Science.gov

Sample records for solid interstellar material

  1. Interstellar and interplanetary solids in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartois, Emmanuel; Alata, Ivan; Engrand, Cécile; Brunetto, Rosario; Duprat, Jean; Pino, Thomas; Quirico, Eric; Remusat, Laurent; Bardin, Noémie; Mostefaoui, Smail; Morinaud, Gilles; Crane, Bruno; Szwec, Nicolas; Delauche, Lucie; Jamme, Frédéric; Sandt, Christophe; Dumas, Paul

    The composition of interstellar matter is driven by environmental parameters and results from extreme interstellar medium physico-chemical conditions. Astrochemists must rely on remote observations to monitor and analyze the interstellar solids composition. They bring additional information from the study of analogues produced in the laboratory, placed in simulated space environments. Planetologists and cosmochemists access and spectroscopically examine collected extraterrestrial material in the laboratory. Diffuse interstellar medium and molecular clouds observations set constraints on the composition of organic solids that can then be compared with collected extraterrestrial materials analyses, to shed light on their possible links.

  2. Presolar/Interstellar Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will review much of our current understanding of the origins, nature, and evolution of materials in circumstellar and interstellar space. I will begin by familiarizing the audience with some of the nomenclature associated the field, reviewing the lifecycle of dust in space, and pointing out where the speakers that follow will address portions of the lifecycle in greater detail. I will then address the different techniques used to study interstellar materials, paying particular attention to (i) telescopic remote sensing of the dust currently in interstellar space, (ii) laboratory studies of individual interstellar grains found in meteorites and other extraterrestrial materials, and (iii) laboratory simulation experiments. To complete the talk, I will focus on the nature of interstellar organic compounds as a particular example of how these disparate techniques can be used to improve our understanding of interstellar matter. While interstellar organics will be addressed in general, particular attention will be made to that portion of the organic inventory that may play a role in the origin and evolution of life on planetary surfaces.

  3. Interstellar Material towards eta UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Jenkins, E. B.; Welty, D. E.; Johns-Krull, C.

    1999-05-01

    The star eta UMa (B3 V, vsini=205 km s(-1) , d=31 pc, l=101(o) , b=+65(o) ) samples nearby interstellar gas in a high latitude direction relatively devoid of material. IMAPS, Hubble GHRS Echelle, and ground based optical data are combined to present a comprehensive picture of the interstellar material (ISM) in this direction. Two main components dominate: the blue-shifted component which appears to be ionized, and the dominant, red-shifted, component which exhibits a low electron density ( ~ 0.2 cm(-3) ). However, the Mg(o/Mg^+) ratio and C(+) fine-structure lines yield different ionizations, depending on the adopted temperature, similar to differences found in the diffuse material towards 23 Ori (Welty et al. 1999). The IMAPS and GHRS data give C, N, O, and Fe column densities, which form the basis for calculating the gas-to-dust mass ratio for the main component using a ``missing mass'' calculation combined with an assumed reference abundance (Frisch et al. 1999). Comparing the eta UMa value with other diffuse cloud values then further constrains uncertainties in N(H(o) ) values for this sightline.

  4. Interstellar material in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    All the substance of the Earth and other terrestrial planets once existed in the form of interstellar grains and gas. A major aspect of solar system formation (and undoubtedly of star formation generally) is the complex series of processes that converted infalling interstellar grains into planets. A cryptic record of these processes is preserved in certain samples of planetary materials, such as chondritic meteorites, that were preserved in a relatively unchanged form since the beginning. It is to be expected that some of these primitive materials might contain or even consist of preserved presolar interstellar grains. The identification and study of such grains, the ancestors of our planetary system, is a matter of intense interest. Types of primitive material accessible or potentially accessible, and component of or relationship to presolar interstellar grains are discussed.

  5. Les Johnson Views Interstellar Sail Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Interstellar Propulsion Research department are proposing different solutions to combustion propellants for future space travel. One alternative being tested is the solar sail. The idea is, once deployed, the sail will allow solar winds to propel a spacecraft away from Earth and towards its destination. This would allow a spacecraft to travel indefinitely without the need to refuel during its ong journey. Thin reflective sails could be propelled through space by sunlight, microwave beams, or laser beams, just as the wind pushes sailboats on Earth. The sail will be the largest spacecraft ever built, sparning 440 yards, twice the diameter of the Louisiana Super Dome. Construction materials are being tested in a simulated space environment, where they are exposed to harsh conditions to test their performance and durability in extremely hot and cold temperatures. A leading candidate for the construction material is a carbon fiber material whose density is less than 1/10 ounce per square yard, the equivalent of flattening one raisin to the point that it covers a square yard. In space, the material would unfurl like a fan when it is deployed from an expendable rocket. This photo shows Les Johnson, manager of MSFC's Interstellar Propulsion Research Center holding the rigid, lightweight carbon fiber. An artist's concept of the sail is on the right. Mankind's first venture outside of our solar system is proposed for launch in a 2010 timeframe. An interstellar probe, powered by the fastest spacecraft ever flown, will zoom toward the stars at 58 miles per second. It will cover the distance from New York to Los Angeles in less than a minute and will travel over 23 billion miles beyond the edge of the solar system.

  6. Cometary Silicates: Interstellar and Nebular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    Evidence for interstellar material in comets is deduced from IR spectra, insitu measurements of Halley, and chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs). IR spectra of comets reveal the spectrally active minerals: amorphous carbon, amorphous silicates, and (in some comets) crystalline silicates. Evidence suggests amorphous silicates are of interstellar origin while crystalline silicates are of nebular origin. 10 microns spectra of comets and submicron amorphous silicate spherules in CP IDPs have shapes similar to lines-of-sight through the ISM. Thermal emission models of cometary IR spectra require Fe-bearing amorphous silicates. Fe-bearing amorphous silicates may be Fe-bearing crystalline silicates formed in AGB outflows that are amorphized through He+ ion bombardment in supernova shocks in the ISM. Crystalline silicates in comets, as revealed by IR spectra, and their apparent absence in the ISM, argues for their nebular origin. The high temperatures (less than l000 K) at which crystals form or are annealed occur in the inner nebula or in nebular shocks in the 5-10 AU region. Oxygen isotope studies of CP IDPs show by mass only 1 % of the silicate crystals are of AGB origin. Together this suggests crystalline silicates in comets are probably primitive grains from the early solar nebula.

  7. Chemical Evolution of Interstellar Dust into Planetary Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomenkova, M. N.; Chang, S.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Comets are believed to retain some interstellar materials, stored in fairly pristine conditions since-their formation. The composition and properties of cometary dust grains should reflect those of grains in the outer part of the protosolar nebula which, at least in part, were inherited from the presolar molecular cloud. However, infrared emission features in comets differ from their interstellar counterparts. These differences imply processing of interstellar material on its way to incorporation in comets, but C and N appear to be retained. Overall dust evolution from the interstellar medium (ISM) to planetary materials is accompanied by an increase in proportion of complex organics and a decrease in pure carbon phases. The composition of cometary dust grains was measured in situ during fly-by missions to comet Halley in 1986. The mass spectra of about 5000 cometary dust grains with masses of 5 x 10(exp -17) - 5 x 10(exp -12) g provide data about the presence and relative abundances of the major elements H, C, N, O,Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni. The bulk abundances of major rock-forming elements integrated over all spectra were found to be solar within a factor of 2, while the volatile elements H, C, N, O in dust are depleted in respect to their total cosmic abundances. The abundances of C and N in comet dust are much closer to interstellar than to meteoritic and are higher than those of dust in the diffuse ISM. In dense molecular clouds dust grains are covered by icy mantles, the average composition of which is estimated to be H:C:N:O = 96:14:1:34. Up to 40% of elemental C and O may be sequestered in mantles. If we use this upper limit to add H, C, N and O as icy mantle material to the abundances residing in dust in the diffuse ISM, then the resulting values for H. C, and N match cometary abundances. Thus, ice mantles undergoing chemical evolution on grains in the dense ISM appear to have been transformed into less volatile and more complex organic

  8. Ortho and parahydrogen in interstellar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, R. R.; Harteck, P.

    1979-01-01

    The ortho/para molecular hydrogen ratio in the interstellar medium is considered. It is shown that the ortho/para ratio will be 3:1 in practically all chemical reactions, even at relatively low temperatures. Two examples of exothermic processes that will result in the formation of a 3:1 ortho:para ratio, corresponding to a high-temperature equilibrium, are examined: H2 formation via three-body or surface recombination and catalytic recombination involving electrons and H(-) ions. Gas-phase scrambling ion reactions are also discussed, and it is suggested that virtually all the H2 equilibrated via scrambling reactions involving H(+) and H3(+) ions should exist as parahydrogen in the J ? 0 quantum state. Arguments are given that deuterium cannot interfere with the long scrambling chain that results in parahydrogen formation.

  9. Laboratory Formation and Analysis of the Materials Comprising Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Alan Douglas

    The optical properties of interstellar dust analogs are investigated. Thin, solid, amorphous films are deposited on a substrate through excimer laser ablation. This process is analogous to the vapour deposition of atoms and ions which is thought to occur in stellar outflows and the interstellar medium (ISM). Refractive indices are calculated for typical polymeric hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) films. Thickness dependent void structure is shown to influence the resultant density of the substance. Refractive indices are also determined for amorphous magnesium silicates in both the pyroxene (MgSiO3) and olivine (Mg2SiO4) composites. A plausible dust grain model is constructed which successfully reproduces the major features of the diffuse interstellar extinction. The effects of thermal annealing and dehydrogenation of HAC are investigated. The resulting graphitized HAC is shown to exhibit a spectral signature which is commonly associated with gas phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Thermal emission from HAC is observed for the first time and is shown to be an excellent match to various anomalous unidentified infrared (UIR) emitters. The emission from HAC closely resembles those rare sources labelled Type B UIR emitters in recent works by Geballe (1996) and Tokunaga (1996). Near threshold laser ionization mass spectroscopy (LIMS) of HAC is shown to produce large ionized molecular clusters including fullerenes. The astrophysical implications of these results are discussed.

  10. Solid breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.; Clemmer, R.G.; Hollenber, G.w.

    1981-01-01

    Increased attention is being given to the consideration of lithium-containing ceramic materials for use as breeder blankets in fusion devices. These materials, e.g., Li/sub 2/O, ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/, Li/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/, Li/sub 2/ZrO/sub 3/, etc., are attractive because of their inherent safety advantages. At present, there is a broad scope of laboratory and irradiation activities in force to provide the requisite data enabling selection of th prime-candidate solid breeder material.

  11. Cometary Materials Originating from Interstellar Ices: Clues from Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresneau, A.; Abou Mrad, N.; d’Hendecourt, L. LS; Duvernay, F.; Flandinet, L.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Vuitton, V.; Thissen, R.; Chiavassa, T.; Danger, G.

    2017-03-01

    We use laboratory experiments to derive information on the chemistry occurring during the evolution of astrophysical ices from dense molecular clouds to interplanetary objects. Through a new strategy that consists of coupling very high resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), we investigate the molecular content of the organic residues synthesized from different initial ice compositions. We also obtain information on the evolution of the soluble part of the residues after their over-irradiation. The results give insight into the role of water ice as a trapping and diluting agent during the chemical evolution. They also give information about the importance of the amount of ammonia in such ices, particularly regarding its competition with the carbon chemistry. All of these results allow us to build a first mapping of the evolution of soluble organic matter based on its chemical and physical history. Furthermore, our results suggest that interstellar ices should lead to organic materials enriched in heteroatoms that present similarities with cometary materials but strongly differ from meteoritic organic material, especially in their C/N ratios.

  12. Modelling interstellar physics and chemistry: implications for surface and solid-state processes.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-13

    We discuss several types of regions in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and other galaxies in which the chemistry appears to be influenced or dominated by surface and solid-state processes occurring on or in interstellar dust grains. For some of these processes, for example, the formation of H₂ molecules, detailed experimental and theoretical approaches have provided excellent fundamental data for incorporation into astrochemical models. In other cases, there is an astrochemical requirement for much more laboratory and computational study, and we highlight these needs in our description. Nevertheless, in spite of the limitations of the data, it is possible to infer from astrochemical modelling that surface and solid-state processes play a crucial role in astronomical chemistry from early epochs of the Universe up to the present day.

  13. Laboratory and observational study of the interrelation of the carbonaceous component of interstellar dust and solar system materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sanford, S. A.; Schutte, W. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1991-01-01

    By studying the chemical and isotopic composition of interstellar ice and dust, one gains insight into the composition and chemical evolution of the solid bodies in the solar nebula and the nature of the material subsequently brought into the inner part of the solar system by comets and meteorites. It is now possible to spectroscopically probe the composition of interstellar ice and dust in the mid-infrared, the spectral range which is most diagnostic of fundamental molecular vibrations. We can compare these spectra of various astronomical objects (including the diffuse and dense interstellar medium, comets, and the icy outer planets and their satellites) with the spectra of analogs we produce in the laboratory under conditions which mimic those in these different objects. In this way one can determine the composition and abundances of the major constituents of the various ices and place general constraints on the types of organics coating the grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. In particular we have shown the ices in the dense clouds contain H2O, CH3OH, CO, perhaps some NH3 and H2CO, we well as nitriles and ketones or esters. Furthermore, by studying the photochemistry of these ice analogs in the laboratory, one gains insight into the chemistry which takes place in interstellar/precometary ices. Chemical and spectroscopic studies of photolyzed analogs (including deuterated species) are now underway. The results of some of these studies will be presented and implications for the evolution of the biogenic elements in interstellar dust and comets will be discussed.

  14. The Abundances of Solid N2 and Gaseous CO2 in Interstellar Dense Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Goorvitch, David; Teixeira, Teresa C. V. S.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present 2338-2322 per centimeter (4.277-4.307 micrometer) infrared spectra of a number of N2-containing mixed molecular ices and demonstrate that the strength of the infrared "forbidden" band due to the N=N stretch near 2328 per centimeter (4.295 micrometer) is extremely sensitive to the composition of the ice. The strength of the 2328 per centimeter N2 fundamental is significantly enhanced relative to that of pure N2 ice when NH3, H2O, or CO2 are present, but is largely unaffected by the presence of CO, CH4 or O2. We use the laboratory data in coil junction with ISO data that probes several lines-of-sight through dense molecular clouds to place limits on the abundance of interstellar solid phase N2 and the composition of the ices. Deriving upper limits is complicated by the presence of overlapping absorptions due to CO2 gas in the clouds and, in some cases, to photospheric CO in the background star. These upper limits are just beginning to be low enough to constrain interstellar grain models and the composition of possible N2-bearing interstellar ices. We outline the search criteria that will need to be met if solid interstellar N2 is to be detected in the future. We also discuss some of the implications of the presence of warm CO2 gas along the lines-of-sight to embedded protostars and demonstrate that its presence may help resolve certain puzzles associated with the previously derived gas/solid CO2 ratios and the relative abundances of polar and nonpolar ices towards these objects. Finally, we briefly comment on the possible implications of these results for the interpretation of N2 detections on outer solar system bodies.

  15. Studies of solid carbon dioxide in interstellar ice analogs subject to thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Douglas W.

    2010-09-01

    Solid CO2 has been detected in many lines of sight in the interstellar medium from infrared observatories. Spectral profiles from space-based observatories have suggested that CO2 on icy grain mantles is mixed with other common molecules such as H2O and CH 3OH in interstellar regions and that thermal annealing has occurred. The vibrational mode at 658 cm-1 (15.2 mum) is suspected to be a powerful diagnostic tool as to the composition of species on icy grain mantles as well as thermal histories. However, previous studies have not systematically investigated ice composition and temperature. Laboratory spectra of interstellar ice analogs have been created in this study order to better understand the physical properties of solid CO2 in these interstellar environments. Existing databases of ice composition studies and effects of ice thermal history were updated in this study to include a more systematic approach. The 658 cm-1 (15.2 mum) bending mode feature of CO2 is examined here and the subsequent astrophysical implications stated. In the first set of experiments, 47 mixtures of H2O,CH3OH, andCO2 were slowly warmed and mid-infrared absorption spectra were recorded at 5K intervals. The second set of experiments involved examining the CO2 bending mode feature of 10 different CO2-containing ice mixtures at different temperatures where ice segregation was suspected. In these experiments, the ice mixtures were slowly heated to the desired temperature for increasing time intervals before cooling down and recording mid-IR absorption spectra. These studies may be used to analyze IR data from space-based observatories such as the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph as well other future IR observations of the interstellar medium. Finally, mass spectroscopy measurements were taken from temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments performed on several binary mixtures of H2O + CO2 and CH 3OH + CO2. Physical properties such as desorption energy of CO2 can be

  16. Interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in two closely related areas: observational astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Twenty years ago the composition of interstellar dust was largely guessed at and the notion of abundant, gas phase, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) anywhere in the interstellar medium (ISM) considered impossible. Today the dust composition of the diffuse and dense ISM is reasonably well constrained and the spectroscopic case for interstellar PAHs, shockingly large molecules by early interstellar chemistry standards, is very strong.

  17. Identification of Crystalline Material in Two Interstellar Dust Candidates from the Stardust Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gainsforth, Zack; Simionovici, Alexandra; Brenker, Frank E.; Schmitz, Sylvia; Burghammer, Manfred; Cloetens, Peter; Lemelle, Laurence; San Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Schoonjans, Tom; Silversmit, Geert; Sole, Vicente A.; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Achilles, Cheri; Allen, Carlton; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Sasa; Bassim, Nabil; Bastien, Ron S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, Janet; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's interstellar collector from the Stardust mission captured several particles that are now thought to be of interstellar origin. We analyzed two of these via nanodiffraction at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and found them to contain crystalline components. The unit cell of the crystalline material is determined from the diffraction patterns and the most likely mineral components are identified as olivine and spinel.

  18. HYDROCARBON MATERIALS OF LIKELY INTERSTELLAR ORIGIN FROM THE PARIS METEORITE

    SciTech Connect

    Merouane, S.; Djouadi, Z.; D'Hendecourt, L. Le Sergeant; Borg, J.; Zanda, B. E-mail: zahia.djouadi@ias.u-psud.fr

    2012-09-10

    We have examined some grains from the Paris meteorite through infrared and Raman micro-spectroscopy in order to investigate their carbonaceous and mineralogical components. In the mid- as well as far-infrared regions, the raw and global spectra of Paris resemble those of CM meteorites. However, we have obtained rather peculiar infrared spectra for some aromatic-rich micron-sized fragments of Paris displaying a very good match between its organic signatures both in the 3.4 {mu}m and 6 {mu}m regions, and the ones observed from the diffuse interstellar medium infrared sources toward the Galactic center, suggesting that this meteorite may have indeed preserved some organic matter of interstellar origin.

  19. Exploring the Potential Formation of Organic Solids in Chondrites and Comets through Polymerization of Interstellar Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebukawa, Yoko; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Cody, George D.

    2013-07-01

    Polymerization of interstellar formaldehyde, first through the formose reaction and then through subsequent condensation reactions, provides a plausible explanation for how abundant and highly chemically complex organic solids may have come to exist in primitive solar system objects. In order to gain better insight on the reaction, a systematic study of the relationship of synthesis temperature with resultant molecular structure was performed. In addition, the effect of the presence of ammonia on the reaction rate and molecular structure of the product was studied. The synthesized formaldehyde polymer is directly compared to chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from primitive meteorites using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The molecular structure of the formaldehyde polymer is shown to exhibit considerable similarity at the functional group level with primitive chondritic IOM. The addition of ammonia to the solution enhances the rate of polymerization reaction at lower temperatures and results in substantial incorporation of nitrogen into the polymer. Morphologically, the formaldehyde polymer exists as submicron to micron-sized spheroidal particles and spheroidal particle aggregates that bare considerable similarity to the organic nanoglobules commonly observed in chondritic IOM. These spectroscopic and morphological data support the hypothesis that IOM in chondrites and refractory organic carbon in comets may have formed through the polymerization of interstellar formaldehyde after planetesimal accretion, in the presence of liquid water, early in the history of the solar system.

  20. Modern solid state laser materials

    SciTech Connect

    Krupke, W.F.

    1984-06-20

    This document contains visual aids used in an invited talk entitled Modern Solid State Laser Materials, presented at the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) held in Anaheim, California, on June 20, 1984. Interest at LLNL in solid state lasers focuses on evaluating the potential of solid state laser media for high average power applications, including inertial fusion power production. This talk identifies the relevant bulk material parameters characterizing average power capacity and uses chromium and neodymium co-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nd:Cr:GSGG) as an example of a laser material with improved laser properties relative to Nd:YAG (plausible large-scale growth, more efficient spectral coupling to xenon flashlamp radiation, reduced stimulated emission cross section, adequate thermal shock and optical damage threshold parameters, etc.). Recently measured spectroscopic, kinetic, and thermo-mechanical properties of Nd:Cr:GSGG are given.

  1. Nebular and Interstellar Materials in a Giant Cluster IDP of Probable Cometary Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, S.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D. J.; Nguyen, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    We are conducting coordinated mineralogical, and isotopic studies of a giant cluster CP-IDP to determine proportions of inner solar system and interstellar materials. We have identified an 16O-rich enstatite grain that likely formed near the Sun.

  2. Accurate oscillator strengths for ultraviolet lines of Ar I - Implications for interstellar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.; Beideck, D. J.; Schectman, R. M.; York, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of absorption from interstellar Ar I in lightly reddened lines of sight provides information on the warm and hot components of the interstellar medium near the sun. The details of the analysis are limited by the quality of the atomic data. Accurate oscillator strengths for the Ar I lines at 1048 and 1067 A and the astrophysical implications are presented. From lifetimes measured with beam-foil spectroscopy, an f-value for 1048 A of 0.257 +/- 0.013 is obtained. Through the use of a semiempirical formalism for treating singlet-triplet mixing, an oscillator strength of 0.064 +/- 0.003 is derived for 1067 A. Because of the accuracy of the results, the conclusions of York and colleagues from spectra taken with the Copernicus satellite are strengthened. In particular, for interstellar gas in the solar neighborhood, argon has a solar abundance, and the warm, neutral material is not pervasive.

  3. The 2140 cm-1 (4.673 microns) solid CO band: the case for interstellar O2 and N2 and the photochemistry of nonpolar interstellar ice analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    The infrared spectra of CO frozen in nonpolar ices containing N2, CO2, O2, and H2O and the UV photochemistry of these interstellar/precometary ice analogs are reported. The spectra are used to test the hypothesis that the narrow 2140 cm-1 (4.673 microns) interstellar absorption feature attributed to solid CO might be produced by CO frozen in ices containing nonpolar species such as N2 and O2. It is shown that mixed molecular ices containing CO, N2, O2, and CO2 provide a good match to the interstellar band at all temperatures between 12 and 30 K both before and after photolysis. The optical constants (real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction) in the region of the solid CO feature are reported for several of these ices. The N2 and O2 absorptions at 2328 cm-1 (4.296 microns) and 1549 cm-1 (6.456 microns), respectively, are also shown. The best matches between the narrow interstellar band and the feature in the laboratory spectra of nonpolar ices are for samples which contain comparable amounts of N2, O2, CO2, and CO. Co-adding the CO band from an N2:O2:CO2:CO = 1:5:1/2:1 ice with that of an H2O:CO = 20:1 ice provides an excellent fit across the entire interstellar CO feature. The four-component, nonpolar ice accounts for the narrow 2140 cm-1 portion of the feature which is associated with quiescent regions of dense molecular clouds. Using this mixture, and applying the most recent cosmic abundance values, we derive that between 15% and 70% of the available interstellar N is in the form of frozen N2 along several lines of sight toward background stars. This is reduced to a range of 1%-30% for embedded objects with lines of sight more dominated by warmer grains. The cosmic abundance of O tied up in frozen O2 lies in the 10%-45% range toward background sources, and it is between 1% and 20% toward embedded objects. The amount of oxygen tied up in CO and CO2 frozen in nonpolar ices can be as much as 2%-10% toward background sources and on the order of 0

  4. Modern solid state laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupke, W. F.

    1984-06-01

    Visual aids used in an invited talk entitled Modern Solid State Laser Materials are presented. Interest at LLNL in solid state lasers focuses on evaluating the potential inertial fusion power production. The relevant bulk material parameters characterizing average power capacity are identified and chromium and neodymium co-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nd:Cr:GSGG) are used as an example of a laser material with improved laser properties relative to Nd:YAG (plausible large scale growth, more efficient spectral coupling to xenon flashlamp radiation, reduced stimulated emission cross section, adequate thermal shock and optical damage threshold parameters, etc.). Recently measured spectroscopic, kinetic, and thermomechanical properties of Nd:Cr:GSGG are given.

  5. Formation of interstellar solid CO{_2} after energetic processing of icy grain mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioppolo, S.; Palumbo, M. E.; Baratta, G. A.; Mennella, V.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Space infrared observations with ISO-SWS and Spitzer telescopes have clearly shown that solid carbon dioxide (CO{2}) is ubiquitous and abundant along the line of sight to quiescent clouds and star forming regions. Due to the CO2 low gas-phase abundance, it is suggested that CO{2} is synthesized on grains after energetic processing of icy mantles and/or surface reactions. Aims: We study quantitatively the abundance of carbon dioxide synthesized from ice mixtures of astrophysical relevance induced by ion irradiation at low temperature. We compare the CO{2} stretching and bending-mode band profiles observed towards some young stellar objects (YSOs) for which infrared spectra exist. Methods: Using a high vacuum experimental setup, the effects induced by fast ions (30-200 keV) on several ice mixtures of astrophysical interest are investigated. Chemical and structural modifications of the ice samples that form new molecular species are analyzed using infrared spectroscopy. The formation cross section of solid CO{2} is estimated from the increase in column density as a function of the dose fitting of experimental data with an exponential curve. Results: Our laboratory experiments showed that carbon dioxide is formed after irradiation of ice mixtures containing C- and O-bearing molecules. Furthermore, when the same amount of energy is released into the icy sample, a larger amount of CO{2} is formed in H{2}O-rich mixtures in agreement with previous studies. We also found that the CO2 stretching and bending mode band profiles depend on the mixture and temperature of the ice sample. We found that the amount of carbon dioxide formed after ion irradiation can account for the observed carbon dioxide towards YSOs. Furthermore, we discovered that laboratory spectra are a good spectroscopic analogue of the interstellar features. Conclusions: Even if the comparison between laboratory and observed spectra presented here cannot be considered unique and complete, our results

  6. Isotopic Fractionation in Primitive Material: Quantifying the Contribution of Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These models make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations, particularly with ALMA.

  7. Nanoprobes, nanostructured materials and solid state materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Houping

    2005-07-01

    Novel templates have been developed to prepare nanostructured porous materials through nonsurfactant templated pathway. And new applications of these materials, such as drug delivery and molecular imprinting, have been explored. The relationship between template content and pore structure has been investigated. The composition and pore structures were studied in detail using IR, TGA, SEM, TEM, BET and XRD. The obtained mesoporous materials have tunable diameters in the range of 2--12 nm. Due to the many advantages of this nonsurfactant templated pathway, such as environment friendly and biocompatibility, controlled release of antibiotics in the nanoporous materials were studied. The in vitro release properties were found to depend on the silica structures which were well tuned by varying the template content. A controlled long-term release pattern of vancomycin was achieved when the template content was 30 wt% or lower. Nanoscale electrochemical probes with dimensions as small as 50 nm in diameter and 1--2 mum in length were fabricated using electron beam deposition on the apex of conventional micron size electrodes. The electroactive region was limited to the extreme tip of the nanoprobe by coating with an insulating polymer and re-opening of the coating at the extreme tip. The novel nanoelectrodes thus prepared were employed to probe neurons in mouse brain slice and the results suggest that the nanoprobes were capable of recording neuronal excitatory postsynaptic potential signals. Interesting solid state chemistry was found in oxygenated iron phthalocyanine. Their Mossbauer spectra show the formation of four oxygenated species apart from the unoxygenated parent compound. The oxygen-bridged compounds formed in the solid matrix bear no resemblance to the one formed by solution chemistry. Tentative assignment of species has been made with the help of Mossbauer and IR spectroscopy. An effort to modify aniline trimer for potential nanoelectronics applications and to

  8. Interstellar/Precometary Organic Material and the Photochemical Evolution of Complex Organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Lou J.; Bernstein, Max; Sandford, Scott; Witteborn, Fred (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    During the past two decades ground-, air-, and space-based infrared spectroscopic observations, combined with realistic laboratory simulations, have revolutionized our understanding of interstellar ice and dust, the raw materials from which planets, comets and stars form. Most interstellar material is concentrated in Large molecular clouds where simple molecules are formed by dust grain and gas phase reactions. Gaseous species striking the cold (10 K) dust will stick, forming an icy grain mantle. This accretion, coupled with energetic particle bombardment and UV photolysis, will produce a complex chemical mixture containing volatile, non-volatile, and isotopically fractionated species. Ices in molecular clouds contain the very simple molecules H2O, CH3OH, CO, CO2, H2, and perhaps some NH3 and H2CO, as well as more complex species including nitriles and ketones or esters. The evidence for these compounds as well as carbon rich materials such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), microdiamonds, and amorphous carbon will be reviewed and the possible connections with comets and meteorites will be presented in the first part of the talk. The second part of the presentation will focus on interstellar/precometary ice photochemical evolution. The chemical composition and photochemical evolution of realistic interstellar/pre-cometary ice analogs containing methanol will be discussed. ultraviolet photolysis of these ices produces H2, H2CO, CO2, CO, CH4, HCO, and more complex molecules. Infrared spectroscopy, H-1 and C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrate that when ices representative of interstellar grains and comets are exposed to UV radiation at low temperature a series of moderately complex organic molecules are formed in the ice including: CH3CH2OH (ethanol), HC(=O)NH2 (formamide), CH3C(=O)NH2 (acetamide), and R-C(integral)N (nitriles). Several of these are already known to be in the interstellar

  9. NASA's IBEX Observes Interstellar Matter

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has directly sampled multiple heavy elements from the Local Interstellar Cloud for the first time. It turns out that this interstellar material is not like...

  10. Fundamental absorption in solids and the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duley, W. W.; Whittet, D. C. B.

    1992-03-01

    It is found that the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction between the 0.44-micron band an 8 microns follows a Tauc-Urbach law characteristic of amorphous semiconductors. This result implies that the majority of extinction in this wavelength range arises predominantly from an amorphous dust component. A comparison between laboratory and interstellar data suggests that this dust is likely to be amorphous carbon. The Tauc-Urbach dependence permits the ratio of total to selective extinction R(V) to be related to the optical properties of this dust component and provides a semiquantitative relation between R(V) and environmental conditions in the interstellar medium. It also supports an important connection between the physics of condensed matter and the optics of interstellar dust.

  11. Nebular and Interstellar Materials in a Giant Cluster IDP of Probable Cometary Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D. J.; Nguyen, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Comets contain a complex mixture of materials with presolar and Solar System origins. Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) are associated with comets by their fragile nature, unequilibrated anhydrous mineralogy and high abundances of circumstellar grains and isotopically anomalous organic materials. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples returned by the Stardust spacecraft contain presolar materials as well as refractory 16O-rich Ca-Al-rich inclusion- (CAI), chondrule-, and AOA-like materials. We are conducting coordinated chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic studies of a giant cluster CP-IDP (U2-20-GCA) to determine the proportions of inner Solar System and interstellar materials. We previously found that this IDP contains abundant presolar silicates (approx. 1,800 ppm) and 15N-rich hotspots [6].

  12. Interstellar Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontcharov, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    This review describes our current understanding of interstellar extinction. This differ substantially from the ideas of the 20th century. With infrared surveys of hundreds of millions of stars over the entire sky, such as 2MASS, SPITZER-IRAC, and WISE, we have looked at the densest and most rarefied regions of the interstellar medium at distances of a few kpc from the Sun. Observations at infrared and microwave wavelengths, where the bulk of the interstellar dust absorbs and radiates, have brought us closer to an understanding of the distribution of the dust particles on scales of the Galaxy and the universe. We are in the midst of a scientific revolution in our understanding of the interstellar medium and dust. Progress in, and the key results of, this revolution are still difficult to predict. Nevertheless, (a) a physically justified model has been developed for the spatial distribution of absorbing material over the nearest few kiloparsecs, including the Gould belt as a dust container, which gives an accurate estimate of the extinction for any object just by its galactic coordinates. It is also clear that (b) the interstellar medium contains roughly half the mass of matter in the galactic vicinity of the solar system (the other half is made up of stars, their remnants, and dark matter) and (c) the interstellar medium and, especially, dust, differ substantially in different regions of space and deep space cannot be understood by only studying near space.

  13. The 2140 cm(exp -1) (4.673 Microns) Solid CO Band: The Case for Interstellar O2 and N2 and the Photochemistry of Non-Polar Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie; Allamandola, Louis J.; Sandford, Scott A.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The infrared spectra of CO frozen in non-polar ices containing N2, CO2, O2, and H2O, and the ultraviolet photochemistry of these interstellar/precometary ice analogs are reported. The spectra are used to test the hypothesis that the narrow 2140/cm (4.673 micrometer) interstellar absorption feature attributed to solid CO might be produced by CO frozen in ices containing non-polar species such as N2 and O2. It is shown that mixed molecular ices containing CO, N2, O2, and CO2 provide a very good match to the interstellar band at all temperatures between 12 and 30 K both before and after photolysis. The optical constants (real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction) in the region of the solid CO feature are reported for several of these ices.

  14. Quenched Carbonaceous Composite: a laboratory analog for carbonaceous material in the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, A T; Wada, S

    1997-01-01

    We review the properties of Quenched Carbonaceous Composite (QCC), a residue produced from a hydrocarbon plasma, and the properties of its derivatives. A. Sakata and his colleagues have shown that QCC has a 220 nm absorption band, visible fluorescence matching the extended red emission seen in reflection nebulae, and infrared absorption bands that correspond to the infrared emission features in reflection nebulae, HII regions, and planetary nebulae. These properties make QCC a strong candidate material as a laboratory analog to the carbonaceous material in the interstellar medium. QCC is distinguished from the PAH hypothesis in that (1) it is a condensate composed of aromatic and aliphatic molecules, as well as radicals; (2) it exhibits a 220 nm absorption that is very similar in wavelength to the 217 nm absorption in the interstellar medium; (3) it exhibits visible fluorescence consistent with that seen in reflection nebulae; and (4) the bands at 7.7 and 8.6 microns are caused by ketone bands in oxidized QCC. The aromatic component in QCC is thought to be typically 1-4 rings, with the majority being about 1-2 rings.

  15. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  16. Biochemical transformation of solid carbonaceous material

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Mow S.; Premuzic, Eugene T.

    2001-09-25

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed.

  17. Isotopic Fractionation in Primitive Materials: Quantifying the Contribution of Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnley, Steven

    We propose to continue theoretical studies aimed at elucidating the contribution of astrochemical processes to the isotopic fractionation measured in carbonaceous meteoritic material, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and comets, including the dust samples returned by the Stardust mission. Prior work has focused on the fractionation chemistry of 15N, 13C, and D in cold, isolated dense cores. We now propose to extend these studies to cores residing in stellar clusters, more energetic conditions that better reflect the birth environment of the Solar System. We will undertake four studies: In cold molecular cores, the computation of 13C, 15N and D fractionation in small and large hydrocarbons that could be precursors to meteoritic organic material A definitive study of isotopic fractionation in candidate presolar cores illuminated by strong ultraviolet radiation from nearby stars in a stellar cluster. A new model of isotopic chemistry in dense cores exposed to greatly enhanced fluxes of cosmic-ray particles due to their proximity to a supernovae. These theoretical models will make predictions that will testable by astronomical observation and so an interdisciplinary approach can be advantageous. We therefore also propose to perform a program of radioastronomical observations to definitively measure the isotopic fractionation of 15N in interstellar molecules. In each environment, we will evaluate the maximum degree of stable-isotope enhancement or depletion present in specific molecular functional groups, which could have been precursor reservoirs of cometary and asteroidal material. For the theoretical projects we will employ comprehensive chemical fractionation networks and astrochemistry codes previously developed with Origins support. These studies will allow us, for the first time, to compare and contrast the effect of irradiation environment and so uniquely delineate astronomical contributions to isotopic fractionation in primitive Solar System materials. In

  18. Dry pulverized solid material pump

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, John W.; Bonin, John H.; Daniel, Jr., Arnold D.

    1984-07-31

    Apparatus is shown for substantially increasing the feed rate of pulverized material into a pressurized container. The apparatus includes a rotor that is mounted internal to the pressurized container. The pulverized material is fed into an annular chamber defined by the center of the rotor. A plurality of impellers are mounted within the annular chamber for imparting torque to the pulverized material.

  19. The Evolution of Interstellar Gas: Massive Stars and the Dispersal of Neutral Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    We studied the effects of newly formed O and B stars on their surrounding interstellar material through a combination of observations and theoretical modeling. The observational data came from measurements of absorption seen in the spectra of background, newly formed stars. Particular attention was given to stellar radiation which converts molecular to atomic material. Laboratory data on absorption cross sections relevant to the analysis and interpretation of carbon monoxide formed part of the effort. The grant supported Postdoctoral Fellows, Drs. Min Yan and Yaron Sheffer, and a laboratory technician. Though the students themselves were not supported. one M.S. Thesis and two Ph.D. dissertations from the University of Toledo were based on the research done under the grant. The research accomplished under this grant led directly to other funded programs. An observing proposal to study the chemistry of diffuse molecular clouds in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds with ESO s Very Large Telescope was another example of a successful outcome of my LTSA program.

  20. Hydrogenation process for solid carbonaceous materials

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Wilcox, Wayne A.

    1979-01-01

    Coal or other solid carbonaceous material is contacted with an organic solvent containing both hydrogen and a transition metal catalyst in solution to hydrogenate unsaturated bonds within the carbonaceous material. This benefaction step permits subsequent pyrolysis or hydrogenolysis of the carbonaceous fuel to form gaseous and liquid hydrocarbon products of increased yield and quality.

  1. CN radical hydrogenation from solid H2 reactions, an alternative way of HCN formation in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borget, Fabien; Müller, Sandra; Grote, Dirk; Theulé, Patrice; Vinogradoff, Vassilissa; Chiavassa, Thierry; Sander, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    Context. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is the most abundant molecule of the interstellar medium (ISM) in gas phase and it has been assumed to exist in solid state or as coating on grains. Aims: Our goal is to show that solid H2 can act as a hydrogenation agent, reacting with CN radicals to form HCN. Methods: In a H2 matrix, we studied the hydrogenation of the CN radical generated from the vacuum ultraviolet photolysis (VUV-photolysis) of C2N2 at 3.8 K. We modified the wavelengths and the host gas in order to be sure that CN radicals can abstract H from H2 molecules. Results: HCN monomers, dimers, and oligomers have been characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). H2CN as well as CN radicals have also been clearly observed during the photolysis performed at 3.8 K. Conclusions: H2 is a hydrogenation reagent towards CN radicals producing HCN. This type of reaction should be taken into account for the reactivity at low temperature in contaminated H2 ice macro-particles (CHIMPs), H2 flakes or in the first sublayers of grains where solid H2 has accumulated.

  2. APPARATUS FOR HANDLING MIXTURES OF SOLID MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, J.P.

    1959-08-25

    An apparatus is described for handling either a mixture of finely subdivided materials or a single material requiring a compacting action thereon preparatory to a chemical reducing process carried out in a crucible container. The apparatus is designed to deposit a mixture of dust-forming solid materials in a container while confining the materials against escape into the surrounding atmosphere. A movable filling tube, having a compacting member, is connected to the container and to a covered hopper receiving the mixture of materials. The filling tube is capable of reciprocating in the container and their relative positions are dependent upon the pressure established upon the material by the compacting member.

  3. Solid C triple bond N bearing material on outer solar system bodies.

    PubMed

    Cruikshank, D P; Allamandola, L J; Hartmann, W K; Tholen, D J; Brown, R H; Matthews, C N; Bell, J F

    1991-01-01

    Using telescopic observations by ourselves and other observers, we have identified cyano-group containing molecules in the very dark solids on the surfaces of a few D-class asteroids, the dust of some comets, and low-albedo hemisphere of Iapetus, and the rings of Uranus, through spectroscopic detection of the 2.2-micrometers overtone of the C triple bond N stretching fundamental mode. The occurrence of this band on all four classes of small Solar System bodies may be diagnostic of the duration of exposure and degree of modification of surface materials, and may also establish a link between outer Solar System and interstellar materials.

  4. Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Stevenson, J.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to improve the properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objectives are to: (1) develop materials based on modifications of the state-of-the-art materials; (2) minimize or eliminate stability problems in the cathode, anode, and interconnect; (3) Electrochemically evaluate (in reproducible and controlled laboratory tests) the current state-of-the-art air electrode materials and cathode/electrolyte interfacial properties; (4) Develop accelerated electrochemical test methods to evaluate the performance of SOFCs under controlled and reproducible conditions; and (5) Develop and test materials for use in low-temperature SOFCs. The goal is to modify and improve the current state-of-the-art materials and minimize the total number of cations in each material to avoid negative effects on the materials properties. Materials to reduce potential deleterious interactions, (3) improve thermal, electrical, and electrochemical properties, (4) develop methods to synthesize both state-of-the-art and alternative materials for the simultaneous fabricatoin and consolidation in air of the interconnections and electrodes with the solid electrolyte, and (5) understand electrochemical reactions at materials interfaces and the effects of component composition and processing on those reactions.

  5. Laboratory Studies of Solid Carbon Dioxide in Planetary and Interstellar Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Douglas; Sandford, Scott A.; Mastrapa, Rachel M.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory spectra have shown that CO2. is a powerful diagnostic tool for analyzing infrared data from remote observations, as it has been detected on icy moons in the outer solar system as well as dust grain surfaces in the interstellar medium. IR absorption profiles of CO2 wi thin ice mixtures containing H2O and CH30H change with respect to tem perature and mixture ratios. In this particular study, the CO2 stretch mode around 235O cm (exp -1) (4.3 rricrons) is systematically observ ed in different mixtures with H2O and CH30H in temperature ranges from 15K to 150 K, as well as vibrational modes in the near-IR such as th e combination bands near 3700 cm (exp -1) (2.7 microns) and 5080 (exp -1) (2.0 microns). Additionally, some high?temperature deposits (T > 50 K) of H2O, CH30H, and CO2 ice mixtures were performed to determine the maximum temperatures at which CO2 will deposit on the sample win dow. These data may then be used to interpret spectra obtained from remote IR observations. This research was sponsored by Oak Ridge Associ ated Universities (ORAU) through the NASA Postdoctoral Program (NPP) as well as Ames Research Center and the SETI institute who provided fa cilities and equipment.

  6. Stability of solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Chick, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    Interconnection materials in a solid oxide fuel cell are exposed to both highly oxidizing conditions at the cathode and to highly reducing conditions at the anode. The thermal expansion characteristics of substituted lanthanum and yttrium chromite interconnect materials were evaluated by dilatometry as a function of oxygen partial pressures from 1 atm to 10{sup -18} atm, controlled using a carbon dioxide/hydrogen buffer.

  7. Surge bin retorting solid feed material

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.; Krambeck, F.J.

    1984-11-06

    An improved surge bin for a Lurgi-Ruhrgas process has baffles which promote uniform flow of feed material through the surge bin. Improved retorting of kerogen from oil shale is obtained. Stripping gas such as steam, is supplied to the surge bin. A separator has a large disengaging volume to remove entrained solid particles and improve the quality of the hydrocarbon product.

  8. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800{degree}C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280{degree}F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

  9. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800[degree]C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280[degree]F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

  10. Sealant materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this work is to complete the development of soft glass-ceramic sealants for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Among other requirements, the materials must soften at the operation temperature of the fuel cell (600-1000{degrees}C) to relieve stresses between stack components, and their thermal expansions must be tailored to match those of the stack materials. Specific objectives included addressing the needs of industrial fuel cell developers, based on their evaluation of samples we supply, as well as working with commercial glass producers to achieve scaled-up production of the materials without changing their properties.

  11. ITER solid breeder blanket materials database

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.C.; Dienst, W.; Flament, T.; Lorenzetto, P.; Noda, K.; Roux, N.

    1993-11-01

    The databases for solid breeder ceramics (Li{sub 2},O, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and LiAlO{sub 2}) and beryllium multiplier material are critically reviewed and evaluated. Emphasis is placed on physical, thermal, mechanical, chemical stability/compatibility, tritium, and radiation stability properties which are needed to assess the performance of these materials in a fusion reactor environment. Correlations are selected for design analysis and compared to the database. Areas for future research and development in blanket materials technology are highlighted and prioritized.

  12. Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Coleman, Sabre J.; Sanner, Robert D.; Dias, Victoria L.; Reynolds, John G.

    2010-09-28

    Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

  13. Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Coleman, Sabre J.; Sanner, Robert D.; Dias, Victoria L.; Reynolds, John G.

    2008-07-01

    Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

  14. Interstellar Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Millar, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the gas-phase chemistry in dense cores where ice mantles containing ethanol and other alcohols have been evaporated. Model calculations show that methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol drive a chemistry leading to the formation of several large ethers and esters. Of these molecules, methyl ethyl ether (CH3OC2H5) and diethyl ether (C2H5)2O attain the highest abundances and should be present in detectable quantities within cores rich in ethanol and methanol. Gas-phase reactions act to destroy evaporated ethanol and a low observed abundance of gas-phase C,H,OH does not rule out a high solid-phase abundance. Grain surface formation mechanisms and other possible gas-phase reactions driven by alcohols are discussed, as are observing strategies for the detection of these large interstellar molecules.

  15. Solid materials for removing metals and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Reynolds, John G.; Coleman, Sabre J.

    2004-10-19

    Solid materials have been developed to remove contaminating metals and organic compounds from aqueous media. The contaminants are removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are sol-gel and or sol-gel and granulated activated carbon (GAC) mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards the contaminant(s). The contaminated solid materials can then be disposed of or the contaminant can be removed and the solids recycled.

  16. Measuring Interstellar Inheritance and Its Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Nittler, L. R.; Davidson, J.; Ciesla, F. J.

    2016-08-01

    CIs, chondrite matrices and IDP accreted ~10 % of pristine interstellar material (ices, silicates, organics). The non-solar O isotopic compositions of most solar materials reflect early heating of interstellar dust and ices in FU Orionis outbursts.

  17. Interstellar Dust - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2012-01-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic materials. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar physics and chemistry and in the formation of organic materials, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. Laboratory experiments that are performed under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments to provide information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. A review of the properties of dust and of the laboratory experiments that are conducted to study the formation processes of dust grains from molecular precursors will be given.

  18. Method and apparatus for semi-solid material processing

    DOEpatents

    Han, Qingyou [Knoxville, TN; Jian, Xiaogang [Knoxville, TN; Xu, Hanbing [Knoxville, TN; Meek, Thomas T [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-24

    A method of forming a material includes the steps of: vibrating a molten material at an ultrasonic frequency while cooling the material to a semi-solid state to form non-dendritic grains therein; forming the semi-solid material into a desired shape; and cooling the material to a solid state. The method makes semi-solid castings directly from molten materials (usually a metal), produces grain size usually in the range of smaller than 50 .mu.m, and can be easily retrofitted into existing conventional forming maching.

  19. Method and apparatus for semi-solid material processing

    DOEpatents

    Han, Qingyou [Knoxville, TN; Jian, Xiaogang [Knoxville, TN; Xu, Hanbing [Knoxville, TN; Meek, Thomas T [Knoxville, TN

    2009-02-24

    A method of forming a material includes the steps of: vibrating a molten material at an ultrasonic frequency while cooling the material to a semi-solid state to form non-dendritic grains therein; forming the semi-solid material into a desired shape; and cooling the material to a solid state. The method makes semi-solid castings directly from molten materials (usually a metal), produces grain size usually in the range of smaller than 50 .mu.m, and can be easily retrofitted into existing conventional forming machine.

  20. Method and apparatus for semi-solid material processing

    DOEpatents

    Han, Qingyou; Jian, Xiaogang; Xu, Hanbing; Meek, Thomas T.

    2007-05-15

    A method of forming a material includes the steps of: vibrating a molten material at an ultrasonic frequency while cooling the material to a semi-solid state to form non-dendritic grains therein; forming the semi-solid material into a desired shape; and cooling the material to a solid state. The method makes semi-solid castings directly from molten materials (usually a metal), produces grain size usually in the range of smaller than 50 .mu.m, and can be easily retrofitted into existing conventional forming machine.

  1. Solid freeform fabrication of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiwen

    This thesis investigates solid freeform fabrication of biological materials for dental restoration and orthopedic implant applications. The basic approach in this study for solid freeform fabrication of biological materials is micro-extrusion of single or multiple slurries for 3D components and inkjet color printing of multiple suspensions for functionally graded materials (FGMs). Common issues associated with micro-extrusion and inkjet color printing are investigated. These common issues include (i) formulation of stable slurries with a pseudoplastic property, (ii) cross-sectional geometry of the extrudate as a function of the extrusion parameters, (iii) fabrication path optimization for extrusion process, (iv) extrusion optimization for multi-layer components, (v) composition control in functionally graded materials, and (vi) sintering optimization to convert the freeform fabricated powder compact to a dense body for biological applications. The present study clearly shows that the rheological and extrusion behavior of dental porcelain slurries depend strongly on the pH value of the slurry and extrusion conditions. A slurry with pseudoplastic properties is a basic requirement for obtaining extruded lines with rectangular cross-sections. The cross-sectional geometry of the extrudate is also strongly affected by extrusion parameters including the extrusion nozzle height, nozzle moving speed, extrusion rate, and critical nozzle height. Proper combinations of these extrusion parameters are necessary in order to obtain single line extrudates with near rectangular cross-sections and 3D objects with dimensional accuracy, uniform wall thickness, good wall uprightness, and no wall slumping. Based on these understandings, single-wall, multi-wall, and solid teeth have been fabricated via micro-extrusion of the dental slurry directly from a CAD digital model in 30 min. Inkjet color printing using stable Al2O3 and ZrO 2 aqueous suspensions has been developed to fabricate

  2. Impact of solids on composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronson, Arturo; Maldonado, Jerry; Chern, Tzong; Martinez, Francisco; Mccord-Medrano, Johnnie; Roschke, Paul N.

    1987-01-01

    The failure modes of composite materials as a result of low velocity impact were investigated by simulating the impact with a finite element analysis. An important facet of the project is the modeling of the impact of a solid onto cylindrical shells composed of composite materials. The model under development will simulate the delamination sustained when a composite material encounters impact from another rigid body. The computer equipment was installed, the computer network tested, and a finite element method model was developed to compare results with known experimental data. The model simulated the impact of a steel rod onto a rotating shaft. Pre-processing programs (GMESH and TANVEL) were developed to generate node and element data for the input into the three dimensional, dynamic finite element analysis code (DYNA3D). The finite element mesh was configured with a fine mesh near the impact zone and a coarser mesh for the impacting rod and the regions surrounding the impacting zone. For the computer simulation, five impacting loads were used to determine the time history of the stresses, the scribed surface areas, and the amount of ridging. The processing time of the computer codes amounted from 1 to 4 days. The calculated surface area were within 6-12 percent, relative error when compated to the actual scratch area.

  3. Advanced Materials and Solids Analysis Research Core (AMSARC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Advanced Materials and Solids Analysis Research Core (AMSARC), centered at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Andrew W. Breidenbach Environmental Research Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, is the foundation for the Agency's solids and surfaces analysis capabilities. ...

  4. Interstellar organics and possible connections with the carbonaceous components of meteorites and IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1991-01-01

    Studying the chemical and isotopic composition of interstellar ice and dust provides insight into the composition and chemical history of the solid bodies in the solar nebula and the nature of the materials subsequently brought into the inner part of the solar system by comets and meteorites. It is now possible to probe the composition of these microscopic interstellar particles. High quality IR spectra of many different astronomical sources (some associated with dark molecular clouds, and others in the diffuse interstellar medium) are now available. Comparisons of these spectra with laboratory spectra and complex organic components of these materials are discussed.

  5. Solid state NMR of porous materials : zeolites and related materials.

    PubMed

    Koller, Hubert; Weiss, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy applied to the science of crystalline micro- and mesoporous silica materials over the past 10 years is reviewed. A survey is provided of framework structure and connectivity analyses from chemical shift effects of various elements in zeolites including heteroatom substitutions, framework defects and pentacoordinated silicon for zeolites containing fluoride ions. New developments in the field of NMR crystallography are included. Spatial host-guest ordering and confinement effects of zeolite-sorbate complexes are outlined, with special emphasis on NMR applications utilizing the heteronuclear dipolar interaction. The characterization of zeolite acid sites and in situ NMR on catalytic conversions is also included. Finally, the motion of extra-framework cations is investigated in two tutorial cases of sodium hopping in sodalite and cancrinite.

  6. An analysis of the interstellar material in the line of sight toward Omicron Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical abundances and physical conditions in the interstellar gas toward Omicron Per are analyzed using Copernicus UV spectrophotometric data on 69 lines due to ions and atoms as well as 19 lines of H2 and HD. The UV extinction toward the star is determined along with the column densities of atomic and molecular hydrogen, the atomic column densities and temperature in the H I region, and the nature of the ionized regions along the line of sight. It is concluded that: (1) Omicron Per is apparently embedded in the near edge of an extended dense molecular cloud, the outer parts of which give rise to the observed absorption lines; (2) the H I region may consist of more than one cloud; (3) the far-UV extinction rise is unusually steep, indicating a high proportion of small grains; (4) the element depletions are somewhat greater than in Zeta Oph, particularly for sulfur and argon; and (5) the molecular abundances are generally consistent with gas-phase formation models rather than with molecular formation on grain surfaces, unless a substantial amount of small grains is present to increase the available surface area.

  7. Stability of solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-08-01

    Chromite interconnection materials in an SOFC are exposed to both highly oxidizing conditions at the cathode and to highly reducing conditions at the anode. Because such conditions could lead to component failure, the authors have evaluated thermal, electrical, chemical, and structural stabilities of these materials as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. The crystal lattice of the chromites was shown to expand for oxygen partial pressures smaller than 10{sup {minus}10} atm, which could lead to cracking and debonding in an SOFC. Highly substituted lanthanum chromite compositions were the most susceptible to lattice expansion; yttrium chromites showed better dimensional stability by more than a factor of two. New chromite compositions were developed that showed little tendency for lattice expansion under strongly reducing conditions, yet provided a good thermal expansion match to other fuel cell components. Use of these new chromite interconnect compositions should improve long-term SOFC performance, particularly for planar cell configurations. Thermodynamic properties of substituted lanthanum manganite cathode compositions have been determined through measurement of electromotive force as a function of temperature. Critical oxygen decomposition pressures for Sr and Ca-substituted lanthanum manganites were established using cells based on a zirconia electrolyte. Strontium oxide and calcium oxide activities in a lanthanum manganite matrix were determined using cells based on strontium fluoride and calcium fluoride electrolytes, respectively. The compositional range of single-phase behavior of these ABO{sub 3}-type perovskites was established as a function of A/B cation ratios and the extent of acceptor doping. Before this work, very little thermodynamic information was in existence for substituted manganite compositions. Such information is needed to predict the long-term stability of solid oxide fuel cell assemblies.

