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Sample records for solid surfaces measured

  1. Solid surface tension measured by a liquid drop under a solid film.

    PubMed

    Nadermann, Nichole; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand

    2013-06-25

    We show that a drop of liquid a few hundred microns in diameter placed under a solid, elastic, thin film (∼10 μm thick) causes it to bulge by tens of microns. The deformed shape is governed by equilibrium of tensions exerted by the various interfaces and the solid film, a form of Neumann's triangle. Unlike Young's equation, which specifies the contact angles at the junction of two fluids and a (rigid) solid, and is fundamentally underdetermined, both tensions in the solid film can be determined here if the liquid-vapor surface tension is known independently. Tensions in the solid film have a contribution from elastic stretch and a constant residual component. The residual component, extracted by extrapolation to films of vanishing thickness and supported by analysis of the elastic deformation, is interpreted as the solid-fluid surface tension, demonstrating that compliant thin-film structures can be used to measure solid surface tensions. PMID:23754440

  2. Solid surface tension measured by a liquid drop under a solid film

    PubMed Central

    Nadermann, Nichole; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand

    2013-01-01

    We show that a drop of liquid a few hundred microns in diameter placed under a solid, elastic, thin film (∼10 μm thick) causes it to bulge by tens of microns. The deformed shape is governed by equilibrium of tensions exerted by the various interfaces and the solid film, a form of Neumann’s triangle. Unlike Young’s equation, which specifies the contact angles at the junction of two fluids and a (rigid) solid, and is fundamentally underdetermined, both tensions in the solid film can be determined here if the liquid–vapor surface tension is known independently. Tensions in the solid film have a contribution from elastic stretch and a constant residual component. The residual component, extracted by extrapolation to films of vanishing thickness and supported by analysis of the elastic deformation, is interpreted as the solid–fluid surface tension, demonstrating that compliant thin-film structures can be used to measure solid surface tensions. PMID:23754440

  3. Measurement of Surface Tension of Solid Cu by Improved Multiphase Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, Masashi; Liukkonen, Matti; Friman, Michael; Heikinheimo, Erkki; Hämäläinen, Marko; Holappa, Lauri

    2008-08-01

    The surface tension of solid Cu was measured with the multiphase equilibrium (MPE) method in a Pb-Cu system at 700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C. A special focus was on the measurement of angles involved in MPE. First, the effect of reading error in each angle measurement on the final result of surface tension of solid was simulated. It was found that the two groove measurements under atmosphere conditions are the primary sources of error in the surface tension of solid in the present system. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to these angle measurements as a new method with high accuracy. The obtained surface-tension values of solid Cu in the present work were 1587, 1610, and 1521 mN/m at 700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C, respectively, representing reasonable temperature dependence.

  4. Quantitative Surface Emissivity and Temperature Measurements of a Burning Solid Fuel Accompanied by Soot Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piltch, Nancy D.; Pettegrew, Richard D.; Ferkul, Paul; Sacksteder, K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Surface radiometry is an established technique for noncontact temperature measurement of solids. We adapt this technique to the study of solid surface combustion where the solid fuel undergoes physical and chemical changes as pyrolysis proceeds, and additionally may produce soot. The physical and chemical changes alter the fuel surface emissivity, and soot contributes to the infrared signature in the same spectral band as the signal of interest. We have developed a measurement that isolates the fuel's surface emissions in the presence of soot, and determine the surface emissivity as a function of temperature. A commercially available infrared camera images the two-dimensional surface of ashless filter paper burning in concurrent flow. The camera is sensitive in the 2 to 5 gm band, but spectrally filtered to reduce the interference from hot gas phase combustion products. Results show a strong functional dependence of emissivity on temperature, attributed to the combined effects of thermal and oxidative processes. Using the measured emissivity, radiance measurements from several burning samples were corrected for the presence of soot and for changes in emissivity, to yield quantitative surface temperature measurements. Ultimately the results will be used to develop a full-field, non-contact temperature measurement that will be used in spacebased combustion investigations.

  5. Reconstructing solid precipitation from snow depth measurements and a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Jessie Ellen; Tremblay, L. Bruno; DéRy, Stephen J.; Stieglitz, Marc

    2005-09-01

    The amount and distribution of snowfall in the Arctic has significant effects on global climate. However, measurements of snowfall from gauges are strongly biased. A new method is described for reconstructing snowfall from observed snow depth records, meteorological observations, and running the NASA Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction Project Catchment Land Surface Model (NSIPP CLSM) in an inverse mode. This method is developed and tested with observations from Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed. Results show snowfall can be accurately reconstructed on the basis of how much snow must have fallen to produce the observed snow depth. The mean cumulative error (bias) of the reconstructed precipitation for 11 snow seasons is 29 mm snow water equivalent (SWE) for the corrected gauge measurement compared to ‒77 mm SWE for the precipitation from the corrected snow gauges. This means the root-mean-square error of reconstructed solid precipitation is 30% less than that of gauge corrections. The intended application of this method is the pan-Arctic landmass, where estimates of snowfall are highly uncertain but where more than 60 years of historical snow depth and air temperature records exist.

  6. Reconstructing solid precipitation from snow depth measurements and a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Jessie Ellen; Tremblay, L. Bruno; Déry, Stephen J.; Stieglitz, Marc

    2005-09-01

    The amount and distribution of snowfall in the Arctic has significant effects on global climate. However, measurements of snowfall from gauges are strongly biased. A new method is described for reconstructing snowfall from observed snow depth records, meteorological observations, and running the NASA Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction Project Catchment Land Surface Model (NSIPP CLSM) in an inverse mode. This method is developed and tested with observations from Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed. Results show snowfall can be accurately reconstructed on the basis of how much snow must have fallen to produce the observed snow depth. The mean cumulative error (bias) of the reconstructed precipitation for 11 snow seasons is 29 mm snow water equivalent (SWE) for the corrected gauge measurement compared to -77 mm SWE for the precipitation from the corrected snow gauges. This means the root-mean-square error of reconstructed solid precipitation is 30% less than that of gauge corrections. The intended application of this method is the pan-Arctic landmass, where estimates of snowfall are highly uncertain but where more than 60 years of historical snow depth and air temperature records exist.

  7. Direct measurement of energy barriers on rough and heterogeneous solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, T.B.; LaGow, J.; Connelly, G.M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper will deal with the phenomenon of energy barriers to the spread of liquids on solids. These barriers often manifest themselves as a {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} of a sessile drop as liquid is added to it. That is, the volume of the drop increases, but the diameter does not. Thus the advancing contact angle ({theta}{sub a}) increases to a maximum. At the point where the hydrostatic pressure in the drop overcomes the {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} force the diameter suddenly increases and the drop relaxes to a metastable configuration which has a lower {theta}{sub a}. Energy barriers should be considered in many applications such as the spreading of liquid adhesives where thorough wetting is the goal. The interfacial forces involved are both long-range Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) forces and short-range acid-base (AB) forces. The authors will describe how they measure the energy barriers on real surfaces directly and resolve them into their LW and AB components.

  8. Uptake measurements of acetaldehyde on solid ice surfaces and on solid/liquid supercooled mixtures doped with HNO3 in the temperature range 203-253 K.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, M; Mirabel, Ph; Le Calvé, S

    2009-04-30

    Uptake of acetaldehyde on ice surfaces has been investigated over the temperature range 203-253 K using a coated wall flow tube coupled to a mass spectrometric detection. The experiments were conducted on pure ice surfaces and on liquid/solid ice mixture both doped with nitric acid (0.063, 0.63, and 6.3 wt %). Uptake of acetaldehyde on these surfaces was always found to be totally reversible whatever the experimental conditions were. The number of acetaldehyde molecules adsorbed per surface unit was conventionally plotted as a function of acetaldehyde concentration in the gas phase. Although the amounts of acetaldehyde adsorbed on solid ice surfaces (pure and HNO(3)-doped ice) were approximately similar and rather limited, the number of acetaldehyde molecules taken up on the HNO(3)-doped solid ice/liquid mixtures are significantly higher, up to 1 or 2 orders of magnitudes compared to pure ice surfaces. At 213 K for example and for low concentrations of acetaldehyde (<1 x 10(13) molecule cm(-3)), the amount of acetaldehyde molecules taken up on solid/liquid doped surfaces is 3.3 and 8.8 times higher than those measured on pure ice respectively for 0.063 and 0.63 wt % of HNO(3). The huge quantities of acetaldehyde taken up by liquid-/solid-doped mixtures are likely dissolved in the nonhomogeneous liquid part of the surfaces according to the Henry's law equilibrium. As a consequence, up to about 10% of acetaldehyde may be scavenged by supercooled liquid droplets of convective clouds in the upper troposphere.

  9. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness.

  10. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness. PMID:25514470

  11. Temperature measurements on solid surfaces in rack-storage fires using IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, J.; Ren, N.; Chaos, M.

    2015-05-01

    The development of fire modeling tools capable of predicting large-scale fire phenomena is of great value to the fire science community. To this end, FM Global has developed an open-source CFD fire simulation code, FireFOAM. The accuracy of this code relies fundamentally on high-quality experimental validation data. However, at larger scales, detailed measurements of local quantities (e.g., surface temperatures) needed for model validation are difficult to obtain. Often, the information obtained from large-scale fire tests is limited to the global heat release rates (HRR) or point temperature or heat flux measurements from embedded thermocouples or heat flux gauges, respectively. The present study addresses this limitation by introducing IR thermographic measurements in a three- and a five-tier-high rack storage scenario. IR temperatures are compared against modeled results. The tested and modeled cases represent realistic industrial warehouse fire scenarios. The rack-stored commodity consisted of corrugated paperboard boxes wrapped around a steel cubic liners, placed on top of a hardwood pallet. The global heat release rate was measured using a 20- MW fire products collector located inside FM Global's Fire Technology Laboratory. An in-house calibrated microbolometer IR camera was used to obtain two-dimensional temperature measurements on the fuel surfaces and on the surfaces inside the flue spaces. Maximum temperatures up to 1200 K were observed on the external surfaces of the test array. Inside the flue spaces between pallet loads, temperatures up to 1400 K were measured. The modeled fire spread results match well fire spread shown in the IR thermographic images. The peak modeled surface temperatures obtained inside some of the horizontal flue spaces were ~1400K, which agreed well with the peak temperatures seen by the IR camera. The effect of the flames present between the surfaces of interest and the IR camera only contribute to about 50 K increase in measured

  12. Direct measurements of chemical bonding at solid surfaces using a unique calorimetric method: Towards understanding surface chemistry in energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Jason A.

    Measuring the heat released when gas phase species adsorb onto surfaces provides essential information about the energies of surface species and the reactions they undergo. Here, heats of adsorption of technologically-interesting surface species were measured using a unique microcalorimetric technique in ultrahigh vacuum. Specifically, systems were studied which are relevant to understanding and improving transition metal catalysts and organic electronics. Metal adsorption energies were measured which elucidate metal-to-oxide and metal-to-polymer interfacial binding, and molecule adsorption energies were measured to understand how catalyst structure influences the energies of adsorbed reaction intermediates. Oxide-supported metal nanoparticles form the basis for many industrial catalysts. Nanoparticle activity, selectivity and resistance to sintering can depend strongly on particle size, oxide support, and defects on the oxide. To investigate the dependence of catalytic properties on oxide surface defects, defects were introduced on MgO(100) and CeO2(111), and their affect on the adsorption energy of metal atoms and the energy of supported nanoparticles was measured. These measurements help to explain why transition metal catalysts sinter more slowly and maintain smaller particles when supported on CeO 2 compared to other oxides, and how surface defects influence nanoparticle formation and film growth on oxides. The effect of nanoparticle size on the adsorption energy of CO on different-sized Pd nanoparticles on Fe3O 4(111) was measured, providing the first direct evidence that the heat of adsorption of CO decreases with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size. Knowledge of the direction and magnitude of particle size effects is necessary for improving existing catalysts and designing new ones. The metal/polymer interface is important because it impacts charge injection, extraction, and transport in organic electronics. Large-scale energy production using polymer

  13. Extracting local surface charges and charge regulation behavior from atomic force microscopy measurements at heterogeneous solid-electrolyte interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Cunlu; Ebeling, Daniel; Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-10-01

    We present a method to determine the local surface charge of solid-liquid interfaces from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements that takes into account shifts of the adsorption/desorption equilibria of protons and ions as the cantilever tip approaches the sample. We recorded AFM force distance curves in dynamic mode with sharp tips on heterogeneous silica surfaces partially covered by gibbsite nano-particles immersed in an aqueous electrolyte with variable concentrations of dissolved NaCl and KCl at pH 5.8. Forces are analyzed in the framework of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory in combination with a charge regulation boundary that describes adsorption and desorption reactions of protons and ions. A systematic method to extract the equilibrium constants of these reactions by simultaneous least-squared fitting to experimental data for various salt concentrations is developed and is shown to yield highly consistent results for silica-electrolyte interfaces. For gibbsite-electrolyte interfaces, the surface charge can be determined, yet, an unambiguous identification of the relevant surface speciation reactions is not possible, presumably due to a combination of intrinsic chemical complexity and heterogeneity of the nano-particle surfaces.

  14. Attractive forces between hydrophobic solid surfaces measured by AFM on the first approach in salt solutions and in the presence of dissolved gases.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Mehdi; Nguyen, Anh V; Yakubov, Gleb E

    2015-02-17

    Interfacial gas enrichment of dissolved gases (IGE) has been shown to cover hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) data has recently been supported by molecular dynamics simulation. It was demonstrated that IGE is responsible for the unexpected stability and large contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles at the hydrophobic solid-water interface. Here we provide further evidence of the significant effect of IGE on an attractive force between hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The force in the presence of dissolved gas, i.e., in aerated and nonaerated NaCl solutions (up to 4 M), was measured by the AFM colloidal probe technique. The effect of nanobubble bridging on the attractive force was minimized or eliminated by measuring forces on the first approach of the AFM probe toward the flat hydrophobic surface and by using high salt concentrations to reduce gas solubility. Our results confirm the presence of three types of forces, two of which are long-range attractive forces of capillary bridging origin as caused by either surface nanobubbles or gap-induced cavitation. The third type is a short-range attractive force observed in the absence of interfacial nanobubbles that is attributed to the IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) at hydrophobic surfaces. Such a force was found to increase with increasing gas saturation and to decrease with decreasing gas solubility.

  15. Surface decontamination of solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M.W.; Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.

    1980-04-01

    This paper summarizes work in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop vibratory finishing into a large-scale decontamination system that can minimize the volume of surface-contaminated metallic and nonmetallic waste requiring geologic disposal. Vibratory finishing is a mass finishing process used in the metal finishing industry to debur, clean and improve surface finishes. The process combines a mechanical scrubbing action of a solid medium with the cleaning action of a liquid compound. The process takes place in a vibrating tub. Tests have demonstrated the ability to rapidly reduce contamination levels of transuranic-contaminated waste to substantially less than 10 nCi/g, the current limit for transuranic waste. The process is effective on a wide range of materials including stainless steel, Plexiglas, Neoprene, and Hypalon, the principal materials in Hanford glove boxes.

  16. Phase conjugate Twyman-Green interferometer for testing spherical surfaces and lenses and for measuring refractive indices of liquids or solid transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, R. P.; Dokhanian, Mostafa; Venkateswarlu, Putcha; George, M. C.

    1990-09-01

    The present paper describes an application of a phase conjugate Twyman-Green interferometer using barium titanate as a self-pumping mirror for testing optical components like concave and convex spherical mirrors and lenses. The aberrations introduced by the beam splitter while testing concave or convex spherical mirrors of large aperture are automatically eliminated due to self-focussing property of the phase conjugate mirror. There is no necessity for a good spherical surface as a reference surface unlike in classical Twyman-Green interferometer or Williams interferometer. The phase conjugate Twyman Green interferometer with a divergent illumination can be used as a test plate for checking spherical surfaces. A nondestructive technique for measuring the refractive indices of a Fabry Perot etalon by using a phase conjugate interferometer is also suggested. The interferometer is found to be useful for measuring the refractive indices of liquids and solid transparent materials with an accuracy of the order of + or - 0.0004.

  17. Phase conjugate Twyman-Green interferometer for testing spherical surfaces and lenses and for measuring refractive indices of liquids or solid transparent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, R. P.; Dokhanian, Mostafa; Venkateswarlu, Putcha; George, M. C.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper describes an application of a phase conjugate Twyman-Green interferometer using barium titanate as a self-pumping mirror for testing optical components like concave and convex spherical mirrors and lenses. The aberrations introduced by the beam splitter while testing concave or convex spherical mirrors of large aperture are automatically eliminated due to self-focussing property of the phase conjugate mirror. There is no necessity for a good spherical surface as a reference surface unlike in classical Twyman-Green interferometer or Williams interferometer. The phase conjugate Twyman Green interferometer with a divergent illumination can be used as a test plate for checking spherical surfaces. A nondestructive technique for measuring the refractive indices of a Fabry Perot etalon by using a phase conjugate interferometer is also suggested. The interferometer is found to be useful for measuring the refractive indices of liquids and solid transparent materials with an accuracy of the order of + or - 0.0004.

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Thomas J.; Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-04-25

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  20. Eigenstress model for electrochemistry of solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongxin; Xiong, Xilin; Gao, Panpan; Li, Xi; Yan, Yu; Volinsky, Alex A; Su, Yanjing

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic analysis and molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to systematically study the size-dependent electrochemical response of solids. By combining the generalized Young-Laplace equation with the popular Butler-Volmer formulation, the direct influence of surface stress on solid film electrochemical reactions was isolated. A series of thermodynamic formulas were developed to describe the size-dependent electrochemical properties of the solid surface. These formulas include intrinsic surface elastic parameters, such as surface eigenstress and surface elastic modulus. Metallic films of Au, Pt, Ni, Cu and Fe were studied as examples. The anodic current density of the metal film increased, while the equilibrium potential decreased with increasing solid film thickness.

  1. Femtosecond laser controlled wettability of solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng; Yang, Qing; Hou, Xun

    2015-12-14

    Femtosecond laser microfabrication is emerging as a hot tool for controlling the wettability of solid surfaces. This paper introduces four typical aspects of femtosecond laser induced special wettability: superhydrophobicity, underwater superoleophobicity, anisotropic wettability, and smart wettability. The static properties are characterized by the contact angle measurement, while the dynamic features are investigated by the sliding behavior of a liquid droplet. Using different materials and machining methods results in different rough microstructures, patterns, and even chemistry on the solid substrates. So, various beautiful wettabilities can be realized because wettability is mainly dependent on the surface topography and chemical composition. The distinctions of the underlying formation mechanism of these wettabilities are also described in detail. PMID:26415826

  2. Nanofluids alter the surface wettability of solids.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sangwook; Horiuchi, Hiroki; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh

    2015-06-01

    We report the results of our studies on the changes in the contact angle and interfacial tension using a nanofluid composed of silica nanoparticles dispersed in water on three different solid substrates: gold (partially hydrophobic), glass (hydrophilic), and a silicon wafer (hydrophilic). We used both the goniometric method and drop-shape analysis to make the measurements. On the basis of the results of the drop-shape analysis using the Laplace equation, we evaluated the contributions of the interfacial tension change to the equilibrium contact angle and the presence of nanoparticles near the solid substrate, thereby elucidating the change in the wettability of the solid substrate. We found that the nanoparticles decrease the contact angle of the substrate with the increase in the nanoparticle concentration. To rationalize our experimental observations on the decrease in the contact angle of the solid substrate in the presence of nanoparticles, we calculated the surface volume fraction of the nanoparticles in the layer near the solid substrate using the particle layering model (based on the nanoparticles' excluded volume effect). We found that the volume fraction of the nanoparticles in the layer close to the substrate increased with an increase in the nanoparticle volume fraction in the bulk and correlated qualitatively with the change in the substrate wettability. The extent of the wettability alteration depends on the volume fraction of the nanoparticles, their size, and the type of substrate. We found a strong correlation between the change in the substrate wettability and the nanoparticle volume fraction in the layer closer to the substrate surface. PMID:25919686

  3. Stable water layers on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Tai, Lin-Ai; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Pin; Yang, Chung-Shi; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-02-17

    Liquid layers adhered to solid surfaces and that are in equilibrium with the vapor phase are common in printing, coating, and washing processes as well as in alveoli in lungs and in stomata in leaves. For such a liquid layer in equilibrium with the vapor it faces, it has been generally believed that, aside from liquid lumps, only a very thin layer of the liquid, i.e., with a thickness of only a few nanometers, is held onto the surface of the solid, and that this adhesion is due to van der Waals forces. A similar layer of water can remain on the surface of a wall of a microchannel after evaporation of bulk water creates a void in the channel, but the thickness of such a water layer has not yet been well characterized. Herein we showed such a water layer adhered to a microchannel wall to be 100 to 170 nm thick and stable against surface tension. The water layer thickness was measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the water layer structure was characterized by using a quantitative nanoparticle counting technique. This thickness was found for channel gap heights ranging from 1 to 5 μm. Once formed, the water layers in the microchannel, when sealed, were stable for at least one week without any special care. Our results indicate that the water layer forms naturally and is closely associated only with the surface to which it adheres. Our study of naturally formed, stable water layers may shed light on topics from gas exchange in alveoli in biology to the post-wet-process control in the semiconductor industry. We anticipate our report to be a starting point for more detailed research and understanding of the microfluidics, mechanisms and applications of gas-liquid-solid systems. PMID:26856872

  4. Program Generates Images Of Solid Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, Sharon P.; Bell, Bradley; Shores, David

    1991-01-01

    Solid Surface Modeler (SSM) computer program generates three-dimensional computer models of solid surfaces for use in visual analysis and animation. Provides advanced functions, including Constructive Solid Geometry, Skin Construction, Tube Construction, Material Property Editing, and Texture Map Tools. Allows user to change such attributes as color, reflectivity, smoothing, and position of object easily. Model saved in ASCII or binary format for use in another program or saved in edit format for reloading in SSM. Written in standard C.

  5. SU-E-T-96: Demonstration of a Consistent Method for Correcting Surface Dose Measurements Using Both Solid State and Ionization Chamber Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T; Gerbi, B; Higgins, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the surface dose (SD) measured using a PTW 30-360 extrapolation chamber with different commonly used dosimeters (Ds): parallel plate ion chambers (ICs): RMI-449 (Attix), Capintec PS-033, PTW 30-329 (Markus) and Memorial; TLD chips (cTLD), TLD powder (pTLD), optically stimulated (OSLs), radiochromic (EXR2) and radiographic (EDR2) films, and to provide an intercomparison correction to Ds for each of them. Methods: Investigations were performed for a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian Clinac 2300, 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm). The Ds were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth dref=1.7cm. The measurements for cTLD, OSLs, EDR2 and EXR2 were corrected to SD using an extrapolation method (EM) indexed to the baseline PTW 30-360 measurements. A consistent use of the EM involved: 1) irradiation of three Ds stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. An additional measurement was performed with externally exposed OSLs (eOSLs), that were rotated out of their protective housing. Results: All single Ds measurements overestimated the SD compared with the extrapolation chamber, except for Attix IC. The closest match to the true SD was measured with the Attix IC (− 0.1%), followed by pTLD (0.5%), Capintec (4.5%), Memorial (7.3%), Markus (10%), cTLD (11.8%), eOSL (12.8%), EXR2 (14%), EDR2 (14.8%) and OSL (26%). The EM method of correction for SD worked well for all Ds, except the unexposed OSLs. Conclusion: This EM cross calibration of solid state detectors with an extrapolation or Attix chamber can provide thickness corrections for cTLD, eOSLs, EXR2, and EDR2. Standard packaged OSLs were not found to be simply corrected.

  6. Eigenstress model for electrochemistry of solid surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongxin; Xiong, Xilin; Gao, Panpan; Li, Xi; Yan, Yu; Volinsky, Alex A.; Su, Yanjing

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic analysis and molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to systematically study the size-dependent electrochemical response of solids. By combining the generalized Young-Laplace equation with the popular Butler-Volmer formulation, the direct influence of surface stress on solid film electrochemical reactions was isolated. A series of thermodynamic formulas were developed to describe the size-dependent electrochemical properties of the solid surface. These formulas include intrinsic surface elastic parameters, such as surface eigenstress and surface elastic modulus. Metallic films of Au, Pt, Ni, Cu and Fe were studied as examples. The anodic current density of the metal film increased, while the equilibrium potential decreased with increasing solid film thickness. PMID:27256492

  7. Surface Sulci in Squeezed Soft Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallinen, T.; Biggins, J. S.; Mahadevan, L.

    2013-01-01

    The squeezing of soft solids, the constrained growth of biological tissues, and the swelling of soft elastic solids such as gels can generate large compressive stresses at their surfaces. This causes the otherwise smooth surface of such a solid to become unstable when its stress exceeds a critical value. Previous analyses of the surface instability have assumed two-dimensional plane-strain conditions, but in experiments isotropic stresses often lead to complex three-dimensional sulcification patterns. Here we show how such diverse morphologies arise by numerically modeling the lateral compression of a rigidly clamped elastic layer. For incompressible solids, close to the instability threshold, sulci appear as I-shaped lines aligned orthogonally with their neighbors; at higher compressions they are Y-shaped and prefer a hexagonal arrangement. In contrast, highly compressible solids when squeezed show only one sulcified phase characterized by a hexagonal sulcus network.

  8. A measurement method for distinguishing the real contact area of rough surfaces of transparent solids using improved Otsu technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bao-Jiang; Yan, Shao-Ze; Xiang, Wu-Wei-Kai

    2015-01-01

    An experimental method of measuring the real contact area of transparent blocks based on the principle of total internal reflection is presented, intending to support the investigation of friction characteristics, heat conduction, and energy dissipation at the contact interface. A laser sheet illuminates the contact interface, and the transmitted laser sheet is projected onto a screen. Then the contact information is acquired from the screen by a camera. An improved Otsu method is proposed to process the data of experimental images. It can compute the threshold of the overall image and filter out all the pixels one by one. Through analyzing the experimental results, we describe the relationship between the real contact area and the positive pressure during a continuous loading process, at different loading rates, with the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) material. A hysteresis phenomenon in the relationship between the real contact area and the positive pressure is found and explained. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272171), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 3132030), and the Education Ministry Doctoral Fund of China (Grant No. 20120002110070).

  9. Solid-surface luminescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtubise, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    We have characterized several interactions that are very important in solid-matrix luminescence. With silica gel chromatoplates and filter paper, simple equations were derived for calculating the individual contributions to the percent decrease in luminescence due to either moisture or to a quenching gas. For sodium acetate as a solid matrix and p-aminobenzoate as a model compound, it was concluded that p-aminobenzoate was incorporated into the crystal structure of sodium acetate, and the triplet energy was lost be skeletal vibrations in sodium acetate. Also, with the same system is was shown that p-aminobenzoate did not undergo rotational relaxation, and thus rotational processes did not contribute to the deactivation of the triplet state. Several results were obtained from model compounds adsorbed on filter paper under different temperature and humidity conditions and with a variety of heavy atoms present. Fundamental photophysical equations were used in calculating several basic parameters that revealed information on rate processes and how the absorbed energy was distributed in an adsorbed lumiphor. The most important advancement with filter paper was the development of equations that relate phosphorescence parameters of adsorbed phosphors to the Young's modulus of filter paper. These equations are based on a fundamental theory that relates the hydrogen-bonding network of paper to the modulus of paper.

  10. Large Surface Measuring Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egdall, Mark; Breidenthal, Robert S.

    1983-09-01

    A new surface measuring concept developed under government contract at Itek Optical Systems has been previously reported by Allen Greenleaf. The method uses four steerable distance-measuring interferometers at the corners of a tetrahedron to determine the posi-tions of a retroreflecting target at various locations on the surface being measured. A small wooden breadboard had been built and tested, demonstrating the feasibility of the concept. This paper reports the building of a scaled-up prototype surface measuring machine to allow the measurement of large aspheric surfaces. A major advantage of the device is that, unlike conventional interferometry, it provides surface measurement in absolute coordinates, thus allowing direct determination of radius of curvature. In addition, the device is self-calibrating. Measurements of a 24-inch mirror have been made with the new machine, giving repeatability of 4 µ m peak sag in the curvature and accuracy of 0.7 μm rms in the surface figure at best focus. The device is currently being used in the production grinding of large aspheric mirrors at Itek. The device is potentially scalable to other industries where highly accurate measurement of unusual surfaces is required.

  11. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOEpatents

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  12. Localized surface instabilities of stressed solids

    SciTech Connect

    Colin, J.; Grilhe, J.; Junqua, N.

    1998-12-31

    Localized instabilities formation on the free surface of solids has been studied when sources of non-homogeneous stress such as dislocations or precipitates are present in the bulk. This formalism of localized perturbations has been used to describe the butterfly transformation of cubic precipitates in superalloys and the contraction of rectangular specimens under stress.

  13. Estimation of solid-liquid interfacial tension using curved surface of a soft solid.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Subrata; Phukan, Monmee; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2015-10-13

    Unlike liquids, for crystalline solids the surface tension is known to be different from the surface energy. However, the same cannot be said conclusively for amorphous materials like soft cross-linked elastomers. To resolve this issue we have introduced here a direct method for measuring solid-liquid interfacial tension by using the curved surface of a solid. In essence, we have used the inner surface of tiny cylindrical channels embedded inside a soft elastomeric film for sensing the effect of the interfacial tension. When a liquid is inserted into the channel, because of wetting-induced alteration in interfacial tension, its thin wall deflects considerably; the deflection is measured with an optical profilometer and analyzed using the Föppl-von Kármán equation. We have used several liquids and cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) as the solid to show that the estimated values of the solid-liquid interfacial tension matches with the corresponding solid-liquid interfacial energy reasonably well.

  14. Estimation of solid-liquid interfacial tension using curved surface of a soft solid.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Subrata; Phukan, Monmee; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2015-10-13

    Unlike liquids, for crystalline solids the surface tension is known to be different from the surface energy. However, the same cannot be said conclusively for amorphous materials like soft cross-linked elastomers. To resolve this issue we have introduced here a direct method for measuring solid-liquid interfacial tension by using the curved surface of a solid. In essence, we have used the inner surface of tiny cylindrical channels embedded inside a soft elastomeric film for sensing the effect of the interfacial tension. When a liquid is inserted into the channel, because of wetting-induced alteration in interfacial tension, its thin wall deflects considerably; the deflection is measured with an optical profilometer and analyzed using the Föppl-von Kármán equation. We have used several liquids and cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) as the solid to show that the estimated values of the solid-liquid interfacial tension matches with the corresponding solid-liquid interfacial energy reasonably well. PMID:26420871

  15. Drop Impact on a Solid Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josserand, C.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    A drop hitting a solid surface can deposit, bounce, or splash. Splashing arises from the breakup of a fine liquid sheet that is ejected radially along the substrate. Bouncing and deposition depend crucially on the wetting properties of the substrate. In this review, we focus on recent experimental and theoretical studies, which aim at unraveling the underlying physics, characterized by the delicate interplay of not only liquid inertia, viscosity, and surface tension, but also the surrounding gas. The gas cushions the initial contact; it is entrapped in a central microbubble on the substrate; and it promotes the so-called corona splash, by lifting the lamella away from the solid. Particular attention is paid to the influence of surface roughness, natural or engineered to enhance repellency, relevant in many applications.

  16. How solid-liquid adhesive property regulates liquid slippage on solid surfaces?

    PubMed

    Xue, Yahui; Wu, Yang; Pei, Xiaowei; Duan, Huiling; Xue, Qunji; Zhou, Feng

    2015-01-13

    The influence of solid-liquid adhesive property on liquid slippage at solid surfaces has been investigated using experiment approach on well-defined model surfaces as well as theoretical analysis. Based on a classical molecular-kinetic description for molecular and hydrodynamic slip, we propose a simple theoretical model that directly relates the liquid slip length to the liquid adhesive force on solid surfaces, which yields an exponential decay function. Well-defined smooth surfaces with varied surface wettability/adhesion are fabricated by forming self-assembled monolayers on gold with different mole ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic thiols. The adhesive force of a water droplet and the molecular slippage on these surfaces are probed by surface force apparatus and quartz crystal microbalance measurements, respectively. The experiment results are well consistent with our theoretical prediction. Our finding benefits the understanding of the underlying mechanism of liquid slippage on solid surfaces at molecular level and the rational design of microfluidics with an aim to be frictionless or highly controllable. PMID:25511171

  17. Measurement of surface microtopography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. D.; Farr, T. G.; Muller, J.-P.; Lewis, P.; Leberl, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    Acquisition of ground truth data for use in microwave interaction modeling requires measurement of surface roughness sampled at intervals comparable to a fraction of the microwave wavelength and extensive enough to adequately represent the statistics of a surface unit. Sub-centimetric measurement accuracy is thus required over large areas, and existing techniques are usually inadequate. A technique is discussed for acquiring the necessary photogrammetric data using twin film cameras mounted on a helicopter. In an attempt to eliminate tedious data reduction, an automated technique was applied to the helicopter photographs, and results were compared to those produced by conventional stereogrammetry. Derived root-mean-square (RMS) roughness for the same stereo-pair was 7.5 cm for the automated technique versus 6.5 cm for the manual method. The principal source of error is probably due to vegetation in the scene, which affects the automated technique but is ignored by a human operator.

  18. Percent solids measurement using Coriolis technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Schietinger, M.

    1995-12-31

    In many industrial processes, measurement of percent solids is vital to product quality. Percent solids values are most often derived form measurement of density, specific gravity and refractive index. In the lab and in the process, measurement methods range from nuclear and refractometer to vibrating tube. For on-line measurement, Coriolis technology, a vibrating tube approach, is playing a more significant role. Coriolis technology is best known for the performance and benefits it provides for direct mass flow measurement. This discussion focuses on Coriolis technology as an option for percent solids measurement and its ability to provide real-time data for controlling the process, maintaining consistency, improving quality, and controlling costs. The combined abilities of a Coriolis mass flowmeter to provide direct mass flow and percent solids information simultaneously provides real-time control that is unattainable with any other single technology.

  19. Measurement of complex surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.M.

    1993-05-01

    Several of the components used in coil fabrication involve complex surfaces and dimensions that are not well suited to measurements using conventional dimensional measuring equipment. Some relatively simple techniques that are in use in the SSCL Magnet Systems Division (MSD) for incoming inspection will be described, with discussion of their suitability for specific applications. Components that are submitted for MSD Quality Assurance (QA) dimensional inspection may be divided into two distinct categories; the first category involves components for which there is an approved drawing and for which all nominal dimensions are known; the second category involves parts for which `reverse engineering` is required, the part is available but there are no available drawings or dimensions. This second category typically occurs during development of coil end parts and coil turn filler parts where it is necessary to manually shape the part and then measure it to develop the information required to prepare a drawing for the part.

  20. Analytical scanning electron microscopy for solid surface.

    PubMed

    Ichinokawa, T

    1989-07-01

    A scanning electron microscope of ultra-high-vacuum (UHV-SEM) with a field emission gun (FEG) is operated at the primary electron energies of from 100 eV to 3 keV. The instrument can form the images that contain information on surface chemical composition, chemical bonding state (electronic structure), and surface crystal structure in a microscopic resolution of several hundred angstroms (A) using the techniques of scanning Auger electron microscope, scanning electron energy loss microscope, and scanning low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) microscope. A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) also has been combined with the SEM in order to obtain the atomic resolution for the solid surface. The instrumentation and examples of their applications are presented both for scanning LEED microscopy and STM.

  1. Acoustic Measurements for Small Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Models have been developed to predict large solid rocket motor acoustic loads based on the scaling of small solid rocket motors. MSFC has measured several small solid rocket motors in horizontal and launch configurations to anchor these models. Solid Rocket Test Motor (SRTM) has ballistics similar to the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) therefore a good choice for acoustic scaling. Acoustic measurements were collected during the test firing of the Insulation Configuration Extended Length (ICXL) 7,6, and 8 (in firing order) in order to compare to RSRM horizontal firing data. The scope of this presentation includes: Acoustic test procedures and instrumentation implemented during the three SRTM firings and Data analysis method and general trends observed in the data.

  2. Flattening of a patterned compliant solid by surface stress.

    PubMed

    Paretkar, Dadhichi; Xu, Xuejuan; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand

    2014-06-21

    We measured the shape change of periodic ridge surface profiles in gelatin organogels resulting from deformation driven by their solid-vapor surface stress. A gelatin organogel was molded onto poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) masters having ridge heights of 1.7 and 2.7 μm and several periodicities. Gel replicas were found to have a shape deformed significantly compared to their PDMS master. Systematically larger deformations in gels were measured for lower elastic moduli. Measuring the elastic modulus independently, we estimate a surface stress of 107 ± 7 mN m(-1) for the organogels in solvent composed of 70 wt% glycerol and 30 wt% water. Shape changes are in agreement with a small strain linear elastic theory. We also measured the deformation of deeper ridges (with height 13 μm), and analysed the resulting large surface strains using finite element analysis. PMID:24736874

  3. Surface Brillouin scattering of opaque solids and thin supported films

    PubMed

    Comins; Every; Stoddart; Zhang; Crowhurst; Hearne

    2000-03-01

    Surface Brillouin scattering (SBS) has been used successfully for the study of acoustic excitations in opaque solids and thin supported films, at both ambient and high temperatures. A number of different systems have been investigated recently by SBS including crystalline silicon, amorphous silicon layers produced by ion bombardment and their high temperature recrystallisation, vanadium carbides, and a nickel-based superalloy. The most recent development includes the measurement of a supported gold film at high pressure. The extraction of the elastic constants is successfully accomplished by a combination of the angular dependence of surface wave velocities and the longitudinal wave threshold within the Lamb shoulder. The application of surface Green's function methods successfully reproduces the experimental SBS spectra. The discrepancies often observed between surface wave velocities and by ultrasonics measurements have been investigated and a detailed correction procedure for the SBS measurements has been developed. PMID:10829704

  4. Surface Brillouin scattering of opaque solids and thin supported films

    PubMed

    Comins; Every; Stoddart; Zhang; Crowhurst; Hearne

    2000-03-01

    Surface Brillouin scattering (SBS) has been used successfully for the study of acoustic excitations in opaque solids and thin supported films, at both ambient and high temperatures. A number of different systems have been investigated recently by SBS including crystalline silicon, amorphous silicon layers produced by ion bombardment and their high temperature recrystallisation, vanadium carbides, and a nickel-based superalloy. The most recent development includes the measurement of a supported gold film at high pressure. The extraction of the elastic constants is successfully accomplished by a combination of the angular dependence of surface wave velocities and the longitudinal wave threshold within the Lamb shoulder. The application of surface Green's function methods successfully reproduces the experimental SBS spectra. The discrepancies often observed between surface wave velocities and by ultrasonics measurements have been investigated and a detailed correction procedure for the SBS measurements has been developed.

  5. Laboratory Measurements of Celestial Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, A. J.; Beckwith, S. V. W.

    1997-01-01

    Our experimental study has focused on laboratory measurements of the low temperature optical properties of a variety of astronomically significant materials in the infrared and mm-wave region of the spectrum. Our far infrared measurements of silicate grains with an open structure have produced a variety of unusual results: (1) the low temperature mass opacity coefficient of small amorphous 2MgO(central dot)SiO2 and MgO(central dot)2SiO2 grains are many times larger than the values previously used for interstellar grain material; (2) all of the amorphous silicate grains studied possess the characteristic temperature dependent signature associated with two level systems in bulk glass; and (3) a smaller but nonzero two level temperature dependence signature is also observed for crystalline particles, its physical origin is unclear. These laboratory measurements yield surprisingly large and variable values for the mm-wave absorption coefficients of small silicate particles similar to interstellar grains, and suggest that the bulk absorptivity of interstellar dust at these long wavelengths will not be well known without such studies. Furthermore, our studies have been useful to better understand the physics of the two level absorption process in amorphous and crystalline grains to gain confidence in the wide applicability of these results.

  6. Measuring Combustion Advance in Solid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    Set of gauges on solid-propellant rocket motor with electrically insulating case measures advance of combustion front and local erosion rates of propellant and insulation. Data furnished by gauges aid in motor design, failure analysis, and performance prediction. Technique useful in determining propellant uniformity and electrical properties of exhaust plum. Gauges used both in flight and on ground. Foilgauge technique also useful in basic research on pulsed plasmas or combustion of solids.

  7. Gravity effects on flame spreading over solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andracchio, C. R.; Cochran, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the spreading of a flame over a solid combustible surface were determined. Flame propagation rates were measured from specimens of thin cellulose acetate sheets burning in both normal gravity (1 g) and reduced gravity (0 g) environments; the specimens were burned in various quiescent mixtures of oxygen, helium, argon, and nitrogen. A correlation for normal gravity and reduced gravity burning was obtained based on theoretical models of previous investigators.

  8. Capillary effects during droplet impact on a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasandideh-Fard, M.; Qiao, Y. M.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.

    1996-03-01

    Impact of water droplets on a flat, solid surface was studied using both experiments and numerical simulation. Liquid-solid contact angle was varied in experiments by adding traces of a surfactant to water. Impacting droplets were photographed and liquid-solid contact diameters and contact angles were measured from photographs. A numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation using a modified SOLA-VOF method was used to model droplet deformation. Measured values of dynamic contact angles were used as a boundary condition for the numerical model. Impacting droplets spread on the surface until liquid surface tension and viscosity overcame inertial forces, after which they recoiled off the surface. Adding a surfactant did not affect droplet shape during the initial stages of impact, but did increase maximum spread diameter and reduce recoil height. Comparison of computer generated images of impacting droplets with photographs showed that the numerical model modeled droplet shape evolution correctly. Accurate predictions were obtained for droplet contact diameter during spreading and at equilibrium. The model overpredicted droplet contact diameters during recoil. Assuming that dynamic surface tension of surfactant solutions is constant, equaling that of pure water, gave predicted droplet shapes that best agreed with experimental observations. When the contact angle was assumed constant in the model, equal to the measured equilibrium value, predictions were less accurate. A simple analytical model was developed to predict maximum droplet diameter after impact. Model predictions agreed well with experimental measurements reported in the literature. Capillary effects were shown to be negligible during droplet impact when We≫Re1/2.

  9. Particle engineering in pharmaceutical solids processing: surface energy considerations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Daryl R

    2015-01-01

    During the past 10 years particle engineering in the pharmaceutical industry has become a topic of increasing importance. Engineers and pharmacists need to understand and control a range of key unit manufacturing operations such as milling, granulation, crystallisation, powder mixing and dry powder inhaled drugs which can be very challenging. It has now become very clear that in many of these particle processing operations, the surface energy of the starting, intermediate or final products is a key factor in understanding the processing operation and or the final product performance. This review will consider the surface energy and surface energy heterogeneity of crystalline solids, methods for the measurement of surface energy, effects of milling on powder surface energy, adhesion and cohesion on powder mixtures, crystal habits and surface energy, surface energy and powder granulation processes, performance of DPI systems and finally crystallisation conditions and surface energy. This review will conclude that the importance of surface energy as a significant factor in understanding the performance of many particulate pharmaceutical products and processes has now been clearly established. It is still nevertheless, work in progress both in terms of development of methods and establishing the limits for when surface energy is the key variable of relevance.

  10. Particle engineering in pharmaceutical solids processing: surface energy considerations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Daryl R

    2015-01-01

    During the past 10 years particle engineering in the pharmaceutical industry has become a topic of increasing importance. Engineers and pharmacists need to understand and control a range of key unit manufacturing operations such as milling, granulation, crystallisation, powder mixing and dry powder inhaled drugs which can be very challenging. It has now become very clear that in many of these particle processing operations, the surface energy of the starting, intermediate or final products is a key factor in understanding the processing operation and or the final product performance. This review will consider the surface energy and surface energy heterogeneity of crystalline solids, methods for the measurement of surface energy, effects of milling on powder surface energy, adhesion and cohesion on powder mixtures, crystal habits and surface energy, surface energy and powder granulation processes, performance of DPI systems and finally crystallisation conditions and surface energy. This review will conclude that the importance of surface energy as a significant factor in understanding the performance of many particulate pharmaceutical products and processes has now been clearly established. It is still nevertheless, work in progress both in terms of development of methods and establishing the limits for when surface energy is the key variable of relevance. PMID:25876912

  11. A study on solid modelling with surface trimming method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching-Yun; Chang, San-Cheng

    1993-07-01

    This paper proposes a Surface Trimming Method based on the intersection curves between free-form surfaces so that a complex solid model with several primitive surfaces can be constructed. These solid models will not only be used by the mechanical engineering industry to design and analyze conventional mechanical parts, but will also be used by the civil engineers to design and analyze structures of irregular shape. The scope of solid modelling application is thus enhanced.

  12. Control of physical properties on solid surface via laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Nishimura, Akihiko

    2012-07-01

    In a safety operation of a nuclear power plant, vapor conditions such as a droplet or liquid membrane toward a solid surface of a heat exchanger and reactor vessel is important. In the present study, focusing on the droplet, the wettability on solid surface and surface free energy of solid are evaluated. In addition, wettability on a metal plate fabricated by laser processing is also considered for the nuclear engineering application.

  13. Surface roughness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    The Optics Division is currently in the research phase of producing grazing-incidence mirrors to be used in x-ray detector applications. The traditional method of construction involves labor-intensive glass grinding. This also culminates in a relatively heavy mirror. For lower resolution applications, the mirrors may be of a replicated design which involves milling a mandrel as a negative of the final shape and electroplating the cylindrical mirror onto it. The mirror is then separated from the mandrel by cooling. The mandrel will shrink more than the 'shell' (mirror) allowing it to be pulled from the mandrel. Ulmer (2) describes this technique and its variations in more detail. To date, several mirrors have been tested at MSFC by the Optical Fabrication Branch by focusing x-ray energy onto a detector with limited success. Little is known about the surface roughness of the actual mirror. Hence, the attempt to gather data on these surfaces. The test involves profiling the surface of a sample, replicating the surface as described above, and then profiling the replicated surface.

  14. Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect from Scratches on Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapke, B. W.; Piatek, J. L.; Nelson, R. M.; Smythe, W. D.; Hale, A. S.

    2003-05-01

    Shepard and Arvidson [1] discovered that the solid surfaces of rocks exhibit an opposition effect. We have measured the phase curve of a natural surface of a piece of solid basalt between 0.05 and 5 degrees in circularly polarized light using the JPL long arm goniometer and confirmed that it has an opposition effect. The circular polarization ratio (CPR) increased with decreasing phase angle, consistent with a coherent backscatter opposition effect (CBOE) Recent laboratory investigations of the CBOE in planetary regolith analogs [2,3,4] have revealed that the width of the peak is remarkably insensitive to particle size, in strong contrast to theoretical expectations. We have hypothesized that one of the reasons for this might be that multiple scattering between irregularities, such as scratches, on the surfaces of a particle could cause coherent backscatter, in addition to scattering between particles. To test this hypothesis we ground the surface of a piece of plate glass with 5 micrometer abrasive and measured its phase curve. As the phase angle decreases, the intensity increases and the CPR decreases, consistent with specular reflection. However, near zero phase there is a nonlinear rise about 2 degrees wide superimposed on the linear specular peak accompanied by an increase in CPR, showing that coherent backscatter is occuring. A piece of commercial diffusing glass exhibited the same phenomena. These results support our hypothesis and also provide a possible explanation for the observations of opposition effects from the solid surfaces of rocks. This research was supported by a grant from NASA's PGG Program References cited: [1] Shepard and Arvidson, Icarus, 141, 172-178 (1999). [2] Nelson et al, Icarus, 147, 545-558 (2000). [3] Nelson et al, Planet. Space Sci., 50, 849-856 (2002). [4] Piatek et al, Abstract, DPS Conference (2003).

  15. Turbulent boundary layer over solid and porous surfaces with small roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, F. Y.; Schetz, J. A.; Collier, F.

    1982-01-01

    Skin friction and profiles of mean velocity, axial and normal turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stress in the untripped boundary layer were measured directly on a large diameter, axisymmetric body with: (1) a smooth, solid surface; (2) a sandpaper-roughened, solid surface; (3) a sintered metal, porous surface; (4) a smooth, perforated titanium surface; (5) a rough solid surface made of fine, diffusion bonded screening, and (6) a rough, porous surface of the same screening. Results obtained for each of these surfaces are discussed. It is shown that a rough, porous wall simply does not influence the boundary layer in the same way as a rough solid wall. Therefore, turbulent transport models for boundary layers over porous surfaces either with or without injection or suction, must include both surface roughness and porosity effects.

  16. Solid Surface Combustion Experiment: Thick Fuel Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, Robert A.; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; West, Jeff; Tang, Lin; Sacksteder, Kurt; Delichatsios, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    The results of experiments for spread over polymethylmethacrylate, PMMA, samples in the microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle are described. The results are coupled with modelling in an effort to describe the physics of the spread process for thick fuels in a quiescent, microgravity environment and uncover differences between thin and thick fuels. A quenching phenomenon not present for thin fuels is delineated, namely the fact that for thick fuels the possibility exists that, absent an opposing flow of sufficient strength to press the flame close enough to the fuel surface to allow the heated layer in the solid to develop, the heated layer fails to become 'fully developed.' The result is that the flame slows, which in turn causes an increase in the relative radiative loss from the flame, leading eventually to extinction. This potential inability of a thick fuel to develop a steady spread rate is not present for a thin fuel because the heated layer is the fuel thickness, which reaches a uniform temperature across the thickness relatively rapidly.

  17. A mean field approach for computing solid-liquid surface tension for nanoscale interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; Ranatunga, R J K Udayana; Torres Flores, David; Pérez, D Vladimir; Moore, Preston B; Shinoda, Wataru; Nielsen, Steven O

    2010-02-01

    The physical properties of a liquid in contact with a solid are largely determined by the solid-liquid surface tension. This is especially true for nanoscale systems with high surface area to volume ratios. While experimental techniques can only measure surface tension indirectly for nanoscale systems, computer simulations offer the possibility of a direct evaluation of solid-liquid surface tension although reliable methods are still under development. Here we show that using a mean field approach yields great physical insight into the calculation of surface tension and into the precise relationship between surface tension and excess solvation free energy per unit surface area for nanoscale interfaces. Previous simulation studies of nanoscale interfaces measure either excess solvation free energy or surface tension, but these two quantities are only equal for macroscopic interfaces. We model the solid as a continuum of uniform density in analogy to Hamaker's treatment of colloidal particles. As a result, the Hamiltonian of the system is imbued with parametric dependence on the size of the solid object through the integration limits for the solid-liquid interaction energy. Since the solid-liquid surface area is a function of the size of the solid, and the surface tension is the derivative of the system free energy with respect to this surface area, we obtain a simple expression for the surface tension of an interface of arbitrary shape. We illustrate our method by modeling a thin nanoribbon and a solid spherical nanoparticle. Although the calculation of solid-liquid surface tension is a demanding task, the method presented herein offers new insight into the problem, and may prove useful in opening new avenues of investigation.

  18. Solid capillarity: when and how does surface tension deform soft solids?

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Bruno; Bäumchen, Oliver; Boulogne, François; Daniels, Karen E; Dufresne, Eric R; Perrin, Hugo; Salez, Thomas; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Style, Robert W

    2016-03-28

    Soft solids differ from stiff solids in an important way: their surface stresses can drive large deformations. Based on a topical workshop held in the Lorentz Center in Leiden, this Opinion highlights some recent advances in the growing field of solid capillarity and poses key questions for its advancement.

  19. Solid capillarity: when and how does surface tension deform soft solids?

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Bruno; Bäumchen, Oliver; Boulogne, François; Daniels, Karen E; Dufresne, Eric R; Perrin, Hugo; Salez, Thomas; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Style, Robert W

    2016-03-28

    Soft solids differ from stiff solids in an important way: their surface stresses can drive large deformations. Based on a topical workshop held in the Lorentz Center in Leiden, this Opinion highlights some recent advances in the growing field of solid capillarity and poses key questions for its advancement. PMID:26936296

  20. Permittivity measurements in solids, powders, and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Frank

    2005-08-01

    A microwave waveguide cell has been constructed to facilitate the measurement of permittivity on solids, powders, and liquids. By employing this cell and a vector network analyzer, permittivity values have been obtained, at room temperature, for samples of perspex, PTFE, sand, and sunflower oil. These values are in agreement with published data. It is hoped that this experiment will provide students with an opportunity to use modern microwave instrumentation and gain a greater appreciation of the physical properties of materials.

  1. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  2. Homogenous Surface Nucleation of Solid Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Hamill, P.; Salcedo, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A general surface nucleation rate theory is presented for the homogeneous freezing of crystalline germs on the surfaces of aqueous particles. While nucleation rates in a standard classical homogeneous freezing rate theory scale with volume, the rates in a surface-based theory scale with surface area. The theory is used to convert volume-based information on laboratory freezing rates (in units of cu cm, seconds) of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) aerosols into surface-based values (in units of sq cm, seconds). We show that a surface-based model is capable of reproducing measured nucleation rates of NAT and NAD aerosols from concentrated aqueous HNO3 solutions in the temperature range of 165 to 205 K. Laboratory measured nucleation rates are used to derive free energies for NAT and NAD germ formation in the stratosphere. NAD germ free energies range from about 23 to 26 kcal mole, allowing for fast and efficient homogeneous NAD particle production in the stratosphere. However, NAT germ formation energies are large (greater than 26 kcal mole) enough to prevent efficient NAT particle production in the stratosphere. We show that the atmospheric NAD particle production rates based on the surface rate theory are roughly 2 orders of magnitude larger than those obtained from a standard volume-based rate theory. Atmospheric volume and surface production of NAD particles will nearly cease in the stratosphere when denitrification in the air exceeds 40 and 78%, respectively. We show that a surface-based (volume-based) homogeneous freezing rate theory gives particle production rates, which are (not) consistent with both laboratory and atmospheric data on the nucleation of solid polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  3. Softening of edges of solids by surface tension.

    PubMed

    Mora, Serge; Pomeau, Yves

    2015-05-20

    Surface tension tends to minimize the area of interfaces between pieces of matter in different thermodynamic phases, be they in the solid or the liquid state. This can be relevant for the macroscopic shape of very soft solids and lead to a roughening of initially sharp edges. We calculate this effect for a Neo-Hookean elastic solid, with assumptions corresponding to actual experiments, namely the case where an initially sharp edge is rounded by the effect of surface tension felt when the fluid surrounding the soft solid (and so surface tension) is changed at the solid/liquid boundary. We consider two opposite limits where the analysis can be carried to the end, the one of a shallow angle and the one of a very sharp angle. Both cases yield a discontinuity of curvature in the state with surface tension although the initial state had a discontinuous slope.

  4. Measurement of Thermal Radiation Properties of Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. C. (Editor)

    1963-01-01

    The overall objectives of the Symposium were to afford (1) an opportunity for workers in the field to describe the equipment and procedures currently in use for measuring thermal radiation properties of solids, (2) an opportunity for constructive criticism of the material presented, and (3) an open forum for discussion of mutual problems. It was also the hope of the sponsors that the published proceedings of the Symposium would serve as a valuable reference on measurement techniques for evaluating thermal radiation properties of solids, partic.ularly for those with limited experience in the field. Because of the strong dependence of emitted flux upon temperature, the program committee thought it advisable to devote the first session to a discussion of the problems of temperature measurement. All of the papers in Session I were presented at the request of and upon topics suggested by the Committee. Because of time and space limitations, it, was impossible to consider all temperature measurement problems that might arise--the objective was rather to call to the attention of the reader some of the problems that might be encountered, and to provide references that might provide solutions.

  5. Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Janecek, Martin; Moses, William

    2008-07-28

    A scintillating crystal's surface reflectance has to be well understood in order to accurately predict and optimize the crystal?s light collection through Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we measure the inner surface reflectance properties for BGO. The measurements include BGO crystals with a mechanically polished surface, rough-cut surface, and chemically etched surface, and with various reflectors attached, both air- coupled and with coupling compound. The measurements are performed with a laser aimed at the center of a hemispherical shaped BGO crystal. The hemispherical shape eliminates any non-perpendicular angles for light entering and exiting the crystal. The reflected light is collected with an array of photodiodes. The laser can be set at an arbitrary angle, and the photodiode array is rotated to fully cover 2? of solid angle. The current produced in the photodiodes is readout with a digital multimeter connected through a multiplexer. The two rows of photodiodes achieve 5-degree by 4-degree resolution, and the current measurement has a dynamic range of 10^5:1. The acquired data was not described by the commonly assumed linear combination of specular and diffuse (Lambertian) distributions, except for a very few surfaces. Surface roughness proved to be the most important parameter when choosing crystal setup. The reflector choice was of less importance and of almost no consequence for rough-cut surfaces. Pure specular reflection distribution for all incidence angles was measured for polished surfaces with VM2000 film, while the most Lambertian distribution for any surface finish was measured for titanium dioxide paint. The distributions acquired in this paper will be used to create more accurate Monte Carlo models for light reflection distribution within BGO crystals.

