makes is a very important star to use as a proxy "Night Time” Sun for standardization purposes, an excellent candidate for asteroseismic studies, and as a target for searches for life-bearing terrestrial planets. This research is supported by grants from NASA/FUSE, NSF/RUI and by the Villanova University Research for Undergraduates Award Program, which we gratefully acknowledge.

  5. [The property and applications of the photovoltaic solar panel in the region of diagnostic X-ray].

    PubMed

    Hirota, Jun'ichi; Tarusawa, Kohetsu; Kudo, Kohsei

    2010-10-20

    In this study, the sensitivity in the diagnostic X-ray region of the single crystalline Si photovoltaic solar panel, which is expected to grow further, was measured by using an X-ray tube. The output voltage of the solar panel was clearly proportional to the tube voltage and a good time response in the irradiation time setting of the tube was measured. The factor which converts measured voltage to irradiation dose was extracted experimentally using a correction filter to investigate the ability of the solar panel as a dose monitor. The obtained conversion factors were N(S) = 13 ± 1[µV/µSv/s] for the serial and N(P) = 58 ± 2[µV/µSv/s] for the parallel connected solar panels, both with the Al 1 mm + Cu 0.1 mm correction filter, respectively. Therefore, a good dose dependence of the conversion factor was confirmed by varying the distance between the X-ray tube and the solar panel with that filter. In conclusion, a simple extension of our results pointed out the potential of a new concept of measurements using, for example, the photovoltaic solar panel, the direct dose measurement from X-ray tube and real time estimation of the exposed dose in IVR.

  6. [The property and applications of the photovoltaic solar panel in the region of diagnostic X-ray].

    PubMed

    Hirota, Jun'ichi; Tarusawa, Kohetsu; Kudo, Kohsei

    2010-10-20

    In this study, the sensitivity in the diagnostic X-ray region of the single crystalline Si photovoltaic solar panel, which is expected to grow further, was measured by using an X-ray tube. The output voltage of the solar panel was clearly proportional to the tube voltage and a good time response in the irradiation time setting of the tube was measured. The factor which converts measured voltage to irradiation dose was extracted experimentally using a correction filter to investigate the ability of the solar panel as a dose monitor. The obtained conversion factors were N(S) = 13 ± 1[µV/µSv/s] for the serial and N(P) = 58 ± 2[µV/µSv/s] for the parallel connected solar panels, both with the Al 1 mm + Cu 0.1 mm correction filter, respectively. Therefore, a good dose dependence of the conversion factor was confirmed by varying the distance between the X-ray tube and the solar panel with that filter. In conclusion, a simple extension of our results pointed out the potential of a new concept of measurements using, for example, the photovoltaic solar panel, the direct dose measurement from X-ray tube and real time estimation of the exposed dose in IVR. PMID:21060220

  7. Study of long term effect of Solar UV and X-ray radiation on the VLF signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sanki, Dipak

    2016-07-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) is one of the bands of Radio waves having frequencies lying between 3-30 KHz, with wavelengths 100-10 Km. It propagates through the Earth-ionosphere wave-guide which is formed by lower part of the ionosphere and upper part of Earth's surface. Ionosphere is the ionized component of upper atmosphere. In the present work, we have studied the long term effect of the high energy solar UV and X-ray radiation on the VLF signals. We have analyzed the VLF signal transmitted at 24 KHz from NAA (Cutler, Maine) and received at Moore Observatory in Brownsboro, Kentucky. Also we have collected X-ray and UV data to study the long term effect of UV and X-ray radiation on the VLF signal. We have analyzed the VLF signal for 2007 to 2015. We calculate the average diurnal peak amplitude of the VLF signal for each day and compare it with the UV and X-ray solar radiation. We found that the correlation coefficient of diurnal peak VLF signal amplitude with both solar X-ray and UV radiation is 0.7 indicating a strong correlation between these two phenomena.

  8. Exploring the active galactic nuclei population with extreme X-ray-to-optical flux ratios (fx/fo > 50)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Ceca, R.; Carrera, F. J.; Caccianiga, A.; Severgnini, P.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Corral, A.; Del Moro, A.; Mateos, S.; Ruiz, A.; Watson, M. G.

    2015-03-01

    The cosmic history of the growth of supermassive black holes in galactic centres parallels that of star formation in the Universe. However, an important fraction of this growth occurs inconspicuously in obscured objects, where ultraviolet/optical/near-infrared emission is heavily obscured by dust. Since the X-ray flux is less attenuated, a high X-ray-to-optical flux ratio (fx/fo) is expected to be an efficient tool to find out these obscured accreting sources. We explore here via optical spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and infrared photometry the most extreme cases of this population (those with fx/fo > 50, EXO50 sources hereafter), using a well-defined sample of seven X-ray sources extracted from the 2XMM catalogue. Five EXO50 sources (˜70 per cent of the sample) in the bright flux regime explored by our survey (f(2-10 keV) ≥ 1.5 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1) are associated with obscured AGN (NH > 1022 cm-2), spanning a redshift range between 0.75 and 1 and characterized by 2-10 keV intrinsic luminosities in the QSO regime (e.g. well in excess to 1044 erg s-1). We did not find compelling evidence of Compton thick active galacic nuclei (AGN). Overall, the EXO50 type 2 QSOs do not seem to be different from standard X-ray-selected type 2 QSOs in terms of nuclear absorption; a very high AGN/host galaxy ratio seems to play a major role in explaining their extreme properties. Interestingly, three out of five EXO50 type 2 QSO objects can be classified as extreme dust-obscured galaxies (EDOGs, f24 μm/fR ≥ 2000), suggesting that a very high AGN/host ratios (along with the large amount of dust absorption) could be the natural explanation also for a part of the EDOG population. The remaining two EXO50 sources are classified as BL Lac objects, having rather extreme properties, and which are good candidates for TeV emission.

  9. Correspondence between laser coupling and x-ray flux measurements in a NIF hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. D.; Divol, L.; Landen, O.; Lepape, S.; Michel, P.; Ralph, J.; Town, R. P. J.; Widmann, K.; Moore, A.

    2014-10-01

    We describe a simple model relating measurements of the hohlraum x-ray emission (DANTE) to the coupled (incident less backscattered) laser power in NIF indirect drive hohlraum experiments. The model was motivated by observing that the measured x-ray emission showed a lag in rise corresponding to a measured reduction in laser coupling due to backscatter. Two adjustable scalar parameters (a coupling efficiency and a time-scale) in the model are determined for each experiment. Comparing these parameters for different hohlraum gas-fill, ablator, pulse-length, and laser power conditions provides insight into the hohlraum behavior and performance. In some cases, the model can be inverted to estimate the backscatter loss using the measured hohlraum x-ray emission time-history and delivered laser power. We will describe the model and compare the adjustable parameters between different hohlraum platforms. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  10. Achromatically filtered diamond photoconductive detectors for high power soft x-ray flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.E.; Landen, O.L.; Bell, P.; Costa, R.; Hargrove, D.

    1999-01-01

    A 1-mm-square diamond photoconductive detector (PCD) has been installed on the LLNL Nova laser system, for use as a broadband soft x-ray power diagnostic. The PCD is installed behind an array of pinholes, which cast multiple, overlapping images of the source onto the diamond. This allows reduction of the x-ray intensity, to avoid saturation problems, while avoiding the spectral dependency of thin film filters. The diode current is read out on a 5 GHz bandwidth scope. The system is calibrated by comparison to an absolutely calibrated array of filtered vacuum x-ray photodiodes ({open_quotes}dante{close_quotes}). The time response of the PCD and its bias electronics have been characterized using the 5th harmonic (210 nm) of a short pulse ({lt}1 ps) Ti: sapphire laser. The data show a fast rise, limited by the 5 GHz scope bandwidth, and a slower fall off, characterized by an RC time of order 200 ps. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Laboratory Studies of the X-Ray Emission Produced by the Interaction of Solar Wind Heavy Ions with Comets

    SciTech Connect

    Beriersdorfer, P; Chen, H; May, M J; Thorn, D; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Kelly, R L; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Szymkowiak, A E; Kahn, S M

    2002-08-09

    The process of X-ray emission following charge exchange between solar wind heavy ions and cometary gases is studied in the laboratory. The emission is recorded with the spare ASTRO-E 6 x 6 microcalorimeter array. The microcalorimeter affords a resolution of better than 10 eV in the range of X-ray energies of interest and thus individual emission lines can be resolved. Our present measurements focus on the most abundant K-shell heavy ions found in the solar wind. In particular, we measure the K-shell emission of bare C, N, O, and Ne, and their hydrogen-like counter parts interacting with such gases as CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4}. Several results are noted that had not been considered in the early cometary X-ray models.

  12. Laboratory Studies of the X-ray Emission Produced by the Interaction of Solar Wind Heavy Ions with Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; May, M.; Thorn, D.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    2002-01-01

    The process of X-ray emission following charge exchange between solar wind heavy ions and cometary gases is studied in the laboratory. The emission is recorded with the spare ASTRO-E 6x6 microcalorimeter array. The microcalorimeter affords a resolution of better than 10 eV in the range of X-ray energies of interest arid thus individual emission lines can be resolved. Our present measurements focus on the most abundant K-shell heavy ions found in the solar wind. In particular, we measure the K-shell emission of bare C, N, O, and Ne, and their hydrogenlike counter parts interacting with such gases as CO2, N2, and CH4. Several results are noted that had not been considered in the early cometary X-ray models.

  13. The ratio of microwaves to X-rays in solar flares: The case for the thick target model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Petrosian, Vahe

    1988-01-01

    The expected ratio of synchrotron microwave radiation to bremsstrahlung X-rays for thick target, thin target, and multithermal solar flare models is calculated. The calculations take into account the variation of the microwave to X-ray ratio with X-ray spectral index. The theoretical results are compared with observed ratios of a sample of 51 solar flares with well known spectral index. From this it is concluded that the nonthermal thick target model with a loop length of and order of 10 to the 9th power cm and a magnetic field of 500 + or - 200 G provides the best fit to the data. The thin target and multithermal models require unreasonably large density or pressure and/or low magnetic field to match the data.

  14. The Ion-induced Charge-exchange X-ray Emission of the Jovian Auroras: Magnetospheric or Solar Wind Origin?

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Yawei; Schultz, David Robert; Kharchenko, Vasili A; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cravens, Thomas E. E.; Lisse, Carey M.; Dalgarno, A.

    2009-01-01

    A new and more comprehensive model of charge-exchange induced X-ray emission, due to ions precipitating into the Jovian atmosphere near the poles, has been used to analyze spectral observations made by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The model includes for the first time carbon ions, in addition to the oxygen and sulfur ions previously considered, in order to account for possible ion origins from both the solar wind and the Jovian magnetosphere. By comparing the model spectra with newly reprocessed Chandra observations, we conclude that carbon ion emission provides a negligible contribution, suggesting that solar wind ions are not responsible for the observed polar X-rays. In addition, results of the model fits to observations support the previously estimated seeding kinetic energies of the precipitating ions ( 0.7-2 MeV/u), but infer a different relative sulfur to oxygen abundance ratio for these Chandra observations.

  15. THE ION-INDUCED CHARGE-EXCHANGE X-RAY EMISSION OF THE JOVIAN AURORAS: MAGNETOSPHERIC OR SOLAR WIND ORIGIN?

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Yawei; Schultz, David R.; Kharchenko, Vasili A.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Lisse, Carey M. E-mail: schultzd@ornl.gov E-mail: stancil@physast.uga.edu E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu

    2009-09-10

    A new and more comprehensive model of charge-exchange induced X-ray emission, due to ions precipitating into the Jovian atmosphere near the poles, has been used to analyze spectral observations made by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The model includes for the first time carbon ions, in addition to the oxygen and sulfur ions previously considered, in order to account for possible ion origins from both the solar wind and the Jovian magnetosphere. By comparing the model spectra with newly reprocessed Chandra observations, we conclude that carbon ion emission provides a negligible contribution, suggesting that solar wind ions are not responsible for the observed polar X-rays. In addition, results of the model fits to observations support the previously estimated seeding kinetic energies of the precipitating ions ({approx}0.7-2 MeV u{sup -1}), but infer a different relative sulfur-to-oxygen abundance ratio for these Chandra observations.

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biomimetic dye molecules for solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Peter L.; Liu Xiaosong; Himpsel, F. J.; Yang Wanli

    2009-11-21

    Dye-sensitized solar cells are potentially inexpensive alternatives to traditional semiconductor solar cells. In order to optimize dyes for solar cells we systematically investigate the electronic structure of a variety of porphyrins and phthalocyanines. As a biological model system we use the heme group in cytochrome c which plays a role in biological charge transfer processes. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the N 1s and C 1s edges reveals the unoccupied molecular orbitals and the orientation of the molecules in thin films. The transition metal 2p edges reflect the oxidation state of the central metal atom, its spin state, and the ligand field of the surrounding N atoms. The latter allows tuning of the energy position of the lowest unoccupied orbital by several tenths of an eV by tailoring the molecules and their deposition. Fe and Mn containing phthalocyanines oxidize easily from +2 to +3 in air and require vacuum deposition for obtaining a reproducible oxidation state. Chlorinated porphyrins, on the other hand, are reduced from +3 to +2 during vacuum deposition at elevated temperatures. These findings stress the importance of controlled thin film deposition for obtaining photovoltaic devices with an optimum match between the energy levels of the dye and those of the donor and acceptor electrodes, together with a molecular orientation for optimal overlap between the {pi} orbitals in the direction of the carrier transport.

  17. Sub-second variations of high energy ( 300 keV) hard X-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Taeil

    1986-01-01

    Subsecond variations of hard X-ray emission from solar flares were first observed with a balloon-borne detector. With the launch of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), it is now well known that subsecond variations of hard X-ray emission occur quite frequently. Such rapid variations give constraints on the modeling of electron energization. Such rapid variations reported until now, however, were observed at relatively low energies. Fast mode data obtained by the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) has time resolution of approximately 1 ms but has no energy resolution. Therefore, rapid fluctuations observed in the fast-mode HXRBS data are dominated by the low energy hard X-rays. It is of interest to know whether rapid fluctuations are observed in high-energy X-rays. The highest energy band at which subsecond variations were observed is 223 to 1057 keV. Subsecond variations observed with HXRBS at energies greater than 300 keV are reported, and the implications discussed.

  18. Correlated observations of impulsive UV and hard X-ray bursts in solar flares from the solar maximum mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C.-C.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Orwig, L. E.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the temporal and spatial structures of UV and hard X-ray bursts in a disk and a limb flare observed with instruments on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Attention is given to the transient UV brightening before the flare, the impulsive enhancement of UV continuum emission, the relationship between emission source region and particle acceleration region, and large scale excitations. The most active part of the active region appears to be the most flare-productive region. These regions exhibit high UV activities with numerous UV transient bursts occurring in many small kernels.

  19. The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat: instrument characterization techniques, instrument capabilities and solar science objectives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher; Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Mason, James

    2016-05-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3U CubeSat launched in December 2015 to the International Space Station for deployment in early 2016. MinXSS will utilize a commercial off the shelf (COTS) X-ray spectrometer from Amptek to measure the solar irradiance from 0.5 – 30 keV with a nominal 0.15 keV FWHM spectral resolution at 5.9 keV and a LASP developed X-ray photometer with similar spectral sensitivity. MinXSS design and development has involved over 40 graduate students supervised by professors and professionals at the University of Colorado at Boulder.The majority of previous solar X-ray measurements have been either at high spectral resolution with a narrow bandpass or spectrally integrating (broad band) photometers. MinXSS will conduct unique soft X-ray measurements of moderate spectral resolution over a relatively large energy range to study solar active region evolution, solar flares, and their effects on Earth’s ionosphere. This presentation focuses on the science instrument characterization involving radioactive X-ray sources and the National Institute for Standard and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF). Detector spectral response, spectral resolution, response linearity are discussed as well as future solar science objectives.

  20. The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat: instrument characterization techniques, instrument capabilities and solar science objectives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher; Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Mason, James

    2016-05-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3U CubeSat launched in December 2015 to the International Space Station for deployment in early 2016. MinXSS will utilize a commercial off the shelf (COTS) X-ray spectrometer from Amptek to measure the solar irradiance from 0.5 - 30 keV with a nominal 0.15 keV FWHM spectral resolution at 5.9 keV and a LASP developed X-ray photometer with similar spectral sensitivity. MinXSS design and development has involved over 40 graduate students supervised by professors and professionals at the University of Colorado at Boulder.The majority of previous solar X-ray measurements have been either at high spectral resolution with a narrow bandpass or spectrally integrating (broad band) photometers. MinXSS will conduct unique soft X-ray measurements of moderate spectral resolution over a relatively large energy range to study solar active region evolution, solar flares, and their effects on Earth’s ionosphere. This presentation focuses on the science instrument characterization involving radioactive X-ray sources and the National Institute for Standard and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF). Detector spectral response, spectral resolution, response linearity are discussed as well as future solar science objectives.

  1. Results of investigation of muon fluxes of superhigh energy cosmic rays with X-ray emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanenko, I. P.; Ivanova, M. A.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Ilyina, N. P.; Mandritskaya, K. V.; Osipova, E. A.; Rakobolskaya, I. V.; Zatsepin, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    The overall data from the investigation of the cosmic ray muon flux in the range of zenith angles (0-90) deg within the energy range (3.5 to 5.0) TeV is presented. The exposure of large X-ray emulsion chambers underground was 1200 tons. year. The data were processe using the method which was applied in the experiment Pamir and differred from the earlier applied one. The obtained value of a slope power index of the differential energy spectrum of the global muon flux is =3.7 that corresponds to the slope of the pion generation differential spectrum, gamma sub PI = 2.75 + or - .04. The analysis of the muon zenith-angular distribution showed that the contribution of rapid generation muons in the total muon flux agree the best with the value .2% and less with .7% at a 90% reliability level.

  2. Generation of high-photon flux-coherent soft x-ray radiation with few-cycle pulses.

    PubMed

    Demmler, Stefan; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Krebs, Manuel; Hage, Arvid; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    We present a tabletop source of coherent soft x-ray radiation with high-photon flux. Two-cycle pulses delivered by a fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier operating at 180 kHz repetition rate are upconverted via high harmonic generation in neon to photon energies beyond 200 eV. A maximum photon flux of 1.3·10(8) photons/s is achieved within a 1% bandwidth at 125 eV photon energy. This corresponds to a conversion efficiency of ~10(-9), which can be reached due to a gas jet simultaneously providing a high target density and phase matching. Further scaling potential toward higher photon flux as well as higher photon energies are discussed.

  3. Generation of high-photon flux-coherent soft x-ray radiation with few-cycle pulses.

    PubMed

    Demmler, Stefan; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Krebs, Manuel; Hage, Arvid; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    We present a tabletop source of coherent soft x-ray radiation with high-photon flux. Two-cycle pulses delivered by a fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier operating at 180 kHz repetition rate are upconverted via high harmonic generation in neon to photon energies beyond 200 eV. A maximum photon flux of 1.3·10(8) photons/s is achieved within a 1% bandwidth at 125 eV photon energy. This corresponds to a conversion efficiency of ~10(-9), which can be reached due to a gas jet simultaneously providing a high target density and phase matching. Further scaling potential toward higher photon flux as well as higher photon energies are discussed. PMID:24281507

  4. The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B. C., Jr.; Allen, Max J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed seven compact soft X-ray/EUV (XUV) multilayer coated and two compact FUV interference film coated Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes for a rocket borne observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. We report here on extensive measurements of the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the XUV telescopes carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory.

  5. DIRECT SPATIAL ASSOCIATION OF AN X-RAY FLARE WITH THE ERUPTION OF A SOLAR QUIESCENT FILAMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Gordon D.; Foord, Adi

    2015-05-10

    Solar flares primarily occur in active regions. Hard X-ray flares have been found to occur only in active regions. They are often associated with the eruption of active region filaments and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). CMEs can also be associated with the eruption of quiescent filaments, not located in active regions. Here we report the first identification of a solar X-ray flare outside an active region observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The X-ray emission was directly associated with the eruption of a long, quiescent filament and fast CME. Images from RHESSI show this flare emission to be located along a section of the western ribbon of the expanding, post-eruption arcade. EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly show no connection between this location and nearby active regions. Therefore the flare emission is found not to be located in or associated with an active region. However, a nearby, small, magnetically strong dipolar region provides a likely explanation for the existence and location of the flare X-ray emission. This emerging dipolar region may have also triggered the filament eruption.

  6. Soft X-ray irradiance measured by the Solar Aspect Monitor on the Solar Dynamic Observatory Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. Y.; Bailey, S. M.; Jones, A.; Woodraska, D.; Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.

    2016-04-01

    The Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM) is a pinhole camera on the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. SAM projects the solar disk onto the CCD through a metallic filter designed to allow only solar photons shortward of 7 nm to pass. Contamination from energetic particles and out-of-band irradiance is, however, significant in the SAM observations. We present a technique for isolating the 0.01-7 nm integrated irradiance from the SAM signal to produce the first results of broadband irradiance for the time period from May 2010 to May 2014. The results of this analysis agree with a similar data product from EVE's EUV SpectroPhotometer to within 25%. We compare our results with measurements from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer Solar X-ray Photometer and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics Solar EUV Experiment at similar levels of solar activity. We show that the full-disk SAM broadband results compared well to the other measurements of the 0.01-7 nm irradiance. We also explore SAM's capability toward resolving spatial contribution from regions of solar disk in irradiance and demonstrate this feature with a case study of several strong flares that erupted from active regions on 11 March 2011.

  7. Plasma dynamics above solar flare soft x-ray loop tops

    SciTech Connect

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2014-06-10

    We measure non-thermal motions in flare loop tops and above the loop tops using profiles of highly ionized spectral lines of Fe XXIV and Fe XXIII formed at multimillion-degree temperatures. Non-thermal motions that may be due to turbulence or multiple flow regions along the line of sight are extracted from the line profiles. The non-thermal motions are measured for four flares seen at or close to the solar limb. The profile data are obtained using the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on the Hinode spacecraft. The multimillion-degree non-thermal motions are between 20 and 60 km s{sup –1} and appear to increase with height above the loop tops. Motions determined from coronal lines (i.e., lines formed at about 1.5 MK) tend to be smaller. The multimillion-degree temperatures in the loop tops and above range from about 11 MK to 15 MK and also tend to increase with height above the bright X-ray-emitting loop tops. The non-thermal motions measured along the line of sight, as well as their apparent increase with height, are supported by Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly measurements of turbulent velocities in the plane of the sky.

  8. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Nishizuka, N.; Oi, A.; Ohyama, M.; Nakajima, H.

    2012-03-10

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  9. SOLPOL: A Solar Polarimeter for Hard X-Rays and Gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McConnell, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    Th goal of this project was to continue the development of a hard X-ray polarimeter for studying solar flares. In earlier work (funded by a previous SR&T grant), we had already achieved several goals, including the following: 1) development of a means of producing a polarized radiation source in the lab that could be used for prototype development; 2) demonstrated the basic Compton scatter polarimeter concept using a simple laboratory setup; 3) used the laboratory results to verify our Monte Carlo simulations; and 4) investigated various detector technologies that could be incorporated into the polarimeter design. For the current one-year program, we wanted to fabricate and test a laboratory science model based on our SOLPOL (Solar Polarimeter) design. The long-term goal of this effort is to develop and test a prototype design that could be used to study flare emissions from either a balloon- or space-borne platform. The current program has achieved its goal of fabricating and testing a science model of the SOLPOL design, although additional testing of the design (and detailed comparison with Monte Carlo simulations) is still desired. This one-year program was extended by six months (no-cost extension) to cover the summer of 1999, when undergraduate student support was available to complete some of the laboratory testing.

  10. Simulation of Quiet-Sun Hard X-Rays Related to Solar Wind Superhalo Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; Wang, Linghua; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose that the accelerated electrons in the quiet Sun could collide with the solar atmosphere to emit Hard X-rays (HXRs) via non-thermal bremsstrahlung, while some of these electrons would move upwards and escape into the interplanetary medium, to form a superhalo electron population measured in the solar wind. After considering the electron energy loss due to Coulomb collisions and the ambipolar electrostatic potential, we find that the sources of the superhalo could only occur high in the corona (at a heliocentric altitude ≳ 1.9 R_{⊙} (the mean radius of the Sun)), to remain a power-law shape of electron spectrum as observed by Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) at 1 AU near solar minimum (Wang et al. in Astrophys. J. Lett. 753, L23, 2012). The modeled quiet-Sun HXRs related to the superhalo electrons fit well to a power-law spectrum, f ˜ ɛ^{-γ} in the photon energy ɛ, with an index γ≈2.0 - 2.3 (3.3 - 3.7) at 10 - 100 keV, for the warm/cold-thick-target (thin-target) emissions produced by the downward-traveling (upward-traveling) accelerated electrons. These simulated quiet-Sun spectra are significantly harder than the observed spectra of most solar HXR flares. Assuming that the quiet-Sun sources cover 5 % of the solar surface, the modeled thin-target HXRs are more than six orders of magnitude weaker than the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) upper limit for quiet-Sun HXRs (Hannah et al. in Astrophys. J. 724, 487, 2010). Using the thick-target model for the downward-traveling electrons, the RHESSI upper limit restricts the number of downward-traveling electrons to at most {≈} 3 times the number of escaping electrons. This ratio is fundamentally different from what is observed during solar flares associated with escaping electrons where the fraction of downward-traveling electrons dominates by a factor of 100 to 1000 over the escaping population.