  8. Laboratory Astrochemistry: Interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are thought to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: (1) objectives, (2) approach and techniques adopted, (3) adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), and (4) results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a

  9. System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Richard G.; Blasewitz, Albert G.

    1982-01-01

    An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

  10. Interstellar Antifreeze: Ethylene Glycol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.; Coudert, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    Interstellar ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2,OH) has been detected in emission toward the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N-LMH) by means of several millimeter-wave rotational torsional transitions of its lowest energy conformer. The types and kinds of molecules found to date in interstellar clouds suggest a chemistry that favors aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols-e.g., formaldehyde (H2CO)/methanol (CH3OH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO)/ethanol (CH3CH2OH). Similarly, ethylene glycol is the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), which has also been detected toward Sgr B2(N-LMH). While there is no consensus as to how any such large complex molecules are formed in the interstellar clouds, atomic hydrogen (H) and carbon monoxide (CO) could form formaldehyde on grain surfaces, but such surface chemistry beyond that point is uncertain. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the gas-phase reaction of atomic hydrogen (H) and solid-phase CO at 10-20 K can produce formaldehyde and methanol and that alcohols and other complex molecules can be synthesized from cometary ice analogs when subject to ionizing radiation at 15 K. Thus, the presence of aldehyde/ reduced alcohol pairs in interstellar clouds implies that such molecules are a product of a low-temperature chemistry on grain surfaces or in grain ice mantles. This work suggests that aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols provide unique observational constraints on the formation of complex interstellar molecules.

  11. Solid lubricant materials for high temperatures: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1985-01-01

    Solid lubricants that can be used above 300 C in air are discussed, including coatings and self-lubricating composite bearing materials. The lubricants considered are representative dichalcogenides, graphite, graphite fluoride, polyimides, soft oxides, oxidatively stable fluorides, and hard coating materials. A few general design considerations revelant to solid lubrication are interspersed.

  12. Youth Solid Waste Educational Materials List, November 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This guide provides a brief description and ordering information for approximately 300 educational materials for grades K-12 on the subject of solid waste. The materials cover a variety of environmental issues and actions related to solid waste management. Entries are divided into five sections including audiovisual programs, books, magazines,…

  13. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  14. THE REINCARNATION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST: THE IMPORTANCE OF ORGANIC REFRACTORY MATERIAL IN INFRARED SPECTRA OF COMETARY COMAE AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2013-09-20

    We consider the reincarnation of interstellar dust to be reborn in protoplanetary disks as aggregates consisting of submicron-sized grains with a crystalline or amorphous silicate core and an organic-rich carbonaceous mantle. We find that infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust reproduce emission peaks at correct wavelengths where the peaks were observed in cometary comae, debris disks, and protoplanetary disks if the volume fraction of organic refractory meets the constraints on elemental abundances. We discuss what we can learn from the infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust in cometary comae and circumstellar disks.

  15. The Reincarnation of Interstellar Dust: The Importance of Organic Refractory Material in Infrared Spectra of Cometary Comae and Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    We consider the reincarnation of interstellar dust to be reborn in protoplanetary disks as aggregates consisting of submicron-sized grains with a crystalline or amorphous silicate core and an organic-rich carbonaceous mantle. We find that infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust reproduce emission peaks at correct wavelengths where the peaks were observed in cometary comae, debris disks, and protoplanetary disks if the volume fraction of organic refractory meets the constraints on elemental abundances. We discuss what we can learn from the infrared spectra of reincarnated interstellar dust in cometary comae and circumstellar disks.

  16. Interstellar Predation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, C. S.; Lee, M.

    Although chemosynthesis and photosynthesis can theoretically supply enough energy for intelligence, for reasons elucidated here, heterotrophy and specifically phagotrophy (ingestion of prey) are likely to make predation a characteristic of life and extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). Here, the Earth's biota is used to consider the nature of interstellar predation. The ability of the ETI to directly ingest a biota will be determined by the chiral preference of the ETI, the compatibility of the biochemistry used in life on Earth with the molecules required by the ETI and the potential toxicity of the macromolecules. If chirality is determined by astrophysical factors and not by the specificities of terrestrial origins of life and if molecules found in terrestrial organisms are also represented in ETIs (which could plausibly include hydrated carbohydrides and many amino acids that are similar or identical to amino acids found in meteoritic or cometary material) then the Earth might represent a universally appreciated resource. The Earth's biota could be used as an energy supply or, if other forms of technology have advanced to the point where bioreactors can be exclusively used to supply a civilization with food, as a culinary curiosity. Even in the absence of metabolic compatibility, technology can be used to extract useful products from an undigestible biota, similarly to the industrial biotransformation of cellulose. The value of the resource will also be determined by the availability of prey. Planets at stages in biological evolution where the surface is dominated by just one or several large (>5kg), abundant, easily captured organisms are particu- larly attractive to predators because harvesting techniques can be standardized. We discuss implications for exobiology and the `Fermi Paradox'.

  17. Interstellar molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Bally, J

    1986-04-11

    The interstellar medium in our galaxy contains matter in a variety of states ranging from hot plasma to cold and dusty molecular gas. The molecular phase consists of giant clouds, which are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the galaxy, the primary reservoir of material for the ongoing birth of new stars, and the medium regulating the evolution of galactic disks.

  18. Discovery of interstellar methane - Observations of gaseous and solid CH4 absorption toward young stars in molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, J.H.; Evans, N.J., II; Achtermann, J.M.; Carr, J.S.; Baas, F. Hawaii, University, Honolulu Joint Astronomy Center, Hilo, HI )

    1991-08-01

    Several molecular clouds have been searched for absorption at 7.6 microns due to gaseous and solid methane. Gaseous CH4 was detected toward NGC 7538 IRS 9 and probably OMC-1 IRc2 and W33 A. The abundance of gaseous CH4 is typically 0.001 that of CO. Solid CH4 was probably detected toward NGC 7538 IRS 9 and possibly detected toward W33 A and NGC 7538 IRS 1. The abundance of solid CH4 is comparable to that of solid CO. The total CH4 abundance (predominantly in the solid phase) is 1-4 percent of the total CO abundance (predominantly gaseous). The high fraction of CH4 in the solid state suggests that it is made in the grain mantles. 22 refs.

  19. Macro material flow modeling for analyzing solid waste management options

    SciTech Connect

    Holter, G.M.; Pennock, K.A.; Shaver, S.R.

    1993-06-01

    A Macro Material Flow Modeling (MMFM) concept and approach are being adopted to develop a predictive modeling capability. This capability is intended to provide part of the basis for evaluating potential impacts from various solid waste management system configurations and operating scenarios, as well as evaluating the impacts of various policies on solid waste quantities and compositions. The MMFM capability, as part of a broader Solid Waste Initiative at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is intended to provide an increased understanding of solid waste as a disposal, energy, and resource problem on a national and global scale, particularly over the long term. This model is a macro-level simulation of the flows of the various materials through the solid waste management system, and also through the associated materials production and use system. Inclusion of materials production and use within the modeling context allows a systems approach to be used, providing a much more complete understanding of the origins of the solid waste materials and also of possible options for materials recovery and reuse than if a more traditional ``end-of-pipe`` view of solid waste is adopted. The MMFM is expected to be useful in evaluating longer-term, broader-ranging solid waste impacts than are traditionally evaluated by decision-makers involved in implementing solutions to local or regional solid waste management problems. This paper discusses the types of questions of interest in evaluating long-term, broad-range impacts from solid waste. It then identifies the basic needs for predictive modeling capabilities like the MMFM, and provides a basic description of the conceptual framework for the model and the associated data. Status of the MMFM implementation is also discussed.

  20. Macro material flow modeling for analyzing solid waste management options

    SciTech Connect

    Holter, G.M.; Pennock, K.A.; Shaver, S.R.

    1993-06-01

    A Macro Material Flow Modeling (MMFM) concept and approach are being adopted to develop a predictive modeling capability. This capability is intended to provide part of the basis for evaluating potential impacts from various solid waste management system configurations and operating scenarios, as well as evaluating the impacts of various policies on solid waste quantities and compositions. The MMFM capability, as part of a broader Solid Waste Initiative at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is intended to provide an increased understanding of solid waste as a disposal, energy, and resource problem on a national and global scale, particularly over the long term. This model is a macro-level simulation of the flows of the various materials through the solid waste management system, and also through the associated materials production and use system. Inclusion of materials production and use within the modeling context allows a systems approach to be used, providing a much more complete understanding of the origins of the solid waste materials and also of possible options for materials recovery and reuse than if a more traditional end-of-pipe'' view of solid waste is adopted. The MMFM is expected to be useful in evaluating longer-term, broader-ranging solid waste impacts than are traditionally evaluated by decision-makers involved in implementing solutions to local or regional solid waste management problems. This paper discusses the types of questions of interest in evaluating long-term, broad-range impacts from solid waste. It then identifies the basic needs for predictive modeling capabilities like the MMFM, and provides a basic description of the conceptual framework for the model and the associated data. Status of the MMFM implementation is also discussed.

  1. Ultrafast laser spectroscopy in complex solid state materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianqi

    2014-12-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on applying the ultrafast laser spectroscopy to the complex solid state materials. It shows that the ultrafast laser pulse can coherently control the material properties in the femtosecond time scale. And the ultrafast laser spectroscopy can be employed as a dynamical method for revealing the fundamental physical problems in the complex material systems.

  2. Stability of solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Pederson, L.R.; Stevenson, J.W.; Raney, P.E.

    1995-08-01

    The phase stability and sintering behavior of materials used in SOFCs has been evaluated. The sintering behavior of Ca and Sr doped lanthanum. manganite (the preferred SOFC cathode material) is highly dependent on the relative proportion of A and B site cations in the material. Ca and Sr doped lanthanum chromite (the preferred interconnect material) have been shown to rapidly expand in reducing atmospheres at temperatures as low as 700{degrees}C. This expansion is due to the reduction of Cr{sup 4+} to Cr{sup 3+} in reducing environments.

  3. Apparatus and methods for filtering granular solid material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Douglas J. (Inventor); Poulter, Clay B. (Inventor); Godfrey, Max R. (Inventor); Tolman, Dennis K. (Inventor); Dutton, Melinda S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Apparatuses for screening granular solid particulate material include a generally planar first screen and a second screen. A plurality of apertures extends through the first screen. At least a portion of the second screen is oriented at an angle to the first screen, and apertures extend through a perforated region of the second screen. The second screen includes at least one region configured to prevent at least some particles of solid material from passing through the second screen.

  4. Chemical digestion of low level nuclear solid waste material

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, Carl R.; Lerch, Ronald E.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical digestion for treatment of low level combustible nuclear solid waste material is provided and comprises reacting the solid waste material with concentrated sulfuric acid at a temperature within the range of 230.degree.-300.degree.C and simultaneously and/or thereafter contacting the reacting mixture with concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide. In a special embodiment spent ion exchange resins are converted by this chemical digestion to noncombustible gases and a low volume noncombustible residue.

  5. Four Interstellar Dust Candidates from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Davis, A. M.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Fougeray, P.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grun, E.; Heck, P. R.; Jillier, J. K.; Hoppe, P.; Howard, L.; Hudson, B.; Huss, G. R.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approx. 0.1 sq m in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 sq m/day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a consortium-based project to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques. The goals and restrictions of the ISPE are described . A summary of analytical techniques is described.

  6. Nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials for solid fuel cell systems

    DOEpatents

    Brinkman, Kyle S

    2015-05-05

    Disclosed are solid fuel cells, including solid oxide fuel cells and PEM fuel cells that include nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials as a component of the fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can include nanocrystalline cerium oxide as a cathode component and microcrystalline cerium oxide as an electrolyte component, which can prevent mechanical failure and interdiffusion common in other fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can also include nanocrystalline cerium oxide in the anode. A PEM fuel cell can include cerium oxide as a catalyst support in the cathode and optionally also in the anode.

  7. Solvent-free synthesis of zeolites from solid raw materials.

    PubMed

    Ren, Limin; Wu, Qinming; Yang, Chengguang; Zhu, Longfeng; Li, Caijin; Zhang, Pengling; Zhang, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangju; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2012-09-19

    As important industrial materials, microporous zeolites are necessarily synthesized in the presence of solvents such as in hydrothermal, solvothermal, and ionothermal routes. We demonstrate here a simple and generalized solvent-free route for synthesizing various types of zeolites by mixing, grinding, and heating solid raw materials. Compared with conventional hydrothermal route, the avoidance of solvents in the synthesis not only significantly reduces the waste production, but also greatly increases the yield of zeolite products. In addition, the use of starting solid raw materials remarkably enhances the synthesis efficiency and reduces the use of raw materials, energy, and costs.

  8. Computational materials design of crystalline solids.

    PubMed

    Butler, Keith T; Frost, Jarvist M; Skelton, Jonathan M; Svane, Katrine L; Walsh, Aron

    2016-11-07

    The modelling of materials properties and processes from first principles is becoming sufficiently accurate as to facilitate the design and testing of new systems in silico. Computational materials science is both valuable and increasingly necessary for developing novel functional materials and composites that meet the requirements of next-generation technology. A range of simulation techniques are being developed and applied to problems related to materials for energy generation, storage and conversion including solar cells, nuclear reactors, batteries, fuel cells, and catalytic systems. Such techniques may combine crystal-structure prediction (global optimisation), data mining (materials informatics) and high-throughput screening with elements of machine learning. We explore the development process associated with computational materials design, from setting the requirements and descriptors to the development and testing of new materials. As a case study, we critically review progress in the fields of thermoelectrics and photovoltaics, including the simulation of lattice thermal conductivity and the search for Pb-free hybrid halide perovskites. Finally, a number of universal chemical-design principles are advanced.

  9. Development of solid thorium-232 reference materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelder, P. R.; Donivan, S.; Chessmore, R. B.

    1985-05-01

    Thorium-232 reference materials with a matrix similar to soil and uranium-mill tailings are necessary for ensuring uniform standardization among measurements performed by remedial-action contractors. Some 200 pounds each of three different concentrations of Th-232 reference material were prepared by diluting a thorium ore with soil. Target values for Th-232 content were 70, 30, and 10 pCi/q. The recommended thorium-232 concentrations for the three reference materials are 71.2 + or - 2.0 pCi/g, 30.5 + or - 0.6 pCi/g, and 10.2 + or - 0.3 pCi/g.

  10. Solid electrolyte material manufacturable by polymer processing methods

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Mohit; Gur, Ilan; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2012-09-18

    The present invention relates generally to electrolyte materials. According to an embodiment, the present invention provides for a solid polymer electrolyte material that is ionically conductive, mechanically robust, and can be formed into desirable shapes using conventional polymer processing methods. An exemplary polymer electrolyte material has an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.6 Pa at 90 degrees C. and is characterized by an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm-1 at 90 degrees C. An exemplary material can be characterized by a two domain or three domain material system. An exemplary material can include material components made of diblock polymers or triblock polymers. Many uses are contemplated for the solid polymer electrolyte materials. For example, the present invention can be applied to improve Li-based batteries by means of enabling higher energy density, better thermal and environmental stability, lower rates of self-discharge, enhanced safety, lower manufacturing costs, and novel form factors.

  11. 76 FR 8658 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Rule; information... carriage of solid hazardous materials in bulk to allow use of the IMSBC Code as an equivalent form of... 202-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On January 1, 2011, compliance with the IMSBC Code...

  12. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, Gregory A.; Thomas, Charles P.

    1995-01-01

    A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

  13. Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, Gregory A.; Thomas, Charles P.

    1996-01-01

    A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

  14. Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1996-02-13

    A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

  15. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1995-10-03

    A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J; Donald Anton, D

    2009-04-23

    In searching for high gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be used. In order to make safe and commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate mitigation strategies to handle potential material exposure events. A crucial aspect of the development of risk identification and mitigation strategies is the development of rigorous environmental reactivity testing standards and procedures. This will allow for the identification of potential risks and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Modified testing procedures for shipping air and/or water sensitive materials, as codified by the United Nations, have been used to evaluate two potential hydrogen storage materials, 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. The modified U.N. procedures include identification of self-reactive substances, pyrophoric substances, and gas-emitting substances with water contact. The results of these tests for air and water contact sensitivity will be compared to the pure material components where appropriate (e.g. LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}). The water contact tests are divided into two scenarios dependent on the hydride to water mole ratio and heat transport characteristics. Air contact tests were run to determine whether a substance will spontaneously react with air in a packed or dispersed form. In the case of the 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} material, the results from the hydride mixture compared to the pure materials results showed the MgH{sub 2} to be the least reactive component and LiBH{sub 4} the more reactive. The combined 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} resulted in a material having environmental reactivity between these two materials. Relative to 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2}, the chemical hydride NH{sub 3}BH

  17. Evolution of Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Lou J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    During the past two decades observations combined with laboratory simulations, have revolutionized our understanding of interstellar ice and dust, the raw materials from which planets, comets and stars form. Most interstellar material is concentrated in large molecular clouds where simple molecules are formed by dust-grain and gas-phase reactions. Gaseous species striking the cold (10K) dust stick, forming an icy grain mantle. This accretion, coupled with UV photolysis, produces a complex chemical mixture containing volatile, non-volatile, and isotopically fractionated species. Ices in molecular clouds contain the very simple molecules H2O, CH3OH, CO, CO2, H2, and perhaps some NH3 and H2CO, as well as more complex species. The evidence for these compounds, as well as carbon-rich materials, will be reviewed and the possible connections with comets and meteorites will be presented in the first part of the talk . The second part of the presentation will focus on interstellar/precometary ice photochemical evolution and the species likely to be found in comets. The chemical composition and photochemical evolution of realistic interstellar/pre-cometary ice analogs will be discussed. Ultraviolet photolysis of these ices produces H2, H2CO, CO2, CO, CH4, HCO, and more complex molecules. When ices representative of interstellar grains and comets are exposed to UV radiation at low temperature a series of moderately complex organic molecules are formed in the ice including: CH3CH2OH (ethanol), HC(=O)NH2 (formamide), CH3C(=O)NH2 (acetamide), and R-C=N (nitriles). Several of these are already known to be in the interstellar medium, and their presence indicates the importance of grain processing. After warming to room temperature an organic residue remains. This is composed primarily of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT, C6H12N4), with lesser amounts of polyoxymethylene-related species (POMs), amides, and ketones. This is in sharp contrast to the organic residues produced by

  18. X-ray characterization of solid small molecule organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, Simon; Shankland, Kenneth; Shankland, Norman; Florence, Alastair

    2014-06-10

    The present invention provides, inter alia, methods of characterizing a small molecule organic material, e.g., a drug or a drug product. This method includes subjecting the solid small molecule organic material to x-ray total scattering analysis at a short wavelength, collecting data generated thereby, and mathematically transforming the data to provide a refined set of data.

  19. Polarimetry of the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The talk will review what is known about the composition of ices and organics in the dense and diffuse interstellar media (ISM). Mixed molecular ices make up a significant fraction of the solid materials in dense molecular clouds and it is now known that thermal and radiation processing of these ices results in the production of more complex organic species, some of which may survive transport into forming stellar systems and the diffuse ISM. Molecular species identified in interstellar ices include H2O, CH3OH, CO, CH4, CO2, and somewhat surprisingly, H2. Theoretical and laboratory studies of the processing of interstellar analog ices containing these species indicate that species like HCO, H2CO, CH3, and NH3 are readily made and should also be present. The irradiation of mixed molecular ices containing these species, when followed by warming, leads to the production of a large variety of more complex species, including ethanol (CH3CH2OH), formamide (HC(=O)NH2), acetamide (CH3C(=O)NH2), nitriles or isonitriles (R-CN or R-NC hexamethylenetetramine (HMT; C6H12N4), a number of polymeric species related to polyoxymethylene [POM,(-CH2O-)n], and ketones {R-C(=O)-R'}. Spectral studies of dust in the diffuse ISM indicate the presence of fairly complex organics, some of which may be related to the organics produced in dense molecular clouds. Spectral comparisons indicate that the diffuse ISM organics may be quite similar to meteoritic kerogens, i.e. they may consist largely of aromatic moieties interlinked by short aliphatic bridges. Interestingly, recent evidence indicates that the galactic distribution of this material closely matches that of silicates, but does not correlate directly with visual extinction. This implies that a large fraction of the visual extinction is caused by a material other than these organics and silicates and that this other material has a significantly different distribution within the galaxy.

  20. Materials research for passive solar systems: solid-state phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Webb, J.D.; Burrows, R.W.; McFadden, J.D.O.; Christensen, C.

    1985-03-01

    A set of solid-state phase-change materials is being evaluated for possible use in passive solar thermal energy storage systems. The most promising materials are organic solid solutions of pentaerythritol (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 4/), pentaglycerinve (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 3/), and neopentyl glycol (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 2/). Solid solution mixtures of these compounds can be tailored so that they exhibit solid-to-solid phase transformations at any desired temperature betweeen 25/sup 0/C and 188/sup 0/C, and have latent heats of transformation between 20 and 70 cal/g. Transformation temperatures, specific heats, and latent heats of transformation have been measured for a number of these materials. Limited cyclic experiments suggest that the solid solutions are stable. These phase-change materials exhibit large amounts of undercooling; however, the addition of certain nucleating agents as particulate dispersions in the solid phase-change material greatly reduces this effect. Computer simulations suggest that the use of an optimized solid-state phase-change material in a Trombe wall could provide better performance than a concrete Trombe wall four times thicker and nine times heavier. Nevertheless, a higher cost of the phase-change materials (approx. =$0.70 per pound) is likely to limit their applicability in passive solar systems unless their performance can be significantly improved through further research.

  1. Interstellar grains within interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst K.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1991-01-01

    Five interstellar graphite spherules extracted from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite are studied. The isotopic and elemental compositions of individual particles are investigated with the help of an ion microprobe, and this analysis is augmented with structural studies of ultrathin sections of the grain interiors by transmission electron microscopy. As a result, the following procedure for the formation of the interstellar graphite spherule bearing TiC crystals is inferred: (1) high-temperature nucleation and rapid growth of the graphitic carbon spherule in the atmosphere of a carbon-rich star, (2) nucleation and growth of TiC crystals during continued growth of the graphitic spherule and the accretion of TiC onto the spherule, (3) quenching of the graphite growth process by depletion of C or by isolation of the spherule before other grain types could condense.

  2. Detection of organic matter in interstellar grains.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Y J

    1997-06-01

    Star formation and the subsequent evolution of planetary systems occurs in dense molecular clouds, which are comprised, in part, of interstellar dust grains gathered from the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM). Radio observations of the interstellar medium reveal the presence of organic molecules in the gas phase and infrared observational studies provide details concerning the solid-state features in dust grains. In particular, a series of absorption bands have been observed near 3.4 microns (approximately 2940 cm-1) towards bright infrared objects which are seen through large column densities of interstellar dust. Comparisons of organic residues, produced under a variety of laboratory conditions, to the diffuse interstellar medium observations have shown that aliphatic hydrocarbon grains are responsible for the spectral absorption features observed near 3.4 microns (approximately 2940 cm-1). These hydrocarbons appear to carry the -CH2- and -CH3 functional groups in the abundance ratio CH2/CH3 approximately 2.5, and the amount of carbon tied up in this component is greater than 4% of the cosmic carbon available. On a galactic scale, the strength of the 3.4 microns band does not scale linearly with visual extinction, but instead increases more rapidly for objects near the Galactic Center. A similar trend is noted in the strength of the Si-O absorption band near 9.7 microns. The similar behavior of the C-H and Si-O stretching bands suggests that these two components may be coupled, perhaps in the form of grains with silicate cores and refractory organic mantles. The ubiquity of the hydrocarbon features seen in the near infrared near 3.4 microns throughout out Galaxy and in other galaxies demonstrates the widespread availability of such material for incorporation into the many newly forming planetary systems. The similarity of the 3.4 microns features in any organic material with aliphatic hydrocarbons underscores the need for complete astronomical observational

  3. Strengthened solid-state laser materials

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, J.

    1985-10-01

    The tensile fracture strength of crystalline materials for high average power lasers has been increased by a factor of 15 using deep chemical polishing. Samples of gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, gadolinium gallium garnet, and yttrium aluminum garnet, which were prepared by conventional mechanical techniques to a high quality polish, were found to contain subsurface damage up to 50 ..mu..m in depth. When this damage was removed by deep chemical etching, the mean strength of small, four-point flexure specimens increased from 155 to 2280 MPa; however, these samples were no longer optically flat after etching. Specimens in which the optical figure was restored by polishing after the etch had an intermediate strength of 630 MPa.

  4. Tunable solid-state fluorescent materials for supramolecular encryption

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xisen; Ke, Chenfeng; Bruns, Carson J.; McGonigal, Paul R.; Pettman, Roger B.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2015-01-01

    Tunable solid-state fluorescent materials are ideal for applications in security printing technologies. A document possesses a high level of security if its encrypted information can be authenticated without being decoded, while also being resistant to counterfeiting. Herein, we describe a heterorotaxane with tunable solid-state fluorescent emissions enabled through reversible manipulation of its aggregation by supramolecular encapsulation. The dynamic nature of this fluorescent material is based on a complex set of equilibria, whose fluorescence output depends non-linearly on the chemical inputs and the composition of the paper. By applying this system in fluorescent security inks, the information encoded in polychromic images can be protected in such a way that it is close to impossible to reverse engineer, as well as being easy to verify. This system constitutes a unique application of responsive complex equilibria in the form of a cryptographic algorithm that protects valuable information printed using tunable solid-state fluorescent materials. PMID:25901677

  5. Determination of carbon-14 in environmental level, solid reference materials.

    PubMed

    Blowers, Paul; Caborn, Jane; Dell, Tony; Gingell, Terry; Harms, Arvic; Long, Stephanie; Sleep, Darren; Stewart, Charlie; Walker, Jill; Warwick, Phil E

    2011-10-01

    An intercomparison exercise to determine the (14)C activity concentrations in a range of solid, environmental level materials was conducted between laboratories in the UK. IAEA reference materials, C2, C6 and C7, and an in-house laboratory QA material were dispatched in 2006 to ten laboratories comprising of members of the Analyst Informal Working Group (AIWG) and one other invited party. The laboratories performed the determinations using a number of techniques, and using the results each one was evaluated in terms of levels of precision, sensitivity and limits of detection. The results of the study show that all techniques are capable of successfully analysing (14)C in environmental level materials, however, a shortage of certified environmental reference materials exists. The suitability of the IAEA reference materials and other material for use as reference materials was also assessed.

  6. The interstellar C-H stretching band near 3.4 microns - Constraints on the composition of organic material in the diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Pendleton, Y.; Sellgren, K.

    1991-01-01

    The composition and history of dust in the diffuse ISM was studied using 3600-2700/cm absorption spectra of objects which have widely varying amounts of visual extinctions along different lines of sight. The 3300/cm and 2950/cm features are attributed to O-H and C-H stretching vibrations, respectively. The O-H feature in OH 32.8-0.3 is suggestive of circumstellar water ice and is probably not due to material in the diffuse ISM. The features in the 3100-2700/cm region are attributed either to C-H vibrations or to M stars. The spectra of the latter show a series of narrow features in this region that are identified with photospheric OH. Objects in which these bands are seen include OH 01-477, T629-5, and the Galactic center source IRS 7. The C-H stretch feature of diffuse ISM dust has subpeaks which fall within 5/cm of C-H stretching vibrations in the -CH2- and -CH3 groups of saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

  7. SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) propellant and polymer materials structural modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The following investigation reviews and evaluates the use of stress relaxation test data for the structural analysis of Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellants and other polymer materials used for liners, insulators, inhibitors, and seals. The stress relaxation data is examined and a new mathematical structural model is proposed. This model has potentially wide application to structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. A dynamic modulus is derived from the new model for stress relaxation modulus and is compared to the old viscoelastic model and experimental data.

  8. PVD materials for electrochromic all-solid-state devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottermann, Clemens R.; Segner, Johannes G.; Bange, Klaus

    1992-11-01

    The electrochromic properties of all solid state devices (ASSDs) are strongly defined by thin film materials used as well as the method of deposition. Various thin film materials deposited by evaporation and sputtering are described serving as electrode, reflector, electrolyte, storage medium, or electrochromic film in ASSD. The impact of process parameters upon the device functionality is shown. In addition, the long-term stability of ASSDs for the different thin film systems is reported.

  9. Method of investigation of deformations of solids of incompressible materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrakhmanova, A. I.; Garifullin, I. R.; Sultanov, L. U.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is development mathematical models, algorithm for the investigation stress-strain state of elastic solids, taking into account the incompressibility materials. The constitutive equations are received using a potential energy of deformations. The system of the linear algebraic equations is received by linearization of a resolving equation. The penalty method is applied for a modelling of the incompressibility of the material. The finite element method is used for numerical solution of the problems.

  10. HANDBOOK: MATERIAL RECOVERY FACILITIES FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this document is to address the technical and economic aspects of material recovery facility (MRF) equipment and technology in such a manner that the document may be of assistance to solid waste planners and engineers at the local community level. This docum...

  11. Interstellar Transfer of Planetary Microbiota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Max K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    Panspermia theories require the transport of micro-organisms in a viable form from one astronomical location to another. The evidence of material ejection from planetary surfaces, of dynamical orbit evolution and of potential survival on landing is setting a firm basis for interplanetary panspermia. Pathways for interstellar panspermia are less clear. We compare the direct route, whereby life-bearing planetary ejecta exit the solar system and risk radiation hazards en route to nearby stellar systems, and an indirect route whereby ejecta hitch a ride within the shielded environment of comets of the Edgeworth- Kuiper Belt that are subsequently expelled from the solar system. We identify solutions to the delivery problem. Delivery to fully-fledged planetary systems of either the direct ejecta or the ejecta borne by comets depends on dynamical capture and is of very low efficiency. However, delivery into a proto-planetary disc of an early solar-type nebula and into pre-stellar molecular clouds is effective, because the solid grains efficiently sputter the incoming material in hypervelocity collisions. The total mass of terrestrial fertile material delivered to nearby pre-stellar systems as the solar system moves through the galaxy is from kilogrammes up to a tonne. Subject to further study of bio-viability under irradiation and fragmenting collisions, a few kg of original grains and sputtered fragments could be sufficient to seed the planetary system with a wide range of solar system micro-organisms.

  12. Development of Ceramic Solid-State Laser Host Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Trivedi, Sudhir; Kutcher, Susan; Wang, Chen-Chia; Kim, Joo-Soo; Hommerich, Uwe; Shukla, Vijay; Sadangi, Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Polycrystalline ceramic laser materials are gaining importance in the development of novel diode-pumped solid-state lasers. Compared to single-crystals, ceramic laser materials offer advantages in terms of ease of fabrication, shape, size, and control of dopant concentrations. Recently, we have developed Neodymium doped Yttria (Nd:Y2O3) as a solid-state ceramic laser material. A scalable production method was utilized to make spherical non agglomerated and monodisperse metastable ceramic powders of compositions that were used to fabricate polycrystalline ceramic material components. This processing technique allowed for higher doping concentrations without the segregation problems that are normally encountered in single crystalline growth. We have successfully fabricated undoped and Neodymium doped Yttria material up to 2" in diameter, Ytterbium doped Yttria, and erbium doped Yttria. We are also in the process of developing other sesquioxides such as scandium Oxide (Sc2O3) and Lutesium Oxide (Lu2O3) doped with Ytterbium, erbium and thulium dopants. In this paper, we present our initial results on the material, optical, and spectroscopic properties of the doped and undoped sesquioxide materials. Polycrystalline ceramic lasers have enormous potential applications including remote sensing, chem.-bio detection, and space exploration research. It is also potentially much less expensive to produce ceramic laser materials compared to their single crystalline counterparts because of the shorter fabrication time and the potential for mass production in large sizes.

  13. Stardust interstellar preliminary examination (ISPE).

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A.J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Basset, R.; Flynn, G.L.; Sutton, S.

    2009-03-23

    The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the Stardust interstellar dust collection and collector using non-destructive techniques. We summarize the status of the ISPE. In January 2006 the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were {approx}0.1 m{sup 2} in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m{sup 2}-day during two periods before the cometary encounter. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques. The goals and restrictions of the ISPE are described in Westphal et al. The ISPE consists of six interdependent projects: (1) Candidate identification through automated digital microscopy and a massively distributed, calibrated search; (2) Candidate extraction and photodocumentation; (3) Characterization of candidates through synchrotron-based Fourier-Tranform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning X-Ray Fluoresence Microscopy (SXRF), and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM); (4) Search for and analysis of craters in foils through FESEM scanning, Auger Spectroscopy and synchrotron-based Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM); (5) Modeling of interstellar dust transport in the solar system; and (6) Laboratory simulations of hypervelocity dust impacts into the collecting media.

  14. Laboratory Astrochemistry: Interstellar PAH Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are though to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken over the past years to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: objectives, approach and techniques adopted, adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a

  15. Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar sys tem without undergoing significant processing. In this poster, we sho w the results of several models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon f ractionation in proto-stellar cores.

  16. Method of encapsulating solid radioactive waste material for storage

    DOEpatents

    Bunnell, Lee Roy; Bates, J. Lambert

    1976-01-01

    High-level radioactive wastes are encapsulated in vitreous carbon for long-term storage by mixing the wastes as finely divided solids with a suitable resin, formed into an appropriate shape and cured. The cured resin is carbonized by heating under a vacuum to form vitreous carbon. The vitreous carbon shapes may be further protected for storage by encasement in a canister containing a low melting temperature matrix material such as aluminum to increase impact resistance and improve heat dissipation.

  17. Technology Challenges in Solid Energetic Materials for Micro Propulsion Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    micro spacecraft, micro satellites (10 to 100 kg), nano satellites (1 to 10 kg), and pico satellites (0.1 to 1 kg). These small-scale satellites will...transfer, and surface tension in micro and nano EM need to be sorted out before the technology is ready for its intended applications. MEMS...Technology Challenges in Solid Energetic Materials for Micro Propulsion Applications by Eugene Zakar ARL-TR-5035 November 2009

  18. Lithium ceramics as the solid breeder material in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenberg, G. W.; Reuther, T. C.; Johnson, C. E.

    1982-03-01

    Fusion blanket designs have for almost a decade considered the use of a solid breeder relying on available data and assumed performance. The conclusion from these studies is that acceptable neutronic and thermal hydraulic performance can be achieved. In the future, it will be necessary to establish that a particular material can tolerate the thermal and irradiation environment of the fusion blanket while still providing the required functions of tritium recovery, power production and neutron shielding.

  19. Mass, energy and material balances of SRF production process. Part 3: solid recovered fuel produced from municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Kärki, Janne

    2015-02-01

    This is the third and final part of the three-part article written to describe the mass, energy and material balances of the solid recovered fuel production process produced from various types of waste streams through mechanical treatment. This article focused the production of solid recovered fuel from municipal solid waste. The stream of municipal solid waste used here as an input waste material to produce solid recovered fuel is energy waste collected from households of municipality. This article presents the mass, energy and material balances of the solid recovered fuel production process. These balances are based on the proximate as well as the ultimate analysis and the composition determination of various streams of material produced in a solid recovered fuel production plant. All the process streams are sampled and treated according to CEN standard methods for solid recovered fuel. The results of the mass balance of the solid recovered fuel production process showed that 72% of the input waste material was recovered in the form of solid recovered fuel; 2.6% as ferrous metal, 0.4% as non-ferrous metal, 11% was sorted as rejects material, 12% as fine faction and 2% as heavy fraction. The energy balance of the solid recovered fuel production process showed that 86% of the total input energy content of input waste material was recovered in the form of solid recovered fuel. The remaining percentage (14%) of the input energy was split into the streams of reject material, fine fraction and heavy fraction. The material balances of this process showed that mass fraction of paper and cardboard, plastic (soft) and wood recovered in the solid recovered fuel stream was 88%, 85% and 90%, respectively, of their input mass. A high mass fraction of rubber material, plastic (PVC-plastic) and inert (stone/rock and glass particles) was found in the reject material stream.

  20. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, A.; Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examation Team: http://www. ssl. berkeley. edu/~westphal/ISPE/

    2011-12-01

    A. J. Westphal, C. Allen, A. Ansari, S. Bajt, R. S. Bastien, H. A. Bechtel, J. Borg, F. E. Brenker, J. Bridges, D. E. Brownlee, M. Burchell, M. Burghammer, A. L. Butterworth, A. M. Davis, P. Cloetens, C. Floss, G. Flynn, D. Frank, Z. Gainsforth, E. Grün, P. R. Heck, J. K. Hillier, P. Hoppe, G. Huss, J. Huth, B. Hvide, A. Kearsley, A. J. King, B. Lai, J. Leitner, L. Lemelle, H. Leroux, R. Lettieri, W. Marchant, L. R. Nittler, R. Ogliore, F. Postberg, M. C. Price, S. A. Sandford, J.-A. Sans Tresseras, T. Schoonjans, S. Schmitz, G. Silversmit, A. Simionovici, V. A. Solé, R. Srama, T. Stephan, V. Sterken, J. Stodolna, R. M. Stroud, S. Sutton, M. Trieloff, P. Tsou, A. Tsuchiyama, T. Tyliszczak, B. Vekemans, L. Vincze, D. Zevin, M. E. Zolensky, >29,000 Stardust@home dusters ISPE author affiliations are at http://www.ssl.berkeley.edu/~westphal/ISPE/. In 2000 and 2002, a ~0.1m2 array of aerogel tiles and alumi-num foils onboard the Stardust spacecraft was exposed to the interstellar dust (ISD) stream for an integrated time of 200 days. The exposure took place in interplanetary space, beyond the orbit of Mars, and thus was free of the ubiquitous orbital debris in low-earth orbit that precludes effective searches for interstellar dust there. Despite the long exposure of the Stardust collector, <<100 ISD particles are expected to have been captured. The particles are thought to be ~1μm or less in size, and the total ISD collection is probably <10-6 by mass of the collection of cometary dust parti-cles captured in the Stardust cometary dust collector from the coma of the Jupiter-family comet Wild 2. Thus, although the first solid sample from the local interstellar medium is clearly of high interest, the diminutive size of the particles and the low numbers of particles present daunting challenges. Nevertheless, six recent developments have made a Preliminary Examination (PE) of this sample practical: (1) rapid automated digital optical scanning microscopy for three

  1. Reliability of chemical microanalyses for solid waste materials.

    PubMed

    Ettler, Vojtěch; Johan, Zdenek; Vítková, Martina; Skála, Roman; Kotrlý, Marek; Habler, Gerlinde; Klementová, Mariana

    2012-06-30

    The investigation of solid speciation of metals and metalloids is required for accurate assessment of the hazardous properties of solid waste materials from high-temperature technologies (slag, bottom ash, fly ash, air-pollution-control residues). This paper deals with the problem of reliability of microanalyses using a combination of electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only. These methods do not permit to detect nanophases in host-crystals and lead to erroneous interpretation of analytical results, considering the elements of nanophases as belonging to the crystal structure of the main phase. More detailed analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on foils prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) can be used to solve this analytical problem. In this study, lamellar aggregates of potassium-rich clinopyroxenes were detected in copper smelting slags by a combination of SEM and EPMA. However, FIB-TEM indicated the presence of leucite inclusions (tens to hundreds nm in size) within the clinopyroxene lamellae. Based on examples from smelting slags and other solid waste materials, recommendations for standard SEM and EPMA applications and the need for methods with higher resolution for mineralogical investigation of waste materials are discussed.

  2. Interstellar isomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrees, D.; Mclean, D.; Herbst, E.

    1986-01-01

    Both observational and theoretical studies of molecular clouds are hindered by many difficulties. One way to partially circumvent the difficulties of characterizing the chemistry within these objects is to study the relative abundances of isomers which are synthesized from a common set of precursors. Unfortunately, only one such system has been confirmed, the HCN/HNC pair of isomers. While the basic outlines of its chemistry have been known for some years, there are still many aspects of the chemistry which are unclear. Another potential pair of isomers is HCO+/HOC+; HCO+ is an abundant instellar molecule and a tentative identification of HOC+ has been made in Sgr B2. This identification is being challenged, however, based on theoretical and laboratory evidence that HOC+ reacts with H2. Another potential pair of interstellar isomers is methyl cyanide (CH3CN, acetonitrile) and methyl isocyanide (CH3NC). The cyanide is well known, however the isocyanide has yet to be observed despite theoretical predictions that appreciable quantities should be present.

  3. Solid State Synthesis and Characterization of Carbo-Nitride Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The preparation of stoichiometric sp(sup 2)-bonded amorphous carbon nitride a- C3N4 in gram quantities was successfully achieved by performing a solid...deg C. The densification of micronized powders by cold isothermal pressing has produced disk-shaped ceramics of C3N4 and B-C-N materials, being...to preparation of a previously unknown material - sphere-shaped nanoscale-size carbon nitride built by stacking of curved C3N4 layers. Preliminary

  4. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William O.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Pillay, Gautam; Bergsman, Theresa M.; Eschbach, Eugene A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Richardson, Richard L.; Roberts, Janet S.; Schalla, Ronald

    1996-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants that utilizes electrical energy. A plurality of electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a selected geometric pattern. Varying phase and voltages configurations are applied to corresponding electrodes to achieve heating, physical phase changes, and the placement of substances within the treatment region. Additionally, treatment mediums can be added to either treat the contamination within the soil or to restrict their mobility.

  5. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, W.O.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pillay, G.; Bergsman, T.M.; Eschbach, E.A.; Goheen, S.C.; Richardson, R.L.; Roberts, J.S.; Schalla, R.

    1996-08-13

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants that utilizes electrical energy. A plurality of electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a selected geometric pattern. Varying phase and voltages configurations are applied to corresponding electrodes to achieve heating, physical phase changes, and the placement of substances within the treatment region. Additionally, treatment mediums can be added to either treat the contamination within the soil or to restrict their mobility. 29 figs.

  6. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William O.; Richardson, Richard L.; Goheen, Steven C.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants. Six electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a substantially equilateral hexagonal arrangement. Six phases of voltages are applied to corresponding electrodes. The voltages are adjusted within a first range of voltages to create multiple current paths between pairs of the electrodes. The current paths are evenly distributed throughout the region defined by the electrodes and therefore uniformly heat the region. The region of earthen material is heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants by promoting microbial action. This temperature is less than a melting temperature of the earthen material.

  7. Review on MIEC Cathode Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnwal, Suman Kumar; Bharadwaj, S.; Kistaiah, P.

    2016-11-01

    The cathode is one of the most important components of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The reduction of oxygen at the cathode (traditional cathodes like LSM, LSGM, etc.) is the slow step in the cell reaction at intermediate temperature (600-800∘C) which is one of the key obstacles to the development of SOFCs. The mixed ionic and electronic conducting cathode (MIEC) like LSCF, BSCF, etc., has recently been proposed as a promising cathode material for SOFC due to the improvement of the kinetic of the cathode reaction. The MIEC materials provide not only the electrons for the reduction of oxygen, but also the ionic conduction required to ensure the transport of the formed oxygen ions and thereby improves the overall electrochemical performance of SOFC system. The characteristics of MIEC cathode materials and its comparison with other traditional cathode materials is studied and presented in the paper.

  8. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, W.O.; Richardson, R.L.; Goheen, S.C.

    1994-07-19

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants. Six electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a substantially equilateral hexagonal arrangement. Six phases of voltages are applied to corresponding electrodes. The voltages are adjusted within a first range of voltages to create multiple current paths between pairs of the electrodes. The current paths are evenly distributed throughout the region defined by the electrodes and therefore uniformly heat the region. The region of earthen material is heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants by promoting microbial action. This temperature is less than a melting temperature of the earthen material. 13 figs.

  9. Cosmic carbon chemistry: from the interstellar medium to the early Earth.

    PubMed

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Cami, Jan

    2010-12-01

    Astronomical observations have shown that carbonaceous compounds in the gas and solid state, refractory and icy are ubiquitous in our and distant galaxies. Interstellar molecular clouds and circumstellar envelopes are factories of complex molecular synthesis. A surprisingly large number of molecules that are used in contemporary biochemistry on Earth are found in the interstellar medium, planetary atmospheres and surfaces, comets, asteroids and meteorites, and interplanetary dust particles. In this article we review the current knowledge of abundant organic material in different space environments and investigate the connection between presolar and solar system material, based on observations of interstellar dust and gas, cometary volatiles, simulation experiments, and the analysis of extraterrestrial matter. Current challenges in astrochemistry are discussed and future research directions are proposed.

  10. Cosmic Carbon Chemistry: From the Interstellar Medium to the Early Earth

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Cami, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Astronomical observations have shown that carbonaceous compounds in the gas and solid state, refractory and icy are ubiquitous in our and distant galaxies. Interstellar molecular clouds and circumstellar envelopes are factories of complex molecular synthesis. A surprisingly large number of molecules that are used in contemporary biochemistry on Earth are found in the interstellar medium, planetary atmospheres and surfaces, comets, asteroids and meteorites, and interplanetary dust particles. In this article we review the current knowledge of abundant organic material in different space environments and investigate the connection between presolar and solar system material, based on observations of interstellar dust and gas, cometary volatiles, simulation experiments, and the analysis of extraterrestrial matter. Current challenges in astrochemistry are discussed and future research directions are proposed. PMID:20554702

  11. Calorimetry study of microwave absorption of some solid materials.

    PubMed

    He, Chun Lin; Ma, Shao Jian; Su, Xiu Juan; Chen, Yan Qing; Liang, Yu Shi

    2013-01-01

    In practice, the dielectric constant of a material varies the applied frequency the material composition, particle size, purity, temperature, physical state (solid or liquid), and moisture content. All of these parameters might change during processing, therefore, it is difficult to predict how well a material will absorb microwave energy in a given process. When the temperature is measured by a digital thermometer, it could not accurately reflect the true temperature of the bulk materials, especially for mixed materials. Thus, in this paper we measured the microwave absorption characteristics of different materials by calorimetry. The microwave power levels, irradiation times, and masses of the materials were varied. It was difficult to predict the microwave energy absorption characteristics of reagent-grade inorganic compounds based on their color, metallic cation, or water stoichiometry. CuO, MnO2, Fe3O4, and MnSO4 x H2O (Taishan) strongly absorbed microwave energy. Most of the remaining inorganic compounds were poor absorbers, with silica hardly absorbing any microwave energy. Carbon-based materials had significantly different microwave absorption characteristics. Activated carbon and coke were especially sensitive to microwaves, but different types of coal were poor absorbers. The jamesonite concentrate absorbed microwave energy strongly, while the zinc concentrate was a poor absorber.

  12. Outgassing of solid material into vacuum thermal insulation spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pao-Lien

    1994-01-01

    Many cryogenic storage tanks use vacuum between inner and outer tank for thermal insulation. These cryogenic tanks also use a radiation shield barrier in the vacuum space to prevent radiation heat transfer. This shield is usually constructed by using multiple wraps of aluminized mylar and glass paper as inserts. For obtaining maximum thermal performance, a good vacuum level must be maintained with the insulation system. It has been found that over a period of time solid insulation materials will vaporize into the vacuum space and the vacuum will degrade. In order to determine the degradation of vacuum, the rate of outgassing of the insulation materials must be determined. Outgassing rate of several insulation materials obtained from literature search were listed in tabular form.

  13. Materials issues in solid oxide fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2007-03-02

    Hydrogen is the main fuel for all types of fuel cells except direct methanol fuel cells. Hydrogen can be generated from all manner of fossil fuels, including coal, natural gas, diesel, gasoline, other hydrocarbons, and oxygenates (e.g., methanol, ethanol, butanol, etc.). The presence of carbon oxides in the fuel can cause significant performance problems resulting in decreasing the cell performance of fuel cells, including solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In the SOFC, the high (800-1000°C) operating temperature yields advantages (e.g., internal fuel reforming) and disadvantages (e.g., material selection and degradation problems). Significant progress in reducing the operating temperature of the SOFC below ~800 ºC may allow less expensive metallic materials to be used for interconnects. This presentation provides insight on the material performance of ferritic steels in fuels containing carbon oxides and seeks to quantify the extent of possible degradation due to carbon species in the gas stream.

  14. Conversion of radioactive waste materials into solid form

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, T.S.; Pohl, C.S.

    1980-10-28

    Radioactive waste materials are converted into solid form by mixing the radioactive waste with a novel polymeric formulation which, when solidified, forms a solid, substantially rigid matrix that contains and entraps the radioactive waste. The polymeric formulation comprises, in certain significant proportions by weight, urea-formaldehyde; methylated urea-formaldehyde; urea and a plasticizer. A defoaming agent may also be incorporated into the polymeric composition. In the practice of the invention, radioactive waste, in the form of a liquid or slurry, is mixed with the polymeric formulation, with this mixture then being treated with an acidic catalyzing agent, such as sulfuric acid. This mixture is then preferably passed to a disposable container so that, upon solidification, the radioactive waste, entrapped within the matrix formed by the polymeric formulation, may be safely and effectively stored or disposed of.

  15. Intermediate temperature reversible solid oxide fuel cell materials set development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pine, Thomas Skidmore

    Novel ceramic materials synthesis methods were developed and tested to produce materials that may allow production of solid oxide fuel cells with improved reversible performance and on-anode hydrocarbon reformation without carbon deposition. A novel means of synthesizing fine particles of a promising ceramic anode material, yttrium doped strontium titanate (SYT) was developed and tested. The modified Pechini process developed was able to produce SYT with fine particle size, high phase purity and good control of dopant stoichiometry. Cells were manufactured from the synthesized materials and tested for operation in both fuel cell mode using dry and humidified hydrogen as well as dry methane fuel. Cells exhibited excellent resistance to carbon formation in the presence of dry methane, with no visible carbon deposition after 100s of hours of exposure. Electrolyzer behavior was as expected, and showed improved interfacial performance of cells when operated in electrolyzer mode compared to performance in fuel cell mode. Full cell impedances were higher than predicted from constituent materials properties, exhibiting area specific resistances 5˜10x higher than expected. This impedance was found to be a result of interdiffusion between anode and electrolyte materials at processing temperatures necessary to mechanically stabilize the anode. This interdiffusion caused the formation of non-conductive interfacial regions that caused the observed poor performance. The current work also included investigation of the glycine nitrate process (GNP) for synthesizing the remaining solid oxide fuel cell components with high phase purity and accurate control of dopant stoichiometry. Product gas evolved during the GNP combustion synthesis process was found to contain high levels of carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen, in contradiction of much of the literature published detailing this process. This finding is in accordance with predictions of pollutant levels based on combustion

  16. Interstellar Isotopes: Prospects with ALMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    Cold molecular clouds are natural environments for the enrichment of interstellar molecules in the heavy isotopes of H, C, N and O. Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets, that may trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. Models of the fractionation chemistry of H, C, N and O in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred, make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and the capabilities of ALMA for testing these models (e.g. in observing doubly-substituted isotopologues) will be outlined.

  17. Soil solid materials affect the kinetics of extracellular enzymatic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammirato, C.; Miltner, A.; Kästner, M.

    2009-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Soil solid materials affect the degradation processes of many organic compounds by decreasing the bioavailability of substrates and by interacting with degraders. The magnitude of this effect in the environment is shown by the fact that xenobiotics which are readily metabolized in aquatic environments can have long residence times in soil. Extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of cellobiose (enzyme: beta-glucosidase from Aspergillus niger) was chosen as model degradation process since it is easier to control and more reproducible than a whole cell processes. Furthermore extracellular enzymes play an important role in the environment since they are responsible for the first steps in the degradation of organic macromolecules; beta-glucosidase is key enzyme in the degradation of cellulose and therefore it is fundamental in the carbon cycle and for soil in general. The aims of the project are: 1) quantification of solid material effect on degradation, 2) separation of the effects of minerals on enzyme (adsorption →change in activity) and substrate (adsorption →change in bioavailability). Our hypothesis is that a rate reduction in the enzymatic reaction in the presence of a solid phase results from the sum of decreased bioavailability of the substrate and decreased activity of enzyme molecules. The relative contribution of the two terms to the overall effect can vary widely depending on the chemical nature of the substrate, the properties of the enzyme and on the surface properties of the solid materials. Furthermore we hypothesize that by immobilizing the enzyme in an appropriate carrier the adsorption of enzymes to soil materials can be eliminated and that therefore immobilization can increase the overall reaction rate (activity loss caused by immobilization < activity loss caused by adsorption to soil minerals). MATERIALS AND METHODS Enzymatic kinetic experiments are carried out in homogeneous liquid systems and in heterogeneous systems where solid

  18. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, Vitaly T.; Ivanov, Alexander V.; Filippov, Eugene A.

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

  19. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

  20. Tunable Solid State Lasers and Synthetic Nonlinear Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-23

    in the MMR refrigerator. The results will be JIM~rJ ]VVX XAT.71uJ* An~ AF P- PMJ~ XRNrK Nn KA XA* XJ Xk W MUX X September 23, 1987 8 discussed at the...interests appeared in the original proposal "Tunable Solid State Lasers and Synthetic Nonlinear Materials." .(= ,- w ,NMIw., 1 Wr 4 W , JWW September 23, 1987...Eric Gustafson - Research Associate Mary Farley - Group Secretary SLAB GEOMETRY LASERS 10 J, 10 Hz Fixed Slab Glass Laser Source Murray Reed Moving

  1. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Basset, R.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker F.; Bridges, J.

    2009-01-01

    In January 2006 the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, C omet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return o f contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approximately 0.1m(exp 2) in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the co llecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Col lector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m(exp 2-) day during two periods before the co metary encounter. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination ( ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using no ndestructive techniques. The ISPE consists of six interdependent proj ects: (1) Candidate identification through automated digital microsco py and a massively distributed, calibrated search (2) Candidate extr action and photodocumentation (3) Characterization of candidates thro ugh synchrotronbased FourierTranform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), S canning XRay Fluoresence Microscopy (SXRF), and Scanning Transmission Xray Microscopy (STXM) (4) Search for and analysis of craters in f oils through FESEM scanning, Auger Spectroscopy and synchrotronbased Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) (5) Modeling of interstell ar dust transport in the solar system (6) Laboratory simulations of h ypervelocity dust impacts into the collecting media

  2. Characterization of the physical properties for solid granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Jonathan R.; Shadle, Lawrence J.; Guenther, Chris; Benyahia, Sofiane; Mei, Joseph S.; Banta, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the behavior of a system is strongly governed by the components within that system. For multiphase systems incorporating solid powder-like particles, there are many different physical properties which need to be known to some level of accuracy for proper design, modeling, or data analysis. In the past, the material properties were determined initially as a secondary part of the study or design. In an attempt to provide results with the least level of uncertainty, a procedure was developed and implemented to provide consistent analysis of several different types of materials. The properties that were characterized included particle sizing and size distributions, shape analysis, density (particle, skeletal and bulk), minimum fluidization velocities, void fractions, particle porosity, and assignment within the Geldart Classification. In the methods used for this experiment, a novel form of the Ergun equation was used to determine the bulk void fractions and particle density. Materials of known properties were initially characterized to validate the accuracy and methodology, prior to testing materials of unknown properties. The procedures used yielded valid and accurate results, with a high level of repeatability. A database of these materials has been developed to assist in model validation efforts and future designs. It is also anticipated that further development of these procedures wil be expanded increasing the properties included in the database.