  6. Structure and properties of solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Difficulties in experimental studies of crystalline surfaces are related to the fact that surface atoms have an intrinsic tendency to react with their environment. A second problem is connected with the effective thickness of surfaces, which ranges from one to several atom layers. The phenomenology of surface interactions with gases are considered, taking into account physical adsorption, chemisorption, and the oxidation of surfaces. Studies of the surface structure are discussed, giving attention to field emission microscopy, field-ion microscopy, electron diffraction techniques, Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, ion microprobe methods, and low-energy backscattering spectroscopy. Investigations of semiconductor surfaces are also described.

  7. Tools for measuring surface cleanliness

    DOEpatents

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  8. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1-2μm and length 100-200μm is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops. PMID:27300959

  9. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1-2μm and length 100-200μm is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops.

  10. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1 -2 μ m and length 100 -200 μ m is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops.

  11. Condensed matter physics at surfaces and interfaces of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Mele, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    This research program is focused on structural and elastic properties of crystalline solids and interfaces between solids. We are particularly interested in novel forms of structural ordering and the effects of this ordering on the lattice dynamical properties. We are currently studying structural and vibrational properties of the surfaces of the elemental alkaline earths (particularly Be), and structural phenomena in the doped fullerites.

  12. Artefacts for optical surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Stuart; Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Brownhill, Andrew; MacDonald, Lindsay

    2011-07-01

    Flexible manufacturing technologies are supporting the routine production of components with freeform surfaces in a wide variety of materials and surface finishes. Such surfaces may be exploited for both aesthetic and performance criteria for a wide range of industries, for example automotive, aircraft, small consumer goods and medial components. In order to ensure conformance between manufactured part and digital design it is necessary to understand, validate and promote best practice of the available measurement technologies. Similar, but currently less quantifiable, measurement requirements also exist in heritage, museum and fine art recording where objects can be individually hand crafted to extremely fine levels of detail. Optical 3D measurement systems designed for close range applications are typified by one or more illumination sources projecting a spot, line or structured light pattern onto a surface or surfaces of interest. Reflections from the projected light are detected in one or more imaging devices and measurements made concerning the location, intensity and optionally colour of the image. Coordinates of locations on the surface may be computed either directly from an understanding of the illumination and imaging geometry or indirectly through analysis of the spatial frequencies of the projected pattern. Regardless of sensing configuration some independent means is necessary to ensure that measurement capability will meet the requirements of a given level of object recording and is consistent for variations in surface properties and structure. As technologies mature, guidelines for best practice are emerging, most prominent at the current time being the German VDI/VDE 2634 and ISO/DIS 10360-8 guidelines. This considers state of the art capabilities for independent validation of optical non-contact measurement systems suited to the close range measurement of table top sized manufactured or crafted objects.

  13. Turbulent boundary layer over solid and porous surfaces with small roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, F. Y.; Schetz, J. A.; Collier, F.

    1982-01-01

    The wind tunnel models and instrumentation used as well as data reduction and error analysis techniques employed are described for an experimental study conducted to measure directly skin friction and obtain profiles of mean velocity, axial and normal turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stress in the untripped boundary on a large diameter axisymmetric body. Results are given for such a body with a (1) smooth, solid surface; (2) a sandpaper roughened, solid surface; (3) a sintered metal, porous surface; (4) a ""smooth'' performated titanium surface; (5) a rough, solid surface made of fine diffusion bonded screening; and (6) a rough, porous surface made of the same screening. The roughness values were in low range (k+ 5 to 7) just above what is normally considered ""hydraulically smooth''. Measurements were taken at several axial locations and tow or normal stream freestream velocities, 45.1 m/sec and 53.5 m/sec.

  14. Probing and mapping electrode surfaces in solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blinn, Kevin S; Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-20

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are potentially the most efficient and cost-effective solution to utilization of a wide variety of fuels beyond hydrogen (1-7). The performance of SOFCs and the rates of many chemical and energy transformation processes in energy storage and conversion devices in general are limited primarily by charge and mass transfer along electrode surfaces and across interfaces. Unfortunately, the mechanistic understanding of these processes is still lacking, due largely to the difficulty of characterizing these processes under in situ conditions. This knowledge gap is a chief obstacle to SOFC commercialization. The development of tools for probing and mapping surface chemistries relevant to electrode reactions is vital to unraveling the mechanisms of surface processes and to achieving rational design of new electrode materials for more efficient energy storage and conversion(2). Among the relatively few in situ surface analysis methods, Raman spectroscopy can be performed even with high temperatures and harsh atmospheres, making it ideal for characterizing chemical processes relevant to SOFC anode performance and degradation(8-12). It can also be used alongside electrochemical measurements, potentially allowing direct correlation of electrochemistry to surface chemistry in an operating cell. Proper in situ Raman mapping measurements would be useful for pin-pointing important anode reaction mechanisms because of its sensitivity to the relevant species, including anode performance degradation through carbon deposition(8, 10, 13, 14) ("coking") and sulfur poisoning(11, 15) and the manner in which surface modifications stave off this degradation(16). The current work demonstrates significant progress towards this capability. In addition, the family of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques provides a special approach to interrogate the electrode surface with nanoscale resolution. Besides the surface topography that is routinely collected by AFM

  15. Probing and Mapping Electrode Surfaces in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blinn, Kevin S.; Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Bottomley, Lawrence A.; Liu, Meilin

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are potentially the most efficient and cost-effective solution to utilization of a wide variety of fuels beyond hydrogen 1-7. The performance of SOFCs and the rates of many chemical and energy transformation processes in energy storage and conversion devices in general are limited primarily by charge and mass transfer along electrode surfaces and across interfaces. Unfortunately, the mechanistic understanding of these processes is still lacking, due largely to the difficulty of characterizing these processes under in situ conditions. This knowledge gap is a chief obstacle to SOFC commercialization. The development of tools for probing and mapping surface chemistries relevant to electrode reactions is vital to unraveling the mechanisms of surface processes and to achieving rational design of new electrode materials for more efficient energy storage and conversion2. Among the relatively few in situ surface analysis methods, Raman spectroscopy can be performed even with high temperatures and harsh atmospheres, making it ideal for characterizing chemical processes relevant to SOFC anode performance and degradation8-12. It can also be used alongside electrochemical measurements, potentially allowing direct correlation of electrochemistry to surface chemistry in an operating cell. Proper in situ Raman mapping measurements would be useful for pin-pointing important anode reaction mechanisms because of its sensitivity to the relevant species, including anode performance degradation through carbon deposition8, 10, 13, 14 ("coking") and sulfur poisoning11, 15 and the manner in which surface modifications stave off this degradation16. The current work demonstrates significant progress towards this capability. In addition, the family of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques provides a special approach to interrogate the electrode surface with nanoscale resolution. Besides the surface topography that is routinely collected by AFM and STM

  16. Method for Measuring Changes in Surface Tension on Agar

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, David S.; Dworkin, Martin

    1983-01-01

    The surface tension of agar surfaces was determined by measuring the contact angles formed by drops of various hydrophobic liquids on the surface and then calculating the composite surface free energy function by solving a series of simultaneous equations derived from these data. This method was used to measure the change in the surface tension of agar produced by the addition of various concentrations of albumin. The resulting curve was typical of the effect of increasing concentrations of surfactants on surface tension. The method was compared with other methods of determining surface tension of solids, and it was concluded that the technique used here provided the most reliable results. PMID:16346273

  17. Measuring Surface Water From Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsch, J.; Alsdorf, D.; Rodriguez, E.; Lettenmaier, D.; Mognard, N.; Participants, T.

    2006-12-01

    Surface fresh water is essential for life, yet we have surprisingly poor knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamics of surface fresh water discharge and changes in storage globally. For example, we are unable to answer such basic questions as "What is the spatial and temporal variability of water stored on and near the surface of all continents?" Furthermore, key societal issues, such as the susceptibility of life to flood hazards, cannot be answered with the current global, in-situ networks designed to observe river discharge at points but not flood events. The measurements required to answer these hydrologic questions are surface water area, the elevation of the water surface (h), its slope (dh/dx), and temporal change (dh/dt). Advances in remote sensing hydrology, particularly over the past 10 years and even more recently, have demonstrated that these hydraulic variables can be measured reliably from orbiting platforms. Measurements of inundated area have been used to varying degrees of accuracy as proxies for discharge, but are successful only when in-situ data are available for calibration and fail to indicate the dynamic topography of water surfaces. Radar altimeters have a rich, multi-decadal history of successfully measuring elevations of the ocean surface and are now also accepted as capable tools for measuring h along orbital profiles crossing fresh water bodies. However, altimeters are profiling tools which, because of their orbital spacings, miss too many fresh water bodies to be useful hydrologically. High spatial resolution images of dh/dt have been observed with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR), but the method requires emergent vegetation to scatter radar pulses back to the receiving antenna. Essentially, existing spaceborne methods have been used to measure components of surface water hydraulics, but none of the technologies can singularly supply the water volume and hydraulic measurements that are needed to accurately model the

  18. Measuring surface water from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, Douglas E.; RodríGuez, Ernesto; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2007-06-01

    Surface fresh water is essential for life, yet we have surprisingly poor knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamics of surface freshwater discharge and changes in storage globally. For example, we are unable to answer such basic questions as "What is the spatial and temporal variability of water stored on and near the surface of all continents?" Furthermore, key societal issues, such as the susceptibility of life to flood hazards, cannot be answered with the current global, in situ networks designed to observe river discharge at points but not flood events. The measurements required to answer these hydrologic questions are surface water area, the elevation of the water surface (h), its slope (∂h/∂x), and temporal change (∂h/∂t). Advances in remote sensing hydrology, particularly over the past 10 years and even more recently, have demonstrated that these hydraulic variables can be measured reliably from orbiting platforms. Measurements of inundated area have been used to varying degrees of accuracy as proxies for discharge but are successful only when in situ data are available for calibration; they fail to indicate the dynamic topography of water surfaces. Radar altimeters have a rich, multidecadal history of successfully measuring elevations of the ocean surface and are now also accepted as capable tools for measuring h along orbital profiles crossing freshwater bodies. However, altimeters are profiling tools, which, because of their orbital spacings, miss too many freshwater bodies to be useful hydrologically. High spatial resolution images of ∂h/∂t have been observed with interferometric synthetic aperture radar, but the method requires emergent vegetation to scatter radar pulses back to the receiving antenna. Essentially, existing spaceborne methods have been used to measure components of surface water hydraulics, but none of the technologies can singularly supply the water volume and hydraulic measurements that are needed to accurately model

  19. Surface tension measurement from the indentation of clamped thin films.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuejuan; Jagota, Anand; Paretkar, Dadhichi; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2016-06-21

    We developed an indentation technique to measure the surface tension of relatively stiff solids. In the proposed method, a suspended thin solid film is indented by a rigid sphere and its deflection is measured by optical interferometry. The film deflection is jointly resisted by surface tension, elasticity and residual stress. Using a version of nonlinear von Karman plate theory that includes surface tension, we are able to separate the contribution of elasticity to the total tension in the film. Surface tension is determined by extrapolating the sum of surface tension and residual stress to zero film thickness. We measured the surface tension of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using this technique and obtained a value of 19.5 ± 3.6 mN m(-1), consistent with the surface energy of PDMS reported in the literature. PMID:27189735

  20. Surface tension measurement from the indentation of clamped thin films.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuejuan; Jagota, Anand; Paretkar, Dadhichi; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2016-06-21

    We developed an indentation technique to measure the surface tension of relatively stiff solids. In the proposed method, a suspended thin solid film is indented by a rigid sphere and its deflection is measured by optical interferometry. The film deflection is jointly resisted by surface tension, elasticity and residual stress. Using a version of nonlinear von Karman plate theory that includes surface tension, we are able to separate the contribution of elasticity to the total tension in the film. Surface tension is determined by extrapolating the sum of surface tension and residual stress to zero film thickness. We measured the surface tension of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using this technique and obtained a value of 19.5 ± 3.6 mN m(-1), consistent with the surface energy of PDMS reported in the literature.

  1. Surface deformation effects induced by radiation pressure and electrostriction forces in dielectric solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrath, N. G. C.; Lukasievicz, G. V. B.; Malacarne, L. C.; Bialkowski, S. E.

    2013-06-01

    The surface displacement produced by radiation pressure and electrostriction forces is investigated considering the commonly accepted theories proposed by Minkowski and Abraham for the energy-momentum tensor. The contributions are modeled considering each effect separately assuming non-absorbing and absorbing solids and the thermoelastic deformation equations are solved numerically. We show that the surface deformation profiles as calculated by the Minkowski or Abraham momenta give different surface curvature, which could in principle be detected by measuring the surface displacement. Finally, an all-optical pump-probe photothermal method to detect the radiation pressure and electrostriction forces in transparent dielectric solids is proposed.

  2. Surface roughness effects with solid lubricants dispersed in mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusano, C.; Goglia, P. R.; Sliney, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The lubricating effectiveness of solid-lubricant dispersions are investigated in both point and line contacts using surfaces with both random and directional roughness characteristics. Friction and wear data obtained at relatively low speeds and at room temperature, indicate that the existence of solid lubricants such as graphite, MoS2, and PTFE in a plain mineral oil generally will not improve the effectiveness of the oil as a lubricant for such surfaces. Under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction force, as a function of time, initially depends upon the directional roughness properties of the contacting surfaces irrespective of whether the base oil or dispersions are used as lubricants.

  3. Solid colloids with surface-mobile linkers.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Stef A J; Helms, Gesa; Dogterom, Marileen

    2015-06-17

    In this report we review the possibilities of using colloids with surface mobile linkers for the study of colloidal self-assembly processes. A promising route to create systems with mobile linkers is the use of lipid (bi-)layers. These lipid layers can be either used in the form of vesicles or as coatings for hard colloids and emulsion droplets. Inside the lipid bilayers molecules can be inserted via membrane anchors. Due to the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, the anchored molecules remain mobile. The use of different lipid mixtures even allows creating Janus-like particles that exhibit directional bonding if linkers are used which have a preference for a certain lipid phase. In nature mobile linkers can be found e.g. as receptors in cells. Therefore, towards the end of the review, we also briefly address the possibility of using colloids with surface mobile linkers as model systems to mimic cell-cell interactions and cell adhesion processes.

  4. Surface force measurement of ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Jun; Hasegawa, Masayuki; Amemiya, Hironao; Kobayashi, Hayato

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) has advantages such as room-temperature operation, high through-put, and high resolution. In the UV-NIL process, the mold needs a release coating material to prevent adhesion of the transfer resin. Usually, fluorinated silane coupling agents are used as release coating materials. To evaluate the release property, surface force analyzer equipment was used. This equipment can measure the surface forces between release-coated or noncoated mold material surfaces and UV-cured resin surfaces in the solid state. Lower surface forces were measured when a release coating was used on the mold material surface.

  5. Laser velocimeter measurements of multiphase flow of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kadambi, J.R.; Chen, R.C.; Bhunia, S.

    1989-01-01

    A unique refractive index matched facility for studying solid-liquid multiphase flow has been developed. The refractive index matching of the solid and the liquid allows the use of non-intrusive Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) to measure the solid and the liquid velocities. These measurements will be useful in developing a better understanding of solid-liquid flows, especially solid-liquid and solid-solid interactions. Silica gel and 50% sodium iodide solution in water (refractive index {approx}1.443) are used as the refractive index matched solid and liquid respectively. A two color back scatter mode LDV is used for making velocity measurements. Tests were conducted in solid-liquid slurries with volumetric solid concentration levels of 5% and 15% in the Reynolds number (Re) range of 400 to 9200. Silica gel particles of mean diameter 40 microns were used. Measurements included mapping of the solid and liquid velocities and obtaining the pressure drop data. Signal processing technique utilizing histogram of velocity measurements made at a point and signal amplitude discrimination was successfully used for differentiating between solid and liquid velocities. 34 refs., 61 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Solid colloids with surface-mobile linkers.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Stef A J; Helms, Gesa; Dogterom, Marileen

    2015-06-17

    In this report we review the possibilities of using colloids with surface mobile linkers for the study of colloidal self-assembly processes. A promising route to create systems with mobile linkers is the use of lipid (bi-)layers. These lipid layers can be either used in the form of vesicles or as coatings for hard colloids and emulsion droplets. Inside the lipid bilayers molecules can be inserted via membrane anchors. Due to the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, the anchored molecules remain mobile. The use of different lipid mixtures even allows creating Janus-like particles that exhibit directional bonding if linkers are used which have a preference for a certain lipid phase. In nature mobile linkers can be found e.g. as receptors in cells. Therefore, towards the end of the review, we also briefly address the possibility of using colloids with surface mobile linkers as model systems to mimic cell-cell interactions and cell adhesion processes. PMID:25993272

  7. Surface flow measurements from drones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Drones are transforming the way we sense and interact with the environment. However, despite their increased capabilities, the use of drones in geophysical sciences usually focuses on image acquisition for generating high-resolution maps. Motivated by the increasing demand for innovative and high performance geophysical observational methodologies, we posit the integration of drone technology and optical sensing toward a quantitative characterization of surface flow phenomena. We demonstrate that a recreational drone can be used to yield accurate surface flow maps of sub-meter water bodies. Specifically, drone's vibrations do not hinder surface flow observations, and velocity measurements are in agreement with traditional techniques. This first instance of quantitative water flow sensing from a flying drone paves the way to novel observations of the environment.

  8. Optical measurements on contaminated surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonham, T. E.; Schmitt, R. J.; Linford, R. M. F.

    1975-01-01

    A bidirectional reflectometer system was developed for in situ measurements of the changes in spectral reflectance of surfaces contaminated with films of organic materials. The system permits experiments with films of controlled thickness in an environment that simulates the thermal, radiation, and vacuum conditions of space. The mechanical and optical construction of the reflectometer are discussed in detail, and actual data curves are used to illustrate its operation and performance.

  9. Phase field simulation of a droplet impacting a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Qian, Tie-Zheng; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-02-01

    We simulate a droplet impacting on a solid surface using a phase field model consisting of the Cahn-Hilliard and Navier Stokes equations with the generalized Navier boundary condition. An efficient gradient stable scheme is used to solve the system in axisymmetric coordinates. Our objective is to understand numerically the mechanisms leading to different impacting phenomena such as adherence, bouncing, partial bouncing, and splashing. In particular, we study how various processes are affected by the relevant dimensionless parameters: the Reynolds number, Weber number, density ratio, viscosity ratio, and the wettability of the solid surface. We also compare our numerical results with the experimental results and observe almost quantitative agreement.

  10. Adsorption of the antimicrobial peptide tritrpticin onto solid and liquid surfaces: Ion-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Salay, Luiz C; Petri, Denise F S; Nakaie, Clovis R; Schreier, Shirley

    2015-12-01

    Developing functional biointerfaces is important for technological applications. We investigated the interaction and adsorption of the antimicrobial peptide tritrpticin (VRRFPWWWPFLRR, TRP3) onto solid and liquid surfaces and the influence of ions on these processes by several techniques. Surface tension measurements showed that salt addition to TRP3 solution causes a high decrease of surface tension due to the adsorption of TRP3 at air-liquid surface. Ellipsometry studies show the TRP3 adsorption on silicon surfaces forming nanometric films that are able to further interact with liposomes. Contact angle measurements gave insight on the nature of thin film and its roughness. AFM shows the topology of the film on the solid substrates. In addition, those techniques also showed that anions can act as modulators on adsorption phenomena and are correlated with the Hofmeister series. The findings of the current work are relevant for the development of functional interfaces such as biocidal surfaces. PMID:26529674

  11. Static thrust recovery of PAR craft on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, K. I.

    2008-08-01

    Power-Augmented-Ram Vehicles belong to a new class of ground-effect machines with hybrid support. Recovered static thrust and static lift on solid surfaces are important amphibious characteristics of this craft. Experimental data for the static thrust recovery and the transition to a hovering mode are obtained in the tests with a vehicle model on two types of ground surface and with variable engine thrust and flap trailing-edge gap. The uphill surface and increased mass of the model demonstrate reductions in thrust recovery. A comparison with a two-dimensional potential-flow theory is presented. The static thrust accumulation, identified in the pre-hovering regime of a model on solid surface, does not significantly benefit the low-speed forward motion.

  12. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  13. Reflectance measurements from particulate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoniemi, J.; Gritsevich, M.; Hakala, T.; Penttilä, A.; Eskelinen, J.; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P.; Arnalds, O.; Guirado, D.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids consists of, e.g., metals and rocky materials, and comets consist of, e.g., icy and rocky materials and dust. Their surfaces can be covered by small particles. To certain extent, these surfaces can resemble some natural or artificial surfaces on the Earth, such as snow layers, sand, gravels, or silt. By measuring the reflectance from such surfaces, one can gain better understanding on how to interpret astronomical observations of asteroids and comets. Even if not completely analogous, these samples and measurements provide a strict test bed for the scattering models applied to interpret observations of small Solar System bodies. FIGIFIGO (Finnish Geodetic Institute's Field Gonio-spectro-polari- radiometer) can measure the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) of surface targets of a diameter of around 10 cm, in a selected angular range and resolution, in the spectral range of 400-2400 nm, at about 10-nm resolution, including linear polarisation (Stokes I, Q, and U, or reflection coefficient matrix elements R_{11}, R_{12}, and R_{13}). Using FIGIFIGO, over 500 samples have been measured over the past years, including over 100 snow samples and almost 100 samples resembling sand, silt, soil, dust, or gravel. For planetary studies, especially interesting are dark volcanic ash and silt samples from Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvönt eruptions. These have been measured loose and compressed, smooth and rough, purely and deposited on snow. Further single-scattering measurements using the Granada setup and measurements using the Univ. Helsinki integrating sphere complement the picture. Generally, we have observed that the reflectance from volcanic materials behaves mostly as expected and modelled. BRF shows typical bowl shape with strong phase-angle dependence. Spectral features are smooth, with slight angular dependence. Polarisation depends strongly on the phase angle, weaker on other angles defining the scattering geometry, and smoothly on the wavelength. There

  14. Investigation of surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong Kyun; Song, Myung Won; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2015-05-20

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid-liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a dc bias voltage across the plates, an ac electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage drop across a load resistor as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent electrical circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. We expect this method to aid in the study of electrical phenomena on solid-liquid interfaces. PMID:25923410

  15. Investigation of surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong Kyun; Song, Myung Won; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2015-05-20

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid-liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a dc bias voltage across the plates, an ac electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage drop across a load resistor as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent electrical circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. We expect this method to aid in the study of electrical phenomena on solid-liquid interfaces.

  16. Investigation of surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jong Kyun; Song, Myung Won; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2015-05-01

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid-liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a dc bias voltage across the plates, an ac electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage drop across a load resistor as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent electrical circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. We expect this method to aid in the study of electrical phenomena on solid-liquid interfaces.

  17. Theory of flame spread above solids. [fuel exothermic surface reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirignano, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A theory for flame spread above a solid fuel is presented. The special case is considered whereby the oxidation is an exothermic surface reaction. The spreading rate is predicted as a function of the thermochemical properties, fuel-bed thickness, and convective velocity. Also, the theory predicts temperature, mass fraction, and heat flux as a function of position.

  18. Study on Nucleation of Water on Solid Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Seiji; Saito, Akio; Matsui, Tatsuyuki

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water was investigated using Molecular Dynamics method. Solid with fcc(111) surface was placed at the bottom of a cell consisting of 864 water molecules. ST2 model with NPT ensemble was used. The pressure and temperature were set at 0.1MPa and 275K, respectively. The interaction between water and the solid was based on the equations proposed by Spohr. Exception was made on the lattice constant which was slightly modified to fit with that for ice structure. The shape of the solid surface was considered. It was found that the only one layer of water molecules was adsorbed in a case of a flat surface, whereas ice nucleation occurred by removing some of the atoms from the surface. Spohr's interaction was also modified so that the dipole moment of water became anti-ferroelectric. It was found that the modification increased the ice growth, further. The effect of lattice constant of solid on nucleation was also investigated. It was found that the variation on lattice constant with a few percent from that of ice was acceptable for nucleation, especially on shrinking side. On expanding side, however, it gave some gaps for water molecules to fit in other than that for ice structure, and it prevented the growth of ice.

  19. Method for measuring surface temperature

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Gary A.; Baker, Sheila N.; McCleskey, T. Mark

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  20. Measuring surface fluxes in CAPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; D-Shah, T.; Nie, Dalin

    1992-01-01

    Two stations (site 1612 and site 2008) were operated by the University of Georgia group from 6 July 1991 to 18 August 1991. The following data were collected continuously: surface energy fluxes (i.e., net radiation, soil heat fluxes, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux), air temperature, vapor pressure, soil temperature (at 1 cm depth), and precipitation. Canopy reflectance and light interception data were taken three times at each site between 6 July and 18 August. Soil moisture content was measured twice at each site.

  1. Surface tension and the mechanics of liquid inclusions in compliant solids.

    PubMed

    Style, Robert W; Wettlaufer, John S; Dufresne, Eric R

    2015-01-28

    Eshelby's theory of inclusions has wide-reaching implications across the mechanics of materials and structures including the theories of composites, fracture, and plasticity. However, it does not include the effects of surface stress, which has recently been shown to control many processes in soft materials such as gels, elastomers and biological tissue. To extend Eshelby's theory of inclusions to soft materials, we consider liquid inclusions within an isotropic, compressible, linear-elastic solid. We solve for the displacement and stress fields around individual stretched inclusions, accounting for the bulk elasticity of the solid and the surface tension (i.e. isotropic strain-independent surface stress) of the solid-liquid interface. Surface tension significantly alters the inclusion's shape and stiffness as well as its near- and far-field stress fields. These phenomena depend strongly on the ratio of the inclusion radius, R, to an elastocapillary length, L. Surface tension is significant whenever inclusions are smaller than 100L. While Eshelby theory predicts that liquid inclusions generically reduce the stiffness of an elastic solid, our results show that liquid inclusions can actually stiffen a solid when R<3L/2. Intriguingly, surface tension cloaks the far-field signature of liquid inclusions when R=3L/2. These results are have far-reaching applications from measuring local stresses in biological tissue, to determining the failure strength of soft composites.

  2. Microwave properties of solid CO2. [for Mars surface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. A.; Howard, H. T.; Fair, B. C.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements over the range of 2.2 to 12.0 GHz show that CO2 snow is a slightly lossy dielectric whose constant varies with density following the Rayleigh formula to 1.27 g/cu cm. It is independent of frequency and does not vary with temperature in the 113 to 183 K range; frequency independence and agreement with the Rayleigh fit are obtained from measurements on dry block ice. The dielectric constant of solid CO2 in block form is lower than that of solid water ice or solid rock; in powder form, the constant for CO2 is also lower than that of H2O (snow) or soils. These measurements may be useful in limiting the interpretations of the Viking radio reflection experiment; a radio value of 3.0 for the dielectric constant near the North Pole would be strong evidence against the presence of cm thicknesses of CO2 in that region.

  3. Nanodroplet impact onto solid platinum surface: Spreading and bouncing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Daniel; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2009-11-01

    The impact of droplets onto solid surfaces is found in a huge variety of natural and technological applications, from rain drops splashing on the pavement, to material manufacturing by molten droplet deposition. Taking inspiration from existing microfluidic technologies (i.e. lab-on-chip), there is increasing interest in the use of nanodroplets (D < 100 nm) for a number of applications such as drug delivery and semiconductor device manufacturing. However, as the size of the droplet is reduced into the nanoscale, the direct use of previously obtained macroscopic results is not guaranteed. At the nanoscale, important effects due to the molecular nature of the fluid, thermal fluctuations and reduced dimensionality can play a critical role in determining system dynamics. In this paper we present the results of large-scale, fully atomistic, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of an argon nanodroplet (D = 18 nm, 54 000 atoms) impact onto a solid platinum surface, using the LAMMPS software package. The fluid argon is modeled using the well-known Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, while the embedded-atom model (EAM) potential is used for the solid platinum. By varying both the impact velocities (10-1000 m/s) and the wettability of the solid surface a wide range of impact behaviors is observed, from smooth spreading, to bouncing recoil, pointing towards a wide array of potential applications.

  4. Surface and defect morphologies in anisotropic elastic and piezoelectric solids

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Huajian; Barnett, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The authors investigate issues related to the equilibrium and stability of surface and line defect morphologies in both piezoelectric and anisotropic elastic solids. Following their previous efforts which established that mechanical stresses in purely elastic solids can promote instability of an initially flat surface with respect to surface roughening, they show that the (initially flat) interface between two dissimilar piezoelectric solids can be unstable when subjected to coupled electromechanical loading. Quite recent cross-sectional observations of electrodeposited thin films by Japanese and British researchers provide experimental confirmation of these predictions. The authors also investigate the occurrence of equilibrium arrangements (zero Peach-Koehler force arrangements) of line defects (dislocations) in anisotropic elastic crystals in the absence of externally applied stresses. Contrary to prevailing opinion, equilibrium arrangements of dislocations under no externally applied stresses appear to be the rule rather than the exception. The existence of such {open_quotes}zero stress arrangements{close_quotes} is fundamental to developing micromechanical models of plastically deforming solids.

  5. Bulk and surface acoustic waves in solid-fluid Fibonacci layered materials.

    PubMed

    Quotane, I; El Boudouti, E H; Djafari-Rouhani, B; El Hassouani, Y; Velasco, V R

    2015-08-01

    We study theoretically the propagation and localization of acoustic waves in quasi-periodic structures made of solid and fluid layers arranged according to a Fibonacci sequence. We consider two types of structures: either a given Fibonacci sequence or a periodic repetition of a given sequence called Fibonacci superlattice. Various properties of these systems such as: the scaling law and the self-similarity of the transmission spectra or the power law behavior of the measure of the energy spectrum have been highlighted for waves of sagittal polarization in normal and oblique incidence. In addition to the allowed modes which propagate along the system, we study surface modes induced by the surface of the Fibonacci superlattice. In comparison with solid-solid layered structures, the solid-fluid systems exhibit transmission zeros which can break the self-similarity behavior in the transmission spectra for a given sequence or induce additional gaps other than Bragg gaps in a periodic structure.

  6. Bulk and surface acoustic waves in solid-fluid Fibonacci layered materials.

    PubMed

    Quotane, I; El Boudouti, E H; Djafari-Rouhani, B; El Hassouani, Y; Velasco, V R

    2015-08-01

    We study theoretically the propagation and localization of acoustic waves in quasi-periodic structures made of solid and fluid layers arranged according to a Fibonacci sequence. We consider two types of structures: either a given Fibonacci sequence or a periodic repetition of a given sequence called Fibonacci superlattice. Various properties of these systems such as: the scaling law and the self-similarity of the transmission spectra or the power law behavior of the measure of the energy spectrum have been highlighted for waves of sagittal polarization in normal and oblique incidence. In addition to the allowed modes which propagate along the system, we study surface modes induced by the surface of the Fibonacci superlattice. In comparison with solid-solid layered structures, the solid-fluid systems exhibit transmission zeros which can break the self-similarity behavior in the transmission spectra for a given sequence or induce additional gaps other than Bragg gaps in a periodic structure. PMID:25819878

  7. Residual Silicone Detection. [external tank and solid rocket booster surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T.

    1980-01-01

    Both photoelectron emission and ellipsometry proved successful in detecting silicone contamination on unpainted and epoxy painted metal surfaces such as those of the external tank and the solid rocket booster. Great success was achieved using photoelectron emission (PEE). Panels were deliberately contaminated to controlled levels and then mapped with PEE to reveal the areas and levels that were contaminated. The panels were then tested with regard to adhesive properties. Tapes were bonded over the contaminated and uncontaminated regions and the peel force was measured, or the contaminated panels were bonded (with CPR 483 foam) to uncontaminated panels and made into lap shear specimens. Other panels were bonded and made into wedge specimens for hydrothermal stress endurance tests. Strong adhesion resulted if the PEE signal fell within an acceptance window, but was poor outside the acceptance window. A prototype instrument is being prepared which can automatically be scanned over the external liquid hydrogen tank and identify those regions that are contaminated and will cause bond degradation.

  8. Removal of Particulate Contamination from Solid Surfaces Using Polymeric Micropillars.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Hadi; Dogra, Navneet; Perreault, François; Schwarz, Cynthia; Simon, Stefan; Vanderlick, T Kyle

    2016-07-01

    This Research Article describes a novel method for removal of particulate contamination, loosely referred to as dust, from solid surfaces using polymeric micropillars. In this Research Article, we illustrate for the first time that polymeric microfibrils of controlled interfacial and geometrical properties can effectively remove micrometric and submicrometric contaminant particles from a solid surface without damaging the underlying substrate. Once these microfibrils are brought into contact with a contaminated surface, because of their their soft and flexible structure, they develop intimate contact with both the surface contaminants and the substrate. While these intrinsically nonsticky micropillars have minimal interfacial interactions with the substrate, we show that they produce strong interfacial interactions with the contaminant particles, granting the detachment of the particles from the surface upon retraction of the cleaning material. The origin and strength of the interfacial interactions at the interfaces between a contaminant particle and both the substrate and the cleaning materials are thoroughly discussed. Unlike flat substrates of the same material, using microfibrillar structures of controlled interfacial and geometrical properties also allows the elimination of the adsorbed particles from the contact interface. Here we demonstrate that by moving the adsorbed particles from the tip to the side of the fibrils and consequently removing them from the contact interface, polymeric microfibrils can clean all contaminant particles from the surface. The effects of the geometrical and interfacial properties of polymeric micropillars on removing the adsorbed particles from the tips of the pillars are fully discussed. This research is not only important in terms of introducing a novel method which can offer a new paradigm for thorough yet nondestructive cleaning of dust particles from solid surfaces, but also it is of fundamental significance for researchers

  9. Removal of Particulate Contamination from Solid Surfaces Using Polymeric Micropillars.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Hadi; Dogra, Navneet; Perreault, François; Schwarz, Cynthia; Simon, Stefan; Vanderlick, T Kyle

    2016-07-01

    This Research Article describes a novel method for removal of particulate contamination, loosely referred to as dust, from solid surfaces using polymeric micropillars. In this Research Article, we illustrate for the first time that polymeric microfibrils of controlled interfacial and geometrical properties can effectively remove micrometric and submicrometric contaminant particles from a solid surface without damaging the underlying substrate. Once these microfibrils are brought into contact with a contaminated surface, because of their their soft and flexible structure, they develop intimate contact with both the surface contaminants and the substrate. While these intrinsically nonsticky micropillars have minimal interfacial interactions with the substrate, we show that they produce strong interfacial interactions with the contaminant particles, granting the detachment of the particles from the surface upon retraction of the cleaning material. The origin and strength of the interfacial interactions at the interfaces between a contaminant particle and both the substrate and the cleaning materials are thoroughly discussed. Unlike flat substrates of the same material, using microfibrillar structures of controlled interfacial and geometrical properties also allows the elimination of the adsorbed particles from the contact interface. Here we demonstrate that by moving the adsorbed particles from the tip to the side of the fibrils and consequently removing them from the contact interface, polymeric microfibrils can clean all contaminant particles from the surface. The effects of the geometrical and interfacial properties of polymeric micropillars on removing the adsorbed particles from the tips of the pillars are fully discussed. This research is not only important in terms of introducing a novel method which can offer a new paradigm for thorough yet nondestructive cleaning of dust particles from solid surfaces, but also it is of fundamental significance for researchers

  10. Surface growth on percolation networks by a conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2016-02-01

    Surface growth by the conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid model is investigated on diluted lattices, i.e., on percolation networks that are embedded in two spatial dimensions. The growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α are defined, respectively, by the mean-square surface width via W2(t ) ˜t2 β and the mean-square saturated width via Wsat2(L ) ˜L2 α , where L is the system size. These are measured on both an infinite network and a backbone network and the results are compared with power-counting predictions obtained using the fractional Langevin equation. While the Monte Carlo results on deterministic fractal substrates show excellent agreement with the predictions [D. H. Kim and J. M. Kim, Phys. Rev. E 84, 011105 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.011105], the results on critical percolation networks deviate by 8%-12% from these predictions.

  11. Surface growth on percolation networks by a conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid growth model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2016-02-01

    Surface growth by the conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid model is investigated on diluted lattices, i.e., on percolation networks that are embedded in two spatial dimensions. The growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α are defined, respectively, by the mean-square surface width via W(2)(t)∼t(2β) and the mean-square saturated width via W(sat)(2)(L)∼L(2α), where L is the system size. These are measured on both an infinite network and a backbone network and the results are compared with power-counting predictions obtained using the fractional Langevin equation. While the Monte Carlo results on deterministic fractal substrates show excellent agreement with the predictions [D. H. Kim and J. M. Kim, Phys. Rev. E 84, 011105 (2011)], the results on critical percolation networks deviate by 8%-12% from these predictions. PMID:26986299

  12. Intensity-Value Corrections for Integrating Sphere Measurements of Solid Samples Measured Behind Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Redding, Rebecca L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate and calibrated directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra of solids are important for both in situ and remote sensing. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass for the ultraviolet (UV), visible, or near-infrared spectral regions. Using both experimental methods and a simple optical model, we demonstrate that glass (fused quartz in our case) leads to artifacts in the reflectance values. We report our observations that the measured reflectance values, for both hemispherical and diffuse reflectance, are distorted by the additional reflections arising at the air–quartz and sample–quartz interfaces. The values are dependent on the sample reflectance and are offset in intensity in the hemispherical case, leading to measured values up to ~6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, ~3.8% too high for 10% reflecting surfaces, approximately correct for 40–60% diffuse-reflecting surfaces, and ~1.5% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon® surfaces. For the case of diffuse-only reflectance, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the polished glass, with differences of nearly 6% for a 99% reflecting matte surface. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces, as verified by both theory and experiment, and depend on sphere design. Finally, empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300–2300 nm range.

  13. Tuning the surface wettability of carbon nanotube carpets in multiscale hierarchical solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karumuri, Anil K.; He, Lvmeng; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.

    2015-02-01

    An attractive approach of increasing functionality of solid surfaces is to create hierarchical multiscale morphology by attaching tailored carpet-like arrays of Carbon nanotubes (CNT) on them. Such surfaces offer fractal morphology along with unprecedented increase in specific surface areas, and significantly boost the potency of porous materials used in surface-active applications. However, full utilization of these structures will require intimate interaction between the solid surface and its environmental fluid. CNT arrays tend to be hydrophobic, which limit their effectiveness in aqueous environments. In this research, we investigated two different surface modifications methods to induce hydrophilic property to CNT nano-carpets on graphitic substrates: dry oxygen plasma treatment and wet sol-gel oxide coating. Structure, morphology, composition and chemistry of these multiscale surfaces have been related to wettability and water flow properties. Plasma oxygen treatments did not alter the surface morphology, but induced temporary wettability, that could be reversed by heat treatment. On the other hand, sol-gel treatment permanently coated the nanotubes with a strongly bonded layer of amorphous SiO2. This coating imparts permanent alterations in surface chemistry, contact angle, wettability and water flow. Porous carbon foams were coated with CNT arrays and their water permeability measured before and after sol-gel silica coating. The hydrophilic coating was seen to increase flow rate and reduce pressure build-up. These results have important implications on all devices that utilize surface activity of porous solids, such as catalytic membranes, antimicrobial filters, and microfluidic sensors.

  14. Dissolved-Solids Transport in Surface Water of the Muddy Creek Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerner, Steven J.

    2008-01-01

    Muddy Creek is located in the southeastern part of central Utah and is a tributary of the Dirty Devil River, which, in turn, is a tributary of the Colorado River. Dissolved solids transported from the Muddy Creek Basin may be stored in the lower Dirty Devil River Basin, but are eventually discharged to the Colorado River and impact downstream water users. This study used selected dissolved-solids measurements made by various local, State, and Federal agencies from the 1970s through 2006, and additional dissolved-solids data that were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during April 2004 through November 2006, to compute dissolved-solids loads, determine the distribution of dissolved-solids concentrations, and identify trends in dissolved-solids concentration in surface water of the Muddy Creek Basin. The dissolved-solids concentration values measured in water samples collected from Muddy Creek during April 2004 through October 2006 ranged from 385 milligrams per liter (mg/L) to 5,950 mg/L. The highest dissolved-solids concentration values measured in the study area were in water samples collected at sites in South Salt Wash (27,000 mg/L) and Salt Wash (4,940 to 6,780 mg/L). The mean annual dissolved-solids load in Muddy Creek for the periods October 1976 to September 1980 and October 2005 to September 2006 was smallest at a site near the headwaters (9,670 tons per year [tons/yr]) and largest at a site at the mouth (68,700 tons/yr). For this period, the mean annual yield of dissolved solids from the Muddy Creek Basin was 44 tons per square mile. During October 2005 to September 2006, direct runoff transported as much as 45 percent of the annual dissolved-solids load at the mouth of Muddy Creek. A storm that occurred during October 5?7, 2006 resulted in a peak streamflow at the mouth of Muddy Creek of 7,150 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) and the transport of an estimated 35,000 tons of dissolved solids, which is about 51 percent of the average annual dissolved-solids

  15. Micro PIV measurement of slip flow on a hydrogel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Mochizuki, O.

    2014-06-01

    Slip flow on a hydrogel surface was investigated in order to clarify the effect of drag reduction on the aqueous surface of living things. Thin-film flow along the hydrogel surface was measured by using a micro PIV (particle image velocimetry) system for comparison with theoretical velocity distribution which satisfied the non-slip condition on a solid surface. The slip flow on the hydrogel was found to be related to the degree of swelling and molecular weight of the hydrogel materials. This shows the possibility of a reduction in wall shear stress as a result of the decrease in the velocity gradient near a wall surface.

  16. Highly efficient solid state catalysis by reconstructed (001) Ceria surface

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, VF; Ozaki, T; Atrei, A; Wu, LJ; Al-Mahboob, A; Sadowski, JT; Tong, X; Nykypanchuk, D; Li, Q

    2014-04-10

    Substrate engineering is a key factor in the synthesis of new complex materials. The substrate surface has to be conditioned in order to minimize the energy threshold for the formation of the desired phase or to enhance the catalytic activity of the substrate. The mechanism of the substrate activity, especially of technologically relevant oxide surfaces, is poorly understood. Here we design and synthesize several distinct and stable CeO2 (001) surface reconstructions which are used to grow epitaxial films of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7. The film grown on the substrate having the longest, fourfold period, reconstruction exhibits a twofold increase in performance over surfaces with shorter period reconstructions. This is explained by the crossover between the nucleation site dimensions and the period of the surface reconstruction. This result opens a new avenue for catalysis mediated solid state synthesis.

  17. Highly efficient solid state catalysis by reconstructed (001) Ceria surface

    PubMed Central

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F.; Ozaki, Toshinori; Atrei, Andrea; Wu, Lijun; Al-Mahboob, Abdullah; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Tong, Xiao; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Li, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Substrate engineering is a key factor in the synthesis of new complex materials. The substrate surface has to be conditioned in order to minimize the energy threshold for the formation of the desired phase or to enhance the catalytic activity of the substrate. The mechanism of the substrate activity, especially of technologically relevant oxide surfaces, is poorly understood. Here we design and synthesize several distinct and stable CeO2 (001) surface reconstructions which are used to grow epitaxial films of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7. The film grown on the substrate having the longest, fourfold period, reconstruction exhibits a twofold increase in performance over surfaces with shorter period reconstructions. This is explained by the crossover between the nucleation site dimensions and the period of the surface reconstruction. This result opens a new avenue for catalysis mediated solid state synthesis. PMID:24717357

  18. Study of surface charge density on solid/liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Hyuk Kyu; Moon, Jong Kyun

    2014-11-01

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid/liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid/liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a DC bias voltage across the plates, an AC electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage difference between the plates as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid/liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. This work was supported by Center for Soft and Living Matter through IBS program in Korea.

  19. Solid state chemistry of nitrogen oxides--part II: surface consumption of NO2.

    PubMed

    Ioppolo, S; Fedoseev, G; Minissale, M; Congiu, E; Dulieu, F; Linnartz, H

    2014-05-14

    Nitrogen oxides are considered to be important astrochemical precursors of complex species and prebiotics. However, apart from the hydrogenation of solid NO that leads to the surface formation of hydroxylamine, little is known about the full solid state reaction network involving both nitrogen and oxygen. Our study is divided into two papers, hereby called Part I and Part II. In the accompanying paper, we investigate the surface reactions NO + O/O2/O3 and NO + N with a focus on the formation of NO2 ice. Here, we complement this study by measurements of the surface destruction of solid NO2, e.g., NO2 + H/O/N. Experiments are performed in two separate ultra-high vacuum setups and therefore under different experimental conditions to better constrain the experimental results. Surface reaction products are monitored by means of Fourier Transform Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-RAIRS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) techniques using mass spectrometry. The surface destruction of solid NO2 leads to the formation of a series of nitrogen oxides such as NO, N2O, N2O3, and N2O4 as well as HNO, NH2OH, and H2O. When NO2 is mixed with an interstellar more relevant apolar (i.e., CO) ice, solid CO2 and HCOOH are also formed due to interactions between different reaction routes. The astrophysical implications of the full nitrogen and oxygen reaction network derived from Parts I and II are discussed.

  20. Modifying Thermal Transport in Colloidal Nanocrystal Solids with Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-12-22

    We present a systematic study on the effect of surface chemistry on thermal transport in colloidal nanocrystal (NC) solids. Using PbS NCs as a model system, we vary ligand binding group (thiol, amine, and atomic halides), ligand length (ethanedithiol, butanedithiol, hexanedithiol, and octanedithiol), and NC diameter (3.3-8.2 nm). Our experiments reveal several findings: (i) The ligand choice can vary the NC solid thermal conductivity by up to a factor of 2.5. (ii) The ligand binding strength to the NC core does not significantly impact thermal conductivity. (iii) Reducing the ligand length can decrease the interparticle distance, which increases thermal conductivity. (iv) Increasing the NC diameter increases thermal conductivity. (v) The effect of surface chemistry can exceed the effect of NC diameter and becomes more pronounced as NC diameter decreases. By combining these trends, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of NC solids can be varied by an overall factor of 4, from ∼0.1-0.4 W/m-K. We complement these findings with effective medium approximation modeling and identify thermal transport in the ligand matrix as the rate-limiter for thermal transport. By combining these modeling results with our experimental observations, we conclude that future efforts to increase thermal conductivity in NC solids should focus on the ligand-ligand interface between neighboring NCs.

  1. Heterogeneous nucleation of calcium phosphates on solid surfaces in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Zhuang, H; Nancollas, G H

    1997-04-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of calcium phosphates on solid surfaces of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly-(tetrafluoroethylene-co-hexafluoropropylene) (FEP), silicone rubber, mica, and radiofrequency glow discharge (RFGD)-treated PMMA, FEP, and silicone rubber has been studied in solutions supersaturated with respect to hydroxyapatite. The surface properties of the substrates were characterized by contact angle measurements. For the RFGD-treated surfaces, the Lifshitz-Van der Waals surface tension component changes very little, but the Lewis acid-base surface tension parameters vary greatly depending upon the materials. With scanning electron microscopy, nucleation of calcium phosphates was observed only on the surfaces: mica, RFGD-treated PMMA and FEP, with relatively high values of the Lewis base surface tension parameter. The more hydrophobic surfaces having low Lewis acid-base surface tensions, untreated PMMA and FEP, silicone rubber, and even RFGD-treated silicone rubber showed no nucleation.

  2. Measurements of solid concentration in a downward vertical gas-solid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Schiewe, T.; Wirth, K.E.; Molerus, O.; Tuzla, K.; Sharma, A.K.; Chen, J.C.

    1999-05-01

    New results from experiments performed in a 15-cm-diameter downflow fast-fluidized bed are presented. Tests were conducted at room temperature and near atmospheric pressure, with 125-{micro}m glass beads. Superficial gas velocities range from 0 to 6.6 m/s. Two different measurement techniques--gamma-absorption tomography and capacitance sensing--were applied to the gas-solids flow in the downer tube. The average local solid fractions from both measurement techniques are compared for various operating conditions of the gas-solid flow. In general, good agreement was obtained between the solid concentration measurements from both measurement techniques. It is demonstrated that combined use of both measurement techniques offers the best change to get time-average information about the concentration distribution over the whole cross section.

  3. Progress in Infrared Pyrometry Measurements of Shocked Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Cazamias, J U; Hare, D E; Poulsen, P

    2001-11-05

    Temperature measurement is one of the grand challenges still facing experimental shock physics. A shock experiment fundamentally measures E({sigma}{sub x}, {var_epsilon}{sub 11}) which is an incomplete equation of state since temperature (or entropy) remains unspecified. Ideally, one would like to experimentally determine a free energy F(T, {var_epsilon}{sub ij}) from which all other thermo-mechanical properties might be derived. In practice, temperature measurement would allow direct comparison with theory/simulation since T and {var_epsilon}{sub 11} are in most theories the underlying variables. Temperature is a sensitive measure of energy partitioning, knowledge of which would increase our understanding phase boundaries and thermally activated processes (such as chemical reactivity (including dissociation and ionization)). Temperature measurement would also allow a thermodynamically consistent coupling of hydrodynamic equations of state to the material's constitutive (deformation) behavior. The measurement of the temperature of a material that has undergone severe strains at small time-scales is extremely difficult, and we are developing a method using infrared reflectance and pyrometry. The emitted power from a warm surface is measured over a range of wavelengths using a multi-channel IR detector with a response time of {approx}0.1 {micro}s. Each channel of the detector passes the radiation from a selected wavelength interval into a detector. Pyrometers typically have anywhere from three to six channels, and not all channels may have enough signal to contribute to the measurement under any given condition. The difficulty in the measurement lies in relating the radiance (power per unit area per solid angle) in each channel to the temperature of the surface since the radiance is determined not only by the temperature, but also by the emissivity of the surface. The emissivity is not a constant for any real surface, but varies both with angle of observation and

  4. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM): useful for developing procedures for immobilization of proteins on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sha, Xue; Sun, Chengjun; Xu, Xiaohe; Alexander, Laura; Loll, Patrick J; Penn, Lynn S

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate the combined use of liquid and air measurements with the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for quantitative analysis of multistep reaction procedures leading to immobilized proteins on solid surfaces. Reactions are conducted on the surfaces of QCM sensor crystals and are quantified by measurements of resonant frequency of the crystals before and after each reaction step. When reactions are conducted in the flow cell of the QCM in the presence of solvent, measurement of resonant frequency can be made in situ (liquid measurement). When reactions cannot be conducted in the flow cell because of temperatures or solvents not tolerated by the cell, frequency can be measured after evaporation of solvent (air measurement). Each reaction step can be analyzed by either liquid or air measurement so that the whole multistep procedure is addressed, no matter how diverse the chemical nature of the steps. We conducted identical multistep procedures on two different starting surfaces, gold and silica, and found comparable results. PMID:23121645

  5. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of drops colliding with solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X.; McLaughlin, J. B.; Kontomaris, K.

    2009-04-01

    Video images of drops colliding with solid surfaces shown by Rioboo et al. (2002) reveal that, for large drop velocities, the drops flatten and form a ring structure before receding and, in some cases, rebounding from the surface. They described the sequence of events in terms of four distinct regimes. During the initial kinematic phase, the dimensionless wetting radius of the drop follows a universal form if the drop Weber and Reynolds numbers are sufficiently large. In the second phase, the drop becomes highly flattened and the values of the Weber and Reynolds numbers influence the time evolution of the dimensionless wetting radius and its maximum value. This is followed by a third phase in which the wetting radius begins to decrease with time and the wettability of the surface influences the dynamics. This paper presents simulation results for the early stages of drop impact and spreading on a partially wetting solid surface. The simulations were performed with a modified version of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) developed by Inamuro et al. (2004) for a liquid-gas density ratio of 1000. The Inamuro et al. version of the LBM was modified by incorporating rigid, no-slip boundary conditions and incorporating a boundary condition on the normal derivative of the order parameter to impose the desired equilibrium contact angle.

  6. The measurement of surface gravity.

    PubMed

    Crossley, David; Hinderer, Jacques; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-04-01

    This review covers basic theory and techniques behind the use of ground-based gravimetry at the Earth's surface. The orientation is toward modern instrumentation, data processing and interpretation for observing surface, land-based, time-variable changes to the geopotential. The instrumentation side is covered in some detail, with specifications and performance of the most widely used models of the three main types: the absolute gravimeters (FG5, A10 from Micro-g LaCoste), superconducting gravimeters (OSG, iGrav from GWR instruments), and the new generation of spring instruments (Micro-g LaCoste gPhone, Scintrex CG5 and Burris ZLS). A wide range of applications is covered, with selected examples from tides and ocean loading, atmospheric effects on gravity, local and global hydrology, seismology and normal modes, long period and tectonics, volcanology, exploration gravimetry, and some examples of gravimetry connected to fundamental physics. We show that there are only a modest number of very large signals, i.e. hundreds of µGal (10(-8) m s(-2)), that are easy to see with all gravimeters (e.g. tides, volcanic eruptions, large earthquakes, seasonal hydrology). The majority of signals of interest are in the range 0.1-5.0 µGal and occur at a wide range of time scales (minutes to years) and spatial extent (a few meters to global). Here the competing effects require a careful combination of different gravimeter types and measurement strategies to efficiently characterize and distinguish the signals. Gravimeters are sophisticated instruments, with substantial up-front costs, and they place demands on the operators to maximize the results. Nevertheless their performance characteristics such as drift and precision have improved dramatically in recent years, and their data recording ability and ruggedness have seen similar advances. Many subtle signals are now routinely connected with known geophysical effects such as coseismic earthquake displacements, post

  7. The measurement of surface gravity.

    PubMed

    Crossley, David; Hinderer, Jacques; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-04-01

    This review covers basic theory and techniques behind the use of ground-based gravimetry at the Earth's surface. The orientation is toward modern instrumentation, data processing and interpretation for observing surface, land-based, time-variable changes to the geopotential. The instrumentation side is covered in some detail, with specifications and performance of the most widely used models of the three main types: the absolute gravimeters (FG5, A10 from Micro-g LaCoste), superconducting gravimeters (OSG, iGrav from GWR instruments), and the new generation of spring instruments (Micro-g LaCoste gPhone, Scintrex CG5 and Burris ZLS). A wide range of applications is covered, with selected examples from tides and ocean loading, atmospheric effects on gravity, local and global hydrology, seismology and normal modes, long period and tectonics, volcanology, exploration gravimetry, and some examples of gravimetry connected to fundamental physics. We show that there are only a modest number of very large signals, i.e. hundreds of µGal (10(-8) m s(-2)), that are easy to see with all gravimeters (e.g. tides, volcanic eruptions, large earthquakes, seasonal hydrology). The majority of signals of interest are in the range 0.1-5.0 µGal and occur at a wide range of time scales (minutes to years) and spatial extent (a few meters to global). Here the competing effects require a careful combination of different gravimeter types and measurement strategies to efficiently characterize and distinguish the signals. Gravimeters are sophisticated instruments, with substantial up-front costs, and they place demands on the operators to maximize the results. Nevertheless their performance characteristics such as drift and precision have improved dramatically in recent years, and their data recording ability and ruggedness have seen similar advances. Many subtle signals are now routinely connected with known geophysical effects such as coseismic earthquake displacements, post

  8. Chemical reactions on solid surfaces of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biham, Ofer; Pirronello, Valerio; Vidali, Gianfranco

    Observed abundances of chemical species in interstellar clouds can be explained in most cases by reaction schemes involving only species in the gas phase. There is however clear evidence that reactions occurring on the surface of dust grains, helping the formation of key molecules, play a fundamental role into shaping the universe as we see it today. In this chapter we focus our attention on surface reactions on solids and in conditions close to those encountered in interstellar clouds. We will describe how experimental techniques of surface science have been used to study the recombination reaction of hydrogen on interstellar dust grain analogues and the oxidation of carbon monoxide in the interaction of oxygen atoms in water ice layers. Using theoretical methods and computer simulations, we show that it is possible to relate experimental results obtained in the laboratory to actual physical and chemical processes occurring in the interstellar space.

  9. Three-dimensional reconstructions of solid surfaces using conventional microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ficker, Tomáš; Martišek, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional digital replicas of solid surfaces are subject of interest of different branches of science and technology. The present paper in its introductory parts brings an overview of the various microscopic reconstructive techniques based on optical sectioning. The main attention is devoted to conventional reconstruction methods and especially to that one employing the Fourier transform. The three-dimensional replicas of this special reconstructive frequency method are compared graphically and numerically with the three-dimensional replicas of the confocal method. Based on the comparative study it has been concluded that the quality of the conventional replicas of surfaces possessing textures of intermediate height irregularities is acceptable and almost comparable with the quality of confocal replicas. This study is relevant both for identifying a convenient technique that provides good qualities of three-dimensional replicas and for selecting the hardware whose price is affordable even for small research groups studying rougher surface textures.