  11. Planetary X-ray studies: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Our solar system is a fascinating physics laboratory and X-ray observations are now firmly established as a powerful diagnostic tool of the multiple processes taking place in it. The science that X-rays reveal encompasses solar, space plasma and planetary physics, and the response of bodies in the solar system to the impact of the Sun's activity. This talk will review what we know from past observations and what we expect to learn in the short, medium and long term. Observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton have demonstrated that the origin of Jupiter's bright soft X-ray aurorae lies in the Charge eXchange (CX) process, likely to involve the interaction with atmospheric neutrals of local magnetospheric ions, as well as those carried in the solar wind. At higher energies electron bremsstrahlung is thought to be the X-ray emitting mechanism, while the whole planetary disk acts as a mirror for the solar X-ray flux via Thomson and fluorescent scattering. This 'X-ray mirror' phenomenon is all that is observed from Saturn's disk, which otherwise lacks X-ray auroral features. The Earth's X-ray aurora is bright and variable and mostly due to electron bremsstrahlung and line emission from atmospheric species. Un-magnetised planets, Venus and Mars, do not show X-ray aurorae but display the interesting combination of mirroring the solar X-ray flux and producing X-rays by Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) in their exospheres. These processes respond to different solar stimulation (photons and solar wind plasma respectively) hence their relative contributions are seen to vary according to the Sun's output. Present and future of planetary X-ray studies are very bright. We are preparing for the arrival of the Juno mission at Jupiter this summer and for coordinated observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton on the approach and later during Juno's orbital phase. These will allow direct correlation of the local plasma conditions with the X-ray emissions and the establishment of the

  12. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II). IV. X-ray luminosity function and first constraints on cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Collins, Chris A.

    2014-10-01

    The X-ray luminosity function that is closely related to the cluster mass function is an important statistic of the census of galaxy clusters in our Universe. It is also an important means to probe the cosmological model of our Universe. Based on our recently completed REFLEX II cluster sample comprising 910 galaxy clusters with redshifts we construct the X-ray luminosity function of galaxy clusters for the nearby Universe and discuss its implications. We derived the X-ray luminosity function of the REFLEX II clusters on the basis of a precisely constructed selection function for the full sample and for several redshift slices from z = 0 to z = 0.4. In this redshift interval we find no significant signature of redshift evolution of the luminosity function. We provide the results of fits of a parameterized Schechter function and extensions of it which provide a reasonable characterization of the data. We also use a model for structure formation and galaxy cluster evolution to compare the observed X-ray luminosity function with the theoretical predictions for different cosmological models. The most interesting constraints can be derived for the cosmological parameters Ωm and σ8. We explore the influence of several model assumptions on which our analysis is based. We find that the scaling relation of X-ray luminosity and mass introduces the largest systematic uncertainty. From the statistical uncertainty alone we can constrain the matter density parameter, Ωm ~ 0.27 ± 0.03 and the amplitude parameter of the matter density fluctuations, σ8 ~ 0.80 ± 0.03. Marginalizing over the most important uncertainties, the normalisation and slope of the LX - M scaling relation, we have larger error bars and a result of Ωm ~ 0.29 ± 0.04 and σ8 ~ 0.77 ± 0.07 (1σ confidence limits). We compare our results with those of the SZ-cluster survey provided by the Planck mission and we find very good agreement with the results using Planck clusters as cosmological probes, but there

  13. The Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays on Solar Orbiter: Flight design, challenges and trade-offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krucker, S.; Bednarzik, M.; Grimm, O.; Hurford, G. J.; Limousin, O.; Meuris, A.; Orleański, P.; Seweryn, K.; Skup, K. R.

    2016-07-01

    STIX is the X-ray spectral imaging instrument on-board the Solar Orbiter space mission of the European Space Agency, and together with nine other instruments will address questions of the interaction between the Sun and the heliosphere. STIX will study the properties of thermal and accelerated electrons near the Sun through their Bremsstrahlung X-ray emission, addressing in particular the emission from flaring regions on the Sun. The design phase of STIX has been concluded. This paper reports the final flight design of the instrument, focusing on design challenges that were faced recently and how they were addressed.

  14. High-Resolution X-Ray and Light Beam Induced Current (LBIC) Measurements of Multcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Budai, John D; Bennett, Charlee J C; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Duty, Chad E; Yelundur, V.; Rohatgi, A.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution, spatially-resolved x-ray Laue patterns and high-resolution light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements are combined to study two multicrystalline solar cells made from the Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) and the Sting Ribbon Growth technique. The LBIC measurements were made at 4 different wavelengths (488, 633, 780, and 980 nm), resulting in penetration depths ranging from <1 {mu}m to >100 {mu}m. There is a strong correlation between the x-ray and LBIC measurements, showing that some twins and grain boundaries are effective in the reduction of local quantum efficiency, while others are benign.

  15. Correlated observations of a spatially resolved type III solar radio burst group and the associated hard X-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.R.; Pick, M.; Raoult, A.

    1980-10-15

    The first measurements of the spatial structure of a group of type III solar radio bursts associated with an impulsive hard X-ray burst are presented. At 169 MHz the radio source has been found to consist of two principal regions separated by approx.3 x 10/sup 5/ km. The two regions together produced a total of four component bursts in good time correlation with spikes in the hard X-ray emission. The observations indicate that electron acceleration/injection occurs over a region which covers a wide range of magnetic field lines.

  16. Correlated observations of a spatially resolved type III solar radio burst group and the associated hard X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.; Pick, M.; Raoult, A.

    1980-01-01

    The first measurements of the spatial structure of a group of type III solar radio bursts associated with an impulsive hard X-ray burst are presented. At 169 MHz the radio source has been found to consist of two principal regions separated by about 300,000 km. The two regions together produced a total of four component bursts in good time correlation with spikes in the hard X-ray emission. The observations indicate that electron acceleration/injection occurs over a region which covers a wide range of magnetic field lines.

  17. RT-2 DETECTION OF QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN THE 2009 JULY 5 SOLAR HARD X-RAY FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, A. R.; Malkar, J. P.; Hingar, M. K.; Agrawal, V. K.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Nandi, A.; Debnath, D.; Kotoch, T. B.; Chidambaram, T. R.; Vinod, P.; Sreekumar, S.; Kotov, Y. D.; Buslov, A. S.; Yurov, V. N.; Tyshkevich, V. G.; Arkhangelskij, A. I.; Zyatkov, R. A.; Begum, S. Shaheda; Manoharan, P. K.

    2010-05-10

    We present the results of an analysis of hard X-ray observations of the C2.7 solar flare detected by the RT-2 experiment on board the Coronas-Photon satellite. We detect hard X-ray pulsations at periods of {approx}12 s and {approx}15 s. We find a marginal evidence for a decrease in period with time. We have augmented these results using the publicly available data from the RHESSI satellite. We present a spectral analysis and measure the spectral parameters.

  18. Investigation of Solar Flares Using Spectrally, Spatially, and Temporally Resolved Observations in Gamma Rays, Hard X Rays, and Microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, Carol Jo; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The high-energy components of solar flares radiate at a wide range of wavelengths. We are using spatially, spectrally, and temporally resolved hard X-ray, gamma-ray, and microwave observations of solar flares to investigate flare models and to understand the flare acceleration process. The hard X-ray and gamma-ray observations are obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spacecraft that was launched on February 5, 2002. The microwave observations are obtained with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO), which has been dedicated to daily observations of solar flares in microwaves with a five-element interferometer since June 1992. These studies are expected to yield exciting new insights into the fundamental physics of the flare acceleration processes.

  19. A mass of less than 15 solar masses for the black hole in an ultraluminous X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Motch, C; Pakull, M W; Soria, R; Grisé, F; Pietrzyński, G

    2014-10-01

    Most ultraluminous X-ray sources have a typical set of properties not seen in Galactic stellar-mass black holes. They have luminosities of more than 3 × 10(39) ergs per second, unusually soft X-ray components (with a typical temperature of less than about 0.3 kiloelectronvolts) and a characteristic downturn in their spectra above about 5 kiloelectronvolts. Such puzzling properties have been interpreted either as evidence of intermediate-mass black holes or as emission from stellar-mass black holes accreting above their Eddington limit, analogous to some Galactic black holes at peak luminosity. Recently, a very soft X-ray spectrum was observed in a rare and transient stellar-mass black hole. Here we report that the X-ray source P13 in the galaxy NGC 7793 is in a binary system with a period of about 64 days and exhibits all three canonical properties of ultraluminous sources. By modelling the strong optical and ultraviolet modulations arising from X-ray heating of the B9Ia donor star, we constrain the black hole mass to be less than 15 solar masses. Our results demonstrate that in P13, soft thermal emission and spectral curvature are indeed signatures of supercritical accretion. By analogy, ultraluminous X-ray sources with similar X-ray spectra and luminosities of up to a few times 10(40) ergs per second can be explained by supercritical accretion onto massive stellar-mass black holes. PMID:25297432

  20. A mass of less than 15 solar masses for the black hole in an ultraluminous X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Motch, C; Pakull, M W; Soria, R; Grisé, F; Pietrzyński, G

    2014-10-01

    Most ultraluminous X-ray sources have a typical set of properties not seen in Galactic stellar-mass black holes. They have luminosities of more than 3 × 10(39) ergs per second, unusually soft X-ray components (with a typical temperature of less than about 0.3 kiloelectronvolts) and a characteristic downturn in their spectra above about 5 kiloelectronvolts. Such puzzling properties have been interpreted either as evidence of intermediate-mass black holes or as emission from stellar-mass black holes accreting above their Eddington limit, analogous to some Galactic black holes at peak luminosity. Recently, a very soft X-ray spectrum was observed in a rare and transient stellar-mass black hole. Here we report that the X-ray source P13 in the galaxy NGC 7793 is in a binary system with a period of about 64 days and exhibits all three canonical properties of ultraluminous sources. By modelling the strong optical and ultraviolet modulations arising from X-ray heating of the B9Ia donor star, we constrain the black hole mass to be less than 15 solar masses. Our results demonstrate that in P13, soft thermal emission and spectral curvature are indeed signatures of supercritical accretion. By analogy, ultraluminous X-ray sources with similar X-ray spectra and luminosities of up to a few times 10(40) ergs per second can be explained by supercritical accretion onto massive stellar-mass black holes.

  1. Numerical Modeling of the Sensitivity of X-Ray Driven Implosions to Low-Mode Flux Asymmetries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scott, R. H. H.; Clark, D. S.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Jones, O. S.; Spears, B. K.; Marinak, M. M.; Town, R. P. J.; et al

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion implosions of the type performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1] to low-mode flux asymmetries has been investigated numerically. It is shown that large-amplitude, low-order mode shapes (Legendre polynomial P4), resulting from associated low order flux asymmetries, cause spatial variations in capsule and fuel momentum that prevent the DT “ice” layer from being decelerated uniformly by the hot spot pressure. This reduces the transfer of kinetic to internal energy of the central hot spot, thus reducing neutron yield. Furthermore, synthetic gated x-ray images indicate that the P4 component of hotmore » spot self-emission shape is insensitive to P4 hot spot shapes, and a positive P4 asymmetry aliases itself as a negative or oblate P2 in these images. Correction of this apparent P2 distortion can further distort the implosion while creating a round x-ray image. Long wavelength asymmetries may be playing a significant role in the observed yield reduction of NIF DT implosions relative to detailed post-shot 2D simulations.« less

  2. Numerical Modeling of the Sensitivity of X-Ray Driven Implosions to Low-Mode Flux Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R. H. H.; Clark, D. S.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Jones, O. S.; Spears, B. K.; Marinak, M. M.; Town, R. P. J.; Norreys, P. A.; Suter, L. J.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion implosions of the type performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1] to low-mode flux asymmetries has been investigated numerically. It is shown that large-amplitude, low-order mode shapes (Legendre polynomial P4), resulting from associated low order flux asymmetries, cause spatial variations in capsule and fuel momentum that prevent the DT “ice” layer from being decelerated uniformly by the hot spot pressure. This reduces the transfer of kinetic to internal energy of the central hot spot, thus reducing neutron yield. Furthermore, synthetic gated x-ray images indicate that the P4 component of hot spot self-emission shape is insensitive to P4 hot spot shapes, and a positive P4 asymmetry aliases itself as a negative or oblate P2 in these images. Correction of this apparent P2 distortion can further distort the implosion while creating a round x-ray image. Long wavelength asymmetries may be playing a significant role in the observed yield reduction of NIF DT implosions relative to detailed post-shot 2D simulations.

  3. Cometary Solar Wind Charge Exchange Line Ratios: Source of X-rays in Comet C/2000 WM1 (linear)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Patrick Dean; Cumbee, Renata; Lyons, David; Gu, Liyi; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Shelton, Robin L.; Stancil, Phillip C.

    2016-06-01

    Cometary solar wind charge exchange (C-SWCX) occurs when highly charged projectile ions present in solar wind capture an electron from a target neutral species present in the cometary atmosphere. The availability of atomic and molecular data necessary for the X-ray emission modeling due to C-SWCX is limited; therefore, we apply multi-channel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) theory (Mullen et al. 2016) to generate cross section data and theoretical X-ray line ratios for a variety of bare and non-bare ion single electron capture (SEC) collisions. Namely, we consider collisions between the solar wind constituent H-like and He-like ions of C, N, O, Ne, Na, Al, and Si and the cometary neutrals H, H2O, CO, CO2, OH, and O. To exemplify the application of this data, we model the X-ray emission of comet C/2000 WM1 (linear) using the charge exchange package in SPEX (Gu et al. 2015) and find excellent agreement with observations made with the XMM-RGS detector. Our analyses show that the X-ray intensity is dominated by C-SWCX with H.Work at UGA was partially funded by NASA grant NNX13AF31G.References:Gu et al. 2016, A&A, accepted 22 January 2016Mullen et al. 2016, ApJS, in press

  4. Faint Coronal Hard X-rays From Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay Erin

    Solar flares are huge explosions on the Sun that release a tremendous amount of energy from the coronal magnetic field, up to 1033 ergs, in a short time (100--1000 seconds), with much of the energy going into accelerated electrons and ions. An efficient acceleration mechanism is needed, but the details of this mechanism remain relatively unknown. A fraction of this explosive energy reaches the Earth in the form of energetic particles, producing geomagnetic storms and posing dangers to spaceborne instruments, astronauts, and Earthbound power grids. There are thus practical reasons, as well as intellectual ones, for wishing to understand this extraordinary form of energy release. Through imaging spectroscopy of the hard X-ray (HXR) emission from solar flares, the behavior of flare-accelerated electrons can be studied. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI ) spacecraft launched in 2002 with the goal of better understanding flare particle acceleration. Using rotation modulation collimators, RHESSI is able to cover a wide energy range (3 keV--17 MeV) with fine angular and energy resolutions. RHESSI's success in the last 10 years in investigating the relationship between energetic electrons and ions, the nature of faint sources in the corona, the energy distribution of flares, and several other topics have significantly advanced the understanding of flares. But along with the wealth of information revealed by RHESSI come some clear observational challenges. Very few, if any, RHESSI observations have come close to imaging the electron acceleration region itself. This is undoubtedly due to a lack of both sensitivity (HXRs from electron beams in the tenuous corona are faint) and dynamic range (HXR sources at chromospheric flare footpoints are much brighter and tend to obscure faint coronal sources). Greater sensitivity is also required to investigate the role that small flares in the quiet Sun could play in heating the corona. The Focusing Optics

  5. Statistics of X-Ray Flares of Sagittarius A*: Evidence for Solar-like Self-organized Criticality Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-Ping; Yuan, Feng; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Q. Daniel; Chen, P. F.; Neilsen, Joseph; Fang, Taotao; Zhang, Shuo; Dexter, Jason

    2015-09-01

    X-ray flares have routinely been observed from the supermassive black hole at our Galactic center, Sagittarius A{}\\star (Sgr A⋆). The nature of these flares remains largely unclear, despite many theoretical models. In this paper, we study the statistical properties of the Sgr A⋆ X-ray flares by fitting the count rate (CR) distribution and the structure function of the light curve with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. With the 3-million-second Chandra observations accumulated in the Sgr A⋆ X-ray Visionary Project, we construct the theoretical light curves through Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the 2-8 keV X-ray light curve can be decomposed into a quiescent component with a constant CR of 6× {10}-3 count s-1 and a flare component with a power-law fluence distribution {dN}/{dE}\\propto {E}-{α {{E}}} with {α }{{E}}=1.65+/- 0.17. The duration-fluence correlation can also be modeled as a power law T\\propto {E}{α {ET}} with {α }{ET}\\lt 0.55 (95% confidence). These statistical properties are consistent with the theoretical prediction of the self-organized criticality system with the spatial dimension S = 3. We suggest that the X-ray flares represent plasmoid ejections driven by magnetic reconnection (similar to solar flares) in the accretion flow onto the black hole.

  6. NEW OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR 0.5–5 KEV SOFT X-RAY SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Warren, Harry P.

    2015-03-20

    The solar corona is orders of magnitude hotter than the underlying photosphere, but how the corona attains such high temperatures is still not understood. Soft X-ray (SXR) emission provides important diagnostics for thermal processes in the high-temperature corona, and is also an important driver of ionospheric dynamics at Earth. There is a crucial observational gap between ∼0.2 and ∼4 keV, outside the ranges of existing spectrometers. We present observations from a new SXR spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD, which measured the spatially integrated solar spectral irradiance from ∼0.5 to ∼5 keV, with ∼0.15 keV FWHM resolution, during sounding rocket flights on 2012 June 23 and 2013 October 21. These measurements show that the highly variable SXR emission is orders of magnitude greater than that during the deep minimum of 2009, even with only weak activity. The observed spectra show significant high-temperature (5–10 MK) emission and are well fit by simple power-law temperature distributions with indices of ∼6, close to the predictions of nanoflare models of coronal heating. Observations during the more active 2013 flight indicate an enrichment of low first-ionization potential elements of only ∼1.6, below the usually observed value of ∼4, suggesting that abundance variations may be related to coronal heating processes. The XUV Photometer System Level 4 data product, a spectral irradiance model derived from integrated broadband measurements, significantly overestimates the spectra from both flights, suggesting a need for revision of its non-flare reference spectra, with important implications for studies of Earth ionospheric dynamics driven by solar SXRs.

  7. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II) - III. Construction of the first flux-limited supercluster sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung; Böhringer, Hans; Nowak, Nina

    2013-03-01

    We present the first supercluster catalogue constructed with the extended ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray (REFLEX II) Galaxy Cluster survey data, which comprises 919 X-ray selected galaxy clusters with a flux limit of 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2. Based on this cluster catalogue we construct a supercluster catalogue using a friends-of-friends algorithm with a linking length depending on the (local) cluster density, which thus varies with redshift. The resulting catalogue comprises 164 superclusters at redshift z ≤ 0.4. The choice of the linking length in the friends-of-friends method modifies the properties of the superclusters. We study the properties of different catalogues such as the distributions of the redshift, extent and multiplicity by varying the choice of parameters. In addition to the supercluster catalogue for the entire REFLEX II sample, we compile a large volume-limited cluster sample from REFLEX II with the redshift and luminosity constraints of z ≤ 0.1 and LX ≥ 5 × 1043 erg s-1. With this catalogue we construct a volume-limited sample of superclusters. This sample is built with a homogeneous linking length, and hence selects effectively the same type of superclusters. By increasing the luminosity cut we can build a hierarchical tree structure of the volume-limited samples, where systems at the top of the tree are only formed via the most luminous clusters. This allows us to test if the same superclusters are found when only the most luminous clusters are visible, comparable to the situation at higher redshift in the REFLEX II sample. We find that the selection of superclusters is very robust, independent of the luminosity cut, and the contamination of spurious superclusters among cluster pairs is expected to be small. Numerical simulations and observations of the substructure of clusters suggest that regions of high cluster number density provide an astrophysically different environment for galaxy clusters, where the mass function and X-ray

  8. A soft x-ray coronal mass ejection occurred on solar limb on 1998 April 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X. J.

    2001-11-01

    Using some data observed with SXT/HXT aboard Yohkoh and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) on 1998 April 23, a comprehensive study on the soft X-ray coronal mass ejection (CME) on solar SE limb shows there were two magnetic dipole sources (MDSs), one magnetic capacity belt (MCB) between MDSs, one neutral current sheet (NCS) and only a few activation sources (ASs). During the MCB was changed by the ASs into a magnetic energy belt (MEB), the material and energy both concentrated to the NCS in the course of its formation. When the MDSs were put through by the MEB, the NCS formed and the CME occurred. The matter ejected not only from the NCS, but also from the whole MEB. The expanding loop of the CME had two footprints, they were just the MDSs. The head of the expanding loop always tended to the foot point of weak source. The locus of the head was just neutral line. From this, the position of NCS also could be determined.

  9. On the variation of solar flare coronal X-ray source sizes with energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2014-05-20

    Observations with RHESSI have enabled the detailed study of the structure of dense hard X-ray coronal sources in solar flares. The variation of source extent with electron energy has been discussed in the context of streaming of non-thermal particles in a one-dimensional cold target model and the results used to constrain both the physical extent of, and density within, the electron acceleration region. Here, we extend this investigation to a more physically realistic model of electron transport that takes into account the finite temperature of the ambient plasma, the initial pitch angle distribution of the accelerated electrons, and the effects of collisional pitch angle scattering. The finite temperature results in the thermal diffusion of electrons, which leads to the observationally inferred value of the acceleration region volume being an overestimate of its true value. The different directions of the electron trajectories, a consequence of both the non-zero injection pitch angle and scattering within the target, cause the projected propagation distance parallel to the guiding magnetic field to be reduced, so that a one-dimensional interpretation can overestimate the actual density by a factor of up to ∼6. The implications of these results for the determination of acceleration region properties (specific acceleration rate, filling factor, etc.) are discussed.

  10. A New High-sensitivity solar X-ray Spectrophotometer SphinX:early operations and databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gburek, Szymon; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Siarkowski, Marek; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Podgorski, Piotr; Trzebinski, Witold; Plocieniak, Stefan; Kordylewski, Zbigniew; Kuzin, Sergey; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio

    The Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) is an instrument operating aboard Russian CORONAS-Photon satellite. A short description of this unique instrument will be presented and its unique capabilities discussed. SphinX is presently the most sensitive solar X-ray spectrophotometer measuring solar spectra in the energy range above 1 keV. A large archive of SphinX mea-surements has already been collected. General access to these measurements is possible. The SphinX data repositories contain lightcurves, spectra, and photon arrival time measurements. The SphinX data cover nearly continuously the period since the satellite launch on January 30, 2009 up to the end-of November 2009. Present instrument status, data formats and data access methods will be shown. An overview of possible new science coming from SphinX data analysis will be discussed.

  11. The low-high-low trend of type III radio burst starting frequencies and solar flare hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Hamish A. S.; Vilmer, Nicole; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: Using simultaneous X-ray and radio observations from solar flares, we investigate the link between the type III radio burst starting frequency and hard X-ray spectral index. For a proportion of events the relation derived between the starting height (frequency) of type III radio bursts and the electron beam velocity spectral index (deduced from X-rays) is used to infer the spatial properties (height and size) of the electron beam acceleration region. Both quantities can be related to the distance travelled before an electron beam becomes unstable to Langmuir waves. Methods: To obtain a list of suitable events we considered the RHESSI catalogue of X-ray flares and the Phoenix 2 catalogue of type III radio bursts. From the 200 events that showed both type III and X-ray signatures, we selected 30 events which had simultaneous emission in both wavelengths, good signal to noise in the X-ray domain and >20 s duration. Results: We find that >50% of the selected events show a good correlation between the starting frequencies of the groups of type III bursts and the hard X-ray spectral indices. A low-high-low trend for the starting frequency of type III bursts is frequently observed. Assuming a background electron density model and the thick target approximation for X-ray observations, this leads to a correlation between starting heights of the type III emission and the beam electron spectral index. Using this correlation we infer the altitude and vertical extents of the flare acceleration regions. We find heights from 183 Mm down to 25 Mm while the sizes range from 13 Mm to 2 Mm. These values agree with previous work that places an extended flare acceleration region high in the corona. We also analyse the assumptions that are required to obtain our estimates and explore possible extensions to our assumed model. We discuss these results with respect to the acceleration heights and sizes derived from X-ray observations alone. Appendices are available in electronic form

  12. SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer): X-ray imaging of the Sun-Earth connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Wang, C.; Smile Team

    2016-06-01

    SMILE is a novel space mission, under development, dedicated to study the dynamic coupling of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere in a global way never attempted before. From a highly elliptical Earth orbit SMILE will obtain X-ray images of the magnetosheath and polar cusps simultaneously with UV images of the Northern aurora, while making in situ solar wind/magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements. X-ray imaging of the dayside magnetosheath and cusps is now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission, first observed at comets, and subsequently found to occur in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. SMILE will turn this unwanted background for astronomical observations into a diagnostic tool for the study of solar-terrestrial interactions, enabling us to trace and link the processes of solar wind injection in the magnetosphere with particle precipitation into the cusps and the aurora. SMILE is the first fully collaborative space mission from inception to implementation and operations between ESA and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. This talk will present the science and impact that SMILE will deliver, together with an overview of its payload and of the mission's development.

  13. SOLAR HARD X-RAY SOURCE SIZES IN A BEAM-HEATED AND IONIZED CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Flannagain, Aidan M.; Gallagher, Peter T.; Brown, John C.