  3. Solid Freeform Fabrication of Composite-Material Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. Jeff; Yang, Jason; Jang, Bor Z.

    2005-01-01

    Composite solid freeform fabrication (C-SFF) or composite layer manufacturing (CLM) is an automated process in which an advanced composite material (a matrix reinforced with continuous fibers) is formed into a freestanding, possibly complex, three-dimensional object. In CLM, there is no need for molds, dies, or other expensive tooling, and there is usually no need for machining to ensure that the object is formed to the desired net size and shape. CLM is a variant of extrusion-type rapid prototyping, in which a model or prototype of a solid object is built up by controlled extrusion of a polymeric or other material through an orifice that is translated to form patterned layers. The second layer is deposited on top of the first layer, the third layer is deposited on top of the second layer, and so forth, until the stack of layers reaches the desired final thickness and shape. The elements of CLM include (1) preparing a matrix resin in a form in which it will solidify subsequently, (2) mixing the fibers and matrix material to form a continuous pre-impregnated tow (also called "towpreg"), and (3) dispensing the pre-impregnated tow from a nozzle onto a base while moving the nozzle to form the dispensed material into a patterned layer of controlled thickness. When the material deposited into a given layer has solidified, the material for the next layer is deposited and patterned similarly, and so forth, until the desired overall object has been built up as a stack of patterned layers. Preferably, the deposition apparatus is controlled by a computer-aided design (CAD) system. The basic CLM concept can be adapted to the fabrication of parts from a variety of matrix materials. It is conceivable that a CLM apparatus could be placed at a remote location on Earth or in outer space where (1) spare parts are expected to be needed but (2) it would be uneconomical or impractical to store a full inventory of spare parts. A wide variety of towpregs could be prepared and stored on

  4. Resilient Sealing Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Signo T. Reis; Richard K. Brow

    2006-09-30

    This report describes the development of ''invert'' glass compositions designed for hermetic seals in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Upon sealing at temperatures compatible with other SOFC materials (generally {le}900 C), these glasses transform to glass-ceramics with desirable thermo-mechanical properties, including coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) over 11 x 10{sup -6}/C. The long-term (>four months) stability of CTE under SOFC operational conditions (e.g., 800 C in wet forming gas or in air) has been evaluated, as have weight losses under similar conditions. The dependence of sealant properties on glass composition are described in this report, as are experiments to develop glass-matrix composites by adding second phases, including Ni and YSZ. This information provides design-guidance to produce desirable sealing materials.

  5. Functional Ceramic Ferroelectromagnetic Materials in Single Phase Solid-Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-05

    materials of 99.9% purity ( Aldrich) ( Bi2O3 , La2O3, PbO, Fe2O3, TiO2) were weighed in a stochiometirc proportion and ball milled in acetone medium for...Aldrich) ( Bi2O3 , MgO, ZrO2, PbO, Fe2O3, TiO2) were weighed in a stochiometirc proportion and ball milled in acetone medium for 24 hours.The mixture...prepared using conventional solid- state reaction route. The raw materials of 99.9% purity ( Aldrich) ( Bi2O3 , La2O3, PbO, Fe2O3, TiO2) were weighed in a

  6. Treating of solid earthen material and a method for measuring moisture content and resistivity of solid earthen material

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William; Richardson, Richard; Goheen, Steven

    1994-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile and non-volatile contaminants. Six electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a substantially equilateral hexagonal arrangement. Six phases of voltages are applied to corresponding electrodes. The voltages are adjusted within a first range of voltages to create multiple current paths between pairs of the electrodes. The current paths are evenly distributed throughout the region defined by the electrodes and therefore uniformly heat the region. The region of earthen material is heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants. This temperature is less than a melting temperature of the earthen material. The voltages are then increased to a second range of voltages effective to create dry regions around the electrodes. The dry regions have a perimeter which define a boundary between the dry regions and the earthen material exterior to the dry regions. Corona discharge occurs at the boundaries of the dry regions. As voltages are increased further, the dry regions move radially outward from the electrodes through the entire region. The corona boundaries decompose the non-volatilized contaminants remaining in the region. The hexagonal arrangement of electrodes is also preferable for measuring resistivity and moisture content of the earthen material. The electric field created between the electrodes is readily discernable and therefore facilitates accurate measurements.

  7. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2006-01-12

    The objective of this work was to obtain a stable materials system for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density greater than 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}. The solid electrolyte chosen for this system was La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, (LSGM). To select the right electrode materials from a group of possible candidate materials, AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed the LSGM electrolyte. Based on the results of the investigation, LSGM electrolyte supported SOFCs were fabricated with La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSCF-LSGM) composite cathode and Nickel-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (Ni-LDC) composite anode having a barrier layer of Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LDC) between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-LDC anode. Electrical performance and stability of these cells were determined and the electrode polarization behavior as a function of cell current was modeled between 600-800 C. The electrical performance of the anode-supported SOFC was simulated assuming an electrode polarization behavior identical to the LSGM-electrolyte-supported SOFC. The simulated electrical performance indicated that the selected material system would provide a stable cell capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density between 0.2 to 1 W/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Solid state dye lasers: rhodamines in silica-zirconia materials.

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, Silke; Yariv, Eli; Reisfeld, Renata; Breuer, Hans Dieter

    2002-05-01

    Silica-zirconia materials as well as silica-zirconia ormosils prepared by the sol-gel technique were doped with the laser dyes Rhodamine B and Rhodamine 6G and used as solid state dye lasers. The photostability and efficiency of the solid state laser samples were measured in a transverse pumping configuration by either a nitrogen laser or the second harmonic of a Nd-YAG laser. Under the excitation of a nitrogen laser the photostability of Rhodamine B in silica-zirconia materials was low and decreased with a growing amount of zirconia. The photophysical properties of the incorporated dyes were studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence lifetimes of both dyes increased when the matrix was modified by organic compounds Furthermore, the threshold energy of Rhodamine 6G in two ormosils containing 3 and 50% methylsilica was measured. The results revealed that the threshold energy was lower for the matrix with a higher amount of ormosil while the slope efficiency was higher in the matrix containing 30% ormosil.

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Solid polymer electrolytes: materials designing and all-solid-state battery applications: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, R. C.; Pandey, G. P.

    2008-11-01

    Polymer electrolytes are promising materials for electrochemical device applications, namely, high energy density rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, electrochromic displays, etc. The area of polymer electrolytes has gone through various developmental stages, i.e. from dry solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) systems to plasticized, gels, rubbery to micro/nano-composite polymer electrolytes. The polymer gel electrolytes, incorporating organic solvents, exhibit room temperature conductivity as high as ~10-3 S cm-1, while dry SPEs still suffer from poor ionic conductivity lower than 10-5 S cm-1. Several approaches have been adopted to enhance the room temperature conductivity in the vicinity of 10-4 S cm-1 as well as to improve the mechanical stability and interfacial activity of SPEs. In this review, the criteria of an ideal polymer electrolyte for electrochemical device applications have been discussed in brief along with presenting an overall glimpse of the progress made in polymer electrolyte materials designing, their broad classification and the recent advancements made in this branch of materials science. The characteristic advantages of employing polymer electrolyte membranes in all-solid-state battery applications have also been discussed.

  10. Interstellar Dust: Contributed Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. (Editor); Allamandola, Louis J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A coherent picture of the dust composition and its physical characteristics in the various phases of the interstellar medium was the central theme. Topics addressed included: dust in diffuse interstellar medium; overidentified infrared emission features; dust in dense clouds; dust in galaxies; optical properties of dust grains; interstellar dust models; interstellar dust and the solar system; dust formation and destruction; UV, visible, and IR observations of interstellar extinction; and quantum-statistical calculations of IR emission from highly vibrationally excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules.

  11. Method of altering the effective bulk density of solid material and the resulting product

    DOEpatents

    Kool, Lawrence B.; Nolen, Robert L.; Solomon, David E.

    1983-01-01

    A method of adjustably tailoring the effective bulk density of a solid material in which a mixture comprising the solid material, a film-forming polymer and a volatile solvent are sprayed into a drying chamber such that the solvent evaporates and the polymer dries into hollow shells having the solid material captured within the shell walls. Shell density may be varied as a function of solid/polymer concentration, droplet size and drying temperature.

  12. Chaotic Exchange of Solid Material Between Planetary Systems: Implications for Lithopanspermia

    PubMed Central

    Belbruno, Edward; Malhotra, Renu; Savransky, Dmitry

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We examined a low-energy mechanism for the transfer of meteoroids between two planetary systems embedded in a star cluster using quasi-parabolic orbits of minimal energy. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that the exchange of meteoroids could have been significantly more efficient than previously estimated. Our study is relevant to astrobiology, as it addresses whether life on Earth could have been transferred to other planetary systems in the Solar System's birth cluster and whether life on Earth could have been transferred from beyond the Solar System. In the Solar System, the timescale over which solid material was delivered to the region from where it could be transferred via this mechanism likely extended to several hundred million years (as indicated by the 3.8–4.0 Ga epoch of the Late Heavy Bombardment). This timescale could have overlapped with the lifetime of the Solar birth cluster (∼100–500 Myr). Therefore, we conclude that lithopanspermia is an open possibility if life had an early start. Adopting parameters from the minimum mass solar nebula, considering a range of planetesimal size distributions derived from observations of asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects and theoretical coagulation models, and taking into account Oort Cloud formation models, we discerned that the expected number of bodies with mass>10 kg that could have been transferred between the Sun and its nearest cluster neighbor could be of the order of 1014 to 3·1016, with transfer timescales of tens of millions of years. We estimate that of the order of 3·108·l (km) could potentially be life-bearing, where l is the depth of Earth's crust in kilometers that was ejected as the result of the early bombardment. Key Words: Extrasolar planets—Interplanetary dust—Interstellar meteorites—Lithopanspermia. Astrobiology 12, 754–774. PMID:22897115

  13. Solid State Ionic Materials - Proceedings of the 4th Asian Conference on Solid State Ionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdari, B. V. R.; Yahaya, M.; Talib, I. A.; Salleh, M. M.

    1994-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * I. INVITED PAPERS * Diffusion of Cations and Anions in Solid Electrolytes * Silver Ion Conductors in the Crystalline State * NMR Studies of Superionic Conductors * Hall Effect and Thermoelectric Power in High Tc Hg-Ba-Ca-Cu-O Ceramics * Solid Electrolyte Materials Prepared by Sol-Gel Chemistry * Preparation of Proton-Conducting Gel Films and their Application to Electrochromic Devices * Thin Film Fuel Cells * Zirconia based Solid Oxide Ion Conductors in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells * The Influence of Anion Substitution on Some Phosphate-based Ion Conducting Glasses * Lithium Intercalation in Carbon Electrodes and its Relevance in Rocking Chair Batteries * Chemical Sensors using Proton Conducting Ceramics * NMR/NQR Studies of Y-Ba-Cu-O Superconductors * Silver Molybdate Glasses and Battery Systems * New Highly Conducting Polymer Ionics and their Application in Electrochemical Devices * Study of Li Electrokinetics on Oligomeric Electrolytes using Microelectrodes * Calculation of Conductivity for Mixed-Phase Electrolytes PEO-MX-Immiscible Additive by Means of Effective Medium Theory * II. CONTRIBUTED PAPERS * Phase Relationship and Electrical Conductivity of Sr-V-O System with Vanadium Suboxide * Amorphous Li+ Ionic Conductors in Li2SO4-Li2O-P2O5 System * Fast Ion Transport in KCl-Al2O3 Composites * The Effect of the Second Phase Precipitation on the Ionic Conductivity of Zr0.85Mg0.15O1.85 * Conductivity Measurements and Phase Relationships in CaCl2-CaHCl Solid Electrolyte * Relationships Between Crystal Structure and Sodium Ion Conductivity in Na7Fe4(AsO4)6 and Na3Al2(AsO4)3 * Electrical Conductivity and Solubility Limit of Ti4+ Ion in Na1+x TiyZr2-ySixP3-xO12 System * Study on Sodium Fast Ion Conductors of Na1+3xAlxTi2-xSi2xP3-2xO12 System * Influences of Zirconia on the Properties of β''-Alumina Ceramics * Decay of Luminescence from Cr3+ Ions in β-Alumina * Lithium Ion Conductivity in the Li4XO4-Li2

  14. Effects of mechanical interaction between the interstellar medium and comets

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.A.

    1986-11-01

    The present treatment of the mechanical interaction of Oort Cloud comets with the interstellar medium gives attention to the importance of the accretion of interstellar material onto comets, as well as to the erosion of cometary surfaces by impacting interstellar grains and the consequences of these interactions. Scaling analyses indicate that collisions with interstellar grains can furnish a potent evolutionary mechanism in the modification of cometary surfaces; this factor may also contribute a substantial number of low mass particulated to the interstellar medium. 48 references.

  15. MATRIICES - Mass Analytical Tool for Reactions in Interstellar ICES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isokoski, K.; Bossa, J. B.; Linnartz, H.

    2011-05-01

    The formation of complex organic molecules (COMs) observed in the inter- and circumstellar medium (ISCM) is driven by a complex chemical network yet to be fully characterized. Interstellar dust grains and the surrounding ice mantles, subject to atom bombardment, UV irradiation, and thermal processing, are believed to provide catalytic sites for such chemistry. However, the solid state chemical processes and the level of complexity reachable under astronomical conditions remain poorly understood. The conventional laboratory techniques used to characterize the solid state reaction pathways - RAIRS (Reflection Absorption IR Spectroscopy) and TPD (Temperature-Programmed Desorption) - are suitable for the analysis of reactions in ices made of relatively small molecules. For more complex ices comprising a series of different components as relevant to the interstellar medium, spectral overlapping prohibits unambiguous identification of reaction schemes, and these techniques start to fail. Therefore, we have constructed a new and innovative experimental set up for the study of complex interstellar ices featuring a highly sensitive and unambiguous detection method. MATRIICES (Mass Analytical Tool for Reactions in Interstellar ICES) combines Laser Ablation technique with a molecular beam experiment and Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (LA-TOF-MS) to sample and analyze the ice analogues in situ, at native temperatures, under clean ultra-high vacuum conditions. The method allows direct sampling and analysis of the ice constituents in real time, by using a pulsed UV ablation laser (355-nm Nd:YAG) to vaporize the products in a MALDI-TOF like detection scheme. The ablated material is caught in a synchronously pulsed molecular beam of inert carrier gas (He) from a supersonic valve, and analysed in a Reflectron Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer. The detection limit of the method is expected to exceed that of the regular surface techniques substantially. The ultimate goal is to fully

  16. Modelling interstellar organics: relevance for the identification of unidentified interstellar features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloci, Giuliano

    2003-02-01

    This thesis is part of the research activity of the Astrochemistry Group of the Cagliari Astronomical Observatory and the Physics Department at the University of Cagliari. The subjects of this work are two specific astrophysical problems concerning the Interstellar Medium (ISM) analysis: 1) the identification of Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) - Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs); 2) the identification of the Extended Red Emission (ERE). A new theoretical approach to the spectroscopic identification of these specific Unidentified Interstellar Features is presented.Concerning the DIBs-UIBs, this work is an extension of a computational Monte-Carlo model developed in the past few years by our group (Mulas G. A&A 1998,338,243) with the aim to integrate quantum-chemical ab initio tecnhiques in it and thus produce a self-contained molecular simulator. Concerning ERE, a general recipe is developed in order to extrapolate the expected photoluminescence of small particles starting from available laboratory results obtained on bulk samples. All the numerical results were obtained for interstellar carbonaceous compounds, hence the title ``Modelling interstellar organics'' given to the thesis. In particular, a specific molecule belonging to the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is chosen as a test case to discuss the PAHs-DIBs-UIBs proposal, while the optical properties of laboratory samples of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) are used to obtain numerical results to be compared with luminescence phenomena such as ERE originating from some solid component of the ISM. The introductive chapter is intended to introduce the unfamiliar reader to the specific topic under study, and a short overview of the scientific scenario involved is given. Then, Part I and II discuss separately the two models above and represent the body of the work; each chapter follows a standard article format: introduction, theoretical method, numerical results, discussion and

  17. 40 CFR 262.215 - Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unwanted material that is not solid or... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Alternative... Eligible Academic Entities § 262.215 Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste. (a) If...

  18. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-11 Flammable solids and oxidizing materials—Detail requirements. (a) Flammable solids and oxidizing materials used as chemical stores and reagents are governed by subparts 194.15...

  19. 40 CFR 262.215 - Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unwanted material that is not solid or... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Alternative... Eligible Academic Entities § 262.215 Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste. (a) If...

  20. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  1. Observations of Carbon Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Geppert, W. D.; Persson, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Primitive Solar System materials (e.g. chondrites. IDPs, the Stardust sample) show large variations in isotopic composition of the major volatiles (H, C, N, and O ) even within samples, witnessing to various degrees of processing in the protosolar nebula. For ex ample. the very pronounced D enhancements observed in IDPs [I] . are only generated in the cold. dense component of the interstellar medium (ISM), or protoplanetary disks, through ion-molecule reactions in the presence of interstellar dust. If this isotopic anomaly has an interstellar origin, this leaves open the possibility for preservation of other isotopic signatures throughout the form ation of the Solar System. The most common form of carbon in the ISM is CO molecules, and there are two potential sources of C-13 fractionation in this reservoir: low temperature chemistry and selective photodissociation. While gas-phase chemistry in cold interstellar clouds preferentially incorporates C-13 into CO [2], the effect of self-shielding in the presence of UV radiation instead leads to a relative enhancement of the more abundant isotopologue, 12CO. Solar System organic material exhibit rather small fluctuations in delta C-13 as compared to delta N-15 and delta D [3][1], the reason for which is still unclear. However, the fact that both C-13 depleted and enhanced material exists could indicate an interstellar origin where the two fractionation processes have both played a part. Formaldehyde (H2CO) is observed in the gas-phase in a wide range of interstellar environments, as well as in cometary comae. It is proposed as an important reactant in the formation of more complex organic molecules in the heated environments around young stars, and formaldehyde polymers have been suggested as the common origin of chondritic insoluable organic matter (IOM) and cometary refractory organic solids [4]. The relatively high gas-phase abundance of H2CO observed in molecular clouds (10(exp- 9) - 10(exp- 8) relative to H2) makes

  2. Solid State Ionics Advanced Materials for Emerging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdari, B. V. R.; Careem, M. A.; Dissanayake, M. A. K. L.; Rajapakse, R. M. G.; Seneviratne, V. A.

    2006-06-01

    Keynote lecture. Challenges and opportunities of solid state ionic devices / W. Weppner -- pt. I. Ionically conducting inorganic solids. Invited papers. Multinuclear NMR studies of mass transport of phosphoric acid in water / J. R. P. Jayakody ... [et al.]. Crystalline glassy and polymeric electrolytes: similarities and differences in ionic transport mechanisms / J.-L. Souquet. 30 years of NMR/NQR experiments in solid electrolytes / D. Brinkmann. Analysis of conductivity and NMR measurements in Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol] fast Li[symbol] ionic conductor: evidence for correlated Li[symbol] motion / O. Bohnké ... [et al.]. Transport pathways for ions in disordered solids from bond valence mismatch landscapes / S. Adams. Proton conductivity in condensed phases of water: implications on linear and ball lightning / K. Tennakone -- Contributed papers. Proton transport in nanocrystalline bioceramic materials: an investigative study of synthetic bone with that of natural bone / H. Jena, B. Rambabu. Synthesis and properties of the nanostructured fast ionic conductor Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol] / Q. N. Pham ... [et al.]. Hydrogen production: ceramic materials for high temperature water electrolysis / A. Hammou. Influence of the sintering temperature on pH sensor ability of Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol]. Relationship between potentiometric and impedance spectroscopy measurements / Q. N. Pham ... [et al.]. Microstructure chracterization and ionic conductivity of nano-sized CeO[symbol]-Sm[symbol]O[symbol] system (x=0.05 - 0.2) prepared by combustion route / K. Singh, S. A. Acharya, S. S. Bhoga. Red soil in Northern Sri Lanka is a natural magnetic ceramic / K. Ahilan ... [et al.]. Neutron scattering of LiNiO[symbol] / K. Basar ... [et al.]. Preparation and properties of LiFePO[symbol] nanorods / L. Q. Mai ... [et al.]. Structural and electrochemical properties of monoclinic and othorhombic MoO[symbol] phases / O. M. Hussain ... [et al.]. Preparation of Zircon (Zr

  3. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2005-01-24

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed strontium-and-magnesium-doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSGM). The objective of the study was to identify the materials system for fabrication and evaluation of intermediate temperature (600-800 C) solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The slurry-coated electrode materials had fine porosity to enhance catalytic activity. Cathode materials investigated include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM-doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF-LSGM. The anode materials were Ni-Ce{sub 0.85}Gd{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} (Ni-GDC) and Ni-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 2} (Ni-LDC) composites. Experiments conducted with the anode materials investigated the effect of having a barrier layer of GDC or LDC in between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-composite anode to prevent adverse reaction of the Ni with lanthanum in LSGM. For proper interpretation of the beneficial effects of the barrier layer, similar measurements were performed without the barrier layer. The ohmic and the polarization resistances of the system were obtained over time as a function of temperature (600-800 C), firing temperature, thickness, and the composition of the electrodes. The study revealed important details pertaining to the ohmic and the polarization resistances of the electrode as they relate to stability and the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrode structures.

  4. Novel Materials and Devices for Solid-State Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Pfeifer, Kent B.

    2015-11-01

    There is a need in many fields, such as nuclear medicine, non-proliferation, energy exploration, national security, homeland security, nuclear energy, etc, for miniature, thermal neutron detectors. Until recently, thermal neutron detection has required physically large devices to provide sufficient neutron interaction and transduction signal. Miniaturization would allow broader use in the fields just mentioned and open up other applications potentially. Recent research shows promise in creating smaller neutron detectors through the combination of high-neutron-cross-section converter materials and solid-state devices. Yet, till recently it is difficult to measure low neutron fluxes by solidstate means given the need for optimized converter materials (purity, chemical composition and thickness) and a lack of designs capable of efficient transduction of the neutron conversion products (x-rays, electrons, gamma rays). Gadolinium-based semiconductor heterojunctions have detected electrons produced by Gd-neutron reactions but only at high neutron fluxes. One of the main limitations to this type of approach is the use of thin converter layers and the inability to utilize all the conversion products. In this LDRD we have optimized the converter material thickness and chemical composition to improve capture of conversion electrons and have detected thermal neutrons with high fidelity at low flux. We are also examining different semiconductor materials and converter materials to attempt to capture a greater percentage of the conversion electrons, both low and higher energy varieties. We have studied detector size and bias scaling, and cross-sensitivity to xrays and shown that we can detect low fluxes of thermal neutrons in less than 30 minutes with high selectivity by our approach. We are currently studying improvements in performance with direct placement of the Gd converter on the detector. The advancement of sensitive, miniature neutron detectors will have benefits in

  5. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2006-06-30

    Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. In this report, further measurements of the oxygen deficient double perovskite PrBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} are reported. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Preliminary measurements in symmetric cells have shown low ASR values at 600 C. Here we describe the first complete cell measurements on Ni/CGO/CGO/PBCO/CGO cells.

  6. DYNA3D Material Model 71 - Solid Element Test Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Zywicz, E

    2008-01-24

    A general phenomenological-based elasto-plastic nonlinear isotropic strain hardening material model was implemented in DYNA3D for use in solid, beam, truss, and shell elements. The constitutive model, Model 71, is based upon conventional J2 plasticity and affords optional temperature and rate dependence (visco-plasticity). The expressions for strain hardening, temperature dependence, and rate dependence allow it to represent a wide variety of material responses. Options to capture temperature changes due to adiabatic heating and thermal straining are incorporated into the constitutive framework as well. The verification problem developed for this constitutive model consists of four uni-axial right cylinders subject to constant true strain-rate boundary conditions. Three of the specimens have different constant strain rates imposed, while the fourth specimen is subjected to several strain rate jumps. The material parameters developed by Fehlmann (2005) for 21-6-9 Nitronic steel are utilized. As demonstrated below, the finite element (FE) simulations are in excellent agreement with the theoretical responses and indicated the model is functioning as desired. Consequently, this problem serves as both a verification problem and regression test problem for DYNA3D.

  7. Interstellar nomads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finney, B. R.; Jones, E. M.

    The possibility that free-wandering comets, those not tied to the gravitational influence of any star, can support a significant human population is considered. The energy sources of such a population would be deuterium from the comets and starlight gathered by gigantic mirrors. The energy budgets of such communities and their possible social structures are addressed from an anthropological perspective. A typical grouping or tribe might comprise 500 people and be divided into bands of about 25 individuals living in spacious habitats built of cometary materials and tending a 'farm' of starlight mirrors about 30,000 km across. The bands would exchange marriageable youths and gather at intervals for community rituals.

  8. Speckles in interstellar radio-wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, K. M.; Gwinn, C. R.; Reynolds, J.; King, E. A.; Jauncey, D.; Nicholson, G.; Flanagan, C.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of speckles in the scattering disk of the Vela pulsar are presented and speckle techniques for studying and circumventing scattering of radio waves by the turbulent interstellar plasma are discussed. The speckle pattern contains, in a hologrammatic fashion, complete information on the structure of the radio source as well as the distribution of the scattering material. Speckle observations of interstellar scattering of radio waves are difficult because of their characteristically short timescales and narrow bandwidths. Here, first observations are presented, taken at 13 cm wavelength with elements of the SHEVE VLBI network, of speckles in interstellar scattering.

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell with single material for electrodes and interconnect

    DOEpatents

    McPheeters, Charles C.; Nelson, Paul A.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell having a plurality of individual cells. A solid oxide fuel cell has an anode and a cathode with electrolyte disposed therebetween, and the anode, cathode and interconnect elements are comprised of substantially one material.

  10. Interstellar and Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathis, John S.

    1997-01-01

    'Interstellar dust' forms a continuum of materials with differing properties which I divide into three classes on the basis of observations: (a) diffuse dust, in the low-density interstellar medium; (b) outer-cloud dust, observed in stars close enough to the outer edges of molecular clouds to be observed in the optical and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum, and (c) inner-cloud dust, deep within the cores of molecular clouds, and observed only in the infrared by means of absorption bands of C-H, C=O, 0-H, C(triple bond)N, etc. There is a surprising regularity of the extinction laws between diffuse- and outer-cloud dust. The entire mean extinction law from infrared through the observable ultraviolet spectrum can be characterized by a single parameter. There are real deviations from this mean law, larger than observational uncertainties, but they are much smaller than differences of the mean laws in diffuse- and outer-cloud dust. This fact shows that there are processes which operate over the entire distribution of grain sizes, and which change size distributions extremely efficiently. There is no evidence for mantles on grains in local diffuse and outer-cloud dust. The only published spectra of the star VI Cyg 12, the best candidate for showing mantles, does not show the 3.4 micro-m band which appreciable mantles would produce. Grains are larger in outer-cloud dust than diffuse dust because of coagulation, not accretion of extensive mantles. Core-mantle grains favored by J. M. Greenberg and collaborators, and composite grains of Mathis and Whiffen (1989), are discussed more extensively (naturally, I prefer the latter). The composite grains are fluffy and consist of silicates, amorphous carbon, and some graphite in the same grain. Grains deep within molecular clouds but before any processing within the solar system are presumably formed from the accretion of icy mantles on and within the coagulated outer-cloud grains. They should contain a mineral

  11. Boundary Conditions for the Paleoenvironment: Chemical and Physical Processes in Dense Interstellar Clouds: Summary of Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, William M.

    1999-01-01

    The basic theme of this program was the study of molecular complexity and evolution for the biogenic elements and compounds in interstellar clouds and in primitive solar system objects. Research included the detection and study of new interstellar and cometary molecules and investigation of reaction pathways for astrochemistry from a comparison of theory and observed molecular abundances. The latter includes studies of cold, dark clouds in which ion-molecule chemistry should predominate, searches for the effects of interchange of material between the gas and solid phases in interstellar clouds, unbiased spectral surveys of particular sources, and systematic investigation of the interlinked chemistry and physics of dense interstellar clouds. In addition, the study of comets has allowed a comparison between the chemistry of such minimally thermally processed objects and that of interstellar clouds, shedding light on the evolution of the biogenic elements during the process of solar system formation. One PhD dissertation on this research was completed by a graduate student at the University of Massachusetts. An additional 4 graduate students at the University of Massachusetts and 5 graduate students from other institutions participated in research supported by this grant, with 6 of these thus far receiving PhD degrees from the University of Massachusetts or their home institutions. Four postdoctoral research associates at the University of Massachusetts also participated in research supported by this grant, receiving valuable training.

  12. Characterization of Thermal Transport in One-dimensional Solid Materials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoqing; Lin, Huan; Tang, Xiaoduan; Bergler, Kevin; Wang, Xinwei

    2014-01-01

    The TET (transient electro-thermal) technique is an effective approach developed to measure the thermal diffusivity of solid materials, including conductive, semi-conductive or nonconductive one-dimensional structures. This technique broadens the measurement scope of materials (conductive and nonconductive) and improves the accuracy and stability. If the sample (especially biomaterials, such as human head hair, spider silk, and silkworm silk) is not conductive, it will be coated with a gold layer to make it electronically conductive. The effect of parasitic conduction and radiative losses on the thermal diffusivity can be subtracted during data processing. Then the real thermal conductivity can be calculated with the given value of volume-based specific heat (ρcp), which can be obtained from calibration, noncontact photo-thermal technique or measuring the density and specific heat separately. In this work, human head hair samples are used to show how to set up the experiment, process the experimental data, and subtract the effect of parasitic conduction and radiative losses. PMID:24514072

  13. Observations of interstellar zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; York, D.

    1981-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer observations of interstellar zinc toward 10 stars are examined. It is found that zinc is at most only slightly depleted in the interstellar medium; its abundance may serve as a tracer of the true metallicity in the gas. The local interstellar medium has abundances that apparently are homogeneous to within a factor of two, when integrated over paths of about 500 pc, and this result is important for understanding the history of nucleosynthesis in the solar neighborhood. The intrinsic errors in detecting weak interstellar lines are analyzed and suggestions are made as to how this error limit may be lowered to 5 mA per target observation.

  14. Analysis of "Midnight" Tracks in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector: Possible Discovery of a Contemporary Interstellar Dust Grain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajit, S.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Cody, G.; Ferrior, T.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grun, E.; Hoppe, P.; Hudson, B.; Kearsley, A.; Lai, B.

    2010-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approximately 0.1m(exp 2) in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m(exp 2) day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques.

  15. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... solids and oxidizing materials used as chemical stores and reagents are governed by subparts 194.15 and... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail...) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  16. Solid State NMR Studies of Energy Conversion and Storage Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankuru Hennadige, Sohan Roshel De Silva

    NMR (Nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy is utilized to study energy conversion and storage materials. Different types of NMR techniques including Magic Angle Spinning, Cross-polarization and relaxation measurement experiments were employed. Four different projects are discussed in this dissertation. First, three types of CFx battery materials were investigated. Electrochemical studies have demonstrated different electrochemical performances by one type, delivering superior performance over the other two. 13C and 19F MAS NMR techniques are employed to identify the atomic/molecular structural factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among different types. Next as the second project, layered polymer dielectrics were investigated by NMR. Previous studies have shown that thin film capacitors are improved by using alternate layers of two polymers with complementary properties: one with a high breakdown strength and one with high dielectric constant as opposed to monolithic layers. 13C to 1H cross-polarization techniques were used to investigate any inter-layer properties that may cause the increase in the dielectric strength. The third project was to study two types of thermoelectric materials. These samples were made of heavily doped phosphorous and boron in silicon by two different methods: ball-milled and annealed. These samples were investigated by NMR to determine the degree of disorder and obtain insight into the doping efficiency. The last ongoing project is on a lithium-ion battery system. The nature of passivating layers or the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed on the electrodes surface is important because of the direct correlation between the SEI and the battery life time/durability. Multinuclear (7Li, 19F, 31P) techniques are employed to identify the composition of the SEI formation of both positive and negative electrodes.

  17. Solid residues from Italian municipal solid waste incinerators: A source for "critical" raw materials.

    PubMed

    Funari, Valerio; Braga, Roberto; Bokhari, Syed Nadeem Hussain; Dinelli, Enrico; Meisel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The incineration of municipal solid wastes is an important part of the waste management system along with recycling and waste disposal, and the solid residues produced after the thermal process have received attention for environmental concerns and the recovery of valuable metals. This study focuses on the Critical Raw Materials (CRM) content in solid residues from two Italian municipal waste incinerator (MSWI) plants. We sampled untreated bottom ash and fly ash residues, i.e. the two main outputs of common grate-furnace incinerators, and determined their total elemental composition with sensitive analytical techniques such as XRF and ICP-MS. After the removal of a few coarse metallic objects from bottom ashes, the corresponding ICP solutions were obtained using strong digestion methods, to ensure the dissolution of the most refractory components that could host significant amounts of precious metals and CRM. The integration of accurate chemical data with a substance flow analysis, which takes into account the mass balance and uncertainties assessment, indicates that bottom and fly ashes can be considered as a low concentration stream of precious and high-tech metals. The magnesium, copper, antimony and zinc contents are close to the corresponding values of a low-grade ore. The distribution of the elements flow between bottom and fly ash, and within different grain size fractions of bottom ash, is appraised. Most elements are enriched in the bottom ash flow, especially in the fine grained fractions. However, the calculated transfer coefficients indicate that Sb and Zn strongly partition into the fly ashes. The comparison with available studies indicates that the CRM concentrations in the untreated solid residues are comparable with those residues that undergo post-treatment beneficiations, e.g. separation between ferrous and non-ferrous fractions. The suggested separate collection of "fresh" bottom ash, which could be processed for further mineral upgrading, can

  18. The nature of interstellar/pre-cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis

    1990-01-01

    During the past 15 years considerable progress in observational techniques has been achieved in the middle-infrared region (5000-500/cm, 2-20 microns), the region where most diagnostic molecular vibrations occur. Spectra of many different astronomical infrared sources, some deeply embedded in dark molecular clouds and others obscured only by dust in the diffuse interstellar medium are now available. These spectra provide a powerful probe, not only for the identification of interstellar molecules in both the gas and solid phases, but also of the physical and chemical conditions which prevail in these two very different domains. By comparing these spectra with laboratory spectra one can determine the composition and abundance of the icy material frozen on the cold (- 10K) dust in the dark interior of molecular clouds and of the hydrocarbon component of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. As these are the building blocks of comets, the work described here also gives insight into the nature of comets.

  19. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2006-09-30

    the perovskite compositions that were being investigated at PNNL, in order to assess the relative importance of the intrinsic properties such as oxygen ion diffusion and surface exchange rates as predictors of performance in cell tests. We then used these measurements to select new materials for scaled up synthesis and performance evaluation in single cell tests. The results of the single cell tests than provided feedback to the materials synthesis and selection steps. In this summary, the following studies are reported: (1) Synthesis, characterization, and DC conductivity measurements of the P1 compositions La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3-x} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}FeO{sub 3-x} were completed. A combinational approach for preparing a range P1 (La,Sr)FeO{sub 3} compositions as thin films was investigated. Synthesis and heat treatment of amorphous SrFeO{sub 3-x} and LaFeO{sub 3-x} films prepared by pulsed laser deposition are described. (2) Oxygen transport properties of K1 compositions La{sub x}Pr{sub 2-x}NiO{sub 4+d} (x =2.0, 1.9, 1.2, 1.0 and 0) measured by electrical conductivity relaxation are presented in this report. Area specific resistances determined by ac impedance measurements for La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} and Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} on CGO are encouraging and suggest that further optimization of the electrode microstructure will enable the target to be reached. (3) The oxygen exchange kinetics of the oxygen deficient double perovskite LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (Ln=Pr and Nd) were determined by electrical conductivity relaxation. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The first complete cell measurements were performed on Ni/CGO/CGO/PBCO/CGO cells. (4) The oxygen exchange kinetics of highly epitaxial thin films of PrBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (PBCO) has been determined by electrical conductivity

  20. Solid and liquid residues as raw materials for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Gallert, C; Winter, J

    2002-11-01

    In the past few decades huge amounts of solid and paste-like wastes of domestic and industrial origin have been deposited on sanitary landfills worldwide. Only a small proportion was incinerated, where incineration plants were available. Since primary resources, such as ores for metal production or crude oil for the production of gasoline, diesel, solvents and plastics, or coal and natural gas as sources for energy or chemicals are not available in unlimited quantities, and because the deposition of residues, wastes and worn-out commodities on sanitary landfills causes pollution of the atmosphere, the soil and the groundwater due to hazardous gaseous emissions and toxic leachates, wastes from households and from industry must be avoided or minimized at an early stage. Whenever waste material can be recycled it must be re-introduced into production processes and the non-recyclable fractions should be used as a fuel for energy recovery. After incineration, the highly toxic dust fractions of ashes and slags resulting from burning the wastes should be deposited on sanitary landfills, while the granulated mineral slag fractions could be used as a substitute for the sand in cement as a construction material. Here we review various processes for the treatment of organic fractions of differently composed wastes to upgrade them to more valuable, re-usable products or at least to recover their energy content. Upgrading processes of organic wastes include composting, biogas fermentation, production of organic acids and solvents, and biopolymer or biosurfactants production. We also include biological purification procedures for the most important components of wastes, such as chitin from the shells of Crustaceae. Typical examples from pilot-scale or full-scale studies are discussed for each process.

  1. Bound and free moisture studies of solid materials by FTNMR

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.L.; Happe, J.A.; Pyper, J.W.

    1984-11-01

    Proton NMR has been used to study the moisure content of a number of solids: Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) and its plastic bonded Kel-F derivatives, Kevlar, aerogel, and Teflon. Most of our studies have been with TATB which exhibits a broad 40KHz Pake doublet with a superimposed narrow water peak. Under high resolution the water peak can often be resolved into two peaks. A similar doublet has been observed with Kevlar and aerogel. Whereas the line widths of the doublet vary from 70 to 1000 Hz depending on the material. The chemical shift is constant at ca. 2.5 ppM. At least one line in TATB has been identified as water by examining samples that have taken up varying amounts of moisture from humid air. Variable temperature studies have been performed on a number of samples with differing results. The water of TATB does not freeze-out down to -60/sup 0/C and does not narrow until +105/sup 0/C, whereas the Kevlar doublet does not change on heating to 140/sup 0/C. Aerogel exhibits the water doublet plus a third narrow peak which are lost upon heating to 70/sup 0/C. Upon exposure to the atmosphere all three peaks return in almost the proportion. 6 references, 6 figures.

  2. Electro-optic materials by solid source MOCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Hiskes, R.; Dicarolis, S.A.; Fouquet, J.; Lu, Z.; Feigelson, R.S.; Route, R.K.; Leplingard, F.; Foster, C.M.

    1993-12-01

    The solid source MOCVD technique, employing a single powder vaporization source composed of mixed beta-diketonate metalorganic compounds, has been used to grow thin films of a variety of electro-optic materials, including lithium niobate, strontium barium niobate, and potassium niobate. Preliminary results for potassium niobate films indicate that a volatile potassium organometallic source can be synthesized useful for growing potassium niobate by MOCVD. High single phase (001) oriented strontium barium niobate films have been deposited which exhibit waveguiding behavior. The most extensive work has been done on lithium niobate deposited epitaxially on a variety of substrates. Oriented z-axis (001) films have been grown on c-axis sapphire with and without a (111) oriented platinum base electrode and on a bulk grown lithium niobate substrate. Films grown directly on c-axis sapphire at 700 C exhibit x-ray rocking curve linewidths as low as .044 degrees, nearly perfect in-plane orientation as determined by x-ray phi scans, and peak-to-peak surface roughness less than 40 {Angstrom}. Optical waveguiding has been demonstrated by single prism coupling technique on similar films 1175--2000 {Angstrom} thick grown at 500 C, with optical losses of approximately 2 db/cm at 632.8 nm measured over 3.5 cm long films. Polarization vs. electric field measurements on 1100 {Angstrom} thick films grown on platinum show a hysteresis loop indicating ferroelectric behavior.

  3. Boussard Interstellar Ramjet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Boussard Interstellar Ramjet engine concept uses interstellar hydrogen scooped up from its environment as the spacecraft passes by to provide propellant mass. The hydrogen is then ionized and then collected by an electromagentic field. In this image, an onboard laser is uded to heat the plasma, and the laser or electron beam is used to trigger fusion pulses thereby creating propulsion.

  4. Interstellar grain chemistry and organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    The detection of prominant infrared absorption bands at 3250, 2170, 2138, 1670 and 1470 cm(-1) (3.08, 4.61, 4.677, 5.99 and 6.80 micron m) associated with molecular clouds show that mixed molecular (icy) grain mantles are an important component of the interstellar dust in the dense interstellar medium. These ices, which contain many organic molecules, may also be the production site of the more complex organic grain mantles detected in the diffuse interstellar medium. Theoretical calculations employing gas phase as well as grain surface reactions predict that the ices should be dominated only by the simple molecules H2O, H2CO, N2, CO, O2, NH3, CH4, possibly CH3OH, and their deuterated counterparts. However, spectroscopic observations in the 2500 to 1250 cm(-1)(4 to 8 micron m) range show substantial variation from source reactions alone. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of laboratory-produced analogs of interstellar ices, one can determine the composition and abundance of the materials frozen on the grains in dense clouds. Experiments are described in which the chemical evolution of an interstellar ice analog is determined during irradiation and subsequent warm-up. Particular attention is paid to the types of moderately complex organic materials produced during these experiments which are likely to be present in interstellar grains and cometary ices.

  5. Anode materials for sour natural gas solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovic, Nemanja

    Novel anode catalysts have been developed for sour natural gas solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Sour natural gas comprises light hydrocarbons, and typically also contains H2S. An alternative fuel SOFC that operates directly on sour natural gas would reduce the overall cost of plant construction and operation for fuel cell power generation. The anode for such a fuel cell must have good catalytic and electrocatalytic activity for hydrocarbon conversion, sulfur-tolerance, resistance to coking, and good electronic and ionic conductivity. The catalytic activity and stability of ABO3 (A= La, Ce and/or Sr, B=Cr and one or more of Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Mn, or Co) perovskites as SOFC anode materials depends on both A and B, and are modified by substituents. The materials have been prepared by both solid state and wet-chemical methods. The physical and chemical characteristics of the materials have been fully characterized using electron microscopy, XRD, calorimetry, dilatometry, particle size and area, using XPS and TGA-DSC-MS. Electrochemical performance was determined using potentiodynamic and potentiostatic cell testing, electrochemical impedance analysis, and conductivity measurements. Neither Ce0.9Sr0.1VO3 nor Ce0.9 Sr0.1Cr0.5V0.5O3 was an active anode for oxidation of H2 and CH4 fuels. However, active catalysts comprising Ce0:9Sr0:1V(O,S)3 and Ce0.9Sr 0.1Cr0.5V0.5(O,S)3 were formed when small concentrations of H2S were present in the fuels. The oxysulfides formed in-situ were very active for conversion of H2S. The maximum performance improved from 50 mW cm-2 to 85 mW cm -2 in 0.5% H2S/CH4 at 850°C with partial substitution of V by Cr in Ce0.9Sr0.1V(O,S)3. Selective conversion of H2S offers potential for sweetening of sour gas without affecting the hydrocarbons. Perovskites La0.75Sr0.25Cr0.5X 0.5O3--delta, (henceforth referred to as LSCX, X=Ti, Mn, Fe, Co) are active for conversion of H2, CH4 and 0.5% H2S/CH4. The order of activity in the different fuels depends on

  6. Diffuse Interstellar Bands in Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. B.; Sarre, P.; Marshall, C. C. M.; Spekkens, K.; de Naray, R. Kuzio

    Recent Fabry-Pérot observations towards the galaxy NGC 1325 with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) led to the serendipitous discovery of an emission feature centered at 661.3 nm arising from material in the interstellar medium (ISM) of our Galaxy; this emission feature lies at the wavelength of one of the sharper and stronger diffuse bands normally seen in absorption. The flux of the feature is 4.2 +/- 0.5 × 10-18 es-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. It appears that this is the first observation of emission from a diffuse band carrier in the ISM, excited in this case by the interstellar radiation field. We present the discovery spectra and describe follow-up measurements proposed for SALT.

  7. 49 CFR 173.240 - Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. 173.240 Section 173.240 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.240 Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. When §...

  8. INTERSTELLAR ANALOGS FROM DEFECTIVE CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES ACCOUNT FOR INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Zhenquan; Abe, Hiroya; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Ohara, Satoshi; Chihara, Hiroki; Koike, Chiyoe; Kaneko, Kenji

    2010-11-15

    Because interstellar dust is closely related to the evolution of matter in the galactic environment and many other astrophysical phenomena, the laboratory synthesis of interstellar dust analogs has received significant attention over the past decade. To simulate the ultraviolet (UV) interstellar extinction feature at 217.5 nm originating from carbonaceous interstellar dust, many reports focused on the UV absorption properties of laboratory-synthesized interstellar dust analogs. However, no general relation has been established between UV interstellar extinction and artificial interstellar dust analogs. Here, we show that defective carbon nanostructures prepared by high-energy collisions exhibit a UV absorption feature at 220 nm which we suggest accounts for the UV interstellar extinction at 217.5 nm. The morphology of some carbon nanostructures is similar to that of nanocarbons discovered in the Allende meteorite. The similarity between the absorption feature of the defective carbon nanostructures and UV interstellar extinction indicates a strong correlation between the defective carbon nanostructures and interstellar dust.

  9. Composite ceramic materials as anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Brian Douglas

    In this thesis, a composite material of La0.8Sr0.2Cr 1-yXyO3 (LSC), Ce0.9Gd0.1O 1.95 (GDC) and Ni was proposed to replace the standard solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) composite anode of Ni metal with Zr0.92Y0.08O 2 (YSZ). Ni-YSZ cermet anodes provide high performance for SOFCs operating on humidified hydrogen as a fuel. The anode performance degrades irreversibly, however, during reduction-oxidation (redox) cycling and due to carbon deposition on the anode when operating on hydrocarbon fuels without the addition of a reforming species (e.g., H2O, CO2). The LSC-GDC-Ni anode has the potential to avoid these drawbacks due to the very low Ni content, which is achieved by replacing the majority of the nickel with LSC, a ceramic electronic conductor. SOFCs were tested from 500-800°C using GDC electrolyte-supported cells with LSCF-GDC cathodes. Current-voltage and impedance measurements were used to characterize the anode performance in hydrogen, methane and propane fuels. The anode atmosphere was cycled between hydrogen and air during operation to test the redox stability of the anode. Power densities of ≈150 mW/cm 2 were achieved in H2 at 750°C, and switching to methane or propane resulted in a ˜25% decrease in power density. The power density in H2 was comparable to an identically prepared Ni-GDC anode on GDC. No carbon deposition was observed for an LSC-GDC-Ni anode after > 3h operation in propane, while the Ni-GDC anode rapidly failed. Seven redox cycles at 750°C resulted in only minimal performance loss for an SOFC with an LSC-GDC-Ni anode. Several studies were conducted to determine favorable compositions and processing parameters to obtain more active LSC-GDC-Ni anodes. The addition of 5 wt.% NiO to the anode was sufficient to catalyze the anode reaction for fine microstructures formed at 1100°C. The results agree well with a proposed reaction mechanism where adsorption/dissociation of H2 on the anode surface is co-limiting with surface diffusion of hydrogen

  10. The Organic Component of Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne

    2003-01-01

    The distribution, chemical structure, and formation of organic matter in the interstellar medium are important to our understanding of the overall evolution of dust. The exchange of dust between the dense and diffuse interstellar medium, and the effects of processing on dust within dense clouds will affect the inventory of material available for incorporation into newly forming star and planetary systems. Observational ground-based studies have confirmed the widespread distribution of the 3.4 pm absorption band attributed to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the diffuse interstellar medium of our own galaxy, and in the dusty spectra of a few nearby galaxies, while space based observations from IS0 probed the signatures of corresponding mid-infrared features. Laboratory experiments which utilize both thermal processes and energetic processing by high energy photons and cosmic rays, produce candidate materials which offer close matches to the observed diffuse interstellar medium and extragalactic hydrocarbon absorption features. Through an analysis of the 4000 to 1000 cm (2.5 to 10 micrometers) region of the spectrum of diffuse interstellar medium (DISM) dust compared with the spectra of thirteen chemical entities produced in the laboratory which serve as analogs to the interstellar material, significant constraints have been placed on the applicability of proposed candidate materials to explain the interstellar features. The results indicate that the organic refractory material in the diffuse interstellar medium is predominantly hydrocarbon in nature, possessing little nitrogen or oxygen, with the carbon distributed between the aromatic and aliphatic forms. Long alkane chains H3C-(CH2),- with n much greater than 4 or 5 are not major constituents of this material. Comparisons to laboratory analogs indicate the DISM organic material resembles plasma processed pure hydrocarbon residues much more so than energetically processed ice residues. This result is consistent with a

  11. Interstellar fullerene compounds and diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omont, Alain

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the presence of fullerenes in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been confirmed and new findings suggest that these fullerenes may possibly form from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the ISM. Moreover, the first confirmed identification of two strong diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) with the fullerene, C60+, connects the long standing suggestion that various fullerenes could be DIB carriers. These new discoveries justify reassessing the overall importance of interstellar fullerene compounds, including fullerenes of various sizes with endohedral or exohedral inclusions and heterofullerenes (EEHFs). The phenomenology of fullerene compounds is complex. In addition to fullerene formation in grain shattering, fullerene formation from fully dehydrogenated PAHs in diffuse interstellar clouds could perhaps transform a significant percentage of the tail of low-mass PAH distribution into fullerenes including EEHFs. But many uncertain processes make it extremely difficult to assess their expected abundance, composition and size distribution, except for the substantial abundance measured for C60+. EEHFs share many properties with pure fullerenes, such as C60, as regards stability, formation/destruction and chemical processes, as well as many basic spectral features. Because DIBs are ubiquitous in all lines of sight in the ISM, we address several questions about the interstellar importance of various EEHFs, especially as possible carriers of diffuse interstellar bands. Specifically, we discuss basic interstellar properties and the likely contributions of fullerenes of various sizes and their charged counterparts such as C60+, and then in turn: 1) metallofullerenes; 2) heterofullerenes; 3) fulleranes; 4) fullerene-PAH compounds; 5) H2@C60. From this reassessment of the literature and from combining it with known DIB line identifications, we conclude that the general landscape of interstellar fullerene compounds is probably much richer than heretofore realized

  12. Investigating nearby exoplanets via interstellar radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffer, Louis K.

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar radar is a potential intermediate step between passive observation of exoplanets and interstellar exploratory missions. Compared with passive observation, it has the traditional advantages of radar astronomy. It can measure surface characteristics, determine spin rates and axes, provide extremely accurate ranges, construct maps of planets, distinguish liquid from solid surfaces, find rings and moons, and penetrate clouds. It can do this even for planets close to the parent star. Compared with interstellar travel or probes, it also offers significant advantages. The technology required to build such a radar already exists, radar can return results within a human lifetime, and a single facility can investigate thousands of planetary systems. The cost, although too high for current implementation, is within the reach of Earth's economy.

  13. Molecular Spectroscopy in Astrophysics: Interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are thought to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A long-term laboratory effort has been undertaken to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these carbon molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The laboratory results will be discussed as well as the implications for astronomy and for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. We will also present the new generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

  14. Laboratory Studies of Interstellar PAH Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are though to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken over the past years to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: objectives, approach and techniques adopted, adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a

  15. 75 FR 34682 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code; Correction AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code.'' This correction provides... (IMSBC) Code,'' which published in the June 17, 2010, issue of the Federal Register, make the...

  16. 75 FR 34573 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ...The Coast Guard proposes to harmonize its regulations with International Maritime Organization (IMO) amendments to Chapter VI and Chapter VII to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended, (SOLAS) that make the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code mandatory. The amendments require that all vessels subject to SOLAS and carrying bulk solid......

  17. The evolution of organic mantles on interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, Willem A.; Greenberg, J. Mayo

    1989-01-01

    By laboratory simulation of the chemical processes on dust grains it was investigated how solid organic materials can be produced in the interstellar medium. The ice mantles that accrete on grains in molecular clouds, consisting primarily of H2O, CO, H2CO, NH3, and O2, are irradiated by the internal UV field, resulting in the storage of radicals upon photodissociation of the original molecules. Transient heating events lead to the production of oxygen-rich organic species by recombination reactions. The experiments indicated that in this way the observed amount of organic material can be produced if a grain passes a few times through a molecular cloud during its life. After the destruction of the cloud the grains enter a more diffuse medium. Here they are subjected to the interstellar UV field as well as to collisions with atomic hydrogen. Experiments show that the intense photoprocessing results in the removal of small species like H2O and NH3 as well as in carbonization of the organic molecules. Contrary to this, the atomic H flux will maintain a certain hydrogen level in the mantle. These processes likely convert the original, oxygen-rich organics into an unsaturated hydrocarbon type material such as that observed towards IRS 7 and in Comet Halley grains.

  18. CaFe interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Kozak, M.; Gnaciński, P.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Beletsky, Y.; Krełowski, J.

    2007-07-01

    A new kind of interstellar cloud is proposed. These are rare (just a few examples among ~300 lines of sight) objects with the CaI 4227-Å, FeI 3720-Å and 3860-Å lines stronger than those of KI (near 7699 Å) and NaI (near 3302 Å). We propose the name `CaFe' for these clouds. Apparently they occupy different volumes from the well-known interstellar HI clouds where the KI and ultraviolet NaI lines are dominant features. In the CaFe clouds we have not found either detectable molecular features (CH, CN) or diffuse interstellar bands which, as commonly believed, are carried by some complex, organic molecules. We have found the CaFe clouds only along sightlines toward hot, luminous (and thus distant) objects with high rates of mass loss. In principle, the observed gas-phase interstellar abundances reflect the combined effects of the nucleosynthetic history of the material, the depletion of heavy elements into dust grains and the ionization state of these elements which may depend on irradiation by neighbouring stars. Based on data collected using the Maestro spectrograph at the Terskol 2-m telescope, Russia; and on data collected using the ESO Feros spectrograph; and on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility acquired with the UVES spectrograph, Chile. E-mail: `arctur'@rambler.ru (AB); marizak@astri.uni.torun.pl (MK); pg@iftia.univ.gda.pl (PG); gala@boao.re.kr (GAG); ybialets@eso.org (YB); jacek@astri.uni.torun.pl (JK)

  19. Status of the Stardust ISPE and the Origin of Four Interstellar Dust Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Ansari, A.; Bajt, S.; Bastien, R. S.; Bassim, N.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F. E.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Changela, H.; Cloetens, P.; Davis, A. M.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G.; Fougeray, P.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Gruen, E.; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Some bulk properties of interstellar dust are known through infrared and X-ray observations of the interstellar medium. However, the properties of individual interstellar dust particles are largely unconstrained, so it is not known whether individual interstellar dust particles can be definitively distinguished from interplanetary dust particles in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) based only on chemical, mineralogical or isotopic analyses. It was therefore understood from the beginning of the Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) that identification of interstellar dust candidates would rest on three criteria - broad consistency with known extraterrestrial materials, inconsistency with an origin as secondary ejecta from impacts on the spacecraft, and consistency, in a statistical sense, of observed dynamical properties - that is, trajectory and capture speed - with an origin in the interstellar dust stream. Here we quantitatively test four interstellar dust candidates, reported previously [1], against these criteria.