  10. Three-dimensional reconstructions of solid surfaces using conventional microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ficker, Tomáš; Martišek, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional digital replicas of solid surfaces are subject of interest of different branches of science and technology. The present paper in its introductory parts brings an overview of the various microscopic reconstructive techniques based on optical sectioning. The main attention is devoted to conventional reconstruction methods and especially to that one employing the Fourier transform. The three-dimensional replicas of this special reconstructive frequency method are compared graphically and numerically with the three-dimensional replicas of the confocal method. Based on the comparative study it has been concluded that the quality of the conventional replicas of surfaces possessing textures of intermediate height irregularities is acceptable and almost comparable with the quality of confocal replicas. This study is relevant both for identifying a convenient technique that provides good qualities of three-dimensional replicas and for selecting the hardware whose price is affordable even for small research groups studying rougher surface textures. PMID:26381761

  11. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Properties of Clean Surfaces: Adhesion, Friction, and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter presents the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of smooth, atomically clean surfaces of solid-solid couples, such as metal-ceramic couples, in a clean environment. Surface and bulk properties, which determine the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of solid-solid couples, are described. The primary emphasis is on the nature and character of the metal, especially its surface energy and ductility. Also, the mechanisms of friction and wear for clean, smooth surfaces are stated.

  12. [Flame temperature distribution measurement of solid propellants].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-hua; Zhu, Shu-guang; Li, Yan; Fang, Zhong-yan; Yang, Rong-jie; Li, Yu-ping; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Yun-fei

    2004-09-01

    Many high temperature bodies such as flame, in which chemical reactions are very complex, emit their own spectra. These emission spectra usually consist of the spectral lines, spectral bands and the continuous spectra. In some cases, the spectral lines gather together. It is very difficult to find the right single spectral line when the spectral line intensity method is used. To deal with this problem, the idea that the single spectral line intensity is replaced by the total intensity of many spectral lines to measure the temperature is mentioned. And the relative intensity method is also changed to deal with this idea. The measurement of the temperature distribution based on this improved method is successful, and the measurement results are compared with the results of the thermocouple method.

  13. Modelling harmonic generation measurements in solids.

    PubMed

    Best, S R; Croxford, A J; Neild, S A

    2014-02-01

    Harmonic generation measurements typically make use of the plane wave result when extracting values for the nonlinearity parameter, β, from experimental measurements. This approach, however, ignores the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and receiver integration which are common features in a typical experiment. Our aim is to determine the importance of these effects when making measurements of β over different sample dimensions, or using different input frequencies. We describe a three-dimensional numerical model designed to accurately predict the results of a typical experiment, based on a quasi-linear assumption. An experiment is designed to measure the axial variation of the fundamental and second harmonic amplitude components in an ultrasonic beam, and the results are compared with those predicted by the model. The absolute β values are then extracted from the experimental data using both the simulation and the standard plane wave result. A difference is observed between the values returned by the two methods, which varies with axial range and input frequency. PMID:23786784

  14. Experimental study of surface tension, specific heat and thermal diffusivity of liquid and solid titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, K.; Wang, H. P.; Chang, J.; Wei, B.

    2015-10-01

    The thermophysical properties of liquid and solid titanium such as the surface tension, specific heat and thermal diffusivity have been investigated over a wide temperature range. By using electromagnetic levitation and oscillating drop method, the surface tension of liquid titanium was measured in the temperature range of 1802-2188 K. The viscosity and density of undercooled liquid titanium were calculated by some well-known models using the measured data as input. In addition, the specific heat of liquid titanium was determined over the experimental range using electromagnetic levitation and drop calorimetry obtaining the value of 33.64 J mol-1 K-1. In addition, the thermal diffusivity of solid titanium was measured by laser flash method in the temperature range of 171-1080 K.

  15. Scientific support for an orbiter middeck experiment on solid surface combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, Robert A.; Vedha-Nayagam, M.; Srikantaiah, Nataraj

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to determine the mechanism of gas-phase flame spread over solid fuel surfaces in the absence of any buoyancy or externally imposed gas-phase flow. Such understanding can be used to improve the fire safety aspects of space travel by providing information that will allow judicious selections of spacecraft materials and environments to be made. The planned experiment consists of measuring the flame spread rate over thermally thin and thermally thick fuels in a closed container in the low-gravity environment of the Space Shuttle. Measurements consist of flame spread rate and shape obtained from two views of the process as recorded on movie film and surface and gas-phase temperatures obtained from fine-wire thermocouples. The temperature measurements along with appropriate modeling provide information about the gas-to-solid heat flux. Environmental parameters to be varied are the oxygen concentration and pressure.

  16. Prediction of fluid velocity slip at solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J S; Todd, B D; Daivis, Peter J

    2011-07-01

    The observed flow enhancement in highly confining geometries is believed to be caused by fluid velocity slip at the solid wall surface. Here we present a simple and highly accurate method to predict this slip using equilibrium molecular dynamics. Unlike previous equilibrium molecular dynamics methods, it allows us to directly compute the intrinsic wall-fluid friction coefficient rather than an empirical friction coefficient that includes all sources of friction for planar shear flow. The slip length predicted by our method is in excellent agreement with the slip length obtained from direct nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. Solids concentration measurements in molten wax by an ultrasonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Y.; Gamwo, I.K.; Blackwell, A.G.; Schehl, R.R.; Zarochak, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    The application of the three-phase slurry reactor system to coal liquefaction processing and chemical industries has recently received considerable attention. To design and efficiently operate a three-phase slurry reactor, the degree of dispersion of the solid (catalyst) in the reactor should be understood. The solids distribution within the reactor greatly affects its performance. An ultrasonic technique is under development for measuring solids concentration in a three-phase slurry reactor. Preliminary measurements have been made on slurries consisting of molten paraffin wax, glass beads, and nitrogen bubbles at 189 C. The data show that the velocity and attenuation of the sound are well-defined functions of the solid and gas concentrations in the molten wax.

  18. Detailed electrical measurements on sago starch biopolymer solid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rahul; Baghel, Jaya; Shukla, S.; Bhattacharya, B.; Rhee, Hee-Woo; Singh, Pramod K.

    2014-12-01

    The biopolymer solid electrolyte has been synthesized and characterized. Potassium iodide (KI) has been added in polymer matrix to develop solid polymer electrolyte. Relationships between electrical, ionic transport parameter and mechanism have been studied in detail. Impedance spectroscopy reveals the detailed electrical studies and ion transport mechanism. The ion dissociation factor is compared with a measured dielectric constant at a fixed frequency. The dielectric data are calculated which support the ionic conductivity data.

  19. Friction, Wear, and Surface Damage of Metals as Affected by Solid Surface Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisson, Edmond E; Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Godfrey, Douglas

    1956-01-01

    As predicted by friction theory, experiments showed that friction and surface damage of metals can be reduced by solid surface films. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding was a very important factor in wear of dry and boundary lubricated surfaces. Films of graphitic carbon on cast irons, nio on nickel alloys, and feo and fe sub 3 o sub 4 on ferrous materials were found to be beneficial. Abrasive films such as fe sub 2 o sub 3 or moo sub 3 were definitely detrimental. It appears that the importance of oxide films to friction and wear processes has not been fully appreciated.

  20. Accumulation of swimming bacteria near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanglai; Bensson, James; Nisimova, Liana; Munger, Daniel; Mahautmr, Panrapee; Tang, Jay X.; Maxey, Martin R.; Brun, Yves V.

    2011-10-01

    We measured the distribution of a forward swimming strain of Caulobacter crescentus near a surface using a three-dimensional tracking technique based on dark field microscopy and found that the swimming bacteria accumulate heavily within a micrometer from the surface. We attribute this accumulation to frequent collisions of the swimming cells with the surface, causing them to align parallel to the surface as they continually move forward. The extent of accumulation at the steady state is accounted for by balancing alignment caused by these collisions with the rotational Brownian motion of the micrometer-sized bacteria. We performed a simulation based on this model, which reproduced the measured results. Additional simulations demonstrate the dependence of accumulation on swimming speed and cell size, showing that longer and faster cells accumulate more near a surface than shorter and slower ones do.

  1. Optical Measurement for Solid- and Liquid-Phase Sb2Te3 around Its Melting Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Masashi; Endo, Rie; Tsutsumi, Kouichi; Morikasa, Fukuyoshi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Fukaya, Toshio; Suzuki, Michio; Susa, Masahiro; Endo, Tomoyoshi; Tadokoro, Toshiyasu

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a system for measuring the complex refractive index of liquid- and solid-phase chalcogenide around their melting points. The system consists of a spectroscopic ellipsometer, an infrared heating system, and prism optics. As a container for the chalcogenide, we use a customized quartz cell, evacuated to several pascal level to avoid sample degradation. We adopted a measurement configuration that uses access from the bottom side, because a mirror-like surface which is necessary for optical measurement was naturally and easily created at the container bottom by gravity. We succeeded in observing the remarkable difference on the indices between liquid- and solid-phase Sb2Te3.

  2. Solids Fraction Measurement with a Reflective Fiber Optic Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Seachman, S.M.; Yue, P.C.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

    2006-11-01

    A method has been developed to extract solids fraction information from a reflective fiber optic probe. The commercially available reflective fiber optic probe was designed to measure axial particle velocity (both up and down directions). However, the reflected light intensity measured is related to particle size and particle concentration. A light reflection model is used to relate the reflected light intensity to solids fraction. In this model we assume that the reflected light intensity is a fixed fraction, K1, of the total light intensity lost in penetration of a solid layer. Also, the solids fraction is related to particle concentration, N, in the light path, by N = K2 (1- ε), where (1-ε) is the solids fraction. The parameters K1 and K2 are determined through a calibration and curve fitting procedure. This paper describes this procedure and the steps taken to derive the values of K1 and K2. It is proposed that the reflective fiber optic can be used for real time measurement of solids fraction in a circulating fluid bed.

  3. Ice nuclei measurements from solid rocket motor effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E., II

    1980-01-01

    The ice crystal forming nuclei (IN) measured in solid rocket motor (SRM) exhaust products is discussed in relation to space shuttle exhaust. Preliminary results from laboratory investigations and flight preparations for March 1978 Titan launch are discussed. The work necessary to provide adequate measurements of IN and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the stabilized ground clouds from SRM's is studied.

  4. Kinetics and molecular binding of GEPIs on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brandon

    proof-of-concept applications. In an enzyme immobilization study, for example enzymes immobilized via GEPIs showed significantly higher activity than those nonspecifically immobilized. In biomineralization studies, several bifunctional GEPIs showed the ability to mineralize hydroxyapatite out of a calcium phosphate solution, where control surfaces and peptides showed no mineralization ability. With the present first study, which established quantitative molecular binding procedures of solid binding peptides, it is now possible to design, tailor and implement GEPIs for a wide range of applications, from nanotechnology to medical problems that require an interface between a biopolymer/biosurface and an inorganic surface.

  5. Lunar surface outgassing and alpha particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, Richard D.; Binder, Alan B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particle?; produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-2 18 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238.

  6. Capillary Spreading of Liquid Drops on Prewetted Solid Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chebbi

    1999-03-15

    A description of the entire configuration of liquid drops spreading over a previously wetted solid surface is given in the case of negligible evaporation and small Bond and Weber numbers. Two solutions are developed: an outer one which is valid in the bulk of the drop and an inner solution which applies in the vicinity of the macroscopic boundary of the drop. The model accounts for deviations from the constant-curvature profile for the outer solution and, in addition, for deviations of the inner solution from the asymptotic approximation of V. V. Kalinin and V. M. Starov (1986, Colloid J. USSR (English tr.) 48, 907). Both solutions are shown to present an inflexion point. Its location is shown to be very sensitive to one parameter which fully determines the inner solution. The value of this parameter, and the spreading laws for the drop radius, the apex height, and the dynamic contact angle are determined by matching the inner and outer solutions. Results show deviations from the power laws used in the literature. These deviations are discussed in relation to the results obtained by V. M. Starov et al. (1994, Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 50, 187), and R. Chebbi and M. S. Selim (1997, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 195, 66), compared with the experimental data presented by V. M. Starov et al. for spreading over dry smooth solid surfaces. Moreover, the present analysis allows description of the entire drop configuration and slope and curvature variations. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10049539

  7. Nano Liquid Crystal Droplet Impact on Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; de Pablo, Juan; dePablo Team

    2015-03-01

    Liquid droplet impaction on solid surfaces is an important problem with a wide range of applications in everyday life. Liquid crystals (LCs) are anisotropic liquids whose internal structure gives rise to rich optical and morphological phenomena. In this work we study the liquid crystal droplet impaction on solid surfaces by molecular dynamics simulations. We employ a widely used Gay-Berne model to describe the elongated liquid crystal molecules and their interactions. Our work shows that, in contrast to isotropic liquids, drop deformation is symmetric unless an instability kicks in, in which case a nano scale liquid crystal droplet exhibits distinct anisotropic spreading modes that do not occur in simple liquids. The drop prefers spreading along the low viscosity direction, but inertia can in some cases overcome that bias. The effects of the director field of the droplet, preferred anchoring direction and the anchoring strength of the wall are investigated. Large scale (0.1 micron) simulations are performed to connect our nano scale results to the experiments. Our studies indicate that LCs could provide an interesting alternative for development of next-generation printing inks.

  8. Drop impact on solid surface: Short time self-similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippi, Julien; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Antkowiak, Arnaud

    2014-11-01

    Drop impact on a solid surface is a problem with many industrial or environmental applications. Many studies focused on the last stages of this phenomenon as spreading or splashing. In this study we are interested in the early stages of drop impact on solid surface. Inspired by Wagner theory developed by water entry community we shown the self-similar structure of the velocity field and the pressure field. The latter is shown to exhibit a maximum not near the impact point, but rather at the contact line. The motion of the contact line is furthermore shown to exhibit a transition from ``tank treading'' motion to pure sweeping when the lamella appears. We performed numerical simulations with the open-cource code Gerris which are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Interestingly the inviscid self-similar impact pressure and velocities depend on the self-similar variable r /√{ t} . This allows to construct a seamless uniform analytical solution encompassing both impact and viscous effects. We predict quantitatively observables of interest, such as the evolution of total and maximum viscous shear stresses and net total force. We finally demonstrate that the structure of the flow resembles a stagnation point flow unexpectedly involving r /√{ t} .

  9. A nanostructured surface increases friction exponentially at the solid-gas interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phani, Arindam; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Hawk, John E.; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    According to Stokes’ law, a moving solid surface experiences viscous drag that is linearly related to its velocity and the viscosity of the medium. The viscous interactions result in dissipation that is known to scale as the square root of the kinematic viscosity times the density of the gas. We observed that when an oscillating surface is modified with nanostructures, the experimentally measured dissipation shows an exponential dependence on kinematic viscosity. The surface nanostructures alter solid-gas interplay greatly, amplifying the dissipation response exponentially for even minute variations in viscosity. Nanostructured resonator thus allows discrimination of otherwise narrow range of gaseous viscosity making dissipation an ideal parameter for analysis of a gaseous media. We attribute the observed exponential enhancement to the stochastic nature of interactions of many coupled nanostructures with the gas media.

  10. A nanostructured surface increases friction exponentially at the solid-gas interface

    PubMed Central

    Phani, Arindam; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Hawk, John E.; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    According to Stokes’ law, a moving solid surface experiences viscous drag that is linearly related to its velocity and the viscosity of the medium. The viscous interactions result in dissipation that is known to scale as the square root of the kinematic viscosity times the density of the gas. We observed that when an oscillating surface is modified with nanostructures, the experimentally measured dissipation shows an exponential dependence on kinematic viscosity. The surface nanostructures alter solid-gas interplay greatly, amplifying the dissipation response exponentially for even minute variations in viscosity. Nanostructured resonator thus allows discrimination of otherwise narrow range of gaseous viscosity making dissipation an ideal parameter for analysis of a gaseous media. We attribute the observed exponential enhancement to the stochastic nature of interactions of many coupled nanostructures with the gas media. PMID:27596851

  11. A nanostructured surface increases friction exponentially at the solid-gas interface.

    PubMed

    Phani, Arindam; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Hawk, John E; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    According to Stokes' law, a moving solid surface experiences viscous drag that is linearly related to its velocity and the viscosity of the medium. The viscous interactions result in dissipation that is known to scale as the square root of the kinematic viscosity times the density of the gas. We observed that when an oscillating surface is modified with nanostructures, the experimentally measured dissipation shows an exponential dependence on kinematic viscosity. The surface nanostructures alter solid-gas interplay greatly, amplifying the dissipation response exponentially for even minute variations in viscosity. Nanostructured resonator thus allows discrimination of otherwise narrow range of gaseous viscosity making dissipation an ideal parameter for analysis of a gaseous media. We attribute the observed exponential enhancement to the stochastic nature of interactions of many coupled nanostructures with the gas media. PMID:27596851

  12. A nanostructured surface increases friction exponentially at the solid-gas interface.

    PubMed

    Phani, Arindam; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Hawk, John E; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-09-06

    According to Stokes' law, a moving solid surface experiences viscous drag that is linearly related to its velocity and the viscosity of the medium. The viscous interactions result in dissipation that is known to scale as the square root of the kinematic viscosity times the density of the gas. We observed that when an oscillating surface is modified with nanostructures, the experimentally measured dissipation shows an exponential dependence on kinematic viscosity. The surface nanostructures alter solid-gas interplay greatly, amplifying the dissipation response exponentially for even minute variations in viscosity. Nanostructured resonator thus allows discrimination of otherwise narrow range of gaseous viscosity making dissipation an ideal parameter for analysis of a gaseous media. We attribute the observed exponential enhancement to the stochastic nature of interactions of many coupled nanostructures with the gas media.

  13. Enhancement of Li+ ion conductivity in solid polymer electrolytes using surface tailored porous silica nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Jagdeep; Singh, Udai P.; Panda, Subhendu K.; Si, Satyabrata

    2016-09-01

    The current study represents the design and synthesis of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based solid polymer electrolytes by solvent casting approach using surface tailored porous silica as nanofillers. The surface tailoring of porous silica nanostructure is achieved through silanization chemistry using 3-glycidyloxypropyl trimethoxysilane in which silane part get anchored to the silica surface whereas epoxy group get stellated from the silica surface. Surface tailoring of silica with epoxy group increases the room temperature electrochemical performances of the resulting polymer electrolytes. Ammonical hydrolysis of organosilicate precursor is used for both silica preparation and their surface tailoring. The composite solid polymer electrolyte films are prepared by solution mixing of PEO with lithium salt in presence of silica nanofillers and cast into film by solvent drying, which are then characterized by impedance measurement for conductivity study and wide angle x-ray diffraction for change in polymer crystallinity. Room temperature impedance measurement reveals Li+ ion conductivity in the order of 10‑4 S cm‑1, which is correlated to the decrease in PEO crystallinity. The enhancement of conductivity is further observed to be dependent on the amount of silica as well as on their surface characteristics.

  14. Enhancement of Li+ ion conductivity in solid polymer electrolytes using surface tailored porous silica nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Jagdeep; Singh, Udai P.; Panda, Subhendu K.; Si, Satyabrata

    2016-09-01

    The current study represents the design and synthesis of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based solid polymer electrolytes by solvent casting approach using surface tailored porous silica as nanofillers. The surface tailoring of porous silica nanostructure is achieved through silanization chemistry using 3-glycidyloxypropyl trimethoxysilane in which silane part get anchored to the silica surface whereas epoxy group get stellated from the silica surface. Surface tailoring of silica with epoxy group increases the room temperature electrochemical performances of the resulting polymer electrolytes. Ammonical hydrolysis of organosilicate precursor is used for both silica preparation and their surface tailoring. The composite solid polymer electrolyte films are prepared by solution mixing of PEO with lithium salt in presence of silica nanofillers and cast into film by solvent drying, which are then characterized by impedance measurement for conductivity study and wide angle x-ray diffraction for change in polymer crystallinity. Room temperature impedance measurement reveals Li+ ion conductivity in the order of 10-4 S cm-1, which is correlated to the decrease in PEO crystallinity. The enhancement of conductivity is further observed to be dependent on the amount of silica as well as on their surface characteristics.

  15. Lunar Surface Material - Spacecraft Measurements of Density and Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relation of the density of the lunar surface layer to depth is probably best determined from spacecraft measurements of the bearing capacity as a function of depth. A comparison of these values with laboratory measurements of the bearing capacity of low-cohesion particulate materials as a function of the percentage of solid indicates that the bulk density at the lunar surface is about 1.1 grams per cubic centimeter and that it increases nearly linearly to about 1.6 grams per cubic centimeter at a depth of 5 centimeters.

  16. Controlled generation of disorder on functionalized solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizenberg, Joanna

    2000-03-01

    Fabrication of surfaces with complex patterns and small features are important in fields ranging from cell biology to electronics. One of the methods used for controlling surface properties is the functionalization of a solid substrate with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Using methods of conventional or soft lithography, these SAMs can be patterned on a micron scale into ORDERED regions formed from DIFFERENT molecules. The strategy described here is based on a conceptually new approach - controlled generation of DISORDERED regions in a SAM of a SINGLE molecule formed on a substrate micropatterned with different materials. Patterned substrates were fabricated by evaporating one metal (Au, Ag, Si, Al) onto the surface of a second through a stencil mask or photoresist and were immersed in a solution of X(CH_2)_nCH3 (X = SH, SiCl3 or PO(OH)_2). It has been shown that SAMs of the same alkanethiol formed on different metals differ in structure. The SAM at the transition region between the two metals will, therefore, have a distinct and disordered character. The size of the disordered region can be regulated over scales of below 20 nm to microns. We show that the increased reactivity of the surface at the transition region can be used for patterning various area-selective processes, such as wetting, crystallization and fabrication of structures with sub-100-nm features in different materials.

  17. Surface composition of solid-rocket exhausted aluminum oxide particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, Wesley R., III; Winstead, Edward L.; Key, Lawrence E.

    1989-01-01

    Particulate samples of aluminum oxide were collected on Teflon filters from the exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle (STS-61A, October 30, 1985) over the altitude interval 4.6-7.6 km immediately after launch. These particles were analyzed using SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, X-ray fluorescent spectroscopy, and conventional wet-chemical techniques. The samples were 0.6-1.0 percent surface-chlorided (chlorided meaning predominantly aluminum chlorides and oxychlorides, possibly including other adsorbed forms of chloride) by weight. This level of chloriding is about one-third of the amount determined previously from laboratory-prepared alumina and surface site samples of solid-rocket-produced alumina (SRPA) after both had been exposed to moist HCl vapor at temperatures down to ambient. This level is equivalent to previous laboratory results with samples exposed to moist HCl at temperatures above the boiling point of water. It is suggested that the present lower chloriding levels, determined for samples from a 'dry' Shuttle exhaust cloud, underscore the importance of a liquid water/hydrochloric acid phase in governing the extent of surface chloriding of SRPA. The reduced chloriding is not trivial with respect to potential physical/chemical modification of the SRPA particle surfaces and their corresponding interaction with the atmosphere.

  18. The measurement of surface gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. C.; Lacoste, L. J. B.

    1978-01-01

    LaCoste and Romberg G and D gravity meters are normally employed when attempting high precision measurement of gravity differences on land. The capabilities and limitations of these instruments are discussed.

  19. Measurement of solid precipitation with an optical disdrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempio, G. E.; Bumke, K.; Macke, A.

    2007-04-01

    A study about measurements of solid precipitation using an optical disdrometer is presented. The optical disdrometer is an improved version of the ODM 470 disdrometer. It allows to measure hydrometeors within a size range of 0.4 to 22 mm in diameter. The main advantage of this instrument is its ability to estimate accurately precipitation even under strong wind conditions (Großklaus, 1996). To measure solid precipitation a geometrical model was developed to determine the mean cross-sectional area of snow crystals for different predefined shapes and sizes. It serves to develop an algorithm, which relates the mean cross sectional area of snow crystals to their maximum dimension, liquid water content, and terminal velocity. The algorithm was applied to disdrometer measurements during winter 1999/2000 in Uppsala/Sweden. Resulting precipitation was compared to independent measurements of a Geonor gauge and to manual measurements. In terms of daily precipitation the disdrometer shows a reliable performance.

  20. Visualizing the shape of soft solid and fluid contacts between two surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Jonathan; Schellenberger, Frank; Kappl, Michael; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    The soft contact between two surfaces is fundamentally interesting for soft materials and fluid mechanics and relevant for friction and wear. The deformation of soft solid interfaces has received much interest because it interestingly reveals similarities to fluid wetting. We present an experimental route towards visualizing the three-dimensional contact geometry of either liquid-solid (i.e., oil and glass) or solid-solid (i.e., elastomer and glass) interfaces using a home-built combination of confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We monitor the shape of a fluid capillary bridge and the depth of indentation in 3D while simultaneously measuring the force. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the height of the capillary bridge depends on the interfacial tensions. By using a slowly evaporating solvent, we quantify the temporal evolution of the capillary bridge and visualized the influence of pinning points on its shape. The position dependence of the advancing and receding contact angle along the three-phase contact line, particle-liquid-air, is resolved. Extending our system, we explore the contact deformation of soft solids where elasticity, in addition to surface tension, becomes an important factor.

  1. Estimation of solid–liquid interfacial tension using curved surface of a soft solid

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Subrata; Phukan, Monmee; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2015-01-01

    Unlike liquids, for crystalline solids the surface tension is known to be different from the surface energy. However, the same cannot be said conclusively for amorphous materials like soft cross-linked elastomers. To resolve this issue we have introduced here a direct method for measuring solid–liquid interfacial tension by using the curved surface of a solid. In essence, we have used the inner surface of tiny cylindrical channels embedded inside a soft elastomeric film for sensing the effect of the interfacial tension. When a liquid is inserted into the channel, because of wetting-induced alteration in interfacial tension, its thin wall deflects considerably; the deflection is measured with an optical profilometer and analyzed using the Föppl–von Kármán equation. We have used several liquids and cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) as the solid to show that the estimated values of the solid–liquid interfacial tension matches with the corresponding solid–liquid interfacial energy reasonably well. PMID:26420871

  2. Surface growth on diluted lattices by a restricted solid-on-solid model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Lee, Sang Bub

    2009-08-01

    An influence of diluted sites on surface growth has been investigated, using the restricted solid-on-solid model. It was found that, with respect to equilibrium growth, the surface width and the saturated width exhibited universal power-law behaviors, i.e., W approximately t(beta) and W(sat) approximately L(zeta), regarding all cases with respect to the concentration of diluted sites x=1-p , with p being the occupation probability on each lattice site. For x < x(c) (=1-p(c), p(c) being the percolation threshold), the growth appeared to be similar to that of a regular lattice, both in two and three dimensions. For x=x(c), the growth yielded nontrivial exponents which were different from those on a regular lattice. In nonequilibrium growth, a considerable amount of diluted sites (x < or = x(c)) appeared to yield nonuniversal growth, unlike the case of a regular lattice. The cause of nonuniversal growth dynamics has been investigated, considering the growth on a backbone cluster and on lattices constructed with periodically and randomly diluted subcells. PMID:19792104

  3. SSM - SOLID SURFACE MODELER, VERSION 6.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Solid Surface Modeler (SSM) is an interactive graphics software application for solid-shaded and wireframe three- dimensional geometric modeling. It enables the user to construct models of real-world objects as simple as boxes or as complex as Space Station Freedom. The program has a versatile user interface that, in many cases, allows mouse input for intuitive operation or keyboard input when accuracy is critical. SSM can be used as a stand-alone model generation and display program and offers high-fidelity still image rendering. Models created in SSM can also be loaded into other software for animation or engineering simulation. (See the information below for the availability of SSM with the Object Orientation Manipulator program, OOM, a graphics software application for three-dimensional rendering and animation.) Models are constructed within SSM using functions of the Create Menu to create, combine, and manipulate basic geometric building blocks called primitives. Among the simpler primitives are boxes, spheres, ellipsoids, cylinders, and plates; among the more complex primitives are tubes, skinned-surface models and surfaces of revolution. SSM also provides several methods for duplicating models. Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) is one of the most powerful model manipulation tools provided by SSM. The CSG operations implemented in SSM are union, subtraction and intersection. SSM allows the user to transform primitives with respect to each axis, transform the camera (the user's viewpoint) about its origin, apply texture maps and bump maps to model surfaces, and define color properties; to select and combine surface-fill attributes, including wireframe, constant, and smooth; and to specify models' points of origin (the positions about which they rotate). SSM uses Euler angle transformations for calculating the results of translation and rotation operations. The user has complete control over the modeling environment from within the system. A variety of file

  4. Acid-base components of solid surfaces and the triboelectric series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clint, J. H.; Dunstan, T. S.

    2001-05-01

    Contact electrification between solids is often explained qualitatively in terms of the relative positions of the materials in the triboelectric series. It is shown that the series can be put on a quantitative basis by analysing data for the wetting, by suitable probe liquids, of individual solid surfaces. In one approach to solid surface energies the polar fraction can be split into contributions from Lewis acid (electron-acceptor) and base (electron-donor) components. Using data for solid surface energy components in the literature it is shown that there is a good correlation between the electron-donor surface tension parameter and the position of the solid in the triboelectric series.

  5. Surface Specularity as an Indicator of Shock-induced Solid-liquid Phase Transitions in Tin

    SciTech Connect

    G. D. Stevens, S. S. Lutz, B. R. Marshall, W.D. Turley, et al.

    2007-12-01

    When highly polished metal surfaces melt upon release after shock loading, they exhibit features that suggest significant surface changes accompany the phase transition. The reflection of light from such surfaces changes from specular (pre-shock) to diffuse upon melting. Typical of this phenomenon is the loss of signal light in velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) measurements, which usually occurs at pressures high enough to melt the free surface. Unlike many other potential material phase-sensitive diagnostics (e.g., reflectometry, conductivity), that show relatively small (1%-10%) changes, the specularity of reflection provides a more sensitive and definitive (>10x) indication of the solid-liquid phase transition. Data will be presented that support the hypothesis that specularity changes indicate melt in a way that can be measured easily and unambiguously.

  6. Measuring Femtosecond Collisional Ionization Rates in Solid-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, Sam; Ciricosta, Orlando; Hollebon, Patrick; Preston, Thomas; Wark, Justin; Burian, Tomas; Chalupsky, Jaromir; Vozda, Vojtech; Dakovski, Georgi; Minitti, Michael; Zastrau, Ulf

    2015-11-01

    The rate at which atoms and ions within a plasma are further ionized by collisions with free electrons is a fundamental parameter that dictates the dynamics of plasma systems at intermediate and high densities. While collisional ionization rates are well known experimentally in a few dilute systems, similar measurements for non-ideal plasmas at densities approaching or exceeding those of solids remain elusive. Here we illustrate a spectroscopic method capable of measuring rates of collisional ionization dynamics in solid-density plasmas by clocking them to Auger recombination processes. We have recently employed this technique on the LCLS X-ray free-electron laser at SLAC and will present the first experimental results for optically-thin, solid-density magnesium plasmas at peak temperatures exceeding 200 eV.

  7. Electrostatic Interaction of Long DNA Molecules with Solid State Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bingquan; Samuilov, Vladimir; Sokolov, Jonathan; Rafailovich, Miriam; Chu, Ben

    2004-03-01

    At low buffer concentration the electric charge of DNA molecules creates a strong electrostatic interaction and, as a result, a number of phenomena, such as the electro-hydrodynamic instability, partial adsorption at the buffer-semiconductor interface and stretching of DNA with the electric field. Long DNA molecules at the silicon substrate?buffer solution interface are very interesting objects for the electrical transport [1,2] and the mechanical properties, like entropic elasticity, studies. The system (DNA-substrate-electric field in the buffer solution) is very complicated. Due to the strong electrostatic interaction of DNA with the substrate, the image charge is generated, and the physical adsorption takes place. We have studied the S. Pombe genomic DNA of the order of 5 Mbp. Within a surface DNA is entropically partially recoiled due to electrostatic adsorption at a few points. While varying the direction of the low electric field the direction of the electroosmotic flow is changing and stretching the parts of DNA between the adsorption points. If the electric field is high enough, DNA is de-trapped and forms a compact coil. This behavior could be considered as an inverse mechanism of entropy trapping due to confined constrictions. In the case of the surface, DNA is recoiled and trapped in the stretched configuration in the deep energetic barrier by Si surface due to the strong electrostatic interaction. If the energy of the field is enough to overcome the barrier, DNA is detached. The Si surface could be considered as an analog of the entropic recoiling nanostructure. [1]. N. Pernodet, V. Samuilov, K. Shin, J. Sokolov, M.H. Rafailovich, D. Gersappe, B. Chu. DNA Electrophoresis on a Flat Surface, Physical Review Letters, 85 (2000) 5651-5654. [2] Y.-S. Seo, V.A. Samuilov, J. Sokolov, M. Rafailovich, B. Tinland, J. Kim, B. Chu. DNA separation at a liquid-solid interface, Electrophoresis, 23 (2002) 2618-2625.

  8. The hydrodynamics of bubble rise and impact with solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Manica, Rogerio; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y C

    2016-09-01

    A bubble smaller than 1mm in radius rises along a straight path in water and attains a constant speed due to the balance between buoyancy and drag force. Depending on the purity of the system, within the two extreme limits of tangentially immobile or mobile boundary conditions at the air-water interface considerably different terminal speeds are possible. When such a bubble impacts on a horizontal solid surface and bounces, interesting physics can be observed. We study this physical phenomenon in terms of forces, which can be of colloidal, inertial, elastic, surface tension and viscous origins. Recent advances in high-speed photography allow for the observation of phenomena on the millisecond scale. Simultaneous use of such cameras to visualize both rise/deformation and the dynamics of the thin film drainage through interferometry are now possible. These experiments confirm that the drainage process obeys lubrication theory for the spectrum of micrometre to millimetre-sized bubbles that are covered in this review. We aim to bridge the colloidal perspective at low Reynolds numbers where surface forces are important to high Reynolds number fluid dynamics where the effect of the surrounding flow becomes important. A model that combines a force balance with lubrication theory allows for the quantitative comparison with experimental data under different conditions without any fitting parameter. PMID:27378067

  9. Controlling solid lipid nanoparticle adhesion by polyelectrolyte multilayer surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Finke, Jan Henrik; Schmolke, Hannah; Klages, C-P; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2013-06-01

    This study addresses the tunability of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) toward adsorption of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). In SLN production for pharmaceutical applications, repellence from production equipment is desired while targeted adsorption is necessary for the functionalization of surfaces. SLN containing triglyceride/phospholipid or wax matrices were exposed to different PEM (consisting of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and poly(acrylic acid)). PEM varied regarding layer architecture and surface properties by means of deposition pH, top layer variation, PEGylation with poly(acrylic acid)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer, and thermal crosslinking. FTIR-ATR and SEM revealed SLN adhesion depending on PEM composition. Particle adsorption was tunable toward attraction as well as repellence: PEGylated PEM displayed lowest adsorption while PEM capped with PAH provided the strongest attraction of particles. Examinations at elevated temperatures resembled production conditions of SLN where these are processed as emulsions. Crystalline triglyceride SLN displayed high anisometry and, consequently, a large specific surface area. These platelets were more adherend than spherical droplets from the same formulation as an emulsion. Wax-based nanoparticles showed spherical shape, both in crystalline and molten state. However, adsorption was fostered as the fluidity of the disperse phase increased upon melting. Additionally, coalescence of adsorbed droplets took place, further increasing adsorption. PMID:23591009

  10. Controlling solid lipid nanoparticle adhesion by polyelectrolyte multilayer surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Finke, Jan Henrik; Schmolke, Hannah; Klages, C-P; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2013-06-01

    This study addresses the tunability of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) toward adsorption of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). In SLN production for pharmaceutical applications, repellence from production equipment is desired while targeted adsorption is necessary for the functionalization of surfaces. SLN containing triglyceride/phospholipid or wax matrices were exposed to different PEM (consisting of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and poly(acrylic acid)). PEM varied regarding layer architecture and surface properties by means of deposition pH, top layer variation, PEGylation with poly(acrylic acid)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer, and thermal crosslinking. FTIR-ATR and SEM revealed SLN adhesion depending on PEM composition. Particle adsorption was tunable toward attraction as well as repellence: PEGylated PEM displayed lowest adsorption while PEM capped with PAH provided the strongest attraction of particles. Examinations at elevated temperatures resembled production conditions of SLN where these are processed as emulsions. Crystalline triglyceride SLN displayed high anisometry and, consequently, a large specific surface area. These platelets were more adherend than spherical droplets from the same formulation as an emulsion. Wax-based nanoparticles showed spherical shape, both in crystalline and molten state. However, adsorption was fostered as the fluidity of the disperse phase increased upon melting. Additionally, coalescence of adsorbed droplets took place, further increasing adsorption.

  11. The solid surface combustion experiment aboard the USML-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, Robert A.; Sacksteder, Kurt; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; Ramachandra, Prashant A.; Tang, Lin; Wolverton, M. Katherine

    1994-01-01

    AA Experimental results from the five experiments indicate that flame spread rate increases with increasing ambient oxygen content and pressure. An experiment was conducted aboard STS-50/USML-1 in the solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE) hardware for flame spread over a thin cellulosic fuel in a quiescent oxidizer of 35% oxygen/65% nitrogen at 1.0 atm. pressure in microgravity. The USML-1 test was the fourth of five planned experiments for thin fuels, one performed during each of five Space Shuttle Orbiter flights. Data that were gathered include gas- and solid-phase temperatures and motion picture flame images. Observations of the flame are described and compared to theoretical predictions from steady and unsteady models that include flame radiation from CO2 and H2O. Experimental results from the five esperiments indicate that flame spread rate increases with increasing ambient oxygen content and pressure. The brightness of the flame and the visible soot radiation also increase with increasing spread rate. Steady-state numerical predictions of temperature and spread rate and flame structure trends compare well with experimental results near the flame's leading edge while gradual flame evolution is captured through the unsteady model.

  12. Dynamic contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of a series of aqueous solutions were measured on a number of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces using a modified Wilhelmy plate technique. Superhydrophobic surfaces are hydrophobic surfaces with micron or nanometer sized surface roughness. These surfaces have very large static advancing contact angles and little static contact angle hysteresis. In this study, the dynamic advancing and dynamic receding contact angles on superhydrophobic surfaces were measured as a function of plate velocity and capillary number. The dynamic contact angles measured on a smooth hydrophobic Teflon surface were found to obey the scaling with capillary number predicted by the Cox-Voinov-Tanner law, θD3 ∝ Ca. The response of the dynamic contact angle on the superhydrophobic surfaces, however, did not follow the same scaling law. The advancing contact angle was found to remain constant at θA = 160∘, independent of capillary number. The dynamic receding contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces were found to decrease with increasing capillary number; however, the presence of slip on the superhydrophobic surface was found to result in a shift in the onset of dynamic contact angle variation to larger capillary numbers. In addition, a much weaker dependence of the dynamic contact angle on capillary number was observed for some of the superhydrophobic surfaces tested.

  13. Determination and visualization of the wave propagation on solid surfaces using a single head laser vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzeszkowski, Mateusz; Prager, Jens

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents an automated system for the evaluation and visualization of structural vibrations on the surface of solid materials in an ultrasonic frequency range using a single head laser Doppler vibrometer. For this method, the vibrometer performs a continuous scan of the surface driven by a two-axes robotic system. Scan and measurement parameters can be adapted to the requirements of geometry, frequency and resolution. Data processing techniques are employed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and minimize the effect of inconvenient laser beam reflections caused by speckles.

  14. Analysis of measurements for solid state laser remote lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    1995-01-01

    The merits of using lidar systems for remote measurements of various atmospheric processes such as wind, turbulence, moisture, and aerosol concentration are widely recognized. Although the lidar technology has progressed considerably over the past two decades, significant research particularly in the area of solid state lidars remains to be conducted in order to fully exploit this technology. The work performed by the UAH (University of Alabama in Huntsville) personnel under this Delivery Order concentrated on analyses of measurements required in support of solid state laser remote sensing lidar systems which are to be designed, deployed, and used to measure atmospheric processes and constituents. UAH personnel has studied and recommended to NASA/MSFC the requirements of the optical systems needed to characterize the detection devices suitable for solid state wavelengths and to evaluate various heterodyne detection schemes. The 2-micron solid state laser technology was investigated and several preliminary laser designs were developed and their performance for remote sensing of atmospheric winds and clouds from a spaceborne platform were specified. In addition to the laser source and the detector, the other critical technologies necessary for global wind measurements by a spaceborne solid state coherent lidar systems were identified to be developed and demonstrated. As part of this work, an analysis was performed to determine the atmospheric wind velocity estimation accuracy using the line-of-sight measurements of a scanning coherent lidar. Under this delivery order, a computer database of materials related to the theory, development, testing, and operation of lidar systems was developed to serve as a source of information for lidar research and development.

  15. Changes in contact angle providing evidence for surface alteration in multi-component solid foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinke, Svenja K.; Hauf, Katharina; Vieira, Josélio; Heinrich, Stefan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Chocolate blooming, one of the major problems in the confectionery industry, is the formation of visible white spots or a greyish haze on the surface of chocolate products due to large sugar or fat crystals on the surface. This leads to aesthetic changes and deterioration of taste and thus large sales losses for the confectionery industry due to consumer complaints. Chocolate blooming is often related to migration of lipids or sugar molecules to the chocolate surface, where they recrystallize with an associated polymorphic change of crystal structure on the surface. The wetting behaviour from contact angle measurements gives further insight into surface properties and is needed to determine surface energies and to evaluate possible migration mechanisms and preferred pathways. Therefore, an equilibrium contact angle is needed which is not directly accessible and is influenced by surface texture and interaction between solid and test liquid. In this study, the surface of cocoa butter and conventional chocolates was characterized by measuring the contact angle with the sessile drop protocol. The influence of roughness, test liquid and pre-crystallization of the samples as well as the storage temperature were investigated. In case of no pre-crystallization, a change in surface properties due to storage at 20 °C was detected, whereas samples stored at 30 °C showed the same wetting behaviour as fresh samples. This is associated with polymorphic transformation from thermodynamically less stable crystals to more stable configurations.

  16. Space shuttle solid rocket motor Profile Measuring Device (PMD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John

    1988-01-01

    The SRM PMD is an electromechanical tool used for measuring and recording the profile and diameters of the solid rocket motor segments, both Tang and Clevis ends. This system consists of a crossbeam assembly that mounts to the SRM segment using the existing assembly pin holes. The mounting configuration is such that the tool can be used to measure Clevis up/Tang down or Clevis up/Tang down. The testing and calibration of the PMD is described.

  17. Solid Character of Membrane Ceramides: A Surface Rheology Study of Their Mixtures with Sphingomyelin

    PubMed Central

    Catapano, Elisa R.; Arriaga, Laura R.; Espinosa, Gabriel; Monroy, Francisco; Langevin, Dominique; López-Montero, Iván

    2011-01-01

    The compression and shear viscoelasticities of egg-ceramide and its mixtures with sphingomyelin were investigated using oscillatory surface rheology performed on Langmuir monolayers. We found high values for the compression and shear moduli for ceramide, compatible with a solid-state membrane, and extremely high surface viscosities when compared to typical fluid lipids. A fluidlike rheological behavior was found for sphingomyelin. Lateral mobilities, measured from particle tracking experiments, were correlated with the monolayer viscosities through the usual hydrodynamic relationships. In conclusion, ceramide increases the solid character of sphingomyelin-based membranes and decreases their fluidity, thus drastically decreasing the lateral mobilities of embedded objects. This mechanical behavior may involve important physiological consequences in biological membranes containing ceramides. PMID:22261061

  18. Measuring the Internal Environment of Solid Rocket Motors During Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenberg, Brent; Smith, Doug; Speas, Kyle; Corliss, Adam

    2003-01-01

    A new instrumentation system has been developed to measure the internal environment of solid rocket test motors during motor ignition. The system leverages conventional, analog gages with custom designed, electronics modules to provide safe, accurate, high speed data acquisition capability. To date, the instrumentation system has been demonstrated in a laboratory environment and on subscale static fire test motors ranging in size from 5-inches to 24-inches in diameter. Ultimately, this system is intended to be installed on a full-scale Reusable Solid Rocket Motor. This paper explains the need for the data, the components and capabilities of the system, and the test results.

  19. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  20. Optical Measurements on Solid Specimens of Solid Rocket Motor Exhaust and Solid Rocket Motor Slag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, F. E., III

    1991-01-01

    Samples of aluminum slag were investigated to aid the Earth Science and Applications Division at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Alumina from space motor propellant exhaust and space motor propellant slag was examined as a component of space refuse. Thermal emittance and solar absorptivity measurements were taken to support their comparison with reflectance measurements derived from actual debris. To determine the similarity between the samples and space motor exhaust or space motor slag, emittance and absorbance results were correlated with an examination of specimen morphology.

  1. Modification of solid surface physicochemistry by formation of conditioning films and adsoption of differently charged cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, M.-O.; Lamparter, A.; Woche, S. K.; Mühl, G.; Rühlmann, J.; Bachmann, J.

    2009-04-01

    Solid interfacial properties play an important role for the distribution and continuity of fluid phases in soil. Under unsaturated conditions a reduced water film connectivity and a larger proportion of air/water interfaces in case of a hydrophobic matrix (low surface free energy) is observed when compared to a wettable counterpart (high surface free energy), indicating that interfacial properties are of great importance for transport and sorption of colloids. In turn, interfacial properties itself can be modified by sorption of organic compounds and cations from soil solution. To investigate the significance of these processes for the alteration of solid interfacial properties we used model materials (acid-washed soda-lime glass beads and quartz sand) as well as natural soil (Gleyic Podzol). To get unconditioned material (free of organic matter) with different interfacial properties a fraction of the glass beads and quartz sand was treated with dichlorodimethylsilane (DCDMS) which produces highly nonpolar particle surfaces indicated by a significant increase of the solid-water contact angle. To initiate the formation of conditioning films on the particle surfaces dissolved organic matter (DOM) solution of different concentration was added. The natural soil was saturated with cations of different charge (i.e. Na+, Ca2+, Al3+). The modification of interfacial properties was quantified in terms of surface charge and solid-liquid contact angle (CA) of different test liquids (i.e. water, ethylene glycol, diiodomethane), which allows the calculation of solid surface free energy (SFE). The measurements indicated a significant impact of conditioning film formation on the CA for both glass beads and quartz sand. While the acid-washed (wettable) glass beads and quartz sand become more water repellent (i.e. increasing CA and decreasing SFE), the DCDMS-treated (hydrophobic) material becomes more wettable (i.e. decreasing CA and increasing SFE). With increasing concentration

  2. Lunar Surface Outgassing and Alpha Particle Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, R. D.; Binder, A. B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particles produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-218 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238. Radon reaches the lunar surface either at areas of high soil porosity or where fissures release the trapped gases in which radon is entrained. Once released, the radon spreads out by "bouncing" across the surface on ballistic trajectories in a randomwalk process. The half-life of radon-222 allows the gas to spread out by several 100 km before it decays (depositing approximately half of the polonium-218 recoil nuclides on the lunar surface) and allows the APS to detect gas release events up to several days after they occur. The long residence time of the lead-210 precursor to polonium-210 allows the mapping of gas vents which have been active over the last approximately 60 years. Because radon and polonium are daughter products of the decay of uranium, the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal uranium distribution.

  3. Hole-to-surface resistivity measurements.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    Hole-to-surface resistivity measurements over a layered volcanic tuff sequence illustrate procedures for gathering, reducing, and interpreting hole-to-surface resistivity data. The magnitude and direction of the total surface electric field resulting from a buried current source is calculated from orthogonal potential difference measurements for a grid of closely spaced stations. A contour map of these data provides a detailed map of the distribution of the electric field away from the drill hole. Resistivity anomalies can be enhanced by calculating the difference between apparent resistivities calculated from the total surface electric field and apparent resistivities for a layered earth model.-from Author

  4. Measurement of the surface tension of liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Arbatan, Tina; Shen, Wei

    2011-11-01

    The capillary rise and Wilhelmy plate methods have been used to study the "surface tension" of water marbles encapsulated with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) powders of 1-, 35-, and 100-μm particle size. With the capillary rise technique, a glass capillary tube was inserted into a water marble to measure the capillary rise of the water. The Laplace pressure exerted by the water marble was directly measured by comparing the heights of the capillary rise from the marble and from a flat water surface in a beaker. An equation based on Marmur's model was proposed to calculate the water marble surface tension. This method does not require the water contact angle with the supporting solid surface to be considered; it is therefore a simple but efficient method for determining liquid marble surface tension. The Wilhelmy method was used to measure the surface tension of a flat water surface covered by PTFE powder. This method offers a new angle for investigating liquid marble shell properties. A discussion on the nature and the realistic magnitude of liquid marble surface tension is offered. PMID:21910463

  5. Embedded Sensors for Measuring Surface Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramer, Daniel J.; Taagen, Thomas J.; Vermaak, Anton G.

    2006-01-01

    The development and evaluation of new hybrid and solid rocket motors requires accurate characterization of the propellant surface regression as a function of key operational parameters. These characteristics establish the propellant flow rate and are prime design drivers affecting the propulsion system geometry, size, and overall performance. There is a similar need for the development of advanced ablative materials, and the use of conventional ablatives exposed to new operational environments. The Miniature Surface Regression Sensor (MSRS) was developed to serve these applications. It is designed to be cast or embedded in the material of interest and regresses along with it. During this process, the resistance of the sensor is related to its instantaneous length, allowing the real-time thickness of the host material to be established. The time derivative of this data reveals the instantaneous surface regression rate. The MSRS could also be adapted to perform similar measurements for a variety of other host materials when it is desired to monitor thicknesses and/or regression rate for purposes of safety, operational control, or research. For example, the sensor could be used to monitor the thicknesses of brake linings or racecar tires and indicate when they need to be replaced. At the time of this reporting, over 200 of these sensors have been installed into a variety of host materials. An MSRS can be made in either of two configurations, denoted ladder and continuous (see Figure 1). A ladder MSRS includes two highly electrically conductive legs, across which narrow strips of electrically resistive material are placed at small increments of length. These strips resemble the rungs of a ladder and are electrically equivalent to many tiny resistors connected in parallel. A substrate material provides structural support for the legs and rungs. The instantaneous sensor resistance is read by an external signal conditioner via wires attached to the conductive legs on the

  6. Interaction of multiply charged ions with solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Havener, C.C.; Reed, K.J.; Snowdon, K.J.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of the decay of inner-shell vacancies can serve as an excellent probe of the neutralization of multicharged ions during their approach to a metal surface. Several recent experiments that have measured electrons emitted during this neutralization are discussed. Measurements of the total electron yield for incident ions with inner-shell vacancies first showed marked differences from the yield observed for lower charge states and indicated the need for further investigations. Measurements of the emitted electron energy distributions have led to a qualitative understanding of the timescales of the neutralization process. For incident ions with high enough energies, projectile inner-shell vacancies have been observed to survive the neutralization process above the surface and then to be transferred to target atoms in close collisions. The inner-shell reactions occurring in such close collisions are analogous to those that have been observed in ion-atom and ion-foil collisions. Recent measurements of angular distributions of the electrons emitted due to the decay of target vacancies created during the interaction show evidence of the projectile penetrating several layers below the surface. 27 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Surface texture measurement for additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantaphyllou, Andrew; Giusca, Claudiu L.; Macaulay, Gavin D.; Roerig, Felix; Hoebel, Matthias; Leach, Richard K.; Tomita, Ben; Milne, Katherine A.

    2015-06-01

    The surface texture of additively manufactured metallic surfaces made by powder bed methods is affected by a number of factors, including the powder’s particle size distribution, the effect of the heat source, the thickness of the printed layers, the angle of the surface relative to the horizontal build bed and the effect of any post processing/finishing. The aim of the research reported here is to understand the way these surfaces should be measured in order to characterise them. In published research to date, the surface texture is generally reported as an Ra value, measured across the lay. The appropriateness of this method for such surfaces is investigated here. A preliminary investigation was carried out on two additive manufacturing processes—selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM)—focusing on the effect of build angle and post processing. The surfaces were measured using both tactile and optical methods and a range of profile and areal parameters were reported. Test coupons were manufactured at four angles relative to the horizontal plane of the powder bed using both SLM and EBM. The effect of lay—caused by the layered nature of the manufacturing process—was investigated, as was the required sample area for optical measurements. The surfaces were also measured before and after grit blasting.

  8. Specular reflection of very slow metastable neon atoms from a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, F

    2001-02-01

    An ultracold narrow atomic beam of metastable neon in the 1s3[(2s)(5)3p:1P0] state is used to study specular reflection of atoms from a solid surface at extremely slow incident velocity. The reflectivity on a silicon (1,0,0) surface and a BK7 glass surface is measured at the normal incident velocity between 1 mm/s and 3 cm/s. The reflectivity above 30% is observed at about 1 mm/s. The observed velocity dependence is explained semiquantitatively by the quantum reflection that is caused by the attractive Casimir-van der Waals potential of the atom-surface interaction.

  9. Optical and surface properties of optically transparent Li3 PO4 solid electrolyte layer for transparent solid batteries.

    PubMed

    Pat, Suat; Özen, Soner; Şenay, Volkan; Korkmaz, Şadan

    2016-07-01

    In this study, optical and surface properties of the optically transparent Li3 PO4 solid electrolyte layer for transparent solid battery have been investigated for the first time. To determine the optical properties, transmittance, absorbance, reflection, refractive index spectra, and optical band gap were determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometer and optical interferometer. The surface property of the transparent Li3 PO4 solid electrolyte was analyzed using atomic force microscopy. One another important parameter is contact angle (CA) surface free energy (SFE). CA and SFE were determined by optical tensiometer. These values probably are a most important parameter for polymer and hybrid battery performance. For the best performance, value of CA should be low. As a result, solid electrolyte layer is a highly transparent and it has a high wettability. SCANNING 38:317-321, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Techniques for Measuring Surface Potentials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2015-01-01

    Materials exposed to the space plasma environment charge to a net potential relative to the ambient plasma. The charging process is due to differential currents to the material surface that results in a net surface charge density. While this process is termed "spacecraft surface charging" when applied to aerospace hardware, it also applies to the surfaces of astronomical objects in direct contact with the space plasma environment including a number of planetary bodies, asteroids, and dust particles. The ability to measure surface potentials is important to many techniques used in conducting fundamental heliospheric science, spacecraft engineering operations, and space technology development activities. This presentation provides a survey of current technologies used to measure surface potentials of spacecraft and planetary bodies with examples of their application to space science and technology programs.

  11. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  12. Surface temperature measurement in semitransparent media

    SciTech Connect

    Roissac, F.Z.; Osman, T.T.; Sacadura, J.F. )

    1993-12-01

    The surface temperature of a semitransparent wall, placed in a convective medium and exposed to external radiation (e.g., building window glasses) can be well approached using a remote sensing technique associated with a correction model. Radiometric measurement is first carried out on an opaque small size black target, which is glued on the concerned surface. This measurement can then be corrected to get the 'real' temperature through a model solving a combined conduction-radiation heat transfer problem. 13 refs.

  13. Surface dose measurement using TLD powder extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapley, P. . E-mail: rapleyp@tbh.net

    2006-10-01

    Surface/near-surface dose measurements in therapeutic x-ray beams are important in determining the dose to the dermal and epidermal skin layers during radiation treatment. Accurate determination of the surface dose is a difficult but important task for proper treatment of patients. A new method of measuring surface dose in phantom through extrapolation of readings from various thicknesses of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) powder has been developed and investigated. A device was designed, built, and tested that provides TLD powder thickness variation to a minimum thickness of 0.125 mm. Variations of the technique have been evaluated to optimize precision with consideration of procedural ease. Results of this study indicate that dose measurements (relative to D{sub max}) in regions of steep dose gradient in the beam axis direction are possible with a precision (2 standard deviations [SDs]) as good as {+-} 1.2% using the technique. The dosimeter was developed and evaluated using variation to the experimental method. A clinically practical procedure was determined, resulting in measured surface dose of 20.4 {+-} 2% of the D{sub max} dose for a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, 80-cm source-to-surface distance (SSD), Theratron 780 Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}C) beam. Results obtained with TLD powder extrapolation compare favorably to other methods presented in the literature. The TLD powder extrapolation tool has been used clinically at the Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre (NWORCC) to measure surface dose effects under a number of conditions. Results from these measurements are reported. The method appears to be a simple and economical tool for surface dose measurement, particularly for facilities with TLD powder measurement capabilities.

  14. PREFACE: International Conference on Solid Films and Surfaces (ICSFS 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achete, C. A.; Almeida, C. M.; Cremona, M.; Rocca, M.; Stavale, F.