    2015-02-01

    Solar flare hard X-rays (HXRs) are produced as bremsstrahlung when an accelerated population of electrons interacts with the dense chromospheric plasma. HXR observations presented by Kontar et al. using the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager have shown that HXR source sizes are three to six times more extended in height than those predicted by the standard collisional thick target model (CTTM). Several possible explanations have been put forward including the multi-threaded nature of flare loops, pitch-angle scattering, and magnetic mirroring. However, the nonuniform ionization (NUI) structure along the path of the electron beam has not been fully explored as a solution to this problem. Ionized plasma is known to be less effective at producing nonthermal bremsstrahlung HXRs when compared to neutral plasma. If the peak HXR emission was produced in a locally ionized region within the chromosphere, the intensity of emission will be preferentially reduced around this peak, resulting in a more extended source. Due to this effect, along with the associated density enhancement in the upper chromosphere, injection of a beam of electrons into a partially ionized plasma should result in an HXR source that is substantially more vertically extended relative to that for a neutral target. Here we present the results of a modification to the CTTM, which takes into account both a localized form of chromospheric NUI and an increased target density. We find 50 keV HXR source widths, with and without the inclusion of a locally ionized region, of ∼3 Mm and ∼0.7 Mm, respectively. This helps to provide a theoretical solution to the currently open question of overly extended HXR sources.

  14. Soft X-Ray (1-7 nm) Solar Spectrometer based on novel Nanowriter Electron-Beam Nanofabrication Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, L. V.; Wieman, S. R.; Chao, W.

    2015-12-01

    A new soft X-ray (SXR) spectrometer combines proven detector technology demonstrated on the SOHO Solar EUV Monitor (SOHO/SEM) and SDO EUV SpectroPhotometer (SDO/EVE/ESP) instruments with novel technology for X-ray optics nanofabrication developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The new spectrometer will provide solar SXR measurements of absolute irradiance in the 1.0 to 7.0 nm range spectrally resolved into bands narrower than 1 nm - measurements that are not available from existing solar-observing instruments but are important for studying and modeling coronal dynamics and the Sun-Earth's connection, e.g. the Earth's Ionosphere. For the proposed SXR spectrometer we will introduce a transmission grating based on novel Nanowriter Electron-Beam Nanofabrication technology developed at the Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The CXRO technology has been used in the fabrication of X-ray zone plates with feature sizes as small as 25 nm in optical elements with overall sizes on the order of 1 cm. The CXRO technology has significant flexibility in terms of pattern geometry, and is thus capable of producing linear transmission gratings with aperture sizes similar to SEM and ESP but with four times the dispersion. With such dispersion, reasonable spectral resolution (< 1nm) can be obtained using commercial off-the shelf (COTS) X-ray sensitive AXUV type silicon photodiodes from the Optodiode Corp. in an instrument with overall size and mass similar to that of SEM or ESP.

  15. Reduction in the intensity of solar X-ray emission in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range and heating of the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoeva, I. K.

    2013-04-15

    The time profiles of the energy spectra of low-intensity flares and the structure of the thermal background of the soft X-ray component of solar corona emission over the period of January-February, 2003, are investigated using the data of the RHESSI project. A reduction in the intensity of X-ray emission of the solar flares and the corona thermal background in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range is revealed. The RHESSI data are compared with the data from the Interball-Geotail project. A new mechanism of solar corona heating is proposed on the basis of the results obtained.

  16. Impulsive and gradual hard X-ray sources in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilmer, N.; Trotter, G.; Kane, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The paper reports recent observations of a relatively large hard X-ray burst with well developed impulsive and gradual components, that was associated with a relatively modest optical flare on Aug. 14, 1979. The impulsive X-ray source has a much higher ion density and the electron injection in the phase is shorter in duration consisting of fewer energetic electrons than in the gradual phase. The gradual X-ray source seems to consist of a lower density region, probably bounded by a magnetic arch in which the energetic electrons are perfectly trapped. The different temporal development of the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray components suggest large differences in the physical parameters of the ambient plasma.

  17. New Instruments for Spectrally-Resolved Solar Soft X-ray Observations from CubeSats, and Larger Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Shih, A.; Warren, H. P.; DeForest, C. E.; Woods, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar soft X-ray (SXR) observations provide important diagnostics of plasma heating, during solar flares and quiescent times. Spectrally- and temporally-resolved measurements are crucial for understanding the dynamics and evolution of these energetic processes; spatially-resolved measurements are critical for understanding energy transport. A better understanding of the thermal plasma informs our interpretation of hard X-ray (HXR) observations of nonthermal particles, improving our understanding of the relationships between particle acceleration, plasma heating, and the underlying release of magnetic energy during reconnection. We introduce a new proposed mission, the CubeSat Imaging X-ray Solar Spectrometer (CubIXSS), to measure spectrally- and spatially-resolved SXRs from the quiescent and flaring Sun from a 6U CubeSat platform in low-Earth orbit during a nominal 1-year mission. CubIXSS includes the Amptek X123-SDD silicon drift detector, a low-noise, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) instrument enabling solar SXR spectroscopy from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM spectral resolution with low power, mass, and volume requirements. An X123-CdTe cadmium-telluride detector is also included for ~5-100 keV HXR spectroscopy with ~0.5-1 keV FWHM resolution. CubIXSS also includes a novel spectro-spatial imager -- the first ever solar imager on a CubeSat -- utilizing a pinhole aperture and X-ray transmission diffraction grating to provide full-Sun imaging from ~0.1 to ~10 keV, with ~25 arcsec and ~0.1 Å FWHM spatial and spectral resolutions, respectively. We discuss scaled versions of these instruments, with greater sensitivity and dynamic range, and significantly improved spectral and spatial resolutions for the imager, for deployment on larger platforms such as Small Explorer missions.

  18. Normal incidence X-ray telescope power spectra of X-ray emission from solar active regions. I - Observations. II - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Daniel O.; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Golub, Leon

    1993-01-01

    Fourier analysis is applied to very high resolution image of coronal active regions obtained by the Normal Incidence X-Ray Telescope is used to find a broad isotropic power-law spectrum of the spatial distribution of soft X-ray intensities. Magnetic structures of all sizes are present down to the resolution limit of the instrument. Power spectra for the X-ray intensities of a sample of topologically different active regions are found which fall off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. A model is presented that relates the basic features of coronal magnetic fluctuations to the subphotospheric hydrodynamic turbulence that generates them. The model is used to find a theoretical power spectrum for the X-ray intensity which falls off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. The implications of a turbulent regime in active regions are discussed.

  19. The first measurements of soft x-ray flux from ignition scale Hohlraums at the national ignition facility using DANTE

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L; Glenzer, S H; Olson, Rick; Suter, Larry J; Widmann, K; Callahan, D A; Dixit, S N; Thomas, C A; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Moore, A; Celeste, J; Dewald, E; Hsing, W W; Warrick, A; Atherton, J; Azevedo, S; Beeler, R; Berger, R; Conder, A; Divol, L; Haynam, C A; Kalantar, D H; Kauffman, R; Kilkenny, J; Liebman, J; Larson, D; Meezan, N B; Michel, P; Moody, J; Rosen, M D; Schneider, M B; Van Wontergheman, B; Wallace, R J; Young, B K; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Berzins, L; Tran, Vu; Torres, P., III

    2010-01-01

    The first 96 and 192 beam vacuum hohlraum have been fielded at the National Ignition Facility demonstrating radiation temperatures up to 340 eV and fluxes of 20 TW/sr representing a 20 times flux increase over NOVA/Omega scale hohlraums. The vacuum hohlraums were irradiated with 2 ns square pulses with energies between 150 - 635 kJ. They produced nearly Planckian spectra with about 30 {+-} 10% more flux than predicted by the current radiation hydrodynamic simulations after careful verification of all component calibrations (which included an {approx} 10% downward correction to Center X-Ray Optics opacities just below the Cu L edge at 50-750 eV), cable deconvolution, and analysis software routines. To corroborate these results, first a half hohlraum experiment was conducted using a single 2 ns-long axial quad with an irradiance of {approx} 1-2 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} for comparison with NIF Early Light experiments completed in 2004. Second, we completed a conversion efficiency test using a 128-beam nearly uniformly illuminated gold sphere with intensities kept low (at 1 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} over 5 ns) to avoid sensitivity to modeling uncertainties for non-local heat conduction and non-linear absorption mechanisms, to compare with similar intensity, 3 ns OMEGA sphere results. The 2004 and 2009 NIF half-hohlraums agreed to 10% in flux, but more importantly, the 2006 OMEGA Au Sphere, the 2009 NIF Au sphere and the calculated Au conversion efficiency agree to {+-}5% in flux, which is estimated to be the absolute calibration accuracy of the DANTEs. Hence we concluded the 30 {+-} 10% higher than expected radiation fluxes from the 96 and 192 beam vacuum hohlraums are attributable to differences in physics when we transitioned to large hot hohlraums. Specifically, using variants in the atomic physics models and electron heat conduction, newer simulations show that nonlocalization of energy deposition leads to less energy being stored in the coronal plasma leading to

  20. Future mission studies: Preliminary comparisons of solar flux models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The results of comparisons of the solar flux models are presented. (The wavelength lambda = 10.7 cm radio flux is the best indicator of the strength of the ionizing radiations such as solar ultraviolet and x-ray emissions that directly affect the atmospheric density thereby changing the orbit lifetime of satellites. Thus, accurate forecasting of solar flux F sub 10.7 is crucial for orbit determination of spacecrafts.) The measured solar flux recorded by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is compared against the forecasts made by Schatten, MSFC, and NOAA itself. The possibility of a combined linear, unbiased minimum-variance estimation that properly combines all three models into one that minimizes the variance is also discussed. All the physics inherent in each model are combined. This is considered to be the dead-end statistical approach to solar flux forecasting before any nonlinear chaotic approach.

  1. Solar-Like M-Class X-ray Flares on Proxima Centauri Observed by the ASCA Satellite.

    PubMed

    Haisch, B; Antunes, A; Schmitt, J H

    1995-06-01

    Because of instrumental sensitivity limits and stellar distances, the types of x-ray flares observable on stars have been intrinsically much more energetic than those on the sun. Such enormous events are a useful extrapolation of the solar phenomenon if the underlying assumption is correct that they form a continuous sequence involving similar physical processes as on the sun. The Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), with its greater sensitivity and high-energy response, is now able to test this hypothesis. Direct comparison with solar flares measured by the x-ray-monitoring Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) is possible. The detection of flares on Proxima Centauri that correspond to GOES M-class events on the sun are reported.

  2. X-ray polarimetry: the measurement of the polarization of solar flare x-rays and the design of a Compton polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Tramiel, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A Compton polarimeter was designed for use in x-ray astrophysics. This device utilizes the anisotropic Compton scattering of polarized x-rays to determine their polarization. This instrument incorporates an intrinisic coincidence rejection scheme to reduce the non x-ray background. The Compton polarimeter is sensitive to x-rays from 30 to 100 keV. Another class of x-ray polarimeter, the photoelectric polarimeter with an energy range 5 to 100 keV, is discussed. This class of devices detects the anisotropic distribution of photoelectrons ejected by polarized x-rays. Previous work on this class of device, which indicated some promise of a useful instrument, is reviewed. An analysis of electron scattering, a complicating effect for these devices, is presented. This analysis indicates a severe limitation on the utility of photoelectric polarimeters. This theoretical work is reconciled with the previous experiments. One implementation, using an imaging proportional counter, was tested in the laboratory. No polarization effects were seen.

  3. ELECTRON ENERGY PARTITION IN THE ABOVE-THE-LOOPTOP SOLAR HARD X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Mitsuo; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    Solar flares produce non-thermal electrons with energies up to tens of MeVs. To understand the origin of energetic electrons, coronal hard X-ray (HXR) sources, in particular above-the-looptop sources, have been studied extensively. However, it still remains unclear how energies are partitioned between thermal and non-thermal electrons within the above-the-looptop source. Here we show that the kappa distribution, when compared to conventional spectral models, can better characterize the above-the-looptop HXRs (≳15 keV) observed in four different cases. The widely used conventional model (i.e., the combined thermal plus power-law distribution) can also fit the data, but it returns unreasonable parameter values due to a non-physical sharp lower-energy cutoff E{sub c}. In two cases, extreme-ultraviolet data were available from SDO/AIA and the kappa distribution was still consistent with the analysis of differential emission measure. Based on the kappa distribution model, we found that the 2012 July 19 flare showed the largest non-thermal fraction of electron energies about 50%, suggesting equipartition of energies. Considering the results of particle-in-cell simulations, as well as density estimates of the four cases studied, we propose a scenario in which electron acceleration is achieved primarily by collisionless magnetic reconnection, but the electron energy partition in the above-the-looptop source depends on the source density. In low-density above-the-looptop regions (few times 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}), the enhanced non-thermal tail can remain and a prominent HXR source is created, whereas in higher-densities (>10{sup 10} cm{sup –3}), the non-thermal tail is suppressed or thermalized by Coulomb collisions.

  4. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  5. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  6. Searching for hard X-ray directivity during the rise, peak, and decay phases of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Peng

    1994-01-01

    We have identified 72 large solar flares (peak counting rates more than 1000 counts/s) observed by Hard X-ray Burst Spectroscopy (HXRBS) on-board the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). Using a database of these flares, we have studied hard X-ray (50-850 keV) spectral center-to-limb variation and its evolution with time. The major results are the following: (1) During the rise phase, the center-to-limb spectral variation is small, with a hardness of delta delta = 0.02 +/- 0.25, and a statistical significance of 0.1 sigma. (2) During the peak phase, the center-to-limb variation is delta delta = 0.13 +/- 0.13, with a statistical significance of 1 sigma. (3) During the decay phase, the center-to-limb variation changes to softening. The softness is relatively large with delta delta = -0.25 +/- 0.21, and a statistical significance of 1.2 sigma. (4) The linear least-squares fits to the spectral center-to-limb variations do not have slopes significantly different from zero during all those three phases. (5) The center events and limb events spectral distributions are shown to be not different by using Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-samples test. (6) The fraction of events detected near the limb is marginally consistent with that expected from isotropically emitting flares. (7) On average, flares evolve as soft-hard-soft. These results suggest that there is no statistically significant evidence for hard X-ray directivity during the rise, peak, and decay phases of solar flares. The hard X-ray radiation pattern at those energies is almost isotropic during all those phases. This lack of directivity (or anisotropy) found in this study is not in agreement with the results discovered by Vestrand et al. (1987) in which they found energetic photon source is anisotropic, using SMM Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data at a much higher energy band of 0.3-1 MeV. If we want to interpret the results of Vestrand et al. (1987) and our present results in a self-consistent way, we must conclude that at

  7. The high accuracy model of the 19 July 2012 solar flare: kinetic description, calculations of X-Ray and microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The limb white-light solar flare M7.7 class was observed at the 19 July 2012 at 05:58UT by RHESSI, GOES and SDO with high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution. These new data make possible to test modern models of solar flares. The flare, which considered here, locates in the picture plane, so we well see two different hard X-ray sources: footpoint and above-the-loop-top. The loop was observed in whit-light and microwave wavelengths. The key part of the presented work is high accuracy kinetic model, which describe behavior of electrons in the target - solar flare loop. We interpret the footpoint source in approximation of the thick target model with reverse current and above-the-loop-top source - in the thin target approximation. The microwave spectrum in the range from 1 to 50 GHz was calculated. Our results fit well the observational data, particularly so important parameter as hard X-Ray spectral index. But intensity of emission of the coronal source was estimated incorrect, it was low than observed. This problem can be solved by taking into account effects of particles acceleration in the collapsing magnetic trap, when fast electrons receive additional energy without changing the index of their energy spectrum. In the result we have flux ~ 5 1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for electrons with energies more then 15 keV, that ~ 5 times larger then in the case classical thick target model. Accordingly , so high flux of electrons to the Chromosphere provides effective heating of the cold plasma in the target, but the reverse current electric field restrict depth of the electron penetration. Received in this work estimates may be used for interpretation of the solar flare optical source formation and evolution.

  8. Set of instruments for solar EUV and soft X-ray monitoring onboard satellite Coronas-Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yury; Kochemasov, Alexey; Kuzin, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Sylwester, Janusz; Yurov, Vitaly

    Coronas-Photon mission is the third satellite of the Russian Coronas program on solar activity observation. The main goal of the "Coronas-Photon" is the study of solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the wide energy range from UV up to high energy gamma-radiation (2000MeV). Scientific payload for solar radiation observation consists of three types of instruments: Monitors (Natalya-2M, Konus-RF, RT-2, Penguin-M, BRM, PHOKA, Sphin-X, SOKOL spectral and timing measurements of full solar disk radiation have timing in flare/burst mode up to one msec. Instruments Natalya-2M, Konus-RF, RT-2 will cover the wide energy range of hard X-rays and soft gamma-rays (15keV to 2000MeV) and will together constitute the largest area detectors ever used for solar observations. Detectors of gamma-ray monitors are based on structured inorganic scintillators. For X-ray and EUV monitors the scintillation phoswich detectors, gas proportional counter, CdZnTe assembly and filter-covered Si-diodes are used. Telescope-spectrometer TESIS for imaging solar spectroscopy in X-rays has angular resolution up to 1arcsec in three spectral lines. Satellite platform and scientific payload is under construction to be launched in autumn 2008. Satellite orbit is circular with initial height 550km and inclination 82.5degrees. Accuracy of the spacecraft orientation to the Sun is better 3arcmin. In the report the capability of PHOKA, SphinX, SOKOL and TESIS as well as the observation program are described and discussed.

  9. Energy of microwave-emitting electrons and hard x-ray/microwave source model in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, N.; Kosugi, T.

    1986-01-01

    Based on the rate of increse of the microwave flux relative to the hard X-ray flux at various energies from the onset to the peak of a flare, the mean energy of microwave-emitting electrons is estimated for 22 flares observed simultaneously in hard X-rays and microwaves. The energy of electrons varying in proportion to the 17 GHz emission is found to concentrate below 100 keV, and the mean energy or eletrons emitting 70 keV x-rays is less than about 130 keV for thin-target and less than about 180 keV for thick-target emission models, suggesting that the 17 GHz emission derives from electrons with energy of less than a few hundred keV. The magnetic field strength in the microwave source is found to be 500-1000 G for the thick-target and 1000-2000 G for the thin-target case, and 16 of the 22 events examined can be successfully explained by the thick-target model. Of the six events which cannot be explained by the thick-target model, two events give L of less than about 300 km.

  10. Analysis of X-ray and EUV spectra of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, K. T.; Acton, L. W.

    1979-01-01

    Data acquired by two flights of an array of six Bragg crystal spectrometers on an Aerobee rocket to obtain high spatial and spectral resolution observations of various coronal features at soft X-ray wavelengths (9-23A) were analyzed. The various aspects of the analysis of the X-ray data are described. These observations were coordinated with observations from the experiments on the Apollo Telescope Mount and the various data sets were related to one another. The Appendices contain the published results, abstracts of papers, computer code descriptions and preprints of papers, all produced as a result of this research project.

  11. Tracing the magnetic connectivity between the solar surface, corona and inner heliosphere using combined X-ray and radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, Nicole; Maksimovic, Milan; Rackovic, Kristina

    On a few examples of flares observed with RHESSI at X-ray wavelengths and with the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) and WIND/WAVES at radio wavelengths, we shall illustrate how these combined observations allow to understand the link between energetic electrons interacting in the flare site and the escaping electrons which produce radio emissions at low frequencies in the high corona and in the interplanetary medium. While in some events, a close correspondence is observed between the timing and the fast variations of the HXR emissions and the radio emissions from electron beams in the high corona observed by Wind/Waves in the 1 to 14 MHz range suggesting a common acceleration/injection site for HXR and radio emitting electrons, in other cases there is a delay of the radio emissions in the high corona with respect to the onset of the HXR emission. We shall discuss in this contribution the input for a few events of the spatially resolved radio observations of the metric/decimetric emissions provided by the Nançay Radioheliograph to better understand the link between the X-ray emissions at the solar c surface and the radio bursts in the high corona. We shall also discuss the percentage of cases for which a close correspondance is observed. We shall also illustrate how these results may help the preparation of the observing modes of X-ray and radio bursts with STIX and RPW on Solar Orbiter.

  12. The soft X-ray background as a supernova blast wave viewed from inside: Solar abundance models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the soft X-ray background is presented in which the Sun is assumed to be inside an active supernova blast wave. The blast wave evolves in a preexisting cavity. The broad band surface brightnesses is explained by such a blast wave with an explosion energy of E sub approx. 5 x 10 to the 50th power ergs and radius 80 to 100 pc, using solar abundances. An approach to treating the problem of large anisotropies in the ambient medium is also explored, accommodating the observed anticorrelation between the soft X-ray surface brightness and the 21 cm column density. It is found that only for post shock temperatures below 10 6 K a shock propagating into a density enhancement will be dimmer than a similar shock in a lower density region.

  13. The soft X-ray background as a supernova blast wave viewed from inside - Solar abundance models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    A model of the soft X-ray background is presented in which the sun is assumed to be inside an active supernova blast wave. The blast wave evolves in a preexisting cavity. The broad band surface brightnesses is explained by such a blast wave with an explosion energy of E sub approximately 5 x 10 to the 50th power ergs and radius 80 to 100 pc, using solar abundances. An approach to treating the problem of large anisotropies in the ambient medium is also explored, accommodating the observed anticorrelation between the soft X-ray surface brightness and the 21 cm column density. It is found that only for post shock temperatures below 10 to the 6 power K a shock propagating into a density enhancement will be dimmer than a similar shock in a lower density region.

  14. Theoretical motivation for high spatial resolution, hard X-ray observations during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    The important role played by hard X-ray radiation as a diagnostic of impulsive phase energy transport mechanism is reviewed. It is argued that the sub-arc second resolution offered by an instrument such as the Pinhole/Occulter Facility (P/OF) can greatly increase our understanding of such mechanisms.

  15. A normal incidence, high resolution X-ray telescope for solar coronal observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1984-01-01

    A Normal Incidence high resolution X-ray Telescope is reported. The design of a telescope assembly which, after fabrication, will be integrated with the mirror fabrication process is described. The assembly is engineered to fit into the Black Brant rocket skin to survive sounding rocket launch conditions. A flight ready camera is modified and tested.

  16. Science Fair Report: Detection of Solar X-Ray Flares with a Geiger Counter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Vicki Rae

    1991-01-01

    Described is a science fair project in which M- and X-class x-ray flares on the surface of the earth were detected using a Geiger counter. Background information, the problem, hypothesis, a list of needed materials, the procedure, observations, conclusions, and a critique are included. (KR)

  17. X-ray emitting hot plasma in solar active regions observed by the SphinX spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, M.; Reale, F.; Gburek, S.; Terzo, S.; Barbera, M.; Collura, A.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Podgorski, P.; Gryciuk, M.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: The detection of very hot plasma in the quiescent corona is important for diagnosing heating mechanisms. The presence and the amount of such hot plasma is currently debated. The SphinX instrument on-board the CORONAS-PHOTON mission is sensitive to X-ray emission of energies well above 1 keV and provides the opportunity to detect the hot plasma component. Methods: We analysed the X-ray spectra of the solar corona collected by the SphinX spectrometer in May 2009 (when two active regions were present). We modelled the spectrum extracted from the whole Sun over a time window of 17 days in the 1.34-7 keV energy band by adopting the latest release of the APED database. Results: The SphinX broadband spectrum cannot be modelled by a single isothermal component of optically thin plasma and two components are necessary. In particular, the high statistical significance of the count rates and the accurate calibration of the spectrometer allowed us to detect a very hot component at ~7 million K with an emission measure of ~2.7 × 1044 cm-3. The X-ray emission from the hot plasma dominates the solar X-ray spectrum above 4 keV. We checked that this hot component is invariably present in both the high and low emission regimes, i.e. even excluding resolvable microflares. We also present and discuss the possibility of a non-thermal origin (which would be compatible with a weak contribution from thick-target bremsstrahlung) for this hard emission component. Conclusions: Our results support the nanoflare scenario and might confirm that a minor flaring activity is ever-present in the quiescent corona, as also inferred for the coronae of other stars.

  18. Estimating the Properties of Hard X-Ray Solar Flares by Constraining Model Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ireland, J.; Tolbert, A. K.; Schwartz, R. A.; Holman, G. D.; Dennis, B. R.

    2013-01-01

    We wish to better constrain the properties of solar flares by exploring how parameterized models of solar flares interact with uncertainty estimation methods. We compare four different methods of calculating uncertainty estimates in fitting parameterized models to Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager X-ray spectra, considering only statistical sources of error. Three of the four methods are based on estimating the scale-size of the minimum in a hypersurface formed by the weighted sum of the squares of the differences between the model fit and the data as a function of the fit parameters, and are implemented as commonly practiced. The fourth method is also based on the difference between the data and the model, but instead uses Bayesian data analysis and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to calculate an uncertainty estimate. Two flare spectra are modeled: one from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite X1.3 class flare of 2005 January 19, and the other from the X4.8 flare of 2002 July 23.We find that the four methods give approximately the same uncertainty estimates for the 2005 January 19 spectral fit parameters, but lead to very different uncertainty estimates for the 2002 July 23 spectral fit. This is because each method implements different analyses of the hypersurface, yielding method-dependent results that can differ greatly depending on the shape of the hypersurface. The hypersurface arising from the 2005 January 19 analysis is consistent with a normal distribution; therefore, the assumptions behind the three non- Bayesian uncertainty estimation methods are satisfied and similar estimates are found. The 2002 July 23 analysis shows that the hypersurface is not consistent with a normal distribution, indicating that the assumptions behind the three non-Bayesian uncertainty estimation methods are not satisfied, leading to differing estimates of the uncertainty. We find that the shape of the hypersurface is crucial in understanding

  19. Fabricating sub-collimating grids for an x-ray solar imaging spectrometer using LIGA techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Brennen, R.A.; Hecht, M.H.; Wiberg, D.V.