  20. The Interstellar Conspiracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Matloff, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    If we were designing a human-carrying starship that could be launched in the not-too-distant future, it would almost certainly not use a warp drive to instantaneously bounce around the universe, as is done in Isaac Asimov's classic Foundation series or in episodes of Star Trek or Star Wars. Sadly, those starships that seem to be within technological reach could not even travel at high relativistic speeds, as does the interstellar ramjet in Poul Anderson's Tau Zero. Warp-speeds seem to be well outside the realm of currently understood physical law; proton-fusing ramjets may never be technologically feasible. Perhaps fortunately in our terrorist-plagued world, the economics of antimatter may never be attractive for large-scale starship propulsion. But interstellar travel will be possible within a few centuries, although it will certainly not be as fast as we might prefer. If humans learn how to hibernate, perhaps we will sleep our way to the stars, as do the crew in A. E. van Vogt's Far Centaurus. However, as discussed in a landmark paper in The Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, the most feasible approach to transporting a small human population to the planets (if any) of Alpha Centauri is the worldship. Such craft have often been featured in science fiction. See for example Arthur C. Clarke's Rendezvous with Rama, and Robert A. Heinlein's Orphans of the Sky. Worldships are essentially mobile versions of the O Neill free-space habitats. Constructed mostly from lunar and/or asteroidal materials, these solar-powered, multi-kilometer-dimension structures could house 10,000 to 100,000 humans in Earth-approximating environments. Artificial gravity would be provided by habitat rotation, and cosmic ray shielding would be provided by passive methods, such as habitat atmosphere and mass shielding, or magnetic fields. A late 21st century space-habitat venture might support itself economically by constructing large solar-powered satellites to beam energy back to

  1. Interstellar chemistry - Polycyanoacetylene formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Schloerb, F. P.; Snell, R. L.; Young, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    It is argued that interstellar polycyanoacetylenes are formed not on dust grains by catalytic buildup or by dissociation of longer molecules, but rather by gas phase ion-molecule reactions. The primary evidence for this view is the detection of deuterated cyanoacetylene in an interstellar cloud. It is also argued that the relative abundance of successive homologs of polycyanoacetylenes rules out the grain catalysis theory.

  2. Observations of interstellar zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.; Jura, M.

    1982-01-01

    IUE observations toward 10 stars have shown that zinc is not depleted in the interstellar medium by more than a factor of two, suggesting that its abundance may serve as a tracer of the true metallicity in the gas. A result pertinent to the history of nucleosynthesis in the solar neighborhood is that the local interstellar medium has abundances that appear to be homogeneous to within a factor of two, when integrated over paths of about 500 pc.

  3. Discovery of interstellar rubidium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; Smith, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Interstellar rubidium is detected through observations of the resonance line of Rb I at 7800 A towards zeta Oph. The abundance ratio of rubidium to potassium is estimated to be approximately solar, and if rubidium is generally found to have an abundance similar to potassium, it is indicated that the local interstellar medium is well mixed with a wide variety of the products of nucleosynthesis.

  4. Interstellar magnesium abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, M. J.; Dufton, P. L.; Hibbert, A.; York, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    An improved evaluation of the Mg II 1240 A doublet oscillator strength is used in conjunction with recently published Copernicus observations to derive accurate Mg II column densities toward 74 stars. These imply an average of 40 percent of interstellar magnesium is in the gaseous phase. Magnesium depletion is examined as a function of various interstellar extinction and density parameters, and the results are briefly discussed in terms of current depletion theories.

  5. Interstellar organic chemistry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1972-01-01

    Most of the interstellar organic molecules have been found in the large radio source Sagittarius B2 toward the galactic center, and in such regions as W51 and the IR source in the Orion nebula. Questions of the reliability of molecular identifications are discussed together with aspects of organic synthesis in condensing clouds, degradational origin, synthesis on grains, UV natural selection, interstellar biology, and contributions to planetary biology.

  6. Solid-phase materials for chelating metal ions and methods of making and using same

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Wey, John E.; Peterson, Eric S.

    2003-06-10

    A solid material for recovering metal ions from aqueous streams, and methods of making and using the solid material, are disclosed. The solid material is made by covalently bonding a chelating agent to a silica-based solid, or in-situ condensing ceramic precursors along with the chelating agent to accomplish the covalent bonding. The chelating agent preferably comprises a oxime type chelating head, preferably a salicylaldoxime-type molecule, with an organic tail covalently bonded to the head. The hydrocarbon tail includes a carbon-carbon double bond, which is instrumental in the step of covalently bonding the tail to the silica-based solid or the in-situ condensation. The invented solid material may be contacted directly with aqueous streams containing metal ions, and is selective to ions such as copper (II) even in the presence of such ions as iron (III) and other materials that are present in earthen materials. The solid material with high selectivity to copper may be used to recover copper from mining and plating industry streams, to replace the costly and toxic solvent extraction steps of conventional copper processing.

  7. Nondestructive image detection of surface and sub-surface defects of solid materials by OBD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Baixuan; Gong, Jian

    1996-09-01

    The measurement principle for detecting surface and sub-surface defects in solid materials by the optical beam deflection method (OBD) is described. The detectable depth of sub-surface defects is predicted through calculating the dependence of the surface temperature distribution of a solid sample, typically metal Al, on the thickness of the solid material and modulation frequencies of a pump laser. The defects in surface and sub-surface of some samples such as carbon film coated on glass, C/C composite material and metallic Al, etc., experimentally detected and directly displayed by grey image or 3D image.

  8. Liquefaction process for solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates

    DOEpatents

    Epperly, William R.; Deane, Barry C.; Brunson, Roy J.

    1982-01-01

    An improved liquefaction process wherein wall scale and particulate agglomeration during the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates is reduced and/or eliminated by subjecting the solid carbonaceous materials to controlled cyclic cavitation during liquefaction. It is important that the solid carbonaceous material be slurried in a suitable solvent or diluent during liquefaction. The cyclic cavitation may be imparted via pressure cycling, cyclic agitation and the like. When pressure cycling or the like is employed an amplitude equivalent to at least 25 psia is required to effectively remove scale from the liquefaction vessel walls.

  9. A review on synthesis and characterization of solid acid materials for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Norsyahida; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Loh, Kee Shyuan

    2016-08-01

    Solid acids emerged as an electrolyte material for application in fuel cells due to their high protonic conductivity and stability at high temperatures between 100 °C and 250 °C. This paper gives an overview of the different solid acid materials and their properties, such as high protonic conductivity and thermal stability, in relation to phase transitions and mechanisms of proton transport. Various solid acid synthesis methods including aqueous and dry mixing, electrospinning, sol-gel, impregnation and thin-film casting will be discussed, and the impact of synthesis methods on the properties of solid acids will be highlighted. The properties of solid acids synthesized as either single crystals and or polycrystalline powders were identified via X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, thermal analyses, optical microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. A selection of electrolyte-electrode assembly methods and the performance of solid acid fuel cell prototypes are also reviewed.

  10. Enabling interstellar probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; International Interstellar Probe Team

    2011-04-01

    The scientific community has advocated a scientific probe to the interstellar medium for over 30 years. While the Voyager spacecraft have passed through the termination shock of the solar wind, they have limited lifetimes as their radioisotope power supplies decay. It remains unclear whether they can reach the heliopause, the boundary between shocked solar wind and interstellar plasmas, and, in any case, they will not reach the undisturbed interstellar medium. As with most exploratory space missions, their ongoing observations continue to raise even more questions about the nature of the interaction of our heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Scientific questions including: What is the nature of the nearby interstellar medium? How do the Sun and galaxy affect the dynamics of the heliosphere? What is the structure of the heliosphere? How did matter in the solar system and interstellar medium originate and evolve? can only be answered by an "interstellar precursor" probe. Such a mission is required to make in situ measurements in the interaction region and interstellar medium itself at distances far from the Sun, but in a finite mission lifetime. By launching a probe toward the incoming "interstellar wind," whose direction is known, the distance to be traveled can be minimized but is still large. The current consensus is that a scientifically compelling mission must function to at least a distance of 200 astronomical units (AU) from the Sun and return a reasonable stream of data during the voyage. The central problem is that of providing a means of propulsion to accelerate a probe from the Solar System. Even with a low-mass payload and spacecraft, achieving the high speeds needed, even with gravity assists, have remained problematic. Voyager 1, the fastest object ever to leave the system is now traveling ˜3.6 AU/yr, and a credible probe must reach at least 2-3 times this speed. The use of an Ares V is an approach for enabling a fast interstellar precursor

  11. Composition, structure and chemistry of interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1986-01-01

    The observational constraints on the composition of the interstellar dust are analyzed. The dust in the diffuse interstellar medium consists of a mixture of stardust (amorphous silicates, amorphous carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and graphite) and interstellar medium dust (organic refractory material). Stardust seems to dominate in the local diffuse interstellar medium. Inside molecular clouds, however, icy grain mantles are also important. The structural differences between crystalline and amorphous materials, which lead to differences in the optical properties, are discussed. The astrophysical consequences are briefly examined. The physical principles of grain surface chemistry are discussed and applied to the formation of molecular hydrogen and icy grain mantles inside dense molecular clouds. Transformation of these icy grain mantles into the organic refractory dust component observed in the diffuse interstellar medium requires ultraviolet sources inside molecular clouds as well as radical diffusion promoted by transient heating of the mantle. The latter process also returns a considerable fraction of the molecules in the grain mantle to the gas phase.

  12. Complex Organics from Laboratory Simulated Interstellar Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    -enriched provides evidence for a connection between intact organic material in the interstellar medium and in meteorites. Thus, some of the oxidized aromatics, amphiphiles, amino acids, hydroxy acids, and other compounds found in meteorites may have had an interstellar ancestry and not solely a product of parent body aqueous alteration. Such compounds should also be targeted for searches of organics in cometary dust.

  13. 49 CFR 173.240 - Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.240 Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. When § 172... portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and sift-proof...

  14. Jet engine with electromagnetic field excitation of expendable solid-state material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybin, O. Yu.; Makarov, S. B.; Ostapenko, O. N.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic field action on a solid-state natural raw material is considered here in the context of producing a mechanical reactive momentum. We suggest the development of a jet engine that possesses fast control and low thrust based on desorption or sputtering of particles flow from a solid surface.

  15. Solid oxide fuel cell with single material for electrodes and interconnect

    DOEpatents

    McPheeters, C.C.; Nelson, P.A.; Dees, D.W.

    1994-07-19

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described having a plurality of individual cells. A solid oxide fuel cell has an anode and a cathode with electrolyte disposed there between, and the anode, cathode and interconnect elements are comprised of substantially one material. 9 figs.

  16. Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry: Sensitive and Quantitative Chemical Depth Profiling of Solid Materials.

    PubMed

    Riedo, Andreas; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Neuland, Maike B; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Direct quantitative and sensitive chemical analysis of solid materials with high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction is of high importance in various fields of analytical research, ranging from in situ space research to the semiconductor industry. Accurate knowledge of the chemical composition of solid materials allows a better understanding of physical and chemical processes that formed/altered the material and allows e.g. to further improve these processes. So far, state-of-the-art techniques such as SIMS, LA-ICP-MS or GD-MS have been applied for chemical analyses in these fields of research. In this report we review the current measurement capability and the applicability of our Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (instrument name LMS) for the chemical analysis of solids with high spatial resolution. The most recent chemical analyses conducted on various solid materials, including e.g. alloys, fossils and meteorites are discussed.

  17. 76 FR 53897 - EPA Seeking Input Materials Measurement; Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), Recycling, and Source...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY EPA Seeking Input Materials Measurement; Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), Recycling, and Source... management, recycling, measurement, data, data collection, construction and demolition (C&D)...

  18. From Interstellar PAHs and Ices to the Origin of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in observational astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Twenty years ago the composition of interstellar dust was largely guessed at, the concept of ices in dense molecular clouds ignored, and the notion of large, abundant, gas phase, carbon rich molecules widespread throughout the interstellar medium (ISM) considered impossible. Today the composition of dust in the diffuse ISM is reasonably well constrained to micron-sized cold refractory materials comprised of amorphous and crystalline silicates mixed with an amorphous carbonaceous material containing aromatic structural units and short, branched aliphatic chains. In dense molecular clouds, the birthplace of stars and planets, these cold dust particles are coated with mixed molecular ices whose composition is very well constrained. Lastly, the signature of carbon-rich polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), shockingly large molecules by earlier interstellar chemistry standards, is widespread throughout the Universe. The first part of this lecture will describe how infrared studies of interstellar space, combined with laboratory simulations, have revealed the composition of interstellar ices (the building blocks of comets) and the high abundance and nature of interstellar PAHs. The laboratory database has now enabled us to gain insight into the identities, concentrations, and physical state of many interstellar materials. Within a dense molecular cloud, and especially in the solar nebula during the star and planet formation stage, the materials frozen into interstellar/precometary ices are photoprocessed by ultraviolet light, producing more complex molecules. The remainder of the presentation will focus on the photochemical evolution of these materials and the possible role of these compounds on the early Earth. As these materials are thought to be the building

  19. Ultrathin two-dimensional inorganic materials: new opportunities for solid state nanochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongfu; Gao, Shan; Lei, Fengcai; Xiao, Chong; Xie, Yi

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: The ultimate goal of solid state chemistry is to gain a clear correlation between atomic, defect, and electronic structure and intrinsic properties of solid state materials. Solid materials can generally be classified as amorphous, quasicrystalline, and crystalline based on their atomic arrangement, in which crystalline materials can be further divided into single crystals, microcrystals, and nanocrystals. Conventional solid state chemistry mainly focuses on studying single crystals and microcrystals, while recently nanocrystals have become a hot research topic in the field of solid state chemistry. As more and more nanocrystalline materials have been artificially fabricated, the solid state chemistry for studying those nanosolids has become a new subdiscipline: solid state nanochemistry. However, solid state nanochemistry, usually called "nanochemistry" for short, primarily studies the microstructures and macroscopic properties of a nanomaterial's aggregation states. Due to abundant microstructures in the aggregation states, it is only possible to build a simple but imprecise correlation between the microscopic morphology and the macroscopic properties of the nanostructures. Notably, atomically thin two-dimensional inorganic materials provide an ideal platform to establish clear structure-property relationships in the field of solid state nanochemistry, thanks to their homogeneous dispersion without the assistance of a capping ligand. In addition, their atomic structures including coordination number, bond length, and disorder degree of the examined atoms can be clearly disclosed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Also, their more exposed interior atoms would inevitably induce the formation of various defects, which would have a non-negligible effect on their physicochemical properties. Based on the obtained atomic and defect structural characteristics, density-functional calculations are performed to study their electronic structures

  20. Material-illumination ambiguities and the perception of solid objects.

    PubMed

    Pont, Sylvia C; te Pas, Susan F

    2006-01-01

    The appearance of objects depends on their material, shape, and on the illumination conditions. Conversely, object appearance provides us with cues about the illumination and the material. This so-called inverse problem is basically underdetermined and therefore we expect that material and illumination perception are confounded. To gain insight into the relevant mechanisms, we rendered a set of artificial spheres for vastly different canonical light fields and reflectance functions. We used four physics-based bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) representing glossy, pitted, velvety, and matte material. The six illumination conditions were collimated illumination from four directions, hemispherical diffuse illumination, and fully diffuse (Ganzfeld) illumination. In three sub-experiments we presented pairs of stimuli and asked human observers to judge whether the material was the same, whether the illumination was the same, and for a subset in which either the illumination or the material was the same to judge which of the two was constant. We found that observers made many errors in all sub-experiments. In experiment 2 the illumination direction was chosen at random. Using an interactive interface, we asked human observers to match the illumination direction of a sphere of one of the four materials with that of a Lambertian sphere. We found systematical material-dependent deviations from veridical performance. Theoretical analysis of the radiance patterns suggests that judgments were based mainly on the position of the shadow edge. In conclusion, we found no evidence for 'material constancy' for perception of smooth rendered spheres despite vast quantitative and qualitative differences in illumination and in BRDF between the stimuli. Although human observers demonstrated some 'illumination constancy', they made systematic errors depending on the material reflectance, suggesting that they used mainly the location of the shadow edge. Our results

  1. Solid spherical glass particle impingement studies of plastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Erosion experiments on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polycarbonate, and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were conducted with spherical glass beads impacting at normal incidence. Optical and scanning electron microscopic studies and surface profile measurements were made on specimens at predetermined test intervals. During the initial stage of damage to PMMA and polycarbonate, material expands or builds up above the original surface. However, this buildup disappears as testing progresses. Little or no buildup was observed on PTFE. PTFE is observed to be the most resistant material to erosion and PMMA the least. At low impact pressures, material removal mechanisms are believed to be similar to those for metallic materials. However, at higher pressures, surface melting is indicated at the center of impact. Deformation and fatigue appear to play major roles in the material removal process with possible melting or softening.

  2. Interstellar H(3)(+).

    PubMed

    Oka, Takeshi

    2006-08-15

    Protonated molecular hydrogen, H(3)(+), is the simplest polyatomic molecule. It is the most abundantly produced interstellar molecule, next only to H(2), although its steady state concentration is low because of its extremely high chemical reactivity. H(3)(+) is a strong acid (proton donor) and initiates chains of ion-molecule reactions in interstellar space thus leading to formation of complex molecules. Here, I summarize the understandings on this fundamental species in interstellar space obtained from our infrared observations since its discovery in 1996 and discuss the recent observations and analyses of H(3)(+) in the Central Molecular Zone near the Galatic center that led to a revelation of a vast amount of warm and diffuse gas existing in the region.

  3. Interstellar H3+

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Protonated molecular hydrogen, H3+, is the simplest polyatomic molecule. It is the most abundantly produced interstellar molecule, next only to H2, although its steady state concentration is low because of its extremely high chemical reactivity. H3+ is a strong acid (proton donor) and initiates chains of ion-molecule reactions in interstellar space thus leading to formation of complex molecules. Here, I summarize the understandings on this fundamental species in interstellar space obtained from our infrared observations since its discovery in 1996 and discuss the recent observations and analyses of H3+ in the Central Molecular Zone near the Galatic center that led to a revelation of a vast amount of warm and diffuse gas existing in the region. PMID:16894171

  4. Interstellar Sweat Equity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. H.; Becker, R. E.; O'Donnell, D. J.; Brody, A. R.

    So, you have just launched aboard the Starship, headed to an exoplanet light years from Earth. You will spend the rest of your natural life on this journey in the expectation and hope that your grandchildren will arrive safely, land, and build a new settlement. You will need to govern the community onboard the Starship. This system of governance must meet unique requirements for participation, representation, and decision-making. On a spaceship that can fly and operate by itself, what will the crewmembers do for their generations in transit? Certainly, they will train and train again to practice the skills they will need upon arrival at a new world. However, this vicarious practice neither suffices to prepare the future pioneers for their destiny at a new star nor will it provide them with the satisfaction in their own work. To hone the crewmembers' inventive and technical skills, to challenge and prepare them for pioneering, the crew would build and expand the interstellar ship in transit. This transstellar ``sweat equity'' gives a stake in the enterprise to all the people, providing meaningful and useful activity to the new generations of crewmembers. They build all the new segments of the vessel from raw materials - including atmosphere - stored on board. Construction of new pressure shell modules would be one option, but they also reconstruct or fill-in existing pressurized volumes. The crew makes new life support system components and develops new agricultural modules in anticipation of their future needs. Upon arrival at the new star or planet, the crew shall apply these robustly developed skills and self-sufficient spirit to their new home.

  5. Liquefaction of solid carbonaceous material with catalyst recycle

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Avinash; Greene, Marvin I.

    1992-01-01

    In the two stage liquefaction of a carbonaceous solid such as coal wherein coal is liquefied in a first stage in the presence of a liquefaction solvent and the first stage effluent is hydrogenated in the presence of a supported hydrogenation catalyst in a second stage, catalyst which has been previously employed in the second stage and comminuted to a particle size distribution equivalent to 100% passing through U.S. 100 Mesh, is passed to the first stage to improve the overall operation.

  6. Solid-State Electrode Engineering and Material Processing for All-Solid-State Lithium and Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yersak, Thomas A.

    In this dissertation we demonstrate the full rechargeability of a FeS 2/lithium metal battery at 60°C. To enable the reversibility of the FeS2 redox chemistry we utilize a bulk all-solid-state battery architecture based upon the Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramic electrolyte. The glass-ceramic electrolyte's non-volatility and non-flammability allows us to use a lithium metal anode safely, while its solid nature confines FeS2's intermediate electroactive species to prevent active material loss and capacity fade. Based only on the weight of the active materials our battery stands to triple the specific energy (Wh kg-1) of conventional state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries. We also observe ortho-FeS2 as a charge product and propose a new discharge mechanism which revises 30 years of research on the subject. Unfortunately, our laboratory FeS2/Li battery could not achieve a practical cell-level specific energy because the composite electrode was nearly 70 wt. % glass-ceramic electrolyte and carbon black. We also found that our batteries were not durable because the formation of lithium dendrites through the glass-ceramic electrolyte separator membrane frequently internally shorted test cells upon charge. The remainder of this dissertation outlines our work to develop an all-solid-state Li-ion battery to address the shorting issue and the work done to engineer better active material-electrolyte solid-solid interfaces in the composite electrode for high cell-level specific energy.

  7. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Basset, R.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Cody, G.; Ferroir, T.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grün, E.; Hoppe, P.; Kearsley, A.; Lemelle, L.; Leroux, H.; Lettieri, R.; Marchant, W.; Mendez, B.; Nittler, L. R.; Ogliore, R.; Postberg, F.; Sandford, S. A.; Schmitz, S.; Silversmit, G.; Simionovici, A.; Srama, R.; Stadermann, F. J.; Stephan, T.; Stroud, R. M.; Susini, J.; Sutton, S.; Trieloff, M.; Tsou, P.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Tyliczszak, T.; Vekemans, B.; Vincze, L.; Warren, J.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2009-03-01

    The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the Stardust interstellar dust collection and collector using non-destructive techniques. We summarize the status of the ISPE.

  8. Synthesis of prebiotic glycerol in interstellar ices.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Ralf I; Maity, Surajit; Jones, Brant M

    2015-01-02

    Contemporary mechanisms for the spontaneous formation of glycerol have not been able to explain its existence on early Earth. The exogenous origin and delivery of organic molecules to early Earth presents an alternative route to their terrestrial in situ formation since biorelevant molecules like amino acids, carboxylic acids, and alkylphosphonic acids have been recovered from carbonaceous chondrites. Reported herein is the first in situ identification of glycerol, the key building block of all cellular membranes, formed by exposure of methanol-based - interstellar model ices to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons. These results provide compelling evidence that the radiation-induced formation of glycerol in low-temperature interstellar model ices is facile. Synthesized on interstellar grains and eventually incorporated into the "building material" of solar systems, biorelevant molecules such as glycerol could have been dispensed to habitable planets such as early Earth by comets and meteorites.

  9. PAH in the laboratory and interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowiak, Thomas J.; Flickinger, Gregory C.; Boyd, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The theory that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a constituent of the interstellar medium, and a source of the IR emission bands at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 microns is being studied using PAH containing acid insoluble residue of the Orgueil CI meteorite and coal tar. FTIR spectra of Orgueil PAH material that has undergone thermal treatment, and a solvent insoluble fraction of coal tar that has been exposed to hydrogen plasma are presented. The UV excided luminescence spectrum of a solvent soluble coal tar film is also shown. Comparison of the lab measurements with observations appears to support the interstellar PAH theory, and shows the process of dehydrogenation expected to take place in the interstellar medium.

  10. Fabrication, properties, and tritium recovery from solid breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E. ); Kondo, T. ); Roux, N. ); Tanaka, S. ); Vollath, D. )

    1991-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 133 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, R.; Textor, G.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM) are summarized. The general objectives of the VIM are to investigate the interplanetary and interstellar media and to continue the Voyager program of ultraviolet astronomy. The VIM will utilize both Voyager spacecraft for the period from January 1990 through December 2019. The mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, control and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  12. Kinetic extruder - a dry pulverized solid material pump

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, John W [Palo Alto, CA; Bonin, John H [Sunnyvale, CA; Daniel, Jr., Arnold D.

    1983-01-01

    Method and apparatus are shown for the continuous feeding of pulverized material to a high pressure container. A rotor is located within the high pressure container. The pulverized material is fed from a feed hopper through a stationary feed pipe to a vented spin-up chamber to a plurality of two-stage sprues mounted in the rotor. Control nozzles downstream from the sprues meter the flow of coal through the sprues.

  13. Kinetic extruder - a dry pulverized solid material pump

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, J. W.; Bonin, J. H.; Daniel, A. D. Jr.

    1983-03-15

    Method and apparatus are shown for the continuous feeding of pulverized material to a high pressure container. A rotor is located within the high pressure container. The pulverized material is fed from a feed hopper through a stationary feed pipe to a vented spin-up chamber to a plurality of two-stage sprues mounted in the rotor. Control nozzles downstream from the sprues meter the flow of coal through the sprues. 19 figs.

  14. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination III: Infrared spectroscopic analysis of interstellar dust candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, Hans A.; Flynn, George J.; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, SašA.; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Borg, Janet; Brenker, Frank E.; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Butterworth, Anna L.; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Frank, David R.; Gainsforth, Zack; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hillier, Jon K.; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Hvide, Brit; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leroux, Hugues; Leonard, Ariel; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Nittler, Larry R.; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Ja; Postberg, Frank; Price, Mark C.; Sandford, Scott A.; Tresseras, Juan-Angel Sans; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Silversmit, Geert; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Solé, Vicente A.; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank J.; Stephan, Thomas; Sterken, Veerle J.; Stodolna, Julien; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Sutton, Steven; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; von Korff, Joshua; Westphal, Andrew J.; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-09-01

    Under the auspices of the Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination, picokeystones extracted from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector were examined with synchrotron Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy to establish whether they contained extraterrestrial organic material. The picokeystones were found to be contaminated with varying concentrations and speciation of organics in the native aerogel, which hindered the search for organics in the interstellar dust candidates. Furthermore, examination of the picokeystones prior to and post X-ray microprobe analyses yielded evidence of beam damage in the form of organic deposition or modification, particularly with hard X-ray synchrotron X-ray fluorescence. From these results, it is clear that considerable care must be taken to interpret any organics that might be in interstellar dust particles. For the interstellar candidates examined thus far, however, there is no clear evidence of extraterrestrial organics associated with the track and/or terminal particles. However, we detected organic matter associated with the terminal particle in Track 37, likely a secondary impact from the Al-deck of the sample return capsule, demonstrating the ability of synchrotron FTIR to detect organic matter in small particles within picokeystones from the Stardust interstellar dust collector.

  15. Subscale solid motor nozzle tests, phase 4 and nozzle materials screening and thermal characterization, phase 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J.; Dodson, J.; Laub, B.

    1979-01-01

    Subscale solid motor nozzles containing a baseline material or low cost materials to be considered as potential replacements for the baseline material are designed and tested. Data are presented from tests of four identically designed 2.5 inch throat diameter nozzles and one 7 inch throat diameter nozzle. The screening of new candidate low cost materials, as well as their thermophysical and thermochemical characterization is also discussed.

  16. Compatibility tests between Jarytherm DBT synthetic oil and solid materials from wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasquelle, Thomas; Falcoz, Quentin; Neveu, Pierre; Flamant, Gilles; Walker, Jérémie

    2016-05-01

    Direct thermocline thermal energy storage is the cheapest sensible thermal energy storage configuration. Indeed, a thermocline tank consists in one tank instead of two and reduces costs. Thermocline thermal energy storages are often filled with cheap solid materials which could react with the heat transfer fluid in the case of incompatibility. PROMES laboratory is building a pilot-scale parabolic trough solar loop including a direct thermocline thermal energy storage system. The working fluid will be a synthetic oil, the Jarytherm® DBT, and the thermal energy storage tank will be filled with stabilized solid materials elaborated from vitrified wastes. Compatibility tests have been conducted in order to check on one hand if the thermo-mechanical properties and life time of the energy storage medium are not affected by the contact with oil and, on the other hand, if the thermal oil performances are not degraded by the solid filler. These experiments consisted in putting in contact the oil and the solid materials in small tanks. In order to discriminate the solid materials tested in the shortest time, accelerating aging conditions at 330 °C for 500 hours were used. The measurements consisted in X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy for the solids, and thermo-physical and chemical properties measurements for the oil. Regarding the solid samples, their crystalline structure did not change during the test, but it is difficult to conclude about their elementary composition and they seem to absorb oil. While thermal properties still makes Jarytherm® DBT a good heat transfer fluid after the accelerated aging tests, this study results in differentiating most compatible materials. Thus according to our study, Jarytherm® DBT can be used in direct thermocline thermal energy storage applications when compatibility of the solid material has been demonstrated.

  17. A novel shielding material prepared from solid waste containing lead for gamma ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Mehmet; Baykara, Oktay; Doğru, Mahmut; Kuluöztürk, Fatih

    2010-09-01

    Human beings are continuously exposed to cosmogenic radiation and its products in the atmosphere from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) within Earth, their bodies, houses and foods. Especially, for the radiation protection environments where high ionizing radiation levels appear should be shielded. Generally, different materials are used for the radiation shielding in different areas and for different situations. In this study, a novel shielding material produced by a metallurgical solid waste containing lead was analyzed as shielding material for gamma radiation. The photon total mass attenuation coefficients ( μ/ ρ) were measured and calculated using WinXCom computer code for the novel shielding material, concrete and lead. Theoretical and experimental values of total mass attenuation coefficient of the each studied sample were compared. Consequently, a new shielding material prepared from the solid waste containing lead could be preferred for buildings as shielding materials against gamma radiation.

  18. The physics of grain-grain collisions and gas-grain sputtering in interstellar shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Mckee, C. F.; Seab, C. G.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Grain-grain collisions and ion sputtering destroy dust grains in interstellar shocks. An analytical theory is developed for the propagation of shock waves in solids driven by grain-grain collisions, which compares very favorably with detailed numerical calculations. This theory is used to determine the fraction of grain vaporized by a grain-grain collision. Our results predict much less vaporization of colliding grains in interstellar shocks than previous estimates. This theory can also be used to determine the fraction of a colliding grain that melts, shatter, or undergoes a phase transformation to a higher density phase. In particular, the latter two processes can be much more important in interstellar shocks than vaporization. The sputtering of grains by impacting gas ions is reanalyzed based upon extensive laboratory studies and a theoretically derived 'universal'sputtering relation. The analytical results are compared to available experimental studies of sputtering of graphite/amorphous carbon, SiO2, SiC, Fe, and H2O. Sputtering yields for astrophysically relevant materials as a function of impact energy and ion mass are derived. These yields are also averaged over thermal impact spectrum and simple polynomial fits to the resulting yields as a function of temperature are presented. The derived sputtering yields are similar to those adopted in previous studies, except for graphite near threshold where the new yields are much larger due to a lower adopted binding energy. The ion bombardment will amorphitize the surface layers of interstellar grains. It will also convert graphite into hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) to a depth of 10-20 A. It is suggested that these HAC surfaces are the carriers of the 3.4 micrometer absorption feature in the interstellar medium.

  19. Fluoride crystals: materials for near-infrared solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Daniela; Veronesi, Stefano; Volpi, Azzurra; Gemmi, Mauro; Tonelli, Mauro; Cassanho, Arlete; Jenssen, Hans P.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we present an overview of the best 2μm laser results obtained in Tm-doped fluoride hosts LiYF4(YLF), LiLuF4 (LLF) and BaY2F8 (BYF) and we report on the growth, spectroscopy and first laser test emission of a novel mixed material BaYLuF8 (BYLF), interesting as a variant of BYF material with a partial substitution of Y3+ ions by Lu3+. The novel host is interesting mainly because indications are that the mixed crystal would be sturdier than BYF. The addition of Lutetium would improve the thermo-mechanical properties going into the direction of high power applications, as suggest from works on YLF and its isomorph LLF. A detailed description of Czochralski growth of fluoride laser materials is provided, focusing on the growth parameters of the novel BYLF:Tm3+12% material grown. With regard of spectroscopy analysis, we report on the results obtained with BYLF host. Detailed absorption, fluorescence and lifetime measurements have been performed focusing on the 3H4 and 3F4 manifolds, the pumping and upper laser level. Moreover diode pumped CW laser emission at 2 μm has been achieved in BYLF: Tm3+12% sample obtaining a slope efficiency of about 28% with respect to the absorbed power.

  20. PHYSICAL EVALUATION OF THIN FILMS OF SOLID STATE MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    microscopy and X-ray and electron diffraction methods. These materials include vapor deposited thin films of boron and boron phosphide on single...crystal silicon substrates via halide reduction, electrodeposits of copper onto single crystal copper substrates, thin films of carbon deposited onto

  1. Structural Composite Construction Materials Manufactured from Municipal Solid Waste

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-20

    in Table 1. Candidate matrix materials included polystyrene (PS) or expanded polystyrene (EPS), high density polyethylene (HDPE), and polyethylene...companies make a variety of expanded polystyrene insulation panels that arc used in insulation and roofing systems.46 Thermoplastics are seeing

  2. The Voyager Interstellar Mission.

    PubMed

    Rudd, R P; Hall, J C; Spradlin, G L

    1997-01-01

    The Voyager Interstellar Mission began on January 1, 1990, with the primary objective being to characterize the interplanetary medium beyond Neptune and to search for the transition region between the interplanetary medium and the interstellar medium. At the start of this mission, the two Voyager spacecraft had already been in flight for over twelve years, having successfully returned a wealth of scientific information about the planetary systems of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, and the interplanetary medium between Earth and Neptune. The two spacecraft have the potential to continue returning science data until around the year 2020. With this extended operating lifetime, there is a high likelihood of one of the two spacecraft penetrating the termination shock and possibly the heliopause boundary, and entering interstellar space before that time. This paper describes the Voyager Interstellar Mission--the mission objectives, the spacecraft and science payload, the mission operations system used to support operations, and the mission operations strategy being used to maximize science data return even in the event of certain potential spacecraft subsystem failures. The implementation of automated analysis tools to offset and enable reduced flight team staffing levels is also discussed.

  3. Interstellar Grain Mantles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witteborn, F.; Goebel, J.; Bregman, J.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Dhendecourt, L. B.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for determining the composition of small dust grains in interstellar matter are discussed. The best way to study the composition of interstellar grain mantles is by infrared spectroscopy. The absorption features in a complete infrared spectrum from 2 to 15 microns can be used as fingerprints to identify the absorbing molecule. Ground-based observations around 3 microns confirmed the presence of H2O ice in interstellar grain mantles, through the detection of the 3.08 micron OH stretching vibration. The detection of other molecules, in particular the carbon bearing molecules, is however hampered by atmospheric absorption in the 5-8 micron region and the presence of the strong ice and silicate bands, which dominate the 3 and 10 micron region respectively. Kuiper Airborne Observatory observations of the 5-8 micron region of the spectrum are therefore extremely important to determine the composition of interstellar grain mantles. The 5 to 8 micron spectra of molecular cloud sources was obtained using a 24 detector grating spectrometer. An important characteristic of this spectrometer is that the whole spectrum is obtained simultaneously. It is therefore relatively easy to correct for atmospheric transmission.

  4. Cathode and electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Allan J; Wang, Shuangyan; Kim, Gun Tae

    2014-01-28

    Novel cathode, electrolyte and oxygen separation materials are disclosed that operate at intermediate temperatures for use in solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes based on oxides with perovskite related structures and an ordered arrangement of A site cations. The materials have significantly faster oxygen kinetics than in corresponding disordered perovskites.

  5. Development of high temperature materials for solid propellant rocket nozzle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, C. R., Jr.; Lineback, L. D.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects of the development and characteristics of thermal shock resistant hafnia ceramic material for use in solid propellant rocket nozzles are presented. The investigation of thermal shock resistance factors for hafnia based composites, and the preparation and analysis of a model of elastic materials containing more than one crack are reported.

  6. 40 CFR 227.32 - Liquid, suspended particulate, and solid phases of a material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... centrifugation and filtration through a 0.45 micron filter. The suspended particulate phase is the supernatant as obtained above prior to centrifugation and filtration. The solid phase includes all material settling to... interact with ocean water to form insoluble matter or new toxic compounds, or materials which may...

  7. 40 CFR 227.32 - Liquid, suspended particulate, and solid phases of a material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... centrifugation and filtration through a 0.45 micron filter. The suspended particulate phase is the supernatant as obtained above prior to centrifugation and filtration. The solid phase includes all material settling to... interact with ocean water to form insoluble matter or new toxic compounds, or materials which may...

  8. 40 CFR 227.32 - Liquid, suspended particulate, and solid phases of a material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... centrifugation and filtration through a 0.45 micron filter. The suspended particulate phase is the supernatant as obtained above prior to centrifugation and filtration. The solid phase includes all material settling to... interact with ocean water to form insoluble matter or new toxic compounds, or materials which may...

  9. 40 CFR 227.32 - Liquid, suspended particulate, and solid phases of a material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... centrifugation and filtration through a 0.45 micron filter. The suspended particulate phase is the supernatant as obtained above prior to centrifugation and filtration. The solid phase includes all material settling to... interact with ocean water to form insoluble matter or new toxic compounds, or materials which may...

  10. 40 CFR 227.32 - Liquid, suspended particulate, and solid phases of a material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... centrifugation and filtration through a 0.45 micron filter. The suspended particulate phase is the supernatant as obtained above prior to centrifugation and filtration. The solid phase includes all material settling to... interact with ocean water to form insoluble matter or new toxic compounds, or materials which may...

  11. Development and evaluation of an ablative closeout material for solid rocket booster thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    A trowellable closeout/repair material designated as MTA-2 was developed and evaluated for use on the Solid Rocket Booster. This material is composed of an epoxy-polysulfide binder and is highly filled with phenolic microballoons for density control and ablative performance. Mechanical property testing and thermal testing were performed in a wind tunnel to simulate the combined Solid Rocket Booster trajectory aeroshear and heating environments. The material is characterized by excellent thermal performance and was used extensively on the Space Shuttle STS-1 and STS-2 flight hardware.

  12. Interstellar dust at our doorstep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.

    2013-12-01

    Interstellar dust has long been researched by astronomical methods to learn about its size distribution, grain properties and composition. However, interstellar dust grains also move through the solar system. They were detected for the first time in-situ with the Ulysses dust detector in 1993. In addition, in 2006, the Stardust mission returned three interstellar dust grain candidates back to Earth after a collection period of 195 days. In this talk we elaborate on how the current in-situ ISD measurement methods are a valuable addition to the knowledge about interstellar dust inferred from classical astronomy. We also discuss the role of interstellar dust dynamics and simulations herein.

  13. Search for interstellar adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2015-05-01

    It is long debated if pre-biotic molecules are indeed present in the interstellar medium. Despite substantial works pointing to their existence, pre-biotic molecules are yet to be discovered with a complete confidence. In this paper, our main aim is to study the chemical evolution of interstellar adenine under various circumstances. We prepare a large gas-grain chemical network by considering various pathways for the formation of adenine. Majumdar et al. (New Astron. 20:15, 2013) proposed that in the absence of adenine detection, one could try to trace two precursors of adenine, namely, HCCN and NH2CN. Recently Merz et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 118:3637-3644, 2014), proposed another route for the formation of adenine in interstellar condition. They proposed two more precursor molecules. But it was not verified by any accurate gas-grain chemical model. Neither was it known if the production rate would be high or low. Our paper fills this important gap. We include this new pathways to find that the contribution through this pathways for the formation of Adenine is the most dominant one in the context of interstellar medium. We propose that observers may look for the two precursors (C3NH and HNCNH) in the interstellar media which are equally important for predicting abundances of adenine. We perform quantum chemical calculations to find out spectral properties of adenine and its two new precursor molecules in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter region. Our present study would be useful for predicting abundance of adenine.

  14. Infrared Emission From Interstellar PAHs, New Probes of the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, D. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2002-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in the understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in two closely related areas: observational IR astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Twenty years ago the composition of interstellar dust was largely unknown and the notion of abundant, gas phase, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) anywhere in the interstellar medium (ISM) considered impossible. Today the dust composition of the diffuse and dense ISM is reasonably well constrained and the spectroscopic case for interstellar PAHs, impossibly large molecules by early interstellar chemistry standards, is very strong. PAH spectral features are now being used as new probes of the ISM. PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. Aromatic carbon-rich materials ranging in size from PAHs and PAH nanoclusters, to sub-micron and micron-sized dust grains represent an important component of the ISM. These species: (1) dominate the heating and cooling of interstellar clouds via energetic photoelectron ejection and infrared (IR) emission; (2) moderate the ionization balance in photodissociation regions and molecular clouds; (3) moderate the composition of the gas phase and play an important role in determining the chemistry of the ISM; (4) contribute to the interstellar extinction in the near IR, visible, and UV spectral regions; and (5) convert UV, visible, and near-IR radiation to mid- and far-IR radiation in the ISM and, as such, are responsible for the well known, widespread family of mid-IR emission features with major components near 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 microns.

  15. Determining mechanical behavior of solid materials using miniature specimens

    DOEpatents

    Manahan, M.P.; Argon, A.S.; Harling, O.K.

    1986-02-04

    A Miniaturized Bend Test (MBT) capable of extracting and determining mechanical behavior information from specimens only so large as to have at least a volume or smallest dimension sufficient to satisfy continuum behavior in all directions is disclosed. The mechanical behavior of the material is determined from the measurements taken during the bending of the specimen and is processed according to the principles of linear or nonlinear material mechanics or both. In a preferred embodiment the determination is carried out by a code which is constructed according to the finite element method, and the specimen used for the determinations is a miniature disk simply supported for central loading at the axis on the center of the disk. 51 figs.

  16. Determining mechanical behavior of solid materials using miniature specimens

    DOEpatents

    Manahan, Michael P.; Argon, Ali S.; Harling, Otto K.

    1986-01-01

    A Miniaturized Bend Test (MBT) capable of extracting and determining mechanical behavior information from specimens only so large as to have at least a volume or smallest dimension sufficient to satisfy continuum behavior in all directions. The mechanical behavior of the material is determined from the measurements taken during the bending of the specimen and is processed according to the principles of linear or nonlinear material mechanics or both. In a preferred embodiment the determination is carried out by a code which is constructed according to the finite element method, and the specimen used for the determinations is a miniature disk simply supported for central loading at the axis on the center of the disk.

  17. Development of Testing Methodologies for Nonlinear Solid State Actuation Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    size and material choice of the different system elements to be recalculated automatically. The masses and stiffnesses were then put into a Matlab ...actuation efficiency and work output for electromechanically fully coupled, non- linear systems working against generalized quasi-static loads. A component...with theoretical prediction. Results show actuation efficiency of a non-linear system is about 200% that of a linear system , and its work output is about

  18. ARPA Solid State Laser and Nonlinear Materials Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    decay times for the different Er levels. Measurements of Er:GGG and Er:YSGG formed the basis for a Judd - Ofelt analysis, discussed in Appendix A, that...include absorption, emission, and lifetime measure- ments, are made for each material in Chapter 2. The Judd - Ofelt Theory is applied to the integrated...room-temperature absorption spectra of ground-state transitions in the visible and near-infrared. The three Judd - Ofelt Parameters are determined and

  19. Solid Propellant Burn Rate Modifiers Based on Reactive Nanocomposite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-26

    increase in the burn rate over a broad range of pressures achieved with replacement of only 5 % of aluminum in aluminized propellant with new...current high performance aluminized HTPB propellants. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER...rate over a broad range of pressures achieved with replacement of only 5 % of aluminum in aluminized propellant with new materials. Furthermore

  20. Thermodynamics of water-solid interactions in crystalline and amorphous pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Pharmaceutical materials, crystalline and amorphous, sorb water from the atmosphere, which affects critical factors in the development of drugs, such as the selection of drug substance crystal form, compatibility with excipients, dosage form selection, packaging, and product shelf-life. It is common practice to quantify the amount of water that a material sorbs at a given relative humidity (RH), but the results alone provide minimal to no physicochemical insight into water-solid interactions, without which pharmaceutical scientists cannot develop an understanding of their materials, so as to anticipate and circumvent potential problems. This research was conducted to advance the science of pharmaceutical materials by examining the thermodynamics of solids with sorbed water. The compounds studied include nonhygroscopic drugs, a channel hydrate drug, a stoichiometric hydrate excipient, and an amorphous excipient. The water sorption isotherms were measured over a range of temperature to extract the partial molar enthalpy and entropy of sorbed water as well as the same quantities for some of the solids. It was found that water-solid interactions spanned a range of energy and entropy as a function of RH, which was unique to the solid, and which could be valuable in identifying batch-to-batch differences and effects of processing in material performance.

  1. Novel functionalized polymeric fabric and fiber material as solid support for solid-phase synthesis and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Bei

    The aim of the research is to develop novel polymer solid support by modifying or fabricating polymeric fibrous materials for peptide synthesis and biomedical applications. Originally chemical inert isotactic polypropylene (iPP) fabric was utilized and modified to serve as a functional flexible planar solid support for solid phase peptide synthesis. The modification was achieved through thermal initiated radical grafting polymerization using acrylic acid, poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate as monomers, and benzoyl peroxide as radical initiator. The iPP fabric was successfully functionalized and possessing as high as 0.7mmol/g carboxylic acid groups. Peptide ligand LHPQF was successfully synthesized on the new functional planar support. Specific enzyme immobilization was fulfilled on the functional iPP fabric support. A commercially available ethylene-acrylic acid copolymer was made into ultrafine copolymer fiber bundles which are composed of nanofibers with diameters ranging from 200nm to 800nm. Various mixing ratios of copolymer/matrix materials were utilized to explore the effect on the final nanofiber physical properties including morphology and stability in solvents. The surface carboxylic acid groups were further converted to amino groups before the functional nanofibers can be applied in solid phase peptide synthesis. Two peptide ligands, LHPQF and HWRGWV, were also successfully synthesized on the nanofiber bundles. Streptavidin and human immunoglobulin G specific binding with the corresponding ligand which was anchored on the nanofibers was conducted successfully to illustrate the potential applications of the nanofiber materials in biomedical field. Further study on the dispersion of the ethylene-acrylic acid nanofiber bundles was pursued to take advantage of the super high active surface area of functional nanofibers. To manipulate the polymer nanofibers during synthesis and bio-assays, a technique was developed to controllably assemble and disperse the

  2. System Design and New Materials for Reversible, Solid-Oxide, High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, J.A.

    2007-12-20

    High temperature solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) offer high electrical efficiency and a potential path to large scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide technology is capable of both power generation and hydrogen production. That makes it possible for the development of a reversible solid-oxide system that can respond to market conditions to produce electricity or hydrogen on demand. New high-temperature electrolyzer cell materials are needed to enable cost-effective hydrogen production system designs based on reversible steam electrolysis. Two test methods were established for the eventual development of the reversible, durable electrode materials: the button cell test and the oxygen electrode test. The button cell test is capable of evaluating the performance and degradation of full solid oxide cells with dual atmosphere of air and hydrogen-steam. The oxygen electrode test is capable of isolating the performance and degradation of the oxygen electrode. It has higher throughput and sensitivity than the button cell test.

  3. Supercooling of Hydrogen on Template Materials to Deterministically Seed Ignition-Quality Solid Fuel Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S. J.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L. A.; Lee, J. R. I.; Baxamusa, S. H.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we explored templating effects of various materials for hydrogen (H2 and D2) solidification by measuring the degree of supercooling required for liquid hydrogen to solidify below each triple point. The results show high supercooling (>100 mK) for most metallic, covalent, and ionic solids, and low supercooling (<100 mK) for van der Waals (vdW) solids. We attribute the low supercooling of vdW solids to the weak interaction of the substrate and hydrogen. Highly ordered pyrolytic graphite showed the lowest supercooling among materials that are solid at room temperature, but did not exhibit a templating effect within a fill-tube and capsule assembly.

  4. Supercooling of Hydrogen on Template Materials to Deterministically Seed Ignition-Quality Solid Fuel Layers

    DOE PAGES

    Shin, S. J.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L. A.; Lee, J. R. I.; ...

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we explored templating effects of various materials for hydrogen (H2 and D2) solidification by measuring the degree of supercooling required for liquid hydrogen to solidify below each triple point. The results show high supercooling (>100 mK) for most metallic, covalent, and ionic solids, and low supercooling (<100 mK) for van der Waals (vdW) solids. We attribute the low supercooling of vdW solids to the weak interaction of the substrate and hydrogen. Highly ordered pyrolytic graphite showed the lowest supercooling among materials that are solid at room temperature, but did not exhibit a templating effect within a fill-tubemore » and capsule assembly.« less

  5. Process for hydroliquefying coal or like carbonaceous solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Malek, John Michael

    1977-01-01

    In this process the products of the dissolution-hydrogenation of coal or the like material in a hydrocarbon rich solvent are subjected in their slurryform fraction to an asphaltenes decomposing action of an alkali, like caustic soda or, being admixed after the gasiform fraction of the hydrogenation products has been taken off the slurryform fraction of the hydrogenation products now including the admixed alkali is subjected to a rehydrogenation by a hydrogen rich gas which after its rehydrogenating use is preferably applied, as source of hydrogen, to said dissolution-hydrogenation of coal. Optionally the admixed alkali includes minor amounts of a carboxylic acid salt of calcium.

  6. Interstellar and Planetary Analogs in the Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss the unique capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to investigate the interaction of ionizing radiation (UV, charged particles) with molecular species (neutral molecules, radicals and ions) and carbonaceous grains in the Solar System and in the Interstellar Medium (ISM). COSmIC stands for Cosmic Simulation Chamber, a laboratory chamber where interstellar and planetary analogs are generated, processed and analyzed. It is composed of a pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a free jet supersonic expansion in a plasma cavity coupled to two ultrahigh-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for photonic detection and a Reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection. This setup allows the study of molecules, ions and solids under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate some interstellar, circumstellar and planetary physical environments providing new fundamental insights on the molecular level into the processes that are critical to the chemistry in the ISM, circumstellar and planet forming regions, and on icy objects in the Solar System. Recent laboratory results that were obtained using COSmIC will be discussed, in particular the progress that have been achieved in monitoring in the laboratory the formation of solid particles from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as circumstellar outflow and planetary atmospheres.

  7. Determination of Material Properties in the Semi-Solid State Using Gleeble Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Solek, Krzysztof; Kuziak, Roman; Kapranos, Plato

    2007-04-07

    This work shows that the Gleeble thermomechanical simulator can be used to carry out controlled material tests. Although originally the simulator was not designed for testing materials in the semi-solid state, it could be adapted to such tests with only minor changes based on the construction of a special chamber for material heating and moulds for material shaping. To achieve this, a special resistance heating system was developed and installed in the Gleeble simulator. The design of a heating chamber that allows uniform heating of the material was achieved by computer simulations. The numerical model of the resistance heating developed and the results of calculations are described in detail.

  8. Cr/sup 3+/-doped colquiriite solid state laser material

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.A.; Chase, L.L.; Newkirk, H.W.; Krupke, W.F.

    1989-03-07

    Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF/sub 6/:Cr/sup 3+/, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr/sup 3+/ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slope efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high-slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd/sup 3+/ or Tm/sup 3+/ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility.

  9. Cr/sup 3 +/-doped colquiriite solid state laser material

    DOEpatents

    Payne, S.A.; Chase, L.L.; Newkirk, H.W.; Krupke, W.F.

    1988-03-31

    Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF/sub 6/:Cr/sup 3 +/, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr/sup 3 +/ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slope efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd/sup 3 +/ or Tm/sup 3 +/ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility. 4 figs.

  10. Cr.sup.3+ -doped colquiriite solid state laser material

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen A.; Chase, Lloyd L.; Newkirk, Herbert W.; Krupke, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF.sub.6 :Cr.sup.3+, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr.sup.3+ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slop efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd.sup.3+ or Tm.sup.3+ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility.

  11. Liquid versus solid phase bioassays for dredged material toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Casado-Martínez, M C; Fernández, N; Forja, J M; DelValls, T A

    2007-05-01

    Since 1994 the results of the analyses of key chemical compounds (trace metals, polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and the comparison with the corresponding sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) are used in decision-making for dredged material management in Spain. Nonetheless in the last decades a tiered testing approach is promoted for assessing the physical and chemical characteristics of dredged sediments and their potential biological effects in the environment. Bioassays have been used for sediment toxicity assessment in Spain but few or no experiences are reported on harbour sediments. We studied the incidence of toxicity in the 7 d bioassay using rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) and the 48 h bioassay using sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) embryos over a series of experiments employing 22 different elutriates. The relative performance of this exposure phase was not comparable to data on the 10-d acute toxicity test using the burrowing amphipod Corophium volutator and the polychaete Arenicola marina, carried out on the whole sediments. These results evidence the importance of the exposure route and the test selected in decision-making, as the toxicity registered for the undiluted elutriates was largely due to the different solubility of sediment-bound contaminants. This work and other studies indicate that for many sediments, a complete battery of test is recommended together with physico-chemical analyses to decide whether dredged sediments are suitable for open water disposal or not.

  12. Material growth and characterization for solid state devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, Ward J.; Abul-Fadl, A.; Iyer, S.

    1987-01-01

    During this period InGaAs and InGaAsP were grown on (100)InP by liquid phase electroepitaxy (LPEE). Results of the epitaxial growth of InGaAs on sputtered quartz masked substrates are presented. The resulting surface morphology can be related to the current density distribution near the edges of a masked pattern. The quaternary InGaAs was grown with compositions corresponding to 1.3 micron and 1.5 micron emission wavelengths. Growth rates were found to be linearly dependent upon current density, and a strong dependence upon composition was noted. These compositions lie in the miscibility gap region of the alloy phase diagram at the 645 C growth temperature. Growths were performed at 685 C to avoid the miscibility gap. Epilayers were characterized by photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Hall effect measurements. Aluminum oxide was deposited on silicon and InGaAs substrates for the characterization of this material as an insulator in a field effect transistor structure. It was determined that the results did not warrant further work with the deposition from an aluminum isopropoxide source. A metallographic vapor phase epitaxy system installation is nearing completion for use in hybrid III-V semiconductor epilayer growths.