    2015-03-01

    Foreword The 17th ICSFS took place at the wonderful city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from the 8th to the 11th of September, 2014. The conference focused on recent advances in controlling and characterizing the physical and chemical properties of films and surfaces, with a particular emphasis on materials for electronic, photonic and spintronic applications. In addition, themes of bio-functionalized structures and devices were strongly discussed in the ICSFS, covering interdisciplinary nano and nano-bio science and technology. The conference has promoted, in various sub-fields of materials surfaces and thin films, an excellent forum for exchange of ideas, presentation of technical achievements and discussion of future directions in the field. In this volume of the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering we are glad to present 11 peer-reviewed ICSFS contributing papers. The cross-disciplinary nature of conference topics is clearly reflected in these Proceedings' contents. The themes discussed ranged from those close to more traditional condensed matter physics, such as semiconductor surfaces to physical chemistry related issues. The Proceedings were organized in accordance with contributions presented at the Conference. We were glad with the presence of over 160 participants, including 24 invited and plenary talks and over 50 oral contributions. We strongly believe that these Proceedings will be useful for a wide audience of those interested in basic and applied surfaces and thin solid interfaces. Acknowledgment We would like to acknowledge the hard work, professional skills and efficiency of the team which oversaw the general organization, particularly of Dicom (Social Communication Division) from the National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology, Inmetro (Brazil). We also would like to thank all the invited speakers and session chairs for making the meeting such a great success. The Conference was supported and sponsored by Academia

  15. Surface roughness measurement of tooling spheres for laser measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarr, Dennis P.; Reed, Paul W.

    2001-02-01

    The usage of chrome or highly polished precision tooling (reference) spheres is common in the calibration and operational characterization of measurement systems such as a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM). The usage of a three-dimensional, (3D) laser triangulation, non-contact measurement system on CMMs and other scanning systems pose several obstacles. The highly specular mirror finish on the tooling sphere provides an accurate mechanical entity that has adverse results with laser sensors. The development of tooling spheres with a diffuse surface would benefit laser based measurement systems. The surface roughness and reflectivity properties have an effect on the laser measurements' accuracy. Efforts to develop spheres and establish meaningful measurements of spheres with modified surface finishes are investigated.

  16. Experimental Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Polarizability in the Solid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, M.; Luna, R.; Satorre, M. A.; Santonja, C.; Millán, C.

    2015-10-01

    We have experimentally determined the polarizability of using the Lorentz-Lorenz equation by simultaneously measuring the density and the refractive index. The conditions were solid phase, mbar pressure, and temperature range 10-86 K. The polarizability value compares well with previous gas-phase experimental results and the results from simulations, and does not depend on the temperature of ice formation. This value is constant in the temperature range studied, despite a structural change from amorphous to crystalline.

  17. The Measurement of Surface Rheological and Surface Adhesive Properties using Nanosphere Embedment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Stephen; McKenna, Gregory

    2008-03-01

    In previous work, we determined the actual rheological behavior at the surface of a polystyrene film with nanometer scale resolution by applying a viscoelastic contact mechanics model to experimental data in the literature. The goal of our current research is to build upon this analysis and use nanosphere embedment experiments to probe the nanorheological behavior of polymer surfaces near the glass transition, in the melt state and in the solid rubbery state. An atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to measure the embedment depth as nanoparticles are pulled into the surface by the thermodynamic work of adhesion. The results show that, with properly designed experiments, both the surface adhesion properties and the surface rheological properties can be extracted from nanosphere embedment rates. We include work on a phase separated copolymer and a commercially available polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber.

  18. Solid surface wetting and the deployment of drops in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Depew, J.

    1994-01-01

    The complete or partial deployment of liquid samples in low gravity is primarily influenced by the interfacial properties of the specific liquid and solid materials used because the overwhelming bias of the Earth gravitational acceleration is removed. This study addresses the engineering aspects of injecting and deploying drops of prescribed volume into an acoustic positioning chamber in microgravity. The specific problems of interest are the design, testing, and implementation of injector tips to be used in a simultaneously retracting dual-injector system in the Drop Physics Module microgravity experiment facility. Prior to release, the liquid to be deployed must be retained within a restricted area at the very end of the injectors under dynamic stimuli from the continuous injection flow as well as from the stepped motion of the injectors. The final released drop must have a well determined volume and negligible residual linear or angular momentum. The outcome of Earth-based short-duration low gravity experiments had been the selection of two types of injector tips which were flown as back-up parts. They were successfully utilized during the USML-1 Spacelab mission as the primary tips. The combination of a larger contact surface, liquid pinning with a sharp edge, and selective coating of strategic tip surfaces with a non-wetting compound has allowed a significant increase in the success rate of deployment of simple and compound drops of aqueous solutions of glycerol and silicone oil. The diameter of the samples studied in the Drop Physics Module range between 0.3 and 2.7 cm. The tests conducted on-orbit with a manually operated small device have allowed the calibration of the volume deployed for a few drop sizes. The design for improved tips to be used during the next USML flight is based on these results.

  19. Solid Surface Wetting and the Deployment of Drops in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Depew, J.

    1994-01-01

    The complete or partial deployment of liquid samples in low gravity is primarily influenced by the interfacial properties of the specific liquid and solid materials used because the overwhelming bias of the Earth gravitational acceleration is removed. This study addresses the engineering aspects of injecting and deploying drops of prescribed volume into an acoustic positioning chamber in microgravity. The specific problems of interest are the design, testing, and implementation of injector tips to be used in a simuttaneously retracting dual-injector system used in the Drop Physics Module microgravity experiment facility. Prior to release, the liquid to be deployed must be retained within a restricted area at the very end of the injectors even under dynamic stimuli due to continuous injection flow as well as to the stepped motion of the injectors, and the final released drop must have a well determined volume as well as negligible residual linear or angular momentum from the deployment process. The outcome of Earthbased short-duration low gravity experiments had been the selection of two types of injector tips which were flown as back-up parts and were successfully utilized during the USML-1 Spacelab mission. The combination of a larger contact surface, liquid pinning with a sharp edge, and selective coating of strategic tip surfaces with a non-wetting compound has allowed a significant increase in the success rate of deployment of simple and compound drops of aqueous solutions of glycerol and silicone oil. The diameter of the samples studied in the Drop Physics Module ranged between 0.3 and 2.7 cm. The tests conducted onsrbit with a manually operated small device have allowed the calibration of the volume deployed for a few drop sizes. The design for improved tips to be used during the next USML flight is based on these results.

  20. Low energy electron elastic reflection from solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starý, Vladimír.; Zemek, Josef

    2004-09-01

    Using our Monte-Carlo (MC) code, we calculated the ratio of the coefficients of elastic reflection of electrons from Si, SiO 2 and Au to those of Cu and Al in the electron energy range 0.2-1.0 and 1.5 keV (Au-Cu), respectively. The electron scattering was simulated by a single scattering model. For the MC calculations, we compared the elastic differential cross-sections calculated using a static field approximation with relativistic partial wave analysis on either the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential of free atoms (TFD model) or the Hartree-Fock-Wigner-Seitz (muffin-tin) potential of atoms in the solid state (HFWS model). The MC data were compared with the experimental values. For both models, reasonably good agreement for Si-Cu and SiO 2-Cu systems was found. In the Au-Cu system, better agreement was achieved using the TFD model. The addition of C in a surface interaction layer of 2-5 nm improves the agreement between simulated and experimental values for the Si-Al and Si-SiO 2 systems.

  1. Interactions of fragment ions of tetradecane with solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, Gikan H.; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Imanaka, Kousuke; Hayashi, Kyohei

    2014-12-01

    Vapors of tetradecane (C14H30) were ionized by electron bombardment. The generated fragment ions such as C3H7, C6H13, and C12H25 ions were separated by an E × B filter (Wien filter) and accelerated toward Si(1 0 0) substrates. Thickness measurements showed that thin films were deposited on the Si substrates by C3H7- and C6H13-ion irradiation, although the Si substrate surface was predominantly sputtered by C12H25 ions. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy showed that the irradiation damage by the fragment-ion beams decreased with the increasing molecular weight of the fragment ions at the same acceleration voltage. Furthermore, Raman spectra as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showed that DLC films were formed by C3H7- and C6H13-ion irradiation with the film thickness being larger in case of C3H7. On the contrary, for C12H25-ion irradiation, chemical sputtering occurred by surface reactions of hydrogen and methyl radicals with silicon atoms. The chemical reaction at the irradiated substrate surface could be enhanced by the higher temperatures achieved by the high energy-density irradiation effect of the polyatomic ions.

  2. Surface morphological response of crystalline solids to mechanical stresses and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2011-08-01

    Surface morphological evolution under the action of external fields is a fascinating topic that has attracted considerable attention within the surface science community over the past two decades. In addition to the interest in a fundamental understanding of field-induced nonlinear response and stability of surface morphology, the problem has been technologically significant in various engineering applications such as microelectronics and nanofabrication. In this report, we review theoretical progress in modeling the surface morphological response of stressed elastic solids under conditions that promote surface diffusion and of electrically conducting solids under surface electromigration conditions. A self-consistent model of surface transport and morphological evolution is presented that has provided the basis for the theoretical and computational work that is reviewed. According to this model, the surface morphological response of electrically conducting elastic solids to the simultaneous action of mechanical stresses and electric fields is analyzed. Emphasis is placed on metallic surfaces, including surfaces of voids in metallic thin films. Surfaces of stressed elastic solids are known to undergo morphological instabilities, such as the Asaro-Tiller or Grinfeld (ATG) instability that leads to emanation of crack-like features from the surface and their fast propagation into the bulk of the solid material. This instability is analyzed theoretically, simulated numerically, and compared with experimental measurements. The surface morphological evolution of electrically conducting, single-crystalline, stressed elastic solids under surface electromigration conditions is also examined. We demonstrate that, through surface electromigration, a properly applied and sufficiently strong electric field can stabilize the surface morphology of the stressed solid against both crack-like ATG instabilities and newly discovered secondary rippling instabilities; the effects of

  3. Surface morphological response of crystalline solids to mechanical stresses and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2011-08-01

    Surface morphological evolution under the action of external fields is a fascinating topic that has attracted considerable attention within the surface science community over the past two decades. In addition to the interest in a fundamental understanding of field-induced nonlinear response and stability of surface morphology, the problem has been technologically significant in various engineering applications such as microelectronics and nanofabrication. In this report, we review theoretical progress in modeling the surface morphological response of stressed elastic solids under conditions that promote surface diffusion and of electrically conducting solids under surface electromigration conditions. A self-consistent model of surface transport and morphological evolution is presented that has provided the basis for the theoretical and computational work that is reviewed. According to this model, the surface morphological response of electrically conducting elastic solids to the simultaneous action of mechanical stresses and electric fields is analyzed. Emphasis is placed on metallic surfaces, including surfaces of voids in metallic thin films.Surfaces of stressed elastic solids are known to undergo morphological instabilities, such as the Asaro-Tiller or Grinfeld (ATG) instability that leads to emanation of crack-like features from the surface and their fast propagation into the bulk of the solid material. This instability is analyzed theoretically, simulated numerically, and compared with experimental measurements. The surface morphological evolution of electrically conducting, single-crystalline, stressed elastic solids under surface electromigration conditions is also examined. We demonstrate that, through surface electromigration, a properly applied and sufficiently strong electric field can stabilize the surface morphology of the stressed solid against both crack-like ATG instabilities and newly discovered secondary rippling instabilities; the effects of

  4. Pyrometric Gas and Surface Temperature Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave; Ng, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    A multiwavelength pyrometer possessing advantages over the one- and two-wavelength designs is described. Results of its application to surface temperature measurements of ceramics is presented. Also described is a probe suitable for gas temperature measurements to temperatures > 2600 K. The design of the probe includes a multiwavelength pyrometer with fiber optic input.

  5. How Properties of Solid Surfaces Modulate the Nucleation of Gas Hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongsheng; Chen, Guangjin; Zhang, Xianren; Sum, Amadeu K.; Wang, Wenchuan

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for CO2 dissolved in water near silica surfaces to investigate how the hydrophilicity and crystallinity of solid surfaces modulate the local structure of adjacent molecules and the nucleation of CO2 hydrates. Our simulations reveal that the hydrophilicity of solid surfaces can change the local structure of water molecules and gas distribution near liquid-solid interfaces, and thus alter the mechanism and dynamics of gas hydrate nucleation. Interestingly, we find that hydrate nucleation tends to occur more easily on relatively less hydrophilic surfaces. Different from surface hydrophilicity, surface crystallinity shows a weak effect on the local structure of adjacent water molecules and on gas hydrate nucleation. At the initial stage of gas hydrate growth, however, the structuring of molecules induced by crystalline surfaces are more ordered than that induced by amorphous solid surfaces. PMID:26227239

  6. How Properties of Solid Surfaces Modulate the Nucleation of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Dongsheng; Chen, Guangjin; Zhang, Xianren; Sum, Amadeu K.; Wang, Wenchuan

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for CO2 dissolved in water near silica surfaces to investigate how the hydrophilicity and crystallinity of solid surfaces modulate the local structure of adjacent molecules and the nucleation of CO2 hydrates. Our simulations reveal that the hydrophilicity of solid surfaces can change the local structure of water molecules and gas distribution near liquid-solid interfaces, and thus alter the mechanism and dynamics of gas hydrate nucleation. Interestingly, we find that hydrate nucleation tends to occur more easily on relatively less hydrophilic surfaces. Different from surface hydrophilicity, surface crystallinity shows a weak effect on the local structure of adjacent water molecules and on gas hydrate nucleation. At the initial stage of gas hydrate growth, however, the structuring of molecules induced by crystalline surfaces are more ordered than that induced by amorphous solid surfaces.

  7. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  8. An Easy Determination of the Surface Chemical Properties of Simple and Natural Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davranche, Mélanie; Lacour, Stella; Bordas, François; Bollinger, Jean-Claude

    2003-01-01

    Surface chemical properties of simple and natural solids are determined as a result of a rapid and straightforward methodology based on the surface-complexation model. Surface charges of the solid are determined by successive potentiometric titrations with an acid and a base. Solids are considered as amphoteric compounds and the functional surface groups are expressed by a generic binding site, ≡SOH. The intrinsic surface acidity constants, pKaS, and the pH of zero point charge, pHzpc, are calculated. From this tutorial, students gain experience in using both analytical techniques and geochemical modeling principle.

  9. Measurement of surface effects on the rotational diffusion of a colloidal particle.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Sebastian; Escauriaza, Cristian; Celedon, Alfredo

    2011-03-15

    A growing number of nanotechnologies involve rotating particles. Because the particles are normally close to a solid surface, hydrodynamic interaction may affect particle rotation. Here, we track probes composed of two particles tethered to a solid surface by a DNA molecule to measure for the first time the effect of a surface on the rotational viscous drag. We use a model that superimposes solutions of the Stokes equation in the presence of a wall to confirm and interpret our measurements. We show that the hydrodynamic interaction between the surface and the probe increases the rotational viscous drag and that the effect strongly depends on the geometry of the probe.

  10. Tuning Solid Surfaces from Hydrophobic to Superhydrophilic by Submonolayer Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Sheng; Zhang, Zhenyu; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2006-01-01

    Molecular-scale understanding and manipulation of the wetting behavior of water on solids remains a fundamental challenge. Using diamond as a model system, we show that the naturally hydrophobic behavior of a hydrogen-terminated C(111) surface can be manipulated by replacing the H termination with a monolayer of adsorbate. In particular, a mixed monolayer of 1 3 Na and 2 3 F atoms leads to superhydrophilic behavior, as shown by first-principles calculations. The physical origin of the superhydrophilic behavior is attributed to the ionic nature of the Na adatoms, which mediate the right degree of binding strength between water molecules and the substrate.

  11. Theoretical Foundation of Zisman's Empirical Equation for Wetting of Liquids on Solid Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Ruzeng; Cui, Shuwen; Wang, Xiaosong

    2010-01-01

    Theories of wetting of liquids on solid surfaces under the condition that van der Waals force is dominant are briefly reviewed. We show theoretically that Zisman's empirical equation for wetting of liquids on solid surfaces is a linear approximation of the Young-van der Waals equation in the wetting region, and we express the two parameters in…

  12. The solid angle (geometry factor) for a spherical surface source and an arbitrary detector aperture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-13

    It is proven that the solid angle (or geometry factor, also called the geometrical efficiency) for a spherically symmetric outward-directed surface source with an arbitrary radius and polar angle distribution and an arbitrary detector aperture is equal to the solid angle for an isotropic point source located at the center of the spherical surface source and the same detector aperture.

  13. Solid-state coherent laser radar wind shear measuring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. Milton

    1992-01-01

    Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) was established in 1984 to engage in the development of coherent laser radar systems and subsystems with applications in atmospheric remote sensing, and in target tracking, ranging and imaging. CTI focuses its capabilities in three major areas: (1) theoretical performance and design of coherent laser radar system; (2) development of coherent laser radar systems for government agencies such as DoD and NASA; and (3) development of coherent laser radar systems for commercial markets. The topics addressed are: (1) 1.06 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system; (2) wind measurement using 1.06 micron system; and flashlamp-pumped 2.09 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system.

  14. Solid Test Meal to Measure the Gastric Emptying with Magnetogastrography

    SciTech Connect

    Reynaga-Ornelas, M. G.; Roca-Chiapas, J. M. de ls; Cordova-Fraga, T.; Bernal, J. J.; Sosa, M.

    2008-08-11

    The gastric emptying is the time of evacuating the food ingested from the stomach to the duodenum in a controlled rate. Diverse studies express the results of the gastric emptying in form of half-time (t{sub 1/2}). The Magnetogastrography (MGG) is a biomagnetic technique that has the advantage of not being invasive, radiation free and does not interfere with the privacy of the subject. The objective was to analyze the magnetic signal of magnetic tracers mixed in a solid food to measure gastric emptying using Magnetogastrography. The ingested test meal displayed a magnetic signal, which served to obtain the signal registered by the fluxgate and the peristaltic contractions could be calculated while the stomach was emptying. The solid food product developed results to work satisfactorily in magnetogastrography.

  15. Solid Test Meal to Measure the Gastric Emptying with Magnetogastrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaga-Ornelas, M. G.; De la Roca-Chiapas, J. M.; Cordova-Fraga, T.; Bernal, J. J.; Sosa, M.

    2008-08-01

    The gastric emptying is the time of evacuating the food ingested from the stomach to the duodenum in a controlled rate. Diverse studies express the results of the gastric emptying in form of half-time (t1/2). The Magnetogastrography (MGG) is a biomagnetic technique that has the advantage of not being invasive, radiation free and does not interfere with the privacy of the subject. The objective was to analyze the magnetic signal of magnetic tracers mixed in a solid food to measure gastric emptying using Magnetogastrography. The ingested test meal displayed a magnetic signal, which served to obtain the signal registered by the fluxgate and the peristaltic contractions could be calculated while the stomach was emptying. The solid food product developed results to work satisfactorily in magnetogastrography.

  16. Temporal coherence of high-order harmonics generated at solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmers, D.; Behmke, M.; Karsch, S.; Keyling, J.; Major, Z.; Stelzmann, C.; Pretzler, G.

    2014-07-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the temporal coherence of high-order harmonics generated by reflection of a titanium sapphire laser off a solid surface. It is found that the coherence length of the harmonic emission is significantly reduced compared with the bandwidth limited case. To identify the responsible mechanism, the acquired data were analyzed by means of particle-in-cell simulations, whose results show good agreement between the calculated spectra and the measured coherence times. We show that the observed broadening can be understood consistently by the occurrence of a Doppler shift induced by the moving plasma surface, which is dented by the radiation pressure of the laser pulse. In this case, this Doppler effect would also lead to positive chirp of the emitted radiation.

  17. Head on collisions of compressible vortex rings on a smooth solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, R.; Kontis, K.; Gongora-Orozco, N.

    2013-07-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on the effects of distance variation on the impingement process of compressible vortex rings on a stationary solid wall. An experimental incident Mach number of 1.61 was used. Qualitative and quantitative studies compared the impingement and interaction flow characteristics of a compressible vortex ring with a stationary, solid, smooth surface at three distances: 1.66, 3.33, and 5.00 inner diameters. The three distances corresponded to an under-developed vortex ring (1.66 inner diameters), a vortex ring at its development threshold (3.33 inner diameters), and a fully developed one (5.00 inner diameters). Qualitative schlieren results showed that the surface distance affected the shock/vortex interaction process along with the impingement process of the vortex ring and the flow structure of its trailing jet. Quantitative data were extrapolated to evaluate the propagation velocity of the vortex ring prior to impingement. The boundary layer thickness was also estimated. Particle image velocimetry studies showed the main and secondary vortices to have opposite vorticity, with the magnitude of the vorticity of the secondary vortices being approximately half of that of the main vortex. Surface pressure results reveal the symmetrical properties of the impinging flow, along with a direct correlation between the maximum pressure measured at the instant the vortex ring impingement and an increase in surface distance.

  18. Gas sorption in solid surfaces: a computational study using rigid and Einstein-solid models.

    PubMed

    Lara-Peña, Mayra; Domínguez, Hector

    2015-11-01

    The reactive Monte Carlo (RxMC) method was proposed to describe the sorption of gases in solid materials due to the chemical reaction A + B ⇌ C. Two models were used to simulate the solid; the first model considered simulations with rigid particles in the solid whereas in the second model the particles were allowed to vibrate inside the solid with a given spring constant, i.e. an Einstein solid was used to simulate the substrate. In both models not only physisorption but also chemisorption of the fluid was observed. Sorption curves, at different spring constants, were simulated and it was noted that sorption was always enhanced with the Einstein solid model. Moreover, an inverse dependent function of the spring constant with the temperature was found. Finally, the second model might be used to explain the unusual sorption behavior observed in actual experimental reactions such as CO2 + Li2O ⇌ Li2CO3.

  19. Surface heat transfer coefficient, heat efficiency, and temperature of pulsed solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, K.; Weber, H.

    1988-08-01

    The temperature of solid-state lasers is a critical parameter. Efficiency and output power are strongly influenced by it. The two parameters which determine the temperature are the heat generation efficiency (HGE) and the surface heat transfer coefficient (SHTC) of the laser rod. These parameters allow the scaling of the rod temperature up to high pumping powers. Moreover, from the temperature inside the rod, the temperature gradients and the mechanical stress can be evaluated. Using transient temperature measurements, the SHTC and the HGE were determined for air- and water-cooled Nd:YAG and alexandrite lasers. The SHTC can be confirmed by theoretical considerations.

  20. Entanglement creation in electron-electron collisions at solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, R.; Giebels, F.; Gollisch, H.

    2015-08-01

    For spin-polarized low-energy electrons impinging on a crystalline surface, an important reaction channel is the collision with a bound valence electron of opposite spin, followed by the emission of a correlated electron pair with antiparallel spins. While primary and valence electrons are not entangled, the screened Coulomb interaction generates spin entanglement between the two outgoing electrons. As a quantitative measure of this entanglement, we calculated a modified von Neumann entropy in terms of direct and exchange transition matrix elements. For coplanar symmetric setups with equal energies of antiparallel-spin electrons, maximal entanglement is analytically shown to occur quite universally, irrespective of the choice of the primary electron energy, the outgoing electron energy, and polar emission angle, and even of the choice of the surface system. Numerical results for Fe(110) and Cu(111) demonstrate first that strong entanglement can persist for unequal energies and second that an overall entanglement reduction due to nonentangled parallel-spin electrons can be avoided for ferromagnetic and even for nonmagnetic surfaces.

  1. Apparatus for measuring surface particulate contamination

    DOEpatents

    Woodmansee, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring surface particulate contamination includes a tool for collecting a contamination sample from a target surface, a mask having an opening of known area formed therein for defining the target surface, and a flexible connector connecting the tool to the mask. The tool includes a body portion having a large diameter section defining a surface and a small diameter section extending from the large diameter section. A particulate collector is removably mounted on the surface of the large diameter section for collecting the contaminants. The tool further includes a spindle extending from the small diameter section and a spool slidingly mounted on the spindle. A spring is disposed between the small diameter section and the spool for biasing the spool away from the small diameter section. An indicator is provided on the spindle so as to be revealed when the spool is pressed downward to compress the spring.

  2. Discrete transistor measuring and matching using a solid core oven.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, M; Mäkelä, K; Vuorela, T; Palovuori, K

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents transistor measurements done at a constant temperature. The aim in this research was to develop a reliable and repeatable method for measuring and searching transistor pairs with similar parameters, as in certain applications it is advantageous to use transistors from the same production batch due to the significant variability in batches from different manufacturers. Transistor manufacturing methods are well established, but due to the large variability in tolerance, not even transistors from the same manufacturing batch have identical properties. Transistors' electrical properties are also strongly temperature-dependent. Therefore, when measuring transistor properties, the temperature must be kept constant. For the measurement process, a solid-core oven providing stable temperature was implemented. In the oven, the base-to-emitter voltage (VBE) and DC-current gain (β) of 32 transistors could be measured simultaneously. The oven's temperature was controlled with a programmable thermostat, which allowed accurate constant temperature operation. The oven is formed by a large metal block with an individual chamber for each transistor to be measured. Isolation of individual transistors and the highly thermally conductive metal core structure prevent thermal coupling between transistors. The oven enables repeatable measurements, and thus measurements between different batches are comparable. In this research study, the properties of over 5000 transistors were measured and the variance of the aforementioned properties was analyzed.

  3. Grating projection system for surface contour measurement.

    PubMed

    Tay, Cho Jui; Thakur, Madhuri; Quan, Chenggen

    2005-03-10

    A grating projection system is a low-cost surface contour measurement technique that can be applied to a wide range of applications. There has been a resurgence of interest in the technique in recent years because of developments in computer hardware and image processing algorithms. We describe a method that projects a phase-shifted grating through a lens on an object surface. The deformed grating image on the object surface is captured by a CCD camera for subsequent analysis. Phase variation is achieved by a linear translation stage on which the grating is mounted. We compare the experimental results with the test results using a mechanical stylus method. PMID:15796237

  4. Suspended Solids Flux Between Salt Marsh and Adjacent Bay: A Long-term Continuous Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, N. S.; Guo, Q.; Psuty, N. P.

    1999-07-01

    The beneficial roles of coastal salt marshes have been well identified as a storm surge protector, a nursery for young fish and a natural filter for pollutants. However, the vectors of nutrients and suspended solids exchanges between the salt marsh and the adjacent bay are not completely known. In this study, suspended solids flux between a salt marsh at Tuckerton, New Jersey, U.S.A. and Great Bay was continuously measured for an extended period of time by an improved monitoring methodology. A field infrared nephelometric turbidimeter was deployed to measure turbidity continuously at the mouth of the tidal creek, and the measured turbidity data were used to derive suspended solids concentrations. Current velocity and water surface elevation were measured concurrently at the same location. During the monitoring period from March to October 1996, suspended solids were found to be imported into the salt marsh from the adjacent bay. The small net import appeared to be inadequate for wetlands areal viability when compared to the relative sea-level rise rates. Results of this study suggested that a minimum of five water sample sets were needed to establish a reasonably good overall TSS-turbidity regression relationship in terms of flux quantification.

  5. Tribology of thin wetting films between bubble and moving solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, S. I.; Stöckelhuber, K. W.; Tsekov, R.; Phan, C. M.; Heinrich, G.

    2014-07-01

    This work shows a successful example of coupling of theory and experiment to study the tribology of bubble rubbing on solid surface. Such kind of investigation is reported for the first time in the literature. A theory about wetting film intercalated between bubble and moving solid surface was developed, thus deriving the non-linear evolution differential equation which accounted for the friction slip coefficient at the solid surface. The stationary 3D film thickness profile, which appears to be a solution of the differential equation, for each particular speed of motion of the solid surface was derived by means of special procedure and unique interferometric experimental setup. This allowed us to determine the 3D map of the lift pressure within the wetting film, the friction force per unit area and the friction coefficient of rubbing at different speeds of motion of the solid surface. Thus, we observed interesting tribological details about the rubbing of the bubble on t! he solid surface like for example: 1. A regime of mixed friction between dry and lubricated friction exists in the range of 6-170 μm/s, beyond which the rubbing between the bubble and solid becomes completely lubricated and passes through the maximum; 2. The friction coefficient of rubbing has high values at very small speeds of solid's motion and reduces substantially with the increase of the speed of the solid motion until reaching small values, which change insignificantly with the further increase of the speed of the solid. Despite the numerous studies on the motion of bubble/droplet in close proximity to solid wall in the literature, the present investigation appears to be a step ahead in this area as far as we were able to derive 3D maps of the bubble close to the solid surface, which makes the investigation more profound.

  6. Tribology of thin wetting films between bubble and moving solid surface.

    PubMed

    Karakashev, Stoyan I; Stöckelhuber, Klaus W; Tsekov, Roumen; Phan, Chi M; Heinrich, Gert

    2014-08-01

    This work shows a successful example of coupling of theory and experiment to study the tribology of bubble rubbing on solid surface. Such kind of investigation is reported for the first time in the literature. A theory about wetting film intercalated between bubble and moving solid surface was developed, thus deriving the non-linear evolution differential equation which accounted for the friction slip coefficient at the solid surface. The stationary 3D film thickness profile, which appears to be a solution of the differential equation, for each particular speed of motion of the solid surface was derived by means of special procedure and unique interferometric experimental setup. This allowed us to determine the 3D map of the lift pressure within the wetting film, the friction force per unit area and the friction coefficient of rubbing at different speeds of motion of the solid surface. Thus, we observed interesting tribological details about the rubbing of the bubble on the solid surface like for example: 1. A regime of mixed friction between dry and lubricated friction exists in the range of 6-170 μm/s, beyond which the rubbing between the bubble and solid becomes completely lubricated and passes through the maximum; 2. The friction coefficient of rubbing has high values at very small speeds of solid's motion and reduces substantially with the increase of the speed of the solid motion until reaching small values, which change insignificantly with the further increase of the speed of the solid. Despite the numerous studies on the motion of bubble/droplet in close proximity to solid wall in the literature, the present investigation appears to be a step ahead in this area as far as we were able to derive 3D maps of the bubble close to the solid surface, which makes the investigation more profound. PMID:24200087

  7. Noninterferometric topography measurements of fast moving surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinhasi, Shirly Vinikman; Eliezer, Shalom; Glam, Benny; Appelbaum, Gabi; Bakshi, Lior

    2011-08-01

    The topography of moving surfaces is recovered by noninterferometric measurements. The phase reconstruction is derived by measuring the intensities of a backscattered pulsed laser light and solving the transport intensity equation (TIE). The TIE is solved by expanding the phase into a series of Zernike polynomials, leading to a set of appropriate algebraic equations. This technique, which enables us to make a direct connection between experiments and the TIE, has been successfully tested in gas gun experiments. In particular, the topographies of a moving projectile and the free surface of a shocked target were recovered. PMID:21811317

  8. Theoretical model of droplet wettability on a low-surface-energy solid under the influence of gravity.

    PubMed

    Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    The wettability of droplets on a low surface energy solid is evaluated experimentally and theoretically. Water-ethanol binary mixture drops of several volumes are used. In the experiment, the droplet radius, height, and contact angle are measured. Analytical equations are derived that incorporate the effect of gravity for the relationships between the droplet radius and height, radius and contact angle, and radius and liquid surface energy. All the analytical equations display good agreement with the experimental data. It is found that the fundamental wetting behavior of the droplet on the low surface energy solid can be predicted by our model which gives geometrical information of the droplet such as the contact angle, droplet radius, and height from physical values of liquid and solid.

  9. An intuitive approach to measuring protein surface curvature.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Ryan G; Burr, Michael A; Souvaine, Diane L; Cheng, Alan C

    2005-12-01

    A natural way to measure protein surface curvature is to generate the least squares fitted (LSF) sphere to a surface patch and use the radius as the curvature measure. While the concept is simple, the sphere-fitting problem is not trivial and known means of protein surface curvature measurement use alternative schemes that are arguably less straightforward to interpret. We have developed an approach to solve the LSF sphere problem by turning the sphere-fitting problem into a solvable plane-fitting problem using a transformation known as geometric inversion. The approach works on any arbitrary surface patch, and returns a radius of curvature that has direct physical interpretation. Additionally, it is flexible in its ability to find the curvature of an arbitrary surface patch, and the "resolution" can be adjusted to highlight atomic features or larger features such as peptide binding sites. We include examples of applying the method to visualization of peptide recognition pockets and protein conformational change, as well as a comparison with a commonly used solid-angle curvature method showing that the LSF method produces more pronounced curvature results.

  10. Particle velocity and solid volume fraction measurements with a new capacitive flowmeter at the Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility. [Glass beads

    SciTech Connect

    Bobis, J.P.; Porges, K.G.A.; Raptis, A.C.; Brewer, W.E.; Bernovich, L.T.

    1986-08-01

    The performance of a new capacitive flowmeter has been assessed experimentally in a gas-entrained solid flow stream at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility (S/GFTF) for solid feedrates in the range of 0.5 to 2 kg/s and solid-gas loadings up to 22, corresponding to a range of solid volume fractions extending from 0.004 to 0.016. Two types of nonintrusive instruments using the capacitive principle were fabricated at ANL and installed in the horizontal leg of a 12.3 m test section to sense the solids. An improved electrode geometry designed to maximize the coverage of the duct interior while minimizing the readout error due to a nonuniform electric field, was incorporated for one spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes on the outside surface of a ceramic liner and for another spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes mounted flush with the duct inside surface. The capacitive instruments measured the solid volume fraction and the average particle velocity. The results are compared with time-of-flight measurements of short-lived radioactive particles that duplicate closely the size and density of the 1000..mu.. glass beads used in these flow tests. Results show that the solid volume fraction measurements agree with the theoretical models presented and that the particle velocity deduced from the cross-correlation scheme agreed to within 5% of the irradiated particle velocity technique for the 21 to 31 m/s range generated with the S/GFTF. 43 refs., 36 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. The heat capacity of water near solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vučelić, V.; Vučelić, D.

    1983-11-01

    Anomalous heat capacities of water at solid/water interfaces have been obtained. The solids vary from inorganic (zeolites, porous class, silica gel, activated carbon) to biological (protein lysozyme and adrenal gland). Water heat capacities at all interfaces exhibit the same pattern. At room temperature the small values are close to ice and increase with temperature, reaching the value of free water between 380 and 440 K.

  12. Synthesis of thiolated glycosaminoglycans and grafting to solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Köwitsch, Alexander; Jurado Abreu, Mauricio; Chhalotre, Ankur; Hielscher, Martin; Fischer, Steffen; Mäder, Karsten; Groth, Thomas

    2014-12-19

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) with varying degree of sulfation were chemically modified to obtain thiolated analogues (tGAGs) for subsequent surface grafting on vinyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Thiolation was achieved by the use of the disulfide containing crosslinker 3,3'-dithiobis(propanoic hydrazide) and subsequent reduction of the disulfide with dithiothreitol. Two different molar ratios of the crosslinker were used for conjugation. The tGAGs were characterized by (1)H-NMR, Raman and flow-field-flow-fractionation (A4F) to determine the chemical composition, structure and molecular weight of the products. Ellman's reagent was used to quantify the thiol concentration of tGAGs. The tGAGs were immobilized onto vinyl-terminated glass and silicon via thiol-ene reaction. This was achieved by homogeneous immobilization from solution as well as with microcontact printing and exposure to UV light. The results of water contact angle measurement (WCA), ellipsometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) demonstrated that the resulting surface coverage was dependent on the degree of thiolation of GAGs.

  13. Operation Argus. Surface measurements - project midas

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, P.; Chernosky, E.; Markham, T.; McCabe, L.; Peterson, A.

    1984-08-31

    The objective was to make surface measurements of the electromagnetic and optical effects in the detonation area (South Atlantic) and in the area geomagnetically conjugate (Azores) during the Argus experiment. The project participated in three events - Argus I, II, and III.

  14. Surface pressure measurements on a hypersonic vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Henfling, J.F.; Larson, D.E.; Payne, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    Extensive surface pressure measurements were obtained on a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8 for the purpose of computational fluid dynamics code validation. Experiments were conducted in the Sandia National Laboratories hypersonic wind tunnel. All measurements were made for laminar flow conditions at a Reynolds number (based on model length) of 1.81 x 10{sup 6} and perfect gas conditions. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted, 10{degree} half- angle cone, with a slice parallel to the axis of the vehicle. To the aft portion of the slice could be attached flaps of varying angle; 10, 20, and 30{degree}. Surface pressure measurements were obtained for angles of attack from -10 to +18{degree}, for various roll angles, at 96 locations on the body surface. All three deflected flap angles produced separated flow on the sliced portion of the body in front of the flap. Because of the three-dimensional expansion over the slice, the separated flow on the slice and flap was also highly three- dimensional. The results of the present experiment provide extensive surface pressure measurements for the validation of computational fluid dynamics codes for separated flow caused by an embedded shock wave.

  15. The effect of solid surface heterogeneity and roughness on the contact angle/drop (bubble) size relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Drelich, J.; Miller, J.D. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The contact angle for varying sizes of drops and air bubbles was measured on clean, heterogeneous, and rough solid surfaces. A linear correlation of the cosine of the contact angle vs reciprocal of the drop (bubble) base radius was obtained for the tetradecane/water/quartz and air/water/polyethylene systems, in which pure single-component liquids and freshly prepared clean solid surfaces were used. It was found that solid surface imperfections, heterogeneity and/or roughness, affect the contact angle /drop (bubble) size relationship. The change in contact angle with bubble size depended on the extent of solid surface heterogeneity, as was observed for the tetradecane/water/methylated quartz system with varying degrees of quartz methylation. For the air/water/polyethylene and air/water/gold systems, it was found that the slope of a plot of cos [theta] vs 1/r increased for rough surfaces when compared to that for smooth surfaces, and that these experimental data qualitatively support the modified Wenzel equation which includes the line-tension term.

  16. The air bubble entrapped under a drop impacting on a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoroddsen, S. T.; Etoh, T. G.; Takehara, K.; Ootsuka, N.; Hatsuki, Y.

    2005-12-01

    We present experimental observations of the disk of air caught under a drop impacting onto a solid surface. By imaging the impact through an acrylic plate with an ultra-high-speed video camera, we can follow the evolution of the air disk as it contracts into a bubble under the centre of the drop. The initial size and contraction speed of the disk were measured for a range of impact Weber and Reynolds numbers. The size of the initial disk is related to the bottom curvature of the drop at the initial contact, as measured in free-fall. The initial contact often leaves behind a ring of micro-bubbles, marking its location. The air disk contracts at a speed comparable to the corresponding air disks caught under a drop impacting onto a liquid surface. This speed also seems independent of the wettability of the liquid, which only affects the azimuthal shape of the contact line. For some impact conditions, the dynamics of the contraction leaves a small droplet at the centre of the bubble. This arises from a capillary wave propagating from the edges of the contracting disk towards the centre. As the wave converges its amplitude grows until it touches the solid substrate, thereby pinching off the micro-droplet at the plate, in the centre of the bubble. The effect of increasing liquid viscosity is to slow down the contraction speed and to produce a more irregular contact line leaving more micro-bubbles along the initial ring.

  17. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  18. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under this part shall be 0.4... for measurement of settleable solids. 434.64 Section 434.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this part, the...

  19. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Notwithstanding any provision of 40 CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under... for measurement of settleable solids. 434.64 Section 434.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this...

  20. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Notwithstanding any provision of 40 CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under... for measurement of settleable solids. 434.64 Section 434.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this...

  1. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Notwithstanding any provision of 40 CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under... for measurement of settleable solids. 434.64 Section 434.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this...

  2. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under this part shall be 0.4... for measurement of settleable solids. 434.64 Section 434.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this part, the...

  3. Towards attosecond measurement in molecules and at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangos, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    1) We will present a number of experimental approaches that are being developed at Imperial College to make attosecond timescale measurements of electronic dynamics in suddenly photoionized molecules and at surfaces. A brief overview will be given of some of the unanswered questions in ultrafast electron and hole dynamics in molecules and solids. These questions include the existence of electronic charge migration in molecules and how this process might couple to nuclear motion even on the few femtosecond timescale. How the timescale of photoemission from a surface may differ from that of an isolated atom, e.g. due to electron transport phenomena associated with the distance from the surface of the emitting atom and the electron dispersion relation, is also an open question. 2) The measurement techniques we are currently developing to answer these questions are HHG spectroscopy, attosecond pump-probe photoelectron/photoion studies, and attosecond pump-probe transient absorption as well as attosecond streaking for measuring surface emission. We will present recent advances in generating two synchronized isolated attosecond pulses at different colours for pump-probe measurements (at 20 eV and 90 eV respectively). Results on generation of isolated attosecond pulses at 300 eV and higher photon energy using a few-cycle 1800 nm OPG source will be presented. The use of these resources for making pump-probe measurements will be discussed. Finally we will present the results of streaking measurement of photoemission wavepackets from two types of surface (WO3 and a evaporated Au film) that show a temporal broadening of ~ 100 as compared to atomic streaks that is consistent with the electron mean free path in these materials. Work supported by ERC and EPSRC.

  4. Denoising surface renewal flux density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapland, T.; Paw U, K.; Snyder, R. L.; McElrone, A.; Calderon Orellana, A.; Williams, L.

    2012-12-01

    When combined with net radiation and ground heat flux density measurements, surface renewal sensible heat flux density measurements can be used to obtain latent heat flux density, and therefore evapotranspiration, via the energy balance residual. Surface renewal is based on analyzing the energy and mass budget of air parcels that interact with plant canopies. The air parcels are manifested as ramp-like shapes in turbulent scalar time series data, and the amplitude and period of the ramps are used to calculate the flux densities. The root mean square error between calibrated surface renewal and eddy covariance is generally twice the root mean square error between two eddy covariance systems. In this presentation, we evaluate the efficacy of various methods for reducing the random error in surface renewal sensible heat flux density measurements. These methods include signal de-spiking, conventional low-pass filtering, wavelet-based filtering, ramp signal to noise thresholds, ramp period scaling, novel rearrangements of the Van Atta procedure (Arch Mech 29:161-171, 1977) for resolving the ramp amplitude and ramp period, sensor replication, and optimization of sensor placement.

  5. Collective Surface Diffusion Measurements with the STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tringides, Michael C.

    1996-03-01

    Time dependent processes in surface overlayers at finite coverage are described in terms of the collective diffusion coefficient D_c. Dc can be measured from the time dependent correlation function C(t), of an initial concentration fluctuation formed in a probe area A. C(t) follows a characteristic 1/D_ct time dependence at long times. The STM can be easily used^1 to measure C(t) and, therefore, Dc by monitoring the current fluctuations with the tip fixed over a location (i.e, by suspending the scanning process). The probe area A is defined by the tunneling region. Experiments on O/Si(111) at low coverage will be described that show a dramatic increase of the current fluctuations (when compared to the clean surface) with the addition of oxygen. The analysis of the current fluctuations obtained at different temperatures is consistent with the 1/D_ct form of the correlation function. This method of measuring collective surface diffusion has the unique advantage of ultrafast speed (limited only by the electronics) and can be used to test predictions about the statistical mechanics of surface diffusion in an ensemble of particles. * Ames Laboratory is operated for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-82. 1. M. L. Lozano and M. C. Tringides, Europhys. Lett. 30 , 537 (1995).

  6. Surface temperature measurements of heterogeneous explosives by IR emission

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, B.F.; Funk, D.J.; Dickson, P.M.; Fugard, C.S.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-03-01

    The authors present measurements of the integrated IR emission (1--5 {micro}m) from both the heterogeneous explosive PBX 9501 and pure HMX at calibrated temperatures from 300 C to 2,500 C. The IR power emitted as a function of temperature is that expected of a black body, attenuated by a unique temperature independent constant which the authors report as the thermal emissivity. The authors have utilized this calibration of IR emission in measurements of the surface temperature from PBX 9501 subject to 1 GPa, two dimensional impact, and spontaneous ignition in unconfined cookoff. They demonstrate that the measurement of IR emission in this spectral region provides a temperature probe of sufficient sensitivity to resolve the thermal response from the solid explosive throughout the range of weak mechanical perturbation, prolonged heating to ignition, and combustion.

  7. Drag force and surface roughness measurements on freshwater biofouled surfaces.

    PubMed

    Andrewartha, J; Perkins, K; Sargison, J; Osborn, J; Walker, G; Henderson, A; Hallegraeff, G

    2010-05-01

    The detrimental effect of biofilms on skin friction for near wall flows is well known. The diatom genera Gomphonema and Tabellaria dominated the biofilm mat in the freshwater open channels of the Tarraleah Hydropower Scheme in Tasmania, Australia. A multi-faceted approach was adopted to investigate the drag penalty for biofouled 1.0 m x 0.6 m test plates which incorporated species identification, drag measurement in a recirculating water tunnel and surface characterisation using close-range photogrammetry. Increases in total drag coefficient of up to 99% were measured over clean surface values for biofouled test plates incubated under flow conditions in a hydropower canal. The effective roughness of the biofouled surfaces was found to be larger than the physical roughness; the additional energy dissipation was caused in part by the vibration of the biofilms in three-dimensions under flow conditions. The data indicate that there was a roughly linear relationship between the maximum peak-to-valley height of a biofilm and the total drag coefficient.

  8. Surface topographical changes measured by phase-locked interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Fung, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    An electronic optical laser interferometer capable of resolving depth differences of as low as 30 A and planar displacements of 6000 A was constructed to examine surface profiles of bearing surfaces without physical contact. Topological chemical reactivity was determined by applying a drop of dilute alcoholic hydrochloric acid and measuring the profile of the solid surface before and after application of this probe. Scuffed bearing surfaces reacted much faster than virgin ones but that bearing surfaces exposed to lubricants containing an organic chloride reacted much more slowly. The reactivity of stainless steel plates, heated in a nitrogen atmosphere to different temperatures, were examined later at ambient temperature. The change of surface contour as a result of the probe reaction followed Arrhenius-type relation with respect to heat treatment temperature. The contact area of the plate of a ball/plate sliding elastohydrodynamic contact run on trimethylopropane triheptanoate with or without additives was optically profiled periodically. As scuffing was approached, the change of profile within the contact region changed much more rapidly by the acid probe and assumed a constant high value after scuffing. A nonetching metallurgical phase was found in the scuff mark, which was apparently responsible for the high reactivity.

  9. Analysis of the morphology of high surface area solids: studies of agglomeration and the determination of shape

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.C. Jr.; Blanco, C.; Coyne, K.; Neil, J.; Pajares, J.

    1987-07-01

    Characterization of the morphology of high surface area solids is most often accomplished by nitrogen desorption and/or mercury intrusion porosimetry. If the void/solid structure is viewed as an interconnected network, ad-de-sorption and retraction/intrusion may be associated with the openings and constrictions within the void network. This more realistic view adds another dimension to the analyses. The data can be analyzed as if the data consisted of agglomerated microspheres. This analysis proves consistent for compacted aerosol silicas but is inconsistent if the solid has a different morphology. More significantly, the ratios of the measured most probable radii of intrusion to those of retraction seem to be characteristic of the void solid structure and pore shapes, and thereby, it may be possible to infer the pore shapes and general structure from this more detailed analysis. A heuristic diagram of these trends is presented. 6 references.

  10. Surface coating effects in remote sensing measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Robert D.

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of the infrared spectra of a liquid-(water) coated quartz substrate and a solid-(pyrophyllite) coated quartzite are compared to theoretical values. Results demonstrate that in the case of the water-coated quartz, a loss in spectral contrast of the quartz emission occurs at the principal restrahlen wavelengths of 8.5, 9.0, and 12.5 µ but is most pronounced at 12.5 µ. In the case of pyrophyllite-coated quartzite, additional spectral features appear between 8.0 and 10.0 µ as the exposure of quartzite through the pyrophyllite coating is increased. Addition of the pure quartzite and pyrophyllite spectra, weighted by exposed area, is shown to satisfactorily describe the composite spectra.

  11. Study of solid/liquid and solid/gas interfaces in Cu-isoleucine complex by surface X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Pilar; Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R.

    2013-02-01

    The enzymes could be understood like structures formed by amino acids bonded with metals, which act as active sites. The research on the coordination of metal-amino acid complexes will bring light on the behavior of metal enzymes, due to the close relation existing between the atomic structure and the functionality. The Cu-isoleucine bond is considered as a good model system to attain a better insight into the characteristics of naturally occurring copper metalloproteins. The surface structure of metal-amino acid complex could be considered as a more realistic model for real systems under biologic working conditions, since the molecular packing is decreased. In the surface, the structural constrains are reduced, keeping the structural capability of surface complex to change as a function of the surrounding environment. In this work, we present a surface X-ray diffraction study on Cu-isoleucine complex under different ambient conditions. Cu(Ile)2 crystals of about 5 mm × 5 mm × 1 mm have been growth, by seeding method in a supersaturated solution, presenting a surface of high quality. The sample for the surface diffraction study was mounted on a cell specially designed for solid/liquid or solid/gas interface analysis. The Cu-isoleucine crystal was measured under a protective dry N2 gas flow and in contact with a saturated metal amino acid solution. The bulk and the surface signals were compared, showing different atomic structures. In both cases, from surface diffraction data, it is observed that the atomic structure of the top layer undergoes a clear structural deformation. A non-uniform surface relaxation is observed producing an inhomogeneous displacement of the surface atoms towards the surface normal.

  12. Adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces, and anisotropic surface tensions studied by capillary meniscus dynamometry.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Cox, Andrew R; Pelan, Eddie G

    2016-07-01

    Here, we review the principle and applications of two recently developed methods: the capillary meniscus dynamometry (CMD) for measuring the surface tension of bubbles/drops, and the capillary bridge dynamometry (CBD) for quantifying the bubble/drop adhesion to solid surfaces. Both methods are based on a new data analysis protocol, which allows one to decouple the two components of non-isotropic surface tension. For an axisymmetric non-fluid interface (e.g. bubble or drop covered by a protein adsorption layer with shear elasticity), the CMD determines the two different components of the anisotropic surface tension, σs and σφ, which are acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", and vary throughout the interface. The method uses data for the instantaneous bubble (drop) profile and capillary pressure, but the procedure for data processing is essentially different from that of the conventional drop shape analysis (DSA) method. In the case of bubble or drop pressed against a substrate, which forms a capillary bridge, the CBD method allows one to determine also the capillary-bridge force for both isotropic (fluid) and anisotropic (solidified) adsorption layers. The experiments on bubble (drop) detachment from the substrate show the existence of a maximal pulling force, Fmax, that can be resisted by an adherent fluid particle. Fmax can be used to quantify the strength of adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces. Its value is determined by a competition of attractive transversal tension and repulsive disjoining pressure forces. The greatest Fmax values have been measured for bubbles adherent to glass substrates in pea-protein solutions. The bubble/wall adhesion is lower in solutions containing the protein HFBII hydrophobin, which could be explained with the effect of sandwiched protein aggregates. The applicability of the CBD method to emulsion systems is illustrated by experiments with soybean-oil drops adherent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in

  13. Adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces, and anisotropic surface tensions studied by capillary meniscus dynamometry.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Cox, Andrew R; Pelan, Eddie G

    2016-07-01

    Here, we review the principle and applications of two recently developed methods: the capillary meniscus dynamometry (CMD) for measuring the surface tension of bubbles/drops, and the capillary bridge dynamometry (CBD) for quantifying the bubble/drop adhesion to solid surfaces. Both methods are based on a new data analysis protocol, which allows one to decouple the two components of non-isotropic surface tension. For an axisymmetric non-fluid interface (e.g. bubble or drop covered by a protein adsorption layer with shear elasticity), the CMD determines the two different components of the anisotropic surface tension, σs and σφ, which are acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", and vary throughout the interface. The method uses data for the instantaneous bubble (drop) profile and capillary pressure, but the procedure for data processing is essentially different from that of the conventional drop shape analysis (DSA) method. In the case of bubble or drop pressed against a substrate, which forms a capillary bridge, the CBD method allows one to determine also the capillary-bridge force for both isotropic (fluid) and anisotropic (solidified) adsorption layers. The experiments on bubble (drop) detachment from the substrate show the existence of a maximal pulling force, Fmax, that can be resisted by an adherent fluid particle. Fmax can be used to quantify the strength of adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces. Its value is determined by a competition of attractive transversal tension and repulsive disjoining pressure forces. The greatest Fmax values have been measured for bubbles adherent to glass substrates in pea-protein solutions. The bubble/wall adhesion is lower in solutions containing the protein HFBII hydrophobin, which could be explained with the effect of sandwiched protein aggregates. The applicability of the CBD method to emulsion systems is illustrated by experiments with soybean-oil drops adherent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in

  14. Reliability and Consistency of Surface Contamination Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rouppert, F.; Rivoallan, A.; Largeron, C.

    2002-02-26

    Surface contamination evaluation is a tough problem since it is difficult to isolate the radiations emitted by the surface, especially in a highly irradiating atmosphere. In that case the only possibility is to evaluate smearable (removeable) contamination since ex-situ countings are possible. Unfortunately, according to our experience at CEA, these values are not consistent and thus non relevant. In this study, we show, using in-situ Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry on contaminated metal samples, that fixed contamination seems to be chemisorbed and removeable contamination seems to be physisorbed. The distribution between fixed and removeable contamination appears to be variable. Chemical equilibria and reversible ion exchange mechanisms are involved and are closely linked to environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature. Measurements of smearable contamination only give an indication of the state of these equilibria between fixed and removeable contamination at the time and in the environmental conditions the measurements were made.

  15. Failed Escape: Solid Surfaces Prevent Tumbling of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Barry, Michael; Stocker, Roman; Sheng, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Understanding how bacteria move close to surfaces is crucial for a broad range of microbial processes including biofilm formation, bacterial dispersion, and pathogenic infections. We used digital holographic microscopy to capture a large number (>103) of three-dimensional Escherichia coli trajectories near and far from a surface. We found that within 20 μm from a surface tumbles are suppressed by 50% and reorientations are largely confined to surface-parallel directions, preventing escape of bacteria from the near-surface region. A hydrodynamic model indicates that the tumble suppression is likely due to a surface-induced reduction in the hydrodynamic force responsible for the flagellar unbundling that causes tumbling. These findings imply that tumbling does not provide an effective means to escape trapping near surfaces.

  16. The effects of solid rocket motor effluents on selected surfaces and solid particle size, distribution, and composition for simulated shuttle booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, D. W.; Linton, R. C.; Russell, W. M.; Trenkle, J. J.; Wilkes, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A series of three tests was conducted using solid rocket propellants to determine the effects a solid rocket plume would have on thermal protective surfaces (TPS). The surfaces tested were those which are baselined for the shuttle vehicle. The propellants used were to simulate the separation solid rocket motors (SSRM) that separate the solid rocket boosters (SRB) from the shuttle launch vehicle. Data cover: (1) the optical effects of the plume environment on spacecraft related surfaces, and (2) the solid particle size, distribution, and composition at TPS sample locations.

  17. Measurement of Solid Rocket Propellant Burning Rate Using X-ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Matthew D.

    The burning rate of solid propellants can be difficult to measure for unusual burning surface geometries, but X-ray imaging can be used to measure burning rate. The objectives of this work were to measure the baseline burning rate of an electrically-controlled solid propellant (ESP) formulation with real-time X-ray radiography and to determine the uncertainty of the measurements. Two edge detection algorithms were written to track the burning surface in X-ray videos. The edge detection algorithms were informed by intensity profiles of simulated 2-D X-ray images. With a 95% confidence level, the burning rates measured by the Projected-Slope Intersection algorithm in the two combustion experiments conducted were 0.0839 in/s +/-2.86% at an average pressure of 407 psi +/-3.6% and 0.0882 in/s +/-3.04% at 410 psi +/-3.9%. The uncertainty percentages were based on the statistics of a Monte Carlo analysis on burning rate.

  18. Measurement of single crystal surface parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, L. W.; Bell, A. E.; Strayer, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The sticking coefficient and thermal desorption spectra of Cs from the (110) plane of W was investigated. A sticking coefficient of unity for the monolayer region was measured for T 250 K. Several distinct binding states were observed in the thermal desorption spectrum. Work function and electron reflection measurements were made on the (110) and (100) crystal faces of Mo. Both LEED and Auger were used to determine the orientation and cleanliness of the crystal surfaces. The work function values obtained for the (110) and (100) planes of Mo were 4.92 and 4.18 eV respectively.

  19. Lidar measurements of solid rocket propellant fire particle plumes.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Brown, Andrea M; Willitsford, Adam H; Dinello-Fass, Ryan; Airola, Marc B; Siegrist, Karen M; Thomas, Michael E; Chang, Yale

    2016-06-10

    This paper presents the first, to our knowledge, direct measurement of aerosol produced by an aluminized solid rocket propellant (SRP) fire on the ground. Such fires produce aluminum oxide particles small enough to loft high into the atmosphere and disperse over a wide area. These results can be applied to spacecraft launchpad accidents that expose spacecraft to such fires; during these fires, there is concern that some of the plutonium from the spacecraft power system will be carried with the aerosols. Accident-related lofting of this material would be the net result of many contributing processes that are currently being evaluated. To resolve the complexity of fire processes, a self-consistent model of the ground-level and upper-level parts of the plume was determined by merging ground-level optical measurements of the fire with lidar measurements of the aerosol plume at height during a series of SRP fire tests that simulated propellant fire accident scenarios. On the basis of the measurements and model results, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) team was able to estimate the amount of aluminum oxide (alumina) lofted into the atmosphere above the fire. The quantification of this ratio is critical for a complete understanding of accident scenarios, because contaminants are transported through the plume. This paper provides an estimate for the mass of alumina lofted into the air. PMID:27409023

  20. Lidar measurements of solid rocket propellant fire particle plumes.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Brown, Andrea M; Willitsford, Adam H; Dinello-Fass, Ryan; Airola, Marc B; Siegrist, Karen M; Thomas, Michael E; Chang, Yale

    2016-06-10

    This paper presents the first, to our knowledge, direct measurement of aerosol produced by an aluminized solid rocket propellant (SRP) fire on the ground. Such fires produce aluminum oxide particles small enough to loft high into the atmosphere and disperse over a wide area. These results can be applied to spacecraft launchpad accidents that expose spacecraft to such fires; during these fires, there is concern that some of the plutonium from the spacecraft power system will be carried with the aerosols. Accident-related lofting of this material would be the net result of many contributing processes that are currently being evaluated. To resolve the complexity of fire processes, a self-consistent model of the ground-level and upper-level parts of the plume was determined by merging ground-level optical measurements of the fire with lidar measurements of the aerosol plume at height during a series of SRP fire tests that simulated propellant fire accident scenarios. On the basis of the measurements and model results, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) team was able to estimate the amount of aluminum oxide (alumina) lofted into the atmosphere above the fire. The quantification of this ratio is critical for a complete understanding of accident scenarios, because contaminants are transported through the plume. This paper provides an estimate for the mass of alumina lofted into the air.