    1997-04-01

    The HESSI mission proposes to perform high resolution imaging and spectroscopy observations in the soft X-ray, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray regimes, with finer angular resolution (nearly 2 arcseconds) and finer energy resolution (approximately 1 keV) than has been previously possible. This combination of imaging and spectroscopy is achieved with a set of Rotating Modulation Collimators placed in front of an array of cooled germanium and silicon detectors. A set of 12 bi-grid collimators, each of which consists of a pair of identically pitched, widely-separated grids, is used to provide the imaging. Each grid consists of a planar array of equally-spaced, parallel, X-ray opaque slats separated by X-ray transparent slits. If the slits of each grid are parallel to each other and the pitch is identical for the two grids, then the transmission through the grid pair depends on the direction of incidence of the incoming X-rays. For slits and slats of equal width, the transmission varies between zero and 50% depending on whether the shadows of the slats in the top grid fall on the slits or slats of the lower grid. A complete transmission cycle from zero to 50% and back to zero corresponds to a change in source direction that is given by p/L, where L is the separation between the grids. The authors describe a deep etch lithography technique developed to fabricate the grids which have pitches below 100 {micro}m. They use a free standing sheet of PMMA as a base for the process, and use the ALS facility to perform the exposures of the PMMA.

  20. MASS AND ENERGY OF ERUPTING SOLAR PLASMA OBSERVED WITH THE X-RAY TELESCOPE ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kim, Kap-Sung; Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2015-01-10

    We investigate seven eruptive plasma observations by Hinode/XRT. Their corresponding EUV and/or white light coronal mass ejection features are visible in some events. Five events are observed in several passbands in X-rays, which allows for the determination of the eruptive plasma temperature using a filter ratio method. We find that the isothermal temperatures vary from 1.6 to 10 MK. These temperatures are an average weighted toward higher temperature plasma. We determine the mass constraints of eruptive plasmas by assuming simplified geometrical structures of the plasma with isothermal plasma temperatures. This method provides an upper limit to the masses of the observed eruptive plasmas in X-ray passbands since any clumping causes the overestimation of the mass. For the other two events, we assume the temperatures are at the maximum temperature of the X-ray Telescope (XRT) temperature response function, which gives a lower limit of the masses. We find that the masses in XRT, ∼3 × 10{sup 13}-5 × 10{sup 14} g, are smaller in their upper limit than the total masses obtained by LASCO, ∼1 × 10{sup 15} g. In addition, we estimate the radiative loss, thermal conduction, thermal, and kinetic energies of the eruptive plasma in X-rays. For four events, we find that the thermal conduction timescales are much shorter than the duration of eruption. This result implies that additional heating during the eruption may be required to explain the plasma observations in X-rays for the four events.

  1. Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams

    DOEpatents

    Shu, Deming; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    1995-01-01

    A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

  2. The X-Ray Properties of Million Solar Mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Richard. M.; Gallo, Elena; Haardt, Francesco; Miller, Brendan P.; Wood, Callum J. L.; Reines, Amy E.; Wu, Jianfeng; Greene, Jenny E.

    2016-07-01

    We present new Chandra X-ray observations of seven low-mass black holes ({M}{{BH}}≈ {10}6 {M}⊙ ) accreting at low-bolometric Eddington ratios between -2.0≲ {log}{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}}≲ -1.5. We compare the X-ray properties of these seven low-mass active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to a total of 73 other low-mass AGNs in the literature with published Chandra observations (with Eddington ratios extending from -2.0≲ {log}{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}}≲ -0.1). We do not find any statistical differences between the low and high Eddington ratio low-mass AGNs in the distributions of their X-ray to ultraviolet luminosity ratios ({α }{{ox}}), or in their X-ray spectral shapes. Furthermore, the {α }{{ox}} distribution of low-{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}} AGNs displays an X-ray weak tail that is also observed within high-{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}} objects. Our results indicate that between -2≲ {log}{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}}≲ -0.1, there is no systematic change in the structure of the accretion flow for active galaxies hosting {10}6 {M}⊙ black holes. We examine the accuracy of current bolometric luminosity estimates for our low-{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}} objects with new Chandra observations, and it is plausible that their Eddington ratios could be underestimated by up to an order of magnitude. If so, then in analogy with weak emission line quasars, we suggest that accretion from a geometrically thick, radiatively inefficient “slim disk” could explain their diverse properties in {α }{{ox}}. Alternatively, if current Eddington ratios are correct (or overestimated), then the X-ray weak tail would imply that there is diversity in disk/corona couplings among individual low-mass objects. Finally, we conclude by noting that the {α }{{ox}} distribution for low-mass black holes may have favorable consequences for the epoch of cosmic reionization being driven by AGN.

  3. POST-OUTBURST X-RAY FLUX AND TIMING EVOLUTION OF SWIFT J1822.3-1606

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, P.; Ng, C.-Y.; Livingstone, M. A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Cumming, A.; Archibald, R. F.

    2012-12-10

    Swift J1822.3-1606 was discovered on 2011 July 14 by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope following the detection of several bursts. The source was found to have a period of 8.4377 s and was identified as a magnetar. Here we present a phase-connected timing analysis and the evolution of the flux and spectral properties using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, Swift, and Chandra observations. We measure a spin frequency of 0.1185154343(8) s{sup -1} and a frequency derivative of -4.3 {+-} 0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} at MJD 55761.0, in a timing analysis that includes significant non-zero second and third frequency derivatives that we attribute to timing noise. This corresponds to an estimated spin-down inferred dipole magnetic field of B {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, consistent with previous estimates though still possibly affected by unmodeled noise. We find that the post-outburst 1-10 keV flux evolution can be characterized by a double-exponential decay with decay timescales of 15.5 {+-} 0.5 and 177 {+-} 14 days. We also fit the light curve with a crustal cooling model, which suggests that the cooling results from heat injection into the outer crust. We find that the hardness-flux correlation observed in magnetar outbursts also characterizes the outburst of Swift J1822.3-1606. We compare the properties of Swift J1822.3-1606 with those of other magnetars and their outbursts.

  4. Post-outburst X-Ray Flux and Timing Evolution of Swift J1822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, P.; Ng, C.-Y.; Livingstone, M. A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Cumming, A.; Archibald, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    Swift J1822.3-1606 was discovered on 2011 July 14 by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope following the detection of several bursts. The source was found to have a period of 8.4377 s and was identified as a magnetar. Here we present a phase-connected timing analysis and the evolution of the flux and spectral properties using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, Swift, and Chandra observations. We measure a spin frequency of 0.1185154343(8) s-1 and a frequency derivative of -4.3 ± 0.3 × 10-15 at MJD 55761.0, in a timing analysis that includes significant non-zero second and third frequency derivatives that we attribute to timing noise. This corresponds to an estimated spin-down inferred dipole magnetic field of B ~ 5 × 1013 G, consistent with previous estimates though still possibly affected by unmodeled noise. We find that the post-outburst 1-10 keV flux evolution can be characterized by a double-exponential decay with decay timescales of 15.5 ± 0.5 and 177 ± 14 days. We also fit the light curve with a crustal cooling model, which suggests that the cooling results from heat injection into the outer crust. We find that the hardness-flux correlation observed in magnetar outbursts also characterizes the outburst of Swift J1822.3-1606. We compare the properties of Swift J1822.3-1606 with those of other magnetars and their outbursts.

  5. Coronal O VI emission observed with UVCS/SOHO during solar flares: Comparison with soft X-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Giordano, S.; Raymond, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we derive the O VI 1032 Å luminosity profiles of 58 flares, during their impulsive phase, based on off-limb measurements by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The O VI luminosities from the transition region plasma (here defined as the region with temperatures 5.0 ≤ log T (K) ≤ 6.0) were inferred from the analysis of the resonantly scattered radiation of the O VI coronal ions. The temperature of maximum ionization for O VI is log Tmax (K) = 5.47. By comparison with simultaneous soft X-ray measurements, we investigate the likely source (chromospheric evaporation, footpoint emission, or heated prominence ejecta) for the transition region emission observed during the impulsive phase. In our study, we find evidence of the main characteristics predicted by the evaporation scenario. Specifically, most O VI flares precede the X-ray peaks typically by several minutes with a mean of 3.2 ± 0.1 min, and clear correlations are found between the soft X-ray and transition region luminosities following power laws with indices ~ 0.7 ± 0.3. Overall, the results are consistent with transition region emission originating from chromospheric evaporation; the thermal X-ray emission peaks after the emission from the evaporation flow as the loops fill with hot plasma. Finally, we were able to infer flow speeds in the range ~20-100 km s-1 for one-third of the events, 14 of which showed speeds between 60 and 80 km s-1. These values are compatible with those found through direct spectroscopic observations at transition region temperatures by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode.

  6. Thermal Properties of A Solar Coronal Cavity Observed with the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, Katherine K.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Kucera, Theresa A.; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kano, Ryouhei

    2011-01-01

    Coronal cavities are voids in coronal emission often observed above high latitude filament channels. Sometimes, these cavities have areas of bright X-ray emission in their centers. In this study, we use data from the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Hinode satellite to examine the thermal emission properties of a cavity observed during July 2008 that contains bright X-ray emission in its center. Using ratios of XRT filters, we find evidence for elevated temperatures in the cavity center. The area of elevated temperature evolves from a ring-shaped structure at the beginning of the observation, to an elongated structure two days later, finally appearing as a compact round source four days after the initial observation. We use a morphological model to fit the cavity emission, and find that a uniform structure running through the cavity does not fit the observations well. Instead, the observations are reproduced by modeling several short cylindrical cavity "cores" with different parameters on different days. These changing core parameters may be due to some observed activity heating different parts of the cavity core at different times. We find that core temperatures of 1.75 MK, 1.7 MK and 2.0 MK (for July 19, July 21 and July 23, respectively) in the model lead to structures that are consistent with the data, and that line-of-sight effects serve to lower the effective temperature derived from the filter ratio.

  7. Temperature dependence of emission measure in solar X-ray plasmas. 1: Non-flaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    1974-01-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet line emission from hot, optically thin material forming coronal active regions on the sun may be described in terms of an emission measure distribution function, Phi (T). A relationship is developed between line flux and Phi (T), a theory which assumes that the electron density is a single-valued function of temperature. The sources of error involved in deriving Phi (T) from a set of line fluxes are examined in some detail. These include errors in atomic data (collisional excitation rates, assessment of other mechanisms for populating excited states of transitions, element abundances, ion concentrations, oscillator strengths) and errors in observed line fluxes arising from poorly - known instrumental responses. Two previous analyses are discussed in which Phi (T) for a non-flaring active region is derived. A least squares method of Batstone uses X-ray data of low statistical significance, a fact which appears to influence the results considerably. Two methods for finding Phi (T) ab initio are developed. The coefficients are evaluated by least squares. These two methods should have application not only to active-region plasmas, but also to hot, flare-produced plasmas.

  8. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HARD X-RAY PULSE TIMINGS AND THE LOCATIONS OF FOOTPOINT SOURCES DURING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Inglis, A. R.; Dennis, B. R.

    2012-04-01

    The cause of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares remains the subject of debate. Recently, Nakariakov and Zimovets proposed a new model suggesting that, in two-ribbon flares, such pulsations could be explained by propagating slow waves. These waves may travel obliquely to the magnetic field, reflect in the chromosphere, and constructively interfere at a spatially separate site in the corona, leading to quasi-periodic reconnection events progressing along the flaring arcade. Such a slow wave regime would have certain observational characteristics. We search for evidence of this phenomenon during a selection of two-ribbon flares observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer; the flares of 2002 November 9, 2005 January 19, and 2005 August 22. We were not able to observe a clear correlation between hard X-ray footpoint separations and pulse timings during these events. Also, the motion of hard X-ray footpoints is shown to be continuous within the observational error, whereas a discontinuous motion might be anticipated in the slow wave model. Finally, we find that for a preferential slow wave propagation angle of 25 Degree-Sign -28 Degree-Sign that is expected for the fastest waves, the velocities of the hard X-ray footpoints lead to estimated pulse periods and ribbon lengths significantly larger than the measured values. Hence, for the three events studied, we conclude that the observational characteristics cannot be easily explained via the Nakariakov and Zimovets propagating slow wave model when only angles of 25 Degree-Sign -28 Degree-Sign are considered. We provide suggested flare parameters to optimize future studies of this kind.

  9. On the lack of correlation between X-ray flux and kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catmabacak, Onur; Hakan Erkut, M.

    2016-07-01

    We study the so-called "parallel tracks" phenomenon, which arises from the observation that kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies correlate with X-ray flux on short time scales (less than a day) while there seems to be no correlation at all on longer time scales (more than a day). The oscillatory modes with frequency bands determined by the radial epicyclic frequency in the magnetic boundary region between the disk and the neutron star magnetosphere are likely to be the origin of these high frequency QPOs. Within the boundary region model, we provide a possible explanation for the parallel track phenomenon taking into account the variation of the model parameters such as the rotation frequency of the innermost disk matter and the radial extension of the boundary region. In addition to the mass, radius, and magnetic field of the neutron star, the frequency bands of oscillatory modes depend on mass accretion rate through these model parameters as well. Using the aspect ratio of the disk, which actually depends on mass accretion rate, we estimate the radial width of the boundary region and its variation on long and short time scales to reproduce the parallel tracks in accordance with observations. We repeat the analysis for a wide range of neutron star masses, radii, and magnetic field strengths in order to understand the effects of these parameters on our results.

  10. Modeling solar flare hard X-ray images and spectra observed with RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Linhui

    2004-12-01

    Observations obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) of a flare on February 20, 2002 indicate a hard X-ray (HXR) coronal source at or near the top of a flare loop (called a HXR looptop source). The existence of the HXR looptop source suggests that magnetic reconnection, which is believed to power flares, occurs above the loop. In order to explain this HXR looptop source, I created a steady-state particle transport model, in which high-energy electrons are continuously injected at the top of a semicircular flare loop. Based on the simulation results, I find that the model predictions are consistent with the RHESSI observations in many respects, but the spectrum of the looptop source obtained from the model is steeper than that from the RHESSI data. This suggests that, instead of being accelerated above the loop as generally believed, the particles might be accelerated in the looptop itself. RHESSI observations of three other homologous flares that occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002, provide strong evidence for the presence of a large- scale current sheet above a flare loop, which is the basis of standard flare models. The most convincing finding is the presence of the temperature distribution of a separate coronal source above the flare loops: the hotter part of the coronal source was located lower in altitude than the cooler part. Together with the fact that the hotter flare loops are higher than the cooler loops, the observations support the existence of a large-scale current sheet between the top of the flare loops and the coronal source above. Blob-like sources along a line above the loop in the decay phase of the April 15, 2002, flare, which are suggestive of magnetic islands initiated by the tearing-mode instability, and the observation of a cusp structure in microwaves, further support the presence of the current sheet. The observations of the three homologous flares reveal two other features which are beyond the

  11. Prediction soft-X-ray spectrum of solar flares from Very Low Frequency observations: an inverse problem in ionospheric science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    Earth's lower ionosphere and upper atmosphere absorb X-rays and gamma-rays from astronomical sources such as solar flares, Short Gamma ray Repeaters (SGRs) or Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The electron-ion production rates due to the ionization of such energetic photons at different heights depend on the intensity and wavelength of the injected spectrum and hence vary from one source to another. Obviously the ion density vs. altitude profile has the imprint of the incident photon spectrum. In this paper, we examine the possibility of inverting the electron density-height profiles uniquely by deconvolution of the VLF amplitude signal to obtain information on the injected spectrum. We have been able to reproduce the soft-X-ray part of the injected spectra from two different classes of solar flares with satisfactory accuracy. With the possibilities of probing even lower parts of the atmosphere, the method presented here is useful to carry out a similar exercise to infer the higher energy part of solar flare spectra and spectra of more energetic events such as the GRBs, SGRs etc. We show that to a certain accuracy, the Earth's atmosphere may be used as a gigantic detector of relatively strong ionizing extra-terrestrial events.

  12. Inverse problem in ionospheric science: prediction of solar soft-X-ray spectrum from very low frequency radiosonde results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, S.; Ray, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    X-rays and gamma-rays from astronomical sources such as solar flares are mostly absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere. Resulting electron-ion production rate as a function of height depends on the intensity and wavelength of the injected spectrum and therefore the effects vary from one source to another. In other words, the ion density vs. altitude profile has the imprint of the incident photon spectrum. In this paper, we investigate whether we can invert the problem uniquely by deconvolution of the VLF amplitude signal to obtain the details of the injected spectrum. We find that it is possible to do this up to a certain accuracy. This leads us to the possibility of uninterrupted observation of X-ray photon spectra of solar flares that are often hindered by the restricted observation window of space satellites to avoid charge particle damages. Such continuous means of observation are essential in deriving information on time evolution of physical processes related to electron acceleration and interaction with plasma in solar atmosphere. Our method is useful to carry out a similar exercise to infer the spectra of more energetic events such as the Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs) etc., by probing even the lower part of the Earth's atmosphere. We thus show that to certain extent, the Earth's atmosphere could be used as a gigantic detector of relatively strong astronomical events.

  13. On Lunar Exospheric Column Densities and Solar Wind Access Beyond the Terminator from ROSAT Soft X-Ray Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Holmstrom, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Travnicek, P.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the Rontgen satellite (ROSAT) position sensitive proportional counter soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges: two 19 deg wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 deg off the terminator toward the dark side and one wedge 38 deg wide centered on the antisolar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show significant limb brightening that is absent in the 38 deg wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears to be dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now, along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which SWCX has been observed.

  14. A comparison of photospheric electric current and ultraviolet and X-ray emission in a solar active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, B. M.; Bruner, M. E.; Hagyard, M. J.; Bonnet, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive set of coordinated observations of a solar active region, taking into account spectroheliograms obtained with the aid of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument, SMM soft X-ray polychromator (XRP) raster maps, and high spatial resolution ultraviolet images of the sun in Lyman-alpha and in the 1600 A continuum. These data span together the upper solar atmosphere from the temperature minimum to the corona. The data are compared to maps of the inferred photospheric electric current derived from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph observations. Some empirical correlation is found between regions of inferred electric current density and the brightest features in the ultraviolet continuum and to a lesser extent those seen in Lyman-alpha within an active region.

  15. Design of the detector to observe the energetic charged particles: a part of the solar X-ray spectrophotometer ChemiX onboard Interhelio-Probe mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnik, Oleksiy; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Siarkowski, Marek; Evgen Kurbatov, mgr..

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic particle radiation may damages payload's electronics, optics, and sensors during of long-term scientific space mission especially the interplanetary ones. That is why it's extremely important to prevent failures of digital electronics, CCDs, semiconductor detectors at the times of passing through regions of enhanced charged particle fluxes. Well developed models of the Earth's radiation belts allow to predict and to protect sensitive equipment against disastrous influence of radiation due to energetic particle contained in the Van Allen belts. In the contrary interplanetary probes flying far away from our planet undergoes passages through clouds of plasma and solar cosmic rays not predictable by present models. Especially these concerns missions planned for non-ecliptic orbits. The practical approach to protect sensitive modules may be to measure the in situ particle fluxes with high time resolution and generation of alarm flags, which will switch off sensitive units of particular scientific equipment. The ChemiX (Chemical composition in X-rays) instrument is being developed by the Solar Physics Division of Polish Space Research Centre for the Interhelio-Probe interplanetary mission. Charged particle bursts can badly affect the regular measurements of X-ray spectra of solar origin. In order to detect presence of these enhanced particle fluxes the Background Particle Monitor (BPM) was developed constituting now a vital part of ChemiX. The BPM measurements of particle fluxes will assist to determine level of X-ray spectra contamination. Simultaneously BPM will measure the energy spectra of ambient particles. We present overall structure, design, technical and a scientific characteristic of BPM, particle sorts, and energy ranges to be registered. We describe nearly autonomous modular structure of BPM consisting of detector head, analogue and digital electronics modules, and of module of secondary power supply [1-3]. Detector head consists of three

  16. ESTIMATING THE PROPERTIES OF HARD X-RAY SOLAR FLARES BY CONSTRAINING MODEL PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, J.; Tolbert, A. K.; Schwartz, R. A.; Holman, G. D.; Dennis, B. R.

    2013-06-01

    We wish to better constrain the properties of solar flares by exploring how parameterized models of solar flares interact with uncertainty estimation methods. We compare four different methods of calculating uncertainty estimates in fitting parameterized models to Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager X-ray spectra, considering only statistical sources of error. Three of the four methods are based on estimating the scale-size of the minimum in a hypersurface formed by the weighted sum of the squares of the differences between the model fit and the data as a function of the fit parameters, and are implemented as commonly practiced. The fourth method is also based on the difference between the data and the model, but instead uses Bayesian data analysis and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to calculate an uncertainty estimate. Two flare spectra are modeled: one from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite X1.3 class flare of 2005 January 19, and the other from the X4.8 flare of 2002 July 23. We find that the four methods give approximately the same uncertainty estimates for the 2005 January 19 spectral fit parameters, but lead to very different uncertainty estimates for the 2002 July 23 spectral fit. This is because each method implements different analyses of the hypersurface, yielding method-dependent results that can differ greatly depending on the shape of the hypersurface. The hypersurface arising from the 2005 January 19 analysis is consistent with a normal distribution; therefore, the assumptions behind the three non-Bayesian uncertainty estimation methods are satisfied and similar estimates are found. The 2002 July 23 analysis shows that the hypersurface is not consistent with a normal distribution, indicating that the assumptions behind the three non-Bayesian uncertainty estimation methods are not satisfied, leading to differing estimates of the uncertainty. We find that the shape of the hypersurface is crucial in understanding

  17. The extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Sun in Time: High-energy evolutionary tracks of a solar-like star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Lin; Johnstone, Colin P.; Güdel, Manuel; Lammer, Helmut

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We aim to describe the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence evolution of X-ray and extreme-ultaviolet radiation of a solar-mass star based on its rotational evolution starting with a realistic range of initial rotation rates. Methods: We derive evolutionary tracks of X-ray radiation based on a rotational evolution model for solar-mass stars and the rotation-activity relation. We compare these tracks to X-ray luminosity distributions of stars in clusters with different ages. Results: We find agreement between the evolutionary tracks derived from rotation and the X-ray luminosity distributions from observations. Depending on the initial rotation rate, a star might remain at the X-ray saturation level for very different time periods, from ≈10 Myr to ≈300 Myr for slow and fast rotators, respectively. Conclusions: Rotational evolution with a spread of initial conditions leads to a particularly wide distribution of possible X-ray luminosities in the age range of 20-500 Myr, before rotational convergence and therefore X-ray luminosity convergence sets in. This age range is crucial for the evolution of young planetary atmospheres and may thus lead to very different planetary evolution histories.

  18. EVIDENCE FOR THE FULL HARD X-RAY SPECTRAL SIGNATURE OF NONUNIFORM IONIZATION IN A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yang; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R. E-mail: gordon.d.holman@nasa.gov

    2011-04-20

    The hard X-ray (HXR) emission from solar flares is observed primarily from the footpoints of flare magnetic loops, where nonthermal electrons are understood to emit thick-target bremsstrahlung as they stream from the fully ionized hot corona to the denser, cooler, and partially ionized chromosphere. The change in the plasma ionization along the path of the electrons should result in a characteristic upward break and corresponding flattening of the X-ray spectrum with increasing energy at lower energies, and a downward break at higher energies. Due to the presence of thermal emission, the upward break usually cannot be observed. We report the first evidence for both breaks in spectra measured with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) during the GOES X1.2 class flare that happened on 2002 October 31. The RHESSI X-ray spectral analysis shows both the breakup at {approx}49 keV and the breakdown at {approx}134 keV at the HXR peak time. The time evolution of both breaks also agrees with the nonuniform ionization (NUI) model. Other possible explanations for the breaks are considered, but the NUI model provides the simplest explanation for the spectral shape and its time evolution. We find that the average column density of the fully ionized plasma changed from 2 x10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} in the rise phase to 7 x10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} after the peak. This indicates that plasma in the target was heated and became ionized during the flare, in agreement with heating by the nonthermal electrons and chromospheric evaporation expected in the collisional thick-target model.

  19. DXL: A Sounding Rocket Mission for the Study of Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galeazzi, M.; Prasai, K.; Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Koutroumpa, D.; Porter, F. S.; Snowden, S.; Cravens, T.; Robertson, I.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S.; McCammon, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy (DXL) mission is an approved sounding rocket project with a first launch scheduled around December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission generated by solar wind charge exchange from that of the local hot bubble to improve our understanding of both. With 1,000 square centimeters proportional counters and grasp of about 10 square centimeters sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keV bands, DXL will achieve in a 5-minute flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  20. Use of a solar panel as a directionally sensitive large-area radiation monitor for direct and scattered x-rays and gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Majid, S

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of a 25.4 X 91 cm solar cell panel used as an x-ray and gamma-ray radiation monitor are presented. Applications for monitoring the primary x-ray beam are described at different values of operating currents and voltages as well as for directional dependence of scattered radiation. Other applications in gamma-ray radiography are also given. The detector showed linear response to both x-ray and gamma-ray exposures. The equipment is rigid, easy to use, relatively inexpensive and requires no power supply or any complex electronic equipment. PMID:2828276

  1. Use of a solar panel as a directionally sensitive large-area radiation monitor for direct and scattered x-rays and gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Majid, S

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of a 25.4 X 91 cm solar cell panel used as an x-ray and gamma-ray radiation monitor are presented. Applications for monitoring the primary x-ray beam are described at different values of operating currents and voltages as well as for directional dependence of scattered radiation. Other applications in gamma-ray radiography are also given. The detector showed linear response to both x-ray and gamma-ray exposures. The equipment is rigid, easy to use, relatively inexpensive and requires no power supply or any complex electronic equipment.