  13. Confirmation of interstellar methylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Jewell, P. R.; Lovas, F. J.

    1995-01-01

    Four spectral emission features of the N(sub KK) = 4(sub 04) -3(sub 13) rotational transition of methylene (CH2) have been detected at signal levels 5-7 sigma above noise toward the hot core of the Orion-KL nebula and the molecular cloud in proximity to the continuum source W51 M. Specifically, in both sources we have resolved the F = 6-5, 5-4, and 4-3 hyperfine transitions of the J = 5-4 fine-structure levels and detected the blended hyperfine structure of the J = 4-3 fine structure levels. At the J = 3-2 fine-structure levels, we have observed new transitions of NS, a known interstellar molecule, which severely contaminates the search for CH2 hyperfine transitions. These new sensitive observations finally confirm the existence of interstellar CH2 which was tentatively reported by us some years ago.

  14. Detecting interstellar migrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matloff, Gregory L.; Pazmino, John

    1997-01-01

    Interstellar migrations may occur when a civilization's star enters the red giant phase, thereby dooming the life-bearing planet. Ecologically self-contained 'world ships', massing billions of kilograms and propelled by hyperthin, space manufactured solar sails thousands of kilometers in diameter unfurled near the home star are possible vehicles to transfer a threatened civilization to a neighboring star. Consideration of the nearest red giants reveals that Pollux is the nearest formerly solar-type red giant. Known stellar neighbors of Pollux are surveyed to determine likely directions for an interstellar migration departing Pollux. Such migrations might consist of many world ships launched over millennia on voyages of about 1000 terrestrial-year duration; discovery of such events will be serendipitous. The difficulties of observing solar-sail star ships near Pollux are considered. A facility dedicated to imaging extrasolar planets within 10 parsecs might be capable of detecting these large spacecraft.

  15. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 7, Appendix E -- Material recovery/material recycling technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1992-10-01

    The enthusiasm for and commitment to recycling of municipal solid wastes is based on several intuitive benefits: Conservation of landfill capacity; Conservation of non-renewable natural resources and energy sources; Minimization of the perceived potential environmental impacts of MSW combustion and landfilling; Minimization of disposal costs, both directly and through material resale credits. In this discussion, ``recycling`` refers to materials recovered from the waste stream. It excludes scrap materials that are recovered and reused during industrial manufacturing processes and prompt industrial scrap. Materials recycling is an integral part of several solid waste management options. For example, in the preparation of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), ferrous metals are typically removed from the waste stream both before and after shredding. Similarly, composting facilities, often include processes for recovering inert recyclable materials such as ferrous and nonferrous metals, glass, Plastics, and paper. While these two technologies have as their primary objectives the production of RDF and compost, respectively, the demonstrated recovery of recyclables emphasizes the inherent compatibility of recycling with these MSW management strategies. This appendix discusses several technology options with regard to separating recyclables at the source of generation, the methods available for collecting and transporting these materials to a MRF, the market requirements for post-consumer recycled materials, and the process unit operations. Mixed waste MRFs associated with mass bum plants are also presented.

  16. Interstellar hydrogen sulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.; Kutner, M. L.; Penzias, A. A.; Wilson, R. W.; Jefferts, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has been detected in seven Galactic sources by observation of a single line corresponding to the rotational transition from the 1(sub 10) to the 1(sub 01) levels at 168.7 GHz. The observations show that hydrogen sulfide is only a moderately common interstellar molecule comparable in abundance to H2CO and CS, but somewhat less abundant than HCN and much less abundant than CO.

  17. Solid state NMR studies of materials for energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambukara Kodiweera Arachchilage, Chandana K.

    Presented in this dissertation are NMR investigations of the dynamical and structural properties of materials for energy conversion and storage devices. 1H and 2H NMR was used to study water and methanol transportation in sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) based membranes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). These results are presented in chapter 3. The amount of liquid in the membrane and ion exchange capacity (IEC) are two main factors that govern the dynamics in these membranes. Water and methanol diffusion coefficients also are comparable. Chapters 4 and 5 are concerned with 31P and 1H NMR in phosphoric acid doped PBI membranes (para-PBI and 2OH-PBI) as well as PBI membranes containing ionic liquids (H3PO4/PMIH2PO4/PBI). These membranes are designed for higher-temperature fuel cell operation. In general, stronger short and long range interactions were observed in the 2OH-PBI matrix, yielding reduced proton transport compared to that of para-PBI. In the case of H3PO4/PMIH2PO 4/PBI, both conductivity and diffusion are higher for the sample with molar ratio 2/4/1. Finally, chapter 6 is devoted to the 31P NMR MAS study of phosphorus-containing structural groups on the surfaces of micro/mesoporous activated carbons. Two spectral features were observed and the narrow feature identifies surface phosphates while the broad component identifies heterogeneous subsurface phosphorus environments including phosphate and more complex structure multiple P-C, P-N and P=N bonds.

  18. Interstellar Grain Surface Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Chemistry on grain surfaces plays an Important role in the formation of interstellar Ices, It can also influence the composition of the gas phase through outgassing near luminous, newly formed stars. This paper reviews the chemical processes taking place on Interstellar grain surfaces with the emphasis on those transforming CO into other hydrocarbons. At low, molecular cloud temperatures (approximately equal to 10K), physisorption processes dominate interstellar grain surface chemistry and GO is largely hydrogenated through reactions with atomic H and oxidized through reactions with atomic O. The former will lead to the formation of H2CO and CH3OH ices, while the latter results in CO2 ice. The observational evidence for these ices in molecular clouds will be discussed. Very close to protostars, the gas and grain temperatures are much higher (approximately equal to 500K) and chemisorption processes, including catalytic surface reactions, becomes important. This will be illustrated based upon our studies of the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis of CH4 from CO on metallic surfaces. Likely, this process has played an important role in the early solar nebula. Observational consequences will be pointed out.

  19. Research on ignition and flame spread of solid materials in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Kenichi; Fujita, Osamu

    1995-01-01

    Fire safety is one of the main concerns for crewed missions such as the space station. Materials used in spacecraft may burn even if metalic. There are severe restrictions on the materials used in spacecraft from the view of fire safety. However, such restrictions or safety standards are usually determined based on experimental results under normal gravity, despite large differences between the phenomena under normal and microgravity. To evaluate the appropriateness of materials for use in space, large amount of microgravity fire-safety combustion data is urgently needed. Solid material combustion under microgravity, such as ignition and flame spread, is a relatively new research field in Japan. As the other reports in this workshop describe, most of microgravity combustion research in Japan is droplet combustion as well as some research on gas phase combustion. Since JAMIC, the Japan Microgravity Center, (which offers 10 seconds microgravity time) opened in 1992, microgravity combustion research is robust, and many drop tests relating to solid combustion (paper combustion, cotton string combustion, metal combustion with Aluminium or Magnesium) have been performed. These tests proved that the 10 seconds of microgravity time at JAMIC is useful for solid combustion research. Some experiments were performed before JAMIC opened. For example, latticed paper was burned under microgravity by using a 50 m drop tower to simulate porous material combustion under microgravity. A 50 m tower provides only 2 seconds microgravity time however, and it was not long enough to investigate the solid combustion phenomena.

  20. Collection-efficient, axisymmetric vacuum sublimation module for the purification of solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael; Paul, Elizabeth; Katovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    A vacuum sublimation module of axisymmetric geometry was developed and employed to purify solid-phase materials. The module provides certain practical advantages and it comprises: a metering valve, glass collector, glass lower body, main seal, threaded bushing, and glass internal cartridge (the latter to contain starting material). A complementary process was developed to de-solvate, sublime, weigh, and collect solid chemical materials exemplified by oxalic acid, ferrocene, pentachlorobenzene, chrysene, and urea. The oxalic acid sublimate was analyzed by titration, melting range, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and its (aqueous phase) electrolytically generated gas. The analytical data were consistent with a high-purity, anhydrous oxalic acid sublimate. Cyclic voltammograms of 0.11 mol. % oxalic acid in water displayed a 2.1 V window on glassy carbon electrode beyond which electrolytic decomposition occurs. During module testing, fifteen relatively pure materials were sublimed with (energy efficient) passive cooling and the solid-phase recovery averaged 95 mass %. Key module design features include: compact vertical geometry, low-angle conical collector, uniformly compressed main seal, modest power consumption, transparency, glovebox compatibility, cooling options, and preferential conductive heat transfer. To help evaluate the structural (module) heat transfer, vertical temperature profiles along the dynamically evacuated lower body were measured versus electric heater power: for example, an input of 18.6 W generated a temperature 443-K at the bottom. Experimental results and engineering calculations indicate that during sublimation, solid conduction is the primary mode of heat transfer to the starting material.

  1. Collection-efficient, axisymmetric vacuum sublimation module for the purification of solid materials.

    PubMed

    May, Michael; Paul, Elizabeth; Katovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    A vacuum sublimation module of axisymmetric geometry was developed and employed to purify solid-phase materials. The module provides certain practical advantages and it comprises: a metering valve, glass collector, glass lower body, main seal, threaded bushing, and glass internal cartridge (the latter to contain starting material). A complementary process was developed to de-solvate, sublime, weigh, and collect solid chemical materials exemplified by oxalic acid, ferrocene, pentachlorobenzene, chrysene, and urea. The oxalic acid sublimate was analyzed by titration, melting range, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and its (aqueous phase) electrolytically generated gas. The analytical data were consistent with a high-purity, anhydrous oxalic acid sublimate. Cyclic voltammograms of 0.11 mol. % oxalic acid in water displayed a 2.1 V window on glassy carbon electrode beyond which electrolytic decomposition occurs. During module testing, fifteen relatively pure materials were sublimed with (energy efficient) passive cooling and the solid-phase recovery averaged 95 mass %. Key module design features include: compact vertical geometry, low-angle conical collector, uniformly compressed main seal, modest power consumption, transparency, glovebox compatibility, cooling options, and preferential conductive heat transfer. To help evaluate the structural (module) heat transfer, vertical temperature profiles along the dynamically evacuated lower body were measured versus electric heater power: for example, an input of 18.6 W generated a temperature 443-K at the bottom. Experimental results and engineering calculations indicate that during sublimation, solid conduction is the primary mode of heat transfer to the starting material.

  2. Impact of Solid Breeder Materials on Tritium Breeding in a Hybrid Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übeyli, Mustafa

    2006-06-01

    Tritium breeding ratio (TBR) is one of the important parameters in design of a Deuterium-Tritium (DT) driven hybrid reactor. Therefore, selection of tritium breeder materials to be used in the blanket is very crucial. In this study, tritium breeding potential of the solid breeders, namely, or in a (DT) fusion driven hybrid reactor fuelled with or was investigated. For this purpose in addition to these solid breeders, different types of liquid breeders, namely natural lithium, Flibe, Flinabe and were used to examine the tritium breeding behavior of liquid-solid breeder couple combinations. Numerical calculations were carried out by using Scale 4.3. According to numerical results, the blanket with fuel using natural lithium as coolant and as solid breeder had the highest TBR value.

  3. Aluminum Foils of the Stardust Interstellar Collector: The Challenge of Recognizing Micrometer-sized Impact Craters made by Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Westphal, A. J.; Burchell, M. J.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary Examination (PE) of the Stardust cometary collector revealed material embedded in aerogel and on aluminium (Al) foil. Large numbers of sub-micrometer impact craters gave size, structural and compositional information. With experience of finding and analyzing the picogram to nanogram mass remains of cometary particles, are we now ready for PE of the Interstellar (IS) collector? Possible interstellar particle (ISP) tracks in the aerogel are being identified by the stardust@home team. We are now assessing challenges facing PE of Al foils from the interstellar collector.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J.L.

    1992-09-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, a' is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, b' is from 0.3 to 0.5 and c' is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1[minus]d)ZrO[sub 2]-(d)Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] where d' is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO[sub 2], where X' is an elemental metal. 5 figs.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J. Lambert

    1992-01-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, "a" is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, "b" is from 0.3 to 0.5 and "c" is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1-d)ZrO.sub.2 -(d)Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 where "d" is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO.sub.2, where "X" is an elemental metal.

  6. New instrumentation technologies for testing the bonding of sensors to solid materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashemian, H. M.; Shell, C. S.; Jones, C. N.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive research and development project that was conducted over a three-year period to develop new technologies for testing the attachment of sensors to solid materials for the following NASA applications: (1) testing the performance of composites that are used for the lining of solid rocket motor nozzles, (2) testing the bonding of surface-mounted platinum resistance thermometers that are used on fuel and oxidizer lines of the space shuttle to detect valve leaks by monitoring temperature, (3) testing the attachment of strain gages that are used in testing the performance of space shuttle main engines, and (4) testing the thermocouples that are used for determining the performance of blast tube liner material in solid rocket boosters.

  7. Short time proton dynamics in bulk ice and in porous anode solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Basoli, Francesco; Senesi, Roberto; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Licoccia, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen reduction and incorporation into solid electrolytes and the reverse reaction of oxygen evolution play a cru-cial role in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) applications. However a detailed un derstanding of the kinetics of the cor-responding reactions, i.e. on reaction mechanisms, rate limiting steps, reaction paths, electrocatalytic role of materials, is still missing. These include a thorough characterization of the binding potentials experienced by protons in the lattice. We report results of Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) measurements of the vibrational state of the protons in Ni- YSZ highly porous composites (75% to 90% ), a ceramic-metal material showing a high electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. The results are compared with INS and Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) experiments on the proton binding states in bulk ice.

  8. VOLATILE ORGANO-METALLOIDS IN BIO-SOLID MATERIALS: ANALYSIS BY VACUUM DISTILLATION-GC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method based on vacuum distillation-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (VD-GC-MS)

    was developed for determining volatile organo-metalloid contaminants in bio-solid materials. Method

    performance was evaluated for dimethylselenide (DMSe), dimethyldisel...

  9. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... table. (a) Rail cars: Class DOT 103, 104, 105, 109, 111, 112, 114, 115, or 120 tank car tanks; Class 106... solid materials. 173.241 Section 173.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.241 Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and...

  10. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials. 173.241 Section 173.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.241 Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and...

  11. 76 FR 46290 - EPA Seeking Input Materials Measurement; Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), Recycling, and Source...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... AGENCY EPA Seeking Input Materials Measurement; Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), Recycling, and Source... INFORMATION: Background For decades, EPA has been providing information on the recycling, reuse and generation... safe recycling and source reduction. The Agency will consider the information gathered from this...

  12. Method for separating liquid and solid products of liquefaction of coal or like carbonaceous materials

    DOEpatents

    Malek, John M.

    1978-04-18

    A method of improving the quality of slurry products taken from coal liquefaction reactors comprising subjecting the slurry to treatment with an alkaline compound such as caustic soda in the presence of steam in order to decompose the phenolic and acidic materials present in the slurry, and to also lower the slurry viscosity to allow separation of solid particles by sedimentation.

  13. Solid rocket booster thermal protection system materials development. [space shuttle boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1978-01-01

    A complete run log of all tests conducted in the NASA-MSFC hot gas test facility during the development of materials for the space shuttle solid rocket booster thermal protection system are presented. Lists of technical reports and drawings generated under the contract are included.

  14. Material efficient production of complex (hybrid) components using semi solid forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedmüller, Kim Rouven; Liewald, Mathias

    2016-10-01

    By means of lightweight design and lightweight material structures, weight of single components and of resulting component assemblies should be reduced and, additionally, existing functionalities, reliabilities and material properties should be preserved. Therefore, on the one hand novel materials and hybrid material combinations are investigated and on the other hand weight reduction is realized by material efficient component designs. With regard to the manufacturing of such complex component geometries with high dimensional accuracy and relating to the realization of hybrid material concepts, semi solid forming technology offers promising prospects. This paper deals with two research projects recently conducted at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology (IFU, University of Stuttgart) in the field of this forming technology. First project is concerned with the manufacturing of hybrid components with integrated sensor and/or actuator functions and second project is in the field of material efficient manufacturing.

  15. Isotope Fractionation in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These models make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations, particularly with ALMA.

  16. Investigation of Carbonaceous Interstellar Dust Analogues by Infrared Spectroscopy: Effects of Energetic Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maté, Belén; Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Victor Jose

    2015-06-01

    Carbonaceous compounds, both solids and gas-phase molecules, are found in very diverse astronomical media. A significant amount of the elemental carbon is found in small dust grains. This carbonaceous dust, mostly formed in the last stages of evolution of C-rich stars, is the carrier of characteristic IR absorption bands revealing the presence of aliphatic, aromatic and olefinic functional groups in variable proportions. Among the various candidate materials investigated as possible carriers of these bands, hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) has led to the best agreement with the observations. Carbonaceous grains are processed by H atoms, UV radiation, cosmic rays and interstellar shocks in their passage from asymptotic giant branch stars to planetary nebulae and to the diffuse interstellar medium. The mechanisms of a-C:H production and evolution in astronomical media are presently a subject of intensive investigation. In this work we present a study of the stability of carbonaceous dust analogues generated in He+CH_4 radiofrequency discharges. In order to simulate the processing of dust in the interstellar environments, the samples have been subjected to electron bombardment, UV irradiation, and both He and H_2 plasma processing. IR spectroscopy is employed to monitor the changes in the structure and composition of the carbonaceous films. A.G.G.M. Tielens. Rev. Mod. Phys., 85, 1021 (2013) J.E. Chiar, A.G.G.M. Tielens, A.J. Adamson and A. Ricca. Astrophys. J., 770, 78 (2013)

  17. X-ray diffraction from shocked materials: investigating solid-solid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, Justin

    2008-04-01

    X-ray diffraction on nanosecond and sub-nanosecond time-scales has proven to be a useful tool in investigating the transient response of shocked crystals. Perhaps the most notable success in this area has been the direct observation of the α- ɛ transition in laser-shocked single crystals of [001] iron. [1,2] The information extracted from the diffraction patterns has been shown to be in remarkable agreement with multi-million atom molecular dynamics calculations. [3] Having successfully observed the transition in single crystals shocked along the principal axis, several further challenges remain. Amongst these are the exploration of the response of single crystals to shocks propagating along other crystallographic directions (where significantly different response is predicted [4]) the role of pre-existing defects in the time-scale of the elastic/plastic response of the material, and any differences that may occur in polycrystalline compared with single crystal samples.[5] A further challenge will be the development of rapid compression techniques that take samples to off-Hugoniot states (for example so-called quasi-isentropic compression). If such states can be produced in a controlled way, much could potentially be learnt about the state of certain planetary cores, including our own. [1] D.H. Kalantar, J.F. Belak, G.W. Collins, J.D. Colvin, H.M. Davies, J.H. Eggert, T.C. Germann, J. Hawreliak, B.L. Holian, K. Kadau, P.S. Lomdahl, H.E. Lorenzana, M.A. Meyers, K. Rosolankova, M.S. Schneider, J. Sheppard, J.S. Stolken and J.S. Wark, Phys. Rev. Lett., 95 075502, 2005 [2] J. Hawreliak, J.D. Colvin, J.H.Eggert, D. Kalantar, H.E. Lorenzana, J.S. Stölken, H.M. Davies, T.C. Germann, B.L. Holian, K. Kadau, P.S. Lomdahl, A. Higginbotham, K. Rosolankova, J. Sheppard, and J.S. Wark, Phys. Rev. B, 74, 184107, 2006 [3] K. Kadau, Timothy C. Germann, Peter S. Lomdahl, and Brad Lee Holian, Science, 296, 1681, 2002 [4] Kai Kadau, Timothy C. Germann, Peter S. Lomdahl, and Brad

  18. Innovative interstellar explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Tom; Roelof, Edmond C.; Gruntman, Mike; Gloeckler, George; Koehn, Patrick L.; Kurth, William S.; Oleson, Steven R.; Fiehler, Douglas I.; Horanyi, Mihaly; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Leary, James C.; Anderson, Brian J.

    2006-09-01

    An interstellar ``precursor'' mission has been under discussion in the scientific community for at least 30 years. Fundamental scientific questions about the interaction of the Sun with the interstellar medium can only be answered with in situ measurements that such a mission can provide. The Innovative Interstellar Explorer (IIE) and its use of Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) is being studied under a NASA ``Vision Mission'' grant. Speed is provided by a combination of a high-energy launch, using current launch vehicle technology, a Jupiter gravity assist, and long-term, low-thrust, continuous acceleration provided by an ion thruster running off electricity provided by advanced radioisotope electric generators. A payload of ten instruments with an aggregate mass of ~35 kg and requiring ~30 W has been carefully chosen to address the compelling science questions. The nominal 20-day launch window opens on 22 October 2014 followed by a Jupiter gravity assist on 5 February 2016. The REP system accelerates the spacecraft to a ``burnout'' speed of 7.8 AU per year at 104 AU on 13 October 2032 (Voyager 1's current speed is ~3.6 AU/yr). The spacecraft will return at least 500 bits per second from at least 200 AU ~30 years after launch. Additional (backup) launch opportunities occur every 13 months to early 2018. In addition to addressing basic heliospheric science, the mission will ensure continued information on the far-heliospheric galactic cosmic ray population after the Voyagers have fallen silent and as the era of human Mars exploration begins.

  19. Interstellar Probe: The Next Step To Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2016-07-01

    In the years following the discovery of the solar wind, the term "heliosphere" was coined and defined as "the region of interplanetary space where the solar wind is flowing supersonically." In June 1971, with the development of the Pioneer probes to Jupiter and beyond well underway, a session of the American Astronautical Society meeting considered scientific exploration reaching beyond the solar system and into the interstellar medium. Despite many discussions, studies, and meetings since, the most recent held under the auspices of the Keck Institute for Space Studies (8-11 September 2014 and 13-15 January 2015), such missions have been relegated to the '"future" due to the large distances and solar system escape speeds contemplated for their execution. In the meantime, the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM), consisting of the twin Voyager spacecraft almost 40 years since their respective launches, are making inroads into this region beyond the termination shock of the solar wind, a new region of the solid bodies of the solar system has been opened by the New Horizons flyby of the Pluto system, and the Cassini Ion and Neutral CAmera (INCA) and Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) have remotely sensed neutral atoms that have provided significant clues to the global structure of the interaction of the solar wind and interstellar medium. It is now time for a dedicated mission to the regime beyond the solar system to explore our galactic environment. A first, near-term implementation can be carried out with the near-current flight system technology. What is also clear is that the high speeds required will limit the spacecraft to a relatively small mass of no more than ~500 kg, regardless of the propulsion details. The recent success of the New Horizons mission at the Pluto system illustrates that with modern technologies, such spacecraft sizes can still accommodate the means to produce paradigm-shifting science, providing for a compelling scientific mission. The

  20. Studies of sulphur containing model interstellar ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. A.; Burke, D. J.; Edridge, J. L.

    2011-05-01

    Sulphur bearing species have long been proposed as good evolutionary tracers of star forming regions. The abundance of sulphur containing molecules varies by large amounts during the evolution of a proto-star and hence astronomical models are very sensitive to the amount of sulphur present and to its chemical composition. Interstellar observations have identified a range of sulphur containing species including SO, SO2, H2S, CS and OCS (amongst others). To try to understand the role of sulphur containing species in interstellar ices, we have undertaken a detailed investigation of the adsorption and desorption of a range of sulphur-containing model ices on a carbonaceous dust grain analogue surface (graphite) held at 14 K. Ices consisting of pure sulphur-containing molecules, sulphur-containing molecules adsorbed on top of amorphous solid water ice, mixed ices containing water ices and sulphur-species, all adsorbed on graphite, have been investigated. Ultra-high vacuum techniques have been used to model the low pressure conditions of interstellar space and a combination of surface infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS - reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) have been used to investigate the behaviour of the ices.

  1. Solid waste initiative Macro Material Flow Modeling conceptual description and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Holter, G.M.; Stapp, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a Macro Material Flow Modeling (MMFM) concept and approach that are being adopted to develop a predictive modeling capability that can be used as the basis for evaluating potential impacts from various solid waste management system configurations and operating scenarios, as well as the impacts of various policies on solid waste quantities and compositions. This capability, as part of a broader Solid Waste Initiative at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is intended to provide an increased understanding of solid waste as a disposal, energy, and resource problem on a national and global scale, particularly over the long term. The results of this increased understanding will eventually have an impact on a variety of US federal government activities, as well as on the activities of other entities. This increased understanding will also help provide the basis for subsequent activities under the Solid Waste Initiative. The report describes current solid waste management practices and their context, defines questions of interest relating to these practices, and proposes an approach that could be employed to analyze these practices and possible alternatives to them. A preliminary review, analysis, and summary of available data to support this approach are also provided.

  2. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  3. Data uncertainties in material flow analysis: Municipal solid waste management system in Maputo City, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Dos Muchangos, Leticia Sarmento; Tokai, Akihiro; Hanashima, Atsuko

    2017-01-01

    Material flow analysis can effectively trace and quantify the flows and stocks of materials such as solid wastes in urban environments. However, the integrity of material flow analysis results is compromised by data uncertainties, an occurrence that is particularly acute in low-and-middle-income study contexts. This article investigates the uncertainties in the input data and their effects in a material flow analysis study of municipal solid waste management in Maputo City, the capital of Mozambique. The analysis is based on data collected in 2007 and 2014. Initially, the uncertainties and their ranges were identified by the data classification model of Hedbrant and Sörme, followed by the application of sensitivity analysis. The average lower and upper bounds were 29% and 71%, respectively, in 2007, increasing to 41% and 96%, respectively, in 2014. This indicates higher data quality in 2007 than in 2014. Results also show that not only data are partially missing from the established flows such as waste generation to final disposal, but also that they are limited and inconsistent in emerging flows and processes such as waste generation to material recovery (hence the wider variation in the 2014 parameters). The sensitivity analysis further clarified the most influencing parameter and the degree of influence of each parameter on the waste flows and the interrelations among the parameters. The findings highlight the need for an integrated municipal solid waste management approach to avoid transferring or worsening the negative impacts among the parameters and flows.

  4. Solid-phase extraction microfluidic devices for matrix removal in trace element assay of actinide materials.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Manard, Benjamin T; Castro, Alonso; Montoya, Dennis P; Xu, Ning; Chamberlin, Rebecca M

    2017-05-15

    Advances in sample nebulization and injection technology have significantly reduced the volume of solution required for trace impurity analysis in plutonium and uranium materials. Correspondingly, we have designed and tested a novel chip-based microfluidic platform, containing a 100-µL or 20-µL solid-phase microextraction column, packed by centrifugation, which supports nuclear material mass and solution volume reductions of 90% or more compared to standard methods. Quantitative recovery of 28 trace elements in uranium was demonstrated using a UTEVA chromatographic resin column, and trace element recovery from thorium (a surrogate for plutonium) was similarly demonstrated using anion exchange resin AG MP-1. Of nine materials tested, compatibility of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chips with the strong nitric acid media was highest. The microcolumns can be incorporated into a variety of devices and systems, and can be loaded with other solid-phase resins for trace element assay in high-purity metals.

  5. Fluorescent material concentration dependency: Förster resonance energy transfer in quasi-solid state DSSCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Woo; Jo, Hyun-Jun; Thogiti, Suresh; Yang, Weon Ki; Cheruku, Rajesh; Kim, Jae Hong

    2017-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is critical for wide spectral absorption, an increased dye loading, and photocurrent generation of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). This process consists of organic fluorescent materials (as an energy donor), and an organic dye (as an energy acceptor on TiO2 surfaces) with quasi-solid electrolyte. The judicious choice of the energy donor and acceptor facilitates a strong spectral overlap between the emission and absorption regions of the fluorescent materials and dye. This FRET process enhances the light-harvesting characteristics of quasi-solid state DSSCs. In this study, DSSCs containing different concentrations (0, 1, and 1.5 wt%) of a fluorescent material (FM) as the energy donor are investigated using FRET. The power conversion efficiency of DSSCs containing FMs in a quasi-solid electrolyte increased by 33% over a pristine cell. The optimized cell fabricated with the quasi-solid state DSSC containing 1.0 wt% FM shows a maximum efficiency of 3.38%, with a short-circuit current density (J SC ) of 4.32 mA/cm-2, and an open-circuit voltage (V OC ) of 0.68 V under illumination of simulated solar light (AM 1.5G, 100 mW/cm-2). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Extended CO Solid: A New Class of High Energy Density Material

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Baer, B J; Yoo, C

    2004-10-14

    Covalently bonded extended phases of molecular solids made of first- and second-row elements at high pressures are a new class of materials with advanced optical, mechanical and energetic properties. The existence of such extended solids has recently been demonstrated using diamond anvil cells in several systems, including N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2},and CO. However, the microscopic quantities produced at the formidable high-pressure/temperature conditions have limited the characterization of their predicted novel properties including high-energy content. In this paper, we present the first experimental evidence that these extended low-Z solids are indeed high energy density materials via milligram-scale high-pressure synthesis, recovery and characterization of polymeric CO (p-CO). Our spectroscopic data reveal that p-CO is a random polymer made of lactonic entities and conjugated C=C with an energy content rivaling or exceeding that of HMX. Solid p-CO explosively decomposes to CO{sub 2} and glassy carbon and thus might be used as an advanced energetic material.

  7. Materials and processes for Shuttle engine, external tank, and Solid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with the materials and processes for three Space Shuttle elements: Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), the External Tank (ET), and the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB), beginning with an overview of the materials selection, tracking and control system. SSME materials and processes are considered with emphasis on hydrogen environment embrittlement, LOX/GOX compatibility, stress corrosion cracking, and hydraulic fluid testing and qualification. The ET is examined with attention given to welding and fracture mechanics, and the thermal protection system. The SRB is discussed with emphasis on corrosion prevention, stress corrosion and fracture toughness, the integrated test bed for in situ corrosion protection verification, aluminum processing, and the thermal protection system.

  8. Mesoscale modeling of strain induced solid state amorphization in crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lei

    Solid state amorphization, and in particular crystalline to amorphous transformation, can be observed in metallic alloys, semiconductors, intermetallics, minerals, and also molecular crystals when they undergo irradiation, hydrogen gas dissolution, thermal interdiffusion, mechanical alloying, or mechanical milling. Although the amorphization mechanisms may be different, the transformation occurs due to the high level of disorder introduced into the material. Milling induced solid state amorphization is proposed to be the result of accumulation of crystal defects, specifically dislocations, as the material is subjected to large deformations during the high energy process. Thus, understanding the deformation mechanisms of crystalline materials will be the first step in studying solid state amorphization in crystalline materials, which not only has scientific contributions, but also technical consequences. A phase field dislocation dynamics (PFDD) approach is employed in this work to simulate plastic deformation of molecular crystals. This PFDD model has the advantage of tracking all of the dislocations in a material simultaneously. The model takes into account the elastic interaction between dislocations, the lattice resistance to dislocation motion, and the elastic interaction of dislocations with an external stress field. The PFDD model is employed to describe the deformation of molecular crystals with pharmaceutical applications, namely, single crystal sucrose, acetaminophen, gamma-indomethacin, and aspirin. Stress-strain curves are produced that result in expected anisotropic material response due to the activation of different slip systems and yield stresses that agree well with those from experiments. The PFDD model is coupled to a phase transformation model to study the relation between plastic deformation and the solid state amorphization of crystals that undergo milling. This model predicts the amorphous volume fraction in excellent agreement with

  9. Discharge characteristics of lithium/molten nitrate thermal battery cells using silver salts as solid cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManis, G. E.; Miles, M. H.; Fletcher, A. N.

    1985-12-01

    Thermal battery cells using molten nitrate electrolytes and liquid lithium anodes have been evaluated using several silver salts with low solubility in molten nitrates as solid cathode materials. These cathode materials do not readily diffuse into the anolyte and, thus, do not have parasitic reactions with the lithium anode. Furthermore, the solid cathode materials have voltammetric characteristics as favorable as many soluble silver salt cathodes. This paper presents the effects of temperature, current density, and cathode material on cell discharge characteristics.

  10. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-02-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km/sec. Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H2S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds.

  11. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-01-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km/sec. Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H2S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds.

  12. Stardust@home: A Massively Distributed Public Search for Interstellar Dust in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Andrew J.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Snead, Christopher J.; Craig, Nahide; Anderson, David; Jones, Steven M.; Brownlee, Donald E.; Farnsworth, Richard; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust mission will return the first samples from a solid solar system body beyond the Moon. Stardust was in the news in January 2004, when it encountered comet Wild2 and captured a sample of cometary dust. But Stardust carries an equally important payload: the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust ever collected. Although it is known that interstellar (IS) dust penetrates into the inner solar system [2, 3], to date not even a single contemporary interstellar dust particle has been captured and analyzed in the laboratory. Stardust uses aerogel collectors to capture dust samples. Identification of interstellar dust impacts in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector probably cannot be automated, but will require the expertise of the human eye. However, the labor required for visual scanning of the entire collector would exceed the resources of any reasonably-sized research group. We are developing a project to recruit the public in the search for interstellar dust, based in part on the wildly popular SETI@home project, which has five million subscribers. We call the project Stardust@home. Using sophisticated chemical separation techniques, certain types of refractory ancient IS particles (so-called presolar grains) have been isolated from primitive meteorites (e.g., [4] ). Recently, presolar grains have been identified in Interplanetary Dust Particles[6]. Because these grains are not isolated chemically, but are recognized only by their unusual isotopic compositions, they are probably less biased than presolar grains isolated from meteorites. However, it is entirely possible that the typical interstellar dust particle is isotopically solar in composition. The Stardust collection of interstellar dust will be the first truly unbiased one.

  13. Visualizing Interstellar's Wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Oliver; von Tunzelmann, Eugénie; Franklin, Paul; Thorne, Kip S.

    2015-06-01

    Christopher Nolan's science fiction movie Interstellar offers a variety of opportunities for students in elementary courses on general relativity theory. This paper describes such opportunities, including: (i) At the motivational level, the manner in which elementary relativity concepts underlie the wormhole visualizations seen in the movie; (ii) At the briefest computational level, instructive calculations with simple but intriguing wormhole metrics, including, e.g., constructing embedding diagrams for the three-parameter wormhole that was used by our visual effects team and Christopher Nolan in scoping out possible wormhole geometries for the movie; (iii) Combining the proper reference frame of a camera with solutions of the geodesic equation, to construct a light-ray-tracing map backward in time from a camera's local sky to a wormhole's two celestial spheres; (iv) Implementing this map, for example, in Mathematica, Maple or Matlab, and using that implementation to construct images of what a camera sees when near or inside a wormhole; (v) With the student's implementation, exploring how the wormhole's three parameters influence what the camera sees—which is precisely how Christopher Nolan, using our implementation, chose the parameters for Interstellar's wormhole; (vi) Using the student's implementation, exploring the wormhole's Einstein ring and particularly the peculiar motions of star images near the ring, and exploring what it looks like to travel through a wormhole.

  14. Evidence for biodegradation products in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Kani; Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    2010-01-01

    The interstellar absorption band centred on 2175 Å that is conventionally attributed to monodisperse graphite spheres of radii 0.02 μm is more plausibly explained as arising from biologically derived aromatic molecules. On the basis of panspermia models, interstellar dust includes a substantial fraction of biomaterial in various stages of degradation. We have modeled such an ensemble of degraded biomaterial with laboratory spectroscopy of algae, grass pigments, bituminous coal and anthracite. The average ulrtraviolet absorption profile for these materials is centred at 2175 Å with a full width at half maximum of 250 Å, in precise agreement with the interstellar extinction observations. Mid-infrared spectra also display general concordance with the unidentified interstellar absorption features found in a wide variety of astronomoical sources.

  15. Detection of inhomogeneities in semi-solid materials using pulsed digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Montes, Maria del Socorro; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Perez-Lopez, Carlos

    2004-08-01

    An out of plane optical sensitive configuration for pulsed digital holography was used to detect inhomogeneities inside semi solid organic materials. A loud speaker was employed to produce a mechanical wave that propagates through the material in such a way that it generates vibrational resonant modes and transient events on the material surface. Surface micro displacements were observed between the firing of two consecutive laser pulses, both for a steady resonant mode and for different times during the transient event. Two kinds of inhomogeneities were inserted approximately 2 cm inside the material diffracting the original mechanical wave and thus changing the resonant mode pattern or the transient wave on the surface. Comparison of phase unwrapped patterns, with and without inhomogeneities allows the rapid identification of their existence. The results for the resonant and transient conditions show that the method may be reliably used to study, compare and distinguish data from inside homogeneous and in-homogeneous organic materials.

  16. Utilization of sepiolite materials as a bottom liner material in solid waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Guney, Yucel; Cetin, Bora; Aydilek, Ahmet H; Tanyu, Burak F; Koparal, Savas

    2014-01-01

    Landfill bottom liners are generally constructed with natural clay soils due to their high strength and low hydraulic conductivity characteristics. However, in recent years it is increasingly difficult to find locally available clay soils that satisfy the required engineering properties. Fine grained soils such as sepiolite and zeolite may be used as alternative materials in the constructions of landfill bottom liners. A study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using natural clay rich in kaolinite, sepiolite, zeolite, and their mixtures as a bottom liner material. Unconfined compression tests, swell tests, hydraulic conductivity tests, batch and column adsorption tests were performed on each type of soil and sepiolite-zeolite mixtures. The results of the current study indicate that sepiolite is the dominant material that affects both the geomechanical and geoenvironmental properties of these alternative liners. An increase in sepiolite content in the sepiolite-zeolite mixtures increased the strength, swelling potential and metal adsorption capacities of the soil mixtures. Moreover, hydraulic conductivity of the mixtures decreased significantly with the addition of sepiolite. The utilization of sepiolite-zeolite materials as a bottom liner material allowed for thinner liners with some reduction in construction costs compared to use of a kaolinite-rich clay.

  17. General introduction: Liquid and solid (materials, main properties and applications …)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabler, Simon

    2014-10-01

    A general introduction about the diversity of foam structures is given with focus onto the structural, mechanical and dynamical properties at hand. Two classes of materials are addressed: liquid and semi-solid foams, on the one hand, solid foams, on the other hand. The latter can be subdivided into metallic, ceramic and organic foams, depending on the nature of the solid skeleton that supports the overall cell structure. Solid foams generally stem from the concept of mechanical light-weight structures, but they can just as well be employed for their large surface area as well as for their acoustic and thermal properties. Modern biomaterials use tailored ceramic or organo-ceramic foams as bone scaffolds, whereas hierarchically micro- and nanoporous structures are being used by chemistry to control catalytic reactions. Future materials design and development is going to rely increasingly on natural and synthetic foam structures and properties, be it food, thermal insulators or car frames, thus giving a promising outlook onto the foam research and development that is about to come. xml:lang="fr"

  18. Enhanced acoustic transmission into dissipative solid materials through the use of inhomogeneous plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. C.; Bolton, J. S.; Rhoads, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    A number of applications, for instance ultrasonic imaging and nondestructive testing, involve the transmission of acoustic energy across fluid-solid interfaces into dissipative solids. However, such transmission is generally hindered by the large impedance mismatch at the interface. In order to address this problem, inhomogeneous plane waves were investigated in this work for the purpose of improving the acoustic energy transmission. To this end, under the assumption of linear hysteretic damping, models for fluid-structure interaction were developed that allow for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous incident waves. For low-loss solids, the results reveal that, at the Rayleigh angle, a unique value of the wave inhomogeneity can be found which minimizes the reflection coefficient, and consequently maximizes the transmission. The results also reveal that with sufficient dissipation levels in the solid material, homogeneous incident waves yield lower reflection values than inhomogeneous waves, due to the large degrees of inhomogeneity inherent in the transmitted waves. Analytical conditions have also been derived which predict the dependence of the optimal incident wave type on the dissipation level and wave speeds in the solid medium. Finally, implications related to the use of acoustic beams of limited spatial extent are discussed.

  19. Ferroelectromagnetic solid solutions on the base piezoelectric ceramic materials for components of micromechatronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochenek, Dariusz; Zachariasz, Radosław; Niemiec, Przemysław; Ilczuk, Jan; Bartkowska, Joanna; Brzezińska, Dagmara

    2016-10-01

    In the presented work, a ferroelectromagnetic solid solutions based on PZT and ferrite powders have been obtained. The main aim of combination of ferroelectric and magnetic powders was to obtain material showing both electric and magnetic properties. Ferroelectric ceramic powder (in amount of 90%) was based on the doped PZT type solid solution while magnetic component was nickel-zinc ferrite Ni1-xZnxFe2O4 (in amount of 10%). The synthesis of components of ferroelectromagnetic solid solutions was performed using the solid phase sintering. Final densification of synthesized powder has been done using free sintering. The aim of the work was to obtain and examine in the first multicomponent PZT type ceramics admixed with chromium with the following chemical composition Pb0.94Sr0.06(Zr0.46Ti0.54)O3+0.25 at% Cr2O3 and next ferroelectromagnetic solid solution based on a PZT type ferroelectric powder (Pb0.94Sr0.06(Zr0.46Ti0.54)O3+0.25 at% Cr2O3) and nickel-zinc ferrite (Ni0.64Zn0.36Fe2O4), from the point of view of their mechanical and electric properties, such as: electric permittivity, ε; dielectric loss, tanδ; mechanical losses, Q-1; and Young modulus, E.

  20. High-precision machining of materials for manufacturing applications using diode-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikumb, Suwas K.; Islam, M. U.

    2000-02-01

    While developments in the field of diode pumped solid state lasers provide a foundation for precision machining of parts with high accuracy and small feature sizes, this promise can not be realized without considering the interactions of individual processes, systems and material parameters. This paper presents our results on the precision machining of small features in various materials using diode pumped solid state lasers. The machined features are characterized geometrically by using optical inspection techniques and the tolerance data is analyzed statistically. Machining parameters relevant to motion system and tool path compensation are discussed along with their relevance to machined feature geometry. The effect of laser beam polarization on the machined kerf width, kerf surface and feature dimensions is reported.

  1. Palynological Investigation of Post-Flight Solid Rocket Booster Foreign Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Linda; Jarzen, David

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of foreign material in a drain tube, from the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of a recent Space Shuttle mission, was identified as pollen. The source of the pollen is from deposits made by bees, collecting pollen from plants found at the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The pollen is determined to have been present in the frustum drain tubes before the shuttle flight. During the flight the pollen did not undergo thermal maturation.

  2. Optical properties of solid-state laser type materials in the near IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenier, Alain; Garapon, Claudine; Madej, Christine; Moine, Bernard; Moncorge, Richard; Monteil, Andre; Pedrini, Christian; Boulon, Georges

    1990-11-01

    Work being done on solid-state lasers in a single laboratory is reviewed. Recent results on broadly tunable laser systems based on transition metal ions are addressed, discussing excited-state absorption measurements and the search for new emitting centers. The main emission spectra obtained with the rare earth doped laser materials Nd(3+), Er(3+), Tm(3+), and Ho(3+) are shown and discussed.

  3. Nonlinear air-coupled emission: The signature to reveal and image microdamage in solid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Solodov, Igor; Busse, Gerd

    2007-12-17

    It is shown that low-frequency elastic vibrations of near-surface planar defects cause high-frequency ultrasonic radiation in surrounding air. The frequency conversion mechanism is concerned with contact nonlinearity of the defect vibrations and provides efficient generation of air-coupled higher-order ultraharmonics, ultrasubharmonics, and combination frequencies. The nonlinear air-coupled ultrasonic emission is applied for location and high-resolution imaging of damage-induced defects in a variety of solid materials.

  4. A novel quaternary solid solution photo-absorber material for photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tiantian; Liu, Zhifeng; Yan, Weiguo; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Xueqi; Liu, Junqi; Wang, Junkai; Han, Jianhua

    2015-09-14

    We report a novel quaternary solid solution (Ag-Cu-Sb-S or ACSS) serving as a photo-absorber material in the photoelectrochemical field for the first time, and ZnO/ACSS nanoarrays exhibited a photocurrent density of 4.45 mA cm(-2). The research indicates that ZnO/ACSS composite structures have enormous potential in PEC hydrogen generation systems.

  5. Determining the Composition and Distribution of Interstellar Dust with X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julia C.; Xiang, J.; Ravel, B.; Kortright, J.

    2008-03-01

    Dust particles smaller than 10 microns are partially transparent to X-rays so that the measured absorption should be sensitive to ALL atoms in both gas and solid phase. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy, as currently possible with the Chandra X-ray satellite can therefore provide a powerful and unique tool for determining the state and composition of interstellar material, since dust grains along the line of sight will imprint oscillatory features (X-ray absorption fine structure - XAFS) near photoelectric edges. I will show how we have begun to determine dust composition through XAFS signatures using laboratory solid state work in complement with space (Chandra and Spitzer spectra) studies to determine and differentiate dust composition along different lines-of-sight, and in different environments.

  6. Evaluation of dry-solids-blend material source for grouts containing 106-AN waste: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Osborne, S.C.; Francis, C.L.; Trotter, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    Stabilization/solidification technology is one of the most widely used techniques for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes. Cement-based products, commonly referred to as grouts, are the predominant materials of choice because of their low associated processing costs, compatibility with a wide variety of disposal scenarios, and ability to meet stringent processing and performance requirements. Such technology is being utilized in a Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the disposal of various wastes, including 106-AN wastes, located on the Hanford Reservation. The WHC personnel have developed a grout formula for 106-AN disposal that is designed to meet stringent performance requirements. This formula consists of a dry-solids blend containing 40 wt % limestone, 28 wt % granulated blast furnace slag (BFS), 28 wt % American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Class F fly ash, and 4 wt % Type I-II-LA Portland cement. This blend is mixed with 106-AN at a mix ratio of 9 lb of dry-solids blend per gallon of waste. This report documents the final results of efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of WHC`s Grout Technology Program to assess the effects of the source of the dry-solids-blend materials on the resulting grout formula.

  7. Interstellar carbon in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swart, P. K.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1983-01-01

    The Murchison and Allende chondrites contain up to 5 parts per million carbon that is enriched in carbon-13 by up to +1100 per mil (the ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13 is approximately 42, compared to 88 to 93 for terrestrial carbon). This 'heavy' carbon is associated with neon-22 and with anomalous krypton and xenon showing the signature of the s-process (neutron capture on a slow time scale). It apparently represents interstellar grains ejected from late-type stars. A second anomalous xenon component ('CCFXe') is associated with a distinctive, light carbon (depleted in carbon-13 by 38 per mil), which, however, falls within the terrestrial range and hence may be of either local or exotic origin.

  8. An interstellar precursor mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Ivie, C.; Lewis, J. C.; Lipes, R. G.; Norton, H. N.; Stearns, J. W.; Stimpson, L.; Weissman, P.

    1977-01-01

    A mission out of the planetary system, with launch about the year 2000, could provide valuable scientific data as well as test some of the technology for a later mission to another star. Primary scientific objectives for the precursor mission concern characteristics of the heliopause, the interstellar medium, stellar distances (by parallax measurements), low energy cosmic rays, interplanetary gas distribution, and mass of the solar system. Secondary objectives include investigation of Pluto. Candidate science instruments are suggested. Individual spacecraft systems for the mission were considered, technology requirements and problem areas noted, and a number of recommendations made for technology study and advanced development. The most critical technology needs include attainment of 50-yr spacecraft lifetime and development of a long-life NEP system.

  9. Review of Physics Related Research and Development Activities in Nondestructive Characterization of Solid Rocket Motor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Lee H.

    1998-10-01

    The perception that solid rocket motors (srm) are of relatively simple mechanical construction with a long history in private, military, and NASA applications may lead some to believe that little is left to be done in terms of basic and applied research and development in support of this technology. The fact is that srm?s are very complicated primarily because of the complexity of the materials from which they are built. The reliability and performance of srm?s are determined by the ballistic and mechanical properties of each individual material component, and by the manufacturing processes that conjoin these materials. In order to insure reliability and good performance, there are on-going materials research and development activities in the srm community. Included are activities involving the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods used for materials and processes characterization. Typical applications include: detection and characterization of defects in fiber reinforced composite materials, detection of weak bonds and debonds, verification of surface cleanliness prior to bonding, characterization of aging materials and bondlines, measurement of elastic properties in filled polymeric materials, monitoring of cure in polymeric materials, and measurement of film or coating thicknesses. NDE methods and physics principles upon which they are based will be described. Challenges and future research and development directions will be identified.

  10. From Brittle to Pliant Viscoelastic Materials with Solid State Linear Polyphosphonium - Carboxylate Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Godeau, Guilhem; Navailles, Laurence; Nallet, Frédéric; Lin, Xinrong; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    A polystyrenylphosphonium polymer was synthesized and complexed with various carboxylic acid derivatives to form new solid-state polyelectrolyte-surfactant assemblies. The properties of these ionic materials were highly dependent on the nature of the anion and included a brittle material, a rubbery ball that bounces, or a sticky fiber. The values for the equilibrium modulus, storage modulus, and loss modulus were dependent on the composition of the carboxylic acid and the number of electrostatic interactions. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies on the supramolecular assemblies confirmed a bilayer structure for two of the assemblies. PMID:24511156

  11. Repulsive Casimir forces between solid materials with high-refractive-index intervening liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Zwol, P. J. van; Palasantzas, G.

    2010-06-15

    In order to explore repulsive Casimir or van der Waals forces between solid materials with liquid as the intervening medium, we analyze dielectric data for a wide range of materials as, for example, (p)olytetrafluoroethylene, polystyrene, silica, and more than 20 liquids. Although significant variation in the dielectric data from different sources exists, we provide a scheme based on measured static dielectric constants, refractive indices, and applying Kramers-Kronig consistency to dielectric data to create accurate dielectric functions at imaginary frequencies. The latter is necessary for more accurate force calculations via the Lifshitz theory, thereby allowing reliable predictions of repulsive Casimir forces.

  12. Large-Spot Material Interactions with a High-Power Solid-State Laser Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Fochs, S N; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-08-06

    We study the material interactions produced by the beam of a 25-kW solid-state laser, in experiments characterized by relatively large spot sizes ({approx}3 cm) and the presence of airflow. The targets are iron or aluminum slabs, of thickness 1 cm. In the experiments with iron, we show that combustion plays an important role in heating the material. In the experiments with aluminum, we observe a sharp transition from no melting to complete melt-through as the intensity on target increases. A layer of paint greatly reduces the requirements for melt-through. We explain these effects and incorporate them into an overall computational model.

  13. FROM INTERSTELLAR TO COMETARY ICES: SOME EXPERIMENTAL ASPECTS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirico, E.

    2009-12-01

    Comets and TransNeptunian Objects are pristine small bodies composed of refractory (minerals, carbonaceous matter) and volatile species (ices). They had been presumed for long as the result of the condensation of interstellar dusts, but along the last ten years, this view has been deeply revised. The mineralogical composition of several comets was found to be dominated by crystalline silicates, evidencing efficient radial mixing in the solar nebula, as well as nebular heating which annealed presolar amorphous silicates and/or silicates condensation from the gas. The origin of the refractory carbon material (Insoluble Organic Matter), in chondrites, Antarctic micrometeorites and stratospheric IDPs, has also been questionned recently. The origin of the volatile species is still a debated topic. At present, no observational evidence discards a connection with the presolar medium, but large uncertainties remain on the nature of ices in comet nucleus, or on the isotopic evolution (D/H) of volatiles in the young proto-sun environment and later in the protoplanetary disk. Experimental studies play a key role in the exploration of these issues. They allow to determine the optical properties of ices required to analyse astronomical observations, they provide thermodynamic and kinetic data to model volatiles sublimation, when a comet approaches the sun. They laso bring valuable insights on solid state chemical processes which act at the surface or in the bulk of interstellar dusts, and likely in comet nucleus. In this presentation, we will report on some of these experimental issues, along with an inventory of important pending questions regarding the nature and the origin of cometary ices.

  14. A new method to study complex materials in solid state chemistry: application to chalcogenide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippens, P. E.; Olivier-Fourcade, J.; Jumas, J. C.

    1998-08-01

    We show that a combined application of Mössbauer spectroscopy and other experimental tools such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance provides a coherent picture of the local electronic structure in chalcogenide materials. In order to develop this idea we propose an analysis of the Sn, Sb and Te local electronic structures for three different systems of materials. The first example concerns the In Sn S system. We show that Li insertion in In16Sn4S32 leads to changes of the Sn oxidation states from Sn(IV) to Sn(II). The second example concerns materials of the Tl Sb S system. We show that variations of the 121Sb Mössbauer isomer shift and surface of the first peak of the X-ray absorption spectra at the Sb LIII edge can be linearly correlated because of the main influence of the Sb 5s electrons. This is explained by changes in the local environment of the Sb atoms. The last example concerns the crystalline phases of the Tl Sn Te system. The formal oxidation numbers of the Te atoms are determined from 125Te Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. They are related to the different types of bonds involving the Te atoms in the Tl Sn Te compounds.

  15. Hierarchical Corannulene-Based Materials: Energy Transfer and Solid-State Photophysics.

    PubMed

    Rice, Allison M; Fellows, W Brett; Dolgopolova, Ekaterina A; Greytak, Andrew B; Vannucci, Aaron K; Smith, Mark D; Karakalos, Stavros G; Krause, Jeanette A; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Popov, Alexey A; Shustova, Natalia B

    2017-04-10

    We report the first example of a donor-acceptor corannulene-containing hybrid material with rapid ligand-to-ligand energy transfer (ET). Additionally, we provide the first time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) data for any corannulene-based compounds in the solid state. Comprehensive analysis of PL data in combination with theoretical calculations of donor-acceptor exciton coupling was employed to estimate ET rate and efficiency in the prepared material. The ligand-to-ligand ET rate calculated using two models is comparable with that observed in fullerene-containing materials, which are generally considered for molecular electronics development. Thus, the presented studies not only demonstrate the possibility of merging the intrinsic properties of π-bowls, specifically corannulene derivatives, with the versatility of crystalline hybrid scaffolds, but could also foreshadow the engineering of a novel class of hierarchical corannulene-based hybrid materials for optoelectronic devices.

  16. Interstellar scattering and resolution limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, Brian

    Density irregularities in both the interplanetary medium and the ionized component of the interstellar medium scatter radio waves, resulting in limitations on the achievable resolution. Interplanetary scattering (IPS) is weak for most observational situations, and in principle the resulting phase corruption can be corrected for when observing with sufficiently many array elements. Interstellar scattering (ISS), on the other hand, is usually strong at frequencies below about 8 GHz, in which case intrinsic structure information over a range of angular scales is irretrievably lost. With the earth-space baselines now planned, it will be possible to search directly for interstellar refraction, which is suspected of modulating the fluxes of background sources.

  17. Matrix isolation as a tool for studying interstellar chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, David W.; Ortman, Bryan J.; Hauge, Robert H.; Margrave, John L.