  1. Surface Wear Measurement Using Optical Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acinger, Kresimir

    1983-12-01

    The coherent optical correlation technique was applied for measuring the surface wear of a tappet (part of car engine), worn by friction with the camshaft. It was found that maximum correlation intensity decays exponentially with the number of wear cycles (i.e. camshaft revolutions). Tappets of the same make have an identical rate of correlation decay. Tappets of different makes have different rates of correlation decay which are in agreement with observed long term wear.

  2. Evaluation of Arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, N.; Long, C. N.; Augustine, J.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, T.; Longenecker, D.; Niebergall, O.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ surface radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure incoming and outgoing shortwave (SW) and thermal infrared, or longwave (LW), radiation. Enhancements may include various sensors for measuring irradiance in narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that keep sensors and shading devices trained on the sun along its diurnal path. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating stations in a pristine undisturbed setting free of artificial blockage (such as from buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data in the Arctic include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the protective glass domes of the radiometers and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, comparisons are made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) SW measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of arctic radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both SW and LW measurements. Solutions to these operational problems that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols are proposed.

  3. Solid-state dosimeters: A new approach for mammography measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brateman, Libby F.; Heintz, Philip H.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To compare responses of modern commercially available solid-state dosimeters (SStDs) used in mammography medical physics surveys for two major vendors of current digital mammography units. To compare differences in dose estimates among SStD responses with ionization chamber (IC) measurements for several target/filter (TF) combinations and report their characteristics. To review scientific bases for measurements of quantities required for mammography for traditional measurement procedures and SStDs. Methods: SStDs designed for use with modern digital mammography units were acquired for evaluation from four manufacturers. Each instrument was evaluated under similar conditions with the available mammography beams provided by two modern full-field digital mammography units in clinical use: a GE Healthcare Senographe Essential (Essential) and a Hologic Selenia Dimensions 5000 (Dimensions), with TFs of Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh; and Rh/Rh and W/Rh, W/Ag, and W/Al, respectively. Measurements were compared among the instruments for the TFs over their respective clinical ranges of peak tube potentials for kVp and half-value layer (HVL) measurements. Comparisons for air kerma (AK) and their associated relative calculated average glandular doses (AGDs), i.e., using fixed mAs, were evaluated over the limited range of 28–30 kVp. Measurements were compared with reference IC measurements for AK, reference HVLs and calculated AGD, for two compression paddle heights for AK, to evaluate scatter effects from compression paddles. SStDs may require different positioning from current mammography measurement protocols. Results: Measurements of kVp were accurate in general for the SStDs (within −1.2 and +1.1 kVp) for all instruments over a wide range of set kVp’s and TFs and most accurate for Mo/Mo and W/Rh. Discrepancies between measurements and reference values were greater for HVL and AK. Measured HVL values differed from reference values by −6.5% to +3.5% depending on the SStD and

  4. Acid-base site detection and mapping on solid surfaces by Kelvin force microscopy (KFM).

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Rubia F; Bernardes, Juliana S; Ducati, Telma R D; Galembeck, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    Electrostatic potential at the surface of acidic or basic solids changes under higher relative humidity (RH), as determined by using Kelvin force microscopy (KFM). The potential on acid surfaces becomes more negative as the water vapor pressure increases, while it becomes more positive on basic solids. These results verify the following hypothesis: OH(-) or H(+) ions associated with atmospheric water ion clusters are selectively adsorbed on solid surfaces, depending on the respective Brønsted acid or base character. Therefore, Kelvin microscopy, under variable humidity, is a rigorous but convenient alternative to determine the acid-base character of solid surfaces, with a great advantage: it uses only one amphoteric and simple reagent to determine both the acid and base sites. Moreover, this technique provides information on the spatial distribution of acid-base sites, which is currently inaccessible to any other method.

  5. Studies of nanosecond pulse surface ionization wave discharges over solid and liquid dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishchev, Vitaly; Leonov, Sergey; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-12-01

    Surface ionization wave discharges generated by high-voltage nanosecond pulses, propagating over a planar quartz surface and over liquid surfaces (distilled water and 1-butanol) have been studied in a rectangular cross section test cell. The discharge was initiated using a custom-made, alternating polarity, high-voltage nanosecond pulse plasma generator, operated at a pulse repetition rate of 100-500 Hz, with a pulse peak voltage and current of 10-15 kV and 7-20 A, respectively, a pulse FWHM of ˜100 ns, and a coupled pulse energy of 2-9 mJ/pulse. Wave speed was measured using a capacitive probe. ICCD camera images demonstrated that the ionization wave propagated predominantly over the quartz wall or over the liquid surface adjacent to the grounded waveguide placed along the bottom wall of the test cell. Under all experimental conditions tested, the surface plasma ‘sheet’ was diffuse and fairly uniform, both for positive and negative polarities. The parameters of ionization wave discharge propagating over distilled water and 1-butanol surfaces were close to those of the discharge over a quartz wall. No perturbation of the liquid surface by the discharge was detected. In most cases, the positive polarity surface ionization wave propagated at a higher speed and over a longer distance compared to the negative polarity wave. For all three sets of experiments (surface ionization wave discharge over quartz, water and 1-butanol), wave speed and travel distance decreased with pressure. Diffuse, highly reproducible surface ionization wave discharge was also observed over the liquid butanol-saturated butanol vapor interface, as well as over the distilled water-saturated water vapor interface, without buffer gas flow. No significant difference was detected between surface ionization discharges sustained using single-polarity (positive or negative), or alternating polarity high-voltage pulses. Plasma emission images yielded preliminary evidence of charge removal from the

  6. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-02-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold- coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was measured to obtain information for the minimum separation distance upon contact. Ellipsometry data for both systems were used to extract optical properties needed for the calculation of the Casimir force via the Lifshitz theory and for comparison to the experiment. Special attention is devoted to the separation of the electrostatic contribution to the measured total force. Our measurements demonstrate large contact potential V0(≈0.67 V ) , and a relatively small density of charges trapped in SiC. Knowledge of both Casimir and electrostatic forces between interacting materials is not only important from the fundamental point of view, but also for device applications involving actuating components at separations of less than 200 nm where surface forces play dominant role.

  7. Analysis of Measurements for Solid State Lidar Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    1996-01-01

    A Detector Characterization Facility (DCF), capable of measuring 2-micron detection devices and evaluating heterodyne receivers, was developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The DCF is capable of providing all the necessary detection parameters for design, development, and calibration of coherent and incoherent solid state laser radar (lidar) systems. The coherent lidars in particular require an accurate knowledge of detector heterodyne quantum efficient, nonlinearity properties, and voltage-current relationship as a function of applied optical power. At present, no detector manufacturer provides these qualities or adequately characterizes their detectors for heterodyne detection operation. In addition, the detector characterization facility measures the detectors DC and AC quantum efficiencies noise equivalent power and frequency response up to several GHz. The DCF is also capable of evaluating various heterodyne detection schemes such as balanced detectors and fiber optic interferometers. The design and analyses of measurements for the DCF were preformed over the previous year and a detailed description of its design and capabilities was provided in the NASA report NAS8-38609/DO77. It should also be noted that the DCF design was further improved to allow for the characterization of diffractive andholographical optical elements and other critical components of coherent lidar systems.

  8. Measuring densities of solids and liquids using magnetic levitation: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Mirica, Katherine A; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Phillips, Scott T; Gupta, Malancha; Whitesides, George M

    2009-07-29

    This paper describes an analytical system that uses magnetic levitation to measure densities of solids and water-immiscible organic liquids with accuracies ranging from +/-0.0002 to +/-0.02 g/cm(3), depending on the type of experiment. The technique is compatible with densities of 0.8-3 g/cm(3) and is applicable to samples with volumes of 1 pL to 1 mL; the samples can be either spherical or irregular in shape. The method employs two permanent NdFeB magnets positioned with like poles facing one another--with the axis between the poles aligned with the gravitational field--and a container filled with paramagnetic medium (e.g., MnCl(2) dissolved in water) placed between these magnets. Density measurements are obtained by placing the sample into the container and measuring the position of the sample relative to the bottom magnet. The balance of magnetic and gravitational forces determines the vertical position of the sample within the device; knowing this position makes it possible to calculate the density of the sample. PMID:19621960

  9. Measuring densities of solids and liquids using magnetic levitation: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Mirica, Katherine A; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Phillips, Scott T; Gupta, Malancha; Whitesides, George M

    2009-07-29

    This paper describes an analytical system that uses magnetic levitation to measure densities of solids and water-immiscible organic liquids with accuracies ranging from +/-0.0002 to +/-0.02 g/cm(3), depending on the type of experiment. The technique is compatible with densities of 0.8-3 g/cm(3) and is applicable to samples with volumes of 1 pL to 1 mL; the samples can be either spherical or irregular in shape. The method employs two permanent NdFeB magnets positioned with like poles facing one another--with the axis between the poles aligned with the gravitational field--and a container filled with paramagnetic medium (e.g., MnCl(2) dissolved in water) placed between these magnets. Density measurements are obtained by placing the sample into the container and measuring the position of the sample relative to the bottom magnet. The balance of magnetic and gravitational forces determines the vertical position of the sample within the device; knowing this position makes it possible to calculate the density of the sample.

  10. Measurements of slip length for flows over graphite surface with gas domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dayong; Wang, Yuliang; Pan, Yunlu; Zhao, Xuezeng

    2016-10-01

    We present the measurements of slip lengths for the flows of purified water over graphite surface covered with surface nanobubbles or nano/micropancakes, which can be produced after using high temperature water to replace low temperature water. The slip length values measured on bare graphite surface, nano/micropancake or nanobubble covered graphite surfaces are about 8 nm, 27 nm, and 63 nm, respectively. Our results indicate that the gaseous domains formed at the solid-liquid interface, including surface nanobubbles and nano/micropancakes, could act as a lubricant and significantly increase slip length.

  11. Surface acoustic BLOCH oscillations, the Wannier-Stark ladder, and Landau-Zener tunneling in a solid.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M M; Kosevich, Yu A; Santos, P V; Cantarero, A

    2010-04-23

    We present the experimental observation of Bloch oscillations, the Wannier-Stark ladder, and Landau-Zener tunneling of surface acoustic waves in perturbed grating structures on a solid substrate. A model providing a quantitative description of our experimental observations, including multiple Landau-Zener transitions of the anticrossed surface acoustic Wannier-Stark states, is developed. The use of a planar geometry for the realization of the Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling allows a direct access to the elastic field distribution. The vertical surface displacement has been measured by interferometry.

  12. Deformation Measurements of Smart Aerodynamic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Burner, Alpheus

    2005-01-01

    Video Model Deformation (VMD) and Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) were used to acquire wind tunnel model deformation measurements of the Northrop Grumman-built Smart Wing tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The F18-E/F planform Smart Wing was outfitted with embedded shape memory alloys to actuate a seamless trailing edge aileron and flap, and an embedded torque tube to generate wing twist. The VMD system was used to obtain highly accurate deformation measurements at three spanwise locations along the main body of the wing, and at spanwise locations on the flap and aileron. The PMI system was used to obtain full-field wing shape and deformation measurements over the entire wing lower surface. Although less accurate than the VMD system, the PMI system revealed deformations occurring between VMD target rows indistinguishable by VMD. This paper presents the VMD and PMI techniques and discusses their application in the Smart Wing test.

  13. On quantum effects on the surface of solid hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, V. I.

    2013-10-15

    The low-frequency spectrum of hypothetical superfluidity on the free surface of a quantum crystal of hydrogen is determined. In the quantum-rough state of the surface, crystallization waves with a quadratic spectrum should propagate. In the atomically smooth state, the spectrum is linear. Crystallization waves propagating along elementary steps are also considered.

  14. Spiral-flow apparatus for measuring permeation of solids by gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, S. M.; Williams, B. B.

    1969-01-01

    Test assembly measures the rate of permeation of a solid by a gas. Test gas is forced, under pressure, into a cylindrical plug containing the solid to be tested. Gas chromatograph detects the presence of the test gas.

  15. Surface ozone measurements using differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sohan L.; Arya, B. C.; Ghude, Sachin D.; Arora, Arun K.; Sinha, Randhir K.

    2005-01-01

    Human activities have been influencing the global atmosphere since the beginning of the industrial era, causing shifts from its natural state. The measurements have shown that tropospheric ozone is increasing gradually due to anthropogenic activities. Surface ozone is a secondary pollutant, its concentration in lower troposphere depends upon its precursors (CO, CH4, non methane hydrocarbons, NOx) as well as weather and transport phenomenon. The surface ozone exceeding the ambient air quality standard is health hazard to human being, animal and vegetation. The regular information of its concentrations on ground levels is needed for setting ambient air quality objectives and understanding photo chemical air pollution in urban areas. A Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) using a tunable CO2 laser has been designed and developed at National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi, to monitor water vapour, surface ozone, ammonia, ethylene etc. Some times ethylene and surface ozone was found to be more than 40 ppb and 140 ppb respectively which is a health hazard. Seasonal variation in ozone concentrations shows maximum in the months of summer and autumn and minimum in monsoon and winter months. In present communication salient features of experimental set up and results obtained will be presented in detail.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanodroplet spreading on solid surfaces, effect of droplet size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Nahid; Murad, Sohail; Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the spreading characteristics of nano-sized droplets on solid surfaces. The spreading behavior was analyzed in terms of the temporal evolution of the dynamic contact angle and spreading diameter for wettable, partially wettable and non-wettable surfaces. The computational model was validated through qualitative comparison with the measurements of Bayer and Megaridis, and through comparison with existing correlations. The comparison based on the ratio of relevant time scales indicated that for the conditions investigated, the spreading dynamics is governed by inertial and surface forces, with negligible influence of viscous forces. In addition, the simulation results indicated that the dynamic contact angle and spreading diameter, as well as the advancing and receding time periods, exhibit strong dependence on droplet size. These results were further analyzed to obtain correlations for the effect of droplet size on these spreading parameters. The correlations indicated that the normalized spreading diameter and contact angle scale with drop diameter as Dm /D0 ~D00.5 and θR ~D00.5, while the advancing and receding time periods scale as t~D02/3. Global kinetic energy and surface energy considerations were used to provide a physical basis for these correlations. The correlations were also found to be generally consistent with the experimentally observed spreading behavior of macroscopic droplets.

  17. Feasibility study of solid surface subreflector production techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The principal effort was to study technical feasibility and cost aspects of the production technique of spin forming a subreflector reflective surface to a desired surface of revolution, back the surface with fiberglass to stabilize it sufficiently so that it may be machined to the target surface tolerance of .008 inches Root Mean Square (RMS) with a goal of .003 inches RMS. To verify this production technique, analyses was performed to define the production procedure. A price estimate for a 150 inch diameter subreflector for a 34 meter cassegrain antenna. During this feasibility study, numerous production processes were evaluated theoretically as production approaches for single surface, non-welded subreflectors. The first successful was the principal process of spin forming the reflective surface, backing with fiberglass and machining to a final contour. The second successful process was spin forming or bump forming a thicker reflective surface, with an integral (welded in) structure as a backing and machining the mounting pads and reflector to a final configuration.

  18. A molecular dynamics simulation of a bubble nucleation on solid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Shigeo; Kimura, Tatsuto

    1999-07-01

    In order to understand the molecular level phenomena related to the phase-change heat transfer, the authors are performing molecular dynamics simulations of a liquid droplet and a vapor bubble. Since many of practical nucleation phenomena are on the solid surface, the authors are paying special attention to the effect of a solid surface. Here, a heterogeneous nucleation of a vapor bubble on a solid surface was simulated by the molecular dynamics method. Liquid argon between parallel solid surfaces was gradually expanded, until a vapor bubble was nucleated. Argon liquid was represented by 5488 Lennard-Jones molecules and each solid surface was represented by three layers of harmonic molecules with the constant temperature heat bath model using the phantom molecules out side of the three-layers. They used a quite wettable potential parameter on the top surface and changed the wettability on the bottom surface. The wettability was varied by changing the potential parameter between argon and solid molecule. After the equilibrium of liquid between two solid surfaces was obtained, they slowly expanded the surfaces. According to the increase in volume, the decrease of pressure was observed. There appeared patches of liquid where the local potential was considerably high. These patches appeared and disappeared randomly in space and time. Finally, at some point of the decrease of the pressure, one of the patches successfully grew to a vapor bubble on the bottom solid surface. Observed pressure showed the minimum at this time of the nucleation. They compared the minimum pressure for various surface potential conditions. With the increase in the surface wettability, the minimum pressure approached to the spinodal line. After the stable vapor bubble was formed on the surface, the authors stopped the expansion and observed the equilibrium structure of the vapor bubble. After averaging the two-dimensional density and potential distributions, they could define the contact angle

  19. Uncertainty in measurement of surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haitjema, Han

    2015-09-01

    The 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) roughness parameters were standardized in 2012. With their increasing use in science and industry, the request for traceability and uncertainty evaluation for these parameters follows logically. This paper gives an overview of the problems and possibilities that appear when uncertainties have to be associated with values that are derived from a measured surface topography, such as the Ra-value of a periodic specimen, the RSm value of a type-D standard, and the Sa-value of a single cutoff length of a type D standard. It is shown that straightforward implementation of the methods described in the ‘Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement’ (GUM) leads to impossible and impracticable equations because of the correlations between some millions of measurement points. A practical solution is found by considering the main aspects of uncertainty, as these are given in the recent ISO 25178 standards series, and applying these to a measured surface topography as a whole.

  20. Numerical values of the surface free energies of solid chemical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezey, L. Z.; Giber, J.

    1984-10-01

    The applicability of a 'standard table' of values of surface free energies (or enthalpies) obtained by the CCSS (complex calculation of surface segregation) method is demonstrated by comparing calculated surface-free-energy values with several recently published experimental results. The investigation (encompassing temperatures from 1023 to 2075 K) shows that a simplified variation of the second step of CCSS is applicable in the calculation of the surface free energies of polycrystalline solid elements for any temperature of interest.

  1. Subnanosecond measurements of detonation fronts in solid high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, S. A.; Bloomquist, D. D.; Tarver, C. M.

    1984-04-01

    Detonation fronts in solid high explosives have been examined through measurements of particle velocity histories resulting from the interaction of a detonation wave with a thin metal foil backed by a water window. Using a high time resolution velocity-interferometer system, experiments were conducted on three explosives—a TATB (1,3,5-triamino-trinitrobenzene)-based explosive called PBX-9502, TNT (2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene), and CP (2-{5-cyanotetrazolato} pentaamminecobalt {III} perchlorate). In all cases, detonation-front rise times were found to be less than the 300 ps resolution of the interferometer system. The thermodynamic state in the front of the detonation wave was estimated to be near the unreacted state determined from an extrapolation of low-pressure unreacted Hugoniot data for both TNT and PBX-9502 explosives. Computer calculations based on an ignition and growth model of a Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) detonation wave show good agreement with the measurements. By using the unreacted Hugoniot and a JWL equation of state for the reaction products, we estimated the initial reaction rate in the high explosive after the detonation wave front interacted with the foil to be 40 μs-1 for CP, 60 μs-1 for TNT, and 80 μs-1 for PBX-9502. The shape of the profiles indicates the reaction rate decreases as reaction proceeds.

  2. Laboratory measurements of direct ozone loss on ice and doped-ice surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory measurements were carried out to test for the possible direct loss of ozone on ice surfaces and solid solutions of nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and sodium sulfite over the temperature range 195 to 262 K. Experiments were performed in a vertical flow tube where the reactor wall was coated with the desired surface. Results indicate that loss of ozone on an ice surface is insignificant. A discussion of the possible importance of these results in the stratosphere is given.

  3. Surfactant-enhanced rapid spreading of drops on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beacham, David; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2009-11-01

    We consider the surfactant-enhanced rapid spreading of drops on solid substrates. This work is conducted in connection with the ability of aqueous trisiloxane solutions to wet effectively highly hydrophobic substrates. We use lubrication theory to derive coupled advective-diffusion equations for surfactant transport to an interface equation. This model accounts for Marangoni stresses, diffusion, intermolecular forces, basal surfactant transport, micelle formation and break-up in the bulk, and sorptive fluxes at both the gas-liquid and liquid- solid interfaces; the model also employs appropriate surfactant equations of state. Our numerical results show the effect of basal adsorption and the mass of deposited surfactant on the deformation of the droplet and its spreading rate. We demonstrate that this rate is maximised for intermediate rates of basal adsorption and total surfactant mass. We also show that for a certain range of parameter values, the spreading is accompanied by pronounced rim formation, as previously observed experimentally. The stability of this rim to transverse disturbances is briefly explored.

  4. Surface and bulk crystallization of amorphous solid water films: Confirmation of "top-down" crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chunqing; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2016-10-01

    The crystallization kinetics of nanoscale amorphous solid water (ASW) films are investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). TPD measurements are used to probe surface crystallization and RAIRS measurements are used to probe bulk crystallization. Isothermal TPD results show that surface crystallization is independent of the film thickness (from 100 to 1000 ML). Conversely, the RAIRS measurements show that the bulk crystallization time increases linearly with increasing film thickness. These results suggest that nucleation and crystallization begin at the ASW/vacuum interface and then the crystallization growth front propagates linearly into the bulk. This mechanism was confirmed by selective placement of an isotopic layer (5% D2O in H2O) at various positions in an ASW (H2O) film. In this case, the closer the isotopic layer was to the vacuum interface, the earlier the isotopic layer crystallized. These experiments provide direct evidence to confirm that ASW crystallization in vacuum proceeds by a "top-down" crystallization mechanism.

  5. Surface and bulk crystallization of amorphous solid water films: Confirmation of “top-down” crystallization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yuan, Chunqing; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2016-01-11

    Here, the crystallization kinetics of nanoscale amorphous solid water (ASW) films are investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). TPD measurements are used to probe surface crystallization and RAIRS measurements are used to probe bulk crystallization. Isothermal TPD results show that surface crystallization is independent of the film thickness (from 100 to 1000 ML). Conversely, the RAIRS measurements show that the bulk crystallization time increases linearly with increasing film thickness. These results suggest that nucleation and crystallization begin at the ASW/vacuum interface and then the crystallization growth front propagates linearly into the bulk. This mechanism wasmore » confirmed by selective placement of an isotopic layer (5% D2O in H2O) at various positions in an ASW (H2O) film. In this case, the closer the isotopic layer was to the vacuum interface, the earlier the isotopic layer crystallized. These experiments provide direct evidence to confirm that ASW crystallization in vacuum proceeds by a “top-down” crystallization mechanism.« less

  6. Measurement of suspended solids in lakes and oceans using satellite remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydor, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Using satellite remote sensing data to measure low concentrations of suspended solids in lakes and oceans requires careful evaluation of background signals from the atmosphere and the water surface. Typical background corrections for Lake Superior are presented and the spectral distribution of the residual radiance from three major categories of turbidity in the lake are determined. The results indicate that for large bodies of water, some general information on atmospheric scattering, water clarity, and the optical properties of suspended solids allows estimates of concentrations of suspended solids to within + or - 0.5 mg/L without using real time ground truth data. Under calibrated conditions the threshold detection level is 0.3 mg/L for the fine particulates dispersed throughout the lake and 1 mg/L for the highly light absorbing effluent from rivers. Comparisons of the minimum reflectance over the open lake areas with reflection from the highly absorbing tannin water from rivers provides a check on the clarity of the atmosphere and the excessive background scatter from the water surface.

  7. Intensity offset and correction of solid spectral library samples measured behind glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Redding, Rebecca L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2013-05-18

    Accurate and calibrated diffuse reflectance spectra libraries of solids are becoming more important for hyperspectral and multispectral remote sensing exploitation. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and in order to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass or quartz for the UV, visible or near-infrared spectral regions to prevent their unwanted dispersal into the instrument or laboratory environment. Using both experimental and theoretical methods we have found that for the case of fused quartz this leads to an intensity offset in the reflectance values. Although expected dispersive effects were observed for the fused quartz window in the UV, the measured hemispherical reflectance values are predominantly vertically shifted by the reflectance from the air-quartz and sample-quartz interfaces with intensity dependent offsets leading to measured values up to nearly 6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, 3.8% too high for 10% reflecting materials, approximately correct (to within experimental error) for 40% to 60% diffuse reflecting surfaces, and 2% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon surfaces. For the diffuse reflectance case, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the glass, with differences nearly 6% too high for reflectance values approaching 99%. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces as verified by theory, modeling and experiment. Empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300 nm to 2300 nm range.

  8. Angular distributions of 5eV atomic oxygen scattered from solid surfaces on the LDEF satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Peters, Palmer N.

    1992-01-01

    The angular distribution of 5eV atomic oxygen scattered off several smooth solid surfaces was measured by experiment A0114 which flew on board the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Target surfaces were silver, vitreous carbon, and lithium fluoride crystal. The apparatus was entirely passive. It used the property of silver surfaces to absorb oxygen atoms with high efficiency; the silver is converted to optically transmissive silver oxide. A collimated beam of oxygen atoms is allowed to fall on the target surface at some pre-set angle. Reflected atoms are then intercepted by a silver film placed so that it subtends a considerable solid angle from the primary beam impact on the target surface. The silver films are evaporated onto flexible optically-clear polycarbonate sheets which are scanned later to determine oxygen uptake. While the silver detector cannot measure atom velocity or energy, its physical configuration allows easy coverage of large angular space both in the beam-plane (that which includes the incident beam and the surface normal), and in the azimuthal plane of the target surface.

  9. Measurements of Water Surface Snow Lines in Classical Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blevins, Sandra M.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Banzatti, Andrea; Zhang, Ke; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.; Salyk, Colette; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep Herschel-PACS spectroscopy of far-infrared water lines from a sample of four protoplanetary disks around solar-mass stars, selected to have strong water emission at mid-infrared wavelengths. By combining the new Herschel spectra with archival Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy, we retrieve a parameterized radial surface water vapor distribution from 0.1 to 100 au using two-dimensional dust and line radiative transfer modeling. The surface water distribution is modeled with a step model composed of a constant inner and outer relative water abundance and a critical radius at which the surface water abundance is allowed to change. We find that the four disks have critical radii of ˜3-11 au, at which the surface water abundance decreases by at least 5 orders of magnitude. The measured values for the critical radius are consistently smaller than the location of the surface snow line, as predicted by the observed spectral energy distribution. This suggests that the sharp drop-off of the surface water abundance is not solely due to the local gas-solid balance, but may also be driven by the deactivation of gas-phase chemical pathways to water below 300 K. Assuming a canonical gas-to-dust ratio of 100, as well as coupled gas and dust temperatures Tgas = Tdust, the best-fit inner water abundances become implausibly high (0.01-1.0 {{{{H}}}2}-1). Conversely, a model in which the gas and dust temperatures are decoupled leads to canonical inner-disk water abundances of ˜ {10}-4 {{{H}}}2-1, while retaining gas-to-dust ratios of 100. That is, the evidence for gas-dust decoupling in disk surfaces is stronger than for enhanced gas-to-dust ratios.

  10. Surface preparation methods to enhance dynamic surface property measurements of shocked metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellner, M. B.; Vogan McNeil, W.; Gray, G. T.; Huerta, D. C.; King, N. S. P.; Neal, G. E.; Valentine, S. J.; Payton, J. R.; Rubin, J.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Buttler, W. T.

    2008-04-01

    This effort investigates surface-preparation methods to enhance dynamic surface-property measurements of shocked metal surfaces. To assess the ability of making reliable and consistent dynamic surface-property measurements, the amount of material ejected from the free surface upon shock release to vacuum (ejecta) was monitored for shocked Al-1100 and Sn targets. Four surface-preparation methods were considered: Fly-cut machine finish, diamond-turned machine finish, polished finish, and ball rolled. The samples were shock loaded by in-contact detonation of HE PBX-9501 on the front side of the metal coupons. Ejecta production at the back side or free side of the metal coupons was monitored using piezoelectric pins, optical shadowgraphy, and x-ray attenuation radiography.

  11. Effect of Paramagnetic Ions on NMR Relaxation of Fluids at Solid Surfaces

    PubMed

    Foley; Farooqui; Kleinberg

    1996-11-01

    Proton NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of water-saturated powder packs have been measured. The powders were a series of synthetic calcium silicates with known concentrations of iron or manganese paramagnetic ions. The rate of water proton relaxation has been found to be linearly proportional to the concentration of paramagnetic ion. The constant of proportionality is used to determine the electron relaxation time of ions at the fluid-solid interface. A substantial relaxivity is found in the absence of paramagnetic ions. Thus the oxide surface itself is an unexpectedly good relaxer of fluid-borne nuclear spins. The results answer some long-standing questions connected with the NMR properties of fluid-saturated sedimentary rocks.

  12. Immobilization and orientation of Photosystem I reaction centers on solid surfaces. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-20

    The overall objective of this project was to test the potential for immobilization and orientation of Photosystem I reaction center protein on solid surfaces. In order to maximize the resources available for this work, bleomycin complexes were used as a test substrate. The reaction of [(H{sub 2}O)(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}Ru{sup II}]{sup 2+} with bleomycin forms at least two stable products following oxidation to the Ru(III) analog. Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements indicate monodentate binding of [(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}Ru{sup III}] to the imidazole and pyrimidine moieties, with coordination to the latter involving the exocyclic amine nitrogen. DNA cleavage studies show the complexes to be ineffective in DNA strand scission.

  13. Microalgae Scatter off Solid Surfaces by Hydrodynamic and Contact Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contino, Matteo; Lushi, Enkeleida; Tuval, Idan; Kantsler, Vasily; Polin, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Interactions between microorganisms and solid boundaries play an important role in biological processes, such as egg fertilization, biofilm formation, and soil colonization, where microswimmers move within a structured environment. Despite recent efforts to understand their origin, it is not clear whether these interactions can be understood as being fundamentally of hydrodynamic origin or hinging on the swimmer's direct contact with the obstacle. Using a combination of experiments and simulations, here we study in detail the interaction of the biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, widely used as a model puller microorganism, with convex obstacles, a geometry ideally suited to highlight the different roles of steric and hydrodynamic effects. Our results reveal that both kinds of forces are crucial for the correct description of the interaction of this class of flagellated microorganisms with boundaries.

  14. Rotational rainbows in diatom(solid) surface scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Schinke, R.

    1982-03-01

    Performing the classical limit of the coordinate-representation-sudden approximation of Gerber et al. (J. Chem. Phys. 73, 4397 (1980)), we discuss rainbow effects in diatom-surface scattering. Under special conditions, which are stated in this article, rainbows can be classified into surface rainbows and rotational rainbows. The latter are expected to be common features of diatom-surface scattering provided: (i) the collision is impulsive and (ii) many rotational states are energetically open. Simple analytic expressions for the rainbow states are derived using a repulsive model potential and the dependence on collision and potential parameters is discussed. The predictions are all substantiated by calculations performed within the sudden approximation and using this model potential.

  15. Seasonal slope surface deformation measured with TLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, L.; Smethurst, J.; Powrie, W.; Sellaiya, A.

    2014-03-01

    In temperate European climates, soil water removal due to vegetation transpiration peaks in summer and soil rewetting from higher levels of precipitation occurs in winter. In clays of high plasticity, the seasonal cycles of drying and wetting cause the soil to experience a volumetric change, resulting in seasonal shrinking and swelling. For a clay slope exhibiting volume change, such behaviour can lead to excessive deformation and could contribute to strain-softening and progressive slope failure. This can in turn cause traffic disruption and loss of life if roads and railways are founded on or surrounded by such slopes. This paper discusses the driving forces of seasonal surface movement, in particular the role of vegetation, and presents the use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to measure the surface movement of a lightly vegetated London Clay slope near Newbury, UK. Two TLS scans were carried out in early and late summer respectively, representing relative wet and dry conditions of the slope. Continuous field measurements of soil water content in upper layers of the slope were obtained from TDR ThetaProbes already installed at the site. The water content data are used to support the results obtained from TLS by indicating the likely volumetric change in the soil due to loss of water.

  16. Physics of solid and liquid alkali halide surfaces near the melting point.

    PubMed

    Zykova-Timan, T; Ceresoli, D; Tartaglino, U; Tosatti, E

    2005-10-22

    This paper presents a broad theoretical and simulation study of the high-temperature behavior of crystalline alkali halide surfaces typified by NaCl(100), of the liquid NaCl surface near freezing, and of the very unusual partial wetting of the solid surface by the melt. Simulations are conducted using two-body rigid-ion Born-Mayer-Huggins-Fumi-Tosi (BMHFT) potentials, with full treatment of long-range Coulomb forces. After a preliminary check of the description of bulk NaCl provided by these potentials, which seems generally good even at the melting point, we carry out a new investigation of solid and liquid surfaces. Solid NaCl(100) is found in this model to be very anharmonic and yet exceptionally stable when hot. It is predicted by a thermodynamic integration calculation of the surface free energy that NaCl(100) should be a well-ordered, nonmelting surface, metastable even well above the melting point. By contrast, the simulated liquid NaCl surface is found to exhibit large thermal fluctuations and no layering order. In spite of that, it is shown to possess a relatively large surface free energy. The latter is traced to a surface entropy deficit, reflecting some kind of surface short-range order. We show that the surface short-range order is most likely caused by the continuous transition of the bulk ionic melt into the vapor, made of NaCl molecules and dimers rather than of single ions. Finally, the solid-liquid interface free energy is derived through Young's equation from direct simulation of partial wetting of NaCl(100) by a liquid droplet. The resulting interface free energy is large, in line with the conspicuous solid-liquid 27% density difference. A partial wetting angle near 50 degrees close to the experimental value of 48 degrees is obtained in the process. It is concluded that three elements, namely, the exceptional anharmonic stability of the solid (100) surface, the molecular short-range order at the liquid surface, and the costly solid

  17. Genesis of femtosecond-induced nanostructures on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Varlamova, Olga; Martens, Christian; Ratzke, Markus; Reif, Juergen

    2014-11-01

    The start and evolution of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS, ripples) are investigated. The important role of irradiation dose (fluence×number of pulses) for the properties of the generated structures is demonstrated. It is shown how, with an increasing dose, the structures evolve from random surface modification to regular sub-wavelength ripples, then coalesce to broader LIPSS and finally form more complex shapes when ablation produces deep craters. First experiments are presented following this evolution in one single irradiated spot. PMID:25402932

  18. Preface: Special Topic Section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Angelos; Martinez, Todd J.; Alavi, Ali; Kresse, Georg

    2015-09-14

    This Special Topic section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces contains a collection of research papers that showcase recent advances in the high accuracy prediction of materials and surface properties. It provides a timely snapshot of a growing field that is of broad importance to chemistry, physics, and materials science.

  19. Boronic acid as an efficient anchor group for surface modification of solid polyvinyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Nishiyabu, Ryuhei; Shimizu, Ai

    2016-07-28

    We report the use of boronic acid as an anchor group for surface modification of solid polyvinyl alcohol (PVA); the surfaces of PVA microparticles, films, and nanofibers were chemically modified with boronic acid-appended fluorescent dyes through boronate esterification using a simple soaking technique in a short time under ambient conditions. PMID:27311634

  20. Improved method of measuring pressure coupled response for composite solid propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wanxing; Wang, Ningfei; Li, Junwei; Zhao, Yandong; Yan, Mi

    2014-04-01

    Pressure coupled response is one of the main causes of combustion instability in the solid rocket motor. It is also a characteristic parameter for predicting the stability. The pressure coupled response function is usually measured by different methods to evaluate the performance of new propellant. Based on T-burner and "burning surface doubled and secondary attenuation", an improved method for measuring the pressure coupled response of composite propellant is introduced in this article. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study has also been conducted to validate the method and to understand the pressure oscillation phenomenon in T-burner. Three rounds of tests were carried out on the same batch of aluminized AP/HTPB composite solid propellant. The experimental results show that the sample propellant had a high response function under the conditions of high pressure (~11.5 MPa) and low frequency (~140 Hz). The numerically predicted oscillation frequency and amplitude are consistent with the experimental results. One practical solid rocket motor using this sample propellant was found to experience pressure oscillation at the end of burning. This confirms that the sample propellant is prone to combustion instability. Finally, acoustic pressure distribution and phase difference in T-burner were analyzed. Both the experimental and numerical results are found to be associated with similar acoustic pressure distribution. And the phase difference analysis showed that the pressure oscillations at the head end of the T-burner are 180° out of phase from those in the aft end of the T-burner.

  1. The Scattering of Gas Atoms from Solid Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1977-01-01

    Traditional undergraduate courses in gas kinetic theory encourage the view that in all collisions between a gas atom and a surface, the angle of incidence of the gas atom equals its angle of reflection. This article illustrates and explains the incorrectness in assuming specular reflection and zero dwell time. (Author/MA)

  2. Hydroxyapatite synthesis on solid surfaces using a biological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Mei, J.; Tse, Y. Y.; Jones, I. P.; Sammons, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    Many naturally occurring mineralisation processes yield hydroxyapatite (HA) or related salts, but biological routes to calcification have not generally been exploited for production of hydroxyapatite for clinical and industrial applications. Serratia sp. NCIMB 40259 is a non-pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium which is capable of growing as a biofilm on many surfaces and can be used to form HA coatings on a variety of polymeric and metallic materials, including titanium. Here we review previous work and report the results of more recent studies on the influence of titanium compositional and surface properties on Serratia adherence and proliferation and biomineralisation on commercially pure titanium (cp Ti) discs and a Ti mesh. Bacterial adherence was equivalent on cpTi and Ti6Al4V, and biofilms formed on both rough and mirror-polished cpTi surfaces. Embedded alumina particles and alkali treatment did not noticeably alter the precipitation of Serratia HA, nor the structure of the coating in comparison with non-treated substrates. Coatings were retained after sintering at 800°C in argon, although the original curved plate-like crystals changed to nano-scale β-tricalcium phosphate particles. A phosphorous-rich diffusion zone formed at the coating-titanium interface. Bacterial mineralisation may have applications as a method for producing coatings on implants in non load-bearing sites, and non-clinical applications where a high surface area is the major concern.

  3. Metal halide solid-state surface treatment for nanocrystal materials

    DOEpatents

    Luther, Joseph M.; Crisp, Ryan; Beard, Matthew C.

    2016-04-26

    Methods of treating nanocrystal and/or quantum dot devices are described. The methods include contacting the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots with a solution including metal ions and halogen ions, such that the solution displaces native ligands present on the surface of the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots via ligand exchange.

  4. Dry layer formation? Solvent polarity at hydrophobic solid-liquid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Robert; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Esenturk, Okan

    2002-03-01

    From low-wear, "friction-free" materials to reverse phase chromatography columns to specific protein domains, hydrophobic surfaces are ubiquitous in physics, chemistry and biology. Our efforts to understand how hydrophobic surfaces influence the solvating properties of an adjacent solvent have led us to investigate solvent polarity at a number of weakly associating, solid-liquid interfaces. Second-order nonlinear optical spectroscopy enables experiments to probe the solvent-sensitive excitation energies of adsorbed probe molecules. Comparisons to probe behavior in bulk solution allow us to infer how hydrophobic surfaces have altered properties inside of the solute cavity. Boundaries formed between hydrophobic surfaces and associating or hydrogen bonding solvents show significantly reduced solvent polarity, consistent with proposed models of dry-layer formation. Polar, aprotic liquid-hydrophobic solid interfaces show no evidence of this effect. We can understand this behavior based on the relative imbalance in forces between the solid and liquid phases.

  5. Thermocapillary motion of a liquid drop on a horizontal solid surface.

    PubMed

    Pratap, Vikram; Moumen, Nadjoua; Subramanian, R Shankar

    2008-05-01

    The motion of drops of decane on horizontal poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-coated glass surfaces resulting from a temperature gradient on the surface is studied experimentally, and a theoretical description of the thermocapillary motion of spherical-cap drops on a horizontal solid surface obtained using the lubrication approximation also is presented. The drop size and the applied temperature gradient are varied in the experiments, and the measured velocities of the drops are compared with predictions from the model. The scalings of the velocity with drop size and with the applied temperature gradient are predicted correctly by the theoretical model, even though the actual velocities are smaller than those predicted. The influence of contact angle hysteresis, which leads to a critical drop size below which drops do not move, is found to be minimal. Unlike in previous studies (Chen, J. Z.; Troian, S. M.; Darhuber, A. A.; Wagner, S. J. Appl. Phys. 2005, 97, 014906; Brzoska, J. B.; Brochard-Wyart, F.; Rondelez, F. Langmuir 1993, 9, 2220), this small critical drop size appears to be independent of the applied temperature gradient. Results also are presented on the deformation of the contact lines of the moving drops in the form of an aspect ratio, and correlated with the temperature difference across the footprints of the drops and the capillary number. PMID:18399689

  6. Does filler surface chemistry impact filler dispersion, polymer dynamics and conductivity in nanofilled solid polymer electrolytes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapatibhotla, Lalitha; Maranas, Janna

    2012-02-01

    We study the impact of nanofiller surface chemistry on filler dispersion, polymer dynamics and ionic conductivity in acidic α-Al2O3 filled PEO+LiClO4 solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs).SPEs are the key to light-weight and high energy density rechargeable Li ion batteries but suffer from low room temperature ionic conductivity. Addition of ceramic nanofillers improves conductivity of SPEs and their surface chemistry influences extent of conductivity enhancement. The ionic conductivity of acidic α-Al2O3 filled SPE is enhanced for salt concentrations at and below eutectic, while neutral γ-Al2O3 filler enhances conductivity only at eutectic composition. Li ion motion is coupled to segmental mobility of polymer and we study how this is affected by addition of α-Al2O3 using quasi-elastic neutron scattering. Aggregation extent of nanoparticles in SPE matrix, a less explored factor in filled SPEs, can affect segmental mobility of polymer. This can vary with surface chemistry of particles and we quantify this using small angle neutron scattering. All measurements are performed as a function of Li concentration, nanoparticle loading and temperature.

  7. Interferometer Development for Study of Interactions between Flames on Parallel Solid Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldmeer, J. S.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z. G.

    1999-01-01

    The interactions between flames spreading over parallel solid sheets of paper are being studied in normal gravity and in microgravity. This geometry provides interesting opportunities to study the interaction of radiative and diffusive transport mechanisms on the spread process. These transport mechanisms are changed when the flame interacts with other flames. Most practical heterogeneous combustion processes involve interacting discrete burning fuel elements, consequently, the study of these interactions is of practical significance. Owing largely to this practical importance, flame interactions have been an area of active research, however microgravity research has been largely limited to droplets. Consideration of flame spread over parallel solid surfaces has been limited to 1-g studies. To study the conductive transport in these flames, an interferometer system has been developed for use in the drop tower. The system takes advantage of a single beam interferometer: Point Diffraction Interferometry (PDI) which uses a portion of the light through the test section to provide the reference beam. Like other interferometric and Schlieren systems, it is a line of sight measurement and is subject to the usual edge and concentration effects. The advantage over Schlieren and shearing interferometry systems is that the fringes are lines of constant index of refraction rather than of its gradient so the images are more readily interpreted. The disadvantage is that it is less able to accommodate a range of temperature gradients.

  8. Evaluation of the measurement uncertainty when measuring the resistance of solid isolating materials to tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stare, E.; Beges, G.; Drnovsek, J.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the results of research into the measurement of the resistance of solid isolating materials to tracking. Two types of tracking were investigated: the proof tracking index (PTI) and the comparative tracking index (CTI). Evaluation of the measurement uncertainty in a case study was performed using a test method in accordance with the IEC 60112 standard. In the scope of the tests performed here, this particular test method was used to ensure the safety of electrical appliances. According to the EN ISO/IEC 17025 standard (EN ISO/IEC 17025), in the process of conformity assessment, the evaluation of the measurement uncertainty of the test method should be carried out. In the present article, possible influential parameters that are in accordance with the third and fourth editions of the standard IEC 60112 are discussed. The differences, ambiguities or lack of guidance referring to both editions of the standard are described in the article 'Ambiguities in technical standards—case study IEC 60112—measuring the resistance of solid isolating materials to tracking' (submitted for publication). Several hundred measurements were taken in the present experiments in order to form the basis for the results and conclusions presented. A specific problem of the test (according to the IEC 60112 standard) is the great variety of influential physical parameters (mechanical, electrical, chemical, etc) that can affect the results. At the end of the present article therefore, there is a histogram containing information on the contributions to the measurement uncertainty.

  9. Test data from small solid propellant rocket motor plume measurements (FA-21)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.; Somers, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A program is described for obtaining a reliable, parametric set of measurements in the exhaust plumes of solid propellant rocket motors. Plume measurements included pressures, temperatures, forces, heat transfer rates, particle sampling, and high-speed movies. Approximately 210,000 digital data points and 15,000 movie frames were acquired. Measurements were made at points in the plumes via rake-mounted probes, and on the surface of a large plate impinged by the exhaust plume. Parametric variations were made in pressure altitude, propellant aluminum loading, impinged plate incidence angle and distance from nozzle exit to plate or rake. Reliability was incorporated by continual use of repeat runs. The test setup of the various hardware items is described along with an account of test procedures. Test results and data accuracy are discussed. Format of the data presentation is detailed. Complete data are included in the appendix.

  10. Free-Surface Optical Scattering as an Indicator of the Shock-Induced Solid-Liquid Phase Transition in Tin

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G. D.; Lutz, S. S.; Marshall, B. R.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Furlanetto, M. R.; Hixson, R. S.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Jensen, B. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Wilke, M. D.

    2008-07-01

    When highly polished metal surfaces melt upon release after shock loading, they exhibit features that suggest significant surface changes accompany the phase transition. The reflection of light from such surfaces changes from specular (pre-shock) to diffuse upon melting. A familiar manifestation of this phenomenon is the loss of signal light in VISAR measurements, which occurs at pressures high enough to melt the free surface. Unlike many other potential material phase-sensitive diagnostics (e.g., reflectometry, conductivity) that show relatively small (1%–10%) changes, the specularity of reflection provides a more sensitive and definitive indication of the solid-liquid phase transition. Data will be presented that support the hypothesis that specularity changes indicate melt in a way that can be measured easily and unambiguously.

  11. Contact Angle of Drops Measured on Nontransparent Surfaces and Capillary Flow Visualized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2003-01-01

    The spreading of a liquid on a solid surface is important for various practical processes, and contact-angle measurements provide an elegant method to characterize the interfacial properties of the liquid with the solid substrates. The complex physical processes occurring when a liquid contacts a solid play an important role in determining the performance of chemical processes and materials. Applications for these processes are in printing, coating, gluing, textile dyeing, and adhesives and in the pharmaceutical industry, biomedical research, adhesives, flat panel display manufacturing, surfactant chemistry, and thermal engineering.

  12. A combined streaming-potential optical reflectometer for studying adsorption at the water/solid surface.

    PubMed

    Theodoly, O; Cascão-Pereira, L; Bergeron, V; Radke, C J

    2005-10-25

    A novel in-situ streaming-potential optical reflectometry apparatus (SPOR) was constructed and utilized to probe the molecular architecture of aqueous adsorbates on a negatively charged silica surface. By combining optical reflectometry and electrokinetic streaming potentials, we measure simultaneously the adsorption density, gamma, and zeta potential, zeta, in a rectangular flow cell constructed with one transparent wall. Both dynamic and equilibrium measurements are possible, allowing the study of sorption kinetics and reversibility. Using SPOR, we investigate the adsorption of a classic nonionic surfactant (pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, C12E5), a simple cationic surfactant (hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) of opposite charge to that of the substrate surface, and two cationic polyelectrolytes (poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate), PDAEMA; (poly(propyl methacrylate) trimethylammonium chloride, MAPTAC). For the polyethylene oxide nonionic surfactant, bilayer adsorption is established above the critical micelle concentration (cmc) both from the adsorption amounts and from the interpretation of the observed zeta potentials. Near adsorption saturation, CTAB also forms bilayer structures on silica. Here, however, we observe a strong charge reversal of the surface. The SPOR data, along with Gouy-Chapman theory, permit assessment of the net ionization fraction of the CTAB bilayer at 10% so that most of the adsorbed CTAB molecules are counterion complexed. The adsorption of both C12E5 and CTAB is reversible. The adsorption of the cationic polymers, however, is completely irreversible to a solvent wash. As with CTAB, both PDAEMA and MAPTAC demonstrate strong charge reversal. For the polyelectrolyte molecules, however, the adsorbed layer is thin and flat. Here also, a Gouy-Chapman analysis shows that less than 20% of the adsorbed layer is ionized. Furthermore, the amount of charge reversal is inversely proportional to the Debye length in agreement

  13. Predicting second gas-solid virial coefficients using calculated molecular properties on various carbon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rybolt, Thomas R; Janeksela, Vanessa E; Hooper, Dana N; Thomas, Howard E; Carrington, Nathan A; Williamson, Eric J

    2004-04-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to obtain values of the second gas-solid virial coefficient, B2s, in the temperature range from 343 to 493 K for seven adsorbate gases: methane, ethane, propane, chloromethane, chlorodifluoromethane, dimethyl ether, and sulfur hexafluoride. Carboxen-1000, a 1200 m2/g carbon molecular sieve (Supelco Inc.), was used as the adsorbent. These data were combined with earlier work to make a combined data set of 36 different adsorbate gases variously interacting with from one to four different carbon surfaces. All B2s values were extrapolated to 403 K to create a set of 65 different gas-solid B2s values at a fixed temperature. The B2s value for a given gas-solid system can be converted to a chromatographic retention time at any desired flow rate and can be converted to the amount of gas adsorbed at any pressure in the low-coverage, Henry's law region. Beginning with a theoretical equation for the second gas-solid virial coefficient, various quantitative structure retention relations (QSRR) were developed and used to correlate the B2s values for different gas adsorbates with different carbon surfaces. Two calculated adsorbate molecular parameters (molar refractivity and connectivity index), when combined with two adsorbent parameters (surface area and a surface energy contribution to the gas-solid interaction), provided an effective correlation (r2 = 0.952) of the 65 different B2s values. The two surface parameters provided a simple yet useful representation of the structure and energy of the carbon surfaces and thus our correlations considered variation in both the adsorbate gas and the adsorbent solid.

  14. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    The number and chemical identity of reactive sites on surfaces of glass affects the processing, reliability, and lifetime of a number of important commercial products. Surface site densities, distributions, and structural identities are closely tied to the formation and processing of the glass surface, and exert a direct influence on strength and coating performance. The surface of a glass sample may vary markedly from the composition and chemistry of the bulk glass. We are taking a physicochemical approach to understanding adsorption sites on pristine multicomponent glass fibers surfaces, directly addressing the effect of processing on surface reactivity. This project aimed to understand the energy distributions of surface adsorption sites, the chemical/structural identity of those sites, and the relationship of these glasses to glass composition, thermal history, and in future work, surface coatings. We have studied the bulk and surface structure as well as the surface reactivity of the glass fibers with solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, inverse gas chromatography (IGC), and computational chemistry methods. These methods, solid-state NMR and IGC, typically require high surface area materials; however, by using probe molecules for NMR experiments or packing a column at high density for IGC measurements, lower surface area materials, such as glass fibers, can be investigated. The glasses used within this study were chosen as representative specimens of fibers with potentially different reactive sites on their surfaces. The two glass compositions were centered around a nominal E-glass, which contains very little alkali cations and mainly alkaline earth cations, and wool glass, which contains an abundance of alkali cations. The concentration of boron was varied from 0 to 8 mole % in both fiber compositions. Fibers were drawn from each composition at a variety of temperatures and draw speeds to provide a range of glass samples with varying

  15. Measurement and modeling on hydrodynamic forces and deformation of an air bubble approaching a solid sphere in liquids.

    PubMed

    Shahalami, Mansoureh; Wang, Louxiang; Wu, Chu; Masliyah, Jacob H; Xu, Zhenghe; Chan, Derek Y C

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between bubbles and solid surfaces is central to a broad range of industrial and biological processes. Various experimental techniques have been developed to measure the interactions of bubbles approaching solids in a liquid. A main challenge is to accurately and reliably control the relative motion over a wide range of hydrodynamic conditions and at the same time to determine the interaction forces, bubble-solid separation and bubble deformation. Existing experimental methods are able to focus only on one of the aspects of this problem, mostly for bubbles and particles with characteristic dimensions either below 100 μm or above 1 cm. As a result, either the interfacial deformations are measured directly with the forces being inferred from a model, or the forces are measured directly with the deformations to be deduced from the theory. The recently developed integrated thin film drainage apparatus (ITFDA) filled the gap of intermediate bubble/particle size ranges that are commonly encountered in mineral and oil recovery applications. Equipped with side-view digital cameras along with a bimorph cantilever as force sensor and speaker diaphragm as the driver for bubble to approach a solid sphere, the ITFDA has the capacity to measure simultaneously and independently the forces and interfacial deformations as a bubble approaches a solid sphere in a liquid. Coupled with the thin liquid film drainage modeling, the ITFDA measurement allows the critical role of surface tension, fluid viscosity and bubble approach speed in determining bubble deformation (profile) and hydrodynamic forces to be elucidated. Here we compare the available methods of studying bubble-solid interactions and demonstrate unique features and advantages of the ITFDA for measuring both forces and bubble deformations in systems of Reynolds numbers as high as 10. The consistency and accuracy of such measurement are tested against the well established Stokes-Reynolds-Young-Laplace model

  16. Measurement and modeling on hydrodynamic forces and deformation of an air bubble approaching a solid sphere in liquids.

    PubMed

    Shahalami, Mansoureh; Wang, Louxiang; Wu, Chu; Masliyah, Jacob H; Xu, Zhenghe; Chan, Derek Y C

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between bubbles and solid surfaces is central to a broad range of industrial and biological processes. Various experimental techniques have been developed to measure the interactions of bubbles approaching solids in a liquid. A main challenge is to accurately and reliably control the relative motion over a wide range of hydrodynamic conditions and at the same time to determine the interaction forces, bubble-solid separation and bubble deformation. Existing experimental methods are able to focus only on one of the aspects of this problem, mostly for bubbles and particles with characteristic dimensions either below 100 μm or above 1 cm. As a result, either the interfacial deformations are measured directly with the forces being inferred from a model, or the forces are measured directly with the deformations to be deduced from the theory. The recently developed integrated thin film drainage apparatus (ITFDA) filled the gap of intermediate bubble/particle size ranges that are commonly encountered in mineral and oil recovery applications. Equipped with side-view digital cameras along with a bimorph cantilever as force sensor and speaker diaphragm as the driver for bubble to approach a solid sphere, the ITFDA has the capacity to measure simultaneously and independently the forces and interfacial deformations as a bubble approaches a solid sphere in a liquid. Coupled with the thin liquid film drainage modeling, the ITFDA measurement allows the critical role of surface tension, fluid viscosity and bubble approach speed in determining bubble deformation (profile) and hydrodynamic forces to be elucidated. Here we compare the available methods of studying bubble-solid interactions and demonstrate unique features and advantages of the ITFDA for measuring both forces and bubble deformations in systems of Reynolds numbers as high as 10. The consistency and accuracy of such measurement are tested against the well established Stokes-Reynolds-Young-Laplace model

  17. Modifying zirconia solid electrolyte surface property to enhance oxide transport

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, B.Y.; Song, S.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper oxide (Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}, BSCCO) is known for its high T{sub c} superconducting behavior and mixed conducting property. The applicability of similar high T{sub c} cuprates for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application has been studied recently. We investigated the electrochemical behavior of several Ag{vert_bar}BSCCO{vert_bar}10 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ){vert_bar}Ag and Ag{vert_bar}YSZ{vert_bar}Ag cells using complex impedance spectroscopy. A highly uniform and porous microstructure was observed at the interface of the YSZ and BSCCO. The ionic conductivity determined from the Nyquest plots in the temperature range of 200-700{degrees}C agrees with the values reported in the literature. The specific resistance of the BSCCO{vert_bar}YSZ interface was also determined to be lower than those of the conventional manganite electrode, suggesting that BSCCO seems attractive for cathode applications in SOFC.