  2. Science Goals and First Light Analysis from the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Warren, Harry; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jones, Andrew; Mason, James; McTiernan, James; Moore, Christopher; Palo, Scott; Solomon, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3U CubeSat with deployment from the ISS planned in Q2 2016. Its goal is to measure the solar soft X-ray (SXR) spectral irradiance, an observational signature of hot plasma in the solar corona. Over the last few decades, there have been very few spectrally resolved observations from ~0.2 to ~4 keV (~0.3-6 nm). This range is sensitive to high-temperature plasma and contains many spectral lines (e.g., Mg, Si, Fe, S, Ar), the abundances of which probe plasma transport and provide valuable constraints on plasma heating mechanisms during both flares and quiescence. This solar SXR emission is primarily absorbed in the E-region of Earth's ionosphere, and the subsequently driven dynamical processes are still poorly understood, in large part because the energy distribution of the incident SXRs is not yet well characterized.MinXSS flies a miniature commercial off-the-shelf soft X-ray (SXR) spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD. The silicon drift detector has 0.5 mm fully depleted thickness and a 25 mm^2 physical area, with a ~16 micron Be entrance window; with on-board thermoelectric cooling and pulse pile-up rejection, it is sensitive to solar SXRs from ~0.5 to 30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution. MinXSS also includes a broadband SXR photometer, providing an integrated intensity over a similar energy range for comparison, cross-calibration, and additional data, especially useful during more intense flares at the upper end of the X123 dynamic range.We present the MinXSS science goals for studying hot plasma in the solar corona, including impulsive flare heating and quiescent coronal heating, and the impact of the resultant SXR emission on Earth's ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere. We present analysis of MinXSS first light results (depending on deployment date from the ISS), as well as modeling and predictions of future observations over the MinXSS 6-12 month mission lifetime.

  3. Inverse Compton X-Ray Emission from TeV Blazar Mrk 421 During a Historical Low-flux State Observed with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Jun; Stawarz, Łukasz

    2016-08-01

    We report on the detection of excess hard X-ray emission from the TeV BL Lac object Mrk 421 during the historical low-flux state of the source in 2013 January. Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observations were conducted four times between MJD 56294 and MJD 56312 with a total exposure of 80.9 ks. The source flux in the 3-40 keV range was nearly constant, except for MJD 56307 when the average flux level increased by a factor of three. Throughout the exposure, the X-ray spectra of Mrk 421 were well represented by a steep power-law model with a photon index of Γ ≃ 3.1, although a significant excess was noted above 20 keV in the MJD 56302 data when the source was in its faintest state. Moreover, Mrk 421 was detected at more than the 4σ level in the 40-79 keV count maps for both MJD 56307 and MJD 56302 but not during the remaining two observations. The detected excess hard X-ray emission connects smoothly with the extrapolation of the high-energy γ-ray continuum of the blazar constrained by Fermi-LAT during source quiescence. These findings indicate that while the overall X-ray spectrum of Mrk 421 is dominated by the highest-energy tail of the synchrotron continuum, the variable excess hard X-ray emission above 20 keV (on the timescale of a week) is related to the inverse Compton emission component. We discuss the resulting constraints on the variability and spectral properties of the low-energy segment of the electron energy distribution in the source.

  4. Inverse Compton X-Ray Emission from TeV Blazar Mrk 421 During a Historical Low-flux State Observed with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Jun; Stawarz, Łukasz

    2016-08-01

    We report on the detection of excess hard X-ray emission from the TeV BL Lac object Mrk 421 during the historical low-flux state of the source in 2013 January. Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observations were conducted four times between MJD 56294 and MJD 56312 with a total exposure of 80.9 ks. The source flux in the 3–40 keV range was nearly constant, except for MJD 56307 when the average flux level increased by a factor of three. Throughout the exposure, the X-ray spectra of Mrk 421 were well represented by a steep power-law model with a photon index of Γ ≃ 3.1, although a significant excess was noted above 20 keV in the MJD 56302 data when the source was in its faintest state. Moreover, Mrk 421 was detected at more than the 4σ level in the 40–79 keV count maps for both MJD 56307 and MJD 56302 but not during the remaining two observations. The detected excess hard X-ray emission connects smoothly with the extrapolation of the high-energy γ-ray continuum of the blazar constrained by Fermi-LAT during source quiescence. These findings indicate that while the overall X-ray spectrum of Mrk 421 is dominated by the highest-energy tail of the synchrotron continuum, the variable excess hard X-ray emission above 20 keV (on the timescale of a week) is related to the inverse Compton emission component. We discuss the resulting constraints on the variability and spectral properties of the low-energy segment of the electron energy distribution in the source.

  5. Constraining hot plasma in a non-flaring solar active region with FOXSI hard X-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Glesener, Lindsay; Christe, Steven; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Brooks, David H.; Williams, David R.; Shimojo, Masumi; Sako, Nobuharu; Krucker, Säm

    2014-12-01

    We present new constraints on the high-temperature emission measure of a non-flaring solar active region using observations from the recently flown Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket payload. FOXSI has performed the first focused hard X-ray (HXR) observation of the Sun in its first successful flight on 2012 November 2. Focusing optics, combined with small strip detectors, enable high-sensitivity observations with respect to previous indirect imagers. This capability, along with the sensitivity of the HXR regime to high-temperature emission, offers the potential to better characterize high-temperature plasma in the corona as predicted by nanoflare heating models. We present a joint analysis of the differential emission measure (DEM) of active region 11602 using coordinated observations by FOXSI, Hinode/XRT, and Hinode/EIS. The Hinode-derived DEM predicts significant emission measure between 1 MK and 3 MK, with a peak in the DEM predicted at 2.0-2.5 MK. The combined XRT and EIS DEM also shows emission from a smaller population of plasma above 8 MK. This is contradicted by FOXSI observations that significantly constrain emission above 8 MK. This suggests that the Hinode DEM analysis has larger uncertainties at higher temperatures and that > 8 MK plasma above an emission measure of 3 × 1044 cm-3 is excluded in this active region.

  6. Electron distribution functions in solar flares from combined X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, M.; Kontar, E. P.

    2013-12-20

    Simultaneous solar flare observations with SDO and RHESSI provide spatially resolved information about hot plasma and energetic particles in flares. RHESSI allows the properties of both hot (≳8 MK) thermal plasma and non-thermal electron distributions to be inferred, while SDO/AIA is more sensitive to lower temperatures. We present and implement a new method to reconstruct electron distribution functions from SDO/AIA data. The combined analysis of RHESSI and AIA data allows the electron distribution function to be inferred over the broad energy range from 0.1 keV up to a few tens of keV. The analysis of two well-observed flares suggests that the distributions in general agree to within a factor of three when the RHESSI values are extrapolated into the intermediate range 1-3 keV, with AIA systematically predicting lower electron fluxes. Possible instrumental and numerical effects, as well as potential physical origins for this discrepancy, are discussed. The inferred electron distribution functions in general show one or two nearly Maxwellian components at energies below ∼15 keV and a non-thermal tail above.

  7. A study of X-ray emission from galactic and extragalactic sources with emphasis on soft and ultra-soft wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.; Lampton, M.; Cruddace, R. G.; Paresce, F.

    1974-01-01

    A Black Brant VC rocket was used to scan the Coma and Virgo clusters in order to measure structure in the X-ray sources. The rocket also made measurements of soft X-ray spectra, soft X-ray background flux during a 50 deg scan of the sky, soft X-rays from De Voucoulers 50, set limits to the energy dependence of soft X-ray background spectra, and the flux of solar 584 A radiation resonantly scattered by interstellar He flowing through the solar system.

  8. Understanding the Impact of Return-Current Losses on the X-Ray Emission from Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    I obtain and examine the implications of one-dimensional analytic solutions for return-current losses on an initially power-law distribution of energetic electrons with a sharp low-energy cutoff in flare plasma with classical (collisional) resistivity. These solutions show, for example, that return-current losses are not sensitive to plasma density, but are sensitive to plasma temperature and the low energy cutoff of the injected nonthermal electron distribution. A characteristic distance from the electron injection site, x(sub rc), is derived. At distances less than x(sub rc) the electron flux density is not reduced by return-current losses, but plasma heating can be substantial in this region, in the upper, coronal part of the flare loop. Before the electrons reach the collisional thick-target region of the flare loop, an injected power-law electron distribution with a low-energy cutoff maintains that structure, but with a flat energy distribution below the cutoff energy, which is now determined by the total potential drop experienced by the electrons. Modifications due to the presence of collisional losses are discussed. I compare these results with earlier analytical results and with more recent numerical simulations. Emslie's 1980 conjecture that there is a maximum integrated X-ray source brightness on the order of 10(exp -15) photons per square centimeter per second per square centimeter is examined. I find that this is not actually a maximum brightness and its value is parameter dependent, but it is nevertheless a valuable benchmark for identifying return-current losses in hard X-ray spectra. I discuss an observational approach to identifying return-current losses in flare data, including identification of a return-current "bump" in X-ray light curves at low photon energies.

  9. Uncertainty Estimation in Fitting Parameterized Models to Solar Flare Hard X-ray Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Jack; Tolbert, A. K.; Holman, G. D.; Dennis, B. R.; Schwartz, R. A.

    2012-05-01

    We compare four different methods of estimating the uncertainty in fit parameters when fitting models to Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spectral data. Two flare spectra are studied: one from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) X1.3 class flare of 19-January-2005, and the other from the X4.8 flare of 23-July-2002. Three of our methods rely on assumptions about the shape of the hyper-surface formed by the weighted sum of the squares of the differences between the model fit and the data as a function of the fit parameters, evaluated around the minimum value of the hyper-surface, to generate uncertainty estimates. The fourth method is based on Bayesian data analysis techniques. The four methods give approximately equal uncertainty estimates for the 19-January-2005 model parameters, but give very different uncertainty estimates for the 23-July-2002 model parameters. This is because the assumptions required for the first three methods hold approximately for the 19-January-2005 analysis, but do not hold for the 23-July-2002 analysis. The Bayesian-based method does not require these assumptions, and so can give reliable uncertainty estimates regardless of the shape of the hyper-surface formed by the model fit to the data. We show that for the 23-July-2002 spectrum, there is a 95% probability that the low energy cutoff to the model distribution of emitting flare electrons lies below approximately 40keV, and a 68% probability that it lies in the estimated range 7-36 keV. The most probable flare electron energy flux is approximately 1028.1 erg-1sec-1 with a 68% credible interval estimated at 1028.1-29.1 erg-1sec-1, and a 95% credible interval estimated at 1028.0-30.3 erg-1sec-1. For the 19-January-2005 spectrum, these quantities are more tightly constrained to 105±4 keV and 1027.66±0.01 erg-1sec-1 (68% uncertainties). The reasons for these disparate results are discussed. This work is funded by the NASA Solar and Heliospheric

  10. Hard solar flare X-ray bursts on 8 December 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.; Mahoney, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    Hard X-ray bursts have been observed from two 1B flares located in the same sunspot region and separated in time by about 70 minutes on Dec. 8, 1970. The bursts are composed by many 'flashes' of 2 to 20 seconds duration. Power spectrum analysis reveals no strong periodicities although a significant peak appears at 7.5 sec. The characteristic times of 2 to 20 sec do not seem likely to be electron transit times since the flare size is so small. These times are evidently connected with the acceleration of the electrons. Fitting Takakura's model of the radio noise region to the observations, this region is found to be small, but the density of electrons above 100 keV is high, on the order of 10 million per cu cm.

  11. Hard X-ray time profiles and acceleration processes in large solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1979-01-01

    The hard X-ray time profiles of the (1972) August 4 and 7 flares are investigated, taking into account a comparison of the time profiles of different energy channels. It is shown that for these flares the temporal features of the intensity profiles of higher energy channels are delayed with respect to those of channel 1. The delay time gradually increases to approximately 5 sec as the channel number increases from 1 to 5, and it jumps to approximately 15 sec for channels 6 and 7. A description is presented of a model in which the delay and other characteristics of the observed time profiles in channels 1-5 are self-consistently explained by the increase of the electron energy loss time with electron energy.

  12. Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-Ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güver, Tolga; Özel, Feryal; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Díaz-Trigo, Maria

    2016-09-01

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE/PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0 ± 0.3% less flux than the RXTE/PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared with EPIC MOS1, MOS2, and ACIS-S detectors. We also show that any intrinsic time-dependent systematic uncertainty that may exist in the calibration of the satellites has already been implicity taken into account in the neutron star radius measurements.

  13. Observations of solar X-ray bursts in the energy range 5-15 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, D. W.; Hudson, H. S.; Peterson, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    Bursts of solar X-rays in the energy range 5-15 keV are associated with flares and are due to thermal emission from a hot coronal plasma. The results of the first study of a large sample of separate bursts, 197 events associated with subflares, and of a few events of importance 1 are presented. The observations were made by a proportional counter on the satellite OSO-7 from October, 1971 to June, 1972. In most cases, the temperature characterizing the X-ray spectrum rises impulsively at the onset of the burst and then declines slowly throughout the remainder of the burst. The emission measure rises exponentially with a time scale of 30-100 sec and then declines slowly on a time scale of the order of 1,000 sec. It is shown that the growth of the thermal energy in the flare plasma throughout the burst can be due to the heating of new cool material.

  14. An Ion Chamber Dedicated to Carbon NEXAFS: Removal of High-Order X-Rays and Reliable Flux Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.-J.; Yang, Y.-W.; Lee, Kaidee

    2007-02-02

    The difficulty of performing a reliable carbon NEXAFS measurement for thin films and adsorbate systems has long been recognized. The difficulty is typically related to lower S/B, carbon buildup in beamline optics, dirty mesh, presence of the high-order x-rays, etc. To alleviate the experimental difficulty, we have constructed an intensity-monitoring ion chamber situated between the beamline and sample chamber. The ion chamber is filled with argon up to a working pressure of 10-3 Torr and terminated with 0.1 {mu}m thick Ti foils at both ends. Titanium foils and the filled argon gas effectively remove the high-order x-rays. Consequently, the data are acquired with predominant 1st-order x-rays and thus free of the aforementioned interference, leading to a more reliable data analysis.

  15. MHD waves on solar magnetic flux tubes - Tutorial review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the highly simplified models that have been developed for solar magnetic flux tubes, which are intense photospheric-level fields confined by external gas pressure but able to vary rapidly with height, are presently discussed with emphasis on the torsional Alfven mode's propagation, reflection, and non-WKB properties. The 'sausage' and 'kink' modes described by the thin flux-tube approximation are noted. Attention is also given to the surface waves and resonance absorption of X-ray-emitting loops, as well as to the results of recent work on the resonant instabilities that occur in the presence of bulk flows.

  16. Recent Solar-Proton Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    2005-01-01

    The event-integrated fluences of energetic solar protons up to 2004 at the Earth have been determined and compared to previous data. The current solar cycle has been very active, and very large fluxes of solar protons have been observed that have had serious effects in the solar system and will have produced many radionuclides in the surfaces of meteorites. Such huge events are not expected again until about 2008 or 2009.

  17. STUDYING THE POLARIZATION OF HARD X-RAY SOLAR FLARES WITH THE GAMMA RAY POLARIMETER EXPERIMENT (GRAPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertley, Camden

    2014-01-01

    The degree of linear polarization of hard X-rays (50-500 keV) can provide a better understanding of the particle acceleration mechanisms and the emission of radiation during solar flares. Difficulties in measuring the linear polarization has limited the ability of past experiments to place constraints on solar flare models. The Gamma RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a balloon-borne Compton polarimeter designed to measure polarization in the 50 - 500 keV energy range. This energy range minimizes the thermal contamination that can potentially affect measurements at lower energies. This research focuses on the analysis of data acquired during the first high altitude balloon flight of the GRAPE payload in 2011. During this 26 hour balloon flight two M-class flares were observed. The analysis effort includes the development of a Monte Carlo simulation of the full instrument payload with the GEANT4 toolkit. The simulations were used in understanding the background environment, creating a response matrix for the deconvolution of the energy loss spectra, and determining the modulation factor for a 100% linearly polarized source. We report on the results from the polarization analysis of the solar flare data. The polarization and spectral data can be used to further our understanding of particle acceleration in the context of current solar flare models.

  18. X-ray observations of characteristic structures and time variations from the solar corona - Preliminary results from Skylab.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaiana, G. S.; Davis, J. M.; Giacconi, R.; Krieger, A. S.; Silk, J. K.; Timothy, A. F.; Zombeck, M.

    1973-01-01

    Examples taken from the S-054 X-ray telescope observations made during the first Skylab mission show the hot coronal plasma tracing the configuration of the magnetic fields. The high spectral resolution and sensitivity of the instrument has enabled the following two facts to be more firmly established: (1) that the 'quiet homogeneous corona' is in fact highly structured and that the structures observed appear to be the results of dispersed active region magnetic fields; and (2) that numerous bright points are distributed randomly on the disk. Their presence at high latitudes may play a role in solar cycle models. In addition, the capability of Skylab for studying time evolution has enabled the restructuring of coronal features to be seen at times of high activity, indicating a restructuring of the coronal magnetic fields.

  19. X-ray line and continuum spectra of solar flares from 0.5 to 8.5 angstroms.

    PubMed

    Meekins, J F; Kreplin, R W; Chubb, T A; Friedman, H

    1968-11-22

    Two crystal spectrometers aboard the orbiting solar observatory OSO-4 cover the wavelength ranges 0.5 to 3.9 angstroms and 1.0 to 8.5 angstroms. Within this range, there appear emission lines from hydrogen-like and helium-like states of calcium, sulfur, silicon, magnesium, and aluminum. The Mg XII Lyman-alpha is present strongly in all x-ray flares. The most intense flares (such as class 3) produce strong Si XIV Lyman-alpha and often S XVI Lyman-alpha. Emission, in the form of Ka lines of highly ionized states of calcium, iron, aluminum, and silicon is usually present. The continuum from 1 to 10 angstroms always dominates the line emission by more than an order of magnitude. Electron temperatures derived from the slope of the continuum spectrum are in the range of 10(7) to 10(8) degrees K, considerably higher than theoretical ionization equilibrium temperatures.

  20. WIDESPREAD NANOFLARE VARIABILITY DETECTED WITH HINODE/X-RAY TELESCOPE IN A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Terzo, Sergio; Reale, Fabio; Miceli, Marco; Klimchuk, James A.; Kano, Ryouhei; Tsuneta, Saku

    2011-08-01

    It is generally agreed that small impulsive energy bursts called nanoflares are responsible for at least some of the Sun's hot corona, but whether they are the explanation for most of the multimillion-degree plasma has been a matter of ongoing debate. We present here evidence that nanoflares are widespread in an active region observed by the X-Ray Telescope on board the Hinode mission. The distributions of intensity fluctuations have small but important asymmetries, whether taken from individual pixels, multipixel subregions, or the entire active region. Negative fluctuations (corresponding to reduced intensity) are greater in number but weaker in amplitude, so that the median fluctuation is negative compared to a mean of zero. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we show that only part of this asymmetry can be explained by Poisson photon statistics. The remainder is explainable through a tendency for exponentially decreasing intensity, such as would be expected from a cooling plasma produced from a nanoflare. We suggest that nanoflares are a universal heating process within active regions.

  1. Implications of solar flare hard X-ray ``knee'' spectra observed by RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, A. J.; Brown, J. C.; Eves, B. A. C.; Kontar, E.

    2003-08-01

    We analyse the RHESSI photon spectra of four flares that exhibit significant deviations from power laws - i.e. changes in the ``local'' Hard X-ray spectral index. These spectra are characterised by two regions of constant power law index connected by a region of changing spectral index - the ``knee''. We develop theoretical and numerical methods of describing such knees in terms of variable photon spectral indices and we study the results of their inversions for source mean thin target and collisional thick target injection electron spectra. We show that a particularly sharp knee can produce unphysical negative values in the electron spectra, and we derive inequalities that can be used to test for this without the need for an inversion to be performed. Such unphysical features would indicate that source model assumptions were being violated, particularly strongly for the collisional thick target model which assumes a specific form for electron energy loss. For all four flares considered here we find that the knees do not correspond to unphysical electron spectra. In the three flares that have downward knees we conclude that the knee can be explained in terms of transport effects through a region of non-uniform ionisation. In the other flare, which has an upward knee, we conclude that it is most likely a feature of the accelerated spectrum.

  2. Coronal Evolution of the Sun in Time: High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Solar Analogs with Different Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telleschi, Alessandra; Güdel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin; Audard, Marc; Ness, Jan-Uwe; Skinner, Stephen L.

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the long-term evolution of X-ray coronae of solar analogs based on high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and photometry with XMM-Newton. Six nearby main-sequence G stars with ages between ~0.1 and ~1.6 Gyr and rotation periods between ~1 and 12.4 days have been observed. We use the X-ray spectra to derive coronal element abundances of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe and the coronal emission measure distribution (EMD). We find that the abundances change from an inverse first ionization potential (FIP) distribution in stars with ages around 0.1 Gyr to a solar-type FIP distribution in stars at ages of 0.3 Gyr and beyond. This transformation is coincident with a steep decline of nonthermal radio emission. The results are in qualitative agreement with a simple model in which the stream of electrons in magnetic fields suppresses diffusion of low-FIP ions from the chromosphere into the corona. The coronal emission measure distributions show shapes characterized by power laws on each side of the EMD peak. The latter shifts from temperatures of about 10 MK in the most rapidly rotating, young stars to temperatures around 4 MK in the oldest target considered here. The power-law index on the cooler side of the EMD exceeds expected slopes for static loops, with typical values being 1.5-3. We interpret this slope with a model in which the coronal emission is due to a superposition of stochastically occurring flares, with an occurrence rate that is distributed in radiated energy E as a power law, dN/dE~E-α, as previously found for solar and stellar flares. We obtain the relevant power-law index α from the slope of the high-temperature tail of the EMD. Our EMDs indicate α~2.2-2.8, in excellent agreement with values previously derived from light curves of magnetically active stars. Modulation with timescales reminiscent of flares is found in the light curves of all our targets. Several strong flares are also observed. We use our α-values to simulate light curves and

  3. New diagnostic for X-ray diffraction measurements at extra-solar planets conditions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppari, F.; Smith, R.; Eggert, J.; Rygg, J. R.; Lazicki, A.; Hawreliak, J.; Wang, J.; Duffy, T. S.; Hicks, D. G.; Boehly, T.; Collins, G. W.

    2013-12-01

    A method for obtaining powder diffraction data on dynamically-compressed solids at multi-megabar pressures has been implemented at the OMEGA Laser Facility [1]. We use laser-driven ramp-compression to generate pressures well within the multi-megabar regime. The drive laser pulse shape is designed so to avoid generation of lots of heating (as in shock-compression) so that the material stays into the solid state. Quasi-monochromatic x-ray radiation is generated by illumination of a metallic foil by laser beams and the diffraction patterns are recorded in transmission geometry by image plates. Simultaneous velocimetry measurements using VISAR allow pressure estimation. This diagnostic has been used to study the structure and phase transitions of a variety of materials (low and high-Z), including Ta, Sn and Mo. We have also studied elements and compounds relevant to geophysics and planetary science at unprecedented high pressures, providing experimental constraints to the equations of states of matter at conditions previously accessible to theoretical simulations only. Performing experiments at the pressure and temperature conditions expected in the interiors of massive planets is of fundamental importance for constraining models describing their interior structure and evolution [2]. These models are currently based on extrapolation of lower pressure-temperature experiments and untested theoretical simulations, resulting in large uncertainties [3]. Here I will present results obtained on MgO, Fe and preliminary analysis of recent FeO data. MgO has been ramp-compressed up to 9 Mbar and diffraction measurements provided the first structural evidence for the occurrence of the B1-B2 phase transition at 6 Mbar [4]. Fe has been studied up to 5 Mbar and the stability of the ɛ phase (hcp-Fe) has been demonstrated by x-ray diffraction measurements. Ramp-compression of FeO in the 3 and 7 Mbar pressure regime significantly extended the knowledge of the phase diagram of this

  4. Solar flare gamma-ray and hard x ray imaging with the GRID-on-a-balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwig, Larry E.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, Brian R.; Starr, R.; Hurford, G. J.; Hudson, H. S.; Vanbeek, F.; Greene, M. E.; Johnson, W. N.; Norris, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    A primary scientific objective for solar flare research during the rapidly approaching maximum in solar activity is the imaging of gamma-ray and hard x ray sources of solar flare emissions. These goals will be pursued by the Gamma Ray Imaging Device (GRID) instrument, one of three instruments recently selected for NASA's Max '91 Solar Balloon Program. The GRID instrument is based on the technique of Fourier transform imaging and utilizes scanning modulation grid collimator optics to provide full-Sun imaging with 1.9-arcsecond resolution over the energy range from 20 to 700 keV at time resolutions from 0.1 to 2 s. The GRID telescope will employ 32 subcollimators, each composed of a matched pair of high-Z collimator grids separated by 5.2 meters and a phoswich scintillation spectrometer detector having no spatial resolution. The subcollimators and integrally-mounted fine aspect system are contained within a telescope canister which will be pointed to 0.1 degree accuracy and cyclically scanned to produce source modulation. The 32 subcollimators provide a uniform distribution of grid slit orientations and a logarithmic distribution of slit spacings corresponding to angular dimensions of 1.9 arcseconds to several arcminutes. The instrument is several orders of magnitude more sensitive than the HXIS instrument on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and nearly 10 times more sensitive than any similar instrument scheduled to fly during the next solar maximum. The payload, designed for long-duration high-altitude balloon capability, is scheduled for its first science flight (8 to 14 days duration) from the Antarctic in January of 1992.