    1989-01-01

    Since the identification of the OH radical as an interstellar species, over 50 molecular species were identified as interstellar denizens. While identification of new species appears straightforward, an explanation for their mechanisms of formation is not. Most astronomers concede that large bodies like interstellar dust grains are necessary for adsorption of molecules and their energies of reactions, but many of the mechanistic steps are unknown and speculative. It is proposed that data from matrix isolation experiments involving the reactions of refractory materials (especially C, Si, and Fe atoms and clusters) with small molecules (mainly H2, H2O, CO, CO2) are particularly applicable to explaining mechanistic details of likely interstellar chemical reactions. In many cases, matrix isolation techniques are the sole method of studying such reactions; also in many cases, complexations and bond rearrangements yield molecules never before observed. The study of these reactions thus provides a logical basis for the mechanisms of interstellar reactions. A list of reactions is presented that would simulate interstellar chemical reactions. These reactions were studied using FTIR-matrix isolation techniques.

  18. Dendrimer-modified solid supports: nanostructured materials with potential drug allergy diagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sanchez, A J; Montañez, M I; Mayorga, C; Torres, M J; Kehr, N S; Vida, Y; Collado, D; Najera, F; De Cola, L; Perez-Inestrosa, E

    2012-01-01

    Complex functional materials consisting of bioactive molecules immobilized on solid supports present potential applications in biosensoring. Advances in the fabrication of these surface materials are of growing interest for antibody-based diagnosis. This work exploits dendrimers as versatile nanostructures for templating sensor surfaces and the critical role of the immobilization protocol in the solid supports cellulose and zeolites, of organic and inorganic composition respectively. The fabrication and characterization, including the degree of functionalization and reproducibility, of different nanostructured materials are described. To validate the approach, the fabricated supports were further used as a solid phase for developing a radioimmunoassay to detect immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific to penicillin, the antibody involved in immediate allergy responses to this drug. The dendrimer-modified supports provide assays with significantly enhanced sensitivity, as well as increase the availability of biomolecules for specific interaction and minimize nonspecific adsorptions through appropriate functionalization protocols in each case. The manufacturing methodology involved the use of a long, flexible hydrophilic spacer in the cellulose materials, and a higher surface density of the immobilized dendrimers in the zeolite crystals. The ability of hybrid zeolite materials in such biosensing applications was evaluated for the first time. The assays were validated in human serum samples from patients allergic to penicillin and from non-allergic controls. The specificity and improved sensitivity of the dendrimer- modified supports make these strategies versatile for different bioactive molecules and could have significant implications for the quantification of a wide range of specific IgE antibodies and other biomolecules of diagnostic interest.

  19. Airborne and laboratory studies of interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Hudgins, D. M.; Witteborn, Fred C.

    1995-01-01

    A brief history of the observations which have led to the hypothesis that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) are the carriers of the widespread interstellar emission features near 3050, 1615, '1300' and 890 cm(exp -1) (3.29, 6.2, '7.7', and 11.2 mu m) is presented. The central role of airborne spectroscopy is stressed. The principal reason for the assignment to PAH's was the resemblance of the interstellar emission spectrum to the laboratory absorption spectra of PAH's and PAH-like materials. Since precious little information was available on the properties of PAH's in the forms that are thought to exist under interstellar conditions -isolated and ionized in the emission zones, with the smallest PAH's being dehydrogenated- there was a need for a spectral data base on PAH's taken in these states. Here, the relevant infrared spectroscopic properties of PAH's will be reviewed. These laboratory spectra show that relative band intensities are severely altered and that band frequencies shift. It is shown that these new data alleviate several of the spectroscopic criticisms previously leveled at the hypothesis.

  20. Solid-state resistance upset welding: A process with unique advantages for advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Solid-state resistance upset welding is suitable for joining many alloys that are difficult to weld using fusion processes. Since no melting takes place, the weld metal retains many of the characteristics of the base metal. Resulting welds have a hot worked structure, and thereby have higher strength than fusion welds in the same mate. Since the material being joined is not melted, compositional gradients are not introduced, second phase materials are minimally disrupted, and minor alloying elements, do not affect weldability. Solid-state upset welding has been adapted for fabrication of structures considered very large compared to typical resistance welding applications. The process has been used for closure of capsules, small vessels, and large containers. Welding emphasis has been on 304L stainless steel, the material for current applications. Other materials have, however, received enough attention to have demonstrated capability for joining alloys that are not readily weldable using fusion welding methods. A variety of other stainless steels (including A-286), superalloys (including TD nickel), refractory metals (including tungsten), and aluminum alloys (including 2024) have been successfully upset welded.

  1. Theoretical Modeling of Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The chemistry of complex interstellar organic molecules will be described. Gas phase processes that may build large carbon-chain species in cold molecular clouds will be summarized. Catalytic reactions on grain surfaces can lead to a large variety of organic species, and models of molecule formation by atom additions to multiply-bonded molecules will be presented. The subsequent desorption of these mixed molecular ices can initiate a distinctive organic chemistry in hot molecular cores. The general ion-molecule pathways leading to even larger organics will be outlined. The predictions of this theory will be compared with observations to show how possible organic formation pathways in the interstellar medium may be constrained. In particular, the success of the theory in explaining trends in the known interstellar organics, in predicting recently-detected interstellar molecules, and, just as importantly, non-detections, will be discussed.

  2. Study of transport of laser-driven relativistic electrons in solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Philippe

    With the ultra intense lasers available today, it is possible to generate very hot electron beams in solid density materials. These intense laser-matter interactions result in many applications which include the generation of ultrashort secondary sources of particles and radiation such as ions, neutrons, positrons, x-rays, or even laser-driven hadron therapy. For these applications to become reality, a comprehensive understanding of laser-driven energy transport including hot electron generation through the various mechanisms of ionization, and their subsequent transport in solid density media is required. This study will focus on the characterization of electron transport effects in solid density targets using the state-of- the-art particle-in-cell code PICLS. A number of simulation results will be presented on the topics of ionization propagation in insulator glass targets, non-equilibrium ionization modeling featuring electron impact ionization, and electron beam guiding by the self-generated resistive magnetic field. An empirically derived scaling relation for the resistive magnetic in terms of the laser parameters and material properties is presented and used to derive a guiding condition. This condition may prove useful for the design of future laser-matter interaction experiments.

  3. Studies in new materials for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Alex W.

    Ceramic materials have historically been of interest for their thermal and mechanical properties. However, certain ceramic materials can have very interesting electrical, magnetic and optical properties, leading to a new subclass, the electroceramics. Perovskites, in particular, have become the subject of intense research in this field. Specifically, doped barium zirconates have shown high proton conductivity in the intermediate temperature range (600--800°C), making them advantageous for use in solid oxide fuel cells. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrochemical devices that convert chemical energy into electricity using ion-conducting oxide ceramics as electrolytes. The anode component of the cell is also of interest. Cermets or ceramic metals can serve a dual role as substrates for thin film electrolytes and anodes in the cell. Thin films of gadolinium and ytterbium doped barium zirconate were deposited using pulsed laser deposition (KrF; 1--3 J/cm2) on several substrates, including cermets developed in our lab, in a 10--400 mTorr oxygen environment with various substrate temperatures. Crystalline structure and chemical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis, respectively. Preliminary electrical measurements of the electrolyte/cermet structure were taken using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Keywords: solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), perovskites, proton conductors, electroceramics, gadolinium-doped barium zirconate (BZG).

  4. Novel Energy Sources -Material Architecture and Charge Transport in Solid State Ionic Materials for Rechargeable Li ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Katiyar, Ram S; Gómez, M; Majumder, S B; Morell, G; Tomar, M S; Smotkin, E; Bhattacharya, P; Ishikawa, Y

    2009-01-19

    Since its introduction in the consumer market at the beginning of 1990s by Sony Corporation ‘Li-ion rechargeable battery’ and ‘LiCoO2 cathode’ is an inseparable couple for highly reliable practical applications. However, a separation is inevitable as Li-ion rechargeable battery industry demand more and more from this well serving cathode. Spinel-type lithium manganate (e.g., LiMn2O4), lithium-based layered oxide materials (e.g., LiNiO2) and lithium-based olivine-type compounds (e.g., LiFePO4) are nowadays being extensively studied for application as alternate cathode materials in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Primary goal of this project was the advancement of Li-ion rechargeable battery to meet the future demands of the energy sector. Major part of the research emphasized on the investigation of electrodes and solid electrolyte materials for improving the charge transport properties in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Theoretical computational methods were used to select electrodes and electrolyte material with enhanced structural and physical properties. The effect of nano-particles on enhancing the battery performance was also examined. Satisfactory progress has been made in the bulk form and our efforts on realizing micro-battery based on thin films is close to give dividend and work is progressing well in this direction.

  5. Assessment of Bacterial Spores in Solid Materials: Curriculum Improvements Partnership Award for the Integration of Research (CIPAIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavallee, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    This summer, we quantified the release, by cryogenic grinding at liquid nitrogen temperatures, of microbes present in 4 different spacecraft solids: epoxy 9309, epoxy 9394, epoxy 9396, and a silicone coating. Three different samples of each material were prepared: aseptically prepared solid material, powdered material inoculated with a known spore count of Bacillus atrophaeus, and solid material artificially embedded with a known spore count of Bacillus atrophaeus. Samples were cryogenically ground as needed, and the powders were directly cultured to determine the number of microbial survivors per gram of material. Recovery rates were found to be highly material-dependent, varying from 0.2 to 50% for inoculated material surfaces and 0.002 to 0.5% for embedded spores. A study of the spore survival rate versus total grinding time was also performed, with results indicating that longer grinding time decreases recovery rates of viable spores.

  6. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF THE DURABILITY OF MATERIALS FOR INTERCONNECTS IN SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick S. Pettit; Gerald H. Meier

    2003-06-30

    This report describes the result of the first eight months of effort on a project directed at improving metallic interconnect materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The results include cyclic oxidation studies of a group of ferritic alloys, which are candidate interconnect materials. The exposures have been carried out in simulated fuel cell atmospheres. The oxidation morphologies have been characterized and the ASR has been measured for the oxide scales. The effect of fuel cell electric current density on chromia growth rates has been considered The thermomechanical behavior of the scales has been investigated by stress measurements using x-ray diffraction and interfacial fracture toughness measurements using indentation. The ultimate goal of this thrust is to use knowledge of changes in oxide thickness, stress and adhesion to develop accelerated testing methods for evaluating SOFC interconnect alloys. Finally a theoretical assessment of the potential for use of ''new'' metallic materials as interconnect materials has been conducted and is presented in this report. Alloys being considered include materials based on pure nickel, materials based on the ''Invar'' concept, and coated materials to optimize properties in both the anode and cathode gases.

  7. Materials for suspension (semi-solid) electrodes for energy and water technologies.

    PubMed

    Hatzell, Kelsey B; Boota, Muhammad; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-12-07

    Suspension or semi-solid electrodes have recently gained increased attention for large-scale applications such as grid energy storage, capacitive water deionization, and wastewater treatment. A suspension electrode is a multiphase material system comprised of an active (charge storing) material suspended in ionic solution (electrolyte). Gravimetrically, the electrolyte is the majority component and aids in physical transport of the active material. This principle enables, for the first time, scalability of electrochemical energy storage devices (supercapacitors and batteries) previously limited to small and medium scale applications. This critical review describes the ongoing material challenges encompassing suspension-based systems. The research described here combines classical aspects of electrochemistry, colloidal science, material science, fluid mechanics, and rheology to describe ion and charge percolation, adsorption of ions, and redox charge storage processes in suspension electrodes. This review summarizes the growing inventory of material systems, methods and practices used to characterize suspension electrodes, and describes universal material system properties (rheological, electrical, and electrochemical) that are pivotal in the design of high performing systems. A discussion of the primary challenges and future research directions is included.

  8. Synthesis of mesoporous silica materials from municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Li, Wen-Kai; Huang, Chun-Yi

    2014-05-01

    Incinerator bottom ash contains a large amount of silica and can hence be used as a silica source for the synthesis of mesoporous silica materials. In this study, the conditions for alkaline fusion to extract silica from incinerator bottom ash were investigated, and the resulting supernatant solution was used as the silica source for synthesizing mesoporous silica materials. The physical and chemical characteristics of the mesoporous silica materials were analyzed using BET, XRD, FTIR, SEM, and solid-state NMR. The results indicated that the BET surface area and pore size distribution of the synthesized silica materials were 992 m2/g and 2-3.8 nm, respectively. The XRD patterns showed that the synthesized materials exhibited a hexagonal pore structure with a smaller order. The NMR spectra of the synthesized materials exhibited three peaks, corresponding to Q(2) [Si(OSi)2(OH)2], Q(3) [Si(OSi)3(OH)], and Q(4) [Si(OSi)4]. The FTIR spectra confirmed the existence of a surface hydroxyl group and the occurrence of symmetric Si-O stretching. Thus, mesoporous silica was successfully synthesized from incinerator bottom ash. Finally, the effectiveness of the synthesized silica in removing heavy metals (Pb2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, and Cr2+) from aqueous solutions was also determined. The results showed that the silica materials synthesized from incinerator bottom ash have potential for use as an adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions.

  9. Materials for suspension (semi-solid) electrodes for energy and water technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzell, Kelsey B.; Boota, Muhammad; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-01-01

    Suspension or semi-solid electrodes have recently gained increased attention for large-scale applications such as grid energy storage, capacitive water deionization, and wastewater treatment. A suspension electrode is a multiphase material system comprised of an active (charge storing) material suspended in ionic solution (electrolyte). Gravimetrically, the electrolyte is the majority component and aids in physical transport of the active material. For the first time, this principle enables, scalability of electrochemical energy storage devices (supercapacitors and batteries) previously limited to small and medium scale applications. This critical review describes the ongoing material challenges encompassing suspension-based systems. The research described here combines classical aspects of electrochemistry, colloidal science, material science, fluid mechanics, and rheology to describe ion and charge percolation, adsorption of ions, and redox charge storage processes in suspension electrodes. Our review summarizes the growing inventory of material systems, methods and practices used to characterize suspension electrodes, and describes universal material system properties (rheological, electrical, and electrochemical) that are pivotal in the design of high performing systems. We include a discussion of the primary challenges and future research directions.

  10. Potential for efficient frequency conversion at high average power using solid state nonlinear optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Eimerl, D.

    1985-10-28

    High-average-power frequency conversion using solid state nonlinear materials is discussed. Recent laboratory experience and new developments in design concepts show that current technology, a few tens of watts, may be extended by several orders of magnitude. For example, using KD*P, efficient doubling (>70%) of Nd:YAG at average powers approaching 100 KW is possible; and for doubling to the blue or ultraviolet regions, the average power may approach 1 MW. Configurations using segmented apertures permit essentially unlimited scaling of average power. High average power is achieved by configuring the nonlinear material as a set of thin plates with a large ratio of surface area to volume and by cooling the exposed surfaces with a flowing gas. The design and material fabrication of such a harmonic generator are well within current technology.

  11. Materials and processes for shuttle engine, external tank, and solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Shuttle flight system is composed of the Orbiter, an External Tank (ET) that contains the ascent propellant to be used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB). The ET is expended on each launch; the Orbiter and SRB's are reusable. It is the requirement for reuse which poses the exciting new materials and processes challenges in the development of the Space Shuttle. A brief description of the Space Shuttle and the mission profile is given. The Shuttle configuration is then described with emphasis on the SSME, ET, and SRB. The materials selection, tracking, and control system used to assure reliability and to minimize cost are described, and salient features and challenges in materials and processes associated with the SSME, ET, and SRB are subsequently discussed.

  12. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Materials for Heavy Duty and Advanced Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Wood, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature Stirling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines, and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. This paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis on heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  13. Method for removing solid particulate material from within liquid fuel injector assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Andriulli, John B.; Strain, Paul D.

    1998-01-01

    A method for removing residual solid particulate material from the interior of liquid fuel injectors and other fluid flow control mechanisms having or being operatively associated with a flow-regulating fixed or variable orifice. The method comprises the sequential and alternate introduction of columns of a non-compressible liquid phase and columns of a compressed gas phase into the body of a fuel injector whereby the expansion of each column of the gas phase across the orifice accelerates the liquid phase in each trailing column of the liquid phase and thereby generates turbulence in each liquid phase for lifting and entraining the solid particulates for the subsequent removal thereof from the body of the fuel injector.

  14. Brazing of bulk graphite/solid tritium breeder materials to metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, David J.; Bowers, David A.; Morgan, Grover D.; Trachsel, Clarence A.; Wille, Gerald W.

    1984-05-01

    The preliminary study involved evaluation of a brazed joint concept for obtaining improved heat transfer conditions between a coolant-containing metal structure and a solid tritium breeder or bulk graphite. A titanium-based braze alloy was used to successfully bond: a) POCO AXF-5Q bulk graphite to metal substrates (OFHC Cu, 316 SS, and Inconel 625), and b) solid tritium breeders (Li 2O, γ-LiAlO 2, Li 4SiO 4, Li 2TiO 3, and Li 2ZrO 3) to a 316 SS sample by employing an intermediate compliant metal layer to accommodate differences in linear thermal expansion of the materials.

  15. Method for removing solid particulate material from within liquid fuel injector assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.; Andriulli, J.B.; Strain, P.D.

    1998-09-08

    A method is described for removing residual solid particulate material from the interior of liquid fuel injectors and other fluid flow control mechanisms having or being operatively associated with a flow-regulating fixed or variable orifice. The method comprises the sequential and alternate introduction of columns of a non-compressible liquid phase and columns of a compressed gas phase into the body of a fuel injector whereby the expansion of each column of the gas phase across the orifice accelerates the liquid phase in each trailing column of the liquid phase and thereby generates turbulence in each liquid phase for lifting and entraining the solid particulates for the subsequent removal thereof from the body of the fuel injector. 1 fig.

  16. Solid-state thermolysis of ammonia borane and related materials for high-capacity hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping

    2012-04-21

    Ammonia borane (NH(3)BH(3), AB) is a unique molecular crystal containing an intriguingly high density of hydrogen. In the past several years, AB has received extensive attention as a promising hydrogen storage medium. Several strategies have been successfully developed for promoting H(2) release and for suppressing the evolution of volatile by-products from the solid-state thermolysis of AB. Several potentially cost-effective and energy-efficient routes for regenerating AB from the spent fuels have been experimentally demonstrated. These remarkable technological advances offer a promising prospect of using AB-based materials as viable H(2) carriers for on-board application. In this perspective, the recent progresses in promoting H(2) release from the solid-state thermolysis of AB and in developing regeneration technologies are briefly reviewed.

  17. Thermal stability of the solid DNA as a novel optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizioł, Jacek; Makyła-Juzak, Katarzyna; Marzec, Mateusz M.; Ekiert, Robert; Marzec, Monika; Gondek, Ewa

    2017-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been extensively exploited for the past decade as the matrix material in organic electronics and nonlinear optics. In this work thermal stability of DNA in solid form was thoroughly studied, mainly by optical methods. Solid samples of low molecular mass DNA were subjected to heating according to different protocols and dissolved. The temperature effect was observed in the evolution of UV absorption and circular dichroism spectra. Thin films of DNA were deposited on polished silicon wafers. They were conditioned at consecutively raised temperature and simultaneously measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Changes in chemical composition of thermally treated films were studied by XPS. Below 100 °C all thermal effects were reversible. Melting occurred at c.a.140 °C. Irreversible chemical changes probably occurred at 170-180 °C.

  18. Interstellar Glycolaldehyde: The First Sugar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.

    2000-09-01

    Interstellar glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) has been detected in emission toward the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N) by means of millimeter-wave rotational transitions. Glycolaldehyde is an important biomarker since it is structurally the simplest member of the monosaccharide sugars that heretofore have gone undetected in interstellar clouds. There is no consensus as to how any such large complex molecules are formed in the interstellar clouds. It may be that the typical environment of dense interstellar clouds is favorable to glycolaldehyde synthesis by means of the polymerization of formaldehyde (H2CO) molecules either on grain surfaces or in the gas phase. Alternatively, we speculate that glycolaldehyde and other complex molecules may undergo assembly from functional molecular groups on grain surfaces. Utilizing common chemical precursors, a chance process could account for the high degree of isomerism observed in complex interstellar molecules (e.g., methyl formate, acetic acid, and glycolaldehyde). This work suggests that the phenomenon of isomerism be investigated further as a means of potentially constraining interstellar chemistry routes for those individual sources where the condition of good source-beam coupling can be achieved.

  19. Oxygen transport in perovskite-type solid oxide fuel cell materials: insights from quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Ana B; Ritzmann, Andrew M; Pavone, Michele; Keith, John A; Carter, Emily A

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: Global advances in industrialization are precipitating increasingly rapid consumption of fossil fuel resources and heightened levels of atmospheric CO2. World sustainability requires viable sources of renewable energy and its efficient use. First-principles quantum mechanics (QM) studies can help guide developments in energy technologies by characterizing complex material properties and predicting reaction mechanisms at the atomic scale. QM can provide unbiased, qualitative guidelines for experimentally tailoring materials for energy applications. This Account primarily reviews our recent QM studies of electrode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a promising technology for clean, efficient power generation. SOFCs presently must operate at very high temperatures to allow transport of oxygen ions and electrons through solid-state electrolytes and electrodes. High temperatures, however, engender slow startup times and accelerate material degradation. SOFC technologies need cathode and anode materials that function well at lower temperatures, which have been realized with mixed ion-electron conductor (MIEC) materials. Unfortunately, the complexity of MIECs has inhibited the rational tailoring of improved SOFC materials. Here, we gather theoretically obtained insights into oxygen ion conductivity in two classes of perovskite-type materials for SOFC applications: the conventional La1-xSrxMO3 family (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co) and the new, promising class of Sr2Fe2-xMoxO6 materials. Using density functional theory + U (DFT+U) with U-J values obtained from ab initio theory, we have characterized the accompanying electronic structures for the two processes that govern ionic diffusion in these materials: (i) oxygen vacancy formation and (ii) vacancy-mediated oxygen migration. We show how the corresponding macroscopic oxygen diffusion coefficient can be accurately obtained in terms of microscopic quantities calculated with first-principles QM. We find that the

  20. Innovative approach to facilitate reuse of nonhazardous industrial solid waste as building material

    SciTech Connect

    St-Laurent, S.G.; Boutin, A.

    1997-12-31

    The steel industry generates large volumes of inorganic nonhazardous solid waste. During the last five years, Quebec`s steel industry has developed new technologies to recover metal from slags and tailings. Since these processes recover 10 to 30 percent of the metal, large volumes of nonhazardous residues still need to be recycled or disposed of. In order to encourage recycling initiatives, le Ministere de l`Environnement et de la Faune du Quebec (MEF) (Quebec`s Ministry of Environment and Wildlife) established guidelines for the management of nonhazardous industrial solid waste. The aim of these guidelines is to propose a test procedure to evaluate the quality of the material and to define material classes based on their potential for reuse. The evaluation procedure is based on standard tests, generally used for the evaluation of stabilized and solidified hazardous waste. The protocol includes an analysis of the total content of metals in the residue, the determination of the acid neutralization capacity and the prediction of the acid generation potential when the residue contains significant levels of sulfides. The protocol includes three different leachate tests in order to evaluate the mobility of contaminants present in the residue. The leaching procedures are: (1) an equilibrium extraction with water, (2) a modified TCLP extraction, and (3) an acid rain simulation effect extraction. A method is actually under development to collect leachate from a material pile subject to 18 months of rainfall. Materials are categorized into different classes according to their test results. Various potential reuse options are associated with material classes. Evaluation criteria were defined by using water quality standards and results obtained by testing reference construction material supplied by the Quebec`s Ministere des Transports (Ministry of Transportation).

  1. Laser driven light sails: An examination of the possibilities for interstellar probes and other missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rather, J. D. G.; Zeiders, G. W.; Vogelsang, K. R.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical discussion of high energy laser propelled light sails is presented. Selection of sail materials, interstellar drag forces, beam pointing, flight velocity, probe mass, and radiation shielding are among the factors discussed. Interstellar probe missions and colonization of the solar system via the light sail are considered.

  2. SPUTTERING FROM A POROUS MATERIAL BY PENETRATING IONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F.; Bringa, E. M.; Cassidy, T. A.; Caro, A.; Loeffler, M. J.; Farkas, D.

    2011-12-10

    Porous materials are ubiquitous in the universe and weathering of porous surfaces plays an important role in the evolution of planetary and interstellar materials. Sputtering of porous solids in particular can influence atmosphere formation, surface reflectivity, and the production of the ambient gas around materials in space. Several previous studies and models have shown a large reduction in the sputtering of a porous solid compared to the sputtering of the non-porous solid. Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the sputtering of a nanoporous solid with 55% of the solid density. We calculate the electronic sputtering induced by a fast, penetrating ion, using a thermal spike representation of the deposited energy. We find that sputtering for this porous solid is, surprisingly, the same as that for a full-density solid, even though the sticking coefficient is high.

  3. Sputtering from a Porous Material by Penetrating Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F.; Bringa, E. M.; Cassidy, T. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Caro, A.; Fama, M.; Loeffler, M.; Baragiola, R. A.; Farkas, D.

    2012-01-01

    Porous materials are ubiquitous in the universe and weathering of porous surfaces plays an important role in the evolution of planetary and interstellar materials. Sputtering of porous solids in particular can influence atmosphere formation, surface reflectivity, and the production of the ambient gas around materials in space, Several previous studies and models have shown a large reduction in the sputtering of a porous solid compared to the sputtering of the non-porous solid. Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the sputtering of a nanoporous solid with 55% of the solid density. We calculate the electronic sputtering induced by a fast, penetrating ion, using a thermal spike representation of the deposited energy. We find that sputtering for this porous solid is, surprisingly, the same as that for a full-density solid, even though the sticking coefficient is high.

  4. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  5. Interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.

    1986-04-01

    The physical properties of the molecular phase of the interstellar medium are studied with regard to star formation and the structure of the Galaxy. Most observations of molecular clouds are made with single-dish, high-surface precision radio telescopes, with the best resolution attainable at 0.2 to 1 arcmin; the smallest structures that can be resolved are of order 10 to the 17th cm in diameter. It is now believed that: (1) most of the mass of the Galaxy is in the form of giant molecular clouds; (2) the largest clouds and those responsible for most massive star formation are concentrated in spiral arms; (3) the molecular clouds are the sites of perpetual star formation, and are significant in the chemical evolution of the Galaxy; (4) giant molecular clouds determine the evolution of the kinematic properties of galactic disk stars; (5) the total gas content is diminishing with time; and (6) most clouds have supersonic internal motions and do not form stars on a free-fall time scale. It is concluded that though progress has been made, more advanced instruments are needed to inspect the processes operating within stellar nurseries and to study the distribution of the molecular clouds in more distant galaxies. Instruments presently under construction which are designed to meet these ends are presented.

  6. Charting the Interstellar Magnetic Field causing the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) Ribbon of Energetic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Berdyugin, A.; Piirola, V.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Seriacopi, D. B.; Wiktorowicz, S. J.; Andersson, B.-G.; Funsten, H. O.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Slavin, J. D.; Hanson, A. J.; Fu, C.-W.

    2015-12-01

    The interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) near the heliosphere is a fundamental component of the solar galactic environment that can only be studied using polarized starlight. The results of an ongoing survey of the linear polarizations of local stars are analyzed with the goal of linking the ISMF that shapes the heliosphere to the nearby field in interstellar space. We present new results on the direction of the magnetic field within 40 pc obtained from analyzing polarization data using a merit function that determines the field direction that provides the best fit to the polarization data. Multiple magnetic components are identified, including a dominant interstellar field, {B}{POL}, that is aligned with the direction ℓ, b = 36.°2, 49.°0 (±16.°0). Stars tracing {B}{POL} have the same mean distance as stars that do not trace {B}{POL}, but show weaker average polarizations consistent with a smaller column density of polarizing material. {B}{POL} is aligned with the ISMF traced by the IBEX Ribbon to within {7.6}-7.6+14.9 degrees. The variations in the polarization position angle directions derived from the data that best match {B}{POL} indicate a low level of magnetic turbulence, ˜9° ± 1°. The direction of {B}{POL} is obtained after excluding polarization data tracing a separate magnetic structure that appears to be associated with interstellar dust deflected around the heliosphere. The velocities of local interstellar clouds relative to the Local Standard of Rest (LSR) increase with the angles between the LSR velocities and {B}{POL}, indicating that the kinematics of local interstellar material is ordered by the ISMF. The Loop I superbubble that extends close to the Sun contains dust that reddens starlight and whose distance is determined by the color excess E(B - V) of starlight. Polarizations caused by grains aligned with respect to {B}{POL} are consistent with the location of the Sun in the rim of the Loop I superbubble. An angle of {76

  7. A New View on Interstellar Dust - High Fidelity Studies of Interstellar Dust Analogue Tracks in Stardust Flight Spare Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Postberg F.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Bugiel, S.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Davis, A. M.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 and 2002 the Stardust Mission exposed aerogel collector panels for a total of about 200 days to the stream of interstellar grains sweeping through the solar system. The material was brought back to Earth in 2006. The goal of this work is the laboratory calibration of the collection process by shooting high speed [5 - 30km/s] interstellar dust (ISD) analogues onto Stardust aerogel flight spares. This enables an investigation into both the morphology of impact tracks as well as any structural and chemical modification of projectile and collector material. First results indicate a different ISD flux than previously assumed for the Stardust collection period.

  8. Validation of a European standard for the determination of hexavalent chromium in solid material.

    PubMed

    Tirez, Kristof; Scharf, Holger; Calzolari, Domenico; Cleven, Rob; Kisser, Monika; Lück, Detlef

    2007-07-01

    A European standard for the determination of Cr(vi) in solid material has been elaborated in the framework of an international co-operation and finally validated in the course of an interlaboratory comparison. The procedure is based on the alkaline digestion prescribed by EPA method 3060A followed by ion chromatography and determines an operationally defined content of Cr(vi), including water-soluble and insoluble chromates. A preliminary robustness study was carried out in order to compare different extraction methodologies and to study the equivalency of different analytical methods for the determination of Cr(vi) in alkaline extracts of soil and waste materials. During an interlaboratory validation trial with 19 European laboratories a set of 4 samples (2 soil and 2 waste samples) was analysed to determine performance characteristics for different combinations of digestion and detection methods. With the procedures prescribed by the new European standard (EN 15192) acceptable results were obtained for both soil samples and one of the waste samples (sludge). However, for the second waste sample (fly ash) a large deviation in analytical results was observed. This indicates that particularly for waste materials a possible occurrence of strong matrix effects has to be considered and supplementary quality control data are needed in order to assess the validity of analytical results. The accuracy of the determination of Cr(vi) in solid matrices remains a challenging field in terms of maximum extraction efficiency and minimum species interconversion.

  9. Torsional rheometer for granular materials slurries and gas-solid mixtures and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Rajagopal, C.; Rajagopal, K.R.; Yalamanchili, R.C.

    1997-03-11

    A torsional rheometer apparatus for determining rheological properties of a specimen is provided. A stationary plate and a rotatable plate are in generally coaxial position and structured to receive a specimen there between. In one embodiment, at least one of the plates and preferably both have roughened specimen engaging surfaces to serve to reduce undesired slippage between the plate and the specimen. A motor is provided to rotate the rotatable plate and a transducer for monitoring forces applied to the stationary plate and generating output signals to a computer which determines the desired rheological properties are provided. In one embodiment, the roughened surfaces consist of projections extending toward the specimen. Where granular material is being evaluated, it is preferred that the roughness of the plate is generally equal to the average size of the granular material being processed. In another embodiment, an air-solid mixture is processed and the roughened portions are pore openings in the plates. Air flows through the region between the two pore containing plates to maintain the solid materials in suspension. In yet another embodiment, the base of the stationary plate is provided with a deformable capacitance sensor and associated electronic means. 17 figs.

  10. Solid-phase extraction microfluidic devices for matrix removal in trace element assay of actinide materials

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Jun; Manard, Benjamin Thomas; Castro, Alonso; ...

    2017-02-02

    Advances in sample nebulization and injection technology have significantly reduced the volume of solution required for trace impurity analysis in plutonium and uranium materials. Correspondingly, we have designed and tested a novel chip-based microfluidic platform, containing a 100-µL or 20-µL solid-phase microextraction column, packed by centrifugation, which supports nuclear material mass and solution volume reductions of 90% or more compared to standard methods. Quantitative recovery of 28 trace elements in uranium was demonstrated using a UTEVA chromatographic resin column, and trace element recovery from thorium (a surrogate for plutonium) was similarly demonstrated using anion exchange resin AG MP-1. Of ninemore » materials tested, compatibility of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chips with the strong nitric acid media was highest. Finally, the microcolumns can be incorporated into a variety of devices and systems, and can be loaded with other solid-phase resins for trace element assay in high-purity metals.« less

  11. A rheometer for measuring the material moduli for granular solids. Quarterly progress report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rajajopal, K.R.

    1996-02-01

    The design of an orthogonal rheometer for measuring the properties of granular solids is described. A section is presented on the constitutive modeling of granular materials based on continuum theory.

  12. Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, Vitaly T.; Ivanov, Alexander V.; Filippov, Eugene A.

    1999-03-16

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination oaf plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

  13. Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

    1999-03-16

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

  14. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, Mark Alan

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding.

  15. Review of high-throughput techniques for detecting solid phase Transformation from material libraries produced by combinatorial methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2005-01-01

    High-throughput measurement techniques are reviewed for solid phase transformation from materials produced by combinatorial methods, which are highly efficient concepts to fabricate large variety of material libraries with different compositional gradients on a single wafer. Combinatorial methods hold high potential for reducing the time and costs associated with the development of new materials, as compared to time-consuming and labor-intensive conventional methods that test large batches of material, one- composition at a time. These high-throughput techniques can be automated to rapidly capture and analyze data, using the entire material library on a single wafer, thereby accelerating the pace of materials discovery and knowledge generation for solid phase transformations. The review covers experimental techniques that are applicable to inorganic materials such as shape memory alloys, graded materials, metal hydrides, ferric materials, semiconductors and industrial alloys.

  16. AN ANALYTICAL MODEL OF INTERSTELLAR GAS IN THE HELIOSPHERE TAILORED TO INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Martin A.; Kucharek, Harald; Moebius, Eberhard; Wu Xian; Bzowski, Maciej; McComas, David

    2012-02-01

    The stationary distribution of interstellar neutral gas in the heliosphere subject to solar gravity, solar radiation pressure, photoionization, and charge exchange is investigated analytically assuming ionization rates and radiation pressure that are proportional to R{sup -2}, where R is the heliocentric radius. The collisionless hyperbolic trajectories of the individual atoms including ionization losses are combined with Liouville's Theorem to construct the heliospheric phase-space distribution function of an interstellar gas species in the solar reference frame under the assumption that the distribution is a drifting Maxwellian at large distances from the Sun. The distribution is transformed to the Earth (essentially Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX)) frame as a function of solar longitude. The expression is then tailored to the latitudinal scan of IBEX as a function of longitude using the fact that IBEX detects each atom close to perihelion in its hyperbolic orbit. The distribution is further adapted to IBEX by integrating the differential intensity over the entrance aperture solid angle of the IBEX-Lo collimator, and over energy to predict the IBEX count rate of helium. The major features of the predicted count rate are described, including a peak in longitude, a peak in latitude at each longitude, and the widths of the major peak in both latitude and longitude. Analytical formulae for these features are derived for comparison with IBEX observations in order to determine the temperature and bulk velocity of the gas in interstellar space. Based in part on these formulae, the results for helium are presented in the companion paper by Moebius et al.

  17. High Strength Carbide-Based Fibrous Monolith Materials for Solid Rocket Nozzles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-19

    by winding FM filaments around a steel mandrel. 5 Figure 3. Fabrication of radially aligned, “pie” nozzle. Figure 4. FM solid rocket...brittle transition temperature ( DBTT ) between 3000°F and 3500°F so a change in behavior of the Gen 3 material between these temperatures would be possible...Figure 18 shows the setup used during these evaluations. The 1.5” x 1.5” monolithic and fibrous monolithic specimens were mounted in a steel

  18. Basic Study of Detecting Defects in Solid Materials Using High-Intensity Aerial Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osumi, Ayumu; Kobayashi, Hiromasa; Ito, Youichi

    2012-07-01

    Recently, developments have improved methods employing aerial ultrasonic waves for detecting defects in solid materials such as metals, pipe walls, and fiber-reinforced plastics. These methods can be performed using a noncontacting aerial ultrasonic probe. In a previous study, we developed a new method using high-intensity aerial ultrasonic waves to successfully detect peeling, artificially created by inserting an air gap between tiles and concrete plates. In the present study, we use the same method to detect the depth and size of defects in a homogeneous medium.

  19. Final reports of the Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Andrew J.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Brenker, Frank E.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Flynn, George; Frank, David R.; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K.; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Sterken, Veerle J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, SašA.; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Borg, Janet; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Hvide, Brit; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leroux, Hugues; Leonard, Ariel; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Nittler, Larry R.; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Ja; Price, Mark C.; Sandford, Scott A.; Tresseras, Juan-Angel Sans; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Silversmit, Geert; Solé, Vicente A.; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank; Stephan, Thomas; Stodolna, Julien; Sutton, Steven; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-09-01

    With the discovery of bona fide extraterrestrial materials in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector, NASA now has a fundamentally new returned sample collection, after the Apollo, Antarctic meteorite, Cosmic Dust, Genesis, Stardust Cometary, Hayabusa, and Exposed Space Hardware samples. Here, and in companion papers in this volume, we present the results from the Preliminary Examination of this collection, the Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE). We found extraterrestrial materials in two tracks in aerogel whose trajectories and morphology are consistent with an origin in the interstellar dust stream, and in residues in four impacts in the aluminum foil collectors. While the preponderance of evidence, described in detail in companion papers in this volume, points toward an interstellar origin for some of these particles, alternative origins have not yet been eliminated, and definitive tests through isotopic analyses were not allowed under the terms of the ISPE. In this summary, we answer the central questions of the ISPE: How many tracks in the collector are consistent in their morphology and trajectory with interstellar particles? How many of these potential tracks are consistent with real interstellar particles, based on chemical analysis? Conversely, what fraction of candidates are consistent with either a secondary or interplanetary origin? What is the mass distribution of these particles, and what is their state? Are they particulate or diffuse? Is there any crystalline material? How many detectable impact craters (>100 nm) are there in the foils, and what is their size distribution? How many of these craters have analyzable residue that is consistent with extraterrestrial material? And finally, can craters from secondaries be recognized through crater morphology (e.g., ellipticity)?

  20. Identification of Possible Interstellar Dust Impact Craters on Stardust Foil I033N,1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, A.; ISPE Team; 29,000 Stardust@home Dusters

    2011-12-01

    The Interstellar Dust Collector onboard NASA's Stardust Mission - the first to return solid extraterrestrial material to Earth from beyond the Moon - was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total of 229 days prior to the spacecraft's return in 2006 [1]. Aluminum foils and aerogel tiles on the collector may have captured the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust. Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) focuses in part on crater identification and analysis of residue within the craters to determine the nature and origin of the impacting particles. Thus far, ISPE has focused on nine foils and found a total of 20 craters. The number density of impact craters on the foils exceeds by far estimates made from interstellar flux calculations [2]. To identify craters, foil I1033N,1 was scanned with the Field Museum's Evo 60 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at a resolution of 52 nm/pixel with a 15 kV and 170-240 pA beam. Contamination was monitored according to the ISPE protocol: four 4 μm × 3 μm areas of C layers of different thicknesses on a Stardust-type Al foil were irradiated 20 times for 50 s each, while the C and Al signals were recorded with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The C/Al ratio did not increase after 20 repetitions on each of the four areas. The same experiment repeated 7 months later yielded identical results. Thus, analysis with the SEM results in no detectable contamination. Crater candidates were manually selected from SEM images, then reimaged at higher resolution (17 nm/pixel) in order to eliminate false detections. The foil was then sent to Washington University for Auger Nanoprobe elemental analysis of crater 11_175 (diam. 1.1 μm), and to the Naval Research Laboratory for focused ion beam work and transmission electron microscopy and EDS. Twelve crater candidates (diam. 0.28 - 1.1 μm), both elliptical and circular, were identified. The number density of craters on foil 1033N is 15.8 cm^-2. Auger measurements

  1. Metal solubilization from metal-containing solid materials by cyanogenic Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Mohammad A; Stagars, Marion; Pensini, Enrico; Krebs, Walter; Brandl, Helmut

    2004-09-30

    Different cyanogenic bacterial strains (Chromobacterium violaceum, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus megaterium) were cultivated under cyanide-forming conditions in the presence of metal-containing solids such as nickel powder or electronic scrap. All microorganisms were able to form water-soluble metal cyanides, however, with different efficiencies. C. violaceum was able to mobilize nickel as tetracyanonickelate [Ni(CN)4(2-)] from fine-grained nickel powder. Gold was microbially solubilized as dicyanaoaurate [Au(CN)2-] from electronic waste. Additionally, cyanide-complexed copper was detected during biological treatment of shredded printed circuit boards scrap. Regarding the formation of tetracyanonickelate, C. violaceum was more effective than P. fluorescens or B. megaterium. Besides a few previous reports on gold solubilization from gold-containing ores or native gold by C. violaceum, the findings demonstrate for the first time the microbial mobilization of metals other than gold from solid materials and represent a novel type of microbial metal mobilization based on the ability of certain microbes to form HCN. The results might have the potential for industrial applications (biorecovery, bioremediation) regarding the treatment of metal-containing solids since metal cyanides can easily be separated by chromatographic means and be recovered by sorption onto activated carbon.

  2. Laboratory Investigations into the Spectra and Origin of Propylene Oxide: A Chiral Interstellar Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. L.; Loeffler, M. J.; Yocum, K. M.

    2017-02-01

    Propylene oxide was recently identified in the interstellar medium, but few laboratory results are available for this molecule to guide current and future investigations. To address this situation, here we report infrared spectra, absorption coefficients, and band strengths of solid propylene oxide along with the first measurement of its refractive index and a calculation of its density, all for the amorphous solid form of the compound. We present the first experimental results showing a low-temperature formation pathway for propylene oxide near 10 K in interstellar ice analogs. Connections are drawn between our new results and the interstellar molecules propanal and acetone, and predictions are made about several as yet unobserved vinyl alcohols and methylketene. Comparisons are given to earlier laboratory work and a few applications to interstellar and solar system astrochemistry are described.

  3. Electrode materials: a challenge for the exploitation of protonic solid oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Emiliana; Pergolesi, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    High temperature proton conductor (HTPC) oxides are attracting extensive attention as electrolyte materials alternative to oxygen-ion conductors for use in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating at intermediate temperatures (400–700 °C). The need to lower the operating temperature is dictated by cost reduction for SOFC pervasive use. The major stake for the deployment of this technology is the availability of electrodes able to limit polarization losses at the reduced operation temperature. This review aims to comprehensively describe the state-of-the-art anode and cathode materials that have so far been tested with HTPC oxide electrolytes, offering guidelines and possible strategies to speed up the development of protonic SOFCs. PMID:27877342

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Electrode materials: a challenge for the exploitation of protonic solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Emiliana; Pergolesi, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico

    2010-08-01

    High temperature proton conductor (HTPC) oxides are attracting extensive attention as electrolyte materials alternative to oxygen-ion conductors for use in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating at intermediate temperatures (400-700 °C). The need to lower the operating temperature is dictated by cost reduction for SOFC pervasive use. The major stake for the deployment of this technology is the availability of electrodes able to limit polarization losses at the reduced operation temperature. This review aims to comprehensively describe the state-of-the-art anode and cathode materials that have so far been tested with HTPC oxide electrolytes, offering guidelines and possible strategies to speed up the development of protonic SOFCs.

  5. Holmium-doped laser materials for eye-safe solid state laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woohong; Bowman, Steven R.; Baker, Colin; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Sadowski, Bryan; Hunt, Michael; Aggarwal, Ishwar; Sanghera, Jasbinder

    2014-06-01

    Trivalent holmium has 14 laser channels from 0.55 to 3.9 μm. The laser emission of most interest is the transition 5I7→5I8 near 2 μm because of its potential for use in eye-safe systems and medical applications. In this paper, we present our recent results in the development of Ho3+ doped laser materials for eye-safe solid state lasers. We report a calorimetric study of non-radiative losses in two micron pumped holmium doped laser host materials such as silica glass, yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) crystal and Lu2O3 ceramics. Optical, spectral and morphological properties as well as the lasing performance from highly transparent ceramics are presented.

  6. Testing and environmental exposure of parachute materials for the solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, B. K.

    1978-01-01

    Static tests and evaluation of nonmetallic materials for use in parachutes for recovery of solid rocket boosters used in the space shuttle program are reported. Literature survey and manufacturer and vendor contacts led to the choice of nylon as the fabric most capable of withstanding the extreme loads and environmental conditions during repeated use. The material tests included rupture strength, elongation, abrasion resistance, shrinkage, environmental exposure, and degradation levels. Rinsing and drying procedures were also investigated and a salt-free level for nylon recommended in preparation for reuse. In all possible cases, worst-case conditions were used (e.g., inflation loads, seawater exposure for 3 days per drop-recovery, etc.).

  7. Strategies for Carbon and Sulfur Tolerant Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Materials, Incorporating Lessons from Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Mermelstein, Joshua; Bermúdez Menéndez, José Miguel; Ramı Rez Reina, Tomás; Brandon, Nigel P

    2016-11-23

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are a rapidly emerging energy technology for a low carbon world, providing high efficiency, potential to use carbonaceous fuels, and compatibility with carbon capture and storage. However, current state-of-the-art materials have low tolerance to sulfur, a common contaminant of many fuels, and are vulnerable to deactivation due to carbon deposition when using carbon-containing compounds. In this review, we first study the theoretical basis behind carbon and sulfur poisoning, before examining the strategies toward carbon and sulfur tolerance used so far in the SOFC literature. We then study the more extensive relevant heterogeneous catalysis literature for strategies and materials which could be incorporated into carbon and sulfur tolerant fuel cells.

  8. Application of material flow analysis to municipal solid waste in Maputo City, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Dos Muchangos, Leticia Sarmento; Tokai, Akihiro; Hanashima, Atsuko

    2017-03-01

    Understanding waste flows within an urban area is important for identifying the main problems and improvement opportunities for efficient waste management. Assessment tools such as material flow analysis (MFA), an extensively applied method in waste management studies, provide a structured and objective evaluating process to characterize the waste management system best, to identify its shortcomings and to propose suitable strategies. This paper presents the application of MFA to municipal solid waste management (MSWM) in Maputo City, the capital of Mozambique. The results included the identification and quantification of the main input and output flows of the MSWM system in 2007 and 2014, from the generation, material recovery and collection, to final disposal and the unaccounted flow of municipal solid waste (MSW). We estimated that the waste generation increased from 397×10(3) tonnes in 2007 to 437×10(3) tonnes in 2014, whereas the total material recovery was insignificant in both years - 3×10(3) and 7×10(3) tonnes, respectively. As for collection and final disposal, the official collection of waste to the local dumpsite in the inner city increased about threefold, from 76×10(3) to 253×10(6) tonnes. For waste unaccounted for, the estimates indicated a reduction during the study period from 300×10(3) to 158×10(3) tonnes, due to the increase of collection services. The emphasized aspects include the need for practical waste reduction strategies, the opportunity to explore the potential for material recovery, careful consideration regarding the growing trend of illegal dumping and the urgency in phasing-out from the harmful practice of open dumping.

  9. Interstellar Propulsion Research Within NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA is actively conducting advanced propulsion research and technology development in various in-space transportation technologies with potential application to interstellar missions and precursors. Within the last few years, interest in the scientific community in interstellar missions as well as outer heliospheric missions, which could function as interstellar precursor missions, has increased. A mission definition team was charted by NASA to define such a precursor, The Interstellar Probe, which resulted in a prioritization of relatively near-term transportation technologies to support its potential implementation. In addition, the goal of finding and ultimately imaging extra solar planets has raised the issue of our complete inability to mount an expedition to such as planet, should one be found. Even contemplating such a mission with today's technology is a stretch of the imagination. However, there are several propulsion concepts, based on known physics, that have promise to enable interstellar exploration in the future. NASA is making small, incremental investments in some key advanced propulsion technologies in an effort to advance their state-of-the-art in support potential future mission needs. These technologies, and their relative maturity, are described.

  10. Interstellar neutrals in interplanetary space

    SciTech Connect

    Hovestadt, D.; Moebius, E. )

    1989-03-01

    The solar system is moving through the interstellar medium with a velocity of about 20 km/s. The neutral interstellar gas, which thereby penetrates the heliosphere, is subject to ionization by solar UV radiation, charge exchange with the solar wind, and electron collisions. The newly created ions are then picked by the solar wind through interaction of interstellar neutrals with the interplanetary magnetic field. The pick-up ions with their peculiar elemental composition probably also constitute the source particles of the Anomalous Cosmic Ray Component (ACR). In this report descriptions of the interaction with the solar wind are reviewed. While most of the constituents are already ionized far beyond the orbit of the Earth, neutral helium (because of its high ionization potential) approaches the Sun to {lt}1 AU. The pick-up of interstellar He{sup +} ions has recently been directly observed for the first time. The observed velocity distribution of He{sup +} extending up to twice the solar wind velocity can be explained in terms of pitch angle scattering of the ions probably by interplanetary Alven waves and subsequent adiabatic cooling in the expanding solar wind. Thermal coupling of the He{sup +} to the solar wind is negligible in the inner heliosphere. Detailed studies of the pick-up distribution provide a method to investigate the interplanetary propagation parameters and the state of the local interstellar medium.

  11. Non-contact measurement technique of the vapor pressure of liquid and high temperature solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, P.-F.; Ishikawa, T.; Yoda, S.

    2003-05-01

    Here is reported a new scheme to accurately determine the vapor pressure of undercooled, liquid, and high temperature solid materials. The method relies on an imaging technique that measures the time variation of the radius of an electrostatically levitated sample. This scheme, compared to other techniques, offers unique opportunity to explore not only the liquid above the melting point but also the undercooled states of highly reactive materials in a contamination free environment. This was exemplified in this paper with titanium. For the first time, we report the vapor pressure (V_p) of its liquid phase over a large temperature range, covering the undercooled region. Over the 1700 to 2050 K temperature range, it was measured as Log V_p(T) = 9.154 - 17978 T^{-1} (3%). Similarly, for high temperature solid titanium, the vapor pressure could be expressed as Log V_p(T) = 16.634 - 32960 T^{-1} (6%) over the 1770 to 1940 K temperature interval. From these data, the average latent heats of vaporization and sublimation were calculated respectively as 344.8 kJ/kg (8%) and 632.1 kJ/kg (6%) respectively.

  12. Solid-state evaluation and polymorphic quantification of venlafaxine hydrochloride raw materials using the Rietveld method.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Larissa S; Ferreira, Fábio F; Cuffini, Silvia L; Campos, Carlos E M; Monti, Gustavo A; Kuminek, Gislaine; Oliveira, Paulo R; Cardoso, Simone G

    2013-12-15

    Venlafaxine hydrochloride (VEN) is an antidepressant drug widely used for the treatment of depression. The purpose of this study was to carry out the preparation and solid state characterization of the pure polymorphs (Forms 1 and 2) and the polymorphic identification and quantification of four commercially-available VEN raw materials. These two polymorphic forms were obtained from different crystallization methods and characterized by X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD), Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT), Raman Spectroscopy (RS), liquid and solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR and ssNMR) spectroscopies, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. The main differences were observed by DSC and XRPD and the latter was chosen as the standard technique for the identification and quantification studies in combination with the Rietveld method for the commercial raw materials (VEN1-VEN4) acquired from different manufacturers. Additionally Form 1 and Form 2 can be clearly distinguished from their (13)C ssNMR spectra. Through the analysis, it was possible to conclude that VEN1 and VEN2 were composed only of Form 1, while VEN3 and VEN4 were a mixture of Forms 1 and 2. Additionally, the Rietveld refinement was successfully applied to quantify the polymorphic ratio for VEN3 and VEN4.

  13. Correlation properties of interstellar dust: Diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from a research program in which an attempt was made to establish the physical nature of the interstellar grains, and the carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands, by comparing relations between different observed properties; the properties used include the extinction in the optical and ultraviolet (including wavelength 2200 and the far-UV rise), cloud density, atomic depletions, and strengths of the diffuse bands. Observations and also data from literature were used, selecting particularly sight-lines where some observed property was found to have anomalous behavior.

  14. Editorial: Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX): Direct Sampling of the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.

    2012-02-01

    This special supplement issue of the Astrophysical Journal comprises six coordinated papers that provide the first detailed analyses of the direct sampling of interstellar neutral atoms by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Interstellar atoms are the detritus of older stars—their stellar winds, novae, and supernovae—spread across the galaxy, which fill the vast interstellar space between the stars. The very local interstellar medium around the Sun is filled with both ionized and neutral atoms with approximately equal numbers, and occasional ionization, charge exchange, and recombination makes them a single interacting material over large distances. IBEX (McComas et al. 2009a) is a NASA Small Explorer mission with the sole, focused science objective to discover the global interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium; this objective has primarily been achieved by taking the first global energetic neutral atom (ENA) images, which provide detailed ENA fluxes and energy spectra over all look directions in space. IBEX was launched 2008 October 19 and subsequently maneuvered into a high-altitude, highly elliptical (~15,000 × 300,000 km), roughly week-long orbit. The payload comprises two very high sensitivity, single-pixel ENA cameras: IBEX-Hi (Funsten et al. 2009a), which measures ENAs from ~300 eV to 6 keV, and IBEX-Lo (Fuselier et al. 2009a), which measures ENAs from ~10 eV to 2 keV. The initial IBEX ENA results were published together in a special issue of Science magazine (McComas et al. 2009b; Funsten et al. 2009b; Fuselier et al. 2009b; Schwadron et al. 2009). Since then there have been numerous additional studies of the IBEX ENA observations of the heliosphere, as well as ENAs from the Moon and Earth's magnetosphere (see recent review by McComas et al. 2011 and references therein). Prior to IBEX, the only interstellar neutral atoms to be directly sampled were He, observed by the Ulysses spacecraft a decade ago (Witte et al. 1996

  15. Solid-state (49/47)Ti NMR of titanium-based MCM-41 hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Ruth; Fajardo, Mariano; Sierra, Isabel; Force, Carmen; del Hierro, Isabel

    2009-11-03

    Titanium solid-state NMR spectroscopy data for a series of organic-inorganic titanium MCM-41 based materials have been collected. These materials have been synthesized by first modifying the mesoporous silica MCM-41 in one step with a mixture of silanes: a triazine propyl triethoxysilane acting as functional linker and methyltrimethoxysilane or hexamethyldisilizane as capped agents to mask the remaining silanol groups. Second, the appropiate titanium precursor Ti(OPr(i))(4), [{Ti(OPr(i))(3)(OMent)}(2)] (OMent = 1R,2S,5R-(-)-menthoxo), Ti(OPr(i))(4), or [Ti(eta(5)-C(5)HMe(4))Cl(3)], has been immobilized by reaction with the modified MCM-41. Finally, after Ti(OPr(i))(4) immobilization onto the organomodified support the reaction with the chiral (+)-diethyl-l-tartrate was accomplished. The materials without functional linker have been also prepared by reaction in one step of the capped agent and the titanium precursor with the mesoporous silica. Relevant correlations of titanium NMR resonance chemical shifts and line widths can be inferred depending on different factors. The immobilization procedure used to prepare titanium-based MCM-41 hybrid materials and the choice of the silylating reagents employed to mask the silanol groups present on the silica surfaces produce significant differences in the Ti NMR spectra. Furthermore, depending on the electronic and sterical influence of the substituents directly attached to the titanium center, chemical shifts and line widths are modified providing novel information about titanium structure.