  18. Segregation of salt ions at amorphous solid and liquid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hofft, Oliver; Kahnert, Uwe; Bahr, S.; Kempter, Volker; Jungwirth, Pavel; Dang, Liem X.

    2007-08-01

    Traditionally, the surfaces of aqueous electrolytes are described as inactive and practically devoid of ions [1, 2]. Indeed, this has turned out to be true for non - polarizable ions, as alkali cations and small anions, as fluoride as well. However, due to polarization interactions singly charged anions, with the heavy halides as particular examples, exhibit a propensity for the water / air (vacuum) interface. This was first suggested in order to rationalize the occurrence of chemical reactions on aqueous interfaces, sea - salt particles, ocean surfaces etc. This initiated MD calculations using polarizable potentials. They suggest that highly polarisable anions can indeed be preferentially adsorbed at the outermost liquid layer. In this description, the ions are polarized by the anisotropy of the interface, creating an induced dipole that is stronger than in the bulk. The interaction between the polarized ions and the surrounding water molecules compensates for the reduced solvation available at the surface. This has triggered a number of laboratory studies, applying mainly non - linear optical probes. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy.

  19. Capillarity of soft amorphous solids: a microscopic model for surface stress.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Joost H; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Andreotti, Bruno

    2014-04-01

    The elastic deformation of a soft solid induced by capillary forces crucially relies on the excess stress inside the solid-liquid interface. While for a liquid-liquid interface this "surface stress" is strictly identical to the "surface free energy," the thermodynamic Shuttleworth equation implies that this is no longer the case when one of the phases is elastic. Here we develop a microscopic model that incorporates enthalpic interactions and entropic elasticity, based on which we explicitly compute as the surface stress and surface free energy. It is found that the compressibility of the interfacial region, through the Poisson ratio near the interface, determines the difference between surface stress and surface energy. We highlight the consequence of this finding by comparing with recent experiments and simulations on partially wetted soft substrates. PMID:24827261

  20. Passive manipulation of free-surface instability by deformable solid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Shivam; Shankar, V

    2016-07-01

    This study deals with the elastohydrodynamic coupling that occurs in the flow of a liquid layer down an inclined plane lined with a deformable solid bilayer and its consequences on the stability of the free surface of the liquid layer. The fluid is Newtonian and incompressible, while the linear elastic constitutive relation has been considered for the deformable solid bilayer, and the densities of the fluid and the two solids are kept equal. A temporal linear stability analysis is carried out for this coupled solid-fluid system. A long-wave asymptotic analysis is employed to obtain an analytical expression for the complex wavespeed in the low wave-number regime, and a numerical shooting method is used to solve the coupled set of governing differential equations in order to obtain the stability criterion for arbitrary values of the wave number. In a previous work on plane Couette flow past an elastic bilayer, Neelmegam et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 043004 (2014)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.90.043004] showed that the instability of the flow can be significantly influenced by the nature of the solid layer, which is adjacent to the liquid layer. In stark contrast, for free-surface flow past a bilayer, our long-wave asymptotic analysis demonstrates that the stability of the free-surface mode is insensitive to the nature of the solid adjacent to the liquid layer. Instead, it is the effective shear modulus of the bilayer G_{eff} (given by H/G_{eff}=H_{1}/G_{1}+H_{2}/G_{2}, where H=H_{1}+H_{2} is the total thickness of the solid bilayer, H_{1} and H_{2} are the thicknesses of the two solid layers, and G_{1} and G_{2} are the shear moduli of the two solid layers) that determines the stability of the free surface in the long-wave limit. We show that for a given Reynolds number, the free-surface instability is stabilized when G_{eff} decreases below a critical value. At finite wave numbers, our numerical solution indicates that additional instabilities at the free surface and

  1. Passive manipulation of free-surface instability by deformable solid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Shivam; Shankar, V.

    2016-07-01

    This study deals with the elastohydrodynamic coupling that occurs in the flow of a liquid layer down an inclined plane lined with a deformable solid bilayer and its consequences on the stability of the free surface of the liquid layer. The fluid is Newtonian and incompressible, while the linear elastic constitutive relation has been considered for the deformable solid bilayer, and the densities of the fluid and the two solids are kept equal. A temporal linear stability analysis is carried out for this coupled solid-fluid system. A long-wave asymptotic analysis is employed to obtain an analytical expression for the complex wavespeed in the low wave-number regime, and a numerical shooting method is used to solve the coupled set of governing differential equations in order to obtain the stability criterion for arbitrary values of the wave number. In a previous work on plane Couette flow past an elastic bilayer, Neelmegam et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 043004 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.043004] showed that the instability of the flow can be significantly influenced by the nature of the solid layer, which is adjacent to the liquid layer. In stark contrast, for free-surface flow past a bilayer, our long-wave asymptotic analysis demonstrates that the stability of the free-surface mode is insensitive to the nature of the solid adjacent to the liquid layer. Instead, it is the effective shear modulus of the bilayer Geff (given by H /Geff=H1/G1+H2/G2 , where H =H1+H2 is the total thickness of the solid bilayer, H1 and H2 are the thicknesses of the two solid layers, and G1 and G2 are the shear moduli of the two solid layers) that determines the stability of the free surface in the long-wave limit. We show that for a given Reynolds number, the free-surface instability is stabilized when Geff decreases below a critical value. At finite wave numbers, our numerical solution indicates that additional instabilities at the free surface and the liquid-solid interface can be induced by wall

  2. Passive manipulation of free-surface instability by deformable solid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Shivam; Shankar, V

    2016-07-01

    This study deals with the elastohydrodynamic coupling that occurs in the flow of a liquid layer down an inclined plane lined with a deformable solid bilayer and its consequences on the stability of the free surface of the liquid layer. The fluid is Newtonian and incompressible, while the linear elastic constitutive relation has been considered for the deformable solid bilayer, and the densities of the fluid and the two solids are kept equal. A temporal linear stability analysis is carried out for this coupled solid-fluid system. A long-wave asymptotic analysis is employed to obtain an analytical expression for the complex wavespeed in the low wave-number regime, and a numerical shooting method is used to solve the coupled set of governing differential equations in order to obtain the stability criterion for arbitrary values of the wave number. In a previous work on plane Couette flow past an elastic bilayer, Neelmegam et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 043004 (2014)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.90.043004] showed that the instability of the flow can be significantly influenced by the nature of the solid layer, which is adjacent to the liquid layer. In stark contrast, for free-surface flow past a bilayer, our long-wave asymptotic analysis demonstrates that the stability of the free-surface mode is insensitive to the nature of the solid adjacent to the liquid layer. Instead, it is the effective shear modulus of the bilayer G_{eff} (given by H/G_{eff}=H_{1}/G_{1}+H_{2}/G_{2}, where H=H_{1}+H_{2} is the total thickness of the solid bilayer, H_{1} and H_{2} are the thicknesses of the two solid layers, and G_{1} and G_{2} are the shear moduli of the two solid layers) that determines the stability of the free surface in the long-wave limit. We show that for a given Reynolds number, the free-surface instability is stabilized when G_{eff} decreases below a critical value. At finite wave numbers, our numerical solution indicates that additional instabilities at the free surface and

  3. Thermodynamic, kinetic and conformational analysis of proteins diffusion-sorption on a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Sanfeld, Albert; Royer, Catherine; Steinchen, Annie

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we examine particularly some of the more fundamental properties of protein conformational changes at a solid surface coupled with diffusion from the bulk of an aqueous solution and with the adsorption-desorption processes. We focus our attention on adsorbed protein monolayers upon a solid surface using a thermodynamic and kinetic analytical development. Account is also taken of the effects on the overall rate of the conformational change on a solid surface of deviation from ideality, of protein flexibility, of surface free energy and of interaction with reactive solid sites. Our theory applied to steady states is illustrated by examples such as folding-misfolding-unfolding of RNase and SNase on a solid surface after diffusion and adsorption from an aqueous solution. For this purpose, we put forward the determining steps which shall lead to the steady state. The existence of three situations is highlighted according to the values of the typical constants relevant for the protein considered: reaction rate determining step, diffusion and sorption determining steps, mixed adsorption diffusion and reaction rate. Finally, we have tried to link the developments of our theories to a large literature based on experimental results encountered during proteins diffusion-sorption-reaction processes, fundamental topics that has been since long investigated by Miller's team in MPKG.

  4. Quadrotor helicopter for surface hydrological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, C.; Tauro, F.; Porfiri, M.; Grimaldi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Surface hydrological measurements are typically performed through user-assisted and intrusive field methodologies which can be inadequate to monitor remote and extended areas. In this poster, we present the design and development of a quadrotor helicopter equipped with digital acquisition system and image calibration units for surface flow measurements. This custom-built aerial vehicle is engineered to be lightweight, low-cost, highly customizable, and stable to guarantee optimal image quality. Quadricopter stability guarantees minimal vibrations during image acquisition and, therefore, improved accuracy in flow velocity estimation through large scale particle image velocimetry algorithms or particle tracking procedures. Stability during the vehicle pitching and rolling is achieved by adopting large arm span and high-wing configurations. Further, the vehicle framework is composed of lightweight aluminum and durable carbon fiber for optimal resilience. The open source Ardupilot microcontroller is used for remote control of the quadricopter. The microcontroller includes an inertial measurement unit (IMU) equipped with accelerometers and gyroscopes for stable flight through feedback control. The vehicle is powered by a 3 cell (11.1V) 3000 mAh Lithium-polymer battery. Electronic equipment and wiring are hosted into the hollow arms and on several carbon fiber platforms in the waterproof fuselage. Four 35A high-torque motors are supported at the far end of each arm with 10 × 4.7 inch propellers. Energy dissipation during landing is accomplished by four pivoting legs that, through the use of shock absorbers, prevent the impact energy from affecting the frame thus causing significant damage. The data capturing system consists of a GoPro Hero3 camera and in-house built camera gimbal and shock absorber damping device. The camera gimbal, hosted below the vehicle fuselage, is engineered to maintain the orthogonality of the camera axis with respect to the water surface by

  5. Direct Measurement of Sub-Debye-Length Attraction between Oppositely Charged Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Nir; Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Andelman, David; Safran, S. A.; Klein, Jacob

    2009-09-01

    Using a surface force balance with fast video analysis, we have measured directly the attractive forces between oppositely charged solid surfaces (charge densities σ+, σ-) across water over the entire range of interaction, in particular, at surface separations D below the Debye screening length λS. At very low salt concentration we find a long-ranged attraction between the surfaces (onset ca. 100 nm), whose variation at D<λS agrees well with predictions based on solving the Poisson-Boltzmann theory, when due account is taken of the independently-determined surface charge asymmetry (σ+≠|σ-|).

  6. Optical measurements of chemically heterogeneous particulate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, Nataliya; Gritsevich, Maria; Zubko, Evgenij; Hakala, Teemu; Peltoniemi, Jouni I.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally study light scattering by particulate surfaces consisting of two high-contrast materials. Using the Finnish Geodetic Institute field goniospectropolarimeter, reflectance and degree of linear polarization are measured in dark volcanic sand, bright salt (NaCl) and bright ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3); and in mixtures of bright and dark components. We found that the light-scattering response monotonically changes with volume ratio of dark and bright components. In contrast to previous finding, we do not detect an enhancement of the negative polarization amplitude in two-component high-contrast mixtures. Two-component mixtures reveal an inverse correlation between maximum of their linear polarization and reflectance near backscattering, the so-called Umov effect. In log-log scales this inverse correlation takes a linear form for the dark and moderate-dark samples, while for the brightest samples there is a noticeable deviation from the linear trend.

  7. Measurements of an expanding surface flashover plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.

    2014-05-21

    A better understanding of vacuum surface flashover and the plasma produced by it is of importance for electron and ion sources, as well as advanced accelerators and other vacuum electronic devices. This article describes time-of-flight and biased-probe measurements made on the expanding plasma generated from a vacuum surface flashover discharge. The plasma expanded at velocities of 1.2–6.5 cm/μs, and had typical densities of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}. The expansion velocity of the plasma leading edge often exhibited a sharp increase at distances of about 50 mm from the discharge site. Comparison with biased-probe data suggests that, under most conditions, the plasma leading edge was dominated by negative ions, with the apparent increase in velocity being due to fast H{sup −} overtaking slower, heavier ions. In some cases, biased-probe data also showed abrupt discontinuities in the plasma energy distribution co-located with large changes in the intercepted plasma current, suggesting the presence of a shock in the leading edge of the expanding plasma.

  8. Solid sulfur in vacuum: Sublimation effects on surface microtexture, color and spectral reflectance, and applications to planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    A form of sulfur that is white at room temperature and very fluffy in texture has been found in laboratory experiments on the effects of vacuum sublimation (evaporation) on solid sulfur. This work is an outgrowth of proton sputtering experiments on sulfur directed toward understanding Jovian magnetospheric effects on the surface of Io. Fluffy white sulfur is formed on the surface of solid yellow, tan, or brown sulfur melt freezes in vacuum by differential (fractional) evaporation of two or more sulfur molecular species present in the original sulfur; S(8) ring sulfur is thought to be the dominant sublimination phase lost to the vacuum sink, and polymeric chain sulfur S(u) the dominant residual phase that remains in place, forming the residual fluffy surface layer. The reflectance spectrum of the original sulfur surface is greaty modified by formation of the fluffy layer: the blue absorption band-edge and shoulder move 0.05 to 0.06 microns toward shorter wavelengths resulting in a permanent increase in reflectivity near 0.42 to 0.46 microns; the UV reflectivity below 0.40 microns is reduced. This form of sulfur should exist in large quantity on the surface of Io, especially in hotspot regions if there is solid free sulfur there that has solidified from a melt. Its color and spectra will indicate relative crystallization age on a scale of days to months and/or surface temperature distribution history.

  9. Acetone cluster ion beam irradiation on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuto, H.; Kakumoto, Y.; Itozaki, S.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.

    2013-11-01

    Acetone cluster ions were produced by the adiabatic expansion method without using a support gas. The acceleration voltage of the acetone cluster ion beam was from 3 to 9 kV. The sputter depths of silicon irradiated with acetone cluster ion beams increased with acceleration voltage and fluence of the acetone cluster ion beams. The sputter depth was close to that induced by the ethanol cluster ion beam accelerated at the same acceleration voltage. The sputtering yield of silicon by the acetone cluster ion beam at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV was approximately 100 times larger than that for an argon monomer ion beam at 9 keV. The sputter depths of silicon dioxide irradiated with the acetone cluster ion beams were smaller than those of silicon, but larger than those induced by ethanol cluster ion beams. The XPS analysis of silicon surface indicated that the silicon surface was more strongly oxidized by the irradiation of acetone cluster ion beam than ethanol cluster ion beam.

  10. Indirect measurements of streamwise solid fraction variations of granular flows accelerating down a smooth rectangular chute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Li-Tsung; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Tai, Yih-Chin; Hsiau, Shu-San

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we detail a method for estimating the flux-averaged solid fraction of a steady granular flows moving down an inclined rectangular chute using velocity measurements from along the perimeter cross section, combined with knowledge of the mass flow rate through the cross section. The chute is 5 cm wide and 150 cm long with an adjustable inclination angle. Four inclination angles, from 27° to 36° at 3° intervals, are tested. This angle range overlaps the internal friction angle of the glass beads, which are 4 mm nominal in diameter. Two slender mirrors are installed at the top and the bottom of the transparent chute to reflect images of the flow down the chute of the two surfaces. This allows photographic recording of the flow with a PIV imaging system and measurement of the flow depth. The mass flow rate can be calibrated simultaneously by collecting the accumulated mass at the chute exit. A linear interpolation scheme is proposed to interpolate the volume flow rate in each section of the chute. Sensitivity analysis suggests that the relative standard deviation of this scheme is about ±6%, i.e., the resultant solid volume fraction is only moderately dependent on the interpolation scheme for the tested cases. This is further confirmed by a direct intercepting method. Compared to the sophisticated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or the radioactive positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) methods, the present method is verified as a cost-effective and nonhazardous alternative for ordinary laboratories. Two distinct groups of streamwise dependence of the solid fractions are found. They are separated by the inclination angle of the chute and agreed with the internal friction angle. In the experiments using the two smaller inclination angles, the solid fraction ratios are found to be linear functions of the streamwise distance, while for the two larger inclination angles, the ratios have a nonlinear concave shape. All decrease with growing downstream

  11. Ordering of liquid squalane near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Haiding; Evmenenko, Guennadi; Dutta, Pulak

    2005-10-01

    X-ray reflectivity is used to study the interfacial structure of liquid squalane on SiO 2/Si(1 0 0) substrates. The data show that there are density oscillations ('layers') near the interface, with the squalane molecular long axes parallel to the substrate. The results are compared to those from molecular dynamics simulations and recent force measurements.

  12. Instrument for elemental composition studies of solids on planetary surfaces with sub-ppm detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Iakovleva, M.; Neuland, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    Current space instruments prove to be successful for a global chemical mapping of the entire planetary body or to perform a local chemical analysis, helpful in determination of modal mineralogy. Nevertheless, the sensitivity and low spatial resolution of these spectroscopic instruments limit the chemical analysis to the most abundant elements with some exceptions (e.g., measurements of Th, K, and H elements by Gamma and neutron spectrometers). Furthermore, the spectroscopic analysis typically provides the chemical composition of 1 micrometer of the uppermost surface layers, which are frequently affected by space weathering effects, again, with the exception of Gamma/neutron investigation where the composition of up to 1 m thick subsurface can be measured. New and recently accepted space instruments, such as Laser Induced Breakdown (LIBS) and Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometers (LIMS) are thought to improve these chemical analysis providing more localised chemical sampling with higher sensitivity and accuracy. We will demonstrate the performance of a highly miniaturised laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer designed for space research for the elemental analysis of solid materials (Rohner et al., 2003). The instrument enables mass spectrometric analysis with sub-ppm detection limits and a typical mass resolution of ~700, sufficient to detect all elements and their isotopes. The studies of NIST standards, minerals and meteoritic samples will be reviewed to emphasize its capability for quantitative analysis and chemical mapping of the inhomogeneous samples with a high spatial (vertical and lateral) resolution. LIMS measurements provide means for investigation of principal elements (metals, non-metals) and allow an analysis of trace elements distributed within a suite of soils and rocks. Thus, LIMS measurements will allow the identification of the mineralogical context of planetary surface and better understanding of the geologic/geochemical structure

  13. Interfacial fracture between highly crosslinked polymer networks and a solid surface: Effect of interfacial bond density

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-03-23

    For highly crosslinked, polymer networks bonded to a solid surface, the effect of interfacial bond density as well as system size on interfacial fracture is studied molecular dynamics simulations. The correspondence between the stress-strain curve and the sequence of molecular deformations is obtained. The failure strain for a fully bonded surface is equal to the strain necessary to make taut the average minimal path through the network from the bottom solid surface to the top surface. At bond coverages less than full, nanometer scale cavities form at the surface yielding an inhomogeneous strain profile. The failure strain and stress are linearly proportional to the number of bonds at the interface unless the number of bonds is so few that van der Waals interactions dominate. The failure is always interfacial due to fewer bonds at the interface than in the bulk.

  14. Quantitative measurement of in-plane acoustic field components using surface-mounted fiber sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Richard O.; Dhawan, Rajat R.; Gunther, Michael F.; Murphy, Kent A.

    1993-01-01

    Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors have been used to obtain calibrated, quantitative measurements of the in-plane displacement components associated with the propagation of ultrasonic elastic stress waves on the surfaces of solids. The frequency response of the sensor is determined by the internal spacing between the two reflecting fiber endface surfaces which form the Fabry-Perot cavity, a distance which is easily controlled during fabrication. With knowledge of the material properties of the solid, the out-of-plane displacement component of the wave may also be determined, giving full field data.

  15. Growth behavior of surface cracks in the circumferential plane of solid and hollow cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the growth behavior of surface fatigue cracks in the circumferential plane of solid and hollow cylinders. In the solid cylinders, the fatigue cracks were found to have a circular arc crack front with specific upper and lower limits to the arc radius. In the hollow cylinders, the fatigue cracks were found to agree accurately with the shape of a transformed semiellipse. A modification to the usual nondimensionalization expression used for surface flaws in flat plates was found to give correct trends for the hollow cylinder problem.

  16. [Combustion temperature measurement of solid propellant and the effect of organic compound on combustion temperature].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue-tie; Li, Yan; Chen, Zuo-ru; Wang, Jun-de

    2003-06-01

    The FTIR emission spectra in the spectral range of 4,500-300 cm-1 for the solid propellants were measured by a remote sensing FTIR system. The P-branch of fine structure of HCl fundamental band lying at 3.46 microns was used for precise combustion temperature measurement of the solid propellant. The effect of the organic compound in the solid propellant on the combustion temperature was discussed.

  17. Surface functionalization of solid state ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene through chemical grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherazi, Tauqir A.; Rehman, Tayyiba; Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Shaikh, Ahson Jabbar; Shahzad, Sohail Anjum; Abbas, Ghazanfar; Raza, Rizwan; Waseem, Amir

    2015-12-01

    The surface of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder was functionalized with styrene using chemical grafting technique. The grafting process was initiated through radical generation on base polymer matrix in the solid state by sodium thiosulfate, while peroxides formed at radical sites during this process were dissociated by ceric ammonium nitrate. Various factors were optimized and reasonably high level of monomer grafting was achieved, i.e., 15.6%. The effect of different acids as additive and divinyl benzene (DVB) as a cross-linking agent was also studied. Post-grafting sulfonation was conducted to introduce the ionic moieties to the grafted polymer. Ion-exchange capacity (IEC) was measured experimentally and is found to be 1.04 meq g-1, which is in close agreement with the theoretical IEC values. The chemical structure of grafted and functionalized polymer was characterized by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and thermal properties were investigated by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thermal analysis depicts that the presence of radicals on the polymer chain accelerates the thermal decomposition process. The results signify that the chemical grafting is an effective tool for substantial surface modification and subsequent functionalization of polyethylene.

  18. Valganciclovir dosing according to body surface area and renal function in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vaudry, W; Ettenger, R; Jara, P; Varela-Fascinetto, G; Bouw, M R; Ives, J; Walker, R

    2009-03-01

    Oral valganciclovir is effective prophylaxis for cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in adults receiving solid organ transplantation (SOT). However, data in pediatrics are limited. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics and safety of valganciclovir oral solution or tablets in 63 pediatric SOT recipients at risk of CMV disease, including 17 recipients < or =2 years old. Patients received up to 100 days' valganciclovir prophylaxis; dosage was calculated using the algorithm: dose (mg) = 7 x body surface area x creatinine clearance (Schwartz method; CrCLS). Ganciclovir pharmacokinetics were described using a population pharmacokinetic approach. Safety endpoints were measured up to week 26. Mean estimated ganciclovir exposures showed no clear relationship to either body size or renal function, indicating that the dosing algorithm adequately accounted for both these variables. Mean ganciclovir exposures, across age groups and organ recipient groups were: kidney 51.8 +/- 11.9 microg * h/mL; liver 61.7 +/- 29.5 microg * h/mL; heart 58.0 +/- 21.8 microg * h/mL. Treatment was well tolerated, with a safety profile similar to that in adults. Seven serious treatment-related adverse events (AEs) occurred in five patients. Two patients had CMV viremia during treatment but none experienced CMV disease. In conclusion, a valganciclovir-dosing algorithm that adjusted for body surface area and renal function provides ganciclovir exposures similar to those established as safe and effective in adults. PMID:19260840

  19. Acoustically Induced Microparticle Orbiting and Clustering on a Solid Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.; Tarimala, S.; Roberts, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    Behavior of colloidal particles in the bulk solution or at interfaces under the effect of high-frequency acoustics is critical to many seemingly different applications ranging from enhanced oil recovery to improved mixing in microfluidic channels and from accelerated contaminant extractions to surface cleaning, drug delivery and microelectronics. It can be detrimental or beneficial, depending on the application. In medical research, flow cytometry and microfluidics, for example, acoustically induced clustering of tracer particles and/or their sticking to the walls of channels, vessels, or tubes often becomes a problem. On the other hand, it can be tailored to enhance processes such as mixing in microfluidic devices, particle separation and sizing, and power generation microdevices. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, microscopic visualization experiments were performed in which polystyrene fluorescent (468/508 nm wavelength) microspheres with a mean diameter of 2.26-µm and density of 1.05 g/cm3, were suspended in either de-ionized water or a 0.1M NaCl solution. The freshly-prepared colloidal suspension was injected into a parallel-plate glass flow cell, which was subjected to high-frequency acoustics (200-500 kHz) through a piezoelectric transducer attached to one of the cell's outer walls. When the suspending medium is de-ionized water, acoustic stimulation of the cell at 313 kHz induced three distinct particle behaviors: 1) entrainment and bulk transport via wavelength-scale Rayleigh streaming, 2) transport via direct radiation forces to concentrate at nodal or anti-nodal planes, and 3) entrapment via boundary layer vorticular microstreaming resulting in mobile particles orbiting deposited particles. This latter phenomenon is intriguing. It occurs at specific frequencies and the shape of the orbits is determined by the applied frequency, whereas the rotation speed is proportional to the applied amplitude. At the higher ionic strength, on the other

  20. Coalescence of sessile microdroplets subject to a wettability gradient on a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Lan, Chuanjin; Das, Arup Kumar; Ma, Yanbao

    2016-09-01

    While there are intensive studies on the coalescence of sessile macroscale droplets, there is little study on the coalescence of sessile microdroplets. In this paper, the coalescence process of two sessile microdroplets is studied by using a many-body dissipative particle dynamics numerical method. A comprehensive parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects on the coalescence process from the wettability gradient, hydrophilicity of the solid surface, and symmetric or asymmetric configurations. A water bridge is formed after two microdroplets contact. The temporal evolution of the coalescence process is characterized by the water bridge's radii parallel to the solid surface (Wm) and perpendicular to the solid surface (Hm). It is found that the changes of both Hm and Wm with time follow a power law; i.e., Hm=β1τβ and Wm=α1τα . The growth of Hm and Wm depends on the hydrophilicity of the substrate. Wm grows faster than Hm on a hydrophilic surface, and Hm grows faster than Wm on a hydrophobic surface. This is due to the strong competition between capillary forces induced by the water-bridge curvature and the solid substrate hydrophobicity. Also, flow structure analysis shows that regardless of the coalescence type once the liquid bridge is formed the liquid flow direction inside the capillary bridge is to expand the bridge radius. Finally, we do not observe oscillation of the merged droplet during the coalescence process, possibly due to the significant effects of the viscous forces.

  1. Ion Solid Interaction And Surface Modification At RF Breakdown In High-Gradient Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Zeke; Norem, Jim; Veitzer, Seth

    2011-06-01

    Ion solid interactions have been shown to be an important new mechanism of unipolar arc formation in high-gradient rf linear accelerators through surface self-sputtering by plasma ions, in addition to an intense surface field evaporation. We believe a non-Debye plasma is formed in close vicinity to the surface and strongly affects surface atomic migration via intense bombardment by ions, strong electric field, and high surface temperature. Scanning electron microscope studies of copper surface of an rf cavity were conducted that show craters, arc pits, and both irregular and regular ripple structures with a characteristic length of 2 microns on the surface. Strong field enhancements are characteristic of the edges, corners, and crack systems at surfaces subjected to rf breakdown.

  2. Surface accuracy measurement sensor for deployable reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, R. B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The breadboard surface accuracy measurement sensor is an optical angle sensor which provides continuous line of sight position measurements of infrared source targets placed strategically about the antenna surface. Measurements of target coordinates define the surface figure relative to a reference frame on the antenna. Sensor operation, tests and test results to date are described.

  3. Determination of kinematic indices corresponding to a solid particle on a flat oscillating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosnegutu, E.; Nedeff, V.; Bontas, O.; Barsan, N.; Chitimus, D.; Rusu, D.

    2016-08-01

    This articles presents a mathematical analysis having as purpose the understanding of the behaviour of a solid particle on a flat oscillating surface. The starting point of the analysis is the initial identification of the actions direction of forces on a solid particle placed on a flat oscillating surface, in a 3D reference system. Following the distribution of forces, for different specific cases of the behaviour of the solid particle, the general equations of kinematic indices could be determined, ks and kj. Due to achieving the 3D distribution model of forces acting on a solid particle, a new kinematic index could be determined, index corresponding to the sideways moving of the solid particle kl. Moreover, a series of graphical representations have been carried out, having as purpose the emphasis of the variation mode of the newly determined kinematic indices, as following: friction coefficient µ = 0.4; the angle of the inertial force to the flat oscillating surface, Φ = 0 - 180° the angle between the projection of the inertial force on XOY plane and OX axis, α2, = 0 - 80o. After analyzing the graphical representations for the new calculation forms of the kinematic indices, kl variation has the same rate and trend as kj. If angle α2 = 0o, the variation curve of ki index coincides with the variation curve of kj, and as we increase the value of angle α2, the variation curve of kl index moves away from the kj curve.

  4. Producing virtually defect-free nanoscale ripples by ion bombardment of rocked solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Matt P.; Bradley, R. Mark

    2016-04-01

    Bombardment of a solid surface with a broad, obliquely incident ion beam frequently produces nanoscale surface ripples. The primary obstacle that prevents the adoption of ion bombardment as a nanofabrication tool is the high density of defects in the patterns that are typically formed. Our simulations indicate that ion bombardment can produce nearly defect-free ripples on the surface of an elemental solid if the sample is concurrently and periodically rocked about an axis orthogonal to the surface normal and the incident beam direction. We also investigate the conditions necessary for rocking to produce highly ordered ripples and discuss how the results of our simulations can be reproduced experimentally. Finally, our simulations show that periodic temporal oscillations of coefficients in the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation can suppress spatiotemporal chaos and lead to patterns with a high degree of order.

  5. MERCURY MEASUREMENTS FOR SOLIDS MADE RAPIDLY, SIMPLY, AND INEXPENSIVELY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While traditional methods for determining mercury in solid samples involve the use of aggressive chemicals to dissolve the matrix and the use of other chemicals to properly reduce the mercury to the volatile elemental form, pyrolysis-based analyzers can be used by directly weighi...

  6. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-05-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, and minerals. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain large-scale, long-distance solids advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a generalized mechanism for advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, enabling a simulated continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  7. What is the surface temperature of a solid irradiated by a Petawatt laser?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, A. J.; Divol, L.

    2016-09-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a Petawatt laser pulse, its surface is heated to tens of millions of degrees within a few femtoseconds, facilitating a diffusive heat wave and the acceleration of electrons to MeV energies into the target. Using numerically converged collisional particle-in-cell simulations, we observe a competition between two surface heating mechanisms-inverse bremsstrahlung in solid density on the one hand and electron scattering on turbulent electric fields on the other. Collisionless heating effectively dominates above the relativistic intensity threshold. Our numerical results show that a high-contrast 40 fs, f/5 laser pulse with 1 J energy will heat the skin layer to 5 keV, and the inside of the target over several microns deep to bulk temperatures in the range of 10-100 eV at solid density.

  8. Highly ordered nanoscale patterns produced by masked ion bombardment of a moving solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, Martin P.; Bradley, R. Mark

    2012-09-01

    We introduce a fabrication method in which a mask with a long, narrow slit is placed between the source of an ion beam and the surface of a solid moving with constant speed. Numerical simulations reveal the method can generate surface ripples and arrays of nanoholes that are virtually defect free. In contrast, the patterns produced by ion bombardment with a broad, unmasked beam are typically rife with defects.

  9. High bandwidth linear viscoelastic properties of complex fluids from the measurement of their free surface fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottier, Basile; Talini, Laurence; Frétigny, Christian

    2012-02-01

    We present a new optical method to measure the linear viscoelastic properties of materials, ranging from complex fluids to soft solids, within a large frequency range (about 0.1--10^4 Hz). The surface fluctuation specular reflection technique is based on the measurement of the thermal fluctuations of the free surfaces of materials at which a laser beam is specularly reflected. The propagation of the thermal surface waves depends on the surface tension, density, and complex viscoelastic modulus of the material. For known surface tension and density, we show that the frequency dependent elastic and loss moduli can be deduced from the fluctuation spectrum. Using a viscoelastic solid (a cross-linked PDMS), which linear viscoelastic properties are known in a large frequency range from rheometric measurements and the time--temperature superposition principle, we show that there is a good agreement between the rheological characterization provided by rheometric and fluctuation measurements. We also present measurements conducted with complex fluids that are supramolecular polymer solutions. The agreement with other low frequency and high frequency rheological measurements is again very good, and we discuss the sensitivity of the technique to surface viscoelasticity.

  10. High-Speed Transport of Fluid Drops and Solid Particles via Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Lih, Shyh-shiuh

    2012-01-01

    A compact sampling tool mechanism that can operate at various temperatures, and transport and sieve particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains with no moving parts, has been created using traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs) that are emitted by an inter-digital transducer (IDT). The generated waves are driven at about 10 MHz, and it causes powder to move towards the IDT at high speed with different speeds for different sizes of particles, which enables these particles to be sieved. This design is based on the use of SAWs and their propelling effect on powder particles and fluids along the path of the waves. Generally, SAWs are elastic waves propagating in a shallow layer of about one wavelength beneath the surface of a solid substrate. To generate SAWs, a piezoelectric plate is used that is made of LiNbO3 crystal cut along the x-axis with rotation of 127.8 along the y-axis. On this plate are printed pairs of fingerlike electrodes in the form of a grating that are activated by subjecting the gap between the electrodes to electric field. This configuration of a surface wave transmitter is called IDT. The IDT that was used consists of 20 pairs of fingers with 0.4-mm spacing, a total length of 12.5 mm. The surface wave is produced by the nature of piezoelectric material to contract or expand when subjected to an electric field. Driving the IDT to generate wave at high amplitudes provides an actuation mechanism where the surface particles move elliptically, pulling powder particles on the surface toward the wavesource and pushing liquids in the opposite direction. This behavior allows the innovation to separate large particles and fluids that are mixed. Fluids are removed at speed (7.5 to 15 cm/s), enabling this innovation of acting as a bladeless wiper for raindrops. For the windshield design, the electrodes could be made transparent so that they do not disturb the driver or pilot. Multiple IDTs can be synchronized to transport water or powder over larger

  11. A new method for solid surface topographical studies using nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baber, N.; Strugalski, Z.

    1984-03-01

    A new simple method has been developed to investigate the topography of a wide range of solid surfaces using nematic liquid crystals. Polarizing microscopy is employed. The usefulness of the method for detecting weak mechanical effects has been demonstrated. An application in criminology is foreseen.

  12. Interference of the surface of the solid on the performance of tethered molecular catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hong, Junghyun; Zaera, Francisco

    2012-08-01

    The catalytic performance of cinchonidine in the promotion of thiol additions to conjugated ketones was used as a probe to assess the tethering of molecular functionality onto solid surfaces using well-known "click" chemistry involving easy-to-react linkers. It has been assumed in many applications that the tethered molecules retain their chemical properties and dominate the chemistry of the resulting solid systems, but it is shown here that this is not always the case. Indeed, a loss of enantioselectivity was observed upon tethering, which could be accounted for by a combination of at least three effects: (1) the nonselective catalytic activity of the surface of the solid itself; (2) the activity of the OH species generated by hydrolysis of some of the Si-alkoxy groups in the trialkoxy moieties used to bind many linkers to oxide surfaces; and (3) the bonding of the molecule to be tethered directly to the surface. Several ideas were also tested to minimize these problems, including the silylation of the active OH groups within the surface of the oxide support, the selection of solvents to optimize silane polymerization and minimize their breaking up via hydrolysis or alcoholysis reactions, and the linking at defined positions in the molecule to be tethered in order to minimize its ability to interact with the surface.

  13. Inferring surface solar absorption from broadband satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Vulis, Inna L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric solar radiation model and surface albedo models that include wavelength dependence and surface anisotropy are combined to study the possibility of inferring the surface solar absorption from satellite measurements. The model includes ocean, desert, pasture land, savannah, and bog surface categories. Problems associated with converting narrowband measurements to broadband quantities are discussed, suggesting that it would be easier to infer surface solar absorption from broadband measurements directly. The practice of adopting a linear relationship between planetary and surface albedo to estimate surface albedos from satellite measurements is examined, showing that the linear conversion between broadband planetary and surface albedos is strongly dependent on vegetation type. It is suggested that there is a linear slope-offset relationship between surface and surface-atmosphere solar absorption.

  14. Apparatus for Measuring Spectral Emissivity of Solid Materials at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Dengfeng; Tan, Hong; Xuan, Yimin; Han, Yuge; Li, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    Spectral emissivity measurements at high temperature are of great importance for both scientific research and industrial applications. A method to perform spectral emissivity measurements is presented based on two sample heating methods, the flat plate and tubular furnace. An apparatus is developed to measure the normal spectral emissivity of solid material at elevated temperatures from 1073 K to 1873 K and wavelengths from 2 \\upmu hbox {m} to 25 \\upmu hbox {m}. Sample heating is accomplished by a torch flame or a high temperature furnace. Two different variable temperature blackbody sources are used as standard references and the radiance is measured by a FTIR spectrometer. Following calibration of the spectral response and background radiance of the spectrometer, the effect of the blackbody temperature interval on calibration results is discussed. Measurements are performed of the normal spectral emissivity of SiC and graphite over the prescribed temperature and wavelength range. The emissivity of SiC at high temperatures is compared with the emissivity at room temperature, and the influence of an oxide layer formed at the surface of SiC on the emissivity is studied. The effect of temperature on the emissivity of graphite is also investigated. Furthermore, a thorough analysis of the uncertainty components of the emissivity measurement is performed.

  15. Surface Tension Measurements of Chemically Modified Oleochemical

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface tension is an important physical property of a substance, which plays a part in a variety of physical phenomenon relevant to many industrial processes. For example, the efficiency of the atomization of a fuel has been shown to be effected dramatically by surface tension and viscosity. Beca...

  16. Solid contact potentiometric sensors for trace level measurements.

    PubMed

    Chumbimuni-Torres, Karin Y; Rubinova, Nastassia; Radu, Aleksandar; Kubota, Lauro T; Bakker, Eric

    2006-02-15

    A simple procedure for the development of a range of polymeric ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) with low detection limits is presented. The electrodes were prepared by using a plasticizer-free methyl methacrylate-decyl methacrylate copolymer as membrane matrix and poly(3-octylthiophene) as intermediate layer deposited by solvent casting on gold sputtered copper electrodes as a solid inner contact. Five different electrodes were developed for Ag+, Pb2+, Ca2+, K+, and I-, with detection limits mostly in the nanomolar range. In this work, the lowest detection limits reported thus far with solid contact ISEs for the detection of silver (2.0 x 10(-9) M), potassium (10(-7) M), and iodide (10(-8) M) are presented. The developed electrodes exhibited a good response time and excellent reproducibility.

  17. High-precision measurements of molecular slip at a solid/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, Justin; Wood, Clay; Burton, Justin

    As fluidic devices get smaller and measurements become more precise and stringent, the need to fully understand the dynamics at interfaces becomes more important. It is now clear that slip near an interface is common at the nanoscale in Newtonian liquids. In simple systems, there is a general trend to larger slip lengths for non-wetting liquid/solid combinations, but many conflicting measurements and interpretations remain. We have developed a novel differential technique using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to measure slip lengths on various substrates. A drop of one liquid is grown on the QCM in the presence of a second, ambient liquid. By choosing the two liquids such that their bulk effects on the QCM frequency and dissipation are identical in the presence of no-slip, we are able to isolate anomalous boundary effects due to interfacial slip. Our data for water on gold (in undecane) are consistent with a slip length of 5nm (for water). A glass surface, wetted by both gold and undecane has also shown strongly anomalous results for the water-undecane pair. In addition to investigating other liquid pairs, future work will include extending this technique to surfaces with independently controllable chemistry and roughness, both of which are known to strongly affect interfacial hydrodynamics.

  18. Modeled impacts of surface coal mining on dissolved solids in the Tongue River, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woods, Paul F.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model has been developed for spatial and temporal simulation of streamflow and dissolved solids in the Tongue River from the Tongue River Dam to Miles City, Montana. User-defined plans of surface coal mining and agricultural development permit evaluation of potential changes in dissolved solids resulting from leaching of overburden material used to backfill mine pits and from withdrawal and return flow of irrigation water. Provision is made for simulation runs using increased streamflow from a proposed larger reservoir intended to replace the present Tongue River Reservoir. Simulations at mean streamflow indicated that mining 119,600 acres of federally leased coal tracts may increase by 4.8 percent the present annual dissolved-solids concentration in the Tongue River at Miles City. Simulations using the proposed Tongue River reservoir show substantial reductions in dissolved-solids concentration when paired with similar simulations using the present Tongue River Reservoir. When compared on a per-acre basis for the study area, the dewatering caused by irrigation increases dissolved-solids concentration more than the input of leachates from surface coal-mining operations. (USGS)

  19. Titan's Surface Temperatures Measured by Cassini CIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Flasar, F. M.; Kundle, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Pearl, J. C.; Nixon, C. A.; Carlson, R. C.; Mamoutkine, A. A.; Brasunas, J. C.; Guandique, E.; Arhterberg, R. K.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Romani, P. N.; Segura, M. E.; Albright, S. A.; Elliott, M. H.; Tingley, J. S.; Calcutt, S.; Coustenis, A.; Bezard, B.; Courtin, R.

    2008-01-01

    A large fraction of 19-micron thermal radiation from the surface of Titan reaches space through a spectral window of low atmospheric opacity. The emergent radiance, after removing the effect of the atmosphere, gives the brightness temperature of the surface. This atmospheric window is covered by the far-infrared channel of the Composite Infrared spectrometer1 (CIRS) on Cassini. In mapping Titan surface temperatures, CIRS is able to improve upon results of Voyager IRIS, by taking advantage of improved latitude coverage and a much larger dataset. Observations are from a wide range of emission angles and thereby provide constraints on the atmospheric opacity and radiance that are used to derive the surface temperature. CIRS finds an average equatorial surface brightness temperature of 93.7+/-0.6 K, virtually identical to the HASI temperature at the Huygens landing site. Mapping in latitude shows that the surface temperature decreases toward the poles by about 2 K in the south and 3 K in the north. This surface temperature distribution is consistent with the formation of lakes seen at high latitudes on Titan.

  20. Visualized study on the interaction between single bubbles and curved solid surface in flotation separation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liwei; Zhao, Yue; Yang, Jingjing; Li, Yanpeng; Meng, Qinglong

    2014-01-01

    The present study has been devoted to bubble-curved solid surface interaction in water, which is critical to the separation of suspended particles by air flotation. For this purpose, two particular stages of the interaction (collision and attachment) have been examined visually using high-speed photography in a laboratory-scale flotation column. The effects of the surface material and surfactant concentration on these two stages have been also studied quantitatively. The considered solid materials are the cleaned glass as hydrophilic surface and Teflon as hydrophobic surface. The experimental results show that the presence of surfactant significantly affects the collision and rebound process of a gas bubble, while there is no obvious effect of the surface material on the rebound process. An increase in surfactant concentration has been observed to suppress the rebound number and maximal distance of the bubble from the surface. Moreover, the three-phase contact time of the bubble is a strong function of the surfactant concentration and surface hydrophobicity as well as of the bubble diameter. Another important finding is that the bubble attachment is only observed at the hydrophobic Teflon surface below the surfactant CMC (critical micelle concentration). Results of this study are relevant for deep understanding of the attachment mechanism and to determine the proper conditions for a selective flotation process.

  1. The influence of petroleum acids and solid surface energy on pipeline wettability in relation to hydrate deposition.

    PubMed

    Aspenes, G; Høiland, S; Barth, T; Askvik, K M

    2009-05-15

    The mechanisms by which hydrates deposit in a petroleum production-line are probably related to pipeline surface properties, e.g. pipeline material, surface energy and roughness. In this work, the wettability alteration of pipeline surfaces from contact with oil, and the adhesion energy between water and solid in the presence of oil is investigated. Contact angles for model systems are determined as a function of solid material and oil composition. Although contact angles in oil/brine/solid systems have previously been extensively reported in the literature, the variety of solids that mimic a pipeline surface is limited. In this study, we include various metal surfaces in addition to glass and epoxy coating. The results show that both the presence of petroleum acids in the oil, and low surface free energy of the pipeline material, lead to more oil-wet systems and consequently reduced adhesion energy between water and solid.

  2. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the Earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-11-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support fast advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope-independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, minerals, and economic goods. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain regional- and global-scale advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a mechanism for sustained advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, simulating a continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  3. Thermal interaction between an impinging hot jet and a conducting solid surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeloff, P. A.; Dougherty, F. C.; Van Dalsem, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Powered-lift aircraft may produce severe high-temperature environments which are potentially damaging to a landing surface or the aircraft. The interaction betweean the high temperature flow field and a nonadiabatic landing surface is analyzed with a coupled computational fluid dynamics/solid thermal conduction computer code, HOTJET. The HOTJET code couples time-accurate, implicit, factored solution schemes for the governing fluid dynamics equations (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations) to the unsteady thermal conduction equation, which governs heat flux within a solid. HOTJET is validated against exact solutions to the thermal conduction and Navier-Stokes equations. First-of-a-kind results are included which show the impact of surface material properties on the fluid physics and the coupled fluid/material thermal fields.

  4. Evaporation of tiny water aggregation on solid surfaces with different wetting properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shen; Tu, Yusong; Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

    2012-11-29

    The evaporation of a tiny amount of water on the solid surface with different wettabilities has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. From nonequilibrium MD simulations, we found that, as the surface changed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, the evaporation speed did not show a monotonic decrease as intuitively expected, but increased first, and then decreased after it reached a maximum value. The analysis of the simulation trajectory and calculation of the surface water interaction illustrate that the competition between the number of water molecules on the water-gas surface from where the water molecules can evaporate and the potential barrier to prevent those water molecules from evaporating results in the unexpected behavior of the evaporation. This finding is helpful in understanding the evaporation on biological surfaces, designing artificial surfaces of ultrafast water evaporating, or preserving water in soil. PMID:23051060

  5. Polyoxoanion chemistry moves toward the future: From solids and solutions to surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Klemperer, W.G.; Wall, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    In the context of modern surface science, current understanding of polyoxoanion surface chemistry is truly modest from a structural/mechanistic point of view. Only three techniques have received any attention to date, and none of them has been developed to anywhere near its full potential. The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) has proven to be a useful qualitative tool for in situ monitoring of polyoxoanion adsorption and adsorption kinetics. A second technique that has shown great potential for in situ study of polyoxoanion surface chemistry at solid-liquid interfaces is modulated infrared spectroscopy. The third and final in situ surface analytical technique that has shown great promise but is yet to be exploited to its full potential is scanning probe microscopy. Sections of the paper discuss scanning probe microscopy; single crystal surfaces; evaporative solution deposition on graphite; electrochemical deposition onto graphite; and self-assembly on metal surfaces.

  6. Analytical estimation of solid angle subtended by complex well-resolved surfaces for infrared detection studies.

    PubMed

    Mahulikar, Shripad P; Potnuru, Santosh K; Kolhe, Pankaj S

    2007-08-01

    The solid angle (Omega) subtended by the hot power-plant surfaces of a typical fighter aircraft, on the detector of an infrared (IR) guided missile, is analytically obtained. The use of the parallel rays projection method simplifies the incorporation of the effect of the optical blocking by engine surfaces, on Omega-subtended. This methodology enables the evaluation of the relative contribution of the IR signature from well-resolved distributed sources, and is important for imaging infrared detection studies. The complex 3D surface of a rear fuselage is projected onto an equivalent planar area normal to the viewing aspect, which would give the same Omega-subtended. PMID:17676106

  7. Stochastic simulation of fluctuation stage of phase transfer on solid surface during thin film formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bondareva, A.L.; Zmievskaya, G.I.

    2005-05-16

    Ions irradiation leads to nano-scale islands of thin cover formation. Influence on a solid surface of the following processes: fluctuation stage of phase transition (new phase island formation), its migration under long-range potentials of interaction which leads to brownian motion of islands on the surface, inelastic collisions of islands has been simulated by stochastic analogue method. The calculated time evolution of islands kinetic distribution function from islands square sizes and coordinates of its masses centres on the surface is calculated taking into account non-linear Gibbs energy of islands formation, which depends on lattice elastic responses as well on dislocation influence.

  8. Superficial composition in binary solid solutions A(B): Drastic effect of pure element surface tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, A.; Aufray, B.

    1985-10-01

    This paper deals with a comparative study of surface segragation of Pb and Ni respectively from Ag(Pb)(111) and Ag(Ni)(111) solid solutions. A high level of segregation of the solute is observed for both systems characterized by very low solute solubility. However, the superficial composition strongly depends on the relative surface tensions of the pure elements: the solute atoms are strictly on superficial sites when γ solute is smaller than γ solvent; in contrast uppermost layer consists purely of solvent when γ solute is greater than γ solvent. Two schematic distributions in close proximity to the surface are proposed in the last case.

  9. Numerical values of the surface free energies of solid chemical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezey, L. Z.; Giber, J.

    1984-10-01

    The knowledge of the surface free energies γ {i/o}of solid chemical elements is necessary in many practically important subjects. The description of the quantities γ {i/o}(more correctly termed as the surface free enthalpies) is a part of a new “complex calculation of surface segregation” (CCSS) method, proposed by the authors. Here the applicability of a “standard table” of the values of γ {/i o }, obtained in that part of CCSS is shown by comparing the calculated values of γ {/i o }with several recently published experimental results.

  10. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Dissolution Theory for Multi-Component Solid/Liquid Surfaces Involving Surface Adsorption and Radiolysis Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R B

    2001-04-01

    A theoretical expression is developed for the dissolution rate response for multi-component radioactive materials that have surface adsorption kinetics and radiolysis kinetics when wetted by a multi-component aqueous solution. An application for this type of dissolution response is the performance evaluation of multi-component spent nuclear fuels (SNFs) for long term interim storage and for geological disposition. Typically, SNF compositions depend on initial composition, uranium oxide and metal alloys being most common, and on reactor burnup which results in a wide range of fission product and actinide concentrations that decay by alpha, beta, and gamma radiation. These compositional/burnup ranges of SNFs, whether placed in interim storage or emplaced in a geologic repository, will potentially be wetted by multi-component aqueous solutions, and these solutions may be further altered by radiolytic aqueous species due to three radiation fields. The solid states of the SNFs are not thermodynamically stable when wetted and will dissolve, with or without radiolysis. The following development of a dissolution theory is based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of energy reactions and energy transport across a solid-liquid phase change discontinuity that propagates at a quasi-steady, dissolution velocity. The integral form of the energy balance equation is used for this spatial surface discontinuity analysis. The integral formulation contains internal energy functional of classical thermodynamics for both the SNFs' solid state and surface adsorption species, and the adjacent liquid state, which includes radiolytic chemical species. The steady-state concentrations of radiolytic chemical species are expressed by an approximate analysis of the decay radiation transport equation. For purposes of illustration a modified Temkin adsorption isotherm was assumed for the surface adsorption kinetics on an arbitrary, finite area of the solid-liquid dissolution interface. For

  11. Solid state photovoltaic cells based on localized surface plasmon-induced charge separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yukina; Tatsuma, Tetsu

    2011-10-01

    Charge separation induced by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs and AgNPs) are applied to various devices and photoelectrochemical functionalities. Here, we develop all solid state In/TiO2/MNPs/ITO photovoltaic cells (MNP = AuNP or AgNP) by using two-dimensional MNP ensembles. Their quantum efficiencies are higher than those of previously reported solid state cells with hole-transport materials (HTMs) (ITO/TiO2/AuNPs/HTM/Au). The photoresponses from cells without HTMs suggest that the photovoltage generates at the TiO2-MNP interface.

  12. Refractive-index determination of solids from first- and second-order critical diffraction angles of periodic surface patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Meichner, Christoph Kador, Lothar; Schedl, Andreas E.; Neuber, Christian; Kreger, Klaus; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2015-08-15

    We present two approaches for measuring the refractive index of transparent solids in the visible spectral range based on diffraction gratings. Both require a small spot with a periodic pattern on the surface of the solid, collimated monochromatic light, and a rotation stage. We demonstrate the methods on a polydimethylsiloxane film (Sylgard{sup ®} 184) and compare our data to those obtained with a standard Abbe refractometer at several wavelengths between 489 and 688 nm. The results of our approaches show good agreement with the refractometer data. Possible error sources are analyzed and discussed in detail; they include mainly the linewidth of the laser and/or the angular resolution of the rotation stage. With narrow-band light sources, an angular accuracy of ±0.025{sup ∘} results in an error of the refractive index of typically ±5 ⋅ 10{sup −4}. Information on the sample thickness is not required.

  13. Refractive-index determination of solids from first- and second-order critical diffraction angles of periodic surface patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichner, Christoph; Schedl, Andreas E.; Neuber, Christian; Kreger, Klaus; Schmidt, Hans-Werner; Kador, Lothar

    2015-08-01

    We present two approaches for measuring the refractive index of transparent solids in the visible spectral range based on diffraction gratings. Both require a small spot with a periodic pattern on the surface of the solid, collimated monochromatic light, and a rotation stage. We demonstrate the methods on a polydimethylsiloxane film (Sylgard® 184) and compare our data to those obtained with a standard Abbe refractometer at several wavelengths between 489 and 688 nm. The results of our approaches show good agreement with the refractometer data. Possible error sources are analyzed and discussed in detail; they include mainly the linewidth of the laser and/or the angular resolution of the rotation stage. With narrow-band light sources, an angular accuracy of ±0.025∘ results in an error of the refractive index of typically ±5 ṡ 10-4. Information on the sample thickness is not required.

  14. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William O.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Pillay, Gautam; Bergsman, Theresa M.; Eschbach, Eugene A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Richardson, Richard L.; Roberts, Janet S.; Schalla, Ronald

    1996-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants that utilizes electrical energy. A plurality of electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a selected geometric pattern. Varying phase and voltages configurations are applied to corresponding electrodes to achieve heating, physical phase changes, and the placement of substances within the treatment region. Additionally, treatment mediums can be added to either treat the contamination within the soil or to restrict their mobility.

  15. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, W.O.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pillay, G.; Bergsman, T.M.; Eschbach, E.A.; Goheen, S.C.; Richardson, R.L.; Roberts, J.S.; Schalla, R.

    1996-08-13

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants that utilizes electrical energy. A plurality of electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a selected geometric pattern. Varying phase and voltages configurations are applied to corresponding electrodes to achieve heating, physical phase changes, and the placement of substances within the treatment region. Additionally, treatment mediums can be added to either treat the contamination within the soil or to restrict their mobility. 29 figs.

  16. The Effects of 3D-Representation Instruction on Composite-Solid Surface-Area Learning for Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Yao-Ting; Shih, Pao-Chen; Chang, Kuo-En

    2015-01-01

    Providing instruction on spatial geometry, specifically how to calculate the surface areas of composite solids, challenges many elementary school teachers. Determining the surface areas of composite solids involves complex calculations and advanced spatial concepts. The goals of this study were to build on students' learning processes for…

  17. Surface effects of vapour-liquid-solid driven Bi surface droplets formed during molecular-beam-epitaxy of GaAsBi.

    PubMed

    Steele, J A; Lewis, R A; Horvat, J; Nancarrow, M J B; Henini, M; Fan, D; Mazur, Y I; Schmidbauer, M; Ware, M E; Yu, S-Q; Salamo, G J

    2016-01-01

    Herein we investigate a (001)-oriented GaAs1-xBix/GaAs structure possessing Bi surface droplets capable of catalysing the formation of nanostructures during Bi-rich growth, through the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism. Specifically, self-aligned "nanotracks" are found to exist trailing the Bi droplets on the sample surface. Through cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy the nanotracks are revealed to in fact be elevated above surface by the formation of a subsurface planar nanowire, a structure initiated mid-way through the molecular-beam-epitaxy growth and embedded into the epilayer, via epitaxial overgrowth. Electron microscopy studies also yield the morphological, structural, and chemical properties of the nanostructures. Through a combination of Bi determination methods the compositional profile of the film is shown to be graded and inhomogeneous. Furthermore, the coherent and pure zincblende phase property of the film is detailed. Optical characterisation of features on the sample surface is carried out using polarised micro-Raman and micro-photoluminescence spectroscopies. The important light producing properties of the surface nanostructures are investigated through pump intensity-dependent micro-PL measurements, whereby relatively large local inhomogeneities are revealed to exist on the epitaxial surface for important optical parameters. We conclude that such surface effects must be considered when designing and fabricating optical devices based on GaAsBi alloys.