  5. The extended ROSAT-ESO flux limited X-ray galaxy cluster survey (REFLEX II) II. Construction and properties of the survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, H.; Chon, G.; Collins, C. A.; Guzzo, L.; Nowak, N.; Bobrovskyi, S.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters provide unique laboratories to study astrophysical processes on large scales and are important probes for cosmology. X-ray observations are currently the best means of detecting and characterizing galaxy clusters. Therefore X-ray surveys for galaxy clusters are one of the best ways to obtain a statistical census of the galaxy cluster population. Aims: In this paper we describe the construction of the REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey based on the southern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. REFLEX II extends the REFLEX I survey by a factor of about two down to a flux limit of 1.8 × 10-12 erg s cm (0.1-2.4 keV). Methods: We describe the determination of the X-ray parameters, the process of X-ray source identification, and the construction of the survey selection function. Results: The REFLEX II cluster sample comprises currently 915 objects. A standard selection function is derived for a lower source count limit of 20 photons in addition to the flux limit. The median redshift of the sample is z = 0.102. Internal consistency checks and the comparison to several other galaxy cluster surveys imply that REFLEX II is better than 90% complete with a contamination less than 10%. Conclusions: With this publication we give a comprehensive statistical description of the REFLEX II survey and provide all the complementary information necessary for a proper modeling of the survey for astrophysical and cosmological applications. Based on observations at the European Southern Observatory La Silla, ChileFull Tables 2 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/555/A30

  6. Operating in the space plasma environment: A spacecraft charging study of the Solar X-ray Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Joel L.; Mccollum, Matthew B.; James, Bonnie F.

    1994-01-01

    This study presents the results of a spacecraft charging effects protection study conducted on the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI). The SXI is being developed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for NOAA's Space Environment Laboratory, and will be used to aid in forecasting energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. Images will provide information on the intensity and location of solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and high speed solar streams. The SXI will be flown on a next-generation GOES sometime in the mid to late 1990's. Charging due to the encounter with a worst-case magnetic substorm environment is modeled using the NASCAP/GEO computer code. Charging levels of exterior surfaces and the floating potential of the spacecraft relative to plasma are determined as a function of spacecraft design, operational configuration, and orbital conditions. Areas where large surface voltage gradients exist on or near the SXI are identified as possible arc-discharge sites. Results of the charging analysis are then used to develop design recommendations that will limit the effects of spacecraft charging on the SXI operation.

  7. Modeling the magnetospheric X-ray emission from solar wind charge exchange with verification from XMM-Newton observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Ian C.; Sembay, Steve; Carter, Jennifer A.; Read, Andrew M.; Milan, Steve E.; Palmroth, Minna

    2016-05-01

    An MHD-based model of terrestrial solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) is created and compared to 19 case study observations in the 0.5-0.7 keV emission band taken from the European Photon Imaging Cameras on board XMM-Newton. This model incorporates the Global Unified Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Simulation-4 MHD code and produces an X-ray emission datacube from O7+ and O8+ emission lines around the Earth using in situ solar wind parameters as the model input. This study details the modeling process and shows that fixing the oxygen abundances to a constant value reduces the variance when comparing to the observations, at the cost of a small accuracy decrease in some cases. Using the ACE oxygen data returns a wide ranging accuracy, providing excellent correlation in a few cases and poor/anticorrelation in others. The sources of error for any user wishing to simulate terrestrial SWCX using an MHD model are described here and include mask position, hydrogen to oxygen ratio in the solar wind, and charge state abundances. A dawn-dusk asymmetry is also found, similar to the results of empirical modeling. Using constant oxygen parameters, magnitudes approximately double that of the observed count rates are returned. A high accuracy is determined between the model and observations when comparing the count rate difference between enhanced SWCX and quiescent periods.

  8. Imaging Grating SpectroPhotometer (I-GRASP) for Solar Soft X-Ray Spectra and Images from a Cube Sat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, Leonid V.; Wieman, Seth; Woods, Thomas N.; Jones, Andrew; Chao, Weilun

    2016-05-01

    We describe the Soft X-ray Imaging Grating SpectroPhotometer (I-GRASP), a novel spectrophotometer with four times narrower transmission grating period (about 50 nm) compared to the MIT-designed 200 nm gratings successfully used for the SOHO/SEM, the SDO/EVE/ESP, and the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM) onboard the EVE sounding rocket suite of instruments. The new grating is based on technology developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and provides four to five time greater diffraction dispersion than the 200 nm period gratings. Such new technology will provide detection of both 0.1 nm - resolved solar spectra in about 1.0 to 7.0 nm spectral range and a soft X-ray pin-hole solar image from the I-GRASP instrument that is appropriately sized for a CubeSat platform. The solar observations of this soft X-ray range do not currently have spectral resolution, so I-GRASP concurrent spectral and imaging X-ray observations will be important for:Improvements in modeling of coronal dynamics and heating by comparing measured and modeled spectra through identifying changes in abundances from different active regions- Resolving some differences in certain iron spectral line intensity ratios observed with SAM, identifying key emission lines, and comparing to those modeled with the CHIANTI atomic database- Studying SXR spectral variability for different solar activity periods including solar flares and the 27-day solar rotation- Studying of the Earth’s ionosphere, thermosphere and mesosphere responses using as input the detailed soft X-ray spectra from I-GRASP- Improving solar soft X-ray reference spectra for accurate calculations of absolute solar irradiance from the SDO/EVE/ESP, SDO/EVE/SAM, TIMED/SEE/XPS, and SORCE/XPS channels that have broadband measurements of the 1-7 nm band- Providing validation for the soft X-Ray observations from the MinXSS CubeSat X123 spectrometer (0.04 to 2.5 nm) with the I-GRASP spectral observations from 1.0 to 7.0 nm- Comparing I

  9. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T. Z.; Behm, K.; Dong, C. F.; Davoine, X.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Petrov, V.; Chvykov, V.; Cummings, P.; Hou, B.; Maksimchuk, A.; Nees, J. A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2016-08-01

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays.

  10. Advances in Small Pixel TES-Based X-Ray Microcalorimeter Arrays for Solar Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, S. R.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing small-pixel transition-edge-sensor (TES) for solar physics and astrophysics applications. These large format close-packed arrays are fabricated on solid silicon substrates and are designed to accommodate count-rates of up to a few hundred counts/pixel/second at a FWHM energy resolution approximately 2 eV at 6 keV. We have fabricated versions that utilize narrow-line planar and stripline wiring. We present measurements of the performance and uniformity of kilo-pixel arrays, incorporating TESs with single 65-micron absorbers on a 7s-micron pitch, as well as versions with more than one absorber attached to the TES, 4-absorber and 9-absorber "Hydras". We have also fabricated a version of this detector optimized for lower energies and lower count-rate applications. These devices have a lower superconducting transition temperature and are operated just above the 40mK heat sink temperature. This results in a lower heat capacity and low thermal conductance to the heat sink. With individual single pixels of this type we have achieved a FWHM energy resolution of 0.9 eV with 1.5 keV Al K x-rays, to our knowledge the first x-ray microcalorimeter with sub-eV energy resolution. The 4-absorber and 9-absorber versions of this type achieved FWHM energy resolutions of 1.4 eV and 2.1 eV at 1.5 keV respectively. We will discuss the application of these devices for new astrophysics mission concepts.

  11. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  12. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Gleckman, Philip L.; O'Gallagher, Joseph J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  13. Temperature dependence of emission measure in solar X-ray plasmas. I - Nonflaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Previous determinations of the form of the emission-measure distribution function for solar active regions are examined. It is found that two analyses in particular are affected by low quality of either observational or atomic data. An alternative method of analysis is discussed.

  14. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Phillip

    1997-01-01

    The main results from this investigation were serendipitous. The long observation approved for the study of the hard X-ray emission of X-ray bursters lead, instead, to one of the largest early samples of the behavior of fast quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOS) in an atoll sources. Our analysis of this data set lead to the several important discoveries including the existence of a robust correlation between QPO frequency and the flux of a soft blackbody component of the X-ray spectrum in the atoll source 4U 0614+091.

  15. Simulated Solar Flare X-Ray and Thermal Cycling Durability Evaluation of Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Candidate Replacement Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Scheiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) second servicing mission (SM2), astronauts noticed that the multilayer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was damaged. Large pieces of the outer layer of MLI (aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP)) were torn in several locations around the telescope. A piece of curled up Al-FEP was retrieved by the astronauts and was found to be severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) organized a HST MLI Failure Review Board (FRB) to determine the damage mechanism of FEP in the HST environment, and to recommend replacement insulation material to be installed on HST during the third servicing mission (SM3) in 1999. Candidate thermal control replacement materials were chosen by the FRB and tested for environmental durability under various exposures and durations. This paper describes durability testing of candidate materials which were exposed to charged particle radiation, simulated solar flare x-ray radiation and thermal cycling under load. Samples were evaluated for changes in solar absorptance and tear resistance. Descriptions of environmental exposures and durability evaluations of these materials are presented.

  16. In-progress X-ray Flare Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Winter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar X-ray flares release intense amounts of radiation and can be associated with subsequent changes in the geomagnetic field as well as a large influx of solar energetic particles. From analyses of 50,000 flares detected with the NOAA GOES satellites over the past 40 years, Winter & Balasubramaniam (2015) introduced a flare phase diagram where X-ray observables indicating flare temperature and background solar activity levels can be used to separate flares of different peak flux. We present results from adapting this method into a real-time forecast tool. Real-time GOES X-ray observations are used to predict expected flare class, with updates made every 1-minute. KSB, in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research on "the Physics of Coupled Flares and CME Systems". LM was supported by AER, and in part by a contract supported by AFRL/RV

  17. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  18. The infrared continuum spectrum of x ray illuminated molecular gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voit, G. Mark

    1990-01-01

    In starburst galaxies, active galaxies, and the mysterious ultraluminous infrared galaxies, x rays are likely to interact with molecular gas and dust, thereby inducing infrared emission. X ray heated thermal dust will emit the IR continuum, and x ray photoelectrons will excite an IR emission-line spectrum. Here, researchers model the IR continuum emission characteristic of some selected x ray spectral fluxes, in particular the x ray bremsstrahlung characteristic of supernova and stellar wind bubble shocks in dense media and the power law spectra characteristic of active galactic nuclei. These models are part of a larger project to determine the complete IR spectra, lines plus continuum, of x ray sources embedded in molecular gas. They modeled the thermal emission from grains by calculating a grain temperature/size/composition distribution function, f(T,a,Comp.), which accounts for temperature fluctuations by averaging over all grain thermal histories. In determining the grain thermal distribution, researchers account for both direct grain heating (by x ray absorption and subsequent electron energy deposition) and indirect grain heating (by absorption of the UV emission stimulated by non-thermal photo- and Auger electrons in the gas phase). We let the grain size distribution be proportional to a(exp -3.5), and they consider two types of grain composition: graphites, which we assume to be pure carbon, and silicates, which contain all other depleted heavy elements. They derive the grain composition distribution function from solar abundances and interstellar depletion data.

  19. Evolution and Activity in the Solar Corona: A Comparison of Coronal and Chromospheric Structures Seen in Soft X-Rays, White Light and H-Alpha Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagenal, Fran

    2001-01-01

    The work completed under this project, 'Evolution and Activity in the Solar Corona: A Comparison of Coronal and Chromospheric Structures Seen in Soft X-Rays, White Light and H-Alpha Emission', includes the following presentations: (1) Analysis of H-alpha Observations of High-altitude Coronal Condensations; (2) Multi-spectral Imaging of Coronal Activity; (3) Measurement and Modeling of Soft X-ray Loop Arcades; (4) A Study of the Origin and Dynamics of CMEs; and various poster presentations and thesis dissertations.

  20. Relation of large-scale coronal X-ray structure and cosmic rays. I - Sources of solar wind streams as defined by X-ray emission and H-alpha absorption features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, A. S.; Nolte, J. T.; Sullivan, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.; Mcintosh, P. S.; Gold, R. E.; Roelof, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the corona and the interplanetary medium during Carrington rotations 1601-1607 is discussed relative to recurrent high-speed solar wind streams and their coronal sources. Only streams A, C, D, and F recur on more than one rotation. Streams A and D are associated with coronal holes, while C and F originate in the high corona (20-50 solar radii) over faint X-ray emissions. The association of the streams with holes is confirmed by earlier findings that there are no large equatorial holes without an associated high-speed stream and that the area of the equatorial region of coronal holes is highly correlated with the maximum velocity observed in the associated stream near 1 AU.

  1. Position and flux stabilization of X-ray beams produced by double-crystal monochromators for EXAFS scans at the titanium K-edge.

    PubMed

    van Silfhout, Roelof; Kachatkou, Anton; Groppo, Elena; Lamberti, Carlo; Bras, Wim

    2014-03-01

    The simultaneous and active feedback stabilization of X-ray beam position and monochromatic beam flux during EXAFS scans at the titanium K-edge as produced by a double-crystal monochromator beamline is reported. The feedback is generated using two independent feedback loops using separate beam flux and position measurements. The flux is stabilized using a fast extremum-searching algorithm that is insensitive to changes in the synchrotron ring current and energy-dependent monochromator output. Corrections of beam height are made using an innovative transmissive beam position monitor instrument. The efficacy of the feedback stabilization method is demonstrated by comparing the measurements of EXAFS spectra on inhomogeneous diluted Ti-containing samples with and without feedback applied.

  2. On stellar X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.; Golub, L.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Stellar X-ray astronomy represents an entirely new astronomical discipline which has emerged during the past five years. It lies at the crossroads of solar physics, stellar physics, and general astrophysics. The present review is concerned with the main physical problems which arise in connection with a study of the stellar X-ray data. A central issue is the extent to which the extrapolation from solar physics is justified and the definition (if possible) of the limits to such extrapolation. The observational properties of X-ray emission from stars are considered along with the solar analogy and the modeling of X-ray emission from late-type stars, the modeling of X-ray emission from early-type stars, the physics of stellar X-ray emission, stellar X-ray emission in the more general astrophysical context, and future prospects.

  3. Some results from the exploration of the solar atmosphere with high-resolution x-ray-EUV spectroscopy at the Naval Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Doschek, G A

    2015-11-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has been one of the world leaders in high-resolution UV-x-ray solar spectroscopy. Much has been learned about the morphology and physical conditions in the atmosphere from spectroscopic instrumentation flown on orbiting spacecraft. In this short summary I discuss the solar atmosphere and our current knowledge of it, and show some of the results obtained by spectroscopic investigations at the Naval Research Laboratory. PMID:26560622

  4. X-ray topography study of LiB3O5 crystals grown from molybdate flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilenko, A. P.; Kolesnikov, A. V.; Trukhanov, E. M.; Pylneva, N. A.; Yurkin, A. M.; Atuchin, V. V.

    2003-10-01

    The real defect structure of LiB3O5 crystal grown by a top seeded solution growth method has been observed using x-ray projection and reflective topography. Space mapping of such defects as growth sector boundaries, striation and dislocations have been produced by the topography analysis. The density of the dislocations is as low as <30 cm-2. It has been shown that the dominant part of the dislocations detected is generated in the under-seed zone of the crystal.

  5. High Energy Solar Physics Data in Europe (HESPE): a European project for the exploitation of hard X-ray data in solar flare physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piana, M.; Csillaghy, A.; Kontar, E. P.; Fletcher, L.; Veronig, A. M.; Vilmer, N.; Hurford, G. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Schwartz, R. A.; Massone, A.; Krucker, S.; Benvenuto, F.; Etesi, L. I.; Guo, J.; Hochmuth, N.; Reid, H.

    2011-12-01

    It has been recognized since the early days of the space program that high-energy observations play a crucial role in understanding the basic mechanisms of solar eruptions. Unfortunately, the peculiar nature of this radiation makes it so difficult to extract useful information from it that non-conventional observational techniques together with complex data analysis procedures must be adopted. HESPE is a European project funded within the seventh Framework Program, with the aim of realizing computational methods for solar high-energy data analysis and technological tools for the intelligent exploitation of science-ready products. Such products and methods are put at disposal of the solar, heliospheric and space weather communities, who will exploit them in order to build flare prediction models and to integrate the information extracted from hard X-rays and gamma rays data, with the one extracted from other wavelengths data.

  6. Design and fabrication of a CCD camera for use with relay optics in solar X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Configured as a subsystem of a sounding rocket experiment, a camera system was designed to record and transmit an X-ray image focused on a charge coupled device. The camera consists of a X-ray sensitive detector and the electronics for processing and transmitting image data. The design and operation of the camera are described. Schematics are included.

  7. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  9. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  10. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  11. IMPULSIVE PHASE CORONAL HARD X-RAY SOURCES IN AN X3.9 CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qingrong; Petrosian, Vahe E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu

    2012-03-20

    We present the analysis of a pair of unusually energetic coronal hard X-ray (HXR) sources detected by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the impulsive phase of an X3.9 class solar flare on 2003 November 3, which simultaneously shows two intense footpoint (FP) sources. A distinct loop top (LT) coronal source is detected up to {approx}150 keV and a second (upper) coronal source up to {approx}80 keV. These photon energies, which were not fully investigated in earlier analysis of this flare, are much higher than commonly observed in coronal sources and pose grave modeling challenges. The LT source in general appears higher in altitude with increasing energy and exhibits a more limited motion compared to the expansion of the thermal loop. The high-energy LT source shows an impulsive time profile and its nonthermal power-law spectrum exhibits soft-hard-soft evolution during the impulsive phase, similar to the FP sources. The upper coronal source exhibits an opposite spatial gradient and a similar spectral slope compared to the LT source. These properties are consistent with the model of stochastic acceleration of electrons by plasma waves or turbulence. However, the LT and FP spectral index difference (varying from {approx}0 to 1) is much smaller than commonly measured and than that expected from a simple stochastic acceleration model. Additional confinement or trapping mechanisms of high-energy electrons in the corona are required. Comprehensive modeling including both kinetic effects and the macroscopic flare structure may shed light on this behavior. These results highlight the importance of imaging spectroscopic observations of the LT and FP sources up to high energies in understanding electron acceleration in solar flares. Finally, we show that the electrons producing the upper coronal HXR source may very likely be responsible for the type III radio bursts at the decimetric/metric wavelength observed during the impulsive phase of this

  12. A high-resolution gamma-ray and hard X-ray spectrometer for solar flare observations in Max 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Curtis, D. W.; Harvey, P.; Hurley, K.; Primbsch, J. H.; Smith, D. M.; Pelling, R. M.; Duttweiler, F.

    1988-01-01

    A long duration balloon flight instrument for Max 1991 designed to study the acceleration of greater than 10 MeV ions and greater than 15 keV electrons in solar flares through high resolution spectroscopy of the gamma ray lines and hard X-ray and gamma ray continuum is described. The instrument, HIREGS, consists of an array of high-purity, n-type coaxial germanium detectors (HPGe) cooled to less than 90 K and surrounded by a bismuth germanate (BGO) anticoincidence shield. It will cover the energy range 15 keV to 20 MeV with keV spectral resolution, sufficient for accurate measurement of all parameters of the expected gamma ray lines with the exception of the neutron capture deuterium line. Electrical segmentation of the HPGe detector into a thin front segment and a thick rear segment, together with pulse-shape discrimination, provides optimal dynamic range and signal-to-background characteristics for flare measurements. Neutrons and gamma rays up to approximately 0.1 to 1 GeV can be detected and identified with the combination of the HPGe detectors and rear BGO shield. The HIREGS is planned for long duration balloon flights (LDBF) for solar flare studies during Max 1991. The two exploratory LDBFs carried out at mid-latitudes in 1987 to 1988 are described, and the LDBFs in Antarctica, which could in principle provide 24 hour/day solar coverage and very long flight durations (20 to 30 days) because of minimal ballast requirements are discussed.

  13. Stelllar wind induced soft X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislyakova, Kristina; Fossati, Luca; Johnstone, Colin P.; Holmström, Mats; Zaitsev, Valery V.; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    We estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX) which produces soft X-ray radiation is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are produces by charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. This mechanism is know to generate X-ray emission of comets in the Solar system. It has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus and Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not effective for the Solar system giants. We present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar Hot Jupiters due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈ 1022 erg s-1, which is 106 times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss the possibility to observe the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  14. STELLAR WIND INDUCED SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Lammer, H.; Fossati, L.; Johnstone, C. P.; Holmström, M.; Zaitsev, V. V.

    2015-01-30

    In this Letter, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX), which produces soft X-ray emission, is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the solar system, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus, and the Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈10{sup 22} erg s{sup –1}, which is 10{sup 6} times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss also the possibility of observing the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  15. Stelllar wind induced soft X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislyakova, Kristina; Fossati, Luca; Johnstone, Colin P.; Holmström, Mats; Zaitsev, Valery V.; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    We estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX) which produces soft X-ray radiation is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are produces by charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. This mechanism is know to generate X-ray emission of comets in the Solar system. It has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus and Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not effective for the Solar system giants. We present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar Hot Jupiters due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈ 1022 erg s‑1, which is 106 times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss the possibility to observe the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  16. High-resolution X-ray spectra of solar flares. III - General spectral properties of X1-X5 type flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Kreplin, R. W.; Cohen, L.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectra of six class X1-X5 solar flares are discussed. The spectra were recorded by spaceborne Bragg crystal spectrometers in the ranges 1.82-1.97, 2.98-3.07 and 3.14-3.24 A. Electron temperatures derived from dielectronic satellite line to resonance line ratios for Fe XXV and Ca XIX are found to remain fairly constant around 22,000,000 and 16,000,000 K respectively during the rise phase of the flares, then decrease by approximately 6,000,000 K during the decay phase. Nonthermal motions derived from line widths for the April 27, 1979 event are found to be greatest during the rise phase (approximately 130 km/sec) and decrease to about 60 km/sec during decay. Volume emission measures for Fe XXV, Ca XIX and Ca XX are derived from photon fluxes as a function of temperature, and examination of the intensity behavior of the Fe K alpha emission as a function of time indicates that it is a result of fluorescence. Differences between the present and previous observations of temperature variation are discussed, and it is concluded that the flare plasmas are close to ionization equilibrium for the flares investigated.

  17. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays. PMID:27610860

  18. Diffusion entropy and waiting time statistics of hard-x-ray solar flares.

    PubMed

    Grigolini, Paolo; Leddon, Deborah; Scafetta, Nicola

    2002-04-01

    We show at work a technique of scaling detection based on evaluating the Shannon entropy of the diffusion process obtained by converting the time series under study into trajectories. This method, called diffusion entropy, affords information that cannot be derived from the direct evaluation of waiting times. We apply this method to the analysis of the distribution of time distance tau between two nearest-neighbor solar flares. This traditional part of the analysis is based on the direct evaluation of the distribution function psi(tau), or of the probability Psi(tau), that no time distance smaller than a given tau is found. We adopt the paradigm of the inverse power-law behavior, and we focus on the determination of the inverse power index mu, without ruling out different asymptotic properties that might be revealed, at larger scales, with the help of richer statistics. We then use the DE method, with three different walking rules, and we focus on the regime of transition to scaling. This regime of transition and the value of the scaling parameter itself, delta, depends on the walking rule adopted, a property of interest to shed light on the slow process of transition from dynamics to thermodynamics often occurring under anomalous statistical conditions. With the first two rules the transition regime occurs throughout a large time interval, and the information contained in the time series is transmitted, to a great extent, to it, as well as to the scaling regime. By using the third rule, on the contrary, the same information is essentially conveyed to the scaling regime, which, in fact, emerges very quickly after a fast transition process. We show that the DE method not only causes to emerge the long-range correlation with a given mu < 3, and so a basin of attraction different from the ordinary Gaussian one, but it also reveals the presence of memory effects induced by the time dependence of the solar flare rate. When this memory is annihilated by shuffling, the

  19. Diffusion entropy and waiting time statistics of hard-x-ray solar flares.

    PubMed

    Grigolini, Paolo; Leddon, Deborah; Scafetta, Nicola

    2002-04-01

    We show at work a technique of scaling detection based on evaluating the Shannon entropy of the diffusion process obtained by converting the time series under study into trajectories. This method, called diffusion entropy, affords information that cannot be derived from the direct evaluation of waiting times. We apply this method to the analysis of the distribution of time distance tau between two nearest-neighbor solar flares. This traditional part of the analysis is based on the direct evaluation of the distribution function psi(tau), or of the probability Psi(tau), that no time distance smaller than a given tau is found. We adopt the paradigm of the inverse power-law behavior, and we focus on the determination of the inverse power index mu, without ruling out different asymptotic properties that might be revealed, at larger scales, with the help of richer statistics. We then use the DE method, with three different walking rules, and we focus on the regime of transition to scaling. This regime of transition and the value of the scaling parameter itself, delta, depends on the walking rule adopted, a property of interest to shed light on the slow process of transition from dynamics to thermodynamics often occurring under anomalous statistical conditions. With the first two rules the transition regime occurs throughout a large time interval, and the information contained in the time series is transmitted, to a great extent, to it, as well as to the scaling regime. By using the third rule, on the contrary, the same information is essentially conveyed to the scaling regime, which, in fact, emerges very quickly after a fast transition process. We show that the DE method not only causes to emerge the long-range correlation with a given mu < 3, and so a basin of attraction different from the ordinary Gaussian one, but it also reveals the presence of memory effects induced by the time dependence of the solar flare rate. When this memory is annihilated by shuffling, the

  20. The temperature of solar flares determined from X-ray spectral line ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.