  16. Food-processes wastewaters treatment using food solid-waste materials as adsorbents or absorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapti, Ilaira; Georgopoulos, Stavros; Antonopoulou, Maria; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Papadaki, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The wastewaters generated by olive-mills during the production of olive oil, wastewaters from a dairy and a cow-farm unit and wastewaters from a small food factory have been treated by means of selected materials, either by-products of the same units, or other solid waste, as absorbents or adsorbents in order to identify the capacity of those materials to remove organic load and toxicity from the aforementioned wastewaters. The potential of both the materials used as absorbents as well as the treated wastewaters to be further used either as fertilizers or for agricultural irrigation purposes are examined. Dry olive leaves, sheep wool, rice husks, etc. were used either in a fixed-bed or in a stirred batch arrangemen,t employing different initial concentrations of the aforementioned wastewaters. The efficiency of removal was assessed using scpectrophotometric methods and allium test phytotoxicity measurements. In this presentation the response of each material employed is shown as a function of absorbent/adsorbent quantity and kind, treatment time and wastewater kind and initial organic load. Preliminary results on the potential uses of the adsorbents/absorbents and the treated wastewaters are also shown. Keywords: Olive-mill wastewaters, dairy farm wastewaters, olive leaves, zeolite, sheep wool

  17. Identification and Mitigation of Generated Solid By-Products during Advanced Electrode Materials Processing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Candace S J; Dysart, Arthur D; Beltz, Jay H; Pol, Vilas G

    2016-03-01

    A scalable, solid-state elevated-temperature process was developed to produce high-capacity carbonaceous electrode materials for energy storage devices via decomposition of a starch-based precursor in an inert atmosphere. In a separate study, it is shown that the fabricated carbonaceous architectures are useful as an excellent electrode material for lithium-ion, sodium-ion, and lithium-sulfur batteries. This article focuses on the study and analysis of the formed nanometer-sized by-products during the lab-scale synthesis of the carbon material. The material production process was studied in operando (that is, during the entire duration of heat treatment). The unknown downstream particles in the process exhaust were collected and characterized via aerosol and liquid suspensions, and they were quantified using direct-reading instruments for number and mass concentrations. The airborne emissions were collected using the Tsai diffusion sampler (TDS) for characterization and further analysis. Released by-product aerosols collected in a deionized (DI) water trap were analyzed, and the aerosols emitted from the post-water-suspension were collected and characterized. After long-term sampling, individual particles in the nanometer size range were observed in the exhaust aerosol with layer-structured aggregates formed on the sampling substrate. Upon the characterization of the released aerosol by-products, methods were identified to mitigate possible human and environmental exposures upon industrial implementation.

  18. Materials Selection for Superheater Tubes in Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, M.; Chimenos, J. M.; Fernández, A. I.; Segarra, M.

    2014-09-01

    Corrosion reduces the lifetime of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) superheater tubes more than any other cause. It can be minimized by the careful selection of those materials that are most resistant to corrosion under operating conditions. Since thousands of different materials are already known and many more are developed every year, here the selection methodology developed by Prof. Ashby of the University of Cambridge was used to evaluate the performance of different materials to be used as MSWI superheater tubes. The proposed materials can operate at steam pressures and temperatures over 40 bars and 400 °C, respectively. Two case studies are presented: one makes a balanced selection between mechanical properties and cost per thermal unit; and the other focuses on increasing tube lifetime. The balanced selection showed that AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel (wrought, hard tempered) is the best candidate with a good combination of corrosion resistance, a relatively low price (0.83-0.92 €/kg) and a good thermal conductivity (23-27 W/m K). Meanwhile, Nitronic 50/XM-19 stainless steel is the most promising candidate for long-term selection, as it presents high corrosion resistance with a relatively low price (4.86-5.14 €/kg) compared to Ni-alloys.

  19. Rational design of novel cathode materials in solid oxide fuel cells using first-principles simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, YongMan; Lin, M. C.; Liu, Meilin

    The search for clean and renewable sources of energy represents one of the most vital challenges facing us today. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are among the most promising technologies for a clean and secure energy future due to their high energy efficiency and excellent fuel flexibility (e.g., direct utilization of hydrocarbons or renewable fuels). To make SOFCs economically competitive, however, development of new materials for low-temperature operation is essential. Here we report our results on a computational study to achieve rational design of SOFC cathodes with fast oxygen reduction kinetics and rapid ionic transport. Results suggest that surface catalytic properties are strongly correlated with the bulk transport properties in several material systems with the formula of La 0.5Sr 0.5BO 2.75 (where B = Cr, Mn, Fe, or Co). The predictions seem to agree qualitatively with available experimental results on these materials. This computational screening technique may guide us to search for high-efficiency cathode materials for a new generation of SOFCs.

  20. From Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Ice to the Origin of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in observational astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Twenty years ago the composition of interstellar dust was largely guessed at, the concept of ices in dense molecular clouds ignored, and the notion of large, abundant, gas phase, carbon rich molecules widespread throughout the interstellar medium (ISM) considered impossible. Today the composition of dust in the diffuse ISM is reasonably well constrained to cold refractory materials comprised of amorphous and crystalline silicates mixed with an amorphous carbonaceous material containing aromatic structural units and short, branched aliphatic chains. In the dense ISM, the birthplace of stars and planets, these cold dust particles are coated with mixed molecular ices whose composition is very well constrained. Lastly, the signature of carbon-rich polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), shockingly large molecules by early interstellar chemistry standards, is widespread throughout the Universe. The first part of this talk will describe how infrared studies of interstellar space, combined with laboratory simulations, have revealed the composition of interstellar ices (the building blocks of comets) and the high abundance and nature of interstellar PAHs. The laboratory database has now enabled us to gain insight into the identities, abundances, and physical state of many interstellar materials. Within a dense molecular cloud, and especially in the presolar nebula, the materials frozen into the interstellar/precometary ices are photoprocessed by ultraviolet light and produce more complex molecules. The remainder of the presentation will focus on the photochemical evolution of these materials and the possible role of these compounds on the to the carbonaceous components of micrometeorites, they are likely to have been important sources of complex materials on the early

  1. The Interstellar Ethics of Self-Replicating Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, K.

    Robotic spacecraft have been our primary means of exploring the Universe for over 50 years. Should interstellar travel become reality it seems unlikely that humankind will stop using robotic probes. These probes will be able to replicate themselves ad infinitum by extracting raw materials from the space resources around them and reconfiguring them into replicas of themselves, using technology such as 3D printing. This will create a colonising wave of probes across the Galaxy. However, such probes could have negative as well as positive consequences and it is incumbent upon us to factor self-replicating probes into our interstellar philosophies and to take responsibility for their actions.

  2. A rheometer for measuring the material moduli for granular solids. Final report, August 7, 1990--February 6, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, K.R.

    1998-03-01

    A great many industrial processes involve interaction between solids and fluids (i.e. gases or liquids). Combustion, gasification of solid fuels, shales or solid wastes, drying of particles, calcining, particle heating, regenerative heat exchangers, oxidation or reduction of ores, metal surface treatments and catalytic and thermal cracking are some of such processes. Solids and fluids serve different roles and several combinations of solids and fluids can arise in a practical situation. Thus, when considering processes or plants it is necessary to be clear as to the particular purpose served by the fluids and the solids. Heating and drying of solids, for example, involve heat and mass transfer only, whereas combustors, gasifiers etc. have the additional complication of chemical reactions which have to be carried out simultaneously with heat and mass transfer. Again, there are many processes where just the flow of granular particles take place, for example, the flow of food grain, coal or sand particles through bin, silo, hoppers, chutes, conveyor belts, inclined planes etc. In most of these cases, a theoretical modeling of the process requires a complete and thorough understanding of the phenomena involved and constitutive modeling of the constituents along with the usual balance laws. In a process, where both a fluid and a solid constituents are involved, it is essential to model both the constituents such that the models accurately describes the characteristics of the constituent concerned. While there are many different models available for fluids, the models for granular materials lack from an understanding of the material parameters.

  3. Dust clouds in Orion and the interstellar neutral hydrogen distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bystrova, N. V.

    1989-01-01

    According to published examples of the far IR observations in the Orion and its surroundings, several well defined dust clouds of different sizes and structure are present. For comparison of these clouds with the neutral hydrogen distribution on the area of approx. 1000 sq degs, the data from Pulkovo Sky Survey in the interstellar neutral Hydrogen Radio Line as well as special observations with the RATAN-600 telescope in 21 cm line were used. From the materials of Pulkovo HI Survey, the data were taken near the line emission at ten velocities between -21.8 and +25.6 km/s LSR for the structural component of the interstellar hydrogen emission. The results given concern mainly the Orion's Great Dust Cloud and the Lambda Orionis region where the information about the situation with the dust and interstellar hydrogen is very essential for interpretation.

  4. A speckle hologram of the interstellar plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, K. M.; Gwinn, C. R.; Reynolds, J.; King, E. A.; Jauncey, D.; Flanagan, C.; Nicolson, G.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of a speckle hologram of scattering material along the line of sight to the Vela pulsar indicate that this material is concentrated in the Vela supernova remnant, deep within the Gum Nebula. The speckle hologram is observed through the amplitude and phase variations of the interferometric cross-power spectrum with time and frequency. These variations describe the density fluctuations of the interstellar plasma, in a holographic fashion. The decorrelation due to the phase variations of the speckles yields the angular size of the scattering disk; comparison with the bandwidth of their amplitude variations yields a characteristic distance from earth to the scattering material of 0.81 +/- 0.03 of the distance from earth to the pulsar. This result is consistent with theories of irregularities associated with particle acceleration in shocks in supernova remnants.

  5. Methods for using novel cathode and electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Allan J.; Wang, Shuangyan; Kim, Gun Tae

    2016-01-12

    Methods using novel cathode, electrolyte and oxygen separation materials operating at intermediate temperatures for use in solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes include oxides with perovskite related structures and an ordered arrangement of A site cations. The materials have significantly faster oxygen kinetics than in corresponding disordered perovskites.

  6. The formation of interstellar jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  7. Interstellar helium in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Lange, J. J.; Scherb, F.

    1972-01-01

    The velocity distribution function of He(+) in the solar wind at 1 AU is calculated with the assumption that the source is photoionization of a cold (T = 100 K), neutral interstellar wind. If the spiral magnetic field is noise free, the velocity distribution is diffuse and would not produce a peak at 4(E over Q) sub H in an E over Q particle spectrum. If the velocity of the interstellar wind with respect to the sun lies in the ecliptic, a large variation of the He(+) number density with respect to ecliptic longitude is expected.

  8. Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Alkesh

    1999-01-01

    This summer at NASA/MSFC, I have contributed to two projects: Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design and Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstration. In the Web Design Project, I worked on an Outline. The Web Design Outline was developed to provide a foundation for a Hierarchy Tree Structure. The Outline would help design a Website information base for future and near-term missions. The Website would give in-depth information on Propulsion Systems and Interstellar Travel. The Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstrator is discussed in this volume by Russell Lee.

  9. Interstellar Grains: 50 Years On

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra

    2011-12-01

    Our understanding of the nature of interstellar grains has evolved considerably over the past half century with the present author and Fred Hoyle being intimately involved at several key stages of progress. The currently fashionable graphite-silicate-organic grain model has all its essential aspects unequivocally traceable to original peer-reviewedpublicationsbytheauthorand/orFredHoyle. Theprevailingreluctancetoaccepttheseclear-cut priorities may be linked to our further work that argued for interstellar grains and organics to have a biological provenance - a position perceived as heretical. The biological model, however, continues to provide a powerful unifying hypothesis for a vast amount of otherwise disconnected and disparate astronomical data.

  10. Electric propulsion and interstellar flight

    SciTech Connect

    Matloff, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Two general classes of interstellar space-flights are defined: endothermic and exothermic. Endothermic methods utilize power sources external to the vehicle and associated technology. Faster exothermic methods utilize on-board propulsive power sources or energy-beam technology. Various proposed endothermic electric propulsion methods are described. These include solar electric rockets, mass drivers, and ramjets. A review of previously suggested exothermic electric propulsion methods is presented. Following this review is a detailed discussion of possible near future application of the beamed-laser ramjet, mainly for ultimate relativistic travel. Electric/magnetic techniques offer an excellent possibility for decelerating an interstellar vehicle, regardless of the acceleration technique. 20 references.

  11. Infrared emission from interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The mid-IR absorption and Raman spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the mechanisms determining them are reviewed, and the implications for observations of similar emission spectra in interstellar clouds are considered. Topics addressed include the relationship between PAHs and amorphous C, the vibrational spectroscopy of PAHs, the molecular emission process, molecular anharmonicity, and the vibrational quasi-continuum. Extensive graphs, diagrams, and sample spectra are provided, and the interstellar emission bands are attributed to PAHs with 20-30 C atoms on the basis of the observed 3.3/3.4-micron intensity ratios.

  12. VUV spectroscopy of carbon dust analogs: contribution to interstellar extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavilan, L.; Alata, I.; Le, K. C.; Pino, T.; Giuliani, A.; Dartois, E.

    2016-02-01

    Context. A full spectral characterization of carbonaceous dust analogs is necessary to understand their potential as carriers of observed astronomical spectral signatures such as the ubiquitous UV bump at 217.5 nm and the far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise common to interstellar extinction curves. Aims: Our goal is to study the spectral properties of carbonaceous dust analogs from the FUV to the mid-infrared (MIR) domain. We seek in particular to understand the spectra of these materials in the FUV range, for which laboratory studies are scarce. Methods: We produced analogs to carbonaceous interstellar dust encountered in various phases of the interstellar medium: amorphous hydrogenated carbons (a-C:H), for carbonaceous dust observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, and soot particles, for the polyaromatic component. Analogs to a-C:H dust were produced using a radio-frequency plasma reactor at low pressures, and soot nanoparticles films were produced in an ethylene (C2H4) flame. We measured transmission spectra of these thin films (thickness <100 nm) in the far-ultraviolet (190-250 nm) and in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV; 50-190 nm) regions using the APEX chamber at the DISCO beam line of the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility. These were also characterized through infrared microscopy at the SMIS beam line. Results: We successfully measured the transmission spectra of these analogs from λ = 1 μm to 50 nm. From these, we extracted the laboratory optical constants via Kramers-Kronig inversion. We used these constants for comparison to existing interstellar extinction curves. Conclusions: We extend the spectral measurements of these types of carbonaceous analogs into the VUV and link the spectral features in this range to the 3.4 μm band. We suggest that these two materials might contribute to different classes of interstellar extinction curves.

  13. Analysis of optimization processses for solid state fabrication of olivine cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladimeji, Charles

    Lithium ion battery discovered since the 1980s has become pivotal to our energy needs. With the need for a shift to renewable energy and increased use of portable devices, energy storage has become a very important aspect of modern day life and technology. In the thesis, optimization techniques for solid state calcination of lithium olivine batteries are characterized and analyzed. A brief introduction into lithium ion battery is discussed, the chemistry and physics of the materials is studied in details. Emphasis is placed on the olivine structure, industrially utilized synthesis method and the performance of olivine lithium ion batteries are also discussed in details. Olivine structure LiFePO4 (LFP) was synthesized via solid state processes, using Li2CO3, NH4H 2PO4 and FeC2O4˙H2O and C12H22O11 as precursor materials. The effects of calendaring in terms of charge/discharge capacity, cycle life performance, surface morphology, and ac impedance was analyzed. The resulting LFP electrode was divided in part, Part A was left as is and Part B was calendared. The calendared electrode exhibited lower impedance under electrochemical impedance test. The calendared electrode also exhibited a higher discharge capacity of about 130 mAh/g at 0.1C compared to the as-is electrode with discharge capacity of about 120mAh/g. Olivine structure LiMnPO4 (LMP) was also synthesized via solid state processes, using Li2CO3, NH4H 2PO4, MnCO3 and C12H22O 11 as precursor materials. Comparison of the carbon addition process was done by adding sucrose to the initial precursor mix and carbon black at the later stages of fabrication. The 3 step carbon addition exhibited the highest specific capacity of about 72mAh/g, 1 step carbon addition possessed the least capacity of about 45mAh/g, while the 2 step process had a capacity of about 65mA/g.

  14. Coordinated Microanalyses of Seven Particles of Probable Interstellar Origin from the Stardust Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Andrew J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Brenker, Frank E.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Flynn, George J.; Frank, David R.; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K.; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Sterken, Veerle J.; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Sasa; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark.; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Sandford, Scott A.; Zolensky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Stardust, a NASA Discovery-class mission, was the first sample-return mission to return solid samples from beyond the Moon. Stardust was effectively two missions in one spacecraft: it returned the first materials from a known primitive solar system body, the Jupiter-family comet Wild 2; Stardust also returned a collector that was exposed to the contemporary interstellar dust stream for 200 days during the interplanetary cruise. Both collections present severe technical challenges in sample preparation and in analysis. By far the largest collection is the cometary one: approximately 300 micro g of material was returned from Wild 2, mostly consisting of approx. 1 ng particles embedded in aerogel or captured as residues in craters on aluminum foils. Because of their relatively large size, identification of the impacts of cometary particles in the collection media is straightforward. Reliable techniques have been developed for the extraction of these particles from aerogel. Coordinated analyses are also relatively straightforward, often beginning with synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence (S-XRF), X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectoscopy (XANES) and x-ray diffraction (S-XRD) analyses of particles while still embedded in small extracted wedges of aerogel called ``keystones'', followed by ultramicrotomy and TEM, Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) and ion microprobe analyses (e.g., Ogliore et al., 2010). Impacts in foils can be readily analyzed by SEM-EDX, and TEM analysis after FIB liftout sample preparation. In contrast, the interstellar dust collection is vastly more challenging. The sample size is approximately six orders of magnitude smaller in total mass. The largest particles are only a few pg in mass, of which there may be only approx.10 in the entire collection. The technical challenges, however, are matched by the scientific importance of the collection. We formed a consortium carry out the Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) to carry

  15. Synthesis of mesoporous silica materials from municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhen-Shu Li, Wen-Kai; Huang, Chun-Yi

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • The optimal alkaline agent for the extraction of silica from bottom ash was Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. • The pore sizes for the mesoporous silica synthesized from bottom ash were 2–3.8 nm. • The synthesized materials exhibited a hexagonal pore structure with a smaller order. • The materials have potential for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions. - Abstract: Incinerator bottom ash contains a large amount of silica and can hence be used as a silica source for the synthesis of mesoporous silica materials. In this study, the conditions for alkaline fusion to extract silica from incinerator bottom ash were investigated, and the resulting supernatant solution was used as the silica source for synthesizing mesoporous silica materials. The physical and chemical characteristics of the mesoporous silica materials were analyzed using BET, XRD, FTIR, SEM, and solid-state NMR. The results indicated that the BET surface area and pore size distribution of the synthesized silica materials were 992 m{sup 2}/g and 2–3.8 nm, respectively. The XRD patterns showed that the synthesized materials exhibited a hexagonal pore structure with a smaller order. The NMR spectra of the synthesized materials exhibited three peaks, corresponding to Q{sup 2} [Si(OSi){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}], Q{sup 3} [Si(OSi){sub 3}(OH)], and Q{sup 4} [Si(OSi){sub 4}]. The FTIR spectra confirmed the existence of a surface hydroxyl group and the occurrence of symmetric Si–O stretching. Thus, mesoporous silica was successfully synthesized from incinerator bottom ash. Finally, the effectiveness of the synthesized silica in removing heavy metals (Pb{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Cr{sup 2+}) from aqueous solutions was also determined. The results showed that the silica materials synthesized from incinerator bottom ash have potential for use as an adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions.

  16. A critical appraisal of nanoindentation with application to elastic-plastic solids and soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Poh Chieh Benny

    This study examines the accuracy of the extracted elastic properties using nanoindentation. Since the conventional method to extract these properties utilizes Sneddon's elastic solution, this study first considers indentations of linearly elastic solids for direct comparison. The study proposes a criterion for a converged specimen's geometry and modifies Sneddon's equation to account for the finite tip radius and specimen compressibility effects. A composite correction factor is derived to account for the violations of the underlying assumptions behind Sneddon's derivation. This factor is a function of indentation depth, and a critical depth is derived beyond which the finite tip radius effect will be insignificant. Techniques to identify the radius of curvature of the indenter and to decouple the elastic constants for linear elastic materials are proposed. Experimental results on nanoindentation of natural latex are reported and discussed in light of the proposed modified relation and techniques.The second part of the study examines the accuracy of the extracted material properties in elastic-plastic nanoindentations. The study establishes that the accurate determination of the projected area of contact, A, is crucial. However, the conventional method to determine A is largely limited to elastic materials, hence a new electrical resistance method is proposed to measure A for elastic-plastic materials. With an accurate A, the error associated with the extracted elastic material properties is reduced by more than 50% in some cases. This error remains to be a function of the material's Poisson's ratio, which is identified to influence the amount of residual stresses at the plastic imprint.Finally, this study examines the accuracy of the extracted material properties in the nanoindentation of soft materials using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The effects of cantilever stiffness, preload, and surface interaction forces are observed to influence the measurements

  17. On the question of interstellar travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Arguments are presented which show that motives for interstellar travel by advanced technological civilizations based on an extrapolation of earth's history may be quite invalid. In addition, it is proposed that interstellar travel is so enormously expensive and perhaps so hazardous, that advanced civilizations do not engage in such practices because of the ease of information transfer via interstellar communication.

  18. Experimental interstellar organic chemistry - Preliminary findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of some explicit experimental simulation of interstellar organic chemistry consisting in low-temperature high-vacuum UV irradiation of condensed simple gases known or suspected to be present in the interstellar medium. The results include the finding that acetonitrile may be present in the interstellar medium. The implication of this and other findings are discussed.

  19. Torque measurements reveal large process differences between materials during high solid enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A common trend in the research on 2nd generation bioethanol is the focus on intensifying the process and increasing the concentration of water insoluble solids (WIS) throughout the process. However, increasing the WIS content is not without problems. For example, the viscosity of pretreated lignocellulosic materials is known to increase drastically with increasing WIS content. Further, at elevated viscosities, problems arise related to poor mixing of the material, such as poor distribution of the enzymes and/or difficulties with temperature and pH control, which results in possible yield reduction. Achieving good mixing is unfortunately not without cost, since the power requirements needed to operate the impeller at high viscosities can be substantial. This highly important scale-up problem can easily be overlooked. Results In this work, we monitor the impeller torque (and hence power input) in a stirred tank reactor throughout high solid enzymatic hydrolysis (< 20% WIS) of steam-pretreated Arundo donax and spruce. Two different process modes were evaluated, where either the impeller speed or the impeller power input was kept constant. Results from hydrolysis experiments at a fixed impeller speed of 10 rpm show that a very rapid decrease in impeller torque is experienced during hydrolysis of pretreated arundo (i.e. it loses its fiber network strength), whereas the fiber strength is retained for a longer time within the spruce material. This translates into a relatively low, rather WIS independent, energy input for arundo whereas the stirring power demand for spruce is substantially larger and quite WIS dependent. By operating the impeller at a constant power input (instead of a constant impeller speed) it is shown that power input greatly affects the glucose yield of pretreated spruce whereas the hydrolysis of arundo seems unaffected. Conclusions The results clearly highlight the large differences between the arundo and spruce materials, both in terms of

  20. Interstellar Aldehydes and their corresponding Reduced Alcohols: Interstellar Propanol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etim, Emmanuel; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Gorai, Prasanta; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-07-01

    There is a well-defined trend of aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols among the known interstellar molecules; methanal (CH_2O) and methanol (CH_3OH); ethenone (C_2H_2O) and vinyl alcohol (CH_2CHOH); ethanal (C_2H_4O) and ethanol(C_2H_5OH); glycolaldehyde (C_2H_4O_2) and ethylene glycol(C_2H_6O_2). The reduced alcohol of propanal (CH_3CH_2CHO) which is propanol (CH_3CH_2CH_2OH) has not yet been observed but its isomer; ethyl methyl ether (CH_3CH_2OCH_3) is a known interstellar molecule. In this article, different studies are carried out in investigating the trend between aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols and the deviation from the trend. Kinetically and with respect to the formation route, alcohols could have been produced from their corresponding reduced aldehydes via two successive hydrogen additions. This is plausible because of (a) the unquestionable high abundance of hydrogen, (b) presence of energy sources within some of the molecular clouds and (c) the ease at which successive hydrogen addition reaction occurs. In terms of stability, the observed alcohols are thermodynamically favorable as compared to their isomers. Regarding the formation process, the hydrogen addition reactions are believed to proceed on the surface of the interstellar grains which leads to the effect of interstellar hydrogen bonding. From the studies, propanol and propan-2-ol are found to be more strongly attached to the surface of the interstellar dust grains which affects its overall gas phase abundance as compared to its isomer ethyl methyl ether which has been observed.

  1. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and Stardust@home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Anderson, D.; Bastien, R.; Butterworth, A.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Kelley, N.; Lettieri, R.; Mendez, B.; Prasad, R.; Tsitrin, S.; von Korff, J.; Warren, J.; Wertheimer, D.; Zhang, A.; Zolensky, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Stardust sample return mission is effectively two missions in one. Stardust brought back to earth for analytical study the first solid samples from a known solar system body beyond the moon, comet Wild2. The first results of the analyses of these samples are reported elsewhere in this session. In a separate aerogel collector, Stardust also captured and has returned the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust. Landgraf et al. [1] has estimated that ~ 50 interstellar dust particles in the micron size range have been captured in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector. Their state after capture is unknown. Before analysis of these particles can begin, they must be located in the collector. Here we describe the current status of Stardust@home, the massively distributed public search for these tiny interstellar dust particles. So far more than 13,000 volunteers have collectively performed more than 10,000,000 searches in stacks of digital images of ~10% of the collector. We report new estimates of the flux of interplanetary dust at ~2 AU based on the results of this search, and will compare with extant models[2]. References: [1] Landgraf et al., (1999) Planet. Spac. Sci. 47, 1029. [2] Staubach et al. (2001) in Interplanetary Dust, E. Grün, ed., Astron. &Astro. Library, Springer, 2001.

  2. THz Time-Domain Spectroscopy of Complex Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioppolo, Sergio; McGuire, Brett A.; Allodi, Marco A.; de Vries, Xander; Finneran, Ian; Carroll, Brandon; Blake, Geoffrey

    2014-06-01

    It is generally accepted that complex organic molecules (COMs) form on the icy surface of interstellar grains. Our ability to identify interstellar complex species in the ices is affected by the limited number of laboratory analogs that can be compared to the huge amount of observational data currently coming from international astronomical facilities, such as the Herschel Space Observatory, SOFIA, and ALMA. We have recently constructed a new THz time-domain spectroscopy system to investigate the spectra of interstellar ice analogs in a range that fully covers the spectral bandwidth of the aforementioned facilities (0.3 - 7.5 THz). The system is coupled to a FT-IR spectrometer to monitor the ices in the mid-IR (4000 - 500 cm-1). This talk focuses on the laboratory investigation of the composition and structure of the bulk phases of interstellar ice analogs (i.e., H2O, CO2, CO, CH3OH, NH3, and CH4) compared to more complex molecules (e.g., HCOOH, CH3COOH, CH3CHO, (CH3)2CO, HCOOCH3, and HCOOC2H5). The ultimate goal of this research project is to provide the scientific community with an extensive THz ice database, which will allow quantitative studies of the ISM, and potentially guide future astronomical observations of species in the solid phase.

  3. Formation of solid materials in the preplanetary nebula and the composition of chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Izakov, M.N.

    1986-07-01

    On the basis of the model of the formation of the preplanetary nebula as an accretion disk during the formation of the sun, the hypothesis is proposed that a significant fraction of the solid materials of the preplanetary nebula was formed by the successive condensation of the components of the gas of solar composition during its motion from the hot, dense region near the protosun to the periphery of the nebula into regions of ever decreasing values of temperature and pressure. The hypothesis removes the contradiction materials and the presence of traces of high-temperature phenomena in chondrite materials and the conclusion that there were never high temperature in the preplanetary nebula at distances of 2-4 AU from the sun, where meteorites encountering the earth originate, and also explains a number of properties of chondrites. It follows from this hypothesis that the mass and angular momentum of the nebula were close to their minimum possible values and that the loss of the nebular gas had already begun at the final stage of its formation.

  4. Construction material properties of slag from the high temperature arc gasification of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Justin G; Olivera, Fernando D; Wasman, Scott J; Townsend, Timothy G; McVay, Michael C; Ferraro, Christopher C; Blaisi, Nawaf I

    2016-06-01

    Slag from the high temperature arc gasification (HTAG) of municipal solid waste (MSW) was tested to evaluate its material properties with respect to use as a construction aggregate. These data were compared to previously compiled values for waste to energy bottom ash, the most commonly produced and beneficially used thermal treatment residue. The slag was tested using gradations representative of a base course and a course aggregate. Los Angeles (LA) abrasion testing demonstrated that the HTAG slag had a high resistance to fracture with a measured LA loss of 24%. Soundness testing indicated a low potential for reactivity and good weathering resistance with a mean soundness loss of 3.14%. The modified Proctor compaction testing found the slag to possess a maximum dry density (24.04kN/m(3)) greater than conventionally used aggregates and WTE BA. The LBR tests demonstrated a substantial bearing capacity (>200). Mineralogical analysis of the HTAG suggested the potential for self cementing character which supports the elevated LBR results. Preliminary material characterization of the HTAG slag establishes potential for beneficial use; larger and longer term studies focusing on the material's possibility for swelling and performance at the field scale level are needed.

  5. THE SURVIVAL OF PASTEURELLA PESTIS IN MATERIALS PRESERVED BY SOLID CARBON DIOXIDE (DRY-ICE).

    PubMed

    GOLDENBERG, M I; QUAN, S F; PRINCE, F M

    1964-01-01

    In the investigation of outbreaks of plague it is frequently more satisfactory to send specimens of suspected material collected in the field to a central laboratory, where usually better facilities for their more detailed examination are available. In the present study the authors have investigated the suitability of solid CO(2) (dry-ice) for the preservation of such material during transit. Three types of preparation were tested: broth suspensions of Pasteurella pestis, the livers and spleens of guinea-pigs dying after being infected with two different strains of P. pestis, and whole carcasses of mice and ground-squirrels infected with the organism. An additional test to ascertain the rate at which animal specimens became frozen and thawed was also carried out.These studies showed that (1) organisms in the various tissues frozen in dry-ice were not adversely affected by such treatment; (2) the survival of P. pestis cells did not depend on the number of organisms present in broth cultures or tissue suspensions, small numbers surviving equally well as large; and (3) plague bacilli contained in whole carcasses, even when present in small numbers, were also successfully preserved. It is concluded from these results, and also from the authors' practical use of the method over several years, that for the transport of plague-suspect materials from the field to the laboratory freezing with dry-ice can be confidently recommended.

  6. Order-disorder transitions in gadolinium zirconate: A potential electrolyte material in solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meilicke, S.; Haile, S.

    1995-12-31

    Rare-earth, yttrium, and calcium doped zirconates are the materials of choice for electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells. The dopant in these materials serves not only to stabilized the cubic phase of zirconia, but also to introduce anion defects that presumably increase the ionic conductivity. In order to understand the relationships between anion defect distribution, thermal history and ionic conductivity, the structural properties of gadolinium zirconate, Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, have been examined via high-temperature x-ray powder diffraction. Gadolinium zirconate is an ideal material for such a structure-property-processing study: it shows ordering of defects at low temperatures, taking on a pyrochlore structure, and disordering at elevated temperature, taking on a defect fluorite structure. Diffraction experiments, performed as functions of time and temperature, confirmed the transition temperature to lie between 1,500 and 1,550 C. They also revealed that the transformation takes place most rapidly just below the transition temperature, indicating that the ordering process is kinetically constrained at low temperatures. Moreover, x-ray data collected at room temperature from quenched samples were found to be as useful, if not more so, than those collected in situ at high temperature. The latter are affected by thermal scattering, severely compromising data quality.

  7. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.; Vasilow, Theodore R.; Bratton, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

  8. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

    1997-11-11

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION OF NEW SOLID DENTAL FILLING TEMPORARY MATERIALS CONTAINING ZINC. FORMULA DEVELOPMENT STAGE.

    PubMed

    Pytko-Polończyk, Jolanta; Antosik, Agata; Zajac, Magdalena; Szlósarczyk, Marek; Krywult, Agnieszka; Jachowicz, Renata; Opoka, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Caries is the most popular problem affecting teeth and this is the reason why so many temporary dental filling materials are being developed. An example of such filling is zinc oxide paste mixed with eugenol, Thymodentin and Coltosol F®. Zinc-oxide eugenol is used in dentistry because of its multiplied values: it improves heeling of the pulp by dentine bridge formation; has antiseptic properties; is hygroscopic. Because of these advantages compouds of zinc oxide are used as temporary fillings, especially in deep caries lesions when treatment is oriented on support of vital pulp. Temporary dental fillings based on zinc oxide are prepared ex tempone by simple mixing powder (Thymodentin) and eugenol liqiud together or a ready to use paste Coltosol F®. Quantitative composition depends mainly on experience of person who is preparing it, therefore, exact qualitative composition of dental fillings is not replicable. The main goal of the study was to develop appropriate dental fillings in solid form containing set amount of zinc oxide. Within the study, the influence of preparation method on solid dental fillings properties like mechanical properties and zinc ions release were examined.

  10. Use of Modeling for Prevention of Solids Formation During Canyon Processing of Legacy Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, W. D.; Crooks III, W. J.; Christian, J. D.

    2002-02-26

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Management (EM) nuclear material stabilization program includes the dissolution and processing of legacy materials from various DOE sites. The SRS canyon facilities were designed to dissolve and process spent nuclear fuel and targets. As the processing of typical materials is completed, unusual and exotic nuclear materials are being targeted for stabilization. These unusual materials are often difficult to dissolve using historical flowsheet conditions and require more aggressive dissolver solutions. Solids must be prevented in the dissolver to avoid expensive delays associated with the build-up of insoluble material in downstream process equipment. Moreover, it is vital to prevent precipitation of all solids, especially plutonium-bearing solids, since their presence in dissolver solutions raises criticality safety issues. To prevent precipitation of undesirable solids in aqueous process solutions, the accuracy of computer models to predict precipitate formation requires incorporation of plant specific fundamental data. These data are incorporated into a previously developed thermodynamic computer program that applies the Pitzer correlation to derive activity coefficient parameters. This improved predictive model will reduce unwanted precipitation in process solutions at DOE sites working with EM nuclear materials in aqueous solutions.

  11. Evaluation of shuttle solid rocket booster case materials. Corrosion and stress corrosion susceptibility of several high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pionke, L. J.; Garland, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Candidate alloys for the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) case were tested under simulated service conditions to define subcritical flaw growth behavior under both sustained and cyclic loading conditions. The materials evaluated were D6AC and 18 Ni maraging steel, both heat treated to a nominal yield strength of 1380 MN/sq m (200 ksi). The sustained load tests were conducted by exposing precracked, stressed specimens of both alloys to alternate immersion in synthetic sea water. It was found that the corrosion and stress corrosion resistance of the 18 Ni maraging steel were superior to that of the D6AC steel under these test conditions. It was also found that austenitizing temperature had little influence on the threshold stress intensity of the D6AC. The cyclic tests were conducted by subjecting precracked surface-flawed specimens of both alloys to repeated load/thermal/environmental profiles which were selected to simulate the SRB missions. It was found that linear removal operations that involve heating to 589 K (600 F) cause a decrease in cyclic life of D6AC steel relative to those tests conducted with no thermal cycling.

  12. Double perovskites as anode materials for solid-oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Hui; Dass, Ronald I; Xing, Zheng-Liang; Goodenough, John B

    2006-04-14

    Extensive efforts to develop a solid-oxide fuel cell for transportation, the bottoming cycle of a power plant, and distributed generation of electric energy are motivated by a need for greater fuel efficiency and reduced air pollution. Barriers to the introduction of hydrogen as the fuel have stimulated interest in developing an anode material that can be used with natural gas under operating temperatures 650 degrees C < T < 1000 degrees C. Here we report identification of the double perovskites Sr2Mg(1-x)MnxMoO(6-delta) that meet the requirements for long-term stability with tolerance to sulfur and show a superior single-cell performance in hydrogen and methane.

  13. [Influence of different auxiliary materials on the dissolution of carbamazepine from solid dosage forms].

    PubMed

    Jeköné, B Z

    1998-03-01

    Results of the development of a solid dosage form containing 200 mg Carbamazepine (CBZ) are presented. Citric acid and low substituted Hydroxypropyl-cellulose (L-HPC) were used as dissolution enhancers of the active ingredient. Granulation the CBZ and citric acid with water has no effect on the dissolution of CBZ, but the granulation with absolute alcohol increases the dissolution rate. This enhancement could be explained with a molecular interaction between the CBZ and citric acid in water-free media. This interaction is indicated by the melting points, IR-spectra and scanning electron microscopy of the materials and granules. Further dissolution enhancement can be reached with L-HPC because of its disintegrating effect on the granules. Application of citric acid and L-HPC together results in extremely fast dissolution of the CBZ.

  14. The gas-grain interaction in the interstellar medium - Thermal accommodation and trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, J. R.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1983-02-01

    The paper develops a numerical model for calculating thermal accommodation coefficients alphaT and trapping functions ft for gases incident on solid surfaces. The method is especially designed for astrophysical applications in that it treats economically and with moderate accuracy (+ or - 20%) the dependences of alphaT and ft on finite and different surface and gas temperatures for a large number of gas-surface combinations. In particular, the method is applied to the astrophysical combinations of hydrogen and helium gases incident on graphite, silicon, and ice surfaces. Graphs are presented of the dependence of alphaT and ft on interstellar gas temperatures in the range of 10 to 10,000 K and grain temperatures in the range 10 to 1000 K, assuming the current estimates of the gas-surface physical parameters such as the composition and the Debye temperature of the grain material, the repulsive range of the surface potential, and the gas-grain adsorption energy.

  15. Extracting material response from simple mechanical tests on hardening-softening-hardening viscoplastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Nisha

    Compliant foams are usually characterized by a wide range of desirable mechanical properties. These properties include viscoelasticity at different temperatures, energy absorption, recoverability under cyclic loading, impact resistance, and thermal, electrical, acoustic and radiation-resistance. Some foams contain nano-sized features and are used in small-scale devices. This implies that the characteristic dimensions of foams span multiple length scales, rendering modeling their mechanical properties difficult. Continuum mechanics-based models capture some salient experimental features like the linear elastic regime, followed by non-linear plateau stress regime. However, they lack mesostructural physical details. This makes them incapable of accurately predicting local peaks in stress and strain distributions, which significantly affect the deformation paths. Atomistic methods are capable of capturing the physical origins of deformation at smaller scales, but suffer from impractical computational intensity. Capturing deformation at the so-called meso-scale, which is capable of describing the phenomenon at a continuum level, but with some physical insights, requires developing new theoretical approaches. A fundamental question that motivates the modeling of foams is `how to extract the intrinsic material response from simple mechanical test data, such as stress vs. strain response?' A 3D model was developed to simulate the mechanical response of foam-type materials. The novelty of this model includes unique features such as the hardening-softening-hardening material response, strain rate-dependence, and plastically compressible solids with plastic non-normality. Suggestive links from atomistic simulations of foams were borrowed to formulate a physically informed hardening material input function. Motivated by a model that qualitatively captured the response of foam-type vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) pillars under uniaxial compression [2011,"Analysis of

  16. Compatibility analysis of material and energy recovery in a regional solid waste management system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Hsi; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2003-01-01

    The rising prices of raw materials and concerns about energy conservation have resulted in an increasing interest in the simultaneous recovery of materials and energy from waste streams. Compatibility exists for several economic, environmental, and managerial reasons. Installing an on-site or off-site presorting facility before an incinerator could be a feasible alternative to achieve both goals if household recycling programs cannot succeed in local communities. However, the regional impacts of presorting solid waste on a waste-to-energy facility remain unclear because of the inherent complexity of solid waste compositions and properties over different areas. This paper applies a system-based approach to assess the impact of installing a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) process before an incinerator. Such an RDF process, consisting of standard unit operations of shredding, magnetic separation, trommel screening, and air classification, might be useful for integrating the recycling and presorting efforts for a large-scale municipal incinerator from a regional sense. An optimization modeling analysis is performed to characterize such integration potential so that the optimal size of the RDF process and associated shipping patterns for flow control can be foreseen. It aims at exploring how the waste inflows with different rates of generation, physical and chemical compositions, and heating values collected from differing administrative districts can be processed by either a centralized presorting facility or an incinerator to meet both the energy recovery and throughput requirements. A case study conducted in Taipei County, which is one of the most densely populated metropolitan areas in Taiwan, further confirms the application potential of such a cost-benefit analysis.

  17. Micro topography of different material surface by solid abrasive lapped at high speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chunlin; Yang, Jiandong; Fan, Jingfeng; Zhou, Huawen

    2007-12-01

    The principle of solid abrasives lapping is that the abrasives are fixed and made into a special lapping tool; the workpiece is lapped in high speed lapping machine tool. It possesses many advantages compared with traditional low speed lapping with particulate abrasives, e.g. high machining efficiency, low machining cost, high and stable machining accuracy. So the highly efficient lapping method has been paid close attention to. This paper made a study on surface micro topography of different material by solid abrasive lapped at high speed. In experiments the lapping technique parameter is fixed, and different workpiece which are made by T10 steel, carbide, ceramic glass and alumina ceramics are lapped. The surface micro topography is measured by SEM, from the measuring result, it can be known that there is some shallow scribe on the surface of T10 steel, and the obvious plastic deformation can be observed. The SEM pictures show that there is some scribe on the surface of ceramics glass after lapped, with more magnification times many micro cracking and some plastic hump can be observed on the scribe. These scribes and humps are first cause of depressing surface quality, and these micro cracking can result in a lot of diffuse reflection on workpiece surface, it decreases the glossiness of mirror surface. On the surface of alumina ceramics there are a lot of defects, the size of such defect is more than the scribe of abrasive, it can be sure that the defect is not produced by lapping, so the material quality is an important effect fact to surface macro topography. On the surface of carbide there are a little of scribe and air cavity, and the scribe is very shallow; the defect of powder metallurgy martial is the primary reason.

  18. Decades-long changes of the interstellar wind through our solar system.

    PubMed

    Frisch, P C; Bzowski, M; Livadiotis, G; McComas, D J; Moebius, E; Mueller, H-R; Pryor, W R; Schwadron, N A; Sokół, J M; Vallerga, J V; Ajello, J M

    2013-09-06

    The journey of the Sun through the dynamically active local interstellar medium creates an evolving heliosphere environment. This motion drives a wind of interstellar material through the heliosphere that has been measured with Earth-orbiting and interplanetary spacecraft for 40 years. Recent results obtained by NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer mission during 2009-2010 suggest that neutral interstellar atoms flow into the solar system from a different direction than found previously. These prior measurements represent data collected from Ulysses and other spacecraft during 1992-2002 and a variety of older measurements acquired during 1972-1978. Consideration of all data types and their published results and uncertainties, over the three epochs of observations, indicates that the trend for the interstellar flow ecliptic longitude to increase linearly with time is statistically significant.

  19. Term Projects on Interstellar Comets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, John E.

    1975-01-01

    Presents two calculations of the probability of detection of an interstellar comet, under the hypothesis that such comets would escape from comet clouds similar to that believed to surround the sun. Proposes three problems, each of which would be a reasonable term project for a motivated undergraduate. (Author/MLH)

  20. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination VII: Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis of Six Stardust Interstellar Candidates Measured with the Advanced Photon Source 2-ID-D Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Anderson, David; Bastien, Ron K.; Brenker, Frank E.; Flynn, George J.; Frank, David; Gainsforth, Zack; Sandford, Scott A.; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Stardust spacecraft exposed an aerogel collector to the interstellar dust passing through the solar system. We performed X-ray fluorescence element mapping and abundance measurements, for elements 19 < or = Z < or = 30, on six "interstellar candidates," potential interstellar impacts identified by Stardust@Home and extracted for analyses in picokeystones. One, I1044,3,33, showed no element hot-spots within the designated search area. However, we identified a nearby surface feature, consistent with the impact of a weak, high-speed particle having an approximately chondritic (CI) element abundance pattern, except for factor-of-ten enrichments in K and Zn and an S depletion. This hot-spot, containing approximately 10 fg of Fe, corresponds to an approximately 350 nm chondritic particle, small enough to be missed by Stardust@Home, indicating that other techniques may be necessary to identify all interstellar candidates. Only one interstellar candidate, I1004,1,2, showed a track. The terminal particle has large enrichments in S, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Zn relative to Fe-normalized CI values. It has high Al/Fe, but does not match the Ni/Fe range measured for samples of Al-deck material from the Stardust sample return capsule, which was within the field-of-view of the interstellar collector. A third interstellar candidate, I1075,1,25, showed an Al-rich surface feature that has a composition generally consistent with the Al-deck material, suggesting that it is a secondary particle. The other three interstellar candidates, I1001,1,16, I1001,2,17, and I1044,2,32, showed no impact features or tracks, but allowed assessment of submicron contamination in this aerogel, including Fe hot-spots having CI-like Ni/Fe ratios, complicating the search for CI-like interstellar/interplanetary dust.

  1. Thermodynamic stability of perovskite and lanthanum nickelate-type cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Deniz

    The need for cleaner and more efficient alternative energy sources is becoming urgent as concerns mount about climate change wrought by greenhouse gas emissions. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are one of the most efficient options if the goal is to reduce emissions while still operating on fossil energy resources. One of the foremost problems in SOFCs that causes efficiency loss is the polarization resistance associated with the oxygen reduction reaction(ORR) at the cathodes. Hence, improving the cathode design will greatly enhance the overall performance of SOFCs. Lanthanum nickelate, La2NiO4+delta (LNO), is a mixed ionic and electronic conductor that has competitive surface oxygen exchange and transport properties and excellent electrical conductivity compared to perovskite-type oxides. This makes it an excellent candidate for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. It has been previously shown that composites of LNO with Sm0.2Ce0.8O2-delta (SDC20) as cathode materials lead to higher performance than standalone LNO. However, in contact with lanthanide-doped ceria, LNO decomposes resulting in free NiO and ceria with higher lanthanide dopant concentration. In this study, the aforementioned instability of LNO has been addressed by compositional tailoring of LNO: lanthanide doped ceria (LnxCe 1-xO2,LnDC)composite. By increasing the lanthanide dopant concentration in the ceria phase close to its solubility limit, the LNO phase has been stabilized in the LNO:LnDC composites. Electrical conductivity of the composites as a function of LNO volume fraction and temperature has been measured, and analyzed using a resistive network model which allows the identification of a percolation threshold for the LNO phase. The thermomechanical compatibility of these composites has been investigated with SOFC systems through measurement of the coefficients of thermal expansion. LNO:LDC40 composites containing LNO lower than 50 vol%and higher than 40 vol% were identified as being

  2. The Role of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Dense Cloud Absorption Features: The Last Major Unanswered Question in Interstellar Ice Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiar, Jean

    Interstellar dust plays a vital role in the star formation process and the eventual formation of planetary systems including our own. Ice mantles are an important component of the dust: reactions involving simple ices can create more complex (and astrobiologically interesting) molecules, and ices sublimated back into the gas phase influence the gas- phase chemistry. Although polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are commonly thought to be very abundant interstellar species and, as such, are likely to be important components of interstellar ices, their contribution to the infrared spectra and chemistry of ices in dense molecular clouds is an open question. This program makes extensive use of three major NASA-funded databases: the Spitzer archive, the 2MASS archive, and the NASA Ames PAH database in order to answer the last major unanswered question in interstellar ice spectroscopy: what role do PAHs play in contributing to unidentified absorption features observed in dense cloud spectra. PAHs are observed to be present and abundant in nearly all phases of the galactic and extragalactic interstellar medium. The evidence for the ubiquity of interstellar PAHs is the widespread well-known family of prominent emission bands at 3.28, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 micron. To date, these PAH bands have been most easily detected in regions where individual gas phase PAH molecules (neutrals and ions) become highly vibrationally excited by the ambient radiation field. While PAHs and closely related aromatic materials should be present throughout dense interstellar regions, PAH emission is quenched in cold dark dense clouds. Also, in these regions, most PAHs should efficiently condense out onto dust grains, either as "pure" solids or as "guest molecules" in icy grain mantles, much as is the case for most other interstellar molecules. Thus, in dense molecular clouds, condensed PAHs will give rise to IR absorption bands rather than emission features. While PAH absorption has been

  3. The Sun's dusty interstellar environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Veerle

    2016-07-01

    The Sun's dusty interstellar environment Interstellar dust from our immediate interstellar neighborhood travels through the solar system at speeds of ca. 26 km/s: the relative speed of the solar system with respect to the local interstellar cloud. On its way, its trajectories are altered by several forces like the solar radiation pressure force and Lorentz force. The latter is due to the charged dust particles that fly through the interplanetary magnetic field. These trajectories differ per particle type and size and lead to varying fluxes and directions of the flow inside of the solar system that depend on location but also on phase in the solar cycle. Hence, these fluxes and directions depend strongly on the configuration of the inner regions and outer regions of the heliosphere. Several missions have measured this dust in the solar system directly. The Ulysses dust detector data encompasses 16 years of intestellar dust fluxes and approximate directions, Stardust captured returned to Earth a few of these particles sucessfully, and finally the Cassini dust detector allowed for compositional information to be obtained from the impacts on the instrument. In this talk, we give an overview of the current status of interstellar dust research through the measurements made inside of the solar system, and we put them in perspective to the knowledge obtained from more classical astronomical means. In special, we focus on the interaction of the dust with the interplanetary magnetic field, and on what we learn about the dust (and the fields) by comparing the available dust data to computer simulations of dust trajectories. Finally, we synthesize the different methods of observation, their results, and give a preview on new research opportunities in the coming year(s).

  4. PAHs in Translucent Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Galazutdinov, G.; Krelowski, J.; Biennier, L.; Beletsky, Y.; Song, I.

    2011-05-01

    We discuss the proposal of relating the origin of some of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in translucent interstellar clouds. The spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have been measured in the laboratory under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions and are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. This comparison provides - for the first time - accurate upper limits for the abundances of specific PAH molecules along specific lines-of-sight. Something that is not attainable from IR observations alone. The comparison of these unique laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations leads to two major findings: (1) a finding specific to the individual molecules that were probed in this study and, which leads to the clear and unambiguous conclusion that the abundance of these specific neutral PAHs must be very low in the individual translucent interstellar clouds that were probed in this survey (PAH features remain below the level of detection) and, (2) a general finding that neutral PAHs exhibit intrinsic band profiles that are similar to the profile of the narrow DIBs indicating that the carriers of the narrow DIBs must have close molecular structure and characteristics. This study is the first quantitative survey of neutral PAHs in the optical range and it opens the way for unambiguous quantitative searches of PAHs in a variety of interstellar and circumstellar environments. // Reference: F. Salama et al. (2011) ApJ. 728 (1), 154 // Acknowledgements: F.S. acknowledges the support of the NASA's Space Mission Directorate APRA Program. J.K. acknowledges the financial support of the Polish State (grant N203 012 32/1550). The authors are deeply grateful to the ESO archive as well as to the ESO staff members for their active support.

  5. The Interstellar Production of Biologically Important Organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Dworkin, Jason; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary tasks of the Astrochemistry Laboratory at Ames Research Center is to use laboratory simulations to study the chemical processes that occur in dense interstellar clouds. Since new stars are formed in these clouds, their materials may be responsible for the delivery of organics to new habitable planets and may play important roles in the origin of life. These clouds are extremely cold (less than 50 kelvin), and most of the volatiles in these clouds are condensed onto dust grains as thin ice mantles. These ices are exposed to cosmic rays and ultraviolet (UV) photons that break chemical bonds and result in the production of complex molecules when the ices are warmed (as they would be when incorporated into a star-forming region). Using cryovacuum systems and UV lamps, this study simulates the conditions of these clouds and studies the resulting chemistry. Some of the areas of progress made in 1999 are described below. It shows some of the types of molecules that may be formed in the interstellar medium. Laboratory simulations have already confirmed that many of these compounds are made under these conditions.

  6. The physics of solid-state neutron detector materials and geometries.

    PubMed

    Caruso, A N

    2010-11-10

    Detection of neutrons, at high total efficiency, with greater resolution in kinetic energy, time and/or real-space position, is fundamental to the advance of subfields within nuclear medicine, high-energy physics, non-proliferation of special nuclear materials, astrophysics, structural biology and chemistry, magnetism and nuclear energy. Clever indirect-conversion geometries, interaction/transport calculations and modern processing methods for silicon and gallium arsenide allow for the realization of moderate- to high-efficiency neutron detectors as a result of low defect concentrations, tuned reaction product ranges, enhanced effective omnidirectional cross sections and reduced electron-hole pair recombination from more physically abrupt and electronically engineered interfaces. Conversely, semiconductors with high neutron cross sections and unique transduction mechanisms capable of achieving very high total efficiency are gaining greater recognition despite the relative immaturity of their growth, lithographic processing and electronic structure understanding. This review focuses on advances and challenges in charged-particle-based device geometries, materials and associated mechanisms for direct and indirect transduction of thermal to fast neutrons within the context of application. Calorimetry- and radioluminescence-based intermediate processes in the solid state are not included.

  7. Next Generation Electrocaloric and Pyroelectric Materials for Solid State Electrothermal Interconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpay, S. Pamir; Mantese, Joseph V.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Zhang, Qiming; Whatmore, Roger W.

    2015-03-01

    Thin film electrocaloric (EC) and pyroelectric (PE) electrothermal interconversion energy sources have recently emerged as viable means for primary and auxiliary solid state cooling and power generation. This emergence is a result of two significant developments: (1) advancements in the formation of high quality polymeric and ceramic thin films with figures of merit that project system level performance as a large percentage of Carnot efficiency, and (2) the ability of these newer materials to support larger electric fields which permit operation at higher voltage; thus making the power electronic architectures more favorable for thermal to electric interconversion. Current research targets to adequately address commercial device needs, include reduction of parasitic losses, increases in mechanical robustness, and the ability to form nearly free-standing element in the range of 1 - 10 microns in thickness. This article will describe the current state-of-the-art materials, thermodynamic cycles and device losses; pointing to potential lines of research that would lead to substantially better figures of merit for electrothermal interconversion.