  18. Surface effects of vapour-liquid-solid driven Bi surface droplets formed during molecular-beam-epitaxy of GaAsBi.

    PubMed

    Steele, J A; Lewis, R A; Horvat, J; Nancarrow, M J B; Henini, M; Fan, D; Mazur, Y I; Schmidbauer, M; Ware, M E; Yu, S-Q; Salamo, G J

    2016-01-01

    Herein we investigate a (001)-oriented GaAs1-xBix/GaAs structure possessing Bi surface droplets capable of catalysing the formation of nanostructures during Bi-rich growth, through the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism. Specifically, self-aligned "nanotracks" are found to exist trailing the Bi droplets on the sample surface. Through cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy the nanotracks are revealed to in fact be elevated above surface by the formation of a subsurface planar nanowire, a structure initiated mid-way through the molecular-beam-epitaxy growth and embedded into the epilayer, via epitaxial overgrowth. Electron microscopy studies also yield the morphological, structural, and chemical properties of the nanostructures. Through a combination of Bi determination methods the compositional profile of the film is shown to be graded and inhomogeneous. Furthermore, the coherent and pure zincblende phase property of the film is detailed. Optical characterisation of features on the sample surface is carried out using polarised micro-Raman and micro-photoluminescence spectroscopies. The important light producing properties of the surface nanostructures are investigated through pump intensity-dependent micro-PL measurements, whereby relatively large local inhomogeneities are revealed to exist on the epitaxial surface for important optical parameters. We conclude that such surface effects must be considered when designing and fabricating optical devices based on GaAsBi alloys. PMID:27377213

  19. Surface effects of vapour-liquid-solid driven Bi surface droplets formed during molecular-beam-epitaxy of GaAsBi

    PubMed Central

    Steele, J. A.; Lewis, R. A.; Horvat, J.; Nancarrow, M. J. B.; Henini, M.; Fan, D.; Mazur, Y. I.; Schmidbauer, M.; Ware, M. E.; Yu, S.-Q.; Salamo, G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we investigate a (001)-oriented GaAs1−xBix/GaAs structure possessing Bi surface droplets capable of catalysing the formation of nanostructures during Bi-rich growth, through the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism. Specifically, self-aligned “nanotracks” are found to exist trailing the Bi droplets on the sample surface. Through cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy the nanotracks are revealed to in fact be elevated above surface by the formation of a subsurface planar nanowire, a structure initiated mid-way through the molecular-beam-epitaxy growth and embedded into the epilayer, via epitaxial overgrowth. Electron microscopy studies also yield the morphological, structural, and chemical properties of the nanostructures. Through a combination of Bi determination methods the compositional profile of the film is shown to be graded and inhomogeneous. Furthermore, the coherent and pure zincblende phase property of the film is detailed. Optical characterisation of features on the sample surface is carried out using polarised micro-Raman and micro-photoluminescence spectroscopies. The important light producing properties of the surface nanostructures are investigated through pump intensity-dependent micro-PL measurements, whereby relatively large local inhomogeneities are revealed to exist on the epitaxial surface for important optical parameters. We conclude that such surface effects must be considered when designing and fabricating optical devices based on GaAsBi alloys. PMID:27377213

  20. Surface effects of vapour-liquid-solid driven Bi surface droplets formed during molecular-beam-epitaxy of GaAsBi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, J. A.; Lewis, R. A.; Horvat, J.; Nancarrow, M. J. B.; Henini, M.; Fan, D.; Mazur, Y. I.; Schmidbauer, M.; Ware, M. E.; Yu, S.-Q.; Salamo, G. J.

    2016-07-01

    Herein we investigate a (001)-oriented GaAs1‑xBix/GaAs structure possessing Bi surface droplets capable of catalysing the formation of nanostructures during Bi-rich growth, through the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism. Specifically, self-aligned “nanotracks” are found to exist trailing the Bi droplets on the sample surface. Through cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy the nanotracks are revealed to in fact be elevated above surface by the formation of a subsurface planar nanowire, a structure initiated mid-way through the molecular-beam-epitaxy growth and embedded into the epilayer, via epitaxial overgrowth. Electron microscopy studies also yield the morphological, structural, and chemical properties of the nanostructures. Through a combination of Bi determination methods the compositional profile of the film is shown to be graded and inhomogeneous. Furthermore, the coherent and pure zincblende phase property of the film is detailed. Optical characterisation of features on the sample surface is carried out using polarised micro-Raman and micro-photoluminescence spectroscopies. The important light producing properties of the surface nanostructures are investigated through pump intensity-dependent micro-PL measurements, whereby relatively large local inhomogeneities are revealed to exist on the epitaxial surface for important optical parameters. We conclude that such surface effects must be considered when designing and fabricating optical devices based on GaAsBi alloys.

  1. A novel optical biosensor for direct and selective determination of serotonin in serum by Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Ramon-Marquez, Teresa; Medina-Castillo, Antonio L; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Alberto; Fernandez-Sanchez, Jorge F

    2016-08-15

    This paper describes a novel biosensor which combines the use of nanotechnology (non-woven nanofibre mat) with Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence (SS-RTP) measurement for the determination of serotonin in human serum. The developed biosensor is simple and can be directly applied in serum; only requires a simple clean-up protocol. Therefore it is the first time that serotonin is analysed directly in serum with a non-enzymatic technique. This new approach is based on the covalent immobilization of serotonin directly from serum on a functional nanofibre material (Tiss®-Link) with a preactivated surface for direct covalent immobilization of primary and secondary amines, and the subsequent measurement of serotonin phosphorescent emission from the solid surface. The phosphorescent detection allows avoiding the interference from any fluorescence emission or scattering light from any molecule present in the serum sample which can be also immobilised on the nanofibre material. The determination of serotonin with this SS-RTP sensor overcomes some limitations, such as large interference from the matrix and high cost and complexity of many of the methods widely used for serotonin analysis. The potential applicability of the sensor in the clinical diagnosis was demonstrated by analysing serum samples from seven healthy volunteers. The method was validated with an external reference laboratory, obtaining a correlation coefficient of 0.997 which indicates excellent correlation between the two methods.

  2. A novel optical biosensor for direct and selective determination of serotonin in serum by Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Ramon-Marquez, Teresa; Medina-Castillo, Antonio L; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Alberto; Fernandez-Sanchez, Jorge F

    2016-08-15

    This paper describes a novel biosensor which combines the use of nanotechnology (non-woven nanofibre mat) with Solid Surface-Room Temperature Phosphorescence (SS-RTP) measurement for the determination of serotonin in human serum. The developed biosensor is simple and can be directly applied in serum; only requires a simple clean-up protocol. Therefore it is the first time that serotonin is analysed directly in serum with a non-enzymatic technique. This new approach is based on the covalent immobilization of serotonin directly from serum on a functional nanofibre material (Tiss®-Link) with a preactivated surface for direct covalent immobilization of primary and secondary amines, and the subsequent measurement of serotonin phosphorescent emission from the solid surface. The phosphorescent detection allows avoiding the interference from any fluorescence emission or scattering light from any molecule present in the serum sample which can be also immobilised on the nanofibre material. The determination of serotonin with this SS-RTP sensor overcomes some limitations, such as large interference from the matrix and high cost and complexity of many of the methods widely used for serotonin analysis. The potential applicability of the sensor in the clinical diagnosis was demonstrated by analysing serum samples from seven healthy volunteers. The method was validated with an external reference laboratory, obtaining a correlation coefficient of 0.997 which indicates excellent correlation between the two methods. PMID:27085954

  3. Surface properties of a single perfluoroalkyl group on water surfaces studied by surface potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Shimoaka, Takafumi; Tanaka, Yuki; Shioya, Nobutaka; Morita, Kohei; Sonoyama, Masashi; Amii, Hideki; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    A discriminative study of a single perfluoroalkyl (Rf) group from a bulk material is recently recognized to be necessary toward the total understanding of Rf compounds based on a primary chemical structure. The single molecule and the bulk matter have an interrelationship via an intrinsic two-dimensional (2D) aggregation property of an Rf group, which is theorized by the stratified dipole-arrays (SDA) theory. Since an Rf group has dipole moments along many C-F bonds, a single Rf group would possess a hydrophilic-like character on the surface. To reveal the hydration character of a single Rf group, in the present study, surface potential (ΔV) measurements are performed for Langmuir monolayers of Rf-containing compounds. From a comparative study with a monolayer of a normal hydrocarbon compound, the hydration/dehydration dynamics of a lying Rf group on water has first been monitored by ΔV measurements, through which a single Rf group has been revealed to have a unique "dipole-interactive" character, which enables the Rf group interacted with the water 'surface.' In addition, the SDA theory proves to be useful to predict the 2D aggregation property across the phase transition temperature of 19°C by use of the ΔV measurements.

  4. Surface properties of a single perfluoroalkyl group on water surfaces studied by surface potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Shimoaka, Takafumi; Tanaka, Yuki; Shioya, Nobutaka; Morita, Kohei; Sonoyama, Masashi; Amii, Hideki; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    A discriminative study of a single perfluoroalkyl (Rf) group from a bulk material is recently recognized to be necessary toward the total understanding of Rf compounds based on a primary chemical structure. The single molecule and the bulk matter have an interrelationship via an intrinsic two-dimensional (2D) aggregation property of an Rf group, which is theorized by the stratified dipole-arrays (SDA) theory. Since an Rf group has dipole moments along many C-F bonds, a single Rf group would possess a hydrophilic-like character on the surface. To reveal the hydration character of a single Rf group, in the present study, surface potential (ΔV) measurements are performed for Langmuir monolayers of Rf-containing compounds. From a comparative study with a monolayer of a normal hydrocarbon compound, the hydration/dehydration dynamics of a lying Rf group on water has first been monitored by ΔV measurements, through which a single Rf group has been revealed to have a unique "dipole-interactive" character, which enables the Rf group interacted with the water 'surface.' In addition, the SDA theory proves to be useful to predict the 2D aggregation property across the phase transition temperature of 19°C by use of the ΔV measurements. PMID:27569518

  5. Prediction of Ablation Rates from Solid Surfaces Exposed to High Temperature Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyuzlu, Kazim M.; Coote, David

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model and a solution algorithm is developed to study the physics of high temperature heat transfer and material ablation and identify the problems associated with the flow of hydrogen gas at very high temperatures and velocities through pipes and various components of Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) motors. Ablation and melting can be experienced when the inner solid surface of the cooling channels and the diverging-converging nozzle of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) motor is exposed to hydrogen gas flow at temperatures around 2500 degrees Kelvin and pressures around 3.4 MPa. In the experiments conducted on typical NTR motors developed in 1960s, degradation of the cooling channel material (cracking in the nuclear fuel element cladding) and in some instances melting of the core was observed. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study based on two types of physics based mathematical models that were developed to simulate the thermal-hydrodynamic conditions that lead to ablation of the solid surface of a stainless steel pipe exposed to high temperature hydrogen gas near sonic velocities. One of the proposed models is one-dimensional and assumes the gas flow to be unsteady, compressible and viscous. An in-house computer code was developed to solve the conservations equations of this model using a second-order accurate finite-difference technique. The second model assumes the flow to be three-dimensional, unsteady, compressible and viscous. A commercial CFD code (Fluent) was used to solve the later model equations. Both models assume the thermodynamic and transport properties of the hydrogen gas to be temperature dependent. In the solution algorithm developed for this study, the unsteady temperature of the pipe is determined from the heat equation for the solid. The solid-gas interface temperature is determined from an energy balance at the interface which includes heat transfer from or to the interface by conduction, convection, radiation, and

  6. Measuring the surface tension of soap bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are for students to gain an understanding of surface tension, to see that pressure inside a small bubble is larger than that inside a large bubble. These concepts can be used to explain the behavior of liquid foams as well as precipitate coarsening and grain growth. Equipment, supplies, and procedures are explained.

  7. Static measurement of the thickness of the ablative coating of the solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Harry C.

    1996-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) used to launch the Space Shuttle are coated with a layer of ablative material to prevent thermal damage when they reenter the earth's atmosphere. The coating consists of a mixture of cork, glass, and resin. A new coating (Marshall Convergent Coating, MCC-2) was recently developed that is environmentally complaint. The coating must meet certain minimum thickness standards in order to protect the SRB. The coating is applied by a robot controlled nozzle that moves from the bottom to top, as the rocket part rotates on a table. Several coats are applied, building up to the desired thickness. Inspectors do a limited amount of destructive 'wet' testing. This involves an inspector inserting a rod in the wet coating and removing the rod. This results in a hole that, of course, must be patched later. The material is cured and the thickness is measured. There is no real-time feedback as the coating is being applied. Although this might seem like the best way to control thickness, the problems with 'blowback' (reflected material covering the sensor) are formidable, and have not been solved. After the thermal coating is applied, a protective top coat is applied. The SRB part is then placed in a oven and baked to harden the surface. The operations personnel then measure the thickness of the layer using the Kaman 7200 Displacement Measuring System. The probe is placed on the surface. One person (the inspector) reads the instrument, while another(the technician) records the thickness. Measurements are taken at one foot intervals. After the measurements are taken, the number of low readings is tabulated. If more than 10 percent of the points fall below the minimum value, there is a design review, and the part may be stripped of coating, and a new coating is applied. There is no other analysis.

  8. Succeed escape: Flow shear promotes tumbling of Escherichia colinear a solid surface

    PubMed Central

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how bacteria move close to a surface under various stimuli is crucial for a broad range of microbial processes including biofilm formation, bacterial transport and migration. While prior studies focus on interactions between single stimulus and bacterial suspension, we emphasize on compounding effects of flow shear and solid surfaces on bacterial motility, especially reorientation and tumble. We have applied microfluidics and digital holographic microscopy to capture a large number (>105) of 3D Escherichia coli trajectories near a surface under various flow shear. We find that near-surface flow shear promotes cell reorientation and mitigates the tumble suppression and re-orientation confinement found in a quiescent flow, and consequently enhances surface normal bacterial dispersion. Conditional sampling suggests that two complimentary hydrodynamic mechanisms, Jeffrey Orbit and shear-induced flagella unbundling, are responsible for the enhancement in bacterial tumble motility. These findings imply that flow shear may mitigate cell trapping and prevent biofilm initiation. PMID:27752062

  9. The possible role of solid surface area in condensation reactions during chemical evolution - Reevaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahav, N.; Chang, S.

    1976-01-01

    Using surface concentration and reaction rate as the main criteria for the feasibility of condensation reactions, four types of prebiotic environments were analyzed: (1) an ocean-sediment system, (2) a dehydrated lagoon bed produced by evaporation, (3) the surface of a frozen sediment, and (4) a fluctuating system where hydration (rainstorms, tidal variations, flooding) and dehydration (evaporation) take place in a cyclic manner. With the possible exception of nucleotides, low adsorption of organomonomers on sediment surfaces of a prebiotic ocean (pH 8) is expected, and significant condensation is considered unlikely. In dehydrated and frozen systems, high surface concentrations are probable and condensation is more likely. In fluctuating environments, condensation rates will be enhanced and the size distribution of the oligomers formed during dehydration may be influenced by a 'redistribution mechanism' in which adsorbed oligomers and monomers are desorbed and redistributed on the solid surface during the next hydration-dehydration cycle.

  10. Semiconductor nanocrystals covalently bound to solid inorganic surfaces using self-assembled monolayers

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Colvin, Vicki L.

    1998-01-01

    Methods are described for attaching semiconductor nanocrystals to solid inorganic surfaces, using self-assembled bifunctional organic monolayers as bridge compounds. Two different techniques are presented. One relies on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on these surfaces. When exposed to solutions of nanocrystals, these bridge compounds bind the crystals and anchor them to the surface. The second technique attaches nanocrystals already coated with bridge compounds to the surfaces. Analyses indicate the presence of quantum confined clusters on the surfaces at the nanolayer level. These materials allow electron spectroscopies to be completed on condensed phase clusters, and represent a first step towards synthesis of an organized assembly of clusters. These new products are also disclosed.

  11. Semiconductor nanocrystals covalently bound to solid inorganic surfaces using self-assembled monolayers

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Colvin, V.L.

    1998-05-12

    Methods are described for attaching semiconductor nanocrystals to solid inorganic surfaces, using self-assembled bifunctional organic monolayers as bridge compounds. Two different techniques are presented. One relies on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on these surfaces. When exposed to solutions of nanocrystals, these bridge compounds bind the crystals and anchor them to the surface. The second technique attaches nanocrystals already coated with bridge compounds to the surfaces. Analyses indicate the presence of quantum confined clusters on the surfaces at the nanolayer level. These materials allow electron spectroscopies to be completed on condensed phase clusters, and represent a first step towards synthesis of an organized assembly of clusters. These new products are also disclosed. 10 figs.

  12. Measurements of erosion characteristics for metal and polymer surfaces using profilometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Ligia C.; Gregory, John C.; Peters, Palmer N.

    1991-01-01

    The surfaces of many materials exposed in low earth orbit are modified due to interaction with atomic oxygen. Chemical changes and surface roughening effects can occur which alter optical and other properties. The experiment A0114 contained 128 solid surface samples, half of which were exposed on the front and half on the rear of Long Duration Exposure Facility. Each sample was subjected to many analyses, but only the methods and techniques are described which were used to measure the changes in roughness, erosion depths, and material growth using profilometry.

  13. Aplication of Phase Shift Projection Moire Technique in Solid Surfaces Topographic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lino, A. C. L.; Dal Fabbro, I. M.; Enes, A. M.

    2008-04-01

    The application of projection moiré with phase shift techniques in vegetable organs surface topography survey had to step up basic procedures before reaching significant conclusions. As recommended by [1], the proposed method should be tested on virtual surfaces [1] before being carried on solid symmetric surfaces [2], followed by tests on asymmetric surfaces as fruits [3] and finally a generation of a 3D digital models of solid figures as well as of fruits [4]. In this research, identified as the step [2], tested objects included cylinders, cubes and spheres. In this sense a Ronchi grid named G1 was generated in a PC, from which other grids referred as G2, G3, and G4 were set out of phase by 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 of period from G1. Grid G1 was then projected onto the samples surface instead of being virtually distorted, receiving the name of Gd. The difference between Gd and G1, G2, G3, and G4 followed by filtration generated the moiré fringes M1, M2, M3 and M4 respectively. Fringes are out of phase one from each other by 1/4 of period, which were processed by the Rising Sun Moiré software to produce packed phase and further on, the unpacked fringes. Final representations in gray levels as well as in contour lines showed the topography of the deformed grid Gd. Parallel line segments were projected onto moiré generated surface images to evaluate the approximation to the real surface. Line segments images were then captured by means of the ImageJ software and the corresponding curve fitting obtained. The work conclusions included the reliability of the proposed method in surveying solid figures shape.

  14. Evaluation of arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, N.; Long, C. N.; Augustine, J.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, T.; Longenecker, D.; Nievergall, O.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2011-08-01

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  15. Surface Temperature Measurement Using Hematite Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring temperature via spectrophotometry principles are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on the temperature dependence of the reflection spectrum of hematite. Light reflected from these sensors can be measured to determine a temperature, based on changes in the reflection spectrum discussed herein.

  16. Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-24

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  17. Surface moisture measurement system electromagnetic induction probe calibration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, R.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-08

    The Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) is designed to measure the moisture concentration near the surfaces of the wastes located in the Hanford Site tank farms. This document describes a calibration methodology to demonstrate that the Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) moisture probe meets relevant requirements in the `Design Requirements Document (DRD) for the Surface Moisture Measurement System.` The primary purpose of the experimental tests described in this methodology is to make possible interpretation of EMI in-tank surface probe data to estimate the surface moisture.

  18. The role of surface roughness in the measurement of slipperiness.

    PubMed

    Chang, W R; Kim, I J; Manning, D P; Bunterngchit, Y

    2001-10-20

    Surface roughness has been shown to have substantial effects on the slip resistance between shoe heels and floor surfaces under various types of walking environments. This paper summarizes comprehensive views of the current understanding on the roles of surface roughness on the shoe and floor surfaces in the measurement of slipperiness and discusses promising directions for future research. Various techniques and instruments for surface roughness measurements and related roughness parameters are reviewed in depth. It is suggested that a stylus-type profilometer and a laser scanning confocal microscope are the preferred instruments for surface roughness measurements in the field and laboratory, respectively. The need for developing enhanced methods for reliably characterizing the slip resistance properties is highlighted. This could be based on the principal understanding of the nature of shoe and floor interface and surface analysis techniques for characterizing both surfaces of shoe and floor. Therefore, surface roughness on both shoe and floor surfaces should be measured and combined to arrive at the final assessment of slipperiness. While controversies around the friction measurement for slipperiness assessment still remain, surface roughness measurement may provide an objective alternative to overcoming the limitations of friction measurements.

  19. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William O.; Richardson, Richard L.; Goheen, Steven C.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants. Six electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a substantially equilateral hexagonal arrangement. Six phases of voltages are applied to corresponding electrodes. The voltages are adjusted within a first range of voltages to create multiple current paths between pairs of the electrodes. The current paths are evenly distributed throughout the region defined by the electrodes and therefore uniformly heat the region. The region of earthen material is heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants by promoting microbial action. This temperature is less than a melting temperature of the earthen material.

  20. Solid Earth Tide Parameters from VLBI Measurements and FCN Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krásná, H.; Böhm, J.; Böhm, S.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    In a common global adjustment of the 24-hour IVS sessions from 1984.0 till 2011.0 with the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS), we have estimated simultaneously terrestrial reference frame (station positions and velocities), celestial reference frame (radio source positions), and Earth orientation parameters, together with complex Love and Shida numbers for diurnal tides and their frequency dependence caused by the resonance with the Free Core Nutation (FCN). As the FCN period is contained in the solid Earth tidal displacements and also in the motion of the Celestial Intermediate Pole w.r.t. the celestial reference system, it is determined from both phenomena as a common parameter in the global solution. Our estimated FCN period of -431.18 ± 0.10 sidereal days is slightly different from the value -431.39 sidereal days adopted in the IERS Conventions 2010.

  1. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, W.O.; Richardson, R.L.; Goheen, S.C.

    1994-07-19

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants. Six electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a substantially equilateral hexagonal arrangement. Six phases of voltages are applied to corresponding electrodes. The voltages are adjusted within a first range of voltages to create multiple current paths between pairs of the electrodes. The current paths are evenly distributed throughout the region defined by the electrodes and therefore uniformly heat the region. The region of earthen material is heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants by promoting microbial action. This temperature is less than a melting temperature of the earthen material. 13 figs.

  2. Filtration of contaminated suspended solids for the treatment of surface water.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Catherine N; Davarpanah, Neginmalak; Fukue, Masaharu; Inoue, Tomohiro

    2009-02-01

    As few technologies exist worldwide for the treatment of contaminated surface water, a new approach is currently under development consisting of an in situ water treatment system based on a floating filtration process for adsorbed contaminants such as heavy metals. Laboratory filtration tests were performed for the removal of contaminated suspended solids (SS) from surface water. SS, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and organic carbon (OC) were monitored. Of the four filters (two non-woven geotextiles, a woven geotextile and a sand filter) evaluated, filter 1 (a non-woven geotextile) was the most effective for removal % of the total suspended solids. The results demonstrated excellent efficiency by filter No. 1, for reducing turbidity by 93-98%, as well as SS by up to 98.9% and COD by 65-71% for three sites with initial turbidities of 70, 20, and 120 NTU, respectively. The level of heavy metal removal was 98.9% due the heavy metal content of the suspended solids (60 mg kg(-1) of Cu, 90 mg kg (-1) of Ni, 130 mg kg(-1) of Zn, 200 mg kg(-1) of Cr, and 80 mg kg(-1) of Pb). The development of this technology could potentially protect the public and aquatic plants and animals from dangerous contaminants such as heavy metals adsorbed onto the suspended solids. PMID:19084263

  3. Description of a pressure measurement technique for obtaining surface static pressures of a radial turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicicco, L. D.; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-07-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  4. Description of a pressure measurement technique for obtaining surface static pressures of a radial turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-02-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  5. Description of a Pressure Measurement Technique for Obtaining Surface Static Pressures of a Radial Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  6. Description of a pressure measurement technique for obtaining surface static pressures of a radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicicco, L. D.; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  7. Laser vibrometer analysis of sensor loading effects in underwater measurements of compliant surface motion

    SciTech Connect

    Caspall, J.J.; Gray, M.D.; Caille, G.W.; Jarzynski, J.; Rogers, P.H.; McCall, G.S. II

    1996-04-01

    The application of contact motion sensors, such as accelerometers, in the measurement of the vibration of compliant surfaces underwater may lead to errors in the evaluation of certain types of surface motion. An underwater scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (USLDV) was used to measure the scattered velocity field due to a mock sensor (rigid, neutrally buoyant cylindrical body) on a compliant surface (the outer surface of a thin cylindrical shell coated with a layer of soft rubber). Axially propagating waves were launched in the shell by a ring of 10 uniformly distributed shakers located near one end of the shell and driven with a short pulse. The outer surface of the coating was scanned over a short line segment in the axial direction with and without the mock sensor attached. The extracted scattered field, consisted of high wavenumber fluid-solid interface waves accompanied by rotational motion of the mock sensor. [Work supported by ONR] {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Rivited panel surface measurement using photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, W. D.; Lobb, V. B.; Lansing, F. L.; Stoller, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    Two riveted antenna panels on rings number 3 and 9 were removed from the 34m antenna at DSS-15, fixed in the leveled position and the surface was photographed indoors. The results from this pilot photogrammetric demonstration and diagnostics of panel surface contours, are presented. The photogrammetric network for each panel incorporated eight photographs, two from each of four camera stations and observed over 200 targets. The accuracy (1 sigma) of the XYZ coordinates for the error ellipsoids was + or - 0.013 mm (0.0005 inch). This level of precision relative to the object size corresponds roughly to 1 part in 250,000 which is superior to conventional dial sweep-arm template techniques by at least a factor of 4.

  9. Laser surface treatment of porous ceramic substrate for application in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmod, D. S. A.; Khan, A. A.; Munot, M. A.; Glandut, N.; Labbe, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Laser has offered a large number of benefits for surface treatment of ceramics due to possibility of localized heating, very high heating/cooling rates and possibility of growth of structural configurations only produced under non-equilibrium high temperature conditions. The present work investigates oxidation of porous ZrB2-SiC sintered ceramic substrates through treatment by a 1072 ± 10 nm ytterbium fiber laser. A multi-layer structure is hence produced showing successively oxygen rich distinct layers. The porous bulk beneath these layers remained unaffected as this laser-formed oxide scale and protected the substrate from oxidation. A glassy SiO2 structure thus obtained on the surface of the substrate becomes subject of interest for further research, specifically for its utilization as solid protonic conductor in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs).

  10. System and method for removing contaminants from solid surfaces and decontaminating waste

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.L.; Geiss, A.J.; Grieco, S.; Neubauer, E.D.; Rhea, J.R.

    1995-10-10

    A method and system are disclosed for removing a surface layer contaminated with radioactive and/or hazardous material and subsequently treating the waste to remove contaminants and provide an essentially contaminant-free final effluent. The contaminated material is removed by blasting the surface with a pressurized stream of air and sodium bicarbonate abrasive media, and the media is dissolved in water subsequent to the blasting operation. The resulting waste is treated in a sequence of steps including adjustment of pH, aeration and separation into primarily solid and liquid phases by precipitation of solids, which are removed for appropriate disposal. The primarily liquid phase is successively passed through a particle filter, a granulated activated carbon filter and a polishing unit to produce the clean final effluent. 1 fig.

  11. Modelling interstellar physics and chemistry: implications for surface and solid-state processes.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-13

    We discuss several types of regions in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and other galaxies in which the chemistry appears to be influenced or dominated by surface and solid-state processes occurring on or in interstellar dust grains. For some of these processes, for example, the formation of H₂ molecules, detailed experimental and theoretical approaches have provided excellent fundamental data for incorporation into astrochemical models. In other cases, there is an astrochemical requirement for much more laboratory and computational study, and we highlight these needs in our description. Nevertheless, in spite of the limitations of the data, it is possible to infer from astrochemical modelling that surface and solid-state processes play a crucial role in astronomical chemistry from early epochs of the Universe up to the present day.

  12. Modelling interstellar physics and chemistry: implications for surface and solid-state processes.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-13

    We discuss several types of regions in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and other galaxies in which the chemistry appears to be influenced or dominated by surface and solid-state processes occurring on or in interstellar dust grains. For some of these processes, for example, the formation of H₂ molecules, detailed experimental and theoretical approaches have provided excellent fundamental data for incorporation into astrochemical models. In other cases, there is an astrochemical requirement for much more laboratory and computational study, and we highlight these needs in our description. Nevertheless, in spite of the limitations of the data, it is possible to infer from astrochemical modelling that surface and solid-state processes play a crucial role in astronomical chemistry from early epochs of the Universe up to the present day. PMID:23734052

  13. Finite-wavelength surface-tension-driven instabilities in soft solids, including instability in a cylindrical channel through an elastic solid.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Chen; Biggins, John

    2016-08-01

    We deploy linear stability analysis to find the threshold wavelength (λ) and surface tension (γ) of Rayleigh-Plateau type "peristaltic" instabilities in incompressible neo-Hookean solids in a range of cylindrical geometries with radius R_{0}. First we consider a solid cylinder, and recover the well-known, infinite-wavelength instability for γ≥6μR_{0}, where μ is the solid's shear modulus. Second, we consider a volume-conserving (e.g., fluid filled and sealed) cylindrical cavity through an infinite solid, and demonstrate infinite-wavelength instability for γ≥2μR_{0}. Third, we consider a solid cylinder embedded in a different infinite solid, and find a finite-wavelength instability with λ∝R_{0}, at surface tension γ∝μR_{0}, where the constants depend on the two solids' modulus ratio. Finally, we consider an empty cylindrical channel (or filled with expellable fluid) through an infinite solid, and find an instability with finite wavelength, λ≈2R_{0}, for γ≥2.543...μR_{0}. Using finite-strain numerics, we show such a channel jumps at instability to a highly peristaltic state, likely precipitating it's blockage or failure. We argue that finite wavelengths are generic for elastocapillary instabilities, with the simple cylinder's infinite wavelength being the exception rather than the rule. PMID:27627392

  14. Finite-wavelength surface-tension-driven instabilities in soft solids, including instability in a cylindrical channel through an elastic solid.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Chen; Biggins, John

    2016-08-01

    We deploy linear stability analysis to find the threshold wavelength (λ) and surface tension (γ) of Rayleigh-Plateau type "peristaltic" instabilities in incompressible neo-Hookean solids in a range of cylindrical geometries with radius R_{0}. First we consider a solid cylinder, and recover the well-known, infinite-wavelength instability for γ≥6μR_{0}, where μ is the solid's shear modulus. Second, we consider a volume-conserving (e.g., fluid filled and sealed) cylindrical cavity through an infinite solid, and demonstrate infinite-wavelength instability for γ≥2μR_{0}. Third, we consider a solid cylinder embedded in a different infinite solid, and find a finite-wavelength instability with λ∝R_{0}, at surface tension γ∝μR_{0}, where the constants depend on the two solids' modulus ratio. Finally, we consider an empty cylindrical channel (or filled with expellable fluid) through an infinite solid, and find an instability with finite wavelength, λ≈2R_{0}, for γ≥2.543...μR_{0}. Using finite-strain numerics, we show such a channel jumps at instability to a highly peristaltic state, likely precipitating it's blockage or failure. We argue that finite wavelengths are generic for elastocapillary instabilities, with the simple cylinder's infinite wavelength being the exception rather than the rule.

  15. Finite-wavelength surface-tension-driven instabilities in soft solids, including instability in a cylindrical channel through an elastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Chen; Biggins, John

    2016-08-01

    We deploy linear stability analysis to find the threshold wavelength (λ ) and surface tension (γ ) of Rayleigh-Plateau type "peristaltic" instabilities in incompressible neo-Hookean solids in a range of cylindrical geometries with radius R0. First we consider a solid cylinder, and recover the well-known, infinite-wavelength instability for γ ≥6 μ R0 , where μ is the solid's shear modulus. Second, we consider a volume-conserving (e.g., fluid filled and sealed) cylindrical cavity through an infinite solid, and demonstrate infinite-wavelength instability for γ ≥2 μ R0 . Third, we consider a solid cylinder embedded in a different infinite solid, and find a finite-wavelength instability with λ ∝R0 , at surface tension γ ∝μ R0 , where the constants depend on the two solids' modulus ratio. Finally, we consider an empty cylindrical channel (or filled with expellable fluid) through an infinite solid, and find an instability with finite wavelength, λ ≈2 R0 , for γ ≥2.543 ...μ R0 . Using finite-strain numerics, we show such a channel jumps at instability to a highly peristaltic state, likely precipitating it's blockage or failure. We argue that finite wavelengths are generic for elastocapillary instabilities, with the simple cylinder's infinite wavelength being the exception rather than the rule.

  16. On the Use of Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter for Surface Dose Measurement during Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yusof, Fasihah Hanum; Ung, Ngie Min; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding; Jong, Wei Loong; Ath, Vannyat; Phua, Vincent Chee Ee; Heng, Siew Ping; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the suitability of using the optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) in measuring surface dose during radiotherapy. The water equivalent depth (WED) of the OSLD was first determined by comparing the surface dose measured using the OSLD with the percentage depth dose at the buildup region measured using a Markus ionization chamber. Surface doses were measured on a solid water phantom using the OSLD and compared against the Markus ionization chamber and Gafchromic EBT3 film measurements. The effect of incident beam angles on surface dose was also studied. The OSLD was subsequently used to measure surface dose during tangential breast radiotherapy treatments in a phantom study and in the clinical measurement of 10 patients. Surface dose to the treated breast or chest wall, and on the contralateral breast were measured. The WED of the OSLD was found to be at 0.4 mm. For surface dose measurement on a solid water phantom, the Markus ionization chamber measured 15.95% for 6 MV photon beam and 12.64% for 10 MV photon beam followed by EBT3 film (23.79% and 17.14%) and OSLD (37.77% and 25.38%). Surface dose increased with the increase of the incident beam angle. For phantom and patient breast surface dose measurement, the response of the OSLD was higher than EBT3 film. The in-vivo measurements were also compared with the treatment planning system predicted dose. The OSLD measured higher dose values compared to dose at the surface (Hp(0.0)) by a factor of 2.37 for 6 MV and 2.01 for 10 MV photon beams, respectively. The measurement of absorbed dose at the skin depth of 0.4 mm by the OSLD can still be a useful tool to assess radiation effects on the skin dermis layer. This knowledge can be used to prevent and manage potential acute skin reaction and late skin toxicity from radiotherapy treatments. PMID:26052690

  17. Effect of surface reflectivity on photonic Doppler velocimetry measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianqian; Xia, Weiguang; Wang, Xi; Song, Hongwei; Huang, Chenguang

    2014-05-01

    While photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) is becoming a common diagnostic for tracking velocity in shock physical experiments, its validity on measuring surfaces with different reflectivity is not studied. This paper investigates the effects of surface reflectivity on PDV measurement for tracking back free surface velocity in laser shock processing. Credible measurement results for coarse polished surfaces with low reflectivity are obtained, whereas fine polished surfaces with relatively high reflectivity lead to heterodyne fringes with high frequency and corresponding unreasonably fast velocities. This phenomenon reported in the paper is somewhat inconsistent with the general view that PDV has remarkable robustness to large changes in surface reflectivity. The reason might be ascribed to multiple reflections of light, which cause the generation of multiple Doppler shifts. The mixing of the reference light and those Doppler-shifted lights brings out high frequency heterodyne fringes resulting in high velocity. Low surface reflectivity is better suited for PDV measurements.

  18. Molecular mechanisms for surfactant-aided oil removal from a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shumeng; Li, Zhi; Liu, Bei; Zhang, Xianren; Yang, Qingyuan

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the detachment mechanism of oil molecules from the hydrophobic solid surface in the aqueous surfactant solution is studied with lattice Monte Carlo simulations. Three different mechanisms for oil removal, including oil carrying microemulsion model, oil film stripping model, and surfactant-aided diffusion model are identified. The molecular mechanisms that agree with experimental observations are found to be dependent sensitively on surfactant structure.

  19. Application of solid state NMR for the study of surface bound species and fossil fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althaus, Stacey

    Recent advances in solid state NMR have been utilized to study a variety of systems. These advancements have allowed for the acquisition of sequences previously only available for solution state detection. The protocol for the measurement of coals and other carbonaceous materials was updated to incorporate the recent advancements in fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and high magnetic fields. Argonne Premium Coals were used to test the sensitivity and resolution of the experiments preformed at high field and fast MAS. The higher field spectra were shown to be slightly less sensitive than the traditional lower field spectra, however, the new high field fast MAS spectra had better resolution. This increased resolution allowed for the separation of a variety of different functional groups, thereby allowing the composition of the coal to be determined. The use of 1 H detection allowed for 2D spectra of coals for the first time. These spectra could be filtered to examine either through-space or through-bond correlations. Indirect detection via 1 H was also pivotal in the detection of natural abundance 15 N spectra. Through-space and through-bond 2D spectra of natural abundance bulk species are shown with a sensitivity increase of 15 fold over traditional detection. This sensitivity enhancement allowed for the detection of natural abundance 15 N surface bound species in 2D, something that could not be acquired via traditional methods. The increased efficiency of the through-space magnetization transfer, Cross polarization, at fast MAS compared to the slower MAS rates is shown. The through-bond magnetization transfer via INEPT was examined and the effect of J-coupling is confirmed. Solid State NMR can be utilized to help improve catalytic interactions. Solid state NMR was used to examine the aldol condensation between p-nitrobenzaldehyde and acetone. The formation of a stable intermediate with p-nitrobenzaldehyde was found on the primary functionalized amine mesoporous

  20. Measurement of surface recombination velocity on heavily doped indium phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Ghalla-Goradia, Manju; Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, Sheila

    1990-01-01

    Surface recombination velocity (SRV) on heavily doped n-type and p-type InP was measured as a function of surface treatment. For the limited range of substrates and surface treatments studied, SRV and surface stability depend strongly on the surface treatment. SRVs of 100,000 cm/sec in both p-type and n-type InP are obtainable, but in n-type the low-SRV surfaces were unstable, and the only stable surfaces on n-type had SRVs of more than 10to the 6th cm/sec.

  1. Soft landing of cell-sized vesicles on solid surfaces for robust vehicle capture/release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dehui; Wu, Zhengfang; Gao, Aiting; Zhang, Weihong; Kang, Chengying; Tao, Qi; Yang, Peng

    2015-04-28

    Based on a concept of a smooth and steady landing of fragile objects without destruction via a soft cushion, we have developed a model for the soft landing of deformable lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) on solid surfaces. The foundation for a successful soft landing is a solid substrate with a two-layer coating, including a bottom layer of positively charged lysozymes and an upper lipid membrane layer. We came to a clear conclusion that anionic GUVs when sedimented on a surface, the vesicle rupture occurs upon the direct contact with the positively charged lysozyme layer due to the strong coulombic interactions. In contrast, certain separation distances was achieved by the insertion of a soft lipid membrane cushion between the charged GUVs and the lysozyme layer, which attenuated the coulombic force and created a mild buffer zone, ensuring the robust capture of GUVs on the substrate without their rupture. The non-covalent bonding facilitated a fully reversible stimuli-responsive capture/release of GUVs from the biomimetic solid surface, which has never been demonstrated before due to the extreme fragility of GUVs. Moreover, the controllable capture/release of cells has been proven to be of vital importance in biotechnology, and similarity the present approach to capture/release cells is expected to open the previously inaccessible avenues of research. PMID:25787226

  2. The first contact of a droplet impacting a dry solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoroddsen, S. T.; Li, E. Q.; Vakarelski, I. U.

    2015-11-01

    The first contact of a drop hitting a dry solid surface, does not occur at a point but along a ring, owing to viscous lubrication pressure in the intervening air layer. This always leads to the entrapment of a small bubble under the center of the drop. The nature of the actual first contact is affected by the roughness of the solid. We use ultra-high-speed imaging, with 200 ns time resolution, to observe the structure of this first contact between the liquid and a smooth solid surface. For a water drop impacting onto regular micro-scope glass slide we observe a ring of micro-bubbles as observed by Thoroddsen et al. which conveniently marks the original diameter of the air-disc. This ring of bubbles arises owing to multiple initial contacts just before the formation of the fully wetted outer section. These contacts are spaced by a few microns and quickly grow in size until they meet each other, entrapping the bubbles. We thereby conclude that the localized contacts are due to nanometric roughness of the glass surface and the presence of the micro-bubbles can therefore distinguish between glass with 10 nm roughness from perfectly smooth glass.

  3. Surface clogging process modeling of suspended solids during urban stormwater aquifer recharge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zijia; Du, Xinqiang; Yang, Yuesuo; Ye, Xueyan

    2012-01-01

    Aquifer recharge, which uses urban stormwater, is an effective technique to control the negative effects of groundwater over-exploitation, while clogging problems in infiltration systems remain the key restricting factor in broadening its practice. Quantitative understanding of the clogging process is still very poor. A laboratory study was conducted to understand surface physical clogging processes, with the primary aim of developing a model for predicting suspended solid clogging processes before aquifer recharge projects start. The experiments investigated the clogging characteristics of different suspended solid sizes in recharge water by using a series of one-dimensional fine quartz sand columns. The results showed that the smaller the suspended particles in recharge water, the farther the distance of movement and the larger the scope of clogging in porous media. Clogging extents in fine sand were 1 cm, for suspended particle size ranging from 0.075 to 0.0385 mm, and 2 cm, for particles less than 0.0385 mm. In addition, clogging development occurred more rapidly for smaller suspended solid particles. It took 48, 42, and 36 hr respectively, for large-, medium-, and small-sized particles to reach pre-determined clogging standards. An empirical formula and iteration model for the surface clogging evolution process were derived. The verification results obtained from stormwater recharge into fine sand demonstrated that the model could reflect the real laws of the surface clogging process.

  4. Extraction of model contaminants from solid surfaces by environmentally compatible microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ruiz, Salomé; Schulreich, Christoph; Kostevic, Angelika; Tiersch, Brigitte; Koetz, Joachim; Kakorin, Sergej; von Klitzing, Regine; Jung, Martin; Hellweg, Thomas; Wellert, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In the present contribution, we evaluate the efficiency of eco-friendly microemulsions to decontaminate solid surfaces by monitoring the extraction of non-toxic simulants of sulfur mustard out of model surfaces. The extraction process of the non-toxic simulants has been monitored by means of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. The kinetics of the removal process was analyzed by different empirical models. Based on the analysis of the kinetics, we can assess the influence of the amounts of oil and water and the microemulsion structure on the extraction process. PMID:26994352

  5. Challenges of infrared reflective spectroscopy of solid-phase explosives and chemicals on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2012-09-01

    Reliable active and passive hyperspectral imaging and detection of explosives and solid-phase chemical residue on surfaces remains a challenge and an active area of research and development. Both methods rely on reference libraries for material identification, but in many cases the reference spectra do not sufficiently resemble those instrumental signals scattered from real-world objects. We describe a physics-based model using the dispersive complex dielectric constant to explain what is often thought of as anomalous behavior of scattered or non-specular signatures encountered in active and passive sensing of explosives or chemicals on surfaces and show modeling and experimental results for RDX.

  6. Surface Waves in Fibre-Reinforced Anisotropic Solid Elastic Media under the Influence of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, M.; Gupta, K. C.; Gupta; Manisha, D.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present paper is to investigate surface waves in an anisotropic, elastic solid medium under the influence of gravity. First, a theory of generalised surface waves was developed and then it was employed to investigate particular cases of waves, viz., Stoneley and Rayleigh, Love type. The wave velocity equations were obtained for different cases and they are in well agreement with the corresponding classical result, when the effect of gravity, viscosity as well as parameters for fibre-reinforcement of the material medium are ignored.

  7. Time-of-flight analyzer system to detect reflected particles from a solid surface following low-energy particle injection

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaoka, H.; Tanaka, N.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Hirouchi, T.; Kisaki, M.; Shinto, K.; Sasao, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Wada, M.

    2008-02-15

    We have developed a time-of-flight analyzer to measure energy distributions of reflected particles from solid surfaces bombarded by low-energy (1-2 keV) ions. The analyzer yields energy distributions of neutrals which can be compared with the energy distributions of charged particles measured by a magnetic deflection-type momentum analyzer. We have tested the system to measure the angular dependence of energy and intensity for neutrals reflected from a polycrystalline W target. The energies of the reflected neutrals are much smaller than the incident ion energies, suggesting multiple scattering in the target. No angular dependence is observed under the condition that the sum of the incident and reflected angles is constant. The intensity of the reflected neutrals takes the maximum around the mirror angle. We compare these characteristics of neutral particle reflections with those of reflected ions.

  8. Proposed method for controlling turbid particles in solid-phase bioluminescent toxicity measurement.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Seul-Ki; Park, Jun-Boum; Ahn, Joo-Sung; Han, Young-Soo

    2015-06-01

    In the recent half century, numerous methods have been developed to assess ecological toxicity. However, the presence of solid-particle turbidity sometimes causes such tests to end with questionable results. Many researchers focused on controlling this arbitrary turbidity effect when using the Microtox® solid-phase toxicity system, but there is not yet a standard method. In this study, we examined four solid-phase sample test methods recommended in the Microtox® manual, or proposed from the literature, and compared the existing methods with our proposed method (centrifuged basic solid-phase test, c-BSPT). Four existing methods use the following strategies to control turbid particles: complete separation of liquid and solid using 0.45-μm filtration before contacting solid samples and bacteria, natural settlement, moderate separation of large particles using coarser pore size filtration, and exclusion of light loss in the toxicity calculation caused by turbidity after full disturbance of samples. Our proposed method uses moderate centrifugation to separate out the heavier soil particles from the lighter bacteria after direct contact between them. Among the solid-phase methods tested, in which the bacteria and solid particles were in direct contact (i.e., the three existing methods and the newly proposed one, c-BSPT), no single method could be recommended as optimal for samples over a range of turbidity. Instead, a simple screening strategy for selecting a sample-dependent solid-phase test method was suggested, depending on the turbidity of the solid suspension. The results of this study highlight the importance of considering solid particles, and the necessity for optimal selection of test method to reduce errors in the measurement of solid-phase toxicity.

  9. A unifying model for adsorption and nucleation of vapors on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Ari

    2015-04-23

    Vapor interaction with solid surfaces is traditionally described with adsorption isotherms in the undersaturated regime and with heterogeneous nucleation theory in the supersaturated regime. A class of adsorption isotherms is based on the idea of vapor molecule clustering around so-called active sites. However, as the isotherms do not account for the surface curvature effects of the clusters, they predict an infinitely thick adsorption layer at saturation and do not recognize the existence of the supersaturated regime. The classical heterogeneous nucleation theory also builds on the idea of cluster formation, but describes the interactions between the surface and the cluster with a single parameter, the contact angle, which provides limited information compared with adsorption isotherms. Here, a new model of vapor adsorption on nonporous solid surfaces is derived. The basic assumption is that adsorption proceeds via formation of molecular clusters, modeled as liquid caps. The equilibrium of the individual clusters with the vapor phase is described with the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption theory modified with the Kelvin equation that corrects for the curvature effect on vapor pressure. The new model extends the FHH adsorption isotherm to be applicable both at submonolayer surface coverages and at supersaturated conditions. It shows good agreement with experimental adsorption data from 12 different adsorbent-adsorbate systems. The model predictions are also compared against heterogeneous nucleation data, and they show much better agreement than predictions of the classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. PMID:25831213

  10. Mode-locking external-cavity laser-diode sensor for displacement measurements of technical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarske, Jürgen; Möbius, Jasper; Moldenhauer, Karsten

    2005-09-01

    A novel laser sensor for position measurements of technical solid-state surfaces is proposed. An external Fabry-Perot laser cavity is assembled by use of an antireflection-coated laser diode together with the technical surface. Mode locking results from pumping the laser diode synchronously to the mode spacing of the cavity. The laser cavity length, i.e., the distance to the measurement object, is determined by evaluation of the modulation transfer function of the cavity by means of a phase-locked loop. The mode-locking external-cavity laser sensor incorporates a resonance effect that results in highly resolving position and displacement measurements. More than a factor-of-10 higher resolution than with conventional nonresonant sensing principles is achieved. Results of the displacement measurements of various technical surfaces are reported. Experimental and theoretical investigations are in good agreement.

  11. Heat Transfer Measurement and Modeling in Rigid High-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Knutson, Jeffrey R.; Cunnington, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Heat transfer in rigid reusable surface insulations was investigated. Steady-state thermal conductivity measurements in a vacuum were used to determine the combined contribution of radiation and solid conduction components of heat transfer. Thermal conductivity measurements at higher pressures were then used to estimate the effective insulation characteristic length for gas conduction modeling. The thermal conductivity of the insulation can then be estimated at any temperature and pressure in any gaseous media. The methodology was validated by comparing estimated thermal conductivities with published data on a rigid high-temperature silica reusable surface insulation tile. The methodology was also applied to the alumina enhanced thermal barrier tiles. Thermal contact resistance for thermal conductivity measurements on rigid tiles was also investigated. A technique was developed to effectively eliminate thermal contact resistance on the rigid tile s cold-side surface for the thermal conductivity measurements.

  12. An extended soft-cube model for the thermal accommodation of gas atoms on solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. R.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical soft cube model was developed for calculating thermal accommodation coefficients alpha and trapping fractions f sub t for the interaction of gases incident upon solid surfaces. A semiempirical correction factor c which allows the calculation of alpha and f sub t when the collision times are long compared to the surface oscillator period were introduced. The processes of trapping, evaporation, and detailed balancing were discussed. The numerical method was designed to treat economically and with moderate (+ or - 20 percent) accuracy the dependence of alpha and f sub t on finite and different surface and gas temperatures for a large number of gas/surface combinations. Comparison was made with experiments of rare gases on tungsten and on alkalis, as well as one astrophysical case of H2 on graphite. The dependence of alpha on the soft cube dimensionless parameters is presented graphically.

  13. Development of Luminescent Imaging for Capturing Cavitation in Water on Solid Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Akihisa; Ando, Jun; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2012-11-01

    Two-color pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is applied to a solid surface to capture the cavitation acting on the surface in water. It is found that the luminescent signal increases under a cavitation region. The luminescence change of a PSP can be related to the oxygen quenching. Based on these, we discuss the luminescence increase at the cavitation region related to the oxygen concentration in water and oxygen pressure of a cavitation bubble. To extract the cavitation from an acquired luminescent image, the motion-capturing PSP method is applied. It eliminates the variation in illumination caused by the bubble creations between the PSP-coated surface and the imaging-acquisition instruments. The time-resolved cavitation images on the PSP-coated surface are captured inside an ultrasonicate bath.

  14. Calculation of surface enthalpy of solids from an ab initio electronegativity based model: case of ice.

    PubMed

    Douillard, J M; Henry, M

    2003-07-15

    A very simple route to calculation of the surface energy of solids is proposed because this value is very difficult to determine experimentally. The first step is the calculation of the attractive part of the electrostatic energy of crystals. The partial charges used in this calculation are obtained by using electronegativity equalization and scales of electronegativity and hardness deduced from physical characteristics of the atom. The lattice energies of the infinite crystal and of semi-infinite layers are then compared. The difference is related to the energy of cohesion and then to the surface energy. Very good results are obtained with ice, if one compares with the surface energy of liquid water, which is generally considered a good approximation of the surface energy of ice.

  15. The structure and properties of a simple model mixture of amphiphilic molecules and ions at a solid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pizio, O.; Sokołowski, S.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2014-05-07

    We investigate microscopic structure, adsorption, and electric properties of a mixture that consists of amphiphilic molecules and charged hard spheres in contact with uncharged or charged solid surfaces. The amphiphilic molecules are modeled as spheres composed of attractive and repulsive parts. The electrolyte component of the mixture is considered in the framework of the restricted primitive model (RPM). The system is studied using a density functional theory that combines fundamental measure theory for hard sphere mixtures, weighted density approach for inhomogeneous charged hard spheres, and a mean-field approximation to describe anisotropic interactions. Our principal focus is in exploring the effects brought by the presence of ions on the distribution of amphiphilic particles at the wall, as well as the effects of amphiphilic molecules on the electric double layer formed at solid surface. In particular, we have found that under certain thermodynamic conditions a long-range translational and orientational order can develop. The presence of amphiphiles produces changes of the shape of the differential capacitance from symmetric or non-symmetric bell-like to camel-like. Moreover, for some systems the value of the potential of the zero charge is non-zero, in contrast to the RPM at a charged surface.

  16. The structure and properties of a simple model mixture of amphiphilic molecules and ions at a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Pizio, O; Sokołowski, S; Sokołowska, Z

    2014-05-01

    We investigate microscopic structure, adsorption, and electric properties of a mixture that consists of amphiphilic molecules and charged hard spheres in contact with uncharged or charged solid surfaces. The amphiphilic molecules are modeled as spheres composed of attractive and repulsive parts. The electrolyte component of the mixture is considered in the framework of the restricted primitive model (RPM). The system is studied using a density functional theory that combines fundamental measure theory for hard sphere mixtures, weighted density approach for inhomogeneous charged hard spheres, and a mean-field approximation to describe anisotropic interactions. Our principal focus is in exploring the effects brought by the presence of ions on the distribution of amphiphilic particles at the wall, as well as the effects of amphiphilic molecules on the electric double layer formed at solid surface. In particular, we have found that under certain thermodynamic conditions a long-range translational and orientational order can develop. The presence of amphiphiles produces changes of the shape of the differential capacitance from symmetric or non-symmetric bell-like to camel-like. Moreover, for some systems the value of the potential of the zero charge is non-zero, in contrast to the RPM at a charged surface.

  17. Using spectroscopic ellipsometry for quick prediction of number density of nanoparticles bound to non-transparent solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Rajendra R.; Genzer, Jan

    2005-12-01

    We report on the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in predicting number density of nanoparticles bound to the surfaces decorated with either organic monolayers or surface-grafted polymers. Two systems are considered that comprise citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles adsorbed on: (1) 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) self-assembled monolayer (SAM), and (2) surface-tethered polyacrylamide (PAAm). Number density of gold nanoparticles on the surface is varied systematically by gradually increasing either the concentration of APTES molecules in the SAM or molecular weight of grafted PAAm. The adsorption of gold nanoparticles on APTES gradient surfaces is monitored via atomic force microscopy (AFM), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and SE. The partition of gold nanoparticles on PAAm gradient assemblies is characterized by AFM, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, and SE. By correlating the results obtained from the various techniques on nanoparticle coatings, we derive an empirical linear relationship between the number density of nanoparticles on surfaces and cos ( Δ) parameter measured in SE. Excellent agreement between nanoparticle number density determined experimentally from AFM scans and that predicted by SE proves the potential of SE as a quick, predictive technique to estimate number density of nanoparticles bound to solid, non-transparent substrates.

  18. A novel weighted density functional theory for adsorption, fluid-solid interfacial tension, and disjoining properties of simple liquid films on planar solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang-Xin

    2009-07-14

    A novel weighted density functional theory (WDFT) for an inhomogeneous 12-6 Lennard-Jones fluid is proposed based on the modified fundamental measure theory for repulsive contribution, the mean-field approximation for attractive contribution, and the first-order mean-spherical approximation with a weighted density for correlation contribution. Extensive comparisons of the theoretical results with molecular simulation and experimental data indicate that the new WDFT yields accurate density profiles, adsorption isotherms, fluid-solid interfacial tensions, as well as disjoining potentials and pressures of simple gases such as argon, nitrogen, methane, ethane, and neon confined in slitlike pores or near graphitic solid surfaces. The present WDFT performs better than the nonlocal density functional theory, which is frequently used in the study of adsorption on porous materials. Since the proposed theory possesses a good dimensional crossover and is able to correctly reduce to two-dimensional case, it performs very well even in very narrow pores. In addition, the present WDFT reproduces very well the supercritical fluid-solid interfacial tensions, whereas the theory of Sweatman underestimates them at high bulk densities. The present WDFT predicts that the increase in the fluid-wall attraction may change the sign of the interfacial tension and hence may make the wall from "phobic" to "philic" with respect to the fluid. The new WDFT is computationally as simple and efficient as the mean-field theory and avoids the second-order direct correlation function as an input. It provides a universal way to construct the excess Helmholtz free-energy functional for inhomogeneous fluids such as Yukawa, square-well, and Sutherland fluids.

  19. Role of the Surface in Solid-Solid Phase Transitions: Molecular Dynamics Study of the α-γ Transition in Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binjun; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2016-05-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics simulation, we study the role of surfaces on solid-solid phase transformations. We contrast the transformation behavior of a thin film (two free surfaces) with a bulk system and with a system containing only one free surface. We focus on bcc Fe and induce the transformation from the bcc to the fcc phase by applying biaxial strain. We find that the critical strain at which the material transforms is independent of whether the system has a free surface or not. However, the nucleation mechanism of the new phase and also the transformation speed are strongly influenced by the existence of surfaces. While bulk systems fail early (after phase transformation to a polycrystal) under the applied load, systems with a free surface show a considerably higher ductility.