    1987-01-01

    The effect on derived solar flare plasma temperatures of (1) a power-law distribution of emission measure as a function of temperature, (2) a high-temperature isothermal source coupled to a low-temperature power-law distribution of emission measure, and (3) two isothermal sources is calculated for line ratios involving the ions S XV, Ca XIX, Ca XX, Fe XXV, Ni XXVII, and Fe XXVI. It is shown that if the Fe XXV temperature is less than about 25 million K, as is true for the majority of flares, then about 75 percent or more of the emission measure is produced by plasma at temperatures equal to or less than the Fe XXV temperature plus about 3 million K. If the Fe XXV temperature is 20 million K or higher, this percentage can be larger. This result is obtained even if a superhot component exists that extends up to several hundred million degrees. Temperatures determined from Fe XXVI demonstrate the presence of a superhot component.

  1. The Solar Flare 4: 10 keV X-ray Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The 4-10 keV solar flare spectrum includes highly excited lines of stripped Ca, Fe, and Ni ions as well as a continuum steeply falling with energy. Groups of lines at approximately 7 keV and approximately 8 keV, observed during flares by the broad-band RHESSI spectrometer and called here the Fe-line and Fe/Ni-line features, are formed mostly of Fe lines but with Ni lines contributing to the approximately 8 keV feature. Possible temperature indicators of these line features are discussed - the peak or centroid energies of the Fe-line feature, the line ratio of the Fe-line to the Fe/Ni-line features, and the equivalent width of the Fe-line feature. The equivalent width is by far the most sensitive to temperature. However, results will be confused if, as is commonly believed, the abundance of Fe varies from flare to flare, even during the course of a single flare. With temperature determined from the thermal continuum, the Fe-line feature becomes a diagnostic of the Fe abundance in flare plasmas. These results are of interest for other hot plasmas in coronal ionization equilibrium such as stellar flare plasmas, hot gas in galaxies, and older supernova remnants.

  2. Grazing-incidence spectrometer for soft X-ray solar imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Frassetto, Fabio; Coraggia, Stefano; Miotti, Paolo; Poletto, Luca

    2013-07-29

    The design and realization of a stigmatic grazing-incidence instrument for space applications to solar imaging spectroscopy is presented. We propose an optical layout in which imaging and spectral capabilities are decoupled by the use of crossed cylindrical mirrors. The design consists of a double telescope and a spectrograph: telescope I consists of a single cylindrical mirror with parabolic section, focusing the radiation on the entrance slit of the spectrograph in the spectral dispersion plane; telescope II consists of two cylindrical mirrors with aspherical section in Wolter configuration focusing the radiation on the spectrograph focal plane in the direction perpendicular to the spectral dispersion plane; the spectrograph consists of a grazing-incidence spherical variable-line-spaced grating with flat-field properties. Telescope II is crossed with respect to the grating and telescope I, i.e., is mounted with its tangential planes coincident with the grating equatorial plane, to decouple spectral and spatial focusing properties. The spectral resolution is preserved also for off-axis angles. The instrument that has been realized operates in the 4-26 nm spectral range and has a field of view of 0.5 deg to image the full Sun disk.

  3. Hard X-ray/gamma-ray and centimeter/millimeter observations of the 3 November 2003 solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N.; Dauphin, C.; Magun, A.; Lüthi, T.

    The 3 November 2003 flare at 09 50 UT was observed in the Hard X-ray HXR Gamma-ray GR domain by RHESSI Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and at centimeter millimeter wavelengths by the Bumishus observatory and the Bern nulling interferometer see e g Dauphin et al Adv Space Res 35 1805 2005 and Dauphin et al Astron Astrophys in press 2006 We shall further study here the shape of the HXR GR continuum observed by RHESSI and show that the spectrum presents evidence of a hardening of the accelerated electron distributions towards the MeV range We shall also discuss the relationship between HXR GR and centimeter millimeter emitting electrons and deduce the energy content in accelerated electrons The present results will be discussed with respect to results previously published on the comparison of bremsstrahlung and gyrosynchrotron emitting electrons obtained from observations of HXR GR spectra in a wide energy range and of centimeter millimeter radiation in a wide frequency range

  4. Probing the Electronic Structure of a Photoexcited Solar Cell Dye with Transient X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Benjamin E. Van; Huse, Nils; Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Lynch, Michael S.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Khalil, Munira

    2012-05-01

    This study uses transient X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy and timedependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to directly visualize the charge density around the metal atom and the surrounding ligands following an ultrafast metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) process in the widely used RuII solar cell dye, Ru(dcbpy)2(NCS)2 (termed N3). We measure the Ru L-edge XA spectra of the singlet ground (1A1) and the transient triplet (3MLCT) excited state of N34 and perform TD-DFT calculations of 2p core-level excitations, which identify a unique spectral signature of the electron density on the NCS ligands. We find that the Ru 2p, Ru eg, and NCS orbitals are stabilized by 2.0, 1.0, and 0.6 eV, respectively, in the transient 3MLCT state of the dye. These results highlight the role of the NCS ligands in governing the oxidation state of the Ru center.

  5. Solar flare count periodicities in different X-ray flare classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng-Xin; Xu, Jing-Chen

    2016-04-01

    Using the Morlet wavelet transform and the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), we investigate the periodic behaviours of C, M and X-class flare counts, respectively, recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) from 1983 May to 2014 December, which cover the two complete solar cycles (SCs) 22 and 23 as well as the part of declining phase of SC 21 and rise and maximum phases of SC 24. Analyses show that the periodic behaviours of various class flare counts are different. (1) Not all periods of various class flare counts appear dominant during the cycle maxima. For C-class flares, during SC 23, periods appear dominant during the maximum phase, however, compared to those during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase of SC 22; for M-class flares, during SCs 22 and 23, periods appear dominant during the cycle maxima; for X-class flares, during SC 22, almost all periods appear during the maximum phase; however, during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase compared to those during SC 22. (2) For C-class flares, the appearance of periods do not follow the amplitude of C-class flare cycles; while, for M and X-class flares, the appearance of periods follows the amplitude of the investigated corresponding class flare cycles. (3) From the overall trends, the 10 yr and longer time-scale trends of the monthly numbers of M and X-class flares, we can infer that the maximum values of the monthly M and X-class flare numbers would increase during SC 25.

  6. High-energy X-Ray Detection of G359.89-0.08 (Sgr A-E): Magnetic Flux Tube Emission Powered by Cosmic Rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Bauer, Franz E.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-03-01

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E > 10 keV) emission from the Galactic center non-thermal filament G359.89-0.08 (Sgr A-E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to ~50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic center monitoring campaign. The featureless power-law spectrum with a photon index Γ ≈ 2.3 confirms a non-thermal emission mechanism. The observed flux in the 3-79 keV band is FX = (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1, corresponding to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity LX = (2.6 ± 0.8) × 1034 erg s-1 assuming a distance of 8.0 kpc. Based on theoretical predictions and observations, we conclude that Sgr A-E is unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or supernova remnant-molecular cloud (SNR-MC) interaction, as previously hypothesized. Instead, the emission could be due to a magnetic flux tube which traps TeV electrons. We propose two possible TeV electron sources: old PWNe (up to ~100 kyr) with low surface brightness and radii up to ~30 pc or MCs illuminated by cosmic rays (CRs) from CR accelerators such as SNRs or Sgr A*.

  7. High-Energy X-Ray Detection of G359.89-0.08 (SGR A-E): Magnetic Flux Tube Emission Powered by Cosmic Rays?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Bauer, Franz E.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Zhang, Will

    2014-01-01

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E (is) greater than 10 keV) emission from the Galactic center non-thermal filament G359.89-0.08 (Sgr A-E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to approximately 50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic center monitoring campaign. The featureless power-law spectrum with a photon index gamma approximately equals 2.3 confirms a non-thermal emission mechanism. The observed flux in the 3-79 keV band is F(sub X) = (2.0 +/- 0.1) × 10(exp -12)erg cm(-2) s(-1) , corresponding to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity L(sub X) = (2.6+/-0.8)×10(exp 34) erg s(-1) assuming a distance of 8.0 kpc. Based on theoretical predictions and observations, we conclude that Sgr A-E is unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or supernova remnant-molecular cloud (SNR-MC) interaction, as previously hypothesized. Instead, the emission could be due to a magnetic flux tube which traps TeV electrons. We propose two possible TeV electron sources: old PWNe (up to (is) approximately 100 kyr) with low surface brightness and radii up to (is) approximately 30 pc or MCs illuminated by cosmic rays (CRs) from CR accelerators such as SNRs or Sgr A*.

  8. On the Evolution of the Inner Disk Radius with Flux in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of ∼8 R G, which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L/L Edd ∼ 0.4–0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  9. IMPLICATIONS OF TEMPORAL DEVELOPMENT OF LOCALIZED ULTRAVIOLET AND HARD X-RAY EMISSION FOR LARGE SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Coyner, Aaron J.; Alexander, David

    2009-11-01

    Ultraviolet and hard X-ray (HXR) emissions in solar flares provide observational signatures of the interaction of flare-accelerated particles with the chromospheric plasma. Earlier studies have shown clear evidence of temporal and spatial relationships between UV and HXR emission, suggesting a common physical origin. However, more recent spatially resolved case studies suggest significant variations in the spatial distributions of the emission signatures, implying that the large-scale magnetic topology of the flaring region must play a crucial role in the spatial and temporal development of the localized UV and HXR emission. We present here an analysis of spatially resolved HXR emission and localized UV emission sources from 11 M and X class flares with observations from RHESSI and high-cadence 1600 A observations from TRACE. Within each flare we address the overall temporal development of individual UV sources and relate them to associated impulsive bursts within the HXR flare profile. We find, for these large flares, that in the initial impulsive bursts of flare activity, the majority of the temporally correlated emission evolves in a series of localized co-spatial sources along the UV ribbons consistent with previous two-dimensional reconnection pictures. However, observations of impulses late in flares, show significant departures from the traditional co-spatial/co-temporal picture. The new results include extended UV ribbons with no corresponding HXR emission and marked spatial separations between temporally correlated sources of UV and HXR emission. In seven of the multi-burst events, we observe the development of independent sets of UV and HXR sources corresponding to the individual impulses seen in the temporal profile. The observed separations and the spatial development of co-temporal emission in multi-burst events emphasize the importance of a complex and time varying magnetic topology in shaping the observed emission distributions in both wavelengths

  10. X-ray studies of quasars with the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.; Branduardi, G.; Fabbiano, G.; Feigelson, E.; Giacconi, R.; Henry, J. P.; Avni, Y.; Elvis, M.; Pye, J. P.; Soltan, A.

    1979-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the X-ray properties of quasars conducted using the Einstein Observatory (HEAO 2) are reported. The positions, fluxes and luminosities of 35 known quasars were observed by the Einstein high-resolution imaging detector and the imaging proportional counter. Assuming optical redshifts as valid distance indicators, 0.5-4.5 keV X-ray luminosities ranging from 10 to the 43rd to 10 to the 47 ergs/sec are obtained, with evidence of very little cold gas absorption. Flux variability on a time scale of less than 10,000 sec is observed for the quasar OX 169, which implies a mass between 8 x 10 to the 5th and 2 x 10 to the 8th solar masses for the black hole assumed to be responsible for the emission. Preliminary results of the quasar survey also indicate that quasars contribute significantly to the diffuse X-ray background.

  11. X ray imaging microscope for cancer research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology employed during the Stanford MSFC LLNL Rocket X Ray Spectroheliograph flight established that doubly reflecting, normal incidence multilayer optics can be designed, fabricated, and used for high resolution x ray imaging of the Sun. Technology developed as part of the MSFC X Ray Microscope program, showed that high quality, high resolution multilayer x ray imaging microscopes are feasible. Using technology developed at Stanford University and at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Troy W. Barbee, Jr. has fabricated multilayer coatings with near theoretical reflectivities and perfect bandpass matching for a new rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). Advanced Flow Polishing has provided multilayer mirror substrates with sub-angstrom (rms) smoothnesss for the astronomical x ray telescopes and x ray microscopes. The combination of these important technological advancements has paved the way for the development of a Water Window Imaging X Ray Microscope for cancer research.

  12. X-ray and radio observations of energetic electrons produced in the 3 November 2003 solar flare at ~09:5000 UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Lüthi, T.; Magun, A.; Krucker, S.; Schwartz, R.; Trottet, G.

    Hard X-ray and radio observations provide complementary observations of energetic electrons produced in solar flares. The GOES X4 flare on 03 November 2003 at ˜ 09:50 UT was observed and imaged up to several 100 keV by the RHESSI experiment. It was simultaneously observed at metric/decimetric wavelengths by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) and at centimetric/millimetric wavelengths by radio instruments operated by the Institute of Applied Physics (University of Bern). We present in this contribution an analysis of these radio and X-ray data. The time profiles of the X-ray emission above 50 keV and of the centimetric/millimetric emissions show two main parts (impulsive emission lasting about three minutes) and a long duration emission (partially observed by RHESSI) separated in time by four minutes. At metric/decimetric wavelengths a type II burst with an unusually high frequency is observed between the impulsive emissions and the long duration radio continuum. Combined analysis of RHESSI sources at energies above a few hundred keV and of metric/decimetric sources observed by the NRH shows the extension in space of both X-ray and radio sources traced by energetic electrons between the impulsive part of the event and the late energetic X-ray phase associated with the strong radio continuum. Spectral analysis of the high energy X-ray continuum and of the centimetric/millimetric will be performed to infer the characteristics of energetic electrons in both parts of the events and to further investigate in this event the relationship between centimetric-millimetric emitting electrons and HXR/GR bremsstrahlung emitting ones.

  13. Numerical simulation of the effects of meteoroid ablation and solar EUV/X-ray radiation in the dayside ionosphere of Mars: MGS/MEX observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, B. M.; Haider, S. A.

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a model which produces three plasma layers simultaneously due to the impact of the meteoroids, solar X-ray (0.5-9 nm), and EUV (9-102.6 nm) radiation at altitude range 75-85 km, 100-115 km, and 135-140 km, respectively, in the dayside ionosphere of Mars. The calculated results are compared with the radio occultation measurements made by Mars Express (MEX) and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) on 18 April 2004 and 11 May 2005, when comets P/2003 WC7 (LINEAR Catalina) and 10P/Tempel 2 intersected the orbit of Mars, respectively. The densities of 21 ions (CO2+, O2+, CO+, O+, NO+, N2+, Mg+, Fe+, Si+, MgO+, FeO+, SiO+, MgCO2+, MgO2+, FeCO2+, FeO2+, SiCO2+, SiO2+, MgN2+, FeN2+, and SiN2+) and 10 neutral species (Mg, Fe, Si, MgO, FeO, SiO, MgCO3, FeCO3, MgO2, and FeO2) have been computed self-consistently for both days. The metallic ions are formed in the middle ionosphere due to the ablation of meteoroids. It is found that the middle ionosphere of Mars strongly depends on incoming mass and flux of the meteoroids. The meteoroids of fluxes 4.0 × 10-15 and 8.3 × 10-16 cm-2 s-1 for masses 4.5 × 10-7 g and 1.0 × 10-3 g have produced third layers, which are good in agreement with the observations made by MEX and MGS on 18 April 2004 and 11 May 2005, respectively.

  14. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  15. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  16. Evolution of chromospheres and coronae in solar mass stars - A far-ultraviolet and soft X-ray comparison of Arcturus /K2 III/ and Alpha Centauri A /G2 V/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    IUE far-UV and Einstein Observatory soft X-ray observations for the red giant Arcturus and the nearby yellow dwarf Alpha-Centauri A, which are archetypes of solar mass stars in different stages of evolution, are compared. Evidence is found for neither coronal soft X-ray emission from the red giant, at surface flux levels of only 0.0006 that detected previously for the yellow dwarf, nor C II and IV resonance line emission at surface flux levels of only 0.02 those of the yellow dwarf. The resonance line upper limits and previous detections of the C II intersystem UV multiplet 0.01 near 2325 A provide evidence for an Arcturus outer atmosphere that is geometrically extended, tenuous and cool. The red giant has, in addition, a prominent cool stellar wind. An extensive tabulation of line identifications, widths and fluxes for the IUE far-UV echelle spectra of the two stars is given, and two competing explanations for the Wilson-Bappu effect are discussed.

  17. Fast X-ray Oscillations during Magnetar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2007-01-01

    The giant flares produced by highly magnetized neutron stars, "magnetars," are the brightest sources of high energy radiation outside our solar system. Serendipitous observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) of the two most recent flares resulted in the discovery of high frequency oscillations in their X-ray fluxes. The frequencies of these oscillations range from approx. 20 Hz to as high as 1800 Hz, and may represent the first detection of global oscillation modes of neutron stars. Here I will present an observational and theoretical overview of these oscillations and discuss how they might allow us to probe neutron star interiors and dense matter physics.

  18. The role of EUV/X-ray solar activity and electron precipitations from radiation belts in the climate changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyan, Sergey; Voronin, Nikolai; Baranova, Lubov

    The authors associate the recently observed climate warming and carbon dioxide concentration growth in lower atmospheric layers with variations of the solar-geomagnetic activity contribution to global cloud formation and with significant decrease of carbon dioxide accumulation in forests in the process of photosynthesis. The contribution of the greenhouse effect of carbon-bearing gases to global warming turns out to be insignificant. We consider the impact of microwave emissions of the ionosphere disturbed by solar flares and magnetic storms on the troposphere and suggest the radio-optical trigger mechanism of the solar influence on weather and climate of the Earth, which consists of the following three stages: - the ionosphere absorbs the ionizing solar radiation and corpuscles from the radiation belts and transforms these into microwaves through the excitation of Rydberg states by electron impact (ionospheric photoelectron, secondary and Auger electrons); - the rates of formation and destruction of water cluster ions in the troposphere are regulated by the microwave radiation; - the clusters contribute to formation of clouds, which affects the energy flux of solar radiation through the troposphere and the flux of outgoing heat from the underlying surface. All stages of the proposed mechanism were strictly confirmed: amplification of ionospheric microwave radiation during solar flares and magnetic storms was detected; the regulation of humidity at altitude above 2 km by solar microwave emission during solar flares was registered; an influence of solar flares and magnetic storms on the cloudiness is distinctly registered at least in some geographic areas; a direct influence of solar-geomagnetic activity on the global total cloud cover in latest maximum of secular variability (in 1985 - in electromagnetic solar activity, and in 2003 - in geomagnetic activity) was discovered. Basing on analysis of satellite data on global cloud cover and radiation balance the

  19. Focusing and photon flux measurements of the 2.88-nm radiation at the sample plane of the soft x-ray microscope, based on capillary discharge source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, M. Fahad; Jancarek, Alexandr; Nevrkla, Michal; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Limpouch, Jiri; Pina, Ladislav

    2015-05-01

    Feasibility measurements leading to the development of a Soft X-ray (SXR) microscopy setup, based on capillary discharge XUV source is presented. Here the Z-pinching plasma is acting as a source of XUV radiation, emitting incoherent radiation in the "water-window" (λ = 2.3 - 4.4 nm) region of interest (natural contrast between the carbon and oxygen edges).This soft X-ray microscopy setup will realize imaging of the biological objects with high spatial resolution. The 2.88 nm radiation line is filtered out from the water-window band, and is focused by an axi-symmetric ellipsoidal mirror, coated with nickle. The focussed spot size is measured and reported. Flux measurements for the available number of photons (photons/pulse) at the sample plane has been carried out with AXUV PIN diode at the sample plane (slightly out of focus). For imaging, a fresnel zone plate lens will be used as an objective. The overall compact transmission SXR microscopy setup design is presented.

  20. Be/X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, Pablo

    2011-03-01

    The interest in X/ γ-ray Astronomy has grown enormously in the last decades thanks to the ability to send X-ray space missions above the Earth’s atmosphere. There are more than half a million X-ray sources detected and over a hundred missions (past and currently operational) devoted to the study of cosmic X/ γ rays. With the improved sensibilities of the currently active missions new detections occur almost on a daily basis. Among these, neutron-star X-ray binaries form an important group because they are among the brightest extra-solar objects in the sky and are characterized by dramatic variability in brightness on timescales ranging from milliseconds to months and years. Their main source of power is the gravitational energy released by matter accreted from a companion star and falling onto the neutron star in a relatively close binary system. Neutron-star X-ray binaries divide into high-mass and low-mass systems according to whether the mass of the donor star is above ˜8 or below ˜2 M⊙, respectively. Massive X-ray binaries divide further into supergiant X-ray binaries and Be/X-ray binaries depending on the evolutionary status of the optical companion. Virtually all Be/X-ray binaries show X-ray pulsations. Therefore, these systems can be used as unique natural laboratories to investigate the properties of matter under extreme conditions of gravity and magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to review the observational properties of Be/X-ray binaries. The open questions in Be/X-ray binaries include those related to the Be star companion, that is, the so-called “Be phenomenon”, such as, timescales associated to the formation and dissipation of the equatorial disc, mass-ejection mechanisms, V/ R variability, and rotation rates; those related to the neutron star, such as, mass determination, accretion physics, and spin period evolution; but also, those that result from the interaction of the two constituents, such as, disc truncation and mass

  1. The Lunar X-ray Observatory (LXO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray emission from charge exchange recombination between the highly ionized solar wind and neutral material i n Earth's magnetosheath has complicated x-ray observations of celestial objects with x-ray observatories including ROSAT, Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku. However, the charge-exchange emission can also be used as an important diagnostic of the solar-wind interacting with the magnetosheath. Soft x-ray observations from low-earth orbit or even the highly eccentric orbits of Chandra and XMM-Newton are likely superpositions of the celestial object of interest, the true extra-solar soft x-ray background, geospheric charge exchange, and heliospheric charge exchange. We show that with a small x-ray telescope placed either on the moon, in a similar vein as the Apollo ALSOP instruments, or at a stable orbit near L1, we can begin t o disentangle the complicated emission structure in the soft x-ray band. Here we present initial results of a feasibility study recently funded by NASA t o place a small x-ray telescope on the lunar surface. The telescope operates during lunar night to observe charge exchange interactions between the solar wind and magnetospheric neutrals, between the solar wind and the lunar atmosphere, and an unobstructed view of the soft x-ray background without the geospheric component.

  2. NEON INSIGHTS FROM OLD SOLAR X-RAYS: A PLASMA TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE CORONAL NEON CONTENT

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Jeremy J.

    2011-12-10

    An analysis using modern atomic data of fluxes culled from the literature for O VIII and Ne IX lines observed in solar active regions by the P78 and Solar Maximum Mission satellites confirms that the coronal Ne/O abundance ratio varies by a factor of two or more, and finds an increase in Ne/O with increasing active region plasma temperature. The latter is reminiscent of evidence for increasing Ne/O with stellar activity in low-activity coronae that reaches a 'neon saturation' in moderately active stars at approximately twice the historically accepted solar value of about 0.15 by number. We argue that neon saturation represents the underlying stellar photospheric compositions, and that low-activity coronae, including that of the Sun, are generally depleted in neon. The implication would be that the solar Ne/O abundance ratio should be revised upward by a factor of about two to n(Ne)/n(O) {approx} 0.3. Diverse observations of neon in the local cosmos provide some support for such a revision. Neon would still be of some relevance for reconciling helioseismology with solar models computed using recently advocated chemical mixtures with lower metal content.

  3. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  4. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Salah, Wa'el; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Hoorani, H.

    2009-09-15

    The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

  5. Installation and testing of a focusing mirror at beamline X28C for high flux x-ray radiolysis of biological macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Michael R.; Rekhi, Sandeep; Bohon, Jen; Gupta, Sayan; Abel, Donald; Toomey, John; Chance, Mark R.

    2008-02-15

    The NSLS X28C white-light beamline has been upgraded with a focusing mirror in order to provide increased x-ray density and a wide selection of beam shapes at the sample position. The cylindrical single crystal silicon mirror uses an Indalloy 51 liquid support bath as both a mechanism for heat transfer and a buoyant support to counter the effects of gravity and correct for minor parabolic slope errors. Calorimetric measurements were performed to verify that the calculated more than 200-fold increase in flux density is delivered by the mirror at the smallest beam spot. The properties of the focused beam relevant to radiolytic footprinting, namely, the physical dimensions of the beam, the effective hydroxyl radical dose delivered to the sample, and sample heating upon irradiation, have been studied at several mirror angles.

  6. X-RAY AND OPTICAL FLUX RATIO ANOMALIES IN QUADRUPLY LENSED QUASARS. II. MAPPING THE DARK MATTER CONTENT IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Pooley, David; Rappaport, Saul; Schechter, Paul L.; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2012-01-10

    We present a microlensing analysis of 61 Chandra observations of 14 quadruply lensed quasars. X-ray flux measurements of the individual quasar images give a clean determination of the microlensing effects in the lensing galaxy and thus offer a direct assessment of the local fraction of stellar matter making up the total integrated mass along the lines of sight through the lensing galaxy. A Bayesian analysis of the ensemble of lensing galaxies gives a most likely local stellar fraction of 7%, with the other 93% in a smooth, dark matter component, at a mean impact parameter R{sub c} of 6.6 kpc from the center of the lensing galaxy. We divide the systems into smaller ensembles based on R{sub c} and find that the most likely local stellar fraction varies qualitatively and quantitatively as expected, decreasing as a function of R{sub c} .