  8. Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures-2: A Materials Science Experiment for the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, J. Mark; Voorhees, Peter W.; Kwon, Yongwoo; Lorik, Tibor

    2004-01-01

    A materials science experiment has been developed and readied for operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Components of this experiment are onboard ISS and area awaiting the flight of science samples. The goal of the experiment is to understand the dynamics of Ostwald ripening, also known as coarsening, a process that occurs in nearly any two-phase mixture found in nature. Attempts to obtain experimental data in ground-based laboratories are hindered due to the presence of gravity, which introduces material transport modes other than that of the coarsening phenomenon. This introduces adjustable parameters in the formulation of theory. The original Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures (CSLM) mission, which flew on the Space Shuttle in 1997, produced data from a coarsened eutectic alloy. Unfortunately, both the science matrix and the hardware, while nominally functional, did not account adequately for operations in microgravity. A significantly redesigned follow-on experiment, CSLM-2 has been developed to redress the inadequacies of the original experiment. This paper reviews the CSLM-2 project: its history, science goals, flight hardware implementation, and planned operations and analysis

  9. An adaptive mesh magneto-hydrodynamic analysis of interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominsky, Paul J.

    Interstellar clouds play a key role in many astrophysical events. The interactions of dense interstellar clouds with shock waves and interstellar wind were investigated using an adaptive three-dimensional Cartesian mesh approach to the magneto-hydrodynamic equations. The mixing of the cloud material with the post-shock material results in complex layers of current density. In both the shock and wind interactions, a tail develops similar to the tail found with comets due to the solar wind. The orientation of this tail structure changes with the direction of the magnetic field, and may be useful to observationally determining the orientation of magnetic fields in the interstellar medium. The octree data structure was analyzed in regard to parallel work units. Larger block sizes have a higher volume to surface ratio and support a higher percentage of computational cells to non-computational cells, but require more cells at the finest grid resolution. Keeping the minimum resolution of the grid fixed, and averaging over all possible grids, the analysis confirms experience that block sizes larger than 8 × 8 × 8 cells do not improve storage efficiency. A novel algorithm was developed to implement rotationally periodic boundary conditions on quadtree and octree data, structures. Astrophysical flows wit h symmetric circulation, such as accretion disks, or periodic instabilities, such supernova remnants, may be able to take advantage of such boundary conditions while maintaining the other benefits of a Cartesian grid.

  10. Spectroscopic Evidence for Interstellar Ice in Comet Hyakutake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Lis, D. C.; Matthews, H. E.; Biver, N.; Crovisier, J.; Davies, J. K.; Dent, W. R. F.; Gautier, D.; Godfrey, P. D.; Keene, J.; Lovell, A. J.; Owen, T. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Rauer, H.; Schloerb, F. P.; Senay, M.; Young, K.

    1996-01-01

    Volatile compounds in comets are the most pristine materials surviving from the time of formation of the Solar System, and thus potentially provide information about conditions that prevailed in the primitive solar material. Moreover, comets may have supplied a substantial fraction of the volatiles on the terrestrial planets, perhaps including organic compounds that played a role in the origin of life on Earth. Here we report the detection of hydrogen isocyanide (HNC) in comet Hyakutake. The abundance of HNC relative to hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is very similar to that observed in quiescent interstellar molecular clouds, and quite different from the equilibrium ratio expected in the outermost solar nebula, where comets are thought to form. Such a departure from equilibrium has long been considered a hallmark of gas-phase chemical processing in the interstellar medium, suggesting that interstellar gases have been incorporated into the comet's nucleus, perhaps as ices frozen onto interstellar grains. If this interpretation is correct, our results should provide constraints on the temperature of the solar nebula, and the subsequent chemical processes that occurred in the region where comets formed.

  11. Diamonds in dense molecular clouds - A challenge to the standard interstellar medium paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Herbst, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of a newly discovered infrared C-H stretching band indicate that interstellar diamond-like material appears to be characteristic of dense clouds. In sharp contrast, the spectral signature of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium is dominated by -CH2- and -CH3 groups. This dichotomy in the aliphatic organic component between the dense and diffuse media challenges standard assumptions about the processes occurring in, and interactions between, these two media. The ubiquity of this interstellar diamond-like material rules out models for meteoritic diamond formation in unusual circumstellar environments and implies that the formation of the diamond-like material is associated with common interstellar processes or stellar types.

  12. A Search for Interstellar Carbon-60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuccitelli, Dana; Richter, Matthew J.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    Carbon-60 has been proposed as a potentially important interstellar molecule. While there is a mounting body of indirect evidence suggesting that interstellar C60 exists, no direct spectroscopic detection toward an astronomical object has been made.We present here the results of our search for interstellar C60 in five sources using TEXES (the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph; Lacy et al. 2002). 1. Introduction The discovery of Buckminsterfullerene, C60, by Kroto et al. (1985) launched a new branch of chemical research. It is sometimes forgotten that the impetus for the experimental discovery of "buckyballs" was an attempt to understand the formation of long-chain carbon molecules in interstellar and circumstellar material. The stability of the molecule was recognized immediately and led to the suggestion that C60 may be widely distributed in the interstellar medium. Currently, only indirect evidence exists for interstellar C60. Because the ionization potential of C60 is relatively low the majority of C60 along optical/UV lines-of-sight will be ionized. Two electronic transitions of C60+, observed in rare gas matrices, lie near two diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) near 9600Å (Foing & Ehrenfreund 1997). Detecting neutral C60 may be easier toward an embedded source using infrared vibrational bands, such as the one near 1184 cm-1 (&lambda=8.45 μm). The exact location and width of the band depends on the gas temperature. Assuming the average temperature is fairly low (T<100 K), the band structure should be be fairly narrow, which argues for high spectral resolution. 2. Observations We searched for the C60 1184 cm-1 vibrational band in three high- extinction molecular cloud sources (AFGL 2136, AFGL 2591, NGC 7538 IRS 1), the mass-loss star NML Cygni, and R Corona Borealis.We used TEXES, the Texas Echelon-cross-Echelle Spectrograph, a high resolution, mid-IR spectrograph (Lacy et al. 2002) on the 3m NASA IRTF. In highresolution mode, TEXES provides resolving

  13. Codisposal of FBC by-products and coal slurry solids: Characterization of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tungate, D.E.; Darmody, R.G.; Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.

    1997-12-31

    The preparation and combustion of high sulfur coal generates many waste products including cleaning and combustion wastes. Pyrite is associated with coal cleaning wastes and it makes them potentially acidic. Coal slurry solids (CSS), the finest textured cleaning wastes, are stored in large impoundments. After the impoundments are retired, they must be reclaimed with a 1.2 in soil cap. Reclamation of abandoned CSS impoundments by direct revegetation would avoid costs associated with the required soil cap. However, CSS have physical and chemical limitations for plant growth including undesirable pH, surface temperatures, and moisture holding capacity. Fluidized bed combustion is a coal combustion technique designed to reduce smoke stack emissions of SO{sub 2}. It results in a highly alkaline by-product (FBC). The combination of CSS and FBC may allow direct revegetation of CSS materials. This would possibly be a more cost effective method of reclaiming CSS materials than using a soil cap while creating an economic value for FBC by-products. This will also preclude the necessity of disturbing a borrow area for the soil cap. An experiment was designed to evaluate the potential for CSS/FBC mixtures to support direct revegetation. Three test blocks with 18 plots each were established on a temporarily inactive portion of an active coal slurry impoundment. The addition of FBC increased the pH of the potentially acidic CSS. Soil fertility analyses indicated Al, B, Ca, Mg, Zn, and soluble salts increased with additions of FBC, while Cu, Fe, K, P, and S remained relatively unchanged, and Mn and Na concentration decreased. Direct revegetation of CSS materials may be facilitated by the addition of FBC by-products. However, other treatments in addition to FBC amendments may be necessary to optimize conditions for plant growth.

  14. Alternative comparison, analysis, and evaluation of solid waste and materials system alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the impact of solid waste technical options on values and objectives that are important to the public. It is written in support of the Solid Waste and Materials Systems Alternatives Study (WHC, 1995). Described are the values that were identified, the major programmatic risks, how the impacts were measured, the performance of alternatives, the methodology used for the analysis, and the implications of the results. Decision analysis was used to guide the collection and analysis of data and the logic of the evaluation. Decision analysis is a structured process for the analysis and evaluation of alternatives. It is theoretically grounded in a set of axioms that capture the basic principles of decision making (von Neuman and Morgenstern 1947). Decision analysis objectively specifies what factors are to be considered, how they are to be measured and evaluated, and heir relative importance. The result is an analysis in which the underlying rationale or logic upon which the decision is based is made explicit. This makes possible open discussion of the decision basis in which facts and values are clearly distinguished, resulting in a well- documented decision that can be clearly explained and justified. The strategy of decision analysis is to analyze the various components relevant to the decision separately and then integrate the individual judgments to arrive at an overall decision. This assures that all the relevant factors are identified and their relative importance is considered. The procedure for obtaining the individual judgments, and the decision rules, for combining them and evaluating alternatives, have both theoretical and empirical foundation in mathematics, economics, and psychology.

  15. Strength and Fracture Toughness of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrolyte Material Improved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2002-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are being developed for various applications in the automobile, power-generation, and aeronautics industries. Recently, the NASA Glenn Research Center has been exploring the possibility of using SOFC's for aeropropulsion under its Zero Carbon Dioxide Emission Technology (ZCET) Program. 10-mol% yttriastabilized zirconia (10YSZ) is a very good anionic conductor at high temperatures and is, therefore, used as an oxygen solid electrolyte in SOFC. However, it has a high thermal expansion coefficient, low thermal shock resistance, low fracture toughness, and poor mechanical strength. For aeronautic applications, the thin ceramic electrolyte membrane of the SOFC needs to be strong and tough. Therefore, we have been investigating the possibility of enhancing the strength and fracture toughness of the 10YSZ electrolyte without degrading its electrical conductivity to an appreciable extent. We recently demonstrated that the addition of alumina to zirconia electrolyte increases its strength as well as its fracture toughness. Zirconia-alumina composites containing 0 to 30 mol% of alumina were fabricated by hot pressing. The hot pressing procedure was developed and various hot pressing parameters were optimized, resulting in dense, crackfree panels of composite materials. Cubic zirconia and a-alumina were the only phases detected, indicating that there was no chemical reaction between the constituents during hot pressing at elevated temperatures. Flexure strength sf and fracture toughness K(sub IC) of the various zirconia-alumina composites were measured at room temperature as well as at 1000 C in air. Both properties showed systematic improvement with increased alumina addition at room temperature and at 1000 C. Use of these modified electrolytes with improved strength and fracture toughness should prolong the life and enhance the performance of SOFC in aeronautics and other applications.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of solid state lithium ion battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifeng

    1999-10-01

    A variety of materials used in lithium ion battery development have been investigated by solid State 6,7Li NMR. In lithiated hard carbon, 7Li high- resolution NMR measurements reveal two distinct insertion mechanisms, one is intercalation between disordered graphene planes and the other is covalently bonded with in amorphous hydrogen-containing regions of the carbon. The irreversible portion of the Li, which constitutes the solid electrolyte interface (SEI), was detected. 7Li NMR results of lithiated natural graphite and mildly oxidized graphite show that the SEI formation is more efficient in latter, and that there is excess reversible capacity not associated with intercalated Li. With measurements of electrochemically lithiated SnO by NMR, Li 2O and LixSn phases were detected at low and intermediate Li contents, and the Lix-2Sn alloy structure is significantly different at high Li content. 6,7Li NMR spectroscopic measurements of Li1+yCoO 2 (y = 0.08, 0.35) suggest that only a small fraction (about 10% of the excess Li) may be reversible, the remainder of the excess are various impurities. For physical mixtures of LiI and nano-scale particles of Al2O 3, the high resolution (MAS) NMR method clearly resolves two or more distinct Li+ sites, one characteristic of bulk LiI and the rest associated with surface/interface regions. Composite solid electrolytes based on PEO, LiI and high surface area inorganic oxides were investigated. The MAS NMR spectrum of a sample with a PEO/Li ratio of 3/2 is consistent with at least two Li environments, one solvated by the polymer and one in small ionic clusters at room temperature. The Li environment becomes more purely ionic as the polymer-associated peak vanishes above 80°C. 6,7Li NMR results in Li-Co-Ni-O and Li- (Cr, Fe)-Mn-O sample systems are also presented.

  17. Interstellar Dust: Physical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A. P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1993-01-01

    Dust is formed in stellar environments, and destroyed by sputtering, shattering and vaporization in shock waves due to cloud-cloud collisions and supernova blast waves. Dust is also destroyed during star formation. We review the dust formation and destruction balance. The calculated destruction time-scale is less than or equal to one billion years and the star dust injection time-scale is approx. 2.5 billion years. Hence, the fractions of elemental carbon and silicon locked up in stardust are less than 0.3 and less than 0.15, respectively. An efficient ISM dust formation route is therefore implied. In particular, in dense clouds dust grows; through the processes of coagulation and the accretion of gas phase molecules e.g. H20, CO, CH4. These icy materials may then be photoprocessed to refractory materials in more diffuse regions. The resulting carbonaceous grain mantle may actually be the glue that holds the coagulated grains together.

  18. Reconstituted polymeric materials derived from post-consumer waste, industrial scrap and virgin resins made by solid state pulverization

    DOEpatents

    Khait, Klementina

    1998-09-29

    A method of making polymeric particulates wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatibilizing agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product.

  19. Reconstituted polymeric materials derived from post-consumer waste, industrial scrap and virgin resins made by solid state shear pulverization

    DOEpatents

    Khait, Klementina

    2001-01-30

    A method of making polymeric particulates wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatibilizing agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product.

  20. Reconstituted Polymeric Materials Derived From Post-Consumer Waste, Industrial Scrap And Virgin Resins Made By Solid State Shear Pulverizat

    DOEpatents

    Khait, Klementina

    2005-02-01

    A method of making polymeric particulates wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatibilizing agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product.

  1. Reconstituted polymeric materials derived from post-consumer waste, industrial scrap and virgin resins made by solid state pulverization

    DOEpatents

    Khait, K.

    1998-09-29

    A method of making polymeric particulates is described wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatible agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product. 29 figs.

  2. Formation and Destruction Processes of Interstellar Dust: From Organic Molecules to carbonaceous Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Biennier, L.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the formation and destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. interstellar dust presents a continuous size distribution from large molecules, radicals and ions to nanometer-sized particles to micron-sized grains. The lower end of the dust size distribution is thought to be responsible for the ubiquitous spectral features that are seen in emission in the IR (UIBs) and in absorption in the visible (DIBs). The higher end of the dust-size distribution is thought to be responsible for the continuum emission plateau that is seen in the IR and for the strong absorption seen in the interstellar UV extinction curve. All these spectral signatures are characteristic of cosmic organic materials that are ubiquitous and present in various forms from gas-phase molecules to solid-state grains. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar chemistry and in the formation of organic molecules, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of dust. Recent space observations in the UV (HST) and in the IR (ISO) help place size constraints on the molecular component of carbonaceous IS dust and indicate that small (ie., subnanometer) PAHs cannot contribute significantly to the IS features in the UV and in the IR. Studies of large molecular and nano-sized IS dust analogs formed from PAH precursors have been performed in our laboratory under conditions that simulate diffuse ISM environments (the particles are cold -100 K vibrational energy, isolated in the gas phase and exposed to a high-energy discharge environment in a cold plasma). The species (molecules, molecular fragments, ions, nanoparticles, etc) formed in the pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) plasma source are detected with a high-sensitivity cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). We will present new experimental results that indicate that nanoparticles are generated in the

  3. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands: a Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Krelowski, J.; Allamandola, L. J.; Musaev, F. A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the proposal relating the origin of some of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in interstellar clouds. Laboratory spectra of several PAHs, isolated at low temperature in inert gas matrices, are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. From this comparison, it is concluded that PAN ions are good candidates to explain some of the DIBs. Unambiguous assignments are difficult, however, due to the shift in wavelengths and the band broadening induced in the laboratory spectra by the solid matrix. Definitive band assignments and, ultimately, the test of the of the proposal that PAH ions carry some of the DIB must await the availability of gas-phase measurements in the laboratory. The present assessment offers a guideline for future laboratory experiments by allowing the preselection of promising PAH molecules to be studied in jet expansions.

  4. Tholins - Organic chemistry of interstellar grains and gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Khare, B. N.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses tholins, defined as complex organic solids formed by the interaction of energy - for example, UV light or spark discharge - with various mixtures of cosmically abundant gases - CH4, C2H6, NH3, H2O, HCHO, and H2S. It is suggested that tholins occur in the interstellar medium and are responsible for some of the properties of the interstellar grains and gas. Additional occurrences of tholins are considered. Tholins have been produced experimentally; 50 or so pyrolytic fragments of the brown, sometimes sticky substances have been identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the incidence of these fragments in tholins produced by different procedures is reported.

  5. Fundamental Studies of the Durability of Materials for Interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick S. Pettit; Gerald H. Meier

    2006-06-30

    Ferritic stainless steels are a leading candidate material for use as an SOFC interconnect, but have the problem of forming volatile chromia species that lead to cathode poisoning. This project has focused both on optimization of ferritic alloys for SOFC applications and evaluating the possibility of using alternative materials. The initial efforts involved studying the oxidation behavior of a variety of chromia-forming ferritic stainless steels in the temperature range 700-900 C in atmospheres relevant to solid oxide fuel cell operation. The alloys exhibited a wide variety of oxidation behavior based on composition. A method for reducing the vaporization is to add alloying elements that lead to the formation of a thermally grown oxide layer over the protective chromia. Several commercial steels form manganese chromate on the surface. This same approach, combined with observations of TiO{sub 2} overlayer formation on the chromia forming, Ni-based superalloy IN 738, has resulted in the development of a series of Fe-22 Cr-X Ti alloys (X=0-4 wt%). Oxidation testing has indicated that this approach results in significant reduction in chromia evaporation. Unfortunately, the Ti also results in accelerated chromia scale growth. Fundamental thermo-mechanical aspects of the durability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect alloys have also been investigated. A key failure mechanism for interconnects is the spallation of the chromia scale that forms on the alloy, as it is exposed to fuel cell environments. Indentation testing methods to measure the critical energy release rate (Gc) associated with the spallation of chromia scale/alloy systems have been evaluated. This approach has been used to evaluate the thermomechanical stability of chromia films as a function of oxidation exposure. The oxidation of pure nickel in SOFC environments was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the NiO scaling kinetics and a four-point probe was used to measure

  6. Ionization in nearby interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.; Fowler, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Due to dielectric recombination, neutral magnesium represents an important tracer for the warm low-density gas around the solar system. New Mg I 2852 absorption-line data from IUE are presented, including detections in a few stars within 40 pc of the sun. The absence of detectable Mg I in Alpha CMa and other stars sets limits on the combined size and electron density of the interstellar cloud which gives rise to the local interstellar wind. For a cloud radius greater than 1 pc and density of 0.1/cu cm, the local cloud has a low fractional ionization, n(e)/n(tot) less than 0.05, if magnesium is undepleted, equilibrium conditions prevail, the cloud temperature is 11,750 K, and 80 percent of the magnesium in the sightline is Mg II.

  7. Interstellar Grains: 50 Years on

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    Our understanding of the nature of interstellar grains has evolved considerably over the past half century with the present author and Fred Hoyle being intimately involved at several key stages of progress. The currently fashionable graphite-silicate-organic grain model has all its essential aspects unequivocally traceable to original peer-reviewed publications by the author and/or Fred Hoyle. The prevailing reluctance to accept these clear-cut priorities may be linked to our further work that argued for interstellar grains and organics to have a biological provenance -- a position perceived as heretical. The biological model, however, continues to provide a powerful unifying hypothesis for a vast amount of otherwise disconnected and disparate astronomical data.

  8. Representing culture in interstellar messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2008-09-01

    As scholars involved with the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) have contemplated how we might portray humankind in any messages sent to civilizations beyond Earth, one of the challenges they face is adequately representing the diversity of human cultures. For example, in a 2003 workshop in Paris sponsored by the SETI Institute, the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) SETI Permanent Study Group, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST), and the John Templeton Foundation, a varied group of artists, scientists, and scholars from the humanities considered how to encode notions of altruism in interstellar messages . Though the group represented 10 countries, most were from Europe and North America, leading to the group's recommendation that subsequent discussions on the topic should include more globally representative perspectives. As a result, the IAA Study Group on Interstellar Message Construction and the SETI Institute sponsored a follow-up workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA in February 2005. The Santa Fe workshop brought together scholars from a range of disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, chemistry, communication science, philosophy, and psychology. Participants included scholars familiar with interstellar message design as well as specialists in cross-cultural research who had participated in the Symposium on Altruism in Cross-cultural Perspective, held just prior to the workshop during the annual conference of the Society for Cross-cultural Research . The workshop included discussion of how cultural understandings of altruism can complement and critique the more biologically based models of altruism proposed for interstellar messages at the 2003 Paris workshop. This paper, written by the chair of both the Paris and Santa Fe workshops, will explore the challenges of communicating concepts of altruism that draw on both biological

  9. Silicon chemistry in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    Interstellar SiO was discovered shortly after CO but it has been detected mainly in high density and high temperature regions associated with outflow sources. A new model of interstellar silicon chemistry that explains the lack of SiO detections in cold clouds is presented which contains an exponential temperature dependence for the SiO abundance. A key aspect of the model is the sensitivity of SiO production by neutral silicon reactions to density and temperature, which arises from the dependence of the rate coefficients on the population of the excited fine structure levels of the silicon atom. This effect was originally pointed out in the context of neutral reactions of carbon and oxygen by Graff, who noted that the leading term in neutral atom-molecule interactions involves the quadrupole moment of the atom. Similar to the case of carbon, the requirement that Si has a quadrupole moment requires population of the J = 1 level, which lies 111K above the J = 0 ground state and has a critical density n(cr) equal to or greater than 10(6)/cu cm. The SiO abundance then has a temperature dependence proportional to exp(-111/T) and a quadratic density dependence for n less than n(cr). As part of the explanation of the lack of SiO detections at low temperatures and densities, this model also emphasizes the small efficiencies of the production routes and the correspondingly long times needed to reach equilibrium. Measurements of the abundance of SiO, in conjunction with theory, can provide information on the physical properties of interstellar clouds such as the abundances of oxygen bearing molecules and the depletion of interstellar silicon.

  10. RUBIDIUM IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Kyle M.; Federman, S. R.; Knauth, David C.; Lambert, David L. E-mail: steven.federman@utoledo.ed E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.ed

    2009-11-20

    We present observations of interstellar rubidium toward o Per, zeta Per, AE Aur, HD 147889, chi Oph, zeta Oph, and 20 Aql. Theory suggests that stable {sup 85}Rb and long-lived {sup 87}Rb are produced predominantly by high-mass stars, through a combination of the weak s- and r-processes. The {sup 85}Rb/{sup 87}Rb ratio was determined from measurements of the Rb I line at 7800 A and was compared to the solar system meteoritic ratio of 2.59. Within 1sigma uncertainties, all directions except HD 147889 have Rb isotope ratios consistent with the solar system value. The ratio toward HD 147889 is much lower than the meteoritic value and similar to that toward rho Oph A; both lines of sight probe the Rho Ophiuchus Molecular Cloud. The earlier result was attributed to a deficit of r-processed {sup 85}Rb. Our larger sample suggests instead that {sup 87}Rb is enhanced in these two lines of sight. When the total elemental abundance of Rb is compared to the K elemental abundance, the interstellar Rb/K ratio is significantly lower than the meteoritic ratio for all the sight lines in this study. Available interstellar samples for other s- and r- process elements are used to help interpret these results.

  11. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  12. Astrophysics with Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, Larry R.; Ciesla, Fred

    2016-09-01

    Extraterrestrial materials, including meteorites, interplanetary dust, and spacecraft-returned asteroidal and cometary samples, provide a record of the starting materials and early evolution of the Solar System. We review how laboratory analyses of these materials provide unique information, complementary to astronomical observations, about a wide variety of stellar, interstellar and protoplanetary processes. Presolar stardust grains retain the isotopic compositions of their stellar sources, mainly asymptotic giant branch stars and Type II supernovae. They serve as direct probes of nucleosynthetic and dust formation processes in stars, galactic chemical evolution, and interstellar dust processing. Extinct radioactivities suggest that the Sun's birth environment was decoupled from average galactic nucleosynthesis for some tens to hundreds of Myr but was enriched in short-lived isotopes from massive stellar winds or explosions shortly before or during formation of the Solar System. Radiometric dating of meteorite components tells us about the timing and duration over which solar nebula solids were assembled into the building blocks of the planets. Components of the most primitive meteoritical materials provide further detailed constraints on the formation, processing, and transport of material and associated timescales in the Sun's protoplanetary disk as well as in other forming planetary systems.

  13. Synchrotron FTIR Examination of Interplanetary Dust Particles: An Effort to Determine the Compounds and Minerals in Interstellar and Circumstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2002-01-01

    Some interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), collected by NASA from the Earth's stratosphere, are the most primitive extraterrestrial material available for laboratory analysis. Many exhibit isotopic anomalies in H, N, and O, suggesting they contain preserved interstellar matter. We report the preliminary results of a comparison of the infrared absorption spectra of subunits of the IDPs with astronomical spectra of interstellar grains.

  14. The relative amounts of stars and interstellar matter in the local Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the balance between star formation and mass loss from evolved stars in the region within 1 kpc of the sun. There is considerably more mass in stars than in the interstellar medium, and more material is being incorporated into new stars than is being returned by evolved stars. In the simplest interpretation of the data, it appears that unless there is some infall of new interstellar gas, the era of substantial star formation out of interstellar gas will be over in a few (perhaps 3) billion years.

  15. Calcium manganite as oxygen electrode materials for reversible solid oxide fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Ni, Chengsheng; Irvine, John T S

    2015-01-01

    For an efficient high-temperature reversible solid oxide fuel cell (RSOFC), the oxygen electrode should be highly active for the conversion between oxygen anions and oxygen gas. CaMnO(3-δ) (CM) is a perovskite that can be readily reduced with the formation of Mn(3+) giving rise to oxygen defective phases. CM is examined here as the oxygen electrode for a RSOFC. CaMn(0.9)Nb(0.1)O(3-δ) (CMN) with Nb doping shows superior electric conductivity (125 S cm(-1) at 700 °C) compared with CM (1-5 S cm(-1) at 700 °C) in air which is also examined for comparison. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data show that CM and CMN are compatible with the widely used yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte up to 950 °C. Both materials show a thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) close to 10.8-10.9 ppm K(-1) in the temperature range between 100-750 °C, compatible with that of YSZ. Polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra for both fuel cell and steam electrolysis modes were investigated at 700 °C, showing that CM presented a polarization resistance of 0.059 Ω cm(2) under a cathodic bias of -0.4 V while CMN gave a polarization resistance of 0.081 Ω cm(2) under an anodic bias of 0.4 V. The phase stability up to 900 °C of these materials was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and variable temperature XRD.

  16. The nature and origin of interstellar diamond.

    PubMed

    Blake, D F; Freund, F; Krishnan, K F; Echer, C J; Shipp, R; Bunch, T E; Tielens, A G; Lipari, R J; Hetherington, C J; Chang, S

    1988-04-14

    Microscopic diamond was recently discovered in oxidized acid residues from several carbonaceous chondrite meteorites (for example, the C delta component of the Allende meteorite). Some of the reported properties of C delta seem in conflict with those expected of diamond. Here we present high spatial resolution analytical data which may help to explain such results. The C delta diamond is an extremely fine-grained (0.5-10 nm) single-phase material, but surface and interfacial carbon atoms, which may comprise as much as 25% of the total, impart an 'amorphous' character to some spectral data. These data support the proposed high-pressure conversion of amorphous carbon and graphite into diamonds due to grain-grain collisions in the interstellar medium although a low-pressure mechanism of formation cannot be ruled out.

  17. A Noncontact Measurement Technique for the Density and Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Solid and Liquid Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Sang K.; Thiessen, David B.; Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1996-01-01

    A noncontact measurement technique for the density and the thermal expansion refractory materials in their molten as well as solid phases is presented. This technique is based on the video image processing of a levitated sample. Experiments were performed using the high-temperature electrostatic levitator (HTESL) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in which 2-3 mm diameter samples can be levitated, melted, and radiatively cooled in a vacuum. Due to the axisymmetric nature of the molten samples when levitated in the HTESL, a rather simple digital image analysis can be employed to accurately measure the volumetric change as a function of temperature. Density and the thermal expansion coefficient measurements were made on a pure nickel sample to test the accuracy of the technique in the temperature range of 1045-1565 C. The result for the liquid phase density can be expressed by p = 8.848 + (6.730 x 10(exp -4)) x T (degC) g/cu cm within 0.8% accuracy, and the corresponding thermal expansion coefficient can be expressed by Beta=(9.419 x 10(exp -5)) - (7.165 x 10(exp -9) x T (degC)/K within 0.2% accuracy.

  18. Zinc sulfide nanosheets as a novel solid-phase extraction material for flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Licheng; Fan, Wei; Li, Shuman; Jia, Yong; Hou, Xiudan; Wang, Xusheng; Wang, Shuai; Guo, Yong

    2017-03-01

    As a novel solid-phase extraction material, zinc sulfide nanosheets were prepared by a simple method and were used to extract flavonoids. We used scanning electron microscopy to show its nanosheet morphology and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction to confirm its chemical and phase compositions. Coupled to a high-performance liquid chromatography, the zinc sulfide nanosheets were packed into a microcolumn and were used to extract four model flavonoids to examine their extraction ability. The parameters of sample loading and elution were investigated. Under optimized conditions, the analytical method for flavonoids was established. For the method, wide linearities from 1 to 250 μg/L and low limits of detection from 0.25 to 0.5 μg/L were obtained. The relative standard deviations for single column repeatability and column to column reproducibility were less than 7.7 and 10.4%, respectively. The established method was also used to analyze two real samples and the recoveries from 88.7 to 98.2% further proved the reliability of the method. Moreover, the zinc sulfide nanosheets have good stability and that in one column can be reused for more than 50 times. This work proves that the prepared zinc sulfide nanosheets are a good candidate as the flavonoids sorbent.

  19. Apparatus for Measuring Spectral Emissivity of Solid Materials at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Dengfeng; Tan, Hong; Xuan, Yimin; Han, Yuge; Li, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    Spectral emissivity measurements at high temperature are of great importance for both scientific research and industrial applications. A method to perform spectral emissivity measurements is presented based on two sample heating methods, the flat plate and tubular furnace. An apparatus is developed to measure the normal spectral emissivity of solid material at elevated temperatures from 1073 K to 1873 K and wavelengths from 2 \\upmu hbox {m} to 25 \\upmu hbox {m}. Sample heating is accomplished by a torch flame or a high temperature furnace. Two different variable temperature blackbody sources are used as standard references and the radiance is measured by a FTIR spectrometer. Following calibration of the spectral response and background radiance of the spectrometer, the effect of the blackbody temperature interval on calibration results is discussed. Measurements are performed of the normal spectral emissivity of SiC and graphite over the prescribed temperature and wavelength range. The emissivity of SiC at high temperatures is compared with the emissivity at room temperature, and the influence of an oxide layer formed at the surface of SiC on the emissivity is studied. The effect of temperature on the emissivity of graphite is also investigated. Furthermore, a thorough analysis of the uncertainty components of the emissivity measurement is performed.

  20. Metals and isotopes in Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal fluids and their associated solid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkley, T.K.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1987-10-10

    The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratio of the hydrothermal solution (HTS) (0.7034) is larger than that of basalt (0.7025) at the southern vent field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (SJFR). Both the Sr isotopic ratio for HTS and the water/rock interaction ratio lie between those at two sites farther south on the East Pacific Rise, 13 /sup 0/N and 21 /sup 0/N. These parameters may be closely related to subsurface temperatures and rates of magma ascent and to extent of faulting and surface areas of the frameworks of the hydrothermal systems. For these three Pacific Ocean sites there is no steady geographical progression of these measured parameters, nor of reported spreading rate, with increasing latitude northward. Pb and Nd isotopic measurements are uniform for all samples from the SJFR, ranging only from 18.43 to 18.58 for /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb (fluids and associated solids) and centering near 0.5131 for /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd (only fluids measured). Values for basalts and sulfides from the site have similar values. Relatively high /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb values at the SJFR suggest the potential for the existence of an anomalous radiogenic heat source in the underlying mantle material.

  1. Solid Liquid Interdiffusion Bonding of Zn4Sb3 Thermoelectric Material with Cu Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Lee, K. T.; Hwang, J. D.; Chu, H. S.; Hsu, C. C.; Chen, S. C.; Chuang, T. H.

    2016-10-01

    The ZnSb intermetallic compound may have thermoelectric applications because it is low in cost and environmentally friendly. In this study, a Zn4Sb3 thermoelectric element coated with a Ni barrier layer and a Ag reaction layer was bonded with a Ag-coated Cu electrode using a Ag/Sn/Ag solid-liquid interdiffusion bonding process. The results indicated that a Ni5Zn21 intermetallic phase formed easily at the Zn4Sb3/Ni interface, leading to sound adhesion. In addition, Sn film was found to react completely with the Ag layer to form a Ag3Sn intermetallic layer having a melting point of 480°C. The resulting Zn4Sb3 thermoelectric module can be applied at the optimized operation temperature (400°C) of Zn4Sb3 material as a thermoelectric element. The bonding strengths ranged from 14.9 MPa to 25.0 MPa, and shear tests revealed that the Zn4Sb3/Cu-joints fractured through the interior of the thermoelectric elements.

  2. Preparation and characterization of porous carbon material-coated solid-phase microextraction metal fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fang; Guo, Jiaming; Zeng, Feng; Fu, Ruowen; Wu, Dingcai; Luan, Tiangang; Tong, Yexiang; Lu, Tongbu; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2010-12-10

    Two kinds of porous carbon materials, including carbon aerogels (CAs), wormhole-like mesoporous carbons (WMCs), were synthesized and used as the coatings of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers. By using stainless steel wire as the supporting core, six types of fibers were prepared with sol-gel method, direct coating method and direct coating plus sol-gel method. Headspace SPME experiments indicated that the extraction efficiencies of the CA fibers are better than those of the WMC fibers, although the surface area of WMCs is much higher than that of CAs. The sol-gel-CA fiber (CA-A) exhibited excellent extraction properties for non-polar compounds (BTEX, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene), while direct-coated CA fiber (CA-B) presented the best performance in extracting polar compounds (phenols). The two CA fibers showed wide linear ranges, low detection limits (0.008-0.047μgL(-1) for BTEX, 0.15-5.7μgL(-1) for phenols) and good repeatabilities (RSDs less than 4.6% for BTEX, and less than 9.5% for phenols) and satisfying reproducibilities between fibers (RSDs less than 5.2% for BTEX, and less than 9.9% for phenols). These fibers were successfully used for the analysis of water samples from the Pearl River, which demonstrated the applicability of the home-made CA fibers.

  3. Suspended solid material (SSM) monitoring in coastal areas by satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Polito, Carmine; Lacava, Teodosio; Ciancia, Emanuele; Coviello, Irina; Faruolo, Mariapia; Paciello, Rossana; Pergola, Nicola; Satriano, Valeria; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2015-04-01

    The variation in Suspended Solid Material (SSM) concentration influences the penetration of light in the water column and therefore water quality, especially in terms of phytoplankton and benthic algae productivity. Remote sensing data have already demonstrated their potential for monitoring SSM in coastal areas. Anyway, an integration of satellite data/products with in situ measurements may further improve the accuracy of the techniques used for SSM retrieval. Such an approach has been used in this work. The studied area was the Ionian sea Basilicata coastal area (South of Italy), where five rivers have their mouths: Bradano, Basento, Cavone, Agri and Sinni. In particular, in this work we integrated in situ measurement carried out in the framework of IOSMOS (IOnian Sea water quality MOnitoring by Satellite data, OP ERDF Basilicata) and MOMEDAS (MOnitoraggio delle acque del mar MEditerraneo mediante DAti Satellitari, OP Basilicata ERF) projects, with historical series of satellite data. Three in situ measurement campaign were carried out on: 18-19 April 2013, 15-16 July 2013 and 1-2 July 2014, collecting SSM information and Spectroradiometers measurements in the Visible - Near InfraRed (VNIR) spectral region. We compared these in situ data with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data. In detail MODIS data acquired in band 1 (red) and 2 (near infrared) from 2002 to 2014 were analyzed by a specific methodology, the Robust Satellite techniques (RST). In this paper, preliminarily results achieved by such a comparison will be shown.

  4. Bio-inspired solid phase extraction sorbent material for cocaine: a cross reactivity study.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Camilla; Sergi, Manuel; Perez, German; Curini, Roberta; Compagnone, Dario; Mascini, Marcello

    2014-12-01

    The binding specificity of a bio-inspired hexapeptide (QHWWDW) versus cocaine and four other drugs such as 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine (MDEA), phencyclidine and morphine was computationally studied and then experimentally confirmed in solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) detection. In simulation, the hexapeptide-drug complexes were docked with different scoring functions and considering pH chemical environment. In experimental, the cross reactivity of the selected hexapeptide was tested as SPE sorbent versus cocaine and other four drugs using buffer solutions at pH 4 and 7. Significant differences in specific retention were found between cocaine (97% of recovery) and both morphine (45% of recovery) and phencyclidine (60% of recovery), but less for ecstasies (average recovery 69%). In agreement with docking simulation, the hexapeptide showed the highest recovery with best specificity versus cocaine at pH 7 with an experimentally binding constant of 2.9 × 10(6)M(-1). The bio-inspired sorbent material analytical performances were compared with a commercial reversed phase cartridge confirming the hexapeptide specificity to cocaine and validating simulated data.

  5. Spectroscopic evidence for interstellar ices in comet Hyakutake.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M; Bockelee-Morvan, D; Lis, D C; Matthews, H E; Biver, N; Crovisier, J; Davies, J K; Dent, W R; Gautier, D; Godfrey, P D; Keene, J; Lovell, A J; Owen, T C; Phillips, T G; Rauer, H; Schloerb, F P; Senay, M; Young, K

    1996-10-03

    Volatile compounds in comets are the most pristine materials surviving from the time of formation of the Solar System, and thus potentially provide information about conditions that prevailed in the primitive solar nebula. Moreover, comets may have supplied a substantial fraction of the volatiles on the terrestrial planets, perhaps including organic compounds that played a role in the origin of life on Earth. Here we report the detection of hydrogen isocyanide (HNC) in comet Hyakutake. The abundance of HNC relative to hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is very similar to that observed in quiescent interstellar molecular clouds, and quite different from the equilibrium ratio expected in the outermost solar nebula, where comets are thought to form. Such a departure from equilibrium has long been considered a hallmark of gas-phase chemical processing in the interstellar medium, suggesting that interstellar gases have been incorporated into the comet's nucleus, perhaps as ices frozen onto interstellar grains. If this interpretation is correct, our results should provide constraints on the temperature of the solar nebula, and the subsequent chemical processes that occurred in the region where comets formed.

  6. Near-infrared absorption spectroscopy of interstellar hydrocarbon grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Sellgren, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present new 3600 - 2700/cm (2.8 - 3.7 micrometer) spectra of objects whose extinction is dominated by dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. The observations presented here augment an ongoing study of the organic component of the diffuse interstellar medium. These spectra contain a broad feature centered near 3300/cm (3.0 micrometers) and/or a feature with a more complex profile near 2950/cm (3.4 micrometers), the latter of which is attributed to saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons in interstellar grains and is the primary interest of this paper. As in our earlier work, the similarity of the absorption bands near 2950/cm (3.4 micrometers) along different lines of sight and the correlation of these features with interstellar extinction reveal that the carrier of this band lies in the dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM). At least 2.5% of the cosmic carbon in the local interstellar medium and 4% toward the Galactic center is tied up in the carrier of the 2950/cm (3.4 micrometer) band. The spectral structure of the diffuse dust hydrocarbon C-H stretch absorption features is reasonably similar to UV photolyzed laboratory ice residues and is quite similar to the carbonaceous component of the Murchison meteorite. The similarity between the DISM and the meteoritic spectrum suggests that some of the interstellar material originally incorporated into the solar nebula may have survived relatively untouched in primitive solar system bodies. Comparisons of the DISM spectrum to hydrogenated amorphous carbon and quenched carbonaceous composite are also presented. The A(sub V)/tau ratio for the 2950/cm (3.4 micrometer) feature is lower toward the Galactic center than toward sources in the local solar neighborhood (approximately 150 for the Galactic center sources vs. approximately 250 for the local ISM sources). A similar trend has been observed previously for silicates in the diffuse medium by Roche & Aitken, suggesting that (1) the silicate and carbonaceous

  7. Development of a poly(dimethylacrylamide) based matrix material for solid phase high density peptide array synthesis employing a laser based material transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridder, Barbara; Foertsch, Tobias C.; Welle, Alexander; Mattes, Daniela S.; von Bojnicic-Kninski, Clemens M.; Loeffler, Felix F.; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Meier, Michael A. R.; Breitling, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Poly(dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA) based matrix materials were developed for laser-based in situ solid phase peptide synthesis to produce high density arrays. In this specific array synthesis approach, amino acid derivatives are embedded into a matrix material, serving as a "solid" solvent material at room temperature. Then, a laser pulse transfers this mixture to the target position on a synthesis slide, where the peptide array is synthesized. Upon heating above the glass transition temperature of the matrix material, it softens, allowing diffusion of the amino acid derivatives to the synthesis surface and serving as a solvent for peptide bond formation. Here, we synthesized PDMA six-arm star polymers, offering the desired matrix material properties, using atom transfer radical polymerization. With the synthesized polymers as matrix material, we structured and synthesized arrays with combinatorial laser transfer. With densities of up to 20,000 peptide spots per cm2, the resolution could be increased compared to the commercially available standard matrix material. Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry experiments revealed the penetration behavior of an amino acid derivative into the prepared acceptor synthesis surface and the effectiveness of the washing protocols.

  8. Fullerenes and Buckyonions in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias Groth, S.

    2004-09-01

    We have studied the contribution of single fullerenes and buckyonions to the interstellar extinction. The photoabsorption spectra of these molecules is predicted and compared with some of the most relevant features of interstellar extinction, the UV bump, far UV rise and the diffuse interstellar bands. We conclude that fullerenes and buckyonions may explain these features and make a preliminary estimate of the carbon fraction locked in these molecules.

  9. Material synthesis and fabrication method development for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hanping

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are operated in high temperature conditions (750-1000 °C). The high operating temperature in turn may lead to very complicated material degradation issues, significantly increasing the cost and reducing the durability of SOFC material systems. In order to widen material selections, reduce cost, and increase durability of SOFCs, there is a growing interest to develop intermediate temperature SOFCs (500-750 °C). However, lowering operating temperature will cause substantial increases of ohmic resistance of electrolyte and polarization resistance of electrodes. This dissertation aimed at developing high-performance intermediate-temperature SOFCs through the employment of a series of layered perovskite oxides as novel cathode materials to minimize the potential electrode polarization on oxygen reduction reaction resulting from the unique crystal structure. The high performance of such perovskites under lower temperatures lies in the fact that a simple cubic perovskite with randomly occupied A-sites transforming into a layered compound with ordered lanthanide and alkali-earth cations may reduce the oxygen bonding strength and provide disorder-free channels for oxygen ion migrations. In order to compromise the cell performance and chemical and mechanical stability, the substitution of Fe in B site was comprehensively investigated to explore the effects of Fe doping on the crystal structure, thermal and electrical properties, as well as electrochemical performance. Furthermore, a platinum nanowire network was successfully developed as an ultrathin electrochemically efficient current collector for SOFCs. The unique platinum network on cathode surface can connect the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) sites at the nano-scale to the external circuit while being able to substantially avoid blocking the open pores of the cathode. The superior electrochemical performance was exhibited, including the highly reduced electrode polarization resistance

  10. New directions for high-performance materials via postextrusion solid state polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almonacil, Celine

    Solid state polymerization (SSP) usually consists of heating condensation polymers to temperatures below their melting point and holding there for a significant time to raise their molecular weight. The process is common in the polymer industry for the production of high molecular weight polyesters and polyamides for industrial fibers and molded products. Recent research has shown that post-extrusion SSP, where polymerization is performed on extruded products such as thin films or fibers, has the potential to lead to high performance materials. Although literature on SSP is abundant, the mechanisms and possible morphological consequences have remained largely unexplored. The purpose of this work is to explore the potential for generating high performance oriented polymer morphologies by performing a fundamental analysis of the mechanisms and morphological consequences of post-extrusion SSP in oriented polymers. It is based on recent research that has shown that interchange reactions can play a fundamental role during many solid state polymerizations by providing the primary mechanism for migration of functionality. It is also based on the recent recognition that these reactions can cause profound changes in the morphology of the polymer. A coarse-grained model which can be used to explore quantitatively the effect of interchange reactions on the topological distribution of chains in inter-crystalline regions is presented here. It includes a novel thermodynamic scheme, coupled with Monte Carlo Rotational Isomeric State simulations, to determine quantitatively the relative probabilities of morphologically different reaction pathways. The results show the role of intrinsic molecular rigidity on interconversions of bridges and loops during SSP of different polymers. The generalized scheme presented here can serve to identify, via gedanken experiments, appropriate semi-rigid systems to explore through real synthesis and processing of high mechanical performance polymers

  11. Microanalysis of Hypervelocity Impact Residues of Possible Interstellar Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, Rhonda M.; Achilles, Cheri; Allen, Carlton; Anasari, Asna; Bajt, Sasa; Bassim, Nabil; Bastien, Ron S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, Janet; Brenker, Frank E.; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Butterworth, Anna L.; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Flynn, George; Fougeray, Patrick; Frank, David; Sandford, Scott A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Stardust spacecraft deployed two collector trays, one dedicated to the collection of dust from Comet Wild 2, and the other for the capture of interstellar dust (ISD). The samples were returned successfully to Earth in 2006, and now provide an unprecedented opportunity for laboratory-based microanalysis of materials from the outer solar system and beyond. Results from the cometary sample studies have demonstrated that Wild 2 contains much more refractory condensate material and much less pristine extra-solar material than expected, which further indicates that there was significant transport of inner solar system materials to the Kuiper Belt in the early solar system [1]. The analysis of the interstellar samples is still in the preliminary examination (PE) phase, due to the level of difficulty in the definitive identification of the ISD features, the overall low abundance, and its irreplaceable nature, which necessitates minimally invasive measurements [2]. We present here coordinated microanalysis of the impact features on the Al foils, which have led to the identification of four impacts that are possibly attributable to interstellar dust. Results from the study of four ISD candidates captured in aerogel are presented elsewhere [2].

  12. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination X: Impact Speeds and Directions of Interstellar Grains on the Stardust Dust Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterken, Veerle J.; Westphal, Andrew J.; Altobelli, Nicolas; Grun, Eberhard; Hillier, Jon K.; Postberg, Frank; Allen, Carlton; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of an interstellar dust model compatible with Ulysses and Galileo observations, we calculate and predict the trajectories of interstellar dust (ISD) in the solar system and the distribution of the impact speeds, directions, and flux of ISD particles on the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector during the two collection periods of the mission. We find that the expected impact velocities are generally low (less than 10 km per second) for particles with the ratio of the solar radiation pressure force to the solar gravitational force beta greater than 1, and that some of the particles will impact on the cometary side of the collector. If we assume astronomical silicates for particle material and a density of 2 grams per cubic centimeter, and use the Ulysses measurements and the ISD trajectory simulations, we conclude that the total number of (detectable) captured ISD particles may be on the order of 50. In companion papers in this volume, we report the discovery of three interstellar dust candidates in the Stardust aerogel tiles. The impact directions and speeds of these candidates are consistent with those calculated from our ISD propagation model, within the uncertainties of the model and of the observations.

  13. Integrated generation of solid fuel and biogas from green cut material from landscape conservation and private households.

    PubMed

    Hensgen, F; Richter, F; Wachendorf, M

    2011-11-01

    Green cut material is a potential source of renewable energy which is not fully exploited through conventional energy recovery systems. A new energy conversion process, the integrated generation of solid fuel and biogas from biomass (IFBB), which includes mechanical separation after hydro-thermal conditioning, was investigated. Ash softening temperature and lower heating value of the solid fuel were increased through the IFFB process in comparison to the untreated raw material. The net energy yield of IFBB at 40 °C conditioning temperature ranged between 1.96 and 2.85 kWh kg(-1) dry matter (DM) and for the direct combustion between 1.75 and 2.65 kWh kg(-1) DM. Conversion efficiencies for the IFBB system were 0.42-0.68 and for direct combustion 0.42-0.63. The IFBB system produces storable energy from material which is nowadays not used for energy conversion.

  14. Extensively Reversible Thermal Transformations of a Bistable, Fluorescence-Switchable Molecular Solid: Entry into Functional Molecular Phase-Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Srujana, P; Radhakrishnan, T P

    2015-06-15

    Functional phase-change materials (PCMs) are conspicuously absent among molecular materials in which the various attributes of inorganic solids have been realized. While organic PCMs are primarily limited to thermal storage systems, the amorphous-crystalline transformation of materials like Ge-Sb-Te find use in advanced applications such as information storage. Reversible amorphous-crystalline transformations in molecular solids require a subtle balance between robust supramolecular assembly and flexible structural elements. We report novel diaminodicyanoquinodimethanes that achieve this transformation by interlinked helical assemblies coupled with conformationally flexible alkoxyalkyl chains. They exhibit highly reversible thermal transformations between bistable (crystalline/amorphous) forms, along with a prominent switching of the fluorescence emission energy and intensity.

  15. A new method for evaluation of heat transfer between solid material and fluid in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimiya, K.

    1999-11-01

    Technological applications in which porous materials are utilized include thermal energy storage, geophysical fluid engineering, thermal insulation, heat transfer enhancement, and heat exchangers. The author proposes a new method to estimate the heat transfer between fluid gas and solid material in a porous medium. In the first stage, the local Nusselt numbers on the heated wall of a flow passage with a porous medium are numerically obtained in advance for the parameter H{sub a}, including the volumetric heat transfer coefficient, h{sub {nu}}, between the fluid and the solid material in a porous medium. In the second stage, the experimental Nusselt numbers on the heated wall are obtained by measuring wall temperatures and heat flux. The volumetric heat transfer coefficient, h{sub {nu}}, is evaluated by comparing experimental Nusselt numbers with numerical ones. This method also gives the longitudinal characteristics of the heat transfer in a porous medium.

  16. The Origin and Evolution of Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Houches, Les

    2006-01-01

    In this lecture I will discuss the many different manifestation of interstellar dust, and current dust models that satisfy interstellar extinction, diffuse infrared emission, and interstellar abundances constraints. Dust is made predominantly in AGB stars and Type I1 supernovae, and I will present observational evidence for the presence of dust in these sources. I will then present chemical evolution models that follow the abundance of dust which is determined by the combined processes of formation, destruction by interstellar shock waves, and accretion in molecular clouds. The model will be applied to the evolution of PAHs and the evolution of dust in the high-redshift galaxy (z=6.42) JD11.

  17. Structure and Dynamics of the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Moles, Mariano; Melnick, Jorge

    Here for the first time is a book that treats practically all aspects of modern research in interstellar matter astrophysics. 20 review articles and 40 carefully selected and refereed papers give a thorough overview of the field and convey the flavor of enthusiastic colloquium discussions to the reader. The book includes sections on: - Molecular clouds, star formation and HII regions - Mechanical energy sources - Discs, outflows, jets and HH objects - The Orion Nebula - The extragalactic interstellar medium - Interstellar matter at high galactic latitudes - The structure of the interstellar medium

  18. The Exobiological Role of Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in observational astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Before this time, the composition of interstellar dust was largely guessed-at, the presence of ices in interstellar clouds ignored, and the notion that large, gas phase, carbon rich molecules might be abundant and widespread throughout the interstellar medium (ISM) considered impossible. Today, the composition of dust in the ISM is reasonably well constrained to micron-sized cold refractory materials comprised of amorphous and crystalline silicates mixed with an amorphous carbonaceous material containing aromatic structural units and short, branched aliphatic chains. Shrouded within the protective confines of cold, opaque molecular clouds--the birthplace of stars and planets--these cold dust particles secrete mantles of mixed molecular ices whose compositions are also well constrained. Finally, amidst the molecular inventory of these ice mantles are likely to be found polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), shockingly large molecules by the standards of interstellar chemistry, the telltale infrared spectral signature of which is now recognized throughout the Universe. In the first part of this talk, we will review the spectroscopic evidence that forms the basis for the currently accepted abundance and ubiquity of PANs in the ISM. We will then look at a few specific examples which illustrate how experimental and theoretical data can be applied to interpret the interstellar spectra and track how the PAN population evolves as it passes from its formation site in the circumstellar outflows of dying stars, through the various phases of the ISM, and into forniing planetary systems. Nevertheless, despite the fact that PANs likely represent the single largest molecular reservoir of organic carbon in evolving planetary systems, they are not what would be considered

  19. Crystal Violet Lactone Salicylaldehyde Hydrazone Zn(II) Complex: a Reversible Photochromic Material both in Solution and in Solid Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Li, Yuanyuan; Tao, Jing; Liu, Lu; Wang, Lili; Hou, Hongwei; Tong, Aijun

    2015-09-01

    Crystal violet lactone (CVL) is a classic halochromic dye which has been widely used as chromogenic reagent in thermochromic and piezochromic systems. In this work, a very first example of CVL-based reversible photochromic compound was developed, which showed distinct color change upon UV-visible light irradiation both in solution and in solid matrix. Moreover, metal complex of CVL salicylaldehyde hydrozone was facilely synthesized, exhibiting reversible photochromic properties with good fatigue resistance. It was served as promising solid material for photo-patterning.

  20. Crystal Violet Lactone Salicylaldehyde Hydrazone Zn(II) Complex: a Reversible Photochromic Material both in Solution and in Solid Matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Li, Yuanyuan; Tao, Jing; Liu, Lu; Wang, Lili; Hou, Hongwei; Tong, Aijun

    2015-09-28

    Crystal violet lactone (CVL) is a classic halochromic dye which has been widely used as chromogenic reagent in thermochromic and piezochromic systems. In this work, a very first example of CVL-based reversible photochromic compound was developed, which showed distinct color change upon UV-visible light irradiation both in solution and in solid matrix. Moreover, metal complex of CVL salicylaldehyde hydrozone was facilely synthesized, exhibiting reversible photochromic properties with good fatigue resistance. It was served as promising solid material for photo-patterning.