  20. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  1. Modelling thermocapillary migration of a microfluidic droplet on a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao

    2015-01-01

    A multiphase lattice Boltzmann model is developed to simulate immiscible thermocapillary flows with the presence of fluid-surface interactions. In this model, interfacial tension force and Marangoni stress are included by introducing a body force term based on the concept of continuum surface force, and phase segregation is achieved using the recolouring algorithm proposed by Latva-Kokko and Rothman. At a solid surface, fluid-surface interactions are modelled by a partial wetting boundary condition that uses a geometric formulation to specify the contact angle, and a colour-conserving boundary closure scheme to improve the numerical accuracy and suppress spurious velocities at the contact line. An additional convection-diffusion equation is solved by the passive scalar approach to obtain the temperature field, which is coupled to the hydrodynamic equations through an equation of state. This model is first validated by simulations of static contact angle and dynamic capillary intrusion process when a constant interfacial tension is considered. It is then used to simulate the thermocapillary migration of a microfluidic droplet on a horizontal solid surface subject to a uniform temperature gradient. We for the first time demonstrate numerically that the droplet motion undergoes two different states depending on the surface wettability: the droplet migrates towards the cooler regions on hydrophilic surfaces but reverses on hydrophobic surfaces. Decreasing the viscosity ratio can enhance the intensity of thermocapillary vortices, leading to an increase in migration velocity. The contact angle hysteresis, i.e., the difference between the advancing and receding contact angles, is always positive regardless of the contact angle and viscosity ratio. The contact angle hysteresis and the migration velocity both first decrease and then increase with the contact angle, and their minimum values occur at the contact angle of 90 degrees.

  2. PESTICIDE SURFACE RESIDUE MEASUREMENTS BY A PRESS SAMPLER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pesticides on household surfaces are a source of exposure to children. Accurate measurements of residues on surfaces are needed to determine amounts available for transfer to foods and other objects handled or eaten by a child. Wiping the surface with a solvent has been the acc...

  3. Reflectivity of very low energy electrons (< 10 eV) from solid surfaces: Physical and instrumental aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazaux, Jacques

    2012-03-01

    The impact of very low energy electrons (VLEE) on solid surfaces plays an important role in various fields of modern technology. Plasma physics, space research and particle-accelerators and progress in these fields are based partly on investigation of VLEE emission and reflection properties as obtained from laboratory measurements. Here the influence of the material composition and of the angle of incidence on the reflectivity, R, of VLEE is derived by the use of simple quantum mechanical arguments showing a rapid decrease of R from 100% when the incident energy of electrons increases from 0 eV while the surface sensitivity increases. The measurements depend significantly on the potential referencing between the electron source, the sample, and the detector, as well as of the energy spread of the incident electrons. VLEE thin film transmission is briefly considered and various practical consequences of the contrasts (crystalline, topographic, doping) as reported in scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM) are discussed. The present developments may be transposed easily to any kind of solid sample and the possibility of imaging the local vacuum level (or work function) change with a minimum of radiation damage is suggested.

  4. Critical micelle concentration values for different surfactants measured with solid-phase microextraction fibers.

    PubMed

    Haftka, Joris J-H; Scherpenisse, Peter; Oetter, Günter; Hodges, Geoff; Eadsforth, Charles V; Kotthoff, Matthias; Hermens, Joop L M

    2016-09-01

    The amphiphilic nature of surfactants drives the formation of micelles at the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers were used in the present study to measure CMC values of 12 nonionic, anionic, cationic, and zwitterionic surfactants. The SPME-derived CMC values were compared to values determined using a traditional surface tension method. At the CMC of a surfactant, a break in the relationship between the concentration in SPME fibers and the concentration in water is observed. The CMC values determined with SPME fibers deviated by less than a factor of 3 from values determined with a surface tension method for 7 out of 12 compounds. In addition, the fiber-water sorption isotherms gave information about the sorption mechanism to polyacrylate-coated SPME fibers. A limitation of the SPME method is that CMCs for very hydrophobic cationic surfactants cannot be determined when the cation exchange capacity of the SPME fibers is lower than the CMC value. The advantage of the SPME method over other methods is that CMC values of individual compounds in a mixture can be determined with this method. However, CMC values may be affected by the presence of compounds with other chain lengths in the mixture because of possible mixed micelle formation. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2173-2181. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26873883

  5. In Situ Investigation the Photolysis of the PAHs Adsorbed on Mangrove Leaf Surfaces by Synchronous Solid Surface Fluorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Wu, Tun-Hua; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    An established synchronous solid surface fluorimetry (S-SSF) was utilized for in situ study the photolysis processes of anthracene (An) and pyrene (Py) adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of Kandelia obovata seedlings (Ko) and Aegiceras corniculata (L.) Blanco seedlings (Ac). Experimental results demonstrated that the photolysis of An and Py adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of two mangrove species under the laboratory conditions, followed first-order kinetics with their photolysis rates in the order of Ac>Ko. In addition, with the same amount of substances, the photolysis rate of An adsorbed on the same mangrove leaf surfaces was much faster than the adsorbed Py. In order to investigate further, the photolysis processes of An and Py in water were also studied for comparison. And the photolysis of An and Py in water also followed first-order kinetics. Moreover, for the same initial amount, the photolysis rate of the PAH in water was faster than that adsorbed on the leaf surfaces of two mangrove species. Therefore, photochemical behaviors of PAHs were dependent not only on their molecular structures but also the physical-chemical properties of the substrates on which they are adsorbed. PMID:24404158

  6. Geometrical calibration television measuring systems with solid state photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiouchenko, V. G.; Strakhov, V. V.; Zhirkov, A. O.

    2000-11-01

    The various optical measuring methods for deriving information about the size and form of objects are now used in difference branches- mechanical engineering, medicine, art, criminalistics. Measuring by means of the digital television systems is one of these methods. The development of this direction is promoted by occurrence on the market of various types and costs small-sized television cameras and frame grabbers. There are many television measuring systems using the expensive cameras, but accuracy performances of low cost cameras are also interested for the system developers. For this reason inexpensive mountingless camera SK1004CP (format 1/3', cost up to 40$) and frame grabber Aver2000 were used in experiments.

  7. Study of proton acceleration at the target front surface in laser-solid interactions by neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Tampo, M.

    2006-03-15

    Proton acceleration inside solid LiF and CH-LiF targets irradiated by a 450-fs, 20-J, 1053-nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} has been studied via neutron spectroscopy. Neutron spectra produced through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction that occurs between accelerated protons, at the front surface, and background {sup 7}Li ions inside the target. From measured and calculated spectra, by three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, the maximum energy, total number, and slope temperature of the accelerated protons are investigated. The study indicates that protons originate at the front surface and are accelerated to a maximum energy that is reasonably consistent with the calculated one due to the ponderomotive force.

  8. Measurement of solid liquid interfacial energy in the pyrene succinonitrile monotectic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbulut, S.; Ocak, Y.; Böyük, U.; Erol, M.; Keslioglu, K.; Marasli, N.

    2006-09-01

    The equilibrated grain boundary groove shapes for solid pyrene (PY) in equilibrium with the PY succinonitrile (SCN) monotectic liquid were directly observed. From the observed grain boundary groove shapes, the Gibbs-Thomson coefficient and solid-liquid interfacial energy for solid PY in equilibrium with the PY SCN monotectic liquid have been determined to be (8.72 ± 0.87) × 10-8 K m and (21.9 ± 3.28) × 10-3 J m-2 with the present numerical method and Gibbs-Thomson equation, respectively. The grain boundary energy of the solid PY phase has been determined to be (42.84 ± 7.28) × 10-3 J m-2 from the observed grain boundary groove shapes. Thermal conductivities of solid and liquid phases for PY-2.5 mol% SCN alloy and pure PY have also been measured.

  9. Ice nucleus activity measurements of solid rocket motor exhaust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The ice Nucleus activity of exhaust particles generated from combustion of Space Shuttle propellant in small rocket motors has been measured. The activity at -20 C was substantially lower than that of aerosols generated by unpressurized combustion of propellant samples in previous studies. The activity decays rapidly with time and is decreased further in the presence of moist air. These tests corroborate the low effectivity ice nucleus measurement results obtained in the exhaust ground cloud of the Space Shuttle. Such low ice nucleus activity implies that Space Shuttle induced inadvertent weather modification via an ice phase process is extremely unlikely.

  10. Measurement of surface tension and viscosity by open capillary techniques

    DOEpatents

    Rye,Robert R. , Yost,Frederick G.

    1998-01-01

    An open-channel capillary is provided, having preferably a v-shaped groove in a flat wettable surface. The groove has timing marks and a source marker in which the specimen to be tested is deposited. The time of passage between the timing marks is recorded, and the ratio of surface tension .gamma. to viscosity .mu. is determined from the equation given below: ##EQU1## where h.sub.0 is the groove depth, .alpha. is the groove angle, .theta. is the liquid/solid contact angle, and t is the flow time. It has been shown by the

  11. Speckle pattern texture analysis method to measure surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I.; Sadovoy, A.; Doronin, A.; Meglinski, I.

    2013-02-01

    Speckle pattern texture analysis method is applied to measure surface roughness of human skin. The method is based on analyzing of a gray level co-occurrence matrix occurred from a speckle image of a rough surface. Paper with different surface roughness is used as a skin phantom. The roughness is controlled by profilometry measurements. The developed methodology could find wide application in dermatology and tissue diagnostics.

  12. Dirt reference standard for surface cleanliness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzi, D. J. O.; Bilmes, G. M.

    2016-08-01

    Thin films based on polymer poly(isobutyl methacrylate) (PIBMA), doped with carbon black particles deposited on steel plate substrates are proposed as dirt reference standards for cleanliness accreditation methods, particularly for instruments based on laser ablation. The films were made with the spin-coating method, obtaining layers with thickness between 4 and 17 μm. Carbon black particles with sizes smaller than 100 nm and concentrations between 1 and 27.6 mgr/cm3 were used. Characterization of the films was made by using absorbance measurements and laser ablation-induced photoacoustic.

  13. A review of surface effects in Kapitza's experiments on heat transfer between solids and helium II (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrit, Jay

    2016-08-01

    In a recent paper, it is shown that the thermal boundary Kapitza resistance between a solid and superfluid helium is explained by resonant scattering of phonons from surface roughness heights, as described in the Adamenko and Fuks (AF) model. We reexamine the original experiments of thermal transfer between a solid (platinum and copper) and superfluid helium conducted by Kapitza in 1940. In particular, we analyze his experimental results for the different surface treatments of the solid in light of the AF model. Time scales for diffuse scattering of phonons at the interface are estimated. Also the role of a layer of varnish on a copper surface is reinterpreted.

  14. Evaluation of a surface/vegetation parameterization using satellite measurements of surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taconet, O.; Carlson, T.; Bernard, R.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1986-01-01

    Ground measurements of surface-sensible heat flux and soil moisture for a wheat-growing area of Beauce in France were compared with the values derived by inverting two boundary layer models with a surface/vegetation formulation using surface temperature measurements made from NOAA-AVHRR. The results indicated that the trends in the surface heat fluxes and soil moisture observed during the 5 days of the field experiment were effectively captured by the inversion method using the remotely measured radiative temperatures and either of the two boundary layer methods, both of which contain nearly identical vegetation parameterizations described by Taconet et al. (1986). The sensitivity of the results to errors in the initial sounding values or measured surface temperature was tested by varying the initial sounding temperature, dewpoint, and wind speed and the measured surface temperature by amounts corresponding to typical measurement error. In general, the vegetation component was more sensitive to error than the bare soil model.

  15. Transfer impedance measurements of the space shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) joints, wire meshes and a carbon graphite motor case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, Peter B.; Perala, Rodney A.; Curry, John D.; Lankford, Alan B.; Keller, J. David

    1988-01-01

    Using three different current injection methods and a simple voltage probe, transfer impedances for Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) joints, wire meshes, aluminum foil, Thorstrand and a graphite composite motor case were measured. In all cases, the surface current distribution for the particular current injection device was calculated analytically or by finite difference methods. The results of these calculations were used to generate a geometric factor which was the ratio of total injected current to surface current density. The results were validated in several ways. For wire mesh measurements, results showed good agreement with calculated results for a 14 by 18 Al screen. SRM joint impedances were independently verified. The filiment wound case measurement results were validated only to the extent that their curve shape agrees with the expected form of transfer impedance for a homogeneous slab excited by a plane wave source.

  16. Surface-Functionalization of Nanostructured Cellulose Aerogels by Solid State Eumelanin Coating.

    PubMed

    Panzella, Lucia; Melone, Lucio; Pezzella, Alessandro; Rossi, Bianca; Pastori, Nadia; Perfetti, Marco; D'Errico, Gerardino; Punta, Carlo; d'Ischia, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Bioinspired aerogel functionalization by surface modification and coating is in high demand for biomedical and technological applications. In this paper, we report an expedient three-step entry to all-natural surface-functionalized nanostructured aerogels based on (a) TEMPO/NaClO promoted synthesis of cellulose nanofibers (TOCNF); (b) freeze-drying for aerogel preparation; and (c) surface coating with a eumelanin thin film by ammonia-induced solid state polymerization (AISSP) of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) or 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) previously deposited from an organic solution. Scanning electron microscopy showed uniform deposition of the dark eumelanin coating on the template surface without affecting porosity, whereas solid state (13)C NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy confirmed the eumelanin-type character of the coatings. DHI melanin coating was found to confer to TOCNF templates a potent antioxidant activity, as tested by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assays as well as strong dye adsorption capacity, as tested on methylene blue. The unprecedented combination of nanostructured cellulose and eumelanin thin films disclosed herein implements an original all-natural multifunctional aerogel biomaterial realized via an innovative coating methodology.

  17. Surface-Functionalization of Nanostructured Cellulose Aerogels by Solid State Eumelanin Coating.

    PubMed

    Panzella, Lucia; Melone, Lucio; Pezzella, Alessandro; Rossi, Bianca; Pastori, Nadia; Perfetti, Marco; D'Errico, Gerardino; Punta, Carlo; d'Ischia, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Bioinspired aerogel functionalization by surface modification and coating is in high demand for biomedical and technological applications. In this paper, we report an expedient three-step entry to all-natural surface-functionalized nanostructured aerogels based on (a) TEMPO/NaClO promoted synthesis of cellulose nanofibers (TOCNF); (b) freeze-drying for aerogel preparation; and (c) surface coating with a eumelanin thin film by ammonia-induced solid state polymerization (AISSP) of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) or 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) previously deposited from an organic solution. Scanning electron microscopy showed uniform deposition of the dark eumelanin coating on the template surface without affecting porosity, whereas solid state (13)C NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy confirmed the eumelanin-type character of the coatings. DHI melanin coating was found to confer to TOCNF templates a potent antioxidant activity, as tested by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assays as well as strong dye adsorption capacity, as tested on methylene blue. The unprecedented combination of nanostructured cellulose and eumelanin thin films disclosed herein implements an original all-natural multifunctional aerogel biomaterial realized via an innovative coating methodology. PMID:26734842

  18. A Highly Selective Sensor for Cyanide in Organic Media and on Solid Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Barare, Belygona; Babahan, Ilknur; Hijji, Yousef M.; Bonyi, Enock; Tadesse, Solomon; Aslan, Kadir

    2016-01-01

    The application of IR 786 perchlorate (IR-786) as a selective optical sensor for cyanide anion in both organic solution (acetonitrile (MeCN), 100%) and solvent-free solid surfaces was demonstrated. In MeCN, IR-786 was selective to two anions in the following order: CN− > OH−. A significant change in the characteristic dark green color of IR-786 in MeCN to yellow was observed as a result of nucleophilic addition of CN− to the fluorophore, i.e., formation of IR 786-(CN), which was also verified by a blue shift in the 775 nm absorbance peak to 430 nm. A distinct green fluorescence emission from the IR-786-(CN) in MeCN was also observed, which demonstrated the selectivity of IR-786 towards CN− in MeCN. Fluorescence emission studies of IR-786 showed that the lower detection limit and the sensitivity of IR-786 for CN− in MeCN was 0.5 μM and 0.5 to 8 μM, respectively. The potential use of IR-786 as a solvent-free solid state sensor for the selective sensing and monitoring of CN− in the environment was also demonstrated. On solvent-free solid state surfaces, the sensitivity of the IR-786 to CN− in water samples was in the range of 50–300 μM with minimal interference by OH−. PMID:26927099

  19. Ionization distances of Rydberg atoms approaching solid surfaces in the presence of weak electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Nedeljkovic, N.N.; Nedeljkovic, Lj.D.

    2005-09-15

    The ionization distances R{sub c}{sup I} of slow hydrogenlike Rydberg atoms approaching solid surfaces in the presence of a weak external electric field are calculated. The ionization is treated as resonant electron tunneling in the very vicinity of the top of the potential barrier, created between the ionic core and polarized solid. We obtain both the complex energies and the ionization distances by solving the energy eigenvalue problem under the outgoing wave boundary condition towards the solid. The eigenvalue problem is studied in parabolic coordinates within the framework of an etalon equation method adapted to include the confluence of turning points. It is demonstrated that in a critical region R{approx_equal}R{sub c}{sup I}>>1 a.u. of ion-surface distances R, parabolic quantum numbers n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, and m can serve as approximate, but 'sufficiently good' quantum numbers, at least for lower n{sub 1} values. The method offers asymptotically exact analytical expressions for the ionization rates and energies, which follow the theoretical predictions of the complex scaling method (CSM). It is also found that the resulting ionization distances R{sub c}{sup I} are in very good agreement with the results of CSM. The implications of using obtained results in analyzing the recent xenon experimental data for R{sub c}{sup I} are briefly discussed.

  20. Electron capture into large-l Rydberg states of multiply charged ions escaping from solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedeljković, N.; Nedeljković, Lj.; Mirković, M.

    2003-07-01

    We have investigated the electron capture into large-l Rydberg states of multiply charged ionic projectiles (e.g., the core charges Z=6, 7, and 8) escaping solid surfaces with intermediate velocities (v≈1 a.u.) in the normal emergence geometry. A model of the nonresonant electron capture from the solid conduction band into the moving large angular-momentum Rydberg states of the ions is developed through a generalization of our results obtained previously for the low-l cases (l=0, 1, and 2). The model is based on the two-wave-function dynamics of the Demkov-Ostrovskii type. The electron exchange process is described by a mixed flux through a moving plane (“Firsov plane”), placed between the solid surface and the ionic projectile. Due to low eccentricities of the large-l Rydberg systems, the mixed flux must be evaluated through the whole Firsov plane. It is for this purpose that a suitable asymptotic method is developed. For intermediate ionic velocities and for all relevant values of the principal quantum number n≈Z, the population probability Pnl is obtained as a nonlinear l distribution. The theoretical predictions concerning the ions S VI, Cl VII, and Ar VIII are compared with the available results of the beam-foil experiments.

  1. Bacterial migration and motion in a fluid phase and near a solid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Frymier, P.D. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of the migration and motion of bacteria in a fluid phase and near solid surfaces is necessary to characterize processes such as the bioremediation of hazardous waste, the pathogenesis of infection, industrial biofouling and wastewater treatment, among others. This study addresses three questions concerning the prediction of the distribution of a population of bacteria in a fluid phase and the motion of bacteria near a solid surface: Under what conditions does a one-dimensional phenomenological model for the density of a population of chemotactic bacteria yield an adequate representation of the migration of bacteria subject to a one-dimensional attractant gradient? How are the values of transport coefficients obtained from experimental data affected by the use of the one-dimensional phenomenological model and also by the use of different descriptions of bacterial swimming behavior in a mathematically rigorous balance equation? How is the characteristic motion of bacteria swimming in a fluid affected by the presence of a solid phase? A computer simulation that rigorously models the movement of a large population of individual chemotactic bacteria in three dimensions is developed to test the validity of a one-dimensional phenomenological model for bacterial migration in a fluid.

  2. Partitioning gas tracer tests for measurement of water in municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Paul T; Jakubowitch, Andrew; Briening, Michele L; Chiu, Pei C

    2003-11-01

    A key component in the operation of almost all bioreactor landfills is the addition of water to maintain optimal moisture conditions. To determine how much water is needed and where to add it, in situ methods are required to measure water within solid waste. Existing technologies often result in measurements of unknown accuracy, because of the variability of solid waste materials and time-dependent changes in packing density, both of which influence most measurement methods. To overcome these problems, a new technology recently developed by hydrologists for measuring water in the vadose zone--the partitioning gas tracer test--was tested. In this technology, the transport behavior of two gas tracers within solid waste is used to measure the fraction of the void space filled with water. One tracer is conservative and does not react with solids or liquids, while a second tracer partitions into the water and is separated from the conservative tracer during transport. This technology was tested in four different solid waste packings and was capable of determining the volumetric water content to within 48% of actual values, with most measurement errors less than 15%. This technology and the factors that affect its applicability to landfills are discussed in this paper. PMID:14649759

  3. Site-Targeted Interfacial Solid-Phase Chemistry: Surface Functionalization of Organic Monolayers via Chemical Transformations Locally Induced at the Boundary between Two Solids.

    PubMed

    Maoz, Rivka; Burshtain, Doron; Cohen, Hagai; Nelson, Peter; Berson, Jonathan; Yoffe, Alexander; Sagiv, Jacob

    2016-09-26

    Effective control of chemistry at interfaces is of fundamental importance for the advancement of methods of surface functionalization and patterning that are at the basis of many scientific and technological applications. A conceptually new type of interfacial chemical transformations has been discovered, confined to the contact surface between two solid materials, which may be induced by exposure to X-rays, electrons or UV light, or by the application of electrical bias. One of the reacting solids is a removable thin film coating that acts as a reagent/catalyst in the chemical modification of the solid surface on which it is applied. Given the diversity of thin film coatings that may be used as solid reagents/catalysts and the lateral confinement options provided by the use of irradiation masks, conductive AFM probes or stamps, and electron beams in such solid-phase reactions, this approach is suitable for precise targeting of different desired chemical modifications to predefined surface sites spanning the macro- to nanoscale.

  4. Site-Targeted Interfacial Solid-Phase Chemistry: Surface Functionalization of Organic Monolayers via Chemical Transformations Locally Induced at the Boundary between Two Solids.

    PubMed

    Maoz, Rivka; Burshtain, Doron; Cohen, Hagai; Nelson, Peter; Berson, Jonathan; Yoffe, Alexander; Sagiv, Jacob

    2016-09-26

    Effective control of chemistry at interfaces is of fundamental importance for the advancement of methods of surface functionalization and patterning that are at the basis of many scientific and technological applications. A conceptually new type of interfacial chemical transformations has been discovered, confined to the contact surface between two solid materials, which may be induced by exposure to X-rays, electrons or UV light, or by the application of electrical bias. One of the reacting solids is a removable thin film coating that acts as a reagent/catalyst in the chemical modification of the solid surface on which it is applied. Given the diversity of thin film coatings that may be used as solid reagents/catalysts and the lateral confinement options provided by the use of irradiation masks, conductive AFM probes or stamps, and electron beams in such solid-phase reactions, this approach is suitable for precise targeting of different desired chemical modifications to predefined surface sites spanning the macro- to nanoscale. PMID:27611648

  5. Isothermal Adsorption Measurement for the Development of High Performance Solid Sorption Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bidyut Baran; Koyama, Shigeru; Alam, K. C. Amanul; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao; Ng, Kim Choon; Chua, Hui Tong

    Interest in low-grade thermal heat powered solid sorption system using natural refrigerants has been increased. However, the drawbacks of these adsorption systems are their poor performance. The objective of this paper is to improve the performance of thermally powered adsorption cooling system by selecting new adsorbent-refrigerant pairs. Adsorption capacity of adsorbent-refrigerant pair depends on the thermophysical properties (pore size, pore volume and pore diameter) of adsorbent and isothermal characteristics of the adsorbent-refrigerant pair. In this paper, the thermophysical properties of three types of silica gels and three types of pitch based activated carbon fibers are determined from the nitrogen adsorption isotherms. The standard nitrogen gas adsorption/desorption measurements on various adsorbents at liquid nitrogen of temperature 77.4 K were performed. Surface area of each adsorbent was determined by the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) plot of nitrogen adsorption data. Pore size distribution was measured by the Horvath and Kawazoe (HK) method. Adsorption/desorption isotherm results showed that all three carbon fibers have no hysteresis and had better adsorption capacity in comparison with those of silica gels.

  6. Measurement of solid-state optical refrigeration by two-band differential luminescence thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlen, Markus P; Epstein, Richard I; Patterson, Wendy M; Sheik - Bahae, Mansoor; Seletskiy, D V

    2009-01-01

    We present a non-contact spectroscopic teclmique for the measurement of laser-induced temperature changes in solids. Two-band differential luminescence thermometry (TBDLT) achieves a sensitivity of {approx}7 mK and enables precise measurement of the net quantum efficiency of optical refrigerator materials. TBDLT detects internal temperature changes by decoupling surface and bulk heating effects via time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Several Yb{sup 3+}-doped fluorozirconate (ZBLANI) glasses fabricated from precursors of varying purity and by different processes are analyzed in detail. A net quantum efficiency of 97.39% at 238 K (at a pump wavelength of 1020.5 nm) is found for a ZBLANI:1%Yb{sup 3+} laser-cooling sample produced from metal fluoride precursors that were purified by chelate-assisted solvent extraction and dried in hydrofluoric gas. In comparison, a ZBLANI:1%Yb{sup 3+} sample produced from commercial-grade metal fluoride precursors showed pronounced laser-induced heating that is indicative of a substantially higher impurity concentration. TBDLT enables rapid and sensitive benchmarking of laser-cooling materials and provides critical feedback to the development and optimization of high-performance optical cryocooler materials.

  7. An ion-beam technique for measuring surface diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, P. M.; Labanda, J. G. C.; Barnett, S. A.

    1999-03-01

    The effective surface diffusion coefficient of Ga along the [110] direction on vicinal GaAs(001)2×4 surfaces during molecular-beam epitaxy was measured using specular ion current measurements. In this technique, 3 keV Ar ions were impinged upon the surface at a glancing angle (typically 3°), and the specularly scattered ion current was measured. Since specular reflections require a locally flat surface, adatoms cause a decrease in the measured current, allowing an average adatom density measurement. The time dependence of the Ga adatom population was measured during and after Ga deposition. Diffusion coefficients, obtained from the adatom lifetimes using a simple model of diffusion to the step edges, were fit well by the expression D=2×10-9 exp(-0.73 eV/kT)cm2/s from 400 to 600 °C.

  8. Physicochemical changes of microbe and solid surface properties during biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfaelou, Stavroula; Vakros, John; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.

    2013-04-01

    Cell immobilization is a promising biotechnology process. For example, entrapment of bacteria cells on synthetic polymeric matrices such as biocarriers is widely used for wastewater treatment because they have strong mechanical strength and durability in contrast to natural polymers. This method is based on the formation of biofilm on the surface of the used carriers and combines two different processes; attached and suspended biomass in a hybrid system. Previous studies have shown that immobilized cell systems have the potential to degrade toxic chemicals faster than conventional wastewater treatment systems because high densities of specialized microorganisms are used in immobilized cell systems. The present study elucidates the surface charge and properties of activated sludge and their role in the formation of biofilm. This information can be used for the optimization of the formation of biofilms as well as for the study of the transport of microorganisms in different environments. The two types of biocarriers that were used in this study are polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-gel beads and Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) carriers. The sludge samples that were investigated were taken from the aeration tank of the wastewater treatment plant of University of Patras (Greece). Measurements of the surface charge of the sludge, the biocarriers and the formed biofilm, were performed using potentiometric mass titrations with different kinds of electrolytes (e.g. NaCl, NaNO3) and at pH ranging from 3 to 11. The determination of pzc and surface charge of activated sludge and biocarriers is significant, because it can provide new valuable informations about the interaction mechanisms and the formation of biofilms. In each case, the point of zero charge (pzc) was identified as the common intersection point of the potentiometric curve of the blank solution of the electrolyte with the corresponding curves of each material. The pzc value for the biofilm was 6.1 to 6.7 and 6.6 to 6

  9. Decoupling the effects of surface chemistry and humidity on solid-state hydrolysis of aspirin in the presence of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Andrew M; Gardner, Catherine E; Auffret, Tony; Aldous, Barry; Jones, William

    2012-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers were functionalized with particles of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCP), and AFM, in force-displacement mode, was used to bring these probes into contact with aspirin (100) and (001) surfaces in order to investigate the effect of aspirin surface chemistry on the interaction between the two materials as a function of relative humidity (RH). The force of adhesion measurements showed a strong dependence on RH for the interactions between DCP and the aspirin (100) surface, with stronger interactions occurring at higher humudities. Relatively much weaker interactions were measured between DCP and the aspirin (001) surface under all RH conditions. Topographic imaging showed that contact between DCP and the aspirin (100) surface at high RH led to localised development of etch pits and, in some cases, growth normal to the surface. The methodology allows for the creation of a localised solid-solid interface between pharmaceutically relevant materials, providing a means of studying solid-state excipient-active ingredient decomposition reactions.

  10. Chemical Treatment of Low-k Dielectric Surfaces for Patterning of Thin Solid Films in Microelectronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Qin, Xiangdong; Zaera, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    A protocol has been developed to selectively process low-k SiCOH dielectric substrates in order to activate or deactivate them toward the deposition of thin solid films by chemical (CVD or ALD) means. The original SiCOH surfaces are hydrophobic, an indication that they are alkyl- rather than silanol-terminated and that, consequently, they are fairly unreactive. However, the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) sometimes done during microelectronics fabrication renders them hydrophilic and reactive. It was shown here that silylation of the CMP-treated surfaces with any of a number of well-known silylation agents such as HMDS, ODTS, or OTS caps the reactive silanol surface groups and turns them back to being hydrophilic and unreactive. Further exposure of any of the passivated surfaces to a combination of ozone and UV radiation reinstates their hydrophilicity and chemical activity. Importantly, it was also demonstrated that all these changes could be induced without altering the original mechanical, optical, or electrical properties of the samples: atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show no increase in roughness, ellipsometry measurements yield the same values for the index of refraction and dielectric constant, and infrared absorption spectroscopy attests to the preservation of the organic fragments present in the original SiCOH samples. The chemical selectivity of the resulting surfaces was tested for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO2 films, which could be grown only on the UV/O3 treated substrates. PMID:26956428

  11. Chemical Treatment of Low-k Dielectric Surfaces for Patterning of Thin Solid Films in Microelectronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Qin, Xiangdong; Zaera, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    A protocol has been developed to selectively process low-k SiCOH dielectric substrates in order to activate or deactivate them toward the deposition of thin solid films by chemical (CVD or ALD) means. The original SiCOH surfaces are hydrophobic, an indication that they are alkyl- rather than silanol-terminated and that, consequently, they are fairly unreactive. However, the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) sometimes done during microelectronics fabrication renders them hydrophilic and reactive. It was shown here that silylation of the CMP-treated surfaces with any of a number of well-known silylation agents such as HMDS, ODTS, or OTS caps the reactive silanol surface groups and turns them back to being hydrophilic and unreactive. Further exposure of any of the passivated surfaces to a combination of ozone and UV radiation reinstates their hydrophilicity and chemical activity. Importantly, it was also demonstrated that all these changes could be induced without altering the original mechanical, optical, or electrical properties of the samples: atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show no increase in roughness, ellipsometry measurements yield the same values for the index of refraction and dielectric constant, and infrared absorption spectroscopy attests to the preservation of the organic fragments present in the original SiCOH samples. The chemical selectivity of the resulting surfaces was tested for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO2 films, which could be grown only on the UV/O3 treated substrates.

  12. Detection of DNA targets hybridized to solid surfaces using optical images of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Lai, Siok Lian; Tan, Wei Ling; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we report a method of detecting DNA targets hybridized to a solid surface by using liquid crystals (LC). The detection principle is based on different interference colors of LC supported on surfaces decorated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). However, the contrast between the ssDNA and dsDNA is not obvious, unless DNA-streptavidin complexes are introduced to the dsDNA to increase the surface mass density. Two different approaches of introducing streptavidin to the system are studied and compared. We find that by premixing the biotin-labeled DNA targets with streptavidin prior to the DNA hybridization, branched-streptavidin complexes are formed and clear LC signal can be observed. This LC-based DNA detection principle represents an important step toward the development of a simple, instrument- and fluorophore-free DNA detection method.

  13. Effect of surface condition on the formation of solid lubricating films at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanyaloglu, Bengi; Graham, E. E.

    1992-01-01

    Solid films were produced on active metal or ceramic surfaces using lubricants (such as tricresyl phosphate) delivered as a vapor at high temperatures, and the lubricity of these deposits under different dynamic wear conditions was investigated. A method is described for chemically activating ceramic surfaces resulting in a surface that could promote the formation of lubricating polymeric derivative of TCP. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the wear characteristics of unlubricated cast iron and of Sialon ceramic at 25 and 280 C, and lubricated with a vapor of TCP at 280 C. It is shown that continuous vapor phase lubrication of chemically treated Sialon reduced its coefficient of friction from 0.7 to less than 0.1.

  14. Understanding the high pressure properties of molecular solids and molecular surfaces deposited on hetrogeneous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Work directed toward understanding the high pressure properties of molecular solids and molecular surfaces deposited on hetrogeneous substrates is reported. The motivation, apart from expanding our basic knowledge about these systems, was to understand and predict the properties of new materials synthesized at high pressure, including pressure induced metallic and superconducting states. As a consequence, information about the states of matter of the Jovian planets and their satellites, which are natural high pressure laboratories was also provided. The work on molecular surfaces and finite two and three dimensional clusters of atoms and molecules was connected with the composition and behavior of planetary atmospheres and on the processes involved in forming surface layers, which is vital to the development of composite materials and microcircuitry.

  15. Surface and confined acoustic waves in finite size 1D solid-fluid phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassouani, Y.; El Boudouti, E. H.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Rais, R.

    2007-12-01

    Using a Green's function method, we investigate theoretically the eigenmodes of a finite one-dimensional phononic crystal (superlattice) composed of N alternating layers of an elastic solid and an ideal fluid. If the finite superlattice is free of stress on both sides, we show that there are always N-1 modes in the allowed bands whereas there is one and only one mode corresponding to each band gap. This mode is either a surface mode in the band gap or a constant-frequency confined band-edge mode. If the finite superlattice is bounded from one side by a homogeneous fluid whereas the other surface is kept free, then an incident phonon from the fluid is perfectly reflected, however this reflection takes place with a large delay time if the frequency of the incident phonon coincides with the eigenfrequency of a surface mode

  16. Study of gadolinia-doped ceria solid electrolyte surface by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Pradyot Majewski, Peter; Aldinger, Fritz

    2009-02-15

    Gadolinia-doped ceria (CGO) is an important material to be used as electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cell for intermediate temperature operation. Ceria doped with 10 mol% gadolinia (Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 1.95}) was prepared by conventional solid state synthesis and found to be single phase by room temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD). The chemical states of the surface of the prepared sample were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Though Gd was present in its characteristic chemical state, Ce was found in both Ce{sup 4+} and Ce{sup 3+} states. Presence of Ce{sup 3+} state was ascribed to the differential yield of oxygen atoms in the sputtering process.

  17. On the inhomogeneity of the transition surface layer of the solid core of the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, S. A.

    2012-05-15

    Different geophysical data and conclusions of theoretical models, which can give information about the behavior of the solid and liquid cores of the Earth as well as about the existence of a transition layer as a temperature-hysteresis region at a relatively weak first-order phase transition, are compared. It is concluded that liquid inclusions inevitably exist in this region; these inclusions are involved (due to the complex convective processes occurring in the liquid core) in the transport of light materials from some areas of the solid-core surface. The porosity and permeability of the transition layer determine the seismic acoustic inhomogeneities in these areas, which contact the convective flows in the liquid core. In particular, this explains the well-known 'east-west' effect. Obviously, the model of the crystalline core is not the only possible alternative for a model of a core with a metallic glasslike structure.

  18. On the inhomogeneity of the transition surface layer of the solid core of the earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikin, S. A.

    2012-05-01

    Different geophysical data and conclusions of theoretical models, which can give information about the behavior of the solid and liquid cores of the Earth as well as about the existence of a transition layer as a temperature-hysteresis region at a relatively weak first-order phase transition, are compared. It is concluded that liquid inclusions inevitably exist in this region; these inclusions are involved (due to the complex convective processes occurring in the liquid core) in the transport of light materials from some areas of the solid-core surface. The porosity and permeability of the transition layer determine the seismic acoustic inhomogeneities in these areas, which contact the convective flows in the liquid core. In particular, this explains the well-known "east-west" effect. Obviously, the model of the crystalline core is not the only possible alternative for a model of a core with a metallic glasslike structure.

  19. Radioactivity Measurements on Glazed Ceramic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, T G

    2000-01-01

    A variety of commonly available household and industrial ceramic items and some specialty glass materials were assayed by alpha pulse counting and ion chamber voltage measurements for radioactivity concentrations. Identification of radionuclides in some of the items was performed by gamma spectroscopy. The samples included tableware, construction tiles and decorative tiles, figurines, and other products with a clay based composition. The concentrations of radioactivity ranged from near background to about four orders of magnitude higher. Almost every nuclide identification test demonstrated some radioactivity content from one or more of the naturally occurring radionuclide series of thorium or uranium. The glazes seemed to contribute most of the activity, although a sample of unglazed pottery greenware showed some activity. Samples of glazing paints and samples of deliberately doped glass from the World War II era were included in the test, as was a section of foam filled poster board. A glass disc with known (232)Th radioactivity concentration was cast for use as a calibration source. The results from the two assay methods are compared, and a projection of sensitivity from larger electret ion chamber devices is presented.

  20. Measurement of local high-level, transient surface heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1988-01-01

    This study is part of a continuing investigation to develop methods for measuring local transient surface heat flux. A method is presented for simultaneous measurements of dual heat fluxes at a surface location by considering the heat flux as a separate function of heat stored and heat conducted within a heat flux gage. Surface heat flux information is obtained from transient temperature measurements taken at points within the gage. Heat flux was determined over a range of 4 to 22 MW/sq m. It was concluded that the method is feasible. Possible applications are for heat flux measurements on the turbine blade surfaces of space shuttle main engine turbopumps and on the component surfaces of rocket and advanced gas turbine engines and for testing sensors in heat flux gage calibrators.

  1. Measuring electric fields from surface contaminants with neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Obrecht, J. M.; Wild, R. J.; Cornell, E. A.

    2007-06-15

    In this paper we demonstrate a technique of utilizing magnetically trapped neutral {sup 87}Rb atoms to measure the magnitude and direction of stray electric fields emanating from surface contaminants. We apply an alternating external electric field that adds to (or subtracts from) the stray field in such a way as to resonantly drive the trapped atoms into a mechanical dipole oscillation. The growth rate of the oscillation's amplitude provides information about the magnitude and sign of the stray field gradient. Using this measurement technique, we are able to reconstruct the vector electric field produced by surface contaminants. In addition, we can accurately measure the electric fields generated from adsorbed atoms purposely placed onto the surface and account for their systematic effects, which can plague a precision surface-force measurement. We show that baking the substrate can reduce the electric fields emanating from adsorbate and that the mechanism for reduction is likely surface diffusion, not desorption.

  2. CMM probe compensation methods for measuring complex screw surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yang, Tianlong; Yin, Xiyun

    2013-01-01

    At present, probe compensation is the key problem in measuring geometric parameters of complex screw surface with CMM due to its complicated 3D shape, aiming at this problem, some new measurement methods are proposed based on geometric feature models, expressing the screw surface and its offset surface separately. Supposing the parameter lead of a screw surface is known, it's realized by scanning one single profile to complete probe compensation and calculate out all parameters, and the probe compensation is done by two improved methods, named as modified cross product and offset surface virtual measurement respectively, the theory and detailed process of which are discussed in this paper. After performing systematic experiments of profile scan, probe compensation and error evaluation, results show that the new measurement methods provide higher precision, stability and realizability.

  3. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

    2007-06-01

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

  4. Electromotive force measurements on cells involving beta-alumina solid electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, N.

    1973-01-01

    Open circuit emf measurements have been made to demonstrate that a two-phase, polycrystalline mixture of beta- alumina and alpha-alumina could be used as a solid electrolyte in galvanic cells with reversible electrodes fixing oxygen or aluminum chemical potentials. These measurements indicate that such a two phase solid electrolyte can be used to monitor oxygen chemical potentials as low as that corresponding to Al, Al2O3 coexistence. The activity of Na2O in beta-alumina in coexistence with alpha-alumina was also determined by emf measurements.

  5. Solid Earth science in the 1990s. Volume 3: Measurement techniques and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Reports are contained from the NASA Workshop on Solid Earth Science in the 1990s. The techniques and technologies needed to address the program objectives are discussed. The Measurement Technique and Technology Panel identified (1) candidate measurement systems for each of the measurements required for the Solid Earth Science Program that would fall under the NASA purview; (2) the capabilities and limitations of each technique; and (3) the developments necessary for each technique to meet the science panel requirements. In nearly all cases, current technology or a development path with existing technology was identified as capable of meeting the requirements of the science panels. These technologies and development paths are discussed.

  6. Electromotive force measurements on cells involving beta-alumina solid electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, N. S.

    1973-01-01

    Open-circuit emf measurements have been made to demonstrate that a two-phase, polycrystalline mixture of beta-alumina and alpha-alumina could be used as a solid electrolyte in galvanic cells with reversible electrodes fixing oxygen or aluminum chemical potentials. These measurements indicate that such a two-phase solid electrolyte may be used to monitor oxygen chemical potentials as low as that corresponding to Al and Al2O3 coexistence (potentials of about 10 to the minus 47th power atm at 1000 K). The activity of Na2O in beta-alumina in coexistence with alpha-alumina was also determined by emf measurements.

  7. Condensed matter physics at surfaces and interfaces of solids. Progress report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Mele, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    This research program is focused on structural and elastic properties of crystalline solids and interfaces between solids. We are particularly interested in novel forms of structural ordering and the effects of this ordering on the lattice dynamical properties. We are currently studying structural and vibrational properties of the surfaces of the elemental alkaline earths (particularly Be), and structural phenomena in the doped fullerites.

  8. Suspended solids transport: an analysis based on turbidity measurements and event based fully calibrated hydrodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Langeveld, J G; Veldkamp, R G; Clemens, F

    2005-01-01

    Modelling suspended solids transport is a key issue for predicting the pollution load discharged by CSOs. Nonetheless, there is still much debate on the main drivers for suspended solids transport and on the modelling approach to be adopted. Current sewer models provide suspended solids transport models. These models, however, rely upon erosion-deposition criteria developed in fluvial environments, therewith oversimplifying the sewer sediment characteristics. Consequently, the performance of these models is poor from a theoretical point of view. To get an improved understanding of the temporal and spatial variations in suspended solids transport, a measuring network was installed in the sewer system of Loenen in conjunction with a hydraulic measuring network from June through December 2001. During the measuring period, 15 storm events rendered high-quality data on both the hydraulics and the turbidity. For each storm event, a hydrodynamic model was calibrated using the Clemens' method. The conclusion of the paper is that modelling of suspended solids transport has been and will be one of the challenges in the field of urban drainage modelling. A direct relation of either shear stress or flow velocity with turbidity could not be found, likely because of the time varying characteristics of the suspended solids.

  9. ULTRASONIC MEASUREMENT MODELS FOR SURFACE WAVE AND PLATE WAVE INSPECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerr, Lester W. Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2010-02-22

    A complete ultrasonic measurement model for surface and plate wave inspections is obtained, where all the electrical, electromechanical, and acoustic/elastic elements are explicitly described. Reciprocity principles are used to describe the acoustic/elastic elements specifically in terms of an integral of the incident and scattered wave fields over the surface of the flaw. As with the case of bulk waves, if one assumes the incident surface waves or plate waves are locally planar at the flaw surface, the overall measurement model reduces to a very modular form where the far-field scattering amplitude of the flaw appears explicitly.

  10. Automatic Measurement of Low Level Contamination on Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, M.; Itoh, H.; Shimada, T.; Yanagihara, S.

    2002-02-28

    Automatic measurement of radioactivity is necessary for considering cost effectiveness in final radiological survey of building structures in decommissioning nuclear facilities. The RAPID (radiation measuring pilot device for surface contamination) was developed to be applied to automatic measurement of low level contamination on concrete surfaces. The RAPID has a capability to measure contamination with detection limit of 0.14 Bq/cm2 for 60Co in 30 seconds of measurement time and its efficiency is evaluated to be 5 m2/h in a normal measurement option. It was confirmed that low level contamination on concrete surfaces could be surveyed by the RAPID efficiently compared with direct measurement by workers through its actual application.

  11. Discussion on a mechanical equilibrium condition of a sessile drop on a smooth solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2009-04-01

    Young's equation describes an interfacial equilibrium condition of a liquid droplet on a smooth solid surface. This relation is derived by Thomas Young in 1805. It has been discussed until today after his work. In general, Young's equation is discussed from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and derived by minimizing the total free energy of the system with intensive parameters in the total free energy kept constant, i.e., the variation in the total free energy is zero. In the derivation, the virtual work variations in the horizontal and vertical directions of the droplet on the smooth solid are considered independently. However, the virtual work variation at the droplet surface depends on the variation of the horizontal and vertical directions, which are related to an incline of the droplet surface. This point has been overlooked in past studies. In this study, by considering this directional dependency, we derive the modified Young's equation based on the thermodynamics. Finally, we evaluate the modified Young's equation by comparing the analytical solution of the relationship between a contact angle and the contact line radii of the droplet with some experimental data. Moreover, we investigated the line tension itself.

  12. Effect of surface microstructure on electrochemical performance of garnet solid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Chen, Wei; Kunz, Martin; Persson, Kristin; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Guoying; Doeff, Marca

    2015-01-28

    Cubic garnet phases based on Al-substituted Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO) have high ionic conductivities and exhibit good stability versus metallic lithium, making them of particular interest for use in next-generation rechargeable battery systems. However, high interfacial impedances have precluded their successful utilization in such devices until the present. Careful engineering of the surface microstructure, especially the grain boundaries, is critical to achieving low interfacial resistances and enabling long-term stable cycling with lithium metal. This study presents the fabrication of LLZO heterostructured solid electrolytes, which allowed direct correlation of surface microstructure with the electrochemical characteristics of the interface. Grain orientations and grain boundary distributions of samples with differing microstructures were mapped using high-resolution synchrotron polychromatic X-ray Laue microdiffraction. The electrochemical characteristics are strongly dependent upon surface microstructure, with small grained samples exhibiting much lower interfacial resistances and better cycling behavior than those with larger grain sizes. Low area specific resistances of 37 Ω cm(2) were achieved; low enough to ensure stable cycling with minimal polarization losses, thus removing a significant obstacle toward practical implementation of solid electrolytes in high energy density batteries.

  13. Two scale simulation of surface stress in solids and its effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Ganesh; De, Deb; Kumar, Arun; Pala, Raj; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2016-05-01

    Surface stress in solids can have profound effects in semi-infinite and nanoscale materials. The current work pertains to the simulation of surface stress, using the concept proposed by Shuttleworth [Proceedings of Physical Society 63 (1949) 444-457]. A two-scale approach is used for the simulation of surface stress. Density functional theory is used to compute the lattice parameter of a free-standing layer (or two layers in the case of (1 1 0) surface) of atoms, which is further used as an input into a finite element model. Aluminium is used as a model material for the computation of surface tension of (1 0 0), (1 1 1) and (1 1 0) planes and the results of the simulations are validated by comparison with results from literature. The utility of the model developed is highlighted by demonstrating the effect of surface tension on the: (i) stress variation in a thin slab & (ii) lattice parameter of nanoscale free-standing crystals.

  14. The effect of a solid surface on the segregation and melting of salt hydrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Anim-Danso, Emmanuel; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-10-22

    Considering the importance of salt and water on earth, the crystallization of salt hydrates next to solid surfaces has important implications in physical and biological sciences. Heterogeneous nucleation is driven by surface interactions, but our understanding of hydrate formation near surfaces is limited. Here, we have studied the hydrate formation of three commonly prevalent salts, MgCl2, CaCl2, and NaCl, next to a sapphire substrate using surface sensitive infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. SFG spectroscopy can detect the crystallization and melting of salt hydrates at the interface by observing the changes in the intensity and the location of the cocrystallized water hydroxyl peaks (3200-3600 cm(-1)). The results indicate that the surface crystal structures of these three hydrates are similar to those in the bulk. For the NaCl solution, the brine solution is segregated next to the sapphire substrate after the formation of the ice phase. In contrast, the MgCl2 and CaCl2 surface hydrate crystals are interdispersed with nanometer-size ice crystals. The nanosize ice crystals melt at much lower temperatures than bulk ice crystals. For NaCl and MgCl2 solution, the NaCl hydrates prefer to crystallize next to the sapphire substrate instead of the ice crystals and MgCl2 hydrates. PMID:25271793

  15. Ground-based measurement of surface temperature and thermal emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owe, M.; Van De Griend, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Motorized cable systems for transporting infrared thermometers have been used successfully during several international field campaigns. Systems may be configured with as many as four thermal sensors up to 9 m above the surface, and traverse a 30 m transect. Ground and canopy temperatures are important for solving the surface energy balance. The spatial variability of surface temperature is often great, so that averaged point measurements result in highly inaccurate areal estimates. The cable systems are ideal for quantifying both temporal and spatial variabilities. Thermal emissivity is also necessary for deriving the absolute physical temperature, and measurements may be made with a portable measuring box.

  16. Experimental measurement of solid solutes solubility in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Manouchehr Manouchehrian; Beiki, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    The solubility of benzoic and salicylic acids was measured at a temperature range from 293 to 333 K in two types of water based nanofluids employed as the solvent. Silica and γ-alumina nanoparticles with volume concentrations of 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 % were dispersed into de-ionized water as the based fluid. The results revealed that the solubility of nanofluid followed the same trend as pure water solubility with increasing temperature. At low temperatures, below 330 K for γ-Al2O3 nanofluids and 323 K for SiO2 nanofluids, nanoparticles had no effect on solubility, but by increasing the temperature, nanofluid solubility decreased. The maximum reduction in the solubility of compounds was observed at the temperature of 333 K and in 0.1 % γ-Alumina nanofluid and 0.025 % Silica nanofluids. Nanofluids solubility decreased up to a critical nanoparticles concentration while increased by increasing nanoparticles concentration further. The maximum reduction of nanofluids solubility at critical concentration was about 12.43 % for salicylic acid and 10.24 % for benzoic acid in 0.025 % SiO2 nanofluid. Nanofluids solubility was found to be strongly dependent on nanoparticles size. Bigger nanoparticles were more effective than smaller ones on nanofluids solubility.

  17. A Surface Chemistry Approach to Enhancing Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids for Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Graham Hamilton

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaic devices have improved rapidly over the past decade of research. By taking advantage of the quantum confinement effect, solar cells constructed using films of infrared-bandgap nanoparticles are able to capture previously untapped ranges of the solar energy spectrum. Additionally, films are fabricated using simple, cheap, reproducible solution processing techniques, enabling the creation of low-cost, flexible photovoltaic devices. A key factor limiting the creation of high efficiency CQD solar cells is the short charge carrier diffusion length in films. Driven by a combination of limited carrier mobility, poor nanoparticle surface passivation, and the presence of unexamined electrically active impurities throughout the film, the poor diffusion length limits the active layer thickness in CQD solar cells, leading to lower-than-desired light absorption, and curtailing the photocurrent generated by such devices. This thesis seeks to address poor diffusion length by addressing each of the limiting factors in turn. Electrical transport in quantum dot solids is examined in the context of improved quantum dot packing; methods are developed to improve packing by using actively densifying components, or by dramatically lowering the volume change required between quantum dots in solution and in solid state. Quantum dot surface passivation is improved by introducing a crucial secondary, small halide ligand source, and by surveying the impact of the processing environment on the final quality of the quantum dot surface. A heretofore unidentified impurity present in quantum dot solids is identified, characterized, and chemically eliminated. Finally, lessons learned through these experiments are combined into a single, novel materials system, leading to quantum dot devices with a significantly improved diffusion length (enhanced from 70 to 230 nm). This enabled thick, high current density (30 mA cm -2, compared to typical values in the 20

  18. Open questions in surface topography measurement: a roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard; Evans, Christopher; He, Liangyu; Davies, Angela; Duparré, Angela; Henning, Andrew; Jones, Christopher W.; O'Connor, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Control of surface topography has always been of vital importance for manufacturing and many other engineering and scientific disciplines. However, despite over one hundred years of quantitative surface topography measurement, there are still many open questions. At the top of the list of questions is ‘Are we getting the right answer?’ This begs the obvious question ‘How would we know?’ There are many other questions relating to applications, the appropriateness of a technique for a given scenario, or the relationship between a particular analysis and the function of the surface. In this first ‘open questions’ article we have gathered together some experts in surface topography measurement and asked them to address timely, unresolved questions about the subject. We hope that their responses will go some way to answer these questions, address areas where further research is required, and look at the future of the subject. The first section ‘Spatial content characterization for precision surfaces’ addresses the need to characterise the spatial content of precision surfaces. Whilst we have been manufacturing optics for centuries, there still isn’t a consensus on how to specify the surface for manufacture. The most common three methods for spatial characterisation are reviewed and compared, and the need for further work on quantifying measurement uncertainties is highlighted. The article is focussed on optical surfaces, but the ideas are more pervasive. Different communities refer to ‘figure, mid-spatial frequencies, and finish’ and ‘form, waviness, and roughness’, but the mathematics are identical. The second section ‘Light scattering methods’ is focussed on light scattering techniques; an important topic with in-line metrology becoming essential in many manufacturing scenarios. The potential of scattering methods has long been recognized; in the ‘smooth surface limit’ functionally significant relationships can be derived from first

  19. Open questions in surface topography measurement: a roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard; Evans, Christopher; He, Liangyu; Davies, Angela; Duparré, Angela; Henning, Andrew; Jones, Christopher W.; O'Connor, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Control of surface topography has always been of vital importance for manufacturing and many other engineering and scientific disciplines. However, despite over one hundred years of quantitative surface topography measurement, there are still many open questions. At the top of the list of questions is ‘Are we getting the right answer?’ This begs the obvious question ‘How would we know?’ There are many other questions relating to applications, the appropriateness of a technique for a given scenario, or the relationship between a particular analysis and the function of the surface. In this first ‘open questions’ article we have gathered together some experts in surface topography measurement and asked them to address timely, unresolved questions about the subject. We hope that their responses will go some way to answer these questions, address areas where further research is required, and look at the future of the subject. The first section ‘Spatial content characterization for precision surfaces’ addresses the need to characterise the spatial content of precision surfaces. Whilst we have been manufacturing optics for centuries, there still isn’t a consensus on how to specify the surface for manufacture. The most common three methods for spatial characterisation are reviewed and compared, and the need for further work on quantifying measurement uncertainties is highlighted. The article is focussed on optical surfaces, but the ideas are more pervasive. Different communities refer to ‘figure, mid-spatial frequencies, and finish’ and ‘form, waviness, and roughness’, but the mathematics are identical. The second section ‘Light scattering methods’ is focussed on light scattering techniques; an important topic with in-line metrology becoming essential in many manufacturing scenarios. The potential of scattering methods has long been recognized; in the ‘smooth surface limit’ functionally significant relationships can be derived from first

  20. Geometry of Logarithmic Strain Measures in Solid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Patrizio; Eidel, Bernhard; Martin, Robert J.

    2016-11-01

    We consider the two logarithmic strain measures ω_{iso} = ||{dev_n log U} || = ||{dev_n log √{F^TF}}|| quad { and } quad {ω_{vol}} = |{tr(log U)} = |{tr(log√{F^TF})}| = |log(det U)| , which are isotropic invariants of the Hencky strain tensor {log U}, and show that they can be uniquely characterized by purely geometric methods based on the geodesic distance on the general linear group {GL(n)}. Here, {F} is the deformation gradient, {U=√{F^TF}} is the right Biot-stretch tensor, log denotes the principal matrix logarithm, {| \\cdot |} is the Frobenius matrix norm, tr is the trace operator and {{ dev}_n X = X- 1/n { tr}(X)\\cdot {1}} is the {n}-dimensional deviator of {Xin{R}^{n × n}}. This characterization identifies the Hencky (or true) strain tensor as the natural nonlinear extension of the linear (infinitesimal) strain tensor {ɛ={ sym}nabla u}, which is the symmetric part of the displacement gradient {nabla u}, and reveals a close geometric relation between the classical quadratic isotropic energy potential μ {| { dev}_n { sym} nabla u |}^2 + κ/2{[{ tr}({ sym} nabla u)]}^2 = μ {| { dev}_n ɛ |}^2 + κ/2 {[{ tr} (ɛ)]}^2 in linear elasticity and the geometrically nonlinear quadratic isotropic Hencky energy μ {| { dev}_n log U |}^2 + κ/2{[{ tr}(log U)]}^2 = μ {ω_{{ iso}}^2} + κ/2{ω_{{ vol}}^2}, where {μ} is the shear modulus and {κ} denotes the bulk modulus. Our deduction involves a new fundamental logarithmic minimization property of the orthogonal polar factor {R}, where {F=RU} is the polar decomposition of {F}. We also contrast our approach with prior attempts to establish the logarithmic Hencky strain tensor directly as the preferred strain tensor in nonlinear isotropic elasticity.