  7. Molecular Level Understanding of Interfaces and Excited State Electronic Structure in Organic Solar Cells Using Soft X-ray Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliboff, Matthew

    Transparent conductive oxides like indium tin oxide (ITO) are common substrates for optoelectronic devices, including organic light emitting diodes and organic solar cells. Tailoring the interface between the oxide and the active layer by adjusting the work function or wettability of the oxide can improve the performance of these devices in both emissive and photovoltaic applications. Molecular design of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) allows for a range of surface properties using the same oxide material. The molecular ordering and conformation adopted by the SAMs determine properties such as work function and wettability at these critical interfaces. I use angle-dependent near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, to determine the molecular orientations of a variety of dipolar phosphonic acid surface modifiers. For a model system, phenylphosphonic acid on indium zinc oxide, the SAMs prove to be surprisingly well-oriented, with the phenyl ring adopting a well-defined tilt angle of 12-16° from the surface normal. The NEXAFS results agree with polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) results and orientations calculated from density functional theory (DFT). These results not only provide a detailed picture of the molecular structure of a technologically important class of SAMs, but they also resolve a long-standing ambiguity regarding the vibrational-mode assignments for phosphonic acids on oxide surfaces, thus improving the utility of PM-IRRAS for future studies. The effect of fluorination on the orientation of these phosponic-acid SAMs is non-trivial, due to the combined effects of the fluorination on binding mode and steric packing. The latter effects are found to be more dominant in aliphatic SAMs, leading to a more upright orientation in the fluorinated SAM. In the aromatic case, the fluorinated SAM adopted a less upright orientation which I attribute to changes in binding mode. The relationship

  8. Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission with the DXL Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galeazzi, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F. S.; Prasai, K.; Robertson, I.; Snowden, S.; Thomas, N. E.; Uprety, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket is a NASA approved mission with a scheduled first launch in December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission of the SWCX from that of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) to improve our understanding of both. To separate the SWCX contribution from the LHB. DXL will use the SWCX signature due to the helium focusing cone at 1=185 deg, b=-18 deg, DXL uses large area propostionai counters, with an area of 1.000 sq cm and grasp of about 10 sq cm sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keY bands. Thanks to the large grasp, DXL will achieve in a 5 minule flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  9. High-energy X-ray detection of G359.89–0.08 (SGR A–E): Magnetic flux tube emission powered by cosmic rays?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Bauer, Franz E.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Tomsick, John A.; Christensen, Finn E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-03-20

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E > 10 keV) emission from the Galactic center non-thermal filament G359.89–0.08 (Sgr A–E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to ∼50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic center monitoring campaign. The featureless power-law spectrum with a photon index Γ ≈ 2.3 confirms a non-thermal emission mechanism. The observed flux in the 3-79 keV band is F{sub X} = (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10{sup –12} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, corresponding to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity L{sub X} = (2.6 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1} assuming a distance of 8.0 kpc. Based on theoretical predictions and observations, we conclude that Sgr A–E is unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or supernova remnant-molecular cloud (SNR-MC) interaction, as previously hypothesized. Instead, the emission could be due to a magnetic flux tube which traps TeV electrons. We propose two possible TeV electron sources: old PWNe (up to ∼100 kyr) with low surface brightness and radii up to ∼30 pc or MCs illuminated by cosmic rays (CRs) from CR accelerators such as SNRs or Sgr A*.

  10. SMM X-ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.; Haisch, Bernhard M. (Compiler); Lemen, James R. (Compiler); Acton, L. W.; Bawa, H. S.; Claflin, E. S.; Freeland, S. L.; Slater, G. L.; Kemp, D. L.; Linford, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The range of observing and analysis programs accomplished with the X-Ray Polychromator (XRP) instruments during the decline of solar cycle 21 and the rise of the solar cycle 22 is summarized. Section 2 describes XRP operations and current status. This is meant as a guide on how the instrument is used to obtain data and what its capabilities are for potential users. The science section contains a series of representative abstracts from recently published papers on major XRP science topics. It is not meant to be a complete list but illustrates the type of science that can come from the analysis of the XRP data. There then follows a series of appendixes that summarize the major data bases that are available. Appendix A is a complete bibliography of papers and presentations produced using XRP data. Appendix B lists all the spectroscopic data accumulated by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS). Appendix C is a compilation of the XRP flare catalogue for events equivalent to a GOES C-level flare or greater. It lists the start, peak and end times as well as the peak Ca XIX flux.

  11. Comprehensive Study of the X-Ray Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts Observed by Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Xi, Shao-Qiang; Yu, Hai; Wang, F. Y.; Mu, Hui-Jun; Lü, Lian-Zhong; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-06-01

    X-ray flares are generally supposed to be produced by later activities of the central engine, and may share a similar physical origin with the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper, we have analyzed all significant X-ray flares from the GRBs observed by Swift from 2005 April to 2015 March. The catalog contains 468 bright X-ray flares, including 200 flares with redshifts. We obtain the fitting results of X-ray flares, such as start time, peak time, duration, peak flux, fluence, peak luminosity, and mean luminosity. The peak luminosity decreases with peak time, following a power-law behavior {L}{{p}}\\propto {T}{peak,z}-1.27. The flare duration increases with peak time. The 0.3–10 keV isotropic energy of the distribution of X-ray flares is a log-normal peaked at {10}51.2 erg. We also study the frequency distributions of flare parameters, including energies, durations, peak fluxes, rise times, decay times, and waiting times. Power-law distributions of energies, durations, peak fluxes, and waiting times are found in GRB X-ray flares and solar flares. These distributions could be well explained by a fractal-diffusive, self-organized criticality model. Some theoretical models based on magnetic reconnection have been proposed to explain X-ray flares. Our result shows that the relativistic jets of GRBs may be dominated by Poynting flux.

  12. Comprehensive Study of the X-Ray Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts Observed by Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Xi, Shao-Qiang; Yu, Hai; Wang, F. Y.; Mu, Hui-Jun; Lü, Lian-Zhong; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-06-01

    X-ray flares are generally supposed to be produced by later activities of the central engine, and may share a similar physical origin with the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper, we have analyzed all significant X-ray flares from the GRBs observed by Swift from 2005 April to 2015 March. The catalog contains 468 bright X-ray flares, including 200 flares with redshifts. We obtain the fitting results of X-ray flares, such as start time, peak time, duration, peak flux, fluence, peak luminosity, and mean luminosity. The peak luminosity decreases with peak time, following a power-law behavior {L}{{p}}\\propto {T}{peak,z}-1.27. The flare duration increases with peak time. The 0.3-10 keV isotropic energy of the distribution of X-ray flares is a log-normal peaked at {10}51.2 erg. We also study the frequency distributions of flare parameters, including energies, durations, peak fluxes, rise times, decay times, and waiting times. Power-law distributions of energies, durations, peak fluxes, and waiting times are found in GRB X-ray flares and solar flares. These distributions could be well explained by a fractal-diffusive, self-organized criticality model. Some theoretical models based on magnetic reconnection have been proposed to explain X-ray flares. Our result shows that the relativistic jets of GRBs may be dominated by Poynting flux.

  13. Microwave and hard X-ray emissions during the impulsive phase of solar flares: Nonthermal electron spectrum and time delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, Ye-Ming; Li, Chung-Sheng

    1986-01-01

    On the basis of the summing-up and analysis of the observations and theories about the impulsive microwave and hard X-ray bursts, the correlations between these two kinds of emissions were investigated. It is shown that it is only possible to explain the optically-thin microwave spectrum and its relations with the hard X-ray spectrum by means of the nonthermal source model. A simple nonthermal trap model in the mildly-relativistic case can consistently explain the main characteristics of the spectrum and the relative time delays.

  14. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  15. The method of convergence to calculate particles fluxes in X rays spectrometry techniques. Application in nuclear compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, C.; Nieva, N.; Brizuela, H.; Heluani, S. P.

    2012-12-01

    A method to calculate particle fluxes applicable in most of the spectroscopy techniques is described. Flux intensities of backscattered or absorbed electrons and emitted photons are calculated using a method of convergence to solve the invariant embedding equations that are used to describe the particle trajectories inside a solid sample. Our results are found to be helpful to carry out a procedure for quantitative characterization using instruments such as electron probe microanalyser or other probes. Examples of application to calculate the composition of ternary alloys are given and are compared with the same calculations using another procedure.

  16. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  17. Determination of the structure and heating mechanisms of coronal loops from soft X-ray observations with the solar probe. [grazing incidence telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; Krieger, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    High resolution soft X-ray imaging from the solar probe is justified in terms of the expected scientific returns which include the determination of the temperature and density structure of a coronal loop. The advantages of the grazing incidence telescope over the multiple pinhole camera are discussed. An instrument package is described which includes a grazing incidence mirror, a thermal prefilter, a three position filter wheel and a focal plane detector baselined as an 800 by 800 back-illuminated charge coupled device. The structural assembly together with the data processing equipment would draw heavily on the designs being developed for the Solar Polar Mission.

  18. Solar Wind Charge Exchange X-ray emission from Mercury’s exosphere: Detectability with Bepi Colombo’s MIXS spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Dennerl, Konrad; Leblanc, François; Modolo, Ronan

    2015-11-01

    We have conducted preliminary hybrid simulations to calculate the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX) X-ray emission in Mercury’s exosphere. Our results imply that the OVII triplet emission intensity for standard slow solar wind conditions is of the same order as the one predicted by simulations for Mars and measured by Chandra in past observations of Mars. Using an oversimplified detector and observation geometry we explore the detectability of Mercury's SWCX emission by the MIXS spectrometer on board Bepi Colombo’s planetary orbiter (MPO).

  19. Soft X-ray emission in kink-unstable coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Rui; Vilmer, Nicole; Brun, Allan Sacha

    Solar flares are associated with intense soft X-ray emission generated by the hot flaring plasma in coronal magnetic loops. We investigate the temporal, spectral and spatial evolution of the properties of the thermal X-ray emission produced in simulated kink-unstable magnetic flux-ropes. The numerical setup used consists of a highly twisted loop embedded in a region of uniform and untwisted background coronal magnetic field. The magnetic flux-rope reconnects with the background flux after the triggering of the kink instability and is then allowed to relax to a lower energy state. Strong ohmic heating leads to strong and quick heating (up to more than 15 MK), to a strong peak of X-ray emission and to the hardening of the thermal X-ray spectrum. The emission pattern is often filamentary and the amount of twist deduced from the X-ray emission alone is considerably lower than the maximum twist in the simulated flux-ropes. The flux-rope plasma becomes strongly multi-thermal during the flaring episode. The emission measure evolves into a bi-modal distribution as a function of temperature during the saturation phase, and later converges to the power-law distribution mathrm{EM}~ T(-4.2) (during the relaxation/cooling) phase. These soft X-ray emission properties are maintained for a large range of coronal magnetic field strength, plasma density and flux-rope twist values.

  20. Reconstruction of the energy spectrum of electrons accelerated in the April 15, 2002 solar flare based on IRIS X-ray spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motorina, G. G.; Kudryavtsev, I. V.; Lazutkov, V. P.; Savchenko, M. I.; Skorodumov, D. V.; Charikov, Yu. E.

    2016-04-01

    We reconstruct the energy distribution of electrons accelerated in the April 15, 2002 solar flare on the basis of the data from the IRIS X-ray spectrometer onboard the CORONAS-F satellite. We obtain the solution to the integral equations describing the transformation of the spectrum of X-ray photons during the recording and reconstruction of the spectrum of accelerated electrons in the bremsstrahlung source using the random search method and the Tikhonov regularization method. In this event, we detected a singularity in the electron spectrum associated with the existence of a local minimum in the energy range 40-60 keV, which cannot be detected by a direct method.

  1. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  2. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  3. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  4. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  5. Radiation exposure due to cosmic rays and solar X-ray photons at various atmospheric heights in aviation range over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-07-01

    In this presentation we present our work on the continuous monitoring of radiation exposure in terms of effective dose rates, due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar X-rays at various altitudes within aviation range over India. As India belongs to equatorial region, there is negligible contribution from solar energetic particles (SEP). The calculation of cosmic ray counts as well as the solar X-ray photons are performed on the basis of the observation of various Dignity series balloon experiments on cosmic ray and solar high energy radiation studies, conducted by ICSP and Monte Carlo simulations performed with GEANT4 detector simulation software. The information on solar activity level from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES) are employed in the calculations. A program, which is done entirely in MATLAB is employed to update regularly in a website, where we show images of dose rate (μSv) distribution over India at four different heights within the aviation range (updating at an interval of 30 minutes) and the approximate dose rates thats should be experienced by a pilot in an entire flight time between pairs of stations distributed all over India.

  6. Analysis of Intermittency in Submillimeter Radio and Hard X-Ray Data During the Impulsive Phase of a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez de Castro, G.; Simões, P. J. A.; Raulin, J.-P.; Guimarães, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present an analysis of intermittent processes occurring during the impulsive phase of the flare SOL2012-03-13, using hard X-rays and submillimeter radio data. Intermittency is a key characteristic in turbulent plasmas and has so far only been analyzed for hard X-ray data. Since in a typical flare the same accelerated electron population is believed to produce both hard X-rays and gyrosynchrotron radiation, we compare the two time profiles by searching for intermittency signatures. For this, we define a cross-wavelet power spectrum, which is used to obtain the local intermittency measure, or {LIM}. When greater than three, the square {LIM} coefficients indicate a local intermittent process. The {LIM}2 coefficient distribution in time and scale helps to identify avalanche or cascade energy release processes. We find two different and well-separated intermittent behaviors in the submillimeter data: for scales greater than 20 s, a broad distribution during the rising and maximum phases of the emission seems to favor a cascade process; for scales below 1 s, short pulses centered on the peak time are representative of avalanches. When applying the same analysis to hard X-rays, we find that only the scales above 10 s produce a distribution related to a cascade energy fragmentation. Our results suggest that different acceleration mechanisms are responsible for tens of keV and MeV energy ranges of electrons.

  7. Analysis of Intermittency in Submillimeter Radio and Hard X-Ray Data During the Impulsive Phase of a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez de Castro, G.; Simões, P. J. A.; Raulin, J.-P.; Guimarães, O. M.

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of intermittent processes occurring during the impulsive phase of the flare SOL2012-03-13, using hard X-rays and submillimeter radio data. Intermittency is a key characteristic in turbulent plasmas and has so far only been analyzed for hard X-ray data. Since in a typical flare the same accelerated electron population is believed to produce both hard X-rays and gyrosynchrotron radiation, we compare the two time profiles by searching for intermittency signatures. For this, we define a cross-wavelet power spectrum, which is used to obtain the local intermittency measure, or {LIM}. When greater than three, the square {LIM} coefficients indicate a local intermittent process. The {LIM}2 coefficient distribution in time and scale helps to identify avalanche or cascade energy release processes. We find two different and well-separated intermittent behaviors in the submillimeter data: for scales greater than 20 s, a broad distribution during the rising and maximum phases of the emission seems to favor a cascade process; for scales below 1 s, short pulses centered on the peak time are representative of avalanches. When applying the same analysis to hard X-rays, we find that only the scales above 10 s produce a distribution related to a cascade energy fragmentation. Our results suggest that different acceleration mechanisms are responsible for tens of keV and MeV energy ranges of electrons.

  8. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  9. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  10. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  11. MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer Detection of Electron-induced X-ray Fluorescence from Mercury's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, R. D.; Nittler, L. R.; Weider, S. Z.; Rhodes, E. A.; Schriver, D.; Schlemm, C. E., II; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) onboard the MESSENGER spacecraft measures elemental abundances on the surface of Mercury by detecting fluorescent X-ray emissions induced on the planet's surface by the incident solar X-ray flux. The most prominent fluorescent lines are the Kα lines from the elements Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe (1-10 keV). The XRS began orbital observations on 23 March 2011 and has observed X-ray fluorescence from the surface of the planet during both "quiet" Sun and flaring conditions whenever a sunlit portion of Mercury has been within the XRS field of view. XRS can detect the characteristic X-rays of Mg, Al, and Si during quiet-Sun conditions, but solar flares are required to produce measureable signals from the elements of higher atomic number such as S, Ca, Ti, and Fe. Nevertheless, X-ray fluorescence up to the Ca fluorescent line (3.69 keV) has been detected from Mercury's surface at times when the XRS field of view included only unlit portions of the planet or during quiet-Sun illumination. To date, seven such events have been detected and are identified as electron-induced X-ray emission produced by ~1-10 keV electrons interacting with Mercury's surface. Electrons in this energy range were detected by the XRS during the three Mercury flybys, and since the beginning of orbital operations electrons of this same energy range have been detected by XRS during almost every orbit. These electron events last from minutes to tens of minutes. Electron transport models suggest that a large percentage of these quasi-trapped electrons do not complete even a single orbit about Mercury before impacting the surface. Knowledge of the precipitating electron distribution at the planet's surface makes it possible to infer surface composition from the measured fluorescent spectra, providing additional measurement opportunities for the XRS.

  12. X-ray response of CdZnTe detectors grown by the vertical Bridgman technique: Energy, temperature and high flux effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbene, L.; Gerardi, G.; Turturici, A. A.; Raso, G.; Benassi, G.; Bettelli, M.; Zambelli, N.; Zappettini, A.; Principato, F.

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, CdZnTe (CZT) is one of the key materials for the development of room temperature X-ray and gamma ray detectors and great efforts have been made on both the device and the crystal growth technologies. In this work, we present the results of spectroscopic investigations on new boron oxide encapsulated vertical Bridgman (B-VB) grown CZT detectors, recently developed at IMEM-CNR Parma, Italy. Several detectors, with the same electrode layout (gold electroless contacts) and different thicknesses (1 and 2.5 mm), were realized: the cathode is a planar electrode covering the detector surface (4.1×4.1 mm2), while the anode is a central electrode (2×2 mm2) surrounded by a guard-ring electrode. The detectors are characterized by electron mobility-lifetime product (μeτe) values ranging between 0.6 and 1·10-3 cm2/V and by low leakage currents at room temperature and at high bias voltages (38 nA/cm2 at 10000 V/cm). The spectroscopic response of the detectors to monochromatic X-ray and gamma ray sources (109Cd, 241Am and 57Co), at different temperatures and fluxes (up to 1 Mcps), was measured taking into account the mitigation of the effects of incomplete charge collection, pile-up and high flux radiation induced polarization phenomena. A custom-designed digital readout electronics, developed at DiFC of University of Palermo (Italy), able to perform a fine pulse shape and height analysis even at high fluxes, was used. At low rates (200 cps) and at room temperature (T=25 °C), the detectors exhibit an energy resolution FWHM around 4% at 59.5 keV, for comparison an energy resolution of 3% was measured with Al/CdTe/Pt detectors by using the same electronics (A250F/NF charge sensitive preamplifier, Amptek, USA; nominal ENC of 100 electrons RMS). At high rates (750 kcps), energy resolution values of 7% and 9% were measured, with throughputs of 2% and 60% respectively. No radiation polarization phenomena were observed at room temperature up to 1 Mcps (241Am source, 60 ke

  13. Hard X-ray Spectroscopic, Microwave and H-alpha Linear Polarization Studies with Hard X-Ray Observations from HESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiplinger, Alan L.

    2005-01-01

    The Principal Investigator (P.I.) has been pursuing a three year grant under NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Guest Investigator Program in support of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). An objective of these efforts is to combine X-ray and other data on solar flares, coronal mass ejections and interplanetary particle events in order to obtain a more comprehensive recognition of signatures, and understanding of interplanetary proton events. Thus, part of these efforts are to investigate if signatures seen in hard X-rays and microwaves can lead to better predictions of interplanetary proton events that can be dangerous to astronauts and spacecraft. The original proposal was written in May, 2000 and it discusses a three-pronged approach for data comparisons with three new types of instrumentation observing at X-ray, microwave and optical wavelengths. The major impetus behind this work and the proposal is that the P.I. discovered a strong correlation between a particular type of hard X-ray signature seen in spectral evolutions and interplanetary proton events (Kiplinger, 1995). The basic signature is that hard X-ray flux peaks either exhibit spectra that soften on their decays (Le. show fewer and fewer high energy X-rays with time) or they harden during decays (i.e. high energy X-rays decay significantly slower that lower energy X-rays). This signature is called progressive hardening. Studies were conducted over an eight-year period of data from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) of the Solar maximum mission. Out of the 750 well observed flares studied, 41 flares had major associated proton events. Of these, 29 events were predicted on the basis of progressive hardening for a hit rate of 71%. The 152 largest flares had a hit rate of 82%.

  14. A DISTINCT PEAK-FLUX DISTRIBUTION OF THE THIRD CLASS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: A POSSIBLE SIGNATURE OF X-RAY FLASHES?

    SciTech Connect

    Veres, P.; Bagoly, Z.; Meszaros, A.; Balazs, L. G.

    2010-12-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous events in the universe. Going beyond the short-long classification scheme, we work in the context of three burst populations with the third group of intermediate duration and softest spectrum. We are looking for physical properties which discriminate the intermediate duration bursts from the other two classes. We use maximum likelihood fits to establish group memberships in the duration-hardness plane. To confirm these results we also use k-means and hierarchical clustering. We use Monte Carlo simulations to test the significance of the existence of the intermediate group and we find it with 99.8% probability. The intermediate duration population has a significantly lower peak flux (with 99.94% significance). Also, long bursts with measured redshift have higher peak fluxes (with 98.6% significance) than long bursts without measured redshifts. As the third group is the softest, we argue that we have related them with X-ray flashes among the GRBs. We give a new, probabilistic definition for this class of events.

  15. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  16. Studies on solar hard X-Rays and gamma-rays: Compton backscatter, anisotropy, polarization and evidence for two phases of acceleration. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of solar X-rays and gamma-rays from large flares show that the hard X-ray spectrum extends into the gamma ray region, where a flattening in the spectrum of the continuum emission is observed above about 1 MeV. This emission is believed to be due to bremsstrahlung. In addition to electron-proton collisions, at energies greater than approximately 500 keV, bremsstrahlung due to electron-electron collisions becomes significant. Bremsstrahlung production was calculated for a variety of electron spectra extending from the nonrelativistic region to relativistic energies and electron-electron bremsstrahlung is taken into account. By comparing these calculations with data, it is shown that the flattening in the spectrum of the continuum emission can be best explained by an electron spectrum consisting of two distinctive components. This evidence, together with information on the X-ray and gamma ray time profiles, implied the existence of two phases of acceleration. The first phase accelerates electrons mainly up to about several hundred keV; the second phase accelerates a small fraction of the electrons accelerated in the first phase to relativistic energies and accelerates protons to tens and hundreds of MeV.

  17. X-rays from the youngest stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  18. Solar flare soft-X-ray spectra from Very Low Frequency observations of ionospheric modulations: Possibility of uninterrupted observation of non-thermal electron-plasma interaction in solar atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    The hard and soft X-ray regions of a solar flare spectrum are the manifestation of interaction, namely of bremsstrahlung radiation of the non-thermal electrons moving inward in the denser part of the solar atmosphere with the plasma heated by those energetic electrons. The continuous and uninterrupted knowledge of X-ray photon spectra of flares are of great importance to derive information on the electron acceleration and hence time-evolution of energy transport and physics during solar flares. Satellite observations of solar X-ray spectrum are often limited by the restricted windows in each duty cycle to avoid the interaction of detectors and instruments with harmful energetic charge particles. In this work we have tried to tackle the problem by examining the possibility of using Earth's ionosphere and atmosphere as the detector of such transient events. Earth's lower ionosphere and upper atmosphere are the places where the X-rays and gamma-rays from such astronomical sources are absorbed. The electron-ion production rates due to the ionization of such energetic photons at different heights depend on the intensity and wavelength of the injected spectra and hence vary from one source to another. Obviously the electron and ion density vs. altitude profile has the imprint of the incident photon spectrum. As a preliminary exercise we developed a novel deconvolution method to extract the soft X-ray part of spectra of some solar flares of different classes from the electron density profiles obtained from Very Low Frequency (VLF) observation of lower ionosphere during those events. The method presented here is useful to carry out a similar exercise to infer the higher energy part of solar flare spectra and spectra of more energetic events such as the GRBs, SGRs etc. with the possibilities of probing even lower parts of the atmosphere.

  19. High-flux solar photon processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lorents, D.C.; Narang, S.; Huestis, D.C.; Mooney, J.L.; Mill, T.; Song, H.K.; Ventura, S.

    1992-06-01

    This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

  20. Improved Ga grading of sequentially produced Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells studied by high resolution X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Schöppe, Philipp; Schnohr, Claudia S.; Oertel, Michael; Kusch, Alexander; Johannes, Andreas; Eckner, Stefanie; Reislöhner, Udo; Ronning, Carsten; Burghammer, Manfred; Martínez-Criado, Gema

    2015-01-05

    There is particular interest to investigate compositional inhomogeneity of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell absorbers. We introduce an approach in which focused ion beam prepared thin lamellas of complete solar cell devices are scanned with a highly focused synchrotron X-ray beam. Analyzing the resulting fluorescence radiation ensures high resolution compositional analysis combined with high spatial resolution. Thus, we are able to detect subtle variations of the Ga/(Ga + In) ratio down to 0.01 on a submicrometer scale. We observed that for sequentially processed solar cells a higher selenization temperature leads to absorbers with almost homogenous Ga/(Ga + In) ratio, which significantly improved the conversion efficiency.